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Sample records for 6-keto-prostaglandin f1 alpha

  1. Stimulation of the synthesis of 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) and 6-keto-prostaglandin F/sub 1. cap alpha. / (6-keto-PGF/sub 1. cap alpha. /) by cultured human umbilical veins

    SciTech Connect

    Ibe, B.O.; Johnson, A.R.; Falck, J.R.; Campbell, W.B.

    1986-03-05

    These studies were designed to investigate the synthesis of 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ and 15-HETE in cultured human endothelial cells. The identification of the 15-HETE in these cells was made by UV absorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Specific radioimmunoassays were developed to quantify the synthesized 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ and 15-HETE. The release of 15-HETE and 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ was stimulated by arachidonic acid, histamine or the calcium ionophore A23187. The release of 15-HETE paralleled the release of 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ and was both concentration-related and time-dependent. Aspirin, ibuprofen and indomethacin inhibited both the formation of 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ and 15-HETE in similar concentrations. These data indicate that agents which stimulate PGI/sub 2/ synthesis also stimulate the synthesis of 15-HETE. Also, they implicate the cyclooxygenase pathway in the synthesis of 6-keto PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ and 15-HETE in human endothelial cells.

  2. Urinary 11-dehydro-thromboxane B₂ and 2,3-dinor-6-keto-prostaglandin-F₁α in healthy post-menopausal and pre-menopausal women receiving aspirin 100 mg.

    PubMed

    Hartanto, Marcia Dewi; Arieselia, Zita; Setiabudy, Rianto; Setiawati, Arini; Baziad, Ali

    2012-07-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases in women increases sharply after menopause. In postmenopausal women, thromboxane production increases while prostacyclin decreases. Low dose aspirin reduces the production of both thromboxane and prostacyclin. The present study was an open-label clinical trial with two parallel groups of 15 premenopausal women and 15 postmenopausal women. Twenty-four hours urine was collected from each subject before and after aspirin 100 mg daily for 7 days. The concentration of thromboxane and prostacyclin was measured as their metabolites (11-dehydro-thromboxane B(2) and 2,3-dinor-6-keto-prostaglandin-F(1α)) in urine using enzyme immunoassay methods. This study showed that aspirin significantly reduced thromboxane in both groups with significantly larger percentage reduction in postmenopausal women compared to premenopausal women (73.32 vs. 61.13%, p = 0.021). This study also showed that aspirin reduced prostacyclin significantly in both groups, but the percentage reduction between the groups was not significantly different. The decrease in the ratio of 11-dTXB(2)/2,3-dinor-6-keto-PGF(1α) should be compared to assess aspirin efficacy as an antithrombotic. Calculation of the ratio of 11-dTXB(2)/2,3-dinor-6-keto-PGF(1α) before aspirin consumption was higher in postmenopausal women than in premenopausal women. The decrease in 11-dTXB(2)/2,3-dinor-6-keto-PGF(1α) ratio by aspirin was greater in postmenopausal women than in premenopausal women (1.91 vs. 0.17; p = 0.022). It was concluded that aspirin reduced thromboxane and prostacyclin significantly in each group with significant 11-dTXB(2) percentage reduction between groups and non-significant 2,3-dinor-6-keto-PGF(1α) percentage reduction between groups, but reduced the 11-dTXB(2)/2,3-dinor-6-keto-PGF(1α) ratio much larger in postmenopausal women compared to that in premenopausal women. PMID:22311294

  3. The alpha-subunit of Leishmania F1 ATP synthase hydrolyzes ATP in presence of tRNA.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Srikanta; Adhya, Samit

    2006-07-14

    Import of tRNAs into the mitochondria of the kinetoplastid protozoon Leishmania requires the tRNA-dependent hydrolysis of ATP leading to the generation of membrane potential through the pumping of protons. Subunit RIC1 of the inner membrane RNA import complex is a bi-functional protein that is identical to the alpha-subunit of F1F0 ATP synthase and specifically binds to a subset (Type I) of importable tRNAs. We show that recombinant, purified RIC1 is a Type I tRNA-dependent ATP hydrolase. The activity was insensitive to oligomycin, sensitive to mutations within the import signal of the tRNA, and required the cooperative interaction between the ATP-binding and C-terminal domains of RIC1. The ATPase activity of the intact complex was inhibited by anti-RIC1 antibody, while knockdown of RIC1 in Leishmania tropica resulted in deficiency of the tRNA-dependent ATPase activity of the mitochondrial inner membrane. Moreover, RIC1 knockdown extracts failed to generate a membrane potential across reconstituted proteoliposomes, as shown by a rhodamine 123 uptake assay, but activity was restored by adding back purified RIC1. These observations identify RIC1 as a novel form of the F1 ATP synthase alpha-subunit that acts as the major energy transducer for tRNA import. PMID:16735512

  4. The alpha1-fetoprotein locus is activated by a nuclear receptor of the Drosophila FTZ-F1 family.

    PubMed Central

    Galarneau, L; Paré, J F; Allard, D; Hamel, D; Levesque, L; Tugwood, J D; Green, S; Bélanger, L

    1996-01-01

    The alpha1-fetoprotein (AFP) gene is located between the albumin and alpha-albumin genes and is activated by transcription factor FTF (fetoprotein transcription factor), presumed to transduce early developmental signals to the albumin gene cluster. We have identified FTF as an orphan nuclear receptor of the Drosophila FTZ-F1 family. FTF recognizes the DNA sequence 5'-TCAAGGTCA-3', the canonical recognition motif for FTZ-F1 receptors. cDNA sequence homologies indicate that rat FTF is the ortholog of mouse LRH-1 and Xenopus xFF1rA. Rodent FTF is encoded by a single-copy gene, related to the gene encoding steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1). The 5.2-kb FTF transcript is translated from several in-frame initiator codons into FTF isoforms (54 to 64 kDa) which appear to bind DNA as monomers, with no need for a specific ligand, similar KdS (approximately equal 3 x 10(-10) M), and similar transcriptional effects. FTF activates the AFP promoter without the use of an amino-terminal activation domain; carboxy-terminus-truncated FTF exerts strong dominant negative effects. In the AFP promoter, FTF recruits an accessory trans-activator which imparts glucocorticoid reactivity upon the AFP gene. FTF binding sites are found in the promoters of other liver-expressed genes, some encoding liver transcription factors; FTF, liver alpha1-antitrypsin promoter factor LFB2, and HNF-3beta promoter factor UF2-H3beta are probably the same factor. FTF is also abundantly expressed in the pancreas and may exert differentiation functions in endodermal sublineages, similar to SF-1 in steroidogenic tissues. HepG2 hepatoma cells seem to express a mutated form of FTF. PMID:8668203

  5. Chemical modification of thiol groups of mitochondrial F1-ATPase from the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Involvement of alpha- and gamma-subunits in the enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Falson, P.; Di Pietro, A.; Gautheron, D.C.

    1986-06-05

    Mitochondrial F1-ATPase from the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been prepared under a stable form and in relatively high amounts by an improved purification procedure. Specific chemical modification of the enzyme by the thiol reagent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) at pH 6.8 leads to complete inactivation characterized by complex kinetics and pH dependence, indicating that several thiols are related to the enzyme activity. A complete protection against NEM effect is afforded by low concentrations of nucleotides in the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/, with ADP and ATP being more efficient than GTP. A total binding of 5 mol of (/sup 14/C)NEM/mol of F1-ATPase is obtained when the enzyme is 85% inactivated: 3 mol of the label are located on the alpha-subunits and 2 on the gamma-subunit. Two out of the 3 mol on the alpha-subunits bind very rapidly before any inactivation occurs. Complete protection by ATP against inactivation by NEM prevents the modification of three essential thiols out of the group of five thiols labeled in the absence of ATP: one is located on a alpha-subunit and two on the gamma-subunit. These two essential thiols of the gamma-subunit can be differentiated by modification with 6,6'-dithiodinicotinic acid (CPDS), another specific thiol reagent. A maximal binding of 4 mol of (/sup 14/C)CPDS/mol of enzyme is obtained, concomitant to a 25% inhibition. Sequential modification of the enzyme by CPDS and (/sup 14/C)NEM leads to the same final deep inactivation as that obtained with (/sup 14/C)NEM alone. One out of the two thiols of the gamma-subunit is no longer accessible to (/sup 14/C)NEM after CPDS treatment. When incubated at pH 6.8 with (/sup 3/H)ATP in the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/, F1-ATPase is able to bind 3, largely exchangeable, mol of nucleotide/mol of enzyme. Modification of the three essential thiols by NEM dramatically decreases the binding of /sup 3/H-nucleotide down to about 1 mol/mol of enzyme.

  6. Analysis of vesicle fluid following the sting of the lionfish Pterois volitans.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, P S; McKinney, H E; Rees, R S; Heggers, J P

    1987-01-01

    Fluid aspirated from blisters following a lionfish (Pterois volitans) sting was analyzed utilizing combined capillary column gas chromatography and negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Analysis for prostaglandin F2 alpha demonstrated 16.91 ng/ml, for prostaglandin E2 0.143 ng/ml, for 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha less than 0.1 ng/ml (nondetectable) and for thromboxane B2 1.65 ng/ml. Platelet aggregation studies showed that blister fluid caused aggregation of isolated platelets only, which was inhibited by heat treatment or by the presence of normal donor plasma. PMID:3438924

  7. Structural insights into differences in drug-binding selectivity between two forms of human alpha1-acid glycoprotein genetic variants, the A and F1*S forms.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Koji; Ono, Tomomi; Nakamura, Teruya; Fukunaga, Naoko; Izumi, Miyoko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Suenaga, Ayaka; Maruyama, Toru; Yamagata, Yuriko; Curry, Stephen; Otagiri, Masaki

    2011-04-22

    Human α(1)-acid glycoprotein (hAGP) in serum functions as a carrier of basic drugs. In most individuals, hAGP exists as a mixture of two genetic variants, the F1*S and A variants, which bind drugs with different selectivities. We prepared a mutant of the A variant, C149R, and showed that its drug-binding properties were indistinguishable from those of the wild type. In this study, we determined the crystal structures of this mutant hAGP alone and complexed with disopyramide (DSP), amitriptyline (AMT), and the nonspecific drug chlorpromazine (CPZ). The crystal structures revealed that the drug-binding pocket on the A variant is located within an eight-stranded β-barrel, similar to that found in the F1*S variant and other lipocalin family proteins. However, the binding region of the A variant is narrower than that of the F1*S variant. In the crystal structures of complexes with DSP and AMT, the two aromatic rings of each drug interact with Phe-49 and Phe-112 at the bottom of the binding pocket. Although the structure of CPZ is similar to those of DSP and AMT, its fused aromatic ring system, which is extended in length by the addition of a chlorine atom, appears to dictate an alternative mode of binding, which explains its nonselective binding to the F1*S and A variant hAGPs. Modeling experiments based on the co-crystal structures suggest that, in complexes of DSP, AMT, or CPZ with the F1*S variant, Phe-114 sterically hinders interactions with DSP and AMT, but not CPZ. PMID:21349832

  8. The effect of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNB) on colonocyte arachidonic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Stratton, M D; Sexe, R; Peterson, B; Kaminski, D L; Li, A P; Longo, W E

    1996-02-01

    In previous studies we found that luminal perfusion of the isolated left colon of the rabbit with the hapten, trinitrobenzene, resulted in the production of an acute inflammatory process associated with alterations in eicosanoid metabolism. As the colitis was attenuated by cyclooxygenase inhibitors it is possible that the inflammation was mediated by arachidonic acid metabolites. In the present study it was intended to evaluate the effect of trinitrobenzene on eicosanoid metabolism in transformed human colonic cells by exposing Caco-2++ cells to various doses of trinitrobenzene. Cell injury was evaluated by measuring lactate dehydrogenase levels and cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase activity was evaluated by measuring prostanoid and leukotriene production. In separate experiments resting and trinitrobenzene stimulated cells were treated with indomethacin and dexamethasone. Trinitrobenzene produced increased prostaglandin E2 and 6-keto prostaglandin F1alpha++ and increased lactate dehydrogenase levels. Leukotriene B4 was significantly increased compared to control values at the highest TNB concentration administered. Indomethacin inhibited the lactate dehydrogenase and prostanoid changes, suggesting that the inflammatory changes produced were mediated by the prostanoids. Dexamethasone administered for 1 hr prior to trinitrobenzene decreased the 6-keto prostaglandin F1alpha but did not alter trinitrobenzene produced changes in lactate dehydrogenase concentrations. Exposure of Caco-2 cells to dexamethasone for 24 hr decreased the trinitrobenzene produced lactate dehydrogenase and eicosanoid changes. The results suggest that trinitrobenzene produces an acute injury to Caco-2 cells that may be mediated by the cyclooxygenase enzymes. PMID:8598672

  9. F-1 Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    This photograph shows F-1 engines being stored in the F-1 Engine Preparation Shop, building 4666, at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Each F-1 engine produced a thrust of 1,500,000 pounds. A cluster of five engines was mounted on the thrust structure of the S-IC stage of a 364-foot long Saturn V launch vehicle that ultimately took astronauts to the Moon.

  10. The mRNA expression of P450 aromatase, gonadotropin beta-subunits and FTZ-F1 in the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus Coioides) during 17alpha-methyltestosterone-induced precocious sex change.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weimin; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Lihong; Zhao, Huihong; Li, Xin; Huang, He; Lin, Haoran

    2007-06-01

    The orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides is a protogynous hermaphroditic fish, but the physiological basis of its sex change remains largely unknown. In the present study, the 2-year-old orange-spotted grouper was induced to change sex precociously by oral administration of 17alpha-methyltestosterone (MT, 50 mg/Kg diet, twice a day at daily ration of 5% bodyweight) for 60 days. The serum testosterone levels were significantly elevated after MT treatment for 20 and 40 days as compared to control, but the levels of serum estradiol (E(2)) remained unchanged. The expression of P450aromA in the gonad significantly decreased after MT treatment for 20, 40, and 60 days. Accordingly, the enzyme activity of gonadal aromatase was also lower. The expression of FSHbeta subunit in the pituitary was significantly decreased after MT treatment for 20 days, but returned to the control levels after 40 and 60 days; however, the expression of LHbeta subunit was not altered significantly by MT treatment. The expression of FTZ-F1 in the gonad also decreased significantly in response to MT treatment for 40 and 60 days, but its expression in the pituitary was not altered significantly. Interestingly, when tested in vitro on ovarian fragments, MT had no direct effect on the expression of P450aromA and FTZ-F1 as well as the activity of gonadal aromatase, suggesting that the inhibition of gonadal P450aromatase and FTZ-F1 by MT may be mediated at upper levels of the brain-pituitary-gonadal axis. Taken together, these results indicated that FSH, P450aromA, FTZ-F1, and serum testosterone are associated with the MT-induced sex change of the orange-spotted grouper, but the cause-effect relationship between these factors and sex change in this species remains to be characterized. PMID:17075797

  11. Influence of prostaglandins and adrenoceptor agonists on contractile activity in the human cervix at term.

    PubMed

    Bryman, I; Norström, A; Lindblom, B

    1986-04-01

    The influence of prostaglandins as well as adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists on contractile activity of isolated cervical smooth muscle from term pregnant women was studied. Prostaglandin E2 had an inhibitory effect at extremely low concentrations. Inhibition also was induced by prostaglandin F2 alpha, prostaglandin I2, and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha, but at considerably higher concentrations. Contractions evoked by noradrenaline or phenylephrine were blocked by the alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist phenoxybenzamine. The beta-adrenoceptor agonist terbutaline acted as an inhibitor, whereas isoprenaline in most cases stimulated contractile activity. The inhibitory action of prostaglandins and especially the high sensitivity to prostaglandin E2 point to a physiologic role of these compounds for cervical dilatation and retraction. A predominance of alpha-adrenoceptors might be of importance for the maintenance of cervical competence during pregnancy. PMID:2870450

  12. F-1 Engine Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    A complete F-1 engine assembly is shown in this photograph. Designed and developed by Rocketdye under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center, the engine measured 19-feet tall by 12.5 feet at the nozzle exit, and each engine produced a 1,500,000-pound thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene as the propellant. A cluster of five F-1 engines was mounted on the Saturn V S-IC (first) stage and burned 15 tons of liquid oxygen and kerosene each second to produce 7,500,000 pounds of thrust.

  13. F-1 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    This close-up view of the F-1 engine for the Saturn V S-IC (first) stage shows the engine's complexity, and also its large size as it dwarfs the technician. Developed by Rocketdyne, under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center, the F-1 engine was utilized in a cluster of five engines to propel the Saturn V's first stage, the S-IC. Liquid oxygen and kerosene were used as its propellant. Initially rated at 1,500,000 pounds of thrust, the engine was later uprated to 1,522,000 pounds of thrust after the third Saturn V launch (Apollo 8, the first marned Saturn V mission) in December 1968. The cluster of five F-1 engines burned over 15 tons of propellant per second, during its two and one-half minutes of operation, to take the vehicle to a height of about 36 miles and to a speed of about 6,000 miles per hour.

  14. Influence of prostaglandins on contractility of the isolated human cervical muscle.

    PubMed

    Bryman, I; Sahni, S; Norström, A; Lindblom, B

    1984-03-01

    The contractile activity of smooth muscle from the pregnant and nonpregnant human cervix uteri was studied in organ bath experiments. Several patterns of spontaneous activity with varying frequency and amplitude were observed. Prostaglandin E2 inhibited muscle activity in a concentration-dependent manner, and total inhibition was achieved in pregnant tissue at extremely low concentrations. Prostaglandin F2 alpha, on the other hand, did not influence spontaneous contractions. Prostaglandin I2 and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha had an inhibitory effect but only at comparatively high concentrations. 5,8,11,14-Eicosatetraynoic acid and indomethacin abolished spontaneous contractions, indicating a regulatory influence of endogenous prostanoids on cervical contractility. The extreme sensitivity to prostaglandin E2 and enhancement of its action during early pregnancy provide evidence for a specific role of this compound in controlling cervical smooth muscle activity in the human female. PMID:6583598

  15. Changes in endothelium-derived vascular regulatory factors during dobutamine-stress-induced silent myocardial ischemia in patients with Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Hino, Y; Ohkubo, T; Katsube, Y; Ogawa, S

    1999-07-01

    The changes in endothelium-derived vascular regulatory factors during dobutamine (DOB)-induced myocardial ischemia (MI) were investigated in 21 patients with Kawasaki disease aged from 11 months to 18 years. They were classified into an ischemia group (8 patients) and a non-ischemia group (13 patients) based on the results of 99mTc myocardial scintigraphy and DOB stress 99mTc myocardial scintigraphy. In the ischemia group, MI was relatively mild, because there were ischemic changes on the electrocardiogram and no significant symptoms during DOB stress. Catheters were positioned near the orifice of the coronary artery (Ao) and at the coronary sinus (CS). Hemodynamics and the blood concentrations of lactic acid and endothelin-1, as well as NO3-, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1alpha, and thromboxane B2, (which are inactive metabolites of nitric oxide, prostaglandin I2 and thromboxane A2, respectively), were measured at rest and after DOB stress (maximum dose: 30 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)). The CS/Ao ratio was determined for all parameters. The rate-pressure product, an index of work load, and the cardiac index were significantly increased by DOB stress in both groups. Coronary angiography showed no vasospasm of the epicardial coronary arteries before or after DOB stress in either group. The plasma concentrations of endothelin-1 and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1alpha were significantly increased after DOB stress in the ischemia group, but the serum concentration of NO did not increase. The lack of an increase in NO production during DOB stress may have contributed to the worsening of MI in patients with Kawasaki disease. PMID:10462014

  16. Eicosanoid production by mouse peritoneal macrophages during Toxoplasma gondii penetration: role of parasite and host cell phospholipases.

    PubMed Central

    Thardin, J F; M'Rini, C; Beraud, M; Vandaele, J; Frisach, M F; Bessieres, M H; Seguela, J P; Pipy, B

    1993-01-01

    The metabolism of endogenous arachidonic acid by mouse resident peritoneal macrophages infected in vitro with Toxoplasma gondii was studied. Prelabeling of macrophages with [5,6,8,9,11,12,14,15-3H]arachidonic acid and challenge with tachyzoites for 15 min resulted in a high mobilization of free labeled arachidonic acid (178%) in the culture medium. The parasites also triggered the synthesis of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (47%), prostaglandin E2 (44%), leukotrienes C4 and D4 (33%) and 5-, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (155%). The study indicated that during the intracellular development phase of the parasites, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (38%), prostaglandin E2 (31%) leukotrienes C4 and D4 (15%), hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (43%), and free arachidonic acid (110%) were secreted into the culture medium. Pretreatment of tachyzoites with phospholipase A2 inhibitors (4-p-bromophenacyl bromide and quinacrine) and no calcium in the culture medium resulted in inhibition of tachyzoite penetration into the macrophages and a decrease of the arachidonic acid metabolism. The triggering of the arachidonic acid cascade by T. gondii was dependent on the active penetration of the parasites into the macrophages, whereas preincubation of the macrophages with phospholipase A2 inhibitors did not affect penetration or free arachidonic acid release, thereby supporting a role for parasite phospholipase in the penetration process and in arachidonic acid mobilization from macrophage membrane phospholipids. Moreover, treatment of macrophages with phospholipase A2 inhibitors decreased the activities of the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways, also suggesting an activation of host cell phospholipase A2 by the parasite. PMID:8454347

  17. Design, Synthesis, and Anti-inflammatory Properties of Orally Active 4-(Phenylamino)-pyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazine p38[alpha] Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, Jr., John; Dyckman, Alaric J.; Lin, Shuqun; Wrobleski, Stephen T.; Wu, Hong; Gillooly, Kathleen M.; Kanner, Steven B.; Lonial, Herinder; Loo, Derek; McIntyre, Kim W.; Pitt, Sidney; Shen, Ding Ren; Shuster, David J.; Yang, XiaoXia; Zhang, Rosemary; Behnia, Kamelia; Zhang, Hongjian; Marathe, Punit H.; Doweyko, Arthur M.; Tokarski, John S.; Sack, John S.; Pokross, Matthew; Kiefer, Susan E.; Newitt, John A.; Barrish, Joel C.; Dodd, John; Schieven, Gary L.; Leftheris, Katerina

    2008-06-30

    A novel structural class of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitors consisting of substituted 4-(phenylamino)-pyrrolo[2,1- f][1,2,4]triazines has been discovered. An initial subdeck screen revealed that the oxindole-pyrrolo[2,1- f][1,2,4]triazine lead 2a displayed potent enzyme inhibition (IC 50 60 nM) and was active in a cell-based TNFalpha biosynthesis inhibition assay (IC 50 210 nM). Replacement of the C4 oxindole with 2-methyl-5- N-methoxybenzamide aniline 9 gave a compound with superior p38 kinase inhibition (IC 50 10 nM) and moderately improved functional inhibition in THP-1 cells. Further replacement of the C6 ester of the pyrrolo[2,1- f][1,2,4]triazine with amides afforded compounds with increased potency, excellent oral bioavailability, and robust efficacy in a murine model of acute inflammation (murine LPS-TNFalpha). In rodent disease models of chronic inflammation, multiple compounds demonstrated significant inhibition of disease progression leading to the advancement of 2 compounds 11b and 11j into further preclinical and toxicological studies.

  18. Discovery of 4-(5-(Cyclopropylcarbamoyl)-2-methylphenylamino)-5-methyl-N-propylpyrrolo[1,2-f][1,2,4]triazine-6-carboxamide (BMS-582949), a Clinical p38[alpha] MAP Kinase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Inflammatory Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chunjian; Lin, James; Wrobleski, Stephen T.; Lin, Shuqun; Hynes, Jr., John; Wu, Hong; Dyckman, Alaric J.; Li, Tianle; Wityak, John; Gillooly, Kathleen M.; Pitt, Sidney; Shen, Ding Ren; Zhang, Rosemary F.; McIntyre, Kim W.; Salter-Cid, Luisa; Shuster, David J.; Zhang, Hongjian; Marathe, Punit H.; Doweyko, Arthur M.; Sack, John S.; Kiefer, Susan E.; Kish, Kevin F.; Newitt, John A.; McKinnon, Murray; Dodd, John H.; Barrish, Joel C.; Schieven, Gary L.; Leftheris, Katerina

    2013-11-20

    The discovery and characterization of 7k (BMS-582949), a highly selective p38{alpha} MAP kinase inhibitor that is currently in phase II clinical trials for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, is described. A key to the discovery was the rational substitution of N-cyclopropyl for N-methoxy in 1a, a previously reported clinical candidate p38{alpha} inhibitor. Unlike alkyl and other cycloalkyls, the sp{sup 2} character of the cyclopropyl group can confer improved H-bonding characteristics to the directly substituted amide NH. Inhibitor 7k is slightly less active than 1a in the p38{alpha} enzymatic assay but displays a superior pharmacokinetic profile and, as such, was more effective in both the acute murine model of inflammation and pseudoestablished rat AA model. The binding mode of 7k with p38{alpha} was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis.

  19. M2-F1 cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This photo shows the cockpit configuration of the M2-F1 wingless lifting body. With a top speed of about 120 knots, the M2-F1 had a simple instrument panel. Besides the panel itself, the ribs of the wooden shell (left) and the control stick (center) are also visible. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly safely and to train pilots before they were towed behind a C-47

  20. Cytokine gene polymorphism [tumor necrosis factor-alpha (-308), IL-10 (-1082), IL-6 (-174), IL-17F, 1RaVNTR] in pediatric patients with primary immune thrombocytopenia and response to different treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Mokhtar, Galila M; El-Beblawy, Nagham M S; Adly, Amira A; Elbarbary, Nancy S; Kamal, Tarek M; Hasan, Esraa M

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the association between development, progression, and response to therapy among patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and different cytokine gene polymorphisms known to be related to autoimmunity [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-10, IL-6, IL-17, IL-1Ra]. A total of 50 pediatric patients with ITP (20 newly diagnosed, 30 chronic) and 50 healthy controls were investigated via PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis for cytokine gene polymorphism. Compared with controls, all patients showed a higher frequency of IL-6-174 CC [P = 0.0001, odds ratio (OR) = 7.048, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.18-22.7], higher GA genotype of TNF-α (-308) (P = 0.001, OR = 6.469, 95% CI = 2.0-20.9), higher CC genotype of IL-17F (P = 0.0001, OR = 55.545, 95% CI = 14.4-213.2), higher GG of IL-10-1082 (P = 0.029, OR = 3.6, 95% CI = 1.08-12.18), and A1A2 genotype of IL-1Ra (P = 0.039, OR = 2.374, 95% CI = 1.03-5.4). IL-10 GA and IL-1Ra A1A1 genotypes were higher among chronic patients (P = 0.042, P = 0.001 respectively) compared with newly diagnosed ones. Best platelet response to steroid treatment was found among GC genotype of IL-6 (-174) and GG genotype of IL-10 (-1082) in all patients with ITP. This suggests that previously mentioned cytokine gene polymorphisms possibly contribute to the susceptibility of acquisition of childhood ITP. Furthermore, GA genotype of IL-10 and A1A1 genotype of IL-1Ra polymorphisms are associated with increased risk of chronic ITP. IL-6 (-174) and IL-10 (-1082) genes might play a role in the effectiveness of steroid therapy among patients with ITP. PMID:27007229

  1. The Saturn V F-1 engine revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, B. W.; Murphy, T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes how the Saturn V F-1 engine could be resurrected for potential use in a new heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV). Performance, history, and reliability of the F-1 will be discussed and a 1990s F-1 engine configuration presented. The status of residual hardware, production capability, test-stand availability, and a general program plan to accomplish this restart will be presented. Similarities between restarting the F-1 program and restarting the Atlas and Delta engine programs will be discussed.

  2. F-1 Engine Firing in Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    This photograph depicts the F-1 engine firing in the Marshall Space Flight Center's F-1 Engine Static Test Stand. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. It is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability is provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. The foundation of the stand is keyed into the bedrock approximately 40 feet below grade.

  3. F-1 Engine Gas Generator Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    The gas generator from an F-1 engine is test-fired at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., on Jan. 24, 2013. Data from the 30 second test will be used in the development of advance...

  4. Cyclic mechanical stretch augments prostacyclin production in cultured human uterine myometrial cells from pregnant women: possible involvement of up-regulation of prostacyclin synthase expression.

    PubMed

    Korita, Daizo; Sagawa, Norimasa; Itoh, Hiroaki; Yura, Shigeo; Yoshida, Masahiro; Kakui, Kazuyo; Takemura, Maki; Yokoyama, Chieko; Tanabe, Tadashi; Fujii, Shingo

    2002-11-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI(2)), a potent smooth muscle relaxant, is a major prostaglandin secreted from human myometrium. The concentrations of PGI(2) metabolites in the maternal plasma were reported to be elevated during pregnancy, especially in labor. To clarify the mechanism in PGI(2) secretion from the myometrium, we first investigated the protein expression of cytosolic phospholipase A(2), cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, COX-2, and prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) in the human uterine myometrium at various gestational ages before labor. To elucidate the involvement of labor in the increase in PGI(2) production during labor, we next examined the effect of labor-like cyclic mechanical stretch on PGI(2) production by cultured human myometrial cells. Pregnancy specifically increased COX-1 and PGIS protein expression in the myometrial tissues before labor (P < 0.01 for both). Cyclic mechanical stretch augmented PGIS promoter activity, via activation of activator protein-1 site, and PGIS mRNA and protein expression in cultured human myometrial cells and resulted in a 3.5-fold increase in the concentration of 6-keto-prostaglandin F(1alpha), the stable metabolite of PGI(2), in the culture medium (P < 0.05). However, stretch did not affect the levels of prostaglandin E(2), prostaglandin F(2alpha), or thromboxane A(2) secreted into the same culture media. These results suggest that cyclic mechanical stretch during labor may contribute to the increase in the PGI(2) concentration in the maternal plasma during parturition. PMID:12414894

  5. The molecular structure of the Na(+)-translocating F1F0-ATPase of Acetobacterium woodii, as revealed by electron microscopy, resembles that of H(+)-translocating ATPases.

    PubMed

    Reidlinger, J; Mayer, F; Müller, V

    1994-12-12

    The Na(+)-translocating F1F0-ATPase of Acetobacterium woodii was examined by electron microscopy. After reconstitution into proteoliposomes, knobs typical for the F1 domain were visible on the outside of the membrane. The F1-part of the isolated enzyme showed a hexagonal symmetry suggesting an alpha 3 beta 3 structure, and the F1F0 complex had molecular dimensions very similar to those of H(+)-translocating ATPases of E. coli, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. PMID:7988711

  6. M2-F1 In Tow Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The M2-F1 lifting body is seen here under tow at the Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. These initial tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind a NASA C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 feet where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began.

  7. M2-F1 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The M2-F1 Lifting Body is seen here under tow, high above Rogers Dry Lake near the Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. R. Dale Reed effectively advocated the project with the support of NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Together, they gained the support of Flight Research Center Director Paul Bikle. After a six-month feasibility study, Bikle gave approval in the fall of 1962 for the M2-F1 to be built. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Flight Research Center management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. These initial tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind a NASA C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began. Pilot for the first series of flights of the M2-F1 was NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Typical glide flights with the M2-F1 lasted about two minutes and reached speeds of 110 to l20 mph. More than 400 ground tows and 77 aircraft tow flights were carried out with the M2-F1. The success of Dryden's M2-F1 program led to NASA's development and construction of two heavyweight lifting bodies based on studies at NASA's Ames and Langley research centers--the M2-F2 and the HL

  8. M2-F1 simulator cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This early simulator of the M2-F1 lifting body was used for pilot training, to test landing techniques before the first ground tow attempts, and to test new control configurations after the first tow attempts and wind-tunnel tests. The M2-F1 simulator was limited in some ways by its analog simulator. It had only limited visual display for the pilot, as well. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne

  9. M2-F1 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The M2-F1 Lifting Body is seen here under tow by an unseen C-47 at the NASA Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. The low-cost vehicle was the first piloted lifting body to be test flown. The lifting-body concept originated in the mid-1950s at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' Ames Aeronautical Laboratory, Mountain View California. By February 1962, a series of possible shapes had been developed, and R. Dale Reed was working to gain support for a research vehicle. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. These initial tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind a NASA C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began. Pilot for the first series of flights of the M2-F1 was NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Typical glide flights with the M2-F1 lasted about two minutes and reached speeds of 110 to l20 mph. More than 400 ground tows and 77 aircraft tow flights were carried out with the M2-F1. The success of Dryden's M2-F1 program led to NASA's development and construction of two heavyweight lifting bodies based on studies at

  10. M2-F1 in Tow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The M2-F1 lifting body is seen here being towed behind a C-47 at the Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric re-entry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle.

  11. Ibuprofen modifies the inflammatory response of the murine lung to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Sordelli, D O; Cerquetti, M C; el-Tawil, G; Ramwell, P W; Hooke, A M; Bellanti, J A

    1985-08-01

    In chronic P. aeruginosa infection, lung tissue damage is induced by either the microorganism or the inflammatory response. We investigated, in an animal model, whether a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, ibuprofen, reduced lung inflammation produced by P. aeruginosa. Lung lavages, pulmonary clearance of P. aeruginosa and lung pathology were studied in CD-1 mice injected with sodium ibuprofenate. A single dose of the drug, injected immediately after 30 min exposure to the P. aeruginosa aerosol, decreased the recruitment of granulocytes into airways in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with 2 doses of the drug 18 and 6 h before the P. aeruginosa challenge was even more effective. The kinetics of changes in prostaglandin E2, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha and thromboxane B2 concentrations in lung lavage fluids after P. aeruginosa aerosol were also modified by ibuprofen. Moreover, ibuprofen treatment did not impair lung clearance of the challenge microorganisms, and the animals had less inflammation of the lungs. PMID:3863757

  12. Pathogenetic role of cyclooxygenase-2 in hyperprostaglandin E syndrome/antenatal Bartter syndrome: therapeutic use of the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor nimesulide.

    PubMed

    Nüsing, R M; Reinalter, S C; Peters, M; Kömhoff, M; Seyberth, H W

    2001-10-01

    Patients with hyperprostaglandin E syndrome/antenatal Bartter syndrome typically have renal salt wasting, hypercalciuria with nephrocalcinosis, and secondary hyperaldosteronism. Antenatally, these patients have fetal polyuria, leading to polyhydramnios and premature birth. Hyperprostaglandin E syndrome/antenatal Bartter syndrome is accompanied by a pathologically elevated synthesis of prostaglandin E(2), thought to be responsible for aggravation of clinical symptoms such as salt and water loss, vomiting, diarrhea, and failure to thrive. In this study administration of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) specific inhibitor nimesulide to patients with hyperprostaglandin E syndrome/antenatal Bartter syndrome blocked renal prostaglandin E(2) formation and relieved the key parameters hyperprostaglandinuria, secondary hyperaldosteronism, and hypercalciuria. Partial suppression of serum thromboxane B(2) synthesis resulting from platelet COX-1 activity and complete inhibition of urinary 6-keto-prostaglandin F(1alpha), reflecting endothelial COX-2 activity, indicate preferential inhibition of COX-2 by nimesulide. Amelioration of the clinical symptoms by use of nimesulide indicates that COX-2 may play an important pathogenetic role in hyperprostaglandin E syndrome/antenatal Bartter syndrome. Moreover, on the basis of our data we postulate that COX-2-derived prostaglandin E(2) is an important mediator for stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in the kidney. PMID:11673754

  13. The cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitor, etodolac, but not aspirin reduces neovascularization in a murine ischemic hind limb model.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kohei; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Tsujimoto, Shunsuke; Uozumi, Naonori; Kita, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Akio; Shimizu, Takao; Hisatome, Ichiro

    2010-02-10

    Cyclooxygenase inhibitors are often prescribed to relieve severe ischemic leg pain in critical ischemic limb patients. Prescription of high doses of aspirin and selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors is reported to increase cardiovascular events through suppression of the vasodilative prostanoid prostaglandin I(2) in endothelium. Here, we evaluated the influence of aspirin and etodolac, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, on neovascularization using a murine ischemia hind limb model. C57BL/6J mice were treated with aspirin or etodolac for twenty-eight days after induction of ischemia. We exploited a concentration of the agents that suppressed cyclooxygenase activity efficiently, especially in prostaglandin I(2) production. Recovery of limb blood perfusion and capillary density in ischemic limbs was significantly suppressed by etodolac treatment when compared to the aspirin treated group and untreated group. Production of 6-keto prostaglandin F(1alpha) and prostaglandin E(2) was lower in the aspirin treated group when compared with the etodolac-treated group. Also, these concentrations were lower in both treatment groups compared with the untreated group. Immunohistochemical analysis suggested cyclooxygenase-2 was expressed in endothelium but not in inflammatory cells in ischemic tissue from the acute to chronic phase. Cyclooxygenase-1 was expressed strongly in inflammatory cells in the acute phase. Furthermore, bone marrow-derived mononuclear cell transplantation improved neovascularization, whereas aspirin and etodolac did not inhibit these effects. Production of arachidonic acid metabolites by transplanted cells was independent of the improvement of neovascularization. In conclusion, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition reduces ischemia-induced neovascularization. PMID:19879866

  14. Hypotensive and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activities of Eisenia fetida Extract in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shumei; Li, Chengde

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to investigate the antihypertensive effects of an Eisenia fetida extract (EFE) and its possible mechanisms in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR rats). Methods. Sixteen-week-old SHR rats and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY rats) were used in this study. Rats were, respectively, given EFE (EFE group), captopril (captopril group), or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (normal control group and SHR group) for 4 weeks. ACE inhibitory activity of EFE in vitro was determined. The systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured using a Rat Tail-Cuff Blood Pressure System. Levels of angiotensin II (Ang II), aldosterone (Ald), and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto-PGF1α) in plasma were determined by radioimmunoassay, and serum nitric oxide (NO) concentration was measured by Griess reagent systems. Results. EFE had marked ACE inhibitory activity in vitro (IC50 = 2.5 mg/mL). After the 4-week drug management, SHR rats in EFE group and in captopril group had lower SBP and DBP, lower levels of Ang II and Ald, and higher levels of 6-keto-PGF1α and NO than the SHR rats in SHR group. Conclusion. These results indicate that EFE has hypotensive effects in SHR rats and its effects might be associated with its ACE inhibitory activity. PMID:26798397

  15. Effect of a selective thromboxane synthase inhibitor on arterial graft patency and platelet deposition in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, M.D.; Huntsman, W.T.; Miett, T.O.; Cronenwett, J.L.

    1987-08-01

    This study examined the effect of selective thromboxane synthase inhibition and nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibition on vascular graft patency and indium 111-labeled platelet deposition in 35 mongrel dogs undergoing carotid artery replacement with 4 mm X 4 cm polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) (one side) and Dacron (opposite side) end-to-end grafts. Aspirin-dipyridamole therapy improved one-week graft patency, from 46% in untreated dogs to 93% in treated dogs. Thromboxane synthase inhibition (U-63557A) improved graft patency in these dogs to 81%. Both drug treatments reduced platelet deposition on Dacron and PTFE grafts by 48% to 68% compared with control dogs. Dacron grafts accumulated significantly more platelets than PTFE grafts but had comparable patency rates. Low-dose aspirin therapy had no significant effect on either graft patency or platelet deposition. All treatment groups showed a 60% to 76% reduction in serum thromboxane B2, but only thromboxane synthase inhibitor treatment increased plasma 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha by 100%. Selective thromboxane synthase inhibition improved small-caliber prosthetic graft patency to the same extent as did conventional cyclooxygenase inhibition in this preliminary study.

  16. Prostacyclin-induced hyperthermia - Implication of a protein mediator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandasamy, S. B.; Williams, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism of the prostacyclin-linked hyperthermia is studied in rabbits. Results show that intracerebroventricular administration of prostacyclin (PGI2) induces dose-related hyperthermia at room temperature (21 C), as well as at low (4 C) and high (30 C) ambient temperatures. It is found that this PGI2-induced hyperthermia is not mediated by its stable metabolite 6-keto prostaglandin F-1(alpha). Only one of the three anion transport systems, the liver transport system, appears to be important to the central inactivation of pyrogen, prostaglandin E2, and PGI2. Phenoxybenzamine and pimozide have no thermolytic effect on PGI2-induced hyperthermia, while PGI2 still induces hyperthermia after norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine levels are depleted by 6-hydroxydopamine. Indomethacin and SC-19220 (a PG antagonist) do not antagonize PGI2 induced hyperthermia, while theophylline does not accentuate the PGI2-induced hyperthermia. However, the hyperthermic response to PGI2 is attenuated by central administration of the protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin. It is concluded that PGI2-induced hyperthermia is not induced by NE, dopamine, or cyclic AMP, but rather that a protein mediator is implicated in the induction of fever by PG12.

  17. Static Test Firing of F-1 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    This photograph depicts a view of the test firing of all five F-1 engines for the Saturn V S-IC test stage at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The S-IC stage is the first stage, or booster, of a 364-foot long rocket that ultimately took astronauts to the Moon. Operating at maximum power, all five of the engines produced 7,500,000 pounds of thrust. The S-IC Static Test Stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level, and was required to hold down the brute force of the 7,500,000-pound thrust. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the up position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. When the Saturn V S-IC first stage was placed upright in the stand , the five F-1 engine nozzles pointed downward on a 1,900-ton, water-cooled deflector. To prevent melting damage, water was sprayed through small holes in the deflector at the rate 320,000 gallons per minutes

  18. Static Test Firing of F-1 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    This photograph depicts a view of the test firing of all five F-1 engine for the Saturn V S-IC test stage at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The S-IC stage is the first stage, or booster, of a 364-foot long rocket that ultimately took astronauts to the Moon. Operating at maximum power, all five of the engines produced 7,500,000 pounds of thrust. The S-IC Static Test Stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level, and was required to hold down the brute force of the 7,500,000-pound thrust. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the up position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. When the Saturn V S-IC first stage was placed upright in the stand , the five F-1 engine nozzles pointed downward on a 1,900-ton, water-cooled deflector. To prevent melting damage, water was sprayed through small holes in the deflector at the rate 320,000 gallons per minutes.

  19. Static Test Firing of F-1 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    This photograph depicts a view of the test firing of all five F-1 engines for the Saturn V S-IC test stage at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The S-IC stage is the first stage, or booster, of a 364-foot long rocket that ultimately took astronauts to the Moon. Operating at maximum power, all five of the engines produced 7,500,000 pounds of thrust. The S-IC Static Test Stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level, and was required to hold down the brute force of the 7,500,000-pound thrust. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the up position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. When the Saturn V S-IC first stage was placed upright in the stand , the five F-1 engine nozzles pointed downward on a 1,900-ton, water-cooled deflector. To prevent melting damage, water was sprayed through small holes in the deflector at the rate 320,000 gallons per minutes.

  20. M2-F1 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This 25-second clip shows Milt Thompson being towed in the M2-F1 behind a C-47 aircraft. The M2-F1 lifting body, dubbed the 'flying bathtub' by the media, was the precursor of a remarkable series of wingless flying vehicles that contributed data used in the Space Shuttles, the X-33 Advanced Technology Demonstrator for the next century's Reusable Launch Vehicle, and the X-38 Technology Demonstrator for crew return from the International Space Station. Based on the ideas and basic design of Alfred J. Eggers and others at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory (now the Ames Research Center), Mountain View, California, in the mid-1950's, the M2-F1 was built in 1962-63 over a four-month period for a cost of only about $30,000, plus an additional $8,000-$10,000 for an ejection seat. Engineers and technicians at the NASA Flight Research Center (now NASA Dryden) kept costs low by designing and fabricating it partly in-house, with the plywood shell constructed by a local sailplane builder. Someone at the time estimated that it would have cost a major aircraft company $150,000 to build the same vehicle. Unlike the later lifting bodies, the M2-F1 was unpowered and was initially towed by a souped-up Pontiac convertible until it was airborne. Later a C-47 took over the towing duties. Flown by such famous research pilots as Milt Thompson, Bruce Peterson, Chuck Yeager, and Bill Dana, the lightweight flying bathtub demonstrated that a wingless vehicle shaped for reentry into the Earth's atmosphere from space could be flown and landed safely. Flown from 1963 to 1966, the lightweight M2-F1 paved the way for the heavyweight M2-F2, M2-F3, HL-10, X-24A, and X-24B lifting bodies that flew under rocket power after launch from a B-52 mothership. The heavyweights flew from 1966 to 1975, demonstrating the viability and versatility of the wingless configuration and the ability of a vehicle with low lift-over-drag characteristics to fly to high altitudes and then to land precisely with their rocket

  1. Axle-less F1-ATPase rotates in the correct direction.

    PubMed

    Furuike, Shou; Hossain, Mohammad Delawar; Maki, Yasushi; Adachi, Kengo; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Kohori, Ayako; Itoh, Hiroyasu; Yoshida, Masasuke; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2008-02-15

    F1-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) is an ATP-driven rotary molecular motor in which the central gamma subunit rotates inside a cylinder made of three alpha and three beta subunits alternately arranged. The rotor shaft, an antiparallel alpha-helical coiled coil of the amino and carboxyl termini of the gamma subunit, deeply penetrates the central cavity of the stator cylinder. We truncated the shaft step by step until the remaining rotor head would be outside the cavity and simply sat on the concave entrance of the stator orifice. All truncation mutants rotated in the correct direction, implying torque generation, although the average rotary speeds were low and short mutants exhibited moments of irregular motion. Neither a fixed pivot nor a rigid axle was needed for rotation of F1-ATPase. PMID:18276891

  2. 26 CFR 1.415(f)-1 - Aggregating plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Aggregating plans. 1.415(f)-1 Section 1.415(f)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.415(f)-1 Aggregating plans. (a) In general. Except as provided in paragraph (g) of this section (regarding multiemployer...

  3. 26 CFR 1.415(f)-1 - Aggregating plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aggregating plans. 1.415(f)-1 Section 1.415(f)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.415(f)-1 Aggregating plans. (a) In general. Except as provided in paragraph (g) of this section (regarding multiemployer...

  4. 26 CFR 1.415(f)-1 - Aggregating plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aggregating plans. 1.415(f)-1 Section 1.415(f)-1...) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.415(f)-1 Aggregating plans. (a) In general. Except as provided in paragraph (g) of this section (regarding multiemployer plans), and...

  5. 26 CFR 1.267(f)-1 - Controlled groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... contained in the 26 CFR part 1 edition revised as of April 1, 1995). ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Controlled groups. 1.267(f)-1 Section 1.267(f)-1...) INCOME TAXES Items Not Deductible § 1.267(f)-1 Controlled groups. (a) In general—(1) Purpose....

  6. 26 CFR 1.267(f)-1 - Controlled groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... contained in the 26 CFR part 1 edition revised as of April 1, 1995). ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Controlled groups. 1.267(f)-1 Section 1.267(f)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.267(f)-1 Controlled groups. (a) In general—(1)...

  7. Chemomechanical coupling of F1-ATPase under hydrolysis conditions

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    F1-ATPase (F1) is the smallest rotary motor protein that couples ATP hydrolysis/synthesis to rotary motion in a highly reversible manner. F1 is unique compared with other motor proteins because of its high efficiency and reversibility in converting chemical energy into mechanical work. To determine the energy conversion mechanism of F1-ATPase, we developed a novel single-molecule manipulation technique with magnetic tweezers and determined the timing of Pi release, which was the last unknown piece of the chemomechanical coupling scheme of F1. The established fundamental chemomechanical coupling scheme provides evidence to explain the high reversibility between catalysis and mechanical work.

  8. Single molecule thermodynamics of ATP synthesis by F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyabe, Shoichi; Muneyuki, Eiro

    2015-01-01

    FoF1-ATP synthase is a factory for synthesizing ATP in virtually all cells. Its core machinery is the subcomplex F1-motor (F1-ATPase) and performs the reversible mechanochemical coupling. The isolated F1-motor hydrolyzes ATP, which is accompanied by unidirectional rotation of its central γ -shaft. When a strong opposing torque is imposed, the γ -shaft rotates in the opposite direction and drives the F1-motor to synthesize ATP. This mechanical-to-chemical free-energy transduction is the final and central step of the multistep cellular ATP-synthetic pathway. Here, we determined the amount of mechanical work exploited by the F1-motor to synthesize an ATP molecule during forced rotations using a methodology combining a nonequilibrium theory and single molecule measurements of responses to external torque. We found that the internal dissipation of the motor is negligible even during rotations far from a quasistatic process.

  9. Rotary catalysis of FoF1-ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Rikiya

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis of ATP, the key reaction of biological energy metabolism, is accomplished by the rotary motor protein; FoF1-ATP synthase (FoF1). In vivo, FoF1, located on the cell membrane, carries out ATP synthesis by using the proton motive force. This heterologous energy conversion is supposed to be mediated by the mechanical rotation of FoF1; however, it still remained unclear. Recently, we developed the novel experimental setup to reproduce the proton motive force in vitro and succeeded in directly observing the proton-driven rotation of FoF1. In this review, we describe the interesting working principles determined so far for FoF1 and then introduce results from our recent study. PMID:27493540

  10. Angiotensin II induced release of prostaglandins from rat uterus.

    PubMed

    Campos, G A; Guerra, F A; Israel, E J

    1983-08-01

    The effect of Angiotensin II (A-II) on 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 (6-keto-PGF1 alpha) and prostaglandin F (PGF) production by the rat uterus was studied using a novel superfusion technique. The method of superfusion used allows prostaglandin synthesis in the myometrium and endometrium to be measured independently while their anatomical relationship is undisturbed. Prostaglandins were measured by radioimmunoassay. In uterine horns from castrated, estrogen treated rats, A-II (10(-6)M) stimulated the production rate of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha in the myometrium nd PGF in the endometrium. Sterile horns and pregnant horns coexisting in the same animals showed different responses when superfused with culture medium containing A-II (10(-6)M). In the sterile horns A-II failed to stimulate prostaglandin synthesis whereas in the pregnant horns there was a significant increase in the production rate of both 6-keto-PGF1 alpha and PGF in the decidua (endometrium) and of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha in the myometrium. Our results suggests that the effect of A-II on prostaglandin synthesis by the rat uterus appears to be dependent of the hormonal milieu of the experimental animal. Estrogen stimulated A-II induced PG synthesis. Progesterone inhibited the synthesis of PGs caused by A-II in non-decidualized uterus but stimulated the release of PG in the decidualized uterus. The apparent differential effect of A-II in stimulating prostaglandin synthesis in the whole uterus indicates that there are different pathways for prostaglandin production in both the endometrium and myometrium. PMID:6689628

  11. Effects of sulfur oxides on eicosanoids

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.C.; Miller, P.D.; Amdur, M.O. )

    1989-01-01

    Ultrafine metal oxides and SO2 react during coal combustion or smelting operations to form primary emissions coated with an acidic SOx layer. Ongoing work in this laboratory has examined the effects of sulfur oxides on pulmonary functions of guinea pigs. We have previously reported that 20 micrograms/m3 acidic sulfur oxide as a surface layer on ultrafine ZnO particles decreases lung volumes, decreases carbon monoxide diffusing capacity, and causes lung inflammation in guinea pigs after 4 daily 3-h exposures. It also produces bronchial hypersensitivity following a single 1-h exposure. The importance of this surface layer is demonstrated by our observation that 200 micrograms/m3 of sulfuric acid droplets of equivalent size are needed to produce the same degree of hypersensitivity. This study characterized the concentration-dependent effects of in vivo exposures to sulfur oxides on arachidonic acid metabolism in the guinea pig lung, and investigated the time course and the relation between eicosanoid composition and pulmonary functions. We focused specifically on four cyclooxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid, that is, prostaglandins (PG) E1, F2 alpha, 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha, and thromboxane (Tx) B2, and two groups of sulfidopeptide leukotrienes (C4, D4, E4, and F4). Guinea pigs were exposed to ultrafine ZnO aerosol (count median diameter = 0.05 microns, sigma g = 1.80) with a layer of acidic sulfur oxide on the surface of the particles. Lung lavage was collected after exposures, and the levels of arachidonic acid metabolites were determined using radioimmunoassay (RIA). Concentration-dependent promotion of PGF2 alpha and concentration-dependent suppression of LtB4 were observed. The increased PGF2 alpha was associated with depressed vital capacity and diffusing capacity of the lungs measured in guinea pigs exposed to the same atmosphere described in a previous study.

  12. 26 CFR 48.6416(f)-1 - Credit on returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Credit on returns. 48.6416(f)-1 Section 48.6416... Special Application to Retailers and Manufacturers Taxes § 48.6416(f)-1 Credit on returns. Any person..., in lieu of claiming refund of the overpayment, claim credit for the overpayment on any return of...

  13. 26 CFR 1.642(f)-1 - Amortization deductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... defined in section 168(d), with respect to a certified pollution control facility as defined in section... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amortization deductions. 1.642(f)-1 Section 1.642(f)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME...

  14. 26 CFR 48.6416(f)-1 - Credit on returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Credit on returns. 48.6416(f)-1 Section 48.6416... Special Application to Retailers and Manufacturers Taxes § 48.6416(f)-1 Credit on returns. Any person..., in lieu of claiming refund of the overpayment, claim credit for the overpayment on any return of...

  15. 26 CFR 48.6416(f)-1 - Credit on returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Credit on returns. 48.6416(f)-1 Section 48.6416... Special Application to Retailers and Manufacturers Taxes § 48.6416(f)-1 Credit on returns. Any person..., in lieu of claiming refund of the overpayment, claim credit for the overpayment on any return of...

  16. 26 CFR 48.6416(f)-1 - Credit on returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Credit on returns. 48.6416(f)-1 Section 48.6416... Special Application to Retailers and Manufacturers Taxes § 48.6416(f)-1 Credit on returns. Any person..., in lieu of claiming refund of the overpayment, claim credit for the overpayment on any return of...

  17. Serum prostacyclin binding defects in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, K K; Hall, E R; Rossi, E C; Papp, A C

    1985-01-01

    To understand the pathophysiologic significance of abnormal serum prostacyclin (PGI2) binding activities in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), we evaluated the PGI2 binding characteristics in three chronic TTP sera and 19 normal sera. PGI2 binding by serum was rapid and reversible. The binding activity in TTP sera (22.1 +/- SD, 4.4%) was significantly lower than that of normal sera (42.2 +/- 6.2%). Moreover, the antiaggregating activity and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6KPGF1 alpha) content in the gel filtrates representing the binding peak was proportionally lower in a TTP serum than normal serum. Although normal and TTP sera bound [14C]arachidonate with similar activity, and neither bound [3H]6KPGF1 alpha, there was a difference in prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) binding. Binding of [3H]PGE1 was subnormal in two TTP sera (W.J. and T.G.) and normal in the third (H.S.). Normal serum corrected the binding defects of TTP serum. Interestingly, the mixture of two TTP sera (W.J. and H.S.) mutually corrected their PGI2 binding defects. In addition, although in vivo plasma transfusions improved the PGI2 binding activity of W.J. and H.S., there existed a striking difference in the nature of their response. These observations indicate that there is at least two types of PGI2 binding defects in TTP. Our data indicate that TTP is associated with diminished serum binding of PGI2. This defect may reduce the availability of PGI2 to damaged vascular sites and decrease an important modulator of platelet thrombus formation at times of severe vascular insult. Images PMID:3880771

  18. The role of prostanoids in the production of acute acalculous cholecystitis by platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, D L; Andrus, C H; German, D; Deshpande, Y G

    1990-01-01

    Gallbladder tissue from patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis contains increased amounts of prostanoids when compared to normal gallbladder tissue. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent stimulus of eicosanoid formation. It has been implicated as a mediator of acute inflammatory processes and systemic responses to shock. In this study the role of PAF in acute acalculous cholecystitis was evaluated. Anesthetized cats underwent gallbladder perfusion with a physiologic buffer solution containing [14C]polyethylene glycol as a nonabsorbable tracer to quantitate mucosal water absorption. Platelet-activating factor was infused into the hepatic artery for 2 hours. Control experiments were performed when vehicle alone was infused. Experiments also were performed when indomethacin was administered intravenously and when indomethacin and PAF were administered. Gallbladder mucosal absorption/secretion and perfusate and tissue prostaglandin E (PGE) and 6 keto prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto PGF1 alpha) levels were evaluated. Gallbladder inflammation was evaluated by beta-glucuronidase and myeloperoxidase tissue concentrations and by a histologic scoring system. Platelet-activating factor eliminated gallbladder absorption and produced net fluid secretion associated with dose-related increases in perfusate PGE concentrations and gallbladder tissue PGE and 6 keto PGF1 alpha levels when compared to control values. Platelet-activating factor produced significant inflammation in the gallbladder with increases in the histologic score of inflammation and tissue lysosomal enzyme activities. Indomethacin significantly decreased the fluid secretion, prostanoid levels, and inflammation produced by PAF. The results suggest that PAF may induce acute gallbladder inflammation associated with systemic stress through a prostanoid-mediated mechanism. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2171443

  19. Aldosterone alters the participation of endothelial factors in noradrenaline vasoconstriction differently in resistance arteries from normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Fabiano E; Blanco-Rivero, Javier; Avendaño, María Soledad; Sastre, Esther; Yela, Rubén; Velázquez, Kyra; Salaíces, Mercedes; Balfagón, Gloria

    2011-03-11

    This study analyzed the effect of aldosterone (0.05mg/kg per day, 3 weeks) on vasoconstriction induced by noradrenaline in mesenteric resistance arteries from WKY rats and SHR. Contraction to noradrenaline was measured in mesenteric resistance arteries from untreated and aldosterone-treatedrats from both strains. Participation of nitric oxide (NO), superoxide anions, thromboxane A(2) (TxA(2)) and prostacyclin in this response was determined. 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG)F1alpha and thromboxane B(2) (TxB(2)) releases were determined by enzyme immunoassay. NO and superoxide anion release were also determined by fluorescence and chemiluminiscence, respectively. Aldosterone did not modify noradrenaline-induced contraction in either strain. In mesenteric resistance arteries from both aldosterone-treated groups, endothelium removal or preincubation with NO synthesis inhibitor L-NAME increased the noradrenaline-induced contraction, while incubation with the superoxide anion scavenger tempol decreased it. Preincubation with either the COX-1/2 or COX-2 inhibitor (indomethacin and NS-398, respectively) decreased the noradrenaline contraction in aldosterone-treated animals, while this response was not modified by COX-1 inhibitor SC-560. TxA(2) synthesis inhibitor (furegrelate), or TxA2 receptor antagonist (SQ 29 548) also decreased the noradrenaline contraction in aldosterone-treated animals. In untreated SHR, but not WKY rats, this response was increased by L-NAME, and reduced by tempol, indomethacin, NS-398 or SQ 29 548. Aldosterone treatment did not modify NO or TxB(2) release, but it did increase superoxide anion and 6-keto-PGF(1alpha) release in mesenteric resistance arteries from both strains. In conclusion, chronic aldosterone treatment reduces smooth muscle contraction to alpha-adrenergic stimuli, producing a new balance in the release of endothelium-derived prostanoids and NO. PMID:21262224

  20. Charmless hadronic B →(f1(1285 ),f1(1420 ))P decays in the perturbative QCD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Xiao, Zhen-Jun; Li, Jing-Wu; Zou, Zhi-Tian

    2015-01-01

    We study 20 charmless hadronic B →f1P decays in the perturbative QCD (pQCD) formalism with B denoting Bu, Bd, and Bs mesons; P standing for the light pseudoscalar mesons; and f1 representing axial-vector mesons f1(1285 ) and f1(1420 ) that result from a mixing of quark-flavor f1 q[u/u ¯ +d d ¯ √{2 } ] and f1 s[s s ¯ ] states with the angle ϕf1.The estimations of C P -averaged branching ratios and C P asymmetries of the considered B →f1P decays, in which the Bs→f1P modes are investigated for the first time, are presented in the pQCD approach with ϕf 1˜24 ° from recently measured Bd /s→J /ψ f1(1285 ) decays. It is found that (a) the tree (penguin) dominant B+→f1π+(K+) decays with large branching ratios [O (10-6) ] and large direct C P violations (around 14%-28% in magnitude) simultaneously are believed to be clearly measurable at the LHCb and Belle II experiments; (b) the Bd→f1KS0 and Bs→f1(η ,η') decays with nearly pure penguin contributions and safely negligible tree pollution also have large decay rates in the order of 10-6- 10-5 , which can be confronted with the experimental measurements in the near future; (c) as the alternative channels, the B+→f1(π+,K+) and Bd→f1KS0 decays have the supplementary power in providing more effective constraints on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa weak phases α , γ , and β , correspondingly, which are explicitly analyzed through the large decay rates and the direct and mixing-induced C P asymmetries in the pQCD approach and are expected to be stringently examined by the measurements with high precision; (d) the weak annihilation amplitudes play important roles in the B+→f1(1420 )K+ , Bd→f1(1420 )KS0 , Bs→f1(1420 )η' decays, and so on, which would offer more evidence, once they are confirmed by the experiments, to identify the soft-collinear effective theory and the pQCD approach on the evaluations of annihilation diagrams and to help further understand the annihilation mechanism in the heavy

  1. A unique mechanism of curcumin inhibition on F1 ATPase.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Mizuki; Hisasaka, Ryosuke; Iwamoto-Kihara, Atsuko; Futai, Masamitsu; Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi

    2014-10-01

    ATP synthase (F-ATPase) function depends upon catalytic and rotation cycles of the F1 sector. Previously, we found that F1 ATPase activity is inhibited by the dietary polyphenols, curcumin, quercetin, and piceatannol, but that the inhibitory kinetics of curcumin differs from that of the other two polyphenols (Sekiya et al., 2012, 2014). In the present study, we analyzed Escherichia coli F1 ATPase rotational catalysis to identify differences in the inhibitory mechanism of curcumin versus quercetin and piceatannol. These compounds did not affect the 120° rotation step for ATP binding and ADP release, though they significantly increased the catalytic dwell duration for ATP hydrolysis. Analysis of wild-type F1 and a mutant lacking part of the piceatannol binding site (γΔ277-286) indicates that curcumin binds to F1 differently from piceatannol and quercetin. The unique inhibitory mechanism of curcumin is also suggested from its effect on F1 mutants with defective β-γ subunit interactions (γMet23 to Lys) or β conformational changes (βSer174 to Phe). These results confirm that smooth interaction between each β subunit and entire γ subunit in F1 is pertinent for rotational catalysis. PMID:25230139

  2. Thermodynamic efficiency and mechanochemical coupling of F1-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Toyabe, Shoichi; Watanabe-Nakayama, Takahiro; Okamoto, Tetsuaki; Kudo, Seishi; Muneyuki, Eiro

    2011-01-01

    F1-ATPase is a nanosized biological energy transducer working as part of FoF1-ATP synthase. Its rotary machinery transduces energy between chemical free energy and mechanical work and plays a central role in the cellular energy transduction by synthesizing most ATP in virtually all organisms. However, information about its energetics is limited compared to that of the reaction scheme. Actually, fundamental questions such as how efficiently F1-ATPase transduces free energy remain unanswered. Here, we demonstrated reversible rotations of isolated F1-ATPase in discrete 120° steps by precisely controlling both the external torque and the chemical potential of ATP hydrolysis as a model system of FoF1-ATP synthase. We found that the maximum work performed by F1-ATPase per 120° step is nearly equal to the thermodynamical maximum work that can be extracted from a single ATP hydrolysis under a broad range of conditions. Our results suggested a 100% free-energy transduction efficiency and a tight mechanochemical coupling of F1-ATPase. PMID:21997211

  3. Genetic Identification of F1 and Post-F1 Serrasalmid Juvenile Hybrids in Brazilian Aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Diogo Teruo; Senhorini, José Augusto; Foresti, Fausto; Martínez, Paulino; Porto-Foresti, Fábio

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile fish trade monitoring is an important task on Brazilian fish farms. However, the identification of juvenile fish through morphological analysis is not feasible, particularly between interspecific hybrids and pure species individuals, making the monitoring of these individuals difficult. Hybrids can be erroneously identified as pure species in breeding facilities, which might reduce production on farms and negatively affect native populations due to escapes or stocking practices. In the present study, we used a multi-approach analysis (molecular and cytogenetic markers) to identify juveniles of three serrasalmid species (Colossoma macropomum, Piaractus mesopotamicus and Piaractus brachypomus) and their hybrids in different stocks purchased from three seed producers in Brazil. The main findings of this study were the detection of intergenus backcrossing between the hybrid ♀ patinga (P. mesopotamicus×P. brachypomus)×♂ C. macropomum and the occurrence of one hybrid triploid individual. This atypical specimen might result from automixis, a mechanism that produces unreduced gametes in some organisms. Moreover, molecular identification indicated that hybrid individuals are traded as pure species or other types of interspecific hybrids, particularly post-F1 individuals. These results show that serrasalmid fish genomes exhibit high genetic heterogeneity, and multi-approach methods and regulators could improve the surveillance of the production and trade of fish species and their hybrids, thereby facilitating the sustainable development of fish farming. PMID:24594674

  4. Genetic identification of F1 and post-F1 serrasalmid juvenile hybrids in Brazilian aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Diogo Teruo; Senhorini, José Augusto; Foresti, Fausto; Martínez, Paulino; Porto-Foresti, Fábio

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile fish trade monitoring is an important task on Brazilian fish farms. However, the identification of juvenile fish through morphological analysis is not feasible, particularly between interspecific hybrids and pure species individuals, making the monitoring of these individuals difficult. Hybrids can be erroneously identified as pure species in breeding facilities, which might reduce production on farms and negatively affect native populations due to escapes or stocking practices. In the present study, we used a multi-approach analysis (molecular and cytogenetic markers) to identify juveniles of three serrasalmid species (Colossoma macropomum, Piaractus mesopotamicus and Piaractus brachypomus) and their hybrids in different stocks purchased from three seed producers in Brazil. The main findings of this study were the detection of intergenus backcrossing between the hybrid ♀ patinga (P. mesopotamicus×P. brachypomus)×♂ C. macropomum and the occurrence of one hybrid triploid individual. This atypical specimen might result from automixis, a mechanism that produces unreduced gametes in some organisms. Moreover, molecular identification indicated that hybrid individuals are traded as pure species or other types of interspecific hybrids, particularly post-F1 individuals. These results show that serrasalmid fish genomes exhibit high genetic heterogeneity, and multi-approach methods and regulators could improve the surveillance of the production and trade of fish species and their hybrids, thereby facilitating the sustainable development of fish farming. PMID:24594674

  5. Effects of the C5a anaphylatoxin and its relationship to cyclo-oxygenase metabolites in rabbit vascular strips.

    PubMed Central

    Hugli, T. E.; Marceau, F.

