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Sample records for 6-line ferrihydrite catalyst

  1. Binary ferrihydrite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, G.P.; Zhao, J.; Feng, Z.

    1996-12-03

    A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered. 3 figs.

  2. Binary ferrihydrite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, Gerald P.; Zhao, Jianmin; Feng, Zhen

    1996-01-01

    A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered.

  3. Ferrous Phosphate Surface Precipitates Resulting from the Reduction of Intragrain 6-line Ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Peretyazhko, Tetyana; Zachara, John M.; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Arey, Bruce W.; McKinley, James P.; Wang, Chong M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Xia, Yuanxian

    2010-07-01

    The reductive biotransformation of 6-line ferrihydrite located within porous silica (intragrain ferrihydrite) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was investigated and compared to the behavior of 6-line ferrihydrite in suspension (free ferrihydrite). The effect of buffer type (PIPES and NaHCO3) and phosphate (P) on the extent of reduction and formation of Fe(II) secondary phases was investigated under anoxic conditions. Electron microscopy and micro X-ray diffraction were applied to evaluate the morphology and mineralogy of the biogenic precipitates and to study the distribution of microorganisms on the surface of porous silica after bioreduction. Kinetic reduction experiments with free and intragrain ferrihydrite revealed contrasting behaviour with respect to the buffer and presence of P. The overall amount of intragrain ferrihydrite reduction was less than that of free ferrihydrite [at 5 mmol L-1 Fe(III)T]. In the intragrain ferrihydrite suspensions, 200-300 µmol L-1 dissolved Fe(III) was released during the initial stages of incubation; no Fe(III)aq was detected in the free ferrihydrite suspensions. Reductive mineralization was not observed in the intragrain ferrihydrite incubations without P, and all biogenic Fe(II) concentrated in the aqueous phase. Distinctive surface precipitates of Fe(II) phosphates with spherical morphology were observed on porous silica when P was present. These precipitates were well colonized by microorganisms and fragments of extracellular materials at the end of incubation.

  4. Ferrous phosphate surface precipitates resulting from the reduction of intragrain 6-line ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Peretyazhko, Tetyana; Zachara, John M.; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Arey, Bruce W.; McKinley, James P.; Wang, Chong M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Xia, Yuanxian

    2010-07-01

    The reductive biotransformation of 6-line ferrihydrite located within porous silica (intragrain ferrihydrite) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was investigated and compared to the behavior of 6-line ferrihydrite in suspension (free ferrihydrite). The effect of buffer type (PIPES and NaHCO3), phosphate (P), and an electron shuttle (AQDS) on the extent of reduction and formation of Fe(II) secondary phases was investigated under anoxic conditions. Electron microscopy and micro X-ray diffraction were applied to evaluate the morphology and mineralogy of the biogenic precipitates and to study the distribution of microorganisms on the surface of porous silica after bioreduction. Kinetic reduction experiments with free and intragrain ferrihydrite revealed contrasting behaviour with respect to the buffer and presence of P. The overall amount of intragrain ferrihydrite reduction was less than that of free ferrihydrite [at 5 mmol L-1 Fe(III)T]. Reductive mineralization was not observed in the intragrain ferrihydrite incubations without P, and all biogenic Fe(II) concentrated in the aqueous phase. Irrespective of buffer and AQDS addition, rosettes of Fe(II) phosphate of approximate 20-30 μm size were observed on porous silica when P was present. The rosettes grew not only on the silica surface but also within it, forming a coherent spherical structure. These precipitates were well colonized by microorganisms and contained extracellular materials at the end of incubation. Microbial extracellular polymeric substances may have adsorbed Fe(II) promoting Fe(II) phosphate nucleation with subsequent crystal growth proceeding in different directions from a common center.

  5. Mössbauer studies of ferrihydrite for Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jung Tae; Kim, Chul Sung; Chun, Dong Hyun; Park, Ji Chan

    2016-01-01

    The 6-line ferrihydrite sample for Ficher-Tropsch catalysts was prepared by using a combination of a co-precipitation technique and a spraydrying method. The crystallographic and magnetic properties of 6-line ferrihydrite sample were investigated by using x-ray diffractometer (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and Mössbauer spectrometer. The XRD patterns of the ferrihydrite sample, measured at 295 K, showed 6-lines peak and its structure was found to be a single-phased hexagonal with space group of P3m1 according to JCPDS card. The temperaturedependent magnetization curves were measured under 1000 Oe between 4.2 and 300 K, and showed blocking temperature ( T B ) around 110 K. Also, Mössbauer spectra of the 6-line ferrihydrite sample were taken at various temperatures ranging from 4.2 to 295 K. At temperature below T B , the obtained spectra were analyzed as two-sextets for Fe sites, while At temperature above T B , the obtained spectra showed a doublet due to relaxation, resulting from the spin dynamic effect.

  6. Kinetics of Fe(II)-catalyzed transformation of 6-line ferrihydrite under anaerobic flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Marcus, M.A.; Bargar, J.R.

    2010-04-01

    The readsorption of ferrous ions produced by the abiotic and microbially-mediated reductive dissolution of iron oxy-hydroxides drives a series of transformations of the host minerals. To further understand the mechanisms by which these transformations occur and their kinetics within a microporous flow environment, flow-through experiments were conducted in which capillary tubes packed with ferrihydrite-coated glass spheres were injected with inorganic Fe(II) solutions under circumneutral pH conditions at 25 C. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to identify the secondary phase(s) formed and to provide data for quantitative kinetic analysis. At concentrations at and above 1.8 mM Fe(II) in the injection solution, magnetite was the only secondary phase formed (no intermediates were detected), with complete transformation following a nonlinear rate law requiring 28 hours and 150 hours of reaction at 18 and 1.8 mM Fe(II), respectively. However, when the injection solution consisted of 0.36 mM Fe(II), goethite was the predominant reaction product and formed much more slowly according to a linear rate law, while only minor magnetite was formed. When the rates are normalized based on the time to react half of the ferrihydrite on a reduced time plot, it is apparent that the 1.8 mM and 18 mM input Fe(II) experiments can be described by the same reaction mechanism, while the 0.36 input Fe(II) experiment is distinct. The analysis of the transformation kinetics suggest that the transformations involved an electron transfer reaction between the aqueous as well as sorbed Fe(II) and ferrihydrite acting as a semiconductor, rather than a simple dissolution and recrystallization mechanism. A transformation mechanism involving sorbed inner sphere Fe(II) alone is not supported, since the essentially equal coverage of sorption sites in the 18 mM and 1.8 mM Fe(II) injections cannot explain the difference in the transformation rates observed.

  7. Nanocrystalline Ferrihydrite-Based Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis: Part II. Effects of Activation Gases on the Catalytic Performance.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Geun Bae; Hong, Seok Yong; Park, Ji Chan; Jung, Heon; Rhee, Young Woo; Chun, Dong Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) was carried out over nanocrystalline ferrihydrite-based (Fe9O2(OH)23) catalysts activated by different reducing agents: syngas (H2+CO), CO, and H2. The syngas activation successfully changed the ferrihydrite-based catalysts into an active and stable catalytic structure with chi-carbide (Fe2.5 C) and epsilon'-carbide (Fe2.2 C). The crystal structure of the catalysts obtained by syngas activation was similar to the structure obtained by CO activation; this similarity was probably due to the peculiar reduction behavior of the ferrihydrite-based catalysts, which exhibit much greater reducibility in CO atmosphere than in H2 atmosphere. The performance of the catalysts activated by syngas was much higher than the performance of the catalysts activated by H2 and was comparable to the performance of the catalysts activated by CO. This strongly demonstrates that the ferrihydrite-based catalysts are advantageous for industrial FTS processes because syngas can be commonly used for both activation pre-treatment and subsequent reaction.

  8. Ferrihydrite in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.; Shoba, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Ferrihydrite—an ephemeral mineral—is the most active Fe-hydroxide in soils. According to modern data, the ferrihydrite structure contains tetrahedral lattice in addition to the main octahedral lattice, with 10-20% of Fe being concentrated in the former. The presence of Fe tetrahedrons influences the surface properties of this mineral. The chemical composition of ferrihydrite samples depends largely on the size of lattice domains ranging from 2 to 6 nm. Chemically pure ferrihydrite rarely occurs in the soil; it usually contains oxyanion (SiO14 4-, PO4 3-) and cation (Al3+) admixtures. Aluminum replace Fe3+ in the structure with a decrease in the mineral particle size. Oxyanions slow down polymerization of Fe3+ aquahydroxomonomers due to the films at the surface of mineral nanoparticles. Si- and Al-ferrihydrites are more resistant to the reductive dissolution than the chemically pure ferrihydrite. In addition, natural ferrihydrite contains organic substance that decreases the grain size of the mineral. External organic ligands favor ferrihydrite dissolution. In the European part of Russia, ferrihydrite is more widespread in the forest soils than in the steppe soils. Poorly crystallized nanoparticles of ferrihydrite adsorb different cations (Zn, Cu) and anions (phosphate, uranyl, arsenate) to immobilize them in soils; therefore, ferrihydrite nanoparticles play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycle of iron and other elements.

  9. The transformation of ferrihydrite into goethite or hematite, revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Cudennec, Yannick . E-mail: Yannick.Cudennec@insa-rennes.fr; Lecerf, Andre

    2006-03-15

    During the oxidation of iron, poorly crystallized phases are firstly formed: 2- and 6-line ferrihydrite, which presents for the last phase, a similarity with wustite FeO but also with hematite {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Crystallization increases with time and the solid phase obtained is dependent on temperature and pH. Obviously, high temperature favours the formation of the oxide hematite {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. As for the pH factor, it is more complicated. Low and high values of pH (2-5 and 10-14) favour the formation of goethite {alpha}-FeOOH, while obtaining hematite is favoured at neutral pH (values around 7). Goethite or hematite are obtained either through a dissolution-crystallization process or in the solid state, through a topotactic transformation. Given the structural relationships observed between ferrihydrite and wustite and hematite, it is allowed to think that a structural continuity could exist between wustite Fe{sub (1-} {sub x} {sub )}O and hematite via ferrihydrite.

  10. New insight on kinetics of catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide on ferrihydrite: Based on the preparation procedures of ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yan; Meng, Shan; Qin, Mei; Liu, Hui; Wei, Yu

    2012-01-01

    The heterogeneous catalytic reaction of H2O2 with iron oxides is an important reaction for the environment since both H2O2 and iron oxides are common constituents of natural and atmospheric waters. In this work, three ferrihydrites, labeled Fh-1, -2 and -3, were prepared by different procedures. Fh-1 was prepared by adding alkali solution to ferric solution under stirring. In the preparation of Fh-2, the mixing procedure of the two solutions was reversed. Fh-3 was obtained by adding alkali solution and ferric solution simultaneously into a certain amount of water. The heterogeneous catalytic reaction of H2O2 with three ferrihydrites in aqueous solution was investigated in detail. The results demonstrated that the apparent reaction rate was affected by the preparation procedure of ferrihydrite besides pH, temperature and the dose of catalyst. The activation energy of the decomposition reaction of H2O2 was determined to be 76.13, 59.41 and 68.05 kJ mol-1 for Fh-1, -2 and -3, respectively. The activation enthalpy of the reaction were determined to be 73.59, 56.56 and 65.76 kJ mol-1 and the activation entropy of the reaction were determined to be -69.65, -119.67 and -90.58 J mol-1 K-1, respectively.

  11. Low aggregation state diminishes ferrihydrite reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunschweig, Juliane; Heister, Katja; Meckenstock, Rainer U.

    2013-04-01

    Ferrihydrite is an abundant iron(oxy)hydroxide in soils and sediments and plays an important role in microbial iron cycling due to its high reactivity. Therefore, it is often synthesized and used in geomicrobiological and mineralogical studies. The reactivities of synthetic ferrihydrites vary between different studies and synthesis protocols. Hence, we synthesized five different ferrihydrites and characterized them with XRD, FTIR, XPS, and BET specific surface area. The reactivity of the ferrihydrite samples towards ascorbic acid was examined and compared with microbial reduction rates by Geobacter sulfurreducens. FTIR and XRD results show the presence of secondary, higher crystalline iron oxide phases like goethite and akaganeite for two samples. Consequently, those samples revealed lower biotic and abiotic reduction rates compared to pure ferrihydrite. Comparison of reduction rates with the specific surface area of all ferrihydrites showed neither correlation with abiotic reductive dissolution nor with microbial reduction. Especially one sample, characterized by a very low aggregation state and presence of secondary minerals, revealed a poor reactivity. We speculate that apart from the occurring secondary minerals also the low aggregation state played an important role. Decreasing aggregation diminishes the amount of kinks and edges on the surfaces, which are produced at contact sites in aggregates. According to dissolution theories, dissolution mainly starts at those surface defects and slows down with decreasing amount of defects. Furthermore, the non-aggregated ferrihydrite is free of micropores, a further stimulant for dissolution. Independent repetitions of experiments and syntheses according to the same protocol but without formation of secondary minerals, confirmed the low reactivity of the non-aggregated ferrihydrite. In summary, our results indicate that a decreasing aggregation state of ferrihydrite to a certain size does increase the reactivity

  12. Spectral Evolution of Bioreduced Ferrihydrite by Hyperthermophiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklute, E. C.; Kashyap, S.; Holden, J. F.; Dyar, M. D.

    2016-05-01

    The hyperthermophile Pyrodictium sp. Su06 reduces ferrihydrite to a black, magnetic, Fe(II)-bearing mineral. Mossbauer spectra for that mineral freeze dried vs. frozen in the original liquid suspension differ. Both represent potential biosignatures.

  13. Exchange bias in nano-ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, D. A.; Krasikov, A. A.; Dubrovskiy, A. A.; Popkov, S. I.; Stolyar, S. V.; Iskhakov, R. S.; Ladygina, V. P.; Yaroslavtsev, R. N.

    2016-11-01

    We report the results of investigations of the effect of cooling in an external magnetic field starting from the temperature over superparamagnetic blocking temperature TB on the shift of magnetic hysteresis loops in systems of ferrihydrite nanoparticles from ˜2.5 to ˜5 nm in size with different TB values. In virtue of high anisotropy fields of ferrihydrite nanoparticles and open hysteresis loops in the range of experimentally attainable magnetic fields, the shape of hysteresis loops of such objects in the field-cooling mode is influenced by the minor hysteresis loop effect. A technique is proposed for distinguishing the exchange bias effect among the effects related to the minor hysteresis loops caused by high anisotropy fields of ferrihydrite particles. The exchange bias in ferrihydrite is stably observed for particles not less than 3 nm in size or with TB over 40 K, and its characteristic value increases with the particle size.

  14. Stability of Ferrihydrite and Organic Matter in Ferrihydrite-Organic Matter Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusterhues, K.; Totsche, K. U.

    2015-12-01

    Iron oxides can bind particularly large amounts of organic matter (OM) and seem to be an important control on OM storage in many soils. To better understand the interactions between Fe oxides and OM, we produced ferrihydrite-OM associations by adsorption and coprecipitation in laboratory experiments. Because ferrihydrites are often formed in OM-rich solutions, we assume that coprecipitation is a common process in nature. In contrast to adsorption on pre-existing ferrihydrite surfaces, coprecipitation involves adsorption, occlusion (physical entrapment of OM), formation of Fe-OM complexes, and poisoning of ferrihydrite growth. The reactivity of coprecipitates may therefore differ from ferriydrites with adsorbed OM. Incubation experiments with an inoculum extracted from a Podzol forest-floor were carried out to quantify the mineralization of the adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter. These experiments showed that the association with ferrihydrite stabilized the associated organic matter, but that differences in the degradability of adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter were small. We therefore conclude that coprecipitation does not lead to a significant formation of microbial inaccessible organic matter domains. Microbial reduction experiments were performed using Geobacter bremensis. We observed that increasing amounts of associated OM led to decreasing initial reaction rates and a decreasing degree of dissolution. Reduction of coprecipitated ferrihydrites was faster than reduction of ferrihydrites with adsorbed OM. Our data demonstrate that the association with ferrihydrite can effectively stabilize labile polysaccharides. Vice versa, these polysaccharides may protect ferrihydrite from reduction by Geobacter-like bacteria. However, a challenge for future studies will be to link formation and degradation of mineral-organic associations to natural porous systems, that is, to the complex interplay of mass transport and microbial distribution in the

  15. Irreversible Sorption of Contaminants During Ferrihydrite Transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, H.L.; Arthur, S.E.; Brady, P.V.; Cygan, R.T.; Nagy, K.L.; Westrich, H.R.

    1999-05-19

    A better understanding of the fraction of contaminants irreversibly sorbed by minerals is necessary to effectively quantify bioavailability. Ferrihydrite, a poorly crystalline iron oxide, is a natural sink for sorbed contaminants. Contaminants may be sorbed/occluded as ferrihydrite precipitates in natural waters or as it ages and transforms to more crystalline iron oxides such as goethite or hematite. Laboratory studies indicate that Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Np, Pb, Sr, U, and Zn are irreversibly sorbed to some extent during the aging and transformation of synthetic ferrihydrite. Barium, Ra and Sr are known to sorb on ferrihydrite in the pH range of 6 to 10 and sorb more strongly at pH values above its zero point of charge (pH> 8). We will review recent literature on metal retardation, including our laboratory and modeling investigation of Ba (as an analogue for Ra) and Sr adsorption/resorption, during ferrihydrite transformation to more crystalline iron oxides. Four ferrihydrite suspensions were aged at pH 12 and 50 °C with or without Ba in 0.01 M KN03 for 68 h or in 0.17 M KN03 for 3424 h. Two ferrihydrite suspensions were aged with and without Sr at pH 8 in 0.1 M KN03 at 70°C. Barium or Sr sorption, or resorption, was measured by periodically centrifuging suspension subsamples, filtering, and analyzing the filtrate for Ba or Sr. Solid subsamples were extracted with 0.2 M ammonium oxalate (pH 3 in the dark) and with 6 M HCl to determine the Fe and Ba or Sr attributed to ferrihydrite (or adsorbed on the goethite/hematite stiace) and the total Fe and Ba or Sr content, respectively. Barium or Sr occluded in goethite/hematite was determined by the difference between the total Ba or Sr and the oxalate extractable Ba or Sr. The percent transformation of ferrihydrite to goethite/hematite was estimated from the ratio of oxalate and HC1 extractable Fe. All Ba was retained in the precipitates for at least 20 h. Resorption of Ba reached a maximum of 7 to 8% of the Ba2+ added

  16. Development of Highly Reactive Nanometer Fe-Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, James A.; Linehan, John C.; Matson, Dean W.; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Bekhazi, Jacky; Alnajjar, Mikhail S.

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes research involving the liquefaction of coal and the removal of oxygen from coal product constituents. Subbituminous Coal and early stage coal liquefaction products contain a substantial fraction of hydroxy-substituted aromatic hydrocarbons (phenols). An important reaction for upgrading of coal-derived organic materials is to remove oxygen groups. This paper describes the hydro-deoxygenation of naphthols and the liquefaction of subbituminous Wyodak coal using a catalyst prepared by in-situ sulfidation of nanometer scale 6-line iron ferrihydrite. The FeS catalyst enables the conversion of naphthol in substantial yields to tetralin and naphthalene at 400 degrees C in 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene. The kinetics and procedures to observe coal liquefaction and hydro-deoxygenation, and the effects of in-situ sulfidation on conversion kinetics are described.

  17. Transformation of ferrihydrite in the presence or absence of trace Fe(II): The effect of preparation procedures of ferrihydrite

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hui; Li Ping; Lu Bin; Wei Yu; Sun Yuhan

    2009-07-15

    Two-line ferrihydrite was prepared by two different procedures. In procedure 1, which is widely used, ferrihydrite (named as ferrihydrite-1) was prepared by droping NaOH solution into Fe(III) solution. In procedure 2, which is rarely reported, ferrihydrite (named as ferrihydrite-2) was prepared by adding Fe(III) and NaOH solutions into a certain volume of water simultaneously. The results showed that mixing procedures of Fe(III) and alkaline were critical in the sub-microstructures and the conversion mechanisms of ferrihydrites in the presence or absence of trace Fe(II). The sub-microstructure of ferrihydrite-1 favored the mechanism of its dissolution re-crystallization and hematite nanoparticles with rough surface were obtained. The sub-microstructure of ferrihydrite-2 favored the solid state transformation from ferrihydrite to hematite and hematite nanoparticles with smooth surface were formed. These research results will be helpful for us to control the synthesis of hematite nanoparticles with different surface state. - Graphical abstract: Ferrihydrites prepared by mixing Fe{sup 3+} and NaOH solutions according to different procedures can rapidly transform into hematite particles with different surface structures in the presence of trace Fe(II).

  18. Evaluation of fine-particle catalysts: Activity testing results and phase identification using Mossbauer spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.; Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.

    1994-10-01

    To evaluate and compare the activities/selectivities of fine- particle size catalysts being developed in the DOE/PETC Advanced Research (AR) Coal Liquefaction program by using standard coal liquefaction activity test procedures. Previously reported results have described the standard test procedure that was developed at Sandia to evaluate fine-particle size iron catalysts being developed in DOE/PETC`s AR Coal Liquefaction Program. This test uses DECS-17 Blind Canyon Coal, phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, and a factorial experimental design that enables evaluation of a catalyst over ranges of temperature (350 to 400{degrees}C), time (20 to 60 minutes), and catalyst loading (0 to 1 wt% on a dmmf coal basis). Testing has been performed on Pacific Northwest Laboratories` (PNL) 6-line ferrihydrite catalyst. Results showed that this catalyst is more active than the University of Pittsburgh`s sulfated iron oxide catalyst that was evaluated previously. PNL has also produced two additional batches of catalyst in an effort to optimize their preparation procedures for larger batches. Sandia has observed significant differences in activities among these three catalysts; these differences might be due to particle size effects, the type of drying procedure, or the amount of moisture present. Mossbauer characterization of the iron phases in the coal, catalyst precursors, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) insoluble material from liquefaction reactions has been performed on the University of Pittsburgh`s catalyst and the first PNL catalyst that was tested at Sandia. The Mossbauer results were obtained at the University of Kentucky and will be presented. Future work will include testing additional catalysts being developed in the AR Coal Liquefaction Program, developing procedures to characterize reaction products, and determining the kinetics of the reactions.

  19. Effects of Al(III) on the ferrihydrite - ordered ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite - hematite transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrón, V.; Michel, F. M.; Liu, Q.; Koch, C. B.; Torrent, J.

    2012-04-01

    Ferrihydrite, a ferric oxyhydroxide nanomineral with high chemical reactivity, is ubiquitous in various Earth surface environments and especially in the edaphosphere. Aluminium is also very common in soils and therefore is tipically associated with iron oxides. Here, we study the influence of Al on the hydrothermal transformation of Al-ferrihydrites to better understand both the structure (much debated in the last years; Michel et al., 2010, Manceau, 2011) and properties of this poorly crystalline phase. Suspensions of synthetic aluminium 2-line ferrihydrite [with Al/(Fe+Al) from 0 to 19 mole%] doped with citrate (citrate/Fe molar ratio = 3%) in order to retard rapid transformation into hematite was aged at 175 °C for periods ranging from 0 to 18 h. X-ray diffraction in the real- and reciprocal-space analyses derived from synchrotron high-energy x-ray total scattering, Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetic measurements and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the dry final products. The presence of Al delays the transformation of ferrihydrite into hematite. In the low-Al samples there is a clear sharpening of the ferrihydrite peaks during aging that is consistent with the formation and growth of the intermediate ordered ferrihydrite. Samples with higher Al contents show minor changes in intensity and peak width that suggest these samples produce less and/or smaller sized intermediate ordered ferrihydrite during aging prior to the formation of hematite. The a- and c-dimensions of the ferrihydrite unit cell [according to the Michel et al. (2010) structure] both decrease with increasing Al content. Uniform changes in the unit cell provide evidence for substitution in all three cation sites in the ferrihydrite structure. The pair distribution functions (from the real XRD pattern) suggest virtually no change in particle size with increasing Al. Increasing the Al concentration results in a decrease in the magnetic enhancement that occurs during aging

  20. Redox Reactions of Reduced Flavin Mononucleotide (FMN), Riboflavin (RBF), and Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) with Ferrihydrite and Lepidocrocite

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhi; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Moore, Dean A.; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-09-17

    Flavins are secreted by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella and can function as endogenous electron transfer mediators (ETM). In order to assess the potential importance of flavins in Fe(III) bioreduction, we investigated the redox reaction kinetics of reduced flavins (FMNH2 and RBFH2) with ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. The organic reductants rapidly reduced and dissolved ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite in the pH range 4-8. The rate constant k for 2-line ferrihydrite reductive dissolution by FMNH2 was 87.5 ± 3.5 M-1∙s-1 at pH 7.0 in batch reactors, and the k was similar for RBFH2. For lepidocrocite, the k was 500 ± 61 M-1∙s-1 for FMNH2, and 236 ± 22 M-1∙s-1 for RBFH2. The surface area normalized initial reaction rates (ra) were between 0.08 and 77 μmoles∙m-2∙s-1 for various conditions in stopped-flow experiments. Initial rates (ro) were first-order with respect to Fe(III) oxide concentration, and ra increased with decreasing pH. Poorly crystalline 2-line ferrihydrite yielded the highest ra, followed by more crystalline 6-line ferrihydrite, and crystalline lepidocrocite. Compared to a previous whole-cell study with Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, our findings suggest that ETM reduction by the Mtr pathway coupled to lactate oxidation are rate limiting, rather than heterogeneous electron transfer to the Fe(III) oxide.

  1. Evaluation of fine-particle size catalysts using standard test procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.C.

    1996-07-01

    The goal of this project is to evaluate and compare the activities/selectivities of fine-particle size catalysts being developed in the DOE/PETC Advanced Research (AR) Liquefaction Program by using standard coal liquefaction activity test procedures. Since bituminous and subbituminous coals have significantly different properties, it is feasible that catalysts may perform differently with these coal types. Because all previous testing has been done with the DECS-17 Blind Canyon bituminous coal, it is important to develop the capability of evaluating catalysts using a subbituminous coal. Initial efforts towards developing a subbituminous coal test are aimed at comparing the reactivities of the Wyodak subbituminous coal and the Blind Canyon bituminous coal. Therefore, the same factorial experimental design was used with the Wyodak coal as was used previously with the Blind Canyon coal. In addition, PNL`s 6-line ferrihydrite catalyst precursor was used in the development of the Wyodak coal test procedure because this catalyst is the best powder catalyst found to date in Sandia`s tests with Blind Canyon coal. Results show that Blind Canyon coal yields higher DHP amounts in the reaction products and higher tetrahydrofuran conversions at the higher severity conditions. Wyodak coal gives higher heptane conversions and higher gas yields for all conditions tested.

  2. Fast microbial reduction of ferrihydrite colloids from a soil effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Andreas; Bosch, Julian; Rennert, Thilo; Heister, Katja; Braunschweig, Juliane; Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Totsche, Kai U.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies on the microbial reduction of synthetic iron oxide colloids showed their superior electron accepting property in comparison to bulk iron oxides. However, natural colloidal iron oxides differ in composition from their synthetic counterparts. Besides a potential effect of colloid size, microbial iron reduction may be accelerated by electron-shuttling dissolved organic matter (DOM) as well as slowed down by inhibitors such as arsenic. We examined the microbial reduction of OM- and arsenic-containing ferrihydrite colloids. Four effluent fractions were collected from a soil column experiment run under water-saturated conditions. Ferrihydrite colloids precipitated from the soil effluent and exhibited stable hydrodynamic diameters ranging from 281 (±146) nm in the effluent fraction that was collected first and 100 (±43) nm in a subsequently obtained effluent fraction. Aliquots of these oxic effluent fractions were added to anoxic low salt medium containing diluted suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens. Independent of the initial colloid size, the soil effluent ferrihydrite colloids were quickly and completely reduced. The rates of Fe2+ formation ranged between 1.9 and 3.3 fmol h-1 cell-1, and are in the range of or slightly exceeding previously reported rates of synthetic ferrihydrite colloids (1.3 fmol h-1 cell-1), but greatly exceeding previously known rates of macroaggregate-ferrihydrite reduction (0.07 fmol h-1 cell-1). The inhibition of microbial Fe(III) reduction by arsenic is unlikely or overridden by the concurrent enhancement induced by soil effluent DOM. These organic species may have increased the already high intrinsic reducibility of colloidal ferrihydrite owing to quinone-mediated electron shuttling. Additionally, OM, which is structurally associated with the soil effluent ferrihydrite colloids, may also contribute to the higher reactivity due to increasing solubility and specific surface area of ferrihydrite. In conclusion, ferrihydrite

  3. Origin of Magnetism in Hydrothermally Aged 2-Line Ferrihydrite Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Liang; Jiang, Zhao-Xia; Du, Yong-Hua; Yin, Xin-Mao; Xi, Shi-Bo; Wen, Wen; Roberts, Andrew P; Wee, Andrew T S; Xiong, Yi-Min; Liu, Qing-Song; Gao, Xing-Yu

    2017-03-07

    As an iron oxyhydroxide, nanosized ferrihydrite (Fh) is important in Earth science, biology, and industrial applications. However, its basic structure and origin of its magnetism have long been debated. We integrate synchrotron-based techniques to explore the chemical structures of 2-line ferrihydrite and to determine the origin of its magnetism during hydrothermal aging in air. Our results demonstrate that both the magnetism and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) signal of 2-line ferrihydrite are enhanced with aging time, and that XMCD spectral patterns resemble that of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) rather than magnetite (Fe3O4). Fe L-edge and K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) further indicate formation of both maghemite and hematite (α-Fe2O3) with increasing concentrations with longer hydrothermal aging time. Thus, magnetic enhancement with longer hydrothermal aging time is attributed to increasing maghemite concentration instead of a magnetically ordered ferrihydrite as previously reported. Moreover, L-edge and K-edge XAS spectra with different probing depths yield different ratios of these Fe oxides, which suggest the formation of a core (ferrihydrite-rich)-shell (with a mixture of both allotropes; α-Fe2O3 and γ-Fe2O3) structure during hydrothermal aging. Our results provide insights into the chemical evolution of 2-line ferrihydrite that reveal unambiguously the origin of its magnetism.

  4. Coprecipitated arsenate inhibits thermal transformation of 2-line ferrihydrite: implications for long-term stability of ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaohui; Xiao, Dongxue; Bush, Richard T; Liu, Jianshe

    2015-03-01

    2-line ferrihydrite, a ubiquitous iron oxy-hydroxide found in natural and engineered systems, is an efficient sink for the toxic metalloids such as arsenic. While much is known of the excellent capacity of ferrihydrite to coprecipitate arsenate, there is little information concerning the long-term stability of arsenate-accumulated ferrihydrite. By thermal treatment methodology, the expedited transformation of ferrihydrite in the presence of coprecipitated arsenate was studied at varying As/Fe ratios (0-0.5) and different heating temperature (40, 300, 450, 600°C). Pure and transformed minerals were characterized by thermogravimetry (TG), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Arsenate was found to retard the thermal transformation of ferrihydrite. The extents of ferrihydrite transformation to hematite decreased with increasing As/Fe ratios, but increased at a higher heating temperature. It is predicted that the coprecipitated arsenate can stabilize the amorphous iron oxides against the transformation to more crystalline solids. Arsenate concentration appears to play an important role in this predicted long-term stability.

