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Sample records for 6-keto-prostaglandin f1 alpha

  1. Production of prostaglandins by the pseudopregnant rat uterus, in vitro, and the effect of tamoxifen with the identification of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1alpha as a major product.

    PubMed Central

    Fenwick, L; Jones, R L; Naylor, B; Poyser, N L; Wilson, N H

    1977-01-01

    1 Prostaglandin production by rat uterus homogenates has been studied, in vitro, on days 2 to 13 of pseudopregnancy. 2 The highest production of prostaglandins occurred on day 5. 3 The amounts of prostaglandins F and D formed were higher than the amounts of prostaglandin E on every day studied. 4 The ratios of prostglandins F and D to prostaglandin E produced steadily decreased up to day 6. It then increased with the highest values occurring between days 10 and 13, 5 Progesterone levels in peripheral plasma increased rapidly from days 2 to 5, remained high up to day 9, then steadily decreased between days 10 and 13. 6 The anti-oestrogenic drug, tamoxifen administered on day 2, significantly inhibited the increase of prostaglandin production which occurred on day 5. Prostaglandin E production was inhibited more than the production of prostaglandins F and D. 7 Analysis of the uterine extracts by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry showed prostaglandin F2alpha, F1alpha (in trace amounts), E2 and D2 to be present. 8 The major product detected was 6-keto-prostaglandin F1alpha. Its identification forms an addendum to the paper. 9 Also present as a major product was 6(9)-oxy-11,15-dihydroxyprosta-7,13-dienoic acid. PMID:836998

  2. Concentrations of prostaglandins E2, F2 alpha and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha in the utero-ovarian venous plasma of nonpregnant and early pregnant ewes.

    PubMed

    Silvia, W J; Ottobre, J S; Inskeep, E K

    1984-05-01

    The effect of pregnancy on concentrations of prostaglandins E2, F2 alpha and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (PGE2, PGF2 alpha and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha) in utero-ovarian venous plasma was examined in ewes on Days 10 through 14 after estrus, an interval which includes the critical period for maternal recognition of pregnancy. The utero-ovarian vein ipsilateral to a corpus luteum was catheterized on Day 9 or 10 in 6 pregnant and 8 nonpregnant ewes. Five blood samples were collected at 30-min intervals for 2 h beginning at 0500 and 1700 h daily. Sampling began at 0500 h on the day after catheterization. The mean and variance within each 2-h collection period were calculated for each ewe. The natural logarithm of the variance in each collection period (ln variance) was used as an estimate of the fluctuations in secretory activity by the endometrial-conceptus complex. Patterns of the mean concentrations of PGE2 were different between pregnant and nonpregnant ewes (P less than 0.01); PGE2 being higher in the pregnant ewes beginning on Day 13. There was a trend for the patterns of ln variance in PGE2 to differ (P less than 0.1) with pregnancy status over the entire period; ln variance was greater in pregnant ewes beginning on Day 13. The patterns of the mean concentrations and ln variances for PGF2 alpha and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha did not differ between pregnant and nonpregnant ewes. There were significant increases in both of these prostaglandins over time, independent of pregnancy status (P less than 0.01). The association of higher concentrations of PGE2 in utero-ovarian venous plasma with early pregnancy is consistent with the hypothesis that PGE2, originating from the uterus and/or conceptus, is one factor involved in maintenance of the corpus luteum of pregnancy.

  3. Stimulation of the synthesis of 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) and 6-keto-prostaglandin F/sub 1. cap alpha. / (6-keto-PGF/sub 1. cap alpha. /) by cultured human umbilical veins

    SciTech Connect

    Ibe, B.O.; Johnson, A.R.; Falck, J.R.; Campbell, W.B.

    1986-03-05

    These studies were designed to investigate the synthesis of 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ and 15-HETE in cultured human endothelial cells. The identification of the 15-HETE in these cells was made by UV absorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Specific radioimmunoassays were developed to quantify the synthesized 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ and 15-HETE. The release of 15-HETE and 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ was stimulated by arachidonic acid, histamine or the calcium ionophore A23187. The release of 15-HETE paralleled the release of 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ and was both concentration-related and time-dependent. Aspirin, ibuprofen and indomethacin inhibited both the formation of 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ and 15-HETE in similar concentrations. These data indicate that agents which stimulate PGI/sub 2/ synthesis also stimulate the synthesis of 15-HETE. Also, they implicate the cyclooxygenase pathway in the synthesis of 6-keto PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ and 15-HETE in human endothelial cells.

  4. The alpha subunit of a plant mitochondrial F1-ATPase is translated in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Boutry, M; Briquet, M; Goffeau, A

    1983-07-25

    The mitochondrial F1-ATPase from bean (Vicia faba L.) was solubilized by a chloroform treatment of mitochondrial membranes and purified by centrifugation on a glycerol gradient. The active fraction contained 5 subunits: alpha (Mr = 52,000), beta (Mr = 51,000), gamma (Mr = 34,000), delta (Mr = 23,800), and epsilon (Mr = 22,900). Purified coupled mitochondria were incubated in the presence of [ 35S ]methionine and malate to allow mitochondrial translation to occur. The largest labeled polypeptide (Mr = 52,000) was present in the chloroform extract, co-sedimented with the F1-ATPase on glycerol gradient and co-migrated with the alpha subunit upon two-dimensional electrophoresis. The results indicate that the alpha subunit of bean mitochondrial ATPase is translated on mitoribosomes, in contrast to the situation in other organisms.

  5. Selective solid-phase extraction of urinary 2,3-dinor-6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha for determination with radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed

    Riutta, A; Nurmi, E; Weber, C; Hansson, G; Vapaatalo, H; Mucha, I

    1994-08-01

    This paper describes a method for selective two-step solid-phase extraction of urinary 2,3-dinor-6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha for reliable determination with radioimmunoassay. In the immunoreactivity profile of non-selectively extracted urine after HPLC separation, over 90% of the total 2,3-dinor-6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha immunoreactivity consisted of interfering material coeluting with 6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha and 2,3-dinor-6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha. Among the alkyl silica sorbents studied (methyl, butyl, octyl, and octadecyl), an efficient separation of 2,3-dinor-6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha from 6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha and the lowest immunoreactive concentration of analyte were achieved in extraction on the methyl silica sorbent by elution of 2,3-dinor-6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha with chloroform: hexane (85:15, v/v) from the cartridge. The proportion of specific immunoreactivity could be further increased by two-step extraction of sample on methyl silica cartridges, first at pH 3 and then at pH 10 using diethyl ether:hexane (85:15, v/v) and chloroform as eluent, respectively. After this, a high correlation was found with concentrations of samples determined by radioimmunoassay using three different antisera. A significant correlation of values was also observed between samples measured by radioimmunoassay and those measured by GC-MS. The values of 12-h excretion of 2,3-dinor-6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha in eight volunteers (268 +/- 204 ng/g creatinine, mean +/- SD) as well as the inhibitory effect of acetylsalicylic acid (74 +/- 12%) are in accordance with those reported in the literature. This selective extraction procedure provides a high validity in radioimmunoassay without requiring subsequent TLC or HPLC purification.

  6. Major urinary metabolites of 6-keto-prostaglandin F2α in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuklev, Dmitry V; Hankin, Joseph A; Uhlson, Charis L; Hong, Yu H; Murphy, Robert C; Smith, William L

    2013-07-01

    Western diets are enriched in omega-6 vs. omega-3 fatty acids, and a shift in this balance toward omega-3 fatty acids may have health benefits. There is limited information about the catabolism of 3-series prostaglandins (PG) formed from eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a fish oil omega-3 fatty acid that becomes elevated in tissues following fish oil consumption. Quantification of appropriate urinary 3-series PG metabolites could be used for noninvasive measurement of omega-3 fatty acid tone. Here we describe the preparation of tritium- and deuterium-labeled 6-keto-PGF2α and their use in identifying urinary metabolites in mice using LC-MS/MS. The major 6-keto-PGF2α urinary metabolites included dinor-6-keto-PGF2α (~10%) and dinor-13,14-dihydro-6,15-diketo-PGF1α (~10%). These metabolites can arise only from the enzymatic conversion of EPA to the 3-series PGH endoperoxide by cyclooxygenases, then PGI3 by prostacyclin synthase and, finally, nonenzymatic hydrolysis to 6-keto-PGF2α. The 6-keto-PGF derivatives are not formed by free radical mechanisms that generate isoprostanes, and thus, these metabolites provide an unbiased marker for utilization of EPA by cyclooxygenases.

  7. The alpha1-fetoprotein locus is activated by a nuclear receptor of the Drosophila FTZ-F1 family.

    PubMed

    Galarneau, L; Paré, J F; Allard, D; Hamel, D; Levesque, L; Tugwood, J D; Green, S; Bélanger, L

    1996-07-01

    The alpha1-fetoprotein (AFP) gene is located between the albumin and alpha-albumin genes and is activated by transcription factor FTF (fetoprotein transcription factor), presumed to transduce early developmental signals to the albumin gene cluster. We have identified FTF as an orphan nuclear receptor of the Drosophila FTZ-F1 family. FTF recognizes the DNA sequence 5'-TCAAGGTCA-3', the canonical recognition motif for FTZ-F1 receptors. cDNA sequence homologies indicate that rat FTF is the ortholog of mouse LRH-1 and Xenopus xFF1rA. Rodent FTF is encoded by a single-copy gene, related to the gene encoding steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1). The 5.2-kb FTF transcript is translated from several in-frame initiator codons into FTF isoforms (54 to 64 kDa) which appear to bind DNA as monomers, with no need for a specific ligand, similar KdS (approximately equal 3 x 10(-10) M), and similar transcriptional effects. FTF activates the AFP promoter without the use of an amino-terminal activation domain; carboxy-terminus-truncated FTF exerts strong dominant negative effects. In the AFP promoter, FTF recruits an accessory trans-activator which imparts glucocorticoid reactivity upon the AFP gene. FTF binding sites are found in the promoters of other liver-expressed genes, some encoding liver transcription factors; FTF, liver alpha1-antitrypsin promoter factor LFB2, and HNF-3beta promoter factor UF2-H3beta are probably the same factor. FTF is also abundantly expressed in the pancreas and may exert differentiation functions in endodermal sublineages, similar to SF-1 in steroidogenic tissues. HepG2 hepatoma cells seem to express a mutated form of FTF.

  8. The alpha1-fetoprotein locus is activated by a nuclear receptor of the Drosophila FTZ-F1 family.

    PubMed Central

    Galarneau, L; Paré, J F; Allard, D; Hamel, D; Levesque, L; Tugwood, J D; Green, S; Bélanger, L

    1996-01-01

    The alpha1-fetoprotein (AFP) gene is located between the albumin and alpha-albumin genes and is activated by transcription factor FTF (fetoprotein transcription factor), presumed to transduce early developmental signals to the albumin gene cluster. We have identified FTF as an orphan nuclear receptor of the Drosophila FTZ-F1 family. FTF recognizes the DNA sequence 5'-TCAAGGTCA-3', the canonical recognition motif for FTZ-F1 receptors. cDNA sequence homologies indicate that rat FTF is the ortholog of mouse LRH-1 and Xenopus xFF1rA. Rodent FTF is encoded by a single-copy gene, related to the gene encoding steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1). The 5.2-kb FTF transcript is translated from several in-frame initiator codons into FTF isoforms (54 to 64 kDa) which appear to bind DNA as monomers, with no need for a specific ligand, similar KdS (approximately equal 3 x 10(-10) M), and similar transcriptional effects. FTF activates the AFP promoter without the use of an amino-terminal activation domain; carboxy-terminus-truncated FTF exerts strong dominant negative effects. In the AFP promoter, FTF recruits an accessory trans-activator which imparts glucocorticoid reactivity upon the AFP gene. FTF binding sites are found in the promoters of other liver-expressed genes, some encoding liver transcription factors; FTF, liver alpha1-antitrypsin promoter factor LFB2, and HNF-3beta promoter factor UF2-H3beta are probably the same factor. FTF is also abundantly expressed in the pancreas and may exert differentiation functions in endodermal sublineages, similar to SF-1 in steroidogenic tissues. HepG2 hepatoma cells seem to express a mutated form of FTF. PMID:8668203

  9. Identification and quantification of N alpha-acetylated Y. pestis fusion protein F1-V expressed in Escherichia coli using LCMS E.

    PubMed

    Bariola, Pauline A; Russell, Brett A; Monahan, Steven J; Stroop, Steven D

    2007-05-31

    N-terminal acetylation in E coli is a rare event catalyzed by three known N-acetyl-transferases (NATs), each having a specific ribosomal protein substrate. Multiple, gram-scale lots of recombinant F1-V, a fusion protein constructed from Y. Pestis antigens, were expressed and purified from a single stably transformed E. coli cell bank. A variant form of F1-V with mass increased by 42-43 Da was detected in all purified lots by electrospray orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS). Peptide mapping LCMS localized the increased mass to an N-terminal Lys-C peptide, residues 1-24, and defined it as +42.0308+/-0.0231 Da using a LockSpray exact mass feature and a leucine enkaphalin mass standard. Sequencing of the variant 1-24 peptide by LCMS and high-energy collision induced dissociation (LCMS(E)) further localized the modification to the amino terminal tri-peptide ADL and identified the modification as N(alpha)-acetylation. The average content of N(alpha)-acetylated F1-V in five lots was 24.7+/-2.6% indicating that a stable acetylation activity for F1-V was established in the E. coli expression system. Alignment of the F1-V N-terminal sequence with those of other known N(alpha)-acetylated ectopic proteins expressed in E. coli reveals a substrate motif analogous to the eukaryote NatA' acetylation pathway and distinct from endogenous E. coli NAT substrates.

  10. The role of cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 in lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1 stimulated enterocyte prostanoid formation.

    PubMed

    Longo, W E; Damore, L J; Mazuski, J E; Smith, G S; Panesar, N; Kaminski, D L

    1998-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide is an inflammatory agent and interleukin-1 is a cytokine. Their pro-inflammatory effects may be mediated by prostanoids produced by inducible cyclooxygenase-2. The aim of this study was to determine the prostanoids produced by lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1 stimulated enterocytes through the cyclooxygenase-1 and 2 pathways. Cultured enterocytes were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or interleukin-1beta with and without cyclooxygenase inhibitors. Low concentrations of indomethacin and valerylsalicylic acid (VSA) were evaluated as cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitors and their effects compared with the effects of a specific cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, SC-58125. Prostaglandin E2, 6-keto prostaglandin F1alpha, prostaglandin D2 and leukotriene B4 levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. Immunoblot analysis using isoform-specific antibodies showed that the inducible cyclooxygenase enzyme (COX-2) was expressed by 4 h in LPS and IL-1beta treated cells while the constitutive COX-1 remained unaltered in its expression. Interleukin-1beta and lipopolysaccharide stimulated the formation of all prostanoids compared with untreated cells, but failed to stimulate leukotriene B4. Indomethacin at 20 microM concentration, and VSA inhibited lipopolysaccharide and interleukin 1beta stimulated prostaglandin E2, but not 6-keto prostaglandin F1alpha formation. SC-58125 inhibited lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1beta stimulated 6-keto prostaglandin F1alpha but not prostaglandin E2 release. The specific cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor also inhibited lipopolysaccharide produced prostaglandin D2 but not interleukin-1beta stimulated prostaglandin D2. While SC-58125 inhibited basal 6-keto prostaglandin-F1alpha formation it significantly increased basal prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin D2 formation. As SC-58125 inhibited lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1beta induced 6-keto prostaglandin F1alpha production but not prostaglandin E2 production, it suggests that these agents

  11. Increased concentrations of arachidonic acid, prostaglandins E2, D2, and 6-oxo-F1 alpha, and histamine in human skin following UVA irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, J.L.; Black, A.K.; Jaenicke, K.F.; Barr, R.M.; Soter, N.A.; Mallett, A.I.; Gilchrest, B.A.; Hensby, C.N.; Parrish, J.A.; Greaves, M.W.

    1983-06-01

    The buttock skin of clinically normal human subjects was subjected to approximately 2.5 minimal erythema doses of ultraviolet A irradiation. Deep red erythema developed during irradiation, faded slightly within the next few hours, increased to maximum intensity between 9-15 h, and decreased gradually thereafter although still persisting strongly at 48 h. Suction blister exudates were obtained at 0, 5, 9, 15, 24, and 48 h after irradiation as well as suction blister exudates from a contralateral control site and assayed for arachidonic acid, prostaglandins D2 and E2, and the prostacyclin breakdown product 6-oxo-prostaglandin F1 alpha by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and for histamine by radioenzyme assay. Increased concentrations of arachidonic acid and prostaglandins D2, E2, and 6-oxo-prostaglandin F1 alpha were found maximally between 5-9 h after irradiation, preceding the phase of maximal erythema. Elevations of histamine concentration occurred 9-15 h after irradiation, preceding and coinciding with the phase of maximal erythema. At 24 h, still at the height of the erythemal response, all values had returned to near control levels. Hence increased concentrations of arachidonic acid and its products from the cyclooxygenase pathway, and of histamine, accompany the early stages up to 24 h. A causal role in production of the erythema seems likely for these substances although other mediators are almost certainly involved.

  12. A novel mutation in the alpha-helix 1 of the C subunit of the F(1)/F(0) ATPase responsible for optochin resistance of a Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Cogné, N; Claverys, J; Denis, F; Martin, C

    2000-10-01

    Previously reported mutations involved in optochin resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolates changed residues 48, 49 or 50, in the transmembrane alpha-helix 2 of the F(1)/F(0) ATPase subunit. We report here an unusual mutation which changes the sequence of the transmembrane alpha-helix 1 of the AtpC subunit. This mutation involves a Gly to Ser substitution resulting from a G to A transition at codon 14 of the atpC gene.

  13. The mRNA expression of P450 aromatase, gonadotropin beta-subunits and FTZ-F1 in the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus Coioides) during 17alpha-methyltestosterone-induced precocious sex change.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weimin; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Lihong; Zhao, Huihong; Li, Xin; Huang, He; Lin, Haoran

    2007-06-01

    The orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides is a protogynous hermaphroditic fish, but the physiological basis of its sex change remains largely unknown. In the present study, the 2-year-old orange-spotted grouper was induced to change sex precociously by oral administration of 17alpha-methyltestosterone (MT, 50 mg/Kg diet, twice a day at daily ration of 5% bodyweight) for 60 days. The serum testosterone levels were significantly elevated after MT treatment for 20 and 40 days as compared to control, but the levels of serum estradiol (E(2)) remained unchanged. The expression of P450aromA in the gonad significantly decreased after MT treatment for 20, 40, and 60 days. Accordingly, the enzyme activity of gonadal aromatase was also lower. The expression of FSHbeta subunit in the pituitary was significantly decreased after MT treatment for 20 days, but returned to the control levels after 40 and 60 days; however, the expression of LHbeta subunit was not altered significantly by MT treatment. The expression of FTZ-F1 in the gonad also decreased significantly in response to MT treatment for 40 and 60 days, but its expression in the pituitary was not altered significantly. Interestingly, when tested in vitro on ovarian fragments, MT had no direct effect on the expression of P450aromA and FTZ-F1 as well as the activity of gonadal aromatase, suggesting that the inhibition of gonadal P450aromatase and FTZ-F1 by MT may be mediated at upper levels of the brain-pituitary-gonadal axis. Taken together, these results indicated that FSH, P450aromA, FTZ-F1, and serum testosterone are associated with the MT-induced sex change of the orange-spotted grouper, but the cause-effect relationship between these factors and sex change in this species remains to be characterized.

  14. Endogenous biosynthesis of thromboxane and prostacyclin in 2 distinct murine models of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Praticò, D; Cyrus, T; Li, H; FitzGerald, G A

    2000-12-01

    Thromboxane A(2) is a potent vasoconstrictor and platelet agonist; prostacyclin is a potent platelet inhibitor and vasodilator. Altered biosynthesis of these eicosanoids is a feature of human hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. This study examined whether in 2 murine models of atherosclerosis their levels are increased and correlated with the evolution of the disease. Urinary 2,3-dinor thromboxane B(2) and 2,3-dinor-6-keto prostaglandin F(1 alpha), metabolites of thromboxane and prostacyclin, respectively, were assayed in apoliprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice on chow and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-deficient mice on chow and a Western-type diet. Atherosclerosis lesion area was measured by en face method. Both eicosanoids increased in apoE-deficient mice on chow and in LDLR-deficient mice on a high-fat diet, but not in LDLR-deficient mice on chow by the end of the study. Aspirin suppressed ex vivo platelet aggregation, serum thromboxane B(2), and 2,3-dinor thromboxane B(2), and significantly reduced the excretion of 2,3-dinor-6-keto prostaglandin F(1 alpha) in these animals. This study demonstrates that thromboxane as well as prostacyclin biosynthesis is increased in 2 murine models of atherogenesis and is secondary to increased in vivo platelet activation. Assessment of their generation in these models may afford the basis for future studies on the functional role of these eicosanoids in the evolution and progression of atherosclerosis. (Blood. 2000;96:3823-3826)

  15. Changes in endogenous prostacyclin in the rat brain during clinical death and after resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Kapuściński, A

    1992-01-01

    By means of the radioimmunologic method changes of concentration of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (PGF1 alpha)--the stable metabolite of prostacyclin in the rat brain have been evaluated during 5-min clinical death and up to 2 hrs after resuscitation. Ischemia did not produce significant changes of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha concentration in the brain. In the early postresuscitation period the concentration of 6-keto-PGF1 in the and 7-fold control values. Later the concentration of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha in the brain decreased reaching in 30 min a 3-fold the control level, and in 60 and 120 min after resuscitation control values. The reasons of unsuccessful therapy of ischemic stroke with prostacyclin are discussed.

  16. Effect of aspirin dosage and enteric coating on platelet reactivity.

    PubMed

    Feng, D; McKenna, C; Murillo, J; Mittleman, M A; Gebara, O C; Lipinska, I; Muller, J E; Tofler, G H

    1997-07-15

    Although aspirin is effective in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, the optimal dose remains uncertain. The purpose of this study was to compare the platelet inhibitory and prostacyclin-sparing effects of 2 doses (81 and 325 mg) and forms (enteric-coated and regular) of aspirin. Since platelet reactivity has been reported to increase after strenuous exercise, a known trigger of myocardial infarction, subjects were studied following maximal treadmill exercise as well as at rest. Forty male healthy subjects were evaluated using a randomized, double-blind, parallel study design. Blood samples were obtained before and after maximal treadmill exercise at baseline and after 7 days on aspirin therapy. Both enteric and regular aspirin in 81- and 325-mg dosages markedly inhibited adenosine diphosphate and epinephrine-induced aggregation at rest and after exercise. Aspirin also inhibited the platelet response to collagen as assessed by a longer lag time to aggregation. The prolongation of lag time was greater for 325 mg than for 81 mg (100 +/- 7 vs 91 +/- 7; p = 0.04, after exercise). There were no significant dose-related differences in plasma 6-keto-prostaglandin F1alpha level; however, enteric-coated aspirin inhibited the exercise-induced increase in 6-keto-prostaglandin F1alpha to a lesser extent than regular aspirin. Although both doses (81 and 325 mg) and types (regular and enteric-coated) of aspirin inhibited adenosine diphosphate and epinephrine-induced aggregation equally, the 325-mg dose inhibited collagen-induced aggregation to a greater extent than 81 mg. The greater platelet inhibition observed with 325 mg may be clinically relevant in acute coronary syndromes characterized by plaque rupture with extensive collagen exposure and platelet activation.

  17. Design, Synthesis, and Anti-inflammatory Properties of Orally Active 4-(Phenylamino)-pyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazine p38[alpha] Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, Jr., John; Dyckman, Alaric J.; Lin, Shuqun; Wrobleski, Stephen T.; Wu, Hong; Gillooly, Kathleen M.; Kanner, Steven B.; Lonial, Herinder; Loo, Derek; McIntyre, Kim W.; Pitt, Sidney; Shen, Ding Ren; Shuster, David J.; Yang, XiaoXia; Zhang, Rosemary; Behnia, Kamelia; Zhang, Hongjian; Marathe, Punit H.; Doweyko, Arthur M.; Tokarski, John S.; Sack, John S.; Pokross, Matthew; Kiefer, Susan E.; Newitt, John A.; Barrish, Joel C.; Dodd, John; Schieven, Gary L.; Leftheris, Katerina

    2008-06-30

    A novel structural class of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitors consisting of substituted 4-(phenylamino)-pyrrolo[2,1- f][1,2,4]triazines has been discovered. An initial subdeck screen revealed that the oxindole-pyrrolo[2,1- f][1,2,4]triazine lead 2a displayed potent enzyme inhibition (IC 50 60 nM) and was active in a cell-based TNFalpha biosynthesis inhibition assay (IC 50 210 nM). Replacement of the C4 oxindole with 2-methyl-5- N-methoxybenzamide aniline 9 gave a compound with superior p38 kinase inhibition (IC 50 10 nM) and moderately improved functional inhibition in THP-1 cells. Further replacement of the C6 ester of the pyrrolo[2,1- f][1,2,4]triazine with amides afforded compounds with increased potency, excellent oral bioavailability, and robust efficacy in a murine model of acute inflammation (murine LPS-TNFalpha). In rodent disease models of chronic inflammation, multiple compounds demonstrated significant inhibition of disease progression leading to the advancement of 2 compounds 11b and 11j into further preclinical and toxicological studies.

  18. Discovery of 4-(5-(Cyclopropylcarbamoyl)-2-methylphenylamino)-5-methyl-N-propylpyrrolo[1,2-f][1,2,4]triazine-6-carboxamide (BMS-582949), a Clinical p38[alpha] MAP Kinase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Inflammatory Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chunjian; Lin, James; Wrobleski, Stephen T.; Lin, Shuqun; Hynes, Jr., John; Wu, Hong; Dyckman, Alaric J.; Li, Tianle; Wityak, John; Gillooly, Kathleen M.; Pitt, Sidney; Shen, Ding Ren; Zhang, Rosemary F.; McIntyre, Kim W.; Salter-Cid, Luisa; Shuster, David J.; Zhang, Hongjian; Marathe, Punit H.; Doweyko, Arthur M.; Sack, John S.; Kiefer, Susan E.; Kish, Kevin F.; Newitt, John A.; McKinnon, Murray; Dodd, John H.; Barrish, Joel C.; Schieven, Gary L.; Leftheris, Katerina

    2013-11-20

    The discovery and characterization of 7k (BMS-582949), a highly selective p38{alpha} MAP kinase inhibitor that is currently in phase II clinical trials for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, is described. A key to the discovery was the rational substitution of N-cyclopropyl for N-methoxy in 1a, a previously reported clinical candidate p38{alpha} inhibitor. Unlike alkyl and other cycloalkyls, the sp{sup 2} character of the cyclopropyl group can confer improved H-bonding characteristics to the directly substituted amide NH. Inhibitor 7k is slightly less active than 1a in the p38{alpha} enzymatic assay but displays a superior pharmacokinetic profile and, as such, was more effective in both the acute murine model of inflammation and pseudoestablished rat AA model. The binding mode of 7k with p38{alpha} was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis.

  19. M2-F1 cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This photo shows the cockpit configuration of the M2-F1 wingless lifting body. With a top speed of about 120 knots, the M2-F1 had a simple instrument panel. Besides the panel itself, the ribs of the wooden shell (left) and the control stick (center) are also visible. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly safely and to train pilots before they were towed behind a C-47

  20. alpha3beta3gamma complex of F1-ATPase from thermophilic Bacillus PS3 can maintain steady-state ATP hydrolysis activity depending on the number of non-catalytic sites.

    PubMed Central

    Amano, T; Matsui, T; Muneyuki, E; Noji, H; Hara, K; Yoshida, M; Hisabori, T

    1999-01-01

    Homogeneous preparations of alpha(3)beta(3)gamma complexes with one, two or three non-competent non-catalytic site(s) were performed as described [Amano, Hisabori, Muneyuki, and Yoshida (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 18128-18133] and their properties were compared with those of the wild-type complex. The ATPase activity of the complex with three non-competent non-catalytic sites decayed rapidly to an inactivated state, as reported previously [Matsui, Muneyuki, Honda, Allison, Dou, and Yoshida (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 8215-8221]. In contrast, the complex with one or two non-competent non-catalytic sites displayed a substantial steady-state phase activity depending on the number of non-competent non-catalytic sites in the complex. This result indicates that one competent non-catalytic site can maintain the continuous catalytic turnover of the enzyme and can potentially relieve all three catalytic sites from inhibition by MgADP(-). Furthermore, the results suggest that the interaction between three non-catalytic sites might not be as strong as that between catalytic sites, which are all strictly required for a continuous catalytic turnover. PMID:10493921

  1. F-1 Engine Gas Generator Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    The gas generator from an F-1 engine is test-fired at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., on Jan. 24, 2013. Data from the 30 second test will be used in the development of advance...

  2. Activation of Ftz-F1-Responsive Genes through Ftz/Ftz-F1 Dependent Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Field, Amanda; Xiang, Jie; Anderson, W. Ray; Graham, Patricia; Pick, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor Ftz-F1 is expressed in all somatic nuclei in Drosophila embryos, but mutations result in a pair-rule phenotype. This was explained by the interaction of Ftz-F1 with the homeodomain protein Ftz that is expressed in stripes in the primordia of segments missing in either ftz-f1 or ftz mutants. Ftz-F1 and Ftz were shown to physically interact and coordinately activate the expression of ftz itself and engrailed by synergistic binding to composite Ftz-F1/Ftz binding sites. However, attempts to identify additional target genes on the basis of Ftz-F1/ Ftz binding alone has met with only limited success. To discern rules for Ftz-F1 target site selection in vivo and to identify additional target genes, a microarray analysis was performed comparing wildtype and ftz-f1 mutant embryos. Ftz-F1-responsive genes most highly regulated included engrailed and nine additional genes expressed in patterns dependent on both ftz and ftz-f1. Candidate enhancers for these genes were identified by combining BDTNP Ftz ChIP-chip data with a computational search for Ftz-F1 binding sites. Of eight enhancer reporter genes tested in transgenic embryos, six generated expression patterns similar to the corresponding endogenous gene and expression was lost in ftz mutants. These studies identified a new set of Ftz-F1 targets, all of which are co-regulated by Ftz. Comparative analysis of enhancers containing Ftz/Ftz-F1 binding sites that were or were not bona fide targets in vivo suggested that GAF negatively regulates enhancers that contain Ftz/Ftz-F1 binding sites but are not actually utilized. These targets include other regulatory factors as well as genes involved directly in morphogenesis, providing insight into how pair-rule genes establish the body pattern. PMID:27723822

  3. Revising the f1(1420 ) resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debastiani, V. R.; Aceti, F.; Liang, Wei-Hong; Oset, E.

    2017-02-01

    We have studied the production and decay of the f1(1285 ) into π a0(980 ) and K*K ¯ as a function of the mass of the resonance and find a shoulder around 1400 MeV, tied to a triangle singularity, for the π a0(980 ) mode, and a peak around 1420 MeV with about 60 MeV width for the K*K ¯ mode. Both of these features agree with the experimental information on which the f1(1420 ) resonance is based. In addition, we find that if the f1(1420 ) is a genuine resonance, coupling mostly to K*K ¯ as seen experimentally, one finds unavoidably about a 20% fraction for π a0(980 ) decay of this resonance, in drastic contradiction with all experiments. Altogether, we conclude that the f1(1420 ) is not a genuine resonance, but the manifestation of the π a0(980 ) and K*K ¯ decay modes of the f1(1285 ) at higher energies than the nominal one.

  4. Electrical field effects on endothelial cell adhesion and growth on conducting biomaterials surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Gwen Elaine

    A major problem for vascular graft implants is poor long-term patency for small-diameter (<6 mm) prostheses. Small-diameter woven Dacron RTM or expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) grafts often occlude in a short time due to thrombus or polytetrafluoroethylene intimal hyperplasia. It has generally been considered that an endothelial cell lining of such grafts might reduce thrombogenicity and thereby produce a more biomimetic prosthesis. Electrical stimulation has been studied for effects on in vitro cell growth, motility, and adhesion characteristics, as well as for in vivo wound healing. A comprehensive literature review was conducted which suggested the need for further research concerning the effects of electrical fields on endothelial cell adhesion and growth properties. The focus of these studies was therefore to determine the effect of electrical fields on the proliferation and adhesion characteristics of endothelial cells cultured on various substrates using low-voltage direct current. Voltages of 0, 0.5, and 1 volt were used for in vitro endothelial cell cultures plated at 50,000 and 100,000 cells/mL. Growth experiments were performed on glass, MylarRTM, Indium Tin Oxide (ITO)-glass, on ITO-, carbon-, and gold-palladium-coated MylarRTM, and on polypyrrole-coated DacronRTM. Proliferation of endothelial cells was determined at 12, 24, and 36 hours. Adhesion characteristics were measured using a novel flow adhesion system. Characterization was via cell staining in conjunction with optical microscopy and a 6-keto-prostaglandin-F 1alpha assay to measure cell viability. Results of these cell growth studies in electric fields indicate that low voltage stimulation moderately increased endothelial cell growth on most substrates. The release of 6-keto-prostaglandin-F1alpha decreased over time at most cell concentrations and voltage levels. Cell adhesion experiments provided contrary results to the growth studies and suggested Rested that low-voltage electric

  5. M2-F1 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The M2-F1 Lifting Body is seen here under tow, high above Rogers Dry Lake near the Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. R. Dale Reed effectively advocated the project with the support of NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Together, they gained the support of Flight Research Center Director Paul Bikle. After a six-month feasibility study, Bikle gave approval in the fall of 1962 for the M2-F1 to be built. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Flight Research Center management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. These initial tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind a NASA C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began. Pilot for the first series of flights of the M2-F1 was NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Typical glide flights with the M2-F1 lasted about two minutes and reached speeds of 110 to l20 mph. More than 400 ground tows and 77 aircraft tow flights were carried out with the M2-F1. The success of Dryden's M2-F1 program led to NASA's development and construction of two heavyweight lifting bodies based on studies at NASA's Ames and Langley research centers--the M2-F2 and the HL

  6. M2-F1 simulator cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This early simulator of the M2-F1 lifting body was used for pilot training, to test landing techniques before the first ground tow attempts, and to test new control configurations after the first tow attempts and wind-tunnel tests. The M2-F1 simulator was limited in some ways by its analog simulator. It had only limited visual display for the pilot, as well. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne

  7. M2-F1 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The M2-F1 Lifting Body is seen here under tow by an unseen C-47 at the NASA Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. The low-cost vehicle was the first piloted lifting body to be test flown. The lifting-body concept originated in the mid-1950s at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' Ames Aeronautical Laboratory, Mountain View California. By February 1962, a series of possible shapes had been developed, and R. Dale Reed was working to gain support for a research vehicle. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. These initial tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind a NASA C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began. Pilot for the first series of flights of the M2-F1 was NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Typical glide flights with the M2-F1 lasted about two minutes and reached speeds of 110 to l20 mph. More than 400 ground tows and 77 aircraft tow flights were carried out with the M2-F1. The success of Dryden's M2-F1 program led to NASA's development and construction of two heavyweight lifting bodies based on studies at

  8. Triggering of human monocyte activation through CD69, a member of the natural killer cell gene complex family of signal transducing receptors

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The expression and function of CD69, a member of the natural killer cell gene complex family of signal transducing receptors, was investigated on human monocytes. CD69 was found expressed on all peripheral blood monocytes, as a 28- and 32-kD disulfide-linked dimer. Molecular cross-linking of CD69 receptors induced extracellular Ca2+ influx, as revealed by flow cytometry. CD69 cross-linking resulted also in phospholipase A2 activation, as detected by in vivo arachidonic acid release measurement from intact cells and by direct in vitro measurement of enzymatic activity using radiolabeled phosphatidylcholine vesicles. Prostaglandin E 2 alpha, 6-keto- prostaglandin F 1 alpha, and leukotriene B4 were detected by radioimmunoassay in supernatants from CD69-stimulated monocytes, suggesting the activation of both cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways after CD69 stimulation. CD69 cross-linking, moreover, was able to induce strong nitric oxide (NO) production from monocytes, as detected by accumulation of NO oxydixed derivatives, and cyclic GMP. It is important to note that NO generation was responsible for CD69- mediated increase in spontaneous cytotoxicity against L929 murine transformed fibroblast cell line and induction of redirected cytotoxicity towards P815 FcRII+ murine mastocytoma cell line. These data indicate that CD69 can act as a potent stimulatory molecule on the surface of human peripheral blood monocytes. PMID:7964477

  9. Anatomy of F1-ATPase powered rotation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, James L.; Ishmukhametov, Robert; Hornung, Tassilo; Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Frasch, Wayne D.

    2014-01-01

    F1-ATPase, the catalytic complex of the ATP synthase, is a molecular motor that can consume ATP to drive rotation of the γ-subunit inside the ring of three αβ-subunit heterodimers in 120° power strokes. To elucidate the mechanism of ATPase-powered rotation, we determined the angular velocity as a function of rotational position from single-molecule data collected at 200,000 frames per second with unprecedented signal-to-noise. Power stroke rotation is more complex than previously understood. This paper reports the unexpected discovery that a series of angular accelerations and decelerations occur during the power stroke. The decreases in angular velocity that occurred with the lower-affinity substrate ITP, which could not be explained by an increase in substrate-binding dwells, provides direct evidence that rotation depends on substrate binding affinity. The presence of elevated ADP concentrations not only increased dwells at 35° from the catalytic dwell consistent with competitive product inhibition but also decreased the angular velocity from 85° to 120°, indicating that ADP can remain bound to the catalytic site where product release occurs for the duration of the power stroke. The angular velocity profile also supports a model in which rotation is powered by Van der Waals repulsive forces during the final 85° of rotation, consistent with a transition from F1 structures 2HLD1 and 1H8E (Protein Data Bank). PMID:24567403

  10. M2-F1 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This 25-second clip shows Milt Thompson being towed in the M2-F1 behind a C-47 aircraft. The M2-F1 lifting body, dubbed the 'flying bathtub' by the media, was the precursor of a remarkable series of wingless flying vehicles that contributed data used in the Space Shuttles, the X-33 Advanced Technology Demonstrator for the next century's Reusable Launch Vehicle, and the X-38 Technology Demonstrator for crew return from the International Space Station. Based on the ideas and basic design of Alfred J. Eggers and others at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory (now the Ames Research Center), Mountain View, California, in the mid-1950's, the M2-F1 was built in 1962-63 over a four-month period for a cost of only about $30,000, plus an additional $8,000-$10,000 for an ejection seat. Engineers and technicians at the NASA Flight Research Center (now NASA Dryden) kept costs low by designing and fabricating it partly in-house, with the plywood shell constructed by a local sailplane builder. Someone at the time estimated that it would have cost a major aircraft company $150,000 to build the same vehicle. Unlike the later lifting bodies, the M2-F1 was unpowered and was initially towed by a souped-up Pontiac convertible until it was airborne. Later a C-47 took over the towing duties. Flown by such famous research pilots as Milt Thompson, Bruce Peterson, Chuck Yeager, and Bill Dana, the lightweight flying bathtub demonstrated that a wingless vehicle shaped for reentry into the Earth's atmosphere from space could be flown and landed safely. Flown from 1963 to 1966, the lightweight M2-F1 paved the way for the heavyweight M2-F2, M2-F3, HL-10, X-24A, and X-24B lifting bodies that flew under rocket power after launch from a B-52 mothership. The heavyweights flew from 1966 to 1975, demonstrating the viability and versatility of the wingless configuration and the ability of a vehicle with low lift-over-drag characteristics to fly to high altitudes and then to land precisely with their rocket

  11. Effect of a selective thromboxane synthase inhibitor on arterial graft patency and platelet deposition in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, M.D.; Huntsman, W.T.; Miett, T.O.; Cronenwett, J.L.

    1987-08-01

    This study examined the effect of selective thromboxane synthase inhibition and nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibition on vascular graft patency and indium 111-labeled platelet deposition in 35 mongrel dogs undergoing carotid artery replacement with 4 mm X 4 cm polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) (one side) and Dacron (opposite side) end-to-end grafts. Aspirin-dipyridamole therapy improved one-week graft patency, from 46% in untreated dogs to 93% in treated dogs. Thromboxane synthase inhibition (U-63557A) improved graft patency in these dogs to 81%. Both drug treatments reduced platelet deposition on Dacron and PTFE grafts by 48% to 68% compared with control dogs. Dacron grafts accumulated significantly more platelets than PTFE grafts but had comparable patency rates. Low-dose aspirin therapy had no significant effect on either graft patency or platelet deposition. All treatment groups showed a 60% to 76% reduction in serum thromboxane B2, but only thromboxane synthase inhibitor treatment increased plasma 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha by 100%. Selective thromboxane synthase inhibition improved small-caliber prosthetic graft patency to the same extent as did conventional cyclooxygenase inhibition in this preliminary study.

  12. Effects of renin inhibition in systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P W; Do, Y S; Schambelan, M; Horton, R; Boger, R S; Luther, R R; Hsueh, W A

    1990-12-01

    The effect of the direct renin inhibitor enalkiren (Abbott Laboratories) was examined in 8 healthy patients with essential hypertension. With an unrestricted sodium diet, plasma renin concentration was inhibited within 10 minutes by intravenous enalkiren and remained essentially undetectable for greater than or equal to 6 hours (11.9 +/- 4 to 1.0 +/- 0.6 ng angiotensin I/ml/hour, p less than 0.05). Mean arterial blood pressure declined gradually (108 +/- 5 to 84 +/- 4 mm Hg, p = 0.02), as did plasma aldosterone concentration (14.4 +/- 3.8 to 4.4 +/- 0.8 ng/dl, p = 0.03), whereas plasma immunoreactive active renin concentration increased progressively (35 +/- 14 to 160 +/- 60 pg/ml, p greater than 0.05). Urinary excretion of the stable metabolite of prostacyclin (6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha) decreased slightly, but not significantly (42 +/- 10 to 33 +/- 11 ng/g creatinine, p = 0.13). The addition of a diuretic decreased baseline blood pressure and increased baseline plasma renin and aldosterone values. Blood pressure responses to enalkiren were slightly (though not significantly) greater than those observed before diuretic administration. We conclude that enalkiren is effective in decreasing blood pressure and in inhibiting the renin system, without significantly altering urinary prostacyclin excretion, in patients with essential hypertension. These results suggest that the renin system contributes to the maintenance of elevated blood pressure in some patients with essential hypertension.

  13. Prostacyclin-induced hyperthermia - Implication of a protein mediator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandasamy, S. B.; Williams, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism of the prostacyclin-linked hyperthermia is studied in rabbits. Results show that intracerebroventricular administration of prostacyclin (PGI2) induces dose-related hyperthermia at room temperature (21 C), as well as at low (4 C) and high (30 C) ambient temperatures. It is found that this PGI2-induced hyperthermia is not mediated by its stable metabolite 6-keto prostaglandin F-1(alpha). Only one of the three anion transport systems, the liver transport system, appears to be important to the central inactivation of pyrogen, prostaglandin E2, and PGI2. Phenoxybenzamine and pimozide have no thermolytic effect on PGI2-induced hyperthermia, while PGI2 still induces hyperthermia after norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine levels are depleted by 6-hydroxydopamine. Indomethacin and SC-19220 (a PG antagonist) do not antagonize PGI2 induced hyperthermia, while theophylline does not accentuate the PGI2-induced hyperthermia. However, the hyperthermic response to PGI2 is attenuated by central administration of the protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin. It is concluded that PGI2-induced hyperthermia is not induced by NE, dopamine, or cyclic AMP, but rather that a protein mediator is implicated in the induction of fever by PG12.

  14. Hypotensive and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activities of Eisenia fetida Extract in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shumei; Li, Chengde

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to investigate the antihypertensive effects of an Eisenia fetida extract (EFE) and its possible mechanisms in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR rats). Methods. Sixteen-week-old SHR rats and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY rats) were used in this study. Rats were, respectively, given EFE (EFE group), captopril (captopril group), or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (normal control group and SHR group) for 4 weeks. ACE inhibitory activity of EFE in vitro was determined. The systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured using a Rat Tail-Cuff Blood Pressure System. Levels of angiotensin II (Ang II), aldosterone (Ald), and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto-PGF1α) in plasma were determined by radioimmunoassay, and serum nitric oxide (NO) concentration was measured by Griess reagent systems. Results. EFE had marked ACE inhibitory activity in vitro (IC50 = 2.5 mg/mL). After the 4-week drug management, SHR rats in EFE group and in captopril group had lower SBP and DBP, lower levels of Ang II and Ald, and higher levels of 6-keto-PGF1α and NO than the SHR rats in SHR group. Conclusion. These results indicate that EFE has hypotensive effects in SHR rats and its effects might be associated with its ACE inhibitory activity. PMID:26798397

  15. Ibuprofen prevents synthetic smoke-induced pulmonary edema

    SciTech Connect

    Shinozawa, Y.; Hales, C.; Jung, W.; Burke, J.

    1986-12-01

    Multiple potentially injurious agents are present in smoke but the importance of each of these agents in producing lung injury as well as the mechanisms by which the lung injury is produced are unknown. In order to study smoke inhalation injury, we developed a synthetic smoke composed of a carrier of hot carbon particles of known size to which a single known common toxic agent in smoke, in this case HCI, could be added. We then exposed rats to the smoke, assayed their blood for the metabolites of thromboxane and prostacyclin, and intervened shortly after smoke with the cyclooxygenase inhibitors indomethacin or ibuprofen to see if the resulting lung injury could be prevented. Smoke exposure produced mild pulmonary edema after 6 h with a wet-to-dry weight ratio of 5.6 +/- 0.2 SEM (n = 11) compared with the non-smoke-exposed control animals with a wet-to-dry weight ratio of 4.3 +/- 0.2 (n = 12), p less than 0.001. Thromboxane B, and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha rose to 1660 +/- 250 pg/ml (p less than 0.01) and to 600 +/- 100 pg/ml (p greater than 0.1), respectively, in the smoke-injured animals compared with 770 +/- 150 pg/ml and 400 +/- 100 pg/ml in the non-smoke-exposed control animals. Indomethacin (n = 11) blocked the increase in both thromboxane and prostacyclin metabolites but failed to prevent lung edema.

  16. Renal hemodynamic effects of nabumetone, sulindac, and placebo in patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cangiano, J L; Figueroa, J; Palmer, R

    1999-03-01

    We assessed the effects of nabumetone, sulindac, and placebo on renal function and renal excretion of vasodilatory prostaglandins in older female patients (age >50 years) with osteoarthritis and normal renal function. Using a prospective, crossover design, we compared the effects of nabumetone 2000 mg/d and sulindac 400 mg/d with placebo on glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal plasma flow (RPF), and urinary excretion of prostaglandin E2 and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1alpha in 12 patients. Urinary excretion of vasodilatory prostaglandins was not decreased after 14 days of treatment with either nabumetone or sulindac. Likewise, treatment with nabumetone or sulindac did not significantly alter renal function compared with placebo. There were no differences in mean changes in GFR or RPF from baseline after treatment with nabumetone or sulindac compared with placebo. The mean (+/- SD) changes in GFR from baseline were 0%+/-8% in patients receiving nabumetone, -8%+/-15% in patients receiving sulindac, and -7%+/-15% in patients receiving placebo. The results of this study demonstrate that treatment with nabumetone or sulindac caused no deterioration in renal function in older female patients with osteoarthritis and normal renal function.

  17. Equatorial F1 characteristics and the international reference ionosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeniyi, J. O.

    1996-07-01

    Average values of the F1 critical frequency (f0F1) and the height of the F1 ledge (hmF1) for Ibadan (Latitude 7.4°N, Longitude 3.9°E) were used for this study. Well-defined F1 characteristics are observed during winter at low solar activity. International reference ionosphere (IRI) does not predict F1 parameters during this season. Deviation of predicted F1 electron density (NF1) by the IRI model from observed values are less than 10% for all seasons of low solar activity, when IRI predicts NF1. Higher percentage deviations are observed during summers of high solar activity. IRI overestimates hmF1. Deviations from experimental values vary from 4 to 35%.

  18. 26 CFR 1.415(f)-1 - Aggregating plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aggregating plans. 1.415(f)-1 Section 1.415(f)-1...) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.415(f)-1 Aggregating plans. (a) In general. Except as provided in paragraph (g) of this section (regarding multiemployer plans), and...

  19. 26 CFR 1.415(f)-1 - Aggregating plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Aggregating plans. 1.415(f)-1 Section 1.415(f)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.415(f)-1 Aggregating plans. (a) In general. Except as provided in paragraph (g) of this section (regarding multiemployer...

  20. 26 CFR 1.415(f)-1 - Aggregating plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aggregating plans. 1.415(f)-1 Section 1.415(f)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.415(f)-1 Aggregating plans. (a) In general. Except as provided in paragraph (g) of this section (regarding multiemployer...

  1. Nonleptonic decays of B →(f1(1285 ),f1(1420 ))V in the perturbative QCD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Xiao, Zhen-Jun; Zou, Zhi-Tian

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the branching ratios, the polarization fractions, the direct C P -violating asymmetries, and the relative phases in 20 nonleptonic decay modes of B →f1V within the framework of the perturbative QCD approach at leading order with f1 including two 3P1-axial-vector states f1(1285 ) and f1(1420 ) . Here, B denotes B+, B0, and Bs0 mesons and V stands for the lightest vector mesons ρ , K*, ω , and ϕ , respectively. The Bs0→f1V decays are studied theoretically for the first time in the literature. Together with the angle ϕf1≈(24-2.7+3.2)∘ extracted from the measurement through Bd /s→J /ψ f1(1285 ) modes for the f1(1285 )-f1(1420 ) mixing system, it is of great interest to find phenomenologically some modes such as the tree-dominated B+→f1ρ+ and the penguin-dominated B+,0→f1K*+,0 , Bs0→f1ϕ with large branching ratios around O (10-6) or even O (10-5), which are expected to be measurable at the LHCb and/or the Belle-II experiments in the near future. The good agreement (sharp contrast) of branching ratios and decay pattern for B+→f1ρ+ , B+,0→f1(1285 )K*+,0[B+,0→f1(1420 )K*+,0] decays between QCD factorization and perturbative QCD factorization predictions can help us to distinguish these two rather different factorization approaches via precision measurements, which would also be helpful for us in exploring the annihilation decay mechanism through its important roles for the considered B →f1V decays.

  2. Single molecule thermodynamics of ATP synthesis by F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyabe, Shoichi; Muneyuki, Eiro

    2015-01-01

    FoF1-ATP synthase is a factory for synthesizing ATP in virtually all cells. Its core machinery is the subcomplex F1-motor (F1-ATPase) and performs the reversible mechanochemical coupling. The isolated F1-motor hydrolyzes ATP, which is accompanied by unidirectional rotation of its central γ -shaft. When a strong opposing torque is imposed, the γ -shaft rotates in the opposite direction and drives the F1-motor to synthesize ATP. This mechanical-to-chemical free-energy transduction is the final and central step of the multistep cellular ATP-synthetic pathway. Here, we determined the amount of mechanical work exploited by the F1-motor to synthesize an ATP molecule during forced rotations using a methodology combining a nonequilibrium theory and single molecule measurements of responses to external torque. We found that the internal dissipation of the motor is negligible even during rotations far from a quasistatic process.

  3. RORα Binds to E2F1 To Inhibit Cell Proliferation and Regulate Mammary Gland Branching Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Gaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan nuclear receptor alpha (RORα) is a potent tumor suppressor that reduces cell proliferation and inhibits tumor growth. However, the molecular mechanism by which it inhibits cell proliferation remains unknown. We demonstrate a noncanonical nuclear receptor pathway in which RORα binds to E2F1 to inhibit cell cycle progression. We showed that RORα bound to the heptad repeat and marked box region of E2F1 and suppressed E2F1-regulated transcription in epithelial cells. Binding of RORα inhibited E2F1 acetylation and its DNA-binding activity by recruiting histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) to the protein complexes. Knockdown of HDAC1 or inhibition of HDAC activity at least partially rescued transcription factor activity of E2F1 that was repressed by RORα. Importantly, RORα levels were increased in mammary ducts compared to terminal end buds and inversely correlated with expression of E2F1 target genes and cell proliferation. Silencing RORα in mammary epithelial cells significantly enhanced cell proliferation in the ductal epithelial cells and promoted side branching of the mammary ducts. These results reveal a novel link between RORα and E2F1 in regulating cell cycle progression and mammary tissue morphogenesis. PMID:24891616

  4. 26 CFR 53.4941(f)-1 - Effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effective dates. 53.4941(f)-1 Section 53.4941(f)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS... Effective dates. (a) In general. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, §§...

  5. 26 CFR 48.6416(f)-1 - Credit on returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Credit on returns. 48.6416(f)-1 Section 48.6416... Special Application to Retailers and Manufacturers Taxes § 48.6416(f)-1 Credit on returns. Any person..., in lieu of claiming refund of the overpayment, claim credit for the overpayment on any return of...

  6. 26 CFR 48.6416(f)-1 - Credit on returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Credit on returns. 48.6416(f)-1 Section 48.6416... Special Application to Retailers and Manufacturers Taxes § 48.6416(f)-1 Credit on returns. Any person..., in lieu of claiming refund of the overpayment, claim credit for the overpayment on any return of...

  7. 26 CFR 48.6416(f)-1 - Credit on returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Credit on returns. 48.6416(f)-1 Section 48.6416... Special Application to Retailers and Manufacturers Taxes § 48.6416(f)-1 Credit on returns. Any person..., in lieu of claiming refund of the overpayment, claim credit for the overpayment on any return of...

  8. 26 CFR 48.6416(f)-1 - Credit on returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Credit on returns. 48.6416(f)-1 Section 48.6416... Special Application to Retailers and Manufacturers Taxes § 48.6416(f)-1 Credit on returns. Any person..., in lieu of claiming refund of the overpayment, claim credit for the overpayment on any return of...

  9. Charmless hadronic B →(f1(1285 ),f1(1420 ))P decays in the perturbative QCD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Xiao, Zhen-Jun; Li, Jing-Wu; Zou, Zhi-Tian

    2015-01-01

    We study 20 charmless hadronic B →f1P decays in the perturbative QCD (pQCD) formalism with B denoting Bu, Bd, and Bs mesons; P standing for the light pseudoscalar mesons; and f1 representing axial-vector mesons f1(1285 ) and f1(1420 ) that result from a mixing of quark-flavor f1 q[u/u ¯ +d d ¯ √{2 } ] and f1 s[s s ¯ ] states with the angle ϕf1.The estimations of C P -averaged branching ratios and C P asymmetries of the considered B →f1P decays, in which the Bs→f1P modes are investigated for the first time, are presented in the pQCD approach with ϕf 1˜24 ° from recently measured Bd /s→J /ψ f1(1285 ) decays. It is found that (a) the tree (penguin) dominant B+→f1π+(K+) decays with large branching ratios [O (10-6) ] and large direct C P violations (around 14%-28% in magnitude) simultaneously are believed to be clearly measurable at the LHCb and Belle II experiments; (b) the Bd→f1KS0 and Bs→f1(η ,η') decays with nearly pure penguin contributions and safely negligible tree pollution also have large decay rates in the order of 10-6- 10-5 , which can be confronted with the experimental measurements in the near future; (c) as the alternative channels, the B+→f1(π+,K+) and Bd→f1KS0 decays have the supplementary power in providing more effective constraints on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa weak phases α , γ , and β , correspondingly, which are explicitly analyzed through the large decay rates and the direct and mixing-induced C P asymmetries in the pQCD approach and are expected to be stringently examined by the measurements with high precision; (d) the weak annihilation amplitudes play important roles in the B+→f1(1420 )K+ , Bd→f1(1420 )KS0 , Bs→f1(1420 )η' decays, and so on, which would offer more evidence, once they are confirmed by the experiments, to identify the soft-collinear effective theory and the pQCD approach on the evaluations of annihilation diagrams and to help further understand the annihilation mechanism in the heavy

  10. Continuous administration of anti-interleukin 10 antibodies delays onset of autoimmunity in NZB/W F1 mice

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have previously shown that continuous administration of anti- interleukin 10 (anti-IL-10) antibodies (Abs) to BALB/c mice modifies endogenous levels of autoantibodies, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF- alpha), and interferon gamma, three immune mediators known to affect the development of autoimmunity in "lupus-prone" New Zealand black/white (NZB/W)F1 mice. To explore the consequences of IL-10 neutralization in NZB/W F1 mice, animals were injected two to three times per week from birth until 8-10 mo of age with anti-IL-10 Abs or with isotype control Abs. Anti-IL-10 treatment substantially delayed onset of autoimmunity in NZB/W F1 mice as monitored either by overall survival, or by development of proteinuria, glomerulonephritis, or autoantibodies. Survival at 9 mo was increased from 10 to 80% in anti- IL-10-treated mice relative to Ig isotype-treated controls. This protection against autoimmunity appeared to be due to an anti-IL-10- induced upregulation of endogenous TNF-alpha, since anti-IL-10- protected NZB/W F1 mice rapidly developed autoimmunity when neutralizing anti-TNF-alpha Abs were introduced at 30 wk along with the anti-IL-10 treatment. Consistent with the protective role of anti-IL-10 treatment in these experiments, continuous administration of IL-10 from 4 until 38 wk of age accelerated the onset of autoimmunity in NZB/W F1 mice. The same period of continuous IL-10 administration did not appear to be toxic to, or cause development of lupus-like autoimmunity in normal BALB/c mice. These data suggest that IL-10 antagonists may be beneficial in the treatment of human systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:8270873

  11. Prostacyclin: its pathogenic role in essential hypertension and the class effect of ACE inhibitors on prostaglandin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-García, J L; Villa, E; Serrano, M; Gallardo, J; García-Robles, R

    1999-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) block degradation of bradykinin, and bradykinin stimulates prostacyclin synthesis. Therefore, we set out to determine whether the effects of ACE inhibitors on prostaglandin production in essential hypertensive patients are class effects or are dependent on ACE inhibitor structure. In addition, we studied whether hypertensives show an impaired capacity to synthesize vasodilator prostaglandins. To address these questions, we compared the effects of captopril (sulfhydryl-containing inhibitor), enalapril and ramipril (carboxyl-containing inhibitors) and fosinopril (phosphoryl-containing inhibitor) on blood pressure and urinary excretion of 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG) F1-alpha (the breakdown product of prostacyclin) in 44 mild-to-moderate essential hypertensive subjects before and 8 weeks after administration of an ACEI. We also studied prostacyclin excretion in 15 normotensive healthy controls. Levels of urinary 6-keto-PGF1-alpha (pg/ml) were measured by specific radioimmunoassay. Hypertensive subjects showed a lower excretion of 6-keto-PGF1-alpha than normotensive controls (212+/-147 vs 353+/-98 pg/ml, p < 0.001). All ACEI induced a significant decrease in MAP and increased the rate of excretion of the prostacyclin metabolite: C, 211+/-200 to 338+/-250 pg/ml, p < 0.05; E, 202+/-133 to 296+/-207 pg/ml, p < 0.05; R, 205+/-127 to 342+/-211 pg/ml, p < 0.05; F, 235+/-128 to 347+/-241 pg/ml, p < 0.05. In hypertensives (n = 44) the decrease in blood pressure correlated negatively with the rise in 6-keto-PGF1-alpha excretion (r = -0.51, p < 0.001). These data suggest that impaired prostacyclin biosynthesis in hypertensive patients could account for haemodynamic changes leading to the hypertensive state. Moreover, the hypotensive mechanisms of ACEI may be mediated by an increase in prostacyclin production; this effect seems to be class-dependent.

  12. Effects of sulfur oxides on eicosanoids

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.C.; Miller, P.D.; Amdur, M.O. )

    1989-01-01

    Ultrafine metal oxides and SO2 react during coal combustion or smelting operations to form primary emissions coated with an acidic SOx layer. Ongoing work in this laboratory has examined the effects of sulfur oxides on pulmonary functions of guinea pigs. We have previously reported that 20 micrograms/m3 acidic sulfur oxide as a surface layer on ultrafine ZnO particles decreases lung volumes, decreases carbon monoxide diffusing capacity, and causes lung inflammation in guinea pigs after 4 daily 3-h exposures. It also produces bronchial hypersensitivity following a single 1-h exposure. The importance of this surface layer is demonstrated by our observation that 200 micrograms/m3 of sulfuric acid droplets of equivalent size are needed to produce the same degree of hypersensitivity. This study characterized the concentration-dependent effects of in vivo exposures to sulfur oxides on arachidonic acid metabolism in the guinea pig lung, and investigated the time course and the relation between eicosanoid composition and pulmonary functions. We focused specifically on four cyclooxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid, that is, prostaglandins (PG) E1, F2 alpha, 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha, and thromboxane (Tx) B2, and two groups of sulfidopeptide leukotrienes (C4, D4, E4, and F4). Guinea pigs were exposed to ultrafine ZnO aerosol (count median diameter = 0.05 microns, sigma g = 1.80) with a layer of acidic sulfur oxide on the surface of the particles. Lung lavage was collected after exposures, and the levels of arachidonic acid metabolites were determined using radioimmunoassay (RIA). Concentration-dependent promotion of PGF2 alpha and concentration-dependent suppression of LtB4 were observed. The increased PGF2 alpha was associated with depressed vital capacity and diffusing capacity of the lungs measured in guinea pigs exposed to the same atmosphere described in a previous study.