    1985-01-01

    Strips of rabbit blood vessels were suspended in vitro and responses to complement peptides C3a and C5a were recorded isotonically. Human C3a (up to 1.5 microM) was inactive on rabbit vascular strips. Human C5a (2.9-59 nM) decreased spontaneous activity of the rabbit portal vein under resting baseline tension. The C5a relaxed strips of portal vein and pulmonary artery that were precontracted with noradrenaline (NA, 200 nM). On the portal vein, C5a-induced relaxation was preceded by a transient contractile phase which decreased with repeated applications of C5a. The magnitude of C5a-induced relaxation of both vessels increased with repeated stimulation by C5a. Maximal levels of relaxation for the third application of C5a at 59 nM averaged 44% and 17% of the NA-induced contraction plateau in portal vein and pulmonary artery, respectively. Strips of rabbit aorta responded minimally to C5a. Indomethacin (5.6 microM) significantly inhibited C5a-induced relaxation of the portal vein and pulmonary artery but had no effect on the early contractile response of the portal vein. Mepyramine (10 microM) failed to modify the C5a response from either vessel, but it reduced the contractile phase of the C5a response on the portal vein when applied in conjunction with indomethacin. The drug SKF 88046, an end organ antagonist of thromboxane (TX) A2 and some contractile prostaglandins, reduced the contractile phase and increased relaxation of the portal vein to C5a but did not modify the response of the pulmonary artery. Radioimmunoassays for 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto-PGF1 alpha) and TXB2 were performed on the fluid bathing rabbit isolated blood vessels.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3921089

  6. Purinoceptors in the rat heart.

    PubMed Central

    Fleetwood, G.; Gordon, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of an intracoronary bolus of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), alpha, beta-methylene ATP (APCPP), beta, gamma-methylene ATP (APPCP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and adenosine on coronary tone and ventricular myocardial contraction were investigated in the perfused rat heart. Adenine nucleotides, given by bolus injection were negatively inotropic in amounts greater than 3 X 10(-7) mol. The potency order was ATP greater than ADP greater than AMP. Adenosine (less than 1 X 10(-5)mol) had no effect on ventricular myocardial contraction. Adenine nucleotides and adenosine (1 X 10(-10)-1 X 10(-7) mol) reduced coronary tone. The potency order was ATP greater than ADP greater than AMP = adenosine. The ATP analogue APPCP was less active than ATP at reducing coronary tone, and APCPP had no vasodilator effect. This suggests the presence of a P2-purinoceptor, subclass P2Y, which mediates vasodilation. ATP and ADP increased the concentration of prostacyclin (measured as 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha) in the perfusate, but only after injection of greater than 3 X 10(-7) mol, suggesting that the vasodilator responses to ATP and ADP were not mediated by prostacyclin. AMP and adenosine had no effect, even at 1 X 10(-5) mol. At a dose of 3 X 10(-9) mol, approximately 40% of ATP and 70% of ADP was converted to AMP and adenosine whilst passing through the heart. The amounts of AMP and adenosine formed, however, were insufficient to account for the vasodilator effects of ATP and ADP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3814919

  7. Effect of ozone exposure on lung functions and plasma prostaglandin and thromboxane concentrations in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.D.; Ainsworth, D.; Lam, H.F.; Amdur, M.O.

    1987-03-30

    Male Hartley guinea pigs were exposed either to filtered air or to 1 ppm ozone (O/sub 3/) for 1 hr. At 2, 8, 24, or 48 hr after exposure we measured ventilation, respiratory mechanics, lung volumes, diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO), and alveolar volume (VA) in anesthetized, tracheotomized animals. Respiratory frequency and tidal volume were unchanged in all groups. Pulmonary resistance was increased 2 hr after O/sub 3/ but returned to control at 8 hr and thereafter. Prolonged reductions in lung volumes (total lung capacity, vital capacity, functional residual capacity, and residual volume) as well as in DLCO and VA occurred after O/sub 3/, with maximum decreases at 8 and 24 hr postexposure. Increased ratios of wet lung weight to body weight were seen at 2, 8, and 24 hr. In separate groups of animals, also exposed either to filtered air or to 1 ppm O/sub 3/, plasma eicosanoid (EC) concentrations were measured at 2, 8, 24, 48, or 72 hr after exposure. Significant increases in thromboxane B2 concentrations were seen at 2, 24, and 48 hr after exposure. Plasma concentrations of 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha (PGF1 alpha) and prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) were increased at 24 hr and at 24, 48, and 72 hr, respectively. The nature of this long-term pulmonary response to a short-term exposure to O/sub 3/ suggests alveolar involvement, including probable alveolar duct constriction and localized pulmonary edema. Although changes in plasma EC concentrations were observed concurrent with impaired lung functions, no simple causal relationship was apparent from these studies.

  8. F-1 Engine Test Firing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    This photograph depicts the Rocketdyne static firing of the F-1 engine at the towering 76-meter Test Stand 1-C in Area 1-125 of the Edwards Air Force Base in California. The Saturn V S-IC (first) stage utilized five F-1 engines for its thrust. Each engine provided 1,500,000 pounds, for a combined thrust of 7,500,000 pounds with liquid oxygen and kerosene as its propellants.

  9. Torsional elasticity and energetics of F1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Czub, Jacek; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2011-05-01

    F(o)F(1)-ATPase is a rotary motor protein synthesizing ATP from ADP driven by a cross-membrane proton gradient. The proton flow through the membrane-embedded F(o) generates the rotary torque that drives the rotation of the asymmetric shaft of F(1). Mechanical energy of the rotating shaft is used by the F(1) catalytic subunit to synthesize ATP. It was suggested that elastic power transmission with transient storage of energy in some compliant part of the shaft is required for the observed high turnover rate. We used atomistic simulations to study the spatial distribution and structural determinants of the F(1) torsional elasticity at the molecular level and to comprehensively characterize the elastic properties of F(1)-ATPase. Our fluctuation analysis revealed an unexpected heterogeneity of the F(1) shaft elasticity. Further, we found that the measured overall torsional moduli of the shaft arise from two distinct contributions, the intrinsic elasticity and the effective potential imposed on the shaft by the catalytic subunit. Separation of these two contributions provided a quantitative description of the coupling between the rotor and the catalytic subunit. This description enabled us to propose a minimal quantitative model of the F(1) energetics along the rotary degrees of freedom near the resting state observed in the crystal structures. As opposed to the usually employed models where the motor mechanical progression is described by a single angular variable, our multidimensional treatment incorporates the spatially inhomogeneous nature of the shaft and its interactions with the stator and offers new insight into the mechanoenzymatics of F(1)-ATPase. PMID:21502534

  10. Torsional elasticity and energetics of F1-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Czub, Jacek; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    FoF1-ATPase is a rotary motor protein synthesizing ATP from ADP driven by a cross-membrane proton gradient. The proton flow through the membrane-embedded Fo generates the rotary torque that drives the rotation of the asymmetric shaft of F1. Mechanical energy of the rotating shaft is used by the F1 catalytic subunit to synthesize ATP. It was suggested that elastic power transmission with transient storage of energy in some compliant part of the shaft is required for the observed high turnover rate. We used atomistic simulations to study the spatial distribution and structural determinants of the F1 torsional elasticity at the molecular level and to comprehensively characterize the elastic properties of F1-ATPase. Our fluctuation analysis revealed an unexpected heterogeneity of the F1 shaft elasticity. Further, we found that the measured overall torsional moduli of the shaft arise from two distinct contributions, the intrinsic elasticity and the effective potential imposed on the shaft by the catalytic subunit. Separation of these two contributions provided a quantitative description of the coupling between the rotor and the catalytic subunit. This description enabled us to propose a minimal quantitative model of the F1 energetics along the rotary degrees of freedom near the resting state observed in the crystal structures. As opposed to the usually employed models where the motor mechanical progression is described by a single angular variable, our multidimensional treatment incorporates the spatially inhomogeneous nature of the shaft and its interactions with the stator and offers new insight into the mechanoenzymatics of F1-ATPase. PMID:21502534

  11. Optimal Thresholding of Classifiers to Maximize F1 Measure

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, Zachary C.; Elkan, Charles; Naryanaswamy, Balakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides new insight into maximizing F1 measures in the context of binary classification and also in the context of multilabel classification. The harmonic mean of precision and recall, the F1 measure is widely used to evaluate the success of a binary classifier when one class is rare. Micro average, macro average, and per instance average F1 measures are used in multilabel classification. For any classifier that produces a real-valued output, we derive the relationship between the best achievable F1 value and the decision-making threshold that achieves this optimum. As a special case, if the classifier outputs are well-calibrated conditional probabilities, then the optimal threshold is half the optimal F1 value. As another special case, if the classifier is completely uninformative, then the optimal behavior is to classify all examples as positive. When the actual prevalence of positive examples is low, this behavior can be undesirable. As a case study, we discuss the results, which can be surprising, of maximizing F1 when predicting 26,853 labels for Medline documents. PMID:26023687

  12. Quinine specifically inhibits the proteolipid subunit of the F0F1 H+ -ATPase of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, R; García, E; De la Campa, A G

    1996-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is uniquely sensitive to quinine and its derivatives, but only those alkaloids having antimalarial properties, i.e., those in the erythro configuration, also possess antipneumococcal activity. Quinine and related compounds inhibit the pneumococcal H+ -ATPase. Quinine- and optochin-resistant pneumococci showed mutations that change amino acid residues located in one of the two transmembrane alpha-helices of the c subunit of the F0F1, H+ -ATPase. PMID:8636056

  13. Rebuilt 3D structure of the chloroplast f1 ATPase-tentoxin complex.

    PubMed

    Minoletti, Claire; Santolini, Jérôme; Haraux, Francis; Pothier, Joël; André, François

    2002-11-15

    The F1 part of the chloroplast H+ adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-synthase (CF1) strongly interacts with tentoxin, a natural fungous cyclic tetrapeptide known to inhibit the chloroplast enzyme and not the mammalian mitochondrial enzyme. Whereas the synthesis or the hydrolysis of ATP requires the stepwise rotation of the protein rotor gamma within the (alphabeta)3 crown, only one molecule of tentoxin is needed to fully inhibit the complex. With the help of an original homology modeling technique, based on robust distance geometry protocols, we built a tridimensional model of the alpha3beta3gamma CF1) subcomplex (3200 esidues), in which we introduced three different nucleotide occupancies to check their possible influence on the tentoxin binding site. Simultaneous comparison of three available high-resolution X-ray structures of F1, performed with a local structural alignment search tool, led to characterizing common structural blocks and the distorsions experienced by the complex during the catalytic turnover. The common structural blocks were used as a starting point of the spinach CF1 structure rebuilding. Finally, tentoxin was docked into its putative binding site of the reconstructed structure. The docking method was initially validated in the mitochondrial enzyme by its ability to relocate nucleotides into their original position in the crystal. Tentoxin binding was found possible to the two alpha/beta interfaces associated with the empty and adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-loaded catalytic sites, but not to the one associated with the ATP-loaded site. These results suggest a mechanism of CF1 inhibition by one molecule of tentoxin, by the impossibility of the alpha/beta interface bearing tentoxin to pass through the ATP-loaded state. PMID:12360520

  14. Structural and biochemical changes in lungs of 3-methylindole-treated rats.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, L. W.; Wilson, D. W.; Schiedt, M. J.; Giri, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Effects of a single dose of 3-methylindole (3-MI) (250 mg/kg intraperitoneally) were studied at different times ranging from 12 hours to 2 weeks post-treatment (PT). Microscopic study revealed mild Clara cell injury 24 hours PT and mucus hyperplasia 24 hours to 2 weeks PT. Diffuse type I alveolar epithelial cell necrosis occurred at 48 hours, followed by type II cell hyperplasia. Septal edema and accumulation of interstitial and capillary polymorphonuclear leukocytes and perivascular mixed mononuclear inflammatory cells accompanied the injury and repair. A gradual resolution of lesions with persistent mononuclear inflammatory cellular clusters at septal junctions, focal septal fibrosis, and accumulation of alveolar macrophages was evident at 1 and 2 weeks PT. Collagen, measured as hydroxyproline, in 3-MI-treated rats was significantly increased to 130% and 139% of control (3.0 mg/lung) at 1 and 2 weeks PT, respectively. Biphasic peaks of plasma 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha occurred at 12 to 24 hours and at 96 hours PT with 3-MI and thromboxane B2 was elevated 12, 48, and 96 hours PT. Right ventricular/left ventricular and septal weight was increased to 120% and 140% of the control 1 and 2 weeks PT. We concluded that 3-MI induces alveolar septal injury in the rat with relatively complete repair of the alveolar epithelium and residual mild focal septal fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension 2 weeks PT. Arachidonic acid-derived mediators and inflammation are associated with 3-MI-induced lung injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:8424451

  15. Primed stimulation of isolated perfused rabbit lung by endotoxin and platelet activating factor induces enhanced production of thromboxane and lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Salzer, W L; McCall, C E

    1990-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis often precedes the development of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and bacterial endotoxin (LPS) produces a syndrome similar to ARDS when infused into experimental animals. We determined in isolated, buffer-perfused rabbit lungs, free of plasma and circulating blood cells that LPS synergized with platelet activating factor (PAF) to injure the lung. In lungs perfused for 2 h with LPS-free buffer (less than 100 pg/ml), stimulation with 1, 10, or 100 nM PAF produced transient pulmonary hypertension and minimal edema. Lungs perfused for 2 h with buffer containing 100 ng/ml of Escherichia coli 0111:B4 LPS had slight elevation of pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and did not develop edema. In contrast, lungs exposed to 100 ng/ml of LPS for 2 h had marked increases in PAP and developed significant edema when stimulated with PAF. LPS treatment increased capillary filtration coefficient, suggesting that capillary leak contributed to pulmonary edema. LPS-primed, PAF-stimulated lungs had enhanced production of thromboxane B2 (TXB) and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6KPF). Indomethacin completely inhibited PAF-stimulated production of TXB and 6KPF in control and LPS-primed preparations, did not inhibit the rise in PAP produced by PAF in control lungs, but blocked the exaggerated rise in PAP and edema seen in LPS-primed, PAF-stimulated lungs. The thromboxane synthetase inhibitor dazoxiben, and the thromboxane receptor antagonist, SQ 29,548, similarly inhibited LPS-primed pulmonary hypertension and edema after PAF-stimulation. These studies indicate that LPS primes the lung for enhanced injury in response to the physiologic mediator PAF by amplifying the synthesis and release of thromboxane in lung tissue. PMID:2318970

  16. Attenuation of ciclosporin-induced nephrotoxicity by dietary supplementation of seal oil in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Herzberg, Gene R; Kang, Zhili; Wang, Lili; Robb, Desmond; Randell, Edward; Smeda, John; Xiong, Jieying; Kara, Mohamedtaki; Liu, Hu

    2005-11-01

    Fish oil, rich in omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), has been reported to attenuate nephrotoxicity induced by ciclosporin (cyclosporine A). Harp seal oil is a rich source of n-3 PUFAs. This study investigated the ability of dietary seal oil to reduce nephrotoxicity caused by ciclosporin. Sprague-Dawley rats were maintained on a standard diet (with sunflower oil as lipid, SFO) or a diet enriched with seal oil (with 85% seal oil and 15% sunflower oil as lipid, SO) for four weeks before and four weeks after intravenous administration of ciclosporin (15 mg kg(-1) daily). Kidney function was assessed by measuring blood urea nitrogen, creatinine clearance, urinary N-acetyl-1-beta-D-glucosaminidase, 6-keto-prostaglandin F(1alpha), thromboxane B(2) and malondialdehyde. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was monitored. Ciclosporin concentrations in blood were measured using liquid chromatographytandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The fatty acid compositions of the diets and erythrocyte membranes were analysed by gas chromatography (GC). The results showed that nephrotoxicity was induced by ciclosporin in rats maintained on both SO and SFO diets. However, rats fed on SO diet endured less toxicity than those on SFO diet. The n-3 and n-6 PUFAs in the erythrocyte membrane of rats maintained on SO diet were found to be 10.79% and 11.93%, while those in rats maintained on SFO diet were found to be 1.67% and 22.71%, respectively. In conclusion, dietary supplementation of seal oil was found to reduce ciclosporin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. PMID:16259782

  17. f 1 (1285) formation in photon-photon fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, H.; Alston-Garnjost, M.; Avery, R. E.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barker, A. R.; Barnett, B. A.; Bauer, D. A.; Bay, A.; Bengtsson, H.-U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Buchanan, C. D.; Buijs, A.; Caldwell, D. O.; Chao, H.-Y.; Chun, S.-B.; Clark, A. R.; Cowan, G. D.; Crane, D. A.; Dahl, O. I.; Daoudi, M.; Derby, K. A.; Eastman, J. J.; Eberhard, P. H.; Edberg, T. K.; Eisner, A. M.; Enomoto, R.; Erné, F. C.; Fairfield, K. H.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hofmann, W.; Hylen, J.; Kamae, T.; Kaye, H. S.; Kenney, R. W.; Khacheryan, S.; Kofler, R. R.; Langeveld, W. G. J.; Layter, J. G.; Lin, W. T.; Linde, F. L.; Loken, S. C.; Lu, A.; Lynch, G. R.; Madaras, R. J.; Magnuson, B. D.; Masek, G. E.; Mathis, L. G.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Miller, E. S.; Moses, W.; Nygren, D. R.; Oddone, P. J.; Paar, H. P.; Park, S. K.; Pellett, D. E.; Pripstein, M.; Ronan, M. T.; Ross, R. R.; Rouse, F. R.; Schwitkis, K. A.; Sens, J. C.; Shapiro, G.; Shen, B. C.; Slater, W. E.; Smith, J. R.; Steinman, J. S.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stork, D. H.; Strauss, M. G.; Sullivan, M. K.; Takahashi, T.; Toutounchi, S.; Van Tyen, R.; Van Dalen, G. J.; Vernon, W.; Wagner, W.; Wang, E. M.; Wang, Y.-X.; Wenzel, W. A.; Wolf, Z. R.; Yamamoto, H.; Yellin, S. J.; Zeitlin, C.; TPC/Two-Gamma Collaboration

    1988-07-01

    We have observed formation of the f 1 (1285) in the reaction e +e -→e +e -π+π-η( η→ γγ). Its γγ ∗ width is determined in several Q2 bins. The γγ coupling parameter for the f 1 (1285) is found to be 2.4±0.5±0.5 keV. This value is compared to that for the X (1420), another J=1 state formed in γγ fusion reactions, which may belong to the same meson nonet.

  18. Identification of E2F-1/Cyclin A antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S K; Ramsey, T M; Chen, Y N; Chen, W; Martin, M S; Clune, K; Sabio, M; Bair, K W

    2001-09-17

    A simple method for the synthesis of a rationally designed (S,S)-[Pro-Leu]-spirolactam scaffold is described. This was expanded to a small biased library of compounds mimicking the 'ZRXL' motif in order to identify E2F-1/Cyclin A antagonists. The synthesized compounds were evaluated in an E2F-1/Cyclin A binding assay and moderately active analogues were identified. In addition, the critical roles of Phe, Leu, Lys, and Arg residues of the identified motif were determined. PMID:11549444

  19. F-1 Engine for Saturn V Undergoing a Static Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The flame and exhaust from the test firing of an F-1 engine blast out from the Saturn S-IB Static Test Stand in the east test area of the Marshall Space Flight Center. A Cluster of five F-1 engines, located in the S-IC (first) stage of the Saturn V vehicle, provided over 7,500,000 pounds of thrust to launch the giant rocket. The towering 363-foot Saturn V was a multistage, multiengine launch vehicle standing taller than the Statue of Liberty. Altogether, the Saturn V engines produced as much power as 85 Hoover Dams.

  20. M2-F1 in flight on tow line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The M2-F1 Lifting Body is seen here under tow at the Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. The wingless, lifting-body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Flight Research Center management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The M2-F1 project had limited goals. They were to show that a piloted lifting body could be built, that it could not only fly but be controlled in flight, and that it could make a successful landing. While the M2-F1 did prove the concept, with a wooden fuselage and fixed landing gear, it was far from an operational spacecraft. The next step in the lifting-body development was to build a heavyweight, rocket-powered vehicle that was more like an operational lifting body, albeit one without the thermal protection system that would be needed for reentry into the atmosphere from space at near-orbital speeds. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. These initial tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind a NASA C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began. Pilot for the first series of flights of the M2-F1 was NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Typical glide flights with the M2-F1 lasted about two minutes and reached speeds of 110 to

  1. Effects of ozone on lung mechanics and cyclooxygenase metabolites in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Fouke, J.M.; Wolin, A.D.; McFadden, E.R. Jr. )

    1991-10-01

    To determine if acute exposure to ozone can cause changes in the production of cyclooxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) in the lung which are associated with changes in lung mechanics, we exposed mongrel dogs to 0.5 ppm ozone for two hours. We measured pulmonary resistance (RL) and dynamic compliance (Cdyn) and obtained methacholine dose response curves and bronchoalveolar lavagate (BAL) before and after the exposures. We calculated the provocative dose of methacholine necessary to increase RL 50% (PD50) and analyzed the BAL for four cyclooxygenase metabolites of AA: a stable hydrolysis product of prostacyclin, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto-PgF1 alpha); prostaglandin E2 (PgE2); a stable hydrolysis product of thromboxane A2, thromboxane B2 (TxB2); and prostaglandin F2 alpha (PgF2 alpha). Following ozone exposure, RL increased from 4.75 +/- 1.06 to 6.08 +/- 1.3 cm H2O/L/sec (SEM) (p less than 0.05), Cdyn decreased from 0.0348 +/- 0.0109 TO .0217 +/- .0101 L/cm H2O (p less than 0.05), and PD50 decreased from 4.32 +/- 2.41 to 0.81 +/- 0.49 mg/cc (p less than 0.05). The baseline metabolite levels were as follows: 6-keto PgF1 alpha: 96.1 +/- 28.8 pg/ml; PgE2: 395.8 +/- 67.1 pg/ml; TxB2: 48.5 +/- 11.1 pg/ml; PgF2 alpha: 101.5 +/- 22.6 pg/ml. Ozone had no effect on any of these prostanoids. These studies quantify the magnitude of cyclooxygenase products of AA metabolism in BAL from dog lungs and demonstrate that changes in their levels are not prerequisites for ozone-induced changes in lung mechanics or airway reactivity.

  2. M2-F1 on lakebed with pilot Milt Thompson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    NASA Flight Research Pilot Milt Thompson, shown here on the lakebed with the M2-F1 lifting body, was an early backer of R. Dale Reed's lifting-body proposal. He urged Flight Research Center director Paul Bikle to approve the M2-F1's construction. Thompson also made the first glide flights in both the M2-F1 and its successor, the heavyweight M2-F2. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, NASA Flight Research Center (later Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA) management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved

  3. M2-F1 ejection seat test at South Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The M2-F1 was fitted with an ejection seat before the airtow flights began. The project selected the seat used in the T-37 as modified by the Weber Company to use a rocket rather than a ballistic charge for ejection. To test the ejection seat, the Flight Research Center's Dick Klein constructed a plywood mockup of the M2-F1's top deck and canopy. On the first firings, the test was unsuccessful, but on the final test the dummy in the seat landed safely. The M2-F1 ejection seat was later used in the two Lunar Landing Research Vehicles and the three Lunar Landing Training Vehicles. Three of them crashed, but in each case the pilot ejected from the vehicle successfully. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with

  4. Fabricated carcass measurements in terminally sired F1 lambs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scientific data for carcass traits of terminal-sire sheep breeds can be used to improve the value of market lambs, but information is lacking for modern terminal-sire breeds in the United States. Thus, the effects of terminal-sire breed on 14 fabricated carcass measurements were determined in F1 wet...

  5. Electrostatic interactions in catalytic centers of F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnaya, Alexandra F.; Romanovsky, Yury M.; Tikhonov, Alexander N.

    2003-10-01

    F1-ATPase is one of the most important enzymes of membrane bioenergetics. F1-ATPase is the constituent complex that provides the ATP formation from ADP and inorganic phosphate (Pi) at the expense of energy of electrochemical gradient of hydrogen ions generated across the energy transducing mitochondrial, chloroplast or bacterial membrane. F1-ATPase is a reversible molecular machine that can work as a proton pump due to energy released in the course of ATP hydrolysis (ATPase reaction). The unusual feature of this enzyme is that it operates as a rotary molecular motor. Recently, using the fluorescence microscopy method for the real time visualization of molecular mobility of individual molecules, it was demonstrated directly that the ATP hydrolysis by F1-ATPase is accompanied by unidirectional rotations of mobile subunits (rotor) of F1F0-ATP synthase. In this work, we calculated the contribution of electrostatic interactions between charged groups of a substrate (MgATP), products molecules (MgADP and Pi), and charged amino acid residuals of ATPase molecule to the energy changes associated with the substrate binding and their chemical transformations in the catalytic centers located at the interface of α and β subunits of the enzyme (oligomer complex α3β3γ of bovine mitochondria ATPase). A catalytic cycle of ATP hydrolysis considered in our work includes conformational changes of α and β subunits caused by unidirectional rotations of an eccentric γ subunit. The knowledge of energy characteristics and force field in catalytic center of an enzyme in different conformational states may be important for further simulation dynamic properties of ATP synthase complex.

  6. M2-F1 in hangar with Pontiac tow vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The M2-F1 Lifting Body is seen here in a hangar with its hotrod Pontiac convertible tow vehicle at the Flight Research Center (later the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. The car was a 1963 Pontiac Catalina convertible, fitted with a 421-cubic-inch tripower engine like those being run at the Daytona 500 auto race. The vehicle also had a four-speed transmission and a heavy-duty suspension and cooling system. A roll bar was also added and the passenger seat turned around so an observer could watch the M2-F1 while it was being towed. The rear seat was removed and a second, side-facing seat installed. The lifting-body team used the Pontiac for all the ground-tow flights over the next three years. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey

  7. Comet C/1917 F1 (Mellish) meteor shower complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdukova, M.; Neslusan, L.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we mapped the whole meteor complex of the long-period comet C/1917 F1 (Mellish), using a procedure of proven reliability when investigating the 96P/Machholz and 2003 EH1 streams (Neslusan et al., 2013a; 2013b). For five perihelion passages of the comet C/1917 F1 in the past, we modeled associated theoretical streams, each consisting of 10000 test particles, and followed their dynamical evolution until the present. Subsequently, we analyzed the orbital characteristics of the parts of a stream that approach the Earth's orbit. These particles were used to predict the corresponding meteor showers. The predicted showers were searched for in the databases of actually observed meteors. According to our modeling, the meteoroid stream of the comet Mellish can be split into 4 filaments (F1 to F4), with 4 distinct radiant areas. The most numerous shower that originates in the comet nucleus of C/1917 F1 corresponds to theoretical filament F3. The meteoroids of this filament approach to the Earth's orbit relatively soon after their ejection from the nucleus. We identified this filament as the December Monocerotids (No. 19 in the IAU MDC list of the established showers). In the phase space of orbital elements, the shower occurs in the vicinity of another established shower, 250 November Orionids. However, shower No. 250 is obviously not related to C/1917 F1 since no single theoretical particle, in all five models, is in an orbit similar to the mean orbit of this shower. Filament F1 might be identified to 348 April rho-Cygnids, the meteoroid stream that was recently discovered by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (Brown et al., 2010). In our models, this filament is numerous and, hence, the shower is well predicted. The particles of filament F1 and, therefore, the real April rho-Cygnids originating in C/1917 F1 can approach the Earth's orbit and collide with our planet not earlier than about 20 millennia after their release from the parent-comet nucleus. Despite this

  8. Internal steel structure of M2-F1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The internal steel structure for the M2-F1 was built at the Flight Research Center (predecessor of the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA) in a section of the calibration hangar dubbed 'Wright Bicycle Shop.' Visible are the stick, rudder pedals, and ejection seat. The external wooden shell was attached to the steel structure. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly

  9. Construction Progress of the F-1 Engine Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the S-IC test stand, related facilities were built during this time. Built to the north of the massive S-IC test stand, was the F-1 Engine test stand. The F-1 test stand, a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, was designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of

  10. Construction Progress of the F-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the S-IC test stand, related facilities were constructed during this time frame. Built just north of the massive S-IC test stand was the F-1 Engine test stand. The F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, and was designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the

  11. Construction Progress of the F-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. North of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F-1 stand is keyed into the bedrock approximately 40 feet below grade. This photo, taken

  12. Construction Progress of the F-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. North of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F

  13. Construction Progress of the F-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. North of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F-1 stand is keyed into the bedrock approximately 40 feet below grade. This photo shows

  14. Construction Progress of the F-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. North of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F

  15. Construction Progress of the F-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. North of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F-1 stand is keyed into the bedrock approximately 40 feet below grade. This photo, taken

  16. Construction Progress of the F-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Northeast of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. The F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, and was designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the

  17. Construction Progress of the F-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. North of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F

  18. Construction Progress of the F-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. North of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F-1 stand is keyed into the bedrock approximately 40 feet below grade. This photo depicts

  19. Construction Progress of the F-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. North of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F

  20. Dr. von Braun Standing by Five F-1 Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    A pioneer of America's space program, Dr. von Braun stands by the five F-1 engines of the Saturn V launch vehicle. This Saturn V vehicle is an actual test vehicle which has been displayed at the U.S. Space Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Designed and developed by Rocketdyne under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center, a cluster of five F-1 engines was mounted on the Saturn V S-IC (first) stage. The engines measured 19-feet tall by 12.5-feet at the nozzle exit and burned 15 tons of liquid oxygen and kerosene each second to produce 7,500,000 pounds of thrust. The S-IC stage is the first stage, or booster, of a 364-foot long rocket that ultimately took astronauts to the Moon.

  1. F-1 Engine Installation to S-IC Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Engineers and technicians at the Marshall Space Flight Center were installing an F-I engine on the Saturn V S-IC (first) stage thrust structure in building 4705. The S-IC (first) stage used five F-1 engines that produced a total thrust of 7,500,000 pounds as each engine produced 1,500,000 pounds of thrust. The S-IC stage lifted the Saturn V vehicle and Apollo spacecraft from the launch pad.

  2. Rotation and structure of FoF1-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Daichi; Iino, Ryota; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2011-06-01

    F(o)F(1)-ATP synthase is one of the most ubiquitous enzymes; it is found widely in the biological world, including the plasma membrane of bacteria, inner membrane of mitochondria and thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts. However, this enzyme has a unique mechanism of action: it is composed of two mechanical rotary motors, each driven by ATP hydrolysis or proton flux down the membrane potential of protons. The two molecular motors interconvert the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis and proton electrochemical potential via the mechanical rotation of the rotary shaft. This unique energy transmission mechanism is not found in other biological systems. Although there are other similar man-made systems like hydroelectric generators, F(o)F(1)-ATP synthase operates on the nanometre scale and works with extremely high efficiency. Therefore, this enzyme has attracted significant attention in a wide variety of fields from bioenergetics and biophysics to chemistry, physics and nanoscience. This review summarizes the latest findings about the two motors of F(o)F(1)-ATP synthase as well as a brief historical background. PMID:21524994

  3. Photoproduction of the f1(1285 ) meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, R.; Schumacher, R. A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Akbar, Z.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Badui, R. A.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Burkert, V. D.; Cao, T.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Ciullo, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dugger, M.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Holtrop, M.; Hicks, K.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mattione, P.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Markov, N.; Mokeev, V.; Moriya, K.; Munevar, E.; Murdoch, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Ni, A.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Roy, P.; Salgado, C.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Stankovic, I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Weygand, D.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The f1(1285 ) meson with mass 1281.0 ±0.8 MeV/c2 and width 18.4 ±1.4 MeV (full width at half maximum) was measured for the first time in photoproduction from a proton target using CLAS at Jefferson Lab. Differential cross sections were obtained via the η π+π-,K+K¯0π- , and K-K0π+ decay channels from threshold up to a center-of-mass energy of 2.8 GeV. The mass, width, and an amplitude analysis of the η π+π- final-state Dalitz distribution are consistent with the axial-vector JP=1+ f1(1285 ) identity, rather than the pseudoscalar 0- η (1295 ) . The production mechanism is more consistent with s -channel decay of a high-mass N* state and not with t -channel meson exchange. Decays to η π π go dominantly via the intermediate a0±(980 ) π∓ states, with the branching ratio Γ [a0π (noK ¯K )] /Γ [η π π (all)] =0.74 ±0.09 . The branching ratios Γ (K K ¯π ) /Γ (η π π ) =0.216 ±0.033 and Γ (γ ρ0) /Γ (η π π ) =0.047 ±0.018 were also obtained. The first is in agreement with previous data for the f1(1285 ) , while the latter is lower than the world average.

  4. Heparin-enhanced plasma phospholipase A2 activity and prostacyclin synthesis in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, H; Kim, D K; Philbin, D M; Peterson, M B; Debros, F; Koski, G; Bonventre, J V

    1995-01-01

    Although eicosanoid production contributes to physiological and pathophysiological consequences of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), the mechanisms accounting for the enhanced eicosanoid production have not been defined. Plasma phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto-PGF1 alpha), and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) levels were measured at various times during cardiac surgery. Plasma PLA2 activity increased after systemic heparinization, before CPB. This was highly correlated with concurrent increases in plasma 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, TXB2 concentrations did not increase with heparin administration but did increase significantly after initiation of CPB. High plasma PLA2 activity, 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, and TXB2 concentrations were measured throughout the CPB period. Protamine, administered to neutralize the heparin, caused an acute reduction of both plasma PLA2 activity and plasma 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, but no change in plasma TXB2 concentrations. Thus the ratio of TXB2 to 6-keto-PGF1 alpha increased significantly after protamine administration. Enhanced plasma PLA2 activity was also measured in patients with lower doses of heparin used clinically for nonsurgical applications. Human plasma PLA2 was identified as group II PLA2 by its sensitivity to deoxycholate and dithiothreitol, its substrate specificity, and its elution characteristics on heparin affinity chromatography. Heparin addition to PMNs in vitro resulted in dose-dependent increases in cellular PLA2 activity and release of PLA2. The PLA2 released from the PMN had characteristics similar to those of post-heparin plasma PLA2. In conclusion, plasma PLA2 activity and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha concentrations are markedly enhanced with systemic heparinization. Part of the anticoagulant and vasodilating effects of heparin may be due to increased plasma prostacyclin (PGI2) levels. In addition the pulmonary vasoconstriction sometimes associated with protamine infusion during cardiac surgery might be due to decreased

  5. F-1 Engine Installation at the Michoud Assembly Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    This image depicts a Boeing worker installing an F-1 engine on the Saturn V S-IC flight stage at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF). The Saturn IB and Saturn V first stages were manufactured at the MAF, located 24 kilometers (approximately 15 miles) east of downtown New Orleans, Louisiana. The prime contractors, Chrysler and Boeing, jointly occupied the MAF. The basic manufacturing building boasted 43 acres under one roof. By 1964, NASA added a separate engineering and office building, vertical assembly building, and test stage building.

  6. F-1 Engine Installation at the Michoud Assembly Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This image depicts an F-1 engine being installed on the Saturn V S-IC flight stage at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF). The Saturn IB and Saturn V first stages were manufactured at the MAF, located at 24 kilometers (approximately 15 miles) east of downtown New Orleans, Louisiana. The prime contractors, Chrysler and Boeing, jointly occupied the MAF. The basic manufacturing building boasted 43 acres under one roof. By 1964, NASA added a separate engineering and office building, vertical assembly building, and test stage building.

  7. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    E. J. Farris and H. M. Sulloway

    2008-01-10

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground on the Hanford Site. This burial ground is a combination of two locations formerly called Minor Construction Burial Ground No. 2 and Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 2. This waste site received radioactive equipment and other miscellaneous waste from 105-F Reactor operations, including dummy elements and irradiated process tubing; gun barrel tips, steel sleeves, and metal chips removed from the reactor; filter boxes containing reactor graphite chips; and miscellaneous construction solid waste.

  8. E2F-1 binding affinity for pRb is not the only determinant of the E2F-1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Fikret; Sladek, Todd L.

    2010-01-01

    E2F-1 is the major cellular target of pRB and is regulated by pRB during cell proliferation. Interaction between pRB and E2F-1 is dependent on the phosphorylation status of pRB. Despite the fact that E2F-1 and pRB have antagonistic activities when they are overexpressed, the role of the E2F-1-pRB interaction in cell growth largely remains unknown. Ideally, it would be better to study the properties of a pRB mutant that fails to bind to E2F, but retains all other activities. To date, no pRB mutation has been characterized in sufficient detail to show that it specifically eliminates E2F binding but leaves other interactions intact. An alternative approach to this issue is to ask whether mutations that change E2F proteins binding affinity to pRB are sufficient to change cell growth in aspect of cell cycle and tumor formation. Therefore, we used the E2F-1 mutants including E2F-1/S332-7A, E2F-1/S375A, E2F-1/S403A, E2F-1/Y411A and E2F-1/L132Q that have different binding affinities for pRB to better understand the roles of the E2F-1 phosphorylation and E2F-1-pRB interaction in the cell cycle, as well as in transformation and gene expression. Data presented in this study suggests that in vivo phosphorylation at amino acids 332-337, 375 and 403 is important for the E2F-1 and pRB interaction in vivo. However, although E2F-1 mutants 332-7, 375 and 403 showed similar binding affinity to pRB, they showed different characteristics in transformation efficiency, G0 accumulation, and target gene experiments. PMID:20616879

  9. April ρ Cygnids and comet C/1917 F1 Mellish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdukova, Maria; Rudawska, Regina; Kornos, Leonard; Toth, Juraj

    2015-12-01

    We have examined the recently-established April ρ Cygnids meteor shower (ARC, IAU#348). The ARC was discovered by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar survey (Brown et al., 2010), and later confirmed by video observations made by the Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance project in America (Phillips et al., 2011). As reported by Neslusan and Hajdukova (2014c), the shower could be part of a broader meteor-shower complex associated with the comet C/1917 F1 (Mellish). According to their model of the meteoroid stream originating from the comet, one of the filaments (F1) approximately corresponds to the ARC. The present study is based on an analysis of the orbital parameters of the ARC from the EDMOND (Kornos et al., 2014a), CAMS (Phillips et al., 2011), and SonotaCo (SonotaCo, 2009) databases. We followed dynamical evolutions of simulated meteoroid streams modeled from observational data. We found that the April ρ Cygnids may consist of both short and long-period components. However, it cannot be excluded that the meteors investigated belong to two different meteor showers situated in the same phase space. It was not possible to make a definitive conclusion concerning their relation to the proposed parent comet.

  10. Functional and idling rotatory motion within F1-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Sabbert, D.; Engelbrecht, S.; Junge, W.

    1997-01-01

    ATP synthase mediates proton flow through its membrane portion, F0, which drives the synthesis of ATP in its headpiece, F1. The F1-portion contains a hexagonal array of three subunits α and three β encircling a central subunit γ, that in turn interacts with a smaller ɛ and with F0. Recently we reported that the application of polarized absorption recovery after photobleaching showed the ATP-driven rotation of γ over at least two, if not three, β. Here we extend probes of such rotation aided by a new theory for assessing continuous versus stepped, Brownian versus unidirectional molecular motion. The observed relaxation of the absorption anisotropy is fully compatible with a unidirectional and stepping rotation of γ over three equidistantly spaced angular positions in the hexagon formed by the alternating subunits α and β. The results strongly support a rotational catalysis with equal participation of all three catalytic sites. In addition we report a limited rotation of γ without added nucleotides, perhaps idling and of Brownian nature, that covers only a narrow angular domain. PMID:9114001

  11. Alpha Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Term that is sometimes used to describe a helium nucleus, a positively charged particle that consists of two protons and two neutrons, bound together. Alpha particles, which were discovered by Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) in 1898, are emitted by atomic nuclei that are undergoing alpha radioactivity. During this process, an unstable heavy nucleus spontaneously emits an alpha particle and transmut...

  12. M2-F1 under tow across lakebed by car

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This 20-second clip shows the M2-F1 being towed by the Pontiac across Rogers Dry Lakebed. The M2-F1 lifting body, dubbed the 'flying bathtub' by the media, was the precursor of a remarkable series of wingless flying vehicles that contributed data used in the Space Shuttles, the X-33 Advanced Technology Demonstrator for the next century's Reusable Launch Vehicle, and the X-38 Technology Demonstrator for crew return from the International Space Station. Based on the ideas and basic design of Alfred J. Eggers and others at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory (now the Ames Research Center), Mountain View, California, in the mid-1950's, the M2-F1 was built in 1962-63 over a four-month period for a cost of only about $30,000, plus an additional $8,000-$10,000 for an ejection seat. Engineers and technicians at the NASA Flight Research Center (now NASA Dryden) kept costs low by designing and fabricating it partly in-house, with the plywood shell constructed by a local sailplane builder. Someone at the time estimated that it would have cost a major aircraft company $150,000 to build the same vehicle. Unlike the later lifting bodies, the M2-F1 was unpowered and was initially towed by a souped-up Pontiac convertible until it was airborne. Later a C-47 took over the towing duties. Flown by such famous research pilots as Milt Thompson, Bruce Peterson, Chuck Yeager, and Bill Dana, the lightweight flying bathtub demonstrated that a wingless vehicle shaped for reentry into the Earth's atmosphere from space could be flown and landed safely. Flown from 1963 to 1966, the lightweight M2-F1 paved the way for the heavyweight M2-F2, M2`F3, HL-10, X-24A, and X-24B lifting bodies that flew under rocket power after launch from a B-52 mothership. The heavyweights flew from 1966 to 1975, demonstrating the viability and versatility of the wingless configuration and the ability of a vehicle with low lift-over-drag characteristics to fly to high altitudes and then to land precisely with their

  13. Plasma thromboxane and prostacyclin: comparison during normal pregnancy and pregnancy complicated by hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ogino, M; Abe, Y; Jimbo, T; Okahara, T

    1986-04-01

    Plasma levels of thromboxane B2 (TXB2) and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto-PGF1 alpha), stable metabolites of two prostanoids with opposing biological effects, TXA2 and prostacyclin, were measured by radioimmunoassay in normal pregnancy (controls) and pregnancy complicated by hypertension (PIH) from 32 to 36 (Period 1; P1) and from 36 to 40 (Period 2; P2) weeks of gestation. The plasma concentration of each compound in the control subjects was 265.6 +/- 58.4 (TXB2), 132.4 +/- 16.5 (6-keto-PGF1 alpha) for P1 (n = 10) and 142.6 +/- 11.8 (TXB2), 68.5 +/- 5.2 (6-keto-PGF1 alpha) for P2 (n = 10) respectively (pg/ml, mean +/- s.e). In the patients with PIH, TXB2 concentrations increased moderately for P1 (419.2 +/- 21.2; n = 7) and significantly (p less than 0.005) for P2 (452.8 +/- 31.0; n = 7) respectively (pg/ml, mean +/- s.e), while the plasma levels of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha revealed a slight to moderate decrease both for P1 (84.5 +/- 4.0; n = 7) and P2 (59.7 +/- 8.1; n = 7) respectively (pg/ml, mean +/- s.e). The physiological balance of TXB2 to 6-keto-PGF1 alpha was significantly greater (p less than 0.005) in the patients with PIH, where the TXB2/6-keto-PGF1 alpha ratio was 5.2 +/- 0.7 for P1 and 9.4 +/- 2.3 for P2 respectively (mean +/- s.e) compared with that of the controls, where it was 2.4 +/- 0.4 for P1 and 2.0 +/- 0.2 for P2 respectively (mean +/- s.e).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3530728

  14. CCTα is a novel antigen detected by the anti-ERCC1 antibody 8F1 with biomarker value in lung and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Vaezi, Alec; Bepler, Gerold; Bhagwat, Nikhil; Malysa, Agnes; Rubatt, Jennifer; Chen, Wei; Hood, Brian; Conrads, Thomas; Wang, Lin; Kemp, Carolyn; Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Determination of in situ protein levels of ERCC1 with the antibody (8F1) is prognostic of survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We previously demonstrated that 8F1 recognizes a second nuclear antigen. We identified this antigen and analyzed its value as a biomarker of clinical outcomes. METHODS The second antigen was identified by mass spectrometry. Protein identity and antibody specificity were confirmed through knockdown and overexpression experiments. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) of 187 early stage NSCLC samples and 60 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) was used to examine the influence of the second antigen on 8F1 immunoreactivity and association with patient outcomes. RESULTS Cholinephosphate citidylyl transferase–α (CCTα, a.k.a. phosphate citidylyl transferase 1 choline alpha (PCYT1A), a phospholipid synthesis enzyme regulated by RAS, is the second antigen of 8F1. In NSCLC, CCTα contributed (rho = 0.38) to 8F1 immunoreactivity. In squamous cell carcinoma of the lung, CCTα was the dominant determinant of 8F1 immunoreactivity, while its contribution in other subtypes of lung cancer was negligible. High expression of CCTα, but not ERCC1, was prognostic of longer disease-free (log-rank p = 0.002), and overall survival (log-rank p = 0.056). Similarly, in HNSCC, CCTα contributed strongly to 8F1 immunoreactivity (rho = 0.74), and high CCTα expression was prognostic of survival (log-rank p = 0.022 for DFS and p = 0.027 for OS). CONCLUSIONS CCTα is the second antigen detected by 8F1. High CCTα expression is prognostic of survival in NSCLC treated by surgery alone and HNSCC. CCTα is a promising biomarker of patient survival and deserves further study. PMID:24692084

  15. F(1)-ATPase: a prototypical rotary molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    F(1)-ATPase, the soluble portion of ATP synthase, has been shown to be a rotary molecular motor in which the central γ subunit rotates inside the cylinder made of α(3)β(3) subunits. The rotation is powered by ATP hydrolysis in three catalytic sites, and reverse rotation of the γ subunit by an external force leads to ATP synthesis in the catalytic sites. Here I look back how our lab became involved in the study of this marvelous rotary machine, and discuss some aspects of its rotary mechanism while confessing we are far from understanding. This article is a very personal essay, not a scientific review, for this otherwise viral machines book. PMID:22297508

  16. Mining for ω and f1 decays in CLAS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiter, Andrew; Wood, Michael; CLAS Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    One advantage of the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) is its ability to reconstruct multi-particle decays. For this reason, we are mining the E02-104 data set for the exclusive decays of the ω and f1 mesons. Each meson has either three or four particles in the final state. Our goal is to determine the reaction rates with CLAS and extrapolate to those for the E12-06-117 experiment, that will run when the CLAS12 detector is built for the TJNAF 12-GeV upgrade. The focus of the latter experiment is to understand the hadronization process from free quarks to color-neutral hadrons. This poster will describe our work using the data mining software developed by the group at Old Dominion University under a grant from the Department of Energy.

  17. Phosphate release coupled to rotary motion of F1-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Kei-ichi; Hummer, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    F1-ATPase, the catalytic domain of ATP synthase, synthesizes most of the ATP in living organisms. Running in reverse powered by ATP hydrolysis, this hexameric ring-shaped molecular motor formed by three αβ-dimers creates torque on its central γ-subunit. This reverse operation enables detailed explorations of the mechanochemical coupling mechanisms in experiment and simulation. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to construct a first atomistic conformation of the intermediate state following the 40° substep of rotary motion, and to study the timing and molecular mechanism of inorganic phosphate (Pi) release coupled to the rotation. In response to torque-driven rotation of the γ-subunit in the hydrolysis direction, the nucleotide-free αβE interface forming the “empty” E site loosens and singly charged Pi readily escapes to the P loop. By contrast, the interface stays closed with doubly charged Pi. The γ-rotation tightens the ATP-bound αβTP interface, as required for hydrolysis. The calculated rate for the outward release of doubly charged Pi from the αβE interface 120° after ATP hydrolysis closely matches the ∼1-ms functional timescale. Conversely, Pi release from the ADP-bound αβDP interface postulated in earlier models would occur through a kinetically infeasible inward-directed pathway. Our simulations help reconcile conflicting interpretations of single-molecule experiments and crystallographic studies by clarifying the timing of Pi exit, its pathway and kinetics, associated changes in Pi protonation, and changes of the F1-ATPase structure in the 40° substep. Important elements of the molecular mechanism of Pi release emerging from our simulations appear to be conserved in myosin despite the different functional motions. PMID:24062450

  18. Inherent conformational flexibility of F1-ATPase α-subunit.

    PubMed

    Hahn-Herrera, Otto; Salcedo, Guillermo; Barril, Xavier; García-Hernández, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    The core of F1-ATPase consists of three catalytic (β) and three noncatalytic (α) subunits, forming a hexameric ring in alternating positions. A wealth of experimental and theoretical data has provided a detailed picture of the complex role played by catalytic subunits. Although major conformational changes have only been seen in β-subunits, it is clear that α-subunits have to respond to these changes in order to be able to transmit information during the rotary mechanism. However, the conformational behavior of α-subunits has not been explored in detail. Here, we have combined unbiased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and calorimetrically measured thermodynamic signatures to investigate the conformational flexibility of isolated α-subunits, as a step toward deepening our understanding of its function inside the α3β3 ring. The simulations indicate that the open-to-closed conformational transition of the α-subunit is essentially barrierless, which is ideal to accompany and transmit the movement of the catalytic subunits. Calorimetric measurements of the recombinant α-subunit from Geobacillus kaustophilus indicate that the isolated subunit undergoes no significant conformational changes upon nucleotide binding. Simulations confirm that the nucleotide-free and nucleotide-bound subunits show average conformations similar to that observed in the F1 crystal structure, but they reveal an increased conformational flexibility of the isolated α-subunit upon MgATP binding, which might explain the evolutionary conserved capacity of α-subunits to recognize nucleotides with considerable strength. Furthermore, we elucidate the different dependencies that α- and β-subunits show on Mg(II) for recognizing ATP. PMID:27137408

  19. The F0F1-type ATP synthases of bacteria: structure and function of the F0 complex.

    PubMed

    Deckers-Hebestreit, G; Altendorf, K

    1996-01-01

    Membrane-bound ATP synthases (F0F1-ATPases) of bacteria serve two important physiological functions. The enzyme catalyzes the synthesis of ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate utilizing the energy of an electrochemical ion gradient. On the other hand, under conditions of low driving force, ATP synthases function as ATPases, thereby generating a transmembrane ion gradient at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. The enzyme complex consists of two structurally and functionally distinct parts: the membrane-integrated ion-translocating F0 complex and the peripheral F1 complex, which carries the catalytic sites for ATP synthesis and hydrolysis. The ATP synthase of Escherichia coli, which has been the most intensively studied one, is composed of eight different subunits, five of which belong to F1, subunits alpha, beta, gamma, delta, and epsilon (3:3:1:1:1), and three to F0, subunits a, b, and c (1:2:10 +/- 1). The similar overall structure and the high amino acid sequence homology indicate that the mechanism of ion translocation and catalysis and their mode of coupling is the same in all organisms. PMID:8905099

  20. Purification and biochemical characterization of the F1-ATPase from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans NASF-1 and analysis of the atp operon.

    PubMed

    Wakai, Satoshi; Ohmori, Asami; Kanao, Tadayoshi; Sugio, Tsuyoshi; Kamimura, Kazuo

    2005-10-01

    ATPase was purified 51-fold from a chemoautotrophic, obligately acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacterium, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans NASF-1. The purified ATPase showed the typical subunit pattern of the F1-ATPase on a polyacrylamide gel containing sodium dodecyl sulfate, with 5 subunits of apparent molecular masses of 55, 50, 33, 20, and 18 kDa. The enzyme hydrolyzed ATP, GTP, and ITP, but neither UTP nor ADP. The K(m) value for ATP was 1.8 mM. ATPase activity was optimum at pH 8.5 at 45 degrees C, and was activated by sulfite. Azide strongly inhibited the enzyme activity, whereas the enzyme was relatively resistant to vanadate, nitrate, and N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. The genes encoding the subunits for the F1F(O)-ATPase from A. ferrooxidans NASF-1 were cloned as three overlapping fragments by PCR cloning and sequenced. The molecular masses of the alpha, beta, gamma, delta, and epsilon subunits of the F1 portion were deduced from the amino acid sequences to be 55.5, 50.5, 33.1, 19.2, and 15.1 kDa, respectively. PMID:16244438

  1. Large-scale purification and characterization of the five subunits of F1-ATPase from pig heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, D; Penin, F; Gautheron, D C

    1991-09-13

    A large-scale purification procedure was developed to isolate the five subunits of F1-ATPase from pig heart mitochondria. The previously described procedure (Williams, N. and Pedersen, P.L. (1986) Methods Enzymol. 126, 484-489) to dissociate the rat liver F1-ATPase by cold treatment followed by warming at 37 degrees C has been adapted for the pig heart enzyme. Removal of endogenous nucleotides from that enzyme before dissociation led to the efficient separation of the alpha and gamma subunits from beta, delta and epsilon subunits. The beta subunit was purified in the hundred-milligram range by anion-exchange chromatography in the absence of any denaturing agent. This subunit was free from any bound nucleotide and almost no ATPase and adenylate kinase-like activities were detected. The delta and epsilon subunits were purified by reversed-phase chromatography (RP-HPLC) in the milligram range. As recently reported (Penin, F., Deléage, G., Gagliardi, D., Roux, B. and Gautheron, D.C. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 9358-9364), these purified subunits kept biophysical features of folded proteins and their ability to reconstitute the tight delta epsilon complex. The alpha and gamma subunits remained poorly soluble and required dissociation by 8 M guanidinium chloride prior to their purification by RP-HPLC. In addition, characterizations of the five subunits by IEF and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis are reported, as well as ultraviolet spectra and solubility properties of the beta, delta and epsilon subunits. PMID:1832960

  2. Upregulation of estrogen receptor expression in the uterus of ovariectomized B6C3F1 mice and Ishikawa cells treated with bromoethane

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Hiroaki; Couse, John F.; Hewitt, Sylvia C.; Haseman, Joseph K.; He, Hong; Zheng, Xiaolin; Majstoravich, Sonja; Korach, Kenneth S.; Dixon, D. . E-mail: dixon@niehs.nih.gov

    2005-12-15

    In a 2-year NTP bioassay, Bromoethane (BE) was found to induce endometrial neoplasms in the uterus of B6C3F1 mice [; ]. In women, hormonal influences, such as 'unopposed' estrogenic stimulus, have been implicated as important etiologic factors in uterine cancer. BE, however, does not affect the serum concentrations of sex hormones in female B6C3F1 mice [] and the mechanism of BE-induced uterine carcinogenesis still remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the estrogenic effects of BE on the uterus of ovariectomized B6C3F1 mice and on Ishikawa cells. Groups of 6 mice were given daily s.c. injections of 0, 100, 500 or 1000 mg BE/kg for 3 consecutive days. Mice treated with 17{beta}-estradiol served as positive controls. Mice were necropsied 24 h after the final injection, and uteri were weighed and examined histologically and immunohistochemically along with the vagina. Changes observed in the estrogen-treated mice included increased uterine weights, edema and inflammation of the endometrium, increased epithelial layers of the uterine and vaginal lumens and keratinization of the vaginal epithelium. In the BE-treated mice, no such changes occurred; however, immunohistochemical staining of the uterus revealed a significant increase in immunoexpression of the estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) in the two higher dose groups. Analysis of mRNA also showed slightly increased uterine ER{alpha} expression in these groups. Upregulated expression of ER{alpha} was confirmed in BE-treated Ishikawa cells, in which Western blotting analyses identified an intense signal at approximately 66 kDa, which is consistent with ER{alpha}. These data suggest that upregulated expression of ER{alpha} may be important in the induction of endometrial neoplasms in BE-treated mice.

  3. Identification and purification of a Bombyx mori homologue of FTZ-F1.

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, H; Hirose, S

    1990-01-01

    Extracts from embryos and from posterior and middle silk glands of the silkworm, Bombyx mori contain a sequence specific DNA binding factor termed BmFTZ-F1. The factor binds to the recognition site of FTZ-F1, a positive regulator of the fushi tarazu gene in Drosophila melanogaster. BmFTZ-F1 and FTZ-F1 share the same methylation interference patterns, the same chromatographic behaviors and similar protease digestion profiles. Anti-FTZ-F1 cross reacts with BmFTZ-F1. These results indicate that BmFTZ-F1 is a B. mori homologue of FTZ-F1. The mobility of the factor-DNA complex formed in the silk gland extract changes depending on the developmental stages. Purification of BmFTZF1 to an almost homogeneous state reveals that the factor is a 73 kd protein. Images PMID:2124348

  4. Identification and functional characterization of grass carp IL-17A/F1: An evaluation of the immunoregulatory role of teleost IL-17A/F1.

    PubMed

    Du, Linyong; Feng, Shiyu; Yin, Licheng; Wang, Xinyan; Zhang, Anying; Yang, Kun; Zhou, Hong

    2015-07-01

    In mammals, IL-17A and IL-17F are hallmark cytokines of Th17 cells which act significant roles in eradicating extracellular pathogens. IL-17A and IL-17F homologs nominated as IL-17A/F1-3 have been revealed in fish and their functions remain largely undefined. Here we identified and characterized grass carp IL-17A/F1 (gcIL-17A/F1) in fish immune system. In this regard, both tissue distribution and inductive expression of gcIL-17A/F1 indicated its possible involvement in immune response. Moreover, recombinant gcIL-17A/F1 (rgcIL-17A/F1) was prepared and displayed an ability to enhance pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) mRNA expression in head kidney leukocytes. It is suggestive of that gcIL-17A/F1 may act as a proinflammatory cytokine in fish immunity. Besides, rgcIL-17A/F1 induced gene expression and protein release of grass carp chemokine CXCL-8 (gcCXCL-8) in head kidney cells (HKCs), probably via NF-κB, p38 and Erk1/2 pathways. In particular, culture medium from the HKCs treated by rgcIL-17A/F1 could stimulate peripheral blood leukocytes migration and immunoneutralization of endogenous gcCXCL-8 could partially attenuate this stimulation, suggesting that rgcIL-17A/F1 could recruit immune cells through producing gcCXCL-8 as mammalian IL-17 A and F. Taken together, we not only identified the pro-inflammatory role of gcIL-17A/F1 in host defense, but also provided the basis for clarifying Th17 cells in teleost. PMID:25847875

  5. 17 CFR 240.12f-1 - Applications for permission to reinstate unlisted trading privileges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... reinstate unlisted trading privileges. 240.12f-1 Section 240.12f-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Rules and Regulations Under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Unlisted Trading § 240.12f-1 Applications for permission to reinstate unlisted trading privileges. (a) An application to reinstate...