  5. Photoinduced Oxidation of Arsenite to Arsenate on Ferrihydrite

    SciTech Connect

    N Bhandari; R Reeder; D Strongin

    2011-12-31

    The photochemistry of an aqueous suspension of the iron oxyhydroxide, ferrihydrite, in the presence of arsenite has been investigated using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), and solution phase analysis. Both ATR-FTIR and XANES show that the exposure of ferrihydrite to arsenite in the dark leads to no change in the As oxidation state, but the exposure of this arsenite-bearing surface, which is in contact with pH 5 water, to light leads to the conversion of the majority of the adsorbed arsenite to the As(V) bearing species, arsenate. Analysis of the solution phase shows that ferrous iron is released into solution during the oxidation of arsenite. The photochemical reaction, however, shows the characteristics of a self-terminating reaction in that there is a significant suppression of this redox chemistry before 10% of the total iron making up the ferrihydrite partitions into solution as ferrous iron. The self-terminating behavior exhibited by this photochemical arsenite/ferrihydrite system is likely due to the passivation of the ferrihydrite surface by the strongly bound arsenate product.

  6. Effects of magnetic interactions in antiferromagnetic ferrihydrite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berquó, Thelma S.; Erbs, Jasmine J.; Lindquist, Anna; Penn, R. Lee; Banerjee, Subir K.

    2009-04-01

    The effects of magnetic interactions in the magnetic properties of six-line ferrihydrite particles were investigated by studying the behavior of aggregated versus coated particles. Four different coating agents (sugar, alginate, lactate and ascorbate) were employed in order to obtain dispersed particles and prevent particle agglomeration; one sub-sample was allowed to dry with no coating agent. The five sets of ferrihydrite particles were from the same batch and the size was estimated as 3.6 ± 0.4 nm in length. Low temperature magnetization, ac susceptibility and Mössbauer spectroscopy data showed contrasting blocking temperatures for uncoated and coated samples with a decrease of TP from about 50 K to 12 K, respectively. The contributions from magnetic interactions were recognized in magnetic measurements and the effective anisotropy constant for non-interacting ferrihydrite was estimated as (100 ± 10) × 103 J m-3. Overall, employing sugar and alginate as coating agents was more successful in preventing particle aggregation and magnetic interactions. In contrast, ascorbate and lactate were unsuitable due to the chemical reaction between the coating agent and ferrihydrite surface.

  7. Magnetic and structural properties of ferrihydrite/hematite nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariona, N.; Camacho-Aguilar, K. I.; Ramos-González, R.; Martinez, Arturo I.; Herrera-Trejo, M.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.

    2016-05-01

    A rich variety of ferrihydrite/hematite nanocomposites (NCs) with specific size, composition and properties were obtained in transformation reactions of 2-line ferrihydrite. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations showed that the NCs consist of clusters of strongly aggregated nanoparticles (NPs) similarly to a "plum pudding", where hematite NPs "raisins" are surrounded by ferrihydrite "pudding". Magnetic measurements of the NCs correlate very well with TEM results; i.e., higher coercive fields correspond to greater hematite crystallite size. First order reversal curve (FORC) measurements were used for the characterization of the magnetic components of the NCs. FORC diagrams revealed that the NCs prepared at short times are composed by single domains with low coercivity, and NCs prepared at times larger than 60 min exhibited elongated distribution along the Hc axis. It suggested that these samples consist of mixtures of different kinds of hematite particles, ones with low coercivity and others with coercivity greater than 600 Oe. For NCs prepared at times larger than 60 min, Mossbauer spectroscopy revealed the presence of two sextets, which one was assigned to fine hematite particles and other to hematite particles with hyperfine parameters near to bulk hematite. The correlation of the structural and magnetic properties of the ferrihydrite/hematite NCs revealed important characteristics of these materials which have not been reported elsewhere.

  8. Factors Influencing Ferrihydrite Crystallinity In Natural And Synthetic Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent investigations of the structure of the mineral ferrihydrite indicate that disparities in the number of peaks observed in powder x-ray diffraction patterns can be attributed to differences in crystallite size. This has lead to the conclusion that specimens previously refer...

  9. Composition and reactivity of ferrihydrite-organic matter associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusterhues, Karin; Hädrich, Anke; Neidhardt, Julia; Küsel, Kirsten; Totsche, Kai

    2014-05-01

    The formation of organo-mineral associations affects many soil forming processes. On the one hand, it will influence soil organic matter composition and development, because the complex organic matter mixtures usually fractionate during their association with mineral surfaces. Whereas the associated fraction is supposed to be stabilized, the non-associated fraction remains mobile and available to degradation by microorganisms. On the other hand, the organic coating will completely change the interface properties of Fe oxides such as solubility, charge and hydrophobicity. This in turn will strongly influence their reactivity towards nutrients and pollutants, the adsorption of new organic matter, and the availability of ferric Fe towards microorganisms. To better understand such processes we produced ferrihydrite-organic matter associations by adsorption and coprecipitation in laboratory experiments. As a surrogate for dissolved soil organic matter we used the water-extractable fraction of a Podzol forest-floor layer under spruce. Sorptive fractionation of the organic matter was investigated by 13C NMR and FTIR. Relative to the original forest-floor extract, the ferrihydrite-associated OM was enriched in polysaccharides but depleted in aliphatic C and carbonyl C, especially when adsorption took place. Liquid phase incubation experiments were carried out with an inoculum extracted from the podzol forest-floor under oxic conditions at pH 4.8 to quantify the mineralization of the adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter. These experiments showed that the association with ferrihydrite stabilized the associated organic matter, but that differences in the degradability of adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter were small. We therefore conclude that coprecipitation does not lead to a significant formation of microbial inaccessible organic matter domains. Microbial reduction experiments were performed using Geobacter bremensis. We observed that increasing amounts of

  10. Magnetic properties of heat treated bacterial ferrihydrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, D. A.; Krasikov, A. A.; Dubrovskiy, A. A.; Popkov, S. I.; Stolyar, S. V.; Bayukov, O. A.; Iskhakov, R. S.; Ladygina, V. P.; Yaroslavtsev, R. N.

    2016-07-01

    The magnetic properties of ferrihydrite nanoparticles, which are products of vital functions of Klebsiella oxitoca bacteria, have been studied. The initial powder containing the nanoparticles in an organic shell was subjected to low-temperature (T=160 °C) heat treatment for up to 240 h. The bacterial ferrihydrite particles exhibit a superparamagnetic behavior. Their characteristic blocking temperature increases from 26 to 80 K with the heat treatment. Analysis of the magnetization curves with regard to the magnetic moment distribution function and antiferromagnetic contribution shows that the low-temperature heat treatment enhances the average magnetic moment of a particle; i.e., the nanoparticles coarsen, probably due to their partial agglomeration during heat treatment. It was established that the blocking temperature nonlinearly depends on the particle volume. Therefore, a model was proposed that takes into account both the bulk and surface magnetic anisotropy. Using this model, the bulk and surface magnetic anisotropy constants KV≈1.7×105 erg/cm3 and KS≈0.055 erg/cm2 have been determined. The effect of the surface magnetic anisotropy of ferrihydrite nanoparticles on the observed magnetic hysteresis loops is discussed.

  11. Spectroscopic and Geochemical Analyses of Ferrihydrite from Hydrothermal Springs in Iceland and Applications to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice; Murad, E.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Ferrihydrite samples were collected from a thermal spring and a cold stream in the Landmannalaugar region of Iceland. Chemical and spectroscopic analyses have been performed on the air-dried and fine-grained fractions of these samples. The ferrihydrite from the cold stream is a pure sample, containing small amounts of Ca, P and Si, which do not form minerals detectable with X-ray diffraction (XRD) or reflectance and transmittance spectroscopy. The ferrihydrite from the thermal pool is a less pure sample, containing larger amounts of amorphous Si and P. The XRD and spectral features for this sample are also consistent with a less crystalline structure. Some of the Si is incorporated in the structure of the ferrihydrite. The Ca, P and possibly some of the Si may be biogenic. The spectral character of these Icelandic ferrihydrites is compared with those of synthetic ferrihydrites and other iron oxide/oxyhydroxide minerals. Ferrihydrite is characterized by a broad Fe3+ excitation band near 0.92 microns (approx. 10900/cm) and a strong Fe-O absorption feature near 475/cm (approx. 21 microns) in transmittance spectra. Multiple bands due to H2O and OH are also present for ferrihydrite. Natural ferrihydrites frequently exhibit a band near 950-1050/cm (approx. 10 microns) that is typically not observed for synthetic ferrihydrites and may be due to some Si in the structure. An additional pair of spectral bands near 1400 and 1500/cm (approx. 7 microns) are characteristic of pure ferrihydrites from natural and synthetic sources. Hydrothermal springs may have been present at one time on Mars in association with volcanic activity. Ferrihydrite formation in such an environment may have contributed to the ferric oxide-rich surface material on Mars.

  12. Arsenic repartitioning during biogenic sulfidization and transformation of ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocar, Benjamin D.; Borch, Thomas; Fendorf, Scott

    2010-02-01

    Iron (hydr)oxides are strong sorbents of arsenic (As) that undergo reductive dissolution and transformation upon reaction with dissolved sulfide. Here we examine the transformation and dissolution of As-bearing ferrihydrite and subsequent As repartitioning amongst secondary phases during biotic sulfate reduction. Columns initially containing As(V)-ferrihydrite coated sand, inoculated with the sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough), were eluted with artificial groundwater containing sulfate and lactate. Rapid and consistent sulfate reduction coupled with lactate oxidation is observed at low As(V) loading (10% of the adsorption maximum). The dominant Fe solid phase transformation products at low As loading include amorphous FeS within the zone of sulfate reduction (near the inlet of the column) and magnetite downstream where Fe(II) (aq) concentrations increase; As is displaced from the zone of sulfidogenesis and Fe(III) (s) depletion. At high As(V) loading (50% of the adsorption maximum), sulfate reduction and lactate oxidation are initially slow but gradually increase over time, and all As(V) is reduced to As(III) by the end of experimentation. With the higher As loading, green rust(s), as opposed to magnetite, is a dominant Fe solid phase product. Independent of loading, As is strongly associated with magnetite and residual ferrihydrite, while being excluded from green rust and iron sulfide. Our observations illustrate that sulfidogenesis occurring in proximity with Fe (hydr)oxides induce Fe solid phase transformation and changes in As partitioning; formation of As sulfide minerals, in particular, is inhibited by reactive Fe(III) or Fe(II) either through sulfide oxidation or complexation.

  13. Arsenic Repartitioning during Biogenic Sulfidization and Transformation of Ferrihydrite

    SciTech Connect

    Kocar, B.; Borch, T; Fendorf, S

    2010-01-01

    Iron (hydr)oxides are strong sorbents of arsenic (As) that undergo reductive dissolution and transformation upon reaction with dissolved sulfide. Here we examine the transformation and dissolution of As-bearing ferrihydrite and subsequent As repartitioning amongst secondary phases during biotic sulfate reduction. Columns initially containing As(V)-ferrihydrite coated sand, inoculated with the sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough), were eluted with artificial groundwater containing sulfate and lactate. Rapid and consistent sulfate reduction coupled with lactate oxidation is observed at low As(V) loading (10% of the adsorption maximum). The dominant Fe solid phase transformation products at low As loading include amorphous FeS within the zone of sulfate reduction (near the inlet of the column) and magnetite downstream where Fe(II){sub (aq)} concentrations increase; As is displaced from the zone of sulfidogenesis and Fe(III){sub (s)} depletion. At high As(V) loading (50% of the adsorption maximum), sulfate reduction and lactate oxidation are initially slow but gradually increase over time, and all As(V) is reduced to As(III) by the end of experimentation. With the higher As loading, green rust(s), as opposed to magnetite, is a dominant Fe solid phase product. Independent of loading, As is strongly associated with magnetite and residual ferrihydrite, while being excluded from green rust and iron sulfide. Our observations illustrate that sulfidogenesis occurring in proximity with Fe (hydr)oxides induce Fe solid phase transformation and changes in As partitioning; formation of As sulfide minerals, in particular, is inhibited by reactive Fe(III) or Fe(II) either through sulfide oxidation or complexation.

  14. Arsenic repartitioning during biogenic sulfidization and transformation of ferrihydrite

    SciTech Connect

    Kocar, Benjamin D.; Borch, Thomas; Fendorf, Scott

    2012-04-30

    Iron (hydr)oxides are strong sorbents of arsenic (As) that undergo reductive dissolution and transformation upon reaction with dissolved sulfide. Here we examine the transformation and dissolution of As-bearing ferrihydrite and subsequent As repartitioning amongst secondary phases during biotic sulfate reduction. Columns initially containing As(V)-ferrihydrite coated sand, inoculated with the sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough), were eluted with artificial groundwater containing sulfate and lactate. Rapid and consistent sulfate reduction coupled with lactate oxidation is observed at low As(V) loading (10% of the adsorption maximum). The dominant Fe solid phase transformation products at low As loading include amorphous FeS within the zone of sulfate reduction (near the inlet of the column) and magnetite downstream where Fe(II)(aq) concentrations increase; As is displaced from the zone of sulfidogenesis and Fe(III)(s) depletion. At high As(V) loading (50% of the adsorption maximum), sulfate reduction and lactate oxidation are initially slow but gradually increase over time, and all As(V) is reduced to As(III) by the end of experimentation. With the higher As loading, green rust(s), as opposed to magnetite, is a dominant Fe solid phase product. Independent of loading, As is strongly associated with magnetite and residual ferrihydrite, while being excluded from green rust and iron sulfide. Our observations illustrate that sulfidogenesis occurring in proximity with Fe (hydr)oxides induce Fe solid phase transformation and changes in As partitioning; formation of As sulfide minerals, in particular, is inhibited by reactive Fe(III) or Fe(II) either through sulfide oxidation or complexation.

  15. Sulfidogenesis Controls on Ferrihydrite Transformation and Repartitioning of Sorbed Arsenic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocar, B. D.; Fendorf, S.

    2007-12-01

    Iron (hydr)oxides are ubiquitous sorbents of arsenic (As) that undergo reductive dissolution and transformation upon reaction with dissolved sulfide. Here, we examine diverging pathways of solid phase iron (Fe) transformation during sulfate reduction in the presence of varying As loadings. Columns initially containing As(V)- ferrihydrite coated sand, inoculated with the sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough), were eluted with artificial groundwater containing sulfate and lactate. Additionally, abiotic batch reaction experiments were conducted to examine Fe secondary products rapidly formed during sulfidization of As-loaded ferrihydrite. Rapid and consistent sulfate reduction coupled with lactate oxidation is observed within column solids possessing low As(V) surface coverage (10% of the adsorption maximum). Column experiments illustrated that at high As(V) surface coverage (50% of the adsorption maximum), sulfate reduction and lactate oxidation are initially slow but gradually increase over time, and all As(V) is reduced to As(III) by the end of experimentation. The dominant Fe solid-phase transformation products at low As coverage include amorphous FeS within the zone of sulfate reduction (near the inlet of the column) and magnetite downstream where Fe(II)aq concentrations exceed 1 mM. Arsenic(V) is reduced to As(III) and displaced from the zone of sulfidogenesis and Fe(III)s depletion. At higher As coverage, green rust carbonate, as opposed to magnetite, is a dominant Fe solid phase product. Independent of loading, As is strongly associated with magnetite and residual ferrihydrite, while being excluded from green rust and iron sulfide. Abiotic batch reactor experiments illustrate that As is readily released from ferrihydrite during sulfidization, and that low As loadings yield initial Fe secondary products of lepidocrocite and FeS, while high loadings inhibit rapid secondary Fe mineral formation. Our observations illustrate that

  16. Ordered ferrimagnetic form of ferrihydrite reveals links among structure, composition, and magnetism

    PubMed Central

    Michel, F. Marc; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José; Morales, María P.; Serna, Carlos J.; Boily, Jean-François; Liu, Qingsong; Ambrosini, Andrea; Cismasu, A. Cristina; Brown, Gordon E.

    2010-01-01

    The natural nanomineral ferrihydrite is an important component of many environmental and soil systems and has been implicated as the inorganic core of ferritin in biological systems. Knowledge of its basic structure, composition, and extent of structural disorder is essential for understanding its reactivity, stability, and magnetic behavior, as well as changes in these properties during aging. Here we investigate compositional, structural, and magnetic changes that occur upon aging of “2-line” ferrihydrite in the presence of adsorbed citrate at elevated temperature. Whereas aging under these conditions ultimately results in the formation of hematite, analysis of the atomic pair distribution function and complementary physicochemical and magnetic data indicate formation of an intermediate ferrihydrite phase of larger particle size with few defects, more structural relaxation and electron spin ordering, and pronounced ferrimagnetism relative to its disordered ferrihydrite precursor. Our results represent an important conceptual advance in understanding the nature of structural disorder in ferrihydrite and its relation to the magnetic structure and also serve to validate a controversial, recently proposed structural model for this phase. In addition, the pathway we identify for forming ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite potentially explains the magnetic enhancement that typically precedes formation of hematite in aerobic soil and weathering environments. Such magnetic enhancement has been attributed to the formation of poorly understood, nano-sized ferrimagnets from a ferrihydrite precursor. Whereas elevated temperatures drive the transformation on timescales feasible for laboratory studies, our results also suggest that ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite could form naturally at ambient temperature given sufficient time. PMID:20133643

  17. Ordered ferrimagnetic form of ferrihydrite reveals links among structure, composition, and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Michel, F Marc; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José; Morales, María P; Serna, Carlos J; Boily, Jean-François; Liu, Qingsong; Ambrosini, Andrea; Cismasu, A Cristina; Brown, Gordon E

    2010-02-16

    The natural nanomineral ferrihydrite is an important component of many environmental and soil systems and has been implicated as the inorganic core of ferritin in biological systems. Knowledge of its basic structure, composition, and extent of structural disorder is essential for understanding its reactivity, stability, and magnetic behavior, as well as changes in these properties during aging. Here we investigate compositional, structural, and magnetic changes that occur upon aging of "2-line" ferrihydrite in the presence of adsorbed citrate at elevated temperature. Whereas aging under these conditions ultimately results in the formation of hematite, analysis of the atomic pair distribution function and complementary physicochemical and magnetic data indicate formation of an intermediate ferrihydrite phase of larger particle size with few defects, more structural relaxation and electron spin ordering, and pronounced ferrimagnetism relative to its disordered ferrihydrite precursor. Our results represent an important conceptual advance in understanding the nature of structural disorder in ferrihydrite and its relation to the magnetic structure and also serve to validate a controversial, recently proposed structural model for this phase. In addition, the pathway we identify for forming ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite potentially explains the magnetic enhancement that typically precedes formation of hematite in aerobic soil and weathering environments. Such magnetic enhancement has been attributed to the formation of poorly understood, nano-sized ferrimagnets from a ferrihydrite precursor. Whereas elevated temperatures drive the transformation on timescales feasible for laboratory studies, our results also suggest that ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite could form naturally at ambient temperature given sufficient time.

  18. Incorporation of Uranium into Hematite during crystallization from ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Timothy A; Morris, Katherine; Law, Gareth T W; Livens, Francis R; Mosselmans, J Frederick W; Bots, Pieter; Shaw, Samuel

    2014-04-01

    Ferrihydrite was exposed to U(VI)-containing cement leachate (pH 10.5) and aged to induce crystallization of hematite. A combination of chemical extractions, TEM, and XAS techniques provided the first evidence that adsorbed U(VI) (≈3000 ppm) was incorporated into hematite during ferrihydrite aggregation and the early stages of crystallization, with continued uptake occurring during hematite ripening. Analysis of EXAFS and XANES data indicated that the U(VI) was incorporated into a distorted, octahedrally coordinated site replacing Fe(III). Fitting of the EXAFS showed the uranyl bonds lengthened from 1.81 to 1.87 Å, in contrast to previous studies that have suggested that the uranyl bond is lost altogether upon incorporation into hematite. The results of this study both provide a new mechanistic understanding of uranium incorporation into hematite and define the nature of the bonding environment of uranium within the mineral structure. Immobilization of U(VI) by incorporation into hematite has clear and important implications for limiting uranium migration in natural and engineered environments.

  19. Incorporation of Uranium into Hematite during Crystallization from Ferrihydrite

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ferrihydrite was exposed to U(VI)-containing cement leachate (pH 10.5) and aged to induce crystallization of hematite. A combination of chemical extractions, TEM, and XAS techniques provided the first evidence that adsorbed U(VI) (≈3000 ppm) was incorporated into hematite during ferrihydrite aggregation and the early stages of crystallization, with continued uptake occurring during hematite ripening. Analysis of EXAFS and XANES data indicated that the U(VI) was incorporated into a distorted, octahedrally coordinated site replacing Fe(III). Fitting of the EXAFS showed the uranyl bonds lengthened from 1.81 to 1.87 Å, in contrast to previous studies that have suggested that the uranyl bond is lost altogether upon incorporation into hematite. The results of this study both provide a new mechanistic understanding of uranium incorporation into hematite and define the nature of the bonding environment of uranium within the mineral structure. Immobilization of U(VI) by incorporation into hematite has clear and important implications for limiting uranium migration in natural and engineered environments. PMID:24580024

  20. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Frandsen, Cathrine; Wallace, Adam F.; Legg, Benjamin; Khalid, Syed; Zhang, Hengzhong; Mørup, Steen; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV-vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 < pH < 3). Results demonstrate that Fe exists mainly as Fe(H2O)63+, μ-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the μ-oxo dimer decreases while the other two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the μ-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the μ-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.

  1. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Khalid, Syed; Frandsen, Cathrine; Wallace, Adam F.; Legg, Benjamin; Zhang, Hengzhong; Morup, Steen; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2015-10-03

    In this study, iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV–vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 < pH < 3). Results demonstrate that Fe exists mainly as Fe(H2O)63+, μ-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the μ-oxo dimer decreases while the other two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the μ-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the μ-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.

  2. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Khalid, Syed; Frandsen, Cathrine; ...

    2015-10-03

    In this study, iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV–vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 < pH < 3). Results demonstrate that Fe exists mainly as Fe(H2O)63+, μ-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the μ-oxo dimer decreases while the othermore » two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the μ-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the μ-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.« less

  3. In vivo efficacy of ferrihydrite as an enterosorbent for arsenic: short-term evaluation in rodents.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John F; Robinson, Abraham; Mitchell, Nicole J; Marroquin-Cardona, Alicia; Johnson, Natalie; Elmore, Sarah E; Romoser, Amelia A; Phillips, Timothy D

    2013-01-01

    The use of dietary adsorbents to reduce arsenic (As) exposure is innovative. Ferrihydrite successfully sorbs arsenite and asenate over a wide range of pH conditions and the As-ferrihydrite complexes are stable in gastrointestinal (GIT) models. Our objectives were to (1) compare structural characteristics (using x-ray diffraction and Fourier-transform infrared [FTIR] spectroscopy) and As binding affinities of industrially produced ferrihydrite (IDF) and lab-synthesized ferrihydrite and (2) evaluate the efficacy of the material displaying the best sorption capability as an As enterosorbent in a short-term mammalian model. Lab-synthesized ferrihydrite displayed superior binding affinity for both arsenate and arsenite in vitro, which led to its use in the in vivo portion of the study. Young Sprague-Dawley male rats were fed either a control diet or a 0.5% w/w ferrihydrite feed. After 1 wk of acclimation, rats were given 0.5 ml of 500 mg/L arsenate or arsenite via gavage with or without ferrihydrite. Rats were then transferred to metabolism cages, and urine collected after 24 and 48 h was analyzed for total As. Rats were evaluated daily for signs of morbidity and mortality for up to 1 wk. Ferrihydrite reduced mean urinary As levels by 74.9% and 43.6% after 24 h and 49.1% and 39.5% after 48 h for arsenite- and arsenate-treated groups, respectively. Importantly, treatment groups receiving ferrihydrite displayed no signs of As-related toxicity. All As reductions were statistically significant except for arsenate treatments at 24 h. Data suggest that, as an enterosorbent, ferrihydrite reduces bioavailability after As exposures.

  4. Adsorption of Cu(II) to ferrihydrite and ferrihydrite-bacteria composites: Importance of the carboxyl group for Cu mobility in natural environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Ellen M.; Peacock, Caroline L.

    2012-09-01

    Bacterially associated iron (hydr)oxide composites are widespread in natural environments, and by analogy with isolated iron (hydr)oxides and bacteria, are important scavengers of dissolved trace-metals. We precipitated ferrihydrite via rapid Fe(III) hydrolysis in the absence and presence of the non-Fe metabolising, Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, commonly found in natural waters, soils and sediments. We combined XRD, SEM, BET and Fe K-edge EXAFS to examine the mineralogy, morphology and crystallinity of the ferrihydrite composites. We find that the mineral fraction of the composites is unaltered in primary mineralogy, morphology and crystallinity compared to pure ferrihydrite. We then measured the adsorption of Cu to ferrihydrite and the ferrihydrite-B. subtilis composites as a function of pH and the ferrihydrite:bacteria mass ratio of the composites, and used EXAFS to determine the molecular mechanisms of Cu adsorption. We determine directly for the first time that Cu uptake by ferrihydrite-B. subtilis composites is the result of adsorption to both the ferrihydrite and B. subtilis fractions. Adsorption of Cu by the B. subtilis fraction results in significant Cu uptake in the low pH regime (pH ˜4, ˜20% of [Cu]total) and significantly enhanced Cu uptake in the mid pH regime. This composite sorption behaviour is in stark contrast to pure ferrihydrite, where Cu adsorption is negligible at low pH. Overall, for composites dominated by either ferrihydrite or B. subtilis, the bacterial fraction is exclusively responsible for Cu adsorption at low pH while the ferrihydrite fraction is predominantly responsible for adsorption at high pH. Furthermore, with an increased mass ratio of bacteria, the dominance of Cu adsorption to the bacterial fraction persists into the mid pH regime and extends significantly into the upper pH region. As such, the distribution of the total adsorbed Cu between the composite fractions is a function of both pH and the ferrihydrite

  5. Mobilization and re-adsorption of arsenate on ferrihydrite and hematite in the presence of oxalate.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bo; Jia, Shao-Yi; Liu, Yong; Wu, Song-Hai; Han, Xu

    2013-11-15

    In this study, mobilization and re-adsorption of arsenate on 2-line ferrihydrite and hematite in the presence of oxalate was investigated. Our results showed that arsenate could be mobilized during the dissolution of ferrihydrite and hematite. After reaching the maximum values, the released arsenate could re-adsorb on the residual ferrihydrite, whereas such an observation was not significant in hematite system. More reactive sites exposed during the dissolution of ferrihydrite could contribute to the re-adsorption of the released arsenate at pH 3.0, while the insignificant re-adsorption of arsenate on hematite could be explained by the inhibitory adsorption effect of oxalate on arsenate. Although dissolution rates of iron oxides decreased with the increase of arsenate on both ferrihydrite and hematite, dissolution rate was mainly determined by the reactivity of iron oxides, and ferrihydrite showed a higher reactivity than hematite in the presence of oxalate. Mathematic model proposed in our study further indicated that arsenate loading showed a more significant effect on arsenate mobilization in hematite system, while it was more effective in arsenate re-adsorption in ferrihydrite system.

  6. Enhanced ferrihydrite dissolution by a unicellular, planktonic cyanobacterium: a biological contribution to particulate iron bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Kranzler, Chana; Kessler, Nivi; Keren, Nir; Shaked, Yeala

    2016-12-01

    Iron (Fe) bioavailability, as determined by its sources, sinks, solubility and speciation, places severe environmental constraints on microorganisms in aquatic environments. Cyanobacteria are a widespread group of aquatic, photosynthetic microorganisms with especially high iron requirements. While iron exists predominantly in particulate form, little is known about its bioavailability to cyanobacteria. Some cyanobacteria secrete iron solubilizing ligands called siderophores, yet many environmentally relevant strains do not have this ability. This work explores the bioavailability of amorphous synthetic Fe-oxides (ferrihydrite) to the non-siderophore producing, unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp PCC 6803. Iron uptake assays with (55) ferrihydrite established dissolution as a critical prerequisite for iron transport. Dissolution assays with the iron binding ligand, desferrioxamine B, demonstrated that Synechocystis 6803 enhances ferrihydrite dissolution, exerting siderophore-independent biological influence on ferrihydrite bioavailability. Dissolution mechanisms were studied using a range of experimental conditions; both cell-particle physical proximity and cellular electron flow were shown to be important determinants of bio-dissolution by Synechocystis 6803. Finally, the effects of ferrihydrite stability on bio-dissolution rates and cell physiology were measured, integrating biological and chemical aspects of ferrihydrite bioavailability. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that Synechocystis 6803 actively dissolves ferrihydrite, highlighting a significant biological component to mineral phase iron bioavailability in aquatic environments.

  7. In vitro evaluation of ferrihydrite as an enterosorbent for arsenic from contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J F; Robinson, A; Johnson, N; Marroquin-Cardona, A; Brattin, B; Taylor, R; Phillips, T D

    2009-07-15

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic trace element found in groundwater due to natural and industrial processes. Exposure has been linked to cancers of the bladder, lungs, skin, kidneys, nasal passages, liver, and the prostate. Arsenic in drinking water is a problem in many countries, notably Bangladesh and Taiwan. The purpose of this research was to utilize binding isotherms, a simulated gastrointestinal (GI) model, and the adult Hydra bioassay to evaluate ferrihydrite's potential to bind As and serve as a potential enterosorbent for As found in drinking water. A variety of clay minerals and synthesized iron oxides including ferrihydrite were screened for their ability to bind As(III), as sodium arsenite, and As(V), as sodium arsenate. After ferrihydrite was demonstrated to be the most effective sorbent for both As species, adsorption isotherms were performed. All isotherm data were fit to the Langmuir equation to determine adsorption capacity (Qmax). Ferrihydrite bound 96% of As(III) and 97% of As(V) in the screening studies and had a Qmax of 1.288 mol/kg for As(III) and 0.744 mol/kg for As(V). Using a simulated GI model, ferrihydrite was found to effectively adsorb As(V) and As(III) in the stomach and intestine. Ferrihydrite (0.25% w/w) protected adult Hydra at levels up to 200 times the minimal effective concentration (MEC) for As(III) and up to 2.5 times the MEC for As(V). These experiments confirm that ferrihydrite is a high capacity sorbent of As and that it is effective at removing As in a simulated GI model. These results suggest that ferrihydrite could be used as a potential enterosorbent for As found in drinking water. Future work will focus on verifying ferrihydrite's safety and efficacy in vivo.

  8. Selective formation of metastable ferrihydrite in the chiton tooth.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Lyle M; Román, Jessica K; Everly, R Michael; Cohen, Michael J; Wilker, Jonathan J; Joester, Derk

    2014-10-20

    Metastable precursors are thought to play a major role in the ability of organisms to create mineralized tissues. Of particular interest are the hard and abrasion-resistant teeth formed by chitons, a class of rock-grazing mollusks. The formation of chiton teeth relies on the precipitation of metastable ferrihydrite (Fh) in an organic scaffold as a precursor to magnetite. In vitro synthesis of Fh under physiological conditions has been challenging. Using a combination of X-ray absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we show that, prior to Fh formation in the chiton tooth, iron ions are complexed by the organic matrix. In vitro experiments demonstrate that such complexes facilitate the formation of Fh under physiological conditions. These results indicate that acidic molecules may be integral to controlling Fh formation in the chiton tooth. This biological approach to polymorph selection is not limited to specialized proteins and can be expropriated using simple chemistry.