  13. Synthetic pathways of gallbladder mucosal prostanoids: the role of cyclooxygenase-1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Longo, W E; Panesar, N; Mazuski, J E; Kaminski, D

    1999-02-01

    Acute cholecystitis is associated with increased gallbladder prostanoid formation and the inflammatory changes and prostanoid increases can be inhibited by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents. Recent information indicates that prostanoids are produced by two cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, COX-1 and COX-2. The purpose of this study was to determine the COX enzymatic pathway in gallbladder mucosal cells involved in the production of prostanoids stimulated by inflammatory agents. Human gallbladder mucosal cells were isolated from cholecystectomy specimens and maintained in cell culture and studied in comparison with cells from a well differentiated gallbladder mucosal carcinoma cell line. COX enzymes were evaluated by Western immunoblotting and prostanoids were measured by ELISA. Unstimulated and stimulated cells were exposed to specific COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors. In both normal and transformed cells constitutive COX-1 was evident and in gallbladder cancer cells lysophosphatidyl choline (LPC) induced the formation of constitutive COX-1 enzyme. While not detected in unstimulated normal mucosal cells and cancer cells, COX-2 protein was induced by both lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and LPC. Unstimulated gallbladder mucosal cells and cancer cells produced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and prostacyclin (6-keto prostaglandin F1alpha, 6-keto PGF1alpha) continuously. In freshly isolated normal gallbladder mucosal cells, continuously produced 6 keto PGF1alpha was inhibited by both COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors while PGE2 levels were not affected. Both LPS and LPC stimulated PGE2 and 6 keto PGF1alpha formation were blocked by COX-2 inhibitors in freshly isolated, normal human gallbladder mucosal cells and in the gallbladder cancer cells. The prostanoid response of gallbladder cells stimulated by proinflammatory agents is inhibited by COX-2 inhibitors suggesting that these agents may be effective in treating the pain and inflammation of gallbladder disease.

  14. Torsional elasticity and energetics of F1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Czub, Jacek; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2011-05-03

    F(o)F(1)-ATPase is a rotary motor protein synthesizing ATP from ADP driven by a cross-membrane proton gradient. The proton flow through the membrane-embedded F(o) generates the rotary torque that drives the rotation of the asymmetric shaft of F(1). Mechanical energy of the rotating shaft is used by the F(1) catalytic subunit to synthesize ATP. It was suggested that elastic power transmission with transient storage of energy in some compliant part of the shaft is required for the observed high turnover rate. We used atomistic simulations to study the spatial distribution and structural determinants of the F(1) torsional elasticity at the molecular level and to comprehensively characterize the elastic properties of F(1)-ATPase. Our fluctuation analysis revealed an unexpected heterogeneity of the F(1) shaft elasticity. Further, we found that the measured overall torsional moduli of the shaft arise from two distinct contributions, the intrinsic elasticity and the effective potential imposed on the shaft by the catalytic subunit. Separation of these two contributions provided a quantitative description of the coupling between the rotor and the catalytic subunit. This description enabled us to propose a minimal quantitative model of the F(1) energetics along the rotary degrees of freedom near the resting state observed in the crystal structures. As opposed to the usually employed models where the motor mechanical progression is described by a single angular variable, our multidimensional treatment incorporates the spatially inhomogeneous nature of the shaft and its interactions with the stator and offers new insight into the mechanoenzymatics of F(1)-ATPase.

  15. Survey of the Asp f 1 allergen in office environments.

    PubMed

    Ryan, T J; Whitehead, L W; Connor, T H; Burau, K D

    2001-06-01

    Sick Building Syndrome remains a prevalent problem with patient complaints similar to typical allergy symptoms. Unlike household allergens typically found in domestic reservoirs, the allergen from a common fungus like Aspergillus fumigatus (i.e., Asp f 1) is conceivably widespread in the work environment. This project surveyed airborne levels of the Asp f 1 allergen in office and non-industrial occupational environments, as well as the dust reservoirs of A. fumigatus believed to be responsible for those levels. Airborne and bulk dust samples were collected, extracted, and assayed for Asp f 1. Concurrently, bulk dusts collected from the same locations were selectively cultured for A. fumigatus, and mesophilic fungi and bacteria. Samples were collected during both wet and dry climatological conditions from paired wet and dry building locations to examine the possibility of Asp f 1 increases due to fungal growth blooms. Very low levels of Asp f 1 were detected but only in the airborne samples (2/120 positive samples, with 3.6 ng/m3 and 1.8 ng/m3; LOD < 1.2 ng/m3). No dust samples showed even detectable traces of the allergen (LOD = 5 ng/g dust). Although A. fumigatus counts from dusts fluctuated significantly with exterior moisture events, analysis of wet versus dry period samples showed no differences in Asp f 1 levels. These results indicate that even in the presence of measurable fungal concentrations, background levels of Asp f 1 are low. Nonindustrial office buildings devoid of indoor air quality issues were not observed to have significant levels of the Asp f 1 allergen in the geographical region studied.

  16. Aldosterone alters the participation of endothelial factors in noradrenaline vasoconstriction differently in resistance arteries from normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Fabiano E; Blanco-Rivero, Javier; Avendaño, María Soledad; Sastre, Esther; Yela, Rubén; Velázquez, Kyra; Salaíces, Mercedes; Balfagón, Gloria

    2011-03-11

    This study analyzed the effect of aldosterone (0.05mg/kg per day, 3 weeks) on vasoconstriction induced by noradrenaline in mesenteric resistance arteries from WKY rats and SHR. Contraction to noradrenaline was measured in mesenteric resistance arteries from untreated and aldosterone-treatedrats from both strains. Participation of nitric oxide (NO), superoxide anions, thromboxane A(2) (TxA(2)) and prostacyclin in this response was determined. 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG)F1alpha and thromboxane B(2) (TxB(2)) releases were determined by enzyme immunoassay. NO and superoxide anion release were also determined by fluorescence and chemiluminiscence, respectively. Aldosterone did not modify noradrenaline-induced contraction in either strain. In mesenteric resistance arteries from both aldosterone-treated groups, endothelium removal or preincubation with NO synthesis inhibitor L-NAME increased the noradrenaline-induced contraction, while incubation with the superoxide anion scavenger tempol decreased it. Preincubation with either the COX-1/2 or COX-2 inhibitor (indomethacin and NS-398, respectively) decreased the noradrenaline contraction in aldosterone-treated animals, while this response was not modified by COX-1 inhibitor SC-560. TxA(2) synthesis inhibitor (furegrelate), or TxA2 receptor antagonist (SQ 29 548) also decreased the noradrenaline contraction in aldosterone-treated animals. In untreated SHR, but not WKY rats, this response was increased by L-NAME, and reduced by tempol, indomethacin, NS-398 or SQ 29 548. Aldosterone treatment did not modify NO or TxB(2) release, but it did increase superoxide anion and 6-keto-PGF(1alpha) release in mesenteric resistance arteries from both strains. In conclusion, chronic aldosterone treatment reduces smooth muscle contraction to alpha-adrenergic stimuli, producing a new balance in the release of endothelium-derived prostanoids and NO.

  17. Coronary vasoconstriction in the rat, isolated perfused heart induced by platelet-activating factor is mediated by leukotriene C4.

    PubMed Central

    Piper, P. J.; Stewart, A. G.

    1986-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (Paf, 0.04-4.50 nmol) dose-dependently induced coronary vasoconstriction and decreased cardiac contractility in rat, isolated perfused hearts and concomitantly released leukotriene-like bioactivity into the cardiac effluent. Platelet-activating factor (0.9 nmol) induced an increase in 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto-PGF1 alpha), PGF2 alpha, PGE2 and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) of cardiac effluents following partial purification using C18 Sep-Paks. The leukotriene-like bioactivity released by Paf was identified as leukotriene C4 (LTC4) using a combination of isolation on reverse phase-h.p.l.c. (r.p.h.p.l.c.) and quantitation by RIA. In addition, LTB4 was also identified by r.p.h.p.l.c. and the levels, determined by RIA, were within the range having biological activity. The release of cyclo-oxygenase products by Paf was prevented by indomethacin (2.8 microM), markedly attenuated by diethylcarbamazine (7.7 mM) but unaffected by FPL 55712 (1.9 microM)-pretreatment. Furthermore, LTC4 (50 pmol) did not increase the release of the cyclo-oxygenase products measured. The release of LTB4 and LTC4 appeared to be unaffected by indomethacin pretreatment whereas diethylcarbamazine-pretreatment markedly inhibited release. The coronary vasoconstriction induced by Paf (0.9 nmol) was attenuated by pretreatment with indomethacin or diethylcarbamazine, whereas FPL 55712 caused a marked inhibition of the response. In contrast, the decrease in cardiac contractility was prevented by indomethacin or diethylcarbamazine and unaffected by FPL 55712 pretreatment. It is concluded that LTC4 may be largely responsible for the coronary vasoconstriction induced by Paf with cyclo-oxygenase products having a possible modulatory role whereas the latter appear to be involved in the Paf-induced decrease in cardiac contractility. PMID:3091131

  18. The evolution of F1 postzygotic incompatibilities in birds.

    PubMed

    Price, Trevor D; Bouvier, Michelle M

    2002-10-01

    We analyzed the rate at which postzygotic incompatibilities accumulate in birds. Our purposes were to assess the role of intrinsic F1 hybrid infertility and inviability in the speciation process, and to compare rates of loss of fertility and viability between the sexes. Among our sample more than half the crosses between species in the same genus produce fertile hybrids. Complete loss of F1 hybrid fertility takes on the order of millions of years. Loss of F1 hybrid viability occurs over longer timescales than fertility: some viable hybrids have been produced between taxa that appear to have been separated for more than 55 my. There is strong support for Haldane's rule, with very few examples where the male has lower fitness than the female. However, in contrast to Drosophila, fertility of the homogametic sex in the F1 appears to be lost before viability of the heterogametic sex in the F1. We conclude that the time span of loss of intrinsic hybrid fertility and viability is often, but not always, longer than the time to speciation. Premating isolation is an important mechanism maintaining reproductive isolation in birds. In addition, other factors causing postzygotic reproductive isolation such as ecological causes of hybrid unfitness, reduced mating success of hybrids, and genetic incompatibilities in the F2s and backcrosses may often be involved in the speciation process.

  19. E2F1 — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The E2F1 protein belongs to the E2F/DP family of transcription factors. E2F1 binds DNA cooperatively with dp (differentiation regulated transcription factor proteins)proteins through the E2 recognition site, 5'-TTTC[CG]CGC-3' found in the promoter region of a number of genes whose products are involved in cell cycle regulation or in DNA replication. The E2F family plays a crucial role in the control of cell cycle and action of tumor suppressor proteins and is also a target of the transforming proteins of small DNA tumor viruses. E2F1 can mediate both cell proliferation and p53-dependent/independent apoptosis.

  20. Improvements on foF1 estimation at polar regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Dario; Scotto, Carlo; Sgrigna, Vittorio

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of a sample of polar ionograms reveals that the DuCharme and Petrie empirical formula often fails in the foF1 estimation at polar regions. A study of the discrepancies between modeled and observed foF1 values is presented, using a data set of Antarctic ionograms from different stations. Such discrepancies have been quantitatively evaluated. Based on this study a correction to the DuCharme and Petrie formula is proposed. This correction is performed to be implemented in an improved version of Autoscala software for a particular ionospheric station, in the frame of AUSPICIO (Automatic Interpretation of Polar Ionograms and Cooperative Ionospheric Observations) project.

  1. M2-F1 in flight on tow line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The M2-F1 Lifting Body is seen here under tow at the Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. The wingless, lifting-body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Flight Research Center management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The M2-F1 project had limited goals. They were to show that a piloted lifting body could be built, that it could not only fly but be controlled in flight, and that it could make a successful landing. While the M2-F1 did prove the concept, with a wooden fuselage and fixed landing gear, it was far from an operational spacecraft. The next step in the lifting-body development was to build a heavyweight, rocket-powered vehicle that was more like an operational lifting body, albeit one without the thermal protection system that would be needed for reentry into the atmosphere from space at near-orbital speeds. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. These initial tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind a NASA C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began. Pilot for the first series of flights of the M2-F1 was NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Typical glide flights with the M2-F1 lasted about two minutes and reached speeds of 110 to

  2. M2-F1 on lakebed with pilot Milt Thompson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    NASA Flight Research Pilot Milt Thompson, shown here on the lakebed with the M2-F1 lifting body, was an early backer of R. Dale Reed's lifting-body proposal. He urged Flight Research Center director Paul Bikle to approve the M2-F1's construction. Thompson also made the first glide flights in both the M2-F1 and its successor, the heavyweight M2-F2. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, NASA Flight Research Center (later Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA) management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved

  3. M2-F1 ejection seat test at South Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The M2-F1 was fitted with an ejection seat before the airtow flights began. The project selected the seat used in the T-37 as modified by the Weber Company to use a rocket rather than a ballistic charge for ejection. To test the ejection seat, the Flight Research Center's Dick Klein constructed a plywood mockup of the M2-F1's top deck and canopy. On the first firings, the test was unsuccessful, but on the final test the dummy in the seat landed safely. The M2-F1 ejection seat was later used in the two Lunar Landing Research Vehicles and the three Lunar Landing Training Vehicles. Three of them crashed, but in each case the pilot ejected from the vehicle successfully. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with

  4. Robustness of the rotary catalysis mechanism of F1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Matsukage, Yuki; Yukawa, Ayako; Tabata, Kazuhito V; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-07-11

    F1-ATPase (F1) is the rotary motor protein fueled by ATP hydrolysis. Previous studies have suggested that three charged residues are indispensable for catalysis of F1 as follows: the P-loop lysine in the phosphate-binding loop, GXXXXGK(T/S); a glutamic acid that activates water molecules for nucleophilic attack on the γ-phosphate of ATP (general base); and an arginine directly contacting the γ-phosphate (arginine finger). These residues are well conserved among P-loop NTPases. In this study, we investigated the role of these charged residues in catalysis and torque generation by analyzing alanine-substituted mutants in the single-molecule rotation assay. Surprisingly, all mutants continuously drove rotary motion, even though the rotational velocity was at least 100,000 times slower than that of wild type. Thus, although these charged residues contribute to highly efficient catalysis, they are not indispensable to chemo-mechanical energy coupling, and the rotary catalysis mechanism of F1 is far more robust than previously thought.

  5. Robustness of the Rotary Catalysis Mechanism of F1-ATPase*

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Matsukage, Yuki; Yukawa, Ayako; Tabata, Kazuhito V.; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    F1-ATPase (F1) is the rotary motor protein fueled by ATP hydrolysis. Previous studies have suggested that three charged residues are indispensable for catalysis of F1 as follows: the P-loop lysine in the phosphate-binding loop, GXXXXGK(T/S); a glutamic acid that activates water molecules for nucleophilic attack on the γ-phosphate of ATP (general base); and an arginine directly contacting the γ-phosphate (arginine finger). These residues are well conserved among P-loop NTPases. In this study, we investigated the role of these charged residues in catalysis and torque generation by analyzing alanine-substituted mutants in the single-molecule rotation assay. Surprisingly, all mutants continuously drove rotary motion, even though the rotational velocity was at least 100,000 times slower than that of wild type. Thus, although these charged residues contribute to highly efficient catalysis, they are not indispensable to chemo-mechanical energy coupling, and the rotary catalysis mechanism of F1 is far more robust than previously thought. PMID:24876384

  6. Stiffness of γ subunit of F(1)-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Daichi; Iino, Ryota; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2010-11-01

    F(1)-ATPase is a molecular motor in which the γ subunit rotates inside the α(3)β(3) ring upon adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. Recent works on single-molecule manipulation of F(1)-ATPase have shown that kinetic parameters such as the on-rate of ATP and the off-rate of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) strongly depend on the rotary angle of the γ subunit (Hirono-Hara et al. 2005; Iko et al. 2009). These findings provide important insight into how individual reaction steps release energy to power F(1) and also have implications regarding ATP synthesis and how reaction steps are reversed upon reverse rotation. An important issue regarding the angular dependence of kinetic parameters is that the angular position of a magnetic bead rotation probe could be larger than the actual position of the γ subunit due to the torsional elasticity of the system. In the present study, we assessed the stiffness of two different portions of F(1) from thermophilic Bacillus PS3: the internal part of the γ subunit embedded in the α(3)β(3) ring, and the complex of the external part of the γ subunit and the α(3)β(3) ring (and streptavidin and magnetic bead), by comparing rotational fluctuations before and after crosslinkage between the rotor and stator. The torsional stiffnesses of the internal and remaining parts were determined to be around 223 and 73 pNnm/radian, respectively. Based on these values, it was estimated that the actual angular position of the internal part of the γ subunit is one-fourth of the magnetic bead position upon stalling using an external magnetic field. The estimated elasticity also partially explains the accommodation of the intrinsic step size mismatch between F(o) and F(1)-ATPase.

  7. M2-F1 in hangar with Pontiac tow vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The M2-F1 Lifting Body is seen here in a hangar with its hotrod Pontiac convertible tow vehicle at the Flight Research Center (later the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. The car was a 1963 Pontiac Catalina convertible, fitted with a 421-cubic-inch tripower engine like those being run at the Daytona 500 auto race. The vehicle also had a four-speed transmission and a heavy-duty suspension and cooling system. A roll bar was also added and the passenger seat turned around so an observer could watch the M2-F1 while it was being towed. The rear seat was removed and a second, side-facing seat installed. The lifting-body team used the Pontiac for all the ground-tow flights over the next three years. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey

  8. Internal steel structure of M2-F1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The internal steel structure for the M2-F1 was built at the Flight Research Center (predecessor of the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA) in a section of the calibration hangar dubbed 'Wright Bicycle Shop.' Visible are the stick, rudder pedals, and ejection seat. The external wooden shell was attached to the steel structure. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly

  9. Construction Progress of the F-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. North of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F

  10. Construction Progress of the F-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. North of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F-1 stand is keyed into the bedrock approximately 40 feet below grade. This photo, taken

  11. Construction Progress of the F-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. North of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F

  12. Construction Progress of the F-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. North of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F-1 stand is keyed into the bedrock approximately 40 feet below grade. This photo depicts

  13. Construction Progress of the F-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. North of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F-1 stand is keyed into the bedrock approximately 40 feet below grade. This photo, taken

  14. Construction Progress of the F-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. North of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F

  15. Construction Progress of the F-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Northeast of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. The F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, and was designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the

  16. Construction Progress of the F-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. North of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F-1 stand is keyed into the bedrock approximately 40 feet below grade. This photo shows

  17. Construction Progress of the F-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. North of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F

  18. Construction Progress of the F-1 Engine Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the S-IC test stand, related facilities were built during this time. Built to the north of the massive S-IC test stand, was the F-1 Engine test stand. The F-1 test stand, a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, was designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of

  19. Construction Progress of the F-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the S-IC test stand, related facilities were constructed during this time frame. Built just north of the massive S-IC test stand was the F-1 Engine test stand. The F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, and was designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the

  20. Regulation of the thermoalkaliphilic F1-ATPase from Caldalkalibacillus thermarum

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Scott A.; Cook, Gregory M.; Montgomery, Martin G.; Leslie, Andrew G. W.

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structure has been determined of the F1-catalytic domain of the F-ATPase from Caldalkalibacillus thermarum, which hydrolyzes adenosine triphosphate (ATP) poorly. It is very similar to those of active mitochondrial and bacterial F1-ATPases. In the F-ATPase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus, conformational changes in the ε-subunit are influenced by intracellular ATP concentration and membrane potential. When ATP is plentiful, the ε-subunit assumes a “down” state, with an ATP molecule bound to its two C-terminal α-helices; when ATP is scarce, the α-helices are proposed to inhibit ATP hydrolysis by assuming an “up” state, where the α-helices, devoid of ATP, enter the α3β3-catalytic region. However, in the Escherichia coli enzyme, there is no evidence that such ATP binding to the ε-subunit is mechanistically important for modulating the enzyme’s hydrolytic activity. In the structure of the F1-ATPase from C. thermarum, ATP and a magnesium ion are bound to the α-helices in the down state. In a form with a mutated ε-subunit unable to bind ATP, the enzyme remains inactive and the ε-subunit is down. Therefore, neither the γ-subunit nor the regulatory ATP bound to the ε-subunit is involved in the inhibitory mechanism of this particular enzyme. The structure of the α3β3-catalytic domain is likewise closely similar to those of active F1-ATPases. However, although the βE-catalytic site is in the usual “open” conformation, it is occupied by the unique combination of an ADP molecule with no magnesium ion and a phosphate ion. These bound hydrolytic products are likely to be the basis of inhibition of ATP hydrolysis. PMID:27621435

  1. Mechanically driven ATP synthesis by F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Akira; Adachi, Kengo; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Ryohei; Yoshida, Masasuke; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2004-01-01

    ATP, the main biological energy currency, is synthesized from ADP and inorganic phosphate by ATP synthase in an energy-requiring reaction. The F1 portion of ATP synthase, also known as F1-ATPase, functions as a rotary molecular motor: in vitro its γ-subunit rotates against the surrounding α3β3 subunits, hydrolysing ATP in three separate catalytic sites on the β-subunits. It is widely believed that reverse rotation of the γ-subunit, driven by proton flow through the associated Fo portion of ATP synthase, leads to ATP synthesis in biological systems. Here we present direct evidence for the chemical synthesis of ATP driven by mechanical energy. We attached a magnetic bead to the γ-subunit of isolated F1 on a glass surface, and rotated the bead using electrical magnets. Rotation in the appropriate direction resulted in the appearance of ATP in the medium as detected by the luciferase-luciferin reaction. This shows that a vectorial force (torque) working at one particular point on a protein machine can influence a chemical reaction occurring in physically remote catalytic sites, driving the reaction far from equilibrium.

  2. Ligand-dependent structural variations in Escherichia coli F1 ATPase revealed by cryoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Gogol, E P; Johnston, E; Aggeler, R; Capaldi, R A

    1990-01-01

    The Escherichia coli F1 ATPase, ECF1, has been examined by cryoelectron microscopy after reaction with Fab' fragments generated from monoclonal antibodies to the alpha and epsilon subunits. The enzyme-antibody complexes appeared triangular due to the superposition of three anti-alpha Fab' fragments on alternating densities of the hexagonally arranged alpha and beta subunits. The Fab' to the epsilon subunit superimposed on a beta subunit. A density was observed near the center of the structure in the internal cavity. The position of this central density with respect to peripheral sites was not fixed. Sorting of images of ECF1 labeled with the combination of three anti-alpha Fab' fragments plus an Fab' directed to the epsilon subunit gave three classes in each of which the central density was closest to a different beta subunit. The distribution of the central density among the three classes was measured for different ligand-binding conditions. When ATP was present in catalytic sites under conditions where there was no enzyme turnover (i.e., without Mg2+ present), there were approximately equal numbers of images in each of three classes. When ATP and Mg2+ were added and ATP hydrolysis was allowed to proceed, almost two-thirds of the images were in the class in which the central density was closest to the beta subunit superimposed by the epsilon subunit. We conclude that domains within the ECF1 structure, either the central mass or a domain including the epsilon subunit, move in the enzyme in response to ligand binding. We suggest that this movement is involved in coupling catalytic sites to the proton channel in the F0 part of the ATP synthase. Images PMID:2148209

  3. Influence of renal insufficiency on the pharmacokinetics of cicletanine and its effects on the urinary excretion of electrolytes and prostanoids.

    PubMed Central

    Ferry, N; Geoffroy, J; Pozet, N; Cuisinaud, G; Benzoni, D; Zech, P Y; Sassard, J

    1988-01-01

    1. The kinetics of a single oral dose (300 mg) of cicletanine a new antihypertensive drug with diuretic properties, and its effects on the urinary excretion of electrolytes and of the major stable metabolites of prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 were studied in patients with normal renal function (n = 6), mild (n = 9) and severe (n = 10) renal insufficiency. 2. In normotensive subjects with normal renal function, cicletanine was rapidly and regularly absorbed, its apparent elimination half-life established around 7 h, and both its renal clearance (0.4 ml min-1) and its cumulative renal excretion (0.85% of the administered dose), were low. Mild renal insufficiency did not significantly alter these parameters, while severe renal impairment reduced the renal clearance and the cumulative urinary excretion of cicletanine and increased its apparent elimination half-life (31 h). However the area under the plasma curve was not changed due to reduced plasma concentrations in these patients. 3. Cicletanine induced a rapid and marked (four fold as a mean) increase in the urinary excretion of water, sodium and potassium which lasted for 6 to 10 h, in subjects with normal renal function. Renal insufficiency did not alter the slope of the calculated plasma concentration-effects curves but reduced the maximum effect observed for water, sodium and potassium. 4. A single oral dose of cicletanine did not change the urinary excretion of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha and thromboxane B2 in the three groups of patients studied, the basal values of which being found to be closely related to the creatinine clearance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3358898

  4. Procyanidins from Vitis vinifera seeds display cardioprotection in an experimental model of ischemia-reperfusion damage.

    PubMed

    Berti, F; Manfredi, B; Mantegazza, P; Rossoni, G

    2003-01-01

    Since the early 1970s, increasing evidence has suggested that the consumption of moderate amounts of alcohol is inversely correlated with mortality from myocardial infarction. There is also some evidence that the protective effects of wine might be more pronounced than those of other alcoholic beverages. These observations prompted us to investigate the cardioprotective activity of Vitis vinifera seeds in experimental ischemia-reperfusion injury. An isolated rabbit heart preparation paced electrically was used to evaluate the effects of a highly purified, high molecular weight fraction of oligomeric procyanidins isolated from Vitis vinifera seeds on myocardial reperfusion injury after 40 min of low-flow (1 ml/min) ischemia. Infusion of the heart with 100 or 200 microg/ml procyanidins dose-dependently reduced left ventricular end-diastolic pressure during ischemia, decreased coronary perfusion pressure, improved cardiac mechanical performance upon reperfusion, increased the release of 6-Keto-prostaglandin F1alpha into the perfusate in both the preischemic and the reperfusion periods and suppressed rhythm irregularity. Procyanidins dose-dependently relaxed human internal mammary aortic (IMA) rings (with intact endothelium) precontracted with norepinephrine. This effect was completely abolished in IMA-rings without functional endothelium or when this vascular tissue was pretreated with nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (NG-monomethyl-L-arginine) or with guanylate cyclase inhibitor (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one). In conclusion, these results indicate that procyanidins could be of therapeutical potential in cardiovascular diseases. However, further investigations are required for a better definition of the mode of action of these oligomers.

  5. Prostacyclin release in experimental diabetes: effects of evening primrose oil.

    PubMed

    Stevens, E J; Carrington, A L; Tomlinson, D R

    1993-09-01

    Alterations in release of endothelium-derived vasomotor agents could underlie microvascular and neuropathic complications in diabetes. This study examined release of the potent vasodilator prostacyclin, measured as immunoreactive 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha, from rat lung, kidney and peripheral nerve. Tissues were taken from control and streptozotocin-diabetic rats which had been treated for 8 weeks with either evening primrose oil (EPO) or, as a control for lipid intake, coconut oil (CO). Lung and kidney slices were incubated in the presence of acetylcholine (ACh), the calcium ionophore 4-Br-A23187, arachidonic acid (AA) or without agonist (basal). Segments of sciatic nerve, with their epineuria punctured, were incubated with or without 4-Br-A23187. Basal prostacyclin release from the lung was significantly higher in rats treated with EPO irrespective of diabetic state (increased by 60% in controls and by 77% in diabetics). Levels were reduced in CO-diabetics compared to EPO-controls (53% reduction) and CO-controls (30% reduction), although this did not reach statistical significance in the latter. Basal prostacyclin release was also significantly reduced in the kidney from CO-diabetics (40% reduction compared to CO-controls and 56% reduction compared to EPO-controls). In the presence of AA, lung prostacyclin release was significantly lower in CO-diabetic rats compared to all other groups (40% reduction compared to EPO-diabetics and 60% compared to both control groups) but there were no differences in renal release between any group. Prostacyclin release by nerves from CO-diabetic rats was significantly reduced (by 91-93%) compared to all other groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Ischemia/reperfusion injury in the rat colon.

    PubMed

    Murthy, S; Hui-Qi, Q; Sakai, T; Depace, D E; Fondacaro, J D

    1997-04-01

    This study investigated metabolic and biochemical consequences of colonic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) in the rat and evaluated whether antioxidants prevent I/R-induced functional damage in the rat colon. The surgical preparation involved a 10 cm segment of the colon and occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) to induce I/R. Arterial blood from the aorta and venous blood from the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) was collected to measure blood gases, lactic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites. Tissue xanthine oxidase (XO) and thiobarbituric acid (TBA) derivatives were measured before and after reperfusion. In addition, vascular and mucosal permeability, and the effect of MDL 73404 (a water soluble vitamin E analog) and 5-aminosalicylic acid on LA, AA, XO and TBA was measured. After ischemia, the colon displayed a metabolic shift from aerobic to anaerobic course by increasing lactic acid production in the colon (183% increase in SMV lactate level compared 87% in the SMA; p < 0.03). After 10 minutes of reperfusion, circulating 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha increased by 3.85 fold (p < 0.001) and thromboxane B2 increased by 2 to 3 fold. An Ischemia time longer than 60 minutes was required to cause changes in tissue XO levels. Tissue TBA levels showed a good dose response corresponding with I/R time. I/R (60 minutes) caused a three and 16 fold increase (p < 0.01) in vascular and mucosal permeability, respectively. MDL 73404 and 5-aminosalicylic acid significantly inhibited the vascular permeability and decreased LA, AA, XO and TBA. These observations provide the first direct experimental evidence for I/R-induced damage in the colon and some of its effects can be reversed by conventional and novel antioxidants.

  7. Photoproduction of the f1(1285 ) meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, R.; Schumacher, R. A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Akbar, Z.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Badui, R. A.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Burkert, V. D.; Cao, T.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Ciullo, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dugger, M.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Holtrop, M.; Hicks, K.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mattione, P.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Markov, N.; Mokeev, V.; Moriya, K.; Munevar, E.; Murdoch, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Ni, A.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Roy, P.; Salgado, C.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Stankovic, I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Weygand, D.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The f1(1285 ) meson with mass 1281.0 ±0.8 MeV/c2 and width 18.4 ±1.4 MeV (full width at half maximum) was measured for the first time in photoproduction from a proton target using CLAS at Jefferson Lab. Differential cross sections were obtained via the η π+π-,K+K¯0π- , and K-K0π+ decay channels from threshold up to a center-of-mass energy of 2.8 GeV. The mass, width, and an amplitude analysis of the η π+π- final-state Dalitz distribution are consistent with the axial-vector JP=1+ f1(1285 ) identity, rather than the pseudoscalar 0- η (1295 ) . The production mechanism is more consistent with s -channel decay of a high-mass N* state and not with t -channel meson exchange. Decays to η π π go dominantly via the intermediate a0±(980 ) π∓ states, with the branching ratio Γ [a0π (noK ¯K )] /Γ [η π π (all)] =0.74 ±0.09 . The branching ratios Γ (K K ¯π ) /Γ (η π π ) =0.216 ±0.033 and Γ (γ ρ0) /Γ (η π π ) =0.047 ±0.018 were also obtained. The first is in agreement with previous data for the f1(1285 ) , while the latter is lower than the world average.

  8. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    E. J. Farris and H. M. Sulloway

    2008-01-10

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground on the Hanford Site. This burial ground is a combination of two locations formerly called Minor Construction Burial Ground No. 2 and Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 2. This waste site received radioactive equipment and other miscellaneous waste from 105-F Reactor operations, including dummy elements and irradiated process tubing; gun barrel tips, steel sleeves, and metal chips removed from the reactor; filter boxes containing reactor graphite chips; and miscellaneous construction solid waste.

  9. 16 CFR Appendix F1 to Part 305 - Standard Clothes Washers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Standard Clothes Washers F1 Appendix F1 to... LABELING RULEâ) Pt. 305, App. F1 Appendix F1 to Part 305—Standard Clothes Washers Range Information “Standard” includes all household clothes washers with a tub capacity of 1.6 cu. ft. or more. Capacity...

  10. M2-F1 under tow across lakebed by car

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This 20-second clip shows the M2-F1 being towed by the Pontiac across Rogers Dry Lakebed. The M2-F1 lifting body, dubbed the 'flying bathtub' by the media, was the precursor of a remarkable series of wingless flying vehicles that contributed data used in the Space Shuttles, the X-33 Advanced Technology Demonstrator for the next century's Reusable Launch Vehicle, and the X-38 Technology Demonstrator for crew return from the International Space Station. Based on the ideas and basic design of Alfred J. Eggers and others at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory (now the Ames Research Center), Mountain View, California, in the mid-1950's, the M2-F1 was built in 1962-63 over a four-month period for a cost of only about $30,000, plus an additional $8,000-$10,000 for an ejection seat. Engineers and technicians at the NASA Flight Research Center (now NASA Dryden) kept costs low by designing and fabricating it partly in-house, with the plywood shell constructed by a local sailplane builder. Someone at the time estimated that it would have cost a major aircraft company $150,000 to build the same vehicle. Unlike the later lifting bodies, the M2-F1 was unpowered and was initially towed by a souped-up Pontiac convertible until it was airborne. Later a C-47 took over the towing duties. Flown by such famous research pilots as Milt Thompson, Bruce Peterson, Chuck Yeager, and Bill Dana, the lightweight flying bathtub demonstrated that a wingless vehicle shaped for reentry into the Earth's atmosphere from space could be flown and landed safely. Flown from 1963 to 1966, the lightweight M2-F1 paved the way for the heavyweight M2-F2, M2`F3, HL-10, X-24A, and X-24B lifting bodies that flew under rocket power after launch from a B-52 mothership. The heavyweights flew from 1966 to 1975, demonstrating the viability and versatility of the wingless configuration and the ability of a vehicle with low lift-over-drag characteristics to fly to high altitudes and then to land precisely with their

  11. Measurement of inclusive f1(1285) and f1(1420) production in Z decays with the DELPHI detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crawley, B.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Hansen, J.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Johansson, P. D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Ramler, L.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A. C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.; Delphi Collaboration

    2003-09-01

    DELPHI results are presented on the inclusive production of two (KoverlineKπ)0 states in the mass region 1.2-1.6 GeV/c2 in hadronic Z decays at LEP I. The measured masses (widths) are 1274±6 MeV/c2 (29±12 MeV/c2) and 1426±6 MeV/c2 (51±14 MeV/c2), respectively. A partial-wave analysis of the (KoverlineKπ)0 system shows that the first peak is consistent with the IG(JPC)=0+(1++)/(0-+)a0(980)π and the second with the IG(JPC)=0+(1++)K∗(892)overlineK+c.c. assignments. The total hadronic production rates per hadronic Z decay are (0.165±0.051) and (0.056±0.012), respectively. These measurements are consistent with the two states being the f1(1285) and f1(1420) mesons.

  12. Measurement of inclusive f1(1285) and f1(1420) production in /Z decays with the DELPHI detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DELPHI Collaboration; Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crawley, B.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Hansen, J.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Johansson, P. D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Ramler, L.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A. C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2003-09-01

    DELPHI results are presented on the inclusive production of two (KKπ)0 states in the mass region 1.2-1.6 GeV/c2 in hadronic /Z decays at LEP I. The measured masses (widths) are /1274+/-6 MeV/c2 (/29+/-12 MeV/c2) and /1426+/-6 MeV/c2 (/51+/-14 MeV/c2), respectively. A partial-wave analysis of the (KKπ)0 system shows that the first peak is consistent with the IG(JPC)=0+(1++)/(0-+)a0(980)π and the second with the IG(JPC)=0+(1++)K*(892)K+c.c. assignments. The total hadronic production rates per hadronic /Z decay are /(0.165+/-0.051) and /(0.056+/-0.012), respectively. These measurements are consistent with the two states being the f1(1285) and f1(1420) mesons.

  13. Inherent conformational flexibility of F1-ATPase α-subunit.

    PubMed

    Hahn-Herrera, Otto; Salcedo, Guillermo; Barril, Xavier; García-Hernández, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    The core of F1-ATPase consists of three catalytic (β) and three noncatalytic (α) subunits, forming a hexameric ring in alternating positions. A wealth of experimental and theoretical data has provided a detailed picture of the complex role played by catalytic subunits. Although major conformational changes have only been seen in β-subunits, it is clear that α-subunits have to respond to these changes in order to be able to transmit information during the rotary mechanism. However, the conformational behavior of α-subunits has not been explored in detail. Here, we have combined unbiased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and calorimetrically measured thermodynamic signatures to investigate the conformational flexibility of isolated α-subunits, as a step toward deepening our understanding of its function inside the α3β3 ring. The simulations indicate that the open-to-closed conformational transition of the α-subunit is essentially barrierless, which is ideal to accompany and transmit the movement of the catalytic subunits. Calorimetric measurements of the recombinant α-subunit from Geobacillus kaustophilus indicate that the isolated subunit undergoes no significant conformational changes upon nucleotide binding. Simulations confirm that the nucleotide-free and nucleotide-bound subunits show average conformations similar to that observed in the F1 crystal structure, but they reveal an increased conformational flexibility of the isolated α-subunit upon MgATP binding, which might explain the evolutionary conserved capacity of α-subunits to recognize nucleotides with considerable strength. Furthermore, we elucidate the different dependencies that α- and β-subunits show on Mg(II) for recognizing ATP.

  14. The repression of E2F-1 is critical for the activity of Minerval against cancer.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Jordi; Gutiérrez, Antonio; Casas, Jesús; Lladó, Victoria; López-Bellan, Alicia; Besalduch, Joan; Dopazo, Ana; Escribá, Pablo V

    2005-10-01

    The recently discovered anticancer drug Minerval (2-hydroxy-9-cis-octadecenoic acid) is a synthetic fatty acid that modifies the structure of the membrane. This restructuring facilitates the recruitment of protein kinase C (PKC) alpha to membranes and is associated with the antineoplastic activity of Minerval in cellular and animal models of cancer. Minerval is a derivative of oleic acid (OA) with an enhanced antiproliferative activity in human cancer cells and animal models of cancer, which is associated with PKCalpha activation and p21(CIP) overexpression. However, the signaling cascades involved in its pharmacological activity remain largely unknown. Here, we showed that this drug induced cell cycle arrest before entry into S phase, human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells accumulating in the G0/G1 phase. This cell cycle arrest was associated with a marked decrease in the expression of E2F-1. This transcription factor activates several cell cycle-related genes, and, accordingly, the expression of certain cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) was markedly lower upon exposure to Minerval. The reduced availability of these kinase heterodimers was associated with reduced phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) observed after drug treatment. Significantly, hypophosphorylated pRb remains bound to E2F-1 and maintains this transcription factor inactive. The modulation of these antiproliferative mechanisms by Minerval explains its anticancer potency, through a new therapeutic strategy that can be used to develop new antitumor drugs. On the other hand, apoptosis did not seem to be involved in its pharmacological mechanism. Interestingly, whereas the changes induced by OA were only modest, they may reflect the beneficial effects of high olive oil intake against cancer.

  15. Identification and purification of a Bombyx mori homologue of FTZ-F1.

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, H; Hirose, S

    1990-01-01

    Extracts from embryos and from posterior and middle silk glands of the silkworm, Bombyx mori contain a sequence specific DNA binding factor termed BmFTZ-F1. The factor binds to the recognition site of FTZ-F1, a positive regulator of the fushi tarazu gene in Drosophila melanogaster. BmFTZ-F1 and FTZ-F1 share the same methylation interference patterns, the same chromatographic behaviors and similar protease digestion profiles. Anti-FTZ-F1 cross reacts with BmFTZ-F1. These results indicate that BmFTZ-F1 is a B. mori homologue of FTZ-F1. The mobility of the factor-DNA complex formed in the silk gland extract changes depending on the developmental stages. Purification of BmFTZF1 to an almost homogeneous state reveals that the factor is a 73 kd protein. Images PMID:2124348

  16. Changes in F2-F1 as a voicing cue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Willis J.; Coren, Amy E.

    2003-10-01

    The interaction between formant transitions and vowel length was measured with respect to syllable final voicing distinctions. A synthesized ad VC token of 360 ms was edited in 5-ms intervals from either side, onset or offset, so that 260 ms were preserved. Ten subjects were asked to make final voicing judgments for the words ``odd'' and ``ought'' ([ad] vs [at]) when hearing the 20 edited tokens. Each token was presented five times, randomly, for a total of 1000 judgements. Results showed an overwhelming number of voiced responses when the entire offset was preserved and symmetrical voiceless results with the deletion of offset. A follow-up experiment utilized a similarly synthesized token of 460 ms. The results when adding 100 ms onto the vowel were insignificantly different than the results acquired for formant transitions, suggesting the latter are a more important cue for syllable final voicing distinctions. These findings contradict previous vowel length conclusions [L. J. Raphael, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 51, 1296-1303 (1972)] and further suggest that in addition to F1 [V. Summers, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 84, 485-492 (1988)], F2 transitions are also an important cue to final voicing distinctions in low vowel contexts.

  17. Theoretical Analysis of the F1-ATPase Experimental Data

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Carrasco, Ruben; Sancho, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract F1-ATPase is a rotatory molecular motor fueled by ATP nucleotides. Different loads can be attached to the motor axis to show that it rotates in main discrete steps of 120° with substeps of ∼80° and 40°. Experimental data show the dependence on the mean rotational velocity ω with respect to the external control parameters: the nucleotide concentration [ATP] and the friction of the load γL. In this work we present a theoretical analysis of the experimental data whose main results are: 1), A derivation of a simple analytical formula for ω([ATP], γL) that compares favorably with experiments; 2), The introduction of a two-state flashing ratchet model that exhibits experimental phenomenology of a greater specificity than has been, to our knowledge, previously available; 3), The derivation of an argument to obtain the values of the substep sizes; 4), An analysis of the energy constraints of the model; and 5), The theoretical analysis of the coupling ratio between the ATP consumed and the success of a forward step. We also discuss the compatibility of our approach with recent experimental observations. PMID:20513403

  18. Close phylogenetic relationship between Angolan and Romanian HIV-1 subtype F1 isolates

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Monick L; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Otsuki, Koko; da Silva, Rosa Ferreira FC; Francisco, Moises; da Silva, Filomena Gomes; Serrano, Ducelina; Morgado, Mariza G; Bello, Gonzalo

    2009-01-01

    Background Here, we investigated the phylogenetic relationships of the HIV-1 subtype F1 circulating in Angola with subtype F1 strains sampled worldwide and reconstructed the evolutionary history of this subtype in Central Africa. Methods Forty-six HIV-1-positive samples were collected in Angola in 2006 and subtyped at the env-gp41 region. Partial env-gp120 and pol-RT sequences and near full-length genomes from those env-gp41 subtype F1 samples were further generated. Phylogenetic analyses of partial and full-length subtype F1 strains isolated worldwide were carried out. The onset date of the subtype F1 epidemic in Central Africa was estimated using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo approach. Results Nine Angolan samples were classified as subtype F1 based on the analysis of the env-gp41 region. All nine Angolan sequences were also classified as subtype F1 in both env-gp120 and pol-RT genomic regions, and near full-length genome analysis of four of these samples confirmed their classification as "pure" subtype F1. Phylogenetic analyses of subtype F1 strains isolated worldwide revealed that isolates from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) were the earliest branching lineages within the subtype F1 phylogeny. Most strains from Angola segregated in a monophyletic group together with Romanian sequences; whereas South American F1 sequences emerged as an independent cluster. The origin of the subtype F1 epidemic in Central African was estimated at 1958 (1934–1971). Conclusion "Pure" subtype F1 strains are common in Angola and seem to be the result of a single founder event. Subtype F1 sequences from Angola are closely related to those described in Romania, and only distantly related to the subtype F1 lineage circulating in South America. Original diversification of subtype F1 probably occurred within the DRC around the late 1950s. PMID:19386115

  19. The calculation of the height of the characteristic point in the F1 layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radicella, S. M.; Mosert de Gonzalez, M.

    The paper describes a method for computing the height of the F1 characteristic point by utilizing the electron density and the local magnetic dip. The characteristic points in the F1 layers for several locations are used to develop a linear relation between hF1 and NF1 with the local magnetic dip as a parameter. The equation given agrees with the data in question and can be used to determine the F1 point with similar sets of data.

  20. 16 CFR Appendix F1 to Part 305 - Standard Clothes Washers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Standard Clothes Washers F1 Appendix F1 to... Appendix F1 to Part 305—Standard Clothes Washers Range Information “Standard” includes all household clothes washers with a tub capacity of 1.6 cu. ft. or more. Capacity Range of Estimated Annual...

  1. 16 CFR Appendix F1 to Part 305 - Standard Clothes Washers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Standard Clothes Washers F1 Appendix F1 to... Appendix F1 to Part 305—Standard Clothes Washers Range Information “Standard” includes all household clothes washers with a tub capacity of 1.6 cu. ft. or more. Capacity Range of Estimated Annual...

  2. 16 CFR Appendix F1 to Part 305 - Standard Clothes Washers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Standard Clothes Washers F1 Appendix F1 to... Appendix F1 to Part 305—Standard Clothes Washers Range Information “Standard” includes all household clothes washers with a tub capacity of 1.6 cu. ft. or more. Capacity Range of Estimated Annual...

  3. 26 CFR 1.430(f)-1 - Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance. 1.430(f)-1 Section 1.430(f)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...(f)-1 Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance. (a) In...

  4. 26 CFR 1.430(f)-1 - Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance. 1.430(f)-1 Section 1.430(f)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... § 1.430(f)-1 Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance. (a) In...

  5. 26 CFR 1.430(f)-1 - Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance. 1.430(f)-1 Section 1.430(f)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... § 1.430(f)-1 Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance. (a) In...

  6. 26 CFR 1.430(f)-1 - Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance. 1.430(f)-1 Section 1.430(f)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... § 1.430(f)-1 Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance. (a) In...

  7. 17 CFR 270.17f-1 - Custody of securities with members of national securities exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... members of national securities exchanges. 270.17f-1 Section 270.17f-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....17f-1 Custody of securities with members of national securities exchanges. (a) No registered... custody of a company which is a member of a national securities exchange as defined in the...

  8. 17 CFR 270.17f-1 - Custody of securities with members of national securities exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... members of national securities exchanges. 270.17f-1 Section 270.17f-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....17f-1 Custody of securities with members of national securities exchanges. (a) No registered... custody of a company which is a member of a national securities exchange as defined in the...

  9. 17 CFR 270.17f-1 - Custody of securities with members of national securities exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... members of national securities exchanges. 270.17f-1 Section 270.17f-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....17f-1 Custody of securities with members of national securities exchanges. (a) No registered... custody of a company which is a member of a national securities exchange as defined in the...

  10. 17 CFR 270.17f-1 - Custody of securities with members of national securities exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... members of national securities exchanges. 270.17f-1 Section 270.17f-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....17f-1 Custody of securities with members of national securities exchanges. (a) No registered... custody of a company which is a member of a national securities exchange as defined in the...

  11. 17 CFR 270.17f-1 - Custody of securities with members of national securities exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... members of national securities exchanges. 270.17f-1 Section 270.17f-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....17f-1 Custody of securities with members of national securities exchanges. (a) No registered... custody of a company which is a member of a national securities exchange as defined in the...

  12. Upregulation of estrogen receptor expression in the uterus of ovariectomized B6C3F1 mice and Ishikawa cells treated with bromoethane

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Hiroaki; Couse, John F.; Hewitt, Sylvia C.; Haseman, Joseph K.; He, Hong; Zheng, Xiaolin; Majstoravich, Sonja; Korach, Kenneth S.; Dixon, D. . E-mail: dixon@niehs.nih.gov

    2005-12-15

    In a 2-year NTP bioassay, Bromoethane (BE) was found to induce endometrial neoplasms in the uterus of B6C3F1 mice [; ]. In women, hormonal influences, such as 'unopposed' estrogenic stimulus, have been implicated as important etiologic factors in uterine cancer. BE, however, does not affect the serum concentrations of sex hormones in female B6C3F1 mice [] and the mechanism of BE-induced uterine carcinogenesis still remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the estrogenic effects of BE on the uterus of ovariectomized B6C3F1 mice and on Ishikawa cells. Groups of 6 mice were given daily s.c. injections of 0, 100, 500 or 1000 mg BE/kg for 3 consecutive days. Mice treated with 17{beta}-estradiol served as positive controls. Mice were necropsied 24 h after the final injection, and uteri were weighed and examined histologically and immunohistochemically along with the vagina. Changes observed in the estrogen-treated mice included increased uterine weights, edema and inflammation of the endometrium, increased epithelial layers of the uterine and vaginal lumens and keratinization of the vaginal epithelium. In the BE-treated mice, no such changes occurred; however, immunohistochemical staining of the uterus revealed a significant increase in immunoexpression of the estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) in the two higher dose groups. Analysis of mRNA also showed slightly increased uterine ER{alpha} expression in these groups. Upregulated expression of ER{alpha} was confirmed in BE-treated Ishikawa cells, in which Western blotting analyses identified an intense signal at approximately 66 kDa, which is consistent with ER{alpha}. These data suggest that upregulated expression of ER{alpha} may be important in the induction of endometrial neoplasms in BE-treated mice.

  13. Topological and functional relationship of subunits F1-gamma and F0I-PVP(b) in the mitochondrial H+-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Gaballo, A; Zanotti, F; Solimeo, A; Papa, S

    1998-12-15

    Diamide treatment of the F0F1-ATP synthase in "inside out" submitochondrial particles (ESMP) in the absence of a respiratory Delta mu H+ as well as of isolated Fo reconstituted with F1 or F1-gamma subunit results in direct disulfide cross-linking between cysteine 197 in the carboxy-terminal region of the F0I-PVP(b) subunit and cysteine 91 at the carboxyl end of a small alpha-helix of subunit F1-gamma, both located in the stalk. The F0I-PVP(b) and F1-gamma cross-linking cause dramatic enhancement of oligomycin-sensitive decay of Delta mu H+. In ESMP and MgATP particles the cross-linking is accompanied by decoupling of respiratory ATP synthesis. These effects are consistent with the view that F0I-PVP(b) and F1-gamma are components of the stator and rotor of the proposed rotary motor, respectively. The fact that the carboxy-terminal region of F0I-PVP(b) and the short alpha-helix of F1-gamma can form a direct disulfide bridge shows that these two protein domains are, at least in the resting state of the enzyme, in direct contact. In isolated F0, diamide also induces cross-linking of OSCP with another subunit of F0, but this has no significant effect on proton conduction. When ESMP are treated with diamide in the presence of Delta mu H+ generated by respiration, neither cross-linking between F0I-PVP(b) and F1-gamma subunits nor the associated effects on proton conduction and ATP synthesis is observed. Cross-linking is restored in respiring ESMP by Delta mu H+ collapsing agents as well as by DCCD or oligomycin. These observations indicate that the torque generated by Delta mu H+ decay through Fo induces a relative motion and/or a separation of the F0I-PVP(b) subunit and F1-gamma which places the single cysteine residues, present in each of the two subunits, at a distance at which they cannot be engaged in disulfide bridging.

  14. The nonlinear chemo-mechanic coupled dynamics of the F 1 -ATPase molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lizhong; Liu, Fang

    2012-03-01

    The ATP synthase consists of two opposing rotary motors, F0 and F1, coupled to each other. When the F1 motor is not coupled to the F0 motor, it can work in the direction hydrolyzing ATP, as a nanomotor called F1-ATPase. It has been reported that the stiffness of the protein varies nonlinearly with increasing load. The nonlinearity has an important effect on the rotating rate of the F1-ATPase. Here, considering the nonlinearity of the γ shaft stiffness for the F1-ATPase, a nonlinear chemo-mechanical coupled dynamic model of F1 motor is proposed. Nonlinear vibration frequencies of the γ shaft and their changes along with the system parameters are investigated. The nonlinear stochastic response of the elastic γ shaft to thermal excitation is analyzed. The results show that the stiffness nonlinearity of the γ shaft causes an increase of the vibration frequency for the F1 motor, which increases the motor's rotation rate. When the concentration of ATP is relatively high and the load torque is small, the effects of the stiffness nonlinearity on the rotating rates of the F1 motor are obvious and should be considered. These results are useful for improving calculation of the rotating rate for the F1 motor and provide insight about the stochastic wave mechanics of F1-ATPase.

  15. Transcription factor E4F1 is essential for epidermal stem cell maintenance and skin homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Matthieu; Caramel, Julie; Goguet-Rubio, Perrine; Linares, Laetitia K.; Estrach, Soline; Hatchi, Elodie; Rodier, Geneviève; Lledo, Gwendaline; de Bettignies, Carine; Thépot, Amélie; Deraison, Céline; Chébli, Karim; Hainaut, Pierre; Dubus, Pierre; Sardet, Claude; Le Cam, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the multifunctional protein E4F1 is involved in signaling pathways that play essential roles during normal development and tumorigenesis. We generated E4F1 conditional knockout mice to address E4F1 functions in vivo in newborn and adult skin. E4F1 inactivation in the entire skin or in the basal compartment of the epidermis induces skin homeostasis defects, as evidenced by transient hyperplasia in the interfollicular epithelium and alteration of keratinocyte differentiation, followed by loss of cellularity in the epidermis and severe skin ulcerations. E4F1 depletion alters clonogenic activity of epidermal stem cells (ESCs) ex vivo and ends in exhaustion of the ESC pool in vivo, indicating that the lesions observed in the E4F1 mutant skin result, at least in part, from cell-autonomous alterations in ESC maintenance. The clonogenic potential of E4F1 KO ESCs is rescued by Bmi1 overexpression or by Ink4a/Arf or p53 depletion. Skin phenotype of E4F1 KO mice is also delayed in animals with Ink4a/Arf and E4F1 compound gene deficiencies. Our data identify a regulatory axis essential for ESC-dependent skin homeostasis implicating E4F1 and the Bmi1–Arf–p53 pathway. PMID:21088222

  16. E4F1 deficiency results in oxidative stress–mediated cell death of leukemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hatchi, Elodie; Rodier, Genevieve; Lacroix, Matthieu; Caramel, Julie; Kirsh, Olivier; Jacquet, Chantal; Schrepfer, Emilie; Lagarrigue, Sylviane; Linares, Laetitia Karine; Lledo, Gwendaline; Tondeur, Sylvie; Dubus, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The multifunctional E4F1 protein was originally discovered as a target of the E1A viral oncoprotein. Growing evidence indicates that E4F1 is involved in key signaling pathways commonly deregulated during cell transformation. In this study, we investigate the influence of E4F1 on tumorigenesis. Wild-type mice injected with fetal liver cells from mice lacking CDKN2A, the gene encoding Ink4a/Arf, developed histiocytic sarcomas (HSs), a tumor originating from the monocytic/macrophagic lineage. Cre-mediated deletion of E4F1 resulted in the death of HS cells and tumor regression in vivo and extended the lifespan of recipient animals. In murine and human HS cell lines, E4F1 inactivation resulted in mitochondrial defects and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that triggered massive cell death. Notably, these defects of E4F1 depletion were observed in HS cells but not healthy primary macrophages. Short hairpin RNA–mediated depletion of E4F1 induced mitochondrial defects and ROS-mediated death in several human myeloid leukemia cell lines. E4F1 protein is overexpressed in a large subset of human acute myeloid leukemia samples. Together, these data reveal a role for E4F1 in the survival of myeloid leukemic cells and support the notion that targeting E4F1 activities might have therapeutic interest. PMID:21708927

  17. Parameters to Maximize 2f2-f1 Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emission Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Jennifer H.; Pratt, Shiela R.; Durrant, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Past research has established parameters for the 2f1-f2 distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) that enhance response levels (e.g., L1 - L2 = 10 dB; f2/f1 = 1.22; L1, L2 = 65, 55 dB SPL). These same parameters do not optimize 2f2-f1 DPOAEs. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate more completely those parameters that…

  18. Alimentary Tract Absorption (f1 Values) for Radionuclides in Local and Regional Fallout from Nuclear Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Shawki; Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents gastrointestinal absorption fractions (f1 values) for estimating internal doses from local and regional fallout radionuclides due to nuclear tests. The choice of f1 values are based on specific circumstances of weapons test conditions and a review of reported f1 values for elements in different physical and chemical states. Special attention is given to fallout from nuclear tests conducted at the Marshall Islands. We make a distinction between the f1 values for intakes of radioactive materials immediately after deposition (acute intakes) and intakes that occur in the course of months and years after deposition, following incorporation into terrestrial and aquatic foodstuffs (chronic intakes). Multiple f1 values for different circumstances where persons are exposed to radioactive fallout (e.g. local vs. regional fallout and coral vs. continental tests) are presented when supportive information is available. In some cases, our selected f1 values are similar to those adopted by the ICRP (e.g. iodine and most actinides). However, f1 values for cesium and strontium derived from urine bioassay data of the Marshallese population are notably lower than the generic f1 values recommended by ICRP, particularly for acute intakes from local fallout (0.4 and 0.05 for Cs and Sr, respectively. The f1 values presented here form the first complete set of values relevant to realistic dose assessments for exposure to local or regional radioactive fallout. PMID:20622554

  19. Characteristics Analysis of F1 Hybrids between Genetically Modified Brassica napus and B. rapa.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Soo-In; Oh, Young-Ju; Lee, Kyeong-Ryeol; Ko, Ho-Cheol; Cho, Hyun-Suk; Lee, Yeon-Hee; Chang, Ancheol

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted on hybridization between transgenic Brassica napus and B. rapa or backcross of F1 hybrid to their parents. However, trait changes must be analyzed to evaluate hybrid sustainability in nature. In the present study, B. rapa and transgenic (BrAGL20) B. napus were hybridized to verify the early flowering phenomenon of F1 hybrids, and F1 hybrid traits were analyzed to predict their impact on sustainability. Flowering of F1 hybrid has been induced slightly later than that of the transgenic B. napus, but flowering was available in the greenhouse without low temperature treatment to young plant, similar to the transgenic B. napus. It is because the BrAGL20 gene has been transferred from transgenic B. napus to F1 hybrid. The size of F1 hybrid seeds was intermediate between those of B. rapa and transgenic B. napus, and ~40% of F1 pollen exhibited abnormal size and morphology. The form of the F1 stomata was also intermediate between that of B. rapa and transgenic B. napus, and the number of stomata was close to the parental mean. Among various fatty acids, the content of erucic acid exhibited the greatest change, owing to the polymorphism of parental FATTY ACID ELONGASE 1 alleles. Furthermore, F2 hybrids could not be obtained. However, BC1 progeny were obtained by hand pollination of B. rapa with F1 hybrid pollen, with an outcrossing rate of 50%.

  20. Alimentary tract absorption (f1 values) for radionuclides in local and regional fallout from nuclear tests.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Shawki A; Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold L

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents gastrointestinal absorption fractions (f1 values) for estimating internal doses from local and regional fallout radionuclides due to nuclear tests. The choice of f1 values are based on specific circumstances of weapons test conditions and a review of reported f1 values for elements in different physical and chemical states. Special attention is given to fallout from nuclear tests conducted at the Marshall Islands. We make a distinction between the f1 values for intakes of radioactive materials immediately after deposition (acute intakes) and intakes that occur in the course of months and years after deposition, following incorporation into terrestrial and aquatic foodstuffs (chronic intakes). Multiple f1 values for different circumstances where persons are exposed to radioactive fallout (e.g., local vs. regional fallout and coral vs. continental tests) are presented when supportive information is available. In some cases, our selected f1 values are similar to those adopted by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) (e.g., iodine and most actinides). However, f1 values for cesium and strontium derived from urine bioassay data of the Marshallese population are notably lower than the generic f1 values recommended by ICRP, particularly for acute intakes from local fallout (0.4 and 0.05 for Cs and Sr, respectively). The f1 values presented here form the first complete set of values relevant to realistic dose assessments for exposure to local or regional radioactive fallout.