  6. 26 CFR 1.402(f)-1 - Required explanation of eligible rollover distributions; questions and answers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... through 15 (as it appeared in the April 1, 1995 edition of 26 CFR part 1), apply. However, for any... distributions; questions and answers. 1.402(f)-1 Section 1.402(f)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE...-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.402(f)-1 Required explanation of eligible rollover...

  7. 26 CFR 1.430(f)-1 - Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance. 1.430(f)-1 Section 1.430(f)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... § 1.430(f)-1 Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance. (a) In...

  8. 26 CFR 1.430(f)-1 - Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance. 1.430(f)-1 Section 1.430(f)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... § 1.430(f)-1 Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance. (a) In...

  9. 26 CFR 1.430(f)-1 - Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance. 1.430(f)-1 Section 1.430(f)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... § 1.430(f)-1 Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance. (a) In...

  10. 26 CFR 1.430(f)-1 - Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance. 1.430(f)-1 Section 1.430(f)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...(f)-1 Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance. (a) In...

  11. 26 CFR 31.3402(f)(1)-1 - Withholding exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withholding exemptions. 31.3402(f)(1)-1 Section 31.3402(f)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(f)(1)-1 Withholding exemptions. (a) In general....

  12. April rho Cygnids and comet C/1917 F1 Mellish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdukova, M.; Rudawska, R.; Kornos, L.; Toth, J.

    2014-07-01

    We have examined the recently-established April ρ Cygnids meteor shower (ARC, IAU#348). The ARC was discovered by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar survey (Brown et al., 2010), and later confirmed by video observations made by the Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance project (Phillips et al., 2011). As reported by Neslusan and Hajdukova (2014), the stream could be a part of a broader complex of showers, possibly associated with the long-period comet C/1917 F1 (Mellish), which is the known parent body of the December Monocerotids (MON, IAU#019). According to their model of the meteoroid stream originating from the comet, one of the filaments corresponds to the April ρ Cygnids. However, the similarity between the mean characteristics of the predicted and the real showers is not clear. The present study is based on an analysis of the orbital parameters of the April ρ Cygnids extracted from several catalogues, using an independent identification methodology proposed by Rudawska et al. (2014). The catalogues used include the radio meteor database of the IAU Meteor Data Center (Lindblad, 2003), the EDMOND database (Kornos et al., 2014 a, b), and the SonotaCo catalogue (SonotaCo, 2009). The results of the orbital evolution of the meteoroid stream and the comet, as well as the conclusion as to their common origin, will be presented.

  13. Changes in F2-F1 as a voicing cue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Willis J.; Coren, Amy E.

    2003-10-01

    The interaction between formant transitions and vowel length was measured with respect to syllable final voicing distinctions. A synthesized ad VC token of 360 ms was edited in 5-ms intervals from either side, onset or offset, so that 260 ms were preserved. Ten subjects were asked to make final voicing judgments for the words ``odd'' and ``ought'' ([ad] vs [at]) when hearing the 20 edited tokens. Each token was presented five times, randomly, for a total of 1000 judgements. Results showed an overwhelming number of voiced responses when the entire offset was preserved and symmetrical voiceless results with the deletion of offset. A follow-up experiment utilized a similarly synthesized token of 460 ms. The results when adding 100 ms onto the vowel were insignificantly different than the results acquired for formant transitions, suggesting the latter are a more important cue for syllable final voicing distinctions. These findings contradict previous vowel length conclusions [L. J. Raphael, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 51, 1296-1303 (1972)] and further suggest that in addition to F1 [V. Summers, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 84, 485-492 (1988)], F2 transitions are also an important cue to final voicing distinctions in low vowel contexts.

  14. Detection of Hearing Loss Using 2f2-f1 and 2f1-f2 Distortion-Product Otoacoustic Emissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Tracy S.; Prieve, Beth A.

    2005-01-01

    Although many distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) may be measured in the ear canal in response to 2 pure tone stimuli, the majority of clinical studies have focused exclusively on the DPOAE at the frequency 2f1-f2. This study investigated another DPOAE, 2f2-f1, in an attempt to determine the following: (a) the optimal stimulus…

  15. 17 CFR 274.51 - Form N-18F-1, for notification of election pursuant to § 270.18f-1 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... section. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form N-18F-1, see the List of CFR... Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FORMS PRESCRIBED UNDER THE INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT... notification of election pursuant to § 270.18f-1 of this chapter by a registered open-end investment company...

  16. 17 CFR 274.51 - Form N-18F-1, for notification of election pursuant to § 270.18f-1 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... section. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form N-18F-1, see the List of CFR... Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FORMS PRESCRIBED UNDER THE INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT... notification of election pursuant to § 270.18f-1 of this chapter by a registered open-end investment company...

  17. 17 CFR 274.51 - Form N-18F-1, for notification of election pursuant to § 270.18f-1 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... section. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form N-18F-1, see the List of CFR... Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FORMS PRESCRIBED UNDER THE INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT... notification of election pursuant to § 270.18f-1 of this chapter by a registered open-end investment company...

  18. Involvement of FTZ-F1 in the regulation of pupation in Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Ping; Fu, Kai-Yun; Lü, Feng-Gong; Meng, Qing-Wei; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2014-11-01

    During the final instar larvae of holometabolous insects, a pulse of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and a drop in juvenile hormone (JH) trigger larval-pupal metamorphosis. In this study, two LdFTZ-F1 cDNAs (LdFTZ-F1-1 and LdFTZ-F1-2) were cloned in Leptinotarsa decemlineata. Both LdFTZ-F1-1 and LdFTZ-F1-2 were highly expressed just before or right after each molt, similar to the expression pattern of an ecdysteroidogenesis gene LdSHD. Ingestion of an ecdysteroid agonist halofenozide (Hal) enhanced LdFTZ-F1-1 and LdFTZ-F1-2 expression in the final larval instar. Conversely, a decrease in 20E by feeding a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) against LdSHD repressed the expression. Moreover, Hal rescued the expression levels in LdSHD-silenced larvae. Thus, 20E peaks seem to induce the transcription of LdFTZ-F1s. Furthermore, ingesting dsLdFTZ-F1 from a common fragment of LdFTZ-F1-1 and LdFTZ-F1-2 successfully knocked down both LdFTZ-F1s, and impaired pupation. Finally, knocking down LdFTZ-F1s significantly repressed the transcription of three ecdysteroidogenesis genes, lowered 20E titer, and reduced the expression of two 20E receptor genes. Silencing LdFTZ-F1s also induced the expression of a JH biosynthesis gene, increased JH titer, but decreased the mRNA level of a JH early-inducible gene. Thus, LdFTZ-F1s are involved in the regulation of pupation by modulating 20E and JH titers and mediating their signaling pathways. PMID:25446391

  19. Effects of ozone on cyclooxygenase metabolites in the baboon tracheobronchial tree

    SciTech Connect

    Fouke, J.M.; DeLemos, R.A.; Dunn, M.J.; McFadden, E.R. Jr. )

    1990-07-01

    Short-term exposure to 0.5 parts per million (ppm) ozone has been shown to cause an increase in respiratory resistance in primates that can be diminished by 50% with pretreatment with cromolyn sodium. Because of the known membrane-stabilizing effects of cromolyn and the resultant inhibition of mediator production, we hypothesized a role for the products of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism in these events. We exposed five adult male baboons to 0.5 ppm ozone on two occasions, once with cromolyn pretreatment and once without. Pulmonary resistance (RL) was monitored and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed before and after each exposure. The BAL was analyzed for a stable hydrolysis product of prostacyclin, 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG) F1 alpha, PGE2, a stable hydrolysis product of thromboxane (Tx) A2, TxB2, and PGF2 alpha. RL increased after ozone exposure (1.62 +/- 0.23 to 3.77 +/- 0.51 cmH2O.l-1.s, difference 2.15; P less than 0.02), and this effect was partially blocked by cromolyn (1.93 +/- 0.09 to 3.18 +/- 0.40 cmH2O.l-1.s, difference 1.25; P less than 0.02). The base-line levels of the metabolites of AA in the BAL were as follows (in pg/ml): 6-keto-PGF1 alpha 72.78 +/- 12.6, PGE2 145.92 +/- 30.52, TxB2 52.52 +/- 9.56, and PGF2 alpha 22.28 +/- 5.42. Ozone exposure had no effect on the level of any of these prostanoids (P = NS). These studies quantify the magnitude of cyclooxygenase products of AA metabolism in BAL from baboon lungs and demonstrate that changes in the levels of these mediators in BAL are not prerequisites for ozone-induced increases in respiratory resistance.

  20. [Differential action of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs on human gallbladder cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase].

    PubMed

    Franchi, A; Di Girolamo, G; Farina, M; de los Santos, A R; Martí, M L; Gimeno, M A

    2000-01-01

    Lysine clonixinate (LC) is a non-steroidal antiinflammatory agent (NSAID) with only few adverse effects. This characteristic has prompted us to suggest that its administration, at levels equivalent to those found in human plasma following therapeutic doses, slightly inhibits cyclooxygenase I (COX I). Three experiments were performed. Experiment 1: to study the in vitro effect of LC at concentrations of 4 and 6 micrograms/ml, comparable with those found in plasma following an oral therapeutic dose of 125 mg. Gallbladder tissue segments were incubated with 0.25 microCi of 14C-arachidonic acid and the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) and 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto PGF1 alpha) was measured. LC did not affect basal production of any of the 3 prostaglandins (PGs) but at 6 micrograms/ml slightly reduced the levels of 5-hidroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE). Experiment 2: LC was administered preoperatively to 6 patients by continuous perfusion, to achieve a steady-state concentration between 4 and 6 micrograms/ml. Gallbladder segments from the 6 treated and another 6 control patients were incubated in 14C-arachidonic acid. Gallbladder segments treated with LC did not show a decreased production of any of the three PGs whereas 5-HETE released to the medium was significantly lower. Experiment 3: 18 patients received an i.v. bolus of LC 100 mg (n1 = 6) or LC 200 mg (n2 = 6) or indomethacin (INDO) 50 mg (n3 = 6). Unlike the administration of INDO bolus, LC in the above doses did not inhibit PG synthesis. Both NSAIDs showed different effects when the production of 5-HETE synthesis was assessed. Treatment with INDO did not alter the production of 5-HETE while LC elicited significant inhibition. The three studies conducted, namely in vitro and in vivo continuous perfusion and i.v. bolus, revealed that LC had no effect on prostaglandin synthesis while reducing significantly the levels of 5-HETE. PMID:11188896

  1. Monoclonal antibodies to Escherichia coli F1-ATPase. Correlation of binding site location with interspecies cross-reactivity and effects on enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Dunn, S D; Tozer, R G; Antczak, D F; Heppel, L A

    1985-09-01

    Twenty-one hybridoma cell lines which secret antibodies to the subunits of the Escherichia coli F1-ATPase were produced. Included within the set are four antibodies which are specific for alpha, six for beta, three for gamma, four for delta and four for epsilon. The antibodies were divided into binding competition subgroups. Two such competition subgroups are represented for the alpha, beta, and epsilon subunits, one for delta and three for gamma. The ability to bind intact F1-ATPase was demonstrated for some of the antibodies to alpha and beta, and for all of those to delta, while the antibodies to gamma and epsilon gave unclear results. All of the antibodies to alpha and beta which bound ATPase were found to have effects on the ATPase activity of purified E. coli F1-ATPase. One of those to alpha inhibited activity by about 30%. Another anti-alpha was mildly stimulatory. The four antibodies to beta which bound ATPase inhibited activity by 90%. In contrast, membrane-bound ATPase was hardly affected by the antibodies to alpha, but was inhibited by 40-60% by the antibodies to beta. The other antibodies to alpha and beta bound only free subunits, or partially dissociated ATPase, suggesting that their epitopes are buried between subunits in ATPase. These antibodies had no effects on activity. The ability of the antibodies to recognize ATPase subunits present in crude extracts from mitochondria, chloroplasts, and a variety of bacteria was tested using nitrocellulose blots of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. One anti-beta specifically recognized proteins in the range of 50,000-60,000 daltons in each of the extracts, although the reaction with mitochondrial beta was weak. Some of the other antibodies had limited cross-reaction, but most were specific for the E. coli protein. In some species, those proteins which were recognized by the anti-beta ran with a higher apparent molecular weight than proteins which were recognized by an anti-alpha. All antibodies which

  2. Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) alters E2F1/Rb pathways and utilizes the E2F1 transcription factor to express viral genes

    PubMed Central

    Sharon, Eyal; Volchek, Ludmila; Frenkel, Niza

    2014-01-01

    E2F transcription factors play pivotal roles in controlling the expression of genes involved in cell-cycle progression. Different viruses affect E2F1/retinoblastoma (Rb) interactions by diverse mechanisms releasing E2F1 from its suppressor Rb, enabling viral replication. We show that in T cells infected with human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A), the E2F1 protein and its cofactor DP1 increased, whereas the Rb protein underwent massive degradation without hyperphosphorylation at three sites known to control E2F/Rb association. Although E2F1 and DP1 increased without Rb suppression, the E2F1 target genes—including cyclin A, cyclin E, and dihydrofolate reductase—were not up-regulated. To test whether the E2F1/DP1 complexes were used for viral transcription, we scanned the viral genome for genes containing the E2F binding site in their promoters. In the present work, we concentrated on the U27 and U79 genes known to act in viral DNA synthesis. We constructed amplicon-6 vectors containing a GFP reporter gene driven by WT viral promoter or by promoter mutated in the E2F binding site. We found that the expression of the fusion U27 promoter was dependent on the presence of the E2F binding site. Test of the WT U79 promoter yielded >10-fold higher expression of the GFP reporter gene than the mutant U79 promoter with abrogated E2F binding site. Moreover, by using siRNA to E2F1, we found that E2F1 was essential for the activity of the U79 promoter. These findings revealed a unique pathway in HHV-6 replication: The virus causes Rb degradation and uses the increased E2F1 and DP1 factors to transcribe viral genes. PMID:24335704

  3. Alpha Thalassemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... an apparently normal individual has a child with hemoglobin H disease or alpha thalassemia minor. It can ... gene on one chromosome 25% 25% 25% 25% hemoglobin H disease there is a 25% chance with ...

  4. E2F-1 has dual roles depending on the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Fikret; Sladek, Todd L.

    2010-01-01

    The E2F family of transcription factors play a critical role in the control of cell proliferation. E2F-1 is the major cellular target of pRB and is regulated by pRB during cell proliferation. E2F-1-mediated activation and repression of target genes occurs in different settings. The role of E2F-1 and E2F-1/pRB complexes in regulation of different target genes, and in cycling versus quiescent cells, is unclear. In this study, effects of free E2F-1 (doesn't complex with pRb) and E2F-1/pRb complex, on E2F-1 target gene expression were compared in different cell growth conditions. Findings suggest that E2F-1 acts in different ways, not only depending on the target gene but also depending on different stages of the cell cycle. For example, E2F-1 acts as part of the repression complex with pRB in the expression of DHFR, b-myb, TK and cdc2 in asynchronously growing cells; on the other hand, E2F-1 acts as an activator in the expression of the same genes in cells that are re-entering the cycle. PMID:20224733

  5. Ectopic POU5F1 in the male germ lineage disrupts differentiation and spermatogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Phillips, LeAnna J; Hartman, Rachel; An, Junhui; Dann, Christina T

    2016-10-01

    Expression levels of the pluripotency determinant, POU5F1, are tightly regulated to ensure appropriate differentiation during early embryogenesis. POU5F1 is also present in the spermatogonial stem cell/progenitor cell population in mice and it is downregulated as spermatogenesis progresses. To test if POU5F1 downregulation is required for SSCs to differentiate, we produced transgenic mice that ubiquitously express POU5F1 in Cre-expressing lineages. Using a Vasa-Cre driver to produce ectopic POU5F1 in all postnatal germ cells, we found that POU5F1 downregulation was necessary for spermatogonial expansion during the first wave of spermatogenesis and for the production of differentiated spermatogonia capable of undergoing meiosis. In contrast, undifferentiated spermatogonia were maintained throughout adulthood, consistent with a normal presence of POU5F1 in these cells. The results suggest that POU5F1 downregulation in differentiating spermatogonia is a necessary step for the progression of spermatogenesis. Further, the creation of a transgenic mouse model for conditional ectopic expression of POU5F1 may be a useful resource for studies of POU5F1 in other cell lineages, during tumorogenesis and cell fate reprogramming. PMID:27486267

  6. 17 CFR 274.127f-1 - Form N-27F-1, notice to periodic payment plan certificate holders of 45-day withdrawal right with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...: For Federal Register citations affecting Form N-27F-1, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FORMS PRESCRIBED UNDER THE INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 Forms for Reports §...

  7. Protein Kinase C-α Interaction with F0F1-ATPase Promotes F0F1-ATPase Activity and Reduces Energy Deficits in Injured Renal Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Grażyna; Bakajsova, Diana

    2015-01-01

    We showed previously that active PKC-α maintains F0F1-ATPase activity, whereas inactive PKC-α mutant (dnPKC-α) blocks recovery of F0F1-ATPase activity after injury in renal proximal tubules (RPTC). This study tested whether mitochondrial PKC-α interacts with and phosphorylates F0F1-ATPase. Wild-type PKC-α (wtPKC-α) and dnPKC-α were overexpressed in RPTC to increase their mitochondrial levels, and RPTC were exposed to oxidant or hypoxia. Mitochondrial levels of the γ-subunit, but not the α- and β-subunits, were decreased by injury, an event associated with 54% inhibition of F0F1-ATPase activity. Overexpressing wtPKC-α blocked decreases in γ-subunit levels, maintained F0F1-ATPase activity, and improved ATP levels after injury. Deletion of PKC-α decreased levels of α-, β-, and γ-subunits, decreased F0F1-ATPase activity, and hindered the recovery of ATP content after RPTC injury. Mitochondrial PKC-α co-immunoprecipitated with α-, β-, and γ-subunits of F0F1-ATPase. The association of PKC-α with these subunits decreased in injured RPTC overexpressing dnPKC-α. Immunocapture of F0F1-ATPase and immunoblotting with phospho(Ser) PKC substrate antibody identified phosphorylation of serine in the PKC consensus site on the α- or β- and γ-subunits. Overexpressing wtPKC-α increased phosphorylation and protein levels, whereas deletion of PKC-α decreased protein levels of α-, β-, and γ-subunits of F0F1-ATPase in RPTC. Phosphoproteomics revealed phosphorylation of Ser146 on the γ subunit in response to wtPKC-α overexpression. We concluded that active PKC-α 1) prevents injury-induced decreases in levels of γ subunit of F0F1-ATPase, 2) interacts with α-, β-, and γ-subunits leading to increases in their phosphorylation, and 3) promotes the recovery of F0F1-ATPase activity and ATP content after injury in RPTC. PMID:25627689

  8. 17 CFR 274.51 - Form N-18F-1, for notification of election pursuant to § 270.18f-1 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Form N-18F-1, for notification of election pursuant to § 270.18f-1 of this chapter. 274.51 Section 274.51 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FORMS PRESCRIBED UNDER THE INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 Registration Statements §...

  9. 26 CFR 1.904(f)-1 - Overall foreign loss and the overall foreign loss account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Overall foreign loss and the overall foreign loss account. 1.904(f)-1 Section 1.904(f)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Income from Sources Without the United States § 1.904(f)-1 Overall foreign loss and...

  10. Installation of the F-1 Engine to the Saturn V S-IC Stage for Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Engineers at the Marshall Space Flight Center install the F-1 engines on the S-IC stage thrust structure at the S-IC static test stand. Engines are installed on the stage after it has been placed in the test stand. This image shows a close-up of an F-1 engine. Five F-1 engines, each weighing 10 tons, gave the booster a total thrust of 7,500,000 pounds, roughly equivalent to 160 million horsepower.

  11. Parameters to Maximize 2f2-f1 Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emission Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Jennifer H.; Pratt, Shiela R.; Durrant, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Past research has established parameters for the 2f1-f2 distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) that enhance response levels (e.g., L1 - L2 = 10 dB; f2/f1 = 1.22; L1, L2 = 65, 55 dB SPL). These same parameters do not optimize 2f2-f1 DPOAEs. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate more completely those parameters that…

  12. Alimentary Tract Absorption (f1 Values) for Radionuclides in Local and Regional Fallout from Nuclear Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Shawki; Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents gastrointestinal absorption fractions (f1 values) for estimating internal doses from local and regional fallout radionuclides due to nuclear tests. The choice of f1 values are based on specific circumstances of weapons test conditions and a review of reported f1 values for elements in different physical and chemical states. Special attention is given to fallout from nuclear tests conducted at the Marshall Islands. We make a distinction between the f1 values for intakes of radioactive materials immediately after deposition (acute intakes) and intakes that occur in the course of months and years after deposition, following incorporation into terrestrial and aquatic foodstuffs (chronic intakes). Multiple f1 values for different circumstances where persons are exposed to radioactive fallout (e.g. local vs. regional fallout and coral vs. continental tests) are presented when supportive information is available. In some cases, our selected f1 values are similar to those adopted by the ICRP (e.g. iodine and most actinides). However, f1 values for cesium and strontium derived from urine bioassay data of the Marshallese population are notably lower than the generic f1 values recommended by ICRP, particularly for acute intakes from local fallout (0.4 and 0.05 for Cs and Sr, respectively. The f1 values presented here form the first complete set of values relevant to realistic dose assessments for exposure to local or regional radioactive fallout. PMID:20622554

  13. Alimentary tract absorption (f1 values) for radionuclides in local and regional fallout from nuclear tests.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Shawki A; Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold L

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents gastrointestinal absorption fractions (f1 values) for estimating internal doses from local and regional fallout radionuclides due to nuclear tests. The choice of f1 values are based on specific circumstances of weapons test conditions and a review of reported f1 values for elements in different physical and chemical states. Special attention is given to fallout from nuclear tests conducted at the Marshall Islands. We make a distinction between the f1 values for intakes of radioactive materials immediately after deposition (acute intakes) and intakes that occur in the course of months and years after deposition, following incorporation into terrestrial and aquatic foodstuffs (chronic intakes). Multiple f1 values for different circumstances where persons are exposed to radioactive fallout (e.g., local vs. regional fallout and coral vs. continental tests) are presented when supportive information is available. In some cases, our selected f1 values are similar to those adopted by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) (e.g., iodine and most actinides). However, f1 values for cesium and strontium derived from urine bioassay data of the Marshallese population are notably lower than the generic f1 values recommended by ICRP, particularly for acute intakes from local fallout (0.4 and 0.05 for Cs and Sr, respectively). The f1 values presented here form the first complete set of values relevant to realistic dose assessments for exposure to local or regional radioactive fallout. PMID:20622554

  14. Calorie restriction does not restore brain mitochondrial function in P301L tau mice, but it does decrease mitochondrial F0F1-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Delic, Vedad; Brownlow, Milene; Joly-Amado, Aurelie; Zivkovic, Sandra; Noble, Kenyaria; Phan, Tam-Anh; Ta, Yen; Zhang, Yumeng; Bell, Stephen D; Kurien, Crupa; Reynes, Christian; Morgan, Dave; Bradshaw, Patrick C

    2015-07-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) has been shown to increase lifespan and delay aging phenotypes in many diverse eukaryotic species. In mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), CR has been shown to decrease amyloid-beta and hyperphosphorylated tau levels and preserve cognitive function. Overexpression of human mutant tau protein has been shown to induce deficits in mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I activity. Therefore, experiments were performed to determine the effects of 4-month CR on brain mitochondrial function in Tg4510 mice, which express human P301L tau. Expression of mutant tau led to decreased ADP-stimulated respiratory rates, but not uncoupler-stimulated respiratory rates. The membrane potential was also slightly higher in mitochondria from the P301L tau mice. As shown previously, tau expression decreased mitochondrial complex I activity. The decreased complex I activity, decreased ADP-stimulated respiratory rate, and increased mitochondrial membrane potential occurring in mitochondria from Tg4510 mice were not restored by CR. However, the CR diet did result in a genotype independent decrease in mitochondrial F0F1-ATPase activity. This decrease in F0F1-ATPase activity was not due to lowered levels of the alpha or beta subunits of F0F1-ATPase. The possible mechanisms through which CR reduces the F0F1-ATPase activity in brain mitochondria are discussed. PMID:26048366

  15. M2-F1 lifting body and Paresev 1B on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    In this photo of the M2-F1 lifting body and the Paresev 1B on the ramp, the viewer sees two vehicles representing different approaches to building a research craft to simulate a spacecraft able to land on the ground instead of splashing down in the ocean as the Mercury capsules did. The M2-F1 was a lifting body, a shape able to re-enter from orbit and land. The Paresev (Paraglider Research Vehicle) used a Rogallo wing that could be (but never was) used to replace a conventional parachute for landing a capsule-type spacecraft, allowing it to make a controlled landing on the ground. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop

  16. 26 CFR 301.6231(f)-1 - Disallowance of losses and credits in certain cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... cases. 301.6231(f)-1 Section 301.6231(f)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... after the close of that taxable year, either— (i) The tax matters partner of that partnership resides... to a partnership for a partnership taxable year; (2) The Internal Revenue Service mails notice to...

  17. 26 CFR 1.665(f)-1A - Undistributed capital gain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Undistributed capital gain. 1.665(f)-1A Section... Taxable Years Beginning on Or After January 1, 1969 § 1.665(f)-1A Undistributed capital gain. (a) Domestic trusts. (1) The term undistributed capital gain means (in the case of a trust other than a foreign...

  18. 26 CFR 1.665(f)-1A - Undistributed capital gain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Undistributed capital gain. 1.665(f)-1A Section... Beginning on Or After January 1, 1969 § 1.665(f)-1A Undistributed capital gain. (a) Domestic trusts. (1) The term undistributed capital gain means (in the case of a trust other than a foreign trust created by a...

  19. 26 CFR 1.514(f)-1 - Definition of business lease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Definition of business lease. 1.514(f)-1 Section... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxation of Business Income of Certain Exempt Organizations § 1.514(f)-1 Definition of business lease. (a) In general. The term business lease means any...

  20. 26 CFR 1.514(f)-1 - Definition of business lease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Definition of business lease. 1.514(f)-1 Section... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxation of Business Income of Certain Exempt Organizations § 1.514(f)-1 Definition of business lease. (a) In general. The term business lease means any...

  1. E2F1 regulates autophagy and the transcription of autophagy genes.

    PubMed

    Polager, S; Ofir, M; Ginsberg, D

    2008-08-14

    The retinoblastoma pathway is often inactivated in human tumors resulting in deregulated E2F activity that can induce both proliferation and cell death. Although the role of E2F in apoptosis is well characterized, little is known regarding its putative participation in other cell death pathways. We show here that activation of E2F1 upregulates the expression of four autophagy genes-microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain-3 (LC3), autophagy-related gene-1 (ATG1), ATG5 and damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM). E2F1-mediated induction of LC3, ATG1 and DRAM is direct and indeed, endogenous E2F1 can be found bound to regions encompassing the promoters of these genes. Regulation of ATG5 by E2F1 is indirect. Importantly, we demonstrate that E2F1 activation enhances autophagy and conversely, reducing endogenous E2F1 expression inhibits DNA damage-induced autophagy. These studies identify E2F1 as a transcriptional regulator of autophagy, and for the first time establish a role for E2F1 in DNA damage-induced autophagy. PMID:18408756

  2. 16 CFR Appendix F1 to Part 305 - Standard Clothes Washers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Standard Clothes Washers F1 Appendix F1 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING DISCLOSURES REGARDING ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND WATER USE OF CERTAIN HOME APPLIANCES AND...

  3. 26 CFR 301.6501(f)-1 - Personal holding company tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Personal holding company tax. 301.6501(f)-1... Collection § 301.6501(f)-1 Personal holding company tax. If a corporation which is a personal holding company... capital stock of the corporation, the personal holding company tax for such year may be assessed, or...

  4. 26 CFR 301.6501(f)-1 - Personal holding company tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Personal holding company tax. 301.6501(f)-1... Collection § 301.6501(f)-1 Personal holding company tax. If a corporation which is a personal holding company... time during the last half of such taxable year, more than 50 percent in value of the...

  5. 26 CFR 1.514(f)-1 - Definition of business lease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Definition of business lease. 1.514(f)-1 Section... § 1.514(f)-1 Definition of business lease. (a) In general. The term business lease means any lease...) if at the close of the organization's taxable year there is a business lease indebtedness as...

  6. 26 CFR 1.430(f)-1 - Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance. 1.430(f)-1 Section 1.430(f)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Effect of prefunding balance and funding standard carryover balance. (a) In general—(1) Overview....

  7. Bmal1 is a direct transcriptional target of the orphan nuclear receptor, NR2F1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orphan nuclear receptor NR2F1 (also known as COUP-TFI, Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter Transcription Factor I) is a highly conserved member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. NR2F1 plays a critical role during embryonic development, particularly in the central and peripheral nervous systems a...

  8. Sterile Insect Technique and F1 Sterility in the European Grapevine Moth, Lobesia botrana

    PubMed Central

    Saour, George

    2014-01-01

    Newly emerged adults of the European grapevine moth, Lobesia botrana (Denis and Schiffermuller) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), were irradiated with various doses of gamma radiation and crossed to unirradiated counterparts of the opposite sex. Fecundity was decreased when unirradiated females were mated with either 300- or 350-Gy-irradiated males. Adult males that were irradiated with 400 Gy and mated with unirradiated females retained a residual fertility of 2.7%. The radiation dose at which irradiated females were found to be 100% sterile when mated with unirradiated males was 150 Gy. The inherited effects in the F1 progeny of irradiated male parents were examined at 100, 150, and 200 Gy. Fecundity and fertility of the F1 progeny of males irradiated with 150 Gy and inbred or crossed with irradiated and unirradiated moths were also recorded. A significant reduction in fertility was observed when F1 males mated with either F1 or unirradiated females. According to sterility index, F1 females who mated with F1 males had greater sterility than when F1 females were crossed to 150-Gy-irradiated males. Based upon the results of this study, 150 Gy of gamma radiation would be the optimal dose to use in a sterile insect technique and F1 sterility program against L. botrana. PMID:25373155

  9. 26 CFR 31.3121(f)-1 - American vessel and aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false American vessel and aircraft. 31.3121(f)-1... § 31.3121(f)-1 American vessel and aircraft. (a) The term “American vessel” means any vessel which is... States. It also includes any vessel which is neither documented nor numbered under the laws of the...

  10. 26 CFR 31.3121(f)-1 - American vessel and aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false American vessel and aircraft. 31.3121(f)-1... § 31.3121(f)-1 American vessel and aircraft. (a) The term “American vessel” means any vessel which is... States. It also includes any vessel which is neither documented nor numbered under the laws of the...

  11. Development of Yersinia pestis F1 antigen-loaded microspheres vaccine against plague

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-shiung; Li, I-Hsun; Hong, Po-da; Yeh, Ming-kung

    2014-01-01

    Yersinia pestis F1 antigen-loaded poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide)/polyethylene glycol (PEG) (PLGA/PEG) microspheres were produced using a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion/solvent extraction technique and assayed for their percent yield, entrapment efficiency, surface morphology, particle size, zeta potential, in vitro release properties, and in vivo animal protect efficacy. The Y. pestis F1 antigen-loaded microspheres (mean particle size 3.8 μm) exhibited a high loading capacity (4.5% w/w), yield (85.2%), and entrapment efficiency (38.1%), and presented a controlled in vitro release profile with a low initial burst (18.5%), then continued to release Y. pestis F1 antigen over 70 days. The distribution (%) of Y. pestis F1 on the microspheres surface, outer layer, and core was 3.1%, 28.9%, and 60.7%, respectively. A steady release rate was noticed to be 0.55 μg Y. pestis F1 antigen/mg microspheres/day of Y. pestis F1 antigen release maintained for 42 days. The cumulative release amount at the 1st, 28th, and 42nd days was 8.2, 26.7, and 31.0 μg Y. pestis F1 antigen/mg microspheres, respectively. The 100 times median lethal dose 50% (LD50) of Y. pestis Yokohama-R strain by intraperitoneal injection challenge in mice test, in which mice received one dose of 40 μg F1 antigen content of PLGA/PEG microspheres, F1 antigen in Al(OH)3, and in comparison with F1 antigen in Al(OH)3 vaccine in two doses, was evaluated after given by subcutaneous immunization of BALB/c mice. The study results show that the greatest survival was observed in the group of mice immunized with one dose of F1 antigen-loaded PLGA/PEG microspheres, and two doses of F1 antigen in Al(OH)3 vaccine (100%). In vivo vaccination studies also demonstrated that F1 vaccines microspheres had a protective ability; its steady-state IgG immune protection in mice plasma dramatic increased from 2 weeks (18,764±3,124) to 7 weeks (126,468±19,176) after vaccination. These findings strongly suggest that F1-antigen loaded

  12. Development of Yersinia pestis F1 antigen-loaded microspheres vaccine against plague.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-shiung; Li, I-Hsun; Hong, Po-da; Yeh, Ming-kung

    2014-01-01

    Yersinia pestis F1 antigen-loaded poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide)/polyethylene glycol (PEG) (PLGA/PEG) microspheres were produced using a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion/solvent extraction technique and assayed for their percent yield, entrapment efficiency, surface morphology, particle size, zeta potential, in vitro release properties, and in vivo animal protect efficacy. The Y. pestis F1 antigen-loaded microspheres (mean particle size 3.8 μm) exhibited a high loading capacity (4.5% w/w), yield (85.2%), and entrapment efficiency (38.1%), and presented a controlled in vitro release profile with a low initial burst (18.5%), then continued to release Y. pestis F1 antigen over 70 days. The distribution (%) of Y. pestis F1 on the microspheres surface, outer layer, and core was 3.1%, 28.9%, and 60.7%, respectively. A steady release rate was noticed to be 0.55 μg Y. pestis F1 antigen/mg microspheres/day of Y. pestis F1 antigen release maintained for 42 days. The cumulative release amount at the 1st, 28th, and 42nd days was 8.2, 26.7, and 31.0 μg Y. pestis F1 antigen/mg microspheres, respectively. The 100 times median lethal dose 50% (LD50) of Y. pestis Yokohama-R strain by intraperitoneal injection challenge in mice test, in which mice received one dose of 40 μg F1 antigen content of PLGA/PEG microspheres, F1 antigen in Al(OH)3, and in comparison with F1 antigen in Al(OH)3 vaccine in two doses, was evaluated after given by subcutaneous immunization of BALB/c mice. The study results show that the greatest survival was observed in the group of mice immunized with one dose of F1 antigen-loaded PLGA/PEG microspheres, and two doses of F1 antigen in Al(OH)3 vaccine (100%). In vivo vaccination studies also demonstrated that F1 vaccines microspheres had a protective ability; its steady-state IgG immune protection in mice plasma dramatic increased from 2 weeks (18,764 ± 3,124) to 7 weeks (126,468 ± 19,176) after vaccination. These findings strongly suggest that F1-antigen

  13. Mapping of fluoride endemic area and assessment of F(-1) accumulation in soil and vegetation.

    PubMed

    Saini, Poonam; Khan, Suphiya; Baunthiyal, Mamta; Sharma, Vinay

    2013-02-01

    The prevalence of fluorosis is mainly due to the consumption of more fluoride (F(-1)) through drinking water, vegetables, and crops. The objective of the study was mapping of F(-1) endemic area of Newai Tehsil, Tonk district, Rajasthan, India. For the present study, water, soil (0-45 cm), and vegetation samples were collected from 17 villages. Fluoride concentration in water samples ranged from 0.3 to 9.8 mg/l. Out of 17 villages studied, the amounts of F(-1) content of eight villages were found to exceed the permissible limits. Labile F(-1) content and total F(-1) content in soil samples ranges 11.00-70.05 mg/l and 50.3-179.63 μg g(-1), respectively. F(-1) content in tree species was found in this order Azadirachta indica 47.32-55.76 μg g(-1) > Prosopis juliflora 40.16-49.63 μg g(-1) > Acacia tortilis 34.39-43.60 μg g(-1). While in case of leafy vegetables, F(-1) content order was Chenopodium album 54.23-98.42 μg g(-1) > Spinacea oleracea 30.41-64.09 μg g(-1) > Mentha arvensis 35.48-51.97 μg g(-1). The order of F(-1) content in crops was found as 41.04 μg g(-1) Pennisetum glaucum > 13.61 μg g(-1) Brassica juncea > 7.98 μg g(-1) Triticum sativum in Krishi Vigyan Kendra (KVK) farms. Among vegetation, the leafy vegetables have more F(-1) content. From the results, it is suggested that the people of KVK farms should avoid the use of highly F(-1) containing water for irrigation and drinking purpose. It has been recommended to the government authority to take serious steps to supply drinking water with low F(-1) concentration for the fluorosis affected villages. Further, grow more F(-1) hyperaccumulator plants in F(-1) endemic areas to lower the F(-1) content of the soils. PMID:22638723

  14. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Disease Information > Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Explore this section to learn more about alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, including a description of the disorder ...

  15. Pigment Epithelium-derived Factor (PEDF) Binds to Cell-surface F1-ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Notari, Luigi; Arakaki, Naokatu; Mueller, David; Meier, Scott; Amaral, Juan; Becerra, S. Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a potent blocker of angiogenesis in vivo, and of endothelial cell migration and tubule formation, binds with high affinity to a yet unknown protein on the surface of endothelial cells. Given that protein fingerprinting suggested a match of a ~60-kDa PEDF-binding protein in bovine retina to Bos taurus F1-ATP synthase β-subunit, and that F1F0-ATP synthase components have been identified recently as cell-surface receptors, we examined the direct binding of PEDF to F1. Size-exclusion ultrafiltration assays showed that recombinant human PEDF formed a complex with recombinant yeast F1. Real-time binding by surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that yeast F1 interacted specifically and reversibly with human PEDF. Kinetic evaluations revealed high binding affinity for PEDF, in agreement with PEDF affinities for endothelial cell-surfaces. PEDF blocked interactions between F1 and angiostatin, another antiangiogenic factor, suggesting overlapping PEDF- and angiostatin-binding sites on F1. Surfaces of endothelial cells exhibited affinity for PEDF-binding proteins of ~60-kDa. Antibodies to F1 β-subunit specifically captured PEDF-binding components in endothelial plasma membranes. Extracellular ATP synthesis activity of endothelial cells was examined in the presence of PEDF. PEDF significantly inhibited the extracellular ATP produced by endothelial cells, in agreement with direct interactions between cell-surface ATP synthase and PEDF. In addition to demonstrating that PEDF binds to cell-surface F1, these results show that PEDF is a ligand for endothelial cell-surface F1F0-ATP synthase. They suggest that PEDF-mediated inhibition of ATP synthase may be part of the biochemical mechanisms by which PEDF exerts its antiangiogenic activity. PMID:20412062

  16. Suppression of F1 Male-Specific Lethality in Caenorhabditis Hybrids by cbr-him-8

    PubMed Central

    Ragavapuram, Vaishnavi; Hill, Emily Elaine; Baird, Scott Everet

    2015-01-01

    Haldane’s Rule and Darwin’s Corollary to Haldane’s Rule are the observations that heterogametic F1 hybrids are frequently less fit than their homogametic siblings, and that asymmetric results are often obtained from reciprocal hybrid crosses. In Caenorhabditis, Haldane’s Rule and Darwin’s Corollary have been observed in several hybrid crosses, including crosses of Caenorhabditis briggsae and C. nigoni. Fertile F1 females are obtained from reciprocal crosses. However, F1 males obtained from C. nigoni mothers are sterile and F1 males obtained from C. briggsae die during embryogenesis. We have identified cbr-him-8 as a recessive maternal-effect suppressor of F1 hybrid male-specific lethality in this combination of species. This result implicates epigenetic meiotic silencing in the suppression of F1 male-specific lethality. It is also shown that F1 males bearing a C. briggsae X chromosome are fertile. When crossed to C. briggsae hermaphrodites or F1 females derived from C. briggsae hermaphrodites, viable F2 and backcross (B2) progeny were obtained. Sibling males that possessed a C. nigoni X chromosome were sterile. Therefore, the sterility of F1 males bearing a C. nigoni X chromosome must result from dysgenic interactions between the X chromosome of C. nigoni and the autosomes of C. briggsae. The fertility of F1 males bearing a C. briggsae X chromosome provides an opportunity to identify C. nigoni loci that prevent spermatogenesis, and hence hermaphroditic reproduction, in diplo-X hybrids. PMID:26721896

  17. Fo-driven Rotation in the ATP Synthase Direction against the Force of F1 ATPase in the FoF1 ATP Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Martin, James; Hudson, Jennifer; Hornung, Tassilo; Frasch, Wayne D.

    2015-01-01

    Living organisms rely on the FoF1 ATP synthase to maintain the non-equilibrium chemical gradient of ATP to ADP and phosphate that provides the primary energy source for cellular processes. How the Fo motor uses a transmembrane electrochemical ion gradient to create clockwise torque that overcomes F1 ATPase-driven counterclockwise torque at high ATP is a major unresolved question. Using single FoF1 molecules embedded in lipid bilayer nanodiscs, we now report the observation of Fo-dependent rotation of the c10 ring in the ATP synthase (clockwise) direction against the counterclockwise force of ATPase-driven rotation that occurs upon formation of a leash with Fo stator subunit a. Mutational studies indicate that the leash is important for ATP synthase activity and support a mechanism in which residues aGlu-196 and cArg-50 participate in the cytoplasmic proton half-channel to promote leash formation. PMID:25713065

  18. Observation of B(s)(0) → J/ψ f1(1285) decays and measurement of the f1(1285) mixing angle.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Hafkenscheid, T W; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-03-01

    Decays of B(s)(0) and B(0) mesons into J/ψ π+π-π+π- final states, produced in pp collisions at the LHC, are investigated using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1 collected with the LHCb detector. B(s)(0) → J/ψ f1(1285) decays are seen for the first time, and the branching fractions are measured. Using these rates, the f1(1285) mixing angle between strange and nonstrange components of its wave function in the qq structure model is determined to be ±(24.0-2.6-0.8+3.1+0.6)°. Implications on the possible tetraquark nature of the f1(1285) are discussed. PMID:24655242

  19. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of FTZ-F1 in the GIFT tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jinling; Chen, Jianjie; Jiang, Zhongliang; Luo, Yongju; Gan, Xi

    2012-08-01

    The FTZ-F1 genes encode orphan receptors of the nuclear receptor superfamily and in mammals have been found to play important roles in the proper development of the adrenal-gonadal axis and sex-determination. We isolated the homologue of FTZ-F1 in genetically improved farmed tilapia (gfFTZ-F1). The full-length cDNA was isolated from the ovary, which included an open reading frame encoding a predicted protein of 486 amino acids. Sequence, tissue distribution and phylogenic analysis of the FTZ-F1 showed that the gfFTZ-F1 belonged to SF-1/Ad4BP group and that gfFTZ-F1 transcripts were only expressed in the gonads and kidney but not in other tissues. Likewise our data suggests that the gfFTZ-F1 gene may share similar functions with other fish and mammalian counterparts, though further study is needed to make any definitive conclusions. PMID:22855453

  20. Mechanistic Basis for Differential Inhibition of the F1Fo-ATPase by Aurovertin

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kathryn M.; Swenson, Lara; Opipari, Anthony W.; Reuter, Rolf; Zarrabi, Nawid; Fierke, Carol A.; Börsch, Michael; Glick, Gary D.

    2009-01-01

    The mitochondrial F1Fo-ATPase performs the terminal step of oxidative phosphorylation. Small molecules that modulate this enzyme have been invaluable in helping decipher F1Fo-ATPase structure, function, and mechanism. Aurovertin is an antibiotic that binds to the β subunits in the F1 domain and inhibits F1Fo-ATPase-catalyzed ATP synthesis in preference to ATP hydrolysis. Despite extensive study and the existence of crystallographic data, the molecular basis of the differential inhibition and kinetic mechanism of inhibition of ATP synthesis by aurovertin has not been resolved. To address these questions, we conducted a series of experiments in both bovine heart mitochondria and E. coli membrane F1Fo-ATPase. Aurovertin is a mixed, noncompetitive inhibitor of both ATP hydrolysis and synthesis with lower Ki values for synthesis. At low substrate concentrations, inhibition is cooperative suggesting a stoichiometry of two aurovertin per F1F0-ATPase. Furthermore, aurovertin does not completely inhibit the ATP hydrolytic activity at saturating concentrations. Single-molecule experiments provide evidence that the residual rate of ATP hydrolysis seen in the presence of saturating concentrations of aurovertin results from a decrease in the binding change mechanism by hindering catalytic site interactions. The results from these studies should further the understanding of how the F1Fo-ATPase catalyzes ATP synthesis and hydrolysis. PMID:19462418

  1. E2F1 mediates sustained lipogenesis and contributes to hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Denechaud, Pierre-Damien; Lopez-Mejia, Isabel C.; Giralt, Albert; Lai, Qiuwen; Blanchet, Emilie; Delacuisine, Brigitte; Nicolay, Brandon N.; Dyson, Nicholas J.; Bonner, Caroline; Pattou, François; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien; Fajas, Lluis

    2015-01-01

    E2F transcription factors are known regulators of the cell cycle, proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. Here, we reveal that E2F1 plays an essential role in liver physiopathology through the regulation of glycolysis and lipogenesis. We demonstrate that E2F1 deficiency leads to a decrease in glycolysis and de novo synthesis of fatty acids in hepatocytes. We further demonstrate that E2F1 directly binds to the promoters of key lipogenic genes, including Fasn, but does not bind directly to genes encoding glycolysis pathway components, suggesting an indirect effect. In murine models, E2F1 expression and activity increased in response to feeding and upon insulin stimulation through canonical activation of the CDK4/pRB pathway. Moreover, E2F1 expression was increased in liver biopsies from obese, glucose-intolerant humans compared with biopsies from lean subjects. Finally, E2f1 deletion completely abrogated hepatic steatosis in different murine models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In conclusion, our data demonstrate that E2F1 regulates lipid synthesis and glycolysis and thus contributes to the development of liver pathology. PMID:26619117

  2. Function of the nuclear receptor FTZ-F1 during the pupal stage in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Abdel-Rahman S; Oish, Yasuhiro; Ueda, Hitoshi

    2014-04-01

    The nuclear receptor βFTZ-F1 is expressed in most cells in a temporally specific manner, and its expression is induced immediately after decline in ecdysteroid levels. This factor plays important roles during embryogenesis, larval ecdysis, and early metamorphic stages. However, little is known about the expression pattern, regulation and function of this receptor during the pupal stage. We analyzed the expression pattern and regulation of ftz-f1 during the pupal period, as well as the phenotypes of RNAi knockdown or mutant animals, to elucidate its function during this stage. Western blotting revealed that βFTZ-F1 is expressed at a high level during the late pupal stage, and this expression is dependent on decreasing ecdysteroid levels. By immunohistological analysis of the late pupal stage, FTZ-F1 was detected in the nuclei of most cells, but cytoplasmic localization was observed only in the oogonia and follicle cells of the ovary. Both the ftz-f1 genetic mutant and temporally specific ftz-f1 knockdown using RNAi during the pupal stage showed defects in eclosion and in the eye, the antennal segment, the wing and the leg, including bristle color and sclerosis. These results suggest that βFTZ-F1 is expressed in most cells at the late pupal stage, under the control of ecdysteroids and plays important roles during pupal development. PMID:24611773

  3. NMR Characterization and Membrane Interactions of the Loop Region of Kindlin-3 F1 Subdomain.

    PubMed

    Chua, Geok-Lin; Tan, Suet-Mien; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2016-01-01

    Kindlins-1,2 and 3 are FERM domain-containing cytosolic proteins involved in the activation and regulation of integrin-mediated cell adhesion. Apart from binding to integrin β cytosolic tails, kindlins and the well characterized integrin-activator talin bind membrane phospholipids. The ubiquitin-like F1 sub-domain of the FERM domain of talin contains a short loop that binds to the lipid membrane. By contrast, the F1 sub-domain of kindlins contains a long loop demonstrated binding to the membrane. Here, we report structural characterization and lipid interactions of the 83-residue F1 loop of kindlin-3 using NMR and optical spectroscopy methods. NMR studies demonstrated that the F1 loop of kindlin-3 is globally unfolded but stretches of residues assuming transient helical conformations could be detected in aqueous solution. We mapped membrane binding interactions of the F1 loop with small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) containing either zwitterionic lipids or negatively charged lipids using 15N-1H HSQC titrations. These experiments revealed that the F1 loop of kindlin-3 preferentially interacted with the negatively charged SUVs employing almost all of the residues. By contrast, only fewer residues appeared to be interacted with SUVs containing neutral lipids. Further, CD and NMR data suggested stabilization of helical conformations and predominant resonance perturbations of the F1 loop in detergent containing solutions. Conformations of an isolated N-terminal peptide fragment, or EK21, of the F1 loop, containing a poly-Lys sequence motif, important for membrane interactions, were also investigated in detergent solutions. EK21 adopted a rather extended or β-type conformations in complex with negatively charged SDS micelles. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the conformations and residue-specific interactions of kindlin F1 loop with lipids. These data therefore provide important insights into the interactions of kindlin FERM domain with membrane

  4. NMR Characterization and Membrane Interactions of the Loop Region of Kindlin-3 F1 Subdomain

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Geok-Lin; Tan, Suet-Mien; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2016-01-01

    Kindlins-1,2 and 3 are FERM domain-containing cytosolic proteins involved in the activation and regulation of integrin-mediated cell adhesion. Apart from binding to integrin β cytosolic tails, kindlins and the well characterized integrin-activator talin bind membrane phospholipids. The ubiquitin-like F1 sub-domain of the FERM domain of talin contains a short loop that binds to the lipid membrane. By contrast, the F1 sub-domain of kindlins contains a long loop demonstrated binding to the membrane. Here, we report structural characterization and lipid interactions of the 83-residue F1 loop of kindlin-3 using NMR and optical spectroscopy methods. NMR studies demonstrated that the F1 loop of kindlin-3 is globally unfolded but stretches of residues assuming transient helical conformations could be detected in aqueous solution. We mapped membrane binding interactions of the F1 loop with small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) containing either zwitterionic lipids or negatively charged lipids using 15N-1H HSQC titrations. These experiments revealed that the F1 loop of kindlin-3 preferentially interacted with the negatively charged SUVs employing almost all of the residues. By contrast, only fewer residues appeared to be interacted with SUVs containing neutral lipids. Further, CD and NMR data suggested stabilization of helical conformations and predominant resonance perturbations of the F1 loop in detergent containing solutions. Conformations of an isolated N-terminal peptide fragment, or EK21, of the F1 loop, containing a poly-Lys sequence motif, important for membrane interactions, were also investigated in detergent solutions. EK21 adopted a rather extended or β-type conformations in complex with negatively charged SDS micelles. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the conformations and residue-specific interactions of kindlin F1 loop with lipids. These data therefore provide important insights into the interactions of kindlin FERM domain with membrane

  5. Structural Insight into BH3 Domain Binding of Vaccinia Virus Antiapoptotic F1L

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Stephanie; Thibault, John; Mehta, Ninad; Colman, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apoptosis is a tightly regulated process that plays a crucial role in the removal of virus-infected cells, a process controlled by both pro- and antiapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family. The proapoptotic proteins Bak and Bax are regulated by antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins and are also activated by a subset of proteins known as BH3-only proteins that perform dual functions by directly activating Bak and Bax or by sequestering and neutralizing antiapoptotic family members. Numerous viruses express proteins that prevent premature host cell apoptosis. Vaccinia virus encodes F1L, an antiapoptotic protein essential for survival of infected cells that bears no discernible sequence homology to mammalian cell death inhibitors. Despite the limited sequence similarities, F1L has been shown to adopt a novel dimeric Bcl-2-like fold that enables hetero-oligomeric binding to both Bak and the proapoptotic BH3-only protein Bim that ultimately prevents Bak and Bax homo-oligomerization. However, no structural data on the mode of engagement of F1L and its Bcl-2 counterparts are available. Here we solved the crystal structures of F1L in complex with two ligands, Bim and Bak. Our structures indicate that F1L can engage two BH3 ligands simultaneously via the canonical Bcl-2 ligand binding grooves. Furthermore, by structure-guided mutagenesis, we generated point mutations within the binding pocket of F1L in order to elucidate the residues responsible for both Bim and Bak binding and prevention of apoptosis. We propose that the sequestration of Bim by F1L is primarily responsible for preventing apoptosis during vaccinia virus infection. IMPORTANCE Numerous viruses have adapted strategies to counteract apoptosis by encoding proteins responsible for sequestering proapoptotic components. Vaccinia virus, the prototypical member of the family Orthopoxviridae, encodes a protein known as F1L that functions to prevent apoptosis by interacting with Bak and the BH3-only protein Bim. Despite

  6. Disruption of RB/E2F-1 interaction by single point mutations in E2F-1 enhances S-phase entry and apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shan, B; Durfee, T; Lee, W H

    1996-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (RB) has been proposed to function as a negative regulator of cell proliferation by complexing with cellular proteins such as the transcription factor E2F. To study the biological consequences of the RB/E2F-1 interaction, point mutants of E2F-1 which fail to bind to RB were isolated by using the yeast two-hybrid system. Sequence analysis revealed that within the minimal 18-amino acid peptide of E2F-1 required for RB binding, five residues, Tyr (position 411), Glu (419), and Asp-Leu-Phe (423-425), are critical. These amino acids are conserved among the known E2F family members. While mutation of any of these five amino acids abolished binding to RB, all mutants retained their full transactivation potential. Expression of mutated E2F-1, when compared with that of wild-type, significantly accelerated entry into S phase and subsequent apoptosis. These results provide direct genetic evidence for the biological significance of the RB/E2F interaction and strongly suggest that the interplay between RB and E2F is critical for proper cell cycle progression. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8570615

  7. 17 CFR 270.18f-1 - Exemption from certain requirements of section 18(f)(1) (of the Act) for registered open-end...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements of section 18(f)(1) (of the Act) for registered open-end investment companies which have the right... which have the right to redeem in kind. (a) A registered open-end investment company which has the right... to pay in cash all requests for redemption by any shareholder of record, limited in amount...

  8. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-F1 Sanitary Sewer System (124-F-1) and the 100-F-26:8 (1607-F1) Sanitary Sewer Pipelines Waste Sites, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2004-130

    SciTech Connect

    L. M. Dittmer

    2008-03-14

    The 1607-F1 Sanitary Sewer System (124-F-1), consisted of a septic tank, drain field, and associated pipelines that received sanitary waste water from the 1701-F Gatehouse, 1709-F Fire Station, and the 1720-F Administrative Office via the 100-F-26:8 pipelines. The septic tank required remedial action based on confirmatory sampling. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  9. Failure of the inhibition of rat gastric mucosal 5-lipoxygenase by novel acetohydroxamic acids to prevent ethanol-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Boughton-Smith, N K; Whittle, B J

    1988-09-01

    1. The role of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and LTC4 as mediators of gastric mucosal damage following ethanol challenge in vivo has been investigated using two selective 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors, BW A4C and BW A137C. 2. Oral administration of ethanol to rats in vivo, induced macroscopic damage to the gastric mucosa and markedly increased the formation of the 5-lipoxygenase products, LTB4 and LTC4, from the mucosa ex vivo. 3. Pretreatment with the acetohydroxamic acids BW A4C and BW A137C (5-50 mg kg-1 p.o.) dose-dependently reduced ethanol-stimulated LTB4 and LTC4 formation by the gastric mucosa, with an ID50 of approximately 5 mg kg-1 p.o. 4. A single oral dose of BW A4C (20 mg kg-1) induced near-maximal inhibition of mucosal LTB4 formation within 30 min, which was well maintained for 5 h, whereas BW A137C (20 mg kg-1 p.o.) induced maximal inhibition between 30 and 60 min after administration, which then diminished over the subsequent 5 h. 5. The mucosal formation of the cyclo-oxygenase product, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha, which was unaltered following ethanol challenge, was not inhibited by the acetohydroxamic acids. Likewise, the small increase in mucosal thromboxane B2 formation following challenge was not inhibited by BW A4C. 6. Neither BW A4C nor BW A137C, at doses that almost completely inhibited the mucosal synthesis of LTB4 or LTC4, reduced the macroscopic gastric mucosal damage induced by ethanol. 7. Pretreatment with the lipoxygenase inhibitor BW 755C (5-50 mg kg-1 p.o.) did reduce mucosal damage, but there was a dissociation between the degree of protection and the inhibition of leukotriene biosynthesis. 8. Oral administration of high doses of either BW A4C or BW A137C (300mgkg-1) did not induce macroscopic gastric damage over a 3 h period. 9. These findings suggest that the leukotrienes, LTB4 and LTC4 are not the primary mediators of ethanol-induced acute mucosal damage, but do not exclude their role in more chronic gastric damage and inflammation. PMID

  10. GENERAL: Stochastic Four-State Mechanochemical Model of F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei-Xia; Zhan, Yong; Zhao, Tong-Jun; Han, Ying-Rong; Chen, Ya-Fei

    2010-10-01

    F1-ATPase, a part of ATP synthase, can synthesize and hydrolyze ATP moleculars in which the central γ-subunit rotates inside the α3 β3cylinder. A stochastic four-state mechanochemical coupling model of F1-ATPase is studied with the aid of the master equation. In this model, the ATP hydrolysis and synthesis are dependent on ATP, ADP, and Pi concentrations. The effects of ATP concentration, ADP concentration, and the external torque on the occupation probability of binding-state, the rotation rate and the diffusion coefficient of F1-ATPase are investigated. Moreover, the results from this model are compared with experiments. The mechanochemical mechanism F1-ATPase is qualitatively explained by the model.

  11. To live or let die – complexity within the E2F1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Poppy Roworth, A; Ghari, Fatemeh; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2015-01-01

    The E2F1 transcription factor is a recognized regulator of the cell cycle as well as a potent mediator of DNA damage-induced apoptosis and the checkpoint response. Understanding the diverse and seemingly dichotomous functions of E2F1 activity has been the focus of extensive ongoing research. Although the E2F pathway is frequently deregulated in cancer, the contributions of E2F1 itself to tumorigenesis, as a promoter of proliferation or cell death, are far from understood. In this review we aim to provide an update on our current understanding of E2F1, with particular insight into its novel interaction partners and post-translational modifications, as a means to explaining its diverse functional complexity. PMID:27308406

  12. Cytogenetic studies of the F1 hybrids of Capsicum annuum with C. chinense and C. baccatum.

    PubMed

    Aniel Kumar, O; Panda, R C; Raja Rao, K G

    1987-06-01

    Partially sterile interspecific hybrids were obtained between C. annuum var. 'cerasiformis' and C. chinense var. 'mishme' (H1), and C. annuum var. 'cerasiformis' and C. baccatum var. 'pendulum' (H2). Morphologically the F1 hybrids were intermediate between the corresponding parents. Meiosis was irregular in the two F1 hybrids. Cytological analysis of the two F1 hybrids revealed that the genome of C. annuum differs from C. chinense by two translocations and some minor structural alterations and from C. baccatum by two translocations, a single inversion and some minor structural alterations. Isolation barriers such as hybrid inviability, weakness and hybrid breakdown in the H1 hybrid and, inaddition, desynapsis in the H2, were operative in these taxa. The differences between the present findings and those reported earlier on the two F1hybrids were attributed to differences in the genetic architecture of the taxa employed in hybridization. PMID:24241571

  13. Atrazine binds to F1F0-ATP synthase and inhibits mitochondrial function in sperm.

    PubMed

    Hase, Yasuyoshi; Tatsuno, Michiko; Nishi, Takeyuki; Kataoka, Kosuke; Kabe, Yasuaki; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Ozawa, Nobuaki; Natori, Michiya; Handa, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hajime

    2008-02-01

    Atrazine is a widely used triazine herbicide. Although controversy still exists, a number of recent studies have described its adverse effects on various animals including humans. Of particular interest is its effects on reproductive capacity. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the adverse effects of atrazine, with a focus on its effects on sperm. Here we show evidence that mitochondrial F(1)F(0)-ATP synthase is a molecular target of atrazine. A series of experiments with sperm and isolated mitochondria suggest that atrazine inhibits mitochondrial function through F(1)F(0)-ATP synthase. Moreover, affinity purification using atrazine as a ligand demonstrates that F(1)F(0)-ATP synthase is a major atrazine-binding protein in cells. The inhibitory activity against mitochondria and F(1)F(0)-ATP synthase is not limited to atrazine but is likely to be applicable to other triazine-based compounds. Thus, our findings may have wide relevance to pharmacology and toxicology. PMID:18060860

  14. 22. STATIC TEST TOWER VIEW OF TEST CELLS AND F1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. STATIC TEST TOWER VIEW OF TEST CELLS AND F-1 TEST LOCK DOWN FOR ENGINE. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  15. 24. CLOSEUP OF MOUNT FOR F1 ENGINE ON STATIC TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. CLOSE-UP OF MOUNT FOR F-1 ENGINE ON STATIC TEST TOWER WITH STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS TEST STAND IN DISTANCE. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  16. Recovered Apollo-Era Saturn V F-1 Engines Arrive at Cape Canaveral

    NASA Video Gallery

    Two F-1 engines that powered the first stage of the Saturn V rockets that lifted NASA’s Apollo missions to the moon were recovered from the Atlantic Ocean March 20, 2013 by Jeff Bezos, the founde...

  17. ATP hydrolysis assists phosphate release and promotes reaction ordering in F1-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Biu; Ueno, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2015-01-01

    F1-ATPase (F1) is a rotary motor protein that can efficiently convert chemical energy to mechanical work of rotation via fine coordination of its conformational motions and reaction sequences. Compared with reactant binding and product release, the ATP hydrolysis has relatively little contributions to the torque and chemical energy generation. To scrutinize possible roles of ATP hydrolysis, we investigate the detailed statistics of the catalytic dwells from high-speed single wild-type F1 observations. Here we report a small rotation during the catalytic dwell triggered by the ATP hydrolysis that is indiscernible in previous studies. Moreover, we find in freely rotating F1 that ATP hydrolysis is followed by the release of inorganic phosphate with low synthesis rates. Finally, we propose functional roles of the ATP hydrolysis as a key to kinetically unlock the subsequent phosphate release and promote the correct reaction ordering. PMID:26678797

  18. 40 CFR Figure F-1 to Subpart F of... - Designation Testing Checklist

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Testing Performance Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Fig. F-1... Application Spec. Corresponding to Sections of 40 CFR Part 53, Subparts E and F Verification...