  9. Properties of synthetic ferrihydrite as an amino acid adsorbent and a promoter of peptide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Matrajt, G; Blanot, D

    2004-03-01

    Ferrihydrite, an iron oxide hydroxide, is found in all kinds of environments, from hydrothermal hot springs to extraterrestrial materials. It has been shown that this material is nanoporous, and because of its high surface area, it has outstanding adsorption properties and in some cases catalysis properties. In this work we studied the adsorption properties of ferrihydrite with respect to amino acids. Samples of pure ferrihydrite were synthesised and exposed to solutions of amino acids including both proteinaceous and non-proteinaceous species. These experiments revealed important characteristics of this mineral as both an adsorbent of amino acids and a promoter of peptide bond formation.

  10. Ferrihydrite Alteration to Magnetite, Maghemite and Hematite; Implications for Iron Oxides on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, A. P.; Bishop, J. L.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Olsen, M.; Wagner, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Synthetic ferrihydrites have been altered to form magnetite, maghemite and hematite through low-temperature heating experiments (some with an organic reductant). Maghemite formed in this manner could become an indicator for Astrobiology on Mars.

  11. Transport of ferrihydrite nanoparticles in saturated porous media: role of ionic strength and flow rate.

    PubMed

    Tosco, Tiziana; Bosch, Julian; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2012-04-03

    The use of nanoscale ferrihydrite particles, which are known to effectively enhance microbial degradation of a wide range of contaminants, represents a promising technology for in situ remediation of contaminated aquifers. Thanks to their small size, ferrihydrite nanoparticles can be dispersed in water and directly injected into the subsurface to create reactive zones where contaminant biodegradation is promoted. Field applications would require a detailed knowledge of ferrihydrite transport mechanisms in the subsurface, but such studies are lacking in the literature. The present study is intended to fill this gap, focusing in particular on the influence of flow rate and ionic strength on particle mobility. Column tests were performed under constant or transient ionic strength, including injection of ferrihydrite colloidal dispersions, followed by flushing with particle-free electrolyte solutions. Particle mobility was greatly affected by the salt concentration, and particle retention was almost irreversible under typical salt content in groundwater. Experimental results indicate that, for usual ionic strength in European aquifers (2 to 5 mM), under natural flow condition ferrihydrite nanoparticles are likely to be transported for 5 to 30 m. For higher ionic strength, corresponding to contaminated aquifers, (e.g., 10 mM) the travel distance decreases to few meters. A simple relationship is proposed for the estimation of travel distance with changing flow rate and ionic strength. For future applications to aquifer remediation, ionic strength and injection rate can be used as tuning parameters to control ferrihydrite mobility in the subsurface and therefore the radius of influence during field injections.

  12. In Vitro Evaluation of Ferrihydrite as an Enterosorbent for Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J. F.; Robinson, A.; Johnson, N.; Marroquin-Cardona, A.; Brattin, B.; Taylor, R.; Phillips, T. D.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic trace element found in groundwater due to natural and industrial processes. Exposure has been linked to cancers of the bladder, lungs, skin, kidneys, nasal passages, liver, and the prostate. Arsenic in drinking water is a problem in many countries, notably Bangladesh and Taiwan. The purpose of this research was to utilize binding isotherms, a simulated gastrointestinal (GI) model, and the adult Hydra bioassay to evaluate ferrihydrite’s potential to bind As and serve as a potential enterosorbent for As found in drinking water. A variety of clay minerals and synthesized iron oxides including ferrihydrite were screened for their ability to bind As(III), as sodium arsenite, and As(V), as sodium arsenate. After ferrihydrite was demonstrated to be the most effective sorbent for both As species, adsorption isotherms were performed. All isotherm data were fit to the Langmuir equation to determine adsorption capacity (Qmax). Ferrihydrite bound 96% of As(III) and 97% of As(V) in the screening studies and had a Qmax of 1.288 mol/kg for As(III) and 0.744 mol/kg for As(V). Using a simulated GI model, ferrihydrite was found to effectively adsorb As(V) and As(III) in the stomach and intestine. Ferrihydrite (0.25% w/w) protected adult hydra at levels up to 200 times the minimal effective concentration (MEC) for As(III) and up to 2.5 times the MEC for As(V). These experiments confirm that ferrihydrite is a high capacity sorbent of As, and that it is effective at removing As in a simulated GI model. These results suggest that ferrihydrite could be used as a potential enterosorbent for As found in drinking water. Future work will focus on verifying ferrihydrite’s safety and efficacy in vivo. PMID:19708388

  13. Understanding the biological stabilization of ferrihydrite and its transformation to magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Lyle; Joester, Derk

    2013-03-01

    The biosynthesis of magnetite in the chiton tooth begins with the formation of ferrihydrite, which is transformed into magnetite. This strategy, which employs crystallization of a precursor into the desired polymorph, is generalized across a range of organisms. However, the specific biological factors that control the transformation are not known. Our results employing atom probe tomography of chiton tooth magnetite revealed the presence of acidic proteins binding sodium and magnesium ions associated with chitin nanofibers. Using a model system we are investigating the influence of organic and inorganic additives on the stabilization of ferrihydrite and the transformation to magnetite. I will discuss the influence of a range of organic and inorganic additives on the formation and transformation of ferrihydrite within the gel. We have found that acidic polymers stabilize ferrihydrite and prevent the formation of the crystalline polymorphs. Transformation of the ferrihydrite to magnetite upon addition of ferrous iron is observed as early as 30 minutes. Taken together, the contribution of these factors to magnetite biomineralization in the presence of an organic matrix will help to elucidate biological mechanisms for nucleation, stabilization, and transformation of iron oxides.

  14. Detailed magnetic monitoring of the enhanced magnetism of ferrihydrite along its progressive transformation into hematite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, L.; Barrón, V.; Andrés-Vergés, M.; Serna, C. J.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.; Morales, M. P.; Lázaro, F. J.

    2016-06-01

    Under certain aging conditions, ferrihydrite evolves into hematite through intermediate products of enhanced magnetism. Although the magnetic properties of the end product, hematite, are to date satisfactorily known, those of ferrihydrite (and especially the products of its progressive aging) are not sufficiently explored. To this end, magnetic experiments, conducted mostly by using alternating magnetic fields, have been performed. The results reveal that two-line ferrihydrite exhibits conspicuous low-temperature spin glass behavior, a new finding that, on the other hand, could be expected given the previous microstructural observations that described this mineral as a very disordered gel. Upon aging, a progressive increase of the effective magnetic moment per iron ion is detected, in agreement with previous observations that ascribed ferrimagnetic character to an intermediate crystalline phase (sometime called ferriferrihydrite) that disappears just before the full transformation into hematite. Transmission electron microscopy observations suggest that this intermediate crystalline phase nucleates at the expense of the primordial gel, remaining physically attached to it until complete transformation into hematite. This microstructural picture appears well supported as, upon aging, the glassy magnetic dynamics found in ferrihydrite persists for the aged products even when dispersed in a nonmagnetic matrix, very likely because part of the so grown ferrimagnetic nanoparticles form aggregates within remains of the nontransformed gel. We propose a coherent model of ferrihydrite aging, based on integrated microstructural and magnetic observations, which is useful for the identification of aging products in geological and biological environments.

  15. Effect of ferrihydrite biomineralization on methanogenesis in an anaerobic incubation from paddy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Li; Xu, Jielong; Tang, Jia; Zhou, Shungui

    2015-05-01

    Microbial reduction of Fe(III) can be one of the major factors controlling methane production from anaerobic sedimentary environments, such as paddy soils and wetlands. Although secondary iron mineralization following Fe(III) reduction is a process that occurs naturally over time, it has not yet been considered in methanogenic systems. This study performed a long-term anaerobic incubation of a paddy soil and ferrihydrite-supplemented soil cultures to investigate methanogenesis during ferrihydrite biomineralization. The results revealed that the long-term effect of ferrihydrite on methanogenesis may be enhancement rather than suppression documented in previous studies. During initial microbial ferrihydrite reduction, methanogenesis was suppressed; however, the secondary minerals of magnetite formation was simultaneous with facilitated methanogenesis in terms of average methane production rate and acetate utilization rate. In the phase of magnetite formation, microbial community analysis revealed a strong stimulation of the bacterial Geobacter, Bacillus, and Sedimentibacter and the archaeal Methanosarcina in the ferrihydrite-supplemented cultures. Direct electric syntrophy between Geobacter and Methanosarcina via conductive magnetite is the plausible mechanism for methanogenesis acceleration along with magnetite formation. Our data suggested that a change in iron mineralogy might affect the conversion of anaerobic organic matter to methane and might provide a fresh perspective on the mitigation of methane emissions from paddy soils by ferric iron fertilization.

  16. Influence of Coprecipitated Organic Matter on Fe2+(aq) -Catalyzed Transformation of Ferrihydrite: Implications for Carbon Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chunmei; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2015-08-10

    The poorly crystalline Fe(III) hydroxide ferrihydrite is an important sink for organic matter (OM), nutrients and contaminants in soils and sediments. Aqueous Fe(II) is known to catalyze the transformation of ferrihydrite to more crystalline and thus less reactive phases. While coprecipitation of OM with ferrihydrite could be a common process in many environments due to changes in pH, redox potential or ionic strength, little is known about the impacts of coprecipitated OM on Fe(II)-catalyzed ferrihydrite transformation and its consequences for C dynamics. Accordingly, we explored the extent and pathways of Fe(II)-induced transformation of OM-ferrihydrite coprecipitates and subsequent C mobility. Mössbauer spectroscopic results indicated that the coprecipitated OM within ferrihydrite weakened the inter-particle magnetic interactions and decreased average particle size. The coprecipitated OM resulted in diminished Fe(II)-induced ferrihydrite transformation and thus preservation of ferrihydrite. The secondary mineral profiles upon Fe(II) reaction with ferrihydrite were a function of OM content and Fe(II) concentration. At low Fe(II) levels, OM completely inhibited goethite formation and stimulated lepidocrocite formation. At high Fe(II) levels, whereas goethite was formed in the presence of OM, OM reduced the amount of goethite and magnetite formation and increased the formation of lepidocrcocite. The solid-phase C content remained unchanged after reaction, while OM desorpability by H2PO4- was enhanced following reaction of OM-ferrihydrites with aqueous Fe(II). These findings provide insights into the reactivity of natural ferrihydrite containing OM in soils and sediments and the subsequent impact on mineral evolution and C dynamics.

  17. HIGH CRYSTALLINITY SI-FERRIHYDRITE: AN INSIGHT INTO ITS NÉEL TEMPERATURE AND SIZE DEPENDENCE OF MAGNETIC PROPERTIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ferrihydrite, an antiferromagnetic iron oxyhydroxide, is of great importance for the cycling of many trace metals in the environment. Four ferrihydrite samples prepared with 1.3 to 3.5 wt% of Si at different synthesis temperatures (7.5 °C, 22 °C, 50 °C and 75 °C) were studied by ...

  18. Synthesis and phase transformations involving scorodite, ferric arsenate and arsenical ferrihydrite: Implications for arsenic mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paktunc, Dogan; Dutrizac, John; Gertsman, Valery

    2008-06-01

    Scorodite, ferric arsenate and arsenical ferrihydrite are important arsenic carriers occurring in a wide range of environments and are also common precipitates used by metallurgical industries to control arsenic in effluents. Solubility and stability of these compounds are controversial because of the complexities in their identification and characterization in heterogeneous media. To provide insights into the formation of scorodite, ferric arsenate and ferrihydrite, series of synthesis experiments were carried out at 70 °C and pH 1, 2, 3 and 4.5 from 0.2 M Fe(SO 4) 1.5 solutions also containing 0.02-0.2 M Na 2HAsO 4. The precipitates were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption fine structure techniques. Ferric arsenate, characterized by two broad diffuse peaks on the XRD pattern and having the structural formula of FeAsO 4·4-7H 2O, is a precursor to scorodite formation. As defined by As XAFS and Fe XAFS, the local structure of ferric arsenate is profoundly different than that of scorodite. It is postulated that the ferric arsenate structure is made of single chains of corner-sharing Fe(O,OH) 6 octahedra with bridging arsenate tetrahedra alternating along the chains. Scorodite was precipitated from solutions with Fe/As molar ratios of 1 over the pH range of 1-4.5. The pH strongly controls the kinetics of scorodite formation and its transformation from ferric arsenate. The scorodite crystallite size increased from 7 to 33 nm by ripening and aggregation. Precipitates, resulting from continuous synthesis at pH 4.5 from solutions having Fe/As molar ratios ranging from 1 to 4 and resembling the compounds referred to as ferric arsenate, arsenical ferrihydrite and As-rich hydrous ferric oxide in the literature, represent variable mixtures of ferric arsenate and ferrihydrite. When the Fe/As ratio increases, the proportion of ferrihydrite increases at the expense of ferric arsenate. Arsenate adsorption appears to retard

  19. Synthetic coprecipitates of exopolysaccharides and ferrihydrite. Part I: Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikutta, Christian; Mikutta, Robert; Bonneville, Steeve; Wagner, Friedrich; Voegelin, Andreas; Christl, Iso; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2008-02-01

    Iron(III) (hydr)oxides formed at extracellular biosurfaces or in the presence of exopolymeric substances of microbes and plants may significantly differ in their structural and physical properties from their inorganic counterparts. We synthesized ferrihydrite (Fh) in solutions containing acid polysaccharides [polygalacturonic acid (PGA), alginate, xanthan] and compared its properties with that of an abiotic reference by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, gas adsorption (N 2, CO 2), X-ray absorption spectroscopy, 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, and electrophoretic mobility measurements. The coprecipitates formed contained up to 37 wt% polymer. Two-line Fh was the dominant mineral phase in all precipitates. The efficacy of polymers to precipitate Fh at neutral pH was higher for polymers with more carboxyl C (PGA ˜ alginate > xanthan). Pure Fh had a specific surface area of 300 m 2/g; coprecipitation of Fh with polymers reduced the detectable mineral surface area by up to 87%. Likewise, mineral micro- (<2 nm) and mesoporosity (2-10 nm) decreased by up to 85% with respect to pure Fh, indicative of a strong aggregation of Fh particles by polymers in freeze-dried state. C-1s STXM images showed the embedding of Fh particles in polymer matrices on the micrometer scale. Iron EXAFS spectroscopy revealed no significant changes in the local coordination of Fe(III) between pure Fh and Fh contained in PGA coprecipitates. 57Fe Mössbauer spectra of coprecipitates confirmed Fh as dominant mineral phase with a slightly reduced particle size and crystallinity of coprecipitate-Fh compared to pure Fh and/or a limited magnetic super-exchange between Fh particles in the coprecipitates due to magnetic dilution by the polysaccharides. The pH iep of pure Fh in 0.01 M NaClO 4 was 7.1. In contrast, coprecipitates of PGA and alginate had a pH iep < 2. Considering the differences in specific surface area, porosity, and net charge between the coprecipitates and pure Fh

  20. Bioaccessibility Of Lead Sequestered To Corundum and Ferrihydrite In A Simulated Gastrointestinal System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead (Pb) sorption onto oxide surfaces in soils may strongly influence the risk posed from incidental ingestion of Pb-contaminated soil. Lead was sorbed to model oxide minerals of corundum (α-Al2O3) and ferrihydrite (Fe5HO8•4H2

  1. Confined Metastable 2-Line Ferrihydrite for Affordable Point-of-Use Arsenic-Free Drinking Water.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Avula Anil; Som, Anirban; Longo, Paolo; Sudhakar, Chennu; Bhuin, Radha Gobinda; Gupta, Soujit Sen; Anshup; Sankar, Mohan Udhaya; Chaudhary, Amrita; Kumar, Ramesh; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2017-02-01

    Arsenic-free drinking water, independent of electrical power and piped water supply, is possible only through advanced and affordable materials with large uptake capacities. Confined metastable 2-line ferrihydrite, stable at ambient temperature, shows continuous arsenic uptake in the presence of other complex species in natural drinking water and an affordable water-purification device is made using the same.

  2. Microbial sulfidogenesis in ferrihydrite-rich environments: Effects on iron mineralogy and arsenic mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Edward D.; Johnston, Scott G.; Bush, Richard T.

    2011-06-01

    Microbial sulfidogenesis plays a potentially important role in Fe and As biogeochemistry within wetland soils, sediments and aquifers. This study investigates the specific effects of microbial sulfidogenesis on Fe mineralogy and associated As mobility in mildly acidic (pH 6) and mildly basic (pH 8) advective-flow environments. A series of experiments were conducted using advective-flow columns, with an initial solid-phase comprising As(III)-bearing ferrihydrite-coated quartz sand. Columns for each pH treatment were inoculated with the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris, and were compared to additional abiotic control columns. Over a period of 28 days, microbial sulfidogenesis (as coupled to the incomplete oxidation of lactate) caused major changes in Fe mineralogy, including replacement of ferrihydrite by mackinawite and magnetite at the in-flow end of the inoculated columns. At pH 8, the Fe 2+ produced by electron transfer between sulfide and ferrihydrite was mainly retained near its zone of formation. In contrast, at pH 6, much of the produced Fe 2+ was transported with advecting groundwater, facilitating the downstream Fe 2+-catalyzed transformation of ferrihydrite to goethite. At both pH 6 and pH 8, the sulfide-driven reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite and its replacement by mackinawite at the in-flow end of the inoculated columns resulted in substantial mobilization of As into the pore-water. At pH 8, this caused the downstream As concentrations within the inoculated columns to be greater than the corresponding abiotic column. However, the opposite occurred under pH 6 conditions, with the Fe 2+-catalyzed transformation of ferrihydrite to goethite in the inoculated columns causing a decrease in downstream As concentrations compared to the abiotic column. Although thermodynamically favorable at intermediate times and depth intervals within the inoculated columns, solid As sulfide phases were undetectable by As XANES spectroscopy. Our findings

  3. Photo-catalyzed p-nitrophenol degradation in aqueous dispersions of ferrihydrite and H2O2.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongjuan; Chen, Rufen; Liu, Hui; Wei, Yu; Wu, Dong

    2014-09-01

    Nitrophenols are hazardous and toxic to living organisms. For this study, ferrihydrite was prepared to test its capabilities for p-nitrophenol degradation. A ferrihydrite particle prepared in neutral environmental conditions is sphere-like with a diameter of 2-4 nm and its total surface area is approximately 229 m2 x g(-1). The combination of ferrihydrite and trace H2O2 is effective for the degradation of p-nitrophenol under simulated sunlight irradiation. Hydroquinone, the initial intermediate of p-nitrophenol decomposition, autocatalyses the subsequent degradation of p-nitrophenol because it accelerates the photo-reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite. The effect of key operating parameters such as ferrihydrite dosage, initial solution pH and H2O2 dosage were also studied on the photocatalytic degradation of p-nitrophenol. The results indicate that the combination of 0.2 g x L(-1) ferrihydrite, 0.45 mmol x L(-1) H2O2 is highly efficient for the degradation of p-nitrophenol (0.15 mmol x L(-1)) at pH 2.5-3.0. A ferrihydrite was reused several times, still keeping its original photocatalysis.

  4. Formation, stability, and solubility of metal oxide nanoparticles: Surface entropy, enthalpy, and free energy of ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiemstra, Tjisse

    2015-06-01

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) is an excellent model for understanding nanoparticle behavior in general. Moreover, Fh is one of the most important Fe (hydr) oxides in nature. Fh particles can be extremely small leading to a very high reactive surface area that changes its chemical potential, strongly affecting the solubility, nucleation, and stability. These characteristics can be coupled to the interfacial Gibbs free energy, being γ = 0.186 ± 0.01 J m-2 for Fh. The surface free energy has a relatively large contribution of surface entropy (-TSsurf = +0.079 ± 0.01 J m-2). The surface entropy is primarily related to the formation of surface groups by chemisorption of water (-17.1 J mol-1 K-1), for Fh equivalent with +0.064 ± 0.002 J m-2 at a surface loading NH2O = 12.6 μmol m-2. The entropy contribution of physisorbed water has been estimated by analyzing, as model, the surface enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs free energy of the principal interfaces of H2O, i.e. ice-water-gas. It is about 20% of the contribution of chemisorbed water. The surface enthalpy of Fh is exceptionally low (Hsurf = +0.107 ± 0.01 J m-2), which can be explained by surface depletion (SD) of relatively unstable Fe polyhedra, or similarly, by additional surface loading of the non-depleted mineral core with specific Fe polyhedra for stabilization. The experimental enthalpy of Fh formation varies linearly with the surface area and correctly predicts the enthalpy value for the mineral core (-405.2 ± 1.2 kJ mol FeO3/2), being similar to the literature value for Fh as virtual bulk material (-406.7 ± 1.5 kJ mol FeO3/2) obtained with MO/DFT computations. The thermochemical quantities of the mineral core and surface are essentially the same for the entire range of Fh samples, in line with the SD model. The solubility of Fh suspensions as a whole may differ from the behavior of individual particles due to polydispersity. For 2-line Fh, the overall solubility is log Kso ∼ -38.5 ± 0.1 and for prolongedly aged 6

  5. Diagenetic nanometric ferrihydrite clusters in 2.4 Ga carbonate banded iron formations from the Minas Supergroup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, R. R.; Wirth, R.; Orberger, B.

    2011-12-01

    Iron (oxyhydr)oxides, abundant on the Martian surface, can be formed via magmatic, hydrothermal, diagenetic or weathering processes. At present their formation are poorly understood. The study of Precambrian samples may be key to better understanding the Martian environmental conditions, past and present. Our FIB-TEM study of iron oxides from a banded iron formation (Gandarela Formation (2.4 Ga), Minas Supergroup, Minas Gerais, Brazil) provides a Precambrian terrestrial analogue for the formation of diagenetic ferrihydrite. A detailed mineralogical, petrological and FIB-TEM study of a carbonate banded iron formation (known locally as carbonate itabirites-CI) has revealed the presence of previously unknown nano-platelets of ferrihydrite, goethite and hematite hosted within dolomite. The CI are millimetrically alternating bands of pink dolomite and grey hematite. The fine sedimentary laminations, micritic sized dolomite crystals and nano (oxyhydr)oxide inclusions in the dolomite grains likely reflect a primary origin during deposition. The pink colour of the dolomite is a result of the nano inclusions of euhedral hematite (≤1 μm) and nano platelets of ferrihydrite and gothite (≥10 nm). The smallest ferrihydrites (~10 nm) are mostly rounded with a hint of a euhedral shape whereas the larger ferrihydrites (400 nm) are euhedral platelets. Clinochlore and talc indicate that the CI have experienced greenschist facies metamorphism at two major intervals; the Transamazonian at 2.1 Ga and the Brasiliano at 0.8 Ga. The ferrihydrites occur either as individual droplets or as clusters of up to 30 crystals. A common feature of all the ferrihydrite platelets is their close association with porosity indicating that the ferrihydrite platelets are a result of precipitation from fluid inclusions trapped within the dolomite during its formation. Deciphering the relative time of precipitation of the ferrihydrite is key in understanding the overall history of the rock. Dislocations

  6. Carbonate component reduces o,oEDDHA/Fe sorption on two-line ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunta, F.; Lucena, J. J.; Smolders, E.

    2012-04-01

    The o,oEDDHA/Fe is the most common and effective iron chelate used as fertilizer in calcareous soils. Several authors have reported that the anionic o,oEDDHA/Fe complex is adsorbed to soil components such as ferrihydrite. The bicarbonate anion may be a competing ion for this sorption, however no studies have yet identified the extent and mechanism of this interaction. The aim of this work was to study the carbonate (bicarbonate + carbonate) effect on EDDHA/Fe adsorption on two-line ferrihydrite. Two-line ferrihydrite was synthetized adding NaOH on a nitrate iron (III) solution up to a final pH to be 8.0 and allowing to age for 22 hours at 20°C. Dialyzed ferrihydrite was characterized by determining specific parameters such as Fe/OH ratio, BET surface, point zero of charge and x-ray diffraction. The sorption was performed at three pH levels (5, 7.5 and 9.5) and three initial carbonate concentrations (from 0 to 2 mM). Initial EDDHA/Fe, ferrihydrite and ionic strength concentrations were adjusted to 0.18 mM, 10 g L-1 and 5 mM respectively. Total dissolved FeEDDHA concentrations were quantified at 480 nm. The o,oEDDHA/Fe isomers (rac-o,oEDDHA/Fe and meso-o,oEDDHA/Fe) were separated and quantified by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) fitting a photodiode array detector (PDA). Distribution factor (KD) and sorbed o,oEDDHA/Fe concentration were determined. Actual carbonate concentration was determined using a multi N/C analyzer. Ferrihydrite samples showed a typical XRD pattern of two-line ferrihydrite, two broad peaks at about 35 and 62° respectively. The BET surfaces (two replicates) were 259.2 ± 3.1 m2/g and 256.0 ± 2.5 m2/g. The Point Zero of Salt Effect (PZSE) was 7.9 ± 0.2 as bibliographically supported for all fresh and thus not rigorously de-carbonated ferrihydrite samples. The KD of the o,oEDDHA/Fe increased from 27.4 ± 0.6 to 304 ± 6 l/kg by decreasing pH from 9.5 and 5.0 when no carbonate was added. Increasing equilibrium carbonate

  7. Secondary Mineralization of Ferrihydrite Affects Microbial Methanogenesis in Geobacter-Methanosarcina Cocultures

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jia; Ma, Jinlian; Tang, Ziyang; Yu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The transformation of ferrihydrite to stable iron oxides over time has important consequences for biogeochemical cycling of many metals and nutrients. The response of methanogenic activity to the presence of iron oxides depends on the type of iron mineral, but the effects of changes in iron mineralogy on methanogenesis have not been characterized. To address these issues, we constructed methanogenic cocultures of Geobacter and Methanosarcina strains with different ferrihydrite mineralization pathways. In this system, secondary mineralization products from ferrihydrite are regulated by the presence or absence of phosphate. In cultures producing magnetite as the secondary mineralization product, the rates of methanogenesis from acetate and ethanol increased by 30.2% and 135.3%, respectively, compared with a control lacking ferrihydrite. Biogenic magnetite was proposed to promote direct interspecies electron transfer between Geobacter and Methanosarcina in a manner similar to that of c-type cytochrome and thus facilitate methanogenesis. Vivianite biomineralization from ferrihydrite in the presence of phosphate did not significantly influence the methanogenesis processes. The correlation between magnetite occurrence and facilitated methanogenesis was supported by increased rates of methane production from acetate and ethanol with magnetite supplementation in the defined cocultures. Our data provide a new perspective on the important role of iron biomineralization in biogeochemical cycling of carbon in diverse anaerobic environments. IMPORTANCE It has been found that microbial methanogenesis is affected by the presence of iron minerals, and their influences on methanogenesis are associated with the mineralogical properties of the iron minerals. However, how changes in iron mineralogy affect microbial methanogenesis has not been characterized. To address this issue, we constructed methanogenic cocultures of Geobacter and Methanosarcina strains with different

  8. Reduction of ferrihydrite with adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter: microbial reduction by Geobacter bremensis vs. abiotic reduction by Na-dithionite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusterhues, K.; Hädrich, A.; Neidhardt, J.; Küsel, K.; Keller, T. F.; Jandt, K. D.; Totsche, K. U.

    2014-09-01

    Ferrihydrite is a widespread poorly crystalline Fe oxide which becomes easily coated by natural organic matter in the environment. This mineral-bound organic matter entirely changes the mineral surface properties and therefore the reactivity of the original mineral. Here, we investigated 2-line ferrihydrite, ferrihydrite with adsorbed organic matter, and ferrihydrite coprecipitated with organic matter for microbial and abiotic reduction of Fe(III). Ferrihydrite-organic matter associations with different organic matter loadings were reduced either by Geobacter bremensis or abiotically by Na-dithionite. Both types of experiments showed decreasing initial Fe-reduction rates and decreasing degrees of reduction with increasing amounts of mineral-bound organic matter. At similar organic matter loadings, coprecipitated ferrihydrites were more reactive than ferrihydrites with adsorbed organic matter. The difference can be explained by the smaller crystal size and poor crystallinity of such coprecipitates. At small organic matter loadings the poor crystallinity of coprecipitates led to even faster Fe-reduction rates than found for pure ferrihydrite. The amount of mineral-bound organic matter also affected the formation of secondary minerals: goethite was only found after reduction of organic matter-free ferrihydrite and siderite was only detected when ferrihydrites with relatively low amounts of mineral-bound organic matter were reduced. We conclude that direct contact of G. bremensis to the Fe oxide mineral surface was inhibited by attached organic matter. Consequently, mineral-bound organic matter shall be taken into account as a factor in slowing down reductive dissolution.

  9. Transformation of two-line ferrihydrite to goethite and hematite as a function of pH and temperature.

    PubMed

    Das, Soumya; Hendry, M Jim; Essilfie-Dughan, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Under oxic aqueous conditions, two-line ferrihydrite gradually transforms to more thermodynamically stable and more crystalline phases, such as goethite and hematite. This temperature- and pH-dependent transformation can play an important role in the sequestration of metals and metalloids adsorbed onto ferrihydrite. A comprehensive assessment of the crystallization of two-line ferrihydrite with respect to temperature (25, 50, 75, and 100 °C) and pH (2, 7, and 10) as a function of reaction time (minutes to months) was conducted via batch experiments. Pure and transformed phases were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The rate of transformation of two-line ferrihydrite to hematite increased with increasing temperature at all pHs studied and followed first-order reaction kinetics. XRD and XANES showed simultaneous formation of goethite and hematite at 50 and 75 °C at pH 10, with hematite being the dominant product at all pHs and temperatures. With extended reaction time, hematite increased while goethite decreased, and goethite reaches a minimum after 7 days. Observations suggest two-line ferrihydrite transforms to hematite via a two-stage crystallization process, with goethite being intermediary. The findings of this study can be used to estimate rates of crystallization of pure two-line ferrihydrite over the broad range of temperatures and pH found in nature.

  10. Effect of Phosphate on Surface Properties of Ferrihydrite and its Reactivity towards Aqueous Fe(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, D.; Schroeder, C.; Haderlein, S.