  1. Arginine methylation-dependent reader-writer interplay governs growth control by E2F-1.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shunsheng; Moehlenbrink, Jutta; Lu, Yi-Chien; Zalmas, Lykourgos-Panagiotis; Sagum, Cari A; Carr, Simon; McGouran, Joanna F; Alexander, Leila; Fedorov, Oleg; Munro, Shonagh; Kessler, Benedikt; Bedford, Mark T; Yu, Qiang; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2013-10-10

    The mechanisms that underlie and dictate the different biological outcomes of E2F-1 activity have yet to be elucidated. We describe the residue-specific methylation of E2F-1 by the asymmetric dimethylating protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) and symmetric dimethylating PRMT5 and relate the marks to different functional consequences of E2F-1 activity. Methylation by PRMT1 hinders methylation by PRMT5, which augments E2F-1-dependent apoptosis, whereas PRMT5-dependent methylation favors proliferation by antagonizing methylation by PRMT1. The ability of E2F-1 to prompt apoptosis in DNA damaged cells coincides with enhanced PRMT1 methylation. In contrast, cyclin A binding to E2F-1 impedes PRMT1 methylation and augments PRMT5 methylation, thus ensuring that E2F-1 is locked into its cell-cycle progression mode. The Tudor domain protein p100-TSN reads the symmetric methylation mark, and binding of p100-TSN downregulates E2F-1 apoptotic activity. Our results define an exquisite level of precision in the reader-writer interplay that governs the biological outcome of E2F-1 activity.

  2. Arginine methylation-dependent reader-writer interplay governs growth control by E2F-1

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shunsheng; Moehlenbrink, Jutta; Lu, Yi-Chien; Zalmas, Lykourgos-Panagiotis; Sagum, Cari A.; Carr, Simon; McGouran, Joanna F.; Alexander, Leila; Fedorov, Oleg; Munro, Shonagh; Kessler, Benedikt; Bedford, Mark T.; Yu, Qiang; La Thangue, Nicholas B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms that underlie and dictate the different biological outcomes of E2F-1 activity have yet to be elucidated. We describe the residue-specific methylation of E2F-1 by the asymmetric dimethylating protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) 1 and symmetric dimethylating PRMT5, and relate the marks to different functional consequences of E2F-1 activity. Methylation by PRMT1 hinders methylation by PRMT5, which augments E2F-1-dependent apoptosis, whereas PRMT5-dependent methylation favours proliferation by antagonising methylation by PRMT1. The ability of E2F-1 to prompt apoptosis in DNA damaged cells coincides with enhanced PRMT1 methylation. In contrast, cyclin A binding to E2F-1 impedes PRMT1 methylation and augments PRMT5 methylation, thus ensuring that E2F-1 is locked into its cell cycle progression mode. The Tudor domain protein p100-TSN reads the symmetric methylation mark, and binding of p100-TSN down-regulates E2F-1 apoptotic activity. Our results define an exquisite level of precision in the reader-writer interplay that governs the biological outcome of E2F-1 activity. PMID:24076217

  3. Characteristics Analysis of F1 Hybrids between Genetically Modified Brassica napus and B. rapa

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Soo-In; Oh, Young-Ju; Lee, Kyeong-Ryeol; Ko, Ho-Cheol; Cho, Hyun-Suk; Lee, Yeon-Hee; Chang, Ancheol

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted on hybridization between transgenic Brassica napus and B. rapa or backcross of F1 hybrid to their parents. However, trait changes must be analyzed to evaluate hybrid sustainability in nature. In the present study, B. rapa and transgenic (BrAGL20) B. napus were hybridized to verify the early flowering phenomenon of F1 hybrids, and F1 hybrid traits were analyzed to predict their impact on sustainability. Flowering of F1 hybrid has been induced slightly later than that of the transgenic B. napus, but flowering was available in the greenhouse without low temperature treatment to young plant, similar to the transgenic B. napus. It is because the BrAGL20 gene has been transferred from transgenic B. napus to F1 hybrid. The size of F1 hybrid seeds was intermediate between those of B. rapa and transgenic B. napus, and ~40% of F1 pollen exhibited abnormal size and morphology. The form of the F1 stomata was also intermediate between that of B. rapa and transgenic B. napus, and the number of stomata was close to the parental mean. Among various fatty acids, the content of erucic acid exhibited the greatest change, owing to the polymorphism of parental FATTY ACID ELONGASE 1 alleles. Furthermore, F2 hybrids could not be obtained. However, BC1 progeny were obtained by hand pollination of B. rapa with F1 hybrid pollen, with an outcrossing rate of 50%. PMID:27632286

  4. E2F1 transcription factor and its impact on growth factor and cytokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Ertosun, Mustafa Gokhan; Hapil, Fatma Zehra; Osman Nidai, Ozes

    2016-10-01

    E2F1 is a transcription factor involved in cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. The transactivation capacity of E2F1 is regulated by pRb. In its hypophosphorylated form, pRb binds and inactivates DNA binding and transactivating functions of E2F1. The growth factor stimulation of cells leads to activation of CDKs (cyclin dependent kinases), which in turn phosphorylate Rb and hyperphosphorylated Rb is released from E2F1 or E2F1/DP complex, and free E2F1 can induce transcription of several genes involved in cell cycle entry, induction or inhibition of apoptosis. Thus, growth factors and cytokines generally utilize E2F1 to direct cells to either fate. Furthermore, E2F1 regulates expressions of various cytokines and growth factor receptors, establishing positive or negative feedback mechanisms. This review focuses on the relationship between E2F1 transcription factor and cytokines (IL-1, IL-2, IL-3, IL-6, TGF-beta, G-CSF, LIF), growth factors (EGF, KGF, VEGF, IGF, FGF, PDGF, HGF, NGF), and interferons (IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-γ).

  5. Alpha Blockers

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions such as high blood pressure and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Find out more about this class of medication. ... these conditions: High blood pressure Enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia) Though alpha blockers are commonly used to treat ...

  6. Alpha fetoprotein

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alpha fetoprotein - series References Cunningham FG, Leveno KJ, Bloom SL, et al. Prenatal diagnosis and fetal therapy. In: Cunningham FG, Leveno KJ, Bloom SL, et al, eds. Williams Obstetrics . 23rd ed. ...

  7. Alpha Thalassemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... an apparently normal individual has a child with hemoglobin H disease or alpha thalassemia minor. It can ... gene on one chromosome 25% 25% 25% 25% hemoglobin H disease there is a 25% chance with ...

  8. E2F1 enhances glycolysis through suppressing Sirt6 transcription in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minghui; Seto, Edward; Zhang, Jingsong

    2015-05-10

    The fast proliferation of cancer cells requires reprogramming of its energy metabolism with aerobic glycolysis as a major energy source. Sirt6, a class III histone deacetylase, has been shown to down regulate glycolysis by inhibiting the expression of several key glycolytic genes. Based on the published study on the metabolic phenotype of E2F1 -/- mice and SIRT6 -/- mice, we hypothesize that E2F1 enhances glycolysis and inhibits the expression of Sirt6. Indeed, over-expressing of E2F1, but not its DNA binding deficient mutant, significantly enhanced glucose uptake and lactate production in bladder and prostate cancer cell lines. E2F1 over-expression also suppressed Sirt6 expression and function. Moreover, E2F1 directly bound to Sirt6 promoter and suppressed Sirt6 promoter activity under both normoxic and hypoxic culture conditions. E2F1 siRNA blocked the up-regulation of E2F1 under hypoxia, increased Sirt6 expression and decreased glycolysis compared to those of scrambled siRNA transected cells. Furthermore, HDAC1 deacetylated E2F1 and diminished its transcription suppression of Sirt6 promoter. Treatment with the HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA), suppressed Sirt6 promoter activity with increased binding of acetylated E2F1 to Sirt6 promoter. Mutating the E2F1 binding site on the proximal Sirt6 promoter abolished the suppression of Sirt6 transcription by TSA. These data indicate a novel oncogenic role of E2F1, i.e. enhancing glycolysis by suppressing Sirt6 transcription.

  9. Effects of ozone on cyclooxygenase metabolites in the baboon tracheobronchial tree

    SciTech Connect

    Fouke, J.M.; DeLemos, R.A.; Dunn, M.J.; McFadden, E.R. Jr. )

    1990-07-01

    Short-term exposure to 0.5 parts per million (ppm) ozone has been shown to cause an increase in respiratory resistance in primates that can be diminished by 50% with pretreatment with cromolyn sodium. Because of the known membrane-stabilizing effects of cromolyn and the resultant inhibition of mediator production, we hypothesized a role for the products of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism in these events. We exposed five adult male baboons to 0.5 ppm ozone on two occasions, once with cromolyn pretreatment and once without. Pulmonary resistance (RL) was monitored and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed before and after each exposure. The BAL was analyzed for a stable hydrolysis product of prostacyclin, 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG) F1 alpha, PGE2, a stable hydrolysis product of thromboxane (Tx) A2, TxB2, and PGF2 alpha. RL increased after ozone exposure (1.62 +/- 0.23 to 3.77 +/- 0.51 cmH2O.l-1.s, difference 2.15; P less than 0.02), and this effect was partially blocked by cromolyn (1.93 +/- 0.09 to 3.18 +/- 0.40 cmH2O.l-1.s, difference 1.25; P less than 0.02). The base-line levels of the metabolites of AA in the BAL were as follows (in pg/ml): 6-keto-PGF1 alpha 72.78 +/- 12.6, PGE2 145.92 +/- 30.52, TxB2 52.52 +/- 9.56, and PGF2 alpha 22.28 +/- 5.42. Ozone exposure had no effect on the level of any of these prostanoids (P = NS). These studies quantify the magnitude of cyclooxygenase products of AA metabolism in BAL from baboon lungs and demonstrate that changes in the levels of these mediators in BAL are not prerequisites for ozone-induced increases in respiratory resistance.

  10. M2-F1 lifting body and Paresev 1B on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    In this photo of the M2-F1 lifting body and the Paresev 1B on the ramp, the viewer sees two vehicles representing different approaches to building a research craft to simulate a spacecraft able to land on the ground instead of splashing down in the ocean as the Mercury capsules did. The M2-F1 was a lifting body, a shape able to re-enter from orbit and land. The Paresev (Paraglider Research Vehicle) used a Rogallo wing that could be (but never was) used to replace a conventional parachute for landing a capsule-type spacecraft, allowing it to make a controlled landing on the ground. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop

  11. Contrasting feature in the repopulation of host-type T cells in the spleens of F1----P and P----F1 radiation bone marrow chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Hirokawa, K.; Sado, T.; Kubo, S.; Kamisaku, H.; Utsuyama, M.

    1986-11-01

    The regeneration and persistence of host- and donor-derived T cells were examined in the thymus as well as the spleen of mouse radiation bone marrow chimeras of two semiallogeneic combinations (F1----P, P----F1) with different Thy-1 markers on T cells of donor and host origins. An unexpectedly large number of host-type T cells were recovered from the spleens of F1----P chimeras, amounting to as high as 45 and 25% of total T cells at 6 and 14 weeks after bone marrow transplantation (BMT), respectively. To the contrary, the residual host-type T cells in the spleens of P----F1 chimeras disappeared quickly, resulting in less than 0.1% of total T cells at 6 weeks after BMT. It was also revealed that the number of host-type T cells in the spleens of F1----P chimeras decreased in proportion to increase of radiation dose given to the recipients.

  12. 26 CFR 5c.44F-1 - Leases and qualified research expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Leases and qualified research expenses. 5c.44F-1 Section 5c.44F-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE ECONOMIC RECOVERY TAX ACT OF 1981 §...

  13. 26 CFR 5c.44F-1 - Leases and qualified research expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Leases and qualified research expenses. 5c.44F-1 Section 5c.44F-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE ECONOMIC RECOVERY TAX ACT OF 1981 §...

  14. 26 CFR 5c.44F-1 - Leases and qualified research expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Leases and qualified research expenses. 5c.44F-1 Section 5c.44F-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE ECONOMIC RECOVERY TAX ACT OF 1981 §...

  15. 26 CFR 5c.44F-1 - Leases and qualified research expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Leases and qualified research expenses. 5c.44F-1 Section 5c.44F-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE ECONOMIC RECOVERY TAX ACT OF 1981 §...

  16. Sterile Insect Technique and F1 Sterility in the European Grapevine Moth, Lobesia botrana

    PubMed Central

    Saour, George

    2014-01-01

    Newly emerged adults of the European grapevine moth, Lobesia botrana (Denis and Schiffermuller) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), were irradiated with various doses of gamma radiation and crossed to unirradiated counterparts of the opposite sex. Fecundity was decreased when unirradiated females were mated with either 300- or 350-Gy-irradiated males. Adult males that were irradiated with 400 Gy and mated with unirradiated females retained a residual fertility of 2.7%. The radiation dose at which irradiated females were found to be 100% sterile when mated with unirradiated males was 150 Gy. The inherited effects in the F1 progeny of irradiated male parents were examined at 100, 150, and 200 Gy. Fecundity and fertility of the F1 progeny of males irradiated with 150 Gy and inbred or crossed with irradiated and unirradiated moths were also recorded. A significant reduction in fertility was observed when F1 males mated with either F1 or unirradiated females. According to sterility index, F1 females who mated with F1 males had greater sterility than when F1 females were crossed to 150-Gy-irradiated males. Based upon the results of this study, 150 Gy of gamma radiation would be the optimal dose to use in a sterile insect technique and F1 sterility program against L. botrana. PMID:25373155

  17. 26 CFR 1.514(f)-1 - Definition of business lease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Definition of business lease. 1.514(f)-1 Section... § 1.514(f)-1 Definition of business lease. (a) In general. The term business lease means any lease...) if at the close of the organization's taxable year there is a business lease indebtedness as...

  18. 26 CFR 1.430(f)-1 - Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance. 1.430(f)-1 Section 1.430(f)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance. (a) In general—(1) Overview....

  19. Bmal1 is a direct transcriptional target of the orphan nuclear receptor, NR2F1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orphan nuclear receptor NR2F1 (also known as COUP-TFI, Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter Transcription Factor I) is a highly conserved member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. NR2F1 plays a critical role during embryonic development, particularly in the central and peripheral nervous systems a...

  20. 16 CFR Appendix F1 to Part 305 - Standard Clothes Washers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Standard Clothes Washers F1 Appendix F1 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING DISCLOSURES REGARDING ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND WATER USE OF CERTAIN HOME APPLIANCES AND OTHER PRODUCTS REQUIRED UNDER THE ENERGY...

  1. 26 CFR 5c.44F-1 - Leases and qualified research expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leases and qualified research expenses. 5c.44F-1 Section 5c.44F-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE ECONOMIC RECOVERY TAX ACT OF 1981 §...

  2. E4F1 dysfunction results in autophagic cell death in myeloid leukemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hatchi, Elodie; Rodier, Geneviève; Sardet, Claude

    2011-01-01

    The multifunctional E4F1 protein was originally identified as a cellular target of the E1A adenoviral oncoprotein. Although E4F1 is implicated in several key oncogenic pathways, its roles in tumorigenesis remain unclear. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of myeloid leukemia (histiocytic sarcomas, HS) based on the genetic inactivation of the tumor suppressor Ink4a/Arf locus, we have recently unraveled an unsuspected function of E4F1 in the survival of leukemic cells. In vivo, genetic ablation of E4F1 in established myeloid tumors results in tumor regression. E4F1 inactivation results in a cascade of alterations originating from dysfunctional mitochondria that induce increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and ends in massive autophagic cell death in HS transformed, but not normal myeloid cells. E4F1 depletion also induces cell death in various human myeloid leukemic cell lines, including acute myeloid leukemic (AML) cell lines. Interestingly, the E4F1 protein is overexpressed in a large proportion of human AML samples. These data provide new insights into E4F1-associated survival functions implicated in tumorigenesis and could open the path for new therapeutic strategies. PMID:22024746

  3. 26 CFR 1.514(f)-1 - Definition of business lease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Definition of business lease. 1.514(f)-1 Section... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxation of Business Income of Certain Exempt Organizations § 1.514(f)-1 Definition of business lease. (a) In general. The term business lease means any...

  4. 26 CFR 1.514(f)-1 - Definition of business lease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Definition of business lease. 1.514(f)-1 Section... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxation of Business Income of Certain Exempt Organizations § 1.514(f)-1 Definition of business lease. (a) In general. The term business lease means any...

  5. 26 CFR 301.6501(f)-1 - Personal holding company tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Personal holding company tax. 301.6501(f)-1... Collection § 301.6501(f)-1 Personal holding company tax. If a corporation which is a personal holding company... capital stock of the corporation, the personal holding company tax for such year may be assessed, or...

  6. 26 CFR 301.6501(f)-1 - Personal holding company tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Personal holding company tax. 301.6501(f)-1... Collection § 301.6501(f)-1 Personal holding company tax. If a corporation which is a personal holding company... capital stock of the corporation, the personal holding company tax for such year may be assessed, or...

  7. 26 CFR 301.6501(f)-1 - Personal holding company tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Personal holding company tax. 301.6501(f)-1... Collection § 301.6501(f)-1 Personal holding company tax. If a corporation which is a personal holding company... capital stock of the corporation, the personal holding company tax for such year may be assessed, or...

  8. 26 CFR 301.6501(f)-1 - Personal holding company tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Personal holding company tax. 301.6501(f)-1... Collection § 301.6501(f)-1 Personal holding company tax. If a corporation which is a personal holding company... capital stock of the corporation, the personal holding company tax for such year may be assessed, or...

  9. 26 CFR 301.6501(f)-1 - Personal holding company tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Personal holding company tax. 301.6501(f)-1... Collection § 301.6501(f)-1 Personal holding company tax. If a corporation which is a personal holding company... capital stock of the corporation, the personal holding company tax for such year may be assessed, or...

  10. 78 FR 69538 - Attestation Process for Employers Using F-1 Students in Off-Campus Work

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... F-1 Students in Off- Campus Work AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration, Department of Labor... employers seeking to hire F-1 foreign students as part-time workers off-campus. These subparts became...), supplemented sections 101(a)(15)(F) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C 1101(a)(15)(F)) by...

  11. E2F-1 gene therapy induces apoptosis and increases chemosensitivity in human pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Mary Jane; Farmer, Michael R; Atienza, Cesar; Stilwell, Ariel; Dong, Yan Bin; Yang, Hai Liang; Wong, Sandra L; McMasters, Kelly M

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is often resistant to conventional chemotherapy. In this study, we examined the role of adenovirus-mediated overexpression of E2F-1 in inducing apoptosis and increasing the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic head exocrine adenocarcinoma cells (mutant p53) were treated by mock infection or adenoviruses expressing beta-galactosidase or E2F-1 (Ad-E2F-1) alone or in combination with sublethal concentrations of each chemotherapeutic drug. Cell growth and viability were assessed at selected time points. Apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry, characteristic changes in cell morphology and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Western blot analysis was used to examine the expression of E2F-1 and Bcl-2 family member proteins and PARP cleavage. Western blot analysis revealed marked overexpression of E2F-1 at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 20 and 70. By 3 days after infection, Ad-E2F-1 treatment at an MOI of 70 resulted in approximately a 20-fold reduction in cell growth and 60% reduction in cell viability as compared to mock-infected cells. Cell cycle analysis, PARP cleavage and changes in cell morphology supported apoptosis as the mechanism of cell death in response to E2F-1. In order to test the efficacy of treatment with a combination of gene therapy and chemotherapy, we utilized concentrations of Ad-E2F-1 which reduced viability to 50% in combination with each chemotherapeutic agent. Cotreatment of the cells with E2F-1 virus and roscovitine (ROS) or etoposide resulted in an additive effect on cell growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis. Interestingly, 5-fluorouracil did not cooperate with Ad-E2F-1 in the mediation of tumor death or inhibition of cell growth. Immunoblotting for Bcl-2 family members revealed no significant changes in the expression levels of Bcl-2, Bcl X(L), Bax or Bak following gene or 'chemogene' therapy with E2F-1. However, a Bax cleavage product was noted

  12. Observation of B(s)(0) → J/ψ f1(1285) decays and measurement of the f1(1285) mixing angle.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Hafkenscheid, T W; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-03-07

    Decays of B(s)(0) and B(0) mesons into J/ψ π+π-π+π- final states, produced in pp collisions at the LHC, are investigated using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1 collected with the LHCb detector. B(s)(0) → J/ψ f1(1285) decays are seen for the first time, and the branching fractions are measured. Using these rates, the f1(1285) mixing angle between strange and nonstrange components of its wave function in the qq structure model is determined to be ±(24.0-2.6-0.8+3.1+0.6)°. Implications on the possible tetraquark nature of the f1(1285) are discussed.

  13. Fo-driven Rotation in the ATP Synthase Direction against the Force of F1 ATPase in the FoF1 ATP Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Martin, James; Hudson, Jennifer; Hornung, Tassilo; Frasch, Wayne D.

    2015-01-01

    Living organisms rely on the FoF1 ATP synthase to maintain the non-equilibrium chemical gradient of ATP to ADP and phosphate that provides the primary energy source for cellular processes. How the Fo motor uses a transmembrane electrochemical ion gradient to create clockwise torque that overcomes F1 ATPase-driven counterclockwise torque at high ATP is a major unresolved question. Using single FoF1 molecules embedded in lipid bilayer nanodiscs, we now report the observation of Fo-dependent rotation of the c10 ring in the ATP synthase (clockwise) direction against the counterclockwise force of ATPase-driven rotation that occurs upon formation of a leash with Fo stator subunit a. Mutational studies indicate that the leash is important for ATP synthase activity and support a mechanism in which residues aGlu-196 and cArg-50 participate in the cytoplasmic proton half-channel to promote leash formation. PMID:25713065

  14. Suppression of F1 Male-Specific Lethality in Caenorhabditis Hybrids by cbr-him-8

    PubMed Central

    Ragavapuram, Vaishnavi; Hill, Emily Elaine; Baird, Scott Everet

    2015-01-01

    Haldane’s Rule and Darwin’s Corollary to Haldane’s Rule are the observations that heterogametic F1 hybrids are frequently less fit than their homogametic siblings, and that asymmetric results are often obtained from reciprocal hybrid crosses. In Caenorhabditis, Haldane’s Rule and Darwin’s Corollary have been observed in several hybrid crosses, including crosses of Caenorhabditis briggsae and C. nigoni. Fertile F1 females are obtained from reciprocal crosses. However, F1 males obtained from C. nigoni mothers are sterile and F1 males obtained from C. briggsae die during embryogenesis. We have identified cbr-him-8 as a recessive maternal-effect suppressor of F1 hybrid male-specific lethality in this combination of species. This result implicates epigenetic meiotic silencing in the suppression of F1 male-specific lethality. It is also shown that F1 males bearing a C. briggsae X chromosome are fertile. When crossed to C. briggsae hermaphrodites or F1 females derived from C. briggsae hermaphrodites, viable F2 and backcross (B2) progeny were obtained. Sibling males that possessed a C. nigoni X chromosome were sterile. Therefore, the sterility of F1 males bearing a C. nigoni X chromosome must result from dysgenic interactions between the X chromosome of C. nigoni and the autosomes of C. briggsae. The fertility of F1 males bearing a C. briggsae X chromosome provides an opportunity to identify C. nigoni loci that prevent spermatogenesis, and hence hermaphroditic reproduction, in diplo-X hybrids. PMID:26721896

  15. Function of the nuclear receptor FTZ-F1 during the pupal stage in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Abdel-Rahman S; Oish, Yasuhiro; Ueda, Hitoshi

    2014-04-01

    The nuclear receptor βFTZ-F1 is expressed in most cells in a temporally specific manner, and its expression is induced immediately after decline in ecdysteroid levels. This factor plays important roles during embryogenesis, larval ecdysis, and early metamorphic stages. However, little is known about the expression pattern, regulation and function of this receptor during the pupal stage. We analyzed the expression pattern and regulation of ftz-f1 during the pupal period, as well as the phenotypes of RNAi knockdown or mutant animals, to elucidate its function during this stage. Western blotting revealed that βFTZ-F1 is expressed at a high level during the late pupal stage, and this expression is dependent on decreasing ecdysteroid levels. By immunohistological analysis of the late pupal stage, FTZ-F1 was detected in the nuclei of most cells, but cytoplasmic localization was observed only in the oogonia and follicle cells of the ovary. Both the ftz-f1 genetic mutant and temporally specific ftz-f1 knockdown using RNAi during the pupal stage showed defects in eclosion and in the eye, the antennal segment, the wing and the leg, including bristle color and sclerosis. These results suggest that βFTZ-F1 is expressed in most cells at the late pupal stage, under the control of ecdysteroids and plays important roles during pupal development.

  16. Structure and partial genomic sequence of the human E2F1 gene.

    PubMed

    Neuman, E; Sellers, W R; McNeil, J A; Lawrence, J B; Kaelin, W G

    1996-09-16

    The E2F family of transcription factors appears to play a critical role in the transcription of certain genes required for cell cycle progression. E2F1, the first cloned member of this family, is regulated during the cell cycle at the mRNA level by changes in transcription of the E2F1 gene and at the protein level by complex formation with proteins such as the retinoblastoma gene product (pRB), cyclin A and DP1. E2F1 can override a pRB-induced G1/S block and can behave as an oncogene in certain cells. E2F1 was cloned and was found to contain seven exons. The dinucleotides at the 5' and 3' splice sites of intron 4 do not agree with consensus splice site sequences. Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized E2F1 to chromosome 20q11. Knowledge of the organization of E2F1 may facilitate identification of additional E2F family members, as well as detection of E2F1 abnormalities in human tumors.

  17. E4F1-mediated control of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is essential for skin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Goguet-Rubio, Perrine; Seyran, Berfin; Gayte, Laurie; Bernex, Florence; Sutter, Anne; Delpech, Hélène; Linares, Laetitia Karine; Riscal, Romain; Repond, Cendrine; Rodier, Geneviève; Kirsh, Olivier; Touhami, Jawida; Noel, Jean; Vincent, Charles; Pirot, Nelly; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Herault, Yann; Sitbon, Marc; Pellerin, Luc; Sardet, Claude; Lacroix, Matthieu; Le Cam, Laurent

    2016-09-27

    The multifunctional protein E4 transcription factor 1 (E4F1) is an essential regulator of epidermal stem cell (ESC) maintenance. Here, we found that E4F1 transcriptionally regulates a metabolic program involved in pyruvate metabolism that is required to maintain skin homeostasis. E4F1 deficiency in basal keratinocytes resulted in deregulated expression of dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (Dlat), a gene encoding the E2 subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. Accordingly, E4f1 knock-out (KO) keratinocytes exhibited impaired PDH activity and a redirection of the glycolytic flux toward lactate production. The metabolic reprogramming of E4f1 KO keratinocytes associated with remodeling of their microenvironment and alterations of the basement membrane, led to ESC mislocalization and exhaustion of the ESC pool. ShRNA-mediated depletion of Dlat in primary keratinocytes recapitulated defects observed upon E4f1 inactivation, including increased lactate secretion, enhanced activity of extracellular matrix remodeling enzymes, and impaired clonogenic potential. Altogether, our data reveal a central role for Dlat in the metabolic program regulated by E4F1 in basal keratinocytes and illustrate the importance of PDH activity in skin homeostasis.

  18. Genomic and Genetic Variation in E2F1 in Men with Non-Obstructive Azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Jorgez, Carolina J.; Wilken, Nathan; Addai, Josephine B.; Newberg, Justin; Vangapandu, Hima V.; Pastuszak, Alexander W.; Mukherjee, Sarmistha; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Lipshultz, Larry I.; Lamb, Dolores J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify gene dosage changes associated with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Design Prospective study. Patients 110 men with NOA and 78 fertile controls. Settings Medical School Interventions None Main Outcome Measure The study has four distinct analytic components: aCGH, a molecular karyotype that detects copy-number-variations (CNV), Taqman-CNV assays to validate CNVs, mutation identification by Sanger sequencing and histologic analyses of testicular tissues. Results A microduplication at 20q11.22 encompassing E2F1 was identified in one of eight men with NOA analyzed using aCGH. CNVs were confirmed and an additional 102 men with NOA screened using Taqman CNV assays for a total of 110 NOA men analyzed for CNVs in E2F1. Eight of 110 (7.3%) NOA men had microduplications or microdeletions of E2F1 that were absent in fertile controls. Conclusions E2F1 microduplications or microdeletions are present in NOA men (7.3%). Duplications or deletions of E2F1 occur very rarely in the general population (0.011%), but E2F1 gene dosage changes, previously reported only in cancers, are present in a subset of NOA men. These results recapitulate the infertility phenotype seen in mice lacking or over-expressing E2f1. PMID:25439843

  19. E4F1-mediated control of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is essential for skin homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Goguet-Rubio, Perrine; Seyran, Berfin; Gayte, Laurie; Sutter, Anne; Delpech, Hélène; Linares, Laetitia Karine; Riscal, Romain; Repond, Cendrine; Rodier, Geneviève; Touhami, Jawida; Noel, Jean; Vincent, Charles; Pirot, Nelly; Herault, Yann; Pellerin, Luc; Sardet, Claude; Lacroix, Matthieu; Le Cam, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The multifunctional protein E4 transcription factor 1 (E4F1) is an essential regulator of epidermal stem cell (ESC) maintenance. Here, we found that E4F1 transcriptionally regulates a metabolic program involved in pyruvate metabolism that is required to maintain skin homeostasis. E4F1 deficiency in basal keratinocytes resulted in deregulated expression of dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (Dlat), a gene encoding the E2 subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. Accordingly, E4f1 knock-out (KO) keratinocytes exhibited impaired PDH activity and a redirection of the glycolytic flux toward lactate production. The metabolic reprogramming of E4f1 KO keratinocytes associated with remodeling of their microenvironment and alterations of the basement membrane, led to ESC mislocalization and exhaustion of the ESC pool. ShRNA-mediated depletion of Dlat in primary keratinocytes recapitulated defects observed upon E4f1 inactivation, including increased lactate secretion, enhanced activity of extracellular matrix remodeling enzymes, and impaired clonogenic potential. Altogether, our data reveal a central role for Dlat in the metabolic program regulated by E4F1 in basal keratinocytes and illustrate the importance of PDH activity in skin homeostasis. PMID:27621431

  20. A Coregulatory Network of NR2F1 and microRNA-140

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Fernanda R.; Li, Na; Pereira, Fred A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Both nuclear receptor subfamily 2 group F member 1 (NR2F1) and microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to play critical roles in the developing and functional inner ear. Based on previous studies suggesting interplay between NR2F1 and miRNAs, we investigated the coregulation between NR2F1 and miRNAs to better understand the regulatory mechanisms of inner ear development and functional maturation. Results Using a bioinformatic approach, we identified 11 potential miRNAs that might coregulate target genes with NR2F1 and analyzed their targets and potential roles in physiology and disease. We selected 6 miRNAs to analyze using quantitative real-time (qRT) -PCR and found that miR-140 is significantly down-regulated by 4.5-fold (P=0.004) in the inner ear of NR2F1 knockout (Nr2f1–/–) mice compared to wild-type littermates but is unchanged in the brain. Based on this, we performed chromatin-immunoprecipitation followed by qRT-PCR and confirmed that NR2F1 directly binds and regulates both miR-140 and Klf9 in vivo. Furthermore, we performed luciferase reporter assay and showed that miR-140 mimic directly regulates KLF9-3’UTR, thereby establishing and validating an example coregulatory network involving NR2F1, miR-140, and Klf9. Conclusions We have described and experimentally validated a novel tissue-dependent coregulatory network for NR2F1, miR-140, and Klf9 in the inner ear and we propose the existence of many such coregulatory networks important for both inner ear development and function. PMID:24349493

  1. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-F1 Sanitary Sewer System (124-F-1) and the 100-F-26:8 (1607-F1) Sanitary Sewer Pipelines Waste Sites, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2004-130

    SciTech Connect

    L. M. Dittmer

    2008-03-14

    The 1607-F1 Sanitary Sewer System (124-F-1), consisted of a septic tank, drain field, and associated pipelines that received sanitary waste water from the 1701-F Gatehouse, 1709-F Fire Station, and the 1720-F Administrative Office via the 100-F-26:8 pipelines. The septic tank required remedial action based on confirmatory sampling. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  2. [Process of meiosis in interspecific hybrid F1 Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. x Lycopersicon chilense Dun].

    PubMed

    Montvid, P Iu; Samovol, O P; Miroshnychenko, V P

    2011-01-01

    The investigation concerns meiosis behaviour in embryo-culture-obtained Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. (mutant seedline Mo 638) x L. chilense Dun. F1 hybrid and its parental forms. It was determined that chiasma frequency decreased while univalent and meiotic disorder frequencies increased in F1 plants in comparison with parents forms. Univalent number and the percent of main disorders lowered with bud tier increasing. The conclusion was made about meiosis regularity connection with the influence of environment factors and heterozygous genotype of F1 plants Lycopersicon esculentum x L. chilense.

  3. Characterization of the interface between gamma and epsilon subunits of Escherichia coli F1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Tang, C; Capaldi, R A

    1996-02-09

    The interaction faces of the gamma and epsilon subunits in the Escherichia coli F1-ATPase have been explored by a combination of cross-linking and chemical modification experiments using several mutant epsilon subunits as follows: epsilonS10C, epsilonH38C, epsilonT43C, epsilonS65C, epsilonS108C, and epsilonM138C, along with a mutant of the gamma subunit, gammaT106C. The replacement of Ser-10 by a Cys or Met-138 by a Cys reduced the inhibition of ECF1 by the epsilon subunit, while the mutation S65C increased this inhibitory effect. Modification of the Cys at position 10 with N-ethylmaleimide or fluoroscein maleimide further reduced the binding affinity of, and the maximal inhibition by, the epsilon subunit. Similar chemical modification of the Cys at position 43 of the epsilon subunit (in the mutant epsilonT43C) and a Cys at position 106 of the gamma subunit (gammaT106C) also affected the inhibition of ECF1 by the epsilon subunit. The various epsilon subunit mutants were reacted with TFPAM3, and the site(s) of cross-linking within the ECF1 complex was determined. Previous studies have shown cross-linking from the Cys at positions 10 and 38 with the gamma subunit and from a Cys at position 108 to an alpha subunit (Aggeler, R., Chicas-Cruz, K., Cai, S. X., Keana, J. F. W., and Capaldi, R. A. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 2956-2961; Aggeler, R., Weinreich, F., and Capaldi, R. A. (1995) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1230, 62-68). Here, cross-linking was found from a Cys at position 43 to the gamma subunit and from the Cys at position 138 to a beta subunit. The site of cross-linking from Cys-10 of epsilon to the gamma subunit was localized by peptide mapping to a region of the gamma subunit between residues 222 and 242. Cross-linking from a Cys at position 38 and at position 43 was with the C-terminal part of the gamma subunit, between residues 202 and 286. ECF1 treated with trypsin at pH 7.0 still binds purified epsilon subunit, while enzyme treated with the protease at pH 8.0 does

  4. Recovered Apollo-Era Saturn V F-1 Engines Arrive at Cape Canaveral

    NASA Video Gallery

    Two F-1 engines that powered the first stage of the Saturn V rockets that lifted NASA’s Apollo missions to the moon were recovered from the Atlantic Ocean March 20, 2013 by Jeff Bezos, the founde...

  5. Giant Acceleration of Diffusion Observed in a Single-Molecule Experiment on F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Ryunosuke; Sasaki, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shuichi; Kudo, Seishi; Inoue, Yuichi; Noji, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Kumiko

    2015-06-01

    The giant acceleration (GA) of diffusion is a universal phenomenon predicted by the theoretical analysis given by Reimann et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 010602 (2001)]. Here we apply the theory of the GA of diffusion to a single-molecule experiment on a rotary motor protein, F1 , which is a component of Fo F1 adenosine triphosphate synthase. We discuss the energetic properties of F1 and identify a high energy barrier of the rotary potential to be 20 kBT , with the condition that the adenosine diphosphates are tightly bound to the F1 catalytic sites. To conclude, the GA of diffusion is useful for measuring energy barriers in nonequilibrium and single-molecule experiments.

  6. 24. CLOSEUP OF MOUNT FOR F1 ENGINE ON STATIC TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. CLOSE-UP OF MOUNT FOR F-1 ENGINE ON STATIC TEST TOWER WITH STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS TEST STAND IN DISTANCE. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  7. 22. STATIC TEST TOWER VIEW OF TEST CELLS AND F1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. STATIC TEST TOWER VIEW OF TEST CELLS AND F-1 TEST LOCK DOWN FOR ENGINE. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  8. Arabidopsis RabF1 (ARA6) Is Involved in Salt Stress and Dark-Induced Senescence (DIS)

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Congfei; Karim, Sazzad; Zhang, Hongsheng; Aronsson, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Arabidopsis small GTPase RabF1 (ARA6) functions in endosomal vesicle transport and may play a crucial role in recycling and degradation of molecules, thus involved in stress responses. Here we have reported that complementary overexpression lines RabF1OE (overexpression), GTPase mutants RabF1Q93L (constitutively active) and RabF1S47N (dominant negative) lines show longer root growth than wild-type, rabF1 knockout and N-myristoylation deletion (Δ1−29, N-terminus) complementary overexpression mutant plants under salt induced stress, which indicates that N-myristoylation of RabF1 is indispensable for salt tolerance. Moreover, RabF1 is highly expressed during senescence and RabF1OE lines were more tolerant of dark-induced senescence (DIS) than wild-type and rabF1. PMID:28157156

  9. Evaluation of IRI predicted characteristics of ionospheric F1 layer by ionosonde observations in Nicosia, Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Md Golam; Haralambous, Haris; Oikonomou, Christina

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents an investigation of F1 layer characteristics derived from manually scaled digital ionosonde measurements at the low-middle latitude European station in Nicosia, Cyprus (geographical coordinates: 35°N, 33°E, geomagnetic lat. 29.38°N, I = 51.7°) from low to high solar activity conditions (2009-2014) and their comparison with IRI-2012 predictions. It assesses the predictability of occurrence probability by employing all three options included in IRI-2012: IRI-95, Scotto-97 no L, and Scotto-97 with L. Results show that Scotto-97 no L option slightly overestimates the occurrence probability but predicts better than IRI-95 option, whereas IRI-95 option closely reflects the time range for F1 layer appearance. The Scotto-97 with L option slightly underestimates the occurrence probability of foF1 + ledge type. A seasonal variation marked with higher occurrence probability in the equinoctial months than in winter is observed, both at low and high solar activity. IRI predictions match reasonably well observed values of foF1 with maximum 0.3 MHz over/under estimation at low solar activity. At high solar activity, IRI slightly overestimates the values of foF1 throughout the year with a varying degree from 0.3 to 1.3 MHz, except for the months of August and September, when the values are underestimated by 0.3 MHz. A seasonal variation with higher foF1 values during equinoctial months than that of summer and winter is noticed in the observations at high solar activity in 2014. Long-term solar variation in the observed foF1 values were evident. Deviation of IRI-2012 predictions from observed foF1 values increases at high solar activity. Observed values of hmF1 demonstrate no distinct diurnal variation. However, these are lower in winter than those of summer and equinoctial months. No significant long-term solar variation in hmF1 was detected during the entire period under consideration. Throughout 2009-2014, with a few exceptions, IRI generally

  10. Complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus marinus Stetter and Fiala 1986 type strain F1

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Sun, Hui; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Lucas, Susan; Barry, Kerrie; Land, Miriam L; Richardson, P M; Huber, Harald; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2009-01-01

    Staphylothermus marinus Fiala and Stetter 1986 belongs to the order Desulfurococcales within the archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota. S. marinus is a hyperthermophilic, sulfur-dependent, anaerobic heterotroph. Strain F1 was isolated from geothermally heated sediments at Vulcano, Italy, but S. marinus has also been isolated from a hydrothermal vent on the East Pacific Rise. We report the complete genome of S. marinus strain F1, the type strain of the species. This is the fifth reported complete genome sequence from the order Desulfurococcales.

  11. Maternal Vitamin D Deficiency Delays Glomerular Maturity in F1 and F2 Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Fernanda A. M.; Ceciliano, Thais C.; Aguila, Marcia B.; Mandarim-de-Lacerda, Carlos A.

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a high prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in women of reproductive age. Methods This work studied the first two generations of offspring (F1 and F2) of Swiss mice from mothers fed one of two diets: SC (standard chow) or VitD- (vitamin D-deficient). Functional and developmental kidney measurements were taken. Results The first two generations of the VitD- group had higher blood pressure at 6 months of age than the offspring of the SC group as well as an increase in renin and AT1r expression. However, at all ages, both F1 and F2 VitD- mice had shorter glomerular diameters, and diet played a significant role in the total variation. Both the F1 and F2 generations of the VitD- group had more immature glomeruli than offspring from the SC group. Immature glomeruli begin to disappear at 10 days, but at this age, F1-VitD- mice had more immature and mature glomeruli than F1-SC mice. At 6 months of age, F1-VitD- mice exhibited more glomeruli, while F2-VitD- mice exhibited the same number of glomeruli as F2-SC mice, but fewer glomeruli compared to the F1-VitD group. Both diet and generation account for the total variation in the number of glomeruli. Decreases in urine output and podocin expression and increases in urea and creatinine in the urine were observed in F1 offspring. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that maternal vitamin D deficiency accompanies changes in the renal expression of important factors that may retard the maturation of glomeruli by extending the period of nephrogenesis. PMID:22927914

  12. 26 CFR 31.3121(f)-1 - American vessel and aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false American vessel and aircraft. 31.3121(f)-1... § 31.3121(f)-1 American vessel and aircraft. (a) The term “American vessel” means any vessel which is...”, see § 31.3121 (e)-1.) (b) The term “American aircraft” means any aircraft registered under the laws...

  13. 26 CFR 31.3121(f)-1 - American vessel and aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false American vessel and aircraft. 31.3121(f)-1... § 31.3121(f)-1 American vessel and aircraft. (a) The term “American vessel” means any vessel which is...”, see § 31.3121 (e)-1.) (b) The term “American aircraft” means any aircraft registered under the laws...

  14. 26 CFR 31.3121(f)-1 - American vessel and aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false American vessel and aircraft. 31.3121(f)-1... § 31.3121(f)-1 American vessel and aircraft. (a) The term “American vessel” means any vessel which is...”, see § 31.3121 (e)-1.) (b) The term “American aircraft” means any aircraft registered under the laws...

  15. 26 CFR 31.3121(f)-1 - American vessel and aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false American vessel and aircraft. 31.3121(f)-1... § 31.3121(f)-1 American vessel and aircraft. (a) The term “American vessel” means any vessel which is...”, see § 31.3121 (e)-1.) (b) The term “American aircraft” means any aircraft registered under the laws...

  16. 26 CFR 31.3121(f)-1 - American vessel and aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false American vessel and aircraft. 31.3121(f)-1... § 31.3121(f)-1 American vessel and aircraft. (a) The term “American vessel” means any vessel which is...”, see § 31.3121 (e)-1.) (b) The term “American aircraft” means any aircraft registered under the laws...

  17. Cezanne regulates E2F1-dependent HIF2α expression

    PubMed Central

    Moniz, Sonia; Bandarra, Daniel; Biddlestone, John; Campbell, Kirsteen J.; Komander, David; Bremm, Anja; Rocha, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mechanisms regulating protein degradation ensure the correct and timely expression of transcription factors such as hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). Under normal O2 tension, HIFα subunits are targeted for proteasomal degradation, mainly through vHL-dependent ubiquitylation. Deubiquitylases are responsible for reversing this process. Although the mechanism and regulation of HIFα by ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation has been the object of many studies, little is known about the role of deubiquitylases. Here, we show that expression of HIF2α (encoded by EPAS1) is regulated by the deubiquitylase Cezanne (also known as OTUD7B) in an E2F1-dependent manner. Knockdown of Cezanne downregulates HIF2α mRNA, protein and activity independently of hypoxia and proteasomal degradation. Mechanistically, expression of the HIF2α gene is controlled directly by E2F1, and Cezanne regulates the stability of E2F1. Exogenous E2F1 can rescue HIF2α transcript and protein expression when Cezanne is depleted. Taken together, these data reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of the expression of HIF2α, demonstrating that the HIF2α promoter is regulated by E2F1 directly and that Cezanne regulates HIF2α expression through control of E2F1 levels. Our results thus suggest that HIF2α is controlled transcriptionally in a cell-cycle-dependent manner and in response to oncogenic signalling. PMID:26148512

  18. Rb inactivation leads to E2F1-mediated DNA double-strand break accumulation.

    PubMed

    Pickering, M T; Kowalik, T F

    2006-02-02

    Although it is unclear which cellular factor(s) is responsible for the genetic instability associated with initiating and sustaining cell transformation, it is known that many cancers have mutations that inactivate the Rb-mediated proliferation pathway. We show here that pRb inactivation and the resultant deregulation of one E2F family member, E2F1, leads to DNA double-strand break (DSB) accumulation in normal diploid human cells. These DSBs occur independent of Atm, p53, caspases, reactive oxygen species, and apoptosis. Moreover, E2F1 does not contribute to c-Myc-associated DSBs, indicating that the DSBs associated with these oncoproteins arise through distinct pathways. We also find E2F1-associated DSBs in an Rb mutated cancer cell line in the absence of an exogenous DSB stimulus. These basal, E2F1-associated DSBs are not observed in a p16(ink4a) inactivated cancer cell line that retains functional pRb, unless pRb is depleted. Thus, Rb status is key to regulating both the proliferation promoting functions associated with E2F and for preventing DNA damage accumulation if E2F1 becomes deregulated. Taken together, these data suggest that loss of Rb creates strong selective pressure, via DSB accumulation, for inactivating p53 mutations and that E2F1 contributes to the genetic instability associated with transformation and tumorigenesis.

  19. MEF/ELF4 transactivation by E2F1 is inhibited by p53.

    PubMed

    Taura, Manabu; Suico, Mary Ann; Fukuda, Ryosuke; Koga, Tomoaki; Shuto, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Takashi; Morino-Koga, Saori; Okada, Seiji; Kai, Hirofumi

    2011-01-01

    Myeloid elf-1-like factor (MEF) or Elf4 is an E-twenty-six (ETS)-related transcription factor with strong transcriptional activity that influences cellular senescence by affecting tumor suppressor p53. MEF downregulates p53 expression and inhibits p53-mediated cellular senescence by transcriptionally activating MDM2. However, whether p53 reciprocally opposes MEF remains unexplored. Here, we show that MEF is modulated by p53 in human cells and mice tissues. MEF expression and promoter activity were suppressed by p53. While we found that MEF promoter does not contain p53 response elements, intriguingly, it contains E2F consensus sites. Subsequently, we determined that E2F1 specifically binds to MEF promoter and transactivates MEF. Nevertheless, E2F1 DNA binding and transactivation of MEF promoter was inhibited by p53 through the association between p53 and E2F1. Furthermore, we showed that activation of p53 in doxorubicin-induced senescent cells increased E2F1 and p53 interaction, diminished E2F1 recruitment to MEF promoter and reduced MEF expression. These observations suggest that p53 downregulates MEF by associating with and inhibiting the binding activity of E2F1, a novel transcriptional activator of MEF. Together with previous findings, our present results indicate that a negative regulatory mechanism exists between p53 and MEF.

  20. Comparison between single-molecule and X-ray crystallography data on yeast F1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Steel, Bradley C; Nord, Ashley L; Wang, Yamin; Pagadala, Vijayakanth; Mueller, David M; Berry, Richard M

    2015-03-10

    Single molecule studies in recent decades have elucidated the full chemo-mechanical cycle of F1-ATPase, mostly based on F1 from thermophilic bacteria. In contrast, high-resolution crystal structures are only available for mitochondrial F1. Here we present high resolution single molecule rotational data on F1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, obtained using new high throughput detection and analysis tools. Rotational data are presented for the wild type mitochondrial enzyme, a "liver" isoform, and six mutant forms of yeast F1 that have previously been demonstrated to be less efficient or partially uncoupled. The wild-type and "liver" isoforms show the same qualitative features as F1 from Escherichia coli and thermophilic bacteria. The analysis of the mutant forms revealed a delay at the catalytic dwell and associated decrease in Vmax, with magnitudes consistent with the level of disruption seen in the crystal structures. At least one of the mutant forms shows a previously un-observed dwell at the ATP binding angle, potentially attributable to slowed release of ADP. We discuss the correlation between crystal structures and single molecule results.

  1. NR2F1 controls tumor cell dormancy via SOX9 and RARβ driven quiescence programs

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Maria Soledad; Parikh, Falguni; Maia, Alexandre Gaspar; Estrada, Yeriel; Bosch, Almudena; Bragado, Paloma; Ekpin, Esther; George, Ajish; Zheng, Yang; Lam, Hung-Ming; Morrissey, Colm; Chung, Chi-Yeh; Farias, Eduardo F.; Bernstein, Emily; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A.

    2014-01-01

    Metastases can originate from disseminated tumor cells (DTCs), which may be dormant for years before reactivation. Here we find that the orphan nuclear receptor NR2F1 is epigenetically upregulated in experimental HNSCC dormancy models and in DTCs from prostate cancer patients carrying dormant disease for 7–18 years. NR2F1-dependent dormancy is recapitulated by a co-treatment with the DNA demethylating agent 5-Aza-C and retinoic acid across various cancer types. NR2F1-induced quiescence is dependent on SOX9, RARβ and CDK inhibitors. Intriguingly, NR2F1 induces global chromatin repression and the pluripotency gene NANOG, which contributes to dormancy of DTCs in the bone marrow. When NR2F1 is blocked in vivo, growth arrest or survival of dormant DTCs is interrupted in different organs. We conclude that NR2F1 is a critical node in dormancy induction and maintenance by integrating epigenetic programs of quiescence and survival in DTCs. PMID:25636082

  2. Transcriptional regulation of human RANK ligand gene expression by E2F1

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Yan; Sun Meng; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Lou Wei; Pinder, Elaine; Gao, Allen C.

    2008-06-06

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) is a critical osteoclastogenic factor involved in the regulation of bone resorption, immune function, the development of mammary gland and cardiovascular system. To understand the transcriptional regulation of RANKL, we amplified and characterized a 1890 bp 5'-flanking sequence of human RANKL gene (-1782 bp to +108 bp relative to the transcription start site). Using a series of deletion mutations of the 1890 bp RANKL promoter, we identified a 72 bp region (-172 to -100 bp) mediating RANKL basal transcriptional activity. Sequence analysis revealed a putative E2F binding site within this 72 bp region in the human RANKL promoter. Overexpression of E2F1 increased RANKL promoter activity, while down-regulation of E2F1 expression by small interfering RNA decreased RANKL promoter activity. RT-PCR and enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) further demonstrated that E2F1 induced the expression of RANKL. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays (EMSA) and antibody competition assays confirmed that E2F1 proteins bind to the consensus E2F binding site in the RANKL promoter. Mutation of the E2F consensus binding site in the RANKL promoter profoundly reduced the basal promoter activity and abolished the transcriptional modulation of RANKL by E2F1. These results suggest that E2F1 plays an important role in regulating RANKL transcription through binding to the E2F consensus binding site.

  3. Phylodynamics of HIV-1 subtype F1 in Angola, Brazil and Romania.

    PubMed

    Bello, Gonzalo; Afonso, Joana Morais; Morgado, Mariza G

    2012-07-01

    The HIV-1 subtype F1 is exceptionally prevalent in Angola, Brazil and Romania. The epidemiological context in which the spread of HIV occurred was highly variable from one country to another, mainly due to the existence of a long-term civil war in Angola and the contamination of a large number of children in Romania. Here we apply phylogenetic and Bayesian coalescent-based methods to reconstruct the phylodynamic patterns of HIV-1 subtype F1 in such different epidemiological settings. The phylogenetic analyses of HIV-1 subtype F1 pol sequences sampled worldwide confirmed that most sequences from Angola, Brazil and Romania segregated in country-specific monophyletic groups, while most subtype F1 sequences from Romanian children branched as a monophyletic sub-cluster (Romania-CH) nested within sequences from adults. The inferred time of the most recent common ancestor of the different subtype F1 clades were as follow: Angola=1983 (1978-1989), Brazil=1977 (1972-1981), Romania adults=1980 (1973-1987), and Romania-CH=1985 (1978-1989). All subtype F1 clades showed a demographic history best explained by a model of logistic population growth. Although the expansion phase of subtype F1 epidemic in Angola (mid 1980s to early 2000s) overlaps with the civil war period (1975-2002), the mean estimated growth rate of the Angolan F1 clade (0.49 year(-1)) was not exceptionally high, but quite similar to that estimated for the Brazilian (0.69 year(-1)) and Romanian adult (0.36 year(-1)) subtype F1 clades. The Romania-CH subtype F1 lineage, by contrast, displayed a short and explosive dissemination phase, with a median growth rate (2.47 year(-1)) much higher than that estimated for adult populations. This result supports the idea that the AIDS epidemic that affected the Romanian children was mainly caused by the spread of the HIV through highly efficient parenteral transmission networks, unlike adult populations where HIV is predominantly transmitted through sexual route.

  4. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-F1 Sanitary Sewer System (124-F-1) and the 100-F-26:8 (1607-F1) Sanitary Sewer Pipelines Waste Sites, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-004

    SciTech Connect

    L. M. Dittmer

    2008-03-14

    The 100-F-26:8 waste site consisted of the underground pipelines that conveyed sanitary waste water from the 1701-F Gatehouse, 1709-F Fire Station, and the 1720-F Administrative Office to the 1607-F1 septic tank. The site has been remediated and presently exists as an open excavation. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  5. Phosphoprotein F1: purification and characterization of a brain kinase C substrate related to plasticity.

    PubMed

    Chan, S Y; Murakami, K; Routtenberg, A

    1986-12-01

    To study the role of protein kinase C (PKC) and its substrates in neuronal function, we have investigated the in vitro endogenous phosphorylation of the neuronal phosphoprotein F1 after induction of synaptic plasticity by long-term potentiation (LTP). The protein F1 phosphorylation was found to increase 5 min (Routtenberg et al., 1985), 1 hr (Lovinger et al., 1986) and 3 d (Lovinger et al., 1985) after LTP. The characteristics of this protein bear close similarities to a number of proteins characterized in various neuronal systems, such as B50 (brain specific, synaptosome-enriched protein), pp46 (a growth cone protein), and GAP 43 (nerve growth and regeneration-associated protein). A positive identification of the purified protein F1 with these proteins would link protein F1 to the developmental growth of axons, nerve regeneration, and polyphosphoinositide metabolism, as well as adult plasticity. We have therefore purified and partially characterized native protein F1 so that a meaningful comparison among the properties of these proteins can be made. Using synaptosomal plasma membrane (P2') as starting material, subsequent purification involved pH extraction, 40-80% ammonium sulfate precipitation, hydroxylapatite, and phenyl-Sepharose column chromatography. This procedure achieved greater than 800-fold purification and about 45% yield relative to P2'. Purified protein F1 (Mr = 47,000, pI = 4.5) was found to be a hydrophilic molecule and was phosphorylated by 1000-fold purified PKC in the presence of phosphatidylserine (PS) and Ca2+. The Ka of PS activation is about 15 micrograms/ml (approximately 20 microM), and that of Ca2+ is about 25 microM. Diolein and DiC:8 (a synthetic diacylglycerol) lowered the requirement of Ca2+ for maximal stimulation from 100 to 5 microM. Ca2+-calmodulin kinases type I and II did not phosphorylate protein F1. The phosphoamino acid analysis showed that 97% of the total incorporated 32P-phosphate was on the serine residue. Phosphopeptide

  6. Expression of ADAM12 is regulated by E2F1 in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zunling; Wang, Yaopeng; Kong, Lijun; Yue, Zhen; Ma, Ying; Chen, Xufang

    2015-12-01

    Our previous study reported that ADAM12 was highly expressed in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and could be an effective marker for diagnosis and prognosis. Yet, the reason for the high expression of ADAM12 in SCLC requires further elucidation. Transcription factor E2F1 has been receiving increasing attention due to the complexity and diversity of its function in cancer. In the present study, the expression of ADAM12 was significantly decreased following silencing of E2F1 expression by siRNA, thus indicating that E2F1 may regulate the expression of ADAM12 at the level of transcription. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-to-sequence analysis identified three binding sites for E2F1 in the locus for ADAM12. They were Chr10: 128010444-128011026, located in the intron of ADAM12, named seq0; Chr10: 128076927‑128078127, located in the promoter of ADAM12, named seq1; and Chr10: 128086195‑128086876, located in the upstream 20 kb from the transcription start site of ADAM12, named: seq2. Dual‑luciferase reporter experiments revealed that seq1 not seq0 and seq2 was able to promote the expression of luciferase. Notably, co-transfection of E2F1 significantly increased the activity of seq1 not seq0 and seq2, but quantitative polymerase chain reaction results showed that seq0, seq1 and seq2 could recruit E2F1, indicating that the influence of E2F1 in regulating the expression of ADAM12 was complex. Sequence analysis clarified that seq1 was a part of the ADAM12 promoter, yet the functions of seq0 and seq2 were unknown. Fusion fragments containing seq0-seq1 or seq2-seq1 were analyzed in luciferase constructs. Compared with seq1 alone, the activities of these fusion fragments were non-significantly reduced. The activities of fusion fragments were significantly decreased following co-transfection with E2F1. Thus, the present findings support the conclusion that the E2F1 transcription factor regulates the expression of ADAM12 by binding differential cis-acting elements.

  7. E4F1 controls a transcriptional program essential for pyruvate dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Matthieu; Rodier, Geneviève; Houles, Thibault; Delpech, Hélène; Seyran, Berfin; Gayte, Laurie; Casas, Francois; Pessemesse, Laurence; Heuillet, Maud; Bellvert, Floriant; Portais, Jean-Charles; Berthet, Charlene; Brivet, Michele; Boutron, Audrey; Le Cam, Laurent; Sardet, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDC) acts as a central metabolic node that mediates pyruvate oxidation and fuels the tricarboxylic acid cycle to meet energy demand. Here, we reveal another level of regulation of the pyruvate oxidation pathway in mammals implicating the E4 transcription factor 1 (E4F1). E4F1 controls a set of four genes [dihydrolipoamide acetlytransferase (Dlat), dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Dld), mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 1 (Mpc1), and solute carrier family 25 member 19 (Slc25a19)] involved in pyruvate oxidation and reported to be individually mutated in human metabolic syndromes. E4F1 dysfunction results in 80% decrease of PDH activity and alterations of pyruvate metabolism. Genetic inactivation of murine E4f1 in striated muscles results in viable animals that show low muscle PDH activity, severe endurance defects, and chronic lactic acidemia, recapitulating some clinical symptoms described in PDC-deficient patients. These phenotypes were attenuated by pharmacological stimulation of PDH or by a ketogenic diet, two treatments used for PDH deficiencies. Taken together, these data identify E4F1 as a master regulator of the PDC. PMID:27621446

  8. Synergistic cooperation of MDM2 and E2F1 contributes to TAp73 transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kasim, Vivi; Huang, Can; Zhang, Jing; Jia, Huizhen; Wang, Yunxia; Yang, Li; Miyagishi, Makoto; Wu, Shourong

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • MDM2 is a novel positive regulator of TAp73 transcriptional activity. • MDM2 colocalizes together and physically interacts with E2F1. • Synergistic cooperation of MDM2 and E2F1 is crucial for TAp73 transcription. • MDM2 regulates TAp73 transcriptional activity in a p53-independent manner. - Abstract: TAp73, a structural homologue of p53, plays an important role in tumorigenesis. E2F1 had been reported as a transcriptional regulator of TAp73, however, the detailed mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here we reported that MDM2-silencing reduced the activities of the TAp73 promoters and the endogenous TAp73 expression level significantly; while MDM2 overexpression upregulated them. We further revealed that the regulation of TAp73 transcriptional activity occurs as a synergistic effect of MDM2 and E2F1, most probably through their physical interaction in the nuclei. Furthermore, we also suggested that MDM2 might be involved in DNA damage-induced TAp73 transcriptional activity. Finally, we elucidated that MDM2-silencing reduced the proliferation rate of colon carcinoma cells regardless of the p53 status. Our data show a synergistic effect of MDM2 and E2F1 on TAp73 transcriptional activity, suggesting a novel regulation pathway of TAp73.