  19. ATP hydrolysis assists phosphate release and promotes reaction ordering in F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Biu; Ueno, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2015-12-01

    F1-ATPase (F1) is a rotary motor protein that can efficiently convert chemical energy to mechanical work of rotation via fine coordination of its conformational motions and reaction sequences. Compared with reactant binding and product release, the ATP hydrolysis has relatively little contributions to the torque and chemical energy generation. To scrutinize possible roles of ATP hydrolysis, we investigate the detailed statistics of the catalytic dwells from high-speed single wild-type F1 observations. Here we report a small rotation during the catalytic dwell triggered by the ATP hydrolysis that is indiscernible in previous studies. Moreover, we find in freely rotating F1 that ATP hydrolysis is followed by the release of inorganic phosphate with low synthesis rates. Finally, we propose functional roles of the ATP hydrolysis as a key to kinetically unlock the subsequent phosphate release and promote the correct reaction ordering.

  20. 26 CFR 31.3121(f)-1 - American vessel and aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false American vessel and aircraft. 31.3121(f)-1... § 31.3121(f)-1 American vessel and aircraft. (a) The term “American vessel” means any vessel which is...”, see § 31.3121 (e)-1.) (b) The term “American aircraft” means any aircraft registered under the laws...

  1. 26 CFR 31.3121(f)-1 - American vessel and aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false American vessel and aircraft. 31.3121(f)-1... § 31.3121(f)-1 American vessel and aircraft. (a) The term “American vessel” means any vessel which is...”, see § 31.3121 (e)-1.) (b) The term “American aircraft” means any aircraft registered under the laws...

  2. 26 CFR 1.669(f)-1A - Character of capital gain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Character of capital gain. 1.669(f)-1A Section 1... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.669(f)-1A Character of capital gain. Amounts distributed as a capital... character that the gain had with respect to the trust. Thus, a capital gain that was taxed to the trust as...

  3. 26 CFR 1.669(f)-1A - Character of capital gain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Character of capital gain. 1.669(f)-1A Section 1... Before January 1, 1969 § 1.669(f)-1A Character of capital gain. Amounts distributed as a capital gain... the gain had with respect to the trust. Thus, a capital gain that was taxed to the trust as a...

  4. Installation of the F-1 Engine to the Saturn V S-IC Stage for Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Engineers at the Marshall Space Flight Center install the F-1 engines on the S-IC stage thrust structure at the S-IC static test stand. Engines are installed on the stage after it has been placed in the test stand. Five F-1 engines, each weighing 10 tons, gave the booster a total thrust of 7,500,000 pounds, roughly equivalent to 160 million horsepower.

  5. Complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus marinus Stetter and Fiala 1986 type strain F1

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Sun, Hui; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Lucas, Susan; Barry, Kerrie; Land, Miriam L; Richardson, P M; Huber, Harald; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2009-01-01

    Staphylothermus marinus Fiala and Stetter 1986 belongs to the order Desulfurococcales within the archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota. S. marinus is a hyperthermophilic, sulfur-dependent, anaerobic heterotroph. Strain F1 was isolated from geothermally heated sediments at Vulcano, Italy, but S. marinus has also been isolated from a hydrothermal vent on the East Pacific Rise. We report the complete genome of S. marinus strain F1, the type strain of the species. This is the fifth reported complete genome sequence from the order Desulfurococcales.

  6. 26 CFR 31.3402(f)(1)-1 - Withholding exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Withholding exemptions. 31.3402(f)(1)-1 Section 31.3402(f)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source §...

  7. 26 CFR 31.3402(f)(1)-1 - Withholding exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Withholding exemptions. 31.3402(f)(1)-1 Section 31.3402(f)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source §...

  8. 26 CFR 31.3121(f)-1 - American vessel and aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false American vessel and aircraft. 31.3121(f)-1... § 31.3121(f)-1 American vessel and aircraft. (a) The term “American vessel” means any vessel which is...”, see § 31.3121 (e)-1.) (b) The term “American aircraft” means any aircraft registered under the laws...

  9. Cezanne regulates E2F1-dependent HIF2α expression.

    PubMed

    Moniz, Sonia; Bandarra, Daniel; Biddlestone, John; Campbell, Kirsteen J; Komander, David; Bremm, Anja; Rocha, Sonia

    2015-08-15

    Mechanisms regulating protein degradation ensure the correct and timely expression of transcription factors such as hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). Under normal O2 tension, HIFα subunits are targeted for proteasomal degradation, mainly through vHL-dependent ubiquitylation. Deubiquitylases are responsible for reversing this process. Although the mechanism and regulation of HIFα by ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation has been the object of many studies, little is known about the role of deubiquitylases. Here, we show that expression of HIF2α (encoded by EPAS1) is regulated by the deubiquitylase Cezanne (also known as OTUD7B) in an E2F1-dependent manner. Knockdown of Cezanne downregulates HIF2α mRNA, protein and activity independently of hypoxia and proteasomal degradation. Mechanistically, expression of the HIF2α gene is controlled directly by E2F1, and Cezanne regulates the stability of E2F1. Exogenous E2F1 can rescue HIF2α transcript and protein expression when Cezanne is depleted. Taken together, these data reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of the expression of HIF2α, demonstrating that the HIF2α promoter is regulated by E2F1 directly and that Cezanne regulates HIF2α expression through control of E2F1 levels. Our results thus suggest that HIF2α is controlled transcriptionally in a cell-cycle-dependent manner and in response to oncogenic signalling. PMID:26148512

  10. Redox Regulation of Rotation of the Cyanobacterial F1-ATPase Containing Thiol Regulation Switch*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yusung; Konno, Hiroki; Sugano, Yasushi; Hisabori, Toru

    2011-01-01

    F1-ATP synthase (F1-ATPase) is equipped with a special mechanism that prevents the wasteful reverse reaction, ATP hydrolysis, when there is insufficient proton motive force to drive ATP synthesis. Chloroplast F1-ATPase is subject to redox regulation, whereby ATP hydrolysis activity is regulated by formation and reduction of the disulfide bond located on the γ subunit. To understand the molecular mechanism of this redox regulation, we constructed a chimeric F1 complex (α3β3γredox) using cyanobacterial F1, which mimics the regulatory properties of the chloroplast F1-ATPase, allowing the study of its regulation at the single molecule level. The redox state of the γ subunit did not affect the ATP binding rate to the catalytic site(s) and the torque for rotation. However, the long pauses caused by ADP inhibition were frequently observed in the oxidized state. In addition, the duration of continuous rotation was relatively shorter in the oxidized α3β3γredox complex. These findings lead us to conclude that redox regulation of CF1-ATPase is achieved by controlling the probability of ADP inhibition via the γ subunit inserted region, a sequence feature observed in both cyanobacterial and chloroplast ATPase γ subunits, which is important for ADP inhibition (Sunamura, E., Konno, H., Imashimizu-Kobayashi, M., Sugano, Y., and Hisabori, T. (2010) Plant Cell Physiol. 51, 855–865). PMID:21193405

  11. Target genes regulated by transcription factor E2F1 in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zun-Ling; Jiao, Fei; Ma, Ying; Yue, Zhen; Kong, Li-Jun

    2016-06-25

    Previously, we have reported that transcription factor E2F1 expression is up-regulated in approximately 95% of small cell lung cancer tissue samples and closely associated with invasion and metastasis, but few studies have investigated specific target genes regulated by E2F1 in this disease. The aim of this study was to clarify the target genes controlled by E2F1 in the small cell lung cancer cell line H1688. The results of chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) showed that total 5 326 potential target genes were identified, in which 4 700 were structural genes and 626 long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Gene Ontology (GO) and enrichment map analysis results indicated that these target genes were associated with three main functions: (1) cell cycle regulation, (2) chromatin and histone modification, and (3) protein transport. MEME4.7.0 software was used to identify the E2F1 binding DNA motif, and six motifs were discovered for coding genes and lncRNAs. These results clarify the target genes of E2F1, and provide the experimental basis for further exploring the roles of E2F1 in tumorigenesis, development, invasion and metastasis, recurrence, and drug resistance in small cell lung cancer. PMID:27350200

  12. Citrullination-acetylation interplay guides E2F-1 activity during the inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Ghari, Fatemeh; Quirke, Anne-Marie; Munro, Shonagh; Kawalkowska, Joanna; Picaud, Sarah; McGouran, Joanna; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Muth, Aaron; Williams, Richard; Kessler, Benedikt; Thompson, Paul R.; Fillipakopoulos, Panagis; Knapp, Stefan; Venables, Patrick J.; La Thangue, Nicholas B.

    2016-01-01

    Peptidyl arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is a nuclear enzyme that converts arginine residues to citrulline. Although increasingly implicated in inflammatory disease and cancer, the mechanism of action of PAD4 and its functionally relevant pathways remains unclear. E2F transcription factors are a family of master regulators that coordinate gene expression during cellular proliferation and diverse cell fates. We show that E2F-1 is citrullinated by PAD4 in inflammatory cells. Citrullination of E2F-1 assists its chromatin association, specifically to cytokine genes in granulocyte cells. Mechanistically, citrullination augments binding of the BET (bromodomain and extra-terminal domain) family bromodomain reader BRD4 (bromodomain-containing protein 4) to an acetylated domain in E2F-1, and PAD4 and BRD4 coexist with E2F-1 on cytokine gene promoters. Accordingly, the combined inhibition of PAD4 and BRD4 disrupts the chromatin-bound complex and suppresses cytokine gene expression. In the murine collagen-induced arthritis model, chromatin-bound E2F-1 in inflammatory cells and consequent cytokine expression are diminished upon small-molecule inhibition of PAD4 and BRD4, and the combined treatment is clinically efficacious in preventing disease progression. Our results shed light on a new transcription-based mechanism that mediates the inflammatory effect of PAD4 and establish the interplay between citrullination and acetylation in the control of E2F-1 as a regulatory interface for driving inflammatory gene expression. PMID:26989780

  13. The missing link between thermodynamics and structure in F1-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, W.; Gao, Y. Q.; Cui, Q.; Ma, J.; Karplus, M.

    2003-01-01

    F1Fo-ATP synthase is the enzyme responsible for most of the ATP synthesis in living systems. The catalytic domain F1 of the F1Fo complex, F1-ATPase, has the ability to hydrolyze ATP. A fundamental problem in the development of a detailed mechanism for this enzyme is that it has not been possible to determine experimentally the relation between the ligand binding affinities measured in solution and the different conformations of the catalytic β subunits (βTP, βDP, βE) observed in the crystal structures of the mitochondrial enzyme, MF1. Using free energy difference simulations for the hydrolysis reaction ATP+H2O → ADP+Pi in the βTP and βDP sites and unisite hydrolysis data, we are able to identify βTP as the “tight” (KD = 10−12 M, MF1) binding site for ATP and βDP as the “loose” site. An energy decomposition analysis demonstrates how certain residues, some of which have been shown to be important in catalysis, modulate the free energy of the hydrolysis reaction in the βTP and βDP sites, even though their structures are very similar. Combined with the recently published simulations of the rotation cycle of F1-ATPase, the present results make possible a consistent description of the binding change mechanism of F1-ATPase at an atomic level of detail. PMID:12552084

  14. Cezanne regulates E2F1-dependent HIF2α expression

    PubMed Central

    Moniz, Sonia; Bandarra, Daniel; Biddlestone, John; Campbell, Kirsteen J.; Komander, David; Bremm, Anja; Rocha, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mechanisms regulating protein degradation ensure the correct and timely expression of transcription factors such as hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). Under normal O2 tension, HIFα subunits are targeted for proteasomal degradation, mainly through vHL-dependent ubiquitylation. Deubiquitylases are responsible for reversing this process. Although the mechanism and regulation of HIFα by ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation has been the object of many studies, little is known about the role of deubiquitylases. Here, we show that expression of HIF2α (encoded by EPAS1) is regulated by the deubiquitylase Cezanne (also known as OTUD7B) in an E2F1-dependent manner. Knockdown of Cezanne downregulates HIF2α mRNA, protein and activity independently of hypoxia and proteasomal degradation. Mechanistically, expression of the HIF2α gene is controlled directly by E2F1, and Cezanne regulates the stability of E2F1. Exogenous E2F1 can rescue HIF2α transcript and protein expression when Cezanne is depleted. Taken together, these data reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of the expression of HIF2α, demonstrating that the HIF2α promoter is regulated by E2F1 directly and that Cezanne regulates HIF2α expression through control of E2F1 levels. Our results thus suggest that HIF2α is controlled transcriptionally in a cell-cycle-dependent manner and in response to oncogenic signalling. PMID:26148512

  15. Citrullination-acetylation interplay guides E2F-1 activity during the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Ghari, Fatemeh; Quirke, Anne-Marie; Munro, Shonagh; Kawalkowska, Joanna; Picaud, Sarah; McGouran, Joanna; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Muth, Aaron; Williams, Richard; Kessler, Benedikt; Thompson, Paul R; Fillipakopoulos, Panagis; Knapp, Stefan; Venables, Patrick J; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2016-02-01

    Peptidyl arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is a nuclear enzyme that converts arginine residues to citrulline. Although increasingly implicated in inflammatory disease and cancer, the mechanism of action of PAD4 and its functionally relevant pathways remains unclear. E2F transcription factors are a family of master regulators that coordinate gene expression during cellular proliferation and diverse cell fates. We show that E2F-1 is citrullinated by PAD4 in inflammatory cells. Citrullination of E2F-1 assists its chromatin association, specifically to cytokine genes in granulocyte cells. Mechanistically, citrullination augments binding of the BET (bromodomain and extra-terminal domain) family bromodomain reader BRD4 (bromodomain-containing protein 4) to an acetylated domain in E2F-1, and PAD4 and BRD4 coexist with E2F-1 on cytokine gene promoters. Accordingly, the combined inhibition of PAD4 and BRD4 disrupts the chromatin-bound complex and suppresses cytokine gene expression. In the murine collagen-induced arthritis model, chromatin-bound E2F-1 in inflammatory cells and consequent cytokine expression are diminished upon small-molecule inhibition of PAD4 and BRD4, and the combined treatment is clinically efficacious in preventing disease progression. Our results shed light on a new transcription-based mechanism that mediates the inflammatory effect of PAD4 and establish the interplay between citrullination and acetylation in the control of E2F-1 as a regulatory interface for driving inflammatory gene expression. PMID:26989780

  16. Transcriptional regulation of human RANK ligand gene expression by E2F1

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Yan; Sun Meng; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Lou Wei; Pinder, Elaine; Gao, Allen C.

    2008-06-06

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) is a critical osteoclastogenic factor involved in the regulation of bone resorption, immune function, the development of mammary gland and cardiovascular system. To understand the transcriptional regulation of RANKL, we amplified and characterized a 1890 bp 5'-flanking sequence of human RANKL gene (-1782 bp to +108 bp relative to the transcription start site). Using a series of deletion mutations of the 1890 bp RANKL promoter, we identified a 72 bp region (-172 to -100 bp) mediating RANKL basal transcriptional activity. Sequence analysis revealed a putative E2F binding site within this 72 bp region in the human RANKL promoter. Overexpression of E2F1 increased RANKL promoter activity, while down-regulation of E2F1 expression by small interfering RNA decreased RANKL promoter activity. RT-PCR and enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) further demonstrated that E2F1 induced the expression of RANKL. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays (EMSA) and antibody competition assays confirmed that E2F1 proteins bind to the consensus E2F binding site in the RANKL promoter. Mutation of the E2F consensus binding site in the RANKL promoter profoundly reduced the basal promoter activity and abolished the transcriptional modulation of RANKL by E2F1. These results suggest that E2F1 plays an important role in regulating RANKL transcription through binding to the E2F consensus binding site.

  17. Transcriptional regulation of BMCC1 mediated by E2F1 in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Sazzadul; Tatsumi, Yasutoshi; Takano, Ryo; Yokochi, Tomoki; Akter, Jesmin; Ozaki, Toshinori; Nakamura, Yohko; Ohira, Miki; Nakagawara, Akira

    2016-09-01

    BCH motif-containing molecule at the carboxyl terminal region 1 (BMCC1)/PRUNE2 is highly expressed in patients with favorable neuroblastoma (NB), encoding a multifunctional scaffold protein that modulates several signaling networks including RhoA and AKT pathways. Accumulating evidence suggests that BMCC1 acts as a tumor-suppressor. In this study, we addressed molecular mechanism underlying transcriptional regulation of BMCC1 in NBs. We found that transcription factor E2F1 was recruited to E2F-binding site in the promoter region of BMCC1 gene. Indeed, overexpression of E2F1 resulted in an increase in the expression level of BMCC1 in NB cell lines. On the other hand, knockdown of E2F1 in NB cells yielded down-regulation of BMCC1. Also, we showed that BMCC1 and E2F1 were simultaneously induced at G1 to S phase transition. Therefore, we conclude that E2F1 directly facilitated BMCC1 transcription. Taking together, these results suggest that BMCC1 induced by E2F1 acts as a tumor suppressor through its pro-apoptotic function, resulted in favorable prognosis of NB. PMID:27453342

  18. E2F1 loss induces spontaneous tumour development in Rb-deficient epidermis.

    PubMed

    Costa, C; Santos, M; Martínez-Fernández, M; Dueñas, M; Lorz, C; García-Escudero, R; Paramio, J M

    2013-06-13

    The specific ablation of Rb1 gene in epidermis (Rb(F/F);K14cre) promotes proliferation and altered differentiation but does not produce spontaneous tumour development. These phenotypic changes are associated with increased expression of E2F members and E2F-dependent transcriptional activity. Here, we have focused on the possible dependence on E2F1 gene function. We have generated mice that lack Rb1 in epidermis in an inducible manner (Rb(F/F);K14creER(TM)). These mice are indistinguishable from those lacking pRb in this tissue in a constitutive manner (Rb(F/F);K14cre). In an E2F1-null background (Rb(F/F);K14creER(TM); and E2F1(-/-) mice), the phenotype due to acute Rb1 loss is not ameliorated by E2F1 loss, but rather exacerbated, indicating that pRb functions in epidermis do not rely solely on E2F1. On the other hand, Rb(F/F);K14creER(TM);E2F1(-/-) mice develop spontaneous epidermal tumours of hair follicle origin with high incidence. These tumours, which retain a functional p19(arf)/p53 axis, also show aberrant activation of β-catenin/Wnt pathway. Gene expression studies revealed that these tumours display relevant similarities with specific human tumours. These data demonstrate that the Rb/E2F1 axis exerts essential functions not only in maintaining epidermal homoeostasis, but also in suppressing tumour development in epidermis, and that the disruption of this pathway may induce tumour progression through specific alteration of developmental programs. PMID:22890321

  19. Scavenger receptors mediate the role of SUMO and Ftz-f1 in Drosophila steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Talamillo, Ana; Herboso, Leire; Pirone, Lucia; Pérez, Coralia; González, Monika; Sánchez, Jonatan; Mayor, Ugo; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Rodriguez, Manuel S; Sutherland, James D; Barrio, Rosa

    2013-04-01

    SUMOylation participates in ecdysteroid biosynthesis at the onset of metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Silencing the Drosophila SUMO homologue smt3 in the prothoracic gland leads to reduced lipid content, low ecdysone titers, and a block in the larval-pupal transition. Here we show that the SR-BI family of Scavenger Receptors mediates SUMO functions. Reduced levels of Snmp1 compromise lipid uptake in the prothoracic gland. In addition, overexpression of Snmp1 is able to recover lipid droplet levels in the smt3 knockdown prothoracic gland cells. Snmp1 expression depends on Ftz-f1 (an NR5A-type orphan nuclear receptor), the expression of which, in turn, depends on SUMO. Furthermore, we show by in vitro and in vivo experiments that Ftz-f1 is SUMOylated. RNAi-mediated knockdown of ftz-f1 phenocopies that of smt3 at the larval to pupal transition, thus Ftz-f1 is an interesting candidate to mediate some of the functions of SUMO at the onset of metamorphosis. Additionally, we demonstrate that the role of SUMOylation, Ftz-f1, and the Scavenger Receptors in lipid capture and mobilization is conserved in other steroidogenic tissues such as the follicle cells of the ovary. smt3 knockdown, as well as ftz-f1 or Scavenger knockdown, depleted the lipid content of the follicle cells, which could be rescued by Snmp1 overexpression. Therefore, our data provide new insights into the regulation of metamorphosis via lipid homeostasis, showing that Drosophila Smt3, Ftz-f1, and SR-BIs are part of a general mechanism for uptake of lipids such as cholesterol, required during development in steroidogenic tissues. PMID:23637637

  20. Evaluation of the recombinant protein TpF1 of Treponema pallidum for serodiagnosis of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chuanhao; Zhao, Feijun; Xiao, Jinhong; Zeng, Tiebing; Yu, Jian; Ma, Xiaohua; Wu, Haiying; Wu, Yimou

    2013-10-01

    Syphilis is a chronic infection caused by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, and diagnosis with sensitive and specific methods is a challenging process that is important for its prevention and treatment. In the present study, we established a recombinant protein TpF1-based indirect immunoglobulin G (IgG) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a Western blot assay for human and rabbit sera. The 20-kDa recombinant protein TpF1 was detected by Western blotting performed with sera from rabbits immunized with recombinant TpF1 and infected with the T. pallidum Nichols strain and T. pallidum clinical isolates but was not detected by Western blotting with sera from uninfected rabbits. The sensitivity of the recombinant protein was determined by screening sera from individuals with primary, secondary, latent, and congenital syphilis (n = 82). The specificity of the recombinant protein was determined by screening sera from uninfected controls (n = 30) and individuals with potentially cross-reactive infections, including Lyme disease (n = 30) and leptospirosis (n = 5). The sensitivities of TpF1-based ELISAs were 93.3%, 100%, 100%, and 100% for primary, secondary, latent, and congenital syphilis, respectively, and the specificities were all 100% for sera from uninfected controls and individuals with potentially cross-reactive infections. In Western blot assays, the sensitivities and specificities of TpF1 for human sera were all 100%. The reactivities of TpF1 with syphilitic sera were proportional to the titers of the T. pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) assay. These data indicate that the recombinant protein TpF1 is a highly immunogenic protein in human and rabbit infections and a promising marker for the screening of syphilis. PMID:23945159

  1. Scavenger Receptors Mediate the Role of SUMO and Ftz-f1 in Drosophila Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Talamillo, Ana; Herboso, Leire; Pirone, Lucia; Pérez, Coralia; González, Monika; Sánchez, Jonatan; Mayor, Ugo; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Rodriguez, Manuel S.; Sutherland, James D.; Barrio, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    SUMOylation participates in ecdysteroid biosynthesis at the onset of metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Silencing the Drosophila SUMO homologue smt3 in the prothoracic gland leads to reduced lipid content, low ecdysone titers, and a block in the larval–pupal transition. Here we show that the SR-BI family of Scavenger Receptors mediates SUMO functions. Reduced levels of Snmp1 compromise lipid uptake in the prothoracic gland. In addition, overexpression of Snmp1 is able to recover lipid droplet levels in the smt3 knockdown prothoracic gland cells. Snmp1 expression depends on Ftz-f1 (an NR5A-type orphan nuclear receptor), the expression of which, in turn, depends on SUMO. Furthermore, we show by in vitro and in vivo experiments that Ftz-f1 is SUMOylated. RNAi–mediated knockdown of ftz-f1 phenocopies that of smt3 at the larval to pupal transition, thus Ftz-f1 is an interesting candidate to mediate some of the functions of SUMO at the onset of metamorphosis. Additionally, we demonstrate that the role of SUMOylation, Ftz-f1, and the Scavenger Receptors in lipid capture and mobilization is conserved in other steroidogenic tissues such as the follicle cells of the ovary. smt3 knockdown, as well as ftz-f1 or Scavenger knockdown, depleted the lipid content of the follicle cells, which could be rescued by Snmp1 overexpression. Therefore, our data provide new insights into the regulation of metamorphosis via lipid homeostasis, showing that Drosophila Smt3, Ftz-f1, and SR-BIs are part of a general mechanism for uptake of lipids such as cholesterol, required during development in steroidogenic tissues. PMID:23637637

  2. Evaluation of the Recombinant Protein TpF1 of Treponema pallidum for Serodiagnosis of Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chuanhao; Zhao, Feijun; Xiao, Jinhong; Zeng, Tiebing; Yu, Jian; Ma, Xiaohua; Wu, Haiying

    2013-01-01

    Syphilis is a chronic infection caused by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, and diagnosis with sensitive and specific methods is a challenging process that is important for its prevention and treatment. In the present study, we established a recombinant protein TpF1-based indirect immunoglobulin G (IgG) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a Western blot assay for human and rabbit sera. The 20-kDa recombinant protein TpF1 was detected by Western blotting performed with sera from rabbits immunized with recombinant TpF1 and infected with the T. pallidum Nichols strain and T. pallidum clinical isolates but was not detected by Western blotting with sera from uninfected rabbits. The sensitivity of the recombinant protein was determined by screening sera from individuals with primary, secondary, latent, and congenital syphilis (n = 82). The specificity of the recombinant protein was determined by screening sera from uninfected controls (n = 30) and individuals with potentially cross-reactive infections, including Lyme disease (n = 30) and leptospirosis (n = 5). The sensitivities of TpF1-based ELISAs were 93.3%, 100%, 100%, and 100% for primary, secondary, latent, and congenital syphilis, respectively, and the specificities were all 100% for sera from uninfected controls and individuals with potentially cross-reactive infections. In Western blot assays, the sensitivities and specificities of TpF1 for human sera were all 100%. The reactivities of TpF1 with syphilitic sera were proportional to the titers of the T. pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) assay. These data indicate that the recombinant protein TpF1 is a highly immunogenic protein in human and rabbit infections and a promising marker for the screening of syphilis. PMID:23945159

  3. JAZ mediates G1 cell cycle arrest by interacting with and inhibiting E2F1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mingli; Wu, Song; Jia, Jinghua

    2011-01-01

    We discovered and reported JAZ as a unique dsRNA binding zinc finger protein that functions as a direct, positive regulator of p53 transcriptional activity to mediate G1 cell cycle arrest in a mechanism involving upregulation of the p53 target gene, p21. We now find that JAZ can also negatively regulate the cell cycle in a novel, p53-independent mechanism resulting from the direct interaction with E2F1, a key intermediate in regulating cell proliferation and tumor suppression. JAZ associates with E2F1's central DNA binding/dimerization region and its C-terminal transactivation domain. Functionally, JAZ represses E2F1 transcriptional activity in association with repression of cyclin A expression and inhibition of G1/S transition. This mechanism involves JAZ-mediated inhibition of E2F1's specific DNA binding activity. JAZ directly binds E2F1 in vitro in a dsRNA-independent manner, and JAZ's dsRNA binding ZF domains, which are necessary for localizing JAZ to the nucleus, are required for repression of transcriptional activity in vivo. Importantly for specificity, siRNA-mediated “knockdown” of endogenous JAZ increases E2F transcriptional activity and releases cells from G1 arrest, indicating a necessary role for JAZ in this transition. Although JAZ can directly inhibit E2F1 activity independently of p53, if functional p53 is expressed, JAZ may exert a more potent inhibition of cell cycle following growth factor withdrawal. Therefore, JAZ plays a dual role in cell cycle regulation by both repressing E2F1 transcriptional activity and activating p53 to facilitate efficient growth arrest in response to cellular stress, which may potentially be exploited therapeutically for tumor growth inhibition. PMID:21715977

  4. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-F1 Sanitary Sewer System (124-F-1) and the 100-F-26:8 (1607-F1) Sanitary Sewer Pipelines Waste Sites, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-004

    SciTech Connect

    L. M. Dittmer

    2008-03-14

    The 100-F-26:8 waste site consisted of the underground pipelines that conveyed sanitary waste water from the 1701-F Gatehouse, 1709-F Fire Station, and the 1720-F Administrative Office to the 1607-F1 septic tank. The site has been remediated and presently exists as an open excavation. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  5. Rotor architecture in the yeast and bovine F1-c-ring complexes of F-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Marie-France; Paumard, Patrick; Sanchez, Corinne; Brèthes, Daniel; Velours, Jean; Dautant, Alain

    2012-02-01

    The F(1)F(O)-ATP synthase is a rotary molecular nanomotor. F(1) is a chemical motor driven by ATP hydrolysis while F(O) is an electrical motor driven by the proton flow. The two stepping motors are mechanically coupled through a common rotary shaft. Up to now, the three available crystal structures of the F(1)c(10) sub-complex of the yeast F(1)F(O)-ATP synthase were isomorphous and then named yF(1)c(10)(I). In this crystal form, significant interactions of the c(10)-ring with the F(1)-head of neighboring molecules affected the overall conformation of the F(1)-c-ring complex. The symmetry axis of the F(1)-head and the inertia axis of the c-ring were tilted near the interface between the F(1)-central stalk and the c-ring rotor, resulting in an unbalanced machine. We have solved a new crystal form of the F(1)c(10) complex, named yF(1)c(10)(II), inhibited by adenylyl-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP) and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), at 6.5Å resolution in which the crystal packing has a weaker influence over the conformation of the F(1)-c-ring complex. yF(1)c(10)(II) provides a model of a more efficient generator. yF(1)c(10)(II) and bovine bF(1)c(8) structures share a common rotor architecture with the inertia center of the F(1)-stator close to the rotor axis. PMID:22119846

  6. Influence of radiation dose on the level of F1 sterility in the cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined inherited sterility effects on the F1 and F2 generations of the cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg), in order to identify the dose of gamma radiation that would fully sterilize F1-generation moths, which would result in no viable offspring when F1 males were inbred- or out-crossed ...

  7. 26 CFR 1.167(f)-1 - Reduction of salvage value taken into account for certain personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reduction of salvage value taken into account for certain personal property. 1.167(f)-1 Section 1.167(f)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... for Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(f)-1 Reduction of salvage value taken into account...

  8. An E2F1-HOXB9 Transcriptional Circuit Is Associated with Breast Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Zhussupova, Aisulu; Hayashida, Tetsu; Takahashi, Maiko; Miyao, Kazuhiro; Okazaki, Hiroshi; Jinno, Hiromitsu; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Homeobox B9 (HOXB9), a member of the homeobox gene family, is overexpressed in breast cancer and promotes tumor progression and metastasis by stimulating epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and angiogenesis within the tumor microenvironment. HOXB9 activates the TGFβ-ATM axis, leading to checkpoint activation and DNA repair, which engenders radioresistance in breast cancer cells. Despite detailed reports of the role of HOXB9 in breast cancer, the factors that regulate HOXB9 transcription have not been extensively examined. Here we uncover an underlying mechanism that may suggest novel targeting strategies for breast cancer treatment. To identify a transcription factor binding site (TFBS) in the HOXB9 promoter region, a dual luciferase reporter assay was conducted. Protein candidates that may directly attach to a TFBS of HOXB9 were examined by Q-PCR, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), and mutation analysis. A HOXB9 promoter region from −404 to −392 was identified as TFBS, and E2F1 was a potential binding candidate in this region. The induction of HOXB9 expression by E2F1 was observed by Q-PCR in several breast cancer cell lines overexpressing E2F1. The stimulatory effect of E2F1 on HOXB9 transcription and its ability to bind the TFBS were confirmed by luciferase, EMSA and ChIP assay. Immunohistochemical analysis of 139 breast cancer tissue samples revealed a significant correlation between E2F1 and HOXB9 expression (p<0.001). Furthermore, a CDK4/6 inhibitor suppressed E2F1 expression and also reduced expression of HOXB9 and its downstream target genes. Our in vitro analysis identified the TFBS of the HOXB9 promoter region and suggested that E2F1 is a direct regulator of HOXB9 expression; these data support the strong correlation we found between E2F1 and HOXB9 in clinical breast cancer samples. These results suggest that targeting the E2F1/HOXB9 axis may be a novel strategy for the control or prevention of cancer

  9. Characterization of uterine granular cell tumors in B6C3F1 mice: a histomorphologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Veit, A C; Painter, J T; Miller, R A; Hardisty, J F; Dixon, D

    2008-09-01

    The granular cell tumor is most often a benign neoplasm of uncertain origin. Four uterine granular cell tumors in control and treated female B6C3F1 mice were identified in chronic studies at the National Toxicology Program. Two tumors occurred in untreated control animals and 2 in treated animals receiving different compounds. Tissue sections were evaluated histologically and stained with hematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid-Schiff with diastase resistance, Masson's trichrome, toluidine blue, phosphotungstic acid-hematoxylin, and stained immunohistochemically with a panel of antibodies to muscle (desmin, alpha smooth muscle actin), neural (S-100, neuron specific enolase), epithelial (wide-spectrum cytokeratin), and macrophage (F4/80) markers. The main histomorphologic feature of tumor cells was the presence of abundant cytoplasmic eosinophilic granules that stained positive for periodic acid-Schiff with diastase resistance. Tumors varied in appearance and were comprised of sheets and nests of round to polygonal cells with distinct borders. Nuclei were hyperchromatic, pleomorphic, and centrally to eccentrically located and often contained single nucleoli. Occasional multinucleated giant cells were observed. Tumors were pale pink and homogeneous with trichrome stain and negative with toluidine blue. Three tumors had positive to weakly positive immunoreactivity for desmin, and 1 was positive for alpha smooth muscle actin. Expression of S-100, wide-spectrum cytokeratin, and neuron-specific enolase was negative for all tumors. Ultrastructurally, prominent electron-dense cytoplasmic granules were abundant and contained secondary lysosomes with heterogeneous lysosomal contents. The characteristics of these uterine granular cell tumors were suggestive of a myogenic origin. PMID:18725470

  10. Independent Review of the Failure Modes of F-1 Engine and Propellants System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The F-1 is the powerful engine, that hurdled the Saturn V launch vehicle from the Earth to the moon on July 16,1969. The force that lifted the rocket overcoming the gravitational force during the first stage of the flight was provided by a cluster of five F-1 rocket engines, each of them developing over 1.5 million pounds of thrust (MSFC-MAN-507). The F-1 Rocket engine used RP-1 (Rocket Propellant-1, commercially known as Kerosene), as fuel with lox (liquid Oxygen) as oxidizer. NASA terminated Saturn V activity and has focused on Space Shuttle since 1972. The interest in rocket system has been revived to meet the National Launch System (NLS) program and a directive from the President to return to the Moon and exploration of the space including Mars. The new program Space Launch Initiative (SLI) is directed to drastically reduce the cost of flight for payloads, and adopt a reusable launch vehicle (RLV). To achieve this goal it is essential to have the ability of lifting huge payloads into low earth orbit. Probably requiring powerful boosters as strap-ons to a core vehicle, as was done for the Saturn launch vehicle. The logic in favor of adopting Saturn system, a proven technology, to meet the SLI challenge is very strong. The F-1 engine was the largest and most powerful liquid rocket engine ever built, and had exceptional performance. This study reviews the failure modes of the F-1 engine and propellant system.

  11. Synergistic cooperation of MDM2 and E2F1 contributes to TAp73 transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kasim, Vivi; Huang, Can; Zhang, Jing; Jia, Huizhen; Wang, Yunxia; Yang, Li; Miyagishi, Makoto; Wu, Shourong

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • MDM2 is a novel positive regulator of TAp73 transcriptional activity. • MDM2 colocalizes together and physically interacts with E2F1. • Synergistic cooperation of MDM2 and E2F1 is crucial for TAp73 transcription. • MDM2 regulates TAp73 transcriptional activity in a p53-independent manner. - Abstract: TAp73, a structural homologue of p53, plays an important role in tumorigenesis. E2F1 had been reported as a transcriptional regulator of TAp73, however, the detailed mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here we reported that MDM2-silencing reduced the activities of the TAp73 promoters and the endogenous TAp73 expression level significantly; while MDM2 overexpression upregulated them. We further revealed that the regulation of TAp73 transcriptional activity occurs as a synergistic effect of MDM2 and E2F1, most probably through their physical interaction in the nuclei. Furthermore, we also suggested that MDM2 might be involved in DNA damage-induced TAp73 transcriptional activity. Finally, we elucidated that MDM2-silencing reduced the proliferation rate of colon carcinoma cells regardless of the p53 status. Our data show a synergistic effect of MDM2 and E2F1 on TAp73 transcriptional activity, suggesting a novel regulation pathway of TAp73.

  12. Examining the fate of released Pseudomonas putida F1 in rhizosphere environments

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.; Davis, L.C.; Erickson, L.E.

    1997-12-31

    Bioremediation, especially plant-based bioremediation, is receiving increasing attention because compared to traditional soil and groundwater remediation techniques, it is rapid, safe, and cost-effective. A soil microcosm study was conducted to see the fate of released bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida F1 in soil. Although the P. p F1 population died off to low levels within the experimental period, the presence of alfalfa and poplar trees helped the survival of P. p F1 in soil. The P. p F1 populations were significantly higher (p = 0.05) in soil samples from the poplar tree soil microcosms than from unplanted control soil microcosms. There was no significant difference observed between soil microcosms planted with alfalfa and unplanted control. The better survival of P. p F1 in planted soil is due to the rhizosphere effect, and therefore, is dependent on the root density in soil. This study shows the beneficial effect of vegetation on the survival of a laboratory cultured strain under conditions close to field condition.

  13. Elasticity, friction, and pathway of γ-subunit rotation in FoF1-ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Kei-ichi; Hummer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    We combine molecular simulations and mechanical modeling to explore the mechanism of energy conversion in the coupled rotary motors of FoF1-ATP synthase. A torsional viscoelastic model with frictional dissipation quantitatively reproduces the dynamics and energetics seen in atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of torque-driven γ-subunit rotation in the F1-ATPase rotary motor. The torsional elastic coefficients determined from the simulations agree with results from independent single-molecule experiments probing different segments of the γ-subunit, which resolves a long-lasting controversy. At steady rotational speeds of ∼1 kHz corresponding to experimental turnover, the calculated frictional dissipation of less than kBT per rotation is consistent with the high thermodynamic efficiency of the fully reversible motor. Without load, the maximum rotational speed during transitions between dwells is reached at ∼1 MHz. Energetic constraints dictate a unique pathway for the coupled rotations of the Fo and F1 rotary motors in ATP synthase, and explain the need for the finer stepping of the F1 motor in the mammalian system, as seen in recent experiments. Compensating for incommensurate eightfold and threefold rotational symmetries in Fo and F1, respectively, a significant fraction of the external mechanical work is transiently stored as elastic energy in the γ-subunit. The general framework developed here should be applicable to other molecular machines. PMID:26261344

  14. Spatial Reference Memory in Normal Aging Fischer 344 × Brown Norway F1 Hybrid Rats

    PubMed Central

    McQuail, Joseph A.; Nicolle, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Fischer 344 × Brown Norway F1 (F344×BN-F1) hybrid rats express greater longevity with improved health relative to aging rodents of other strains; however, few behavioral reports have thoroughly evaluated cognition across the F344×BN-F1 lifespan. Consequently, this study evaluated spatial reference memory in F344×BN-F1 rats at 6, 18, 24 or 28 months (mo) of age in the Morris water maze. Reference memory decrements were observed between 6 mo and 18 mo and between 18 mo and 24 mo. At 28 mo, spatial learning was not worse than 24 mo, but swim speed was significantly slower. Reliable individual differences revealed that ~50% of 24-28 mo performed similarly to 6 mo while others were spatial learning-impaired. Aged rats were impaired at learning within daily training sessions, but not impaired at retaining information between days of training. Aged rats were also slower to learn to escape onto the platform, regardless of strategy. In summary, these data clarify the trajectory of cognitive decline in aging F344×BN-F1 rats and elucidate relevant behavioral parameters. PMID:25086838

  15. Nanoseconds molecular dynamics simulation of primary mechanical energy transfer steps in F1-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Böckmann, Rainer A; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2002-03-01

    The mitochondrial membrane protein FoF1-ATP synthase synthesizes adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the universal currency of energy in the cell. This process involves mechanochemical energy transfer from a rotating asymmetric gamma-'stalk' to the three active sites of the F1 unit, which drives the bound ATP out of the binding pocket. Here, the primary structural changes associated with this energy transfer in F1-ATP synthase were studied with multi-nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations. By forced rotation of the gamma-stalk that mimics the effect of proton motive Fo-rotation during ATP synthesis, a time-resolved atomic model for the structural changes in the F1 part in terms of propagating conformational motions is obtained. For these, different time scales are found, which allows the separation of nanosecond from microsecond conformational motions. In the simulations, rotation of the gamma-stalk lowers the ATP affinity of the betaTP binding pocket and triggers fast, spontaneous closure of the empty betaE subunit. The simulations explain several mutation studies and the reduced hydrolysis rate of gamma-depleted F1-ATPase. PMID:11836535

  16. Interactions between the lysine-rich histone F1 and deoxyribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Johns, E W; Forrester, S

    1969-02-01

    1. The interactions of the lysine-rich histone F1 with DNA have been studied at various histone to DNA ratios, in water and in the presence of uni- and bi-valent cations. In water only, histone F1, even in fourfold excess, is unable to precipitate all the DNA. In 0.14m-sodium chloride, 0.8mg. of histone F1 is required to precipitate 1mg. of DNA, whereas in 0.07m-magnesium chloride only 0.4mg. is required. 2. Bivalent cations are also shown to be more effective in dissociating the DNA-histone complex. Histone F1 can be selectively removed from deoxyribonucleoprotein with 0.1m-magnesium chloride. 3. The precipitation of DNA by histone F1 is a reversible process and the complex can be taken in and out of solution by changing the ionic environment. 4. The bearing of these results on the observed ability of various DNA-histone complexes to act as templates for RNA synthesis is discussed. PMID:4975020

  17. The transcription factor E2F-1 mediates the autoregulation of RB gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Shan, B; Chang, C Y; Jones, D; Lee, W H

    1994-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) gene is the prototype tumor suppressor gene. Mutations in this gene are often associated with the occurrence of various tumors. Several mutations have been found in the promoter region of the gene, suggesting that inappropriate transcriptional regulation of the RB gene contributes to tumorigenesis. Sequence analysis of the RB promoter has revealed a potential E2F recognition site within a region critical for RB gene transcription. By using the cloned E2F-1 gene, here we report that (i) RB expression is negatively regulated by its own gene product, (ii) E2F-1 binds specifically to an E2F recognition sequence in the RB promoter and transactivates the RB promoter, (iii) overexpression of RB suppresses E2F-1-mediated stimulation of RB promoter activity, and (iv) the expression of the RB gene is paralleled by the expression of the E2F-1 gene during cell cycle progression. These results demonstrate that expression of RB is negatively autoregulated through E2F-1. Images PMID:8264596

  18. The CYP51F1 Gene of Leptographium qinlingensis: Sequence Characteristic, Phylogeny and Transcript Levels.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lulu; Li, Zhumei; Yu, Jiamin; Ma, Mingyuan; Zhang, Ranran; Chen, Hui; Pham, Thanh

    2015-01-01

    Leptographium qinlingensis is a fungal associate of the Chinese white pine beetle (Dendroctonus armandi) and a pathogen of the Chinese white pine (Pinus armandi) that must overcome the terpenoid oleoresin defenses of host trees. L. qinlingensis responds to monoterpene flow with abundant mechanisms that include export and the use of these compounds as a carbon source. As one of the fungal cytochrome P450 proteins (CYPs), which play important roles in general metabolism, CYP51 (lanosterol 14-α demethylase) can catalyze the biosynthesis of ergosterol and is a target for antifungal drug. We have identified an L. qinlingensis CYP51F1 gene, and the phylogenetic analysis shows the highest homology with the 14-α-demethylase sequence from Grosmannia clavigera (a fungal associate of Dendroctonus ponderosae). The transcription level of CYP51F1 following treatment with terpenes and pine phloem extracts was upregulated, while using monoterpenes as the only carbon source led to the downregulation of CYP5F1 expression. The homology modeling structure of CYP51F1 is similar to the structure of the lanosterol 14-α demethylase protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae YJM789, which has an N-terminal membrane helix 1 (MH1) and transmembrane helix 1 (TMH1). The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of terpenoid and azole fungicides (itraconazole (ITC)) and the docking of terpenoid molecules, lanosterol and ITC in the protein structure suggested that CYP51F1 may be inhibited by terpenoid molecules by competitive binding with azole fungicides. PMID:26016505

  19. Identification of E2F1 as a positive transcriptional regulator for {delta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kwonseop; Oh, Minsoo; Ki, Hyunkyoung; Wang Tao; Bareiss, Sonja; Fini, M. Elizabeth.; Li Dawei; Lu Qun

    2008-05-02

    {delta}-Catenin is upregulated in human carcinomas. However, little is known about the potential transcriptional factors that regulate {delta}-catenin expression in cancer. Using a human {delta}-catenin reporter system, we have screened several nuclear signaling modulators to test whether they can affect {delta}-catenin transcription. Among {beta}-catenin/LEF-1, Notch1, and E2F1, E2F1 dramatically increased {delta}-catenin-luciferase activities while {beta}-catenin/LEF-1 induced only a marginal increase. Rb suppressed the upregulation of {delta}-catenin-luciferase activities induced by E2F1 but did not interact with {delta}-catenin. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses in 4 different prostate cancer cell lines revealed that regulation of {delta}-catenin expression is controlled mainly at the transcriptional level. Interestingly, the effects of E2F1 on {delta}-catenin expression were observed only in human cancer cells expressing abundant endogenous {delta}-catenin. These studies identify E2F1 as a positive transcriptional regulator for {delta}-catenin, but further suggest the presence of strong negative regulator(s) for {delta}-catenin in prostate cancer cells with minimal endogenous {delta}-catenin expression.

  20. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (an-tee-TRIP-sin) deficiency, or AAT ... as it relates to lung disease. Overview Alpha-1 antitrypsin, also called AAT, is a protein made ...

  1. Decreased brain infarct following focal ischemia in mice lacking the transcription factor E2F1.

    PubMed

    MacManus, J P; Koch, C J; Jian, M; Walker, T; Zurakowski, B

    1999-09-01

    E2F1+/- mice subjected to 2 h middle cerebral artery occlusion developed an infarct of 77.0 +/- 3.2 mm3 (mean +/- s.e.m., n = 15) in the ischemic hemisphere after 24 h reperfusion. A significantly smaller infarct of 58.8 +/- 4.8 mm3 (n = 15; p < 0.01) was found in E2F1-/- animals. Both deficient and normal mice had similar cerebral angioarchitecture and intra-ischemic decreases in regional blood flow. Similar areas of hypoxia in both groups of ischemic animals were demonstrated directly by immunohistochemical detection of nitroimidazole adducts. It was concluded that all animals received the same ischemic insult, yet the subsequent damage was different in the mutant mice. This is the first indication that the E2F1 gene plays a role in ischemic death of post-mitotic neurons. PMID:10511428

  2. Unique cytokine production profile following stimulation with DNA in macrophages from NZB/W F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yoshiyuki; Yoshinaga, Takaharu; Nishikawa, Makiya; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2008-06-01

    Nucleosome is the major autoantigen in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as macrophages (M Phis) and dendritic cells (DCs), play the central roles in the acquisition of Ag-specific immune responses and activation of such APCs is required for the efficient Ag-presentation. Therefore, adjuvant activity of DNA in nucleosomes would cause the prominent effects on the production of anti-nucleosome antibodies. In this study, we report that elicited peritoneal M Phis from New Zealand Black/White F1 (NZB/W) mice showed a unique cytokine production profile following stimulation with DNA. M Phis from 5-week old NZB/W mice produced a higher amount of IL-6 and about a half amount of TNF-alpha after stimulation with DNA complexed with cationic liposomes compared with those from control ICR mice. These results suggest that M Phis of NZB/W mice have altered responsiveness to DNA and this might elevate the antigenicity of nucleosomes to induce the production of anti-nucleosome antibodies. PMID:18520062

  3. MAP of F1 and V antigens from Yersinia pestis astride innate and adaptive immune response.

    PubMed

    Rai, Reeta; Das, Baijnath; Choudhary, Nageshwar; Talukdar, Ayantika; Rao, Donthamsetty Nageswara

    2015-10-01

    Yersinia pestis, a causative agent of plague, has a plethora of armors to fight against major components of innate immunity and survive within host cells. Dendritic cells and macrophages are important antigen presenting cells for effective immune response. This report is focused on the changes in DC activation and TLR2 and TLR4 expression on macrophages induced by MAP of F1 and V antigens of Y. pestis. F1 and V MAPs bear potential synthetic T and B cell epitopes from F1 and V protein respectively. We evaluated these parameters in DC's isolated from spleen and lamina propria and macrophages isolated from peritoneal lavage of mice after intranasal immunization. F1 MAP and V MAP significantly increased the expression of CD80 and CD86 on CD11c(+) dendritic cells isolated from spleen and lamina propria as well as intracellular IL-12 levels. Similarly, in macrophages derived from peritoneal cavity, the above formulation enhanced TLR2 and TLR4 expression. Again after in vitro stimulation with F1 and V MAP these macrophages produced significantly high IL12 and TNFα. The study clearly indicates involvement of DC and macrophages for efficient antigen presentation to immune cells. From this study we conclude that F1MAP and VMAP ameliorate innate immune mechanism. These two synthetic constructs exert their effect via TLR2 and TLR4, leading to the production of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages and are able to increase DC activation, that could be helpful in generation of adaptive immunity as well as is important strong immune response. PMID:26188288

  4. Effect of parent genetic background on latency and antigenicity of UV-induced tumors originating in F1 hybrids.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, T; Iwashiro, M; Kuribayashi, K; Imamura, S

    1995-02-01

    Wide variations in susceptibility to skin tumor development by chronic ultraviolet light (UV) exposure and antigenicity of induced tumors which is estimated by tumor rejection in syngeneic recipients have been recognized among various murine strains. To examine the effect of parent genetic background on latency and antigenicity of UV-induced tumors originating in F1 hybrids, we induced skin tumors in three mouse strains: BALB/c, C57BL/6, (B6), and C3H/HeMs (C3H/He), and their F1 hybrids: (BALB/c x C3H/He)F1 (CC3F1), (BALB/c x B6)F1 (CB6F1) and (C3H/HexB6)F1 (C3B6F1) by exposing mice to UV radiation (0.44 mW/cm2 for 1 h) three times a week, and analyzed whether the UV-induced tumors originating in F1 hybrids possess the similar property in latency or antigenicity as seen in the UV-induced tumors derived from the parent strains. The latency of tumor induction by chronic UV exposure in C3H/He, BALB/c and their F1 hybrid CC3F1 was relatively short whereas that of B6 was relatively long, and that of F1 hybrids with B6 (CB6F1 and C3B6F1) was intermediate. On the other hand, the low antigenicity as progressive growth behavior of UV-induced tumors in syngeneic recipients was observed not only in tumors derived from C3H/He but also in those from F1 hybrids with C3H/He (C3B6F1 and CC3F1) whereas most tumors derived from B6, BALB/c and their F1 hybrid CB6F1 were highly antigenic as to be rejected in syngeneic recipients. These findings suggest that the parent genetic quality regulating the susceptibility to tumor induction by chronic UV exposure is co-dominantly inherited into F1 hybrids.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7757331

  5. E2F1-Mediated Induction of NFYB Attenuates Apoptosis via Joint Regulation of a Pro-Survival Transcriptional Program

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaolei; Nevins, Joseph Roy

    2015-01-01

    The E2F1 transcription factor regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis through the control of a considerable variety of target genes. Previous work has detailed the role of other transcription factors in mediating the specificity of E2F function. Here we identify the NF-YB transcription factor as a novel direct E2F1 target. Genome-wide expression analysis of the effects of NFYB knockdown on E2F1-mediated transcription identified a large group of genes that are co-regulated by E2F1 and NFYB. We also provide evidence that knockdown of NFYB enhances E2F1-induced apoptosis, suggesting a pro-survival function of the NFYB/E2F1 joint transcriptional program. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that deregulation of these NFY-dependent E2F1 target genes might play a role in sarcomagenesis as well as drug resistance. PMID:26039627

  6. M2-F1 in flight being towed by a C-47

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The M2-F1 Lifting Body is seen here being towed behind a C-47 at the Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. In this rear view, the M2-F1 is flying above and to one side of the C-47. This was done to avoid wake turbulence from the towplane. Lacking wings, the M2-F1 used an unusual configuration for its control surfaces. It had two rudders on the fins, two elevons (called 'elephant ears') mounted on the outsides of the fins, and two body flaps on the upper rear fuselage. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. These initial tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind the C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began. Pilot for the first series of flights of the M2-F1 was NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Typical glide flights with the M2-F1 lasted about two minutes and reached speeds of 110 to l20 mph. More than 400 ground tows and 77 aircraft tow flights were carried out with the M2-F1. The success of Dryden's M2-F1 program led to NASA's development and construction of two heavyweight lifting bodies based on studies at NASA's Ames and

  7. Pou5f1 contributes to dorsoventral patterning by positive regulation of vox and modulation of fgf8a expression.

    PubMed

    Belting, Heinz-Georg; Wendik, Björn; Lunde, Karen; Leichsenring, Manuel; Mössner, Rebecca; Driever, Wolfgang; Onichtchouk, Daria

    2011-08-15

    Pou5f1/Oct-4 in mice is required for maintenance of embryonic pluripotent cell populations. Zebrafish pou5f1 maternal-zygotic mutant embryos (spiel ohne grenzen; MZspg) lack endoderm and have gastrulation and dorsoventral patterning defects. A contribution of Pou5f1 to the control of bmp2b, bmp4 and vox expression has been suggested, however the mechanisms remained unclear and are investigated in detail here. Low-level overexpression of a Pou5f1-VP16 activator fusion protein can rescue dorsalization in MZspg mutants, indicating that Pou5f1 acts as a transcriptional activator during dorsoventral patterning. Overexpression of larger quantities of Pou5f1-VP16 can ventralize wild-type embryos, while overexpression of a Pou5f1-En repressor fusion protein can dorsalize embryos. Lack of Pou5f1 causes a transient upregulation of fgf8a expression after mid-blastula transition, providing a mechanism for delayed activation of bmp2b in MZspg embryos. Overexpression of the Pou5f1-En repressor induces fgf8, suggesting an indirect mechanism of Pou5f1 control of fgf8a expression. Transcription of vox is strongly activated by Pou5f1-VP16 even when translation of zygotically expressed transcripts is experimentally inhibited by cycloheximide. In contrast, bmp2b and bmp4 are not activated under these conditions. We show that Pou5f1 binds to phylogenetically conserved Oct/Pou5f1 sites in the vox promoter, both in vivo (ChIP) and in vitro. Our data reveals a set of direct and indirect interactions of Pou5f1 with the BMP dorsoventral patterning network that serve to fine-tune dorsoventral patterning mechanisms and coordinate patterning with developmental timing. PMID:21621531

  8. Draft Genome Sequence and Annotation of the Entomopathogenic Bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophila Strain F1

    PubMed Central

    Lanois, Anne; Ogier, Jean-Claude; Gouzy, Jérome; Laroui, Christine; Rouy, Zoé; Givaudan, Alain

    2013-01-01

    We report the 4.3-Mb genome sequence of Xenorhabdus nematophila strain F1, a Gram-negative bacterium that is a symbiont of the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae and pathogenic by direct injection for a wide variety of insects. PMID:23788541

  9. Rocketdyne - F-1 Saturn V First Stage Engine. Chapter 1, Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biggs, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Before I go into the history of F-1, I want to discuss the F-1 engine s role in putting man on the moon. The F-1 engine was used in a cluster of five on the first stage, and that was the only power during the first stage. It took the Apollo launch vehicle, which was 363 feet tall and weighed six million pounds, and threw it downrange fifty miles, threw it up to forty miles of altitude, at Mach 7. It took two and one-half minutes to do that and, in the process, burned four and one-half million pounds of propellant, a pretty sizable task. (See Slide 2, Appendix C) My history goes back to the same year I started working at Rocketdyne. That s where the F-1 had its beginning, back early in 1957. In 1957, there was no space program. Rocketdyne was busy working overtime and extra days designing, developing, and producing rocket engines for weapons of mass destruction, not for scientific reasons. The Air Force contracted Rocketdyne to study how to make a rocket engine that had a million pounds of thrust. The highest thing going at the time had 150,000 pounds of thrust. Rocketdyne s thought was the new engine might be needed for a ballistic missile, not that it was going to go on a moon shot.

  10. F1 rotary motor of ATP synthase is driven by the torsionally-asymmetric drive shaft

    PubMed Central

    Kulish, O.; Wright, A. D.; Terentjev, E. M.

    2016-01-01

    F1F0 ATP synthase (ATPase) either facilitates the synthesis of ATP in a process driven by the proton moving force (pmf), or uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to pump protons against the concentration gradient across the membrane. ATPase is composed of two rotary motors, F0 and F1, which compete for control of their shared γ -shaft. We present a self-consistent physical model of F1 motor as a simplified two-state Brownian ratchet using the asymmetry of torsional elastic energy of the coiled-coil γ -shaft. This stochastic model unifies the physical concepts of linear and rotary motors, and explains the stepped unidirectional rotary motion. Substituting the model parameters, all independently known from recent experiments, our model quantitatively reproduces the ATPase operation, e.g. the ‘no-load’ angular velocity is ca. 400 rad/s anticlockwise at 4 mM ATP. Increasing the pmf torque exerted by F0 can slow, stop and overcome the torque generated by F1, switching from ATP hydrolysis to synthesis at a very low value of ‘stall torque’. We discuss the motor efficiency, which is very low if calculated from the useful mechanical work it produces - but is quite high when the ‘useful outcome’ is measured in the number of H+ pushed against the chemical gradient. PMID:27321713

  11. Sampling and Analysis Instruction for the 120-F-1 Glass Dump Site

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.M.

    1998-03-01

    This sampling and analysis instruction has been prepared to clearly define the sampling and analysis activities to be performed to develop the basis for surveillance and maintenance of the 120-F-1 Glass Dumpsite. The purpose of this investigation is to augment historical information and obtain data to establish a technical basis for surveillance and maintenance at the site.

  12. 17 CFR 270.8f-1 - Deregistration of certain registered investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Commission on Form N-8F (17 CFR 274.218) if the investment company: (a) Has sold substantially all of its.... 80a-3(c)(7)) of the Act; or (d) Has become a business development company. Note to § 270.8f-1... investment company; (b) Has distributed substantially all of its assets to its shareholders and has...

  13. M2-F1 in flight over lakebed on tow line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Following the first M2-F1 airtow flight on 16 August 1963, the Flight Research Center used the vehicle for both research flights and to check out new lifting-body pilots. These included Bruce Peterson, Don Mallick, Fred Haise, and Bill Dana from NASA. Air Force pilots who flew the M2-F1 included Chuck Yeager, Jerry Gentry, Joe Engle, Jim Wood, and Don Sorlie, although Wood, Haise, and Engle only flew on car tows. In the three years between the first and last flights of the M2-F1, it made about 400 car tows and 77 air tows. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and

  14. Lattice QCD results for the B --> D(*) l nu form factors: F(1) and G(1)

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Water, R.S.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    I review the current status of lattice QCD calculations of the B {yields} D and B {yields} D* form factors and discuss prospects for their improvement. Successful calculations within the quenched approximation demonstrate the power of lattice methods for calculating F(1) and G(1), and the unquenched calculations in progress should soon allow for a 2-3% exclusive determination of |Vcb|.

  15. Correlations between measures of feed efficiency and feedlot return for F1 lambs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective estimates of feedlot return for progeny of terminal-sire breeds of sheep are needed to improve lamb profitability. Thus, we used recent economic data to determine the effects of terminal-sire breed on returns of F1 lambs. Annually for 3 yr, Columbia, USMARC Composite, Suffolk, and Texel ra...

  16. Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit

    SciTech Connect

    S. W. Clark and H. M. Sulloway

    2007-09-26

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

  17. 26 CFR 1.672(f)-1 - Foreign persons not treated as owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Foreign persons not treated as owners. 1.672(f... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.672(f)-1 Foreign persons not treated as owners. (a) General rule—(1) Application of the general...

  18. 26 CFR 301.6229(f)-1 - Special rule for partial settlement agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... October 4, 2001, see § 301.6229(f)-1T contained in 26 CFR part 1, revised April 1, 2001. ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Assessment In General § 301... nonpartnership items under section 6231(b)(1)(C) and will not be subject to any future or pending...

  19. Analysis of POU1F1 gene DdeI polymorphism in Chinese goats.

    PubMed

    Li, M J; Zhang, C M; Lan, X Y; Fang, X T; Lei, C Z; Chen, H

    2016-01-01

    As a member of the POU-domain family, the POU1F1 is a positive regulator for growth hormone, prolactin and thyroid-stimulating hormone b, by binding to target DNA promoters as a dimer in mammals. This study described the polymorphisms at the goat POU1F1-DdeI locus and analyzed the distribution of alleles in 15 indigenous Chinese goat breeds. The PCR-RFLP analysis showed a predominance of the D1D1 genotype and the D1 allele, with average frequencies of 0.550 and 0.790, respectively, irrespective of goat utility type. The D1D2 genotype was the second most frequent, with a mean frequency of 0.371. The distributions of genotypic and allelic frequencies at this locus were found to be significantly different among populations based on a Chi square test (P < 0.001), suggesting that the breed factor significantly affected the molecular genetic character of the POU1F1 gene. The genetic diversity analysis revealed that Chinese indigenous populations had a wide spectrum of genetic diversity at the goat POU1F1-DdeI locus. However, an ANOVA analysis revealed no significant differences in gene homozygosity, gene heterozygosity, effective allele numbers, or polymorphism information content among meat, dairy, and cashmere utility types (P > 0.05). This suggests that the goat utility types had no significant effect on the spectrum of genetic diversity. PMID:26985963

  20. In Utero Nutritional Manipulation Provokes Dysregulated Adipocytokines Production in F1 Offspring in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hanafi, Mervat Y.; Saleh, Moustafa M.; Kamel, Maher A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intrauterine environment plays a pivotal role in the origin of fatal diseases such as diabetes. Diabetes and obesity are associated with low-grade inflammatory state and dysregulated adipokines production. This study aims to investigate the effect of maternal obesity and malnutrition on adipokines production (adiponectin, leptin, and TNF-α) in F1 offspring in rats. Materials and Methods. Wistar rats were allocated in groups: F1 offspring of control mothers under control diet (CF1-CD) and under high-fat diet (CF1-HCD), F1 offspring of obese mothers under CD (OF1-CD) and under HCD (OF1-HCD), and F1 offspring of malnourished mothers under CD (MF1-CD) and under HCD (MF1-HCD). Every 5 weeks postnatally, blood samples were obtained for biochemical analysis. Results. At the end of the 30-week follow-up, OF1-HCD and MF1-HCD exhibited hyperinsulinemia, moderate dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and impaired glucose homeostasis compared to CF1-CD and CF1-HCD. OF1-HCD and MF1-HCD demonstrated low serum levels of adiponectin and high levels of leptin compared to CF1-CD and CF1-HCD. OF1-CD, OF1-HCD, and MF1-HCD had elevated serum levels of TNF-α compared to CF1-CD and CF1-HCD (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Maternal nutritional manipulation predisposes the offspring to development of insulin resistance in their adult life, probably via instigating dysregulated adipokines production. PMID:27200209

  1. 78 FR 36211 - Extension of Employment Authorization for Syrian F-1 Nonimmigrant Students Experiencing Severe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... in Syria since March 2011. See 77 FR 20038 (Apr. 3, 2012). The original notice was effective from... the civil unrest in Syria since March 2011. See 77 FR 20038. It enabled these F-1 students to obtain... load requirement described in 77 FR 20038. See 8 CFR 214.2(f)(6)(i)(F). Who is covered under...