    2012-12-01

    The iron redox cycle plays a prominent role for the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and metals as well as transformation of contaminants in soils, sediments and aquifers. The mineral surface acts as a sorption site for Fe(II), which becomes partially oxidized upon sorption [1]. According to Gorski and Scherer [2], the electron is transferred to the bulk mineral, where it may be stored in a conduction band leading to an increased reductive potential of the system. Iron (hydr)oxides also exhibit a high sorption capacity for phosphate which forms strong surface complexes with iron. Phosphate is a common constituent of pore waters as a result of agricultural fertilizers, and is frequently used by microbiologists as buffer in laboratory experiments. We investigated the effect of phosphate on the oxidation of Fe(II) in the presence of ferrihydrite minerals in batch reactors. We synthesized three different ferrihydrites: untreated ferrihydrite (Fh); phosphate-coated ferrihydrite (pc-Fh), where phosphate was added to suspensions of pure ferrihydrite and allowed to sorb to the mineral surface; and phosphate-doped ferrihydrite (pd-Fh), where phosphate co-precipitated with ferrihydrite and was included in the bulk mineral structure. Nitrobenzene was used as model oxidant to study ferrous iron oxidation in anoxic Fh-Fe(II) suspensions. Fe(II) oxidation was much slower in the presence of pc-Fh and pd-Fh compared to untreated Fh. Using Mössbauer spectroscopy, we added dissolved Fe(II) either as pure 57Fe (Mössbauer-active) to analyse for the iron fraction associated with the minerals surface, or as 56Fe (Mössbauer-inactive) to focus on the bulk mineral only. We took Mössbauer spectra for each system before and after Fe(II) oxidation by nitrobenzene. Surface bound Fe(II) was oxidized by two processes: e-transfer to structural Fe(III) in Fh and nitrobenzene reduction. The oxidation product was lepidocrocite which increased with nitrobenzene reduction. Phosphate-doped and

  11. Control of Earth-like magnetic fields on the transformation of ferrihydrite to hematite and goethite

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhaoxia; Liu, Qingsong; Dekkers, Mark J.; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José; Roberts, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Hematite and goethite are the two most abundant iron oxides in natural environments. Their formation is controlled by multiple environmental factors; therefore, their relative concentration has been used widely to indicate climatic variations. In this study, we aimed to test whether hematite and goethite growth is influenced by ambient magnetic fields of Earth-like values. Ferrihydrite was aged at 95 °C in magnetic fields ranging from ~0 to ~100 μT. Our results indicate a large influence of the applied magnetic field on hematite and goethite growth from ferrihydrite. The synthesized products are a mixture of hematite and goethite for field intensities <~60 μT. Higher fields favour hematite formation by accelerating ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite aggregation. Additionally, hematite particles growing in a controlled magnetic field of ~100 μT appear to be arranged in chains, which may be reduced to magnetite keeping its original configuration, therefore, the presence of magnetic particles in chains in natural sediments cannot be used as an exclusive indicator of biogenic magnetite. Hematite vs. goethite formation in our experiments is influenced by field intensity values within the range of geomagnetic field variability. Thus, geomagnetic field intensity could be a source of variation when using iron (oxyhydr-)oxide concentrations in environmental magnetism. PMID:27458091

  12. Control of Earth-like magnetic fields on the transformation of ferrihydrite to hematite and goethite.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhaoxia; Liu, Qingsong; Dekkers, Mark J; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José; Roberts, Andrew P

    2016-07-26

    Hematite and goethite are the two most abundant iron oxides in natural environments. Their formation is controlled by multiple environmental factors; therefore, their relative concentration has been used widely to indicate climatic variations. In this study, we aimed to test whether hematite and goethite growth is influenced by ambient magnetic fields of Earth-like values. Ferrihydrite was aged at 95 °C in magnetic fields ranging from ~0 to ~100 μT. Our results indicate a large influence of the applied magnetic field on hematite and goethite growth from ferrihydrite. The synthesized products are a mixture of hematite and goethite for field intensities <~60 μT. Higher fields favour hematite formation by accelerating ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite aggregation. Additionally, hematite particles growing in a controlled magnetic field of ~100 μT appear to be arranged in chains, which may be reduced to magnetite keeping its original configuration, therefore, the presence of magnetic particles in chains in natural sediments cannot be used as an exclusive indicator of biogenic magnetite. Hematite vs. goethite formation in our experiments is influenced by field intensity values within the range of geomagnetic field variability. Thus, geomagnetic field intensity could be a source of variation when using iron (oxyhydr-)oxide concentrations in environmental magnetism.

  13. Surface chemistry of ferrihydrite: Part 1. EXAFS studies of the geometry of coprecipitated and adsorbed arsenate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waychunas, G.A.; Rea, B.A.; Fuller, C.C.; Davis, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    EXAFS spectra were collected on both the As and Fe K-edges from samples of two-line ferrihydrite with adsorbed (ADS) and coprecipitated (CPT) arsenate prepared over a range of conditions and arsenate surface coverages. Spectra also were collected for arsenate adsorbed on the surfaces of three FeOOH crystalline polymorphs, ?? (goethite), ?? (akaganeite), and ?? (lepidocrocite), and as a free ion in aqueous: solution. Analyses of the As EXAFS show clear evidence for inner sphere bidentate (bridging) arsenate complexes on the ferrihydrite surface and on the surfaces of the crystalline FeOOH polymorphs. The bridging arsenate is attached to adjacent apices of edge-sharing Fe oxyhydroxyl octahedra. The arsenic-iron distance at the interface (3.28 ??0.01 A ??) is close to that expected for this geometry on the FeOOH polymorph surfaces, but is slightly shorter on the ferrihydrite surfaces (3.25 ?? 0.02 A ??). Mono-dentate arsenate linkages (3.60 ?? 0.03 A ??) also occur on the ferrihydrite, but are not generally observed on the crystalline FeOOH polymorphs. The proportion of monodentate bonds appears largest for adsorption samples with the smallest As Fe molar ratio. In all cases the arsenate tetrahedral complex is relatively undistorted with As-O bonds of 1.66 ?? 0.01 A ??. Precipitation of arsenate or scorodite-like phases was not observed for any samples, all of which were prepared at a pH value of 8. The Fe EXAFS results confirm that the Fe-Fe correlations in the ferrihydrite are progressively disrupted in the CPT samples as the As Fe ratio is increased. Coherent crystallite size is probably no more than 10 A?? in diameter and no Fe oxyhydroxyl octahedra corner-sharing linkages (as would be present in FeOOH polymorphs) are observed at the largest As Fe ratios. Comparison of the number and type of Fe-Fe neighbors with the topological constraints imposed by the arsenate saturation limit in the CPT samples (about 0.7 As Fe) indicates ferrihydrite units consisting mainly

  14. Stability and fate of ferrihydrite during episodes of water/rock interactions on early Mars: An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehouck, Erwin; McLennan, Scott M.; Sklute, Elizabeth C.; Dyar, M. Darby

    2017-02-01

    The presence on the surface of Mars of ferrihydrite, a nanocrystalline iron oxide species, has long been suspected from spectroscopic observations and is further suggested by recent results from the Mars Exploration Rovers and Mars Science Laboratory robotic missions. However, because ferrihydrite is a metastable species in terrestrial environments, it is unclear what would have been its fate during episodes of water/rock interactions that are known to have occurred at the landing sites of the above-mentioned robotic missions. Accordingly, the laboratory experiments presented in this paper investigate the recrystallization of ferrihydrite under various conditions applicable to early Mars. These included low-temperature experiments (1 month at 40°C) at pH ranging from circum-neutral to strongly acidic, and high-temperature experiments (8 days at 150°C) at circum-neutral pH. The effect of mixtures with other mineral phases (namely, amorphous silica and olivine) was also tested. Results obtained at low temperature are at odds with some earlier studies and suggest that ferrihydrite behaves differently in rock-dominated conditions compared to water-dominated conditions. The coexistence of amorphous silica favored the formation of jarosite under low-temperature, acidic conditions, whereas a sample of pure ferrihydrite produced only goethite under the same conditions. At high temperature, ferrihydrite converted into hematite in all samples, but the ferrihydrite-silica mixture led to hematite with much broader diffraction peaks than other experiments, indicating an inhibiting effect of dissolved silica on the recrystallization process. The implications of these results for the aqueous history of early Mars are discussed.

  15. Properties of impurity-bearing ferrihydrite I. Effects of Al content and precipitation rate on the structure of 2-line ferrihydrite

    SciTech Connect

    Cismasu, A. Cristina; Michel, F. Marc; Stebbins, Jonathan F.; Levard, Clément; Brown, Jr., Gordon E.

    2012-10-11

    The association of Al with ferrihydrite (Fh) may have a considerable effect on the composition, structure, and surface properties of Fh nanoparticles, and thus impact its reactivity and interaction with pollutant species. Aluminous Fh is abundant in natural environments, but the mode of association of Al with this nanomineral is not yet fully understood. Al{sup 3+} speciation may vary from true chemical substitution for Fe{sup 3+}, to adsorption or surface precipitation, and/or to formation of a mixture of two (or more) individual nanoscale phases. The conditions of formation (i.e. slow vs. rapid precipitation) may also affect the nature of Fh nanoparticles in terms of their crystallinity, phase purity, and Al speciation. In this study we used a variety of laboratory (TEM, NMR, ICP-AES) and synchrotron-based techniques (X-ray total scattering and PDF analysis, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, Al K-edge XANES spectroscopy) to characterize two synthetic Al-bearing Fh series formed at different precipitation rates in the presence of 5-40 mol% Al. We find that Al is dominantly octahedrally coordinated in the synthetic Fh samples and that up to 20-30 mol% Al substitutes for Fe in the Fh structure, regardless of the synthesis method we used. Formation of separate aluminous phases (e.g., gibbsite) was most significant at Al concentrations above 30 mol% Al in slowly precipitated samples. However, small amounts (<6% of total Al) of Al-hydroxide phases were also detected by NMR spectroscopy in samples with lower Al content (as low as 15 mol% Al), particularly in the Fh series that was precipitated slowly. Furthermore, it appears that the amount of Al incorporated in Fh is not affected by the synthesis methods we used and is more likely controlled by the accumulated strain caused by Al substitution in the Fh lattice. Given the prevalence of naturally occurring aluminous ferrihydrite, assumptions about ferrihydrite reactivity in natural environments should consider the

  16. Oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  17. Formation of ferrihydrite and associated iron corrosion products in permeable reactive barriers of zero-valent iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furukawa, Yoko; Kim, Jin-Wook; Watkins, Janet; Wilkin, Richard T.

    2002-01-01

    Ferrihydrite, which is known to form in the presence of oxygen and to be stabilized by the adsorption of Si, PO4 and SO4, is ubiquitous in the fine-grained fractions of permeable reactive barrier (PRB) samples from the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center (Elizabeth City, NC) and the Denver Federal Center (Lakewood, CO) studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. The concurrent energy-dispersive X-ray data indicate a strong association between ferrihydrite and metals such as Si, Ca, and Cr. Magnetite, green rust 1, aragonite, calcite, mackinawite, greigite and lepidocrocite were also present, indicative of a geochemical environment that is temporally and spatially heterogeneous. Whereas magnetite, which is known to form due to anaerobic Fe0 corrosion, passivates the Fe0 surface, ferrihydrite precipitation occurs away from the immediate Fe0 surface, forming small (<0.1 microm) discrete clusters. Consequently, Fe0-PRBs may remain effective for a longer period of time in slightly oxidized groundwater systems where ferrihydrite formation occurs compared to oxygen-depleted systems where magnetite passivation occurs. The ubiquitous presence of ferrihydrite suggests that the use of Fe0-PRBs may be extended to applications that require contaminant adsorption rather than, or in addition to, redox-promoted contaminant degradation.

  18. Chemical analysis for optimal synthesis of ferrihydrite-modified diatomite using soft X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wenhui; Peng, Jian; Hu, Yongfeng

    2009-12-01

    Effects of process parameters such as concentrations of FeCl2, NaOH, and drying temperature on the formation mechanism and chemical characteristics of ferrihydrite-modified diatomite are studied by using X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. The spectra were recorded in total electron yield mode and/or fluorescence yield mode to investigate the chemical nature of Fe and Si on the surface and/or in the bulk of ferrihydrite-modified diatomite, respectively. It was found that only the surface SiO2 was partially dissolved in the NaOH solution with stirring and heating, whereas the bulk of diatomite seemed to be preserved. The dissolved Si was incorporated into the structure of ferrihydrite to form the 2-line Si-containing ferrihydrite on the surface of diatomite. The crystalline degree of ferrihydrite increased with the increasing FeCl2 concentration and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area of ferrihydrite-modified diatomite decreased with the increasing FeCl2 concentration. The crystalline degree of ferrihydrite decreased with the increase of NaOH concentration. The high temperature calcination caused an energy shift in the Si L-edge spectra to the high energy side and a transformation of Si-containing ferrihydrite to crystallized hematite might occur when ferrihydrite-modified diatomite is calcined at 900°C. In this study, the optimal synthesis conditions for the ferrihydrite-modified diatomite with the least crystalline Si-containing ferrihydrite and the highest surface area were found to be as the follows: 0.5 M FeCl2 solution, 6 M NaOH solution and drying temperature of 50°C.

  19. Surface complexation of ferrous iron and carbonate on ferrihydrite and the mobilization of arsenic.

    PubMed

    Appelo, C A J; Van Der Weiden, M J J; Tournassat, C; Charlet, L

    2002-07-15

    Surface complexation models are commonly used to predict the mobility of trace metals in aquifers. For arsenic in groundwater, surface complexation models cannot be used because the database is incomplete. Both carbonate and ferrous iron are often present at a high concentration in groundwater and will influence the sorption of arsenic, but the surface complexation constants are absent in the database of Dzombak and Morel. This paper presents the surface complexation constants for carbonate and ferrous iron on ferrihydrite as derived for the double-layer model. For ferrous iron the constants were obtained from published data supplemented by new experiments to determine the sorption on the strong sites of ferrihydrite. For carbonate the constants were derived from experiments by Zachara et al., who employed relatively low concentrations of carbonate. The double-layer model, optimized for low concentrations, was tested against sorption experiments of carbonate on goethite at higher concentration by Villalobos and Leckie, and reasonable agreement was found. Sorption was also estimated using linear free energy relations (LFER), and results compared well with our derived constants. Model calculations confirm that sorption of particularly carbonate at common soil and groundwater concentrations reduces the sorption capacity of arsenic on ferrihydrite significantly. The displacing effect of carbonate on sorbed arsenate and arsenite has been overlooked in many studies. It may be an important cause for the high concentrations of arsenic in groundwater in Bangladesh. Sediments containing high amounts of sorbed arsenic are deposited in surface water with low carbonate concentrations. Subsequently the sediments become exposed to groundwater with a high dissolved carbonate content, and arsenic is mobilized by displacement from the sediment surface.

  20. The effect of calcium on aqueous uranium(VI) speciation and adsorption to ferrihydrite and quartz

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fox, P.M.; Davis, J.A.; Zachara, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies of uranium(VI) geochemistry have focused on the potentially important role of the aqueous species, CaUO2 (CO3)32- and Ca2 UO2(CO3)30(aq), on inhibition of microbial reduction and uranium(VI) aqueous speciation in contaminated groundwater. However, to our knowledge, there have been no direct studies of the effects of these species on U(VI) adsorption by mineral phases. The sorption of U(VI) on quartz and ferrihydrite was investigated in NaNO3 solutions equilibrated with either ambient air (430 ppm CO2) or 2% CO2 in the presence of 0, 1.8, or 8.9 mM Ca2+. Under conditions where the Ca2UO2(CO3)30 (aq) species predominates U(VI) aqueous speciation, the presence of Ca in solution lowered U(VI) adsorption on quartz from 77% in the absence of Ca to 42% and 10% at Ca concentrations of 1.8 and 8.9 mM, respectively. U(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite decreased from 83% in the absence of Ca to 57% in the presence of 1.8 mM Ca. Surface complexation model predictions that included the formation constant for aqueous Ca2UO2(CO3)30(aq) accurately simulated the effect of Ca2+ on U(VI) sorption onto quartz and ferrihydrite within the thermodynamic uncertainty of the stability constant value. This study confirms that Ca2+ can have a significant impact on the aqueous speciation of U(VI), and consequently, on the sorption and mobility of U(VI) in aquifers. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Surface chemistry of ferrihydrite: Part 2. Kinetics of arsenate adsorption and coprecipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, C.C.; Dadis, J.A.; Waychunas, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of As(V) adsorption by ferrihydrite was investigated in coprecipitation and postsynthesis adsorption experiments conducted in the pH range 7.5-9.0. In coprecipitation experiments, As(V) was present in solution during the hydrolysis and precipitation of iron. In adsorption experiments, a period of rapid (<5 min) As(V) uptake from solution was followed by continued uptake for at least eight days, as As(V) diffused to adsorption sites on ferrihydrite surfaces within aggregates of colloidal particles. The time dependence of As(V) adsorption is well described by a general model for diffusion into a sphere if a subset of surface sites located near the exterior of aggregates is assumed to attain adsorptive equilibrium rapidly. The kinetics of As(V) desorption after an increase in pH were also consistent with diffusion as a rate-limiting process. Aging of pure ferrihydrite prior to As(V) adsorption caused a decrease in adsorption sites on the precipitate owing to crystallite growth. In coprecipitation experiments, the initial As(V) uptake was significantly greater than in post-synthesis adsorption experiments, and the rate of uptake was not diffusion limited because As(V) was coordinated by surface sites before crystallite growth and coagulation processes could proceed. After the initial adsorption, As(V) was slowly released from coprecipitates for at least one month, as crystallite growth caused desorption of As(V). Adsorption densities as high as 0.7 mole As(V) per mole of Fe were measured in coprecipitates, in comparison to 0.25 mole As(V) per mole of Fe in post-synthesis adsorption experiments. Despite the high Concentration of As(V) in the precipitates, EXAFS spectroscopy (Waychunas et al., 1993) showed that neither ferric arsenate nor any other As-bearing surface precipitate or solid solution was formed. The high adsorption densities are possible because the ferrihydrite particles are extremely small, approaching the size of small dioctahedral chains at

  2. Reflectance and Mossbauer spectroscopy of ferrihydrite-montmorillonite assemblages as Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Burns, R. G.; Chang, S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Spectroscopic analyses show that Fe(3+)-doped smectites prepared in the laboratory exhibit important similarities to the soils on Mars. Ferrihydrite has been identified as the interlayer ferric component in Fe(3+)-doped smectites by a low quadrupole splitting and magnetic field strength of approximately 48 tesla in Mossbauer spectra measured at 4.2 K, as well as a crystal field transition at 0.92 micrometer. Ferrihydrite in these smectites explains features in the visible-near infrared region that resemble the energies and band strengths of features in reflectance spectra observed for several bright regions on Mars. Clay silicates have met resistance in the past as Mars soil analogs because terrestrial clay silicates exhibit prominent hydrous spectral features at 1.4, 1.9, and 2.2 micrometers; and these are observed weakly, if at all, in reflectance spectra of Mars. However, several mechanisms can weaken or compress these features, including desiccation under low-humidity conditions. The hydration properties of the interlayer cations also effect band strengths, such that a ferrihydrite-bearing smectite in the Martian environment would exhibit a 1.9 micrometers H2O absorption that is even weaker than the 2.2 micrometers structural OH absorption. Mixing experiments demonstrate that infrared spectral features of clays can be significantly suppressed and that the reflectance can be significantly darkened by mixing with only a few percent of a strongly absorbing opaque material. Therefore, the absolute reflectance of a soil on Mars may be disproportionately sensitive to a minor component. For this reason, the shape and position of spectral features and the chemical composition of potential analogs are of utmost importance in assessing the composition of the soil on Mars. Given the remarkable similarity between visible-infrared reflectance spectra of soils in bright regions on Mars and Fe(3+)-doped montmorillonites, coupled with recent observations of smectites in SNC

  3. Phosphate effects on copper(II) and lead(II) sorption to ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiberg, Charlotta; Sjöstedt, Carin; Persson, Ingmar; Gustafsson, Jon Petter

    2013-11-01

    Transport of lead(II) and copper(II) ions in soil is affected by the soil phosphorus status. Part of the explanation may be that phosphate increases the adsorption of copper(II) and lead(II) to iron (hydr)oxides in soil, but the details of these interactions are poorly known. Knowledge about such mechanisms is important, for example, in risk assessments of contaminated sites and development of remediation methods. We used a combination of batch experiments, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and surface complexation modeling with the three-plane CD-MUSIC model to study the effect of phosphate on sorption of copper(II) and lead(II) to ferrihydrite. The aim was to identify the surface complexes formed and to derive constants for the surface complexation reactions. In the batch experiments phosphate greatly enhanced the adsorption of copper(II) and lead(II) to ferrihydrite at pH < 6. The largest effects were seen for lead(II).

  4. A study on adsorption mechanism of organoarsenic compounds on ferrihydrite by XAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, N.

    2013-04-01

    Anthropogenic organoarsenic compounds which were used such as agrochemicals, pesticides, and herbicides can have a potential as a source of arsenic pollution in water. In the process, the adsorption of arsenic onto mineral surface in soil may play an important role to affect arsenic distribution in solid-water interface. However, adsorption structures of organoarsenic compounds on the iron-(oxyhydr)oxides are not well known. In this study, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was employed to know the adsorption structure of methyl- and phenyl-substituted organoarsenic compounds (methylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), phenylarsonic acid (PAA), and diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) onto ferrihydrite which can be a strong adsorbent of arsenic. EXAFS analysis suggests that the formation of inner-sphere surface complex for all organoarsenic compounds with ferrihydrite regardless of the organic functional groups and the number of substitution. The As-Fe distances are around 3.27 , which suggests both mono-and bi-dentate inner-sphere complexes by DFT calculations. The corresponding coordination numbers (CNs) are less than two, suggesting that coexistence of both structures of inner-sphere complexes.

  5. Characterization of the Adsorption of Nucleic Acid Bases onto Ferrihydrite via Fourier Transform Infrared and Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffractometry.

    PubMed

    Canhisares-Filho, José E; Carneiro, Cristine E A; de Santana, Henrique; Urbano, Alexandre; da Costa, Antonio C S; Zaia, Cássia T B V; Zaia, Dimas A M

    2015-09-01

    Minerals could have played an important role in concentration, protection, and polymerization of biomolecules. Although iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust, there are few works in the literature that describe the use of iron oxide-hydroxide in prebiotic chemistry experiments. In the present work, the interaction of adenine, thymine, and uracil with ferrihydrite was studied under conditions that resemble those of prebiotic Earth. At acidic pH, anions in artificial seawater decreased the pH at the point of zero charge (pHpzc) of ferrihydrite; and at basic pH, cations increased the pHpzc. The adsorption of nucleic acid bases onto ferrihydrite followed the order adenine > uracil > thymine. Adenine adsorption peaked at neutral pH; however, for thymine and uracil, adsorption increased with increasing pH. Electrostatic interactions did not appear to play an important role on the adsorption of nucleic acid bases onto ferrihydrite. Adenine adsorption onto ferrihydrite was higher in distilled water compared to artificial seawater. After ferrihydrite was mixed with artificial seawaters or nucleic acid bases, X-ray diffractograms and Fourier transform infrared spectra did not show any change. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy showed that the interaction of adenine with ferrihydrite was not pH-dependent. In contrast, the interactions of thymine and uracil with ferrihydrite were pH-dependent such that, at basic pH, thymine and uracil lay flat on the surface of ferrihydrite, and at acidic pH, thymine and uracil were perpendicular to the surface. Ferrihydrite adsorbed much more adenine than thymine; thus adenine would have been better protected against degradation by hydrolysis or UV radiation on prebiotic Earth.

  6. Simultaneous lead and antimony immobilization in shooting range soil by a combined application of hydroxyapatite and ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shouhei; Katoh, Masahiko; Sato, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether a combined application of hydroxyapatite and ferrihydrite could immobilize lead and antimony in shooting range soil in which the level of lead contamination is markedly higher than that of antimony. In addition, we evaluated the stability of lead and antimony immobilized by the combined application with varying soil pH. The levels of water-soluble lead and antimony for the combined application were lower than those of single applications of hydroxyapatite or ferrihydrite, indicating that the combined application could suppress the levels of water-soluble lead and antimony by 99.9% and 95.5%, respectively, as compared with the levels in shooting range soil without immobilization material. The amounts of residual lead and amorphous Fe/Al oxide-bound antimony fractions in sequential extraction increased with a decrease in the exchangeable and carbonate lead fractions as well as in non-specifically bound and specifically bound antimony fractions. The alteration of lead and antimony phases to chemically more stable ones as a result of the combined application would result in the suppression of their mobility. The stability of immobilized lead and antimony in the combined application was equal to that of lead with a single application of hydroxyapatite and that of antimony with a single application of ferrihydrite within neutral to alkaline pH conditions, respectively. Therefore, this study suggests that the combined application of hydroxyapatite and ferrihydrite can simultaneously immobilize lead and antimony in shooting range soil with neutral to alkaline pH.

  7. TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON THE SYNTHESIS OF SI-FERRIHYDRITE NANOPARTICLES OF VARIABLE SIZES IDENTIFIED BY MAGNETIC MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ferrihydrite is an antiferromagnetic iron oxyhydroxide formed as an ubiquitous product of natural iron diagenesis, and found in iron-containing water, soil, river sediment and oceanic crust. As such, it is a sensitive indicator or proxy of environmental change. This iron phase ha...

  8. Enhanced dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride by Geobacter sulfurreducens in the presence of naturally occurring quinones and ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Doong, Ruey-an; Lee, Chun-chi; Lien, Chia-min

    2014-02-01

    The effect of naturally occurring quinones including lawsone (LQ), ubiquinone (UQ), juglone (JQ), and 1,4-naphthoquinone (NQ) on the biotransformation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) in the presence of Geobacter sulfurreducens and ferrihydrite was investigated. AQDS was used as the model compound for comparison. The reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite by G. sulfurreducens was enhanced by AQDS, NQ, and LQ. However, addition of UQ and JQ had little enhancement effect on Fe(II) production. The bioreduction efficiency and rate of ferrihydrite was highly dependent on the natural property and concentration of quinone compounds and the addition of low concentrations of LQ and NQ significantly accelerated the biotransformation rate of CT. The pseudo-first-order rate constants for CT dechlorination (kobsCT) in AQDS-, LQ- and NQ-amended batches were 5.4-5.8, 4.6-7.4 and 2.4-5.8 times, respectively, higher than those in the absence of quinone. A good relationship between kobsCT for CT dechlorination and bioreduction ratio of ferrihydrite was observed, indicating the important role of biogenic Fe(II) in dechlorination of CT under iron-reducing conditions. Spectroscopic analysis showed that AQDS and NQ could be reduced to semiquinones and hydroquinones, while only hydroquinones were generated in LQ-amended batches.

  9. Decoupling of arsenic and iron release from ferrihydrite suspension under reducing conditions: a biogeochemical model

    PubMed Central

    Burnol, André; Garrido, Francis; Baranger, Philippe; Joulian, Catherine; Dictor, Marie-Christine; Bodénan, Françoise; Morin, Guillaume; Charlet, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    High levels of arsenic in groundwater and drinking water are a major health problem. Although the processes controlling the release of As are still not well known, the reductive dissolution of As-rich Fe oxyhydroxides has so far been a favorite hypothesis. Decoupling between arsenic and iron redox transformations has been experimentally demonstrated, but not quantitatively interpreted. Here, we report on incubation batch experiments run with As(V) sorbed on, or co-precipitated with, 2-line ferrihydrite. The biotic and abiotic processes of As release were investigated by using wet chemistry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption and genomic techniques. The incubation experiments were carried out with a phosphate-rich growth medium and a community of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria under strict anoxic conditions for two months. During the first month, the release of Fe(II) in the aqueous phase amounted to only 3% to 10% of the total initial solid Fe concentration, whilst the total aqueous As remained almost constant after an initial exchange with phosphate ions. During the second month, the aqueous Fe(II) concentration remained constant, or even decreased, whereas the total quantity of As released to the solution accounted for 14% to 45% of the total initial solid As concentration. At the end of the incubation, the aqueous-phase arsenic was present predominately as As(III) whilst X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated that more than 70% of the solid-phase arsenic was present as As(V). X-ray diffraction revealed vivianite Fe(II)3(PO4)2.8H2O in some of the experiments. A biogeochemical model was then developed to simulate these aqueous- and solid-phase results. The two main conclusions drawn from the model are that (1) As(V) is not reduced during the first incubation month with high Eh values, but rather re-adsorbed onto the ferrihydrite surface, and this state remains until arsenic reduction is energetically more favorable than iron reduction, and (2) the release of As

  10. The effect of calcium on aqueous uranium(VI) speciation and adsorption to ferrihydrite and quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Patricia M; Davis, James A; Zachara, John M

    2006-01-30

    Recent studies of uranium(VI) geochemistry have focused on the potentially important role of the aqueous species, CaUO2(CO3)32- and Ca2UO2(CO3)30(aq), on inhibition of microbial reduction and uranium(VI) aqueous speciation in contaminated groundwater. However, to our knowledge, there have been no direct studies of the effects of these species on U(VI) adsorption by mineral phases. The sorption of U(VI) on quartz and ferrihydrite was investigated in NaNO3 solutions equilibrated with either ambient air (430 ppm CO2) or 2% CO2 in the presence of 0, 1.8, or 8.9 mM Ca2+. Under conditions where the Ca2UO2(CO3)30(aq) species predominates U(VI) aqueous speciation, the presence of Ca in solution lowered U(VI) adsorption on quartz from 77% in the absence of Ca to 42% and 10% at Ca concentrations of 1.8 and 8.9 mM, respectively. U(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite decreased from 83% in the absence of Ca to 57% in the presence of 1.8 mM Ca. Surface complexation model predictions that included the formation constant for aqueous Ca2UO2(CO3)30(aq) accurately simulated the effect of Ca2+ on U(VI) sorption onto quartz and ferrihydrite within the thermodynamic uncertainty of the stability constant value. This study confirms that Ca2+ can have a significant impact on the aqueous speciation of U(VI), and consequently, on the sorption and mobility of U(VI) in aquifers.

  11. Impact of Redox Reactions on Colloid Transport in Saturated Porous Media: An Example of Ferrihydrite Colloids Transport in the Presence of Sulfide.

    PubMed

    Liao, Peng; Yuan, Songhu; Wang, Dengjun

    2016-10-18

    Transport of colloids in the subsurface is an important environmental process with most research interests centered on the transport in chemically stable conditions. While colloids can be formed under dynamic redox conditions, the impact of redox reactions on their transport is largely overlooked. Taking the redox reactions between ferrihydrite colloids and sulfide as an example, we investigated how and to what extent the redox reactions modulated the transport of ferrihydrite colloids in anoxic sand columns over a range of environmentally relevant conditions. Our results reveal that the presence of sulfide (7.8-46.9 μM) significantly decreased the breakthrough of ferrihydrite colloids in the sand column. The estimated travel distance of ferrihydrite colloids in the absence of sulfide was nearly 7-fold larger than that in the presence of 46.9 μM sulfide. The reduced breakthrough was primarily attributed to the reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite colloids by sulfide in parallel with formation of elemental sulfur (S(0)) particles from sulfide oxidation. Reductive dissolution decreased the total mass of ferrihydrite colloids, while the negatively charged S(0) decreased the overall zeta potential of ferrihydrite colloids by attaching onto their surfaces and thus enhanced their retention in the sand. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical role of redox reactions on the transport of redox-sensitive colloids in saturated porous media.

  12. An evaluation of least-squares fitting methods in XAFS spectroscopy: iron-based SBA-15 catalyst formulations.

    PubMed

    Huggins, Frank E; Kim, Dae-Jung; Dunn, Brian C; Eyring, Edward M; Huffman, Gerald P

    2009-06-01

    A detailed comparison has been made of determinations by (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and four different XAFS spectroscopic methods of %Fe as hematite and ferrihydrite in 11 iron-based SBA-15 catalyst formulations. The four XAFS methods consisted of least-squares fitting of iron XANES, d(XANES)/dE, and EXAFS (k(3)chi and k(2)chi) spectra to the corresponding standard spectra of hematite and ferrihydrite. The comparison showed that, for this particular application, the EXAFS methods were superior to the XANES methods in reproducing the results of the benchmark Mössbauer method in large part because the EXAFS spectra of the two iron-oxide standards were much less correlated than the corresponding XANES spectra. Furthermore, the EXAFS and Mössbauer results could be made completely consistent by inclusion of a factor of 1.3+/-0.05 for the ratio of the Mössbauer recoilless fraction of hematite relative to that of ferrihydrite at room temperature (293K). This difference in recoilless fraction is attributed to the nanoparticle nature of the ferrihydrite compared to the bulk nature of the hematite. Also discussed are possible alternative non-least-squares XAFS methods for determining the iron speciation in this application as well as criteria for deciding whether or not least-squares XANES methods should be applied for the determination of element speciation in unknown materials.