  9. Spatial reference memory in normal aging Fischer 344 × Brown Norway F1 hybrid rats.

    PubMed

    McQuail, Joseph A; Nicolle, Michelle M

    2015-01-01

    Fischer 344 × Brown Norway F1 (F344 × BN-F1) hybrid rats express greater longevity with improved health relative to aging rodents of other strains; however, few behavioral reports have thoroughly evaluated cognition across the F344 × BN-F1 lifespan. Consequently, this study evaluated spatial reference memory in F344 × BN-F1 rats at 6, 18, 24, or 28 months of age in the Morris water maze. Reference memory decrements were observed between 6 and 18 months and 18 and 24 months. At 28 months, spatial learning was not worse than 24 months, but swim speed was significantly slower. Reliable individual differences revealed that ∼50% of 24- to 28-month-old rats performed similarly to 6 months, whereas others were spatial learning impaired. Aged rats were impaired at learning within daily training sessions but not impaired at retaining information between days of training. Aged rats were also slower to learn to escape onto the platform, regardless of strategy. In summary, these data clarify the trajectory of cognitive decline in aging F344 × BN-F1 rats and elucidate relevant behavioral parameters.

  10. E4F1 controls a transcriptional program essential for pyruvate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Matthieu; Rodier, Geneviève; Kirsh, Olivier; Houles, Thibault; Delpech, Hélène; Seyran, Berfin; Gayte, Laurie; Casas, Francois; Pessemesse, Laurence; Heuillet, Maud; Bellvert, Floriant; Portais, Jean-Charles; Berthet, Charlene; Bernex, Florence; Brivet, Michele; Boutron, Audrey; Le Cam, Laurent; Sardet, Claude

    2016-09-27

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDC) acts as a central metabolic node that mediates pyruvate oxidation and fuels the tricarboxylic acid cycle to meet energy demand. Here, we reveal another level of regulation of the pyruvate oxidation pathway in mammals implicating the E4 transcription factor 1 (E4F1). E4F1 controls a set of four genes [dihydrolipoamide acetlytransferase (Dlat), dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Dld), mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 1 (Mpc1), and solute carrier family 25 member 19 (Slc25a19)] involved in pyruvate oxidation and reported to be individually mutated in human metabolic syndromes. E4F1 dysfunction results in 80% decrease of PDH activity and alterations of pyruvate metabolism. Genetic inactivation of murine E4f1 in striated muscles results in viable animals that show low muscle PDH activity, severe endurance defects, and chronic lactic acidemia, recapitulating some clinical symptoms described in PDC-deficient patients. These phenotypes were attenuated by pharmacological stimulation of PDH or by a ketogenic diet, two treatments used for PDH deficiencies. Taken together, these data identify E4F1 as a master regulator of the PDC.

  11. F1-ATPase conformational cycle from simultaneous single-molecule FRET and rotation measurements

    PubMed Central

    Sugawa, Mitsuhiro; Okazaki, Kei-ichi; Kobayashi, Masaru; Matsui, Takashi; Hummer, Gerhard; Masaike, Tomoko; Nishizaka, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Despite extensive studies, the structural basis for the mechanochemical coupling in the rotary molecular motor F1-ATPase (F1) is still incomplete. We performed single-molecule FRET measurements to monitor conformational changes in the stator ring-α3β3, while simultaneously monitoring rotations of the central shaft-γ. In the ATP waiting dwell, two of three β-subunits simultaneously adopt low FRET nonclosed forms. By contrast, in the catalytic intermediate dwell, two β-subunits are simultaneously in a high FRET closed form. These differences allow us to assign crystal structures directly to both major dwell states, thus resolving a long-standing issue and establishing a firm connection between F1 structure and the rotation angle of the motor. Remarkably, a structure of F1 in an ε-inhibited state is consistent with the unique FRET signature of the ATP waiting dwell, while most crystal structures capture the structure in the catalytic dwell. Principal component analysis of the available crystal structures further clarifies the five-step conformational transitions of the αβ-dimer in the ATPase cycle, highlighting the two dominant modes: the opening/closing motions of β and the loosening/tightening motions at the αβ-interface. These results provide a new view of tripartite coupling among chemical reactions, stator conformations, and rotary angles in F1-ATPase. PMID:27166420

  12. Identification of E2F1 as a positive transcriptional regulator for {delta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kwonseop; Oh, Minsoo; Ki, Hyunkyoung; Wang Tao; Bareiss, Sonja; Fini, M. Elizabeth.; Li Dawei; Lu Qun

    2008-05-02

    {delta}-Catenin is upregulated in human carcinomas. However, little is known about the potential transcriptional factors that regulate {delta}-catenin expression in cancer. Using a human {delta}-catenin reporter system, we have screened several nuclear signaling modulators to test whether they can affect {delta}-catenin transcription. Among {beta}-catenin/LEF-1, Notch1, and E2F1, E2F1 dramatically increased {delta}-catenin-luciferase activities while {beta}-catenin/LEF-1 induced only a marginal increase. Rb suppressed the upregulation of {delta}-catenin-luciferase activities induced by E2F1 but did not interact with {delta}-catenin. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses in 4 different prostate cancer cell lines revealed that regulation of {delta}-catenin expression is controlled mainly at the transcriptional level. Interestingly, the effects of E2F1 on {delta}-catenin expression were observed only in human cancer cells expressing abundant endogenous {delta}-catenin. These studies identify E2F1 as a positive transcriptional regulator for {delta}-catenin, but further suggest the presence of strong negative regulator(s) for {delta}-catenin in prostate cancer cells with minimal endogenous {delta}-catenin expression.

  13. Independent Review of the Failure Modes of F-1 Engine and Propellants System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The F-1 is the powerful engine, that hurdled the Saturn V launch vehicle from the Earth to the moon on July 16,1969. The force that lifted the rocket overcoming the gravitational force during the first stage of the flight was provided by a cluster of five F-1 rocket engines, each of them developing over 1.5 million pounds of thrust (MSFC-MAN-507). The F-1 Rocket engine used RP-1 (Rocket Propellant-1, commercially known as Kerosene), as fuel with lox (liquid Oxygen) as oxidizer. NASA terminated Saturn V activity and has focused on Space Shuttle since 1972. The interest in rocket system has been revived to meet the National Launch System (NLS) program and a directive from the President to return to the Moon and exploration of the space including Mars. The new program Space Launch Initiative (SLI) is directed to drastically reduce the cost of flight for payloads, and adopt a reusable launch vehicle (RLV). To achieve this goal it is essential to have the ability of lifting huge payloads into low earth orbit. Probably requiring powerful boosters as strap-ons to a core vehicle, as was done for the Saturn launch vehicle. The logic in favor of adopting Saturn system, a proven technology, to meet the SLI challenge is very strong. The F-1 engine was the largest and most powerful liquid rocket engine ever built, and had exceptional performance. This study reviews the failure modes of the F-1 engine and propellant system.

  14. 26 CFR 1.167(f)-1 - Reduction of salvage value taken into account for certain personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reduction of salvage value taken into account for certain personal property. 1.167(f)-1 Section 1.167(f)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... for Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(f)-1 Reduction of salvage value taken into account...

  15. 26 CFR 54.4980F-1 - Notice requirements for certain pension plan amendments significantly reducing the rate of future...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... whether an amendment is a section 204(h) amendment. Thus, for example, provisions relating to the right to... amendments significantly reducing the rate of future benefit accrual. 54.4980F-1 Section 54.4980F-1 Internal... (CONTINUED) PENSION EXCISE TAXES § 54.4980F-1 Notice requirements for certain pension plan...

  16. 26 CFR 54.4980F-1 - Notice requirements for certain pension plan amendments significantly reducing the rate of future...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... whether an amendment is a section 204(h) amendment. Thus, for example, provisions relating to the right to... amendments significantly reducing the rate of future benefit accrual. 54.4980F-1 Section 54.4980F-1 Internal... (CONTINUED) PENSION EXCISE TAXES § 54.4980F-1 Notice requirements for certain pension plan...

  17. 40 CFR Table F-1 to Subpart F of... - Performance Specifications for PM2.5 Class II Equivalent Samplers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Performance Specifications for PM2.5 Class II Equivalent Samplers F Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Subpt. F, Table F-1 Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 53—Performance Specifications for PM2.5 Class...

  18. 40 CFR Table F-1 to Subpart F of... - Performance Specifications for PM2.5 Class II Equivalent Samplers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Performance Specifications for PM2.5 Class II Equivalent Samplers F Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Subpt. F, Table F-1 Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 53—Performance Specifications for PM2.5 Class...

  19. Microbial ketonization of ginsenosides F1 and C-K by Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yan; Jung, Sun Young; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Dae-Young; Min, Jin-Woo; Wang, Chao; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2014-12-01

    Ginsenosides are the major pharmacological components in ginseng. We isolated lactic acid bacteria from Kimchi to identify microbial modifications of ginsenosides. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the strain DCY65-1 belongs to the genus Lactobacillus and is most closely related to Lactobacillus brevis. On the basis of TLC and HPLC analysis, we found two metabolic pathways: F1 → 6α,12β-dihydroxydammar-3-one-20(S)-O-β-D-glucopyranoside and C-K → 12β-hydroxydammar-3-one-20(S)-O-β-D-glucopyranoside. These results suggest that strain DCY65-1 is capable of potent ketonic decarboxylation, ketonizing the hydroxyl group at C-3. The F1 metabolite had a more potent inhibitory effect on mushroom tyrosinase than did the substrate. Therefore, the F1 and C-K derivatives may be more pharmacologically active compounds, which should be further characterized.

  20. Optical pumping effect in absorption imaging of F =1 atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sooshin; Seo, Sang Won; Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Shin, Y.

    2016-08-01

    We report our study of the optical pumping effect in absorption imaging of 23Na atoms in the F =1 hyperfine spin states. Solving a set of rate equations for the spin populations in the presence of a probe beam, we obtain an analytic expression for the optical signal of the F =1 absorption imaging. Furthermore, we verify the result by measuring the absorption spectra of 23Na Bose-Einstein condensates prepared in various spin states with different probe-beam pulse durations. The analytic result can be used in the quantitative analysis of F =1 spinor condensate imaging and readily applied to other alkali-metal atoms with I =3 /2 nuclear spin such as 87Rb.

  1. Cat (Fel d 1) and dog (Can f 1) allergen levels in cars, dwellings and schools.

    PubMed

    Niesler, A; Ścigała, G; Łudzeń-Izbińska, B

    Pets are an important source of indoor allergens. The aim of the study was to compare cat and dog allergen levels in cars, schools and homes. The study was carried out in 17 cars, 14 classrooms and 19 dwellings located in the highly industrialized and urbanized region of Poland. Dust and air samples were analyzed for Fel d 1 and Can f 1 using a double monoclonal ELISA assay. The highest amounts of cat and dog allergens (Fel d 1: 1169 μg/g; Can f 1: 277 μg/g) were found in dwellings with pets. Allergen concentrations were correlated with the number of animals kept at home. Although concentrations on automobile seats were lower, Fel d 1 levels exceeded 8 μg/g in 23.5 % of cars and high levels of Can f 1 (>10 μg/g) were found in 17.6 % of cars. The study revealed that cars of pet owners may be reservoirs of cat and dog allergens even when animals are not transported in them. In schools, concentrations of pet allergens did not reach high levels, but the moderate levels of Fel d 1 (≥1-8 μg/g) and Can f 1 (≥2-10 μg/g) were detected in 42.9 and 7.1 % of the investigated classrooms. Concentrations of cat and dog allergen in schools were higher than in homes without pets. While airborne Fel d 1 and Can f 1 levels were found low, residential allergen concentrations in settled dust and air were correlated. The study results suggest that classrooms and cars of pet owners may be important sites of exposure to cat and dog allergens, though the highest concentrations of Fel d 1 and Can f 1 are found in homes of pet owners.

  2. How release of phosphate from mammalian F1-ATPase generates a rotary substep

    PubMed Central

    Bason, John V.; Montgomery, Martin G.; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Walker, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The rotation of the central stalk of F1-ATPase is driven by energy derived from the sequential binding of an ATP molecule to its three catalytic sites and the release of the products of hydrolysis. In human F1-ATPase, each 360° rotation consists of three 120° steps composed of substeps of about 65°, 25°, and 30°, with intervening ATP binding, phosphate release, and catalytic dwells, respectively. The F1-ATPase inhibitor protein, IF1, halts the rotary cycle at the catalytic dwell. The human and bovine enzymes are essentially identical, and the structure of bovine F1-ATPase inhibited by IF1 represents the catalytic dwell state. Another structure, described here, of bovine F1-ATPase inhibited by an ATP analog and the phosphate analog, thiophosphate, represents the phosphate binding dwell. Thiophosphate is bound to a site in the αEβE-catalytic interface, whereas in F1-ATPase inhibited with IF1, the equivalent site is changed subtly and the enzyme is incapable of binding thiophosphate. These two structures provide a molecular mechanism of how phosphate release generates a rotary substep as follows. In the active enzyme, phosphate release from the βE-subunit is accompanied by a rearrangement of the structure of its binding site that prevents released phosphate from rebinding. The associated extrusion of a loop in the βE-subunit disrupts interactions in the αEβE-catalytic interface and opens it to its fullest extent. Other rearrangements disrupt interactions between the γ-subunit and the C-terminal domain of the αE-subunit. To restore most of these interactions, and to make compensatory new ones, the γ-subunit rotates through 25°–30°. PMID:25918412

  3. Operating principles of rotary molecular motors: differences between F1 and V1 motors.

    PubMed

    Yamato, Ichiro; Kakinuma, Yoshimi; Murata, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Among the many types of bioenergy-transducing machineries, F- and V-ATPases are unique bio- and nano-molecular rotary motors. The rotational catalysis of F1-ATPase has been investigated in detail, and molecular mechanisms have been proposed based on the crystal structures of the complex and on extensive single-molecule rotational observations. Recently, we obtained crystal structures of bacterial V1-ATPase (A3B3 and A3B3DF complexes) in the presence and absence of nucleotides. Based on these new structures, we present a novel model for the rotational catalysis mechanism of V1-ATPase, which is different from that of F1-ATPases.

  4. [Meiosis passing age dependence in Solanum linnaeum L. x solanum incanum L. F1 interspecific hybrid].

    PubMed

    Montvid, P Iu

    2011-01-01

    Meiosis passing in the first- and second-year-plants of F1 interspecific hybrid Solanum linnaeum L. x Solanum incanum L. has been carried out. Fruit with seeds were formed during a second year of vegetation. The quantities of uni- and tetravalents and main disorders frequency lowered with plant age. Meiosis in parental forms was normal. The conclusion was drawn about F1 Solanum linnaeum L. x Solanum incanum L. meiosis regularity connection with heterozygous genotype, influence of environmental factors and plant age.

  5. Torque generation and elastic power transmission in the rotary F(O)F(1)-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Junge, Wolfgang; Sielaff, Hendrik; Engelbrecht, Siegfried

    2009-05-21

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the universal fuel of the cell, is synthesized from adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate (P(i)) by 'ATP synthase' (F(O)F(1)-ATPase). During respiration or photosynthesis, an electrochemical potential difference of protons is set up across the respective membranes. This powers the enzyme's electrical rotary nanomotor (F(O)), which drives the chemical nanomotor (F(1)) by elastic mechanical-power transmission, producing ATP with high kinetic efficiency. Attempts to understand in detail the mechanisms of torque generation in this simple and robust system have been both aided and complicated by a wealth of sometimes conflicting data.

  6. M2-F1 in flight being towed by a C-47

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The M2-F1 Lifting Body is seen here being towed behind a C-47 at the Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. In this rear view, the M2-F1 is flying above and to one side of the C-47. This was done to avoid wake turbulence from the towplane. Lacking wings, the M2-F1 used an unusual configuration for its control surfaces. It had two rudders on the fins, two elevons (called 'elephant ears') mounted on the outsides of the fins, and two body flaps on the upper rear fuselage. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. These initial tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind the C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began. Pilot for the first series of flights of the M2-F1 was NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Typical glide flights with the M2-F1 lasted about two minutes and reached speeds of 110 to l20 mph. More than 400 ground tows and 77 aircraft tow flights were carried out with the M2-F1. The success of Dryden's M2-F1 program led to NASA's development and construction of two heavyweight lifting bodies based on studies at NASA's Ames and

  7. POU5F1 isoforms show different expression patterns in human embryonic stem cells and preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Cauffman, Greet; Liebaers, Inge; Van Steirteghem, André; Van de Velde, Hilde

    2006-12-01

    The contribution of the POU domain, class 5, transcription factor-1 (POU5F1) in maintaining totipotency in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) has been repeatedly proven. In humans, two isoforms are encoded: POU5F1_iA and POU5F1_iB. So far, no discrimination has been made between the isoforms in POU5F1 studies, and it is unknown which isoform contributes to the undifferentiated phenotype. Using immunocytochemistry, expression of POU5F1_iA and POU5F1_iB was examined in hESCs and all stages of human preimplantation development to look for differences in expression, biological activity, and relation to totipotency. POU5F1_iA and POU5F1_iB displayed different temporal and spatial expression patterns. During human preimplantation development, a significant POU5F1_iA expression was seen in all nuclei of compacted embryos and blastocysts and a clear POU5F1_iB expression was detected from the four-cell stage onwards in the cytoplasm of all cells. The cytoplasmic localization might imply no or other biological functions beyond transcription activation for POU5F1_iB. The stemness properties of POU5F1 can be assigned to POU5F1_iA because hESCs expressed POU5F1_iA but not POU5F1_iB. However, POU5F1_iA is not the appropriate marker to identify totipotent cells, because POU5F1_iA was also expressed in the nontotipotent trophectoderm and was not expressed in zygotes and early cleavage stage embryos, which are assumed to be totipotent. The expression pattern of POU5F1_iA may suggest that POU5F1_iA alone cannot sustain totipotency and that coexpression with other stemness factors might be the key to totipotency.

  8. Two genes encode related cytoplasmic elongation factors 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) in Drosophila melanogaster with continuous and stage specific expression.

    PubMed Central

    Hovemann, B; Richter, S; Walldorf, U; Cziepluch, C

    1988-01-01

    We have characterized two previously cloned genes, F1 and F2 (1) that code for elongation factor EF - 1 alpha of Drosophila melanogaster. Genomic Southern blot hybridization revealed that they are the only gene copies present. We isolated cDNA clones of both transcripts from embryonal and pupal stage of development that cover the entire transcription unit. The 5' ends of both genes have been determined by primer extension and for F1 also by RNA sequencing. These start sites have been shown to be used consistently during development. Comparison of cDNA and genomic sequences revealed that EF - 1 alpha,F1 consists of two and EF - 1 alpha,F2 of five exons. The two described elongation factor genes exhibit several regions of strong sequence conservation when compared to five recently cloned eucaryotic elongation factors. Images PMID:3131735

  9. F1 rotary motor of ATP synthase is driven by the torsionally-asymmetric drive shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulish, O.; Wright, A. D.; Terentjev, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    F1F0 ATP synthase (ATPase) either facilitates the synthesis of ATP in a process driven by the proton moving force (pmf), or uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to pump protons against the concentration gradient across the membrane. ATPase is composed of two rotary motors, F0 and F1, which compete for control of their shared γ -shaft. We present a self-consistent physical model of F1 motor as a simplified two-state Brownian ratchet using the asymmetry of torsional elastic energy of the coiled-coil γ -shaft. This stochastic model unifies the physical concepts of linear and rotary motors, and explains the stepped unidirectional rotary motion. Substituting the model parameters, all independently known from recent experiments, our model quantitatively reproduces the ATPase operation, e.g. the ‘no-load’ angular velocity is ca. 400 rad/s anticlockwise at 4 mM ATP. Increasing the pmf torque exerted by F0 can slow, stop and overcome the torque generated by F1, switching from ATP hydrolysis to synthesis at a very low value of ‘stall torque’. We discuss the motor efficiency, which is very low if calculated from the useful mechanical work it produces - but is quite high when the ‘useful outcome’ is measured in the number of H+ pushed against the chemical gradient.

  10. Short communication: hair cortisol concentrations in Holstein-Friesian and crossbreed F1 heifers.

    PubMed

    Peric, T; Comin, A; Corazzin, M; Montillo, M; Cappa, A; Campanile, G; Prandi, A

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity of Holstein-Friesian and crossbreed F1 heifers by analysis of the cortisol concentrations in hair samples. Cortisol, the primary hormone of the HPA axis, is the biological endpoint for the investigation of the HPA response. The study was conducted on 290 prepubertal heifers; 142 heifers were pure Holstein-Friesian and 148 were crossbreed F1 heifers obtained from the 3-way rotational system with Swedish Red and Montbéliarde breeds. Extraction was performed on the hair using methanol, and cortisol concentrations were determined by a radioimmunoassay method. Cortisol concentrations measured in regrown hair of crossbreed F1 heifers were significantly lower than those in hair of Holstein-Friesian heifers. This result helps us to better understand the differences in HPA activity and allostatic load between Holstein-Friesian and crossbreed F1 heifers and allows us to better assess the adaptability of these animals to the environment and the importance of crossbreed traits for profitability in dairy farming.

  11. F1 rotary motor of ATP synthase is driven by the torsionally-asymmetric drive shaft

    PubMed Central

    Kulish, O.; Wright, A. D.; Terentjev, E. M.

    2016-01-01

    F1F0 ATP synthase (ATPase) either facilitates the synthesis of ATP in a process driven by the proton moving force (pmf), or uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to pump protons against the concentration gradient across the membrane. ATPase is composed of two rotary motors, F0 and F1, which compete for control of their shared γ -shaft. We present a self-consistent physical model of F1 motor as a simplified two-state Brownian ratchet using the asymmetry of torsional elastic energy of the coiled-coil γ -shaft. This stochastic model unifies the physical concepts of linear and rotary motors, and explains the stepped unidirectional rotary motion. Substituting the model parameters, all independently known from recent experiments, our model quantitatively reproduces the ATPase operation, e.g. the ‘no-load’ angular velocity is ca. 400 rad/s anticlockwise at 4 mM ATP. Increasing the pmf torque exerted by F0 can slow, stop and overcome the torque generated by F1, switching from ATP hydrolysis to synthesis at a very low value of ‘stall torque’. We discuss the motor efficiency, which is very low if calculated from the useful mechanical work it produces - but is quite high when the ‘useful outcome’ is measured in the number of H+ pushed against the chemical gradient. PMID:27321713

  12. 26 CFR 301.6229(f)-1 - Special rule for partial settlement agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Pursuant to section 6226(c), a partner is a party to a partnership-level judicial proceeding with respect... additional amounts. When a partner settles partnership items, the settled partnership items convert to....6229(f)-1 Special rule for partial settlement agreements. (a) In general. If a partner enters into...

  13. Irradiation of adult Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae): egg sterility in parental and F1 generations.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eric B; McInnis, Donald O; Kurashima, Rick; Woods, Bill; Suckling, David M

    2012-02-01

    Adult Epiphyas postvittana Walker were irradiated using a Cobalt 60 source to determine the dose needed to achieve complete egg sterility of mated female moths, and egg sterility of female moths mated to F1 generation males. Adult male and female E. postvittana were irradiated at 100, 200, 250, and 300 Gy and their fertility (when crossed with normal moths) was compared with nonirradiated moths. Viable progeny (determined by egg hatch) were found at doses of 100 and 200 Gy, but very little at 250 and 300 Gy. In particular, there was no survival of female progeny into the F1 generation. Males irradiated at 250 and 300 Gy had very low egg eclosion rates (2.25 and 1.86% at 250 and 300 Gy, respectively) when mated with normal females. The F2 generation from those male progeny had a mean percent hatched of < 1.02%. Based on our results, a dose of 250-300 Gy is recommended for irradiation of E. postvittana adults used for sterile insect technique (SIT) if sterility of parental moths is the desired outcome. Our data also suggests that inclusion of F1 hybrid sterility rather than parental generation sterility into programs using the SIT may allow for doses lower than what we have reported, especially during initial phases of an eradication program where increase fitness of moths might be desirable. Further research is needed to verify the use of F1 hybrid sterility in light brown apple moth SIT programs.

  14. Initial Report for the Radiation Effects Research Foundation F1 Mail Survey.

    PubMed

    Milder, Cm; Sakata, R; Sugiyama, H; Sadakane, A; Utada, M; Cordova, Ka; Hida, A; Ohishi, W; Ozasa, K; Grant, Ej

    2016-01-01

    To study the full health effects of parental radiation exposure on the children of the atomic bomb survivors, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation developed a cohort of 76,814 children born to atomic bomb survivors (F1 generation) to assess cancer incidence and mortality from common adult diseases. In analyzing radiationassociated health information, it is important to be able to adjust for sociodemographic and lifestyle variations that may affect health. In order to gain this and other background information on the F1 cohort and to determine willingness to participate in a related clinical study, the F1 Mail Survey Questionnaire was designed with questions corresponding to relevant health, sociodemographic, and lifestyle indicators. Between the years 2000 and 2006, the survey was sent to a subset of the F1 Mortality Cohort. A total of 16,183 surveys were completed and returned: 10,980 surveys from Hiroshima residents and 5,203 from Nagasaki residents. The response rate was 65.6%, varying somewhat across parental exposure category, city, gender, and year of birth. Differences in health and lifestyle were noted in several variables on comparison across city and gender. No major differences in health, lifestyle, sociodemographics, or disease were seen across parental exposure categories, though statistically significant tests for heterogeneity and linear trend revealed some possible changes with dose. The data described herein provide a foundation for studies in the future.

  15. Linkage analysis and map construction in genetic populations of clonal F1 and double cross.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luyan; Li, Huihui; Wang, Jiankang

    2015-01-15

    In this study, we considered four categories of molecular markers based on the number of distinguishable alleles at the marker locus and the number of distinguishable genotypes in clonal F1 progenies. For two marker loci, there are nine scenarios that allow the estimation of female, male, and/or combined recombination frequencies. In a double cross population derived from four inbred lines, five categories of markers are classified and another five scenarios are present for recombination frequency estimation. Theoretical frequencies of identifiable genotypes were given for each scenario, from which the maximum likelihood estimates of one or more of the three recombination frequencies could be estimated. If there was no analytic solution, then Newton-Raphson method was used to acquire a numerical solution. We then proposed to use an algorithm in Traveling Salesman Problem to determine the marker order. Finally, we proposed a procedure to build the two haploids of the female parent and the two haploids of the male parent in clonal F1. Once the four haploids were built, clonal F1 hybrids could be exactly regarded as a double cross population. Efficiency of the proposed methods was demonstrated in simulated clonal F1 populations and one actual maize double cross. Extensive comparisons with software JoinMap4.1, OneMap, and R/qtl show that the methodology proposed in this article can build more accurate linkage maps in less time.

  16. 26 CFR 1.904(f)-1 - Overall foreign loss and the overall foreign loss account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... States § 1.904(f)-1 Overall foreign loss and the overall foreign loss account. (a)(1) Overview of...)(3) when the taxpayer disposes of property used predominantly outside the United States in a trade or... to recapture when the taxpayer disposes of certain properties under section 904(f)(3)); and §...

  17. Whole-Genome Sequences of Four Corynebacterium CDC Group F-1 Strains Isolated from Urine

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, Anne-Marie; Peters, Geoffrey A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Three draft and one complete genome sequence from strains isolated from urine and consistent with Corynebacterium CDC group F-1 were assembled and studied. Genome sizes ranged between 2.3 and 2.44 Mb, with G+C content between 60.4% and 60.7%. PMID:28153894

  18. M2-F1 in flight over lakebed on tow line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Following the first M2-F1 airtow flight on 16 August 1963, the Flight Research Center used the vehicle for both research flights and to check out new lifting-body pilots. These included Bruce Peterson, Don Mallick, Fred Haise, and Bill Dana from NASA. Air Force pilots who flew the M2-F1 included Chuck Yeager, Jerry Gentry, Joe Engle, Jim Wood, and Don Sorlie, although Wood, Haise, and Engle only flew on car tows. In the three years between the first and last flights of the M2-F1, it made about 400 car tows and 77 air tows. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and

  19. M2-F1 lifting body aircraft on a flatbed truck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    After the grounding of the M2-F1 in 1966, it was kept in outside storage on the Dryden complex. After several years, its fabric and plywood structure was damaged by the sun and weather. Restoration of the vehicle began in February 1994 under the leadership of NASA retiree Dick Fischer, with other retirees who had originally worked on the M2-F1's construction and flight research three decades before also participating. The photo shows the now-restored M2-F1 returning to the site of its flight research, now called the Dryden Flight Research Center, on 22 August 1997. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, NASA Flight Research Center (later Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA) management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available

  20. 26 CFR 301.6223(f)-1 - Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Duplicate copy of final partnership... In General § 301.6223(f)-1 Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment. (a) In... the notice of final partnership administrative adjustment (for example, in the event the...

  1. 26 CFR 301.6223(f)-1 - Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Duplicate copy of final partnership... In General § 301.6223(f)-1 Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment. (a) In... the notice of final partnership administrative adjustment (for example, in the event the...

  2. 26 CFR 301.6223(f)-1 - Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Duplicate copy of final partnership... In General § 301.6223(f)-1 Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment. (a) In... the notice of final partnership administrative adjustment (for example, in the event the...

  3. 26 CFR 301.6223(f)-1 - Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Duplicate copy of final partnership... In General § 301.6223(f)-1 Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment. (a) In... the notice of final partnership administrative adjustment (for example, in the event the...

  4. 26 CFR 301.6223(f)-1 - Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Duplicate copy of final partnership... In General § 301.6223(f)-1 Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment. (a) In... the notice of final partnership administrative adjustment (for example, in the event the...

  5. Chromosomal rearrangements directly cause underdominant F1 pollen sterility in Mimulus lewisii-Mimulus cardinalis hybrids.

    PubMed

    Stathos, Angela; Fishman, Lila

    2014-11-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements can contribute to the evolution of postzygotic reproductive isolation directly, by disrupting meiosis in F1 hybrids, or indirectly, by suppressing recombination among genic incompatibilities. Because direct effects of rearrangements on fertility imply fitness costs during their spread, understanding the mechanism of F1 hybrid sterility is integral to reconstructing the role(s) of rearrangements in speciation. In hybrids between monkeyflowers Mimulus cardinalis and Mimulus lewisii, rearrangements contain all quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for both premating barriers and pollen sterility, suggesting that they may have facilitated speciation in this model system. We used artificial chromosome doubling and comparative mapping to test whether heterozygous rearrangements directly cause underdominant male sterility in M. lewisii-M. cardinalis hybrids. Consistent with a direct chromosomal basis for hybrid sterility, synthetic tetraploid F1 s showed highly restored fertility (83.4% pollen fertility) relative to diploids F1 s (36.0%). Additional mapping with Mimulus parishii-M. cardinalis and M. parishii-M. lewisii hybrids demonstrated that underdominant male sterility is caused by one M. lewisii specific and one M. cardinalis specific reciprocal translocation, but that inversions had no direct effects on fertility. We discuss the importance of translocations as causes of reproductive isolation, and consider models for how underdominant rearrangements spread and fix despite intrinsic fitness costs.

  6. Fluorographane (C1H(x)F(1-x-δ))n: synthesis and properties.

    PubMed

    Sofer, Zdeněk; Šimek, Petr; Mazánek, Vlastimil; Šembera, Filip; Janoušek, Zbyněk; Pumera, Martin

    2015-04-04

    Fluorographane (C1HxF1-x-δ)n was obtained from graphene by hydrogenation via the Birch reaction with consequent fluorination of the resulting graphane. Fluorographane exhibits fast heterogeneous electron transfer rates and hydrophobicity, which increase with increasing fluorination.

  7. In Utero Nutritional Manipulation Provokes Dysregulated Adipocytokines Production in F1 Offspring in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hanafi, Mervat Y.; Saleh, Moustafa M.; Kamel, Maher A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intrauterine environment plays a pivotal role in the origin of fatal diseases such as diabetes. Diabetes and obesity are associated with low-grade inflammatory state and dysregulated adipokines production. This study aims to investigate the effect of maternal obesity and malnutrition on adipokines production (adiponectin, leptin, and TNF-α) in F1 offspring in rats. Materials and Methods. Wistar rats were allocated in groups: F1 offspring of control mothers under control diet (CF1-CD) and under high-fat diet (CF1-HCD), F1 offspring of obese mothers under CD (OF1-CD) and under HCD (OF1-HCD), and F1 offspring of malnourished mothers under CD (MF1-CD) and under HCD (MF1-HCD). Every 5 weeks postnatally, blood samples were obtained for biochemical analysis. Results. At the end of the 30-week follow-up, OF1-HCD and MF1-HCD exhibited hyperinsulinemia, moderate dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and impaired glucose homeostasis compared to CF1-CD and CF1-HCD. OF1-HCD and MF1-HCD demonstrated low serum levels of adiponectin and high levels of leptin compared to CF1-CD and CF1-HCD. OF1-CD, OF1-HCD, and MF1-HCD had elevated serum levels of TNF-α compared to CF1-CD and CF1-HCD (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Maternal nutritional manipulation predisposes the offspring to development of insulin resistance in their adult life, probably via instigating dysregulated adipokines production. PMID:27200209

  8. Saturn V F-1 Engine Gas Generator Blazes Back To Life

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Jan. 10, 2013, a resurrected gas generator from a Saturn V F-1 engine completed two hot-fire tests that are part of a series of tests at Test Stand 116 located in the East Test Area at NASA's Ma...

  9. Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit

    SciTech Connect

    S. W. Clark and H. M. Sulloway

    2007-09-26

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

  10. Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit

    SciTech Connect

    S. W. Clark and H. M Sulloway

    2007-10-31

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

  11. The transcription factor E4F1 coordinates CHK1-dependent checkpoint and mitochondrial functions.

    PubMed

    Rodier, Geneviève; Kirsh, Olivier; Baraibar, Martín; Houlès, Thibault; Lacroix, Matthieu; Delpech, Hélène; Hatchi, Elodie; Arnould, Stéphanie; Severac, Dany; Dubois, Emeric; Caramel, Julie; Julien, Eric; Friguet, Bertrand; Le Cam, Laurent; Sardet, Claude

    2015-04-14

    Recent data support the notion that a group of key transcriptional regulators involved in tumorigenesis, including MYC, p53, E2F1, and BMI1, share an intriguing capacity to simultaneously regulate metabolism and cell cycle. Here, we show that another factor, the multifunctional protein E4F1, directly controls genes involved in mitochondria functions and cell-cycle checkpoints, including Chek1, a major component of the DNA damage response. Coordination of these cellular functions by E4F1 appears essential for the survival of p53-deficient transformed cells. Acute inactivation of E4F1 in these cells results in CHK1-dependent checkpoint deficiency and multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions that lead to increased ROS production, energy stress, and inhibition of de novo pyrimidine synthesis. This deadly cocktail leads to the accumulation of uncompensated oxidative damage to proteins and extensive DNA damage, ending in cell death. This supports the rationale of therapeutic strategies simultaneously targeting mitochondria and CHK1 for selective killing of p53-deficient cancer cells.

  12. Rocketdyne - F-1 Saturn V First Stage Engine. Chapter 1, Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biggs, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Before I go into the history of F-1, I want to discuss the F-1 engine s role in putting man on the moon. The F-1 engine was used in a cluster of five on the first stage, and that was the only power during the first stage. It took the Apollo launch vehicle, which was 363 feet tall and weighed six million pounds, and threw it downrange fifty miles, threw it up to forty miles of altitude, at Mach 7. It took two and one-half minutes to do that and, in the process, burned four and one-half million pounds of propellant, a pretty sizable task. (See Slide 2, Appendix C) My history goes back to the same year I started working at Rocketdyne. That s where the F-1 had its beginning, back early in 1957. In 1957, there was no space program. Rocketdyne was busy working overtime and extra days designing, developing, and producing rocket engines for weapons of mass destruction, not for scientific reasons. The Air Force contracted Rocketdyne to study how to make a rocket engine that had a million pounds of thrust. The highest thing going at the time had 150,000 pounds of thrust. Rocketdyne s thought was the new engine might be needed for a ballistic missile, not that it was going to go on a moon shot.

  13. Less is more: reduced catechol production permits Pseudomonas putida F1 to grow on styrene.

    PubMed

    George, Kevin W; Hay, Anthony

    2012-11-01

    Pseudomonas putida F1 is unable to grow on styrene due to the accumulation of 3-vinylcatechol, a toxic metabolite that is produced through the toluene degradation (tod) pathway and causes catechol-2,3-dioxygenase (C23O) inactivation. In this study, we characterized a spontaneous F1 mutant, designated SF1, which acquired the ability to grow on styrene and did not accumulate 3-vinylcatechol. Whereas adaptation to new aromatic substrates has typically been shown to involve increased C23O activity or the acquisition of resistance to C23O inactivation, SF1 retained wild-type C23O activity. Surprisingly, SF1 grew more slowly on toluene, its native substrate, and exhibited reduced toluene dioxygenase (TDO) activity (approximately 50 % of that of F1), the enzyme responsible for ring hydroxylation and subsequent production of 3-vinylcatechol. DNA sequence analysis of the tod operon of SF1 revealed a single base pair mutation in todA (C479T), a gene encoding the reductase component of TDO. Replacement of the wild-type todA allele in F1 with todA(C479T) reduced TDO activity to SF1 levels, obviated vinylcatechol accumulation, and conferred the ability to grow on styrene. This novel 'less is more' strategy - reduced catechol production as a means to expand growth substrate range - sheds light on an alternative approach for managing catechol toxicity during the metabolism of aromatic compounds.

  14. 40 CFR Figure F-1 to Subpart F of... - Designation Testing Checklist

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Designation Testing Checklist F Figure F-1 to Subpart F of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Testing Performance Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Fig....

  15. 40 CFR Figure F-1 to Subpart F of... - Designation Testing Checklist

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Designation Testing Checklist F Figure F-1 to Subpart F of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Testing Performance Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Fig....

  16. Correlations between measures of feed efficiency and feedlot return for F1 lambs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective estimates of feedlot return for progeny of terminal-sire breeds of sheep are needed to improve lamb profitability. Thus, we used recent economic data to determine the effects of terminal-sire breed on returns of F1 lambs. Annually for 3 yr, Columbia, USMARC Composite, Suffolk, and Texel ra...

  17. M2-F1 on lakebed with Pontiac convertible tow vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The M2-F1 lifting body, dubbed the 'flying bathtub' by the media, was the precursor of a remarkable series of wingless flying vehicles that contributed data used in the space shuttle and the X-38 Technology Demonstrator for crew return from the International Space Station. The early tow tests were done using the 1963 Pontiac Catalina convertible modified for the purpose. The first flight attempt occurred on 1 March 1963 but was unsuccessful due to control-system problems. It was not until 5 April 1963, after tests in the Ames Research Center wind tunnel, that Milt Thompson made the first M2-F1 tow flight. Based on the ideas and basic design of Alfred J. Eggers and others at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory (now the Ames Research Center), Mountain View, Calif., in the mid-1950s, the M2-F1 came to be built over a four-month period in 1962-63 for a cost of only about $30,000 plus perhaps an additional $8,000-$10,000 for an ejection seat and $10,000 for solid-propellant rockets to add time to the landing flare. Engineers and technicians at the NASA Flight Research Center (now NASA Dryden) kept costs low by designing and fabricating it partly in-house, with the plywood shell constructed by a local sailplane builder. Someone at the time estimated that it would have cost a major aircraft company $150,000 to build the same vehicle. Unlike the later lifting bodies, the M2-F1 was unpowered and was initially towed until it was airborne by a souped-up Pontiac convertible. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina

  18. Cloning and expression of Aca f 1: a new allergen of Acacia farnesiana pollen

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Gholam Reza; Morakabati, Payam; Akbari, Bahareh; Dousti, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Acacia farnesiana is the main source of allergenic pollen and one of the most important causes of respiratory allergic disease in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The purpose of this study was to produce a recombinant variety of allergenic Ole e 1-like protein from the pollen of this tree. To predict its allergenic cross-reactivity with other members of the Ole e 1-like protein family of common allergenic plants, the nucleotide sequence homology of the Acacia Ole e 1-like protein was evaluated. Amplification of cDNA strands encoding Acacia Ole e 1-like protein was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequenced. Following expression in Escherichia coli using the pET-21b(+) vector, the recombinant protein was purified using metal-affinity chromatography. IgE-binding competence of purified recombinant Ole e 1- like protein (rAca f 1) was analysed by immunoassay using 25 sera collected from Acacia pollen-sensitised patients. Nucleotide sequencing revealed an open reading frame of 453 bp encoding 150 amino acid residues that belonged to the Ole e 1-like protein family, and 11 patients (44%) had considerable specific IgE levels for the rAca f 1. Immunodetection and inhibition assays indicated that the purified rAca f 1 may be the same as that in the crude extract. Aca f 1, the second allergen from Acacia pollen, was identified as a member of the family of Ole e 1-like protein. A high degree of homology was found among amino acid sequences of Aca f 1 and several allergenic members of Ole e 1-like protein family. PMID:27833445

  19. Polymorphisms and expression of the chicken POU1F1 gene associated with carcass traits.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heng-Yong; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yi-Ping; Wang, Ji-Wen; Zhu, Qing

    2012-08-01

    POU1F1 is an essential factor that regulates the development and reproduction of animal. The objective of the current research was to screen for polymorphism, expression of POU1F1 and their association with carcass quality traits. A total of 126 Erlang mountainous chickens from two strains (SD02 and SD03) were employed for testing. Seventeen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected, but only two SNPs (g.96217999 T > C and g.96219442 C > T) were associated with carcass quality traits. In SD03 chicken, g.96217999 T > C genotypes were significantly associated with body weight (BW), carcass weight (CW), eviscerated weight (EW), and semi-eviscerated weight (SEW; P < 0.05), and was highly significantly associated with breast muscle weight (BMW) and abdominal fat weight (AW; P < 0.01). g.96219442 C > T was significantly associated with BW, EW, SEW (P < 0.05). However, these two SNPs were not significantly associated with any carcass traits in SD02 chicken. Diplotypes showed that in SD03 chicken, the haplotype [C: C] was the most favorable haplotype because it was associated with higher BW, CW, SEW, EW, BMW, and AW (P < 0.05). On the contrary, haplotype [T: T] was associated with lower carcass quality traits (P < 0.01). In addition, qRT-PCR revealed that at 13 weeks, the POU1F1 mRNA expression was significantly higher in breast muscle of cock compared to that of hens (P < 0.05), whereas there was no significant correlation between POU1F1 expression and carcass traits. These results suggested that POU1F1 could be a potential candidate gene for carcass traits in chicken.

  20. Cloning and expression of Aca f 1: a new allergen of Acacia farnesiana pollen.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Gholam Reza; Assarehzadegan, Mohammad-Ali; Morakabati, Payam; Akbari, Bahareh; Dousti, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Acacia farnesiana is the main source of allergenic pollen and one of the most important causes of respiratory allergic disease in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The purpose of this study was to produce a recombinant variety of allergenic Ole e 1-like protein from the pollen of this tree. To predict its allergenic cross-reactivity with other members of the Ole e 1-like protein family of common allergenic plants, the nucleotide sequence homology of the Acacia Ole e 1-like protein was evaluated. Amplification of cDNA strands encoding Acacia Ole e 1-like protein was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequenced. Following expression in Escherichia coli using the pET-21b(+) vector, the recombinant protein was purified using metal-affinity chromatography. IgE-binding competence of purified recombinant Ole e 1- like protein (rAca f 1) was analysed by immunoassay using 25 sera collected from Acacia pollen-sensitised patients. Nucleotide sequencing revealed an open reading frame of 453 bp encoding 150 amino acid residues that belonged to the Ole e 1-like protein family, and 11 patients (44%) had considerable specific IgE levels for the rAca f 1. Immunodetection and inhibition assays indicated that the purified rAca f 1 may be the same as that in the crude extract. Aca f 1, the second allergen from Acacia pollen, was identified as a member of the family of Ole e 1-like protein. A high degree of homology was found among amino acid sequences of Aca f 1 and several allergenic members of Ole e 1-like protein family.

  1. Inheritance of Trans Chromosomal Methylation patterns from Arabidopsis F1 hybrids.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Ian K; Groszmann, Michael; Wang, Aihua; Peacock, W James; Dennis, Elizabeth S

    2014-02-04

    Hybridization in plants leads to transinteractions between the parental genomes and epigenomes that can result in changes to both 24 nt siRNA and cytosine methylation ((m)C) levels in the hybrid. In Arabidopsis the principle processes altering the hybrid methylome are Trans Chromosomal Methylation (TCM) and Trans Chromosomal deMethylation (TCdM) in which the (m)C pattern of a genomic segment attains the same (m)C pattern of the corresponding segment on the other parental chromosome. We examined two loci that undergo TCM/TCdM in the Arabidopsis C24/Landsberg erecta (Ler) F1 hybrids, which show patterns of inheritance dependent on the properties of the particular donor and recipient chromosomal segments. At At1g64790 the TCM- and TCdM-derived (m)C patterns are maintained in the F2 generation but are transmitted in outcrosses or backcrosses only by the C24 genomic segment. At a region between and adjacent to At3g43340 and At3g43350, the originally unmethylated Ler genomic segment receives the C24 (m)C pattern in the F1, which is then maintained in backcross plants independent of the presence of the parental C24 segment. In backcrosses to an unmethylated Ler allele, the newly methylated F1 Ler segment may act as a TCM source in a process comparable to paramutation in maize. TCM-derived (m)C patterns are associated with reduced expression of both At3g43340 and At3g43350 in F1 and F2 plants, providing support for such events influencing the transcriptome. The inheritance of the F1 (m)C patterns and the segregation of other genetic and epigenetic determinants may contribute to the reduced hybrid vigor in the F2 and subsequent generations.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of F1-ATPase rotary catalysis using high-speed imaging

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Minagawa, Yoshihiro; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    F1-ATPase (F1) is a rotary motor protein fueled by ATP hydrolysis. Although the mechanism for coupling rotation and catalysis has been well studied, the molecular details of individual reaction steps remain elusive. In this study, we performed high-speed imaging of F1 rotation at various temperatures using the total internal reflection dark-field (TIRDF) illumination system, which allows resolution of the F1 catalytic reaction into elementary reaction steps with a high temporal resolution of 72 µs. At a high concentration of ATP, F1 rotation comprised distinct 80° and 40° substeps. The 80° substep, which exhibited significant temperature dependence, is triggered by the temperature-sensitive reaction, whereas the 40° substep is triggered by ATP hydrolysis and the release of inorganic phosphate (Pi). Then, we conducted Arrhenius analysis of the reaction rates to obtain the thermodynamic parameters for individual reaction steps, that is, ATP binding, ATP hydrolysis, Pi release, and TS reaction. Although all reaction steps exhibited similar activation free energy values, ΔG‡ = 53–56 kJ mol−1, the contributions of the enthalpy (ΔH‡), and entropy (ΔS‡) terms were significantly different; the reaction steps that induce tight subunit packing, for example, ATP binding and TS reaction, showed high positive values of both ΔH‡ and ΔS‡. The results may reflect modulation of the excluded volume as a function of subunit packing tightness at individual reaction steps, leading to a gain or loss in water entropy. PMID:25262814

  3. M2-F1 lifting body and Paresev 1B on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    In this photo of the M2-F1 lifting body and the Paresev 1B on the ramp, the viewer sees two vehicles representing different approaches to building a research craft to simulate a spacecraft able to land on the ground instead of splashing down in the ocean as the Mercury capsules did. The M2-F1 was a lifting body, a shape able to re-enter from orbit and land. The Paresev (Paraglider Research Vehicle) used a Rogallo wing that could be (but never was) used to replace a conventional parachute for landing a capsule-type spacecraft, allowing it to make a controlled landing on the ground. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop

  4. M2-F1 mounted in NASA Ames Research Center 40x80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    After the first attempted ground-tow tests of the M2-F1 in March 1963, the vehicle was taken to the Ames Research Center, Mountain View, CA, for wind-tunnel testing. During these tests, Milt Thompson and others were in the M2-F1 to position the control surfaces for each test. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly safely and to train pilots before they were towed behind a C

  5. Wooden shell of M2-F1 being assembled at El Mirage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Wooden shell of the M2-F1 being assembled at El Mirage, CA. While Flight Research Center technicians built the internal steel structure of the M2-F1, sailplane builder Gus Briegleb built the vehicle's outer wooden shell. Its skin was 3/32-inch mahogany plywood, with 1/8-inch mahogany rib sections reinforced with spruce. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly safely and to

  6. Proposed Ames M2-F1, M1-L half-cone, and Langley lenticular bodies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Dale Reed, who inaugurated the lifting-body flight research at NASA's Flight Research Center (later, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA), originally proposed that three wooden outer shells be built. These would then be attached to the single internal steel structure. The three shapes were (viewer's left to right) the M2-F1, the M1-L, and a lenticular shape. Milt Thompson, who supported Reed's advocacy for a lifting-body research project, recommended that only the M2-F1 shell be built, believing that the M1-L shape was 'too radical,' while the lenticular one was 'too exotic.' Although the lenticular shape was often likened to that of a flying saucer, Reed's wife Donna called it the 'powder puff.' The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey

  7. M2-F1 in flight over lakebed on tow line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    After initial ground-tow flights of the M2-F1 using the Pontiac as a tow vehicle, the way was clear to make air tows behind a C-47. The first air tow took place on 16 August 1963. Pilot Milt Thompson found that the M2-F1 flew well, with good control. This first flight lasted less than two minutes from tow-line release to touchdown. The descent rate was 4,000 feet per minute. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got

  8. E2F1 promote the aggressiveness of human colorectal cancer by activating the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zejun; Gong, Chaoju; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Xiaomin; Mei, Lingming; Song, Mintao; Qiu, Lanlan; Luo, Shuchai; Zhu, Zhihua; Zhang, Ronghui; Gu, Hongqian; Chen, Xiang

    2015-08-21

    As the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit, the high expression of ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2 (RRM2) induces cancer and contributes to tumor growth and invasion. In several colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines, we found that the expression levels of RRM2 were closely related to the transcription factor E2F1. Mechanistic studies were conducted to determine the molecular basis. Ectopic overexpression of E2F1 promoted RRM2 transactivation while knockdown of E2F1 reduced the levels of RRM2 mRNA and protein. To further investigate the roles of RRM2 which was activated by E2F1 in CRC, CCK-8 assay and EdU incorporation assay were performed. Overexpression of E2F1 promoted cell proliferation in CRC cells, which was blocked by RRM2 knockdown attenuation. In the migration and invasion tests, overexpression of E2F1 enhanced the migration and invasion of CRC cells which was abrogated by silencing RRM2. Besides, overexpression of RRM2 reversed the effects of E2F1 knockdown partially in CRC cells. Examination of clinical CRC specimens demonstrated that both RRM2 and E2F1 were elevated in most cancer tissues compared to the paired normal tissues. Further analysis showed that the protein expression levels of E2F1 and RRM2 were parallel with each other and positively correlated with lymph node metastasis (LNM), TNM stage and distant metastasis. Consistently, the patients with low E2F1 and RRM2 levels have a better prognosis than those with high levels. Therefore, we suggest that E2F1 can promote CRC proliferation, migration, invasion and metastasis by regulating RRM2 transactivation. Understanding the role of E2F1 in activating RRM2 transcription will help to explain the relationship between E2F1 and RRM2 in CRC and provide a novel predictive marker for diagnosis and prognosis of the disease. - Highlights: • E2F1 promotes RRM2 transactivation in CRC cells. • E2F1 promotes the proliferation of CRC cells by activating RRM2. • E2F1 promotes the migration and

  9. Genotype-specific environmental impact on the variance of blood values in inbred and F1 hybrid mice.

    PubMed

    Klempt, Martina; Rathkolb, Birgit; Fuchs, Edith; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Wolf, Eckhard; Aigner, Bernhard

    2006-02-01

    Mice are important models for biomedical research because of the possibility of standardizing genetic background and environmental conditions, which both affect phenotypic variability. Inbred mouse strains as well as F1 hybrid mice are routinely used as genetically defined animal models; however, only a few studies investigated the variance of phenotypic parameters in inbred versus F1 hybrid mice and the potential interference of the genetic background with different housing conditions. Thus, we analyzed the ranges of clinical chemical and hematologic parameters in C3H and C57BL/6 inbred mice and their reciprocal F1 hybrids (B6C3F1, C3B6F1) in two different mouse facilities. Two thirds of the blood parameters examined in the same strain differed between the facilities for both the inbred strains and the F1 hybrid lines. The relation of the values between inbred and F1 hybrid mice was also affected by the facility. The variance of blood parameters in F1 hybrid mice compared with their parental inbred strains was inconsistent in one facility but generally smaller in the other facility. A subsequent study of F1 hybrid animals derived from the parental strains C3H and BALB/c, which was done in the latter housing unit, detected no general difference in the variance of blood parameters between F1 hybrid and inbred mice. Our study clearly demonstrates the possibility of major interactions between genotype and environment regarding the variance of clinical chemical and hematologic parameters.

  10. Effective Protective Immunity to Yersinia pestis Infection Conferred by DNA Vaccine Coding for Derivatives of the F1 Capsular Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Grosfeld, Haim; Cohen, Sara; Bino, Tamar; Flashner, Yehuda; Ber, Raphael; Mamroud, Emanuelle; Kronman, Chanoch; Shafferman, Avigdor; Velan, Baruch

    2003-01-01

    Three plasmids expressing derivatives of the Yersinia pestis capsular F1 antigen were evaluated for their potential as DNA vaccines. These included plasmids expressing the full-length F1, F1 devoid of its putative signal peptide (deF1), and F1 fused to the signal-bearing E3 polypeptide of Semliki Forest virus (E3/F1). Expression of these derivatives in transfected HEK293 cells revealed that deF1 is expressed in the cytosol, E3/F1 is targeted to the secretory cisternae, and the nonmodified F1 is rapidly eliminated from the cell. Intramuscular vaccination of mice with these plasmids revealed that the vector expressing deF1 was the most effective in eliciting anti-F1 antibodies. This response was not limited to specific mouse strains or to the mode of DNA administration, though gene gun-mediated vaccination was by far more effective than intramuscular needle injection. Vaccination of mice with deF1 DNA conferred protection against subcutaneous infection with the virulent Y. pestis Kimberley53 strain, even at challenge amounts as high as 4,000 50% lethal doses. Antibodies appear to play a major role in mediating this protection, as demonstrated by passive transfer of anti-deF1 DNA antiserum. Taken together, these observations indicate that a tailored genetic vaccine based on a bacterial protein can be used to confer protection against plague in mice without resorting to regimens involving the use of purified proteins. PMID:12496187

  11. M2-F1 in flight during low-speed car tow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The M2-F1 shown in flight during a low-speed car tow runs across the lakebed. Such tests allowed about two minutes to test the vehicle's handling in flight. NASA Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center) personnel conducted as many as 8 to 14 ground-tow flights in a single day either to test the vehicle in preparation for air tows or to train pilots to fly the vehicle before they undertook air tows. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30

  12. M2-F1 fabrication by Grierson Hamilton, Bob Green, and Ed Browne

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Flight Research Center discretionary funds paid for the M2-F-1's construction. NASA mechanics, sheet-metal smiths, and technicians did much of the work in a curtained-off area of a hangar called the 'Wright Bicycle Shop.' The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly safely and to train pilots before they were towed behind a C-47 aircraft and released. These initial car-tow tests

  13. Construction Progress of the S-IC and F-1 Test Stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. North of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F

  14. Construction Progress of the S-IC and F-1 Test Stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the S-IC test stand, related facilities were built during this time. Built to the north of the massive S-IC test stand, was the F-1 Engine test stand. The F-1 test stand, a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, was designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of

  15. Trichloroethylene degradation by Escherichia coli containing the cloned Pseudomonas putida F1 toluene dioxygenase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Zylstra, G.J.; Gibson, D.T. ); Wackett, L.P. )

    1989-12-01

    Toluene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida F1 has been implicated as an enzyme capable of degrading trichloroethylene. This has now been confirmed with Escherichia coli JM109(pDTG601) that contains the structural genes (todC1C2BA) of toluene dioxygenase under the control of the tac promoter. The extent of trichloroethylene degradation by the recombinant organism depended on the cell concentration and the concentration of trichloroethylene. A linear rate of trichloroethylene degradation was observed with the E. coli recombinant strain. In contrast, P. putida F39/D, a mutant strain of P. putida F1 that does not contain cis-toluene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, showed a much faster initial rate of trichloroethylene degradation which decreased over time.

  16. Development of High Speed Digital Camera: EXILIM EX-F1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, Osamu

    The EX-F1 is a high speed digital camera featuring a revolutionary improvement in burst shooting speed that is expected to create entirely new markets. This model incorporates a high speed CMOS sensor and a high speed LSI processor. With this model, CASIO has achieved an ultra-high speed 60 frames per second (fps) burst rate for still images, together with 1,200 fps high speed movie that captures movements which cannot even be seen by human eyes. Moreover, this model can record movies at full High-Definition. After launching it into the market, it was able to get a lot of high appraisals as an innovation camera. We will introduce the concept, features and technologies about the EX-F1.

  17. Solution structure and function in trifluoroethanol of PP-50, an ATP-binding peptide from F1ATPase.

    PubMed

    Chuang, W J; Abeygunawardana, C; Gittis, A G; Pedersen, P L; Mildvan, A S

    1995-05-10

    PP-50, a synthetic peptide, based on residues 141-190 of the beta-subunit of mitochondrial F1ATPase, containing the GX4GKT consensus sequence for nucleoside triphosphate binding, binds ATP tightly (Kd = 17.5 microM) as found by fluorescence titration at pH 4.0. CD and 2D proton NMR studies at pH 4.0 revealed two beta-turns, regions of extended secondary structure, transient tertiary structure, and flexibility in the GX4GKT region (W.J. Chuang, C. Abeygunawardana, P. L. Pedersen, and A. S. Mildvan, 1992, Biochemistry 31, 7915-7921). CD titration of PP-50 with trifluoroethanol (TFE) reveals a decrease in ellipticity at 208 and 222 nm, saturating at 25% TFE. Computer analysis indicates that 25% TFE increases the helix content from 5.8 to 28.6%, decreases the beta-structure from 30.2 to 20.2% and decreases the coil content from 64 to 51.2%. Fluorescence titrations of H2ATP2- with PP-50 in 25% TFE yields a Kd of 7.3 microM, 2.4-fold tighter than in H2O, probably due to TFE increasing the activity of H2ATP2- . PP-50 completely quenches the fluorescence of H2ATP2- in 25% TFE, while in H2O the fluorescence quenching is only 62%. In H2O the binding of H2ATP2- increases the structure of PP-50 as detected by CD, but in 25% TFE no significant change in CD is found on binding either H2ATP2- or Mg2+ HATP (Kd = 14 microM). The complete proton NMR spectrum of PP-50 in 25% TFE has been assigned. The solution structure, determined by distance geometry, molecular dynamics with simulated annealing, and energy minimization, consists of a coil (residues 1-8), a strand (residues 9-12), a loop (residues 13-22) containing the GX4GKT consensus sequence (residues 16-23), an alpha-helix (residues 23-36), a turn (residues 38-41), and a coil (residues 42-50), similar to that of the corresponding region of the X-ray structure of F1ATPase (J.P. Abrahams, A.G.W. Leslie, R. Lutter, and J. E. Walker, 1994 Nature 370, 621-628) and to the structure of a homologous peptide from the ATP-binding site of

  18. V gene analysis of anti-cardiolipin antibodies from (NZW x BXSB) F1 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Y; Sumida, T; Iwamoto, I; Yoshida, S; Koike, T

    1994-01-01

    In (NZW x BXSB) F1 (W/B F1) male mice, systemic lupus-like disease, thrombocytopenia and coronary vascular disease with myocardial infarction occur, due to the presence of platelet-associated antibodies, anti-platelet antibodies and anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL). We developed monoclonal aCL and analysed the specificity of aCL. In the W/B F1 mice, there are aCL with pathogenic properties, which have an IgG isotype and reveal a cofactor-dependent binding to CL, binding activity to platelets, and lupus anti-coagulant (LA) activity. Here, we analysed the usage of VH and V kappa genes of six aCL, including two pathogenic aCL, from W/B F1 mice, in an attempt to address the question of whether or not aCL with pathogenic properties use restricted Ig V genes. Sequence analysis of VH and V kappa genes of aCL showed that the pathogenic aCL had VHJ558 and V kappa 21 or V kappa 23 genes, whereas the other aCL without pathogenic features used mainly the 7183 VH family and the random V kappa gene group. However, two pathogenic aCL showed a 86.6% homology with the IgV region, each other, indicating that they were not closely related clones. Thus, these findings suggest the possibility that usage of Ig VH genes in pathogenic aCL is not random, but that there may exist a few epitopes of antigen recognized by the pathogenic aCL. PMID:7959886

  19. Carryover of cigarette smoke effects on hematopoietic cytokines to F1 mouse litters.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Mamta; Kumar, Pradeep; Mishra, Vani; Chaudhari, Bhushan Pradosh; Munjal, Ashok Kumar; Tripathi, Shambhoo Sharan; Raisuddin, Seikh; Paul, Bhola Nath

    2011-09-01

    Neutrophils have been implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD, being recruited into the lung in response to cigarette smoke (CS) inhalation and responsible for the release of proteases and oxidant-producing enzymes, resulting in bronchitis and emphysema. Several hematopoietic cytokines are involved in neutrophil growth and recruitment; however, little is known about the effects of CS on hematopoietic cytokines are transmitted between generations. In the present investigation we evaluate the expression of hematopoietic and proinflammatory cytokines in different organs of female F(0) mice subjected to sub-chronic CS exposure, and in F(1) litters. Virgin female Balb/c mice inhaled either air or air containing CS for 90 days. The specific resistance of the airways (sRaw) was evaluated and, thereafter, the mice were mated with unexposed adult males. The levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA and protein were evaluated in the bone marrow, amniotic fluid and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of F(0) dams at gestation day(14) (gd(14)) and the bone marrow, BALF and lungs of F(0) dams and F(1) littermates at post natal day(21) (pnd(21)). At gd(14), overexpression of GM-CSF, G-CSF and IL-6 mRNA and protein was observed in the bone marrow, amniotic fluid and BALF of F(0) dams. These hematopoietic cytokines were also overexpressed in the lungs of F(1) littermates compared with the control F(1) litters at pnd(21). Lineage-specific hematopoietic growth factors may play an important role in the transmission of neutrophil-associated disease susceptibility across generations.