  2. Body size and shape analyses of F1 hybrid Rhagoletis pomonella and Rhagoletis zephyria (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experimentally generated F1 hybrids of apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh), and Rhagoletis zephyria Snow (Diptera: Tephritidae) were classified using morphometric methods. Five of nine mean body size measurements of hybrids from crossing female R. pomonella × male R. zephyria were interm...

  3. Degradation of trichloroethylene by toluene dioxygenase in whole-cell studies with Pseudomonas putida F1.

    PubMed Central

    Wackett, L P; Gibson, D T

    1988-01-01

    Toluene-induced cells of Pseudomonas putida F1 removed trichloroethylene from growth media at a significantly greater initial rate than the methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. With toluene-induced P. putida F1, the initial degradation rate varied linearly with trichloroethylene concentration over the range of 8 to 80 microM (1.05 to 10.5 ppm). At 80 microM (10.5 ppm) trichloroethylene and 30 degrees C, the initial rate was 1.8 nmol/min per mg of total cell protein, but the rate decreased rapidly with time. A series of mutant strains derived from P. putida F1 that are defective in the todC gene, which encodes the oxygenase component of toluene dioxygenase, failed to degrade trichloroethylene and to oxidize indole to indigo. A spontaneous revertant selected from a todC culture regained simultaneously the abilities to oxidize toluene, to form indigo, and to degrade trichloroethylene. The three isomeric dichloroethylenes were degraded by P. putida F1, but tetrachloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and ethylene were not removed from incubation mixtures. PMID:3415234

  4. IN VITRO PERCUTANEOUS APPROACH OF SODIUM ARSENATE IN B6C3F1 MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Percutaneous absorption of sodium [73As] arsenate in female B6C3F1 mice was investigated in this study from various exposure conditions, including solid compound, aqueous solution (100 and 250 ul) and soil (= 23 mg/cm2). In vitro diffusion experiments were conducted for 24 hr usi...

  5. F-1 engines of Apollo/Saturn V first stage leave trail of flame after liftoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    The five F-1 engines of the Apollo/Saturn V space vehicle's first (S-IC) stage leaves a trail of flame in the sky after liftoff. The launch of the Apollo 6 (Spacecraft 020/Saturn 502) unmanned space mission occurred on April 4, 1968. These views of the Apollo 6 launch were taken from a chase plane.

  6. How subunit coupling produces the γ-subunit rotary motion in F1-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jingzhi; Karplus, Martin

    2008-01-01

    FoF1-ATP synthase manufactures the energy “currency,” ATP, of living cells. The soluble F1 portion, called F1-ATPase, can act as a rotary motor, with ATP binding, hydrolysis, and product release, inducing a torque on the γ-subunit. A coarse-grained plastic network model is used to show at a residue level of detail how the conformational changes of the catalytic β-subunits act on the γ-subunit through repulsive van der Waals interactions to generate a torque that drives unidirectional rotation, as observed experimentally. The simulations suggest that the calculated 85° substep rotation is driven primarily by ATP binding and that the subsequent 35° substep rotation is produced by product release from one β-subunit and a concomitant binding pocket expansion of another β-subunit. The results of the simulation agree with single-molecule experiments [see, for example, Adachi K, et al. (2007) Cell 130:309–321] and support a tri-site rotary mechanism for F1-ATPase under physiological condition. PMID:18216260

  7. Initial Report for the Radiation Effects Research Foundation F1 Mail Survey.

    PubMed

    Milder, Cm; Sakata, R; Sugiyama, H; Sadakane, A; Utada, M; Cordova, Ka; Hida, A; Ohishi, W; Ozasa, K; Grant, Ej

    2016-01-01

    To study the full health effects of parental radiation exposure on the children of the atomic bomb survivors, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation developed a cohort of 76,814 children born to atomic bomb survivors (F1 generation) to assess cancer incidence and mortality from common adult diseases. In analyzing radiationassociated health information, it is important to be able to adjust for sociodemographic and lifestyle variations that may affect health. In order to gain this and other background information on the F1 cohort and to determine willingness to participate in a related clinical study, the F1 Mail Survey Questionnaire was designed with questions corresponding to relevant health, sociodemographic, and lifestyle indicators. Between the years 2000 and 2006, the survey was sent to a subset of the F1 Mortality Cohort. A total of 16,183 surveys were completed and returned: 10,980 surveys from Hiroshima residents and 5,203 from Nagasaki residents. The response rate was 65.6%, varying somewhat across parental exposure category, city, gender, and year of birth. Differences in health and lifestyle were noted in several variables on comparison across city and gender. No major differences in health, lifestyle, sociodemographics, or disease were seen across parental exposure categories, though statistically significant tests for heterogeneity and linear trend revealed some possible changes with dose. The data described herein provide a foundation for studies in the future. PMID:27039765

  8. Irradiation of adult Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae): egg sterility in parental and F1 generations.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eric B; McInnis, Donald O; Kurashima, Rick; Woods, Bill; Suckling, David M

    2012-02-01

    Adult Epiphyas postvittana Walker were irradiated using a Cobalt 60 source to determine the dose needed to achieve complete egg sterility of mated female moths, and egg sterility of female moths mated to F1 generation males. Adult male and female E. postvittana were irradiated at 100, 200, 250, and 300 Gy and their fertility (when crossed with normal moths) was compared with nonirradiated moths. Viable progeny (determined by egg hatch) were found at doses of 100 and 200 Gy, but very little at 250 and 300 Gy. In particular, there was no survival of female progeny into the F1 generation. Males irradiated at 250 and 300 Gy had very low egg eclosion rates (2.25 and 1.86% at 250 and 300 Gy, respectively) when mated with normal females. The F2 generation from those male progeny had a mean percent hatched of < 1.02%. Based on our results, a dose of 250-300 Gy is recommended for irradiation of E. postvittana adults used for sterile insect technique (SIT) if sterility of parental moths is the desired outcome. Our data also suggests that inclusion of F1 hybrid sterility rather than parental generation sterility into programs using the SIT may allow for doses lower than what we have reported, especially during initial phases of an eradication program where increase fitness of moths might be desirable. Further research is needed to verify the use of F1 hybrid sterility in light brown apple moth SIT programs. PMID:22420255

  9. GACD: Integrated Software for Genetic Analysis in Clonal F1 and Double Cross Populations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luyan; Meng, Lei; Wu, Wencheng; Wang, Jiankang

    2015-01-01

    Clonal species are common among plants. Clonal F1 progenies are derived from the hybridization between 2 heterozygous clones. In self- and cross-pollinated species, double crosses can be made from 4 inbred lines. A clonal F1 population can be viewed as a double cross population when the linkage phase is determined. The software package GACD (Genetic Analysis of Clonal F1 and Double cross) is freely available public software, capable of building high-density linkage maps and mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) in clonal F1 and double cross populations. Three functionalities are integrated in GACD version 1.0: binning of redundant markers (BIN); linkage map construction (CDM); and QTL mapping (CDQ). Output of BIN can be directly used as input of CDM. After adding the phenotypic data, the output of CDM can be used as input of CDQ. Thus, GACD acts as a pipeline for genetic analysis. GACD and example datasets are freely available from www.isbreeding.net. PMID:26503825

  10. 77 FR 59942 - Extension of Employment Authorization for Haitian F-1 Nonimmigrant Students Experiencing Severe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... direct result of the January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti. See 75 FR 56120, September 15, 2010. The... economic hardship as a result of the January 12, 2010 earthquake. See 75 FR 56120. It enabled these F-1... earthquake may apply for employment authorization under the guidelines described in 75 FR 56120. This...

  11. M2-F1 lifting body aircraft on a flatbed truck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    After the grounding of the M2-F1 in 1966, it was kept in outside storage on the Dryden complex. After several years, its fabric and plywood structure was damaged by the sun and weather. Restoration of the vehicle began in February 1994 under the leadership of NASA retiree Dick Fischer, with other retirees who had originally worked on the M2-F1's construction and flight research three decades before also participating. The photo shows the now-restored M2-F1 returning to the site of its flight research, now called the Dryden Flight Research Center, on 22 August 1997. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, NASA Flight Research Center (later Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA) management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available

  12. Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit

    SciTech Connect

    S. W. Clark and H. M Sulloway

    2007-10-31

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

  13. 26 CFR 301.6223(f)-1 - Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Duplicate copy of final partnership... In General § 301.6223(f)-1 Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment. (a) In... the notice of final partnership administrative adjustment (for example, in the event the...

  14. 26 CFR 301.6223(f)-1 - Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Duplicate copy of final partnership... In General § 301.6223(f)-1 Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment. (a) In... the notice of final partnership administrative adjustment (for example, in the event the...

  15. SATURATION OF LINDANE METABOLISM IN CHRONICALLY TREATED (YS X VY) F1 HYBRID MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The organochlorine insecticide lindane (gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane) induces hepatomas in select strains of mice including two of three phenotypic classes of (YS x VY) F1 hybrid mice. In contrast, lindane does not induce hepatomas in rats and other strains of mice. It has been su...

  16. Saturn V F-1 Engine Gas Generator Blazes Back To Life

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Jan. 10, 2013, a resurrected gas generator from a Saturn V F-1 engine completed two hot-fire tests that are part of a series of tests at Test Stand 116 located in the East Test Area at NASA's Ma...

  17. F1 rotary motor of ATP synthase is driven by the torsionally-asymmetric drive shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulish, O.; Wright, A. D.; Terentjev, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    F1F0 ATP synthase (ATPase) either facilitates the synthesis of ATP in a process driven by the proton moving force (pmf), or uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to pump protons against the concentration gradient across the membrane. ATPase is composed of two rotary motors, F0 and F1, which compete for control of their shared γ -shaft. We present a self-consistent physical model of F1 motor as a simplified two-state Brownian ratchet using the asymmetry of torsional elastic energy of the coiled-coil γ -shaft. This stochastic model unifies the physical concepts of linear and rotary motors, and explains the stepped unidirectional rotary motion. Substituting the model parameters, all independently known from recent experiments, our model quantitatively reproduces the ATPase operation, e.g. the ‘no-load’ angular velocity is ca. 400 rad/s anticlockwise at 4 mM ATP. Increasing the pmf torque exerted by F0 can slow, stop and overcome the torque generated by F1, switching from ATP hydrolysis to synthesis at a very low value of ‘stall torque’. We discuss the motor efficiency, which is very low if calculated from the useful mechanical work it produces - but is quite high when the ‘useful outcome’ is measured in the number of H+ pushed against the chemical gradient.

  18. F1 rotary motor of ATP synthase is driven by the torsionally-asymmetric drive shaft.

    PubMed

    Kulish, O; Wright, A D; Terentjev, E M

    2016-01-01

    F1F0 ATP synthase (ATPase) either facilitates the synthesis of ATP in a process driven by the proton moving force (pmf), or uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to pump protons against the concentration gradient across the membrane. ATPase is composed of two rotary motors, F0 and F1, which compete for control of their shared γ -shaft. We present a self-consistent physical model of F1 motor as a simplified two-state Brownian ratchet using the asymmetry of torsional elastic energy of the coiled-coil γ -shaft. This stochastic model unifies the physical concepts of linear and rotary motors, and explains the stepped unidirectional rotary motion. Substituting the model parameters, all independently known from recent experiments, our model quantitatively reproduces the ATPase operation, e.g. the 'no-load' angular velocity is ca. 400 rad/s anticlockwise at 4 mM ATP. Increasing the pmf torque exerted by F0 can slow, stop and overcome the torque generated by F1, switching from ATP hydrolysis to synthesis at a very low value of 'stall torque'. We discuss the motor efficiency, which is very low if calculated from the useful mechanical work it produces - but is quite high when the 'useful outcome' is measured in the number of H(+) pushed against the chemical gradient. PMID:27321713

  19. 40 CFR Figure F-1 to Subpart F of... - Designation Testing Checklist

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Testing Performance Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Fig. F-1... Application Spec. Corresponding to Sections of 40 CFR Part 53, Subparts E and F Verification Comments... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Designation Testing Checklist F...

  20. M2-F1 on lakebed with Pontiac convertible tow vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The M2-F1 lifting body, dubbed the 'flying bathtub' by the media, was the precursor of a remarkable series of wingless flying vehicles that contributed data used in the space shuttle and the X-38 Technology Demonstrator for crew return from the International Space Station. The early tow tests were done using the 1963 Pontiac Catalina convertible modified for the purpose. The first flight attempt occurred on 1 March 1963 but was unsuccessful due to control-system problems. It was not until 5 April 1963, after tests in the Ames Research Center wind tunnel, that Milt Thompson made the first M2-F1 tow flight. Based on the ideas and basic design of Alfred J. Eggers and others at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory (now the Ames Research Center), Mountain View, Calif., in the mid-1950s, the M2-F1 came to be built over a four-month period in 1962-63 for a cost of only about $30,000 plus perhaps an additional $8,000-$10,000 for an ejection seat and $10,000 for solid-propellant rockets to add time to the landing flare. Engineers and technicians at the NASA Flight Research Center (now NASA Dryden) kept costs low by designing and fabricating it partly in-house, with the plywood shell constructed by a local sailplane builder. Someone at the time estimated that it would have cost a major aircraft company $150,000 to build the same vehicle. Unlike the later lifting bodies, the M2-F1 was unpowered and was initially towed until it was airborne by a souped-up Pontiac convertible. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina

  1. E2F1 promote the aggressiveness of human colorectal cancer by activating the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zejun; Gong, Chaoju; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Xiaomin; Mei, Lingming; Song, Mintao; Qiu, Lanlan; Luo, Shuchai; Zhu, Zhihua; Zhang, Ronghui; Gu, Hongqian; Chen, Xiang

    2015-08-21

    As the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit, the high expression of ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2 (RRM2) induces cancer and contributes to tumor growth and invasion. In several colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines, we found that the expression levels of RRM2 were closely related to the transcription factor E2F1. Mechanistic studies were conducted to determine the molecular basis. Ectopic overexpression of E2F1 promoted RRM2 transactivation while knockdown of E2F1 reduced the levels of RRM2 mRNA and protein. To further investigate the roles of RRM2 which was activated by E2F1 in CRC, CCK-8 assay and EdU incorporation assay were performed. Overexpression of E2F1 promoted cell proliferation in CRC cells, which was blocked by RRM2 knockdown attenuation. In the migration and invasion tests, overexpression of E2F1 enhanced the migration and invasion of CRC cells which was abrogated by silencing RRM2. Besides, overexpression of RRM2 reversed the effects of E2F1 knockdown partially in CRC cells. Examination of clinical CRC specimens demonstrated that both RRM2 and E2F1 were elevated in most cancer tissues compared to the paired normal tissues. Further analysis showed that the protein expression levels of E2F1 and RRM2 were parallel with each other and positively correlated with lymph node metastasis (LNM), TNM stage and distant metastasis. Consistently, the patients with low E2F1 and RRM2 levels have a better prognosis than those with high levels. Therefore, we suggest that E2F1 can promote CRC proliferation, migration, invasion and metastasis by regulating RRM2 transactivation. Understanding the role of E2F1 in activating RRM2 transcription will help to explain the relationship between E2F1 and RRM2 in CRC and provide a novel predictive marker for diagnosis and prognosis of the disease. - Highlights: • E2F1 promotes RRM2 transactivation in CRC cells. • E2F1 promotes the proliferation of CRC cells by activating RRM2. • E2F1 promotes the migration and

  2. Efficacies of immunotherapy with polypeptide vaccine from ProDer f 1 in asthmatic mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaopin; Li, Qiuyu; Jiang, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    Allergic asthma is associated with the major house dust mite group 1 allergens Der p 1 and Der f 1, which belongs to the papin-like protease family and is the most potent of indoor allergens and allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), is seen as effective intervention for the entity. The current study was designed to verify the SIT efficacies of the enzymatic hydrolysates (papain and trypsin) in mice with asthma. We initially developed the asthmatic mouse models with ProDer f 1, and respectively applied recombinant ProDer f 1 protein and the two kinds of enzymatic hydrolysates for SIT. The results were verified by measuring the contents of IL-4, IL-10, IL-17 and IFN-γ changed in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and supernatant of splenocyte culture as well as level changes of specific IgE and IgG2a in the serum. After SIT intervention, the symptoms of allergic inflammation was alleviated significantly in mice treated with ProDer f 1 protein and the two enzymatic hydrolysates via detection of the lung tissue sections, and infiltration of inflammatory cells was also notably depressed as compared with the models, though the epithelial structure in airways remained similar with the PBS group. In addition, we observed lower serum contents of the specific IgE antibody and lower levels of IL-4, IL-17 in BALF and splenic cells in mice undergone SIT, whereas specific IgG2a, IFN-γ and IL-10 in BALF and supernatant of splenocyte culture were higher as compared to the asthma group. The findings suggest the SIT using the above two kinds of hydrolysates may effectively inhibit the allergic inflammation in the airways of mouse models sensitized with ProDer f 1 protein. PMID:25932130

  3. The participation of metals in the mechanism of the F(1)-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Frasch, W D

    2000-05-31

    The Mg(2+) cofactor of the F(1)F(0) ATP synthase is required for the asymmetry of the catalytic sites that leads to the differences in affinity for nucleotides. Vanadyl (V(IV)=O)(2+) is a functional surrogate for Mg(2+) in the F(1)-ATPase. The (51)V-hyperfine parameters derived from EPR spectra of VO(2+) bound to specific sites on the enzyme provide a direct probe of the metal ligands at each site. Site-directed mutations of residues that serve as metal ligands were found to cause measurable changes in the (51)V-hyperfine parameters of the bound VO(2+), thereby providing a means by which metal ligands were identified in the functional enzyme in several conformations. At the low-affinity catalytic site comparable to beta(E) in mitochondrial F(1), activation of the chloroplast F(1)-ATPase activity induces a conformational change that inserts the P-loop threonine and catch-loop tyrosine hydroxyl groups into the metal coordination sphere thereby displacing an amino group and the Walker homology B aspartate. Kinetic evidence suggests that coordination of this tyrosine by the metal when the empty site binds substrate may provide an escapement mechanism that allows the gamma subunit to rotate and the conformation of the catalytic sites to change, thereby allowing rotation only when the catalytic sites are filled. In the high-affinity conformation analogous to the beta(DP) site of mitochondrial F(1), the catch-loop tyrosine has been displaced by carboxyl groups from the Walker homology B aspartate and from betaE197 in Chlamydomonas CF(1). Coordination of the metal by these carboxyl groups contributes significantly to the ability of the enzyme to bind the nucleotide with high affinity. PMID:10838047

  4. E2F1 downregulation by arsenic trioxide in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sze-Kwan; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Zheng, Chun-Yan; Leung, Leanne Lee; Ho, James Chung-Man

    2014-11-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Nonetheless preliminary data have suggested potential activity of ATO in solid tumors including lung cancer. This study aimed to examine the underlying mechanisms of ATO in the treatment of lung adenocarcinoma. Using a panel of 7 lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, the effects of ATO treatment on cell viability, expression of E2F1 and its downstream targets, phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization and alteration of apoptotic/anti-apoptotic factors were studied. Tumor growth inhibition in vivo was investigated using a nude mouse xenograft model. ATO decreased cell viability with clinically achievable concentrations (8 µM) in all cell lines investigated. This was accompanied by reduced expression of E2F1, cyclin A2, skp2, c-myc, thymidine kinase and ribonucleotide reductase M1, while p-c-Jun was upregulated. Cell viability was significantly decreased with E2F1 knockdown. Treatment with ATO resulted in phosphatidylserine externalization in H23 cells and mitochondrial membrane depolarization in all cell lines, associated with truncation of Bid, downregulation of Bcl-2, upregulation of Bax and Bak, caspase-9 and -3 activation and PARP cleavage. Using the H358 xenograft model, the tumor growth was suppressed in the ATO treatment group during 8 days of treatment, associated with downregulation of E2F1 and upregulation of truncated Bid and cleaved caspase-3. In conclusion, ATO has potent in vitro and in vivo activity in lung adenocarcinoma, partially mediated through E2F1 downregulation and apoptosis. PMID:25174355

  5. Polymorphisms and expression of the chicken POU1F1 gene associated with carcass traits.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heng-Yong; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yi-Ping; Wang, Ji-Wen; Zhu, Qing

    2012-08-01

    POU1F1 is an essential factor that regulates the development and reproduction of animal. The objective of the current research was to screen for polymorphism, expression of POU1F1 and their association with carcass quality traits. A total of 126 Erlang mountainous chickens from two strains (SD02 and SD03) were employed for testing. Seventeen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected, but only two SNPs (g.96217999 T > C and g.96219442 C > T) were associated with carcass quality traits. In SD03 chicken, g.96217999 T > C genotypes were significantly associated with body weight (BW), carcass weight (CW), eviscerated weight (EW), and semi-eviscerated weight (SEW; P < 0.05), and was highly significantly associated with breast muscle weight (BMW) and abdominal fat weight (AW; P < 0.01). g.96219442 C > T was significantly associated with BW, EW, SEW (P < 0.05). However, these two SNPs were not significantly associated with any carcass traits in SD02 chicken. Diplotypes showed that in SD03 chicken, the haplotype [C: C] was the most favorable haplotype because it was associated with higher BW, CW, SEW, EW, BMW, and AW (P < 0.05). On the contrary, haplotype [T: T] was associated with lower carcass quality traits (P < 0.01). In addition, qRT-PCR revealed that at 13 weeks, the POU1F1 mRNA expression was significantly higher in breast muscle of cock compared to that of hens (P < 0.05), whereas there was no significant correlation between POU1F1 expression and carcass traits. These results suggested that POU1F1 could be a potential candidate gene for carcass traits in chicken. PMID:22722987

  6. The regulatory switch of F1-ATPase studied by single-molecule FRET in the ABEL trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockenhauer, Samuel D.; Duncan, Thomas M.; Moerner, W. E.; Börsch, Michael

    2014-03-01

    F1-ATPase is the soluble portion of the membrane-embedded enzyme FoF1-ATP synthase that catalyzes the production of adenosine triphosphate in eukaryotic and eubacterial cells. In reverse, the F1 part can also hydrolyze ATP quickly at three catalytic binding sites. Therefore, catalysis of 'non-productive' ATP hydrolysis by F1 (or FoF1) must be minimized in the cell. In bacteria, the ɛ subunit is thought to control and block ATP hydrolysis by mechanically inserting its C-terminus into the rotary motor region of F1. We investigate this proposed mechanism by labeling F1 specifically with two fluorophores to monitor the C-terminus of the ɛ subunit by Förster resonance energy transfer. Single F1 molecules are trapped in solution by an Anti-Brownian electrokinetic trap which keeps the FRET-labeled F1 in place for extended observation times of several hundreds of milliseconds, limited by photobleaching. FRET changes in single F1 and FRET histograms for different biochemical conditions are compared to evaluate the proposed regulatory mechanism.

  7. The regulatory switch of F1-ATPase studied by single-molecule FRET in the ABEL Trap

    PubMed Central

    Bockenhauer, Samuel D.; Duncan, Thomas M.; Moerner, W. E.; Börsch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    F1-ATPase is the soluble portion of the membrane-embedded enzyme FoF1-ATP synthase that catalyzes the production of adenosine triphosphate in eukaryotic and eubacterial cells. In reverse, the F1 part can also hydrolyze ATP quickly at three catalytic binding sites. Therefore, catalysis of ‘non-productive’ ATP hydrolysis by F1 (or FoF1) must be minimized in the cell. In bacteria, the ε subunit is thought to control and block ATP hydrolysis by mechanically inserting its C-terminus into the rotary motor region of F1. We investigate this proposed mechanism by labeling F1 specifically with two fluorophores to monitor the C-terminus of the ε subunit by Förster resonance energy transfer. Single F1 molecules are trapped in solution by an Anti-Brownian electrokinetic trap which keeps the FRET-labeled F1 in place for extended observation times of several hundreds of milliseconds, limited by photobleaching. FRET changes in single F1 and FRET histograms for different biochemical conditions are compared to evaluate the proposed regulatory mechanism. PMID:25309100

  8. Sequence Conservation and Sexually Dimorphic Expression of the Ftz-F1 Gene in the Crustacean Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad Ishak, Nur Syafiqah; Kato, Yasuhiko; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the genes required for environmental sex determination is important for understanding the evolution of diverse sex determination mechanisms in animals. Orthologs of Drosophila orphan receptor Fushi tarazu factor-1 (Ftz-F1) are known to function in genetic sex determination. In contrast, their roles in environmental sex determination remain unknown. In this study, we have cloned and characterized the Ftz-F1 ortholog in the branchiopod crustacean Daphnia magna, which produces males in response to environmental stimuli. Similar to that observed in Drosophila, D. magna Ftz-F1 (DapmaFtz-F1) produces two splicing variants, αFtz-F1 and βFtz-F1, which encode 699 and 777 amino acids, respectively. Both isoforms share a DNA-binding domain, a ligand-binding domain, and an AF-2 activation domain and differ only at the A/B domain. The phylogenetic position and genomic structure of DapmaFtz-F1 suggested that this gene has diverged from an ancestral gene common to branchiopod crustacean and insect Ftz-F1 genes. qRT-PCR showed that at the one cell and gastrulation stages, both DapmaFtz-F1 isoforms are two-fold more abundant in males than in females. In addition, in later stages, their sexual dimorphic expressions were maintained in spite of reduced expression. Time-lapse imaging of DapmaFtz-F1 RNAi embryos was performed in H2B-GFP expressing transgenic Daphnia, demonstrating that development of the RNAi embryos slowed down after the gastrulation stage and stopped at 30–48 h after ovulation. DapmaFtz-F1 shows high homology to insect Ftz-F1 orthologs based on its amino acid sequence and exon-intron organization. The sexually dimorphic expression of DapmaFtz-F1 suggests that it plays a role in environmental sex determination of D. magna. PMID:27138373

  9. Sequence Conservation and Sexually Dimorphic Expression of the Ftz-F1 Gene in the Crustacean Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Mohamad Ishak, Nur Syafiqah; Kato, Yasuhiko; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the genes required for environmental sex determination is important for understanding the evolution of diverse sex determination mechanisms in animals. Orthologs of Drosophila orphan receptor Fushi tarazu factor-1 (Ftz-F1) are known to function in genetic sex determination. In contrast, their roles in environmental sex determination remain unknown. In this study, we have cloned and characterized the Ftz-F1 ortholog in the branchiopod crustacean Daphnia magna, which produces males in response to environmental stimuli. Similar to that observed in Drosophila, D. magna Ftz-F1 (DapmaFtz-F1) produces two splicing variants, αFtz-F1 and βFtz-F1, which encode 699 and 777 amino acids, respectively. Both isoforms share a DNA-binding domain, a ligand-binding domain, and an AF-2 activation domain and differ only at the A/B domain. The phylogenetic position and genomic structure of DapmaFtz-F1 suggested that this gene has diverged from an ancestral gene common to branchiopod crustacean and insect Ftz-F1 genes. qRT-PCR showed that at the one cell and gastrulation stages, both DapmaFtz-F1 isoforms are two-fold more abundant in males than in females. In addition, in later stages, their sexual dimorphic expressions were maintained in spite of reduced expression. Time-lapse imaging of DapmaFtz-F1 RNAi embryos was performed in H2B-GFP expressing transgenic Daphnia, demonstrating that development of the RNAi embryos slowed down after the gastrulation stage and stopped at 30-48 h after ovulation. DapmaFtz-F1 shows high homology to insect Ftz-F1 orthologs based on its amino acid sequence and exon-intron organization. The sexually dimorphic expression of DapmaFtz-F1 suggests that it plays a role in environmental sex determination of D. magna. PMID:27138373

  10. Wooden shell of M2-F1 being assembled at El Mirage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Wooden shell of the M2-F1 being assembled at El Mirage, CA. While Flight Research Center technicians built the internal steel structure of the M2-F1, sailplane builder Gus Briegleb built the vehicle's outer wooden shell. Its skin was 3/32-inch mahogany plywood, with 1/8-inch mahogany rib sections reinforced with spruce. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly safely and to

  11. M2-F1 mounted in NASA Ames Research Center 40x80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    After the first attempted ground-tow tests of the M2-F1 in March 1963, the vehicle was taken to the Ames Research Center, Mountain View, CA, for wind-tunnel testing. During these tests, Milt Thompson and others were in the M2-F1 to position the control surfaces for each test. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly safely and to train pilots before they were towed behind a C

  12. M2-F1 in flight over lakebed on tow line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    After initial ground-tow flights of the M2-F1 using the Pontiac as a tow vehicle, the way was clear to make air tows behind a C-47. The first air tow took place on 16 August 1963. Pilot Milt Thompson found that the M2-F1 flew well, with good control. This first flight lasted less than two minutes from tow-line release to touchdown. The descent rate was 4,000 feet per minute. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got

  13. Proposed Ames M2-F1, M1-L half-cone, and Langley lenticular bodies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Dale Reed, who inaugurated the lifting-body flight research at NASA's Flight Research Center (later, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA), originally proposed that three wooden outer shells be built. These would then be attached to the single internal steel structure. The three shapes were (viewer's left to right) the M2-F1, the M1-L, and a lenticular shape. Milt Thompson, who supported Reed's advocacy for a lifting-body research project, recommended that only the M2-F1 shell be built, believing that the M1-L shape was 'too radical,' while the lenticular one was 'too exotic.' Although the lenticular shape was often likened to that of a flying saucer, Reed's wife Donna called it the 'powder puff.' The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey

  14. M2-F1 lifting body and Paresev 1B on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    In this photo of the M2-F1 lifting body and the Paresev 1B on the ramp, the viewer sees two vehicles representing different approaches to building a research craft to simulate a spacecraft able to land on the ground instead of splashing down in the ocean as the Mercury capsules did. The M2-F1 was a lifting body, a shape able to re-enter from orbit and land. The Paresev (Paraglider Research Vehicle) used a Rogallo wing that could be (but never was) used to replace a conventional parachute for landing a capsule-type spacecraft, allowing it to make a controlled landing on the ground. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop

  15. Role of the f1(1285) state in the J / ψ → ϕ K bar K* and J/ψ → ϕf1(1285) decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ju-Jun; Oset, E.

    2016-02-01

    We study the role of the f1 (1285) resonance in the decays of J / ψ → ϕ K bar K* and J / ψ → ϕf1 (1285). The theoretical approach is based on the results of chiral unitary theory where the f1 (1285) resonance is dynamically generated from the K* K bar -c.c. interaction. In order to further test the dynamical nature of the f1 (1285) state, we investigate the J / ψ → ϕ K bar K* decay close to the K bar K* threshold and make predictions for the ratio of the invariant mass distributions of the J / ψ → ϕ K bar K* decay and the J / ψ → ϕf1 (1285) partial decay width with all the parameters of the mechanism fixed in previous studies. The results can be tested in future experiments and therefore offer new clues on the nature of the f1 (1285) state.

  16. M2-F1 in flight during low-speed car tow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The M2-F1 shown in flight during a low-speed car tow runs across the lakebed. Such tests allowed about two minutes to test the vehicle's handling in flight. NASA Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center) personnel conducted as many as 8 to 14 ground-tow flights in a single day either to test the vehicle in preparation for air tows or to train pilots to fly the vehicle before they undertook air tows. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30

  17. M2-F1 fabrication by Grierson Hamilton, Bob Green, and Ed Browne

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Flight Research Center discretionary funds paid for the M2-F-1's construction. NASA mechanics, sheet-metal smiths, and technicians did much of the work in a curtained-off area of a hangar called the 'Wright Bicycle Shop.' The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly safely and to train pilots before they were towed behind a C-47 aircraft and released. These initial car-tow tests

  18. Construction Progress of the S-IC and F-1 Test Stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the S-IC test stand, related facilities were built during this time. Built to the north of the massive S-IC test stand, was the F-1 Engine test stand. The F-1 test stand, a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, was designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of

  19. Construction Progress of the S-IC and F-1 Test Stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. North of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F

  20. Low doses of paclitaxel potently induce apoptosis in human retinoblastoma Y79 cells by up-regulating E2F1.

    PubMed

    Drago-Ferrante, Rosa; Santulli, Andrea; Di Fiore, Riccardo; Giuliano, Michela; Calvaruso, Giuseppe; Tesoriere, Giovanni; Vento, Renza

    2008-10-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is an anticancer drug currently in phase II clinical trials. This study shows for the first time that low doses of PTX (5 nM) potently induce apoptosis in human retinoblastoma Y79 cells. The effect of PTX is accompanied by a potent induction of E2F1 which appears to play a critical role in the effects induced by PTX. PTX induced a dose- and time-dependent effect, with G2/M arrest, cyclines A, E and B1 accumulation and a marked modification in the status of Cdc2-cyclin B1 complex, the major player of the G2/M checkpoint. Apoptosis followed G2/M arrest. An early and prolonged increase in p53 expression with its stabilization by phosphorylation and acetylation and its nuclear translocation occurred. Consistently, PTX increased p21WAF1, bax and MDM2 levels, suggesting that p53 is transcriptionally active. p53 accumulated following both E2F1 up-regulation and increase in the levels of p14ARF which interacts with MDM2 preventing ubiquitination and proteosomal degradation of p53. Both extrinsic (E2F1/Fas/JNK/caspase-2 activation) and intrinsic (Bcl-2 phosphorylation, Bid fragmentation and Bax increase) pathways seemed to be involved. Loss of mitochondrial potential and activation of apoptosome and executive caspase-3,-6 and-7 was shown. Incubation with either the irreversible pan-caspase inhibitors Z-VAD-FMK, or SP600125, a selective inhibitor of JNK, or pifithrin alpha, a potent p53 inhibitor, significantly inhibited the effects induced by PTX. PMID:18813780

  1. To die, or not to die: E2F1 never decides by itself during serum starvation

    PubMed Central

    Sakamuro, Daitoku; Folk, Watson P; Kumari, Alpana

    2015-01-01

    The adenovirus E2 promoter-binding factor-1 (E2F1) induces apoptosis in response to DNA damage and serum starvation. After DNA damage, E2F1 is phosphorylated by ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase to promote apoptosis. However, precisely how serum starvation stimulates E2F1-induced apoptosis is unclear. We recently found that serum starvation reduces E2F1 poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, thereby releasing a proapoptotic protein, bridging integrator-1 (BIN1), into the cytoplasm. PMID:27308445

  2. E2F1 Hinders Skin Wound Healing by Repressing Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Expression, Neovascularization, and Macrophage Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ning; Wang, Haiping; Deng, Pei; Xu, Yi; Feng, Youping; Zeng, Hong; Yang, Hongxia; Hou, Kai; Wang, Andrew; Parthasarathy, Keshav; Goyal, Samaksh; Qin, Gangjian; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Refractory surface of wound and dermal chronic ulcer are largely attributed to poor neovascularization. We have previously shown that E2F1 suppresses VEGF expression in the ischemic heart, and that genetic deletion of E2F1 leads to better cardiac recovery. However, whether E2F1 has a role in dermal wound healing is currently not known. Methods and Results Skin wounds were surgically induced in E2F1-null (E2F1–/–) mice and WT littermates. E2F1–/– displayed an accelerated wound healing including wound closure, dermal thickening and collagen deposition, which was associated with an increased endothelial cell proliferation and greater vessel density in the border zone of the wound. Furthermore, more macrophages were recruited to the skin lesions and the level of VEGF expression was markedly higher in E2F1–/– than in WT mice. Conclusions E2F1 hinders skin wound healing by suppressing VEGF expression, neovascularization, and macrophage recruitment. Strategies that target E2F1 may enhance wound healing. PMID:27490344

  3. Human Herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) and HHV-6B Alter E2F1/Rb Pathways and E2F1 Localization and Cause Cell Cycle Arrest in Infected T Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Mlechkovich, Guy; Frenkel, Niza

    2007-01-01

    E2F transcription factors play pivotal roles in controlling the expression of genes involved in cell viability as well as genes involved in cell death. E2F1 is an important constituent of this protein family, which thus far contains eight members. The interaction of E2F1 with its major regulator, retinoblastoma protein (Rb), has been studied extensively in the past two decades, concentrating on the role of E2F1 in transcriptional regulation and the role of Rb in cell replication and cancer formation. Additionally, the effect of viral infections on E2F1/Rb interactions has been analyzed for different viruses, concentrating on cell division, which is essential for viral replication. In the present study, we monitored E2F1-Rb interactions during human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) and HHV-6B infections of SupT1 T cells. The results have shown the following dramatic alterations in E2F1-Rb pathways compared to the pathways of parallel mock-infected control cultures. (i) The E2F1 levels were elevated during viral infections. (ii) The cellular localization of E2F1 was dramatically altered, and it was found to accumulate both in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions, as opposed to the strict nuclear localization seen in the mock-infected cells. (iii) Although E2F1 expression was elevated, two exemplary target genes, cyclin E and MCM5, were not upregulated. (iv) The Rb protein was dephosphorylated early postinfection, a trait that also occurred with UV-inactivated virus. (v) Infection was associated with significant reduction of E2F1/Rb complexing. (vi) HHV-6 infections were accompanied by cell cycle arrest. The altered E2F1-Rb interactions and functions might contribute to the observed cell cycle arrest. PMID:17913805

  4. The Na(+)-translocating ATPase of Acetobacterium woodii is a F1F0-type enzyme as deduced from the primary structure of its beta, gamma and epsilon subunits.

    PubMed

    Forster, A; Daniel, R; Müller, V

    1995-05-10

    A 4.5 kbp EcoRI fragment hybridizing to a fragment of uncD (coding for subunit beta of F1F0-ATPases) was cloned from chromosomal DNA of Acetobacterium woodii. The nucleotide sequence was determined and revealed five open reading frames (ORF), four of which were identified to code for subunits of the Na(+)-ATPase. The deduced amino acid sequences of these ORF's are homologous to subunit alpha (partial coding sequence, C-terminal end), gamma, beta and epsilon of F1F0-ATPases from various organisms; furthermore, the organization of the genes in the order uncA (alpha), uncG (gamma), uncD (beta), uncC (epsilon) is identical to the structure of unc operon as present in most bacteria. Downstream of uncC is an ORF whose deduced amino acid sequence has 53% sequence homology to AlgD from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The structure and organization of the unc genes are the final proof that the Na(+)-ATPase from A. woodii is a member of the family of F1F0-ATPases. PMID:7748890

  5. E2F1 and p53 Transcription Factors as Accessory Factors for Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Vélez-Cruz, Renier; Johnson, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Many of the biochemical details of nucleotide excision repair (NER) have been established using purified proteins and DNA substrates. In cells however, DNA is tightly packaged around histones and other chromatin-associated proteins, which can be an obstacle to efficient repair. Several cooperating mechanisms enhance the efficiency of NER by altering chromatin structure. Interestingly, many of the players involved in modifying chromatin at sites of DNA damage were originally identified as regulators of transcription. These include ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, histone modifying enzymes and several transcription factors. The p53 and E2F1 transcription factors are well known for their abilities to regulate gene expression in response to DNA damage. This review will highlight the underappreciated, transcription-independent functions of p53 and E2F1 in modifying chromatin structure in response to DNA damage to promote global NER. PMID:23202967

  6. Trichloroethylene degradation by Escherichia coli containing the cloned Pseudomonas putida F1 toluene dioxygenase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Zylstra, G.J.; Gibson, D.T. ); Wackett, L.P. )

    1989-12-01

    Toluene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida F1 has been implicated as an enzyme capable of degrading trichloroethylene. This has now been confirmed with Escherichia coli JM109(pDTG601) that contains the structural genes (todC1C2BA) of toluene dioxygenase under the control of the tac promoter. The extent of trichloroethylene degradation by the recombinant organism depended on the cell concentration and the concentration of trichloroethylene. A linear rate of trichloroethylene degradation was observed with the E. coli recombinant strain. In contrast, P. putida F39/D, a mutant strain of P. putida F1 that does not contain cis-toluene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, showed a much faster initial rate of trichloroethylene degradation which decreased over time.

  7. F-1 Engine Test Firing at the S-IB Static Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The test laboratory of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) tested the F-1 engine, the most powerful rocket engine ever fired at MSFC. The engine was tested on the newly modified Saturn IB static test stand that had been used for three years to test the Saturn I eight-engine booster, S-I (first) stage. In 1961, the test stand was modified to permit static firing of the S-I/S-IB stage and the name of the stand was then changed to the S-IB Static Test Stand. Producing a combined thrust of 7,500,000 pounds, five F-1 engines powered the S-IC (first) stage of the Saturn V vehicle for the marned lunar mission.

  8. F-1 Engine Test Firing at the S-IB Static Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The test laboratory of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) tested the F-1 engine, the most powerful rocket engine ever fired at MSFC. The engine was tested on the newly modified Saturn IB Static Test Stand which had been used for three years to test the Saturn I eight-engine booster, S-I (first) stage. In 1961 the test stand was modified to permit static firing of the S-I/S-IB stage and the name of the stand was then changed to the S-IB Static Test Stand. Producing a combined thrust of 7,500,000 pounds, five F-1 engines powered the S-IC (first) stage of the Saturn V vehicle for the marned lunar mission.

  9. Development of High Speed Digital Camera: EXILIM EX-F1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, Osamu

    The EX-F1 is a high speed digital camera featuring a revolutionary improvement in burst shooting speed that is expected to create entirely new markets. This model incorporates a high speed CMOS sensor and a high speed LSI processor. With this model, CASIO has achieved an ultra-high speed 60 frames per second (fps) burst rate for still images, together with 1,200 fps high speed movie that captures movements which cannot even be seen by human eyes. Moreover, this model can record movies at full High-Definition. After launching it into the market, it was able to get a lot of high appraisals as an innovation camera. We will introduce the concept, features and technologies about the EX-F1.

  10. A genetic system involving superoxide causes F1 necrosis in wheat (T. aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Khanna-Chopra, R; Dalal, M; Kumar, G P; Laloraya, M

    1998-07-30

    A genetic system in wheat is described in which F1 produced by crossing a drought tolerant cultivar C306 and high yielding cultivar WL711 exhibits leaf necrosis leading to the death of the plant. The mechanism underlying hybrid necrosis is not yet known. The hybrid exhibited a higher level of superoxide anion compared to the healthy leaves of parents at similar developmental stages. This increase in superoxide generation preceded necrotic lesion formation and displayed a gradient from the leaf tip to base. The leaf tip where necrotic lesions make their first appearance exhibited a higher level of superoxide compared to the base. Superoxide anion thus appears to play a vital role in necrosis of leaves in F1 hybrid. This genetic system can be a model system for understanding cell death in higher plants. PMID:9703992

  11. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A.; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles (4He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei—nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons—is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the ‘adiabatic projection method’ to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  12. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    PubMed

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  13. Proteomics reveals a core molecular response of Pseudomonas putida F1 to acute chromate challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Dorothea K.; Chourey, Karuna; Wickham, Gene S; Thieman, Stephanie; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Zhang, Bing; McCarthy, Andrea T; Rudisill, Matt; Shah, Manesh B; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida is a model organism for bioremediation because of its remarkable metabolic versatility, extensive biodegradative functions, and ubiquity in contaminated soil environments. To further the understanding of molecular pathways responding to the heavy metal chromium(VI) [Cr(VI)], the proteome of aerobically grown, Cr(VI)-stressed P. putida strain F1 was characterized within the context of two disparate nutritional environments: rich (LB) media and minimal (M9L) media containing lactate as the sole carbon source.

  14. VIIRS F1 "best" relative spectral response characterization by the government team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Chris; McIntire, Jeff; Schwarting, Tom; Moyer, Dave

    2011-10-01

    The VIIRS Flight 1 (F1) instrument completed sensor level testing, including relative spectral response (RSR) characterization in 2009 and is moving forward towards a launch on the NPP platform late in 2011. As part of its mandate to produce analyses of F1 performance essentials, the VIIRS Government Team, consisting of NASA, Aerospace Corp., and MIT/Lincoln Lab elements, has produced an independent (from that of industry) analysis of F1 RSR. The test data used to derive RSR for all VIIRS spectral bands was collected in the TVAC environment using the Spectral Measurement Assembly (SpMA), a dual monochromator system with tungsten and ceramic glow bar sources. These spectrally contiguous measurements were analyzed by the Government Team to produce a complete in-band + out-of-band RSR for 21 of the 22 VIIRS bands (exception of the Day-Night Band). The analysis shows that VIIRS RSR was well measured in the pre-launch test program for all bands, although the measurement noise floor is high on the thermal imager band I5. The RSR contain expected detector to detector variation resulting from the VIIRS non-telecentric optical design, and out-of-band features are present in some bands; non-compliances on the integrated out-of-band spectral performance metric are noted in M15 and M16A,B bands and also for several VisNIR bands, though the VisNIR non-compliances were expected due to known scattering in the VisNIR integrated filter assembly. The Government Team "best" RSR have been released into the public domain for use by the science community in preparation for the post-launch era of VIIRS F1.

  15. Multispectral scanner flight model (F-1) radiometric calibration and alignment handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This handbook on the calibration of the MSS-D flight model (F-1) provides both the relevant data and a summary description of how the data were obtained for the system radiometric calibration, system relative spectral response, and the filter response characteristics for all 24 channels of the four band MSS-D F-1 scanner. The calibration test procedure and resulting test data required to establish the reference light levels of the MSS-D internal calibration system are discussed. The final set of data ("nominal" calibration wedges for all 24 channels) for the internal calibration system is given. The system relative spectral response measurements for all 24 channels of MSS-D F-1 are included. These data are the spectral response of the complete scanner, which are the composite of the spectral responses of the scan mirror primary and secondary telescope mirrors, fiber optics, optical filters, and detectors. Unit level test data on the measurements of the individual channel optical transmission filters are provided. Measured performance is compared to specification values.

  16. Mutations in RCA1 and AFG3 inhibit F1-ATPase assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Paul, M F; Tzagoloff, A

    1995-10-01

    The RCA1 (YTA12) and AFG3 (YTA10) genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae code for homologous mitochondrial proteins that belong to the recently described AAA protein-family [Kunau et al. (1993) Biochimie 75,209-224]. Mutations in either gene have been shown to induce a respiratory defect. In the case of rca1 mutants this phenotype has been ascribed to defective assembly of cytochrome oxidase and ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase. In the present study we show that the respiratory defect of afg3 mutants, like that of rca1 mutants, is also caused by an arrest in assembly of cytochrome oxidase and ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase. In addition to the absence of the respiratory complexes, rca1 and afg3 mutants exhibit reduced mitochondrial ATPase activity. As a first step to an understanding of the biochemical basis for the ATPase defect we have examined the assembly of the F1 and F0 constituents of the ATPase complex. We present evidence that the ATPase lesion stems at least in part from the failure of rca1 and afg3 mutants to assemble F1. Although the mutants also display lower steady-state concentrations of some F0 subunits, this could be a secondary effect of defective F1 assembly. PMID:7589436

  17. (16)Oxygen irradiation enhances cued fear memory in B6D2F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Raber, Jacob; Marzulla, Tessa; Kronenberg, Amy; Turker, Mitchell S

    2015-11-01

    The space radiation environment includes energetic charged particles that may impact cognitive performance. We assessed the effects of (16)O ion irradiation on cognitive performance of C57BL/6J × DBA/2J F1 (B6D2F1) mice at OHSU (Portland, OR) one month following irradiation at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL, Upton, NY). Hippocampus-dependent contextual fear memory and hippocampus-independent cued fear memory of B6D2F1 mice were tested. (16)O ion exposure enhanced cued fear memory. This effect showed a bell-shaped dose response curve. Cued fear memory was significantly stronger in mice irradiated with (16)O ions at a dose of 0.4 or 0.8 Gy than in sham-irradiated mice or following irradiation at 1.6 Gy. In contrast to cued fear memory, contextual fear memory was not affected following (16)O ion irradiation at the doses used in this study. These data indicate that the amygdala might be particularly susceptible to effects of (16)O ion exposure. PMID:26553639

  18. Role of directional fidelity in multiple aspects of extreme performance of the F1-ATPase motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Ruizheng; Wang, Zhisong

    2013-08-01

    Quantitative understanding of the best possible performance of nanomotors allowed by physical laws pertains to the study of nanomotors from biology as well as nanotechnology. The biological nanomotor F1 ATPase is the best available model system as it is the only nanomotor known for extreme energy conversion near the limit of energy conservation. Using a unified theoretical framework centered on a concept called directional fidelity, we analyze recent experiments in which the F1 motor's performance was measured for controlled chemical potentials and expose from the experiments quantitative evidence for the motor's multiple extreme performances in directional fidelity, speed, and catalytic capability close to physical limits. Specifically, the motor nearly exhausts the available energy from the fuel to retain the highest possible directional fidelity for an arbitrary load, encompassing the motor's extreme energy conversion and beyond. The theory-experiment comparison implies a tight chemomechanical coupling up to stalemate as futile steps occur, but unlikely involve fuel consumption. The F1-motor data also help clarify the relation between directional fidelity and experimentally measured stepping ratio.

  19. Trapping the ATP binding state leads to a detailed understanding of the F1-ATPase mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Kwangho; Pu, Jingzhi; Karplus, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The rotary motor enzyme FoF1-ATP synthase uses the proton-motive force across a membrane to synthesize ATP from ADP and Pi (H2PO4−) under cellular conditions that favor the hydrolysis reaction by a factor of 2 × 105. This remarkable ability to drive a reaction away from equilibrium by harnessing an external force differentiates it from an ordinary enzyme, which increases the rate of reaction without shifting the equilibrium. Hydrolysis takes place in the neighborhood of one conformation of the catalytic moiety F1-ATPase, whose structure is known from crystallography. By use of molecular dynamics simulations we trap a second structure, which is rotated by 40° from the catalytic dwell conformation and represents the state associated with ATP binding, in accord with single-molecule experiments. Using the two structures, we show why Pi is not released immediately after ATP hydrolysis, but only after a subsequent 120° rotation, in agreement with experiment. A concerted conformational change of the α3β3 crown is shown to induce the 40° rotation of the γ-subunit only when the βE subunit is empty, whereas with Pi bound, βE serves as a latch to prevent the rotation of γ. The present results provide a rationalization of how F1-ATPase achieves the coupling between the small changes in the active site of βDP and the 40° rotation of γ. PMID:25453082

  20. Simultaneous F 0-F 1 modifications of Arabic for the improvement of natural-sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ykhlef, F.; Bensebti, M.

    2013-03-01

    Pitch (F 0) modification is one of the most important problems in the area of speech synthesis. Several techniques have been developed in the literature to achieve this goal. The main restrictions of these techniques are in the modification range and the synthesised speech quality, intelligibility and naturalness. The control of formants in a spoken language can significantly improve the naturalness of the synthesised speech. This improvement is mainly dependent on the control of the first formant (F 1). Inspired by this observation, this article proposes a new approach that modifies both F 0 and F 1 of Arabic voiced sounds in order to improve the naturalness of the pitch shifted speech. The developed strategy takes a parallel processing approach, in which the analysis segments are decomposed into sub-bands in the wavelet domain, modified in the desired sub-band by using a resampling technique and reconstructed without affecting the remained sub-bands. Pitch marking and voicing detection are performed in the frequency decomposition step based on the comparison of the multi-level approximation and detail signals. The performance of the proposed technique is evaluated by listening tests and compared to the pitch synchronous overlap and add (PSOLA) technique in the third approximation level. Experimental results have shown that the manipulation in the wavelet domain of F 0 in conjunction with F 1 guarantees natural-sounding of the synthesised speech compared to the classical pitch modification technique. This improvement was appropriate for high pitch modifications.

  1. Properties of kojic acid and curcumin: Assay on cell B16-F1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiharto, Ariff, Arbakariya; Ahmad, Syahida; Hamid, Muhajir

    2016-03-01

    Ultra violet (UV) exposure and oxidative stress are casually linked to skin disorders. They can increase melanin synthesis, proliferation of melanocytes, and hyperpigmentation. It is possible that antioxidants or inhibitors may have a beneficial effect on skin health to reduce hyperpigmentation. In the last few years, a huge number of natural herbal extracts have been tested to reduce hyperpigmentation. The objective of this study was to determine and to compare of kojic acid and curcumin properties to viability cell B16-F1. In this study, our data showed that the viability of cell B16-F1 was 63.91% for kojic acid and 64.12% for curcumin at concentration 100 µg/ml. Further investigation assay of antioxidant activities, indicated that IC50 for kojic acid is 63.8 µg/ml and curcumin is 16.05 µg/ml. Based on the data, kojic acid and curcumin have potential antioxidant properties to reduce hyperpigmentation with low toxicity effect in cell B16-F1.

  2. Studies of carcinogenicity of sodium chlorite in B6C3F1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yokose, Y.; Uchida, K.; Nakae, D.; Shiraiwa, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Konishi, Y.

    1987-12-01

    The carcinogenic activities of sodium chlorite in B6C3F1 mice were examined. Sodium chlorite was given at concentration of 0 (control), 0.025% (low dose), or 0.05% (high dose) in the drinking water of 150 female and 150 male mice for 80 weeks, after which time the animals were returned to distilled water without sodium chlorite. All mice were sacrificed 85 weeks from the beginning of the experiment. The incidence of tumor-bearing animals was 32% (control), 34% (low dose), and 26% (high dose) in female mice, and 46% (control), 57% (low dose), and 53% (high dose) in male mice. The types and incidence of neoplasms that occurred frequently in each group of both sexes were similar to those observed spontaneously in B6C3F1 mice. The incidence of lymphomas/leukemias in the high dose group of females (2%), however, was lower than that in the control group (15%). Furthermore, the incidence of pulmonary adenomas in the high dose group of males (12%) was higher than that in the control group (0%), but neither dose-related increases in the adenoma incidences nor increased incidences of the adenocarcinomas were observed. These results indicated no clear evidence of a carcinogenic potential of sodium chlorite in B6C3F1 mice.

  3. CHRONIC ZEBRAFISH PFOS EXPOSURE ALTERS SEX RATIO AND MATERNAL RELATED EFFECTS IN F1 OFFSPRING

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyong; Chen, Jiangfei; Lin, Kuanfei; Chen, Yuanhong; Hu, Wei; Tanguay, Robert L.; Huang, Changjiang; Dong, Qiaoxiang

    2012-01-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) is an organic contaminant ubiquitous in the environment, wildlife, and humans. Few studies have assessed its chronic toxicity on aquatic organisms. The present study defined the effects of long-term exposure to PFOS on zebrafish development and reproduction. Specifically, zebrafish at 8 h postfertilization (hpf) were exposed to PFOS at 0, 5, 50, and 250 μg/L for five months. Growth suppression was observed in the 250 μg/L PFOS-treated group. The sex ratio was altered, with a significant female dominance in the high-dose PFOS group. Male gonad development was also impaired in a dose-dependent manner by PFOS exposure. Although female fecundity was not impacted, the F1 embryos derived from high-dose exposed females paired with males without PFOS exposure developed severe deformity at early development stages and resulted in 100% larval mortality at 7 d postfertilization (dpf). Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid quantification in embryos indicated that decreased larval survival in F1 offspring was directly correlated to the PFOS body burden, and larval lethality was attributable to maternal transfer of PFOS to the eggs. Lower-dose parental PFOS exposure did not result in decreased F1 survival; however, the offspring displayed hyperactivity of basal swimming speed in a light-to-dark behavior assessment test. These findings demonstrate that chronic exposure to PFOS adversely impacts embryonic growth, reproduction, and subsequent offspring development. Environ. PMID:21671259

  4. Suppressibility of the 2f1-f2 stimulated acoustic emissions in gerbil and man.

    PubMed

    Brown, A M; Kemp, D T

    1984-01-01

    The suppression tuning properties of the oto-acoustic distortion product emission, 2f1-f2 have been measured in the ear canal of gerbil and man. The results show the acoustic response to be suppressible in a similar, frequency-dependent manner in both species. Frequencies near to those of the stimulating tones are most effective in suppressing the response. Derived iso-suppression tuning curves have Q10dB values of between 1 and 6. Suppressor tones having frequencies near to f2 (the higher frequency stimulus) make a contribution to the tuning curve which is largely independent of the stimulus intensity and the frequency ratio between the two primary tones. Suppressors having f1-associated frequencies produce a variable amount of suppression depending on the stimulus parameters chosen. No specific suppression feature could be associated with suppressors near to 2f1-f2. The frequency selectivity of the acoustic DP generation mechanism shown by this study indicates a close association with the transduction mechanism. The demonstration of comparable signals in gerbil and man facilitates the direct transfer of laboratory results to the study of human ears. PMID:6706860

  5. Transcriptome shock in an interspecific F1 triploid hybrid of Oryza revealed by RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Sun, Yue; Wang, Xutong; Lin, Xiuyun; Sun, Shuai; Shen, Kun; Wang, Jie; Jiang, Tingting; Zhong, Silin; Xu, Chunming; Liu, Bao

    2016-02-01

    Interspecific hybridization is a driving force in evolution and speciation of higher plants. Interspecific hybridization often induces immediate and saltational changes in gene expression, a phenomenon collectively termed "transcriptome shock". Although transcriptome shock has been reported in various plant and animal taxa, the extent and pattern of shock-induced expression changes are often highly idiosyncratic, and hence entails additional investigations. Here, we produced a set of interspecific F1 triploid hybrid plants between Oryza sativa, ssp. japonica (2n = 2x = 24, genome AA) and the tetraploid form of O. punctata (2n = 4x = 48, genome, BBCC), and conducted RNA-seq transcriptome profiling of the hybrids and their exact parental plants. We analyzed both homeolog expression bias and overall gene expression level difference in the hybrids relative to the in silico "hybrids" (parental mixtures). We found that approximately 16% (2,541) of the 16,112 expressed genes in leaf tissue of the F1 hybrids showed nonadditive expression, which were specifically enriched in photosynthesis-related pathways. Interestingly, changes in the maternal homeolog expression, including non-stochastic silencing, were the major causes for altered homeolog expression partitioning in the F1 hybrids. Our findings have provided further insights into the transcriptome response to interspecific hybridization and heterosis. PMID:25828709

  6. Inheritance of glutenin subunits in F1 seeds of reciprocal crosses between European hexaploid wheat cultivars.

    PubMed

    Burnouf, T; Bouriquet, R; Poullard, P

    1983-01-01

    Ten pairs of reciprocal crosses have been made between wheat cultivars which show differences in their glutenin subunit compositions. The F1 seed glutenin subunit composition was studied by means of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). The results indicate that all the high molecular weight (HMW) and medium molecular weight (MMW) subunits (from 133,000 to 65,000 daltons) are transmitted to the F1 seed generation from the parental cultivars. In accordance with the triploid nature of the heterozygous endosperm (3n) and with the maternal and paternal gene dosage ratio (2∶1) in the endosperm itself, a significant effect of maternal parent is registered when comparing pairs of reciprocal seeds. Genes coding for the glutenin subunits are expressed whatever their doses are (one, two, or three) in the hybrid endosperm; thus the glutenin subunits inheritance is consistent with the co-dominant type.For one pair of the reciprocal crosses, two MMW parental bands (MW: 71,000 and 66,000) seemed absent in the F1 seed patterns while a new band with an intermediate, apparent MW (68,000) appears. This phenomenon was observed when the glutenins analyzed by electrophoresis were previously separated from other endosperm proteins, and not when they were directly extracted from the ground seed. We assume that the extraction can cause interactions between moieties attached to the subunits and lead to the formation of a complex having an intermediate electrophoretic mobility. PMID:24264867

  7. Receptor expression and sympatric speciation: unique olfactory receptor neuron responses in F1 hybrid Rhagoletis populations.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Shannon B; Linn, Charles E; Michel, Andrew; Dambroski, Hattie R; Berlocher, Stewart H; Feder, Jeffrey L; Roelofs, Wendell L

    2006-10-01

    The Rhagoletis pomonella species complex is one of the foremost examples supporting the occurrence of sympatric speciation. A recent study found that reciprocal F(1) hybrid offspring from different host plant-infesting populations in the complex displayed significantly reduced olfactory host preference in flight-tunnel assays. Behavioral and electrophysiological studies indicate that olfactory cues from host fruit are important chemosensory signals for flies to locate fruit for mating and oviposition. The reduced olfactory abilities of hybrids could therefore constitute a significant post-mating barrier to gene flow among fly populations. The present study investigated the source of changes in the hybrid olfactory system by examining peripheral chemoreception in F(1) hybrid flies, using behaviorally relevant volatiles from the parent host fruit. Single-sensillum electrophysiological analyses revealed significant changes in olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) response specificities in hybrid flies when compared to parent ORN responses. We report that flies from F(1) crosses of apple-, hawthorn- and flowering dogwood-origin populations of R. pomonella exhibited distinct ORN response profiles absent from any parent population. These peripheral alterations in ORN response profiles could result from misexpression of multiple receptors in hybrid neurons as a function of genomic incompatibilities in receptor-gene pathways in parent populations. We conclude that these changes in peripheral chemoreception could impact olfactory host preference and contribute directly to reproductive isolation in the Rhagoletis complex, or could be genetically coupled to other host-associated traits. PMID:16985190

  8. Nasal Tumorigenesis in B6C3F1 Mice Following Intraperitoneal Diethylnitrosamine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Ju; Wallig, Matthew A; Jeffery, Elizabeth H

    2016-08-01

    Diethylnitrosamine (DEN) is a chemical broadly used in animal models as a hepatocarcinogen, reported to also cause pulmonary neoplasms in mice. The original objective was to evaluate the impact of a Western diet with or without 10% broccoli on DEN-induced on liver cancer. We administered DEN (45 mg/kg) intraperitoneally to young adult male B6C3F1 mice by 6 weekly injections and evaluated liver cancer 6 months after the DEN treatments. Here, we report unexpected primary tumorigenesis in nasal epithelium, independent of dietary treatment. More than 50% of DEN-treated B6C3F1 mice developed nasal neoplasm-related lesions, not reported previously in the literature. Only one of these neoplasms was visible externally prior to postmortem examination. Intraperitoneal DEN treatment used as a model for liver cancer can have a carcinogenic effect on the nasal epithelium in B6C3F1 mice, which should be carefully monitored in future liver cancer studies. PMID:27207684

  9. Genome reorganization in F1 hybrids uncovers the role of retrotransposons in reproductive isolation

    PubMed Central

    Senerchia, Natacha; Felber, François; Parisod, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization leads to new interactions among divergent genomes, revealing the nature of genetic incompatibilities having accumulated during and after the origin of species. Conflicts associated with misregulation of transposable elements (TEs) in hybrids expectedly result in their activation and genome-wide changes that may be key to species boundaries. Repetitive genomes of wild wheats have diverged under differential dynamics of specific long terminal repeat retrotransposons (LTR-RTs), offering unparalleled opportunities to address the underpinnings of plant genome reorganization by selfish sequences. Using reciprocal F1 hybrids between three Aegilops species, restructuring and epigenetic repatterning was assessed at random and LTR-RT sequences with amplified fragment length polymorphism and sequence-specific amplified polymorphisms as well as their methylation-sensitive counterparts, respectively. Asymmetrical reorganization of LTR-RT families predicted to cause conflicting interactions matched differential survival of F1 hybrids. Consistent with the genome shock model, increasing divergence of merged LTR-RTs yielded higher levels of changes in corresponding genome fractions and lead to repeated reorganization of LTR-RT sequences in F1 hybrids. Such non-random reorganization of hybrid genomes is coherent with the necessary repression of incompatible TE loci in support of hybrid viability and indicates that TE-driven genomic conflicts may represent an overlooked factor supporting reproductive isolation. PMID:25716787

  10. Genome reorganization in F1 hybrids uncovers the role of retrotransposons in reproductive isolation.

    PubMed

    Senerchia, Natacha; Felber, François; Parisod, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Interspecific hybridization leads to new interactions among divergent genomes, revealing the nature of genetic incompatibilities having accumulated during and after the origin of species. Conflicts associated with misregulation of transposable elements (TEs) in hybrids expectedly result in their activation and genome-wide changes that may be key to species boundaries. Repetitive genomes of wild wheats have diverged under differential dynamics of specific long terminal repeat retrotransposons (LTR-RTs), offering unparalleled opportunities to address the underpinnings of plant genome reorganization by selfish sequences. Using reciprocal F1 hybrids between three Aegilops species, restructuring and epigenetic repatterning was assessed at random and LTR-RT sequences with amplified fragment length polymorphism and sequence-specific amplified polymorphisms as well as their methylation-sensitive counterparts, respectively. Asymmetrical reorganization of LTR-RT families predicted to cause conflicting interactions matched differential survival of F1 hybrids. Consistent with the genome shock model, increasing divergence of merged LTR-RTs yielded higher levels of changes in corresponding genome fractions and lead to repeated reorganization of LTR-RT sequences in F1 hybrids. Such non-random reorganization of hybrid genomes is coherent with the necessary repression of incompatible TE loci in support of hybrid viability and indicates that TE-driven genomic conflicts may represent an overlooked factor supporting reproductive isolation. PMID:25716787

  11. 16Oxygen irradiation enhances cued fear memory in B6D2F1 mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raber, Jacob; Marzulla, Tessa; Kronenberg, Amy; Turker, Mitchell S.