  13. An Evaluation of Least-Squares Fitting Methods in XAFS Spectroscopy: Iron-Based SBA-15 Catalyst Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, F.; Kim, D; Dunn, B; Eyring, E; Huffman, G

    2009-01-01

    A detailed comparison has been made of determinations by {sup 57}Fe M{umlt o}ssbauer spectroscopy and four different XAFS spectroscopic methods of %Fe as hematite and ferrihydrite in 11 iron-based SBA-15 catalyst formulations. The four XAFS methods consisted of least-squares fitting of iron XANES, d(XANES)/dE, and EXAFS (k{sup 3}chi and k{sup 2}chi) spectra to the corresponding standard spectra of hematite and ferrihydrite. The comparison showed that, for this particular application, the EXAFS methods were superior to the XANES methods in reproducing the results of the benchmark M{umlt o}ssbauer method in large part because the EXAFS spectra of the two iron-oxide standards were much less correlated than the corresponding XANES spectra. Furthermore, the EXAFS and M{umlt o}ssbauer results could be made completely consistent by inclusion of a factor of 1.3 {+-} 0.05 for the ratio of the M{umlt o}ssbauer recoilless fraction of hematite relative to that of ferrihydrite at room temperature (293 K). This difference in recoilless fraction is attributed to the nanoparticle nature of the ferrihydrite compared to the bulk nature of the hematite. Also discussed are possible alternative non-least-squares XAFS methods for determining the iron speciation in this application as well as criteria for deciding whether or not least-squares XANES methods should be applied for the determination of element speciation in unknown materials.

  14. Effect of silicic acid on arsenate and arsenite retention mechanisms on 6-L ferrihydrite: A spectroscopic and batch adsorption approach.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaodong; Root, Robert A; Farrell, James; Ela, Wendell; Chorover, Jon

    2013-11-01

    The competitive adsorption of arsenate and arsenite with silicic acid at the ferrihydrite-water interface was investigated over a wide pH range using batch sorption experiments, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and density functional theory (DFT) modeling. Batch sorption results indicate that the adsorption of arsenate and arsenite on the 6-L ferrihydrite surface exhibits a strong pH-dependence, and the effect of pH on arsenic sorption differs between arsenate and arsenite. Arsenate adsorption decreases consistently with increasing pH; whereas arsenite adsorption initially increases with pH to a sorption maximum at pH 7-9, where after sorption decreases with further increases in pH. Results indicate that competitive adsorption between silicic acid and arsenate is negligible under the experimental conditions; whereas strong competitive adsorption was observed between silicic acid and arsenite, particularly at low and high pH. In-situ, flow-through ATR-FTIR data reveal that in the absence of silicic acid, arsenate forms inner-sphere, binuclear bidentate, complexes at the ferrihydrite surface across the entire pH range. Silicic acid also forms inner-sphere complexes at ferrihydrite surfaces throughout the entire pH range probed by this study (pH 2.8 - 9.0). The ATR-FTIR data also reveal that silicic acid undergoes polymerization at the ferrihydrite surface under the environmentally-relevant concentrations studied (e.g., 1.0 mM). According to ATR-FTIR data, arsenate complexation mode was not affected by the presence of silicic acid. EXAFS analyses and DFT modeling confirmed that arsenate tetrahedra were bonded to Fe metal centers via binuclear bidentate complexation with average As(V)-Fe bond distance of 3.27 Å. The EXAFS data indicate that arsenite forms both mononuclear bidentate and binuclear bidentate complexes with 6-L ferrihydrite as indicated by two As

  15. Impact of ferrihydrite and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate on the reductive transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene by a gram-positive fermenting bacterium.

    PubMed

    Borch, Thomas; Inskeep, William P; Harwood, Jace A; Gerlach, Robin

    2005-09-15

    Batch studies were conducted to explore differences in the transformation pathways of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) reduction by a Gram-positive fermenting bacterium (Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6) in the presence and absence of ferrihydrite and the electron shuttle anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Strain ES6 was capable of TNT and ferrihydrite reduction with increased reduction rates in the presence of AQDS. Hydroxylaminodinitrotoluenes, 2,4-dihydroxylamino-6-nitrotoluene (2,4-DHANT), and tetranitroazoxytoluenes were the major metabolites observed in ferrihydrite- and AQDS-free systems in the presence of pure cell cultures. Ferrihydrite enhanced the production of amino derivatives because of reactions with microbially produced surface-associated Fe(ll). The presence of AQDS in the absence of ferrihydrite promoted the fast initial formation of arylhydroxylamines such as 2,4-DHANT. However, unlike in pure cell systems, these arylhydroxylamines were transformed into several unidentified polar products. When both microbially reduced ferrihydrite and AQDS were present simultaneously, the reduction of TNT was more rapid and complete via pathways thatwould have been difficult to infer solely from single component studies. This study demonstrates the complexity of TNT degradation patterns in model systems where the interactions among bacteria, Fe minerals, and organic matter have a pronounced effect on the degradation pathway of TNT.

  16. Iron and Carbon Dynamics during Aging and Reductive Transformation of Biogenic Ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Cismasu, A Cristina; Williams, Kenneth H; Nico, Peter S

    2016-01-05

    Natural organic matter is often associated with Fe(III) oxyhydroxides, and may be stabilized as a result of coprecipitation or sorption to their surfaces. However, the significance of this association in relation to Fe and C dynamics and biogeochemical cycling, and the mechanisms responsible for organic matter stabilization as a result of interaction with minerals under various environmental conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, etc.) are not entirely understood. The preservation of mineral-bound OM may be affected by OM structure and mineral identity, and bond types between OM and minerals may be central to influencing the stability, transformation and composition of both organic and mineral components under changing environmental conditions. Here we use bulk and submicron-scale spectroscopic synchrotron methods to examine the in situ transformation of OM-bearing, biogenic ferrihydrite stalks (Gallionella ferruginea-like), which formed following injection of oxygenated groundwater into a saturated alluvial aquifer at the Rifle, CO field site. A progression from oxidizing to reducing conditions during an eight-month period triggered the aging and reductive transformation of Gallionella-like ferrihydrite stalks to Fe (hydroxy)carbonates and Fe sulfides, as well as alteration of the composition and amount of OM. Spectromicroscopic measurements showed a gradual decrease in reduced carbon forms (aromatic/alkene, aliphatic C), a relative increase in amide/carboxyl functional groups and a significant increase in carbonate in the stalk structures, and the appearance of organic globules not associated with stalk structures. Biogenic stalks lost ∼30% of their initial organic carbon content. Conversely, a significant increase in bulk organic matter accompanied these transformations. The character of bulk OM changed in parallel with mineralogical transformations, showing an increase in aliphatic, aromatic and amide functional groups. These changes likely occurred as a result of an

  17. Synthetic coprecipitates of exopolysaccharides and ferrihydrite. Part II: Siderophore-promoted dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikutta, Christian; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2008-02-01

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) coprecipitated with exopolymers of plants and microbes may differ in its geochemical reactivity from its abiotic counterpart. We synthesized Fh in the presence and absence of acid polysaccharides (polygalacturonic acid (PGA), alginate, xanthan) and characterized the physical and structural properties of the precipitates formed [Mikutta C., Mikutta R., Bonneville S., Wagner F., Voegelin A., Christl I. and Kretzschmar R. (2008) Synthetic coprecipitates of exopolysaccharides and ferrihydrite. Part I: Characterization. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta]. In this paper, we focus on the reactivity of PGA and alginate coprecipitates and pure Fh, and studied their interaction with the microbial siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB) in the presence and absence of low molecular weight organic (LMWO) acid anions (malate, citrate). Batch adsorption and dissolution experiments were performed in the dark at pH 7 in 10 mM NaClO 4 background electrolyte. In the dissolution experiments, different modes of ligand addition were applied (single, simultaneous, stepwise). With an estimated Langmuir sorption maximum of 15 mmol/mol Fe, a PGA coprecipitate with 11% C org sorbed about four times as much DFOB as pure Fh, and the amount of DFOB sorbed was ˜4-fold larger than estimated from the sum of DFOB sorption to pure Fh and PGA alone. The apparent initial dissolution rates, Rapp-initial, and pseudo-first order rate coefficients, k, of the coprecipitates exceeded those of pure Fh by up to two orders of magnitude. Citrate and malate exerted a strong synergistic effect on the DFOB-promoted dissolution of pure Fh, whereas synergistic effects of both anions were absent or negligible for the coprecipitates. Rapp-initial of the citrate and DFOB-promoted dissolution of PGA coprecipitates increased with increasing molar C/Fe ratio of the coprecipitates, independent of the charge of the LMWO ligand. Our results indicate that polyuronates stabilize Fh particles sterically and /or

  18. Differential arsenic mobilization from As-bearing ferrihydrite by iron-respiring Shewanella strains with different arsenic-reducing activities.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shenghua; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Donghun; Kanaly, Robert A; Kim, Min-Gyu; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2013-08-06

    Arsenic immobilization and release in the environment is significantly influenced by bacterial oxidation and reduction of arsenic and arsenic-bearing minerals. In this study, we tested three iron-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Shewanella sp. HN-41, and Shewanella putrefaciens 200, which have diverse arsenate-reducing activities with regard to reduction of an As-bearing ferrihydrite slurry. In the cultures of S. oneidensis MR-1 and Shewanella sp. HN-41, which are not capable of respiratory reduction of As(V) to As(III), arsenic was maintained predominantly in its pentavalent form, existing in particulate poorly crystalline As-bearing ferrihydrite and formed small quantities of a stable ferrous arsenate [Fe3(AsO4)2] precipitate. However, in the culture of the As(V) reducer, S. putrefaciens 200, As(V) was reduced to As(III) and a small fraction of As-bearing ferrihydrite was transformed into ribbon-shaped siderite that subsequently re-released arsenic into the liquid phase. Our results indicated that release of arsenic and formation of diverse secondary nanoscale Fe-As minerals are specifically closely related to the arsenic-reducing abilities of different bacteria. Therefore, bacterial arsenic reduction appears to significantly influence As mobilization in soils, minerals, and other Fe-rich environments.

  19. Reforming catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Givens, E.N.; Plank, C.J.; Rosinski, E.J.

    1980-03-04

    Crystalline aluminosilicate zeolites are mixed with conventional reforming catalysts to produce new catalytic compositions with high catalytic activity and selectivity and excellent aging characteristics. These new catalytic compositions may be utilized alone or in conjunction with conventional reforming catalysts. The acidic activity of the total catalyst system is controlled within defined limits. When so controlled the utility of these catalyst systems in reforming hydrocarbon mixtures is to reduce the C1 and C2 concentrations in reformer gas product, while increasing the C3 and C4 concentrations and maintaining high liquid yield at high octane numbers.

  20. Co-adsorption of phosphate and zinc(II) on the surface of ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zhu, Runliang; Xu, Tianyuan; Xu, Yin; Ge, Fei; Xi, Yunfei; Zhu, Jianxi; He, Hongping

    2016-02-01

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) is of great importance in affecting the migration and transformation of heavy-metal cations and oxyanions. To advance the understanding of co-adsorption reactions on Fh surface, the co-adsorption of phosphate and Zn(II) from aqueous solution to a synthesized Fh was determined. The batch experiments demonstrated a synergistic adsorption of phosphate and Zn(II) on Fh. In the pH range of 3.5-6, the adsorption of the two contaminants showed strong pH dependence in the single solute adsorption systems, but the dependence alleviated in the simultaneous adsorption system. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the chemical shifts of Zn 2p1/2 and Zn 2p3/2 binding energies were more significant than that of P 2p in the single and simultaneous adsorption systems. On the other side, in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) observed increased formation of outer- and inner-sphere complexes of phosphate in the simultaneous system. Thus, the synergistic adsorption of the two contaminants could be attributed to the formation of ternary complexes as well as electrostatic interactions, while surface precipitation could not be completely ruled out. On the basis of the results from both the batch adsorption experiments and structural characterization, these two contaminants were likely to form phosphate-bridged ternary complexes (≡Fe-P-Zn) in the simultaneous adsorption system.

  1. Low temperature XAFS investigation on the lutetium binding changes during the 2-line ferrihydrite alteration process.

    PubMed

    Dardenne, K; Schäfer, T; Lindqvist-Reis, P; Denecke, M A; Plaschke, M; Rothe, J; Kim, J I

    2002-12-01

    The time dependent changes of Lu speciation (used as Am(III) homologue), initially sorbed onto 2-line ferrihydrite at pH 5.9, during tempering (70 degrees C) to stable crystalline transformation products, goethite and hematite, is studied. Microscopies (AFM, SEM), XRD and FTIR spectroscopy confirm transformation to both goethite and hematite, with a predominance of hematite. XRD investigation of another transformation series at pH 8.0 (75 degrees C, [Lu(III)initial] 7 times higher) shows that the cell volume of hematite increases, suggesting the incorporation of Lu in the crystal structure. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) (pH 5.9 series, 70 degrees C) reveals a shortening of the Lu-O bond distance and an increase in asymmetry of the first shell with increasing tempering time in the intermediate temper time samples. The intensity of the second peak in the Fourier transform (FT) of the EXAFS increases and splits into two components. The EXAFS data of the end product can be modeled well using a hematite-like cluster, with an isotropic expansion of distances to account for incorporation of Lu into the hematite structure. These results demonstrate that the Lu is incorporated in the crystal lattice of the transformation product, as opposed to being occluded or remaining a sorbed species on the surface.

  2. Effects of humic substances and quinones at low concentrations on ferrihydrite reduction by Geobacter metallireducens.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Manfred; Kappler, Andreas; Jiang, Jie; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2009-08-01

    Humic substances (HS) and quinones can accelerate dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction by electron shuttling between microorganisms and poorly soluble iron(III) (hydr)oxides. The mechanism of electron shuttling for HS is not fully understood, but it is suggested that the most important redox-active components in HS are also quinones. Here we studied the influence of HS and different quinones at low concentrations on ferrihydrite reduction by Geobacter metallireducens. The aquatic HS used were humic and fulvic acids (HA and FA) isolated from groundwater of a deep aquifer in Gorleben (Niedersachsen, Germany). HA stimulated iron reduction stronger than FA down to total HA concentrations as low as 1 mg/L. The quinones studied showed large differences: some had strong accelerating effects, whereas others showed only small effects, no effects, or even inhibitory effects on the kinetics of iron reduction. We found that the redox potentials of the most active quinones fall in a narrow range of -137 to -225 mV vs NHE at pH 7. These results give evidence that the kinetic of microbial iron reduction mediated by electron shuttles is mainly controlled by thermodynamic parameters, i.e., by the redox potential of the shuttle compound, rather than by the proportion of dissolved vs adsorbed compound.

  3. Uranium(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite: Application of a surface complexation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, T.D.; Davis, J.A.; Payne, T.E.; Waychunas, G.A.; Xu, N.

    1994-01-01

    A study of U(VI) adsorption by ferrihydrite was conducted over a wide range of U(VI) concentrations, pH, and at two partial pressures of carbon dioxide. A two-site (strong- and weak-affinity sites, FesOH and FewOH, respectively) surface complexation model was able to describe the experimental data well over a wide range of conditions, with only one species formed with each site type: an inner-sphere, mononuclear, bidentate complex of the type (FeO2)UO2. The existence of such a surface species was supported by results of uranium EXAFS spectroscopy performed on two samples with U(VI) adsorption density in the upper range observed in this study (10 and 18% occupancy of total surface sites). Adsorption data in the alkaline pH range suggested the existence of a second surface species, modeled as a ternary surface complex with UO2CO30 binding to a bidentate surface site. Previous surface complexation models for U(VI) adsorption have proposed surface species that are identical to the predominant aqueous species, e.g., multinuclear hydrolysis complexes or several U(VI)-carbonate complexes. The results demonstrate that the speciation of adsorbed U(VI) may be constrained by the coordination environment at the surface, giving rise to surface speciation for U(VI) that is significantly less complex than aqueous speciation.

  4. Uranium(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite: Application of a surface complexation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, T.D.; Davis, J.A.; Payne, T.E.; Waychunas, G.A.; Xu, N.

    1994-01-01

    A study of U(VI) adsorption by ferrihydrite was conducted over a wide range of U(VI) concentrations, pH, and at two partial pressures of carbon dioxide. A two-site (strong- and weak-affinity sites, FesOH and FewOH, respectively) surface complexation model was able to describe the experimental data well over a wide range of conditions, with only one species formed with each site type: an inner-sphere, mononuclear, bidentate complex of the type (FeO2)UO2. The existence of such a surface species was supported by results of uranium EXAFS spectroscopy performed on two samples with U(VI) adsorption density in the upper range observed in this study (10 and 18% occupancy of total surface sites). Adsorption data in the alkaline pH range suggested the existence of a second surface species, modeled as a ternary surface complex with UO2CO30 binding to a bidentate surface site. Previous surface complexation models for U(VI) adsorption have proposed surface species that are identical to the predominant aqueous species, e.g., multinuclear hydrolysis complexes or several U(VI)-carbonate complexes. The results demonstrate that the speciation of adsorbed U(VI) may be constrained by the coordination environment at the surface, giving rise to surface speciation for U(VI) that is significantly less complex than aqueous speciation. ?? 1994.

  5. Phosphate Imposed Limitations on Biological Reduction and Alteration of Ferrihydrite Mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Borch, Thomas; Masue, Yoko; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Fendorf, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Biogeochemical transformation (inclusive of dissolution) of iron (hydr)oxides resulting from dissimilatory reduction has a pronounced impact on the fate and transport of nutrients and contaminants in subsurface environments. Despite the reactivity noted for pristine (unreacted) minerals, iron (hydr)oxides within native environments will likely have a different reactivity owing in part to changes in surface composition. Accordingly, here we explore the impact of surface modifications induced by phosphate adsorption on ferrihydrite reduction by Shewanella putrefaciens under static and advective flow conditions. Alterations in surface reactivity induced by phosphate adsorption change the extent, nearly linearly, and pathway of iron biomineralization. Magnetite is the most appreciable mineralization product while minor amounts of vivianite and green rust-like phases are formed in systems having high aqueous concentrations of phosphate, ferrous iron, and biogenic bicarbonate. Goethite and lepidocrocite, characteristic biomineralization products at low ferrous-iron concentrations, are inhibited in the presence of adsorbed phosphate. Considering deviations in reactivity of iron (hydr)oxides with changes in surface composition is important for deciphering mineralization pathways under native conditions and predicting reactive characteristics.

  6. Bimetallic Catalysts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinfelt, John H.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical reaction rates can be controlled by varying composition of miniscule clusters of metal atoms. These bimetallic catalysts have had major impact on petroleum refining, where work has involved heterogeneous catalysis (reacting molecules in a phase separate from catalyst.) Experimentation involving hydrocarbon reactions, catalytic…

  7. Oxyhydrochlorination catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    An improved catalyst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HCl and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride.

  8. Effect of Humic Substances on the Trapping and Transformations of U(VI) by Ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dublet, G.; Brown, G. E.; Bargar, J.; Fendorf, S. E.; Janot, N.

    2013-12-01

    The Old Rifle DOE site in Colorado was a major site for milling uranium ore. U concentrations up to 1.8 uM persist in the Rifle aquifer, even after 'cleaning' the waste source of contaminations [1]. Understanding the behavior of U(VI) in this anthropogenically perturbed system is crucial for controlling the level of U contamination. Direct investigations of U speciation at this site have shown that U is associated with a wide variety of minerals as well as with natural organic matter (NOM) [2]. NOM has multiple functional groups which can be highly reactive with respect to aqueous metal ions, including actinides. Such interactions result in the formation of organo-mineral-metal (ternary) complexes and catalyze redox transformations; in addition, they can enhance mineral dissolution and metal transport [3,4,5]. In the complex soil/sediment system, aqueous, mineral, and organic phases are intimately mixed and their interactions are difficult to characterize by direct investigation [1]. The nanoparticulate iron hydroxide ferrihydrite (Fh), which is ubiquitous in many natural soils and highly reactive toward metal ions, is expected to significantly influence the fate of U in natural soils and is abundant in the subsurface at the Rifle site. NOM is also abundant at this site; however, little is known about the effect of NOM associated with ferrihydrite on the fate of U in such subsurface environments. To date, simple model systems composed mainly of two components (Fh and NOM) [6], (U and NOM or simple organic molecules) [7], or (Fh and U) [8,9], and more rarely composed of three components [10,11] have been studied in an effort to understand interactions among these components. In order to extend this earlier work to ternary systems, we have carried out batch reactions of U, a humic acid standard - Eliott soil humic acid (ESHA), and Fh under conditions that mimic those in the subsurface at Rifle. We have used U L3- and Fe K-edge XANES and EXAFS spectroscopy coupled

  9. Zn isotopic fractionation caused by sorption on goethite and 2-Lines ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juillot, F.; Maréchal, C.; Ponthieu, M.; Cacaly, S.; Morin, G.; Benedetti, M.; Hazemann, J. L.; Proux, O.; Guyot, F.

    2008-10-01

    Zn isotopic fractionation caused by sorption on 2-Lines ferrihydrite (Fh2L) and goethite was investigated to assess the role of reactions at the Fe-oxyhydroxide/water interface in changes of the isotopic distribution of Zn. Since sorption reactions are ubiquitous in Earth's surface environments, it is important to evaluate their influence on the isotopic distribution of Zn before it can be used to track and quantify contributions of various sources and/or biogeochemical processes involving this element. Our results show that Zn isotopes are fractionated upon sorption on Fe-oxyhydroxides with an enrichment of the heavy isotopes present on the solid's surface. This fractionation appears to proceed through an equilibrium mechanism and yields different (Δ 66/64Zn) sorbed-aqueous values for Zn sorption on goethite [(Δ 66/64Zn) sorbed-aqueous around +0.29‰] and Fh2L [(Δ 66/64Zn) sorbed-aqueous around +0.53‰]. These different magnitudes of Zn fractionation are related to structural differences between Zn complexes existing on the surface of goethite (octahedrally coordinated Zn by oxygen atoms) and Fh2L (tetrahedrally coordinated Zn by oxygen atoms), as evidenced by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and CD-MUSIC modeling. These results show the importance of accounting for reactions at the Fe-oxyhydroxide/water interface when dealing with the isotopic distribution of Zn at the Earth's surface. Considering the large range of other possible sorbents (Mn or Al oxides, phyllosilicates, carbonates, biologic surfaces, etc.) and the importance of reactions at sorbent/water interfaces for other non-traditional stable isotopes (i.e. Cr, Fe, Ni and Cu) that are increasingly used in environmental studies, these results emphasize the need for further experimental studies that are needed to quantify the isotopic fractionation of these elements possibly accompanying their sorption.

  10. Transport in Porous Media of Poly(Acrylic Acid) Coated Ferrihydrite Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, P. R.; Xiang, A.; Koel, B. E.

    2012-12-01

    Augmentation of soils with iron to enhance biological processes such as uranium reduction via iron reducing bacteria, e.g., Geobacter sp., might be achieved via the injection of iron nanoparticles into the subsurface. The challenge is to make these nanoparticles transportable in the subsurface while not affecting the iron bioavailability. Poorly crystallized 2-line ferrihydrite iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and coated with different amounts of poly(acrylic acid) polymers (Na-PAA6K or Na-PAA140K). Analyses were then performed on these particles, including sorption/desorption of the polymer onto the iron nanoparticles, particle size, zeta potential, transport in sand and soil columns, and bioavailabity of the Fe(III) in the absence and presence of the coating to iron reducing organisms. Results showed that at pH values of environmental relevance, the zeta potential of the particles varied from about 3 mV (pH=8.2) for the non-coated particles to about -30 mV for the particles coated with the polymers to their highest sorption capacity. The coated particle diameter was shown to be in the range of 200 nm. Column transport experiments showed that for the highest polymer coating the nanoparticle breakthrough was virtually identical to that of bromide, while significant filtration was observed for particles with an intermediate coating, and complete particle removal via filtration was observed for the non-coated particles. These results held for sand as well as for soil, which had been previously characterized, from a field site at Rifle, CO. Bioavailability experiments showed no difference in the iron reduction rate between the untreated and treated nanoparticles. These results show that it is possible to manufacture iron nanoparticles to enhance biological iron reduction, and that the transport properties of these treated particles is tunable so that a desired retention in the porous medium can be achieved.

  11. Effects of sulfate ligand on uranyl carbonato surface species on ferrihydrite surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arai, Yuji; Fuller, C.C.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding uranium (U) sorption processes in permeable reactive barriers (PRB) are critical in modeling reactive transport for evaluating PRB performance at the Fry Canyon demonstration site in Utah, USA. To gain insight into the U sequestration mechanism in the amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide (AFO)-coated gravel PRB, U(VI) sorption processes on ferrihydrite surfaces were studied in 0.01 M Na2SO4 solutions to simulate the major chemical composition of U-contaminatedgroundwater (i.e., [SO42-]~13 mM L-1) at the site. Uranyl sorption was greater at pH 7.5 than that at pH 4 in both air- and 2% pCO2-equilibrated systems. While there were negligible effects of sulfate ligands on the pH-dependent U(VI) sorption (<24 h) in both systems, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis showed sulfate ligand associated U(VI) surface species at the ferrihydrite–water interface. In air-equilibrated systems, binary and mono-sulfate U(VI) ternary surface species co-existed at pH 5.43. At pH 6.55–7.83, a mixture of mono-sulfate and bis-carbonato U(VI) ternary surface species became more important. At 2% pCO2, there was no contribution of sulfate ligands on the U(VI) ternary surface species. Instead, a mixture of bis-carbonato inner-sphere (38%) and tris-carbonato outer-sphere U(VI) ternary surface species (62%) was found at pH 7.62. The study suggests that the competitive ligand (bicarbonate and sulfate) coordination on U(VI) surface species might be important in evaluating the U solid-state speciation in the AFO PRB at the study site where pCO2 fluctuates between 1 and 2 pCO2%.

  12. Catalyst mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Masel, Richard I.; Rosen, Brian A.

    2017-02-14

    Catalysts that include at least one catalytically active element and one helper catalyst can be used to increase the rate or lower the overpotential of chemical reactions. The helper catalyst can simultaneously act as a director molecule, suppressing undesired reactions and thus increasing selectivity toward the desired reaction. These catalysts can be useful for a variety of chemical reactions including, in particular, the electrochemical conversion of CO.sub.2 or formic acid. The catalysts can also suppress H.sub.2 evolution, permitting electrochemical cell operation at potentials below RHE. Chemical processes and devices using the catalysts are also disclosed, including processes to produce CO, OH.sup.-, HCO.sup.-, H.sub.2CO, (HCO.sub.2).sup.-, H.sub.2CO.sub.2, CH.sub.3OH, CH.sub.4, C.sub.2H.sub.4, CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH, CH.sub.3COO.sup.-, CH.sub.3COOH, C.sub.2H.sub.6, O.sub.2, H.sub.2, (COOH).sub.2, or (COO.sup.-).sub.2, and a specific device, namely, a CO.sub.2 sensor.

  13. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping; Smith, R. Davis

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  14. Dependence of microbial magnetite formation on humic substance and ferrihydrite concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piepenbrock, Annette; Dippon, Urs; Porsch, Katharina; Appel, Erwin; Kappler, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    Iron mineral (trans)formation during microbial Fe(III) reduction is of environmental relevance as it can influence the fate of pollutants such as toxic metal ions or hydrocarbons. Magnetite is an important biomineralization product of microbial iron reduction and influences soil magnetic properties that are used for paleoclimate reconstruction and were suggested to assist in the localization of organic and inorganic pollutants. However, it is not well understood how different concentrations of Fe(III) minerals and humic substances (HS) affect magnetite formation during microbial Fe(III) reduction. We therefore used wet-chemical extractions, magnetic susceptibility measurements and X-ray diffraction analyses to determine systematically how (i) different initial ferrihydrite (FH) concentrations and (ii) different concentrations of HS (i.e. the presence of either only adsorbed HS or adsorbed and dissolved HS) affect magnetite formation during FH reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In our experiments magnetite formation did not occur at FH concentrations lower than 5 mM, even though rapid iron reduction took place. At higher FH concentrations a minimum fraction of Fe(II) of 25-30% of the total iron present was necessary to initiate magnetite formation. The Fe(II) fraction at which magnetite formation started decreased with increasing FH concentration, which might be due to aggregation of the FH particles reducing the FH surface area at higher FH concentrations. HS concentrations of 215-393 mg HS/g FH slowed down (at partial FH surface coverage with sorbed HS) or even completely inhibited (at complete FH surface coverage with sorbed HS) magnetite formation due to blocking of surface sites by adsorbed HS. These results indicate the requirement of Fe(II) adsorption to, and subsequent interaction with, the FH surface for the transformation of FH into magnetite. Additionally, we found that the microbially formed magnetite was further reduced by strain MR-1 leading to

  15. Adsorption of arsenite and arsenate onto ferrihydrite under competitive conditions : kinetics, isotherm, and pH effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, P.; Pichler, T.

    2014-12-01

    Competitive adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto ferrihydrite was investigated in both single and bi-component systems using batch experiments. The adsorption of As(III) was inhibited by the presence of As(V) over the whole pH range when compared to As(III) only conditions. As(V) was adsorbed to a similar extent with As(III) at low pH under competitive conditions. Isotherm studies also showed that As(V) significantly decreased the adsorption of As(III) at pH 5, while the presence of As(III) had a small effect on As(V) adsorption. The Freundlich isotherm equation was successfully fitted to both single and bi-component adsorption scenarios of As(III) and As(V). At the same time intervals in the first 2 h under competitive conditions, kinetics studies suggested that the amount of As(III) adsorbed in the presence of As(V) was reduced compared to the single component system at low pH. The effect of As(III) on the adsorption rate of As(V) was negligible. A pseudo-second-order model could be fitted perfectly to each species under both single and competitive conditions. The spectra of ferrihydrite with adsorbed As(III), As(V) or both As species have a similar shape by ATR-FTIR, indicating that competition may be at play.

  16. Changes in Iron, Sulfur, and Arsenic Speciation Associated with Bacterial Sulfate Reduction in Ferrihydrite-Rich Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Saalfield, S.; Bostick, B

    2009-01-01

    Biologically mediated redox processes have been shown to affect the mobility of iron oxide-bound arsenic in reducing aquifers. This work investigates how dissimilatory sulfate reduction and secondary iron reduction affect sulfur, iron, and arsenic speciation. Incubation experiments were conducted with As(III/V)-bearing ferrihydrite in carbonate-buffered artificial groundwater enriched with lactate (10 mM) and sulfate (0.08-10 mM) and inoculated with Desulfovibrio vulgaris (ATCC 7757, formerly D. desulfuricans), which reduces sulfate but not iron or arsenic. Sulfidization of ferrihydrite led to formation of magnetite, elemental sulfur, and trace iron sulfides. Observed reaction rates imply that the majority of sulfide is recycled to sulfate, promoting microbial sulfate reduction in low-sulfate systems. Despite dramatic changes in Fe and S speciation, and minimal formation of Fe or As sulfides, most As remained in the solid phase. Arsenic was not solubilized in As(V)-loaded incubations, which experienced slow As reduction by sulfide, whereas As(III)-loaded incubations showed limited and transient As release associated with iron remineralization. This suggests that As(III) production is critical to As release under reducing conditions, with sulfate reduction alone unlikely to release As. These data also suggest that bacterial reduction of As(V) is necessary for As sequestration in sulfides, even where sulfate reduction is active.

  17. Highly dispersed metal catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Xiao, Xin; West, William L.; Rhodes, William D.

    2016-11-08

    A supported catalyst having an atomic level single atom structure is provided such that substantially all the catalyst is available for catalytic function. A process of forming a single atom catalyst unto a porous catalyst support is also provided.