  20. How the regulatory protein, IF1, inhibits F1-ATPase from bovine mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Gledhill, Jonathan R.; Montgomery, Martin G.; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Walker, John E.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of bovine F1-ATPase inhibited by a monomeric form of the inhibitor protein, IF1, known as I1–60His, lacking most of the dimerization region, has been determined at 2.1-Å resolution. The resolved region of the inhibitor from residues 8–50 consists of an extended structure from residues 8–13, followed by two α-helices from residues 14–18 and residues 21–50 linked by a turn. The binding site in the βDP-αDP catalytic interface is complex with contributions from five different subunits of F1-ATPase. The longer helix extends from the external surface of F1 via a deep groove made from helices and loops in the C-terminal domains of subunits βDP, αDP, βTP, and αTP to the internal cavity surrounding the central stalk. The linker and shorter helix interact with the γ-subunit in the central stalk, and the N-terminal region extends across the central cavity to interact with the nucleotide binding domain of the αE subunit. To form these complex interactions and penetrate into the core of the enzyme, it is likely that the initial interaction of the inhibitor with F1 forms via the open conformation of the βE subunit. Then, as two ATP molecules are hydrolyzed, the βE-αE interface converts to the βDP-αDP interface via the βTP-αTP interface, trapping the inhibitor progressively in its binding site and a nucleotide in the catalytic site of subunit βDP. The inhibition probably arises by IF1 imposing the structure and properties of the βTP-αTP interface on the βDP-αDP interface, thereby preventing it from hydrolyzing the bound ATP. PMID:17895376

  1. VIIRS F1 "best" relative spectral response characterization by the government team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Chris; McIntire, Jeff; Schwarting, Tom; Moyer, Dave

    2011-10-01

    The VIIRS Flight 1 (F1) instrument completed sensor level testing, including relative spectral response (RSR) characterization in 2009 and is moving forward towards a launch on the NPP platform late in 2011. As part of its mandate to produce analyses of F1 performance essentials, the VIIRS Government Team, consisting of NASA, Aerospace Corp., and MIT/Lincoln Lab elements, has produced an independent (from that of industry) analysis of F1 RSR. The test data used to derive RSR for all VIIRS spectral bands was collected in the TVAC environment using the Spectral Measurement Assembly (SpMA), a dual monochromator system with tungsten and ceramic glow bar sources. These spectrally contiguous measurements were analyzed by the Government Team to produce a complete in-band + out-of-band RSR for 21 of the 22 VIIRS bands (exception of the Day-Night Band). The analysis shows that VIIRS RSR was well measured in the pre-launch test program for all bands, although the measurement noise floor is high on the thermal imager band I5. The RSR contain expected detector to detector variation resulting from the VIIRS non-telecentric optical design, and out-of-band features are present in some bands; non-compliances on the integrated out-of-band spectral performance metric are noted in M15 and M16A,B bands and also for several VisNIR bands, though the VisNIR non-compliances were expected due to known scattering in the VisNIR integrated filter assembly. The Government Team "best" RSR have been released into the public domain for use by the science community in preparation for the post-launch era of VIIRS F1.

  2. Nondeletional alpha-thalassemia: first description of alpha Hph alpha and alpha Nco alpha mutations in a Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Ayala, S; Colomer, D; Aymerich, M; Pujades, A; Vives-Corrons, J L

    1996-07-01

    Several different deletions underlie the molecular basis of alpha-thalassemia. The most common alpha-thalassemia determinant in Spain is the rightward deletion (-alpha 3.7). To our knowledge, however, no cases of alpha-thalassemia due to nondeletional mutations have so far been described in this particular Mediterranean area. Here, we report the existence of nondeletional forms of alpha-thalassemia in ten Spanish families. The alpha 2-globin gene was characterized in ten unrelated patients and their relatives only when the presence of deletional alpha-thalassemia was ruled out. The alpha 2-globin gene analysis was performed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by restriction enzyme analysis or by allelespecific priming. This allowed the identification of a 5-base pair (bp) deletion at the donor site of IVS I (alpha Hph alpha) in 9 cases and the alpha 2 initiation codon mutation (alpha Nco alpha) in one case. Although these alpha 2-globin gene mutations are found in other mediterranean areas, our results demonstrate their presence in the Spanish population and suggest that the alpha Hph alpha/alpha alpha genotype is probably the most common nondeletional form of alpha-thalassemia in Spain.

  3. Bioleaching of heavy metals from a contaminated soil using indigenous Penicillium chrysogenum strain F1.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xinhui; Chai, Liyuan; Yang, Zhihui; Tang, Chongjian; Tong, Haixia; Yuan, Pingfu

    2012-09-30

    Bioleaching of heavy metals from contaminated soil using Penicillium chrysogenum strain F1 was investigated. Batch experiments were performed to compare leaching efficiencies of heavy metals between one-step and two-step processes and to determine the transformation of heavy metal fractions before and after bioleaching. The results showed that two-step process had higher leaching efficiencies of heavy metals than one-step process. When the mass ratio of soil to culture medium containing P. chrysogenum strain F1 was 5% (w/v), 50%, 35%, 9% and 40% of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn were removed in one-step process, respectively. The two-step process had higher removals of 63% Cd, 56% Cu, 14% Pb and 54% Zn as compared with one-step process. The results of the sequential extraction showed that the metals remaining in the soil were mainly bonded in stable fractions after bioleaching. The results of TEM and SEM showed that during bioleaching process, although the mycelium of P. chrysogenum was broken into fragments, no damage was obviously observed on the surface of the living cell except for thinner cell wall, smaller vacuoles and concentrated cytoplasm. The result implied that P. chrysogenum strain F1 can be used to remove heavy metals from polluted soil.

  4. Simultaneous F 0-F 1 modifications of Arabic for the improvement of natural-sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ykhlef, F.; Bensebti, M.

    2013-03-01

    Pitch (F 0) modification is one of the most important problems in the area of speech synthesis. Several techniques have been developed in the literature to achieve this goal. The main restrictions of these techniques are in the modification range and the synthesised speech quality, intelligibility and naturalness. The control of formants in a spoken language can significantly improve the naturalness of the synthesised speech. This improvement is mainly dependent on the control of the first formant (F 1). Inspired by this observation, this article proposes a new approach that modifies both F 0 and F 1 of Arabic voiced sounds in order to improve the naturalness of the pitch shifted speech. The developed strategy takes a parallel processing approach, in which the analysis segments are decomposed into sub-bands in the wavelet domain, modified in the desired sub-band by using a resampling technique and reconstructed without affecting the remained sub-bands. Pitch marking and voicing detection are performed in the frequency decomposition step based on the comparison of the multi-level approximation and detail signals. The performance of the proposed technique is evaluated by listening tests and compared to the pitch synchronous overlap and add (PSOLA) technique in the third approximation level. Experimental results have shown that the manipulation in the wavelet domain of F 0 in conjunction with F 1 guarantees natural-sounding of the synthesised speech compared to the classical pitch modification technique. This improvement was appropriate for high pitch modifications.

  5. Polycomb recruitment attenuates retinoic acid-induced transcription of the bivalent NR2F1 gene.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Kristian B; Mongan, Nigel P; Zhuang, Yong; Ng, Mary M; Benoit, Yannick D; Gudas, Lorraine J

    2013-07-01

    Polycomb proteins play key roles in mediating epigenetic modifications that occur during cell differentiation. The Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) mediates the tri-methylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3). In this study, we identify a distinguishing feature of two classes of PRC2 target genes, represented by the Nr2F1 (Coup-TF1) and the Hoxa5 gene, respectively. Both genes are transcriptionally activated by all-trans retinoic acid (RA) and display increased levels of the permissive H3K9/K14ac and tri-methylated histone H3 lysine 4 epigenetic marks in response to RA. However, while in response to RA the PRC2 and H3K27me3 marks are greatly decreased at the Hoxa5 promoter, these marks are initially increased at the Nr2F1 promoter. Functional depletion of the essential PRC2 protein Suz12 by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) technology enhanced the RA-associated transcription of Nr2F1, Nr2F2, Meis1, Sox9 and BMP2, but had no effect on the Hoxa5, Hoxa1, Cyp26a1, Cyp26b1 and RARβ2 transcript levels in wild-type embryonic stem cells. We propose that PRC2 recruitment attenuates the RA-associated transcriptional activation of a subset of genes. Such a mechanism would permit the fine-tuning of transcriptional networks during differentiation.

  6. Genome reorganization in F1 hybrids uncovers the role of retrotransposons in reproductive isolation

    PubMed Central

    Senerchia, Natacha; Felber, François; Parisod, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization leads to new interactions among divergent genomes, revealing the nature of genetic incompatibilities having accumulated during and after the origin of species. Conflicts associated with misregulation of transposable elements (TEs) in hybrids expectedly result in their activation and genome-wide changes that may be key to species boundaries. Repetitive genomes of wild wheats have diverged under differential dynamics of specific long terminal repeat retrotransposons (LTR-RTs), offering unparalleled opportunities to address the underpinnings of plant genome reorganization by selfish sequences. Using reciprocal F1 hybrids between three Aegilops species, restructuring and epigenetic repatterning was assessed at random and LTR-RT sequences with amplified fragment length polymorphism and sequence-specific amplified polymorphisms as well as their methylation-sensitive counterparts, respectively. Asymmetrical reorganization of LTR-RT families predicted to cause conflicting interactions matched differential survival of F1 hybrids. Consistent with the genome shock model, increasing divergence of merged LTR-RTs yielded higher levels of changes in corresponding genome fractions and lead to repeated reorganization of LTR-RT sequences in F1 hybrids. Such non-random reorganization of hybrid genomes is coherent with the necessary repression of incompatible TE loci in support of hybrid viability and indicates that TE-driven genomic conflicts may represent an overlooked factor supporting reproductive isolation. PMID:25716787

  7. 16Oxygen irradiation enhances cued fear memory in B6D2F1 mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raber, Jacob; Marzulla, Tessa; Kronenberg, Amy; Turker, Mitchell S.

    2015-11-01

    The space radiation environment includes energetic charged particles that may impact cognitive performance. We assessed the effects of 16O ion irradiation on cognitive performance of C57BL/6J × DBA/2J F1 (B6D2F1) mice at OHSU (Portland, OR) one month following irradiation at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL, Upton, NY). Hippocampus-dependent contextual fear memory and hippocampus-independent cued fear memory of B6D2F1 mice were tested. 16O ion exposure enhanced cued fear memory. This effect showed a bell-shaped dose response curve. Cued fear memory was significantly stronger in mice irradiated with 16O ions at a dose of 0.4 or 0.8 Gy than in sham-irradiated mice or following irradiation at 1.6 Gy. In contrast to cued fear memory, contextual fear memory was not affected following 16O ion irradiation at the doses used in this study. These data indicate that the amygdala might be particularly susceptible to effects of 16O ion exposure.

  8. Bovine F1Fo ATP synthase monomers bend the lipid bilayer in 2D membrane crystals

    PubMed Central

    Jiko, Chimari; Davies, Karen M; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Tani, Kazutoshi; Maeda, Shintaro; Mills, Deryck J; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Gerle, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    We have used a combination of electron cryo-tomography, subtomogram averaging, and electron crystallographic image processing to analyse the structure of intact bovine F1Fo ATP synthase in 2D membrane crystals. ATPase assays and mass spectrometry analysis of the 2D crystals confirmed that the enzyme complex was complete and active. The structure of the matrix-exposed region was determined at 24 Å resolution by subtomogram averaging and repositioned into the tomographic volume to reveal the crystal packing. F1Fo ATP synthase complexes are inclined by 16° relative to the crystal plane, resulting in a zigzag topology of the membrane and indicating that monomeric bovine heart F1Fo ATP synthase by itself is sufficient to deform lipid bilayers. This local membrane curvature is likely to be instrumental in the formation of ATP synthase dimers and dimer rows, and thus for the shaping of mitochondrial cristae. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06119.001 PMID:25815585

  9. Effects of shikonin isolated from zicao on lupus nephritis in NZB/W F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin Chang; Feng, Jian; Huang, Feng; Fan, Yong Sheng; Wang, Yan Yan; Cao, Ling Yong; Wen, Cheng Pin

    2009-09-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the potential protective effects of Shikonin extracted from Zicao on lupus nephritis (LN) using NZB/W F1 mice. Oral administration of Shikonin (24, 40 mg/kg body weight/d) or vehicle was applied to sixty female NZB/W F1 mice of 28-week-old with LN. Treatment with Shikonin for 14 weeks suppressed proteinuria dose-dependently with the mean proteinuria of 274.0 mg/dl and 160.3 mg/dl for low-dose and high-dose Shikonin groups, respectively, compared to 499.2 mg/dl for the vehicle. Also, Shikonin was observed to reduce circulating adhesion molecules significantly and down-regulate intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) mRNA expression in kidney. However, anti-double stranded (ds)DNA antibody in mice with low or high Shikonin dose administration both exhibited no significant elevation, differing from vehicle group. Kidney histological examination showed that renal glomerular lesions were alleviated after Shikonin application. These results suggest that Shikonin has therapeutic effects on LN in NZB/W F1 mice, to which inhibition of anti-dsDNA may be potential contribution, and its part mechanism is related to suppression of mRNA expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) in the kidney.

  10. Properties of kojic acid and curcumin: Assay on cell B16-F1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiharto, Ariff, Arbakariya; Ahmad, Syahida; Hamid, Muhajir

    2016-03-01

    Ultra violet (UV) exposure and oxidative stress are casually linked to skin disorders. They can increase melanin synthesis, proliferation of melanocytes, and hyperpigmentation. It is possible that antioxidants or inhibitors may have a beneficial effect on skin health to reduce hyperpigmentation. In the last few years, a huge number of natural herbal extracts have been tested to reduce hyperpigmentation. The objective of this study was to determine and to compare of kojic acid and curcumin properties to viability cell B16-F1. In this study, our data showed that the viability of cell B16-F1 was 63.91% for kojic acid and 64.12% for curcumin at concentration 100 µg/ml. Further investigation assay of antioxidant activities, indicated that IC50 for kojic acid is 63.8 µg/ml and curcumin is 16.05 µg/ml. Based on the data, kojic acid and curcumin have potential antioxidant properties to reduce hyperpigmentation with low toxicity effect in cell B16-F1.

  11. A Bacterial Virulence Protein Promotes Pathogenicity by Inhibiting the Bacterium's Own F1Fo ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Jin; Pontes, Mauricio H.; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Several intracellular pathogens including Salmonella enterica and Mycobacterium tuberculosis require the virulence protein MgtC to survive within macrophages and to cause a lethal infection in mice. We now report that, unlike secreted virulence factors that target the host vacuolar ATPase to withstand phagosomal acidity, the MgtC protein acts on Salmonella's own F1Fo ATP synthase. This complex couples proton translocation to ATP synthesis/ hydrolysis and is required for virulence. We establish that MgtC interacts with the a subunit of the F1Fo ATP synthase, hindering ATP-driven proton translocation and NADH-driven ATP synthesis in inverted vesicles. An mgtC null mutant displays heightened ATP levels and an acidic cytoplasm whereas mgtC overexpression decreases ATP levels. A single amino acid substitution in MgtC that prevents binding to the F1Fo ATP synthase abolishes control of ATP levels and attenuates pathogenicity. MgtC provides a singular example of a virulence protein that promotes pathogenicity by interfering with another virulence protein. PMID:23827679

  12. Upregulation of estrogen receptor expression in the uterus of ovariectomized B6C3F1 mice and Ishikawa cells treated with bromoethane.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Hiroaki; Couse, John F; Hewitt, Sylvia C; Haseman, Joseph K; He, Hong; Zheng, Xiaolin; Majstoravich, Sonja; Korach, Kenneth S; Dixon, D

    2005-12-15

    In a 2-year NTP bioassay, Bromoethane (BE) was found to induce endometrial neoplasms in the uterus of B6C3F1 mice [; ]. In women, hormonal influences, such as "unopposed" estrogenic stimulus, have been implicated as important etiologic factors in uterine cancer. BE, however, does not affect the serum concentrations of sex hormones in female B6C3F1 mice [] and the mechanism of BE-induced uterine carcinogenesis still remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the estrogenic effects of BE on the uterus of ovariectomized B6C3F1 mice and on Ishikawa cells. Groups of 6 mice were given daily s.c. injections of 0, 100, 500 or 1000 mg BE/kg for 3 consecutive days. Mice treated with 17beta-estradiol served as positive controls. Mice were necropsied 24 h after the final injection, and uteri were weighed and examined histologically and immunohistochemically along with the vagina. Changes observed in the estrogen-treated mice included increased uterine weights, edema and inflammation of the endometrium, increased epithelial layers of the uterine and vaginal lumens and keratinization of the vaginal epithelium. In the BE-treated mice, no such changes occurred; however, immunohistochemical staining of the uterus revealed a significant increase in immunoexpression of the estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) in the two higher dose groups. Analysis of mRNA also showed slightly increased uterine ERalpha expression in these groups. Upregulated expression of ERalpha was confirmed in BE-treated Ishikawa cells, in which Western blotting analyses identified an intense signal at approximately 66 kDa, which is consistent with ERalpha. These data suggest that upregulated expression of ERalpha may be important in the induction of endometrial neoplasms in BE-treated mice.

  13. ATP-binding site of adenylate kinase: mechanistic implications of its homology with ras-encoded p21, F1-ATPase, and other nucleotide-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1986-02-01

    The MgATP binding site of adenylate kinase, located by a combination of NMR and x-ray diffraction, is near three protein segments, five to seven amino acids in length, that are homologous in sequence to segments found in other nucleotide-binding phosphotransferases, such as myosin and F1-ATPase, ras p21 and transducin GTPases, and cAMP-dependent and src protein kinases, suggesting equivalent mechanistic roles of these segments in all of these proteins. Segment 1 is a glycine-rich flexible loop that, on adenylate kinase, may control access to the ATP-binding site by changing its conformation. Segment 2 is an alpha-helix containing two hydrophobic residues that interact with the adenine-ribose moiety of ATP, and a lysine that may bind to the beta- and gamma-phosphates of ATP. Segment 3 is a hydrophobic strand of parallel beta-pleated sheet, terminated by a carboxylate, that flanks the triphosphate binding site. The various reported mutations of ras p21 that convert it to a transforming agent all appear to involve segment 1, and such substitutions may alter the properties of p21 by hindering a conformational change at this segment. In F1-ATPase, the flexible loop may, by its position, control both the accessibility and the ATP/ADP equilibrium constant on the enzyme.

  14. ATP-binding site of adenylate kinase: mechanistic implications of its homology with ras-encoded p21, F1-ATPase, and other nucleotide-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1986-01-01

    The MgATP binding site of adenylate kinase, located by a combination of NMR and x-ray diffraction, is near three protein segments, five to seven amino acids in length, that are homologous in sequence to segments found in other nucleotide-binding phosphotransferases, such as myosin and F1-ATPase, ras p21 and transducin GTPases, and cAMP-dependent and src protein kinases, suggesting equivalent mechanistic roles of these segments in all of these proteins. Segment 1 is a glycine-rich flexible loop that, on adenylate kinase, may control access to the ATP-binding site by changing its conformation. Segment 2 is an alpha-helix containing two hydrophobic residues that interact with the adenine-ribose moiety of ATP, and a lysine that may bind to the beta- and gamma-phosphates of ATP. Segment 3 is a hydrophobic strand of parallel beta-pleated sheet, terminated by a carboxylate, that flanks the triphosphate binding site. The various reported mutations of ras p21 that convert it to a transforming agent all appear to involve segment 1, and such substitutions may alter the properties of p21 by hindering a conformational change at this segment. In F1-ATPase, the flexible loop may, by its position, control both the accessibility and the ATP/ADP equilibrium constant on the enzyme. Images PMID:2869483

  15. Forkhead transcription factor FoxF1 interacts with Fanconi anemia protein complexes to promote DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Arun; Ustiyan, Vladimir; Zhang, Yufang; Kalin, Tanya V; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V

    2016-01-12

    Forkhead box F1 (Foxf1) transcription factor is an important regulator of embryonic development but its role in tumor cells remains incompletely understood. While 16 proteins were characterized in Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex, its interactions with cellular transcriptional machinery remain poorly characterized. Here, we identified FoxF1 protein as a novel interacting partner of the FA complex proteins. Using multiple human and mouse tumor cell lines and Foxf1+/- mice we demonstrated that FoxF1 physically binds to and increases stability of FA proteins. FoxF1 co-localizes with FANCD2 in DNA repair foci in cultured cells and tumor tissues obtained from cisplatin-treated mice. In response to DNA damage, FoxF1-deficient tumor cells showed significantly reduced FANCD2 monoubiquitination and FANCM phosphorylation, resulting in impaired formation of DNA repair foci. FoxF1 knockdown caused chromosomal instability, nuclear abnormalities, and increased tumor cell death in response to DNA-damaging agents. Overexpression of FoxF1 in DNA-damaged cells improved stability of FA proteins, decreased chromosomal and nuclear aberrations, restored formation of DNA repair foci and prevented cell death after DNA damage. These findings demonstrate that FoxF1 is a key component of FA complexes and a critical mediator of DNA damage response in tumor cells.

  16. 17 CFR 249.1200 - Form X-17F-1A-Report for missing, lost, stolen or counterfeit securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form X-17F-1A-Report for... Reporting and Inquiry With Respect to Missing, Lost, Stolen, or Counterfeit Securities § 249.1200 Form X-17F... Register citations affecting Form X-17F-1A, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in...

  17. 26 CFR 54.4980F-1 - Notice requirements for certain pension plan amendments significantly reducing the rate of future...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... amendments significantly reducing the rate of future benefit accrual. 54.4980F-1 Section 54.4980F-1 Internal... significantly reducing the rate of future benefit accrual. The following questions and answers concern the... a plan amendment of an applicable pension plan that significantly reduces the rate of future...

  18. Role of the transcription factor E2F1 in CXCR4-mediated neurotoxicity and HIV neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Saori; Khan, Muhammad Z.; Hippensteel, Randi L; Parkar, Anjum; Raghupathi, Ramesh; Meucci, Olimpia

    2006-01-01

    This study sought to determine the role of the transcription factor E2F1 in CXCR4-mediated neurotoxicity and HIV neuropathology. We studied the effect of the HIV envelope protein gp120 on the expression of E2F1-dependent apoptotic proteins in human and rodent neurons and examined the expression pattern of E2F1 in the brain of HIV-infected individuals. Our findings suggest that in cultured neurons gp120 increased E2F1 levels in the nucleus, stimulated its transcriptional activity, and enhanced the expression of the E2F1 target proteins Cdc2 and Puma. Studies with neuronal cultures from E2F1 deficient mice demonstrated that the transcription factor is required for gp120-induced neurotoxicity and up-regulation of Cdc2 and Puma. Levels of E2F1 protein were greater in the nucleus of neurons in brains of HIV-infected patients exhibiting dementia when compared to HIV-negative subjects or HIV-positive neurologically normal patients. Overall, these studies indicate that E2F1 is primarily involved in CXCR4-mediated neurotoxicity and HIV neuropathogenesis. PMID:17011204

  19. 26 CFR 48.4216(f)-1 - Value of used components excluded from price of certain trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Value of used components excluded from price of certain trucks. 48.4216(f)-1 Section 48.4216(f)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... of the finished article. For example, where a manufacturer builds a truck for a customer who...

  20. Forkhead transcription factor FoxF1 interacts with Fanconi anemia protein complexes to promote DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Arun; Ustiyan, Vladimir; Zhang, Yufang; Kalin, Tanya V.; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V.

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box F1 (Foxf1) transcription factor is an important regulator of embryonic development but its role in tumor cells remains incompletely understood. While 16 proteins were characterized in Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex, its interactions with cellular transcriptional machinery remain poorly characterized. Here, we identified FoxF1 protein as a novel interacting partner of the FA complex proteins. Using multiple human and mouse tumor cell lines and Foxf1+/− mice we demonstrated that FoxF1 physically binds to and increases stability of FA proteins. FoxF1 co-localizes with FANCD2 in DNA repair foci in cultured cells and tumor tissues obtained from cisplatin-treated mice. In response to DNA damage, FoxF1-deficient tumor cells showed significantly reduced FANCD2 monoubiquitination and FANCM phosphorylation, resulting in impaired formation of DNA repair foci. FoxF1 knockdown caused chromosomal instability, nuclear abnormalities, and increased tumor cell death in response to DNA-damaging agents. Overexpression of FoxF1 in DNA-damaged cells improved stability of FA proteins, decreased chromosomal and nuclear aberrations, restored formation of DNA repair foci and prevented cell death after DNA damage. These findings demonstrate that FoxF1 is a key component of FA complexes and a critical mediator of DNA damage response in tumor cells. PMID:26625197

  1. ‘Caro-Tex 312’, a high yielding, orange-fruited, Habanero-type, F1 hybrid pepper

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Research Service of the U. S. Department of Agriculture and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences of Texas A&M University have released the high yielding, orange-fruited, Habanero-type, F1 hybrid pepper cultivar CaroTex-312. CaroTex-312 is the result of an F1 cross made at C...

  2. F1 and Tbilisi Are Closely Related Brucellaphages Exhibiting Some Distinct Nucleotide Variations Which Determine the Host Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Al Dahouk, Sascha; Nöckler, Karsten; Göllner, Cornelia; Appel, Bernd; Hertwig, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We report on the 41,143-bp genome of brucellaphage F1, a podovirus that infects several Brucella species. The F1 genome is almost identical to the genome of brucellaphage Tb. However, some structural proteins of the phages exhibit extensive polymorphisms and might be responsible for their different host ranges. PMID:24482520

  3. 17 CFR 249.1200 - Form X-17F-1A-Report for missing, lost, stolen or counterfeit securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Form X-17F-1A-Report for... Reporting and Inquiry With Respect to Missing, Lost, Stolen, or Counterfeit Securities § 249.1200 Form X-17F... Register citations affecting Form X-17F-1A, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in...

  4. 17 CFR 249.1200 - Form X-17F-1A-Report for missing, lost, stolen or counterfeit securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Form X-17F-1A-Report for... Reporting and Inquiry With Respect to Missing, Lost, Stolen, or Counterfeit Securities § 249.1200 Form X-17F... Register citations affecting Form X-17F-1A, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in...

  5. 17 CFR 249.1200 - Form X-17F-1A-Report for missing, lost, stolen or counterfeit securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Form X-17F-1A-Report for... Reporting and Inquiry With Respect to Missing, Lost, Stolen, or Counterfeit Securities § 249.1200 Form X-17F... Register citations affecting Form X-17F-1A, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in...

  6. 17 CFR 249.1200 - Form X-17F-1A-Report for missing, lost, stolen or counterfeit securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Form X-17F-1A-Report for... Reporting and Inquiry With Respect to Missing, Lost, Stolen, or Counterfeit Securities § 249.1200 Form X-17F... Register citations affecting Form X-17F-1A, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in...

  7. Intestine-specific homeobox (ISX) upregulates E2F1 expression and related oncogenic activities in HCC

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Chee-Yin; Hsi, Edward; Kuo, Hsing-Tao; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.; Hsu, Shih-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Intestine-specific homeobox (ISX), a newly identified proto-oncogene, is involved in cell proliferation and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the underlying mechanisms linking gene expression and tumor formation remain unclear. In this study, we found that ISX transcriptionally activated E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F1) and associated oncogenic activity by directly binding to the E2 site of its promoter. Forced expression of ISX increased the expression of and phosphorylated the serine residue at position 332 of E2F1, which may be translocated into the nucleus to form the E2F1–DP-1 complex, suggesting that the promotion of oncogenic activities of the ISX–E2F1 axis plays a critical role in hepatoma cells. Coexpression of ISX and E2F1 significantly promoted p53 and RB-mediated cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis, and repressed apoptosis and autophagy. In contrast, short hairpin RNAi-mediated attenuation of ISX and E2F1 decreased cell proliferation and malignant transformation, respectively, in hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. The mRNA expression of E2F1 and ISX in 238 paired specimens from human HCC patients, and the adjacent, normal tissues exhibited a tumor-specific expression pattern which was highly correlated with disease pathogenesis, patient survival time, progression stage, and poor prognosis. Therefore, our results indicate that E2F1 is an important downstream gene of ISX in hepatoma progression. PMID:27175585

  8. Classifying genotype F of hepatitis B virus into F1 and F2 subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hideaki; Fujiwara, Kei; Gish, Robert G.; Sakugawa, Hiroshi; Yoshizawa, Hiroshi; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Orito, Etsuro; Ueda, Ryuzo; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Kato, Takanobu; Miyakawa, Yuzo; Mizokami, Masashi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the propriety of providing hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes F and H with two distinct genotypes. METHODS: Eleven HBV isolates of genotype F (HBV/F) were recovered from patients living in San Francisco, Japan, Panama, and Venezuela, and their full-length sequences were determined. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out among them along with HBV isolates previously reported. RESULTS: Seven of them clustered with reported HBV/F isolates in the phylogenetic tree constructed on the entire genomic sequence. The remaining four flocked on another branch along with three HBV isolates formerly reported as genotype H. These seven HBV isolates, including the four in this study and the three reported, had a sequence divergence of 7.3-9.5% from the other HBV/F isolates, and differed by >13.7% from HBV isolates of the other six genotypes (A-E and G). Based on a marked genomic divergence, falling just short of >8% separating the seven genotypes, these seven HBV/F isolates were classified into F2 subtype and the former seven into F1 subtype provisionally. In a pairwise comparison of the S-gene sequences among the 7 HBV/F2 isolates and against 47 HBV/F1 isolates as well as 136 representing the other six genotypes (A-E and G), two clusters separated by distinct genetic distances emerged. CONCLUSION: Based on these analyses, classifying HBV/F isolates into two subtypes (F1 and F2) would be more appropriate than providing them with two distinct genotypes (F and H). PMID:16419158

  9. None of the rotor residues of F1-ATPase are essential for torque generation.

    PubMed

    Chiwata, Ryohei; Kohori, Ayako; Kawakami, Tomonari; Shiroguchi, Katsuyuki; Furuike, Shou; Adachi, Kengo; Sutoh, Kazuo; Yoshida, Masasuke; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-20

    F1-ATPase is a powerful rotary molecular motor that can rotate an object several hundred times as large as the motor itself against the viscous friction of water. Forced reverse rotation has been shown to lead to ATP synthesis, implying that the mechanical work against the motor's high torque can be converted into the chemical energy of ATP. The minimal composition of the motor protein is α3β3γ subunits, where the central rotor subunit γ turns inside a stator cylinder made of alternately arranged α3β3 subunits using the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis. The rotor consists of an axle, a coiled coil of the amino- and carboxyl-terminal α-helices of γ, which deeply penetrates the stator cylinder, and a globular protrusion that juts out from the stator. Previous work has shown that, for a thermophilic F1, significant portions of the axle can be truncated and the motor still rotates a submicron sized bead duplex, indicating generation of up to half the wild-type (WT) torque. Here, we inquire if any specific interactions between the stator and the rest of the rotor are needed for the generation of a sizable torque. We truncated the protruding portion of the rotor and replaced part of the remaining axle residues such that every residue of the rotor has been deleted or replaced in this or previous truncation mutants. This protrusionless construct showed an unloaded rotary speed about a quarter of the WT, and generated one-third to one-half of the WT torque. No residue-specific interactions are needed for this much performance. F1 is so designed that the basic rotor-stator interactions for torque generation and control of catalysis rely solely upon the shape and size of the rotor at very low resolution. Additional tailored interactions augment the torque to allow ATP synthesis under physiological conditions.

  10. Trends in the E and F1 Regions of the Earth's Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremer, J.

    2007-05-01

    Ground based ionosonde measurements are a very important source for investigations of long-term variations in the ionospheric E and F1 regions. Data of such observations are available at many different ionospheric stations all over the world since partly more than 50 years. Here mainly standard parameters foE, h'E, and foF1 are used for trend analyses. Two main problems have to be taken into consideration in these analyses. Firstly, the data series have to be homogeneous, i. e. the observations should not be disturbed by artificial steps due to changes in the used technical equipment or in the evaluation algorithm. Secondly, the strong solar and geomagnetic influences upon the ionospheric data have carefully to be removed by an appropriate regression analysis. Otherwise it is impossible to detect the small trends in the different ionospheric parameters. The trends derived at individual stations differ markedly. Nevertheless, the mean global trends estimated from the trends at the different stations are statistically significant different from zero (positive trends in foE and foF1, negative trend in h'E). These mean trends can at least qualitatively be explained by an increasing atmospheric greenhouse effect (increase of CO2 content or of other greenhouse gases) and decreasing ozone values. The positive foE trend is also in qualitative agreement with rocket mass spectrometer observations of ion densities in the E region. Furthermore first indications could be found that the changing ozone trend (before about 1979, between 1979 until 1995, and after about 1995) can modify the estimated long-term variations at least in foE.

  11. Temperature Dependence of the Rotation and Hydrolysis Activities of F1-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Furuike, Shou; Adachi, Kengo; Sakaki, Naoyoshi; Shimo-Kon, Rieko; Itoh, Hiroyasu; Muneyuki, Eiro; Yoshida, Masasuke; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    F1-ATPase, a water-soluble portion of the enzyme ATP synthase, is a rotary molecular motor driven by ATP hydrolysis. To learn how the kinetics of rotation are regulated, we have investigated the rotational characteristics of a thermophilic F1-ATPase over the temperature range 4–50°C by attaching a polystyrene bead (or bead duplex) to the rotor subunit and observing its rotation under a microscope. The apparent rate of ATP binding estimated at low ATP concentrations increased from 1.2 × 106 M−1 s−1 at 4°C to 4.3 × 107 M−1 s−1 at 40°C, whereas the torque estimated at 2 mM ATP remained around 40 pN·nm over 4–50°C. The rotation was stepwise at 4°C, even at the saturating ATP concentration of 2 mM, indicating the presence of a hitherto unresolved rate-limiting reaction that occurs at ATP-waiting angles. We also measured the ATP hydrolysis activity in bulk solution at 4–65°C. F1-ATPase tends to be inactivated by binding ADP tightly. Both the inactivation and reactivation rates were found to rise sharply with temperature, and above 30°C, equilibrium between the active and inactive forms was reached within 2 s, the majority being inactive. Rapid inactivation at high temperatures is consistent with the physiological role of this enzyme, ATP synthesis, in the thermophile. PMID:18375515

  12. RAPD linkage mapping in a longleaf pine x slash pine F1 family.

    PubMed

    Kubisiak, T L; Nelson, C D; Nance, W L; Stine, M

    1995-06-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs) were used to construct linkage maps of the parent of a longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) slash pine (Pinus elliottii Englm.) F1 family. A total of 247 segregating loci [233 (1∶1), 14 (3∶1)] and 87 polymorphic (between parents), but non-segregating, loci were identified. The 233 loci segregating 1∶1 (testcross configuration) were used to construct parent-specific linkage maps, 132 for the longleaf-pine parent and 101 for the slash-pine parent. The resulting linkage maps consisted of 122 marker loci in 18 groups (three or more loci) and three pairs (1367.5 cM) for longleaf pine, and 91 marker loci in 13 groups and six pairs for slash pine (952.9 cM). Genome size estimates based on two-point linkage data ranged from 2348 to 2392 cM for longleaf pine, and from 2292 to 2372 cM for slash pine. Linkage of 3∶1 loci to testcross loci in each of the parental maps was used to infer further linkages within maps, as well as potentially homologous counterparts between maps. Three of the longleaf-pine linkage groups appear to be potentially homologous counterparts to four different slash-pine linkage groups. The number of heterozygous loci (previously testcross in parents) per F1 individual, ranged from 96 to 130. With the 87 polymorphic, but non-segregating, loci that should also be heterozygous in the F1 progeny, a maximum of 183-217 heterozygous loci could be available for mapping early height growth (EHG) loci and for applying genomic selection in backcross populations.

  13. Dale Reed with model in front of M2-F1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Dale Reed with a model of the M2-F1 in front of the actual lifting body. Reed used the model to show the potential of the lifting bodies. He first flew it into tall grass to test stability and trim, then hand-launched it from buildings for longer flights. Finally, he towed the lifting-body model aloft using a powered model airplane known as the 'Mothership.' A timer released the model and it glided to a landing. Dale's wife Donna used a 9 mm. camera to film the flights of the model. Its stability as it glided--despite its lack of wings--convinced Milt Thompson and some Flight Research Center engineers including the center director, Paul Bikle, that a piloted lifting body was possible. The lifting body concept evolved in the mid-1950s as researchers considered alternatives to ballistic reentries of piloted space capsules. The designs for hypersonic, wingless vehicles were on the boards at NASA Ames and NASA Langley facilities, while the US Air Force was gearing up for its Dyna-Soar program, which defined the need for a spacecraft that would land like an airplane. Despite favorable research on lifting bodies, there was little support for a flight program. Dryden engineer R. Dale Reed was intrigued with the lifting body concept, and reasoned that some sort of flight demonstration was needed before wingless aircraft could be taken seriously. In February 1962, he built a model lifting body based upon the Ames M2 design, and air-launched it from a radio controlled 'mothership.' Home movies of these flights, plus the support of research pilot Milt Thompson, helped pursuade the facilities director, Paul Bikle, to give the go-ahead for the construction of a full-scale version, to be used as a wind-tunnel model and possibly flown as a glider. Comparing lifting bodies to space capsules, an unofficial motto of the project was, 'Don't be Rescued from Outer Space--Fly Back in Style.' The construction of the M2-F1 was a joint effort by Dryden and a local glider manufacturer, the

  14. Surface Plasmon Resonance Analysis of Histidine-Tagged F1-ATPase Surface Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Jenifer K.; Richter, Mark L.; Berrie, Cindy L.

    2015-11-01

    Studies of the rotational activity of the enzymatic core (α3β3γ) of the F1-ATPase motor protein have relied on binding the enzyme to NTA-coated glass surfaces via polyhistidine tags engineered into the C-termini of each of the three α or β subunits. Those studies revealed the rotational motion of the central γ subunit by monitoring the motion of attached micron-long actin filaments or spherical nanoparticles. However, only a small percentage of the attached filaments or particles were observed to rotate, likely due, at least in part, to non-uniform surface attachment of the motor proteins. In this study, we have applied surface plasmon resonance to monitor the kinetics and affinity of binding of the His-tagged motor protein to NTA-coated gold sensor surfaces. The binding data, when fit to a heterogeneous binding model, exhibit two sets of adsorption-desorption rate constants with two dissociation constants of 4.0 × 10-9 M and 8.6 × 10-11 M for 6His-α3β3γ binding to the nickel ion-activated NTA surface. The data are consistent with mixed attachment of the protein via two (bimodal) and three (trimodal) NTA/Ni2+-His-tag interactions, respectively, with the less stable bimodal interaction dominating. The results provide a partial explanation for the low number of surface-attached F1 motors previously observed in rotation studies and suggest alternative approaches to uniform F1 motor surface attachment for future fabrication of motor-based nanobiodevices and materials.

  15. None of the Rotor Residues of F1-ATPase Are Essential for Torque Generation

    PubMed Central

    Chiwata, Ryohei; Kohori, Ayako; Kawakami, Tomonari; Shiroguchi, Katsuyuki; Furuike, Shou; Adachi, Kengo; Sutoh, Kazuo; Yoshida, Masasuke; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    F1-ATPase is a powerful rotary molecular motor that can rotate an object several hundred times as large as the motor itself against the viscous friction of water. Forced reverse rotation has been shown to lead to ATP synthesis, implying that the mechanical work against the motor’s high torque can be converted into the chemical energy of ATP. The minimal composition of the motor protein is α3β3γ subunits, where the central rotor subunit γ turns inside a stator cylinder made of alternately arranged α3β3 subunits using the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis. The rotor consists of an axle, a coiled coil of the amino- and carboxyl-terminal α-helices of γ, which deeply penetrates the stator cylinder, and a globular protrusion that juts out from the stator. Previous work has shown that, for a thermophilic F1, significant portions of the axle can be truncated and the motor still rotates a submicron sized bead duplex, indicating generation of up to half the wild-type (WT) torque. Here, we inquire if any specific interactions between the stator and the rest of the rotor are needed for the generation of a sizable torque. We truncated the protruding portion of the rotor and replaced part of the remaining axle residues such that every residue of the rotor has been deleted or replaced in this or previous truncation mutants. This protrusionless construct showed an unloaded rotary speed about a quarter of the WT, and generated one-third to one-half of the WT torque. No residue-specific interactions are needed for this much performance. F1 is so designed that the basic rotor-stator interactions for torque generation and control of catalysis rely solely upon the shape and size of the rotor at very low resolution. Additional tailored interactions augment the torque to allow ATP synthesis under physiological conditions. PMID:24853745

  16. New orbit recalculations of comet C/1890 F1 Brooks and its dynamical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Królikowska, Małgorzata; Dybczyński, Piotr A.

    2016-08-01

    C/1890 F1 Brooks belongs to a group of 19 comets used by Jan Oort to support his famous hypothesis on the existence of a spherical cloud containing hundreds of billions of comets with orbits of semi-major axes between 50 000 and 150 000 au. Comet Brooks stands out from this group because of a long series of astrometric observations as well as a nearly 2-yr-long observational arc. Rich observational material makes this comet an ideal target for testing the rationality of an effort to recalculate astrometric positions on the basis of original (comet-star) measurements using modern star catalogues. This paper presents the results of such a new analysis based on two different methods: (i) automatic re-reduction based on cometary positions and the (comet-star) measurements and (ii) partially automatic re-reduction based on the contemporary data for the reference stars originally used. We show that both methods offer a significant reduction in the uncertainty of orbital elements. Based on the most preferred orbital solution, the dynamical evolution of comet Brooks during three consecutive perihelion passages is discussed. We conclude that C/1890 F1 is a dynamically old comet that passed the Sun at a distance below 5 au during its previous perihelion passage. Furthermore, its next perihelion passage will be a little closer than during the 1890-1892 apparition. C/1890 F1 is interesting also because it suffered extremely small planetary perturbations when it travelled through the planetary zone. Therefore, in the next passage through perihelion, it will once again be a comet from the Oort spike.

  17. Enhanced inhibitory effects of TBT chloride on the development of F1 rats.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, H; Tsunoda, M; Kaido, T; Hosokawa, M; Sugaya, C; Inoue, Y; Kudo, Y; Satoh, T; Katagiri, H; Akita, H; Saji, M; Wakasa, M; Negishi, T; Tashiro, T; Aizawa, Y

    2010-05-01

    Neurotoxicity is one of the major effects of tributyltin (TBT). The effects on the next generation of F(1) rats exposed to TBT via the placenta and their dams' milk may be stronger than those on adults. Pregnant Wister rats were exposed to TBT at 0 and 125 ppm in their food. Half of the female F(1) rats in both groups were exposed to TBT at 125 ppm in their food from 9 to 15 weeks of age. Female F(1) rats were divided into the following groups: the control-control (CC) group, with no exposure; the TBT-control (TC) group, exposed to TBT via the placenta and their dams' milk; the control-TBT (CT) group, exposed to TBT via their food from 9 to 15 weeks of age; and the TBT-TBT (TT) group, exposed to TBT via the placenta, their dams' milk, and their food (n = 10/group). After administration, an open-field test and prepulse inhibition (PPI) test were performed at 15 weeks of age. The mean body weights of the TC and TT groups were significantly lower than that of the CC group from 9 to 15 weeks of age. The mean relative thymus weight of the TC and TT groups was significantly lower than that of the CC group. In the open-field test, a marked decrease in the total locomotion distance was observed in the TT group. The mean values in the TT and TC groups were significantly lower than that in the CC group. For the locomotion distance between 15 and 20 min, the mean values in the CT, TC, and TT groups were significantly lower than that in the CC group. The mean locomotor distance between 25 and 30 min in the TT group was significantly lower than that in the CC and TC groups. The mean values of instances of wall rearing in the TC, CT, and TT groups were significantly lower than that in the CC group. The mean value of face washing or body washing in the TT group was significantly lower than that in the CT group. There were no significant differences in indexes of the PPI test. Exposure to TBT via the placenta and their dams' milk inhibited the development of F(1) rats, which

  18. Mineral requirements for growth and maintenance of F1 Boer × Saanen male kids.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, I A M A; Härter, C J; Pereira Filho, J M; Sobrinho, A G da Silva; Resende, K T

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the net requirements of minerals for the growth and maintenance of intact male F1 Boer × Saanen goat kids in the initial phase of growth. The following 2 experiments were performed: Exp. 1 was performed to determine the net growth requirements for Ca, P, Mg, Na, and K by F1 Boer × Saanen goat kids from 5 to 25 kg of BW and Exp. 2 was performed to determine the maintenance requirements of F1 Boer × Saanen goats from 15 to 25 kg BW. In Exp. 1, 32 intact male goat kids were distributed in a completely randomized design and mineral body composition was fit to an allometric equation in the form of a nonlinear model. To determine the mineral requirements for maintenance in Exp. 2, 21 intact male goat kids were distributed in a randomized block design, where the goat kids were subjected to 3 levels of feed restriction (0, 30, and 60% feed restriction). At the onset of Exp. 2, 7 goat kids were harvested and used to estimate the initial body composition (15 kg BW). Initial body composition was used to calculate the retention of minerals. The maintenance requirements were estimated by regressions obtained from the retention of minerals in the empty body and the intake of the mineral. The concentration of Ca, P, Na, and K in the empty BW decreased by 11, 13, 26, and 23% with the increase in BW from 5 to 25 kg (P < 0.01). As a consequence, our results showed that net requirements of Ca, P, Mg, Na, and K for weight gain decreased by 27.5, 27.8, 4.25, 43.2, and 39.7%, respectively, with the increase in BW from 5 to 25 kg (P < 0.01). The net requirements (g/kg of ADG) decreased from 9.7 to 7.0 for Ca, 6.5 to 4.7 for P, 0.38 to 0.36 for Mg, 0.88 to 0.50 for Na, and 1.9 to 1.2 for K when BW increased from 5 to 25 kg. The daily net requirements for maintenance per kilogram of BW were 38 mg of Ca, 42 mg of P, 1.6 mg of Mg, 5.0 mg of Na, and 19 mg of K. These results for the nutritional requirements of minerals may help to formulate more

  19. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    PubMed

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-03

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  20. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A.; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles (4He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei—nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons—is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the ‘adiabatic projection method’ to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  1. alpha-Hexachlorocyclohexane (alpha-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    alpha - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( alpha - HCH ) ; CASRN 319 - 84 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Ass

  2. Extensive allelic variation in gene expression in populus F1 hybrids.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yan; Adams, Keith L

    2007-12-01

    Hybridization between plant species can induce speciation as well as phenotypic novelty and heterosis. Hybrids also can show genome rearrangements and gene expression changes compared with their parents. Here we determined the allelic variation in gene expression in Populus trichocarpa x Populus deltoides F(1) hybrids. Among 30 genes analyzed in four independently formed hybrids, 17 showed >1.5-fold expression biases for one of the two alleles, and there was monoallelic expression of one gene. Expression ratios of the alleles differed between leaves and stems for 10 genes. The results suggest differential regulation of the two parental alleles in the hybrids. To determine if the allelic expression biases were caused by hybridization we compared the ratios of species-specific transcripts between an F(1) hybrid and its parents. Thirteen of 19 genes showed allelic expression ratios in the hybrid that were significantly different from the ratios of the parental species. The P. deltoides allele of one gene was silenced in the hybrid. Modes of gene regulation were inferred from the hybrid-parent comparisons. Cis-regulation was inferred for 6 genes, trans-regulation for 1 gene, and combined cis- and trans-regulation for 9 genes. The results from this study indicate that hybridization between plant species can have extensive effects on allelic expression patterns, some of which might lead to phenotypic changes.

  3. Little qualitative RNA misexpression in sterile male F1 hybrids of Drosophila pseudoobscura and D. persimilis

    PubMed Central

    Reiland, Jane; Noor, Mohamed AF

    2002-01-01

    Background Although the genetics of hybrid sterility has been the subject of evolutionary studies for over sixty years, no one has shown the reason(s) why alleles that operate normally within species fail to function in another genetic background. Several lines of evidence suggest that failures in normal gene transcription contribute to hybrid dysfunctions, but genome-wide studies of gene expression in pure-species and hybrids have not been undertaken. Here, we study genome-wide patterns of expression in Drosophila pseudoobscura, D. persimilis, and their sterile F1 hybrid males using differential display. Results Over five thousand amplifications were analyzed, and 3312 were present in amplifications from both of the pure species. Of these, 28 (0.5%) were not present in amplifications from adult F1 hybrid males. Using product-specific primers, we were able to confirm one of nine of the transcripts putatively misexpressed in hybrids. This transcript was shown to be male-specific, but without detectable homology to D. melanogaster sequence. Conclusion We tentatively conclude that hybrid sterility can evolve without widespread, qualitative misexpression of transcripts in species hybrids. We suggest that, if more misexpression exists in sterile hybrids, it is likely to be quantitative, tissue-specific, and/ or limited to earlier developmental stages. Although several caveats apply, this study was a first attempt to determine the mechanistic basis of hybrid sterility, and one potential candidate gene has been identified for further study. PMID:12223116

  4. What Causes Partial F1 Hybrid Viability? Incomplete Penetrance versus Genetic Variation

    PubMed Central

    López-Fernández, Hernán; Bolnick, Daniel I.

    2007-01-01

    Background Interspecific hybrid crosses often produce offspring with reduced but non-zero survivorship. In this paper we ask why such partial inviability occurs. This partial inviability could arise from incomplete penetrance of lethal Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities (DMIs) shared by all members of a hybrid cross. Alternatively, siblings may differ with respect to the presence or number of DMIs, leading to genotype-dependent variation in viability and hence non-Mendelian segregation of parental alleles in surviving F1 hybrids. Methodology/Principal Findings We used amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) to test for segregation distortion in one hybrid cross between green and longear sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus and L. megalotis). Hybrids showed partial viability, and twice as much segregation distortion (36.8%) of AFLPs as an intraspecific control cross (18.8%). Incomplete penetrance of DMIs, which should cause genotype-independent mortality, is insufficient to explain the observed segregation distortion. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that F1 hybrid sunfish are polymorphic for DMIs, either due to sex-linked DMI loci (causing Haldane's Rule), or polymorphic autosomal DMI loci. Because few AFLP markers were sex-linked (2%), the most parsimonious conclusion is that parents may have been heterozygous for loci causing hybrid inviability. PMID:18074018

  5. Variability in the amount of homoeologous pairing among F1 hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Lidia; Greizerstein, Eduardo; Ferrari, María

    2016-01-01

    Genes involved in the exclusive pairing of homologous chromosomes have been described in several polyploid species but little is known about the activity of these genes in diploids (which have only one dose of each homoeologous genome). Analysis of the meiotic behaviour of species, natural and artificial hybrids and polyploids of Glandularia suggests that, in allopolyploids where homoeologous genomes are in two doses, regulator genes prevent homoeologous pairing. The different meiotic phenotypes in diploid F1 hybrids between Glandularia pulchella and Glandularia incisa strongly suggest that these pairing regulator genes possess an incomplete penetrance when homoeologous genomes are in only one dose. Moreover, the meiotic analysis of natural and artificial F1 hybrids suggests that the genetic constitution of parental species influences the activity of pairing regulator genes and is mainly responsible for variability in the amount of homoeologous pairing observed in diploid hybrids. In Glandularia, the pairing regulator genes originated in South American diploid species. The cytogenetic characteristics of this genus make it a good model to analyse and explore in greater depth the activity of pairing regulator genes at different ploidy levels. PMID:27255515

  6. Replication of a chronic hepatitis B virus genotype F1b construct.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Sergio; Jiménez, Gustavo; Alarcón, Valentina; Prieto, Cristian; Muñoz, Francisca; Riquelme, Constanza; Venegas, Mauricio; Brahm, Javier; Loyola, Alejandra; Villanueva, Rodrigo A

    2016-03-01

    Genotype F is one of the less-studied genotypes of human hepatitis B virus, although it is widely distributed in regions of Central and South American. Our previous studies have shown that HBV genotype F is prevalent in Chile, and phylogenetic analysis of its full-length sequence amplified from the sera of chronically infected patients identified it as HBV subgenotype F1b. We have previously reported the full-length sequence of a HBV molecular clone obtained from a patient chronically infected with genotype F1b. In this report, we established a system to study HBV replication based on hepatoma cell lines transfected with full-length monomers of the HBV genome. Culture supernatants were analyzed after transfection and found to contain both HBsAg and HBeAg viral antigens. Consistently, fractionated cell extracts revealed the presence of viral replication, with both cytoplasmic and nuclear DNA intermediates. Analysis of HBV-transfected cells by indirect immunofluorescence or immunoelectron microscopy revealed the expression of viral antigens and cytoplasmic viral particles, respectively. To test the functionality of the ongoing viral replication further at the level of chromatinized cccDNA, transfected cells were treated with a histone deacetylase inhibitor, and this resulted in increased viral replication. This correlated with changes posttranslational modifications of histones at viral promoters. Thus, the development of this viral replication system for HBV genotype F will facilitate studies on the regulation of viral replication and the identification of new antiviral drugs.

  7. Risk reduction activities for an F-1-based advanced booster for NASA's Space Launch System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, A. M.; Doering, K. B.; Cook, S. A.; Meadows, R. G.; Lariviere, B. W.; Bachtel, F. D.

    For NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction (ABEDRR) procurement, Dynetics, Inc. and Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) formed a team to offer a wide-ranging set of risk reduction activities and full-scale, system-level demonstrations that support NASA's goal of enabling competition on an affordable booster that meets the evolved capabilities of the SLS. During the ABEDRR effort, the Dynetics Team will apply state-of-the-art manufacturing and processing techniques to the heritage F-1, resulting in a low recurring cost engine while retaining the benefits of Apollo-era experience. ABEDRR will use NASA test facilities to perform full-scale F-1 gas generator and powerpack hot-fire test campaigns for engine risk reduction. Dynetics will also fabricate and test a tank assembly to verify the structural design. The Dynetics Team is partnered with NASA through Space Act Agreements (SAAs) to maximize the expertise and capabilities applied to ABEDRR.

  8. Maternal obesity and malnourishment exacerbate perinatal oxidative stress resulting in diabetogenic programming in F1 offspring.

    PubMed

    Saad, M I; Abdelkhalek, T M; Haiba, M M; Saleh, M M; Hanafi, M Y; Tawfik, S H; Kamel, M A

    2016-06-01

    The effect of in-utero environment on fetal health and survival is long-lasting, and this is known as the fetal origin hypothesis. The oxidative stress state during gestation could play a pivotal role in fetal programming and development of diseases such as diabetes. In this study, we investigated the effect of intra-uterine obesity and malnutrition on oxidative stress markers in pancreatic and peripheral tissues of F1 offspring both prenatally and postnatally. Furthermore, the effect of postnatal diet on oxidative stress profile was evaluated. The results indicated that intra-uterine obesity and malnourishment significantly increased oxidative stress in F1 offspring. Moreover, the programming effect of obesity was more pronounced and protracted than malnutrition. The obesity-induced programming of offspring tissues was independent of high-caloric environment that the offspring endured; however, high-caloric diet potentiated its effect. In addition, pancreas and liver were the most affected tissues by fetal reprogramming both prenatally and postnatally. In conclusion, maternal obesity and malnutrition-induced oxidative stress could predispose offspring to insulin resistance and diabetes.

  9. Developmental trajectories and breakdown in F1 interpopulation hybrids of Tribolium castaneum

    PubMed Central

    Drury, Douglas W; Ehmke, Ross C; Jideonwo, Victoria N; Wade, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    When hybrid inviability is an indirect by-product of local adaptation, we expect its degree of severity between pairs of populations to vary and to be sensitive to the environment. While complete reciprocal hybrid inviability is the outcome of the gradual process of local adaptation, it is not representative of the process of accumulation of incompatibility. In the flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, some pairs of populations exhibit complete, reciprocal F1 hybrid incompatibility while other pairs are fully or partially compatible. We characterize this naturally occurring variation in the degree and timing of expression of the hybrid incompatible phenotype to better understand the number of genes or developmental processes contributing to speciation. We assessed the morphological and developmental variation in four Tribolium castaneum populations and their 12 possible F1 hybrids at each life-history stage from egg to adult. We find that the rate of hybrid larval development is affected in all interpopulation crosses, including those eventually producing viable, fertile adults. Hybrid incompatibility manifests early in development as changes in the duration of instars and diminished success in the transition between instars are relative to the parent populations. Parent populations with similar developmental profiles may produce hybrids with disrupted development. The degree and timing of expression of hybrid inviability depends upon populations crossed, direction of the cross, and environment in which hybrids are raised. Our findings suggest that the coordinated expression of genes involved in transitional periods of development is the underlying cause of hybrid incompatibility in this species. PMID:23919145

  10. Effects of changing jaw height on F1 during babble: a case study at 9 months.

    PubMed

    Steeve, Roger W

    2012-04-01

    An empirical gap exists in our understanding of the extent that mandibular kinematics modulate acoustic changes in natural babble productions of infants. Data were recorded from a normal developing 9-month-old infant. Mandibular position was tracked from the infant during vowel and canonical babble. Linear predictive coding analysis was used to track estimates of formant center-frequency for F1. For each sample, a correlation coefficient was computed between changes in jaw height and formant history for F1. A Mann-Whitney rank sum test reached significance for differences among coefficients for vowel and canonical babble. Coefficients for vowel babble productions were nearest to -1 with a median of r=-0.76, showing the strongest relationship between jaw position and formant history, while the median for canonical babble coefficients was r=-0.54, indicating greater contribution of the tongue and lips. This 9-month-old infant exhibited plasticity for coordinating the jaw, tongue and lips among babble types.

  11. Engineering a light-controlled F1 ATPase using structure-based protein design

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The F1 sub-complex of ATP synthase is a biological nanomotor that converts the free energy of ATP hydrolysis into mechanical work with an astonishing efficiency of up to 100% (Kinosita et al., 2000). To probe the principal mechanics of the machine, I re-engineered the active site of E.coli F1 ATPase with a structure-based protein design approach: by incorporation of a site-specific, photoswitchable crosslinker, whose end-to-end distance can be modulated by illumination with light of two different wavelengths, a dynamic constraint was imposed on the inter-atomic distances of the α and β subunits. Crosslinking reduced the ATP hydrolysis activity of four designs tested in vitro and in one case created a synthetic ATPase whose activity can be reversibly modulated by subsequent illumination with near UV and blue light. The work is a first step into the direction of the long-term goal to design nanoscaled machines based on biological parts that can be precisely controlled by light. PMID:27547581

  12. A proline-to-histidine mutation in POU1F1 is associated with production traits in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Maltecca, C; Khatib, H

    2008-10-01

    POU class 1 homeobox 1 (POU1F1) is a member of the tissue-specific POU-containing transcription factor family. The expression of POU1F1 in mammalian pituitary gland controls the transcription of the genes encoding growth hormone, prolactin (PRL) and the subunits of thyroid-stimulating hormone. In addition, some genes in the JAK/STAT signalling pathway downstream of POU1F1 have been shown to be associated with different production traits in dairy cattle. To investigate whether the POU1F1 gene is associated with economically important traits in dairy cattle, a pooled DNA sequencing approach was used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene. An SNP in exon 3 of POU1F1 that changes a proline to a histidine was identified. A total of 2141 individuals from two North American Holstein cattle resource populations were genotyped for this SNP using a modified PCR-RFLP method. Statistical analyses revealed significant association of POU1F1 variants with milk yield and productive life, which makes POU1F1 a possible candidate for marker-assisted selection in dairy cattle breeding programmes.