    2015-11-01

    The space radiation environment includes energetic charged particles that may impact cognitive performance. We assessed the effects of 16O ion irradiation on cognitive performance of C57BL/6J × DBA/2J F1 (B6D2F1) mice at OHSU (Portland, OR) one month following irradiation at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL, Upton, NY). Hippocampus-dependent contextual fear memory and hippocampus-independent cued fear memory of B6D2F1 mice were tested. 16O ion exposure enhanced cued fear memory. This effect showed a bell-shaped dose response curve. Cued fear memory was significantly stronger in mice irradiated with 16O ions at a dose of 0.4 or 0.8 Gy than in sham-irradiated mice or following irradiation at 1.6 Gy. In contrast to cued fear memory, contextual fear memory was not affected following 16O ion irradiation at the doses used in this study. These data indicate that the amygdala might be particularly susceptible to effects of 16O ion exposure.

  12. alpha-Hexachlorocyclohexane (alpha-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    alpha - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( alpha - HCH ) ; CASRN 319 - 84 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Ass

  13. Single-molecule Analysis of F0F1-ATP Synthase Inhibited by N,N-Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide*

    PubMed Central

    Toei, Masashi; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    N,N-Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) is a classical inhibitor of the F0F1-ATP synthase (F0F1), which covalently binds to the highly conserved carboxylic acid of the proteolipid subunit (c subunit) in F0. Although it is well known that DCCD modification of the c subunit blocks proton translocation in F0 and the coupled ATP hydrolysis activity of F1, how DCCD inhibits the rotary dynamics of F0F1 remains elusive. Here, we carried out single-molecule rotation assays to characterize the DCCD inhibition of Escherichia coli F0F1. Upon the injection of DCCD, rotations irreversibly terminated with first order reaction kinetics, suggesting that the incorporation of a single DCCD moiety is sufficient to block the rotary catalysis of the F0F1. Individual molecules terminated at different angles relative to the three catalytic angles of F1, suggesting that DCCD randomly reacts with one of the 10 c subunits. DCCD-inhibited F0F1 sometimes showed transient activation; molecules abruptly rotated and stopped after one revolution at the original termination angle, suggesting that hindrance by the DCCD moiety is released due to thermal fluctuation. To explore the mechanical activation of DCCD-inhibited molecules, we perturbed inhibited molecules using magnetic tweezers. The probability of transient activation increased upon a forward forcible rotation. Interestingly, during the termination F0F1, showed multiple positional shifts, which implies that F1 stochastically changes the angular position of its rotor upon a catalytic reaction. This effect could be caused by balancing the angular positions of the F1 and the F0 rotors, which are connected via elastic elements. PMID:23893417

  14. Downregulation of thymidylate synthase and E2F1 by arsenic trioxide in mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sze-Kwan; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Zheng, Chun-Yan; Ho, James Chung-Man

    2015-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a global health issue. Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been shown to suppress thymidylate synthase (TYMS) in lung adenocarcinoma and colorectal cancer, and induce apoptosis in acute promyelocytic leukemia. With TYMS as a putative therapeutic target, the effect of ATO in mesothelioma was therefore studied. A panel of 5 mesothelioma cell lines was used to study the effect of ATO on cell viability, protein expression, mRNA expression and TYMS activity by MTT assay, western blot, qPCR and tritium-release assay, respectively. The knockdown of TYMS and E2F1 was performed with a specific siRNA. Phosphatidylserine externalization and mitochondrial membrane depolarization were measured by Annexin V and JC-1 staining respectively. The in vivo effect of ATO was studied using a nude mouse xenograft model. Application of ATO demonstrated anticancer effects in the cell line model with clinically achievable concentrations. Downregulation of TYMS protein (except H226 cells and 1.25 µM ATO in H2052 cells) and mRNA expression (H28 cells), pRB1 (H28 cells) and E2F1 and TYMS activity (except H226 cells) were also evident. E2F1 knockdown decreased cell viability more significantly than TYMS knockdown. In general, thymidine kinase 1, ribonucleotide reductase M1, c-myc and skp2 were downregulated by ATO. p-c-Jun was downregulated in H28 cells while upregulated in 211H cells. Phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, downregulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, and upregulation of Bak and cleaved caspase-3 were observed. In the H226 xenograft model, the relative tumor growth was aborted, and E2F1 was downregulated while cleaved caspase-3 was elevated and localized to the nucleus in the ATO treatment group. ATO has potent antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects in mesothelioma in vitro and in vivo, partially mediated through E2F1 targeting (less effect through TYMS targeting). There is sound scientific evidence to support the

  15. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... measures the level of the protein AAT in blood. Alpha-1 antitrypsin phenotype testing evaluates the amount and type of AAT being produced and compares it to normal patterns. Alpha-1 antitrypsin genotype testing ( DNA testing) can ...

  16. Alpha-1 antitrypsin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003715.htm Alpha-1 antitrypsin test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is a laboratory test to measure the ...

  17. 17 CFR 249.1200 - Form X-17F-1A-Report for missing, lost, stolen or counterfeit securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Register citations affecting Form X-17F-1A, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Form X-17F-1A-Report for... Reporting and Inquiry With Respect to Missing, Lost, Stolen, or Counterfeit Securities § 249.1200 Form...

  18. 17 CFR 249.1200 - Form X-17F-1A-Report for missing, lost, stolen or counterfeit securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Register citations affecting Form X-17F-1A, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form X-17F-1A-Report for... Reporting and Inquiry With Respect to Missing, Lost, Stolen, or Counterfeit Securities § 249.1200 Form...

  19. 17 CFR 249.1200 - Form X-17F-1A-Report for missing, lost, stolen or counterfeit securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Register citations affecting Form X-17F-1A, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Form X-17F-1A-Report for... Reporting and Inquiry With Respect to Missing, Lost, Stolen, or Counterfeit Securities § 249.1200 Form...

  20. 17 CFR 249.1200 - Form X-17F-1A-Report for missing, lost, stolen or counterfeit securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Register citations affecting Form X-17F-1A, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Form X-17F-1A-Report for... Reporting and Inquiry With Respect to Missing, Lost, Stolen, or Counterfeit Securities § 249.1200 Form...

  1. 17 CFR 249.1200 - Form X-17F-1A-Report for missing, lost, stolen or counterfeit securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Register citations affecting Form X-17F-1A, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Form X-17F-1A-Report for... Reporting and Inquiry With Respect to Missing, Lost, Stolen, or Counterfeit Securities § 249.1200 Form...

  2. ‘Caro-Tex 312’, a high yielding, orange-fruited, Habanero-type, F1 hybrid pepper

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Research Service of the U. S. Department of Agriculture and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences of Texas A&M University have released the high yielding, orange-fruited, Habanero-type, F1 hybrid pepper cultivar CaroTex-312. CaroTex-312 is the result of an F1 cross made at C...

  3. 26 CFR 54.4980F-1 - Notice requirements for certain pension plan amendments significantly reducing the rate of future...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Notice requirements for certain pension plan amendments significantly reducing the rate of future benefit accrual. 54.4980F-1 Section 54.4980F-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) PENSION EXCISE TAXES §...

  4. 26 CFR 54.4980F-1 - Notice requirements for certain pension plan amendments significantly reducing the rate of future...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... amendments significantly reducing the rate of future benefit accrual. 54.4980F-1 Section 54.4980F-1 Internal... significantly reducing the rate of future benefit accrual. The following questions and answers concern the... a plan amendment of an applicable pension plan that significantly reduces the rate of future...

  5. 17 CFR 239.31 - Form F-1, registration statement under the Securities Act of 1933 for securities of certain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... affecting Form F-1, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... statement under the Securities Act of 1933 for securities of certain foreign private issuers. 239.31 Section... under the Securities Act of 1933 for securities of certain foreign private issuers. (a) Form F-1...

  6. 17 CFR 239.31 - Form F-1, registration statement under the Securities Act of 1933 for securities of certain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... affecting Form F-1, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... statement under the Securities Act of 1933 for securities of certain foreign private issuers. 239.31 Section... under the Securities Act of 1933 for securities of certain foreign private issuers. (a) Form F-1...

  7. 17 CFR 239.31 - Form F-1, registration statement under the Securities Act of 1933 for securities of certain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... F-1, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed... statement under the Securities Act of 1933 for securities of certain foreign private issuers. 239.31 Section... under the Securities Act of 1933 for securities of certain foreign private issuers. (a) Form F-1...

  8. 17 CFR 239.31 - Form F-1, registration statement under the Securities Act of 1933 for securities of certain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... F-1, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed... statement under the Securities Act of 1933 for securities of certain foreign private issuers. 239.31 Section... under the Securities Act of 1933 for securities of certain foreign private issuers. (a) Form F-1...

  9. F1 and Tbilisi Are Closely Related Brucellaphages Exhibiting Some Distinct Nucleotide Variations Which Determine the Host Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Al Dahouk, Sascha; Nöckler, Karsten; Göllner, Cornelia; Appel, Bernd; Hertwig, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We report on the 41,143-bp genome of brucellaphage F1, a podovirus that infects several Brucella species. The F1 genome is almost identical to the genome of brucellaphage Tb. However, some structural proteins of the phages exhibit extensive polymorphisms and might be responsible for their different host ranges. PMID:24482520

  10. Forkhead transcription factor FoxF1 interacts with Fanconi anemia protein complexes to promote DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Arun; Ustiyan, Vladimir; Zhang, Yufang; Kalin, Tanya V.; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V.

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box F1 (Foxf1) transcription factor is an important regulator of embryonic development but its role in tumor cells remains incompletely understood. While 16 proteins were characterized in Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex, its interactions with cellular transcriptional machinery remain poorly characterized. Here, we identified FoxF1 protein as a novel interacting partner of the FA complex proteins. Using multiple human and mouse tumor cell lines and Foxf1+/− mice we demonstrated that FoxF1 physically binds to and increases stability of FA proteins. FoxF1 co-localizes with FANCD2 in DNA repair foci in cultured cells and tumor tissues obtained from cisplatin-treated mice. In response to DNA damage, FoxF1-deficient tumor cells showed significantly reduced FANCD2 monoubiquitination and FANCM phosphorylation, resulting in impaired formation of DNA repair foci. FoxF1 knockdown caused chromosomal instability, nuclear abnormalities, and increased tumor cell death in response to DNA-damaging agents. Overexpression of FoxF1 in DNA-damaged cells improved stability of FA proteins, decreased chromosomal and nuclear aberrations, restored formation of DNA repair foci and prevented cell death after DNA damage. These findings demonstrate that FoxF1 is a key component of FA complexes and a critical mediator of DNA damage response in tumor cells. PMID:26625197

  11. 26 CFR 25.2523(f)-1A - Special rule applicable to community property transferred prior to January 1, 1982.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Special rule applicable to community property transferred prior to January 1, 1982. 25.2523(f)-1A Section 25.2523(f)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Deductions Prior to 1982...

  12. The Alpha Centauri System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderblom, David R.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Alpha Centauri star system, which is the closest star system to the sun. Discusses the difficulties associated with measurements involving Alpha Centauri, along with some of the recent advances in stellar seismology. Raises questions about the possibilities of planets around Alpha Centauri. (TW)

  13. The p38 MAPK-MK2 axis regulates E2F1 and FOXM1 expression after epirubicin treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Olano, Natalia; Koo, Chuay-Yeng; Monteiro, Lara J.; Pinto, Paola H.; Gomes, Ana R.; Aligue, Rosa; Lam, Eric W.-F.

    2012-01-01

    E2F1 is responsible for the regulation of FOXM1 expression, which plays a key role in epirubicin resistance. In here, we examined the role and regulation of E2F1 in response to epirubicin in cancer cells. We first demonstrated that E2F1 plays a key role in promoting FOXM1 expression, cell survival and epirubicin resistance as its depletion by siRNA attenuated FOXM1 induction and cell viability in response to epirubicin. We also found that the p38-MAPK activity mirrors the expression patterns of E2F1 and FOXM1 in both epirubicin sensitive and resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells, suggesting p38 has a role in regulating E2F1 expression and epirubicin resistance. Consistently, studies using pharmacological inhibitors, siRNA knockdown and knockout MEFs revealed that p38 mediates the E2F1 induction by epirubicin and that the induction of E2F1 by p38 is in turn mediated through its downstream kinase MK2 (MAPK-activated protein kinase 2; MAPKAPK2). In agreement, in vitro phosphorylation assays showed that MK2 can directly phosphorylate E2F1 at Ser-364. Transfection assays also demonstrated that E2F1 phosphorylation at Ser-364 participates in its induction by epirubicin, but also suggests that other phosphorylation events are also involved. In addition, the p38-MK2 axis can also limit JNK induction by epirubicin and notably, JNK represses FOXM1 expression. Collectively, these findings underscore the importance of p38-MK2 signalling in the control of E2F1 and FOXM1 expression as well as epirubicin sensitivity. PMID:22802261

  14. Red nucleus and rubrospinal tract disorganization in the absence of Pou4f1

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Lopez, Jesus E.; Moreno-Bravo, Juan A.; Madrigal, M. Pilar; Martinez, Salvador; Puelles, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The red nucleus (RN) is a neuronal population that plays an important role in forelimb motor control and locomotion. Histologically it is subdivided into two subpopulations, the parvocellular RN (pRN) located in the diencephalon and the magnocellular RN (mRN) in the mesencephalon. The RN integrates signals from motor cortex and cerebellum and projects to spinal cord interneurons and motor neurons through the rubrospinal tract (RST). Pou4f1 is a transcription factor highly expressed in this nucleus that has been related to its specification. Here we profoundly analyzed consequences of Pou4f1 loss-of-function in development, maturation and axonal projection of the RN. Surprisingly, RN neurons are specified and maintained in the mutant, no cell death was detected. Nevertheless, the nucleus appeared disorganized with a strong delay in radial migration and with a wider neuronal distribution; the neurons did not form a compacted population as they do in controls, Robo1 and Slit2 were miss-expressed. Cplx1 and Npas1, expressed in the RN, are transcription factors involved in neurotransmitter release, neuronal maturation and motor function processes among others. In our mutant mice, both transcription factors are lost, suggesting an abnormal maturation of the RN. The resulting altered nucleus occupied a wider territory. Finally, we examined RST development and found that the RN neurons were able to project to the spinal cord but their axons appeared defasciculated. These data suggest that Pou4f1 is necessary for the maturation of RN neurons but not for their specification and maintenance. PMID:25698939

  15. Red nucleus and rubrospinal tract disorganization in the absence of Pou4f1.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Lopez, Jesus E; Moreno-Bravo, Juan A; Madrigal, M Pilar; Martinez, Salvador; Puelles, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The red nucleus (RN) is a neuronal population that plays an important role in forelimb motor control and locomotion. Histologically it is subdivided into two subpopulations, the parvocellular RN (pRN) located in the diencephalon and the magnocellular RN (mRN) in the mesencephalon. The RN integrates signals from motor cortex and cerebellum and projects to spinal cord interneurons and motor neurons through the rubrospinal tract (RST). Pou4f1 is a transcription factor highly expressed in this nucleus that has been related to its specification. Here we profoundly analyzed consequences of Pou4f1 loss-of-function in development, maturation and axonal projection of the RN. Surprisingly, RN neurons are specified and maintained in the mutant, no cell death was detected. Nevertheless, the nucleus appeared disorganized with a strong delay in radial migration and with a wider neuronal distribution; the neurons did not form a compacted population as they do in controls, Robo1 and Slit2 were miss-expressed. Cplx1 and Npas1, expressed in the RN, are transcription factors involved in neurotransmitter release, neuronal maturation and motor function processes among others. In our mutant mice, both transcription factors are lost, suggesting an abnormal maturation of the RN. The resulting altered nucleus occupied a wider territory. Finally, we examined RST development and found that the RN neurons were able to project to the spinal cord but their axons appeared defasciculated. These data suggest that Pou4f1 is necessary for the maturation of RN neurons but not for their specification and maintenance. PMID:25698939

  16. Temperature Dependence of the Rotation and Hydrolysis Activities of F1-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Furuike, Shou; Adachi, Kengo; Sakaki, Naoyoshi; Shimo-Kon, Rieko; Itoh, Hiroyasu; Muneyuki, Eiro; Yoshida, Masasuke; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    F1-ATPase, a water-soluble portion of the enzyme ATP synthase, is a rotary molecular motor driven by ATP hydrolysis. To learn how the kinetics of rotation are regulated, we have investigated the rotational characteristics of a thermophilic F1-ATPase over the temperature range 4–50°C by attaching a polystyrene bead (or bead duplex) to the rotor subunit and observing its rotation under a microscope. The apparent rate of ATP binding estimated at low ATP concentrations increased from 1.2 × 106 M−1 s−1 at 4°C to 4.3 × 107 M−1 s−1 at 40°C, whereas the torque estimated at 2 mM ATP remained around 40 pN·nm over 4–50°C. The rotation was stepwise at 4°C, even at the saturating ATP concentration of 2 mM, indicating the presence of a hitherto unresolved rate-limiting reaction that occurs at ATP-waiting angles. We also measured the ATP hydrolysis activity in bulk solution at 4–65°C. F1-ATPase tends to be inactivated by binding ADP tightly. Both the inactivation and reactivation rates were found to rise sharply with temperature, and above 30°C, equilibrium between the active and inactive forms was reached within 2 s, the majority being inactive. Rapid inactivation at high temperatures is consistent with the physiological role of this enzyme, ATP synthesis, in the thermophile. PMID:18375515

  17. Bi-site activation occurs with the native and nucleotide-depleted mitochondrial F1-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Milgrom, Y M; Murataliev, M B; Boyer, P D

    1998-01-01

    Experiments are reported on the uni-site catalysis and the transition from uni-site to multi-site catalysis with bovine heart mitochondrial F1-ATPase. The very slow uni-site ATP hydrolysis is shown to occur without tightly bound nucleotides present and with or without Pi in the buffer. Measurements of the transition to higher rates and the amount of bound ATP committed to hydrolysis as the ATP concentration is increased at different fixed enzyme concentrations give evidence that the filling of a second site can initiate near maximal turnover rates. They provide rate constant information, and show that an apparent Km for a second site of about 2 microM and Vmax of 10 s-1, as suggested by others, is not operative. Careful initial velocity measurements also eliminate other suggested Km values and are consistent with bi-site activation to near maximal hydrolysis rates, with a Km of about 130 microM and Vmax of about 700 s-1. However, the results do not eliminate the possibility of additional 'hidden' Km values with similar Vmax:Km ratios. Recent data on competition between TNP-ATP and ATP revealed a third catalytic site for ATP in the millimolar concentration range. This result, and those reported in the present paper, allow the conclusion that the mitochondrial F1-ATPase can attain near maximal activity in bi-site catalysis. Our data also add to the evidence that a recent claim, that the mitochondrial F1-ATPase does not show catalytic site cooperativity, is invalid. PMID:9480927

  18. Surface Plasmon Resonance Analysis of Histidine-Tagged F1-ATPase Surface Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Jenifer K.; Richter, Mark L.; Berrie, Cindy L.

    2015-11-01

    Studies of the rotational activity of the enzymatic core (α3β3γ) of the F1-ATPase motor protein have relied on binding the enzyme to NTA-coated glass surfaces via polyhistidine tags engineered into the C-termini of each of the three α or β subunits. Those studies revealed the rotational motion of the central γ subunit by monitoring the motion of attached micron-long actin filaments or spherical nanoparticles. However, only a small percentage of the attached filaments or particles were observed to rotate, likely due, at least in part, to non-uniform surface attachment of the motor proteins. In this study, we have applied surface plasmon resonance to monitor the kinetics and affinity of binding of the His-tagged motor protein to NTA-coated gold sensor surfaces. The binding data, when fit to a heterogeneous binding model, exhibit two sets of adsorption-desorption rate constants with two dissociation constants of 4.0 × 10-9 M and 8.6 × 10-11 M for 6His-α3β3γ binding to the nickel ion-activated NTA surface. The data are consistent with mixed attachment of the protein via two (bimodal) and three (trimodal) NTA/Ni2+-His-tag interactions, respectively, with the less stable bimodal interaction dominating. The results provide a partial explanation for the low number of surface-attached F1 motors previously observed in rotation studies and suggest alternative approaches to uniform F1 motor surface attachment for future fabrication of motor-based nanobiodevices and materials.

  19. The F0F1 ATP Synthase Complex Localizes to Membrane Rafts in Gonadotrope Cells.

    PubMed

    Allen-Worthington, Krystal; Xie, Jianjun; Brown, Jessica L; Edmunson, Alexa M; Dowling, Abigail; Navratil, Amy M; Scavelli, Kurt; Yoon, Hojean; Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S; Clarke, Iain; Roberson, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    Fertility in mammals requires appropriate communication within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the GnRH receptor (GnRHR) is a central conduit for this communication. The GnRHR resides in discrete membrane rafts and raft occupancy is required for signaling by GnRH. The present studies use immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to define peptides present within the raft associated with the GnRHR and flotillin-1, a key raft marker. These studies revealed peptides from the F0F1 ATP synthase complex. The catalytic subunits of the F1 domain were validated by immunoprecipitation, flow cytometry, and cell surface biotinylation studies demonstrating that this complex was present at the plasma membrane associated with the GnRHR. The F1 catalytic domain faces the extracellular space and catalyzes ATP synthesis when presented with ADP in normal mouse pituitary explants and a gonadotrope cell line. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was blunted by coadministration of inhibitory factor 1, limiting inorganic phosphate in the media, and by chronic stimulation of the GnRHR. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was enhanced by pharmacological inhibition of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases. Kisspeptin administration induced coincident GnRH and ATP release from the median eminence into the hypophyseal-portal vasculature in ovariectomized sheep. Elevated levels of extracellular ATP augmented GnRH-induced secretion of LH from pituitary cells in primary culture, which was blocked in media containing low inorganic phosphate supporting the importance of extracellular ATP levels to gonadotrope cell function. These studies indicate that gonadotropes have intrinsic ability to metabolize ATP in the extracellular space and extracellular ATP may serve as a modulator of GnRH-induced LH secretion. PMID:27482602

  20. New orbit recalculations of comet C/1890 F1 Brooks and its dynamical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Królikowska, Małgorzata; Dybczyński, Piotr A.

    2016-08-01

    C/1890 F1 Brooks belongs to a group of 19 comets used by Jan Oort to support his famous hypothesis on the existence of a spherical cloud containing hundreds of billions of comets with orbits of semi-major axes between 50 000 and 150 000 au. Comet Brooks stands out from this group because of a long series of astrometric observations as well as a nearly 2-yr-long observational arc. Rich observational material makes this comet an ideal target for testing the rationality of an effort to recalculate astrometric positions on the basis of original (comet-star) measurements using modern star catalogues. This paper presents the results of such a new analysis based on two different methods: (i) automatic re-reduction based on cometary positions and the (comet-star) measurements and (ii) partially automatic re-reduction based on the contemporary data for the reference stars originally used. We show that both methods offer a significant reduction in the uncertainty of orbital elements. Based on the most preferred orbital solution, the dynamical evolution of comet Brooks during three consecutive perihelion passages is discussed. We conclude that C/1890 F1 is a dynamically old comet that passed the Sun at a distance below 5 au during its previous perihelion passage. Furthermore, its next perihelion passage will be a little closer than during the 1890-1892 apparition. C/1890 F1 is interesting also because it suffered extremely small planetary perturbations when it travelled through the planetary zone. Therefore, in the next passage through perihelion, it will once again be a comet from the Oort spike.

  1. Cell proliferation in the absence of E2F1-3.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Pamela L; Chong, Jean-Leon; Sáenz-Robles, M Teresa; Ferrey, Antoney; Hagan, John P; Gomez, Yorman M; Rajmohan, Ravi; Sharma, Nidhi; Chen, Hui-Zi; Pipas, James M; Robinson, Michael L; Leone, Gustavo

    2011-03-01

    E2F transcription factors regulate the progression of the cell cycle by repression or transactivation of genes that encode cyclins, cyclin dependent kinases, checkpoint regulators, and replication proteins. Although some E2F functions are independent of the Retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (Rb) and related family members, p107 and p130, much of E2F-mediated repression of S phase entry is dependent upon Rb. We previously showed in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts that concomitant loss of three E2F activators with overlapping functions (E2F1, E2F2, and E2F3) triggered the p53-p21(Cip1) response and caused cell cycle arrest. Here we report on a dramatic difference in the requirement for E2F during development and in cultured cells by showing that cell cycle entry occurs normally in E2f1-3 triply-deficient epithelial stem cells and progenitors of the developing lens. Sixteen days after birth, however, massive apoptosis in differentiating epithelium leads to a collapse of the entire eye. Prior to this collapse, we find that expression of cell cycle-regulated genes in E2F-deficient lenses is aberrantly high. In a second set of experiments, we demonstrate that E2F3 ablation alone does not cause abnormalities in lens development but rescues phenotypic defects caused by loss of Rb, a binding partner of E2F known to recruit histone deacetylases, SWI/SNF and CtBP-polycomb complexes, methyltransferases, and other co-repressors to gene promoters. Together, these data implicate E2F1-3 in mediating transcriptional repression by Rb during cell cycle exit and point to a critical role for their repressive functions in cell survival. PMID:21185283

  2. Proliferation in the Absence of E2F1-3

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Pamela L.; Chong, Jean-Leon; Sáenz-Robles, M. Teresa; Ferrey, Antoney; Hagan, John P.; Gomez, Yorman M.; Rajmohan, Ravi; Sharma, Nidhi; Chen, Hui-Zi; Pipas, James M.; Robinson, Michael L.; Leone, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    E2F transcription factors regulate the progression of the cell cycle by repression or transactivation of genes that encode cyclins, cyclin dependent kinases, checkpoint regulators, and replication proteins. Although some E2F functions are independent of the Retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (Rb) and related family members, p107 and p130, much of E2F-mediated repression of S phase entry is dependent upon Rb. We previously showed in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts that concomitant loss of three E2F activators with overlapping functions (E2F1, E2F2, and E2F3) triggered the p53-p21Cip1 response and caused cell cycle arrest. Here we report on a dramatic difference in the requirement for E2F during development and in cultured cells by showing that cell cycle entry occurs normally in E2f1-3 triply-deficient epithelial stem cells and progenitors of the developing lens. Sixteen days after birth, however, massive apoptosis in differentiating epithelium leads to a collapse of the entire eye. Prior to this collapse, we find that expression of cell cycle-regulated genes in E2F-deficient lenses is aberrantly high. In a second set of experiments, we demonstrate that E2F3 ablation alone does not cause abnormalities in lens development but rescues phenotypic defects caused by loss of Rb, a binding partner of E2F known to recruit histone deacetylases, SWI/SNF and CtBP-polycomb complexes, methyltransferases, and other co-repressors to gene promoters. Together, these data implicate E2F1-3 in mediating transcriptional repression by Rb during cell cycle exit and point to a critical role for their repressive functions in cell survival. PMID:21185283

  3. Dale Reed with model in front of M2-F1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Dale Reed with a model of the M2-F1 in front of the actual lifting body. Reed used the model to show the potential of the lifting bodies. He first flew it into tall grass to test stability and trim, then hand-launched it from buildings for longer flights. Finally, he towed the lifting-body model aloft using a powered model airplane known as the 'Mothership.' A timer released the model and it glided to a landing. Dale's wife Donna used a 9 mm. camera to film the flights of the model. Its stability as it glided--despite its lack of wings--convinced Milt Thompson and some Flight Research Center engineers including the center director, Paul Bikle, that a piloted lifting body was possible. The lifting body concept evolved in the mid-1950s as researchers considered alternatives to ballistic reentries of piloted space capsules. The designs for hypersonic, wingless vehicles were on the boards at NASA Ames and NASA Langley facilities, while the US Air Force was gearing up for its Dyna-Soar program, which defined the need for a spacecraft that would land like an airplane. Despite favorable research on lifting bodies, there was little support for a flight program. Dryden engineer R. Dale Reed was intrigued with the lifting body concept, and reasoned that some sort of flight demonstration was needed before wingless aircraft could be taken seriously. In February 1962, he built a model lifting body based upon the Ames M2 design, and air-launched it from a radio controlled 'mothership.' Home movies of these flights, plus the support of research pilot Milt Thompson, helped pursuade the facilities director, Paul Bikle, to give the go-ahead for the construction of a full-scale version, to be used as a wind-tunnel model and possibly flown as a glider. Comparing lifting bodies to space capsules, an unofficial motto of the project was, 'Don't be Rescued from Outer Space--Fly Back in Style.' The construction of the M2-F1 was a joint effort by Dryden and a local glider manufacturer, the

  4. New orbit recalculations of comet C/1890 F1 Brooks and its dynamical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Królikowska, Małgorzata; Dybczyński, Piotr A.

    2016-04-01

    C/1890 F1 Brooks belongs to a group of nineteen comets used by Jan Oort to support his famous hypothesis on the existence of a spherical cloud containing hundreds of billions of comets with orbits of semimajor axes between 50 and 150 thousand au. Comet Brooks stands out from this group because of a long series of astrometric observations as well as nearly two-year long observational arc. Rich observational material makes this comet an ideal target for testing the rationality of an effort to recalculate astrometric positions on the basis of original (comet-star)-measurements using modern star catalogues. This paper presents the results of such new analysis based on two different methods: (i) automatic re-reduction based on cometary positions and the (comet-star)-measurements, and (ii) partially automatic re-reduction based on the contemporary data for originally used reference stars. We show that both methods offer a significant reduction of orbital elements uncertainties. Based on the most preferred orbital solution, the dynamical evolution of comet Brooks during three consecutive perihelion passages is discussed. We conclude that C/1890 F1 is a dynamically old comet that passed the Sun at a distance below 5 au during its previous perihelion passage. Furthermore, its next perihelion passage will be a little closer than during the 1890-1892 apparition. C/1890 F1 is interesting also because it suffered extremely small planetary perturbations when it travelled through the planetary zone. Therefore, in the next passage through perihelion it will be once again a comet from the Oort spike.

  5. An F1 Schmidt satellite camera and the methods of plate measurement and reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, J.

    1971-01-01

    The f1 Hewitt camera is a field flattened Schmidt system of 60cm aperture. The salient features of this equipment are briefly described. Details of the methods of plate measurement are then given. The plate reduction is carried out in two stages. The plate is first calibrated using the photogrammetric method. The formulae usually quoted have been extended to take account of the large distortion introduced by the field flattening lens. In the second stage, the satellite measurements are reduced to satellite positions corrected for refraction, aberration, and when necessary, phase.

  6. The Analysis of Quantitative Traits for Simple Genetic Models from Parental, F1 and Backcross Data

    PubMed Central

    Elston, R. C.; Stewart, John

    1973-01-01

    The following models are considered for the genetic determination of quantitative traits: segregation at one locus, at two linked loci, at any number of equal and additive unlinked loci, and at one major locus and an indefinite number of equal and additive loci. In each case an appropriate likelihood is given for data on parental, F1 and backcross individuals, assuming that the environmental variation is normally distributed. Methods of testing and comparing the various models are presented, and methods are suggested for the simultaneous analysis of two or more traits. PMID:4711900

  7. Modeling of TCE and Toluene Toxicity to Pseudomonas putida F1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Olson, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    Prediction of viable bacterial distribution with respect to contaminants is important for efficient bioremediation of contaminated ground-water aquifers, particularly those contaminated with residual NAPLs. While bacterial motility and chemotaxis may help situate bacteria close to high concentrations of contaminant thereby enhancing bioremediation, prolonged exposure to high concentrations of contaminates is toxic to contaminant-degrading bacteria. The purpose of this work is to model the toxicity of trichloroethylene and toluene to Pseudomonas putida F1. The Live/Dead® bacterial viability assay was used to determine the toxic effect of chemical contaminants on the viability of P. putida F1 in a sealed zero head-space experimental environment. Samples of bacterial suspensions were exposed to common ground-water pollutants, TCE and toluene, for different durations. Changes in live and dead cell populations were monitored over the course of experiments using fluorescence microscopy. Data obtained from these toxicity experiments were fit to simple linear and exponential bacterial decay models using non-linear regression to describe loss of bacterial viability. TCE toxicity to P. putida F1 was best described with an exponential decay model (Figure 1a), with a decay constant kTCE = 0.025 h-4.95 (r2 = 0.956). Toluene toxicity showed a marginally better fit to the linear decay model (Figure 1b) (r2 = 0.971), with a decay constant ktoluene = 0.204 h-1. Best-fit model parameters obtained for both TCE and toluene were used to predict bacterial viability in toxicity experiments with higher contaminant concentrations and matched well with experimental data. Results from this study can be used to predict bacterial accumulation and viability near NAPL sources, and thus may be helpful in improving bioremediation performance assessment of contaminated sites. Figure 1: Survival ratios (S = N/No) of P. putida F1 in TCE- (a) and toluene- (b) stressed samples (observed (

  8. Crystallization of F 1F 0-ATP synthase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselyova, O. I.; Shiryaeva, G. N.; Efremov, R. G.; Gordeliy, V. I.; Yaminsky, I. V.; Yanyushin, M. F.; Büldt, G.; Yaguzhinsky, L. S.

    2005-02-01

    Crystallization of F 1F 0-ATP synthase from thermophilic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus was carried out in the present work. A new crystallization method based on slow detergent removal in a two-phase system, consisting of decane and protein solution, was developed. Three-dimensional protein crystals were grown by this method. Two-dimensional molecular lattice with unit cell parameters of a=28 nm, b=23 nm and φ=104° was observed by atomic force microscopy on their surface. Thickness of protein surface layer of the crystals was determined also. Model of the protein molecular packing of the crystals is suggested basing on the experimental data.

  9. Stepping rotation of F1-ATPase visualized through angle-resolved single-fluorophore imaging

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Kengo; Yasuda, Ryohei; Noji, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiroyasu; Harada, Yoshie; Yoshida, Masasuke; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2000-01-01

    Orientation dependence of single-fluorophore intensity was exploited in order to videotape conformational changes in a protein machine in real time. The fluorophore Cy3 attached to the central subunit of F1-ATPase revealed that the subunit rotates in the molecule in discrete 120° steps and that each step is driven by the hydrolysis of one ATP molecule. These results, unlike those from the previous study under a frictional load, show that the 120° stepping is a genuine property of this molecular motor. The data also show that the rate of ATP binding is insensitive to the load exerted on the rotor subunit. PMID:10840052

  10. Antinociceptive activity of niga-ichigoside F1 from Rubus imperialis.

    PubMed

    Niero, R; Cechinel Filho, V; Souza, M M; Montanari, J L; Yunes, R A; Delle Monache, F

    1999-08-01

    This work describes the antinociceptive effect of a triterpene glycoside, niga-ichigoside F1 (1), obtained from an EtOAc extract of the aerial parts of Rubus imperialis. When evaluated against an HOAc-induced writhing model, it exhibited an ID(50) value of 3.1 mg/kg (ip). Moreover, in a formalin-induced pain model, both phases of pain were inhibited by compound 1, with ID(50) values of 2.6 (first phase) and 2.7 (second phase) mg/kg, (ip), respectively. PMID:10479322

  11. The evolving role of the orphan nuclear receptor ftz-f1, a pair-rule segmentation gene.

    PubMed

    Heffer, Alison; Grubbs, Nathaniel; Mahaffey, James; Pick, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    Segmentation is a critical developmental process that occurs by different mechanisms in diverse taxa. In insects, there are three common modes of embryogenesis-short-, intermediate-, and long-germ development-which differ in the number of segments specified at the blastoderm stage. While genes involved in segmentation have been extensively studied in the long-germ insect Drosophila melanogaster (Dm), it has been found that their expression and function in segmentation in short- and intermediate-germ insects often differ. Drosophila ftz-f1 encodes an orphan nuclear receptor that functions as a maternally expressed pair-rule segmentation gene, responsible for the formation of alternate body segments during Drosophila embryogenesis. Here we investigated the expression and function of ftz-f1 in the short-germ beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Tc). We found that Tc-ftz-f1 is expressed in stripes in Tribolium embryos. These stripes overlap alternate Tc-Engrailed (Tc-En) stripes, indicative of a pair-rule expression pattern. To test whether Tc-ftz-f1 has pair-rule function, we utilized embryonic RNAi, injecting double-stranded RNA corresponding to Tc-ftz-f1 coding or non-coding regions into early Tribolium embryos. Knockdown of Tc-ftz-f1 produced pair-rule segmentation defects, evidenced by loss of expression of alternate En stripes. In addition, a later role for Tc-ftz-f1 in cuticle formation was revealed. These results identify a new pair-rule gene in Tribolium and suggest that its role in segmentation may be shared among holometabolous insects. Interestingly, while Tc-ftz-f1 is expressed in pair-rule stripes, the gene is ubiquitously expressed in Drosophila embryos. Thus, the pair-rule function of ftz-f1 is conserved despite differences in expression patterns of ftz-f1 genes in different lineages. This suggests that ftz-f1 expression changed after the divergence of lineages leading to extant beetles and flies, likely due to differences in cis-regulatory sequences. We

  12. Directed evolution reveals requisite sequence elements in the functional expression of P450 2F1 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Behrendorff, James B Y H; Moore, Chad D; Kim, Keon-Hee; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Smith, Christopher A; Johnston, Wayne A; Yun, Chul-Ho; Yost, Garold S; Gillam, Elizabeth M J

    2012-09-17

    Cytochrome P450 2F1 (P450 2F1) is expressed exclusively in the human respiratory tract and is implicated in 3-methylindole (3MI)-induced pneumotoxicity via dehydrogenation of 3MI to a reactive electrophilic intermediate, 3-methyleneindolenine (3-MEI). Studies of P450 2F1 to date have been limited by the failure to express this enzyme in Escherichia coli. By contrast, P450 2F3, a caprine homologue that shares 84% sequence identity with P450 2F1 (86 amino acid differences), has been expressed in E. coli at yields greater than 250 nmol/L culture. We hypothesized that a limited number of sequence differences between P450s 2F1 and 2F3 could limit P450 2F1 expression in E. coli and that problematic P450 2F1 sequence elements could be identified by directed evolution. A library of P450 2F1/2F3 mutants was created by DNA family shuffling and screened for expression in E. coli. Three generations of DNA shuffling revealed a mutant (named JH_2F_F3_1_007) with 96.5% nucleotide sequence identity to P450 2F1 and which expressed 119 ± 40 pmol (n = 3, mean ± SD) hemoprotein in 1 mL microaerobic cultures. Across all three generations, two regions were observed where P450 2F3-derived sequence was consistently substituted for P450 2F1 sequence in expressing mutants, encoding nine amino acid differences between P450s 2F1 and 2F3: nucleotides 191-278 (amino acids 65-92) and 794-924 (amino acids 265-305). Chimeras constructed to specifically test the importance of these two regions confirmed that P450 2F3 sequence is essential in both regions for expression in E. coli but that other non-P450 2F1 sequence elements outside of these regions also improved the expression of mutant JH_2F_F3_1_007. Mutant JH_2F_F3_1_007 catalyzed the dehydrogenation of 3MI to 3-MEI as indicated by the observation of glutathione adducts after incubation in the presence of glutathione. The JH_2F_F3_1_007 protein differs from P450 2F1 at only 20 amino acids and should facilitate further studies of the structure

  13. Calibration issues in delta alpha /alpha .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaro, Paolo; Centurión, Miriam; Levshakov, Sergei

    Laser Comb Wavelength calibration shows that the ThAr one is locally unreliable with possible deviations of up to 100 {m s}-1 within one order range, while delivering an overall 1 {m s}-1 accuracy (Wilken et al 2009). Such deviation corresponds to delta alpha /alpha ≈ 7* 10-6 for a Fe II-Mg II pair. Comparison of line shifts among the 5 Fe II lines, with almost identical sensitivity to fine structure constant changes, offers a clean way to directly test the presence of possible local wavelength calibration errors of whatever origin. We analyzed 5 absorption systems, with zabs ranging from 1.15 to 2.19 towards 3 bright QSOs. The results show that while some lines are aligned within 20 {m s}-1, others reveal large deviations reaching 200 {m s}-1 or higher and corresponding to a delta alpha /alpha > 10-5 level. The origin of these deviations is not clearly identified but could be related to the adaptation of wavelength calibration to CCD manufacturing irregularities. These results suggest that to draw conclusions from delta alpha /alpha analysis based on one or only few lines must be done with extreme care.

  14. The INA complex facilitates assembly of the peripheral stalk of the mitochondrial F1Fo-ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Lytovchenko, Oleksandr; Naumenko, Nataliia; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schmidt, Bernhard; von der Malsburg, Karina; Deckers, Markus; Warscheid, Bettina; van der Laan, Martin; Rehling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial F1Fo-ATP synthase generates the bulk of cellular ATP. This molecular machine assembles from nuclear- and mitochondria-encoded subunits. Whereas chaperones for formation of the matrix-exposed hexameric F1-ATPase core domain have been identified, insight into how the nuclear-encoded F1-domain assembles with the membrane-embedded Fo-region is lacking. Here we identified the INA complex (INAC) in the inner membrane of mitochondria as an assembly factor involved in this process. Ina22 and Ina17 are INAC constituents that physically associate with the F1-module and peripheral stalk, but not with the assembled F1Fo-ATP synthase. Our analyses show that loss of Ina22 and Ina17 specifically impairs formation of the peripheral stalk that connects the catalytic F1-module to the membrane embedded Fo-domain. We conclude that INAC represents a matrix-exposed inner membrane protein complex that facilitates peripheral stalk assembly and thus promotes a key step in the biogenesis of mitochondrial F1Fo-ATP synthase. PMID:24942160

  15. Identification of novel E2F1 target genes regulated in cell cycle-dependent and independent manners.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, R; Komori, H; Ishida, S; Okamura, N; Nakayama, K; Nakayama, K I; Ohtani, K

    2006-03-16

    The transcription factor E2F mediates cell cycle-dependent expression of genes important for cell proliferation in response to growth stimulation. To further understand the role of E2F, we utilized a sensitive subtraction method to explore new E2F1 targets, which are expressed at low levels and might have been unrecognized in previous studies. We identified 33 new E2F1-inducible genes, including checkpoint genes Claspin and Rad51ap1, and four genes with unknown function required for cell cycle progression. Moreover, we found three groups of E2F1-inducible genes that were not induced by growth stimulation. At least, two groups of genes were directly induced by E2F1, indicating that E2F1 can regulate expression of genes not induced during the cell cycle. One included Neogenin, WASF1 and SGEF genes, which may have a role in differentiation or development. The other was the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(Kip1), which was involved in suppression of inappropriate cell cycle progression induced by deregulated E2F. E2F1-responsive regions of these genes were located more upstream than those of typical E2F targets and did not have typical E2F sites. These results indicate that there are groups of E2F1 targets, which are regulated in a distinct manner from that of typical E2F targets. PMID:16288221

  16. Viral-mediated noisy gene expression reveals biphasic E2f1 response to MYC

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jeffrey V.; Yao, Guang; Nevins, Joseph R.; You, Lingchong

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression mediated by viral vectors is subject to cell-to-cell variability, which limits the accuracy of gene delivery. When coupled with single-cell measurements, however, such variability provides an efficient means to quantify signaling dynamics in mammalian cells. Here, we illustrate the utility of this approach by mapping the E2f1 response to MYC, serum stimulation, or both. Our results revealed an underappreciated mode of gene regulation: E2f1 expression first increased then decreased as MYC input increased. This biphasic pattern was also reflected in other nodes of the network including the miR-17-92 micro RNA cluster and p19Arf. A mathematical model of the network successfully predicted modulation of the biphasic E2F response by serum and a CDK inhibitor. In addition to demonstrating how noise can be exploited to probe signaling dynamics, our results reveal how coordination of the MYC/RB/E2F pathway enables dynamic discrimination of aberrant and normal levels of growth stimulation. PMID:21292160

  17. Maternal obesity and malnourishment exacerbate perinatal oxidative stress resulting in diabetogenic programming in F1 offspring.

    PubMed

    Saad, M I; Abdelkhalek, T M; Haiba, M M; Saleh, M M; Hanafi, M Y; Tawfik, S H; Kamel, M A

    2016-06-01

    The effect of in-utero environment on fetal health and survival is long-lasting, and this is known as the fetal origin hypothesis. The oxidative stress state during gestation could play a pivotal role in fetal programming and development of diseases such as diabetes. In this study, we investigated the effect of intra-uterine obesity and malnutrition on oxidative stress markers in pancreatic and peripheral tissues of F1 offspring both prenatally and postnatally. Furthermore, the effect of postnatal diet on oxidative stress profile was evaluated. The results indicated that intra-uterine obesity and malnourishment significantly increased oxidative stress in F1 offspring. Moreover, the programming effect of obesity was more pronounced and protracted than malnutrition. The obesity-induced programming of offspring tissues was independent of high-caloric environment that the offspring endured; however, high-caloric diet potentiated its effect. In addition, pancreas and liver were the most affected tissues by fetal reprogramming both prenatally and postnatally. In conclusion, maternal obesity and malnutrition-induced oxidative stress could predispose offspring to insulin resistance and diabetes. PMID:26667119

  18. Replication of a chronic hepatitis B virus genotype F1b construct.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Sergio; Jiménez, Gustavo; Alarcón, Valentina; Prieto, Cristian; Muñoz, Francisca; Riquelme, Constanza; Venegas, Mauricio; Brahm, Javier; Loyola, Alejandra; Villanueva, Rodrigo A

    2016-03-01

    Genotype F is one of the less-studied genotypes of human hepatitis B virus, although it is widely distributed in regions of Central and South American. Our previous studies have shown that HBV genotype F is prevalent in Chile, and phylogenetic analysis of its full-length sequence amplified from the sera of chronically infected patients identified it as HBV subgenotype F1b. We have previously reported the full-length sequence of a HBV molecular clone obtained from a patient chronically infected with genotype F1b. In this report, we established a system to study HBV replication based on hepatoma cell lines transfected with full-length monomers of the HBV genome. Culture supernatants were analyzed after transfection and found to contain both HBsAg and HBeAg viral antigens. Consistently, fractionated cell extracts revealed the presence of viral replication, with both cytoplasmic and nuclear DNA intermediates. Analysis of HBV-transfected cells by indirect immunofluorescence or immunoelectron microscopy revealed the expression of viral antigens and cytoplasmic viral particles, respectively. To test the functionality of the ongoing viral replication further at the level of chromatinized cccDNA, transfected cells were treated with a histone deacetylase inhibitor, and this resulted in increased viral replication. This correlated with changes posttranslational modifications of histones at viral promoters. Thus, the development of this viral replication system for HBV genotype F will facilitate studies on the regulation of viral replication and the identification of new antiviral drugs. PMID:26620585

  19. Variability in the amount of homoeologous pairing among F1 hybrids.

    PubMed

    Poggio, Lidia; Greizerstein, Eduardo; Ferrari, María

    2016-01-01

    Genes involved in the exclusive pairing of homologous chromosomes have been described in several polyploid species but little is known about the activity of these genes in diploids (which have only one dose of each homoeologous genome). Analysis of the meiotic behaviour of species, natural and artificial hybrids and polyploids of Glandularia suggests that, in allopolyploids where homoeologous genomes are in two doses, regulator genes prevent homoeologous pairing. The different meiotic phenotypes in diploid F1 hybrids between Glandularia pulchella and Glandularia incisa strongly suggest that these pairing regulator genes possess an incomplete penetrance when homoeologous genomes are in only one dose. Moreover, the meiotic analysis of natural and artificial F1 hybrids suggests that the genetic constitution of parental species influences the activity of pairing regulator genes and is mainly responsible for variability in the amount of homoeologous pairing observed in diploid hybrids. In Glandularia, the pairing regulator genes originated in South American diploid species. The cytogenetic characteristics of this genus make it a good model to analyse and explore in greater depth the activity of pairing regulator genes at different ploidy levels. PMID:27255515

  20. First Saturn V S-IC Stage Five F-1 Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    This photograph depicts a dramatic view of the first test firing of all five F-1 engines for the Saturn V S-IC stage at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The testing lasted a full duration of 6.5 seconds. It also marked the first test performed in the new S-IC static test stand and the first test using the new control blockhouse. The S-IC stage is the first stage, or booster, of a 364-foot long rocket that ultimately took astronauts to the Moon. Operating at maximum power, all five of the engines produced 7,500,000 pounds of thrust. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the up position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. When the Saturn V S-IC first stage was placed upright in the stand , the five F-1 engine nozzles pointed downward on a 1,900 ton, water-cooled deflector. To prevent melting damage, water was sprayed through small holes in the deflector at the rate 320,000 gallons per minute.

  1. Developmental trajectories and breakdown in F1 interpopulation hybrids of Tribolium castaneum

    PubMed Central

    Drury, Douglas W; Ehmke, Ross C; Jideonwo, Victoria N; Wade, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    When hybrid inviability is an indirect by-product of local adaptation, we expect its degree of severity between pairs of populations to vary and to be sensitive to the environment. While complete reciprocal hybrid inviability is the outcome of the gradual process of local adaptation, it is not representative of the process of accumulation of incompatibility. In the flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, some pairs of populations exhibit complete, reciprocal F1 hybrid incompatibility while other pairs are fully or partially compatible. We characterize this naturally occurring variation in the degree and timing of expression of the hybrid incompatible phenotype to better understand the number of genes or developmental processes contributing to speciation. We assessed the morphological and developmental variation in four Tribolium castaneum populations and their 12 possible F1 hybrids at each life-history stage from egg to adult. We find that the rate of hybrid larval development is affected in all interpopulation crosses, including those eventually producing viable, fertile adults. Hybrid incompatibility manifests early in development as changes in the duration of instars and diminished success in the transition between instars are relative to the parent populations. Parent populations with similar developmental profiles may produce hybrids with disrupted development. The degree and timing of expression of hybrid inviability depends upon populations crossed, direction of the cross, and environment in which hybrids are raised. Our findings suggest that the coordinated expression of genes involved in transitional periods of development is the underlying cause of hybrid incompatibility in this species. PMID:23919145

  2. Toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1: genetic organization of the tod operon

    SciTech Connect

    Zylstra, G.J.; McCombie, W.R.; Gibson, D.T.; Finette, B.A.

    1988-06-01

    Pseudomonas putida PpF1 degrades toluene through cis-toluene dihydrodiol to 3-methylcatechol. The latter compound is metabolized through the well-established meta pathway for catechol degradation. The first four steps in the pathway involve the sequential action of toluene dioxygenase (todABC1C2), cis-toluene, dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (todD), 3-methylcatechol 2,3-dioxygenase (todE), and 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-2,4-heptadienoate hydrolase (todF). The genes for these enzymes form part of the tod operon which is responsible for the degradation of toluene by this organism. A combination of transposon mutagenesis of the PpF1 chromosome, was well as the analysis of cloned chromosomal fragments, was used to determine the physical order of the genes in the tod operon. The genes were determined to be transcribed in the order todF, todC1, todC2, todB, todA, todD, todE.

  3. On the structural possibility of pore-forming mitochondrial FoF1 ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Gerle, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    The mitochondrial permeability transition is an inner mitochondrial membrane event involving the opening of the permeability transition pore concomitant with a sudden efflux of matrix solutes and breakdown of membrane potential. The mitochondrial F(o)F(1) ATP synthase has been proposed as the molecular identity of the permeability transition pore. The likeliness of potential pore-forming sites in the mitochondrial F(o)F(1) ATP synthase is discussed and a new model, the death finger model, is described. In this model, movement of a p-side density that connects the lipid-plug of the c-ring with the distal membrane bending Fo domain allows reversible opening of the c-ring and structural cross-talk with OSCP and the catalytic (αβ)(3) hexamer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26968896

  4. Variability in the amount of homoeologous pairing among F1 hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Lidia; Greizerstein, Eduardo; Ferrari, María

    2016-01-01

    Genes involved in the exclusive pairing of homologous chromosomes have been described in several polyploid species but little is known about the activity of these genes in diploids (which have only one dose of each homoeologous genome). Analysis of the meiotic behaviour of species, natural and artificial hybrids and polyploids of Glandularia suggests that, in allopolyploids where homoeologous genomes are in two doses, regulator genes prevent homoeologous pairing. The different meiotic phenotypes in diploid F1 hybrids between Glandularia pulchella and Glandularia incisa strongly suggest that these pairing regulator genes possess an incomplete penetrance when homoeologous genomes are in only one dose. Moreover, the meiotic analysis of natural and artificial F1 hybrids suggests that the genetic constitution of parental species influences the activity of pairing regulator genes and is mainly responsible for variability in the amount of homoeologous pairing observed in diploid hybrids. In Glandularia, the pairing regulator genes originated in South American diploid species. The cytogenetic characteristics of this genus make it a good model to analyse and explore in greater depth the activity of pairing regulator genes at different ploidy levels. PMID:27255515

  5. Hybrid rotors in F1F(o) ATP synthases: subunit composition, distribution, and physiological significance.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Karsten; Müller, Volker

    2015-09-01

    The c ring of the Na+ F1F(o) ATP synthase from the anaerobic acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii is encoded by three different genes: atpE1, atpE2 and atpE3. Subunit c1 is similar to typical V-type c subunits and has four transmembrane helices with one ion binding site. Subunit c2 and c3 are identical at the amino acid level and are typical F-type c subunits with one ion binding site in two transmembrane helices. All three constitute a hybrid F(o)V(o) c ring, the first found in nature. To analyze whether other species may have similar hybrid rotors, we searched every genome sequence publicly available as of 23 February 2015 for F1F(o) ATPase operons that have more than one gene encoding the c subunit. This revealed no other species that has three different c subunit encoding genes but twelve species that encode one F(o)- and one V(o)-type c subunit in one operon. Their c subunits have the conserved binding motif for Na+. The organisms are all anaerobic. The advantage of hybrid c rings for the organisms in their environments is discussed. PMID:25838297

  6. A construction of F(1) as automorphisms of a 196,883-dimensional algebra.

    PubMed

    Griess, R L

    1981-02-01

    In this note, I announce the construction of the finite simple group F(1), whose existence was predicted independently in 1973 by Bernd Fischer and by me. The group has order 2(46)3(20)5(9)7(6)11(2)13(3)17.19.23.29.31.41. 47.59.71 = 808,017,424,794,512,875,886,459,904,961,710,757,005,754,368,000,000,000 and is realized as a group of automorphisms of a 196,883-dimensional commutative nonassociative algebra over the rational numbers, which has an associative form. Equivalently, it is a group of automorphisms of a cubic form in 196,883 variables. It turns out that all the relevant arguments and calculations may be done by hand. Furthermore, existence of the group F(1) implies the existence of a number of other sporadic simple groups for which existence proofs formerly depended on work with computers. We are beginning to look upon this group as a "friendly giant." PMID:16592973

  7. Engineering a light-controlled F1 ATPase using structure-based protein design.

    PubMed

    Hoersch, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The F1 sub-complex of ATP synthase is a biological nanomotor that converts the free energy of ATP hydrolysis into mechanical work with an astonishing efficiency of up to 100% (Kinosita et al., 2000). To probe the principal mechanics of the machine, I re-engineered the active site of E.coli F1 ATPase with a structure-based protein design approach: by incorporation of a site-specific, photoswitchable crosslinker, whose end-to-end distance can be modulated by illumination with light of two different wavelengths, a dynamic constraint was imposed on the inter-atomic distances of the α and β subunits. Crosslinking reduced the ATP hydrolysis activity of four designs tested in vitro and in one case created a synthetic ATPase whose activity can be reversibly modulated by subsequent illumination with near UV and blue light. The work is a first step into the direction of the long-term goal to design nanoscaled machines based on biological parts that can be precisely controlled by light. PMID:27547581

  8. Interspecific Introgression in Cetaceans: DNA Markers Reveal Post-F1 Status of a Pilot Whale

    PubMed Central

    Miralles, Laura; Lens, Santiago; Rodríguez-Folgar, Antonio; Carrillo, Manuel; Martín, Vidal; Mikkelsen, Bjarni; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Visual species identification of cetacean strandings is difficult, especially when dead specimens are degraded and/or species are morphologically similar. The two recognised pilot whale species (Globicephala melas and Globicephala macrorhynchus) are sympatric in the North Atlantic Ocean. These species are very similar in external appearance and their morphometric characteristics partially overlap; thus visual identification is not always reliable. Genetic species identification ensures correct identification of specimens. Here we have employed one mitochondrial (D-Loop region) and eight nuclear loci (microsatellites) as genetic markers to identify six stranded pilot whales found in Galicia (Northwest Spain), one of them of ambiguous phenotype. DNA analyses yielded positive amplification of all loci and enabled species identification. Nuclear microsatellite DNA genotypes revealed mixed ancestry for one individual, identified as a post-F1 interspecific hybrid employing two different Bayesian methods. From the mitochondrial sequence the maternal species was Globicephala melas. This is the first hybrid documented between Globicephala melas and G. macrorhynchus, and the first post-F1 hybrid genetically identified between cetaceans, revealing interspecific genetic introgression in marine mammals. We propose to add nuclear loci to genetic databases for cetacean species identification in order to detect hybrid individuals. PMID:23990883

  9. The c-Ring of the F1FO-ATP Synthase: Facts and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nesci, Salvatore; Trombetti, Fabiana; Ventrella, Vittoria; Pagliarani, Alessandra

    2016-04-01

    The F1FO-ATP synthase is the only enzyme in nature endowed with bi-functional catalytic mechanism of synthesis and hydrolysis of ATP. The enzyme functions, not only confined to energy transduction, are tied to three intrinsic features of the annular arrangement of c subunits which constitutes the so-called c-ring, the core of the membrane-embedded FO domain: (i) the c-ring constitution is linked to the number of ions (H(+) or Na(+)) channeled across the membrane during the dissipation of the transmembrane electrochemical gradient, which in turn determines the species-specific bioenergetic cost of ATP, the "molecular currency unit" of energy transfer in all living beings; (ii) the c-ring is increasingly involved in the mitochondrial permeability transition, an event linked to cell death and to most mitochondrial dysfunctions; (iii) the c subunit species-specific amino acid sequence and susceptibility to post-translational modifications can address antibacterial drug design according to the model of enzyme inhibitors which target the c subunits. Therefore, the simple c-ring structure not only allows the F1FO-ATP synthase to perform the two opposite tasks of molecular machine of cell life and death, but it also amplifies the enzyme's potential role as a drug target. PMID:26621635

  10. Engineering a light-controlled F1 ATPase using structure-based protein design

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The F1 sub-complex of ATP synthase is a biological nanomotor that converts the free energy of ATP hydrolysis into mechanical work with an astonishing efficiency of up to 100% (Kinosita et al., 2000). To probe the principal mechanics of the machine, I re-engineered the active site of E.coli F1 ATPase with a structure-based protein design approach: by incorporation of a site-specific, photoswitchable crosslinker, whose end-to-end distance can be modulated by illumination with light of two different wavelengths, a dynamic constraint was imposed on the inter-atomic distances of the α and β subunits. Crosslinking reduced the ATP hydrolysis activity of four designs tested in vitro and in one case created a synthetic ATPase whose activity can be reversibly modulated by subsequent illumination with near UV and blue light. The work is a first step into the direction of the long-term goal to design nanoscaled machines based on biological parts that can be precisely controlled by light. PMID:27547581

  11. Phenotypical and functional evaluation of CD8+/S6F1+ T lymphocytes in haemophiliac individuals with HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Cavallin, F; Traldi, A; Zambello, R

    1993-01-01

    In this study we investigated the distribution of the S6F1 antigen, an epitope of the lymphocyte function-associated antigen, on CD8+ T lymphocytes in a series of 15 HIV-1+ and 20 HIV-1- haemophiliac patients. MoAbs recognizing the S6F1 antigen have been claimed to distinguish between killer effectors (brightly S6F1+ stained) and suppressor cells (dimly S6F1+ stained) within the CD8+ lymphoid population. In addition, we tried to find a correlation between the spontaneous in vitro immunoglobulin synthesis from patients' peripheral blood lymphocytes and the pattern of S6F1 expression. Although the total number of double-positive CD8+/S6F1+ cells was similar in both HIV-1+ and HIV-1- haemophiliac patients, a significant increase in the CD8+/S6F1+ population bright versus dim was documented in HIV-1-infected with respect to HIV-1- haemophiliacs (bright/dim ratio 3.97 +/- 0.61 versus 0.75 +/- 0.1, respectively, P < 0.005). This finding was correlated to a significant increase in spontaneous in vitro immunoglobulin production in HIV-1+ subjects compared with control haemophiliacs (P < 0.005). Purified CD8+ lymphocytes from HIV-1+ subjects showed a reduced suppressor activity on mitogen-induced immunoglobulin production. Taken together, these data suggest that HIV-1 infection favours the generation of CD8+/S6F1+ bright cells with putative cytotoxic-associated function, leading to a progressive reduction in the number of CD8+/S6F1+ dim suppressor lymphocytes. This phenomenon may contribute to the polyclonal hypergammaglobulinaemia present in HIV-1+ haemophiliac patients. PMID:8324903

  12. Isolation and expression analysis of FTZ-F1 encoding gene of black rock fish ( Sebastes schlegelii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafi, Muhammad; Wang, Yanan; Zhou, Xiaosu; Ma, Liman; Muhammad, Faiz; Qi, Jie; Zhang, Quanqi

    2013-03-01

    Sex related FTZ-F1 is a transcriptional factor regulating the expression of fushi tarazu (a member of the orphan nuclear receptors) gene. In this study, FTZ-F1 gene ( FTZ-F1) was isolated from the testis of black rockfish ( Sebastes schlegeli) by homology cloning. The full-length cDNA of S. schlegeli FTZ-F1 ( ssFTZ-F1) contained a 232bp 5' UTR, a 1449bp ORF encoding FTZ-F1 (482 amino acid residules in length) with an estimated molecular weight of 5.4kD and a 105bp 3' UTR. Sequence, tissue distribution and phylogenic analysis showed that ssFTZ-F1 belonged to FTZ group, holding highly conserved regions including I, II and III FTZ-F1 boxes and an AF-2 hexamer. Relatively high expression was observed at different larva stages. In juveniles (105 days old), the transcript of ssFTZ-F1 can be detected in all tissues and the abuncance of the gene transcript in testis, ovary, spleen and brain was higher than that in other tissues. In mature fish, the abundance of gene transcript was higher in testis, ovary, spleen and brain than that in liver (trace amount), and the gene was not transcribed in other tissues. The highest abundance of gene transcript was always observed in gonads of both juvenile and mature fish. In addition, the abundance of gene transcript in male tissues were higher than that in female tissue counterparts ( P<0.05).