  18. Reforming catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, W.C. Jr.; Swan, G.A.

    1991-11-19

    This patent describes a catalyst useful for reforming a naphtha feed at high severity reforming conditions. It comprises the metals, platinum, rhenium and iridium on a refractory porous inorganic oxide support, the support consisting essentially of alumina, wherein the concentration by weight of each of the metals platinum and rhenium is at least 0.1 percent and iridium at least 0.15 percent and at least one of the metals is present in a concentration of at least 0.3 percent, and the sum-total; concentration of the metals is greater than 0.9 percent, and wherein each catalyst particle contains all three of the metals platinum, rhenium and iridium. This patent also describes this composition wherein the catalyst contains from about 0.1 percent to about 3 percent of a halogen and from about 0.05 percent to about 0.02 percent sulfur.

  19. Catalyst activator

    DOEpatents

    McAdon, Mark H.; Nickias, Peter N.; Marks, Tobin J.; Schwartz, David J.

    2001-01-01

    A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

  20. A surface structural model for ferrihydrite I: Sites related to primary charge, molar mass, and mass density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiemstra, Tjisse; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H.

    2009-08-01

    A multisite surface complexation (MUSIC) model for ferrihydrite (Fh) has been developed. The surface structure and composition of Fh nanoparticles are described in relation to ion binding and surface charge development. The site densities of the various reactive surface groups, the molar mass, the mass density, the specific surface area, and the particle size are quantified. As derived theoretically, molecular mass and mass density of nanoparticles will depend on the types of surface groups and the corresponding site densities and will vary with particle size and surface area because of a relatively large contribution of the surface groups in comparison to the mineral core of nanoparticles. The nano-sized (˜2.6 nm) particles of freshly prepared 2-line Fh as a whole have an increased molar mass of M ˜ 101 ± 2 g/mol Fe, a reduced mass density of ˜3.5 ± 0.1 g/cm 3, both relatively to the mineral core. The specific surface area is ˜650 m 2/g. Six-line Fh (5-6 nm) has a molar mass of M ˜ 94 ± 2 g/mol, a mass density of ˜3.9 ± 0.1 g/cm 3, and a surface area of ˜280 ± 30 m 2/g. Data analysis shows that the mineral core of Fh has an average chemical composition very close to FeOOH with M ˜ 89 g/mol. The mineral core has a mass density around ˜4.15 ± 0.1 g/cm 3, which is between that of feroxyhyte, goethite, and lepidocrocite. These results can be used to constrain structural models for Fh. Singly-coordinated surface groups dominate the surface of ferrihydrite (˜6.0 ± 0.5 nm -2). These groups can be present in two structural configurations. In pairs, the groups either form the edge of a single Fe-octahedron (˜2.5 nm -2) or are present at a single corner (˜3.5 nm -2) of two adjacent Fe octahedra. These configurations can form bidentate surface complexes by edge- and double-corner sharing, respectively, and may therefore respond differently to the binding of ions such as uranyl, carbonate, arsenite, phosphate, and others. The relatively low PZC of

  1. Effects of Amendment with Ferrihydrite and Gypsum on the Structure and Activity of Methanogenic Populations in Rice Field Soil

    PubMed Central

    Lueders, Tillmann; Friedrich, Michael W.

    2002-01-01

    Methane emission from paddy fields may be reduced by the addition of electron acceptors to stimulate microbial populations competitive to methanogens. We have studied the effects of ferrihydrite and gypsum (CaSO4 · 2H2O) amendment on methanogenesis and population dynamics of methanogens after flooding of Italian rice field soil slurries. Changes in methanogen community structure were followed by archaeal small subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA)- and rRNA-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and by quantitative SSU rRNA hybridization probing. Under ferrihydrite amendment, acetate was consumed efficiently (<60 μM) and a rapid but incomplete inhibition of methanogenesis occurred after 3 days. In contrast to unamended controls, the dynamics of Methanosarcina populations were largely suppressed as indicated by rDNA and rRNA analysis. However, the low acetate availability was still sufficient for activation of Methanosaeta spp., as indicated by a strong increase of SSU rRNA but not of relative rDNA frequencies. Unexpectedly, rRNA amounts of the novel rice cluster I (RC-I) methanogens increased significantly, while methanogenesis was low, which may be indicative of transient energy conservation coupled to Fe(III) reduction by these methanogens. Under gypsum addition, hydrogen was rapidly consumed to low levels (∼0.4 Pa), indicating the presence of a competitive population of hydrogenotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). This was paralleled by a suppressed activity of the hydrogenotrophic RC-I methanogens as indicated by the lowest SSU rRNA quantities detected in all experiments. Full inhibition of methanogenesis only became apparent when acetate was depleted to nonpermissive thresholds (<5 μM) after 10 days. Apparently, a competitive, acetotrophic population of SRB was not present initially, and hence, acetotrophic methanosarcinal populations were less suppressed than under ferrihydrite amendment. In conclusion, although methane

  2. Enhanced nanoscale catalyst precursor powders generated using a flow-through hydrothermal process

    SciTech Connect

    Darab, J.G.; Linehan, J.C.; Matson, D.W.

    1994-08-01

    A novel flow-through hydrothermal process, termed the Rapid Thermal Decomposition of precursors in Solution (RTDS), has been used to generate large quantities of ultra-fine, nano-crystalline hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), 6-line ferrihydrite (5Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}9H{sub 2}O) and ferric oxyhydroxysulfate powders. The heterogeneous catalytic activity of these powders towards C-C bond scission in the model compound naphthyl bibenzylmethane and in the first-stage liquefaction of Blind Canyon seam coal was investigated. The effects of the crystalline phase and the agglomerate size of these powders on their catalytic activity are reported.

  3. Catalyst suppliers consolidate further, offer more catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1995-10-02

    The list of suppliers of catalysts to the petroleum refining industry has decreased by five since Oil and Gas Journal`s survey of refining catalysts and catalytic additives was last published. Despite the consolidation, the list of catalyst designations has grown to about 950 in this latest survey, compared to 820 listed in 1993. The table divides the catalysts by use and gives data on their primary differentiating characteristics, feedstock, products, form, bulk density,catalyst support, active agents, availability, and manufactures.

  4. Hydrocracking catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, B.; Galiasso, R.; Kum, H.

    1985-02-12

    The invention relates to a particular method for the preparation of a hydrocracking catalyst, using a high iron content bauxite as a basis. This bauxite is ground and screened to a specific size and mixed with three types of additives: a promoter additive of the P, Mo, Co, Ni, W type. A hardener additive of the phosphoric acid type, ammonium phosphate. And a lubricant and pore-generating additive of the polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene-glycol, starch type. The particularity consists in that the three additives are added simultaneously during the extrusion of the sample. That way, a particular surface composition is obtained which allows for the activity of the catalyst. Extruded products are obtained in sizes of 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32'' and submitted to drying and calcination programs for their activation. The obtained catalyst offers a good mechanical strength, a high content in macropores and a high activity, specifically for the hydrocracking of heavy Venezuelan crudes or residues.

  5. The Mineralogic Transformation of Ferrihydrite Induced by Heterogeneous Reaction with Bioreduced Anthraquinone Disulfonate (AQDS) and the Role of Phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, John M.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Peretyazhko, Tetyana; Bowden, Mark E.; Wang, Chong M.; Kennedy, David W.; Moore, Dean A.; Arey, Bruce W.

    2011-10-12

    Anthraquinone-2-6-disulfonate (AQDS) enhances electron donor utilization and mineral product crystallization in studies of Fe(III) oxide reductive mineralization by metal reducing bacteria (MRB) through heterogeneous redox reaction. In spite of the strong effect of AQDS in these systems, little information exits on its direct role in reductive mineralization. To provide such insights, bioreduced AQDS (AH2DS; dihydro-anthraquinone) was reacted with a 2-line, Si-substituted ferrihydrite under anoxic conditions at neutral pH in PIPES buffer. Phosphate (P) and bicarbonate (C); common adsorptive oxyanions and media/buffer components known to effect ferrihydrite mineralization; and Fe(II)aq (as a catalytic mineralization agent) were used in comparative experiments. Heterogeneous AH2DS oxidation coupled with Fe(III) reduction occurred within 0.13-1 day, with mineralogic transformation occurring thereafter. The product suite included lepidocrocite, goethite, and/or magnetite, with proportions varing with reductant:oxidant ratio (r:o) and the presence of P or C. Lepidocrocite was the primary product at low r:o in the absence of P or C, with evidence for multiple formation pathways. P inhibited reductive recrystallization, while C promoted goethite formation. Stoichiometric magnetite was the sole product at higher r:o in the absence and presence of P. Lepidocrocite was the primary mineralization product in the Fe(II)aq system, with magnetite observed at near equal amounts when Fe(II) was high [Fe(II)/Fe(III)]=0.5 and P was absent. P had a greater effect on reductive mineralization in the Fe(II)aq system, while AQDS was more effective than Fe(II)aq in promoting magnetite formation. The direct AH2DS-driven reductive reaction pathway produced mineral products that were different from AH2DS-ferrihydite-MRB systems, particularly in presence of P.

  6. Biotransformation of Two-Line Silica-Ferrihydrite by a Dissimilatory Fe(III)-Reducing Bacterium: Formation of Carbonate Green Rust in the Presence of Phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kennedy, David W.

    2004-07-01

    The reductive biotransformation of two Si-ferrihydrite (0.01 and 0.05 mole% Si) coprecipiates by Shewanella putrefaciens, strain CN32, was investigated in 1,4-piperazinediethanesulfonic acid-buffered media (pH ~7) with lactate as the electron donor. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (electron shuttle) that stimulates respiration was present in the media. Experiments were performed without and with PO43- (ranging from 1 to 20 mmol/L in media containing 50 mmol/L Fe). Our objectives were to define the combined effects of SiO44- and PO43- on the bioreducibility and biomineralization of ferrihydrites under anoxic conditions. Iron reduction was measured as a function of time, solids were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mossbauer spectroscopy, and aqueous solutions were analyzed for Si, P, Cl- and inorganic carbon. Both of the ferrihydrites were rapidly reduced regardless of the Si content. Si concentration had no effect on the reduction rate or mineralization products. Magnetite was formed in the absence of PO43- whereas carbonate green rust GR(CO32-) ([FeII(6-x)FeIIIx(OH)12]x+(CO32-)0.5x.yH2O) and vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2.8H2O], were formed when PO43- was present. GR(CO32-) dominated as a mineral product in samples with < 4 mmol/L PO43-. The Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio of GR(CO32-) varied with PO43- concentration; it was 2 in the 1 mmol/L PO43- and approached 1 in the 4- and 10-mmol/L PO43- samples. GR appeared to form by solid-state transformation of ferrihydrite. Medium PO43- concentration dictated the mechanism of transformation. In 1 mmol/L PO43- media, an intermediate Fe(II)/Fe(III) phase with structural Fe(II), which we tentatively assigned to a protomagnetite phase, slowly transformed to GR with time. In contrast, in medium with >4 mmol/L PO43-, a residual ferrihydrite with sorbed Fe2+ phase transformed to GR. Despite similar chemistries, PO43- was shown to have a profound effect on ferrihydrite biotransformations while that of SiO44- was minimal.

  7. Cracking catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Otterstedt, J. E. A.; Jaras, S. G.; Pudas, R.; Upson, L. L.

    1985-05-07

    A cracking catalyst having good resistance to metal poisoning has at least two particle fractions of different particle sizes, the cracking catalyzing zeolite material being concentrated to the coarser particle size fractions, and the finer particle size fractions being formed from material having relatively lower or no or insignificant cracking catalyzing activity. The particles of the finer particle size fractions have a matrix of kaolin and amorphous alumina--silica and may contain for example, an SO /SUB x/ eliminating additive such as Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, CaO and/or MgO. The coarser particle size fractions having cracking catalyzing effect have a mean particle size of from 80 to 125 ..mu..m and the finer particle size fractions a mean particle size of from 30 to 75 ..mu..m. The coarser particle size fractions have a zeolite content of at least 20 weight % and may have a zeolite content of up to 100 weight %, the remainder consisting essentially of material which has relatively lower or no or insignificant cracking-catalyzing activity and which consists of kaolin and amorphous alumina-silica. The catalyst mass as a whole may have a zeolite content of up to 50 weight %.

  8. Surface complexation and precipitate geometry for aqueous Zn(II) sorption on ferrihydrite: II. XANES analysis and simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waychunas, G.A.; Fuller, C.C.; Davis, J.A.; Rehr, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis of sorption complexes has the advantages of high sensitivity (10- to 20-fold greater than extended X-ray absorption fine structure [EXAFS] analysis) and relative ease and speed of data collection (because of the short k-space range). It is thus a potentially powerful tool for characterization of environmentally significant surface complexes and precipitates at very low surface coverages. However, quantitative analysis has been limited largely to "fingerprint" comparison with model spectra because of the difficulty of obtaining accurate multiple-scattering amplitudes for small clusters with high confidence. In the present work, calculations of the XANES for 50- to 200-atom clusters of structure from Zn model compounds using the full multiple-scattering code Feff 8.0 accurately replicate experimental spectra and display features characteristic of specific first-neighbor anion coordination geometry and second-neighbor cation geometry and number. Analogous calculations of the XANES for small molecular clusters indicative of precipitation and sorption geometries for aqueous Zn on ferrihydrite, and suggested by EXAFS analysis, are in good agreement with observed spectral trends with sample composition, with Zn-oxygen coordination and with changes in second-neighbor cation coordination as a function of sorption coverage. Empirical analysis of experimental XANES features further verifies the validity of the calculations. The findings agree well with a complete EXAFS analysis previously reported for the same sample set, namely, that octahedrally coordinated aqueous Zn2+ species sorb as a tetrahedral complex on ferrihydrite with varying local geometry depending on sorption density. At significantly higher densities but below those at which Zn hydroxide is expected to precipitate, a mainly octahedral coordinated Zn2+ precipitate is observed. An analysis of the multiple scattering paths contributing to the XANES

  9. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Laura J.; Bray, Lane A.

    1995-01-01

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications.

  10. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Silva, L.J.; Bray, L.A.

    1995-05-30

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: (a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; (b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; (c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and (d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications. 3 figs.

  11. A high-resolution TEM-AEM, pH titration, and modeling study of Zn 2+ coprecipitation with ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Stacin; Zhu, Chen; Rule, Joseph; Nuhfer, Noel T.; Ford, Robert; Hedges, Sheila; Soong, Yee

    2005-03-01

    Experiments of Zn 2+ and Fe 3+ coprecipitation as a function of pH were conducted in the laboratory at ambient temperature and pressure. X-ray diffraction patterns of the coprecipitates show two broad peaks at 0.149 and 0.258 nm, which is consistent with published patterns for pure 2-line ferrihydrite. Zn 2+ uptake occurred at pH ≥5 while Fe 3+ precipitation occurred between pH 3 and 4, although both Zn 2+ and Fe 3+ were present in the same solution during the entire range of pH titration. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy shows that the coprecipitates are 2 to 6 nm sized single crystalline particles but aggregated to 50 to 400 nm sized clusters. Analytical electron microscopy indicated that the 5% atomic Zn with respect to Fe was homogeneously distributed. No segregated phases were found in the clusters or at single crystal edges, which is consistent with published extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) results at similar Zn/(Zn + Fe) ratios. Hence, occlusion and surface precipitation may be excluded as possible coprecipitation mechanisms. The bulk solution Zn 2+ sorption edge was fitted to both solid solution and generalized diffuse layer surface complexation models. However, a solid solution model is inconsistent with published EXAFS results that show tetrahedral polydentate Zn 2+ complexes sharing apices with Fe 3+octahedra.

  12. Arsenic scavenging by aluminum-substituted ferrihydrites in a circumneutral pH river impacted by acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Adra, Areej; Morin, Guillaume; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Menguy, Nicolas; Maillot, Fabien; Casiot, Corinne; Bruneel, Odile; Lebrun, Sophie; Juillot, Farid; Brest, Jessica

    2013-11-19

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) is a nanocrystalline ferric oxyhydroxide involved in the retention of pollutants in natural systems and in water-treatment processes. The status and properties of major chemical impurities in natural Fh is however still scarcely documented. Here we investigated the structure of aluminum-rich Fh, and their role in arsenic scavenging in river-bed sediments from a circumneutral river (pH 6-7) impacted by an arsenic-rich acid mine drainage (AMD). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy at the Fe K-edge shows that Fh is the predominant mineral phase forming after neutralization of the AMD, in association with minor amount of schwertmannite transported from the AMD. TEM-EDXS elemental mapping and SEM-EDXS analyses combined with EXAFS analysis indicates that Al(3+) substitutes for Fe(3+) ions into the Fh structure in the natural sediment samples, with local aluminum concentration within the 25-30 ± 10 mol %Al range. Synthetic aluminous Fh prepared in the present study are found to be less Al-substituted (14-20 ± 5 mol %Al). Finally, EXAFS analysis at the arsenic K-edge indicates that As(V) form similar inner-sphere surface complexes on the natural and synthetic Al-substituted Fh studied. Our results provide direct evidence for the scavenging of arsenic by natural Al-Fh, which emphasize the possible implication of such material for scavenging pollutants in natural or engineered systems.

  13. An evaluation of ferrihydrite- and Metsorb™-DGT techniques for measuring oxyanion species (As, Se, V, P): effective capacity, competition and diffusion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Price, Helen L; Teasdale, Peter R; Jolley, Dianne F

    2013-11-25

    This study investigated several knowledge gaps with respect to the diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique for measurement of oxyanions (As(III), As(V), Se(IV), Se(VI), PO4(3-), and V(V)) using the ferrihydrite and Metsorb™ binding layers. Elution efficiencies for each binding layer were higher with 1:20 dilutions, as analytical interferences for ICP-MS were minimised. Diffusion coefficients measured by diffusion cell and by DGT time-series experiments were found to agree well and generally agreed with previously reported values, although a range of diffusion coefficients have been reported for inorganic As and Se species. The relative binding affinity for both ferrihydrite and Metsorb™ was PO4(3-) ≈ As(V)>V(V) ≈ As(III)>Se(IV) > Se(VI) and effective binding capacities were measured in single ion solutions, and spiked synthetic freshwater and seawater, advising practical decisions about DGT monitoring. Under the conditions tested the performance of both ferrihydrite and Metsorb™ binding layers was directly comparable for As(V), As(III) Se(IV), V(V) and PO4(3-) over a deployment spanning ≤ 2 days for both freshwater and seawater. In order to return quantitative data for several analytes we recommend that the DGT method using either ferrihydrite or Metsorb™ be deployed for a maximum of 2 days in marine waters likely to contain high levels of the most strongly adsorbing oxyanions contaminants. The high pH, the competitive ions present in seawater and the identity of co-adsorbing ions affect the capacity of each binding layer for the analytes of interest. In freshwaters, longer deployment times can be considered but the concentration and identity of co-adsorbing ions may impact on quantitative uptake of Se(IV). This study found ferrihydrite-DGT outperformed Metsorb-DGT while previous studies have found the opposite, with variation in binding materials masses used being a likely reason. Clearly, preparation of both binding layers should always be

  14. Use of Ferrihydrite-Coated Pozzolana and Biogenic Green Rust to Purify Waste Water Containing Phosphate and Nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby, Christian; Naille, Sébastien; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Morin, Guillaume; Mallet, Martine; Guerbois, Delphine; Barthélémy, Kévin; Etique, Marjorie; Zegeye, Asfaw; Zhang, Yuhai; Boumaïza, Hella; Al-Jaberi, Muayad; Renard, Aurélien; Noël, Vincent; Binda, Paul; Hanna, Khalil; Despas, Christelle; Abdelmoula, Mustapha; Kukkadapu, Ravi; Sarrias, Joseph; Albignac, Magali; Rocklin, Pascal; Nauleau, Fabrice; Hyvrard, Nathalie; Génin, Jean-Marie

    2016-06-27

    The activated sludge treatments combined to the addition of ferric chloride is commonly used to eliminate nitrate and phosphate from waste water in urban area. These processes that need costly infrastructures are not suitable for rural areas and passive treatments (lagoons, reed bed filters…) are more frequently performed. Reed bed filters are efficient for removing organic matter but are not suitable for treating phosphate and nitrate as well. Passive water treatments using various materials (hydroxyapatite, slag…) were already performed, but those allowing the elimination of both nitrate and phosphate are not actually available. The goal of this work is to identify the most suitable iron based materials for such treatments and to determine their optimal use conditions, in particular in hydrodynamic mode. The reactivity of the iron based minerals was measured either by using free particles in suspension or by depositing these particles on a solid substrate. Pouzzolana that is characterized by a porous sponge-like structure suits for settling a high amount of iron oxides. The experimental conditions enabling to avoid any ammonium formation when green rust encounters nitrate were determined within the framework of a full factorial design. The process is divided into two steps that will be performed inside two separated reactors. Indeed, the presence of phosphate inhibits the reduction of nitrate by green rust and the dephosphatation process must precede the denitrification process. In order to remove phosphate, ferrihydrite coated pouzzolana is the best materials. The kinetics of reaction of green rust with nitrate is relatively slow and often leads to the formation of ammonium. The recommendation of the identified process is to favor the accumulation of nitrite in a first step, these species reacting much more quickly with green rust and do not transform into ammonium.

  15. Detecting Nanophase Weathering Products with CheMin: Reference Intensity Ratios of Allophane, Aluminosilicate Gel, and Ferrihydrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S. J.; Morris, R. V.; Achilles, C. N.; Ming, D W.; Blake, D. F.; Anderson, R. C.; Bristow, T. F.; Crisp, A.; DesMarais, D. J.; Downs, R. T.; Farmer, J. D.; Morookian, J. M.; Morrison, S. M.; Sarrazin, P.; Spanovich, N.; Stolper, E. M.; Treiman, A. H.; Vaniman, D. T.; Yen, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) data collected of the Rocknest samples by the CheMin instrument on Mars Science Laboratory suggest the presence of poorly crystalline or amorphous materials [1], such as nanophase weathering products or volcanic and impact glasses. The identification of the type(s) of X-ray amorphous material at Rocknest is important because it can elucidate past aqueous weathering processes. The presence of volcanic and impact glasses would indicate that little chemical weathering has occurred because glass is highly susceptible to aqueous alteration. The presence of nanophase weathering products, such as allophane, nanophase iron-oxides, and/or palagonite, would indicate incipient chemical weathering. Furthermore, the types of weathering products present could help constrain pH conditions and identify which primary phases altered to form the weathering products. Quantitative analysis of phases from CheMin data is achieved through Reference Intensity Ratios (RIRs) and Rietveld refinement. The RIR of a mineral (or mineraloid) that relates the scattering power of that mineral (typically the most intense diffraction line) to the scattering power of a separate mineral standard such as corundum [2]. RIRs can be calculated from XRD patterns measured in the laboratory by mixing a mineral with a standard in known abundances and comparing diffraction line intensities of the mineral to the standard. X-ray amorphous phases (e.g., nanophase weathering products) have broad scattering signatures rather than sharp diffraction lines. Thus, RIRs of X-ray amorphous materials are calculated by comparing the area under one of these broad scattering signals with the area under a diffraction line in the standard. Here, we measured XRD patterns of nanophase weathering products (allophane, aluminosilicate gel, and ferrihydrite) mixed with a mineral standard (beryl) in the CheMinIV laboratory instrument and calculated their RIRs to help constrain the abundances of these phases in

  16. Transport of poly(acrylic acid) coated 2-line ferrihydrite nanoparticles in saturated aquifer sediments for environmental remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Aishuang; Zhou, Sheng; Koel, Bruce E.; Jaffé, Peter R.

    2014-04-01

    Groundwater remediation using iron oxide and zero-valent iron nanoparticles (NPs) can be effective, but is limited in many applications due to the NP strong retention in groundwater-saturated porous media after injection, the passivation of the porous surface, and the high cost of nanomaterials versus macro scale iron. In this study, we investigated transport of bare and polymer-coated 2-line ferrihydrite NPs (30-300 nm) in saturated aquifer sediments. The influence of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) polymer coatings was studied on the colloidal stability and transport in sediments packed column tests simulating groundwater flow in saturated sediments. In addition, the influence of calcium cations was investigated by transport measurements using sediments with calcium concentrations in the aqueous phase ranging from 0.5 (typical for most sediments) to 2 mM. Measurements were also made of zeta potential, hydrodynamic diameter, polymer adsorption and desorption properties, and bio-availability of PAA-coated NPs. We found that NP transport through the saturated aquifer sediments was improved by PAA coating and that the transport properties could be tuned by adjusting the polymer concentration. We further discovered that PAA coatings enhanced NP transport, compared to bare NPs, in all calcium-containing experiments tested, however, the presence of calcium always exhibited a negative effect on NP transport. In tests of bioavailability, the iron reduction rate of the coated and bare NPs by Geobacter sulfurreducens was the same, which shows that the PAA coating does not significantly reduce NP Fe(III) bioavailability. Our results demonstrate that much improved transport of iron oxide NP can be achieved in saturated aquifer sediments by introducing negatively charged polyelectrolytes and optimizing polymer concentrations, and furthermore, these coated NPs retain their bioavailability that is needed for applications in bio-environmental remediation.

  17. Inorganic species of arsenic in soil solution determined by microcartridges and ferrihydrite-based diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT).

    PubMed

    Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo; Six, Laetitia; Williams, Paul N; Smolders, Erik

    2013-01-30

    The bioavailability of soil arsenic (As) is determined by its speciation in soil solution, i.e., arsenite [As(III)] or arsenate [As(V)]. Soil bioavailability studies require suitable methods to cope with small volumes of soil solution that can be speciated directly after sampling, and thereby minimise any As speciation change during sample collection. In this study, we tested a self-made microcartridge to separate both As species and compared it to a commercially available cartridge. In addition, the diffusive gradient in thin films technique (DGT), in combination with the microcartridges, was applied to synthetic solutions and to a soil spiked with As. This combination was used to improve the assessment of available inorganic As species with ferrihydrite(FH)-DGT, in order to validate the technique for environmental analysis, mainly in soils. The self-made microcartridge was effective in separating As(III) from As(V) in solution with detection by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) in volumes of only 3 ml. The DGT study also showed that the FH-based binding gels are effective for As(III) and As(V) assessment, in solutions with As and P concentrations and ionic strength commonly found in soils. The FH-DGT was tested on flooded and unflooded As spiked soils and recoveries of As(III) and As(V) were 85-104% of the total dissolved As. This study shows that the DGT with FH-based binding gel is robust for assessing inorganic species of As in soils.

  18. Sequential and simultaneous adsorption of Sb(III) and Sb(V) on ferrihydrite: Implications for oxidation and competition.

    PubMed

    Qi, Pengfei; Pichler, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Antimony (Sb) is a naturally occurring element of growing environmental concern whose toxicity, adsorption behavior and other chemical properties are similar to that of arsenic (As). However, less is known about Sb compared to As. Individual and simultaneous adsorption experiments with Sb(III) and Sb(V) were conducted in batch mode with focus on the Sb speciation of the remaining liquid phase during individual Sb(III) adsorption experiments. The simultaneous adsorption and oxidation of Sb(III) was confirmed by the appearance of Sb(V) in the solution at varying Fe/Sb ratios (500, 100 and 8) and varying pH values (3.8, 7 and 9). This newly formed Sb(V) was subsequently removed from solution at a Fe/Sb ratio of 500 or at a pH of 3.8. However, more or less only Sb(V) was observed in the liquid phase at the end of the experiments at lower Fe/Sb ratios and higher pH, indicating that competition took place between the newly formed Sb(V) and Sb(III), and that Sb(III) outcompeted Sb(V). This was independently confirmed by simultaneous adsorption experiments of Sb(III) and Sb(V) in binary systems. Under such conditions, the presence of Sb(V) had no influence on the adsorption of Sb(III) while Sb(V) adsorption was significantly inhibited by Sb(III) over a wide pH range (4-10). Thus, in the presence of ferrihydrite and under redox conditions, which allow the presence of both Sb species, Sb(V) should be the dominant species in aquatic environments, since Sb(III) is adsorbed preferentially and at the same time oxidized to Sb(V).

  19. Lewis Base Catalysts 6: Carbene Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The use of N-heterocyclic carbenes as catalysts for organic transformations has received increased attention in the past 10 years. A discussion of catalyst development and nucleophilic characteristics precedes a description of recent advancements and new reactions using N-heterocyclic carbenes in catalysis. PMID:21494949

  20. Deactivation of Oxidation Catalysts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    the fresh catalyst . The loss in chromium may be related to the formation of volatile chromium oxychlorde which vaporizes from the catalyst . It is...CeO2 only marginally improved the thtrmal stability. The addition of 2% water vapor inhibited the oxidation of ethanol for all three copper catalysts ...original activity. Field tests of a copper chromite catalyst on process gas containing H2S, methyl mercaptan, n-aldehydes, and furfural showed

  1. Role of Outer-Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in the Biomineralization of Ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Catherine L.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Kennedy, David W.; Saffarini, Daad; Arey, Bruce W.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Moore, Dean A.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Moyles, Dianne M.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to improve the understanding of electron transfer mechanisms at the microbe-mineral interface, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 mutants with in-frame deletions of outer membrane cytochrome genes mtrC, omcA, or both, were characterized for the ability to reduce metal oxides using a suite of microscopic, spectroscopic, and biochemicalr techniques. The results indicate that neither MtrC nor OmcA are essential for the reduction of soluble, complexed Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-NTA; however, at least one of these outer membrane cytochromes is required for the reduction of Fe(III)- and Mn(III/IV)- oxides. In vitro analysis of purified, recombinant protein demonstrated that both cytochromes transfer electrons directly to metal-oxides; however, MtrC transfers electrons at a faster rate than OmcA. Immunolocalization of MtrC and OmcA reveal that both cytochromes are surface-exposed on the cell outer-membrane and co-localize with insoluble iron precipitates when respiring ferrihydrite or cultured aerobically with Fe(III)-citrate. Additionally, during prolonged incubation, wild-type cells promoted biotransformation of ferrihydrite to vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2•8H2O] while the double cytochrome mutant was unable to form any secondary mineral phases. Collectively, our results support a role for direct electron transfer from OMCs to metal oxides by establishing their in vitro electron transfer activities, confirming the requirement of either MtrC or OmcA for in vivo reductive biomineralization of ferrihydrite, and localizing the cytochromes to the cell exterior where they can directly contact mineral substrates.

  2. System for reactivating catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2010-03-02

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  3. Magnetite formation from ferrihydrite by hyperthermophilic archaea from Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge hydrothermal vent chimneys.