  13. Spawning and fertility of F1 hybrids of the coral genus Acropora in the Indo-Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Naoko; Iwao, Kenji; Morita, Masaya; Fukami, Hironobu

    2016-09-01

    The role of hybridization through multi-specific synchronous spawning in the evolution of reef-building corals has been discussed since the 1990s, particularly for the genus Acropora. However, F1 hybrids have been reported as common in only one case in the Caribbean, with no evidence of mechanisms that would allow continuous reproduction of the hybrids. In this study, we report for the first time the fecundity of two F1 hybrid colonies produced experimentally from two Indo-Pacific species, A. intermedia and A. florida. These F1 hybrids spawned at the same time as the parental corals. Backcrossing and F1 hybrid crossing were successful in both directions. Furthermore, more than 90% self-fertilization was achieved in an F1 hybrid, although it was negligible in the parental corals. While it is possible that the F1 hybrid was a chimera, these results suggest that some products of interspecific hybridization may persist as the offspring of self-fertilizing F1 hybrids.

  14. The cat lipocalin Fel d 7 and its cross-reactivity with the dog lipocalin Can f 1.

    PubMed

    Apostolovic, D; Sánchez-Vidaurre, S; Waden, K; Curin, M; Grundström, J; Gafvelin, G; Cirkovic Velickovic, T; Grönlund, H; Thomas, W R; Valenta, R; Hamsten, C; van Hage, M

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the prevalence of sensitization to the cat lipocalin Fel d 7 among 140 cat-sensitized Swedish patients and elucidated its allergenic activity and cross-reactivity with the dog lipocalin Can f 1. Sixty-five of 140 patients had IgE to rFel d 7 whereof 60 also had IgE to rCan f 1. A moderate correlation between IgE levels to rFel d 7 and rCan f 1 was found. rFel d 7 activated basophils in vitro and inhibited IgE binding to rCan f 1 in 4 of 13 patients, whereas rCan f 1 inhibited IgE binding to rFel d 7 in 7 of 13 patients. Fel d 7 and Can f 1 showed high similarities in protein structure and epitopes in common were found using cross-reactive antisera. Fel d 7 is a common allergen in a Swedish cat-sensitized population that cross-reacts with Can f 1, and may contribute to symptoms in cat- but also in dog-allergic patients.

  15. E2F1 interactions with hHR23A inhibit its degradation and promote DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Randeep K.; Dagnino, Lina

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a major mechanism for removal of DNA lesions induced by exposure to UV radiation in the epidermis. Recognition of damaged DNA sites is the initial step in their repair, and requires multiprotein complexes that contain XPC and hHR23 proteins, or their orthologues. A variety of transcription factors are also involved in NER, including E2F1. In epidermal keratinocytes, UV exposure induces E2F1 phosphorylation, which allows it to recruit various NER factors to sites of DNA damage. However, the relationship between E2F1 and hHR23 proteins vis-à-vis NER has remained unexplored. We now show that E2F1 and hHR23 proteins can interact, and this interaction stabilizes E2F1, inhibiting its proteasomal degradation. Reciprocally, E2F1 regulates hHR23A subcellular localization, recruiting it to sites of DNA photodamage. As a result, E2F1 and hHR23A enhance DNA repair following exposure to UV radiation, contributing to genomic stability in the epidermis. PMID:27028861

  16. Alpha Hydroxy Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cosmetics Home Cosmetics Products & Ingredients Ingredients Alpha Hydroxy Acids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... for Industry: Labeling for Cosmetics Containing Alpha Hydroxy Acids The following information is intended to answer questions ...

  17. Platypus Pou5f1 reveals the first steps in the evolution of trophectoderm differentiation and pluripotency in mammals.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Hitoshi; Sekita, Yoko; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; Grützner, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Uterine nourishment of embryos by the placenta is a key feature of mammals. Although a variety of placenta types exist, they are all derived from the trophectoderm (TE) cell layer of the developing embryo. Egg-laying mammals (platypus and echidnas) are distinguished by a very short intrauterine embryo development, in which a simple placenta forms from TE-like cells. The Pou5f1 gene encodes a class V POU family transcription factor Oct3/4. In mice, Oct3/4 together with the highly conserved caudal-related homeobox transcription factor Cdx2, determines TE fate in pre-implantation development. In contrast to Cdx2, Pou5f1 has only been identified in eutherian mammals and marsupials, whereas, in other vertebrates, pou2 is considered to be the Pou5f1 ortholog. Here, we show that platypus and opossum genomes contain a Pou5f1 and pou2 homolog, pou2-related, indicating that these two genes are paralogues and arose by gene duplication in early mammalian evolution. In a complementation assay, we found that platypus or human Pou5f1, but not opossum or zebrafish pou2, restores self-renewal in Pou5f1-null mouse ES cells, showing that platypus possess a fully functional Pou5f1 gene. Interestingly, we discovered that parts of one of the conserved regions (CR4) is missing from the platypus Pou5f1 promoter, suggesting that the autoregulation and reciprocal inhibition between Pou5f1 and Cdx2 evolved after the divergence of monotremes and may be linked to the development of more elaborate placental types in marsupial and eutherian mammals.

  18. Protease Omi facilitates neurite outgrowth in mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells by cleaving transcription factor E2F1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qi; Hu, Qing-song; Xu, Ran-jie; Zhen, Xue-chu; Wang, Guang-hui

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Omi is an ATP-independent serine protease that is necessary for neuronal function and survival. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of protease Omi in regulating differentiation of mouse neuroblastoma cells and to identify the substrate of Omi involved in this process. Methods: Mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells and Omi protease-deficient mnd2 mice were used in this study. To modulate Omi and E2F1 expression, N2a cells were transfected with expression plasmids, shRNA plasmids or siRNA. Protein levels were detected using immunoblot assays. The interaction between Omi and E2F1 was studied using immunoprecipitation, GST pulldown and in vitro cleavage assays. N2a cells were treated with 20 μmol/L retinoic acid (RA) and 1% fetal bovine serum to induce neurite outgrowth, which was measured using Image J software. Results: E2F1 was significantly increased in Omi knockdown cells and in brain lysates of mnd2 mice, and was decreased in cells overexpressing wild-type Omi, but not inactive Omi S276C. In brain lysates of mnd2 mice, endogenous E2F1 was co-immunoprecipitated with endogenous Omi. In vitro cleavage assay demonstrated that Omi directly cleaved E2F1. Treatment of N2a cells with RA induced marked differentiation and neurite outgrowth accompanied by significantly increased Omi and decreased E2F1 levels, which were suppressed by pretreatment with the specific Omi inhibitor UCF-101. Knockdown of Omi in N2a cells suppressed RA-induced neurite outgrowth, which was partially restored by knockdown of E2F1. Conclusion: Protease Omi facilitates neurite outgrowth by cleaving the transcription factor E2F1 in differentiated neuroblastoma cells; E2F1 is a substrate of Omi. PMID:26238290

  19. Isolation and expression analysis of FTZ-F1 encoding gene of black rock fish ( Sebastes schlegelii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafi, Muhammad; Wang, Yanan; Zhou, Xiaosu; Ma, Liman; Muhammad, Faiz; Qi, Jie; Zhang, Quanqi

    2013-03-01

    Sex related FTZ-F1 is a transcriptional factor regulating the expression of fushi tarazu (a member of the orphan nuclear receptors) gene. In this study, FTZ-F1 gene ( FTZ-F1) was isolated from the testis of black rockfish ( Sebastes schlegeli) by homology cloning. The full-length cDNA of S. schlegeli FTZ-F1 ( ssFTZ-F1) contained a 232bp 5' UTR, a 1449bp ORF encoding FTZ-F1 (482 amino acid residules in length) with an estimated molecular weight of 5.4kD and a 105bp 3' UTR. Sequence, tissue distribution and phylogenic analysis showed that ssFTZ-F1 belonged to FTZ group, holding highly conserved regions including I, II and III FTZ-F1 boxes and an AF-2 hexamer. Relatively high expression was observed at different larva stages. In juveniles (105 days old), the transcript of ssFTZ-F1 can be detected in all tissues and the abuncance of the gene transcript in testis, ovary, spleen and brain was higher than that in other tissues. In mature fish, the abundance of gene transcript was higher in testis, ovary, spleen and brain than that in liver (trace amount), and the gene was not transcribed in other tissues. The highest abundance of gene transcript was always observed in gonads of both juvenile and mature fish. In addition, the abundance of gene transcript in male tissues were higher than that in female tissue counterparts ( P<0.05).

  20. Phenotypical and functional evaluation of CD8+/S6F1+ T lymphocytes in haemophiliac individuals with HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Cavallin, F; Traldi, A; Zambello, R

    1993-01-01

    In this study we investigated the distribution of the S6F1 antigen, an epitope of the lymphocyte function-associated antigen, on CD8+ T lymphocytes in a series of 15 HIV-1+ and 20 HIV-1- haemophiliac patients. MoAbs recognizing the S6F1 antigen have been claimed to distinguish between killer effectors (brightly S6F1+ stained) and suppressor cells (dimly S6F1+ stained) within the CD8+ lymphoid population. In addition, we tried to find a correlation between the spontaneous in vitro immunoglobulin synthesis from patients' peripheral blood lymphocytes and the pattern of S6F1 expression. Although the total number of double-positive CD8+/S6F1+ cells was similar in both HIV-1+ and HIV-1- haemophiliac patients, a significant increase in the CD8+/S6F1+ population bright versus dim was documented in HIV-1-infected with respect to HIV-1- haemophiliacs (bright/dim ratio 3.97 +/- 0.61 versus 0.75 +/- 0.1, respectively, P < 0.005). This finding was correlated to a significant increase in spontaneous in vitro immunoglobulin production in HIV-1+ subjects compared with control haemophiliacs (P < 0.005). Purified CD8+ lymphocytes from HIV-1+ subjects showed a reduced suppressor activity on mitogen-induced immunoglobulin production. Taken together, these data suggest that HIV-1 infection favours the generation of CD8+/S6F1+ bright cells with putative cytotoxic-associated function, leading to a progressive reduction in the number of CD8+/S6F1+ dim suppressor lymphocytes. This phenomenon may contribute to the polyclonal hypergammaglobulinaemia present in HIV-1+ haemophiliac patients. PMID:8324903

  1. ROS production is essential for the apoptotic function of E2F1 in pheochromocytoma and neuroblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Espada, Lilia; Meo-Evoli, Nathalie; Sancho, Patricia; Real, Sebastian; Fabregat, Isabel; Ambrosio, Santiago; Tauler, Albert

    2012-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate that accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is essential for E2F1 mediated apoptosis in ER-E2F1 PC12 pheochromocytoma, and SH-SY5Y and SK-N-JD neuroblastoma stable cell lines. In these cells, the ER-E2F1 fusion protein is expressed in the cytosol; the addition of 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT) induces its translocation to the nucleus and activation of E2F1target genes. Previously we demonstrated that, in ER-E2F1 PC12 cells, OHT treatment induced apoptosis through activation of caspase-3. Here we show that caspase-8 activity did not change upon treatment with OHT. Moreover, over-expression of Bcl-xL arrested OHT-induced apoptosis; by contrast, over-expression of c-FLIP, did not have any effect on OHT-induced apoptosis. OHT addition induces BimL expression, its translocation to mitochondria and activation of Bax, which is paralleled by diminished mitochondrial enrichment of Bcl-xL. Treatment with a Bax-inhibitory peptide reduced OHT-induced apoptosis. These results point out the essential role of mitochondria on the apoptotic process driven by E2F1. ROS accumulation followed E2F1 induction and treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, inhibited E2F1-induced Bax translocation to mitochondria and subsequent apoptosis. The role of ROS in mediating OHT-induced apoptosis was also studied in two neuroblastoma cell lines, SH-SY5Y and SK-N-JD. In SH-SY5Y cells, activation of E2F1 by the addition of OHT induced ROS production and apoptosis, whereas over-expression of E2F1 in SK-N-JD cells failed to induce either response. Transcriptional profiling revealed that many of the genes responsible for scavenging ROS were down-regulated following E2F1-induction in SH-SY5Y, but not in SK-N-JD cells. Finally, inhibition of GSK3β blocked ROS production, Bax activation and the down regulation of ROS scavenging genes. These findings provide an explanation for the apparent contradictory role of E2F1 as an apoptotic agent versus a cell cycle activator.

  2. Up-regulation of E2F-1 in Down's syndrome brain exhibiting neuropathological features of Alzheimer-type dementia.

    PubMed

    Motonaga, K; Itoh, M; Hirayama, A; Hirano, S; Becker, L E; Goto, Y; Takashima, S

    2001-06-29

    We studied the expression of the apoptosis-related protein, E2F-1, in Down's syndrome (DS) brains. The immunoreactivity for E2F-1 was detected in the pyramidal neurons of the cerebral cortex from DS brains exhibiting the neuropathological features of dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT), in accordance with the amyloid beta protein (A beta) deposition in the neuron. Therefore, the implication is that A beta deposition may trigger E2F-1-mediated neuronal apoptosis in DS brains with DAT.

  3. E2F1 and TFDP1 Regulate PITX1 Expression in Normal and Osteoarthritic Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, DaShen; Lavigne, Patrick; Moreau, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported a loss-of-PITX1 expression in patients suffering of knee/hip osteoarthritis (OA). Search for the mechanism underlying this event led us to discover that PITX1 repression was triggered by the aberrant nuclear accumulation of Prohibitin (PHB1), an E2F1 co-repressor, in OA articular chondrocytes. In the current study, we assessed in details the involvement of E2F transcription factors in regulating PITX1 expression. We also analyzed other genes that are similarly regulated by E2F in regard to osteoarthritis. The transcriptional regulation of the PITX1 promoter by E2F1 was analyzed with the luciferase reporter assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, which confirmed direct E2F1-PITX1 interactions. The probable binding sites for E2F1 in the PITX1 promoter were identified by DNA pulldown experiments. In silico and in vitro analyses show that the PITX1 proximal promoter region contains 2 specific sequences that are bound by E2F1. Overexpression of E2F1 enhances PITX1 promoter activity and mRNA transcription. In primary control and osteoarthritis chondrocytes, real time RT-PCR was used to measure the mRNA expression levels of candidate genes under E2F1 transcriptional control. Transcription Factor Dp-1 (TFDP1) knockdown experiments confirmed that the E2F1-TFDP1 complex regulates PITX1. Knockdown of TFDP1, an E2F1 dimerization partner, inhibits the activating effect of E2F1 and reduces both PITX1 promoter activity and mRNA transcription. Real time RT-PCR results reveal reduced expression of TFDP1 and a similar downregulation of their targets PITX1, BRCA1, CDKN1A, and RAD51 in mid-stage OA chondrocytes. Collectively, our data define a previously uncharacterized role for E2F1 and TFDP1 in the transcriptional regulation of PITX1 in articular chondrocytes. Additional E2F1 targets may be affected in OA pathogenesis. PMID:27802335

  4. The Alpha Centauri System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderblom, David R.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Alpha Centauri star system, which is the closest star system to the sun. Discusses the difficulties associated with measurements involving Alpha Centauri, along with some of the recent advances in stellar seismology. Raises questions about the possibilities of planets around Alpha Centauri. (TW)

  5. 8-Chloro-adenosine-induced E2F1 promotes p14ARF gene activation in H1299 cells through displacing Sp1 from multiple overlapping E2F1/Sp1 sites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Jun; Li, Wen-Juan; Yang, Sheng-Yong; Li, Shu-Yan; Ni, Ju-Hua; Jia, Hong-Ti

    2009-02-15

    The regulation of p14ARF gene by E2F transcription factor, which differs from that of classical E2F targets, has recently been attributed to a variant E2F-response element. However, promoter assays suggest multiple elements present in the p14ARF promoter and argue against the idea that the ARF promoter has a unique ability to distinguish between aberrant and physiological levels of E2F1. Therefore, the functional characterization of the promoter still needs to be done. We demonstrate that at least two overlapping E2F1/Sp1 binding sites are present in the p14ARF promoter, and E2F1 activates the promoter through displacing constitutive Sp1 from the overlapping sites. We found that 8-chloro-adenosine (a metabolite of 8-Cl-cAMP) exposure induced the p14ARF gene in human lung cancer H1299 cells, followed by increased expression of E2F1 and constitutive expression of Sp1. The combination of cotransfection and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) indicated that constitutive binding of Sp1 to the overlapping sites contributed to a constitutive expression of the ARF gene in unexposed H1299, whereas displacing Sp1 from the overlapping sites by E2F1 promoted the gene activation after exposure. EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed increased association of E2F1 with the overlapping sites in the active promoter in 8-Cl-Ado-exposed cells. Together, these data suggest that the overlapping E2F1/Sp1 site, being present in multiple copies in the p14ARF promoter, may serve as the targets for both E2F1 and Sp1, thereby playing a crucial role in response to some oncogenic signals and stimulators, which activate the ARF gene through inducing E2F in the cell.

  6. Cytosine chemoreceptor McpC in Pseudomonas putida F1 also detects nicotinic acid.

    PubMed

    Parales, Rebecca E; Nesteryuk, Vasyl; Hughes, Jonathan G; Luu, Rita A; Ditty, Jayna L

    2014-12-01

    Soil bacteria are generally capable of growth on a wide range of organic chemicals, and pseudomonads are particularly adept at utilizing aromatic compounds. Pseudomonads are motile bacteria that are capable of sensing a wide range of chemicals, using both energy taxis and chemotaxis. Whilst the identification of specific chemicals detected by the ≥26 chemoreceptors encoded in Pseudomonas genomes is ongoing, the functions of only a limited number of Pseudomonas chemoreceptors have been revealed to date. We report here that McpC, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein in Pseudomonas putida F1 that was previously shown to function as a receptor for cytosine, was also responsible for the chemotactic response to the carboxylated pyridine nicotinic acid.

  7. Asymmetry in the F1-ATPase and Its Implications for the Rotational Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sean X.; Wang, Hongyun; Oster, George

    2004-01-01

    ATP synthase uses a rotary mechanism to carry out its cellular function of manufacturing ATP. The centralγ-shaft rotates inside a hexameric cylinder composed of alternating α- and β-subunits. When operating in the hydrolysis direction under high frictional loads and low ATP concentrations, a coordinated mechanochemical cycle in the three catalytic sites of the β-subunits rotates the γ-shaft in three 120° steps. At low frictional loads, the 120° steps alternate with three ATP-independent substeps separated by ∼30°. We present a quantitative model that accounts for these substeps and show that the observed pauses are due to 1), the asymmetry of the F1 hexamer that produces a propeller-like motion of the power-stroke and 2), the relatively tight binding of ADP to the catalytic sites. PMID:14990467

  8. Control of spinor dynamics in an anti-ferromagnetic F=1 Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassman, Zachary; Fahey, Donald; Wilson, Ryan; Tiesinga, Eite; Lett, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Spin-exchange collisions driving coherent population oscillations of the F = 1 ground state magnetic sublevels can be used for precision quantum measurements in a condensed Bose gas. Entanglement generated by these dynamics enables below standard quantum limit phase estimation by way of an SU(1,1) interferometer and antiferromagnetic spin-nematic squeezing. In order to observe these effects, we have simulated the spinor dynamics in the single mode approximation with both fully quantum and semi-classical models. We present a study of microwave pulse sequences, which can be used to control the spinor dynamics via energy level shifts and rotations, and discuss improved methods for future experiments in this field.

  9. Measurement of the Microwave Lensing shift in NIST-F1 and NIST-F2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferts, S. R.; Heavner, T. P.; Barlow, S. E.; Ashby, N.

    2016-06-01

    With several Primary Frequency Standards (PFS) across the world demonstrating systematic fractional frequency uncertainties on order of 1 x 10-16, it is crucial to accurately measure or model even small frequency shifts that could affect the ultimate PFS uncertainty, and thus ultimately impact the rate of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) which relies on precision PFS measurements. Recently there has been controversy about the physical causes and size of PFS frequency shifts due to microwave lensing effects. We present here the first measurements of microwave lensing frequency shifts in the PFS NIST-F1 and NIST-F2. The measured frequency shifts agree well with the recent theory of Ashby et al [1].

  10. Tumor induction by monoenergetic neutrons in B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiromitsu; Kashimoto, Naoki; Kajimura, Junko; Ishikawa, Masayori; Kamiya, Kenji

    2007-05-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate induction of tumors by monoenergetic neutrons in B6C3F1 mice. Individual groups of 6 week-old animals of both sexes (about 30 mice/group) were exposed to 0.5 Gy of various monoenergetic neutrons (dose rate 0.5 cGy/min) and then observed for 13 months. The incidences of tumors (mainly liver neoplasms) in non-irradiated male and female controls were 11% and 0%, respectively. In the irradiated animals, the incidences were 53%, 50%, 60% and 43% in males, and 75%, 81%, 71%, and 85% in females, after 0.18, 0.32, 0.6 and 1.0 MeV neutron exposure, respectively. There were no significant differences in the tumor induction rate among the different energy groups.

  11. Simulation of proton movement in FoF1-ATP synthase by quantum-mechanical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivontsin, L. A.; Mashkovtseva, E. V.; Nartsissov, Ya R.

    2017-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical approach is applied to the description of proton transport through FoF1-ATP synthase which is the crucial process in ATP synthesis. Proton was described as a particle located in potential wells formed by charged centers along the half-channels. Energy spectra of bounded states were calculated using Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization, and the initial population of each quantum level was determined by Boltzman distribution. Water molecules were stochastically distributed in an inlet half-channel taking into account atomic radii. Characteristic time of proton transition between the charged centers (amino acid or water molecule) was estimated and it revealed the critical areas needed to be full with water. All possible pathways were analyzed in Monte-Carlo simulation which allows calculating of a mean time of proton transfer trough the inlet half-channel (23 ms).

  12. [Study of the effects of gamma-irradiation of common wheat F1 seeds using gliadins as genetic markers].

    PubMed

    Kozub, N O; Sozinov, I O; Blium, Ia B; Sozinov, O O

    2013-01-01

    Effects of irradiation of dry F1 seeds with gamma rays in the dose of 200 Gy were studied. Hybrids between near-isogenic lines on the basis of the variety Bezostaya 1 served as the material of investigation. Irradiation markedly reduced productivity traits of F1 plants and did not affect the survival of F1 plants under the given growth conditions. A significant relative increase in the frequency of pollen grains with the 1BL/1RS translocation that formed F2 seeds in comparison with the control was one of the effects of irradiation of F1 seeds. Irradiation with gamma-rays induced mutations at gliadin loci with the frequency of 7,4 % (at 0,5 % in the control).

  13. Gene expression and epigenetic aberrations in F1-placentas fathered by obese males.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Megan; Strick, Reiner; Strissel, Pamela L; Dittrich, Ralf; McPherson, Nicole O; Lane, Michelle; Pliushch, Galyna; Potabattula, Ramya; Haaf, Thomas; El Hajj, Nady

    2017-02-10

    Gene expression and/or epigenetic deregulation may have consequences for sperm and blastocysts, as well as for the placenta, together potentially contributing to problems observed in offspring. We previously demonstrated specific perturbations of fertilization, blastocyst formation, implantation, as well as aberrant glucose metabolism and adiposity in offspring using a mouse model of paternal obesity. The current investigation analyzed gene expression and methylation of specific CpG residues in F1 placentas of pregnancies fathered by obese and normal-weight male mice, using real-time PCR and bisulfite pyrosequencing. Our aim was to determine if paternal obesity deregulated placental gene expression and DNA methylation when compared to normal-weight males. Gene methylation of sperm DNA was analyzed and compared to placentas to address epigenetic transmission. Of the 10 paternally expressed genes (Pegs), 11 genes important for development and transport of nutrients, and the long-terminal repeat Intracisternal A particle (IAP) elements, derived from a member of the class II endogenous retroviral gene family, we observed a significant effect of paternal diet-induced obesity on deregulated expression of Peg3, Peg9, Peg10, and the nutrient transporter gene Slc38a2, and aberrant DNA methylation of the Peg9 promoter in F1 placental tissue. Epigenetic changes in Peg9 were also found in sperm from obese fathers. We therefore propose that paternal obesity renders changes in gene expression and/or methylation throughout the placental genome, which could contribute to the reproductive problems related to fertility and to the metabolic, long-term health impact on offspring.

  14. Proteomics reveals a core molecular response of Pseudomonas putida F1 to acute chromate challenge

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas putida is a model organism for bioremediation because of its remarkable metabolic versatility, extensive biodegradative functions, and ubiquity in contaminated soil environments. To further the understanding of molecular pathways responding to the heavy metal chromium(VI) [Cr(VI)], the proteome of aerobically grown, Cr(VI)-stressed P. putida strain F1 was characterized within the context of two disparate nutritional environments: rich (LB) media and minimal (M9L) media containing lactate as the sole carbon source. Results Growth studies demonstrated that F1 sensitivity to Cr(VI) was impacted substantially by nutrient conditions, with a carbon-source-dependent hierarchy (lactate > glucose >> acetate) observed in minimal media. Two-dimensional HPLC-MS/MS was employed to identify differential proteome profiles generated in response to 1 mM chromate under LB and M9L growth conditions. The immediate response to Cr(VI) in LB-grown cells was up-regulation of proteins involved in inorganic ion transport, secondary metabolite biosynthesis and catabolism, and amino acid metabolism. By contrast, the chromate-responsive proteome derived under defined minimal growth conditions was characterized predominantly by up-regulated proteins related to cell envelope biogenesis, inorganic ion transport, and motility. TonB-dependent siderophore receptors involved in ferric iron acquisition and amino acid adenylation domains characterized up-regulated systems under LB-Cr(VI) conditions, while DNA repair proteins and systems scavenging sulfur from alternative sources (e.g., aliphatic sulfonates) tended to predominate the up-regulated proteome profile obtained under M9L-Cr(VI) conditions. Conclusions Comparative analysis indicated that the core molecular response to chromate, irrespective of the nutritional conditions tested, comprised seven up-regulated proteins belonging to six different functional categories including transcription, inorganic ion transport

  15. Impaired peripheral glucose sensing in F1 offspring of diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Maher A; Helmy, Madiha H; Hanafi, Mervat Y; Mahmoud, Shimaa A; Abo Elfetooh, Hanan

    2014-09-01

    Maternal diabetes can induce permanent changes in glucose homeostasis that can occur pre- and post-natal and leads to type 2 diabetes in adulthood. This study aimed to investigate the effect of maternal diabetes on the F1 offspring peripheral glucose sensing and mitochondrial biogenesis in an attempt to clarify the mechanism of diabetogenic programming. Two groups of female Wistar rats were used (diabetic and control); diabetes was neonatally induced by STZ injection to 5-day old rats. After the pregnancy and delivery, the offspring were weaned to control diet or high-caloric (HCD) diet and followed up for 30 weeks. Every 5 weeks, OGTT was constructed, and serum and tissues were obtained for the assessment of mTFA, mtDNA, UCP2, insulin receptor (IR), phospho-insulin receptor (phospho-IR), and GLUT4. The result indicated impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and insulin resistance in the offspring under control diet at the 15th week of age and thereafter while those offspring under HCD showed IGT at 10th week, and diabetes was evidenced at the 25th week of age. This defect in glucose metabolism was preceded by impairment in the phosphorylation of IR and decreased IR and Glut4 that cause impaired glucose sensing together with inhibited mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle and adipose tissues. This study indicated that maternal diabetes caused impaired glucose sensing and insulin resistance in the peripheral tissues and caused change in the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Post-natal feeding with HCD may accelerate these changes. Male F1 offspring appears to be more sensitive than females for fetal programming of T2D.

  16. Immune resistance of semisyngeneic F1 hybrid mice to lymphoma grafts differs from natural hybrid resistance in its genetic pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.O.; Klein, G.

    1984-07-01

    Resistance of semisyngeneic F1 hybrid mice immunized three times with irradiated tumor cells was compared to the genetic pattern of natural hybrid resistance to challenge with live tumor cells. Syngeneic mice responded equally well to immunization with all five hemopoietic tumor lines tested as the naturally much more highly resistant F1 hybrids. Natural hybrid resistance was found to be severely reduced by sublethal irradiation with 4 Gy, in contrast to hybrid resistance to parental bone marrow.

  17. The Drosophila nuclear receptors DHR3 and betaFTZ-F1 control overlapping developmental responses in late embryos.

    PubMed

    Ruaud, Anne-Françoise; Lam, Geanette; Thummel, Carl S

    2010-01-01

    Studies of the onset of metamorphosis have identified an ecdysone-triggered transcriptional cascade that consists of the sequential expression of the transcription-factor-encoding genes DHR3, betaFTZ-F1, E74A and E75A. Although the regulatory interactions between these genes have been well characterized by genetic and molecular studies over the past 20 years, their developmental functions have remained more poorly understood. In addition, a transcriptional sequence similar to that observed in prepupae is repeated before each developmental transition in the life cycle, including mid-embryogenesis and the larval molts. Whether the regulatory interactions between DHR3, betaFTZ-F1, E74A and E75A at these earlier stages are similar to those defined at the onset of metamorphosis, however, is unknown. In this study, we turn to embryonic development to address these two issues. We show that mid-embryonic expression of DHR3 and betaFTZ-F1 is part of a 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E)-triggered transcriptional cascade similar to that seen in mid-prepupae, directing maximal expression of E74A and E75A during late embryogenesis. In addition, DHR3 and betaFTZ-F1 exert overlapping developmental functions at the end of embryogenesis. Both genes are required for tracheal air filling, whereas DHR3 is required for ventral nerve cord condensation and betaFTZ-F1 is required for proper maturation of the cuticular denticles. Rescue experiments support these observations, indicating that DHR3 has essential functions independent from those of betaFTZ-F1. DHR3 and betaFTZ-F1 also contribute to overlapping transcriptional responses during embryogenesis. Taken together, these studies define the lethal phenotypes of DHR3 and betaFTZ-F1 mutants, and provide evidence for functional bifurcation in the 20E-responsive transcriptional cascade.

  18. Hypoxia promotes cell proliferation by modulating E2F1 in chicken pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we sought to investigate the expression of the transcription factor E2F1 in chicken pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells upon hypoxia exposure, as well as the role that E2F1 played in the regulation of cell proliferation. Isolated chicken pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells were subjected to hypoxia or normoxia for indicated time points. Cell viability, DNA synthesis, cell cycle profile, and expression of E2F1 were analyzed. The results showed that hypoxia promoted cell proliferation and DNA synthesis which was accompanied by an increased S phase entry and upregulation of E2F1 at mRNA and protein levels. Using siRNA technology, we demonstrated that gene inactivation of endogenous E2F1 abolished hypoxia-induced cell proliferation, DNA synthesis, and S phase entry compared with negative siRNA transfected cells. These results suggest that hypoxia-induced proliferation is mediated by inducing E2F1 in chicken pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. PMID:23902684

  19. Bcl-xL regulates metabolic efficiency of neurons through interaction with the mitochondrial F1FO ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Alavian, Kambiz N.; Li, Hongmei; Collis, Leon; Bonanni, Laura; Zeng, Lu; Sacchetti, Silvio; Lazrove, Emma; Nabili, Panah; Flaherty, Benjamin; Graham, Morven; Chen, Yingbei; Messerli, Shanta; Mariggio, Maria A.; Rahner, Christoph; McNay, Ewan; Shore, Gordon; Smith, Peter J. S.; Hardwick, J. Marie; Jonas, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Anti-apoptotic Bcl2 family proteins such as Bcl-xL protect cells from death by sequestering apoptotic molecules, but also contribute to normal neuronal function. We find in hippocampal neurons that Bcl-xL enhances the efficiency of energy metabolism. Our evidence suggests that Bcl-xL interacts directly with the beta subunit of the F1FO ATP synthase, decreasing an ion leak within the F1FO ATPase complex and thereby increasing net transport of H+ by F1FO during F1FO ATPase activity. By patch clamping submitochondrial vesicles enriched in F1FO ATP synthase complexes, we find that, in the presence of ATP, pharmacological or genetic inhibition of Bcl-xL increases the membrane leak conductance. In addition, recombinant Bcl-xL protein directly increases ATPase activity of purified synthase complexes, while inhibition of endogenous Bcl-xL decreases F1FO enzymatic activity. Our findings suggest that increased mitochondrial efficiency contributes to the enhanced synaptic efficacy found in Bcl-xL expressing neurons. PMID:21926988

  20. Bcl-xL regulates metabolic efficiency of neurons through interaction with the mitochondrial F1FO ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Alavian, Kambiz N; Li, Hongmei; Collis, Leon; Bonanni, Laura; Zeng, Lu; Sacchetti, Silvio; Lazrove, Emma; Nabili, Panah; Flaherty, Benjamin; Graham, Morven; Chen, Yingbei; Messerli, Shanta M; Mariggio, Maria A; Rahner, Christoph; McNay, Ewan; Shore, Gordon C; Smith, Peter J S; Hardwick, J Marie; Jonas, Elizabeth A

    2011-09-18

    Anti-apoptotic Bcl2 family proteins such as Bcl-x(L) protect cells from death by sequestering apoptotic molecules, but also contribute to normal neuronal function. We find in hippocampal neurons that Bcl-x(L) enhances the efficiency of energy metabolism. Our evidence indicates that Bcl-x(L)interacts directly with the β-subunit of the F(1)F(O) ATP synthase, decreasing an ion leak within the F(1)F(O) ATPase complex and thereby increasing net transport of H(+) by F(1)F(O) during F(1)F(O) ATPase activity. By patch clamping submitochondrial vesicles enriched in F(1)F(O) ATP synthase complexes, we find that, in the presence of ATP, pharmacological or genetic inhibition of Bcl-x(L) activity increases the membrane leak conductance. In addition, recombinant Bcl-x(L) protein directly increases the level of ATPase activity of purified synthase complexes, and inhibition of endogenous Bcl-x(L) decreases the level of F(1)F(O) enzymatic activity. Our findings indicate that increased mitochondrial efficiency contributes to the enhanced synaptic efficacy found in Bcl-x(L)-expressing neurons.

  1. The generation mechanisms and repeatability of 2F1-F2 distortion product otoacoustic emissions: study on normally hearing subjects.

    PubMed

    Parazzini, M; Wilson, H K; Bell, S; Tognola, G; Ravazzani, P; Lutman, M E

    2006-01-01

    The 2F1-F2 distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) is considered to consist of two generation mechanisms, the so-called place-fixed and wave-fixed mechanisms, depending on the frequency ratio F2/F1. The general assumption is that for a small frequency ratio there is a predominantly place-fixed emission mechanism, while with a larger frequency ratio there is a predominantly wave-fixed mechanism. There is also a lack of published data on the repeatability of the two components when separated. One aim of this study was therefore to identify the wave-fixed and place-fixed components of the 2F1-F2 DPOAE using a time-window separation method. The second aim was to quantify the test-retest repeatability of the separated 2F1-F2 DPOAE components in a group of normally hearing subjects. Results confirmed the presence of wave-fixed and place-fixed components for 2F1-F2 and a predominance of place or wave-fixed DPOAE as a function of frequency ratio. This pattern varied somewhat among subjects. Moreover, regardless of which component was stronger for any F2/F1, both components were highly repeatable across time within individual ears.

  2. Decreased sperm number and motile activity on the F1 offspring maternally exposed to butyl p-hydroxybenzoic acid (butyl paraben).

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung-Sun; Che, Jeong-Hwan; Ryu, Doug-Young; Kim, Tae-Won; Li, Guang-Xun; Lee, Yong-Soon

    2002-03-01

    Butyl p-hydroxybenzoic acid (butyl paraben, BP) is widely used as a preservative in food and cosmetic products. Routledge et al showed that BP is weakly estrogenic in both in vitro and in vivo (rat uterotrophic) analyses. We investigated whether maternal exposures to BP during gestation and lactation periods affected the development of the reproductive organs of the F1 offspring. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected subcutaneously with 100 or 200 mg/kg of BP from gestation day (GD) 6 to postnatal day (PND) 20. In the group exposed to 200 mg/kg of BP, the proportion of pups born alive and the proportion of pups surviving to weaning were decreased. The body weights of female offspring were significantly decreased at PND 49. The weights of testes, seminal vesicles and prostate glands were significantly decreased in rats exposed to 100 mg/kg of BP on PND 49. In contrast, the weights of female reproductive organs were not affected by BP. The sperm count and the sperm motile activity in the epididymis were significantly decreased at doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg of BP. In accordance with the sperm count in the epididymis, the number of round spermatids and elongated spermatids in the seminiferous tubule (stage VII) were significantly decreased by BP. Testicular expression of estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and ER-beta mRNA was significantly increased in 200 mg/kg of BP treated group at PND 90. Taken together, these results indicated that maternal exposure of BP might have adverse effects on the F1 male offspring.

  3. Mutated and bacteriophage T4 nanoparticle arrayed F1-V immunogens from Yersinia pestis as next generation plague vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tao, Pan; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Kirtley, Michelle L; van Lier, Christina J; Sha, Jian; Yeager, Linsey A; Chopra, Ashok K; Rao, Venigalla B

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonic plague is a highly virulent infectious disease with 100% mortality rate, and its causative organism Yersinia pestis poses a serious threat for deliberate use as a bioterror agent. Currently, there is no FDA approved vaccine against plague. The polymeric bacterial capsular protein F1, a key component of the currently tested bivalent subunit vaccine consisting, in addition, of low calcium response V antigen, has high propensity to aggregate, thus affecting its purification and vaccine efficacy. We used two basic approaches, structure-based immunogen design and phage T4 nanoparticle delivery, to construct new plague vaccines that provided complete protection against pneumonic plague. The NH₂-terminal β-strand of F1 was transplanted to the COOH-terminus and the sequence flanking the β-strand was duplicated to eliminate polymerization but to retain the T cell epitopes. The mutated F1 was fused to the V antigen, a key virulence factor that forms the tip of the type three secretion system (T3SS). The F1mut-V protein showed a dramatic switch in solubility, producing a completely soluble monomer. The F1mut-V was then arrayed on phage T4 nanoparticle via the small outer capsid protein, Soc. The F1mut-V monomer was robustly immunogenic and the T4-decorated F1mut-V without any adjuvant induced balanced TH1 and TH2 responses in mice. Inclusion of an oligomerization-deficient YscF, another component of the T3SS, showed a slight enhancement in the potency of F1-V vaccine, while deletion of the putative immunomodulatory sequence of the V antigen did not improve the vaccine efficacy. Both the soluble (purified F1mut-V mixed with alhydrogel) and T4 decorated F1mut-V (no adjuvant) provided 100% protection to mice and rats against pneumonic plague evoked by high doses of Y. pestis CO92. These novel platforms might lead to efficacious and easily manufacturable next generation plague vaccines.

  4. Thromboxane and prostacyclin synthesis following whole body irradiation in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Schneidkraut, M.J.; Kot, P.A.; Ramwell, P.W.; Rose, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of radiation on the mechanism and source of in vivo thromboxane B/sub 2/ (TxB/sub 2/) and 6-keto-prostaglandin F/sub 1..cap alpha../ (6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha..) synthesis was evaluated. Rats were irradiated with 2, 10, or 20 gray (Gy) whole body gamma irradiation and showed an increase in urine TxB/sup 2/ after either 10 or 20 Gy. Urine 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ was elevated only after exposure to 20 Gy. Irradiation did not alter urine volume and osmolarity, nor was there a correlation between urine osmolarity and the urinary concentration of TxB/sup 2/ or 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../. Rats were pretreated with indomethacin to determine if radiation-induced alterations in urine TxB/sup 2/ and 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ could be suppressed. Pretreatment with indomethacin significantly decreased urine TxB..cap alpha.. and 6-keto-PFG/sub 1..cap alpha../ in both irradiated and nonirradiated animals. Finally, the sources of urinary cyclooxygenase products were investigated using an isogravitometric cross-perfusion system. These experiments demonstrated that urine TxB..cap alpha.. is derived from extrarenal sources, whereas 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha.. is synthesized primarily by the kidney. It may be concluded that radiation exposure increases in vivo cyclooxygenase pathway activity by both renal and ultrarenal tissues.

  5. Asymmetric hybridization in Rhododendron agastum: a hybrid taxon comprising mainly F1s in Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Hong-Guang; Milne, Richard I.; Sun, Hang

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Rhododendron (Ericaceae) is a large woody genus in which hybridization is thought to play an important role in evolution and speciation, particularly in the Sino-Himalaya region where many interfertile species often occur sympatrically. Rhododendron agastum, a putative hybrid species, occurs in China, western Yunnan Province, in mixed populations with R. irroratum and R. delavayi. Methods Material of these taxa from two sites 400 km apart (ZhuJianYuan, ZJY and HuaDianBa, HDB) was examined using cpDNA and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences, and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) loci, to test the possibility that R. agastum was in fact a hybrid between two of the other species. Chloroplast trnL-F and trnS-trnG sequences together distinguished R. irroratum, R. delavayi and some material of R. decorum, which is also considered a putative parent of R. agastum. Key Results All 14 R. agastum plants from the HDB site had the delavayi cpDNA haplotype, whereas at the ZJY site 17 R. agastum plants had this haplotype and four had the R. irroratum haplotype. R. irroratum and R. delavayi are distinguished by five unequivocal point mutations in their ITS sequences; every R. agastum accession had an additive pattern (double peaks) at each of these sites. Data from AFLP loci were acquired for between ten and 21 plants of each taxon from each site, and were analysed using a Bayesian approach implemented by the program NewHybrids. The program confirmed the identity of all accessions of R. delavayi, and all R. irroratum except one, which was probably a backcross. All R. agastum from HDB and 19 of 21 from ZJY were classified as F1 hybrids; the other two could not be assigned a class. Conclusions Rhododendron agastum represents populations of hybrids between R. irroratum and R. delavayi, which comprise mostly or only F1s, at the two sites examined. The sites differ in that at HDB there was no detected variation in cpDNA type or hybrid class

  6. The carcinogenicity of dichloroacetic acid in the male B6C3F1 mouse

    SciTech Connect

    DeAngelo, A.B.; Daniel, F.B.; Stober, J.A.; Olson, G.R. )

    1991-02-01

    Groups of male B6C3F1 mice (N = 50) were provided drinking water containing 2 g/liter sodium chloride (control) and 0.05, 0.5, and 5 g/liter dichloroacetic acid (DCA). Treatment of 30 animals in each group was carried out to 60 or 75 weeks. In a separate experiment, mice exposed to 3.5 g/liter DCA and the corresponding acetic acid control group were killed at 60 weeks. Groups of 5 mice were killed at 4, 15, 30, and 45 weeks. Time-weighted mean daily doses of 7.6, 77, 410, and 486 mg/kg/day were calculated for 0.05, 0.5, 3.5, and 5 g/liter DCA treatments. Animals exposed to 3.5 and 5 g/liter DCA had final body weights that were 87 and 83%, respectively, of the control value. Relative liver weights of 136, 230, and 351% of the control value were measured for 0.5, 3.5, and 5 g/liter, respectively. At 60 weeks mice receiving 5.0 g/liter DCA had a 90% prevalence of liver neoplasia with a mean multiplicity of 4.50 tumors/animal. Exposure to 3.5 g/liter DCA for 60 weeks resulted in a 100% tumor prevalence with an average of 4.0 tumors/animal. The prevalence of liver neoplasia and tumor multiplicity at 60 and 75 weeks in the 0.05 g/liter DCA (24.1%; 0.31 tumors/animal) and in the 0.5 g/liter group (11.1%; 0.11 tumors/animal) did not differ significantly from the control value (7.1% and 0.07 tumors/animal). No liver tumors were found in the group treated with acetic acid. Hyperplastic nodules were seen in the 3.5 (58%; 0.92/animal) and 5 g/liter DCA groups (83%; 1.27/animal). There was a significant positive dose-related trend in the age-adjusted prevalence of liver tumors. These data confirm the hepatocarcinogenicity of DCA administered in the drinking water to male B6C3F1 mice for 60 weeks.

  7. Carcinogenicity of bisphenol-A in Fischer rats and B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Huff, J

    2001-11-01

    Bisphenol-A (BP-A; 4,4'-isopropylidenediphenol) is a monomer of plastics commonly used in various consumer products, and is used as an intermediate in the manufacture of epoxy, polycarbonate, and polyester-styrene resins. A National Toxicology Program carcinogenesis bioassay of BP-A (>98% pure) was conducted by feeding diets containing 0, 1000, or 2000 ppm BP-A to groups of 50 male and 50 female Fischer (F)344 rats; 0, 1000, or 5000 ppm to groups of 50 male B6C3F1 mice; and 0, 5000, or 10,000 ppm to groups of 50 female B6C3F1 mice for 103 weeks. The mean body weights of the low- and high-dose rats and of female mice and high-dose male mice were lower than those of the controls throughout much of the study. Lower body weight gains in rats were likely caused by reduced food consumption. Survivals were comparable among groups. Regarding neoplasia, leukemias occurred at increased incidences in BP-A-dosed rats of both sexes: male, 13/50 controls vs 12/50 low-dose and 23/50 high-dose (P < 0.03); in females, the respective findings were 7/50, 13/50, and 12/50. Interstitial-cell tumors of the testes were increased in BP-A-dosed male rats: 35/49 controls vs 48/50 (P < 0.01) and 46/49 (P < 0.01); and an increasing trend was observed for mammary gland fibroadenomas in male rats (P < 0.05, 0/50 controls vs 0/50 and 4/50). In male mice, lymphomas/leukemias were increased: 2/49 controls vs 9/50 (P < 0.05) and 5/50. Multinucleated giant hepatocytes were observed in male mice (1/49 controls vs 41/49 and 41/50), whereas there was no increase of liver tumors. In their BP-A bioassay report, the National Toxicology Program concluded that there was no convincing evidence that BP-A was carcinogenic for rats or mice. However, the marginal increases in leukemias in male and female rats, along with increases in the combined incidence of lymphomas and leukemias in male mice, suggest that BP-A may be associated with increased cancers of the hematopoietic system. Increases in interstitial

  8. Acrylonitrile is a multisite carcinogen in male and female B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Ghanayem, Burhan I; Nyska, Abraham; Haseman, Joseph K; Bucher, John R

    2002-07-01

    Acrylonitrile is a heavily produced unsaturated nitrile, which is used in the production of synthetic fibers, plastics, resins, and rubber. Acrylonitrile is a multisite carcinogen in rats after exposure via gavage, drinking water, or inhalation. No carcinogenicity studies of acrylonitrile in a second animal species were available. The current studies were designed to assess the carcinogenicity of acrylonitrile in B6C3F1 mice of both sexes. Acrylonitrile was administered by gavage at 0, 2.5, 10, or 20 mg/kg/day, 5 days per week, for 2 years. Urinary thiocyanate and N-acetyl-S-(2-cyanoethyl)-L-cysteine were measured as markers of exposure to acrylonitrile. In general, there were dose-related increases in urinary thiocyanate and N-acetyl-S-(2-cyanoethyl)-L-cysteine concentrations in all dosed groups of mice and at all time points. Survival was significantly (p < 0.001) reduced in the top dose (20 mg/kg) group of male and female mice relative to controls. The incidence of forestomach papillomas and carcinomas was increased in mice of both sexes in association with an increase in forestomach epithelial hyperplasia. The incidence of Harderian gland adenomas and carcinomas was also markedly increased in the acrylonitrile-dosed groups. In female mice, the incidence of benign or malignant granulosa cell tumors (combined) in the ovary in the 10 mg/kg dose group was greater than that in the vehicle control group, but because of a lack of dose response, this was considered an equivocal finding. In addition, the incidences of atrophy and cysts in the ovary of the 10 and 20 mg/kg dose groups were significantly increased. The incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar adenoma or carcinoma (combined) were significantly increased in female mice treated with acrylonitrile at 10 mg/kg/day for 2 years. This was also considered an equivocal result. In conclusion, these studies demonstrated that acrylonitrile causes multiple carcinogenic effects after gavage administration to male and female B6

  9. Oncogenic evaluation of tetrachlorvinphos in the B6C3F1 mouse.

    PubMed

    Parker, C M; Van Gelder, G A; Chai, E Y; Gellatly, J B; Serota, D G; Voelker, R W; Vesselinovitch, S D

    1985-10-01

    Groups of 80 male and 80 female B6C3F1 mice were fed diets containing 17.5, 64, 320, 1600, 8000, and 16000 ppm tetrachlorvinphos (TCVP) for up to 103 weeks. Another group of 80 male and 80 female mice were fed TCVP (16000 ppm) that was used in a previous bioassay. One hundred-sixty male and 160 female mice served as the control group. Ten treated and 20 control mice/sex/group were killed at 6, 12, and 18 months. It was estimated that the study maximum-tolerated dose was exceeded by three- and sixfold in the 8000- and 16000-ppm dose groups, respectively. Consequently, these exposures produced excessive cytotoxicity and regenerative changes in the liver and kidneys which were associated with sex-hormonal imbalance and metabolic overload in liver. A significant decrease (15-40%) in body weight was observed in mice fed 8000 and 16000 ppm TCVP. These treated mice did not gain weight during the study. Reduced food consumption and caloric intake throughout the study were probably responsible for the increased survival and the decreased incidence of spontaneous neoplasia in mice fed 8000 and 16000 ppm TCVP. Classification of pathologic lesions observed in these high-dose groups differed among study and consulting pathologists. The consultant and Shell pathologists concluded that the liver and kidney changes were causally related to excessive toxicity which was manifest primarily by hepatocellular hyperplasia and renal tubular adenoma. Study pathologist in accordance with his classification found statistically significant increases in hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatocellular adenoma or carcinoma, and renal tubular carcinoma in male mice fed 16000 ppm TCVP. The incidence of hepatic neoplasms as evaluated by the study pathologist in female mice fed 8000 and 16000 ppm TCVP although statistically significant was of questionable biologic significance when compared with historical female controls. The only statistically significant finding observed by the consulting pathologist

  10. Monoamine oxidase B levels are highly expressed in human gliomas and are correlated with the expression of HiF-1α and with transcription factors Sp1 and Sp3

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Martyn A.; Baskin, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Monoamine oxidases A and B (MAOA and MAOB) are highly expressed in many cancers. Here we investigated the level of MAOB in gliomas and confirmed its high expression. We found that MAOB levels correlated with tumor grade and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HiF-1α) expression. HiF-1α was localized to the nuclei in high-grade gliomas, but it was primarily cytosolic in low-grade gliomas and normal human astrocytes. Expression of both glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and MAOB are correlated to HiF-1α expression levels. Levels of MAOB are correlated by the levels of transcription factor Sp3 in the majority of GBM examined, but this control of MAOB expression by Sp3 in low grade astrocytic gliomas is significantly different from control in the in the majority of glioblastomas. The current findings support previous suggestions that MAOB can be exploited for the killing of cancer cells. Selective cell toxicity can be achieved by designing non-toxic prodrugs that require MAOB for their catalytic conversion into mature cytotoxic chemotherapeutics. PMID:26689994

  11. Mitochondrial F0F1-ATP synthase is a molecular target of 3-iodothyronamine, an endogenous metabolite of thyroid hormone

    PubMed Central

    Cumero, S; Fogolari, F; Domenis, R; Zucchi, R; Mavelli, I; Contessi, S

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE 3-iodothyronamine (T1AM) is a metabolite of thyroid hormone acting as a signalling molecule via non-genomic effectors and can reach intracellular targets. Because of the importance of mitochondrial F0F1-ATP synthase as a drug target, here we evaluated interactions of T1AM with this enzyme. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Kinetic analyses were performed on F0F1-ATP synthase in sub-mitochondrial particles and soluble F1-ATPase. Activity assays and immunodetection of the inhibitor protein IF1 were used and combined with molecular docking analyses. Effects of T1AM on H9c2 cardiomyocytes were measured by in situ respirometric analysis. KEY RESULTS T1AM was a non-competitive inhibitor of F0F1-ATP synthase whose binding was mutually exclusive with that of the inhibitors IF1 and aurovertin B. Both kinetic and docking analyses were consistent with two different binding sites for T1AM. At low nanomolar concentrations, T1AM bound to a high-affinity region most likely located within the IF1 binding site, causing IF1 release. At higher concentrations, T1AM bound to a low affinity-region probably located within the aurovertin binding cavity and inhibited enzyme activity. Low nanomolar concentrations of T1AM increased ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration in cardiomyocytes, indicating activation of F0F1-ATP synthase consistent with displacement of endogenous IF1,, reinforcing the in vitro results. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Effects of T1AM on F0F1-ATP synthase were twofold: IF1 displacement and enzyme inhibition. By targeting F0F1-ATP synthase within mitochondria, T1AM might affect cell bioenergetics with a positive effect on mitochondrial energy production at low, endogenous, concentrations. T1AM putative binding locations overlapping with IF1 and aurovertin binding sites are described. PMID:22452346

  12. Interpreting EEG alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Bazanova, O M; Vernon, D

    2014-07-01

    Exploring EEG alpha oscillations has generated considerable interest, in particular with regards to the role they play in cognitive, psychomotor, psycho-emotional and physiological aspects of human life. However, there is no clearly agreed upon definition of what constitutes 'alpha activity' or which of the many indices should be used to characterize it. To address these issues this review attempts to delineate EEG alpha-activity, its physical, molecular and morphological nature, and examine the following indices: (1) the individual alpha peak frequency; (2) activation magnitude, as measured by alpha amplitude suppression across the individual alpha bandwidth in response to eyes opening, and (3) alpha "auto-rhythmicity" indices: which include intra-spindle amplitude variability, spindle length and steepness. Throughout, the article offers a number of suggestions regarding the mechanism(s) of alpha activity related to inter and intra-individual variability. In addition, it provides some insights into the various psychophysiological indices of alpha activity and highlights their role in optimal functioning and behavior.

  13. Borders and comparative cytoarchitecture of the perirhinal and postrhinal cortices in an F1 hybrid mouse.

    PubMed

    Beaudin, Stephane A; Singh, Teghpal; Agster, Kara L; Burwell, Rebecca D

    2013-02-01

    We examined the cytoarchitectonic and chemoarchitectonic organization of the cortical regions associated with the posterior rhinal fissure in the mouse brain, within the framework of what is known about these regions in the rat. Primary observations were in a first-generation hybrid mouse line, B6129PF/J1. The F1 hybrid was chosen because of the many advantages afforded in the study of the molecular and cellular bases of learning and memory. Comparisons with the parent strains, the C57BL6/J and 129P3/J are also reported. Mouse brain tissue was processed for visualization of Nissl material, myelin, acetyl cholinesterase, parvalbumin, and heavy metals. Tissue stained for heavy metals by the Timm's method was particularly useful in the assignment of borders and in the comparative analyses because the patterns of staining were similar across species and strains. As in the rat, the areas examined were parcellated into 2 regions, the perirhinal and the postrhinal cortices. The perirhinal cortex was divided into areas 35 and 36, and the postrhinal cortex was divided into dorsal (PORd) and ventral (PORv) subregions. In addition to identifying the borders of the perirhinal cortex, we were able to identify a region in the mouse brain that shares signature features with the rat postrhinal cortex.

  14. Sensitivity to foot shock in autoimmune NZB x NZW F1 hybrid mice.

    PubMed

    Schrott, L M; Crnic, L S

    1994-11-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated deficits in active avoidance learning in young (12-week-old) mice that develop lupus-like autoimmunity. Because foot shock is the motivating stimulus in this task, sensitivity to foot shock was assessed in autoimmune NZB x NZW F1 hybrid (B/W) and nonautoimmune NZW female mice. Responses to shock at levels ranging from 0.05 to 1.6 mA were recorded twice during the development of autoimmunity. At 12 weeks of age, B/W mice did not differ from NZW mice in sensitivity to shock. However, at 24 weeks of age, when antibody levels were elevated, sensitivity to foot shock decreased in B/W mice at low shock levels and increased at high shock levels. A neurological battery revealed no deficits that could account for these effects. However, IgM anti-DNA antibody levels were positively correlated with responsiveness to high levels of shock. The change in the pattern of sensitivity at 24 weeks may be due to a combination of disease-related sensory impairment at low shock levels and hyperalgesia at high shock levels. The response to high levels of shock may also be an indication of enhanced emotionality, an interpretation consistent with reports in other lupus-prone strains and affective disorders in humans with lupus.

  15. Composition of the nighttime ionospheric F 1 region near the magnetic equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Rusch, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of vertical E x B transport on NO(+), O2(+) and O(+) densities in the nighttime equatorial ionospheric F 1 region are investigated. Ion densities are calculated as functions of altitude, latitude and local time by the numerical solution of coupled, time-dependent ion continuity equations, taking into account production, loss by charge exchange and dissociative recombination and transport by diffusion and E x B drift. The results of the calculations are compared with measurements of NO(+), O2(+) and O(+) ion densities obtained at low altitudes by a mass spectrometer on board the Atmospheric Explorer C satellite, and are found to be consistent with the observations, suggesting that in the equatorial region, vertical transport by E x B drift is primarily responsible for producing the observed NO(+), O2(+) and O(+) density profiles. In addition, the reaction of O2(+) with N(4S) is found to be an important sink for O2(+) and a source of NO(+) ions. Implications of the observed and calculated near constancy of electron and ion densities with altitude when NO(+) is the dominant ion on the growth of large-scale irregularities are also considered

  16. Measurement of the inertial properties of the Helios F-1 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayman, W. H.

    1975-01-01

    A gravity pendulum method of measuring lateral moments of inertia of large structures with an error of less than 1% is outlined. The method is based on the fact that in a physical pendulum with a knife-edge support the distance from the axis of rotation to the system center of gravity determines the minimal period of oscillation and is equal to the system centroidal radius of gyration. The method is applied to results of a test procedure in which the Helios F-1 spacecraft was placed in a roll fixture with crossed flexure pivots as elastic constraints and system oscillation measurements were made with each of a set of added moment-of-inertia increments. Equations of motion are derived with allowance for the effect of the finite pivot radius and an error analysis is carried out to find the criterion for maximum accuracy in determining the square of the centroidal radius of gyration. The test procedure allows all measurements to be made with the specimen in upright position.

  17. Thermodynamics and kinetics of the FoF1-ATPase: application of the probability isotherm.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Brian; Loiselle, Denis

    2016-02-01

    We use the results of recent publications as vehicles with which to discuss the thermodynamics of the proton-driven mitochondrial F o F1-ATP synthase, focusing particularly on the possibility that there may be dissociation between rotatory steps and ATP synthesis/hydrolysis. Such stoichiometric 'slippage' has been invoked in the literature to explain observed non-ideal behaviour. Numerical solution of the Rate Isotherm (the kinetic equivalent of the more fundamental Probability Isotherm) suggests that such 'slippage' is an unlikely explanation; instead, we suggest that the experimental results may be more consistent with damage to the enzyme caused by its isolation from the biomembrane and its experimental fixation, resulting in non-physiological friction within the enzyme's rotary mechanism. We emphasize the unavoidable constraint of the Second Law as instantiated by the obligatory dissipation of Gibbs Free Energy if the synthase is to operate at anything other than thermodynamic equilibrium. We use further numerical solution of the Rate Isotherm to demonstrate that there is no necessary association of low thermodynamic efficiency with high metabolic rates in a bio-world in which the dominating mechanism of metabolic control is multifactorial enzyme activation.

  18. Thermodynamics and kinetics of the FoF1-ATPase: application of the probability isotherm

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Brian; Loiselle, Denis

    2016-01-01

    We use the results of recent publications as vehicles with which to discuss the thermodynamics of the proton-driven mitochondrial FoF1-ATP synthase, focusing particularly on the possibility that there may be dissociation between rotatory steps and ATP synthesis/hydrolysis. Such stoichiometric ‘slippage’ has been invoked in the literature to explain observed non-ideal behaviour. Numerical solution of the Rate Isotherm (the kinetic equivalent of the more fundamental Probability Isotherm) suggests that such ‘slippage’ is an unlikely explanation; instead, we suggest that the experimental results may be more consistent with damage to the enzyme caused by its isolation from the biomembrane and its experimental fixation, resulting in non-physiological friction within the enzyme's rotary mechanism. We emphasize the unavoidable constraint of the Second Law as instantiated by the obligatory dissipation of Gibbs Free Energy if the synthase is to operate at anything other than thermodynamic equilibrium. We use further numerical solution of the Rate Isotherm to demonstrate that there is no necessary association of low thermodynamic efficiency with high metabolic rates in a bio-world in which the dominating mechanism of metabolic control is multifactorial enzyme activation. PMID:26998316

  19. Subchronic studies of doxylamine in B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, C D; Blackwell, B N

    1988-02-01

    Doxylamine succinate, a histamine (H1) antagonist (antihistamine), was administered as an admixture in the feed to male and female B6C3F1 mice for 14 or 90 days. Dose levels of 0, 100, 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 ppm doxylamine were administered to males and females in the 14-day study while dose levels of 0, 80, 162, 325, 750, and 1500 ppm were administered to both sexes in the 90-day study. Little toxicity was seen in the 14-day study. Final body weights in the highest dose group were reduced 4.0 and 7.3% in males and females, respectively. Treatment-related histopathological changes in the 14-day study were limited to a very low incidence of hepatic necrosis in both sexes. There was little toxicity observed in the 90-day study and no clear dose response relative to weight gain was observed. Histologically, the liver was the only organ affected by doxylamine administration. The liver lesions consisted of hepatic cell cytomegaly and/or karyomegaly which varied from mild to severe and a possible dose-related hepatic necrosis.