  13. Protease Omi facilitates neurite outgrowth in mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells by cleaving transcription factor E2F1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qi; Hu, Qing-song; Xu, Ran-jie; Zhen, Xue-chu; Wang, Guang-hui

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Omi is an ATP-independent serine protease that is necessary for neuronal function and survival. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of protease Omi in regulating differentiation of mouse neuroblastoma cells and to identify the substrate of Omi involved in this process. Methods: Mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells and Omi protease-deficient mnd2 mice were used in this study. To modulate Omi and E2F1 expression, N2a cells were transfected with expression plasmids, shRNA plasmids or siRNA. Protein levels were detected using immunoblot assays. The interaction between Omi and E2F1 was studied using immunoprecipitation, GST pulldown and in vitro cleavage assays. N2a cells were treated with 20 μmol/L retinoic acid (RA) and 1% fetal bovine serum to induce neurite outgrowth, which was measured using Image J software. Results: E2F1 was significantly increased in Omi knockdown cells and in brain lysates of mnd2 mice, and was decreased in cells overexpressing wild-type Omi, but not inactive Omi S276C. In brain lysates of mnd2 mice, endogenous E2F1 was co-immunoprecipitated with endogenous Omi. In vitro cleavage assay demonstrated that Omi directly cleaved E2F1. Treatment of N2a cells with RA induced marked differentiation and neurite outgrowth accompanied by significantly increased Omi and decreased E2F1 levels, which were suppressed by pretreatment with the specific Omi inhibitor UCF-101. Knockdown of Omi in N2a cells suppressed RA-induced neurite outgrowth, which was partially restored by knockdown of E2F1. Conclusion: Protease Omi facilitates neurite outgrowth by cleaving the transcription factor E2F1 in differentiated neuroblastoma cells; E2F1 is a substrate of Omi. PMID:26238290

  14. Use of 24-F-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to prevent parturient paresis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Goff, J P; Horst, R L; Beitz, D C; Littledike, E T

    1988-05-01

    Forty-one aged Jersey cows were fed a high Ca diet prior to parturition to predispose them to parturient paresis. Twenty-one of the cows were treated with 24-F-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, a synthetic analogue of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, 7 d before the expected parturition. Treated cows received either 100 micrograms (n = 7) or 150 micrograms (n = 14) of 24-F-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, intramuscularly at 7-d intervals until the cow calved. Incidence of parturient paresis among untreated animals was 85% (17/20). Injections of 100 micrograms of 24-F-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 reduced the incidence of parturient paresis to 43% (3/7), whereas 150 micrograms injections of 24-F-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 reduced the incidence of parturient paresis to 29% (4/14). Plasma concentrations of hydroxyproline were not elevated prior to parturition in 24-F-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-treated cows, indicating that treatment did not stimulate bone resorption and that the ability of 24-F-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to prevent parturient paresis likely resides in its ability to stimulate intestinal Ca absorption prior to parturition. Further, cows treated with 24-F-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 that developed parturient paresis had lower than normal plasma concentrations of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, indicating that 24-F-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 treatment impairs the metabolism of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in response to hypocalcemia. These data suggest that injection of 24-F-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, delivered at 7-d intervals prior to parturition, can effectively reduce incidence of parturient paresis in dairy cows. PMID:3397418

  15. ROS Production Is Essential for the Apoptotic Function of E2F1 in Pheochromocytoma and Neuroblastoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Espada, Lilia; Meo-Evoli, Nathalie; Sancho, Patricia; Real, Sebastian; Fabregat, Isabel; Ambrosio, Santiago; Tauler, Albert

    2012-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate that accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is essential for E2F1 mediated apoptosis in ER-E2F1 PC12 pheochromocytoma, and SH-SY5Y and SK-N-JD neuroblastoma stable cell lines. In these cells, the ER-E2F1 fusion protein is expressed in the cytosol; the addition of 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT) induces its translocation to the nucleus and activation of E2F1target genes. Previously we demonstrated that, in ER-E2F1 PC12 cells, OHT treatment induced apoptosis through activation of caspase-3. Here we show that caspase-8 activity did not change upon treatment with OHT. Moreover, over-expression of Bcl-xL arrested OHT-induced apoptosis; by contrast, over-expression of c-FLIP, did not have any effect on OHT-induced apoptosis. OHT addition induces BimL expression, its translocation to mitochondria and activation of Bax, which is paralleled by diminished mitochondrial enrichment of Bcl-xL. Treatment with a Bax-inhibitory peptide reduced OHT-induced apoptosis. These results point out the essential role of mitochondria on the apoptotic process driven by E2F1. ROS accumulation followed E2F1 induction and treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, inhibited E2F1-induced Bax translocation to mitochondria and subsequent apoptosis. The role of ROS in mediating OHT-induced apoptosis was also studied in two neuroblastoma cell lines, SH-SY5Y and SK-N-JD. In SH-SY5Y cells, activation of E2F1 by the addition of OHT induced ROS production and apoptosis, whereas over-expression of E2F1 in SK-N-JD cells failed to induce either response. Transcriptional profiling revealed that many of the genes responsible for scavenging ROS were down-regulated following E2F1-induction in SH-SY5Y, but not in SK-N-JD cells. Finally, inhibition of GSK3β blocked ROS production, Bax activation and the down regulation of ROS scavenging genes. These findings provide an explanation for the apparent contradictory role of E2F1 as an apoptotic agent versus a cell cycle activator

  16. E2F1-dependent miR-421 regulates mitochondrial fragmentation and myocardial infarction by targeting Pink1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Zhou, Lu-Yu; Wang, Jian-Xun; Wang, Yin; Sun, Teng; Zhao, Bing; Yang, Yong-Jie; An, Tao; Long, Bo; Li, Na; Liu, Cui-Yun; Gong, Ying; Gao, Jin-Ning; Dong, Yan-Han; Zhang, Jian; Li, Pei-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial fragmentation plays an important role in the progression of cardiac diseases, such as myocardial infarction and heart failure. Mitochondrial network is controlled by many factors in different cell types. Here we show that the interplay between E2F1, miR-421 and Pink1 regulates mitochondrial morphology and cardiomyocyte cell death. Pink1 reduces mitochondrial fragmentation and protects cardiomyocyte from apoptosis. On the other hand, miR-421 promotes cardiomyocyte mitochondrial fragmentation, apoptosis and myocardial infarction by suppressing Pink1 translation. Finally, we show that transcription factor E2F1 activates miR-421 expression. Knocking down E2F1 suppresses mitochondrial fragmentation, apoptosis and myocardial infarction by affecting miR-421 levels. Collectively, these data identify the E2F1/miR-421/Pink axis as a regulator of mitochondrial fragmentation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and suggest potential therapeutic targets in treatment of cardiac diseases. PMID:26184432

  17. The Application of Restriction Landmark Genome Scanning Method for Surveillance of Non-Mendelian Inheritance in F1 Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Takamiya, Tomoko; Hosobuchi, Saeko; Noguchi, Tomotsugu; Paterson, Andrew H.; Iijima, Hiroshi; Murakami, Yasufumi; Okuizumi, Hisato

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed inheritance of DNA methylation in reciprocal F1 hybrids (subsp. japonica cv. Nipponbare × subsp. indica cv. Kasalath) of rice (Oryza sativa L.) using restriction landmark genome scanning (RLGS), and detected differing RLGS spots between the parents and reciprocal F1 hybrids. MspI/HpaII restriction sites in the DNA from these different spots were suspected to be heterozygously methylated in the Nipponbare parent. These spots segregated in F1 plants, but did not segregate in selfed progeny of Nipponbare, showing non-Mendelian inheritance of the methylation status. As a result of RT-PCR and sequencing, a specific allele of the gene nearest to the methylated sites was expressed in reciprocal F1 plants, showing evidence of biased allelic expression. These results show the applicability of RLGS for scanning of non-Mendelian inheritance of DNA methylation and biased allelic expression. PMID:20148066

  18. D → a1, f1 transition form factors and semileptonic decays via 3-point QCD sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Yabing; Hu, Yue; He, Linlin; Yang, Wei; Chen, Yan; Hao, Yannan

    2016-07-01

    By using the 3-point QCD sum rules, we calculate the transition form factors of D decays into the spin triplet axial vector mesons a1(1260), f1(1285), f1(1420). In the calculations, we consider the quark contents of each meson in detail. In view of the fact that the isospin of a1(1260) is one, we calculate the D+ → a 10(1260) and D0 → a 1‑(1260) transition form factors separately. In the case of f1(1285), f1(1420), the mixing between light flavor SU(3) singlet and octet is taken into account. Based on the form factors obtained here, we give predictions for the branching ratios of relevant semileptonic decays, which can be tested in the future experiments.

  19. [Alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes and alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists].

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Ikunobu; Suzuki, Fumiko; Tanaka, Takashi; Yamamoto, Hatsumi; Morishima, Shigeru

    2006-03-01

    Alpha(1)-adrenoceptors are widely distributed in the human body and play important physiologic roles. Three alpha(1)-adrenoceptor subtypes (alpha(1A), alpha(1B) and alpha(1D)) have been cloned and show different pharmacologic profiles. In addition, a putative alpha(1)-adrenoceptor (alpha(1L) subtype) has also been proposed. Recently, three drugs (tamsulosin, naftopidil, and silodosin) have been developed in Japan for the treatment of urinary obstruction in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. In this review, we describe recent alpha(1)-adrenoceptor subclassifications and the pharmacologic characteristics (subtype selectivity and clinical relevance) of alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists. PMID:16518082

  20. Promoter analysis of the rabbit POU5F1 gene and its expression in preimplantation stage embryos

    PubMed Central

    Kobolak, Julianna; Kiss, Katalin; Polgar, Zsuzsanna; Mamo, Solomon; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire; Tancos, Zsuzsanna; Bock, Istvan; Baji, Arpad G; Tar, Krisztina; Pirity, Melinda K; Dinnyes, Andras

    2009-01-01

    Background The POU5F1 gene encodes the octamer-binding transcription factor-4 (Oct4). It is crucial in the regulation of pluripotency during embryonic development and widely used as molecular marker of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). The objective of this study was to identify and to analyse the promoter region of rabbit POU5F1 gene; furthermore to examine its expression pattern in preimplantation stage rabbit embryos. Results The upstream region of rabbit POU5F1 was subcloned sequenced and four highly conserved promoter regions (CR1-4) were identified. The highest degree of similarity on sequence level was found among the conserved domains between rabbit and human. Among the enhancers the proximal enhancer region (PE-1A) exhibited the highest degree of homology (96.4%). Furthermore, the CR4 regulator domain containing the distal enhancer (DE-2A) was responsible for stem cell-specific expression. Also, BAC library screen revealed the existence of a processed pseudogene of rabbit POU5F1. The results of quantitative real-time PCR experiments showed that POU5F1 mRNA was abundantly present in oocytes and zygotes, but it was gradually reduced until the activation of the embryonic genome, thereafter a continuous increase in POU5F1 mRNA level was observed until blastocyst stage. By using the XYClone laser system the inner cell mass (ICM) and trophoblast portions of embryos were microdissected and examined separately and POU5F1 mRNA was detected in both cell types. Conclusion In this study we provide a comparative sequence analysis of the regulatory region of rabbit POU5F1 gene. Our data suggest that the POU5F1 gene is strictly regulated during early mammalian development. We proposed that the well conserved CR4 region containing the DE-2A enhancer is responsible for the highly conserved ESC specific gene expression. Notably, we are the first to report that the rabbit POU5F1 is not restricted to ICM cells only, but it is expressed in trophoblast cells as well. This

  1. Standardized F1: a consistent measure of strength of modulation of visual responses to sine-wave drifting gratings.

    PubMed

    Wypych, M; Wang, C; Nagy, A; Benedek, G; Dreher, B; Waleszczyk, W J

    2012-11-01

    The magnitude of spike-responses of neurons in the mammalian visual system to sine-wave luminance-contrast-modulated drifting gratings is modulated by the temporal frequency of the stimulation. However, there are serious problems with consistency and reliability of the traditionally used methods of assessment of strength of such modulation. Here we propose an intuitive and simple tool for assessment of the strength of modulations in the form of standardized F1 index, zF1. We define zF1 as the ratio of the difference between the F1 (component of amplitude spectrum of the spike-response at temporal frequency of stimulation) and the mean value of spectrum amplitudes to standard deviation along all frequencies in the spectrum. In order to assess the validity of this measure, we have: (1) examined behavior of zF1 using spike-responses to optimized drifting gratings of single neurons recorded from four 'visual' structures (area V1 of primary visual cortex, superior colliculus, suprageniculate nucleus and caudate nucleus) in the brain of commonly used visual mammal - domestic cat; (2) compared the behavior of zF1 with that of classical statistics commonly employed in the analysis of steady-state responses; (3) tested the zF1 index on simulated spike-trains generated with threshold-linear model. Our analyses indicate that zF1 is resistant to distortions due to the low spike count in responses and therefore can be particularly useful in the case of recordings from neurons with low firing rates and/or low net mean responses. While most V1 and a half of caudate neurons exhibit high zF1 indices, the majorities of collicular and suprageniculate neurons exhibit low zF1 indices. We conclude that despite the general shortcomings of measuring strength of modulation inherent in the linear system approach, zF1 can serve as a sensitive and easy to interpret tool for detection of modulation and assessment of its strength in responses of visual neurons. PMID:23000273

  2. miR-449a promotes liver cancer cell apoptosis by downregulation of Calpain 6 and POU2F1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yonglei; Wang, Yutong; Sun, Xiangjun; Mei, Chuanzhong; Wang, Liying; Li, Zengxia; Zha, Xiliang

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study shows that Calpain 6 (CAPN6) expression is regulated by PI3K-Akt in liver cancer through POU2F1 and CAPN6 which promote cell proliferation and inhibit apoptosis of liver cancer cells. microRNAs (miRNAs) plays important roles in regulation of gene expression. However, whether miRNAs regulates CAPN6 expression and its cellular function is still unknown. This study aims to investigate how miRNAs regulate liver cancer apoptosis through POU2F1-CAPN6. It was verified that POU2F1 could promote cell proliferation and inhibit apoptosis through CAPN6. Using methods of bioinformatics, miR-449a was predicted as a potential regulator of both CAPN6 and POU2F1. It was verified that CAPN6 and POU2F1 were the target genes of miR-449a by luciferase assay. CAPN6 and POU2F1 protein and mRNA levels decreased in liver cancer cells with miR-449a overexpression using western blot and real time RT-PCR assays. miR-449a expression was lower in liver cancer tissues compared with their normal ones, so did the cells. Overexpression of miR-449a inhibited cell proliferation, induced G1 phase arrest and cell apoptosis in liver cancer. Further research demonstrated that miR-449a inhibited cancer cell proliferation and induced apoptosis via suppressing both POU2F1 and CAPN6. The study indicated that miR-449a functions as a tumor inhibitor in liver cancer by decreasing POU2F1 and CAPN6 expression in liver cancer. PMID:26375440

  3. The SOD1 transgene expressed in erythroid cells alleviates fatal phenotype in congenic NZB/NZW-F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Noriyuki; Konno, Tasuku; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Saori; Lee, Jaeyong; Okada, Futoshi; Iuchi, Yoshihito; Homma, Takujiro; Fujii, Junichi

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress due to a superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) deficiency causes anemia and autoimmune responses, which are phenotypically similar to autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in C57BL/6 mice and aggravates AIHA pathogenesis in New Zealand black (NZB) mice. We report herein on an evaluation of the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a model mouse with inherited SLE, that is, F1 mice of the NZB × New Zealand white (NZW) strain. The ROS levels within red blood cells (RBCs) of the F1 mice were similar to the NZW mice but lower compared to the NZB mice throughout adult period. Regarding SLE pathogenesis, we examined the effects of an SOD1 deficiency or the overexpression of human SOD1 in erythroid cells by establishing corresponding congenic F1 mice. A SOD1 deficiency caused an elevation in ROS production, methemoglobin content, and hyperoxidation of peroxiredoxin in RBC of the F1 mice, which were all consistent with elevated oxidative stress. However, while the overexpression of human SOD1 in erythroid cells extended the life span of the congenic F1 mice, the SOD1 deficiency had no effect on life span compared to wild-type F1 mice. It is generally recognized that NZW mice possess a larval defect in the immune system and that NZB mice trigger an autoimmune reaction in the F1 mice. Our results suggest that the oxidative insult originated from the NZB mouse background has a functional role in triggering an aberrant immune reaction, leading to fatal responses in F1 mice. PMID:27080108

  4. Measurement of the Microwave Lensing shift in NIST-F1 and NIST-F2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferts, S. R.; Heavner, T. P.; Barlow, S. E.; Ashby, N.

    2016-06-01

    With several Primary Frequency Standards (PFS) across the world demonstrating systematic fractional frequency uncertainties on order of 1 x 10-16, it is crucial to accurately measure or model even small frequency shifts that could affect the ultimate PFS uncertainty, and thus ultimately impact the rate of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) which relies on precision PFS measurements. Recently there has been controversy about the physical causes and size of PFS frequency shifts due to microwave lensing effects. We present here the first measurements of microwave lensing frequency shifts in the PFS NIST-F1 and NIST-F2. The measured frequency shifts agree well with the recent theory of Ashby et al [1].

  5. Cytosine chemoreceptor McpC in Pseudomonas putida F1 also detects nicotinic acid

    PubMed Central

    Nesteryuk, Vasyl; Hughes, Jonathan G.; Luu, Rita A.; Ditty, Jayna L.

    2014-01-01

    Soil bacteria are generally capable of growth on a wide range of organic chemicals, and pseudomonads are particularly adept at utilizing aromatic compounds. Pseudomonads are motile bacteria that are capable of sensing a wide range of chemicals, using both energy taxis and chemotaxis. Whilst the identification of specific chemicals detected by the ≥26 chemoreceptors encoded in Pseudomonas genomes is ongoing, the functions of only a limited number of Pseudomonas chemoreceptors have been revealed to date. We report here that McpC, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein in Pseudomonas putida F1 that was previously shown to function as a receptor for cytosine, was also responsible for the chemotactic response to the carboxylated pyridine nicotinic acid. PMID:25294107

  6. Reversal of spin dynamics in an antiferromagnetic F = 1 spinor Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwettmann, Arne; Summy, Gil; Pechkis, Hyewon; Wrubel, Jonathan; Barnett, Ryan; Wilson, Ryan; Tiesinga, Eite; Lett, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The antiferromagnetic F = 1 sodium spinor Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) exhibits coherent population oscillations of the magnetic sublevels that are internally driven by spin-exchange collisions. Here, we experimentally demonstrate reversals of the collisional dynamics. The reversals are controlled with microwave pulses. We observe nearly complete reversals even after a significant amount of population oscillation has already occurred. In addition, and somewhat surprisingly, we can generate partial reversals in the cold, non-condensed normal gas. We explain our results with numerical calculations based on the truncated Wigner approximation and an analytical theory based on the Bogoliubov approximation. In the future, this type of microwave control of collisional dynamics will allow us to implement matter-wave analogs of devices known from quantum optics with photons, such as a phase-sensitive matter-wave amplifier.

  7. Control of spinor dynamics in an anti-ferromagnetic F=1 Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassman, Zachary; Fahey, Donald; Wilson, Ryan; Tiesinga, Eite; Lett, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Spin-exchange collisions driving coherent population oscillations of the F = 1 ground state magnetic sublevels can be used for precision quantum measurements in a condensed Bose gas. Entanglement generated by these dynamics enables below standard quantum limit phase estimation by way of an SU(1,1) interferometer and antiferromagnetic spin-nematic squeezing. In order to observe these effects, we have simulated the spinor dynamics in the single mode approximation with both fully quantum and semi-classical models. We present a study of microwave pulse sequences, which can be used to control the spinor dynamics via energy level shifts and rotations, and discuss improved methods for future experiments in this field.

  8. Little or no gene flow despite F1 hybrids at two interspecific contact zones.

    PubMed

    Mckean, Natasha E; Trewick, Steven A; Morgan-Richards, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Hybridization can create the selective force that promotes assortative mating but hybridization can also select for increased hybrid fitness. Gene flow resulting from hybridization can increase genetic diversity but also reduce distinctiveness. Thus the formation of hybrids has important implications for long-term species coexistence. This study compares the interaction between the tree wētā Hemideina thoracica and its two neighboring species; H. crassidens and H. trewicki. We examined the ratio of parent and hybrid forms in natural areas of sympatry. Individuals with intermediate phenotype were confirmed as first generation hybrids using nine independent genetic markers. Evidence of gene flow from successful hybridization was sought from the distribution of morphological and genetic characters. Both species pairs appear to be largely retaining their own identity where they live in sympatry, each with a distinct karyotype. Hemideina thoracica and H. trewicki are probably reproductively isolated, with sterile F1 hybrids. This species pair shows evidence of niche differences with adult size and timing of maturity differing where Hemideina thoracica is sympatric with H. trewicki. In contrast, evidence of a low level of introgression was detected in phenotypes and genotypes where H. thoracica and H. crassidens are sympatric. We found no evidence of size divergence although color traits in combination with hind tibia spines reliably distinguish the two species. This species pair show a bimodal hybrid zone in the absence of assortative mating and possible sexual exclusion by H. thoracica males in the formation of F1 hybrids. PMID:27066230

  9. Impaired peripheral glucose sensing in F1 offspring of diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Maher A; Helmy, Madiha H; Hanafi, Mervat Y; Mahmoud, Shimaa A; Abo Elfetooh, Hanan

    2014-09-01

    Maternal diabetes can induce permanent changes in glucose homeostasis that can occur pre- and post-natal and leads to type 2 diabetes in adulthood. This study aimed to investigate the effect of maternal diabetes on the F1 offspring peripheral glucose sensing and mitochondrial biogenesis in an attempt to clarify the mechanism of diabetogenic programming. Two groups of female Wistar rats were used (diabetic and control); diabetes was neonatally induced by STZ injection to 5-day old rats. After the pregnancy and delivery, the offspring were weaned to control diet or high-caloric (HCD) diet and followed up for 30 weeks. Every 5 weeks, OGTT was constructed, and serum and tissues were obtained for the assessment of mTFA, mtDNA, UCP2, insulin receptor (IR), phospho-insulin receptor (phospho-IR), and GLUT4. The result indicated impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and insulin resistance in the offspring under control diet at the 15th week of age and thereafter while those offspring under HCD showed IGT at 10th week, and diabetes was evidenced at the 25th week of age. This defect in glucose metabolism was preceded by impairment in the phosphorylation of IR and decreased IR and Glut4 that cause impaired glucose sensing together with inhibited mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle and adipose tissues. This study indicated that maternal diabetes caused impaired glucose sensing and insulin resistance in the peripheral tissues and caused change in the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Post-natal feeding with HCD may accelerate these changes. Male F1 offspring appears to be more sensitive than females for fetal programming of T2D. PMID:24895245

  10. An Expressed Retrogene of the Master Embryonic Stem Cell Gene POU5F1 Is Associated with Prostate Cancer Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Breyer, Joan P.; Dorset, Daniel C.; Clark, Travis A.; Bradley, Kevin M.; Wahlfors, Tiina A.; McReynolds, Kate M.; Maynard, William H.; Chang, Sam S.; Cookson, Michael S.; Smith, Joseph A.; Schleutker, Johanna; Dupont, William D.; Smith, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic association studies of prostate and other cancers have identified a major risk locus at chromosome 8q24. Several independent risk variants at this locus alter transcriptional regulatory elements, but an affected gene and mechanism for cancer predisposition have remained elusive. The retrogene POU5F1B within the locus has a preserved open reading frame encoding a homolog of the master embryonic stem cell transcription factor Oct4. We find that 8q24 risk alleles are expression quantitative trait loci correlated with reduced expression of POU5F1B in prostate tissue and that predicted deleterious POU5F1B missense variants are also associated with risk of transformation. POU5F1 is known to be self-regulated by the encoded Oct4 transcription factor. We further observe that POU5F1 expression is directly correlated with POU5F1B expression. Our results suggest that a pathway critical to self-renewal of embryonic stem cells may also have a role in the origin of cancer. PMID:24581739

  11. Hypoxia promotes cell proliferation by modulating E2F1 in chicken pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we sought to investigate the expression of the transcription factor E2F1 in chicken pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells upon hypoxia exposure, as well as the role that E2F1 played in the regulation of cell proliferation. Isolated chicken pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells were subjected to hypoxia or normoxia for indicated time points. Cell viability, DNA synthesis, cell cycle profile, and expression of E2F1 were analyzed. The results showed that hypoxia promoted cell proliferation and DNA synthesis which was accompanied by an increased S phase entry and upregulation of E2F1 at mRNA and protein levels. Using siRNA technology, we demonstrated that gene inactivation of endogenous E2F1 abolished hypoxia-induced cell proliferation, DNA synthesis, and S phase entry compared with negative siRNA transfected cells. These results suggest that hypoxia-induced proliferation is mediated by inducing E2F1 in chicken pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. PMID:23902684

  12. Monoamine oxidase B levels are highly expressed in human gliomas and are correlated with the expression of HiF-1α and with transcription factors Sp1 and Sp3

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Martyn A.; Baskin, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Monoamine oxidases A and B (MAOA and MAOB) are highly expressed in many cancers. Here we investigated the level of MAOB in gliomas and confirmed its high expression. We found that MAOB levels correlated with tumor grade and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HiF-1α) expression. HiF-1α was localized to the nuclei in high-grade gliomas, but it was primarily cytosolic in low-grade gliomas and normal human astrocytes. Expression of both glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and MAOB are correlated to HiF-1α expression levels. Levels of MAOB are correlated by the levels of transcription factor Sp3 in the majority of GBM examined, but this control of MAOB expression by Sp3 in low grade astrocytic gliomas is significantly different from control in the in the majority of glioblastomas. The current findings support previous suggestions that MAOB can be exploited for the killing of cancer cells. Selective cell toxicity can be achieved by designing non-toxic prodrugs that require MAOB for their catalytic conversion into mature cytotoxic chemotherapeutics. PMID:26689994

  13. Event counting alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, Richard D.; MacArthur, Duncan W.

    1996-01-01

    An electrostatic detector for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure.

  14. Alpha-particle diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will focus on the state of development of diagnostics which are expected to provide the information needed for {alpha}- physics studies in the future. Conventional measurement of detailed temporal and spatial profiles of background plasma properties in DT will be essential for such aspects as determining heating effectiveness, shaping of the plasma profiles and effects of MHD, but will not be addressed here. This paper will address (1) the measurement of the neutron source, and hence {alpha}-particle birth profile, (2) measurement of the escaping {alpha}-particles and (3) measurement of the confined {alpha}-particles over their full energy range. There will also be a brief discussion of (4) the concerns about instabilities being generated by {alpha}-particles and the methods necessary for measuring these effects. 51 refs., 10 figs.

  15. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  16. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  17. Event counting alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, R.D.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1996-08-27

    An electrostatic detector is disclosed for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure. 6 figs.

  18. Identification of the human ApoAV gene as a novel ROR{alpha} target gene

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, Ulrika; Nilsson, Tina; McPheat, Jane; Stroemstedt, Per-Erik; Bamberg, Krister; Balendran, Clare; Kang, Daiwu . E-mail: Daiwu.Kang@astrazeneca.com

    2005-04-29

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-{alpha} (ROR{alpha}) (NR1F1) is an orphan nuclear receptor with a potential role in metabolism. Previous studies have shown that ROR{alpha} regulates transcription of the murine Apolipoprotein AI gene and human Apolipoprotein CIII genes. In the present study, we present evidence that ROR{alpha} also induces transcription of the human Apolipoprotein AV gene, a recently identified apolipoprotein associated with triglyceride levels. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of ROR{alpha} increased the endogenous expression of ApoAV in HepG2 cells and ROR{alpha} also enhanced the activity of an ApoAV promoter construct in transiently transfected HepG2 cells. Deletion and mutation studies identified three AGGTCA motifs in the ApoAV promoter that mediate ROR{alpha} transactivation, one of which overlaps with a previously identified binding site for PPAR{alpha}. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism whereby ROR{alpha} modulates lipid metabolism and implies ROR{alpha} as a potential target for the treatment of dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis.

  19. Characterization of the shrimp eyestalk cDNA encoding a novel fushi tarazu-factor 1 (FTZ-F1).

    PubMed

    Chan, S M; Chan, K M

    1999-07-01

    To study the role of ecdysone and the ecdysone inducible gene in the regulation of molting and development in crustaceans, we have cloned a cDNA encoding an orphan nuclear receptor family member from the eyestalk of the shrimp Metapenaeus ensis. The size of the cDNA is 4.3 kb with the longest open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein of 545 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence of the shrimp cDNA consists of regions that are characteristic of those of the nuclear hormone receptors. It shows a high degree of amino acid sequence identity in the DNA binding domain, ligand binding domain and the FTZ box as compared to those of invertebrates and vertebrates. Unlike the insects Drosophila melanogaster and Bombyx mori, an AF2 transactivation domain was present in the shrimp FTZ-F1. Northern blot analysis using total RNA indicated that the FTZ-F1 mRNA could also be detected in the mature ovary. Northern blot analysis and RT-PCR analysis showed that the shrimp FTZ-F1 transcripts could be detected in the ovary, newly hatched nauplius, testis, eyestalk and epidermis of the adult shrimp. Although the cDNA clone was isolated from the eyestalk library, the shrimp FTZ-F1 appeared to express most abundantly in the mature oocytes. The presence of abundant FTZ-F1 specific maternal message in the late vitellogenic ovary and early nauplius indicates that it may be important for the early embryonic and larval development of the shrimp. Interestingly, shrimp FTZ-F1 can also be found in testis of the male shrimp. The presence of FTZ-F1 in other tissues such as epidermis suggests that it may also be involved in other physiological processes such as molting. PMID:10413106

  20. CYP79F1 and CYP79F2 have distinct functions in the biosynthesis of aliphatic glucosinolates in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sixue; Glawischnig, Erich; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Naur, Peter; Jørgensen, Bodil; Olsen, Carl-Erik; Hansen, Carsten H; Rasmussen, Hasse; Pickett, John A; Halkier, Barbara A

    2003-03-01

    Cytochromes P450 of the CYP79 family catalyze the conversion of amino acids to oximes in the biosynthesis of glucosinolates, a group of natural plant products known to be involved in plant defense and as a source of flavor compounds, cancer-preventing agents and bioherbicides. We report a detailed biochemical analysis of the substrate specificity and kinetics of CYP79F1 and CYP79F2, two cytochromes P450 involved in the biosynthesis of aliphatic glucosinolates in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using recombinant CYP79F1 and CYP79F2 expressed in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively, we show that CYP79F1 metabolizes mono- to hexahomomethionine, resulting in both short- and long-chain aliphatic glucosinolates. In contrast, CYP79F2 exclusively metabolizes long-chain elongated penta- and hexahomomethionines. CYP79F1 and CYP79F2 are spatially and developmentally regulated, with different gene expression patterns. CYP79F2 is highly expressed in hypocotyl and roots, whereas CYP79F1 is strongly expressed in cotyledons, rosette leaves, stems, and siliques. A transposon-tagged CYP79F1 knockout mutant completely lacks short-chain aliphatic glucosinolates, but has an increased level of long-chain aliphatic glucosinolates, especially in leaves and seeds. The level of long-chain aliphatic glucosinolates in a transposon-tagged CYP79F2 knockout mutant is substantially reduced, whereas the level of short-chain aliphatic glucosinolates is not affected. Biochemical characterization of CYP79F1 and CYP79F2, and gene expression analysis, combined with glucosinolate profiling of knockout mutants demonstrate the functional role of these enzymes. This provides valuable insights into the metabolic network leading to the biosynthesis of aliphatic glucosinolates, and into metabolic engineering of altered aliphatic glucosinolate profiles to improve nutritional value and pest resistance. PMID:12609033

  1. Regulation of a senescence checkpoint response by the E2F1 transcription factor and p14ARF tumor suppressor

    SciTech Connect

    Dimri, Goberdhan P.; Itahana, Koji; Acosta, Meileen; Campisi, Judith

    1999-11-05

    Normal cells do not divide indefinitely due to a process known as replicative senescence. Human cells arrest growth with a senescent phenotype when they acquire one or more critically short telomere as a consequence of cell division. Recent evidence suggests that certain types of DNA damage, chromatin remodeling, or oncogenic forms of Rasor Raf can also elicit a senescence response. We show here that E2F1, a multifunctional transcription factor that binds the retinoblastoma (pRb) tumor suppressor and can either promote or suppress tumorigenesis, induces a senescent phenotype when overexpressed in normal human fibroblasts. Normal human cells stably arrested proliferation and expressed several markers of replicative senescence in response to E2F1. This activity of E2F1 was independent of its pRb binding activity, but dependent on its ability to stimulate gene expression. The E2F1 target gene critical for the senescence response appeared to be the p14ARF tumor suppressor. Replicatively senescent human fibroblasts overexpressed p14ARF, and ectopic expression of p14ARF in presenescent cells induced a phenotype similar to that induced by E2F1. Consistent with a critical role for p14ARF, cells with compromised p53 function were immune to senescence induction by E2F1, as were cells deficient in p14ARF. Our findings support the idea that the senescence response is a critical tumor suppressive mechanism, provide an explanation for the apparently paradoxical roles of E2F1 in oncogenesis, and identify p14ARF as a potentially important mediator of the senescent phenotype.

  2. Acrylonitrile is a multisite carcinogen in male and female B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Ghanayem, Burhan I; Nyska, Abraham; Haseman, Joseph K; Bucher, John R

    2002-07-01

    Acrylonitrile is a heavily produced unsaturated nitrile, which is used in the production of synthetic fibers, plastics, resins, and rubber. Acrylonitrile is a multisite carcinogen in rats after exposure via gavage, drinking water, or inhalation. No carcinogenicity studies of acrylonitrile in a second animal species were available. The current studies were designed to assess the carcinogenicity of acrylonitrile in B6C3F1 mice of both sexes. Acrylonitrile was administered by gavage at 0, 2.5, 10, or 20 mg/kg/day, 5 days per week, for 2 years. Urinary thiocyanate and N-acetyl-S-(2-cyanoethyl)-L-cysteine were measured as markers of exposure to acrylonitrile. In general, there were dose-related increases in urinary thiocyanate and N-acetyl-S-(2-cyanoethyl)-L-cysteine concentrations in all dosed groups of mice and at all time points. Survival was significantly (p < 0.001) reduced in the top dose (20 mg/kg) group of male and female mice relative to controls. The incidence of forestomach papillomas and carcinomas was increased in mice of both sexes in association with an increase in forestomach epithelial hyperplasia. The incidence of Harderian gland adenomas and carcinomas was also markedly increased in the acrylonitrile-dosed groups. In female mice, the incidence of benign or malignant granulosa cell tumors (combined) in the ovary in the 10 mg/kg dose group was greater than that in the vehicle control group, but because of a lack of dose response, this was considered an equivocal finding. In addition, the incidences of atrophy and cysts in the ovary of the 10 and 20 mg/kg dose groups were significantly increased. The incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar adenoma or carcinoma (combined) were significantly increased in female mice treated with acrylonitrile at 10 mg/kg/day for 2 years. This was also considered an equivocal result. In conclusion, these studies demonstrated that acrylonitrile causes multiple carcinogenic effects after gavage administration to male and female B6

  3. Molecular Probes: A Tool for Studying Toxicity of VOCs to P.Putida F1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Olson, M. S.

    2007-12-01

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are of great concern in ground water remediation, and are generally present in the form of NAPLs in subsurface environments. Among the various treatment technologies, in situ bioremediation is one of the most effective and low-cost treatment options. Many soil bacteria are reported to degrade these organic contaminants via metabolism (using them as a source of carbon to derive energy) or co- metabolism up to certain concentrations. However, larger concentrations of these contaminants are toxic to bacteria. Thus, in order to achieve successful bioremediation, it is important to determine the optimal concentrations of various contaminants that is beneficial for the activity and survival of degrading bacteria. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel method for toxicity analyses of VOC contaminants to the soil bacteria that degrade them. The present study is based on a two-color fluorescence assay of bacterial viability which facilitates actual counting of live and dead bacteria. Pseudomonas putida F1 cells were labeled with a LIVE/DEAD® BacLightTM bacterial viability kit (Invitrogen), which consists of a mixture of two dyes, SYTO 9 and propidium iodide, each with a different ability to penetrate healthy bacterial cells. Live cells stain green whereas propidium iodide (red dye) only penetrates cells with compromised membranes that are considered dead or dying. Stained cells were exposed to different concentrations of trichloroethylene (TCE) and toluene in sealed vials. Change in the concentrations of green and red cells were monitored over the time using fluorescence microscopy. UTHSCSA ImageTool software was used to count the live and dead cells in the images. It was observed that live (green) cell concentrations decreased and dead/damaged (red) cell concentrations increased over time when cells were exposed to TCE. No significant changes were observed in control experiments. Death rate constants calculated based on live cell

  4. Inhalation pharmacokinetics of ethylbenzene in B6C3F1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Charest-Tardif, G.; Tardif, R.; Krishnan, K. . E-mail: Kannan.krishnan@umontreal.ca

    2006-01-15

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the inhalation pharmacokinetics of ethylbenzene (EB) in male and female B6C3F1 mice following single and repeated exposures. Initially, groups of 28 male and female mice were exposed for 4 h to 75, 200, 500, or 1000 ppm in order to determine potential non-linearity in the kinetics of EB. Then, groups of male and female mice were exposed for 6 h to 75 ppm and 750 ppm (corresponding to the NTP exposures) for 1 or 7 consecutive days, to evaluate whether EB kinetics was altered during repeated exposures, The maximal blood concentration (C {sub max}; mean {+-} SD, n = 4) observed in female mice at the end of a 4-h exposure to 75, 200, 500, and 1000 ppm was 0.53 {+-} 0.18, 2.26 {+-} 0.38, 19.17 {+-} 2.74, and 82.36 {+-} 16.66 mg/L, respectively. The areas under the concentration vs. time curve (AUCs) following 4-h exposure to 75, 200, 500, and 1000 ppm were 88.5, 414.0, 3612.2, and 19,104.1 mg/L/min, respectively, in female mice, and 116.7, 425.7, 3148.3, and 16,039.1 mg/L/min in male mice. The comparison of C {sub max} and the kinetic profile of EB in mice exposed to 75 ppm suggests that they are similar between 1-day and 7-day exposures. However, at 750 ppm, the rate of EB elimination would appear to be greater after repeated exposures than single exposure, the pattern being evident in both male and female mice. Overall, the single and repeated exposure pharmacokinetic data collected in the present study suggest that EB kinetics is saturable at exposure concentrations exceeding 500 ppm (and therefore at 750 ppm used in the NTP mouse cancer bioassay) but is in the linear range at the lower concentration used in the bioassay (75 ppm). These data suggest that consideration of the nature and magnitude of non-linear kinetics and induction of metabolism during repeated exposures is essential for the conduct of a scientifically sound analysis of EB cancer dose-response data collected in B6C3F1 mice.

  5. Quantitative Genomics of 30 Complex Phenotypes in Wagyu x Angus F1 Progeny

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lifan; Michal, Jennifer J.; O'Fallon, James V.; Pan, Zengxiang; Gaskins, Charles T.; Reeves, Jerry J.; Busboom, Jan R.; Zhou, Xiang; Ding, Bo; Dodson, Michael V.; Jiang, Zhihua

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a total of 91 genes involved in various pathways were investigated for their associations with six carcass traits and twenty-four fatty acid composition phenotypes in a Wagyu×Angus reference population, including 43 Wagyu bulls and their potential 791 F1 progeny. Of the 182 SNPs evaluated, 102 SNPs that were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium with minor allele frequencies (MAF>0.15) were selected for parentage assignment and association studies with these quantitative traits. The parentage assignment revealed that 40 of 43 Wagyu sires produced over 96.71% of the calves in the population. Linkage disequilibrium analysis identified 75 of 102 SNPs derived from 54 genes as tagged SNPs. After Bonferroni correction, single-marker analysis revealed a total of 113 significant associations between 44 genes and 29 phenotypes (adjusted P<0.05). Multiple-marker analysis confirmed single-gene associations for 10 traits, but revealed two-gene networks for 9 traits and three-gene networks for 8 traits. Particularly, we observed that TNF (tumor necrosis factor) gene is significantly associated with both beef marbling score (P=0.0016) and palmitic acid (C16:0) (P=0.0043), RCAN1 (regulator of calcineurin 1) with rib-eye area (P=0.0103), ASB3 (ankyrin repeat and SOCS box-containing 3) with backfat (P=0.0392), ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette A1) with both palmitic acid (C16:0) (P=0.0025) and oleic acid (C18:1n9) (P=0.0114), SLC27A1(solute carrier family 27 A1) with oleic acid (C18:1n9) (P=0.0155), CRH (corticotropin releasing hormone) with both linolenic acid (OMEGA-3) (P=0.0200) and OMEGA 6:3 RATIO (P=0.0054), SLC27A2 (solute carrier family 27 A2) with both linoleic acid (OMEGA-6) (P=0.0121) and FAT (P=0.0333), GNG3 (guanine nucleotide binding protein gamma 3 with desaturase 9 (P=0.0115), and EFEMP1 (EGF containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1), PLTP (phospholipid transfer protein) and DSEL (dermatan sulfate epimerase-like) with conjugated linoleic acid

  6. Asymmetric hybridization in Rhododendron agastum: a hybrid taxon comprising mainly F1s in Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Hong-Guang; Milne, Richard I.; Sun, Hang

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Rhododendron (Ericaceae) is a large woody genus in which hybridization is thought to play an important role in evolution and speciation, particularly in the Sino-Himalaya region where many interfertile species often occur sympatrically. Rhododendron agastum, a putative hybrid species, occurs in China, western Yunnan Province, in mixed populations with R. irroratum and R. delavayi. Methods Material of these taxa from two sites 400 km apart (ZhuJianYuan, ZJY and HuaDianBa, HDB) was examined using cpDNA and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences, and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) loci, to test the possibility that R. agastum was in fact a hybrid between two of the other species. Chloroplast trnL-F and trnS-trnG sequences together distinguished R. irroratum, R. delavayi and some material of R. decorum, which is also considered a putative parent of R. agastum. Key Results All 14 R. agastum plants from the HDB site had the delavayi cpDNA haplotype, whereas at the ZJY site 17 R. agastum plants had this haplotype and four had the R. irroratum haplotype. R. irroratum and R. delavayi are distinguished by five unequivocal point mutations in their ITS sequences; every R. agastum accession had an additive pattern (double peaks) at each of these sites. Data from AFLP loci were acquired for between ten and 21 plants of each taxon from each site, and were analysed using a Bayesian approach implemented by the program NewHybrids. The program confirmed the identity of all accessions of R. delavayi, and all R. irroratum except one, which was probably a backcross. All R. agastum from HDB and 19 of 21 from ZJY were classified as F1 hybrids; the other two could not be assigned a class. Conclusions Rhododendron agastum represents populations of hybrids between R. irroratum and R. delavayi, which comprise mostly or only F1s, at the two sites examined. The sites differ in that at HDB there was no detected variation in cpDNA type or hybrid class

  7. The alpha channeling effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-10

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  8. 17 CFR 270.27f-1 - Notice of right of withdrawal required to be mailed to periodic payment plan certificate holders...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... required to be mailed to periodic payment plan certificate holders and exemption from section 27(f) for certain periodic payment plan certificates. 270.27f-1 Section 270.27f-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....27f-1 Notice of right of withdrawal required to be mailed to periodic payment plan certificate...

  9. 17 CFR 270.27f-1 - Notice of right of withdrawal required to be mailed to periodic payment plan certificate holders...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... required to be mailed to periodic payment plan certificate holders and exemption from section 27(f) for certain periodic payment plan certificates. 270.27f-1 Section 270.27f-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....27f-1 Notice of right of withdrawal required to be mailed to periodic payment plan certificate...

  10. 17 CFR 270.27f-1 - Notice of right of withdrawal required to be mailed to periodic payment plan certificate holders...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... required to be mailed to periodic payment plan certificate holders and exemption from section 27(f) for certain periodic payment plan certificates. 270.27f-1 Section 270.27f-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....27f-1 Notice of right of withdrawal required to be mailed to periodic payment plan certificate...

  11. 17 CFR 270.27f-1 - Notice of right of withdrawal required to be mailed to periodic payment plan certificate holders...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... required to be mailed to periodic payment plan certificate holders and exemption from section 27(f) for certain periodic payment plan certificates. 270.27f-1 Section 270.27f-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....27f-1 Notice of right of withdrawal required to be mailed to periodic payment plan certificate...

  12. 17 CFR 270.27f-1 - Notice of right of withdrawal required to be mailed to periodic payment plan certificate holders...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... required to be mailed to periodic payment plan certificate holders and exemption from section 27(f) for certain periodic payment plan certificates. 270.27f-1 Section 270.27f-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....27f-1 Notice of right of withdrawal required to be mailed to periodic payment plan certificate...

  13. 40 CFR Table F-1 to Subpart F of... - Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production F Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98... GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production Pt. 98, Subpt. F, Table F-1 Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98—Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum...

  14. 40 CFR Table F-1 to Subpart F of... - Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production F Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98... GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production Pt. 98, Subpt. F, Table F-1 Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98—Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum...

  15. 40 CFR Table F-1 to Subpart F of... - Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production F Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98... GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production Pt. 98, Subpt. F, Table F-1 Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98—Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum...

  16. 40 CFR Table F-1 to Subpart F of... - Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production F Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98... GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production Pt. 98, Subpt. F, Table F-1 Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98—Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum...

  17. Inheritance of steroid-independent male sexual behavior in male offspring of B6D2F1 mice.

    PubMed

    McInnis, Christine M; Bonthuis, Paul J; Rissman, Emilie F; Park, Jin Ho

    2016-04-01

    The importance of gonadal steroids in modulating male sexual behavior is well established. Individual differences in male sexual behavior, independent of gonadal steroids, are prevalent across a wide range of species, including man. However, the genetic mechanisms underlying steroid-independent male sexual behavior are poorly understood. A high proportion of B6D2F1 hybrid male mice demonstrates steroid-independent male sexual behavior (identified as "maters"), providing a mouse model that opens up avenues of investigation into the mechanisms regulating male sexual behavior in the absence of gonadal hormones. Recent studies have revealed several proteins that play a significant factor in regulating steroid-independent male sexual behavior in B6D2F1 male mice, including amyloid precursor protein (APP), tau, and synaptophysin. The specific goals of our study were to determine whether steroid-independent male sexual behavior was a heritable trait by determining if it was dependent upon the behavioral phenotype of the B6D2F1 sire, and whether the differential expression of APP, tau, and synaptophysin in the medial preoptic area found in the B6D2F1 sires that did and did not mate after gonadectomy was similar to those found in their male offspring. After adult B6D2F1 male mice were bred with C57BL/6J female mice, they and their male offspring (BXB1) were orchidectomized and identified as either maters or "non-maters". A significant proportion of the BXB1 maters was sired only from B6D2F1 maters, indicating that the steroid-independent male sexual behavior behavioral phenotype of the B6D2F1 hybrid males, when crossed with C57BL/6J female mice, is inherited by their male offspring. Additionally, APP, tau, and synaptophysin were elevated in in the medial preoptic area in both the B6D2F1 and BXB1 maters relative to the B6D2F1 and BXB1 non-maters, respectively, suggesting a potential genetic mechanism for the inheritance of steroid-independent male sexual behavior. PMID

  18. A Catalytic Role of XoxF1 as La3+-Dependent Methanol Dehydrogenase in Methylobacterium extorquens Strain AM1

    PubMed Central

    Sasa, Kentaro; Tashiro, Shinya; Iwama, Tomonori; Hayakawa, Takashi; Kawai, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    In the methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacterium extorquens strain AM1, MxaF, a Ca2+-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (MDH), is the main enzyme catalyzing methanol oxidation during growth on methanol. The genome of strain AM1 contains another MDH gene homologue, xoxF1, whose function in methanol metabolism has remained unclear. In this work, we show that XoxF1 also functions as an MDH and is La3+-dependent. Despite the absence of Ca2+ in the medium strain AM1 was able to grow on methanol in the presence of La3+. Addition of La3+ increased MDH activity but the addition had no effect on mxaF or xoxF1 expression level. We purified MDH from strain AM1 grown on methanol in the presence of La3+, and its N-terminal amino acid sequence corresponded to that of XoxF1. The enzyme contained La3+ as a cofactor. The ΔmxaF mutant strain could not grow on methanol in the presence of Ca2+, but was able to grow after supplementation with La3+. Taken together, these results show that XoxF1 participates in methanol metabolism as a La3+-dependent MDH in strain AM1. PMID:23209751

  19. The F0F1-ATP Synthase Complex Contains Novel Subunits and Is Essential for Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Zíková, Alena; Schnaufer, Achim; Dalley, Rachel A.; Panigrahi, Aswini K.; Stuart, Kenneth D.

    2009-01-01

    The mitochondrial F0F1 ATP synthase is an essential multi-subunit protein complex in the vast majority of eukaryotes but little is known about its composition and role in Trypanosoma brucei, an early diverged eukaryotic pathogen. We purified the F0F1 ATP synthase by a combination of affinity purification, immunoprecipitation and blue-native gel electrophoresis and characterized its composition and function. We identified 22 proteins of which five are related to F1 subunits, three to F0 subunits, and 14 which have no obvious homology to proteins outside the kinetoplastids. RNAi silencing of expression of the F1 α subunit or either of the two novel proteins showed that they are each essential for the viability of procyclic (insect stage) cells and are important for the structural integrity of the F0F1-ATP synthase complex. We also observed a dramatic decrease in ATP production by oxidative phosphorylation after silencing expression of each of these proteins while substrate phosphorylation was not severely affected. Our procyclic T. brucei cells were sensitive to the ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin even in the presence of glucose contrary to earlier reports. Hence, the two novel proteins appear essential for the structural organization of the functional complex and regulation of mitochondrial energy generation in these organisms is more complicated than previously thought. PMID:19436713

  20. Immunodeficiency in RFM/(T6xRFM)F1 mouse chimaeras with lethal host-versus-graft syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Hard, R C; Montour, J L; Fuchs, B A

    1995-01-01

    Rather than central tolerance, the perinatal inoculation of related F1 hybrid spleen cells into inbred mice may result in host-versus-graft (HVG) reactions manifested as transient autoimmunity, or as a lethal immunodeficiency syndrome. RFM/(T6xRFM)F1 chimaeras with lethal disease die in 30 days with lymphosplenomegaly, immune complexes and impaired immune responses. The present studies used in vitro proliferation assays to show that the HVG reaction caused hyperplasia sufficient to account for the lymphosplenomegaly, while also causing severe impairment of splenic and nodal cell responses to concanavalin A (Con A) and to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). By 25 days, HVG mice could not distinguish between self and non-self as judged by mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) to RFM, (T6xRFM)F1 and third party A/J cells. There were no indications that host cells reactive to F1 donor cells had undergone clonal deletion, anergy or expansion. Flow cytometry revealed that donor T lymphocytes achieved stable engraftment, mostly in the nodes, despite the HVG reaction. Taken together with previous observations, these studies showed that HVG reactions in young parent F1/chimaeras can result in an immunodeficiency state which is characterized by an early appearing, profound and persistent impairment of both host and donor T and B cell functions. The results suggest that HVG reactions can contribute directly to immune deficits seen after clinical allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. PMID:7743676

  1. Exacerbating effects of human parvovirus B19 NS1 on liver fibrosis in NZB/W F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tsai-Ching; Tsai, Chun-Chou; Chiu, Chun-Ching; Hsu, Jeng-Dong; Tzang, Bor-Show

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder with unknown etiology that impacts various organs including liver. Recently, human parvovirus B19 (B19) is recognized to exacerbate SLE. However, the effects of B19 on liver in SLE are still unclear. Herein we aimed to investigate the effects of B19 on liver in NZB/W F1 mice by injecting subcutaneously with PBS, recombinant B19 NS1, VP1u or VP2, respectively. Our experimental results revealed that B19 NS1 protein significantly enhanced the TGF-β/Smad fibrotic signaling by increasing the expressions of TGF-β, Smad2/3, phosphorylated Smad2/3, Smad4 and Sp1. The consequent fibrosis-related proteins, PAI-1 and α-SMA, were also significantly induced in livers of NZB/W F1 mice receiving B19 NS1 protein. Accordingly, markedly increased collagen deposition was also observed in livers of NZB/W F1 mice receiving B19 NS1 protein. However, no significant difference was observed in livers of NZB/W F1 mice receiving B19 VP1u or VP2 as compared to the controls. These findings indicate that B19 NS1 plays a crucial role in exacerbating liver fibrosis in NZB/W F1 mice through enhancing the TGF-â/Smad fibrotic signaling. PMID:23840852

  2. The candidate tumor suppressor BTG3 is a transcriptional target of p53 that inhibits E2F1

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Yi-Hung; Chung, Pei-Han; Hsu, Fu-Fei; Sun, Te-Ping; Chang, Wen-Ying; Shieh, Sheau-Yann

    2007-01-01

    Proper regulation of cell cycle progression is pivotal for maintaining genome stability. In a search for DNA damage-inducible, CHK1-modulated genes, we have identified BTG3 (B-cell translocation gene 3) as a direct p53 target. The p53 transcription factor binds to a consensus sequence located in intron 2 of the gene both in vitro and in vivo, and depletion of p53 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) abolishes DNA damage-induced expression of the gene. Furthermore, ablation of BTG3 by siRNA in cancer cells results in accelerated exit from the DNA damage-induced G2/M block. In vitro, BTG3 binds to and inhibits E2F1 through an N-terminal domain including the conserved box A. Deletion of the interaction domain in BTG3 abrogates not only its growth suppression activity, but also its repression on E2F1-mediated transactivation. We also present evidence that by disrupting the DNA binding activity of E2F1, BTG3 participates in the regulation of E2F1 target gene expression. Therefore, our studies have revealed a previously unidentified pathway through which the activity of E2F1 may be guarded by activated p53. PMID:17690688

  3. An ester extract of Cochinchina momordica seeds induces differentiation of melanoma B16 F1 cells via MAPKs signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lian-Mei; Han, Li-Na; Ren, Feng-Zhi; Chen, Shu-Hong; Liu, Li-Hua; Wang, Ming-Xia; Sang, Mei-Xiang; Shan, Bao-En

    2012-01-01

    Cochinchina momordica seeds (CMS) have been widely used due to antitumor activity by Mongolian tribes of China. However, the details of the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In the present study, we found that an EtOAc (ethyl ester) extract of CMS (CMSEE) induced differentiation and caused growth inhibition of melanoma B16 F1 cells. CMSEE at the concentration of 5-200 μg/ml exhibited strongest anti-proliferative effects on B16 F1 cells among other CMS fractions (water or petroleum ether). Moreover, CMSEE induced melanoma B16 F1 cell differentiation, characterized by dendrite-like outgrowth, increasing melanogenesis production, as well as enhancing tyrosinase activity. Western blot analysis showed that sustained phosphorylation of p38 MAP accompanied by decrease in ERK1/2 and JNK dephosphorylation were involved in CMSEE-induced B16 F1 cell differentiation. Notably, 6 compounds that were isolated and identified may be responsible for inducing differentiation of CMSEE. These results indicated that CMSEE contributes to the differentiation of B16 F1 cells through modulating MAPKs activity, which may throw some light on the development of potentially therapeutic strategies for melanoma treatment. PMID:23098473

  4. Alpha-thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Harteveld, Cornelis L; Higgs, Douglas R

    2010-01-01

    Alpha-thalassaemia is inherited as an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by a microcytic hypochromic anaemia, and a clinical phenotype varying from almost asymptomatic to a lethal haemolytic anaemia.It is probably the most common monogenic gene disorder in the world and is especially frequent in Mediterranean countries, South-East Asia, Africa, the Middle East and in the Indian subcontinent. During the last few decades the incidence of alpha thalassaemia in North-European countries and Northern America has increased because of demographic changes. Compound heterozygotes and some homozygotes have a moderate to severe form of alpha thalassaemia called HbH disease. Hb Bart's hydrops foetalis is a lethal form in which no alpha-globin is synthesized. Alpha thalassaemia most frequently results from deletion of one or both alpha genes from the chromosome and can be classified according to its genotype/phenotype correlation. The normal complement of four functional alpha-globin genes may be decreased by 1, 2, 3 or all 4 copies of the genes, explaining the clinical variation and increasing severity of the disease. All affected individuals have a variable degree of anaemia (low Hb), reduced mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH/pg), reduced mean corpuscular volume (MCV/fl) and a normal/slightly reduced level of HbA2. Molecular analysis is usually required to confirm the haematological observations (especially in silent alpha-thalassaemia and alpha-thalassaemia trait). The predominant features in HbH disease are anaemia with variable amounts of HbH (0.8-40%). The type of mutation influences the clinical severity of HbH disease. The distinguishing features of the haemoglobin Bart's hydrops foetalis syndrome are the presence of Hb Bart's and the total absence of HbF. The mode of transmission of alpha thalassaemia is autosomal recessive. Genetic counselling is offered to couples at risk for HbH disease or haemoglobin Bart's Hydrops Foetalis Syndrome. Carriers of alpha+- or

  5. Effective Hamiltonian for non-leptonic |Delta F| = 1 decays at NNLO in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbahn, Martin; Haisch, Ulrich; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    The authors compute the effective hamiltonian for non-leptonic |{Delta}F| = 1 decays in the standard model including next-to-next-to-leading order QCD corrections. In particular, they present the complete three-loop anomalous dimension matrix describing the mixing of current-current and QCD penguin operators. The calculation is performed in an operator basis which allows to consistently use fully anticommuting {gamma}{sub 5} in dimensional regularization at an arbitrary number of loops. The renormalization scheme dependences and their cancellation in physical quantities is discussed in detail. Furthermore, they demonstrate how the results are transformed to a different basis of effective operators which is frequently adopted in phenomenological applications. They give all necessary two-loop constant terms which allow to obtain the three-loop anomalous dimensions and the corresponding initial conditions of the two-loop Wilson coefficients in the latter scheme. Finally, they solve the renormalization group equation and given the analytic expressions for the low-energy Wilson coefficients relevant for non-leptonic B meson decays beyond next-to-leading order in both renormalization schemes.