    PubMed

    Lin, T Jennifer; Breves, E A; Dyar, M D; Ver Eecke, H C; Jamieson, J W; Holden, J F

    2014-05-01

    Hyperthermophilic iron reducers are common in hydrothermal chimneys found along the Endeavour Segment in the northeastern Pacific Ocean based on culture-dependent estimates. However, information on the availability of Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxides within these chimneys, the types of Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxides utilized by the organisms, rates and environmental constraints of hyperthermophilic iron reduction, and mineral end products is needed to determine their biogeochemical significance and are addressed in this study. Thin-section petrography on the interior of a hydrothermal chimney from the Dante edifice at Endeavour showed a thin coat of Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxide associated with amorphous silica on the exposed outer surfaces of pyrrhotite, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite in pore spaces, along with anhydrite precipitation in the pores that is indicative of seawater ingress. The iron sulfide minerals were likely oxidized to Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxide with increasing pH and Eh due to cooling and seawater exposure, providing reactants for bioreduction. Culture-dependent estimates of hyperthermophilic iron reducer abundances in this sample were 1740 and 10 cells per gram (dry weight) of material from the outer surface and the marcasite-sphalerite-rich interior, respectively. Two hyperthermophilic iron reducers, Hyperthermus sp. Ro04 and Pyrodictium sp. Su06, were isolated from other active hydrothermal chimneys on the Endeavour Segment. Strain Ro04 is a neutrophilic (pH opt 7-8) heterotroph, while strain Su06 is a mildly acidophilic (pH opt 5), hydrogenotrophic autotroph, both with optimal growth temperatures of 90-92 °C. Mössbauer spectroscopy of the iron oxides before and after growth demonstrated that both organisms form nanophase (<12 nm) magnetite [Fe3 O4 ] from laboratory-synthesized ferrihydrite [Fe10 O14 (OH)2 ] with no detectable mineral intermediates. They produced up to 40 mm Fe(2+) in a growth-dependent manner, while all abiotic and biotic controls produced <3 mm Fe

  4. An in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction investigation of lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite-seeded Al(OH) 3 crystallisation from supersaturated sodium aluminate liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Loan, Melissa J.; Madsen, Ian C.; Knott, Robert B.; Brodie, Greta M.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2012-02-01

    Lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite-seeded Al(OH) 3 crystallisation from supersaturated sodium aluminate liquor at 70 °C was investigated using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The presence of iron oxides and oxyhydroxides in the Bayer process has implications for the nucleation and growth of scale on process equipment, and a greater understanding of the effect they have on Al(OH) 3 crystallisation may allow for development of methods for Al(OH) 3 scale prevention. The early stages of both crystallisation reactions were characterised by nucleation of gibbsite on the seed material. This was followed by a rapid increase in gibbsite concentration, which coincided with the appearance of the bayerite and nordstrandite polymorphs of Al(OH) 3. The lepidocrocite-seeded reaction then proceeded via a mechanism similar to that which has been observed previously for goethite, hematite and magnetite-seeded Al(OH) 3 crystallisation. Different behaviour was observed in the ferrihydrite-seeded experiment, with nucleation as well as growth occurring during the period of rapid increase in gibbsite concentration, followed by a period of diffusion controlled growth.

  5. Competitive adsorption of As(III), As(V), Sb(III) and Sb(V) onto ferrihydrite in multi-component systems: Implications for mobility and distribution.

    PubMed

    Qi, Pengfei; Pichler, Thomas

    2017-05-15

    The simultaneous adsorption behavior and competitive interactions between As(III), As(V), Sb(III) and Sb(V) by ferrihydrite were evaluated in multi-component (binary, ternary, quaternary) systems. In binary systems, Sb(III) had a stronger inhibitory influence on As(III) adsorption than Sb(V) did, and As(V) had a stronger inhibitory effect on Sb(V) adsorption than As(III) did. In ternary systems, NO3(-), PO4(3-) and SO4(2-) did not compete with the adsorption of As(III) and Sb(III). NO3(-) and SO4(2-) also had no distinct effect on the adsorption of As(V) and Sb(V), while PO4(3-) competed with As(V) and Sb(V) for surface sites. In quaternary systems, the simultaneous adsorption behavior of the four redox species was pH dependent. Sb(III) always showed the strongest adsorption affinity regardless of pH. At pH 3.5 As(III) showed the lowest affinity could be due to the presence and negative effect of Sb(III) and As(V). The Freundlich model provided a good fit for the simultaneous adsorption data under quaternary conditions. The study of competitive/simultaneous adsorption of the four possible redox species onto ferrihydrite contributed to a better understanding of their distribution, mobility and fate in the environment.

  6. Catalyst patterning for nanowire devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor); Han, Jie (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nanowire devices may be provided that are based on carbon nanotubes or single-crystal semiconductor nanowires. The nanowire devices may be formed on a substrate. Catalyst sites may be formed on the substrate. The catalyst sites may be formed using lithography, thin metal layers that form individual catalyst sites when heated, collapsible porous catalyst-filled microscopic spheres, microscopic spheres that serve as masks for catalyst deposition, electrochemical deposition techniques, and catalyst inks. Nanowires may be grown from the catalyst sites.

  7. Textured catalysts and methods of making textured catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong; Zacher, Alan H.

    2007-03-06

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  8. Catalyst Alloys Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xincai

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials used for diamond formation at high pressures. Several such catalyst products have been developed and applied in China and around the world. The catalyst alloy most widely used in China is Ni70Mn25Co5 developed at Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In this article, detailed techniques for manufacturing such a typical catalyst alloy will be reviewed. The characteristics of the alloy will be described. Detailed processing of the alloy will be presented, including remelting and casting, hot rolling, annealing, surface treatment, cold rolling, blanking, finishing, packaging, and waste treatment. An example use of the catalyst alloy will also be given. Industrial experience shows that for the catalyst alloy products, a vacuum induction remelt furnace can be used for remelting, a metal mold can be used for casting, hot and cold rolling can be used for forming, and acid pickling can be used for metal surface cleaning.

  9. Methods of making textured catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong; Zacher, Alan H.

    2010-08-17

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  10. Liquefaction with microencapsulated catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Sol W.

    1985-01-01

    A method of dispersing a liquefaction catalyst within coal or other carbonaceous solids involves providing a suspension in oil of microcapsules containing the catalyst. An aqueous solution of a catalytic metal salt is emulsified in the water-immiscible oil and the resulting minute droplets microencapsulated in polymeric shells by interfacial polycondensation. The catalyst is subsequently blended and dispersed throughout the powdered carbonaceous material to be liquefied. At liquefaction temperatures the polymeric microcapsules are destroyed and the catalyst converted to minute crystallites in intimate contact with the carbonaceous material.

  11. Polyolefin catalyst manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Inkrott, K.E.; Scinta, J.; Smith, P.D. )

    1989-10-16

    Statistical process control (SPC) procedures are absolutely essential for making new-generation polyolefin catalysts with the consistent high quality required by modern polyolefin processes. Stringent quality assurance is critical to the production of today's high-performance catalysts. Research and development efforts during the last 20 years have led to major technological improvements in the polyolefin industry. New generation catalysts, which once were laboratory curiosities, must now be produced commercially on a regular and consistent basis to meet the increasing requirements of the plastics manufacturing industry. To illustrate the more stringent requirements for producing the new generation polyolefin catalysts, the authors compare the relatively simple, first-generation polypropylene catalyst production requirements with some of the basic requirements of manufacturing a more complex new-generation catalyst, such as Catalyst Resources Inc.'s LYNX 900. The principles which hold true for the new-generation catalysts such as LYNX 900 are shown to apply equally to the scale-up of other advanced technology polyolefin catalysts.

  12. METHOD OF PURIFYING CATALYSTS

    DOEpatents

    Joris, G.G.

    1958-09-01

    It has been fuund that the presence of chlorine as an impurity adversely affects the performance of finely divided platinum catalysts such as are used in the isotopic exchange process for the production of beavy water. This chlorine impurity may be removed from these catalysts by treating the catalyst at an elevated temperature with dry hydrogen and then with wet hydrogen, having a hydrogen-water vapor volume of about 8: 1. This alternate treatment by dry hydrogen and wet hydrogen is continued until the chlorine is largely removed from the catalyst.

  13. 2-line ferrihydrite: synthesis, characterization and its adsorption behaviour for removal of Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Rout, K; Mohapatra, M; Anand, S

    2012-03-21

    Nano-structured 2-line ferrihydrite was synthesized by a pH-controlled precipitation technique at 90 °C. Chemical, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman analyses confirmed the sample to be 2-line ferrihydrite. The nano nature of the prepared sample was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The surface area obtained by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method was 175.8 m(2) g(-1). The nanopowder so obtained was used to study its behaviour for the removal of Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) from aqueous solutions. The relative importance of experimental parameters such as solution pH, contact time and concentration of adsorbate on the uptake of various cations was evaluated. By increasing the pH from 2.0 to 5.5, adsorption of the four cations increased. The kinetics parameters were compared by fitting the contact time data to both linear as well as non-linear forms of pseudo-second-order models. Linear forms of both Langmuir and Freundlich models fitted the equilibrium data of all the cations except for Pb(II) which was also fitted to the non-linear forms of both the models as it gave a low R(2) value of 0.85 for the Langmuir model. High Langmuir monolayer capacities of 366, 250, 62.5 and 500 mg g(-1) were obtained for Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II), respectively. Presence of chloride or sulfate had an adverse effect on cation adsorption. The interactive effects on adsorption from solutions containing two, three or four cations were studied. Surprisingly no Cd(II) adsorption was observed in Pb(II)-Cd(II), Pb(II)-Cd(II)-Zn(II) and Pb(II)-Cd(II)-Cu(II)-Zn(II) systems under the studied concentration range. The overall loading capacity of the adsorbent decreased in mixed cation systems. Metal ion loaded adsorbents were characterized by XRD, FTIR and Raman techniques. The high adsorption capability of the 2-lines ferrihydrite makes it a potentially attractive adsorbent for the removal of cations from aqueous solutions.

  14. Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, James H. (Inventor); Taylor, Jesse W. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Catalyst compositions and methods for F-T synthesis which exhibit high CO conversion with minor levels (preferably less than 35% and more preferably less than 5%) or no measurable carbon dioxide generation. F-T active catalysts are prepared by reduction of certain oxygen deficient mixed metal oxides.

  15. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  16. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2015-09-29

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  17. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  18. Organometallic polymerization catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Waymouth, R.M.

    1993-12-31

    Well-defined transition metal catalysts have resulted in exciting new opportunities in polymer synthesis. The stereochemistry of vinyl polymers can be rationally controlled with choice of the appropriate catalysts. Studies with optically active catalyst precursors have revealed considerable information on the absolute stereochemistry of olefin polymerization and have led to the synthesis of novel chiral polyolefins. The development of homogeneous olefin metathesis catalysts has also led to a variety of well-defined new polymer structures with controlled molecular weight and molecular weight distribution. Recent advances in understanding the mechanisms and stereochemistry of homogeneous transition metal catalyzed polymerization will be discussed. The ability to control polymer structure through catalyst design presents exciting opportunities in the synthesis of {open_quotes}tailor-made{close_quotes} macromolecules.

  19. Nano-structured Mg-doped Fe2O3-ferrihydrite powder--a new adsorbent for cation removal from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, M; Mohapatra, L; Hariprasad, D; Anand, S; Mishra, B K

    2012-01-01

    The present studies were undertaken with a view to developing a low-cost, efficient adsorbent for removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. A new cost-effective nano-structured Mg-doped Fe2O3-ferrihydrite adsorbent exhibiting high uptake capacities for various cations was synthesized. After preliminary testing of a series of Mg-doped (0.38 to 0.98%) samples for Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II) or Co(II) adsorption, a typical sample containing 55.7% Fe and 0.38% Mg was chosen for detailed characterization studies (XRD, TG-DTA, FTIR and TEM techniques). The adsorption behaviour of cations on the prepared nano powder was studied under various experimental conditions. The generated data were fitted to kinetic and isotherm models. The Langmuir monolayer capacities were 99.1, 83.3, 111.1 and 151.5 mg/g for Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II) and Co(II), respectively. It is the first time that such a high loading capacity for Co(II) has been reported. The effect of the presence of chloride or sulphate was dependent on the nature of the cation. Lead(II) adsorption was endothermic in nature with increased randomness at the solid-liquid interface, while for the rest of the three cations the adsorption process was exothermic. The XRD and FTIR studies on the loaded samples revealed structural changes during the adsorption process. The high cation loading capacities along with the stability of the loaded adsorbent make the synthesized ferrihydrite-Fe2O3 nano powder a potential candidate for contaminated water purification.

  20. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Sopchak, David A [Livermore, CA; Upadhye, Ravindra S [Pleasanton, CA; Reynolds, John G [San Ramon, CA; Satcher, Joseph H [Patterson, CA; Gash, Alex E [Brentwood, CA

    2011-11-15

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  1. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Sopchak, David A.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Reynolds, John G.; Satcher, Joseph H.; Gash, Alex E.

    2010-06-29

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  2. Reclaim spent catalysts properly

    SciTech Connect

    Lassner, J.A.; Lasher, L.B.; Koppel, R.L.; Hamilton, J.N.

    1994-08-01

    Treatment of spent catalysts and metallic by products has become increasingly more complex over the last couple of years, due to tightening environmental concerns. Three options are available: (1) Reclaiming the metals and either reusing them to make new catalyst or recycling them for other uses. This is now the preferred option. A reclaiming firm is generally employed to handle the task. (2) Regeneration and reuse. While this generally is the preferred option, few commercial catalysts can be regenerated effectively and economically. (3) Landfilling. This has been the traditional route. However, stricter environmental regulations have made landfilling unattractive. To maximize the reclamation both economically and environmentally, five factors should be addressed: (1) proper planning and physical handling; (2) transportation of materials; (3) environmental concerns; (4) end uses of the catalyst; and (5) choosing the proper reclamation partner. These factors are discussed.

  3. Catalysts and method

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    An improved catlayst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HC1 and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride.

  4. Epoxidation catalyst and process

    DOEpatents

    Linic, Suljo; Christopher, Phillip

    2010-10-26

    Disclosed herein is a catalytic method of converting alkenes to epoxides. This method generally includes reacting alkenes with oxygen in the presence of a specific silver catalyst under conditions suitable to produce a yield of the epoxides. The specific silver catalyst is a silver nanocrystal having a plurality of surface planes, a substantial portion of which is defined by Miller indices of (100). The reaction is performed by charging a suitable reactor with this silver catalyst and then feeding the reactants to the reactor under conditions to carry out the reaction. The reaction may be performed in batch, or as a continuous process that employs a recycle of any unreacted alkenes. The specific silver catalyst has unexpectedly high selectivity for epoxide products. Consequently, this general method (and its various embodiments) will result in extraordinarily high epoxide yields heretofore unattainable.

  5. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, Rayford G.; Dosch, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  6. Plasmatron-catalyst system

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Rabinovich, Alexander; Alexeev, Nikolai

    2007-10-09

    A plasmatron-catalyst system. The system generates hydrogen-rich gas and comprises a plasmatron and at least one catalyst for receiving an output from the plasmatron to produce hydrogen-rich gas. In a preferred embodiment, the plasmatron receives as an input air, fuel and water/steam for use in the reforming process. The system increases the hydrogen yield and decreases the amount of carbon monoxide.

  7. Catalytic reforming catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, W.C.; Kluksdahl, H.E.

    1980-12-09

    An improved catalyst, having a reduced fouling rate when used in a catalytic reforming process, said catalyst comprising platinum disposed on an alumina support wherein the alumina support is obtained by removing water from aluminum hydroxide produced as a by-product from a ziegler higher alcohol synthesis reaction, and wherein the alumina is calcined at a temperature of 1100-1400/sup 0/F so as to have a surface area of 165 to 215 square meters per gram.

  8. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1993-01-05

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  9. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Angelici, R.J.; Gao, H.

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilication, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanidation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical. 2 figs.

  10. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Angelici, Robert J.; Gao, Hanrong

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilation, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical.

  11. Wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) study of "two-line" ferrihydrite structure: Effect of arsenate sorption and counterion variation and comparison with EXAFS results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waychunas, G.A.; Fuller, C.C.; Rea, B.A.; Davis, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements have been made on a suite of "two-line" ferrihydrite (FHY2) samples containing varying amounts of coprecipitated arsenate. Samples prepared at pH 8 with counter ions chloride, nitrate, and a mixture of both also were examined. The raw WAXS scattering functions show that "two-line" ferrihydrite actually has a large number of non-Bragg (i.e., diffuse scattering) maxima up to our observation limit of 16 A??-1. The type of counter ion used during synthesis produces no significant change in this function. In unarsenated samples, Radial Distribution Functions (RDFs) produced from the scattering functions show a well-defined Fe-O peak at 2.02 A?? in excellent agreement with the mean distance of 2.01 A?? from extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. The area under the Fe-O peak is consistent with only octahedral oxygen coordination about iron, and an iron coordination about oxygen of 2.2, in agreement with the EXAFS results, the sample composition, and XANES measurements. The second peak observed in the RDFs is clearly divided into two populations of correlations, at 3.07 and 3.52 A??, respectively. These distances are close to the EXAFS-derived Fe-Fe subshell distances of 3.02-3.05 and 3.43-3.46 A??, respectively, though this is misleading as the RDF peaks also include contributions from O-Fe and O-O correlations. Simulated RDFs of the FeOOH polymorphs indicate how the observed RDF structure relates to the EXAFS pair-correlation function, and allow comparisons with an ordered ferrihydrite structure. The effect of increasing arsenate content is dramatic, as the RDF peaks are progressively smeared out, indicating a wider range of interatomic distances even at moderate surface coverages, and a loss of longer range correlations. At an As/Fe ratio of 0.68, the surface saturation level of arsenate, the RDF shows little order beyond what would be expected from small pieces of dioctahedral Fe oxyhydroxyl chains or

  12. Magnetic and dendritic catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Deraedt, Christophe; Ruiz, Jaime; Astruc, Didier

    2015-07-21

    The recovery and reuse of catalysts is a major challenge in the development of sustainable chemical processes. Two methods at the frontier between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis have recently emerged for addressing this problem: loading the catalyst onto a dendrimer or onto a magnetic nanoparticle. In this Account, we describe representative examples of these two methods, primarily from our research group, and compare them. We then describe new chemistry that combines the benefits of these two methods of catalysis. Classic dendritic catalysis has involved either attaching the catalyst covalently at the branch termini or within the dendrimer core. We have used chelating pyridyltriazole ligands to insolubilize catalysts at the termini of dendrimers, providing an efficient, recyclable heterogeneous catalysts. With the addition of dendritic unimolecular micelles olefin metathesis reactions catalyzed by commercial Grubbs-type ruthenium-benzylidene complexes in water required unusually low amounts of catalyst. When such dendritic micelles include intradendritic ligands, both the micellar effect and ligand acceleration promote faster catalysis in water. With these types of catalysts, we could carry out azide alkyne cycloaddition ("click") chemistry with only ppm amounts of CuSO4·5H2O and sodium ascorbate under ambient conditions. Alternatively we can attach catalysts to the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), essentially magnetite (Fe3O4) or maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), offering the opportunity to recover the catalysts using magnets. Taking advantage of the merits of both of these strategies, we and others have developed a new generation of recyclable catalysts: dendritic magnetically recoverable catalysts. In particular, some of our catalysts with a γ-Fe2O3@SiO2 core and 1,2,3-triazole tethers and loaded with Pd nanoparticles generate strong positive dendritic effects with respect to ligand loading, catalyst loading, catalytic activity and

  13. Characterisation of gold catalysts.

    PubMed

    Villa, Alberto; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Chan-Thaw, Carine E; Hammond, Ceri; Veith, Gabriel M; Wang, Di; Manzoli, Maela; Prati, Laura; Hutchings, Graham J

    2016-09-21

    Au-based catalysts have established a new important field of catalysis, revealing specific properties in terms of both high activity and selectivity for many reactions. However, the correlation between the morphology and the activity of the catalyst is not always clear although much effort has been addressed to this task. To some extent the problem relates to the complexity of the characterisation techniques that can be applied to Au catalyst and the broad range of ways in which they can be prepared. Indeed, in many reports only a few characterization techniques have been used to investigate the potential nature of the active sites. The aim of this review is to provide a critical description of the techniques that are most commonly used as well as the more advanced characterization techniques available for this task. The techniques that we discuss are (i) transmission electron microscopy methods, (ii) X-ray spectroscopy techniques, (iii) vibrational spectroscopy techniques and (iv) chemisorption methods. The description is coupled with developing an understanding of a number of preparation methods. In the final section the example of the supported AuPd alloy catalyst is discussed to show how the techniques can gain an understanding of an active oxidation catalyst.

  14. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  15. Catalyst reforming process

    SciTech Connect

    Swan, G.A. III

    1989-05-23

    This patent describes a process for catalytically reforming a gasoline boiling range naphtha, with hydrogen, in a semi-regenerative or semi-cyclic reforming process unit comprised of serially connected reactors, inclusive of a lead reactor and one or more downstream reactors, the last of which is the tail reactor, each of which contains a halogenated reforming catalyst comprised of a halide, a Group VIII noble metal, and an inorganic oxide support, the improvement which comprises continuously injecting into each downstream reactor a mixture of water and halide at a water to halide ratio from about 20:1 to about 60:1 wherein the specific ratio of water to halide for each individual downstream reactor is chosen so as to maintain the level of halide on catalyst in each downstream reactor from about 0.5 to 1.5 wt. % based on the total weight of the catalyst.

  16. Partial oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    2000-01-01

    A two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion. The dehydrogenation portion is a group VIII metal and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure. There is also disclosed a method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  17. Oxide Nanocrystal Model Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weixin

    2016-03-15

    Model catalysts with uniform and well-defined surface structures have been extensively employed to explore structure-property relationships of powder catalysts. Traditional oxide model catalysts are based on oxide single crystals and single crystal thin films, and the surface chemistry and catalysis are studied under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. However, the acquired fundamental understandings often suffer from the "materials gap" and "pressure gap" when they are extended to the real world of powder catalysts working at atmospheric or higher pressures. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis have realized controlled synthesis of catalytic oxide nanocrystals with uniform and well-defined morphologies. These oxide nanocrystals consist of a novel type of oxide model catalyst whose surface chemistry and catalysis can be studied under the same conditions as working oxide catalysts. In this Account, the emerging concept of oxide nanocrystal model catalysts is demonstrated using our investigations of surface chemistry and catalysis of uniform and well-defined cuprous oxide nanocrystals and ceria nanocrystals. Cu2O cubes enclosed with the {100} crystal planes, Cu2O octahedra enclosed with the {111} crystal planes, and Cu2O rhombic dodecahedra enclosed with the {110} crystal planes exhibit distinct morphology-dependent surface reactivities and catalytic properties that can be well correlated with the surface compositions and structures of exposed crystal planes. Among these types of Cu2O nanocrystals, the octahedra are most reactive and catalytically active due to the presence of coordination-unsaturated (1-fold-coordinated) Cu on the exposed {111} crystal planes. The crystal-plane-controlled surface restructuring and catalytic activity of Cu2O nanocrystals were observed in CO oxidation with excess oxygen. In the propylene oxidation reaction with O2, 1-fold-coordinated Cu on Cu2O(111), 3-fold-coordinated O on Cu2O(110), and 2-fold-coordinated O on Cu2O(100) were identified

  18. Secret Lives of Catalysts Revealed

    SciTech Connect

    Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor

    2008-01-01

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division discuss the first-ever glimpse of nanoscale catalysts in action. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2008/10/21/catalysts/

  19. Bio-inspired 2-line ferrihydrite as a high-capacity and high-rate-capability anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Ukita, Masahiro; Sakuma, Ryo; Nakanishi, Makoto; Fujii, Tatsuo; Imanishi, Nobuyuki; Takada, Jun

    2016-10-01

    A high-capacity and high-rate-capability anode material for lithium-ion batteries, silicon-doped iron oxyhydroxide or 2-line ferrihydrite (2Fh), was prepared by mixing iron nitrate powder, tetraethyl orthosilicate, 2-propanol, and ammonium hydrogen carbonate powder at room temperature. The design of this material was inspired by a bacteriogenic product, a nanometric amorphous iron-based oxide material containing small amounts of structural Si. The atomistic structure of the prepared Si-doped 2Fh was strongly affected by the Si molar ratio [x = Si/(Fe + Si)]. Its crystallinity gradually decreased as the Si molar ratio increased, with a structural variation from nanocrystalline to amorphous at x = 0.25. The sample with x = 0.20 demonstrated the best Li storage performance. The developed material exhibited a high capacity of ∼400 mAh g-1 at the 25th cycle in the voltage range of 0.3-3.0 V and at a current rate of 9 A g-1, which was three times greater than that of the Si-free 2Fh. This indicates that Si-doping into the 2Fh structure realizes good rate capability, which are presumably because of the specific nanocomposite structure of iron-based electrochemical centers embedded in the Si-based amorphous matrix, generated by reversible Li insertion/deinsertion process.

  20. Trapping of Cr by formation of ferrihydrite during the reduction of chromate ions by Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxysalt green rusts

    SciTech Connect

    Loyaux-Lawniczak, S.; Refait, P.; Ehrhardt, J.J.; LeComte, P.; Genin, J.M.R.

    2000-02-01

    Hexavalent chromium, a byproduct of many industrial processes, is toxic and produces mobile aqueous oxyanions, whereas Cr(III) is relatively immobile in the environment and, moreover, essential in human glucidic metabolism. For this reason, Fe(II)-Fe(III) layered double hydroxysalt green rusts, recently identified as a mineral in hydromorphic soils, were evaluated as potential Fe(II)-bearing phases for hexavalent chromium reduction. Both considered synthetic varieties, the hydroxysulfate GR(SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) and the hydroxychloride GR(Cl{sup {minus}}), proved to be very reactive; their interaction with potassium chromate solutions leads to the rapid and complete reduction of Cr(VI) into Cr(III). The Cr(III)-bearing solid phase, studied by X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer, X-ray photoelectron, and Raman spectroscopies, was determined to be a poorly ordered Cr(III)-Fe(III) oxyhydroxide, similar to the 2 the line ferrihydrite. The comparison between the experimental redox potential and pH values for a theoretical equilibrium diagram bearing Cr and Fe phases indicated that the solubility of this solid solution, which may govern the behavior of chromium in the environment, is of the same order as that of pure Cr(OH){sub 3}.

  1. 2H and 27Al solid-state NMR study of the local environments in Al-doped 2-line ferrihydrite, goethite, and lepidocrocite

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Jongsik; Ilott, Andrew J.; Middlemiss, Derek S.; ...

    2015-05-13

    Although substitution of aluminum into iron oxides and oxyhydroxides has been extensively studied, it is difficult to obtain accurate incorporation levels. Assessing the distribution of dopants within these materials has proven especially challenging because bulk analytical techniques cannot typically determine whether dopants are substituted directly into the bulk iron oxide or oxyhydroxide phase or if they form separate, minor phase impurities. These differences have important implications for the chemistry of these iron-containing materials, which are ubiquitous in the environment. In this work, 27Al and 2H NMR experiments are performed on series of Al-substituted goethite, lepidocrocite, and 2-line ferrihydrite in ordermore » to develop an NMR method to track Al substitution. The extent of Al substitution into the structural frameworks of each compound is quantified by comparing quantitative 27Al MAS NMR results with those from elemental analysis. Magnetic measurements are performed for the goethite series to compare with NMR measurements. Static 27Al spin–echo mapping experiments are used to probe the local environments around the Al substituents, providing clear evidence that they are incorporated into the bulk iron phases. As a result, predictions of the 2H and 27Al NMR hyperfine contact shifts in Al-doped goethite and lepidocrocite, obtained from a combined first-principles and empirical magnetic scaling approach, give further insight into the distribution of the dopants within these phases.« less

  2. Aerogel derived catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J. G., LLNL

    1996-12-11

    Aerogels area class of colloidal materials which have high surface areas and abundant mesoporous structure. SiO{sub 2} aerogels show unique physical, optical and structural properties. When catalytic metals are incorporated in the aerogel framework, the potential exists for new and very effective catalysts for industrial processes. Three applications of these metal-containing SiO{sub 2} aerogels as catalysts are briefly reviewed in this paper--NO{sub x} reduction, volatile organic compound destruction, and partial oxidation of methane.

  3. Process of making supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, James A.; Subramanian, Somasundaram

    1992-01-01

    Oxide supported metal catalysts have an additional metal present in intimate association with the metal catalyst to enhance catalytic activity. In a preferred mode, iridium or another Group VIII metal catalyst is supported on a titania, alumina, tungsten oxide, silica, or composite oxide support. Aluminum ions are readsorbed onto the support and catalyst, and reduced during calcination. The aluminum can be added as aluminum nitrate to the iridium impregnate solution, e.g. chloroiridic acid.

  4. Recovery of iron oxides from acid mine drainage and their application as adsorbent or catalyst.

    PubMed

    Flores, Rubia Gomes; Andersen, Silvia Layara Floriani; Maia, Leonardo Kenji Komay; José, Humberto Jorge; Moreira, Regina de Fatima Peralta Muniz

    2012-11-30

    Iron oxide particles recovered from acid mine drainage represent a potential low-cost feedstock to replace reagent-grade chemicals in the production of goethite, ferrihydrite or magnetite with relatively high purity. Also, the properties of iron oxides recovered from acid mine drainage mean that they can be exploited as catalysts and/or adsorbents to remove azo dyes from aqueous solutions. The main aim of this study was to recover iron oxides with relatively high purity from acid mine drainage to act as a catalyst in the oxidation of dye through a Fenton-like mechanism or as an adsorbent to remove dyes from an aqueous solution. Iron oxides (goethite) were recovered from acid mine drainage through a sequential precipitation method. Thermal treatment at temperatures higher than 300 °C produces hematite through a decrease in the BET area and an increase in the point of zero charge. In the absence of hydrogen peroxide, the solids adsorbed the textile dye Procion Red H-E7B according to the Langmuir model, and the maximum amount adsorbed decreased as the temperature of the thermal treatment increased. The decomposition kinetics of hydrogen peroxide is dependent on the H(2)O(2) concentration and iron oxides dosage, but the second-order rate constant normalized to the BET surface area is similar to that for different iron oxides tested in this and others studies. These results indicate that acid mine drainage could be used as a source material for the production of iron oxide catalysts/adsorbents, with comparable quality to those produced using analytical-grade reagents.

  5. Reforming with polymetallic catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, W.C. Jr.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a process for catalytically reforming, with hydrogen, a hydrocarbon naphtha feed at reforming conditions, the improvement comprising contacting the naphtha feed, and hydrogen, with a halogenated, supported platinum-rhenium catalyst promoted with iridium agglomerated to exhibit a crystallinity greater than 50 percent, as measured by X-ray.

  6. Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar

    1984-01-01

    A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

  7. Salesperson, Catalyst, Manager, Leader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worth, Michael J.; Asp, James W., II

    1996-01-01

    This article examines four roles of the college or university development officer: salesperson (when direct solicitation is seen as the officer's primary role); catalyst (or sales manager, adviser, expert, facilitator); manager (stressing the importance of the overall office functioning); and leader (who exerts a leadership role in the…

  8. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  9. Sabatier Catalyst Poisoning Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallette, Tim; Perry, Jay; Abney, Morgan; Knox, Jim; Goldblatt, Loel

    2013-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) on the International Space Station (ISS) has been operational since 2010. The CRA uses a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane by reaction of the metabolic CO2 scrubbed from the cabin air and the hydrogen byproduct from the water electrolysis system used for metabolic oxygen generation. Incorporating the CRA into the overall air revitalization system has facilitated life support system loop closure on the ISS reducing resupply logistics and thereby enhancing longer term missions. The CRA utilizes CO2 which has been adsorbed in a 5A molecular sieve within the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, CDRA. There is a potential of compounds with molecular dimensions similar to, or less than CO2 to also be adsorbed. In this fashion trace contaminants may be concentrated within the CDRA and subsequently desorbed with the CO2 to the CRA. Currently, there is no provision to remove contaminants prior to entering the Sabatier catalyst bed. The risk associated with this is potential catalyst degradation due to trace organic contaminants in the CRA carbon dioxide feed acting as catalyst poisons. To better understand this risk, United Technologies Aerospace System (UTAS) has teamed with MSFC to investigate the impact of various trace contaminants on the CRA catalyst performance at relative ISS cabin air concentrations and at about 200/400 times of ISS concentrations, representative of the potential concentrating effect of the CDRA molecular sieve. This paper summarizes our initial assessment results.

  10. Hydroprocessing catalyst composition

    SciTech Connect

    Apelian, M.R.; Degnan, T.F. Jr.; Marler, D.O.; Mazzone, D.N.