  20. Hormone-regulated defense and stress response networks contribute to heterosis in Arabidopsis F1 hybrids.

    PubMed

    Groszmann, Michael; Gonzalez-Bayon, Rebeca; Lyons, Rebecca L; Greaves, Ian K; Kazan, Kemal; Peacock, W James; Dennis, Elizabeth S

    2015-11-17

    Plant hybrids are extensively used in agriculture to deliver increases in yields, yet the molecular basis of their superior performance (heterosis) is not well understood. Our transcriptome analysis of a number of Arabidopsis F1 hybrids identified changes to defense and stress response gene expression consistent with a reduction in basal defense levels. Given the reported antagonism between plant immunity and growth, we suggest that these altered patterns of expression contribute to the greater growth of the hybrids. The altered patterns of expression in the hybrids indicate decreases to the salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis pathway and increases in the auxin [indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)] biosynthesis pathway. SA and IAA are hormones known to control stress and defense responses as well as plant growth. We found that IAA-targeted gene activity is frequently increased in hybrids, correlating with a common heterotic phenotype of greater leaf cell numbers. Reduced SA concentration and target gene responses occur in the larger hybrids and promote increased leaf cell size. We demonstrated the importance of SA action to the hybrid phenotype by manipulating endogenous SA concentrations. Increasing SA diminished heterosis in SA-reduced hybrids, whereas decreasing SA promoted growth in some hybrids and phenocopied aspects of hybrid vigor in parental lines. Pseudomonas syringae infection of hybrids demonstrated that the reductions in basal defense gene activity in these hybrids does not necessarily compromise their ability to mount a defense response comparable to the parents.

  1. [Analysis of POU1F1 gene polymorphisms in Qinchuan cattle and Chinese Holstein cattle].

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin-Jun; Liu, Bo; Fang, Xin-Tang; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Run-Feng; Bao, Bin; Zhang, Hai-Jun

    2006-11-01

    PCR-RFLP was applied to analyze the polymorphisms of POU1F1 gene in 218 Qinchuan cattle (QQ) and Chinese Holstein cattle (HC). Results demonstrated Hinf I polymorphisms in the 451 bp PCR product in the two populations. The frequencies of alleles A/B in QQ and HC populations were 0.232/0.768 and 0.132/0.868, respectively. The frequencies of three genotypes AA, AB and BB were 0.030/0.403/0.567 and 0.007/0.251/0.742, respectively. Qinchuan cattle population was at Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium at this locus, but Chinese Holstein cattle population was not. The gene heterozygosity/effective allele gene number/Shannon information entropy/polymorphism information content of Qinchuan cattle and Chinese Holstein cattle populations were listed for 0.356/1.553/0.541/0.292 and 0.229/1.297/0.390/0.203, respectively. All indices were higher in the Qinchuan cattle population.

  2. Immunomodulation by classical conditioning in NZB/W (F1) mice: Lifespan and diurnal variation

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, Mario André Leocadio; Menna-Barreto, Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Eritematosus (SLE) is a systemic inflammatory disease often treated with the agent cyclophosphamide (CY), known by provoking important adverse reactions to the organism. Ader and Cohen have demonstrated an alternative way of administrating this agent based on pavlovian conditioning, in order to reduce the aggression caused by CY. Considering the influence of the temporal organization on learning and memory processes, the purpose of this study was to understand the temporal aspects involved in the conditioned immunomodulation. In a search for circadian modulation, we selected NZB/W (F1) female mice, a strain that spontaneously develop SLE. Divided into two major groups, the animals were submitted, in different phases of day, to a classical conditioning immunomodulation protocol, consisting in weekly parings of saccharin solution and CY injections. The success of the paradigm was evaluated by comparing lifespan among the groups. Simultaneously, it was monitored the water intake behavior, in order to correlate the stability of two rhythmic parameters, amplitude and spectral power density of the 24-h rhythm, with the progression of SLE. Our results indicate that mice could benefit from the conditioning task performed either in the light phase or in the dark phase of the LD cycle, as expressed by an increased lifespan. Concerning the rhythmic parameters, there was evidence of association between the rhythmic stability and the evolution of SLE, demonstrated by the maintenance of healthy levels of amplitude and spectral potency of the 24-h rhythm in animals exposed to the conditioning paradigm. PMID:27226820

  3. Effective Hamiltonian for non-leptonic |Delta F| = 1 decays at NNLO in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbahn, Martin; Haisch, Ulrich; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    The authors compute the effective hamiltonian for non-leptonic |{Delta}F| = 1 decays in the standard model including next-to-next-to-leading order QCD corrections. In particular, they present the complete three-loop anomalous dimension matrix describing the mixing of current-current and QCD penguin operators. The calculation is performed in an operator basis which allows to consistently use fully anticommuting {gamma}{sub 5} in dimensional regularization at an arbitrary number of loops. The renormalization scheme dependences and their cancellation in physical quantities is discussed in detail. Furthermore, they demonstrate how the results are transformed to a different basis of effective operators which is frequently adopted in phenomenological applications. They give all necessary two-loop constant terms which allow to obtain the three-loop anomalous dimensions and the corresponding initial conditions of the two-loop Wilson coefficients in the latter scheme. Finally, they solve the renormalization group equation and given the analytic expressions for the low-energy Wilson coefficients relevant for non-leptonic B meson decays beyond next-to-leading order in both renormalization schemes.

  4. [Field experiment of F1 generation and superior families selection of Dendrobium officinale].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Si, Jin-Ping; Wu, Ling-Shang; Guo, Ying-Ying; Yu, Jie; Wang, Lin-Hua

    2013-11-01

    Based on randomized block design of experiment, agronomic traits and yields of 14 F1 generations of Dendrobium officinale were determined. The results showed that the differences in agronomic traits and yields among families were significant, and the hybrid vigor was obvious. Families of 6b x 2a, 9 x 66 and 78 x 69 were selected with the remarkable superiority of yields, agronomic traits and product customization. Correlation analysis between agronomic traits and yields showed that plant height, stem diameter, leaf number, blade length and blade width were all significantly correlated with biological yields and economic yields. Among which, stem diameter, leaf number and blade length were the most significant, and an optimal linear regression model could be established. When the number of shoots was fewer than 4.5, both biological yields and economic yields increased with the increasing number of shoots, but it could not much affect yields when the number of shoots was larger than 4.5. Shoots number, stem diameter and leaf index were basic stability when compared biennial traits to annual, which could be used for early selection.

  5. Metabolic Trade-offs in Yeast are Caused by F1F0-ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Avlant; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Intermediary metabolism provides living cells with free energy and precursor metabolites required for synthesizing proteins, lipids, RNA and other cellular constituents, and it is highly conserved among living species. Only a fraction of cellular protein can, however, be allocated to enzymes of intermediary metabolism and consequently metabolic trade-offs may take place. One such trade-off, aerobic fermentation, occurs in both yeast (the Crabtree effect) and cancer cells (the Warburg effect) and has been a scientific challenge for decades. Here we show, using flux balance analysis combined with in vitro measured enzyme specific activities, that fermentation is more catalytically efficient than respiration, i.e. it produces more ATP per protein mass. And that the switch to fermentation at high growth rates therefore is a consequence of a high ATP production rate, provided by a limited pool of enzymes. The catalytic efficiency is also higher for cells grown on glucose compared to galactose and ethanol, which may explain the observed differences in their growth rates. The enzyme F1F0-ATP synthase (Complex V) was found to have flux control over respiration in the model, and since it is evolutionary conserved, we expect the trade-off to occur in organisms from all kingdoms of life. PMID:26928598

  6. Inheritance of steroid-independent male sexual behavior in male offspring of B6D2F1 mice.

    PubMed

    McInnis, Christine M; Bonthuis, Paul J; Rissman, Emilie F; Park, Jin Ho

    2016-04-01

    The importance of gonadal steroids in modulating male sexual behavior is well established. Individual differences in male sexual behavior, independent of gonadal steroids, are prevalent across a wide range of species, including man. However, the genetic mechanisms underlying steroid-independent male sexual behavior are poorly understood. A high proportion of B6D2F1 hybrid male mice demonstrates steroid-independent male sexual behavior (identified as "maters"), providing a mouse model that opens up avenues of investigation into the mechanisms regulating male sexual behavior in the absence of gonadal hormones. Recent studies have revealed several proteins that play a significant factor in regulating steroid-independent male sexual behavior in B6D2F1 male mice, including amyloid precursor protein (APP), tau, and synaptophysin. The specific goals of our study were to determine whether steroid-independent male sexual behavior was a heritable trait by determining if it was dependent upon the behavioral phenotype of the B6D2F1 sire, and whether the differential expression of APP, tau, and synaptophysin in the medial preoptic area found in the B6D2F1 sires that did and did not mate after gonadectomy was similar to those found in their male offspring. After adult B6D2F1 male mice were bred with C57BL/6J female mice, they and their male offspring (BXB1) were orchidectomized and identified as either maters or "non-maters". A significant proportion of the BXB1 maters was sired only from B6D2F1 maters, indicating that the steroid-independent male sexual behavior behavioral phenotype of the B6D2F1 hybrid males, when crossed with C57BL/6J female mice, is inherited by their male offspring. Additionally, APP, tau, and synaptophysin were elevated in in the medial preoptic area in both the B6D2F1 and BXB1 maters relative to the B6D2F1 and BXB1 non-maters, respectively, suggesting a potential genetic mechanism for the inheritance of steroid-independent male sexual behavior.

  7. Fish oil induced hyperlipidemia and oxidative stress in BioF1B hamsters is attenuated by elderberry extract.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Pratibha; Jayasooriya, Anura P; Cheema, Sukhinder K

    2012-06-01

    We have previously reported fish oil induced hyperlipidemia in BioF1B hamsters compared with Golden Syrian (GS) hamsters. Elderberry (Sambucus nigra L.) extract is abundant in anthocyanins and is believed to exert cardioprotective effects primarily by virtue of its hypolipidemic and antioxidant potential. In the current study, high-fat fish oil feeding increased oxidative stress in BioF1B hamsters compared with GS hamsters; this increase was associated with increased levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in plasma and liver. We then investigated whether cosupplementation with anthocyanin-rich elderberry extract would reverse fish oil induced hyperlipidemia and reduce lipid peroxidation in BioF1B hamsters. Plasma and hepatic lipids decreased significantly when hamsters were fed diets containing elderberry extract along with fish oil. Both plasma and liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances showed significant reductions upon cosupplementation with elderberry extract in fish oil fed BioF1B hamsters. Our findings demonstrate that cosupplementation with elderberry extract reverses hyperlipidemia and lipid peroxidation observed with dietary fish oil alone in BioF1B hamsters.

  8. An Escherichia coli system for assay of F1p site-specific recombination on substrate plasmids.

    PubMed

    Snaith, M R; Kilby, N J; Murray, J A

    1996-11-21

    We have developed an Escherichia coli system for testing the behaviour of plasmids carrying target sites for the F1p site-specific recombinase. The E. coli strain BL-FLP is described, which carries a chromosomally integrated bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase gene expressed from a lac promoter, and harbours the plasmid pMS40.pMS40 has the features: (i) it carries the FLP recombinase gene under the control of a bacteriophage T7 promoter, (ii) it confers kanamycin resistance, and (iii) it uses an R6K origin of replication; these two latter features make it compatible with most conventional cloning vectors. Substrate plasmids carrying F1p-recognition targets (FRT) are transformed into BL-FLP, and the consequences of F1p-mediated recombination can be analysed after subsequent extraction of plasmid DNA. We show that this system is capable of base-perfect F1p-mediated recombination on plasmid substrates. We also present a corrected sequence of the commonly used F1p substrate plasmid, pNEO beta GAL (O'Gorman et al. (1991) Science 251, 1351-1355).

  9. 40 CFR Table F-1 to Subpart F of... - Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production F Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98... GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production Pt. 98, Subpt. F, Table F-1 Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98—Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum...

  10. 40 CFR Table F-1 to Subpart F of... - Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production F Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98... GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production Pt. 98, Subpt. F, Table F-1 Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98—Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum...

  11. 40 CFR Table F-1 to Subpart F of... - Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production F Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98... GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production Pt. 98, Subpt. F, Table F-1 Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98—Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum...

  12. 17 CFR 274.219 - Form N-17f-1, cover page for each certificate of accounting of securities and similar investments...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... in the custody of a member of a national securities exchange, filed pursuant to rule 17f-1. 274.219... investment company in the custody of a member of a national securities exchange, filed pursuant to rule 17f-1... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Form N-17f-1, cover page...

  13. 17 CFR 274.219 - Form N-17f-1, cover page for each certificate of accounting of securities and similar investments...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... in the custody of a member of a national securities exchange, filed pursuant to rule 17f-1. 274.219... investment company in the custody of a member of a national securities exchange, filed pursuant to rule 17f-1... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Form N-17f-1, cover page...

  14. 17 CFR 274.219 - Form N-17f-1, cover page for each certificate of accounting of securities and similar investments...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... in the custody of a member of a national securities exchange, filed pursuant to rule 17f-1. 274.219... investment company in the custody of a member of a national securities exchange, filed pursuant to rule 17f-1... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Form N-17f-1, cover page...

  15. 40 CFR Table F-1 to Subpart F of... - Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production F Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98... GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production Pt. 98, Subpt. F, Table F-1 Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part...

  16. 3D-localization microscopy and tracking of FoF1-ATP synthases in living bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renz, Anja; Renz, Marc; Klütsch, Diana; Deckers-Hebestreit, Gabriele; Börsch, Michael

    2015-03-01

    FoF1-ATP synthases are membrane-embedded protein machines that catalyze the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate. Using photoactivation-based localization microscopy (PALM) in TIR-illumination as well as structured illumination microscopy (SIM), we explore the spatial distribution and track single FoF1-ATP synthases in living E. coli cells under physiological conditions at different temperatures. For quantitative diffusion analysis by mean-squared-displacement measurements, the limited size of the observation area in the membrane with its significant membrane curvature has to be considered. Therefore, we applied a 'sliding observation window' approach (M. Renz et al., Proc. SPIE 8225, 2012) and obtained the one-dimensional diffusion coefficient of FoF1-ATP synthase diffusing on the long axis in living E. coli cells.

  17. ALPHA CONTAMINATION MONITORING

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This project was conducted to determine the alpha hazard existing in the vicinity of the missile launch pad following the destruction of a missile ...were used for plutonium particle collection. Because all warhead-carrying missiles were properly launched after Project 2.3 was approved, no alpha contamination data was obtained.

  18. Assessment of a recombinant F1-V fusion protein vaccine intended to protect Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) from plague

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, Lisa L.; Shenk, Tanya M.; Powell, Bradford; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2011-01-01

    As part of an ongoing restoration program in Colorado, USA, we evaluated adverse reactions and seroconversion in captive Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) after vaccination with a recombinant F1-V fusion protein vaccine against Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes plague. Ten adult female lynx received the F1-V vaccine; 10 source- and age-matched lynx remained unvaccinated as controls. All of the vaccinated and control lynx remained apparently healthy throughout the confinement period. We observed no evidence of injection site or systemic reactions to the F1-V vaccine. Among vaccinated lynx, differences in log10 reciprocal antibody titers measured in sera collected before and after vaccination (two doses) ranged from 1.2 to 5.2 for anti-F1 antibodies and from 0.6 to 5.2 for anti-V antibodies; titers in unvaccinated lynx did not change appreciably over the course of confinement prior to release, and thus differences in anti-F1 (P=0.003) and anti-V (P=0.0005) titers were greater among vaccinated lynx than among controls. Although our findings suggest that the F1-V fusion protein vaccine evaluated here is likely to stimulate antibody responses that may help protect Canada lynx from plague, we observed no apparent differences in survival between vaccinated and unvaccinated subject animals. Retrospectively, 22 of 50 (44%; 95% confidence interval 29–59%) unvaccinated lynx captured or recaptured in Colorado during 2000–08 had passive hemagglutination antibody titers >1:16, consistent with exposure to Y. pestis; paired pre- and postrelease titers available for eight of these animals showed titer increases similar in magnitude to those seen in response to vaccination, suggesting at least some lynx may naturally acquire immunity to plague in Colorado habitats.

  19. Modulation of F0F1-ATP synthase activity by cyclophilin D regulates matrix adenine nucleotide levels

    PubMed Central

    Chinopoulos, Christos; Konràd, Csaba; Kiss, Gergely; Metelkin, Eugeniy; Töröcsik, Beata; Zhang, Steven F.; Starkov, Anatoly A.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclophilin D was recently shown to bind to and decrease the activity of F0F1-ATP synthase in submitochondrial particles and permeabilized mitochondria (Giorgio et al. 2009, J Biol Chem, 284:33982). Cyclophilin D binding decreased both the ATP synthesis and hydrolysis rates. Here, we reaffirm these findings by demonstrating that in intact mouse liver mitochondria energized by ATP, absence of cyclophilin D or presence of cyclosporin A led to a decrease in the extent of uncoupler-induced depolarization. Accordingly, in substrate-energized mitochondria an increase in F0F1-ATP synthase activity mediated by a relief of inhibition by cyclophilin D was evident as slightly increased respiration rates during arsenolysis. However, the modulation of F0F1-ATP synthase by cyclophilin D did not increase the ANT-mediated ATP efflux rate in energized mitochondria or the ATP influx rate in de-energized mitochondria. The lack of effect of cyclophilin D on the ANT-mediated adenine nucleotide exchange rate was attributed to the ~2.2 times lower flux control coefficient of the F0F1-ATP synthase than that of ANT, deduced from measurements of adenine nucleotide flux rates in intact mitochondria. These findings were further supported by a recent kinetic model of the mitochondrial phosphorylation system, suggesting that a ~30% change in F0F1-ATP synthase activity in fully energized or fully deenergized mitochondria affects ADP-ATP exchange rate mediated by the ANT in the range of 1.38-1.7%. We conclude that in mitochondria exhibiting intact inner membranes, the absence of cyclophilin D or inhibition of its binding to F0F1-ATP synthase by cyclosporin A will affect only matrix adenine nucleotides levels. PMID:21281446

  20. Rb/E2F1 Regulates the Innate Immune Receptor Toll-Like Receptor 3 in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Taura, Manabu; Suico, Mary Ann; Koyama, Kosuke; Komatsu, Kensei; Miyakita, Rui; Matsumoto, Chizuru; Kudo, Eriko; Kariya, Ryusho; Goto, Hiroki; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Chiaki; Shuto, Tsuyoshi; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Tumor suppressor genes regulate the antiviral host defense through molecular mechanisms that are not yet well explored. Here, we show that the tumor suppressor retinoblastoma (Rb) protein positively regulates Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) expression, the sensing receptor for viral double-stranded RNA and poly(I·C). TLR3 expression was lower in Rb knockout (Rb−/−) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and in mammalian epithelial cells transfected with Rb small-interfering RNA (siRNA) than in control cells. Consequently, induction of cytokines interleukin-8 and beta interferon after poly(I·C) stimulation was impaired in Rb−/− MEF and Rb siRNA-transfected cells compared to controls. TLR3 promoter analysis showed that Rb modulates the transcription factor E2F1, which directly binds to the proximal promoter of TLR3. Exogenous addition of E2F1 decreased TLR3 promoter activity, while Rb dose dependently curbed the effect of E2F1. Interestingly, poly(I·C) increased the Rb expression, and the poly(I·C)-induced TLR3 expression was impaired in Rb-depleted cells, suggesting the importance of Rb in TLR3 induction by poly(I·C). Together, these data indicated that E2F1 suppresses TLR3 transcription, but during immune stimulation, Rb is upregulated to block the inhibitory effect of E2F1 on TLR3, highlighting a role of Rb-E2F1 axis in the innate immune response in epithelial cells. PMID:22310660

  1. Assessment of a recombinant F1-V fusion protein vaccine intended to protect Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) from plague.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Lisa L; Shenk, Tanya M; Powell, Bradford; Rocke, Tonie E

    2011-10-01

    As part of an ongoing restoration program in Colorado, USA, we evaluated adverse reactions and seroconversion in captive Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) after vaccination with a recombinant F1-V fusion protein vaccine against Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes plague. Ten adult female lynx received the F1-V vaccine; 10 source- and age-matched lynx remained unvaccinated as controls. All of the vaccinated and control lynx remained apparently healthy throughout the confinement period. We observed no evidence of injection site or systemic reactions to the F1-V vaccine. Among vaccinated lynx, differences in log(10) reciprocal antibody titers measured in sera collected before and after vaccination (two doses) ranged from 1.2 to 5.2 for anti-F1 antibodies and from 0.6 to 5.2 for anti-V antibodies; titers in unvaccinated lynx did not change appreciably over the course of confinement prior to release, and thus differences in anti-F1 (P=0.003) and anti-V (P=0.0005) titers were greater among vaccinated lynx than among controls. Although our findings suggest that the F1-V fusion protein vaccine evaluated here is likely to stimulate antibody responses that may help protect Canada lynx from plague, we observed no apparent differences in survival between vaccinated and unvaccinated subject animals. Retrospectively, 22 of 50 (44%; 95% confidence interval 29-59%) unvaccinated lynx captured or recaptured in Colorado during 2000-08 had passive hemagglutination antibody titers >1:16, consistent with exposure to Y. pestis; paired pre- and postrelease titers available for eight of these animals showed titer increases similar in magnitude to those seen in response to vaccination, suggesting at least some lynx may naturally acquire immunity to plague in Colorado habitats.

  2. Comparative proteomic analysis reveals mechanistic insights into Pseudomonas putida F1 growth on benzoate and citrate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas species are capable to proliferate under diverse environmental conditions and thus have a significant bioremediation potential. To enhance our understanding of their metabolic versatility, this study explores the changes in the proteome and physiology of Pseudomonas putida F1 resulting from its growth on benzoate, a moderate toxic compound that can be catabolized, and citrate, a carbon source that is assimilated through central metabolic pathways. A series of repetitive batch cultivations were performed to ensure a complete adaptation of the bacteria to each of these contrasting carbon sources. After several growth cycles, cell growth stabilized at the maximum level and exhibited a reproducible growth profile. The specific growth rates measured for benzoate (1.01 ± 0.11 h-1) and citrate (1.11 ± 0.12 h-1) were similar, while a higher yield was observed for benzoate (0.6 and 0.3 g cell mass per g of benzoate and citrate, respectively), reflecting the different degrees of carbon reduction in the two substrates. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed an enrichment of several oxygenases/dehydrogenases in benzoate-grown cells, indicative of the higher carbon reduction of benzoate. Moreover, the upregulation of all 14 proteins implicated in benzoate degradation via the catechol ortho-cleavage pathway was observed, while several stress-response proteins were increased to aid cells to cope with benzoate toxicity. Unexpectedly, citrate posed more challenges than benzoate in the maintenance of pH homeostasis, as indicated by the enhancement of the Na+/H+ antiporter and carbonic anhydrase. The study provides important mechanistic insights into Pseudomonas adaptation to varying carbon sources that are of great relevance to bioremediation efforts. PMID:24156539

  3. Lupus nephropathy in New Zealand F1 hybrid mice treated by (-)15-deoxyspergualin.

    PubMed

    Okubo, M; Inoue, K; Umetani, N; Sato, N; Kamata, K; Masaki, Y; Uchiyama, T; Yan, X J; Aoyagi, T; Shirai, T

    1988-10-01

    The effect of (-)15-deoxyspergualin (15-dsp), a new immunosuppressant which was originally separated from the culture filtrate of a strain of Bacillus laterosporus, was evaluated in this study. Various doses of 15-dsp were subcutaneously administered to New Zealand black/white F1 hybrid mice (B/WF1) four times a week starting at 14 weeks of age, just prior to the onset of nephropathy. The life span of the treated animals, studied at 0.6 to 6.0 mg/kg body weights, compared with the control mice was significantly prolonged by 15-dsp treatment (percent survival of the treated mice at 50 to 70 weeks of age was significantly higher than that of the control mice, except that of the 0.6 mg group at 60 wks of age, P less than 0.05 by Fisher's exact test). In the 6.0 mg group of mice, complete suppression of spontaneously progressive splenomegaly with decreased total spleen cells was observed at 24 through 36 weeks of age compared with the same-aged control group of mice (P less than 0.01). Absolute numbers of L3T4+ splenocytes determined by flow cytometry, as well as L3T4+/Lyt2+ ratio, were decreased, while in vitro interleukin 2 production by splenocytes induced with staphylococcal enterotoxin A was significantly enhanced. Serum IgG anti-ds DNA antibody levels, measured by radioimmunoassay in the treated mice, were significantly lower at 24 through 36 weeks of age than those in the control mice (P less than 0.01), and the incidence of significant proteinuria (greater than or equal to 100 mg/dl) in the 15-dsp group was lower at both 32 and 36 weeks of age (P less than 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Mechanochemical Energy Transduction during the Main Rotary Step in the Synthesis Cycle of F1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Czub, Jacek; Wieczór, Miłosz; Prokopowicz, Bartosz; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2017-03-09

    F1-ATPase is a highly efficient molecular motor that can synthesize ATP driven by a mechanical torque. Its ability to function reversibly in either direction requires tight mechanochemical coupling between the catalytic domain and the rotating central shaft, as well as temporal control of substrate binding and product release. Despite great efforts and significant progress, the molecular details of this synchronized and fine-tuned energy conversion mechanism are not fully understood. Here, we use extensive molecular dynamics simulations to reconcile recent single-molecule experiments with structural data and provide a consistent thermodynamic, kinetic and mechanistic description of the main rotary substep in the synthetic cycle of mammalian ATP synthase. The calculated free energy profiles capture a discrete pattern in the rotation of the central γ-shaft, with a metastable intermediate located-consistently with recent experimental findings-at 70° relative to the X-ray position. We identify this rotary step as the ATP-dependent substep, and find that the associated free energy input supports the mechanism involving concurrent nucleotide binding and release. During the main substep, our simulations show no significant opening of the ATP-bound β subunit; instead, we observe that mechanical energy is transmitted to its nucleotide binding site, thus lowering the affinity for ATP. Simultaneously, the empty subunit assumes a conformation that enables the enzyme to harness the free energy of ADP binding to drive ATP release. Finally, we show that ligand exchange is regulated by a checkpoint mechanism, an apparent prerequisite for high efficiency in protein nanomotors.

  5. Kinetics of Arsenic Methylation by Freshly Isolated B6C3F1 Mouse Hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kedderis, Gregory L.; Elmore, Amy R.; Crecelius, Eric A.; Yager, Janice W.; Goldsworthy, Thomas L.

    2006-06-10

    The toxic and carcinogenic effects of arsenic may be mediated by both inorganic and methylated arsenic species. The methylation of arsenicIII takes place via sequential oxidative methylation and reduction steps to form monomethylarsenic (MMA) and dimethylarsenic (DMA) species. The kinetics of arsenic methylation were determined in freshly isolated hepatocytes from male B6C3F1 mice. Hepatocytes (>90% viability) were isolated by collagenase perfusion and suspended in Williams Medium E with various concentrations of arsenicIII (sodium m-arsenite). Aliquots of the cell suspension were lysed with 1.0% Triton X-100 and analyzed for arsenic species by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry. The formation of MMAIII from sodium arsenite (1 ?M) was linear with respect to time for >90 min. DMAIII formation did not become significant until 60 min. MMAV and DMAV were not consistently observed in the incubations. These results suggest that the reduction of MMAV to MMAIII is rapid relative to the methylation rate since MMAV was not observed as a major product of arsenicIII metabolism in mouse hepatocytes. Metabolism of arsenicV was not observed in mouse hepatocytes, consistent with inhibition of arsenicV active cellular uptake by phosphate in the medium. The formation of MMAIII increased with increasing arsenicIII concentrations up to approximately 2 ?M and declined thereafter. The concentration dependence is consistent with a saturable methylation reaction accompanied by substrate inhibition of the reaction by arsenicIII. Kinetic analysis of the data suggested an apparent KM of approximately 3.6 ?M arsenicIII, an apparent Vmax of approximately 38.9 ?g MMAIII formed/L/hr/million cells, and an apparent KI of approximately 1.3 ?M arsenicIII. The results of this study can be used in the physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for arsenic disposition in mice to predict the concentration of MMAIII in liver and other tissues.

  6. Age- and sex-dependent thymic abnormalities in NZB × SJL F1 hybrid mice

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, F.; Robert, F.

    1980-01-01

    The cellular organization of the thymus was investigated in 3- and 12-month-old NZB × SJL F1 hybrid (NS) mice. Age-dependent alterations were demonstrated which differed strikingly according to the sex of the animals. In female mice, marked abnormalities of the thymus developed during ageing. They consisted of a more or less pronounced hypertrophy accompanied by histological changes and modifications in the nature of the lymphocyte populations. Three types of qualitative changes were found at 12 months of age: (1) depletion of cortical thymocytes as evidenced by histology, by the evaluation of peanut-agglutinin (PNA) binding and by cell electrophoresis; (2) hyperplasia of the medullary lymphoid tissue, probably reflecting the expansion of a population of mature T lymphocytes. This was further suggested by a rise (up to 60%) in the frequency of lymphocytes lacking both PNA receptor and B cell markers, by an increased proportion (57%) of high electrophoretic mobility (EPM) lymphocytes and by an augmentation of in vitro reactivities to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and, although to a lesser extent, to concanavalin A (Con A). (3) The appearance of significant numbers of B lymphocytes (up to 20%) as assessed by surface immunoglobulin (sIg) and complement receptor (CR) detection which was accompanied by a vigorous responsiveness of thymus cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). None of these abnormalities was seen in the male mice. Instead, the thymus of NS males displayed a nearly normal age-related involution without major change in the proportions of its lymphocyte subpopulations. NS mice thus provide an interesting model of thymic disease influenced by sex-linked factors. ImagesFig. 3 PMID:7438550

  7. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  8. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  9. Event counting alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, Richard D.; MacArthur, Duncan W.

    1996-01-01

    An electrostatic detector for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure.

  10. Event counting alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, R.D.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1996-08-27

    An electrostatic detector is disclosed for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure. 6 figs.

  11. Alpha-particle diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will focus on the state of development of diagnostics which are expected to provide the information needed for {alpha}- physics studies in the future. Conventional measurement of detailed temporal and spatial profiles of background plasma properties in DT will be essential for such aspects as determining heating effectiveness, shaping of the plasma profiles and effects of MHD, but will not be addressed here. This paper will address (1) the measurement of the neutron source, and hence {alpha}-particle birth profile, (2) measurement of the escaping {alpha}-particles and (3) measurement of the confined {alpha}-particles over their full energy range. There will also be a brief discussion of (4) the concerns about instabilities being generated by {alpha}-particles and the methods necessary for measuring these effects. 51 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Draft genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. strain F1, a potential source for glycoside hydrolases isolated from Brazilian soil.

    PubMed

    Melo, Ricardo Rodrigues de; Persinoti, Gabriela Felix; Paixão, Douglas Antonio Alvaredo; Squina, Fábio Márcio; Ruller, Roberto; Sato, Helia Harumi

    2017-02-10

    Here, we show the draft genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. F1, a strain isolated from soil with great potential for secretion of hydrolytic enzymes used to deconstruct cellulosic biomass. The draft genome assembly of Streptomyces sp. strain F1 has 69 contigs with a total genome size of 8,142,296bp and G+C 72.65%. Preliminary genome analysis identified 175 proteins as Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes, being 85 glycoside hydrolases organized in 33 distinct families. This draft genome information provides new insights on the key genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes involved in biomass deconstruction employed by soil bacteria.

  13. Forestomach tumor induction by 2,4-hexadienal in F344N rats and B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Po C; Mahler, Joel; Peddada, Shyamal; Lomnitski, Liat; Nyska, Abraham

    2003-09-01

    2,4-Hexadienal (2,4-Hx) was studied for its toxicity and carcinogenicity because of its alpha, beta-unsaturated aldehyde structure and potential link between exposure to lipid peroxidation products in the diet and human malignancies. Male and female F344N rats and B6C3F1 mice received 2,4-Hx in corn oil by gavage for 16 days, 14 weeks, or 2 years. In the 16-day studies 2,4-Hx induced forestomach necrosis and ulceration at 240 mg/kg and forestomach epithelial hyperplasia at 80 mg/kg in rats and mice. In the 14-week studies the chemical induced forestomach hyperplasia and nasal olfactory atrophy or necrosis at 120 mg/kg in rats and mice. In the 2-year studies 2,4-Hx induced squamous cell papilloma and carcinoma of the forestomach in male and female rats at 45 and 90 mg/kg and in male and female mice at 120 mg/kg. Two male mice in the 120 mg/kg group had uncommon squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (tongue). Mechanistic studies indicated that the forestomach carcinogenesis in rats and mice may be due to depletion of glutathione as a result of oxidative stress induced by 2,4-Hx.

  14. Reexamination of the {alpha}-{alpha}''fishbone'' potential

    SciTech Connect

    Day, J. P.; McEwen, J. E.; Elhanafy, M.; Smith, E.; Woodhouse, R.; Papp, Z.

    2011-09-15

    The fishbone potential of composite particles simulates the Pauli effect by nonlocal terms. We determine the {alpha}-{alpha} fishbone potential by simultaneously fitting to two-{alpha} resonance energies, experimental phase shifts, and three-{alpha} binding energies. We found that, essentially, a simple Gaussian can provide a good description of two-{alpha} and three-{alpha} experimental data without invoking three-body potentials.

  15. Adenovirus E2F1 Overexpression Sensitizes LNCaP and PC3 Prostate Tumor Cells to Radiation In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S.; Stoyanova, Radka; Hachem, Paul; Ahmed, Mansoor M.; Pollack, Alan

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: We previously showed that E2F1 overexpression radiosensitizes prostate cancer cells in vitro. Here, we demonstrate the radiosensitization efficacy of adenovirus (Ad)-E2F1 infection in growing (orthotopic) LNCaP and (subcutaneous) PC3 nude mice xenograft tumors. Methods and Materials: Ad-E2F1 was injected intratumorally in LNCaP (3 x 10{sup 8} plaque-forming units [PFU]) and PC3 (5 x 10{sup 8} PFU) tumors treated with or without radiation. LNCaP tumor volumes (TV) were measured by magnetic resonance imaging, caliper were used to measure PC3 tumors, and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Apoptosis was measured by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling, and key proteins involved in cell death signaling were analyzed by Western blotting. Results: Intracellular overexpression of Ad-E2F1 had a significant effect on the regression of TV and reduction of PSA levels relative to that of adenoviral luciferase (Ad-Luc)-infected control. The in vivo regressing effect of Ad-E2F1 on LNCaP tumor growth was significant (PSA, 34 ng/ml; TV, 142 mm{sup 3}) compared to that of Ad-Luc control (PSA, 59 ng/ml; TV, 218 mm{sup 3}; p <0.05). This effect was significantly enhanced by radiation therapy (compare: Ad-E2F1+RT/PSA, 16 ng/ml, and TV, 55 mm{sup 3} to Ad-Luc+RT/PSA, 42 ng/ml, and TV, 174 mm{sup 3}, respectively; p <0.05). For PC3 tumors, the greatest effect was observed with Ad-E2F1 infection alone; there was little or no effect when radiotherapy (RT) was combined. However, addition of RT enhanced the level of in situ apoptosis in PC3 tumors. Molecularly, addition of Ad-E2F1 in a combination treatment abrogated radiation-induced BCL-2 protein expression and was associated with an increase in activated BAX, and together they caused a potent radiosensitizing effect, irrespective of p53 and androgen receptor functional status. Conclusions: We show here for the first time that

  16. Gamete fertility and ovule number variation in selfed reciprocal F1 hybrid triploid plants are heritable and display epigenetic parent-of-origin effects.

    PubMed

    Duszynska, Dorota; McKeown, Peter C; Juenger, Thomas E; Pietraszewska-Bogiel, Anna; Geelen, Danny; Spillane, Charles

    2013-04-01

    Polyploidy and hybridization play major roles in plant evolution and reproduction. To investigate the reproductive effects of polyploidy and hybridization in Arabidopsis thaliana, we analyzed fertility of reciprocal pairs of F1 hybrid triploids, generated by reciprocally crossing 89 diploid accessions to a tetraploid Ler-0 line. All F1 hybrid triploid genotypes exhibited dramatically reduced ovule fertility, while variation in ovule number per silique was observed across different F1 triploid genotypes. These two reproductive traits were negatively correlated suggesting a trade-off between increased ovule number and ovule fertility. Furthermore, the ovule fertility of the F1 hybrid triploids displayed both hybrid dysgenesis and hybrid advantage (heterosis) effects. Strikingly, both reproductive traits (ovule fertility, ovule number) displayed epigenetic parent-of-origin effects between genetically identical reciprocal F1 hybrid triploid pairs. In some F1 triploid genotypes, the maternal genome excess F1 hybrid triploid was more fertile, whilst for other accessions the paternal genome excess F1 hybrid triploid was more fertile. Male gametogenesis was not significantly disrupted in F1 triploids. Fertility variation in the F1 triploid A. thaliana is mainly the result of disrupted ovule development. Overall, we demonstrate that in F1 triploid plants both ovule fertility and ovule number are subject to parent-of-origin effects that are genome dosage-dependent.

  17. The alpha channeling effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-10

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  18. Mutagenicity of furan in female Big Blue B6C3F1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Terrell, Ashley N.; Huynh, Mailee; Grill, Alex E.; Kovi, Ramesh C.; O’Sullivan, M. Gerard; Guttenplan, Joseph B.; Ho, Yen-Yi; Peterson, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Furan is an abundant food and environmental contaminant that is a potent liver carcinogen in rodent models. To determine if furan is genotoxic in vivo, female B6C3F1 Big Blue transgenic mice were treated with 15 mg/kg bw furan by gavage 5 days a week for 6 weeks, or once weekly for 3 weeks. Liver cII trans-gene mutation-frequency and mutation spectra were determined. Furan did not increase the mutation frequency under either treatment condition. In the 6-week treatment regimen, there was a change in the cII transgene mutation-spectrum, with the fraction of GC to AT transitions significantly reduced. The only other significant change was an increase in GC to CG transversions; these represented a minor contribution to the overall mutation spectrum. A much larger furan-dependent shift was observed in the 3-week study. There was a significant increase in transversion mutations, predominantly GC to TA transversions as well as smaller non-significant changes in GC to CG and AT to TA transversions. To determine if these mutations were caused by cis-2-butene-1,4-dial (BDA), a reactive metabolite of furan, the mutagenic activity and the mutation spectrum of BDA was determined in vitro, in Big Blue mouse embryonic fibroblasts. This compound did not increase the cII gene mutation-frequency but caused a substantial increase in AT to CG transversions. This increase, however, lost statistical significance when adjusted for multiple comparisons. Together, these findings suggest that BDA may not be directly responsible for the in-vivo effects of furan on mutational spectra. Histopathological analysis of livers from furan-treated mice revealed that furan induced multifocal, hepatocellular necrosis admixed with reactive leukocytes and pigment-laden Kupffer cells, enhanced oval-cell hyperplasia, and increased hepatocyte mitoses, some of which were atypical. An indirect mechanism of genotoxicity is proposed in which chronic toxicity followed by inflammation and secondary cell

  19. Mutagenicity of furan in female Big Blue B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Ashley N; Huynh, Mailee; Grill, Alex E; Kovi, Ramesh C; O'Sullivan, M Gerard; Guttenplan, Joseph B; Ho, Yen-Yi; Peterson, Lisa A

    2014-08-01

    Furan is an abundant food and environmental contaminant that is a potent liver carcinogen in rodent models. To determine if furan is genotoxic in vivo, female B6C3F1 Big Blue transgenic mice were treated with 15 mg/kg bw furan by gavage 5 days a week for 6 weeks, or once weekly for 3 weeks. Liver cII transgene mutation-frequency and mutation spectra were determined. Furan did not increase the mutation frequency under either treatment condition. In the 6-week treatment regimen, there was a change in the cII transgene mutation-spectrum, with the fraction of GC to AT transitions significantly reduced. The only other significant change was an increase in GC to CG transversions; these represented a minor contribution to the overall mutation spectrum. A much larger furan-dependent shift was observed in the 3-week study. There was a significant increase in transversion mutations, predominantly GC to TA transversions as well as smaller non-significant changes in GC to CG and AT to TA transversions. To determine if these mutations were caused by cis-2-butene-1,4-dial (BDA), a reactive metabolite of furan, the mutagenic activity and the mutation spectrum of BDA was determined in vitro, in Big Blue mouse embryonic fibroblasts. This compound did not increase the cII gene mutation-frequency but caused a substantial increase in AT to CG transversions. This increase, however, lost statistical significance when adjusted for multiple comparisons. Together, these findings suggest that BDA may not be directly responsible for the in-vivo effects of furan on mutational spectra. Histopathological analysis of livers from furan-treated mice revealed that furan induced multifocal, hepatocellular necrosis admixed with reactive leukocytes and pigment-laden Kupffer cells, enhanced oval-cell hyperplasia, and increased hepatocyte mitoses, some of which were atypical. An indirect mechanism of genotoxicity is proposed in which chronic toxicity followed by inflammation and secondary cell

  20. Early growth performance of full-sib Acacia auriculiformis x Acacia mangium F1 hybrid progenies at three different sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah Aimin, Atirah Abdullah; Abdullah, Mohd Zaki; Muhammad, Norwati; Ratnam, Wickneswari

    2014-09-01

    Field trials of 14 full sib Acacia auriculiformis x Acacia mangium F1 hybrid progenies were evaluated for growth performance at three sites (Bintulu, Mentakab and Segamat). Results indicated that there were significant differences (p> 0.05) for diameter breast height (Dbh) and total height (Ht) among the progenies and different sites. Superior progenies have been identified for future tree selection and improvement.

  1. A recombinant raccoon poxvirus vaccine expressing both Yersinia pestis F1 and truncated V antigens protects animals against lethal plague.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Kingstad-Bakke, B; Berlier, W; Osorio, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated in mice and prairie dogs that simultaneous administration of two recombinant raccoon poxviruses (rRCN) expressing Yersinia pestis antigens (F1 and V307-a truncated version of the V protein) provided superior protection against plague challenge compared to individual single antigen constructs. To reduce costs of vaccine production and facilitate implementation of a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) control program for prairie dogs, a dual antigen construct is more desirable. Here we report the construction and characterization of a novel RCN-vectored vaccine that simultaneously expresses both F1 and V307 antigens. This dual antigen vaccine provided similar levels of protection against plague in both mice and prairie dogs as compared to simultaneous administration of the two single antigen constructs and was also shown to protect mice against an F1 negative strain of Y. pestis.. The equivalent safety, immunogenicity and efficacy profile of the dual RCN-F1/V307 construct warrants further evaluation in field efficacy studies in sylvatic plague endemic areas.

  2. A Recombinant Raccoon Poxvirus Vaccine Expressing both Yersinia pestis F1 and Truncated V Antigens Protects Animals against Lethal Plague

    PubMed Central

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Kingstad-Bakke, Brock; Berlier, Willy; Osorio, Jorge E.

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated in mice and prairie dogs that simultaneous administration of two recombinant raccoon poxviruses (rRCN) expressing Yersinia pestis antigens (F1 and V307—a truncated version of the V protein) provided superior protection against plague challenge compared to individual single antigen constructs. To reduce costs of vaccine production and facilitate implementation of a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) control program for prairie dogs, a dual antigen construct is more desirable. Here we report the construction and characterization of a novel RCN-vectored vaccine that simultaneously expresses both F1 and V307 antigens. This dual antigen vaccine provided similar levels of protection against plague in both mice and prairie dogs as compared to simultaneous administration of the two single antigen constructs and was also shown to protect mice against an F1 negative strain of Y. pestis. The equivalent safety, immunogenicity and efficacy profile of the dual RCN-F1/V307 construct warrants further evaluation in field efficacy studies in sylvatic plague endemic areas. PMID:26344891

  3. Potentially Functional Polymorphisms in POU5F1 Gene Are Associated with the Risk of Lung Cancer in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Niu, Rui; Wang, Yuzhuo; Zhu, Meng; Wen, Yifan; Sun, Jie; Shen, Wei; Cheng, Yang; Zhang, Jiahui; Jin, Guangfu; Ma, Hongxia; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Dai, Juncheng

    2015-01-01

    POU5F1 is a key regulator of self-renewal and differentiation in embryonic stem cells and may be associated with initiation, promotion, and progression in cancer. We hypothesized that functional polymorphisms in POU5F1 may play an important role in modifying the lung cancer risk. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a case-control study to explore the association between 17 potentially functional SNPs in POU5F1 gene and the lung cancer risk in 1,341 incident lung cancer cases and 1,982 healthy controls in a Chinese population. We found that variant alleles of rs887468 and rs3130457 were significantly associated with increased risk of lung cancer after multiple comparison (OR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.11-1.51, P fdr = 0.017 for rs887468; OR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.10-1.51, P fdr = 0.034 for rs3130457, resp.). In addition, we detected a significant interaction between rs887468 genotypes and smoking status on lung cancer risk (P = 0.017). Combined analysis of these 2 SNPs showed a significant allele-dosage association between the number of risk alleles and increased risk of lung cancer (P trend < 0.001). These findings indicate that potentially functional polymorphisms in POU5F1 gene may contribute to lung cancer susceptibility in a Chinese population.

  4. 26 CFR 25.2523(f)-1 - Election with respect to life estate transferred to donee spouse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Election with respect to life estate transferred... Deductions § 25.2523(f)-1 Election with respect to life estate transferred to donee spouse. (a) In general... prescribed by section 6075(b) (determined without regard to section 6019(a)(2)), including any...

  5. 26 CFR 25.2523(f)-1 - Election with respect to life estate transferred to donee spouse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Election with respect to life estate... Deductions § 25.2523(f)-1 Election with respect to life estate transferred to donee spouse. (a) In general... prescribed by section 6075(b) (determined without regard to section 6019(a)(2)), including any...

  6. Axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics analysis of Saturn V/S1-C/F1 nozzle and plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.

    1993-01-01

    An axisymmetric single engine Computational Fluid Dynamics calculation of the Saturn V/S 1-C vehicle base region and F1 engine plume is described. There were two objectives of this work, the first was to calculate an axisymmetric approximation of the nozzle, plume and base region flow fields of S1-C/F1, relate/scale this to flight data and apply this scaling factor to a NLS/STME axisymmetric calculations from a parallel effort. The second was to assess the differences in F1 and STME plume shear layer development and concentration of combustible gases. This second piece of information was to be input/supporting data for assumptions made in NLS2 base temperature scaling methodology from which the vehicle base thermal environments were being generated. The F1 calculations started at the main combustion chamber faceplate and incorporated the turbine exhaust dump/nozzle film coolant. The plume and base region calculations were made for ten thousand feet and 57 thousand feet altitude at vehicle flight velocity and in stagnant freestream. FDNS was implemented with a 14 species, 28 reaction finite rate chemistry model plus a soot burning model for the RP-1/LOX chemistry. Nozzle and plume flow fields are shown, the plume shear layer constituents are compared to a STME plume. Conclusions are made about the validity and status of the analysis and NLS2 vehicle base thermal environment definition methodology.

  7. Cytogenetic studies on two F1 hybrids of autotetraploid rice varieties showing extremely high level of heterosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanisms of two F1 hybrids (D46AxDTP-4 and D46Ax Dminghui63) of auototetraploid rice (2n=4x=48) showing extremely high pollen fertility 87.40% and 85.97%, respectively, seed set 82.00% and 79%, respectively and extremely high level of heterosis were analyzed cytologically. Chromosome pairing of th...

  8. Rubus imperialis (Rosaceae) extract and pure compound niga-ichigoside F1: wound healing and anti-inflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    Tonin, Talita Dacroce; Thiesen, Liliani Carolini; de Oliveira Nunes, Maria Luisa; Broering, Milena Fronza; Donato, Marcos Paulo; Goss, Marina Jagielski; Petreanu, Marcel; Niero, Rivaldo; Machado, Isabel Daufenback; Santin, José Roberto

    2016-11-01

    Here, we evaluate the anti-inflammatory and wound-healing effects of methanolic crude extract obtained from aerial parts (leaves and branches) of Rubus imperialis Chum. Schl. (Rosaceae) and the pure compound niga-ichigoside F1. Anti-inflammatory activity was determined in vivo and in vitro, and the healing effect was evaluated in surgical lesions in mice skin. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) assay and H2O2-induced oxidative stress were used to determine antioxidant activity. The efferocytosis activity was also determined. The data obtained show that the extract of R. imperialis promote reduction in the inflammatory process induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or carrageenan in the air pouch model; the effects could be reinforced by nitric oxide reduction in LPS-stimulated neutrophils, and an increase in the efferocytosis. The extract showed wound healing property in vitro and in vivo, scavenging activity for DPPH, and cytoprotection in the H2O2-induced oxidative stress in L929 cells. In addition, the compound niga-ichigoside F1 was able to reduce the NO secretion; however, it did not present wound-healing activity in vitro. Together, the data obtained point out the modulatory actions of R. imperialis extract on leukocyte migration to the inflamed tissue, the antioxidant, and the pro-resolutive activity. However, the R. imperialis anti-inflammatory activity may be mediated in parts by niga-ichigoside F1, and on wound healing do not correlated with niga-ichigoside F1.

  9. Immunotoxicological Profile of Chloroform in Female B6c3f1 Mice When Administered In Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chloroform can be formed as a disinfection by-product during water chlorination, one of the primary modalities for purifying municipal water supplies for human consumption. The goal of this study was to characterize the immunotoxic effects of chloroform in female B6C3F1 mice when...

  10. Potentially Functional Polymorphisms in POU5F1 Gene Are Associated with the Risk of Lung Cancer in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Rui; Wang, Yuzhuo; Zhu, Meng; Wen, Yifan; Sun, Jie; Shen, Wei; Cheng, Yang; Zhang, Jiahui; Jin, Guangfu; Ma, Hongxia; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Dai, Juncheng

    2015-01-01

    POU5F1 is a key regulator of self-renewal and differentiation in embryonic stem cells and may be associated with initiation, promotion, and progression in cancer. We hypothesized that functional polymorphisms in POU5F1 may play an important role in modifying the lung cancer risk. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a case-control study to explore the association between 17 potentially functional SNPs in POU5F1 gene and the lung cancer risk in 1,341 incident lung cancer cases and 1,982 healthy controls in a Chinese population. We found that variant alleles of rs887468 and rs3130457 were significantly associated with increased risk of lung cancer after multiple comparison (OR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.11–1.51, Pfdr = 0.017 for rs887468; OR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.10–1.51, Pfdr = 0.034 for rs3130457, resp.). In addition, we detected a significant interaction between rs887468 genotypes and smoking status on lung cancer risk (P = 0.017). Combined analysis of these 2 SNPs showed a significant allele-dosage association between the number of risk alleles and increased risk of lung cancer (Ptrend < 0.001). These findings indicate that potentially functional polymorphisms in POU5F1 gene may contribute to lung cancer susceptibility in a Chinese population. PMID:26824036

  11. 26 CFR 1.904(f)-1T - Overall foreign loss and the overall foreign loss account (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Overall foreign loss and the overall foreign... (temporary). (a)(1) For further guidance, see § 1.904(f)-1(a)(1). (2) Application to post-1986 taxable years... taxable years beginning after December 31, 1986, modified so as to take into account the effect...

  12. 26 CFR 1.904(f)-1T - Overall foreign loss and the overall foreign loss account (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Overall foreign loss and the overall foreign...) For further guidance, see § 1.904(f)-1(a)(1). (2) Application to post-1986 taxable years. The... beginning after December 31, 1986, modified so as to take into account the effect of statutory...

  13. 'Caro-Tex 312’ – An F1 Hybrid, High Yielding, Multiple Disease Resistant, Orange Habanero Pepper Cultivar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Texas A&M University and the USDA-ARS U.S. Vegetable Laboratory in Charleston, SC, have developed a new, F1 hybrid Habanero pepper cultivar. ‘Caro-Tex 312’ produces a large, orange-fruited Habanero pepper with typical shape and high pungency. It also possesses unique yield, early maturity and dise...

  14. Electron density and height at the F 1 region minimum gradient at low solar activity for an equatorial station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeniyi, J. O.; Radicella, Sandro M.

    1997-09-01

    The presence of a ledge of ionization between the E and F2 laver maximum electron density, either with a distinct critical frequency (fOF1) or in the form of an inflection point, is found to be a persistent feature of the equatorial ionosphere from 0700 to 1800 LT at low solar activity. The electron density NF1, and the height hF1, at the position of minimum gradient in ionospheric profiles were investigated for Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, an equatorial station. NF1 was found to exhibit a clear diurnal variation, which depends on solar zenith angle (x). The cos(x) power was found to be 0.34. An obvious seasonal variation in NF1 was not found. The height hF1 shows neither a diurnal nor seasonal dependence, and has an average value of (166 ± 6) km. NF1 and hF1 were compared at 1000, 1200 and 1400 LT in the months of January and July, for Ouagadougou and Ibadan, Nigeria, another equatorial station. The comparison shows that there is no significant difference in hF1 for both stations, but some differences were found in NF1.

  15. Flagellin-F1-V fusion protein is an effective plague vaccine in mice and two species of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Mizel, Steven B; Graff, Aaron H; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Ervin, Sean; Lees, Cynthia J; Lively, Mark O; Hantgan, Roy R; Thomas, Michael J; Wood, James; Bell, Brian

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies have clearly demonstrated that flagellin is a potent adjuvant that promotes robust immune responses when it is given with a protein antigen. In view of the potential biological and practical benefits of a recombinant protein vaccine composed of a single fusion protein containing flagellin and antigen, we have evaluated the efficacy of a fusion protein composed of flagellin and two protective antigens of Yersinia pestis (F1 and V) in eliciting protection against respiratory challenge with Y. pestis. Flagellin-F1-V was produced and purified in high yield under good manufacturing practices conditions. The fusion protein retains full Toll-like receptor 5-stimulating activity in vitro. Using a prime-boost immunization protocol, we found that flagellin-F1-V elicits robust antigen-specific humoral immunity in mice and two species of nonhuman primates. Immune mice were fully protected against intranasal challenge with 150 mean tolerated doses of Y. pestis CO92. In immune mice, the bacteria were completely cleared within 3 days after challenge. Flagellin-F1-V exhibited full stability for at least 297 days at 4 degrees C and at least 168 days at 25 degrees C. At between 29 and 84 days at 37 degrees C, the protein exhibited a loss of biological activity that appeared to be associated with a substantial change in protein diameter, possibly due to oligomerization. On the basis of our results, we believe that flagellin-F1-V is an outstanding candidate for evaluation in studies with humans.

  16. Alpha One Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    Languages French (Francais) German (Deutsch) Italian (Italiano) Spanish (Español) Portuguese (Portugues) Swedish (Svenska) Donate One Time Monthly Keep In Touch | About Us | Contact Us | What is the Alpha-1 ...

  17. Effects of an omega-3 fatty acid-enriched lipid emulsion on eicosanoid synthesis in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): A prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The use of lipid emulsions has been associated with changes in lung function and gas exchange which may be mediated by biologically active metabolites derived from arachidonic acid. The type and quantity of the lipid emulsions used could modulate this response, which is mediated by the eicosanoids. This study investigates the use of omega-3 fatty acid-enriched lipid emulsions in ARDS patients and their effects on eicosanoid values. Methods Prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study carried out at the Intensive Medicine Department of Vall d'Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona-Spain). We studied 16 consecutive patients with ARDS and intolerance to enteral nutrition (14 men; age: 58 ± 13 years; APACHE II score 17.8 ± 2.3; Lung Injury Score: 3.1 ± 0.5; baseline PaO2/FiO2 ratio: 149 ± 40). Patients were randomized into two groups: Group A (n = 8) received the study emulsion Lipoplus® 20%, B. Braun Medical (50% MCT, 40% LCT, 10% fish oil (FO)); Group B (n = 8) received the control emulsion Intralipid® Fresenius Kabi (100% LCT). Lipid emulsions were administered for 12 h at a dose of 0.12 g/kg/h. We measured LTB4, TXB2, and 6-keto prostaglandin F1α values at baseline [immediately before the administration of the lipid emulsions (T-0)], at the end of the administration (T-12) and 24 hours after the beginning of the infusion (T 24) in arterial and mixed venous blood samples. Results In group A (FO) LTB4, TXB2, 6-keto prostaglandin F1α levels fell during omega-3 administration (T12). After discontinuation (T24), levels of inflammatory markers (both systemic and pulmonary) behaved erratically. In group B (LCT) all systemic and pulmonary mediators increased during lipid administration and returned to baseline levels after discontinuation, but the differences did not reach statistical significance. There was a clear interaction between the treatment in group A (fish oil) and changes in LTB4 over time. Conclusions Infusion of lipids enriched

  18. [Dynamics of violations of intravascular platelet activity in rats during the formation of metabolic syndrome using fructose models].

    PubMed

    Medvedev, I N

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To trace the development of disorders intravascular platelet activity in experimental form of the metabolic syndrome. The study included 61 rat male Wistar rats at the age of 2.5-3 months. Animals were divided into 2 groups: 32 rats were given free access to drink 10% solution of fructose for 8 weeks and 29 rats were the control group. The level of the total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLD cholesterol) and triglycerides were determined using colorimetric enzymatic method. The blood plasma content of endothelin-1 was determined by radioimmunoassay, thromboxane B2 and 6-keto-prostaglandin F(1α)--by ELISA. The total content of nitrogen oxide metabolites was revealed in blood. Intravascular platelet activity was assessed using phase contrast microscopy. In terms of fructose load in rats simultaneously with the increase of body weight and the development of biochemical disorders that are characteristic for the metabolic syndrome, there comes a marked progressive increase in intravascular platelet activity [reduction of the number of discocytes from 81.0 ± 0.1 to 61.3 ± 0.2%, increase in the number of reactive platelets from 19.0 ± 0.1 to 38.7 ± 0.2%, an increase in the number of freely moving in the blood of small units from 2.4 ± 0.0 to 14.6 ± 0.1 per 100 free platelets, and of medium and large units (from 4 or more cells) from 0.1 ± 0.03 to 2.3 ± 0.06 per 100 free platelets], largely due to the increase (p < 0.01) of the synthesis of thromboxane B2 (from 145.9 ± 0.2 to 232.6 ± 0.7 pg/ml), endothelin-4 (from 6.9 ± 0.2 to 12.5 ± 0.4 pg/ml) and reduction (p < 0.01) of the generation of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α (from 75.9 ± 0.2 to 62.3 ± 0.4 pg/ml), and the total amount of nitric oxide metabolites (from 27.9 ± 0.3 to 23.2 ± 0.1 mmol/l).

  19. Coaching the alpha male.

    PubMed

    Ludeman, Kate; Erlandson, Eddie

    2004-05-01

    Highly intelligent, confident, and successful, alpha males represent about 70% of all senior executives. Natural leaders, they willingly take on levels of responsibility most rational people would find overwhelming. But many of their quintessential strengths can also make alphas difficult to work with. Their self-confidence can appear domineering. Their high expectations can make them excessively critical. Their unemotional style can keep them from inspiring their teams. That's why alphas need coaching to broaden their interpersonal tool kits while preserving their strengths. Drawing from their experience coaching more than 1,000 senior executives, the authors outline an approach tailored specifically for the alpha. Coaches get the alpha's attention by inundating him with data from 360-degree feedback presented in ways he will find compelling--both hard-boiled metrics and vivid verbatim comments from colleagues about his strengths and weaknesses. A 360-degree assessment is a wake-up call for most alphas, providing undeniable proof that their behavior doesn't work nearly as well as they think it does. That paves the way for a genuine commitment to change. In order to change, the alpha must venture into unfamiliar--and often uncomfortable--psychological territory. He must admit vulnerability, accept accountability not just for his own work for others', connect with his underlying emotions, learn to motivate through a balance of criticism and validation, and become aware of unproductive behavior patterns. The goal of executive coaching is not simply to treat the alpha as an individual problem but to improve the entire team dynamic. Initial success creates an incentive to persevere, and the virtuous cycle reverberates throughout the entire organization.