  6. Dominant NZB contributions to lupus in the (SWR x NZB)F1 model.

    PubMed

    Xie, S; Chang, S H; Sedrak, P; Kaliyaperumal, A; Datta, S K; Mohan, C

    2002-10-01

    (SWR x NZB)F1 (or SNF1) mice succumb to lupus nephritis. Analysis of NZB x SNF1 backcross mice has recently revealed the existence of four dominant SWR loci (H2 on Chr 17, Swrl-1 on Chr 1, Swrl-2 on Chr 14 and Swrl-3 on Chr 18), and two NZB loci (Nba1 and Lbw2/Sbw2, both on Chr 4) conferring lupus susceptibility. The present study focusing on a panel of 88 SWR x SNF1 backcross mice reveals the existence of five suggestive loci for antinuclear antibody formation, consisting of three dominant NZB contributions (Nba4 on Chr 5, Lbw4 on Chr 6, and Nba5 on Chr 7), and two recessive SWR contributions (Swrl-1 on Chr 1, and Swrl-4 on Chr 10). In addition, this study reveals a dominant NZB locus for GN (Nba3 on Chr 7, peak at 31 cM), and a dominant NZB locus linked to early mortality, on Chr 10 (peak at 4 cM). Collectively, these studies suggest that lupus in the SNF1 strain is the epistatic end-product of four dominant SWR loci and four dominant NZB loci. The immunological functions and molecular identities of these loci await elucidation. PMID:12215897

  7. Immunomodulation by classical conditioning in NZB/W (F1) mice: Lifespan and diurnal variation

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, Mario André Leocadio; Menna-Barreto, Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Eritematosus (SLE) is a systemic inflammatory disease often treated with the agent cyclophosphamide (CY), known by provoking important adverse reactions to the organism. Ader and Cohen have demonstrated an alternative way of administrating this agent based on pavlovian conditioning, in order to reduce the aggression caused by CY. Considering the influence of the temporal organization on learning and memory processes, the purpose of this study was to understand the temporal aspects involved in the conditioned immunomodulation. In a search for circadian modulation, we selected NZB/W (F1) female mice, a strain that spontaneously develop SLE. Divided into two major groups, the animals were submitted, in different phases of day, to a classical conditioning immunomodulation protocol, consisting in weekly parings of saccharin solution and CY injections. The success of the paradigm was evaluated by comparing lifespan among the groups. Simultaneously, it was monitored the water intake behavior, in order to correlate the stability of two rhythmic parameters, amplitude and spectral power density of the 24-h rhythm, with the progression of SLE. Our results indicate that mice could benefit from the conditioning task performed either in the light phase or in the dark phase of the LD cycle, as expressed by an increased lifespan. Concerning the rhythmic parameters, there was evidence of association between the rhythmic stability and the evolution of SLE, demonstrated by the maintenance of healthy levels of amplitude and spectral potency of the 24-h rhythm in animals exposed to the conditioning paradigm. PMID:27226820

  8. Immunomodulation by classical conditioning in NZB/W (F1) mice: Lifespan and diurnal variation.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Mario André Leocadio; Menna-Barreto, Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Eritematosus (SLE) is a systemic inflammatory disease often treated with the agent cyclophosphamide (CY), known by provoking important adverse reactions to the organism. Ader and Cohen have demonstrated an alternative way of administrating this agent based on pavlovian conditioning, in order to reduce the aggression caused by CY. Considering the influence of the temporal organization on learning and memory processes, the purpose of this study was to understand the temporal aspects involved in the conditioned immunomodulation. In a search for circadian modulation, we selected NZB/W (F1) female mice, a strain that spontaneously develop SLE. Divided into two major groups, the animals were submitted, in different phases of day, to a classical conditioning immunomodulation protocol, consisting in weekly parings of saccharin solution and CY injections. The success of the paradigm was evaluated by comparing lifespan among the groups. Simultaneously, it was monitored the water intake behavior, in order to correlate the stability of two rhythmic parameters, amplitude and spectral power density of the 24-h rhythm, with the progression of SLE. Our results indicate that mice could benefit from the conditioning task performed either in the light phase or in the dark phase of the LD cycle, as expressed by an increased lifespan. Concerning the rhythmic parameters, there was evidence of association between the rhythmic stability and the evolution of SLE, demonstrated by the maintenance of healthy levels of amplitude and spectral potency of the 24-h rhythm in animals exposed to the conditioning paradigm. PMID:27226820

  9. Controlled rotation of the F1-ATPase reveals differential and continuous binding changes for ATP synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Kengo; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Masasuke; Nishizaka, Takayuki; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    F1-ATPase is an ATP-driven rotary molecular motor that synthesizes ATP when rotated in reverse. To elucidate the mechanism of ATP synthesis, we imaged binding and release of fluorescently labelled ADP and ATP while rotating the motor in either direction by magnets. Here we report the binding and release rates for each of the three catalytic sites for 360° of the rotary angle. We show that the rates do not significantly depend on the rotary direction, indicating ATP synthesis by direct reversal of the hydrolysis-driven rotation. ADP and ATP are discriminated in angle-dependent binding, but not in release. Phosphate blocks ATP binding at angles where ADP binding is essential for ATP synthesis. In synthesis rotation, the affinity for ADP increases by >104, followed by a shift to high ATP affinity, and finally the affinity for ATP decreases by >104. All these angular changes are gradual, implicating tight coupling between the rotor angle and site affinities. PMID:22929779

  10. Addition of Aromatic Substrates Restores Trichloroethylene Degradation Activity in Pseudomonas putida F1

    PubMed Central

    Morono, Yuki; Unno, Hajime; Tanji, Yasunori; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2004-01-01

    The rate of trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation by toluene dioxygenase (TDO) in resting cells of Pseudomonas putida F1 gradually decreased and eventually stopped within 1.5 h, as in previous reports. However, the subsequent addition of toluene, which is the principal substrate of TDO, resulted in its immediate degradation without a lag phase. After the consumption of toluene, degradation of TCE restarted at a rate similar to its initial degradation, suggesting that this degradation was mediated by TDO molecules that were present before the cessation of TCE degradation. The addition of benzene and cumene, which are also substrates of TDO, also caused restoration of TCE degradation activity: TCE was degraded simultaneously with cumene, and a larger amount of TCE was degraded after cumene was added than after toluene or benzene was added. But substrates that were expected to supply the cells with NADH or energy did not restore TCE degradation activity. This cycle of pseudoinactivation and restoration of TCE degradation was observed repeatedly without a significant decrease in the number of viable cells, even after six additions of toluene spread over 30 h. The results obtained in this study demonstrate a new type of restoration of TCE degradation that has not been previously reported. PMID:15128539

  11. Redeployment of Myc and E2f1-3 drives Rb-deficient cell cycles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huayang; Tang, Xing; Srivastava, Arunima; Pécot, Thierry; Daniel, Piotr; Hemmelgarn, Benjamin; Reyes, Stephan; Fackler, Nicholas; Bajwa, Amneet; Kladney, Raleigh; Koivisto, Christopher; Chen, Zhong; Wang, Qianben; Huang, Kun; Machiraju, Raghu; Sáenz-Robles, Maria Teresa; Cantalupo, Paul; Pipas, James M; Leone, Gustavo

    2015-08-01

    Robust mechanisms to control cell proliferation have evolved to maintain the integrity of organ architecture. Here, we investigated how two critical proliferative pathways, Myc and E2f, are integrated to control cell cycles in normal and Rb-deficient cells using a murine intestinal model. We show that Myc and E2f1-3 have little impact on normal G1-S transitions. Instead, they synergistically control an S-G2 transcriptional program required for normal cell divisions and maintaining crypt-villus integrity. Surprisingly, Rb deficiency results in the Myc-dependent accumulation of E2f3 protein and chromatin repositioning of both Myc and E2f3, leading to the 'super activation' of a G1-S transcriptional program, ectopic S phase entry and rampant cell proliferation. These findings reveal that Rb-deficient cells hijack and redeploy Myc and E2f3 from an S-G2 program essential for normal cell cycles to a G1-S program that re-engages ectopic cell cycles, exposing an unanticipated addiction of Rb-null cells on Myc. PMID:26192440

  12. Design of reimaging F/1.0 long-wavelength infrared optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Liu, Bo; Jia, Hong-guang

    2011-08-01

    A reimaging F/1.0 long-wavelength infrared optical system is proposed. The design has a flexible opto-mechanical layout. The design process is as follows. Firstly, the catadioptric reimaging system consists of two reflecting mirrors and a relay lenses. Two reflecting mirrors make up of the first imaging system and are therefore free of chromatic aberrations, while low dispersion lenses were used in the reimaging system, so the optical system do not need achromatic design for a high image quality. Then, to correct high-order aberrations resulting from large relative aperture, more parameters need to be used with aspheric or diffractive surfaces due to modern optic technology development. Here, aspheric is selected for easily manufacture. Finally, the design is completed with the help of ZEMAX software. The effective focal length of the objective is 120mm and the field of view (FOV) is 4°. The simulated final design shows adequate image quality and the modulation transfer function (MTF) is close to diffraction limit. The effect of the surrounding environmental temperature is analyzed using the concept of thermal defocusing, and the thermal compensation is discussed.

  13. Explorations of Magnetic Phases in F = 1 Rubidium-87 Spinor Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Jennie Sara

    Spinor Bose Einstein condensates have widely been sought after as perfect emulators of condensed matter phenomena, providing widely tunable and highly controlled systems. Utilizing a novel spin sensitive phase contrast imaging technique, the vector magnetization is measured in-situ with high spatial and temporal resolution and applied to a number of experiments. Using optically trapped F = 1 87Rb spinor condensates, the equilibrium phase diagram of a spin-1 Bose gas is quantitatively explored by observing the evolution of unmagnetized spin textures and their thermal equilibrium properties. Spin domain coarsening and a strong dependence of the spin configuration on the quadratic Zeeman shift is observed, supporting the predicted mean-field equilibrium phase diagram for small values of the quadratic shift. Additionally, spinor Bose gases are demonstrated to be an effective tool in calibrating and characterizing experimental imaging systems. Sinusoidal test patterns of varying pitch are created and used to extract the modulation transfer function and quantify optical aberrations which are of immense importance in systems which claim to have high spatial resolution. Lastly we realize an optical kagome geometry in a two-dimensional optical superlattice with a scalar Bose gases. The optical superlattice can be tuned between various geometries, including kagome, one-dimensional stripe, and decorated triangular lattice. Using atom optics we characterize the various geometries and demonstrate the versatility of this optical superlattice. The kagome geometry presents a new experimental arena for studies of geometrically frustrated systems.

  14. Thermodynamics and kinetics of the FoF1-ATPase: application of the probability isotherm.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Brian; Loiselle, Denis

    2016-02-01

    We use the results of recent publications as vehicles with which to discuss the thermodynamics of the proton-driven mitochondrial F o F1-ATP synthase, focusing particularly on the possibility that there may be dissociation between rotatory steps and ATP synthesis/hydrolysis. Such stoichiometric 'slippage' has been invoked in the literature to explain observed non-ideal behaviour. Numerical solution of the Rate Isotherm (the kinetic equivalent of the more fundamental Probability Isotherm) suggests that such 'slippage' is an unlikely explanation; instead, we suggest that the experimental results may be more consistent with damage to the enzyme caused by its isolation from the biomembrane and its experimental fixation, resulting in non-physiological friction within the enzyme's rotary mechanism. We emphasize the unavoidable constraint of the Second Law as instantiated by the obligatory dissipation of Gibbs Free Energy if the synthase is to operate at anything other than thermodynamic equilibrium. We use further numerical solution of the Rate Isotherm to demonstrate that there is no necessary association of low thermodynamic efficiency with high metabolic rates in a bio-world in which the dominating mechanism of metabolic control is multifactorial enzyme activation. PMID:26998316

  15. Collisional spin evolution in microwave-dressed F=1 spinor Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qimin; Nematollahi, Delaram; Schwettmann, Arne; Tiesinga, Eite

    2016-05-01

    Spin-exchange collisions in F=1 spinor Bose-Einstein condensates, where two atoms with magnetic quantum number m=0 collide and change into a pair with m=+/-1, are useful to implement matter-wave quantum optics in spin space, because the collisions generate entanglement and they can be precisely controlled using microwave dressing. Here, we numerically investigate the collisional evolution of spin populations in a single spatial mode for different initial superposition states and applied microwave pulse sequences. To find the parameter regime where quantum effects dominate, we compare results from our fully quantum simulation involving a large basis set to those obtained from a semi-classical model based on quasi-probability distributions. Our simulations are motivated by our planned experiments on matter-wave quantum optics in this system, including the creation and characterization of two-mode squeezing between the m = +/-1 spin projections as well as the construction of a nonlinear spin-exchange based interferometer to measure phase with uncertainties that improve upon the shot-noise limit in the number of atoms in the m = +/-1 states. We acknowledge support of the Vice President for Research of the University of Oklahoma.

  16. Measurement of the inertial properties of the Helios F-1 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayman, W. H.

    1975-01-01

    A gravity pendulum method of measuring lateral moments of inertia of large structures with an error of less than 1% is outlined. The method is based on the fact that in a physical pendulum with a knife-edge support the distance from the axis of rotation to the system center of gravity determines the minimal period of oscillation and is equal to the system centroidal radius of gyration. The method is applied to results of a test procedure in which the Helios F-1 spacecraft was placed in a roll fixture with crossed flexure pivots as elastic constraints and system oscillation measurements were made with each of a set of added moment-of-inertia increments. Equations of motion are derived with allowance for the effect of the finite pivot radius and an error analysis is carried out to find the criterion for maximum accuracy in determining the square of the centroidal radius of gyration. The test procedure allows all measurements to be made with the specimen in upright position.

  17. Metabolic Trade-offs in Yeast are Caused by F1F0-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Avlant; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Intermediary metabolism provides living cells with free energy and precursor metabolites required for synthesizing proteins, lipids, RNA and other cellular constituents, and it is highly conserved among living species. Only a fraction of cellular protein can, however, be allocated to enzymes of intermediary metabolism and consequently metabolic trade-offs may take place. One such trade-off, aerobic fermentation, occurs in both yeast (the Crabtree effect) and cancer cells (the Warburg effect) and has been a scientific challenge for decades. Here we show, using flux balance analysis combined with in vitro measured enzyme specific activities, that fermentation is more catalytically efficient than respiration, i.e. it produces more ATP per protein mass. And that the switch to fermentation at high growth rates therefore is a consequence of a high ATP production rate, provided by a limited pool of enzymes. The catalytic efficiency is also higher for cells grown on glucose compared to galactose and ethanol, which may explain the observed differences in their growth rates. The enzyme F1F0-ATP synthase (Complex V) was found to have flux control over respiration in the model, and since it is evolutionary conserved, we expect the trade-off to occur in organisms from all kingdoms of life. PMID:26928598

  18. Metabolic Trade-offs in Yeast are Caused by F1F0-ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Avlant; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Intermediary metabolism provides living cells with free energy and precursor metabolites required for synthesizing proteins, lipids, RNA and other cellular constituents, and it is highly conserved among living species. Only a fraction of cellular protein can, however, be allocated to enzymes of intermediary metabolism and consequently metabolic trade-offs may take place. One such trade-off, aerobic fermentation, occurs in both yeast (the Crabtree effect) and cancer cells (the Warburg effect) and has been a scientific challenge for decades. Here we show, using flux balance analysis combined with in vitro measured enzyme specific activities, that fermentation is more catalytically efficient than respiration, i.e. it produces more ATP per protein mass. And that the switch to fermentation at high growth rates therefore is a consequence of a high ATP production rate, provided by a limited pool of enzymes. The catalytic efficiency is also higher for cells grown on glucose compared to galactose and ethanol, which may explain the observed differences in their growth rates. The enzyme F1F0-ATP synthase (Complex V) was found to have flux control over respiration in the model, and since it is evolutionary conserved, we expect the trade-off to occur in organisms from all kingdoms of life. PMID:26928598

  19. Hormone-regulated defense and stress response networks contribute to heterosis in Arabidopsis F1 hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Groszmann, Michael; Gonzalez-Bayon, Rebeca; Lyons, Rebecca L.; Greaves, Ian K.; Kazan, Kemal; Peacock, W. James; Dennis, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    Plant hybrids are extensively used in agriculture to deliver increases in yields, yet the molecular basis of their superior performance (heterosis) is not well understood. Our transcriptome analysis of a number of Arabidopsis F1 hybrids identified changes to defense and stress response gene expression consistent with a reduction in basal defense levels. Given the reported antagonism between plant immunity and growth, we suggest that these altered patterns of expression contribute to the greater growth of the hybrids. The altered patterns of expression in the hybrids indicate decreases to the salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis pathway and increases in the auxin [indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)] biosynthesis pathway. SA and IAA are hormones known to control stress and defense responses as well as plant growth. We found that IAA-targeted gene activity is frequently increased in hybrids, correlating with a common heterotic phenotype of greater leaf cell numbers. Reduced SA concentration and target gene responses occur in the larger hybrids and promote increased leaf cell size. We demonstrated the importance of SA action to the hybrid phenotype by manipulating endogenous SA concentrations. Increasing SA diminished heterosis in SA-reduced hybrids, whereas decreasing SA promoted growth in some hybrids and phenocopied aspects of hybrid vigor in parental lines. Pseudomonas syringae infection of hybrids demonstrated that the reductions in basal defense gene activity in these hybrids does not necessarily compromise their ability to mount a defense response comparable to the parents. PMID:26527659

  20. Distribution of Fitness Effects Caused by Single-Nucleotide Substitutions in Bacteriophage f1

    PubMed Central

    Peris, Joan B.; Davis, Paulina; Cuevas, José M.; Nebot, Miguel R.; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Empirical knowledge of the fitness effects of mutations is important for understanding many evolutionary processes, yet this knowledge is often hampered by several sources of measurement error and bias. Most of these problems can be solved using site-directed mutagenesis to engineer single mutations, an approach particularly suited for viruses due to their small genomes. Here, we used this technique to measure the fitness effect of 100 single-nucleotide substitutions in the bacteriophage f1, a filamentous single-strand DNA virus. We found that approximately one-fifth of all mutations are lethal. Viable ones reduced fitness by 11% on average and were accurately described by a log-normal distribution. More than 90% of synonymous substitutions were selectively neutral, while those affecting intergenic regions reduced fitness by 14% on average. Mutations leading to amino acid substitutions had an overall mean deleterious effect of 37%, which increased to 45% for those changing the amino acid polarity. Interestingly, mutations affecting early steps of the infection cycle tended to be more deleterious than those affecting late steps. Finally, we observed at least two beneficial mutations. Our results confirm that high mutational sensitivity is a general property of viruses with small genomes, including RNA and single-strand DNA viruses infecting animals, plants, and bacteria. PMID:20382832

  1. Growth performances of F1 Angus Plus calves grazing on pasture in Hawaii's tropical climate.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Ferreira, R; Duponte, M W; Fukumoto, G K; Zhao, B

    2009-04-01

    Angus Plus cattle offer advantages for heat tolerance and forage utilization by introduction of Brangus and Brahman to Angus. To evaluate its adaptability in Hawaii Islands, we reported the growth performances of 213 F1 Angus Plus calve grazing on pasture. Least-square means of pre-weaning ADG ranged from 1,087 to 1,167 g in bull calves and from 1,030 to 1,048 g in heifer calves. The 205 d-adjusted weaning weight were 226 to 285 kg in bulls and 214 to 252 kg in heifers. The birth weight and hip height at birth were significantly correlated with weaning weight, 205 d-adjusted weaning weight, hip height at weaning and pre-weaning ADG (P < 0.01). Sire group significantly influenced pre-weaning growth performances through interaction with sex of calf. Bull calves from sire group of high growth were 1.0-3.8 kg heavier in birth weight than the bull calves from other sires (P < 0.001). Sire group x sex interaction was significant (P < 0.05) for calf birth weight, 205-d adjusted weaning weight and pre-weaning ADG. Sire group also played a significant role in hip height at birth (P < 0.05). Selections of the sires preferable for growth significantly improved calf pre-weaning growth performances. PMID:18759132

  2. [Quantitive variation of polysaccharides and alcohol-soluble extracts in F1 generation of Dendrobium officinale].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Jing-Jing; Wu, Ling-Shang; Si, Jin-Ping; Guo, Ying-Ying; Yu, Jie; Wang, Lin-Hua

    2013-11-01

    Using phenol-sulfuric acid method and hot-dip method of alcohol-soluble extracts, the contents of polysaccharides and alcohol-soluble extracts in 11 F1 generations of Dendrobium officinale were determined. The results showed that the polysaccharides contents in samples collected in May and February were 32.89%-43.07% and 25.77%-35.25%, respectively, while the extracts contents were 2.81%-4.85% and 7.90%-17.40%, respectively. They were significantly different among families. The content of polysaccharides in offspring could be significantly improved by hybridization between parents with low and high polysaccharides contents, and the hybrid vigor was obvious. Cross breeding was an effective way for breeding new varieties with higher polysaccharides contents. Harvest time would significantly affect the contents of polysaccharides and alcohol-soluble extracts. The contents of polysaccharides in families collected in May were higher than those of polysaccharides in families collected in February, but the extracts content had the opposite variation. The extents of quantitative variation of polysaccharides and alcohol-soluble extracts were different among families, and each family had its own rules. It would be significant in giving full play to their role as the excellent varieties and increasing effectiveness by studying on the quantitative accumulation regularity of polysaccharides and alcohol-soluble extracts in superior families (varieties) of D. officinale to determine the best harvesting time. PMID:24494555

  3. [Field experiment of F1 generation and superior families selection of Dendrobium officinale].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Si, Jin-Ping; Wu, Ling-Shang; Guo, Ying-Ying; Yu, Jie; Wang, Lin-Hua

    2013-11-01

    Based on randomized block design of experiment, agronomic traits and yields of 14 F1 generations of Dendrobium officinale were determined. The results showed that the differences in agronomic traits and yields among families were significant, and the hybrid vigor was obvious. Families of 6b x 2a, 9 x 66 and 78 x 69 were selected with the remarkable superiority of yields, agronomic traits and product customization. Correlation analysis between agronomic traits and yields showed that plant height, stem diameter, leaf number, blade length and blade width were all significantly correlated with biological yields and economic yields. Among which, stem diameter, leaf number and blade length were the most significant, and an optimal linear regression model could be established. When the number of shoots was fewer than 4.5, both biological yields and economic yields increased with the increasing number of shoots, but it could not much affect yields when the number of shoots was larger than 4.5. Shoots number, stem diameter and leaf index were basic stability when compared biennial traits to annual, which could be used for early selection. PMID:24558865

  4. Mitochondrial F1F0-ATP synthase and organellar internal architecture.

    PubMed

    Velours, Jean; Dautant, Alain; Salin, Bénédicte; Sagot, Isabelle; Brèthes, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    The mitochondrial F(1)F(0)-ATP synthase adopts supramolecular structures. The interaction domains between monomers involve components belonging to the F(0) domains. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alteration of these components destabilizes the oligomeric structures, leading concomitantly to the appearance of monomeric species of ATP synthase and anomalous mitochondrial morphologies in the form of onion-like structures. The mitochondrial ultrastructure at the cristae level is thus modified. Electron microscopy on cross-sections of wild type mitochondria display many short cristae with narrowed intra-cristae space, whereas yeast mutants defected in supramolecular ATP synthases assembly present a low number of large lamellar cristae of constant thickness and traversing the whole organelle. The growth of these internal structures leads finally to mitochondria with sphere-like structures with a mean diameter of 1 microm that are easily identified by epifluorescence microscopy. As a result, ATP synthase is an actor of the mitochondrial ultrastructure in yeast. This paper reviews the ATP synthase components whose modifications lead to anomalous mitochondrial morphology and also provides a schema showing the formation of the so-called onion-like structures. PMID:19703649

  5. Redeployment of Myc and E2f1-3 drives Rb deficient cell cycles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huayang; Tang, Xing; Srivastava, Arunima; Pécot, Thierry; Daniel, Piotr; Hemmelgarn, Benjamin; Reyes, Stephan; Fackler, Nicholas; Bajwa, Amneet; Kladney, Raleigh; Koivisto, Christopher; Chen, Zhong; Wang, Qianben; Huang, Kun; Machiraju, Raghu; Sáenz-Robles, Maria Teresa; Cantalupo, Paul; Pipas, James M.; Leone, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Robust mechanisms to control cell proliferation have evolved to maintain the integrity of organ architecture. Here, we investigated how two critical proliferative pathways, Myc and E2f, are integrated to control cell cycles in normal and Rb deficient cells using a murine intestinal model. We show that Myc and E2f1-3 have little impact on normal G1-S transitions. Instead, they synergistically control an S-G2 transcriptional program required for normal cell divisions and maintaining crypt-villus integrity. Surprisingly, Rb deficiency results in the Myc-dependent accumulation of E2f3 protein and chromatin repositioning of both Myc and E2f3, leading to the ‘super activation’ of a G1-S transcriptional program, ectopic S phase entry and rampant cell proliferation. These findings reveal that Rb deficient cells hijack and redeploy Myc and E2f3 from an S-G2 program essential for normal cell cycles to a G1-S program that re-engages ectopic cell cycles, exposing an unanticipated addiction of Rb-null cells on Myc. PMID:26192440

  6. Identification of the mitochondrially encoded subunit 6 of F1FO ATPase in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Škodová-Sveráková, Ingrid; Horváth, Anton; Maslov, Dmitri A

    2015-06-01

    Kinetoplast maxicircle DNA of trypanosomatids encodes eighteen proteins. RNA editing is required to confer translatability to mRNA for twelve of these. Sequence conservation of the predicted hydrophobic polypeptides indicates that they represent functional components of the respiratory chain. Yet, so far only two of those, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and apocytochrome b of cytochrome c reductase, have been identified with biochemical methods. Here we report on identification of A6 subunit of F1FO ATPase encoded by a pan-edited mRNA in Trypanosoma brucei. The polypeptide was present among the (35)S-labeled mitochondrial translation products characterized by anomalous migration in denaturing 2D gels. It was identified as an ATPase subunit by co-migration with this complex in Blue Native 2D gels. A partial N-terminal sequence of the corresponding polypeptide present in the gel-purified ATPase complex from Leishmania tarentolae was consistent with the predicted A6 sequence. PMID:26276057

  7. Combining ability analysis over F1-F 5 generations in diallel crosses of bread wheat.

    PubMed

    Bhullar, G S; Gill, K S; Khehra, A S

    1979-03-01

    Combining ability studies for grain yield and its primary component traits in diallel crosses involving seven diverse wheat cultivars of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) over generations F1-F5 are reported. The general and specific combining ability variances were significant in all generations for all the traits except specific combining ability variance for number of spikes per plant in the F5. The ratio of general to specific combining ability variances was significant for all the traits except grain yield in all the generations. This indicated an equal role of additive and non-additive gene effects in the inheritance of grain yield, and the predominance of the former for its component traits. The presence of significant specific combining ability variances in even the advanced generations may be the result of an additive x additive type of epistasis or evolutionary divergence among progenies in the same parental array. The relative breeding values of the parental varieties, as indicated by their general combining ability effects, did not vary much over the generations. The cheap and reliable procedure observed for making the choice of parents, selecting hybrids and predicting advanced generation (F5) bulk hybrid performance was the determination of breeding values of the parents on the relative performance of their F2 progeny bulks. PMID:24306488

  8. Identification of the mitochondrially encoded subunit 6 of F1FO ATPase in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Škodová-Sveráková, Ingrid; Horváth, Anton; Maslov, Dmitri A.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetoplast maxicircle DNA of trypanosomatids encodes eighteen proteins. RNA editing is required to confer translatability to mRNA for twelve of these. Sequence conservation of the predicted hydrophobic polypeptides indicates that they represent functional components of the respiratory chain. Yet, so far only two of those, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and apocytochrome b of cytochrome c reductase, have been identified with biochemical methods. Here we report on identification of A6 subunit of F1FO ATPase encoded by a pan-edited mRNA in Trypanosoma brucei. The polypeptide was present among the 35S-labeled mitochondrial translation products characterized by anomalous migration in denaturing 2D gels. It was identified as an ATPase subunit by co-migration with this complex in Blue Native 2D gels. A partial N-terminal sequence of the corresponding polypeptide present in the gel-purified ATPase complex from Leishmania tarentolae was consistent with the predicted A6 sequence. PMID:26276057

  9. Thermodynamics and kinetics of the FoF1-ATPase: application of the probability isotherm

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Brian; Loiselle, Denis

    2016-01-01

    We use the results of recent publications as vehicles with which to discuss the thermodynamics of the proton-driven mitochondrial FoF1-ATP synthase, focusing particularly on the possibility that there may be dissociation between rotatory steps and ATP synthesis/hydrolysis. Such stoichiometric ‘slippage’ has been invoked in the literature to explain observed non-ideal behaviour. Numerical solution of the Rate Isotherm (the kinetic equivalent of the more fundamental Probability Isotherm) suggests that such ‘slippage’ is an unlikely explanation; instead, we suggest that the experimental results may be more consistent with damage to the enzyme caused by its isolation from the biomembrane and its experimental fixation, resulting in non-physiological friction within the enzyme's rotary mechanism. We emphasize the unavoidable constraint of the Second Law as instantiated by the obligatory dissipation of Gibbs Free Energy if the synthase is to operate at anything other than thermodynamic equilibrium. We use further numerical solution of the Rate Isotherm to demonstrate that there is no necessary association of low thermodynamic efficiency with high metabolic rates in a bio-world in which the dominating mechanism of metabolic control is multifactorial enzyme activation. PMID:26998316

  10. Biochemical Characterization and Agglutinating Properties of Xenorhabdus nematophilus F1 Fimbriae

    PubMed Central

    Moureaux, N.; Karjalainen, T.; Givaudan, A.; Bourlioux, P.; Boemare, N.

    1995-01-01

    Xenorhabdus spp., entomopathogenic bacteria symbiotically associated with nematodes of the family Steinernematidae, occur spontaneously in two phases. Only the phase I variants of Xenorhabdus nematophilus F1 expressed fimbriae when the bacteria were grown on a solid medium (nutrient agar; 24 and 48 h of growth). These appendages were purified and characterized. They were rigid, with a diameter of 6.4 (plusmn) 0.3 nm, and were composed of 16-kDa pilin subunits. The latter were synthesized and assembled during the first 24 h of growth. Phase II variants of X. nematophilus did not possess fimbriae and apparently did not synthesize pilin. Phase I variants of X. nematophilus have an agglutinating activity with sheep, rabbit, and human erythrocytes and with hemocytes of the insect Galleria mellonella. The purified fimbriae agglutinated sheep and rabbit erythrocytes. The hemagglutination by bacteria and purified fimbriae was mannose resistant and was inhibited by porcine gastric mucin and N-acetyl-lactosamine. The last sugar seems to be a specific inhibitor of hemagglutination by X. nematophilus. PMID:16535079

  11. Composition of the nighttime ionospheric F 1 region near the magnetic equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Rusch, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of vertical E x B transport on NO(+), O2(+) and O(+) densities in the nighttime equatorial ionospheric F 1 region are investigated. Ion densities are calculated as functions of altitude, latitude and local time by the numerical solution of coupled, time-dependent ion continuity equations, taking into account production, loss by charge exchange and dissociative recombination and transport by diffusion and E x B drift. The results of the calculations are compared with measurements of NO(+), O2(+) and O(+) ion densities obtained at low altitudes by a mass spectrometer on board the Atmospheric Explorer C satellite, and are found to be consistent with the observations, suggesting that in the equatorial region, vertical transport by E x B drift is primarily responsible for producing the observed NO(+), O2(+) and O(+) density profiles. In addition, the reaction of O2(+) with N(4S) is found to be an important sink for O2(+) and a source of NO(+) ions. Implications of the observed and calculated near constancy of electron and ion densities with altitude when NO(+) is the dominant ion on the growth of large-scale irregularities are also considered

  12. The acute mammalian toxicology of dibenz(b,f)-1,4-oxazepine.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, B

    1977-12-01

    Dibenz(b,f)-1,4-oxazepine (CR), a potent peripheral sensory irritant material, has been shown to have a very low acute lethal and sub-lethal toxicity by intravenous, intraperitoneal, oral, percutaneous and inhalation routes to several species of laboratory mammal. There was no organ-specific pathology. Comparison of the acute toxicity of CR with that of two other peripheral sensory irritants, 1-chloroacetophenone (CN) and 2-chlorobenzyl-lidene malononitrile (CS), shows CR to be significantly less toxic than either of them. Pyrotechnically generated CR smoke was more toxic than pure (thermally generated) aerosols of CR; this was due to the presence of pyrotechnic decomposition products in the atmosphere from the burning of the smoke generating composition. However, the median lethal toxicity of pyrotechnically generated CR smoke was very significantly less than that of either pyrotechnically generated CN or CS smokes. Short-term cumulative toxicity did not occur following multiple oral dosing with CR. The acute toxicology of three ether intermediates encountered in the synthesis of CR from 1-chloro-2-nitrobenzene and sodium phenoxide (2-nitrodiphenyl ether, 2-aminodiphenyl ether and 2-formamidodiphenyl ether) was investigated; all three ethers were found to be less acutely toxic than CR itself. PMID:339407

  13. 3D-localization microscopy and tracking of FoF1-ATP synthases in living bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renz, Anja; Renz, Marc; Klütsch, Diana; Deckers-Hebestreit, Gabriele; Börsch, Michael

    2015-03-01

    FoF1-ATP synthases are membrane-embedded protein machines that catalyze the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate. Using photoactivation-based localization microscopy (PALM) in TIR-illumination as well as structured illumination microscopy (SIM), we explore the spatial distribution and track single FoF1-ATP synthases in living E. coli cells under physiological conditions at different temperatures. For quantitative diffusion analysis by mean-squared-displacement measurements, the limited size of the observation area in the membrane with its significant membrane curvature has to be considered. Therefore, we applied a 'sliding observation window' approach (M. Renz et al., Proc. SPIE 8225, 2012) and obtained the one-dimensional diffusion coefficient of FoF1-ATP synthase diffusing on the long axis in living E. coli cells.

  14. Expressions and clinical significances of c-MET, p-MET and E2f-1 in human gastric carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To investigate on the expressions and the clinical significances of hepatocyte growth factor receptor (c-MET), phosphorylated c-MET (p-MET) and e2f-1 transcription factor in primary lesion of gastric adenocarcinoma (GC). Method Tissue samples from the primary lesion of GC in patients who accepted D2/D3 radical gastrectomy with R0/R1 resection were stained by immunohistochemistry of c-MET, p-MET, e2f-1 and Ki-67. The univariate and the multivariate analyses involving in clinicopathological parameters and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results The positivity rates for c-MET (66.12%, 80 cases/121 cases), p-MET (59.50%, 72 cases/121 cases), e2f-1 (38.84%, 47 cases/121 cases) and Ki-67 (72.73%, 88 cases/121 cases) in primary lesion of GC was significantly higher than that in non-cancerous tissue at 5 cm places far from the margin of primary lesion (P < 0.05, respectively). The deeper tumor invasion, the severer lymph node metastasis, the later stage of TNM and the higher expression of Ki-67 was respectively an independent risk factor for the higher expression of c-MET or p-MET, but the younger age and the shorter survival time was an independent risk factor for the higher expression of e2f-1 respectively. Survival analysis showed that the worse prognosis could be observed in the patients with the combination of both c-MET-positive and e2f-1-negative (P = 0.038) or both p-MET-positive and e2f-1-negative (P = 0.042). Cox analysis demonstrated that the severer lymphatic node metastasis and the higher positivity rate of c-MET, p-MET or e2f-1 were an independent prognosis factor respectively. The higher expression of e2f-1 was identified in patients with Stage I-II, which correlated with a shorter survival time. Survival analysis also revealed that the prognosis of patients with positive expression of e2f-1 at Stage I-II was significantly worse than that in patients with negative expression of e2f-1 (χ2 = 13.437, P = 0.001). However, in

  15. Noncompact three-dimensional quantum electrodynamics with N{sub f}=1 and N{sub f}=4

    SciTech Connect

    Hands, S.J.; Kogut, J.B.; Scorzato, L.; Strouthos, C.G.

    2004-09-01

    We present numerical results for noncompact three-dimensional quantum electrodynamics for numbers of flavors N{sub f}=1 and N{sub f}=4. In particular, we address the issue of whether chiral symmetry is spontaneously broken in the continuum limit, and obtain a positive answer for N{sub f}=1, with a dimensionless condensate estimated to be {beta}{sup 2}<{psi}{psi}>{approx_equal}O(10{sup -3}), implying that the critical number of flavors N{sub fc}>1. We also compare the N{sub f}=1 and N{sub f}=4 models by analyzing the transition from strong to weak coupling behavior using an equation of state based on a continuous phase transition. While some qualitative differences emerge, it appears difficult to determine whether N{sub f}=4 lies above or below N{sub fc}.

  16. Alpha- and gamma- tocopherol prevent age-related transcriptional alterations in the heart and brain of mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the global effects of vitamin E supplementation on aging, we used high density oligonucleotide arrays to measure transcriptional alterations in the heart and brain (neocortex) of 30-month-old B6C3F1 mice supplemented with alpha- and gamma-tocopherol since middle age (15 months). Gene ...

  17. Human embryonic stem cell-derived mesenchymal cells preserve kidney function and extend lifespan in NZB/W F1 mouse model of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Austin; Yavanian, Gregory; Nastke, Maria-Dorothea; Morales, Peter; Kouris, Nicholas A; Kimbrel, Erin A; Lanza, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Adult tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are showing promise in clinical trials for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, the inability to manufacture large quantities of functional cells from a single donor as well as donor-dependent variability in quality limits their clinical utility. Human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived MSCs are an alternative to adult MSCs that can circumvent issues regarding scalability and consistent quality due to their derivation from a renewable starting material. Here, we show that hESC-MSCs prevent the progression of fatal lupus nephritis (LN) in NZB/W F1 (BWF1) mice. Treatment led to statistically significant reductions in proteinuria and serum creatinine and preserved renal architecture. Specifically, hESC-MSC treatment prevented disease-associated interstitial inflammation, protein cast deposition, and infiltration of CD3(+) lymphocytes in the kidneys. This therapy also led to significant reductions in serum levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), two inflammatory cytokines associated with SLE. Mechanistically, in vitro data support these findings, as co-culture of hESC-MSCs with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BWF1 lymphocytes decreased lymphocyte secretion of TNFα and IL-6, and enhanced the percentage of putative regulatory T cells. This study represents an important step in the development of a commercially scalable and efficacious cell therapy for SLE/LN. PMID:26628350

  18. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha and multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Bhupendra Nath

    2016-01-01

    Rapid tumor growth creates a state of hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment and results in release of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HiF-1α) in the local milieu. Hypoxia inducible factor activity is deregulated in many human cancers, especially those that are highly hypoxic. In multiple myeloma (MM) in initial stages of disease establishment, the hypoxic bone marrow microenvironment supports the initial survival and growth of the myeloma cells. Hypoxic tumour cells are usually resistant to radiotherapy and most conventional chemotherapeutic agents, rendering them highly aggressive and metastatic. Therefore, HIF is an attractive, although challenging, therapeutic target in MM directly or indirectly in recent years. PMID:26900575

  19. E2F1 expression is deregulated and plays an oncogenic role in sporadic Burkitt’s lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Privado, Irene; Rodríguez-Martínez, María; Rebollo, Patricia; Martín-Pérez, Daniel; Artiga, María-Jesús; Menárguez, Javier; Flemington, Erik K.; Piris, Miguel A.; Campanero, Miguel R.

    2009-01-01

    Current treatments of sBL are associated with severe toxicities. A better understanding of sBL formation would facilitate development of less toxic therapies. The etiology of sporadic Burkitt’s lymphoma (sBL) remains however largely unknown, being C-MYC up-regulation the only lesion known to occur in all sBL cases. Several studies examining the role of C-MYC in the pathogenesis of BL have concluded that C-MYC translocation is not the only critical event and that additional unidentified factors are expected to be involved in the formation of this tumor. We herein report that a gene distinct from C-MYC, E2F1, is involved in the formation of all or most sBL tumors. We found that E2F1 is highly expressed in Burkitt’s lymphoma cell lines and sBL lymphoma specimens. Our data indicate that its elevated expression is not merely the consequence of the presence of more cycling cells in this tumor relative to other cell lines or to other neoplasias. In fact, we show that reduction of its expression in sBL cells inhibits tumor formation and decreases their proliferation rate. We also provide data suggesting that E2F1 collaborates with C-MYC in sBL formation. E2F1 expression down-regulation did not affect, however, proliferation of human primary diploid fibroblasts. Since E2F1 is not needed for cell proliferation of normal cells, our results reveal E2F1 as a promising therapeutic target for sBL. PMID:19406837

  20. Assessment of a recombinant F1-V fusion protein vaccine intended to protect Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) from plague

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, Lisa L.; Shenk, Tanya M.; Powell, Bradford; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2011-01-01

    As part of an ongoing restoration program in Colorado, USA, we evaluated adverse reactions and seroconversion in captive Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) after vaccination with a recombinant F1-V fusion protein vaccine against Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes plague. Ten adult female lynx received the F1-V vaccine; 10 source- and age-matched lynx remained unvaccinated as controls. All of the vaccinated and control lynx remained apparently healthy throughout the confinement period. We observed no evidence of injection site or systemic reactions to the F1-V vaccine. Among vaccinated lynx, differences in log10 reciprocal antibody titers measured in sera collected before and after vaccination (two doses) ranged from 1.2 to 5.2 for anti-F1 antibodies and from 0.6 to 5.2 for anti-V antibodies; titers in unvaccinated lynx did not change appreciably over the course of confinement prior to release, and thus differences in anti-F1 (P=0.003) and anti-V (P=0.0005) titers were greater among vaccinated lynx than among controls. Although our findings suggest that the F1-V fusion protein vaccine evaluated here is likely to stimulate antibody responses that may help protect Canada lynx from plague, we observed no apparent differences in survival between vaccinated and unvaccinated subject animals. Retrospectively, 22 of 50 (44%; 95% confidence interval 29–59%) unvaccinated lynx captured or recaptured in Colorado during 2000–08 had passive hemagglutination antibody titers >1:16, consistent with exposure to Y. pestis; paired pre- and postrelease titers available for eight of these animals showed titer increases similar in magnitude to those seen in response to vaccination, suggesting at least some lynx may naturally acquire immunity to plague in Colorado habitats.

  1. Recombinant V antigen protects mice against pneumonic and bubonic plague caused by F1-capsule-positive and -negative strains of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, G W; Leary, S E; Williamson, E D; Titball, R W; Welkos, S L; Worsham, P L; Friedlander, A M

    1996-01-01

    The purified recombinant V antigen from Yersinia pestis, expressed in Escherichia coli and adsorbed to aluminum hydroxide, an adjuvant approved for human use, was used to immunize outbred Hsd:ND4 mice subcutaneously. Immunization protected mice from lethal bubonic and pneumonic plague caused by CO92, a wild-type F1+ strain, or by the isogenic F1- strain C12. This work demonstrates that a subunit plague vaccine formulated for human use provides significant protection against bubonic plague caused by an F1- strain (C12) or against substantial aerosol challenges from either F1+ (CO92) or F1-(C12) Y. pestis. PMID:8890210

  2. Exclusive photoproduction of f1(1285) meson off the proton in kinematics available at the Jefferson Laboratory experimental facilities

    SciTech Connect

    N.I. Kochelev, M. Battaglieri, R. De Vita

    2009-08-01

    We calculated the exclusive f1(1285) meson photoproduction cross section at an energy of a few GeV within the Regge approach. The calculation shows that the cross section is sizable, being in the range of 100 nb, and much larger than the expected cross section of the eta(1295) meson photoproduction at the same energy. These two facts make it possible to use this reaction to study the poor known properties of the f1(1285) meson in the JLab kinematics.

  3. Steps towards 8m honeycomb mirrors. V - A method for polishing aspheres as fast as f/1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, J. R. P.

    1984-01-01

    The present method for the polishing of near-f/1 aspherics employs a lap whose shape is continuously changed under computer control as it moves over the rigid mirror blank. Required changes of radius, astigmatism, and coma in a circular lap are accomplished by means of edge-bending levers and tensioning members that use screw actuators. Attention is given to the case of an f/1, 8-m diameter paraboloid whose mirror blank has been cast in a centrifugally stressed, rotating furnace to within 1 mm of the desired optical figure. Attention is also given to the mechanical design of the active lap.

  4. Alpha Particle Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Ray, K.

    2009-05-13

    The study of burning plasmas is the next frontier in fusion energy research, and will be a major objective of the U.S. fusion program through U.S. collaboration with our international partners on the ITER Project. For DT magnetic fusion to be useful for energy production, it is essential that the energetic alpha particles produced by the fusion reactions be confined long enough to deposit a significant fraction of their initial ~3.5 MeV energy in the plasma before they are lost. Development of diagnostics to study the behavior of energetic confined alpha particles is a very important if not essential part of burning plasma research. Despite the clear need for these measurements, development of diagnostics to study confined the fast confined alphas to date has proven extremely difficult, and the available techniques remain for the most part unproven and with significant uncertainties. Research under this grant had the goal of developing diagnostics of fast confined alphas, primarily based on measurements of the neutron and ion tails resulting from alpha particle knock-on collisions with the plasma deuterium and tritium fuel ions. One of the strengths of this approach is the ability to measure the alphas in the hot plasma core where the interesting ignition physics will occur.

  5. Gamete fertility and ovule number variation in selfed reciprocal F1 hybrid triploid plants are heritable and display epigenetic parent-of-origin effects.

    PubMed

    Duszynska, Dorota; McKeown, Peter C; Juenger, Thomas E; Pietraszewska-Bogiel, Anna; Geelen, Danny; Spillane, Charles

    2013-04-01

    Polyploidy and hybridization play major roles in plant evolution and reproduction. To investigate the reproductive effects of polyploidy and hybridization in Arabidopsis thaliana, we analyzed fertility of reciprocal pairs of F1 hybrid triploids, generated by reciprocally crossing 89 diploid accessions to a tetraploid Ler-0 line. All F1 hybrid triploid genotypes exhibited dramatically reduced ovule fertility, while variation in ovule number per silique was observed across different F1 triploid genotypes. These two reproductive traits were negatively correlated suggesting a trade-off between increased ovule number and ovule fertility. Furthermore, the ovule fertility of the F1 hybrid triploids displayed both hybrid dysgenesis and hybrid advantage (heterosis) effects. Strikingly, both reproductive traits (ovule fertility, ovule number) displayed epigenetic parent-of-origin effects between genetically identical reciprocal F1 hybrid triploid pairs. In some F1 triploid genotypes, the maternal genome excess F1 hybrid triploid was more fertile, whilst for other accessions the paternal genome excess F1 hybrid triploid was more fertile. Male gametogenesis was not significantly disrupted in F1 triploids. Fertility variation in the F1 triploid A. thaliana is mainly the result of disrupted ovule development. Overall, we demonstrate that in F1 triploid plants both ovule fertility and ovule number are subject to parent-of-origin effects that are genome dosage-dependent. PMID:23368793

  6. Growth, puberty, and carcass characteristics of Brahman-, Senepol-, and Tuli-sired F1 Angus bulls.

    PubMed

    Chase, C C; Chenoweth, P J; Larsen, R E; Hammond, A C; Olson, T A; West, R L; Johnson, D D

    2001-08-01

    Postweaning growth, sexual development, libido, and carcass data were collected from two consecutive calf crops using 31 Brahman x Angus (B x A), 41 Senepol x Angus (S x A), and 38 Tuli x Angus (T x A) F1 bulls. Following weaning (by mid-September) and preconditioning, at the start of the study (late September) bulls were fed concentrate (three times each week at a rate equivalent to 4.5 kg/d) on bahiagrass pasture for approximately 250 d. At the start of the study and at 28-d intervals, BW, hip height, and scrotal circumference (SC) were measured. Concurrently at 28-d intervals, when the SC of a bull was > or = 23 cm, semen collection was attempted using electroejaculation. Ejaculates were evaluated for presence of first spermatozoa (FS), 50 x 10(6) sperm with at least 10% motility (PU), and 500 x 10(6) sperm with at least 50% motility (PP). After all bulls reached PP they were subjected to two libido tests. Carcass data were collected on all bulls (n = 110) and Warner-Bratzler shear (WBS) force values were assessed on a subset (n = 80). For both years, B x A bulls were heavier (P < 0.05) and taller (P < 0.05) than S x A and T x A bulls at the start and end of the study. However, breed type did not influence (P > 0.10) gain in BW or hip height during the study. Scrotal circumference of T x A bulls was larger (P < 0.05) than that of B x A or S x A bulls at the start of the study, but there was no effect (P > 0.10) of breed type by the end of the study. At PU and PP, B x A bulls were older (P < 0.05), heavier (P < 0.05), and taller (P < 0.05) and had larger (P < 0.05) SC than S x A and T x A bulls. Tuli x Angus bulls were younger (P < 0.05) than S x A bulls at PU and PP but had similar SC. Libido scores tended (P < 0.10) to be lower for B x A than for S x A and T x A bulls. Breed type affected (P < 0.05) carcass traits; B x A bulls had the heaviest (P < 0.05) hot carcass weight, greatest (P < 0.05) dressing percentage, larger (P < 0.05) longissimus muscle area than

  7. Do ATP4- and Mg2+ bind stepwise to the F1-ATPase of Halobacterium saccharovorum?

    PubMed

    Schobert, B

    1998-06-01

    It is commonly believed that MgATP2- is the substrate of F1-ATPases and ATP4- acts as a competitive inhibitor. However, the velocity equation for such competitive inhibition is equivalent to that for a rapid equilibrium ordered binding mechanism in which ATP4- adds first and the binding of Mg2+ is dependent on the formation of the E x ATP4- complex. According to this ordered-binding model, solution formed MgATP2- is not recognized by the ATPase as a direct substrate, and the high-affinity binding of Mg2+ to the E x ATP4- complex is the key reaction towards the formation of the ternary complex. These models (and others) were tested with an F1- ATPase, isolated from Halobacterium saccharovorum, by evaluating the rate of ATP hydrolysis as a function of free [ATP4-] or free [Mg2+]. The rates were asymmetrical with respect to increasing [ATP4-] versus increasing [Mg2+]. For the ordered-binding alternative, a series of apparent dissociation constants were obtained for ATP4-(K(A)aPP), which decreased as [Mg2+] increased. From this family of K(A)aPP the true K(A) was retrieved by extrapolation to [Mg2+] = 0 and was found to be 0.2 mM. The dissociation constants for Mg2+, established from these experiments, were also apparent (K(B)aPP) and dependent on [ATP4-] as well as on the pH. The actual K(B) was established from a series of K(B)aPP by extrapolating to [ATP4-] = infinity and to the absence of competing protons, and was found to be 0.0041 mM. The pKa of the protonable group for Mg2+ binding is 8.2. For the competitive inhibition alternative, rearrangement of the constants and fitting to the velocity equation gave an actual binding constant for MgATP2- (K(EAB)) of 0.0016 mM and for ATP4- (K(EA)) of 0.2 mM. Decision between the two models has far-reaching mechanistic implications. In the competitive inhibition model MgATP2- binds with high affinity, but Mg2+ cannot bind once the E x ATP4- complex is formed, while in the ordered-binding model binding of Mg2+ requires that

  8. Immunotoxicity of nitrobenzene in female B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Burns, L A; Bradley, S G; White, K L; McCay, J A; Fuchs, B A; Stern, M; Brown, R D; Musgrove, D L; Holsapple, M P; Luster, M I

    1994-01-01

    Nitrobenzene (NBZ) is primarily employed as an oxidizing agent in the synthesis of analine and benzene compounds. It produces myelotoxic effects and effects on erythrocytes in both animal models and man. Reported hepatosplenomegaly and effects on the bone marrow are indicators that NBZ may be immunotoxic. In these studies, female B6C3F1 mice were exposed to 30, 100 and 300 mg/kg of NBZ in corn oil by gavage for 14 consecutive days. To assess the immunotoxic potential of NBZ, body and organ weights were determined and selected immunologic and host resistance responses were studied. In these studies, the liver and spleen appeared to be the primary target organs. Both liver and spleen weights were dose dependently increased. Gross histopathologic examinations revealed significant changes in the spleen, consisting of severe congestion of the red pulp areas with erythrocytes and reticulocytes. Serum chemistry profiles showed increases in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities, indicating liver toxicity. Hematologic studies showed a decrease in erythrocyte number and a concomitant increase in mean corpuscular hemoglobin and mean corpuscular volume. A dose-dependent increase in peripheral reticulocytes was also seen. DNA synthesis was enhanced, as was the number of formed elements and the number of monocyte/granulocyte stem cells in the bone marrow of treated mice. IgM responses were decreased and the phagocytic activity of macrophages in the liver was dose dependently increased with a concomitant decrease in the activities in the spleen and lung. Other immunological parameters examined were unchanged. Host resistance to microbial or viral infection was not markedly altered by NBZ; however, there were trends towards increased susceptibility where T-cell function contributes to host defense. These data indicate that NBZ-induced hemolysis and liver injury are linked to the observed alterations in bone marrow activity. PMID:7988385

  9. Chronic bioassays of chlorinated humic acids in B6C3F1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    van Duuren, B.L.; Melchionne, S.; Seidman, I.; Pereira, M.A.

    1986-11-01

    Humic acids (Fluka), chlorinated to carbon:chlorine (C:Cl) ratios of 1:1 and 1:0.3, were administered to B6C3F1 mice, 50 males and 50 females per group, in the drinking water at a total organic carbon (TOC) level of 0.5 g/L. The mice were 6 to 8 weeks old at the beginning of the bioassays. The doses used were based on short-term (8 weeks) evaluations for toxicity, palatability, and weight gain. The chronic bioassays included the following control groups: unchlorinated humic acids (0.5 g/L), no-treatment (100 males and 100 females), dibromoethane (DBE, 2.0 mM in drinking water; positive control) and 0.44% sodium chloride in drinking water, i.e., at the same concentration as those receiving chlorinated humic acids. The chlorinated humic acids were prepared freshly and chemically assayed once per week. All chemicals were, with the exception of DBE, administered for 24 months; DBE was administered for 18 months. The volumes of solutions consumed were measured once weekly. All treatment groups showed normal weight gain except the DBE group. No markedly significant increases in tumor incidences were evident in any of the organs and tissues examined in the chlorinated humic acid groups compared to unchlorinated humic acids and the no-treatment control groups. DBE caused the expected high incidence of squamous carcinomas of the forestomach. The chlorinated humic acids tested contained direct-acting alkylating agents, based on their reactivity with p-nitrobenzylpyridine (PNBP), and showed mutagenic activity in S. typhimurium.

  10. In utero exposure to phthalate downregulates critical genes in Leydig cells of F1 male progeny.

    PubMed

    Sekaran, Suganya; Jagadeesan, Arunakaran

    2015-07-01

    Phthalates are the largest group of environmental pollutants and are considered toxicant to the endocrine system. The present study was aimed to test the effect of in utero exposure of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) on Leydig cell steroidogenesis in F1 male offspring's. Pregnant dams were oral gavaged with different doses (1, 10, and 100 mg/kg/day) of DEHP or olive oil during gestational Day 9-21. Serum testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) levels were significantly reduced in male offspring at 60 days of age. Our results also demonstrate a coordinate, dose-dependent disruption of genes involved in steroidogenesis. The gene expression of StAR, Cyp11a1, 3β-HSD, 17β-HSD, 5α-reductase and cytochrome P450 19a1 (or) aromatase (Cyp-19) were significantly decreased. The transcription factors like steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) and specific protein-1 (Sp-1) showed a significant decrease in 10 and 100 mg DEHP treatment group. DNA methylation analysis using bisulfite specific-methylation PCR shows hypermethylation in the SF-1 and Sp-1 promoter regions. Further to determine whether the DEHP-induced methylation changes were associated with increased DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt) levels, we measured the expression levels of Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b, Dnmt1, and Dnmt3l using real-time PCR and Western blot method. The mRNA and protein expressions of Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b, and Dnmt1 were stimulated in 10 and 100 mg DEHP treatment groups, whereas no significant change was seen in Dnmt3l expression, suggesting that increased Dnmt3a/b, Dnmt1 may cause DNA hypermethylation in testicular Leydig cells. Overall, these data suggest that gestational exposure to DEHP affects adult testicular function via altered methylation patterns. PMID:25649163

  11. Adenovirus E2F1 Overexpression Sensitizes LNCaP and PC3 Prostate Tumor Cells to Radiation In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S.; Stoyanova, Radka; Hachem, Paul; Ahmed, Mansoor M.; Pollack, Alan

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: We previously showed that E2F1 overexpression radiosensitizes prostate cancer cells in vitro. Here, we demonstrate the radiosensitization efficacy of adenovirus (Ad)-E2F1 infection in growing (orthotopic) LNCaP and (subcutaneous) PC3 nude mice xenograft tumors. Methods and Materials: Ad-E2F1 was injected intratumorally in LNCaP (3 x 10{sup 8} plaque-forming units [PFU]) and PC3 (5 x 10{sup 8} PFU) tumors treated with or without radiation. LNCaP tumor volumes (TV) were measured by magnetic resonance imaging, caliper were used to measure PC3 tumors, and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Apoptosis was measured by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling, and key proteins involved in cell death signaling were analyzed by Western blotting. Results: Intracellular overexpression of Ad-E2F1 had a significant effect on the regression of TV and reduction of PSA levels relative to that of adenoviral luciferase (Ad-Luc)-infected control. The in vivo regressing effect of Ad-E2F1 on LNCaP tumor growth was significant (PSA, 34 ng/ml; TV, 142 mm{sup 3}) compared to that of Ad-Luc control (PSA, 59 ng/ml; TV, 218 mm{sup 3}; p <0.05). This effect was significantly enhanced by radiation therapy (compare: Ad-E2F1+RT/PSA, 16 ng/ml, and TV, 55 mm{sup 3} to Ad-Luc+RT/PSA, 42 ng/ml, and TV, 174 mm{sup 3}, respectively; p <0.05). For PC3 tumors, the greatest effect was observed with Ad-E2F1 infection alone; there was little or no effect when radiotherapy (RT) was combined. However, addition of RT enhanced the level of in situ apoptosis in PC3 tumors. Molecularly, addition of Ad-E2F1 in a combination treatment abrogated radiation-induced BCL-2 protein expression and was associated with an increase in activated BAX, and together they caused a potent radiosensitizing effect, irrespective of p53 and androgen receptor functional status. Conclusions: We show here for the first time that

  12. Cytological attributes of sperm bundles unique to F1 progeny of irradiated male lepidoptera: Relevance to sterile insect technique programs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The unique genetic phenomena responsible for inherited F1 sterility in Lepidoptera and some other arthropods also provide advantages for the use of inherited sterility instead of full sterility in a sterile insect technique (SIT) program. Lepidopteran females generally can be completely sterilized ...

  13. Axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics analysis of Saturn V/S1-C/F1 nozzle and plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.

    1993-01-01

    An axisymmetric single engine Computational Fluid Dynamics calculation of the Saturn V/S 1-C vehicle base region and F1 engine plume is described. There were two objectives of this work, the first was to calculate an axisymmetric approximation of the nozzle, plume and base region flow fields of S1-C/F1, relate/scale this to flight data and apply this scaling factor to a NLS/STME axisymmetric calculations from a parallel effort. The second was to assess the differences in F1 and STME plume shear layer development and concentration of combustible gases. This second piece of information was to be input/supporting data for assumptions made in NLS2 base temperature scaling methodology from which the vehicle base thermal environments were being generated. The F1 calculations started at the main combustion chamber faceplate and incorporated the turbine exhaust dump/nozzle film coolant. The plume and base region calculations were made for ten thousand feet and 57 thousand feet altitude at vehicle flight velocity and in stagnant freestream. FDNS was implemented with a 14 species, 28 reaction finite rate chemistry model plus a soot burning model for the RP-1/LOX chemistry. Nozzle and plume flow fields are shown, the plume shear layer constituents are compared to a STME plume. Conclusions are made about the validity and status of the analysis and NLS2 vehicle base thermal environment definition methodology.

  14. The Dependence of the Distortion Product 2f1-f2 on Primary Levels in Non-Impaired Human Ears.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahr, Sumit; Long, Glenis R.; Culpepper, N. Brandt

    1998-01-01

    The ILO92 was used to determine the level of Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions (DPOAEs) at 2f1-f2 for 16 combinations of primary levels in the range of 40 to 80 dB SPL from 40 unimpaired adult ears. An overall increase of DPOAE amplitude with increase in primary level was observed. (Author/CR)

  15. 'Caro-Tex 312’ – An F1 Hybrid, High Yielding, Multiple Disease Resistant, Orange Habanero Pepper Cultivar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Texas A&M University and the USDA-ARS U.S. Vegetable Laboratory in Charleston, SC, have developed a new, F1 hybrid Habanero pepper cultivar. ‘Caro-Tex 312’ produces a large, orange-fruited Habanero pepper with typical shape and high pungency. It also possesses unique yield, early maturity and dise...

  16. ftz-f1 and Hr39 opposing roles on EcR expression during Drosophila mushroom body neuron remodeling.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Ana; Clouet-Redt, Christelle; Farge, Morgane; Flandre, Adrien; Guignard, Thomas; Fernando, Céline; Juge, François; Dura, Jean-Maurice

    2011-01-01

    Developmental axon pruning is a general mechanism that is required for maturation of neural circuits. During Drosophila metamorphosis, the larval-specific dendrites and axons of early γ neurons of the mushroom bodies are pruned and replaced by adult-specific processes. We found that the nuclear receptor ftz-f1 is required for this pruning, activates expression of the steroid hormone receptor EcR-B1, whose activity is essential for γ remodeling, and represses expression of Hr39, an ftz-f1 homologous gene. If inappropriately expressed in the γ neurons, HR39 inhibits normal pruning, probably by competing with endogenous FTZ-F1, which results in decreased EcR-B1 expression. EcR-B1 was previously identified as a target of the TGFβ signaling pathway. We found that the ftz-f1 and Hr39 pathway apparently acts independently of TGFβ signaling, suggesting that EcR-B1 is the target of two parallel molecular pathways that act during γ neuron remodeling. PMID:21131955

  17. F1 Screening for Resistance Gene Alleles to Bt Cotton in Helicoverpa armigera: How to Differentiate S and R Genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The F1 screening method relies on the availabilit