  20. alpha2-Adrenoreceptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Mayer, P; Imbert, T

    2001-06-01

    A review of the literature relating to the therapeutic potential of alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists published between 1990 and 2000 is presented. Although extensively studied since the early 1970s in a wide spectrum of therapeutic applications, the distinction of alpha2-adrenoceptor subtypes and some emerging evidence concerning new applications in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, obesity and schizophrenia, have refreshed an interest in this class of agents.

  1. Alpha Particle Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Ray, K.

    2009-05-13

    The study of burning plasmas is the next frontier in fusion energy research, and will be a major objective of the U.S. fusion program through U.S. collaboration with our international partners on the ITER Project. For DT magnetic fusion to be useful for energy production, it is essential that the energetic alpha particles produced by the fusion reactions be confined long enough to deposit a significant fraction of their initial ~3.5 MeV energy in the plasma before they are lost. Development of diagnostics to study the behavior of energetic confined alpha particles is a very important if not essential part of burning plasma research. Despite the clear need for these measurements, development of diagnostics to study confined the fast confined alphas to date has proven extremely difficult, and the available techniques remain for the most part unproven and with significant uncertainties. Research under this grant had the goal of developing diagnostics of fast confined alphas, primarily based on measurements of the neutron and ion tails resulting from alpha particle knock-on collisions with the plasma deuterium and tritium fuel ions. One of the strengths of this approach is the ability to measure the alphas in the hot plasma core where the interesting ignition physics will occur.

  2. Alpha- and gamma- tocopherol prevent age-related transcriptional alterations in the heart and brain of mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the global effects of vitamin E supplementation on aging, we used high density oligonucleotide arrays to measure transcriptional alterations in the heart and brain (neocortex) of 30-month-old B6C3F1 mice supplemented with alpha- and gamma-tocopherol since middle age (15 months). Gene ...

  3. Effect of exogenous 5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid on cardiac anaphylaxis.

    PubMed Central

    Juan, H.; Peskar, B. A.; Simmet, T.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of infusions of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (6 X 10(-8) mol min-1 and 15 X 10(-8) mol min-1) on the coronary constriction and the release of immunoreactive sulphidopeptide-leukotrienes (SP-LT), thromboxane B2(TXB2) and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (PGF1 alpha) from perfused anaphylactic guinea-pig hearts were investigated. EPA dose-dependently inhibited the profound early coronary flow reduction after antigen injection. The less pronounced late phase of anaphylactic coronary flow reduction was, however, not significantly affected. EPA (15 X 10(-8) mol min-1) significantly shortened the average duration of antigen-induced arrhythmias. EPA dose-dependently decreased release of immunoreactive TXB2 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha from anaphylactic guinea-pig hearts. Release of immunoreactive SP-LT was dose-dependently increased after antigen challenge in the presence of EPA. Inhibiton of the release of SP-LT by the lipoxygenase inhibitor esculetin (1 X 10(-7) mol min-1) was accompanied by a significant attenuation of flow reduction during the late phase of anaphylactic vasoconstriction. Reversed phase h.p.l.c. of perfusates from anaphylactic guinea-pig hearts revealed immunoreactivity comigrating with authentic leukotriene C4 (LTC4), LTD4, and LTE4. In perfusates from hearts treated with EPA infusions, additional immunoreactivity was detected comigrating with LTC5, LTD5 and LTE5. In addition to immunoreactivity migrating with LTB4, as observed in control heart perfusates, in perfusates from EPA-treated hearts, a second peak was observed, which coincides with the retention time described for LTB5. Exogenous LTC5 (1 X 10(-12) mol min-1 and 20 X 10(-12) mol min-1) induced dose-dependent reductions of coronary flow and was found to be a slightly weaker constrictor than LTC4, but no significant differences were observed. Coronary vasoconstriction elicited by infusion of exogenous LTC4 (20 X 10(-12) mol min-1) was dose-dependently inhibited by infusions of EPA. However

  4. Intranasal Protollin(Trademark)/F1-V Vaccine Elicits Respiratory and Serum Antibody Responses and Protects Mice Against Lethal Aerosolized Plague Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-07

    specific serum antibody responses [30]; ironically in this same study, an intranasal prime-boost reg- imen proved that two doses of F1-V plus LT were...Vaccine 24 (2006) 1625–1632 Intranasal ProtollinTM/F1-V vaccine elicits respiratory and serum antibody responses and protects mice against lethal... Intranasal immunization of mice with F1-V formulated with a Proteosome- ased adjuvant (ProtollinTM), elicited high titers of specific IgA in lungs whereas

  5. On a summer maximum in the occurrence frequency of 150 km (F1) radar echoes over Pohnpei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunoda, Roland T.; Ecklund, Warner L.

    2004-03-01

    Using three and a half years of 50 MHz radar data collected from Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia (6.96°N, 158.19°E geographic, 0.3° magnetic dip latitude), we show for the first time that the occurrence frequency of 150 km (or F1) echoes has a broad but conspicuous maximum during northern summer in this longitude sector with minimal activity in other months. Given a seasonal similarity to sporadic E (Es), we suggest that an Es-layer instability [Cosgrove and Tsunoda, 2002] generates a polarization electric field ($\\vec E$), which maps along geomagnetic field lines to the F1 region. There, $\\vec E$ forms thin plasma sheets that provide gradients to excite 3-m-scale plasma waves via an interchange process.

  6. Lack of association of GH1 and POU1F1 gene variants with meat production traits in Piemontese cattle.

    PubMed

    Di Stasio, L; Sartore, S; Albera, A

    2002-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and the Pit-1 transcription factor have been shown to be involved in the physiological mechanisms related to growth. The present study was carried out to investigate the possible association of the polymorphism at GH1 and POU1F1 loci with meat production traits in Piemontese cattle. Fourteen traits were considered, expressing growth (weight at 5, 7 and 11 months, daily gain), size [withers height (WH), trunk length (TL), chest girth (CG) at 12 months] and meat conformation [withers width (WW), shoulder muscularity (SM), loin width (LW), loin thickness (LT), thigh muscularity (TM), thigh profile (TP), bone thinness (BT)]. Data were analysed with a mixed model procedure to estimate the allele substitution and the dominance effects. The results did not provide evidence of association of GH1 and POU1F1 polymorphisms with the evaluated traits.

  7. Taxis of Pseudomonas putida F1 toward phenylacetic acid is mediated by the energy taxis receptor Aer2.

    PubMed

    Luu, Rita A; Schneider, Benjamin J; Ho, Christie C; Nesteryuk, Vasyl; Ngwesse, Stacy E; Liu, Xianxian; Parales, Juanito V; Ditty, Jayna L; Parales, Rebecca E

    2013-04-01

    The phenylacetic acid (PAA) degradation pathway is a widely distributed funneling pathway for the catabolism of aromatic compounds, including the environmental pollutants styrene and ethylbenzene. However, bacterial chemotaxis to PAA has not been studied. The chemotactic strain Pseudomonas putida F1 has the ability to utilize PAA as a sole carbon and energy source. We identified a putative PAA degradation gene cluster (paa) in P. putida F1 and demonstrated that PAA serves as a chemoattractant. The chemotactic response was induced during growth with PAA and was dependent on PAA metabolism. A functional cheA gene was required for the response, indicating that PAA is sensed through the conserved chemotaxis signal transduction system. A P. putida F1 mutant lacking the energy taxis receptor Aer2 was deficient in PAA taxis, indicating that Aer2 is responsible for mediating the response to PAA. The requirement for metabolism and the role of Aer2 in the response indicate that P. putida F1 uses energy taxis to detect PAA. We also revealed that PAA is an attractant for Escherichia coli; however, a mutant lacking a functional Aer energy receptor had a wild-type response to PAA in swim plate assays, suggesting that PAA is detected through a different mechanism in E. coli. The role of Aer2 as an energy taxis receptor provides the potential to sense a broad range of aromatic growth substrates as chemoattractants. Since chemotaxis has been shown to enhance the biodegradation of toxic pollutants, the ability to sense PAA gradients may have implications for the bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons that are degraded via the PAA pathway.

  8. Taxis of Pseudomonas putida F1 toward Phenylacetic Acid Is Mediated by the Energy Taxis Receptor Aer2

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Rita A.; Schneider, Benjamin J.; Ho, Christie C.; Nesteryuk, Vasyl; Ngwesse, Stacy E.; Liu, Xianxian; Parales, Juanito V.; Ditty, Jayna L.

    2013-01-01

    The phenylacetic acid (PAA) degradation pathway is a widely distributed funneling pathway for the catabolism of aromatic compounds, including the environmental pollutants styrene and ethylbenzene. However, bacterial chemotaxis to PAA has not been studied. The chemotactic strain Pseudomonas putida F1 has the ability to utilize PAA as a sole carbon and energy source. We identified a putative PAA degradation gene cluster (paa) in P. putida F1 and demonstrated that PAA serves as a chemoattractant. The chemotactic response was induced during growth with PAA and was dependent on PAA metabolism. A functional cheA gene was required for the response, indicating that PAA is sensed through the conserved chemotaxis signal transduction system. A P. putida F1 mutant lacking the energy taxis receptor Aer2 was deficient in PAA taxis, indicating that Aer2 is responsible for mediating the response to PAA. The requirement for metabolism and the role of Aer2 in the response indicate that P. putida F1 uses energy taxis to detect PAA. We also revealed that PAA is an attractant for Escherichia coli; however, a mutant lacking a functional Aer energy receptor had a wild-type response to PAA in swim plate assays, suggesting that PAA is detected through a different mechanism in E. coli. The role of Aer2 as an energy taxis receptor provides the potential to sense a broad range of aromatic growth substrates as chemoattractants. Since chemotaxis has been shown to enhance the biodegradation of toxic pollutants, the ability to sense PAA gradients may have implications for the bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons that are degraded via the PAA pathway. PMID:23377939

  9. Gestational Exposure to Bisphenol A Affects the Function and Proteome Profile of F1 Spermatozoa in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md Saidur; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Karmakar, Polash Chandra; Yoon, Sung-Jae; Ryu, Buom-Yong; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2016-01-01

    Background: Maternal exposure to the endocrine disruptor bisphenol A (BPA) has been linked to offspring reproductive abnormalities. However, exactly how BPA affects offspring fertility remains poorly understood. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of gestational BPA exposure on sperm function, fertility, and proteome profile of F1 spermatozoa in adult mice. Methods: Pregnant CD-1 mice (F0) were gavaged with BPA at three different doses (50 μg/kg bw/day, 5 mg/kg bw/day, and 50 mg/kg bw/day) on embryonic days 7 to 14. We investigated the function, fertility, and related processes of F1 spermatozoa at postnatal day 120. We also evaluated protein profiles of F1 spermatozoa to monitor their functional affiliation to disease. Results: BPA inhibited sperm count, motility parameters, and intracellular ATP levels in a dose-dependent manner. These effects appeared to be caused by reduced numbers of stage VIII seminiferous epithelial cells in testis and decreased protein kinase A (PKA) activity and tyrosine phosphorylation in spermatozoa. We also found that BPA compromised average litter size. Proteins differentially expressed in spermatozoa from BPA treatment groups are known to play a critical role in ATP generation, oxidative stress response, fertility, and in the pathogenesis of several diseases. Conclusions: Our study provides mechanistic support for the hypothesis that gestational exposure to BPA alters sperm function and fertility via down-regulation of tyrosine phosphorylation through a PKA-dependent mechanism. In addition, we anticipate that the BPA-induced changes in the sperm proteome might be partly responsible for the observed effects in spermatozoa. Citation: Rahman MS, Kwon WS, Karmakar PC, Yoon SJ, Ryu BY, Pang MG. 2017. Gestational exposure to bisphenol-A affects the function and proteome profile of F1 spermatozoa in adult mice. Environ Health Perspect 125:238–245; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP378 PMID:27384531

  10. Effect of membrane-associated f1 bacteriophage coat protein upon the activity of Escherichia coli phosphatidylserine synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, B K; Webster, R E

    1978-01-01

    The effects of insertion of the major coat protein of f1 bacteriophage into Escherichia coli membranes were investigated under conditions allowing in vivo analysis of phosphatidylserine synthesis. An E. coli strain possessing a temperature-sensitive phosphatidylserine decarboxylase was utilized under conditions in which the decarboxylase activity was reduced but nonlethal. The presence of the coat protein in the host membranes inhibits the activity of the phosphatidylserine synthetase and perhaps affects the activity of the phosphatidylserine decarboxylase. PMID:211116

  11. Efficiency of PBN to Trap 3-CAR in B6C3F1 Mouse Liver Slices: An EPR Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    AL/OE-TR-1995-0139 UNITED STATES AIR FORCE ARMSTRONG LABORATORY EFFICIENCY OF PBN TO TRAP 3-CAR IN B6C3F1 MOUSE LIVER SLICES: AN EPR STUDY...and Eckstein, JM. 1993 Comparative intestinal and testes toxicity of 4 aminothiols in irradiated and non-irradiated mice . Ann Clin and Lab Sei 23 (6...Air Force Armstrong Laboratory. Additional copies may be purchased from: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield

  12. Antenna noise temperatures of the 34-meter beam-waveguide antenna with horns of different gains installed at F1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Lee, P. R.; Franco, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    This article presents a set of theoretical and measured zenith-antenna noise temperatures at 8.45 GHz for the DSS-13 34-m beam-waveguide antenna when horns of different gains are installed at F1. The methodology for calculations is shown in detail. The major differences between calculated and measured values are attributed to changes in subreflector support leg scattering when illuminated by the various horns.

  13. Linkage of E2F1 transcriptional network and cell proliferation with respiratory chain activity in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kazunori; Uchida, Tetsu; Fukumura, Motonori; Tamiya, Shigetoshi; Higurashi, Masato; Sakai, Hirosato; Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Shibanuma, Motoko

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria are multifunctional organelles; they have been implicated in various aspects of tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigated a novel role of the basal electron transport chain (ETC) activity in cell proliferation by inhibiting mitochondrial replication and transcription (mtR/T) using pharmacological and genetic interventions, which depleted mitochondrial DNA/RNA, thereby inducing ETC deficiency. Interestingly, mtR/T inhibition did not decrease ATP levels despite deficiency in ETC activity in different cell types, including MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, but it severely impeded cell cycle progression, specifically progression during G2 and/or M phases in the cancer cells. Under these conditions, the expression of a group of cell cycle regulators was downregulated without affecting the growth signaling pathway. Further analysis suggested that the transcriptional network organized by E2F1 was significantly affected because of the downregulation of E2F1 in response to ETC deficiency, which eventually resulted in the suppression of cell proliferation. Thus, in this study, the E2F1-mediated ETC-dependent mechanism has emerged as the regulatory mechanism of cell cycle progression. In addition to E2F1, FOXM1 and BMYB were also downregulated, which contributed specifically to the defects in G2 and/or M phase progression. Thus, ETC-deficient cancer cells lost their growing ability, including their tumorigenic potential in vivo. ETC deficiency abolished the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from the mitochondria and a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mimicked the deficiency, thereby suggesting that ETC activity signaled through ROS production. In conclusion, this novel coupling between ETC activity and cell cycle progression may be an important mechanism for coordinating cell proliferation and metabolism.

  14. Alpha irradiation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Keeton, S C; Mount, M E

    1999-03-26

    With the end of the Cold War and the associated limitations imposed on the nuclear weapons stockpile by strategic arms treaties, much has changed in the stockpile stewardship program. Weapons that were originally designed for stockpile lives on the order of 15 to 20 years are now being evaluated for much longer periods: in some cases as much as 60 years. As such, issues that were once considered to be of no consequence are being reexamined. Among these is the extent of the radiation dose received by secondary organics over time that results from the intrinsic alpha source of the weapon components. This report describes the results of work performed to estimate the alpha radiation deposition in the organic components of an LLNL system at specific points in its stockpile life. Included are discussions of the development of the intrinsic time- and energy-dependent alpha source term per unit mass, estimation of the effective source and absorber material thicknesses, development of a simplified model for the total intrinsic alpha source term and energy deposition in the absorber, and the alpha radiation deposition in the organic components of a selected LLNL weapon.

  15. Diffusion properties of single FoF1-ATP synthases in a living bacterium unraveled by localization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renz, Marc; Rendler, Torsten; Börsch, Michael

    2012-03-01

    FoF1-ATP synthases in Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria are membrane-bound enzymes which use an internal protondriven rotary double motor to catalyze the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). According to the 'chemiosmotic hypothesis', a series of proton pumps generate the necessary pH difference plus an electric potential across the bacterial plasma membrane. These proton pumps are redox-coupled membrane enzymes which are possibly organized in supercomplexes, as shown for the related enzymes in the mitochondrial inner membrane. We report diffusion measurements of single fluorescent FoF1-ATP synthases in living E. coli by localization microscopy and single enzyme tracking to distinguish a monomeric enzyme from a supercomplex-associated form in the bacterial membrane. For quantitative mean square displacement (MSD) analysis, the limited size of the observation area in the membrane with a significant membrane curvature had to be considered. The E. coli cells had a diameter of about 500 nm and a length of about 2 to 3 μm. Because the surface coordinate system yielded different localization precision, we applied a sliding observation window approach to obtain the diffusion coefficient D = 0.072 μm2/s of FoF1-ATP synthase in living E. coli cells.

  16. Minor coat protein composition and location of the A protein in bacteriophage f1 spheroids and I-forms.

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, J; Webster, R E

    1982-01-01

    The filamentous bacteriophage f1 can be transformed into a spherical particle (spheroid) or an intermediate shortened filament with a flared end (I-forms) by exposure to a chloroform-water interface at 22 or 4 degrees C, respectively. The protein composition of bacteriophage f1 spheroids and I-forms was examined by separating the proteins from the purified. [35S]cysteine-labeled particles by sodium dodecyl sulfate-urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Quantitation of the radioactivity on the gels showed that I-forms and spheroids contain the same complement of minor coat proteins as do untreated f1 phage. This composition is unchanged after removal of the DNA, either by digestion with micrococcal nuclease or by centrifugation of the particles through CsCl density gradients, indicating that none of the minor coat proteins is held in the particles solely through an interaction with the DNA. We also examined the location of the A protein in I-forms by decoration with ferritin-conjugated antibodies and examination under the electron microscope and found that the A protein is located specifically at the flared end of the I-form particle, through which the DNA is extruded and at which contraction into spheroids begins. The implications of these results with regard to the orientation of the DNA within the capsid and the process of infection are discussed. Images PMID:7097858

  17. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Antimicrobial Mechanism of Peptide F1 against Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jianyin; Chen, Feilong; Duan, Shan; Gao, Xiangyang; Liu, Guo; Chen, Yunjiao; Dixon, William; Xiao, Hang; Cao, Yong

    2015-08-19

    Antimicrobial peptides have received increasing attention in the agricultural and food industries due to their potential to control pathogens. However, to facilitate the development of novel peptide-based antimicrobial agents, details regarding the molecular mechanisms of these peptides need to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial mechanism of peptide F1, a bacteriocin found in Tibetan kefir, against Escherichia coli at protein levels using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis. In response to treatment with peptide F1, 31 of the 280 identified proteins in E. coli showed alterations in their expression, including 10 down-regulated proteins and 21 up-regulated proteins. These 31 proteins all possess different molecular functions and are involved in different molecular pathways, as is evident in referencing the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. Specifically, pathways that were significantly altered in E. coli in response to peptide F1 treatment include the tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, glycerophospholipid metabolism, and the cell cycle-caulobacter pathways, which was also associated with inhibition of the cell growth, induction of morphological changes, and cell death. The results provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of antimicrobial peptides.

  18. LIMD1 antagonizes E2F1 activity and cell cycle progression by enhancing Rb function in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mayank, Adarsh K; Sharma, Shipra; Deshwal, Ravi K; Lal, Sunil K

    2014-07-01

    Tumour suppressor genes restrain inappropriate cell growth and division, as well as stimulate cell death to maintain tissue homeostasis. Loss of function leads to abnormal cellular behaviour, including hyperproliferation of cell and perturbation of cell cycle regulation. LIMD1 is a tumour suppressor gene located at chromosome 3p21.3, a region commonly deleted in many solid malignancies. LIMD1 interacts with retinoblastoma (Rb) and is involved in Rb-mediated downregulation of E2F1-target genes. However, the role of LIMD1 in cell cycle regulation remains unclear. We propose that LIMD1 induces cell cycle arrest, utilising Rb-E2F1 axis, and show that ectopic expression of LIMD1 in A549 cells results in hypo-phosphorylation that potentiates Rb function, which correlates with downregulation of E2F1. In agreement with these observations, LIMD1 overexpression retards cell cycle progression and blocks S-phase entry, as cells accumulate in G0/G1 phase and have reduced incorporation of BrdU. Most significantly, LIMD1-dependent effects on Rb function and cell cycle are reversed on depletion of endogenous LIMD1, underscoring its centrality in Rb-mediated cell cycle regulation. Hence, our findings provide new insight into cell cycle control by Rb-LIMD1 nexus.

  19. Treponema pallidum (syphilis) antigen TpF1 induces angiogenesis through the activation of the IL-8 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pozzobon, Tommaso; Facchinello, Nicola; Bossi, Fleur; Capitani, Nagaja; Benagiano, Marisa; Di Benedetto, Giulietta; Zennaro, Cristina; West, Nicole; Codolo, Gaia; Bernardini, Marialina; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; D’Elios, Mario Milco; Pellegrini, Luca; Argenton, Francesco; de Bernard, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Over 10 million people every year become infected by Treponema pallidum and develop syphilis, a disease with broad symptomatology that, due to the difficulty to eradicate the pathogen from the highly vascularized secondary sites of infection, is still treated with injections of penicillin. Unlike most other bacterial pathogens, T. pallidum infection produces indeed a strong angiogenic response whose mechanism of activation, however, remains unknown. Here, we report that one of the major antigen of T. pallidum, the TpF1 protein, has growth factor-like activity on primary cultures of human endothelial cells and activates specific T cells able to promote tissue factor production. The growth factor-like activity is mediated by the secretion of IL-8 but not of VEGF, two known angiogenic factors. The pathogen’s factor signals IL-8 secretion through the activation of the CREB/NF-κB signalling pathway. These findings are recapitulated in an animal model, zebrafish, where we observed that TpF1 injection stimulates angiogenesis and IL-8, but not VEGF, secretion. This study suggests that the angiogenic response observed during secondary syphilis is triggered by TpF1 and that pharmacological therapies directed to inhibit IL-8 response in patients should be explored to treat this disease. PMID:26728351

  20. Evaluation of regulatory genetic variants in POU5F1 and risk of congenital heart disease in Han Chinese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan; Ding, Chenyue; Zhang, Kai; Ni, Bixian; da, Min; Hu, Liang; Hu, Yuanli; Xu, Jing; Wang, Xiaowei; Chen, Yijiang; Mo, Xuming; Cui, Yugui; Shen, Hongbing; Sha, Jiahao; Liu, Jiayin; Hu, Zhibin

    2015-10-01

    OCT4 is a transcription factor of the POU family, which plays a key role in embryonic development and stem cell pluripotency. Previous studies have shown that Oct4 is required for cardiomyocyte differentiation in mice and its depletion could result in cardiac morphogenesis in embryo. However, whether the genetic variations in OCT4 coding gene, POU5F1, confer the predisposition to congenital heart disease (CHD) is unclear. This study sought to investigate the associations between low-frequency (defined here as having minor allele frequency (MAF) between 0.1%-5%) and rare (MAF below 0.1%) variants with potential function in POU5F1 and risk of CHD. We conducted association analysis in a two-stage case-control study with a total of 2,720 CHD cases and 3,331 controls in Chinese. The low-frequency variant rs3130933 was observed to be associated with a significantly increased risk of CHD [additive model: adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.15, adjusted P = 3.37 × 10-6]. Furthermore, luciferase activity assay showed that the variant A allele led to significantly lower expression levels as compared to the G allele. These findings indicate for the first time that low-frequency functional variant in POU5F1 may contribute to the risk of congenital heart malformations.

  1. Genetic analysis and identification of SSR markers associated with rice blast disease in a BC2F1 backcross population.

    PubMed

    Hasan, N; Rafii, M Y; Abdul Rahim, H; Nusaibah, S A; Mazlan, N; Abdullah, S

    2017-01-23

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) blast disease is one of the most destructive rice diseases in the world. The fungal pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae, is the causal agent of rice blast disease. Development of resistant cultivars is the most preferred method to achieve sustainable rice production. However, the effectiveness of resistant cultivars is hindered by the genetic plasticity of the pathogen genome. Therefore, information on genetic resistance and virulence stability are vital to increase our understanding of the molecular basis of blast disease resistance. The present study set out to elucidate the resistance pattern and identify potential simple sequence repeat markers linked with rice blast disease. A backcross population (BC2F1), derived from crossing MR264 and Pongsu Seribu 2 (PS2), was developed using marker-assisted backcross breeding. Twelve microsatellite markers carrying the blast resistance gene clearly demonstrated a polymorphic pattern between both parental lines. Among these, two markers, RM206 and RM5961, located on chromosome 11 exhibited the expected 1:1 testcross ratio in the BC2F1 population. The 195 BC2F1 plants inoculated against M. oryzae pathotype P7.2 showed a significantly different distribution in the backcrossed generation and followed Mendelian segregation based on a single-gene model. This indicates that blast resistance in PS2 is governed by a single dominant gene, which is linked to RM206 and RM5961 on chromosome 11. The findings presented in this study could be useful for future blast resistance studies in rice breeding programs.

  2. Microscopy of single F(o) F(1) -ATP synthases--the unraveling of motors, gears, and controls.

    PubMed

    Börsch, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Optical microscopy of single F(1) -ATPase and F(o) F(1) -ATP synthases started 15 years ago. Direct demonstration of ATP-driven subunit rotation by videomicroscopy became the new exciting tool to analyze the conformational changes of this enzyme during catalysis. Stimulated by these experiments, technical improvements for higher time resolution, better angular resolution, and reduced viscous drag were developed rapidly. Optics and single-molecule enzymology were entangled to benefit both biochemists and microscopists. Today, several single-molecule microscopy methods are established including controls for the precise nanomanipulation of individual enzymes in vitro. Förster resonance energy transfer, which has been used for simultaneous monitoring of conformational changes of different parts of this rotary motor, is one of them and may become the tool for the analysis of single F(o) F(1) -ATP synthases in membranes of living cells. Here, breakthrough experiments are critically reviewed and challenges are discussed for the future microscopy of single ATP synthesizing enzymes at work.

  3. Biodegradation of 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid by novel identified co-metabolizing degrader Achromobacter sp. f1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Fang; Ning, Li-Qun; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Yang, Zong-Zheng; Cao, Jing-Guo; Sheng, Hong-Jie; Jiang, Xin

    2017-02-02

    Several bacteria have been isolated to degrade 4-chloronitrobenzene. Degradation of 4-chloronitrobenzene by Cupriavidus sp. D4 produces 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid as a dead-end by-product, a potential pollutant. To date, no bacterium that degrades 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid has been reported. Strain f1, isolated from a soil polluted by 4-chloronitrobenzene, was able to co-metabolize 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid in the presence of ethanol or other appropriate carbon sources. The strain was identified as Achromobacter sp. based on its physiological, biochemical characteristics, and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The organism completely degraded 50, 100 and 200 mg L(-1) of 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid within 48, 60, and 72 h, respectively. During the degradation of 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid, Cl(-) was released. The initial metabolic product of 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid was identified as 6-hydroxy-5-chloro-2-picolinic acid by LC-MS and NMR. Using a mixed culture of Achromobacter sp. f1 and Cupriavidus sp. D4 for degradation of 4-chloronitrobenzen, 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid did not accumulate. Results infer that Achromobacter sp. f1 can be used for complete biodegradation of 4-chloronitrobenzene in remedial applications.

  4. Ribosomal protein genes are highly enriched among genes with allele-specific expression in the interspecific F1 hybrid catfish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ailu; Wang, Ruijia; Liu, Shikai; Peatman, Eric; Sun, Luyang; Bao, Lisui; Jiang, Chen; Li, Chao; Li, Yun; Zeng, Qifan; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2016-06-01

    Interspecific hybrids provide a rich source for the analysis of allele-specific expression (ASE). In this work, we analyzed ASE in F1 hybrid catfish using RNA-Seq datasets. While the vast majority of genes were expressed with both alleles, 7-8 % SNPs exhibited significant differences in allele ratios of expression. Of the 66,251 and 177,841 SNPs identified from the datasets of the liver and gill, 5420 (8.2 %) and 13,390 (7.5 %) SNPs were identified as significant ASE-SNPs, respectively. With these SNPs, a total of 1519 and 3075 ASE-genes were identified. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that genes encoding cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (RP) were highly enriched among ASE genes. Parent-of-origin was determined for 27 and 30 ASE RP genes in the liver and gill, respectively. The results indicated that genes from both channel catfish and blue catfish were involved in ASE. However, each RP gene appeared to be almost exclusively expressed from only one parent, indicating that ribosomes in the hybrid catfish were in the "hybrid" form. Overall representation of RP transcripts among the transcriptome appeared lower in the F1 hybrid catfish than in channel catfish or blue catfish, suggesting that the "hybrid" ribosomes may work more efficiently for translation in the F1 hybrid catfish.

  5. ALPHA MIS: Reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Lovin, J.K.; Haese, R.L.; Heatherly, R.D.; Hughes, S.E.; Ishee, J.S.; Pratt, S.M.; Smith, D.W.

    1992-02-01

    ALPHA is a powerful and versatile management information system (MIS) initiated and sponsored and by the Finance and Business Management Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who maintain and develop it in concert with the Business Systems Division for its Information Center. A general-purpose MIS, ALPHA allows users to access System 1022 and System 1032 databases to obtain and manage information. From a personal computer or a data terminal, Energy Systems employees can use ALPHA to control their own report reprocessing. Using four general commands (Database, Select, Sort, and Report) they can (1) choose a mainframe database, (2) define subsets within it, (3) sequentially order a subset by one or more variables, and (4) generate a report with their own or a canned format.

  6. The Apollo Alpha Spectrometer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagoda, N.; Kubierschky, K.; Frank, R.; Carroll, J.

    1973-01-01

    Located in the Science Instrument Module of Apollo 15 and 16, the Alpha Particle Spectrometer was designed to detect and measure the energy of alpha particles emitted by the radon isotopes and their daughter products. The spectrometer sensor consisted of an array of totally depleted silicon surface barrier detectors. Biased amplifier and linear gate techniques were utilized to reduce resolution degradation, thereby permitting the use of a single 512 channel PHA. Sensor identification and in-flight radioactive calibration were incorporated to enhance data reduction.

  7. FoxF1 and FoxF2 transcription factors synergistically promote Rhabdomyosarcoma carcinogenesis by repressing transcription of p21Cip1 CDK inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yuqi; Le, Tien; Turpin, Brian; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V.; Kalin, Tanya V.

    2016-01-01

    The role of Forkhead Box F1 (FoxF1) transcription factor in carcinogenesis is not well characterized. Depending on tissue and histological type of cancer, FoxF1 was shown to be either oncogene or tumor suppressor. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most aggressive pediatric soft tissue sarcoma. While FoxF1 is highly expressed in alveolar RMS, the functional role of FoxF1 in RMS is unknown. The present study demonstrates that expression of FoxF1 and its closely related transcription factor FoxF2 are essential for rhabdomyosarcoma tumor growth. Depletion of FoxF1 or FoxF2 in rhabdomyosarcoma cells decreased tumor growth in orthotopic mouse models of RMS. The decreased tumorigenesis was associated with the reduced tumor cell proliferation. Cell cycle regulatory proteins Cdk2, Cdk4/6, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin E2 were decreased in FoxF1- and FoxF2-deficient RMS tumors. Depletion of either FoxF1 or FoxF2 delayed G1-S cell cycle progression, decreased levels of phosphorylated Rb and increased protein levels of the CDK inhibitors, p21Cip1 and p27Kip1. Depletion of both FoxF1 and FoxF2 in tumor cells completely abrogated RMS tumor growth in mice. Overexpression of either FoxF1 or FoxF2 in tumor cells was sufficient to increase carcinogenesis in orthotopic RMS mouse model. FoxF1 and FoxF2 directly bound to and repressed transcriptional activity of p21Cip1 promoter through −556/−545 bp region, but did not affect p27Kip1 transcription. Knockdown of p21Cip1 restored cell cycle progression in the FoxF1- or FoxF2-deficient tumor cells. Altogether, FoxF1 and FoxF2 promoted RMS tumorigenesis by inducing tumor cell proliferation via transcriptional repression of p21Cip1 gene promoter. Due to robust oncogenic activity in RMS tumors, FoxF1 and FoxF2 may represent promising targets for anti-tumor therapy. PMID:27425595

  8. Human FGF1 promoter is active in ependymal cells and dopaminergic neurons in the brains of F1B-GFP transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Shu; Lin, Hua-Kuo; Chiu, Hsun; Lee, Don-Ching; Chung, Yu-Fen; Chiu, Ing-Ming

    2015-03-01

    FGF1 is involved in multiple biological functions and exhibits the importance in neuroprotective effects. Our previous studies indicated that, in human brain and retina, the FGF1B promoter controlled the expression of FGF1. However, the exact function and regulation of FGF1 in brain is still unclear. Here, we generated F1B-GFP transgenic mice that expressed the GFP reporter gene under the control of human FGF1B promoter (-540 to +31). Using the fresh brain sections of F1B-GFP transgenic mice, we found that the F1B-GFP cells expressed strong fluorescent signals in the ventricular system throughout the brain. The results of immunohistochemistry further showed that two distinct populations of F1B-GFP(+) cells existed in the brains of F1B-GFP transgenic mice. We demonstrated that one population of F1B-GFP(+) cells was ependymal cells, which distributed along the entire ventricles, and the second population of F1B-GFP(+) cells was neuronal cells that projected their long processes into multiple directions in specific areas of the brain. The double labeling of F1B-GFP(+) cells and tyrosine hydroxylase indicated that a subpopulation of F1B-GFP(+) -neuronal cells was dopaminergic neurons. Importantly, these F1B-GFP(+) /TH(+) cells were distributed in the main dopaminergic neuronal groups including hypothalamus, ventral tegmental area, and raphe nuclei. These results suggested that human FGF1B promoter was active in ependymal cells, neurons, and a portion of dopaminergic neurons. Thus, the F1B-GFP transgenic mice provide an animal model not only for studying FGF1 gene expression in vivo but also for understanding the role of FGF1 contribution in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease.

  9. V-ATPase: a master effector of E2F1-mediated lysosomal trafficking, mTORC1 activation and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Meo-Evoli, Nathalie; Almacellas, Eugènia; Massucci, Francesco Alessandro; Gentilella, Antonio; Ambrosio, Santiago; Kozma, Sara C.; Thomas, George; Tauler, Albert

    2015-01-01

    In addition to being a master regulator of cell cycle progression, E2F1 regulates other associated biological processes, including growth and malignancy. Here, we uncover a regulatory network linking E2F1 to lysosomal trafficking and mTORC1 signaling that involves v-ATPase regulation. By immunofluorescence and time-lapse microscopy we found that E2F1 induces the movement of lysosomes to the cell periphery, and that this process is essential for E2F1-induced mTORC1 activation and repression of autophagy. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments reveal that E2F1 regulates v-ATPase activity and inhibition of v-ATPase activity repressed E2F1-induced lysosomal trafficking and mTORC1 activation. Immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that E2F1 induces the recruitment of v-ATPase to lysosomal RagB GTPase, suggesting that E2F1 regulates v-ATPase activity by enhancing the association of V0 and V1 v-ATPase complex. Analysis of v-ATPase subunit expression identified B subunit of V0 complex, ATP6V0B, as a transcriptional target of E2F1. Importantly, ATP6V0B ectopic-expression increased v-ATPase and mTORC1 activity, consistent with ATP6V0B being responsible for mediating the effects of E2F1 on both responses. Our findings on lysosomal trafficking, mTORC1 activation and autophagy suppression suggest that pharmacological intervention at the level of v-ATPase may be an efficacious avenue for the treatment of metastatic processes in tumors overexpressing E2F1. PMID:26356814

  10. V-ATPase: a master effector of E2F1-mediated lysosomal trafficking, mTORC1 activation and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Meo-Evoli, Nathalie; Almacellas, Eugènia; Massucci, Francesco Alessandro; Gentilella, Antonio; Ambrosio, Santiago; Kozma, Sara C; Thomas, George; Tauler, Albert

    2015-09-29

    In addition to being a master regulator of cell cycle progression, E2F1 regulates other associated biological processes, including growth and malignancy. Here, we uncover a regulatory network linking E2F1 to lysosomal trafficking and mTORC1 signaling that involves v-ATPase regulation. By immunofluorescence and time-lapse microscopy we found that E2F1 induces the movement of lysosomes to the cell periphery, and that this process is essential for E2F1-induced mTORC1 activation and repression of autophagy. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments reveal that E2F1 regulates v-ATPase activity and inhibition of v-ATPase activity repressed E2F1-induced lysosomal trafficking and mTORC1 activation. Immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that E2F1 induces the recruitment of v-ATPase to lysosomal RagB GTPase, suggesting that E2F1 regulates v-ATPase activity by enhancing the association of V0 and V1 v-ATPase complex. Analysis of v-ATPase subunit expression identified B subunit of V0 complex, ATP6V0B, as a transcriptional target of E2F1. Importantly, ATP6V0B ectopic-expression increased v-ATPase and mTORC1 activity, consistent with ATP6V0B being responsible for mediating the effects of E2F1 on both responses. Our findings on lysosomal trafficking, mTORC1 activation and autophagy suppression suggest that pharmacological intervention at the level of v-ATPase may be an efficacious avenue for the treatment of metastatic processes in tumors overexpressing E2F1.

  11. E2F1 enhances 8-chloro-adenosine-induced G2/M arrest and apoptosis in A549 and H1299 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hong-Ying; Cao, Ji-Xiang; Qi, Jun-Juan; Wu, Guo-Sheng; Li, Shu-Yan; An, Guo-Shun; Jia, Hong-Ti; Cai, Wang-Wei; Ni, Ju-Hua

    2012-03-01

    The E2F1 transcription factor is a well known regulator of cell proliferation and apoptosis, but its role in response to DNA damage is less clear. 8-Chloro-adenosine (8-Cl-Ado), a nucleoside analog, can inhibit proliferation in a variety of human tumor cells. However, it is still elusive how the agent acts on tumors. Here we show that A549 and H1299 cells formed DNA double-strand breaks after 8-Cl-Ado exposure, accompanied by E2F1 upregulation at protein level. Overexpressed wild-type (E2F1-wt) colocalized with double-strand break marker γ-H2AX and promoted G2/M arrest in 8-Cl-Ado-exposed A549 and H1299, while expressed S31A mutant of E2F1 (E2F1-mu) significantly reduced ability to accumulate at sites of DNA damage and G2/M arrest, suggesting that E2F1 is required for activating G2/M checkpoint pathway upon DNA damage. Transfection of either E2F1-wt or E2F1-mu plasmid promoted apoptosis in 8-Cl-Ado-exposed cells, indicating that 8-Cl-Ado may induce apoptosis in E2F1-dependent and E2F1-independent ways. These findings demonstrate that E2F1 plays a crucial role in 8-Cl-Ado-induced G2/M arrest but is dispensable for 8-Cl-Ado-induced apoptosis. These data also suggest that the mechanism of 8-Cl-Ado action is complicated.

  12. E2F1-mediated DNA damage is implicated in 8-Cl-adenosine-induced chromosome missegregation and apoptosis in human lung cancer H1299 cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu-Ying; Zhou, Zhe; Cao, Ji-Xiang; Jin, Ya-Qiong; Li, Shu-Yan; Ni, Ju-Hua; An, Guo-Shun; Zhang, Yu-Xiang; Jia, Hong-Ti

    2013-12-01

    Although E2F1-mediated DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) and tetraploid have been extensively studied, the role of E2F1 in mitotic catastrophe is still unknown. We have previously shown that 8-chloro-adenosine (8-Cl-Ado) induces DNA DSBs and aberrant mitosis in human lung cancer cells, followed by delayed apoptosis. Here, we demonstrate that E2F1-mediated DNA damage is implicated in 8-Cl-Ado-induced chromosome missegregation and apoptosis in lung cancer H1299 cells. We showed that E2F1 was accumulated upon 8-Cl-Ado-induced DNA DSBs. Induction of E2F1 by 8-Cl-Ado caused DNA damage in cycling cells including M cells. In contrast, silencing of E2F1 expression decreased 8-Cl-Ado-induced DNA DSBs, particularly eliminated E2F1-mediated mitotic DNA damage. Over-expression of E2F1 and/or 8-Cl-Ado exposure resulted in aberrant mitotic spindles and chromosome segregation errors. Furthermore, over-expression of E2F1 expression enhanced 8-Cl-Ado-induced apoptosis. Together, our data indicate that E2F1-mediated DNA damage, in particular mitotic DNA damage, is an important fraction of 8-Cl-Ado-induced DNA damage, which is implicated in 8-Cl-Ado-induced mitotic catastrophe and delayed apoptosis. Induction of E2F1 by 8-Cl-Ado may contribute at least partly to the drug-inhibited proliferation of cancer cells.

  13. M2-F1 on lakebed with pilots Milt Thompson, Chuck Yeager, Don Mallick, and Bruce Peterson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    After the initial M2-F1 airtow flights, the NASA Flight Research Center used the vehicle to check out other pilots. Bruce Peterson was scheduled to take over as the M2-F1 project pilot from Milt Thompson, while Don Mallick was to be his backup. Col. (later Brig. Gen.) Charles (Chuck) Yeager, then commandant of the Air Force's Aerospace Research Pilots School, wanted to evaluate a possible lifting-body trainer for the school. This photo shows all of these distinguished pilots on or in the M2-F1, with Col. Yeager in the pilot's seat. The lifting body concept evolved in the mid-1950s as researchers considered alternatives to ballistic reentries of piloted space capsules. The designs for hypersonic, wingless vehicles were on the boards at NASA Ames and NASA Langley facilities, while the US Air Force was gearing up for its Dyna-Soar program, which defined the need for a spacecraft that would land like an airplane. Despite favorable research on lifting bodies, there was little support for a flight program. Dryden engineer R. Dale Reed was intrigued with the lifting body concept, and reasoned that some sort of flight demonstration was needed before wingless aircraft could be taken seriously. In February 1962, he built a model lifting body based upon the Ames M2 design, and air-launched it from a radio controlled 'mothership.' Home movies of these flights, plus the support of research pilot Milt Thompson, helped pursuade the facilities director, Paul Bikle, to give the go-ahead for the construction of a full-scale version, to be used as a wind-tunnel model and possibly flown as a glider. Comparing lifting bodies to space capsules, an unofficial motto of the project was, 'Don't be Rescued from Outer Space--Fly Back in Style.' The construction of the M2-F1 was a joint effort by Dryden and a local glider manufacturer, the Briegleb Glider Company. The budget was $30,000. NASA craftsmen and engineers built the tubular steel interior frame. Its mahogany plywood shell was hand

  14. Salivary Alpha-Amylase Reactivity in Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Cynthia; Couture-Lalande, Marie-Ève; Narain, Tasha A.; Lebel, Sophie; Bielajew, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The two main components of the stress system are the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and sympathetic-adrenal-medullary (SAM) axes. While cortisol has been commonly used as a biomarker of HPA functioning, much less attention has been paid to the role of the SAM in this context. Studies have shown that long-term breast cancer survivors display abnormal reactive cortisol patterns, suggesting a dysregulation of their HPA axis. To fully understand the integrity of the stress response in this population, this paper explored the diurnal and acute alpha-amylase profiles of 22 breast cancer survivors and 26 women with no history of cancer. Results revealed that breast cancer survivors displayed identical but elevated patterns of alpha-amylase concentrations in both diurnal and acute profiles relative to that of healthy women, F (1, 39) = 17.95, p < 0.001 and F (1, 37) = 7.29, p = 0.010, respectively. The average area under the curve for the diurnal and reactive profiles was 631.54 ± 66.94 SEM and 1238.78 ± 111.84 SEM, respectively. This is in sharp contrast to their cortisol results, which showed normal diurnal and blunted acute patterns. The complexity of the stress system necessitates further investigation to understand the synergistic relationship of the HPA and SAM axes. PMID:27023572

  15. From Alpha to Omega

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czaja, Paul Clement

    2006-01-01

    The Alpha point of the authors' life as a Montessori educator began in 1959, when he was a graduate student studying philosophy at Fordham University in the Bronx, New York. While studying the works of the great American philosopher William James, the author came across the writings of Maria Montessori and immediately became captivated by her…

  16. [alpha]-Oxocarboxylic Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.; Fernando, Marian S.

    2010-01-01

    Several [alpha]-oxocarboxylic acids play key roles in metabolism in plants and animals. However, there are inconsistencies between the structures as commonly portrayed and the reported acid ionization constants, which result because the acids are predominantly hydrated in aqueous solution; that is, the predominant form is RC(OH)[subscript 2]COOH…

  17. Radial-velocity variations in Alpha Ori, Alpha Sco, and Alpha Her

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.A.; Patten, B.M.; Goldberg, L. Computer Sciences Corp., Seabrook, MD Iowa State Univ., Ames )

    1989-12-01

    Radial-velocity observations of Alpha Ori, Alpha Sco A, and Alpha Her A are used to study radial-velocity periodicities in M supergiants. The data refer to several metallic lines in the H-alpha region and to H-alpha itself. It is shown that Alpha Ori and Alpha Sco A have cycle lengths of about 1 yr and semiamplitudes of 2 km/s. It is suggested that many semiregular red supergiant varibles such as Alpha Ori may be heading toward chaos. All three stars show short-term stochastic flucutations with an amplitude of 1-2 km/s. It is found that the long-term variability of H-alpha velocities may be a consequence of intermittent failed ejections. 58 refs.

  18. Crystal Structures of Mite Allergens Der f 1 and Der p 1 Reveal Differences in Surface-Exposed Residues that May Influence Antibody Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Chapman, Martin D.; Vailes, Lisa D.; Stura, Enrico A.; Saint-Remy, Jean-Marie; Minor, Wladek; Pomés, Anna

    2009-12-01

    The Group 1 mite allergens, Der f 1 and Der p 1, are potent allergens excreted by Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, respectively. The human IgE antibody responses to the Group 1 allergens show more cross-reactivity than the murine IgG antibody responses which are largely species-specific. Here, we report the crystal structure of the mature form of Der f 1, which was isolated from its natural source, and a new, high-resolution structure of mature recombinant Der p 1. Unlike Der p 1, Der f 1 is monomeric both in the crystalline state and in solution. Moreover, no metal binding is observed in the structure of Der f 1, despite the fact that all amino acids involved in Ca{sup 2+} binding in Der p 1 are completely conserved in Der f 1. Although Der p 1 and Der f 1 share extensive sequence identity, comparison of the crystal structures of both allergens revealed structural features which could explain the differences in murine and human IgE antibody responses to these allergens. There are structural differences between Der f 1 and Der p 1 which are unevenly distributed on the allergens' surfaces. This uneven spatial arrangement of conserved versus altered residues could explain both the specificity and cross-reactivity of antibodies against Der f 1 and Der p 1.

  19. Use of multiple peptides containing T cell epitopes is a feasible approach for peptide-based immunotherapy in Can f 1 allergy

    PubMed Central

    Immonen, Anu K; Taivainen, Antti H; Närvänen, Ale T O; Kinnunen, Tuure T; Saarelainen, Soili A; Rytkönen-Nissinen, Marja A; Virtanen, Tuomas I

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that the major dog allergen Can f 1 contains seven T cell epitope regions, none of which was preferentially recognized. To identify the immune characteristics of Can f 1 epitopes and to verify their suitability for peptide-based allergen immunotherapy, short-term T cell lines were generated with epitope-containing peptides from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Can f 1 skinprick test-positive allergic and healthy control subjects. The lines were examined for their proliferative capacity and cytokine production upon stimulation with the allergen peptide, a homologous peptide from human tear lipocalin (TL) and Can f 1 and TL proteins. Can f 1 peptides induced proliferation of T cells and gave rise to T cell lines with comparable efficiencies. In particular, the T cell lines of allergic subjects induced with p33–48 and p107–122 favoured the production of interferon-γ and interleukin-10, respectively. A greater number of Can f 1-specific T cell lines were generated from allergic than from healthy individuals. Two p107–122-induced Can f 1-specific T cell lines also reacted to a homologous peptide of human TL. Our results suggest that several T cell epitope-containing peptides should be used in combination for specific immunotherapy in Can f 1 allergy. PMID:17233739

  20. Multiple cis-regulatory elements are involved in the complex regulation of the sieve element-specific MtSEO-F1 promoter from Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Bucsenez, M; Rüping, B; Behrens, S; Twyman, R M; Noll, G A; Prüfer, D

    2012-09-01

    The sieve element occlusion (SEO) gene family includes several members that are expressed specifically in immature sieve elements (SEs) in the developing phloem of dicotyledonous plants. To determine how this restricted expression profile is achieved, we analysed the SE-specific Medicago truncatula SEO-F1 promoter (PMtSEO-F1) by constructing deletion, substitution and hybrid constructs and testing them in transgenic tobacco plants using green fluorescent protein as a reporter. This revealed four promoter regions, each containing cis-regulatory elements that activate transcription in SEs. One of these segments also contained sufficient information to suppress PMtSEO-F1 transcription in the phloem companion cells (CCs). Subsequent in silico analysis revealed several candidate cis-regulatory elements that PMtSEO-F1 shares with other SEO promoters. These putative sieve element boxes (PSE boxes) are promising candidates for cis-regulatory elements controlling the SE-specific expression of PMtSEO-F1.

  1. HER2 Signaling Drives DNA Anabolism and Proliferation through SRC-3 Phosphorylation and E2F1-Regulated Genes.

    PubMed

    Nikolai, Bryan C; Lanz, Rainer B; York, Brian; Dasgupta, Subhamoy; Mitsiades, Nicholas; Creighton, Chad J; Tsimelzon, Anna; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Lonard, David M; Smith, Carolyn L; O'Malley, Bert W

    2016-03-15

    Approximately 20% of early-stage breast cancers display amplification or overexpression of the ErbB2/HER2 oncogene, conferring poor prognosis and resistance to endocrine therapy. Targeting HER2(+) tumors with trastuzumab or the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor lapatinib significantly improves survival, yet tumor resistance and progression of metastatic disease still develop over time. Although the mechanisms of cytosolic HER2 signaling are well studied, nuclear signaling components and gene regulatory networks that bestow therapeutic resistance and limitless proliferative potential are incompletely understood. Here, we use biochemical and bioinformatic approaches to identify effectors and targets of HER2 transcriptional signaling in human breast cancer. Phosphorylation and activity of the Steroid Receptor Coactivator-3 (SRC-3) is reduced upon HER2 inhibition, and recruitment of SRC-3 to regulatory elements of endogenous genes is impaired. Transcripts regulated by HER2 signaling are highly enriched with E2F1 binding sites and define a gene signature associated with proliferative breast tumor subtypes, cell-cycle progression, and DNA replication. We show that HER2 signaling promotes breast cancer cell proliferation through regulation of E2F1-driven DNA metabolism and replication genes together with phosphorylation and activity of the transcriptional coactivator SRC-3. Furthermore, our analyses identified a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) signaling node that, when targeted using the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib, defines overlap and divergence of adjuvant pharmacologic targeting. Importantly, lapatinib and palbociclib strictly block de novo synthesis of DNA, mostly through disruption of E2F1 and its target genes. These results have implications for rational discovery of pharmacologic combinations in preclinical models of adjuvant treatment and therapeutic resistance.

  2. Two Tightly Linked Genes at the hsa1 Locus Cause Both F1 and F2 Hybrid Sterility in Rice.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takahiko; Takashi, Tomonori; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Kurata, Nori

    2016-02-01

    Molecular mechanisms of hybrid breakdown associated with sterility (F2 sterility) are poorly understood as compared with those of F1 hybrid sterility. Previously, we characterized three unlinked epistatic loci, hybrid sterility-a1 (hsa1), hsa2, and hsa3, responsible for the F2 sterility in a cross between Oryza sativa ssp. indica and japonica. In this study, we identified that the hsa1 locus contains two interacting genes, HSA1a and HSA1b, within a 30-kb region. HSA1a-j (japonica allele) encodes a highly conserved plant-specific domain of unknown function protein (DUF1618), whereas the indica allele (HSA1a-i(s)) has two deletion mutations that cause disruption of domain structure. The second gene, HSA1b-i(s), encodes an uncharacterized protein with some similarity to a nucleotide-binding protein. Homozygous introgression of indica HSA1a-i(s)-HSA1b-i(s) alleles into japonica showed female gamete abortion at an early mitotic stage. The fact that the recombinant haplotype HSA1a-j-HSA1b-i(s) caused semi-sterility in the heterozygous state with the HSA1a-i(s)-HSA1b-i(s) haplotype suggests that variation in the hsa1 locus is a possible cause of the wide-spectrum sterility barriers seen in F1 hybrids and successive generations in rice. We propose a simple genetic model to explain how a single causal mechanism can drive both F1 and F2 hybrid sterility.

  3. Characterization of murine pituitary-derived cell lines Tpit/F1, Tpit/E and TtT/GF.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Saishu; Higuchi, Masashi; Ueharu, Hiroki; Nishimura, Naoto; Tsuda, Mitsuyoshi; Yako, Hideji; Chen, Mo; Mitsuishi, Hideo; Sano, Yoshiya; Kato, Takako; Kato, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    The pituitary is an important endocrine tissue of the vertebrate that produces and secretes many hormones. Accumulating data suggest that several types of cells compose the pituitary, and there is growing interest in elucidating the origin of these cell types and their roles in pituitary organogenesis. Therein, the histogenous cell line is an extremely valuable experimental tool for investigating the function of derived tissue. In this study, we compared gene expression profiles by microarray analysis and real-time PCR for murine pituitary tumor-derived non-hormone-producing cell lines TtT/GF, Tpit/F1 and Tpit/E. Several genes are characteristically expressed in each cell line: Abcg2, Nestin, Prrx1, Prrx2, CD34, Eng, Cspg4 (Ng2), S100β and nNos in TtT/GF; Cxcl12, Raldh1, Msx1 and Twist1 in Tpit/F1; and Cxadr, Sox9, Cdh1, EpCAM and Krt8 in Tpit/E. Ultimately, we came to the following conclusions: TtT/GF cells show the most differentiated state, and may have some properties of the pituitary vascular endothelial cell and/or pericyte. Tpit/F1 cells show the epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes with stemness still in a transiting state. Tpit/E cells have a phenotype of epithelial cells and are the most immature cells in the progression of differentiation or in the initial endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Thus, these three cell lines must be useful model cell lines for investigating pituitary stem/progenitor cells as well as organogenesis.

  4. Characterization of Murine Pituitary-Derived Cell Lines Tpit/F1, Tpit/E and TtT/GF

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIDA, Saishu; HIGUCHI, Masashi; UEHARU, Hiroki; NISHIMURA, Naoto; TSUDA, Mitsuyoshi; YAKO, Hideji; CHEN, Mo; MITSUISHI, Hideo; SANO, Yoshiya; KATO, Takako; KATO, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    The pituitary is an important endocrine tissue of the vertebrate that produces and secretes many hormones. Accumulating data suggest that several types of cells compose the pituitary, and there is growing interest in elucidating the origin of these cell types and their roles in pituitary organogenesis. Therein, the histogenous cell line is an extremely valuable experimental tool for investigating the function of derived tissue. In this study, we compared gene expression profiles by microarray analysis and real-time PCR for murine pituitary tumor-derived non-hormone-producing cell lines TtT/GF, Tpit/F1 and Tpit/E. Several genes are characteristically expressed in each cell line: Abcg2, Nestin, Prrx1, Prrx2, CD34, Eng, Cspg4 (Ng2), S100β and nNos in TtT/GF; Cxcl12, Raldh1, Msx1 and Twist1 in Tpit/F1; and Cxadr, Sox9, Cdh1, EpCAM and Krt8 in Tpit/E. Ultimately, we came to the following conclusions: TtT/GF cells show the most differentiated state, and may have some properties of the pituitary vascular endothelial cell and/or pericyte. Tpit/F1 cells show the epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes with stemness still in a transiting state. Tpit/E cells have a phenotype of epithelial cells and are the most immature cells in the progression of differentiation or in the initial endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Thus, these three cell lines must be useful model cell lines for investigating pituitary stem/progenitor cells as well as organogenesis. PMID:24881870

  5. Allelic interaction of F1 pollen sterility loci and abnormal chromosome behaviour caused pollen sterility in intersubspecific autotetraploid rice hybrids.

    PubMed

    He, J H; Shahid, M Q; Li, Y J; Guo, H B; Cheng, X A; Liu, X D; Lu, Y G

    2011-08-01

    The intersubspecific hybrids of autotetraploid rice has many features that increase rice yield, but lower seed set is a major hindrance in its utilization. Pollen sterility is one of the most important factors which cause intersubspecific hybrid sterility. The hybrids with greater variation in seed set were used to study how the F(1) pollen sterile loci (S-a, S-b, and S-c) interact with each other and how abnormal chromosome behaviour and allelic interaction of F(1) sterility loci affect pollen fertility and seed set of intersubspecific autotetraploid rice hybrids. The results showed that interaction between pollen sterility loci have significant effects on the pollen fertility of autotetraploid hybrids, and pollen fertility further decreased with an increase in the allelic interaction of F(1) pollen sterility loci. Abnormal ultra-structure and microtubule distribution patterns during pollen mother cell (PMC) meiosis were found in the hybrids with low pollen fertility in interphase and leptotene, suggesting that the effect-time of pollen sterility loci interaction was very early. There were highly significant differences in the number of quadrivalents and bivalents, and in chromosome configuration among all the hybrids, and quadrivalents decreased with an increase in the seed set of autotetraploid hybrids. Many different kinds of chromosomal abnormalities, such as chromosome straggling, chromosome lagging, asynchrony of chromosome disjunction, and tri-fission were found during the various developmental stages of PMC meiosis. All these abnormalities were significantly higher in sterile hybrids than in fertile hybrids, suggesting that pollen sterility gene interactions tend to increase the chromosomal abnormalities which cause the partial abortion of male gametes and leads to the decline in the seed set of the autotetraploid rice hybrids.

  6. Role of mprF1 and mprF2 in the Pathogenicity of Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yinyin; Sakinc, Tuerkan; Laverde, Diana; Wobser, Dominique; Benachour, Abdellah; Theilacker, Christian; Hartke, Axel; Huebner, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Background Enterococcus faecalis is one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections. Due to its innate and acquired resistance to most antibiotics, identification of new targets for antimicrobial treatment of E. faecalis is a high priority. The multiple peptide resistance factor MprF, which was first described in Staphylococcus aureus, modifies phosphatidylglycerol with lysin and reduces the negative charge of the membrane, thus increasing resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides. We studied the effect of mprF in E. faecalis regarding influence on bacterial physiology and virulence. Results Two putative mprF paralogs (mprF1 and mprF2) were identified in E. faecalis by BLAST search using the well-described S. aureus gene as a lead. Two deletion mutants in E. faecalis 12030 were created by homologous recombination. Analysis of both mutants by thin-layer chromatography showed that inactivation of mprF2 abolishes the synthesis of three distinct amino-phosphatidylglycerols (PGs). In contrast, deletion of mprF1 did not interfere with the biosynthesis of amino-PG. Inactivation of mprF2 increased susceptibility against several antimicrobial peptides and resulted in a 42% increased biofilm formation compared to wild-type mprF. However, resistance to opsonic killing was increased in the mutant, while virulence in a mouse bacteremia model was unchanged. Conclusion Our data suggest that only mprF2 is involved in the aminoacylation of PG in enterococci, and is probably responsible for synthesis of Lys-PG, Ala-PG, and Arg-PG, while mprF1 does not seem to have a role in aminoacylation. As in other Gram-positive pathogens, aminoacylation through MprF2 increases resistance against cationic antimicrobial peptides. Unlike mprF found in other bacteria, mprF2 does not seem to be a major virulence factor in enterococci. PMID:22723861

  7. Rotationally resolved photoelectron spectra in resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of HCl via the F 1Δ2 Rydberg state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kwanghsi; McKoy, V.

    1991-12-01

    Results of studies of rotational ion distributions in the X 2Π3/2 and X 2Π1/2 spin-orbit states of HCl+ resulting from (2+1') resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) via the S(0) branch of the F