    1993-07-13

    A bifunctional hydroprocessing catalyst is described which comprises a metal component having hydrogenation/dehydrogenation functionality and a support component comprising an inorganic, non-layered, porous, crystalline phase material having pores with diameters of at least about 13 [angstrom] and exhibiting, after calcination, an X-ray diffraction pattern with at least one peak with a relative intensity of 100 at a d-spacing greater than about 18 [angstrom], the catalyst having a surface area S, where S, expressed in m[sup 2].g[sup [minus]1], is defined by the equation: S[ge]600-13.3X where X is the total metals loading in weight percent and is least 12 weight percent. A second hydroprocessing catalyst is described according to claim 1 in which the crystalline phase has a composition expressed as follows: M[sub n/q](W[sub a]X[sub b]Y[sub c]Z[sub d]O[sub h]) wherein M is one or more ions; n is the charge of the composition excluding M expressed as oxides; q is the weighted molar average valence of M; n/q is the number of moles or mole fraction of M; W is one or more divalent elements; X is one or more trivalent elements; Y is one or more tetravalent elements; Z is one or more pentavalent elements; a, b, c, and d are mole fraction of W, X, Y, and Z, respectively, h is a number of from 1 to 2.5; and (a+b+c+d) = 1. A third hydroprocessing catalyst is described according to claim 1 in which the catalyst is at least one base metal of Group VIA, VIIA or VIIIA of the Periodic Table.

  11. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.; Fuentes, Sergio; Torres, Brenda

    2007-05-29

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  12. Surface complexation and precipitate geometry for aqueous Zn(II) sorption on ferrihydrite I: X-ray absorption extended fine structure spectroscopy analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waychunas, G.A.; Fuller, C.C.; Davis, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    "Two-line" ferrihydrite samples precipitated and then exposed to a range of aqueous Zn solutions (10-5 to 10-3 M), and also coprecipitated in similar Zn solutions (pH 6.5), have been examined by Zn and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Typical Zn complexes on the surface have Zn-O distances of 1.97(0.2) A?? and coordination numbers of about 4.0(0.5), consistent with tetrahedral oxygen coordination. This contrasts with Zn-O distances of 2.11(.02) A?? and coordination numbers of 6 to 7 in the aqueous Zn solutions used in sample preparation. X-ray absorption extended fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) fits to the second shell of cation neighbors indicate as many as 4 Zn-Fe neighbors at 3.44(.04) A?? in coprecipitated samples, and about two Zn-Fe neighbors at the same distance in adsorption samples. In both sets of samples, the fitted coordination number of second shell cations decreases as sorption density increases, indicating changes in the number and type of available complexing sites or the onset of competitive precipitation processes. Comparison of our results with the possible geometries for surface complexes and precipitates suggests that the Zn sorption complexes are inner sphere and at lowest adsorption densities are bidentate, sharing apical oxygens with adjacent edge-sharing Fe(O,OH)6 octahedra. Coprecipitation samples have complexes with similar geometry, but these are polydentate, sharing apices with more than two adjacent edge-sharing Fe(O,OH)6 polyhedra. The results are inconsistent with Zn entering the ferrihydrite structure (i.e., solid solution formation) or formation of other Zn-Fe precipitates. The fitted Zn-Fe coordination numbers drop with increasing Zn density with a minimum of about 0.8(.2) at Zn/(Zn + Fe) of 0.08 or more. This change appears to be attributable to the onset of precipitation of zinc hydroxide polymers with mainly tetrahedral Zn coordination. At the highest loadings studied, the nature of the complexes changes further

  13. Reduction of ferrihydrite with adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter: microbial reduction by Geobacter bremensis vs. abiotic reduction by Na-dithionite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusterhues, K.; Hädrich, A.; Neidhardt, J.; Küsel, K.; Keller, T. F.; Jandt, K. D.; Totsche, K. U.

    2014-04-01

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) is a widespread poorly crystalline Fe oxide which becomes easily coated by natural organic matter (OM) in the environment. This mineral-bound OM entirely changes the mineral surface properties and therefore the reactivity of the original mineral. Here, we investigated the reactivity of 2-line Fh, Fh with adsorbed OM and Fh coprecipitated with OM towards microbial and abiotic reduction of Fe(III). As a surrogate for dissolved soil OM we used a water extract of a Podzol forest floor. Fh-OM associations with different OM-loadings were reduced either by Geobacter bremensis or abiotically by Na-dithionite. Both types of experiments showed decreasing initial Fe reduction rates and decreasing degrees of reduction with increasing amounts of mineral-bound OM. At similar OM-loadings, coprecipitated Fhs were more reactive than Fhs with adsorbed OM. The difference can be explained by the smaller crystal size and poor crystallinity of such coprecipitates. At small OM loadings this led to even faster Fe reduction rates than found for pure Fh. The amount of mineral-bound OM also affected the formation of secondary minerals: goethite was only found after reduction of OM-free Fh and siderite was only detected when Fhs with relatively low amounts of mineral-bound OM were reduced. We conclude that direct contact of G. bremensis to the Fe oxide mineral surface was inhibited when blocked by OM. Consequently, mineral-bound OM shall be taken into account besides Fe(II) accumulation as a further widespread mechanism to slow down reductive dissolution.

  14. A recombinant matriptase causes an increase in caspase-3 activity in a small-intestinal epithelial IEC-6 line cultured on fibronectin-coated plates.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Seiya; Tsuzuki, Satoshi; Inouye, Kuniyo; Fushiki, Tohru

    2014-05-01

    Matriptase is an epithelial-derived type-II transmembrane serine protease. This protease is expressed prominently in the villus tip of small-intestinal epithelia at which senescent cells undergo shedding and/or apoptosis. The basement membrane of epithelial cells, including small-intestinal epithelial cells, contains extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as fibronectin and laminin. We found previously that high concentrations of a recombinant matriptase catalytic domain (r-MatCD) (e.g. 1 μM) caused an increased detachment of and increases in the activity of apoptotic effector caspase-3 in a rat small-intestinal epithelial IEC-6 line cultured on laminin-coated plates and proposed that at sites with its high level of expression, matriptase contributes to promoting shedding and/or detachment-induced death of epithelial cells through a mechanism mediating loss of cell-ECM adhesion. In this study, we found that even without increasing cell detachment, a high concentration of r-MatCD causes an increase in caspase-3 activity in IEC-6 cells cultured on fibronectin-coated plates, suggesting that the recombinant matriptase can cause apoptosis by a mechanism unrelated to cell detachment. Also, r-MatCD-treated IEC-6 cells on fibronectin were found to display spindle-like morphological changes. We suggest that r-MatCD causes apoptosis of IEC-6 on fibronectin by a mechanism involving the disruption of cell integrity.

  15. Fluorination process using catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Hochel, Robert C.; Saturday, Kathy A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for converting an actinide compound selected from the group consisting of uranium oxides, plutonium oxides, uranium tetrafluorides, plutonium tetrafluorides and mixtures of said oxides and tetrafluorides, to the corresponding volatile actinide hexafluoride by fluorination with a stoichiometric excess of fluorine gas. The improvement involves conducting the fluorination of the plutonium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3, AgF.sub.2 and NiF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced. The improvement also involves conducting the fluorination of one of the uranium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3 and AgF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced.

  16. Fluorination process using catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Hochel, R.C.; Saturday, K.A.

    1983-08-25

    A process is given for converting an actinide compound selected from the group consisting of uranium oxides, plutonium oxides, uranium tetrafluorides, plutonium tetrafluorides and mixtures of said oxides and tetrafluorides, to the corresponding volatile actinide hexafluoride by fluorination with a stoichiometric excess of fluorine gas. The improvement involves conducting the fluorination of the plutonium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF/sub 3/, AgF/sub 2/ and NiF/sub 2/, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced. The improvement also involves conducting the fluorination of one of the uranium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF/sub 3/ and AgF/sub 2/, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced.

  17. High-Activity Dealloyed Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kongkanand, Anusorn

    2014-09-30

    Reduction of costly Pt usage in proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes is one of the major challenges towards development and commercialization of fuel cell vehicles. Although few have met the initial-kinetic activity requirements in a realistic fuel cell device, no catalyst material has ever met the demanding fuel cell durability targets set by DOE. In this project, a team of 4 universities and 2 companies came together to investigate a concept that appeared promising in preliminary non-fuel cell tests then to further develop the catalyst to a mature level ready for vehicle implementation. The team consists of academia with technical leadership in their respective areas, a catalyst supplier, and a fuel cell system integrator.The tightly collaborative project enabled development of a highly active and durable catalyst with performance that significantly exceeds that of previous catalysts and meets the DOE targets for the first time (Figure 1A). The catalyst was then further evaluated in full-active-area stack in a realistic vehicle operating condition (Figure 1B). This is the first public demonstration that one can realize the performance benefit and Pt cost reduction over a conventional pure Pt catalyst in a long-term realistic PEMFC system. Furthermore, systematic analyses of a range of catalysts with different performance after fuel cell testing allowed for correlation between catalyst microstructure and its electrocatalytic activity and durability. This will in turn aid future catalyst development.

  18. External Catalyst Breakup Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-01

    anhydrous amonia cylinder and associated valve is revealed in the background. Nominal instrumentation for the reactor tests consisted of Temperatures...above the catalyst bed. Liquid, anhydrous ammonia was selected as the quench medium after consideration of the influence water might have on...corresponding to this G Iading and temperature at an amonia dissociation fraction of 0.5 and Lhamber pressure of 200 psia is 18.4 ft/sec. A typical five pound

  19. Steam reforming catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Kramarz, Kurt W.; Bloom, Ira D.; Kumar, Romesh; Ahmed, Shabbir; Wilkenhoener, Rolf; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel. A vapor of the hydrocarbon fuel and steam is brought in contact with a two-part catalyst having a dehydrogenation powder portion and an oxide-ion conducting powder portion at a temperature not less than about 770.degree.C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich. The H.sub.2 content of the hydrogen gas is greater than about 70 percent by volume. The dehydrogenation portion of the catalyst includes a group VIII metal, and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide from the group crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure and mixtures thereof. The oxide-ion conducting portion of the catalyst is a ceramic powder of one or more of ZrO.sub.2, CeO.sub.2, Bi.sub.2 O.sub.3, (BiVO).sub.4, and LaGaO.sub.3.

  20. Geometry of sorbed arsenate on ferrihydrite and crystalline FeOOH: Re-evaluation of EXAFS results and topological factors in predicting sorbate geometry, and evidence for monodentate complexes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waychunas , Glenn A.; Davis, James A.; Fuller, Christopher C.

    1995-01-01

    Manceau's (1995) reinterpretation of some of our EXAFS results (Waychunas et al., 1993) has been analyzed using both old and newly collected data in an attempt to clarify the nature of proposed monodentate and edge-sharing bidentate arsenate complexes on the ferrihydrite surface. It is shown that EXAFS analysis utilizing data with sufficient k-range does indicate the presence of relatively short AsFe bonds, suggestive of an edge-sharing complex as indicated by Manceau (1995). However, a variety of data analysis factors and crystal chemical considerations create doubt in this assignment. Most significantly, X-ray scattering data collected on a sample of ferrihydrite with a large density of sorbed arsenate, which should show a substantial fraction of the edge-sharing complex, does not show any such correlation within fitting uncertainty. We also suggest that it is unnecessary to invoke the presence of edge-sharing bidentate arsenate to explain the surface growth poisoning of ferrihydrite with increasing sorbed arsenate, as Manceau (1995) claims.Further, we show that a model based on the topology of close packed oxygen ions offers a clear explanation why monodentate arsenate should appear on some surfaces and not on others, and why differing AsFe distances might be observed on a single surface with a single type of complex. This model also explains why bidentate sorbed arsenate can occupy positions with consistent “tilt” angles. Without such consistency, the sorbed arsenate would be highly positionally disordered, and difficult to detect accurately via EXAFS methods.

  1. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Tzou, M.S.; Jiang, H.J.

    1987-03-31

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  2. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H.; Tzou, Ming-Shin; Jiang, Hui-Jong

    1987-01-01

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  3. Catalyst systems and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Ozkan, Umit S [Worthington, OH; Holmgreen, Erik M [Columbus, OH; Yung, Matthew M [Columbus, OH

    2012-07-24

    A method of carbon monoxide (CO) removal comprises providing an oxidation catalyst comprising cobalt supported on an inorganic oxide. The method further comprises feeding a gaseous stream comprising CO, and oxygen (O.sub.2) to the catalyst system, and removing CO from the gaseous stream by oxidizing the CO to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) in the presence of the oxidation catalyst at a temperature between about 20 to about 200.degree. C.

  4. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Dennis P [Maplewood, MN; Schmoeckel, Alison K [Stillwater, MN; Vernstrom, George D [Cottage Grove, MN; Atanasoski, Radoslav [Edina, MN; Wood, Thomas E [Stillwater, MN; Yang, Ruizhi [Halifax, CA; Easton, E Bradley [Halifax, CA; Dahn, Jeffrey R [Hubley, CA; O'Neill, David G [Lake Elmo, MN

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  5. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhichao; Benavides, Pahola T.; Dunn, Jennifer B.; Cronauer, Donald C.

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of five different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5], Mo/Co/ γ-Al2O3, and Pt/ γ-Al2O3) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module.

  6. Results of catalyst testing using iron-based catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Linehan, J.C.; Darab, J.G.; Matson, D.W.

    1993-03-01

    As coal liquefaction catalysts, iron-based products are generally inferior to the more expensive molybdenum, cobalt, or nickel-based materials. However, the lower costs of production and recovery (or in the case of some iron catalysts, non-recovery) give the iron-based materials a potential economic advantage over the more efficient precious and semi-precious metal catalysts for this application. Recent research has shown that a number of different iron-containing materials can be successfully utilized as coal liquefaction catalysts or as catalyst. Pyrrhotite (Fe[sub 1-x]S) or a similar iron-sulfide phase is commonly believed to be the active catalyst in coal liquefaction and model compound pyrolysis reactions, although no specific phase has been yet been isolated as the actual catalyst species. The active iron-containing catalyst is usually generated in situ from an iron-oxide precursor and an elemental sulfur source under reducing conditions in the reactor vessel. Most research has concentrated on the use of common iron-oxide phases such as hematite or goethite (and their derivatives) as the iron-bearing precursor, or on non-specific iron materials produced by the reaction of various iron salts and compounds in the coal or liquefaction reactor. To our knowledge there has been no systematic effort to determine the optimum iron-containing precursor phase for producing active coal liquefaction catalysts, despite the fact that there are over ten iron-(hydroxy)oxide phases which can be easily synthesized in the laboratory. We have undertaken a systematic study to identify the most active iron-oxide catalyst precursor phases, the co-catalysts, and the coal pretreatments which will provide optimum yields in coal liquefaction processes.

  7. Mixed Alcohol Synthesis Catalyst Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; White, James F.; Stevens, Don J.

    2007-09-03

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). PNNL is tasked with obtaining commercially available or preparing promising mixed-alcohol catalysts and screening them in a laboratory-scale reactor system. Commercially available catalysts and the most promising experimental catalysts are provided to NREL for testing using a slipstream from a pilot-scale biomass gasifier. From the standpoint of producing C2+ alcohols as the major product, it appears that the rhodium catalyst is the best choice in terms of both selectivity and space-time yield (STY). However, unless the rhodium catalyst can be improved to provide minimally acceptable STYs for commercial operation, mixed alcohol synthesis will involve significant production of other liquid coproducts. The modified Fischer-Tropsch catalyst shows the most promise for providing both an acceptable selectivity to C2+ alcohols and total liquid STY. However, further optimization of the Fischer-Tropsch catalysts to improve selectivity to higher alcohols is highly desired. Selection of a preferred catalyst will likely entail a decision on the preferred coproduct slate. No other catalysts tested appear amenable to the significant improvements needed for acceptable STYs.

  8. DEHYDROGENATION CATALYST FOR PRODUCTION OF MTBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this project were to better understand the effect of different catalyst preparation parameters, the effect of different catalyst treatment parameters, and the mechanism of deactivation. Accordingly, catalysts were made using various preparation methods and with...

  9. Molecular water oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gratzel, Michael; Munavalli, Shekhar; Pern, Fu-Jann; Frank, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A dimeric composition of the formula: ##STR1## wherein L', L", L'", and L"" are each a bidentate ligand having at least one functional substituent, the ligand selected from bipyridine, phenanthroline, 2-phenylpyridine, bipyrimidine, and bipyrazyl and the functional substituent selected from carboxylic acid, ester, amide, halogenide, anhydride, acyl ketone, alkyl ketone, acid chloride, sulfonic acid, phosphonic acid, and nitro and nitroso groups. An electrochemical oxidation process for the production of the above functionally substituted bidentate ligand diaqua oxo-bridged ruthenium dimers and their use as water oxidation catalysts is described.

  10. Novel Reforming Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Pfefferle, Lisa D; Haller, Gary L

    2012-10-16

    Aqueous phase reforming is useful for processing oxygenated hydrocarbons to hydrogen and other more useful products. Current processing is hampered by the fact that oxide based catalysts are not stable under high temperature hydrothermal conditions. Silica in the form of structured MCM-41 is thermally a more stable support for Co and Ni than conventional high surface area amorphous silica but hydrothermal stability is not demonstrated. Carbon nanotube supports, in contrast, are highly stable under hydrothermal reaction conditions. In this project we show that carbon nanotubes are stable high activity/selectivity supports for the conversion of ethylene glycol to hydrogen.

  11. Alkene metathesis: the search for better catalysts.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Prashant H; Blechert, Siegfried

    2007-06-28

    Alkene metathesis catalyst development has made significant progress over recent years. Research in metathesis catalyst design has endeavoured to tackle three key issues: those of (i) catalyst efficiency and activity, (ii) substrate scope and selectivity--particularly stereoselective metathesis reactions--and (iii) the minimization of metal impurities and catalyst recycling. This article describes a brief history of metathesis catalyst development, followed by a survey of more recent research, with a particular emphasis on ruthenium catalysts.

  12. Performance characteristics of diffusive gradients in thin films equipped with a binding gel layer containing precipitated ferrihydrite for measuring arsenic(V), selenium(VI), vanadium(V), and antimony(V).

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Zhang, Hao; Santner, Jakob; Davison, William

    2010-11-01

    Measurements at high spatial resolution by DGT (diffusive gradients in thin films) require a binding agent that is homogeneously distributed in the binding layer. Formation of ferrihydrite by in situ precipitation within a hydrogel has been previously shown to meet these requirements for the measurement of oxyanions by DGT. Here, we report for the first time detailed performance characteristics of the binding gel and associated DGT devices obtained by deployment in known solutions. To allow comparison of measured and theoretical accumulation of As(V), Se(VI), V(V), and Sb(V), their diffusion coefficients were determined using an independent diffusion cell. Theoretical responses were obtained irrespective of ionic strength (1-100 mmol L(-1)) and pH (3-8), except for Se above pH 7.8 and V below pH 5. Calculated detection limits, based on deployment times of 1 day, were lower than those for devices made with a binding gel cast with a ferrihydrite slurry, and the measured capacity of the binding layer was also superior. There was no evidence for interference from other oxyanions, but binding performance showed some deterioration after 38 days of storage. The potential capability for measuring labile forms of these oxyanions in acidic to neutral, fresh to brackish waters was demonstrated.

  13. Catalyst separation method reduces Platformer turnaround costs

    SciTech Connect

    Blashka, S.R.; Welch, J.G.; Nite, K.; Furfaro, A.P.

    1995-09-18

    A catalyst separation technology that segregates catalyst particles by density has proved successful in recovering CCR (continuous catalyst regeneration) Platforming catalyst that had been contaminated with heel catalyst, non-flowing catalyst. UOP`s CCR Platforming process converts naphtha to high-octane gasoline components and aromatics for petrochemical use. The reforming reactions take place in a series of Platforming reactors loaded with platinum-containing reforming catalyst. CCR Platforming technology incorporates a moving catalyst bed in a system that permits addition and withdrawal of catalyst from the reactor while the unit is operating. As the catalyst circulates through the reactors, it builds up typical carbon levels of 5%. Over time, the heel catalyst will build up carbon levels as high as 50%. When the catalyst is unloaded, heel catalyst is released, contaminating the last fraction of catalyst removed from the reactor. The heel-contaminated catalyst should not be reused because only a small fraction of the carbon on the heel catalyst is removed in the regeneration section. If returned to inventory, the carbon would react rapidly, causing temperature excursions. If heel-contaminated catalyst is reused, there is a high potential for damage to the unit. Density grading was used, after ex situ regeneration to recover the uncontaminated catalyst for reuse.

  14. Startup procedure for reforming catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    McHale, W.D.; Schoennagel, H.J.

    1984-08-14

    Process for reforming a hydrocarbon charge under reforming conditions in a reforming zone containing a sulfur-sensitive metal containing reforming catalyst wherein over-cracking of the charge stock and excessive temperature rise in the reforming zone is suppressed by pre-conditioning the catalyst, prior to contact with the charge, with a reformate of specified octane number and aromatics content.

  15. Catalysts for low temperature oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Toops, Todd J.; Parks, III, James E.; Bauer, John C.

    2016-03-01

    The invention provides a composite catalyst containing a first component and a second component. The first component contains nanosized gold particles. The second component contains nanosized platinum group metals. The composite catalyst is useful for catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, oxides of nitrogen, and other pollutants at low temperatures.

  16. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, V.A.; Iton, L.E.; Pasterczyk, J.W.; Winterer, M.; Krause, T.R.

    1994-04-26

    A zeolite-based catalyst is described for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C[sub 2]+ hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  17. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; Iton, Lennox E.; Pasterczyk, James W.; Winterer, Markus; Krause, Theodore R.

    1994-01-01

    A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  18. Doped palladium containing oxidation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2014-02-18

    A supported oxidation catalyst includes a support having a metal oxide or metal salt, and mixed metal particles thereon. The mixed metal particles include first particles including a palladium compound, and second particles including a precious metal group (PMG) metal or PMG metal compound, wherein the PMG metal is not palladium. The oxidation catalyst may also be used as a gas sensor.

  19. Zeolites for reforming catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, J.L.; Nadler, M.; Potter, M.J.; Martir, R.V.

    1991-01-22

    This patent describes a reforming catalyst exhibiting enhanced selectivity, activity, and activity maintenance. It comprises: zeolite crystals having a pH within the range of 9.4 to 10.0, wherein the pH is determined by measuring pH of supernatent liquid from a mixture of one part of the zeolite crystals with ten parts of dionized water by weight, and comprising exchangeable cations and at least one catalytically active metal selected from the group consisting of Group VII of the Periodic Table of Elements, tin and germanium. This patten also describes a process for treating zeolite to have a pH within a range effective in imparting enhanced activity, selectivity and activity maintenance to catalysts loaded onto the zeolite. The process comprising washing zeolite with an aqueous liquid in a manner so as to result with zeolite having a pH within the pH range of 9.4 to 10.0. The PH of supernatent liquid from a mixture of one part of the zeolite crystals with ten parts of dionized water by weight.

  20. Catalyst design for biorefining.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F

    2016-02-28

    The quest for sustainable resources to meet the demands of a rapidly rising global population while mitigating the risks of rising CO2 emissions and associated climate change, represents a grand challenge for humanity. Biomass offers the most readily implemented and low-cost solution for sustainable transportation fuels, and the only non-petroleum route to organic molecules for the manufacture of bulk, fine and speciality chemicals and polymers. To be considered truly sustainable, biomass must be derived from resources which do not compete with agricultural land use for food production, or compromise the environment (e.g. via deforestation). Potential feedstocks include waste lignocellulosic or oil-based materials derived from plant or aquatic sources, with the so-called biorefinery concept offering the co-production of biofuels, platform chemicals and energy; analogous to today's petroleum refineries which deliver both high-volume/low-value (e.g. fuels and commodity chemicals) and low-volume/high-value (e.g. fine/speciality chemicals) products, thereby maximizing biomass valorization. This article addresses the challenges to catalytic biomass processing and highlights recent successes in the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts facilitated by advances in nanotechnology and the synthesis of templated porous materials, as well as the use of tailored catalyst surfaces to generate bifunctional solid acid/base materials or tune hydrophobicity.

  1. Prelife catalysts and replicators

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Nowak, Martin A.

    2009-01-01

    Life is based on replication and evolution. But replication cannot be taken for granted. We must ask what there was prior to replication and evolution. How does evolution begin? We have proposed prelife as a generative system that produces information and diversity in the absence of replication. We model prelife as a binary soup of active monomers that form random polymers. ‘Prevolutionary’ dynamics can have mutation and selection prior to replication. Some sequences might have catalytic activity, thereby enhancing the rates of certain prelife reactions. We study the selection criteria for these prelife catalysts. Their catalytic efficiency must be above certain critical values. We find a maintenance threshold and an initiation threshold. The former is a linear function of sequence length, and the latter is an exponential function of sequence length. Therefore, it is extremely hard to select for prelife catalysts that have long sequences. We compare prelife catalysis with a simple model for replication. Assuming fast template-based elongation reactions, we can show that replicators have selection thresholds that are independent of their sequence length. Our calculation demonstrates the efficiency of replication and provides an explanation of why replication was selected over other forms of prelife catalysis. PMID:19692408

  2. Supported molten-metal catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Datta, Ravindra; Singh, Ajeet; Halasz, Istvan; Serban, Manuela

    2001-01-01

    An entirely new class of catalysts called supported molten-metal catalysts, SMMC, which can replace some of the existing precious metal catalysts used in the production of fuels, commodity chemicals, and fine chemicals, as well as in combating pollution. SMMC are based on supporting ultra-thin films or micro-droplets of the relatively low-melting (<600.degree. C.), inexpensive, and abundant metals and semimetals from groups 1, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16, of the periodic table, or their alloys and intermetallic compounds, on porous refractory supports, much like supported microcrystallites of the traditional solid metal catalysts. It thus provides orders of magnitude higher surface area than is obtainable in conventional reactors containing molten metals in pool form and also avoids corrosion. These have so far been the chief stumbling blocks in the application of molten metal catalysts.

  3. Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Bercaw, John E.; Herzog, Timothy A.

    1998-01-01

    A metallocene catalyst system for the polymerization of .alpha.-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula ##STR1## wherein: R.sup.1, R.sup.2, and R.sup.3 are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyls as a substituent, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R.sup.8).sub.3 where R.sup.8 is selected from the group consisting of C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; R.sup.4 and R.sup.6 are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R.sup.1 and R.sup.3 ; R.sup.5 is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E.sup.1, E.sup.2 are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Si(R.sup.9).sub.2 --Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Ge(R.sup.9).sub.2, Sn(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2 --C(R.sup.9).sub.2, where R.sup.9 is C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C.sub.S or C.sub.1 -symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from .alpha.-olefin monomers.

  4. Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Bercaw, J.E.; Herzog, T.A.

    1998-01-13

    A metallocene catalyst system is described for the polymerization of {alpha}-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula shown wherein: R{sup 1}, R{sup 2}, and R{sup 3} are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyls as a substituent, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R{sup 8}){sub 3} where R{sup 8} is selected from the group consisting of C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or C{sub 3} to C{sub 10} cycloalkyl; R{sup 4} and R{sup 6} are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R{sup 1} and R{sup 3}; R{sup 5} is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E{sup 1}, E{sup 2} are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}--Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Ge(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Sn(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}--C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, where R{sup 9} is C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or C{sub 3} to C{sub 10} cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C{sub S} or C{sub 1}-symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from {alpha}-olefin monomers.

  5. Ceramic catalyst materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G.; Gardner, T.J.; Hanprasopwattanna, A.; Reardon, J.; Datye, A.K.

    1995-08-01

    Hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) ion-exchange materials show great potential as ceramic catalyst supports due to an inherently high ion-exchange capacity which allows facile loading of catalytically active transition metal ions, and an ability to be cast as thin films on virtually any substrate. By coating titania and HTO materials onto inexpensive, high surface area substrates such as silica and alumina, the economics of using these materials is greatly improved, particularly for the HTO materials, which are substantially more expensive in the bulk form than other oxide supports. In addition, the development of thin film forms of these materials allows the catalytic and mechanical properties of the final catalyst formulation to be separately engineered. In order to fully realize the potential of thin film forms of titania and HTO, improved methods for the deposition and characterization of titania and HTO films on high surface area substrates are being developed. By varying deposition procedures, titania film thickness and substrate coverage can be varied from the submonolayer range to multilayer thicknesses on both silica and alumina. HTO films can also be formed, but the quality and reproducibility of these films is not nearly as good as for pure titania films. The films are characterized using a combination of isopropanol dehydration rate measurements, point of zero charge (PZC) measurements, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analysis. In order to assess the effects of changes in film morphology on catalytic activity, the films are being loaded with MoO{sub 3} using either incipient wetness impregnation or ion-exchange of heptamolybdate anions followed by calcining. The MoO{sub 3} is then sulfided to form MOS{sub 2}, and tested for catalytic activity using pyrene hydrogenation and dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization, model reactions that simulate reactions occurring during coal liquefaction.

  6. Catalyst deactivation in residue hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect

    Oballa, M.C.; Wong, C.; Krzywicki, A.

    1994-12-31

    The existence of a computer-controlled bench scale hydrocracking units at the authors site has made cheaper the non-stop running of experiments for long periods of time. It was, therefore possible to show, at minimal costs, when three hydrocracking catalysts in service reach their maximum lifetime. Different parameters which are helpful for catalyst life and activity predictions were calculated, e.g., relative catalyst age and the effectiveness factor. Experimental results compared well with model, giving them the minimum and maximum catalyst lifetime, as well as the deactivation profile with regard to sulfur and metals removal. Reaction rate constants for demetallization and desulfurization were also determined. Six commercial catalysts were evaluated at short term runs and the three most active were used for long term runs. Out of three catalysts tested for deactivation at long term runs, it was possible to choose one whose useful life was higher than the others. All runs were carried out in a Robinson-Mahoney continuous flow stirred tank reactor, using 50/50 volumetric mixture of Cold Lake/Lloydminster atmospheric residue and NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst.

  7. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhichao; Dunn, Jennifer B.; Cronauer, Donald C.

    2014-09-01

    Catalysts are critical inputs for many pathways that convert biomass into biofuels. Energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during the production of catalysts and chemical inputs influence the life-cycle energy consumption, and GHG emissions of biofuels and need to be considered in biofuel life-cycle analysis (LCA). In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of three different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5]) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module. They were selected because they are consumed in existing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) analyses of biofuel processes. For example, a thermochemical ethanol production pathway (indirect gasification and mixed alcohol synthesis) developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) uses olivine, DEPG, and tar reforming and alcohol synthesis catalysts (Dutta et al., 2011). ZSM-5 can be used in biofuel production pathways such as catalytic upgrading of sugars into hydrocarbons (Biddy and Jones, 2013). Other uses for these compounds and catalysts are certainly possible. In this report, we document the data sources and methodology we used to develop material and energy flows for the catalysts and compounds in the GREET catalyst module. In Section 2 we focus on compounds used in the model Dutta et al. (2011) developed. In Section 3, we report material and energy flows associated with ZSM-5 production. Finally, in Section 4, we report results.

  8. ZSM-5 catalyst developed for toluene disproportionation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S.; Shihabi, D.S. ); Absil, R.P.L.; Huang, Y.Y.; Leiby, S.M.; Marler, D.O.; McWilliams, J.P. )

    1989-08-21

    Toluene disproportionation over a new ZSM-5 catalyst formulation shows better activity and stability compared to the current Mobil Toluene disproportionation (MTDP) catalyst. Subsequent adiabatic pilot plant operations confirmed the activity and stability of the new catalyst. This process flexibility is expected to translate into considerable economic advantages for the process using the new catalyst formulation.

  9. Chalcogen catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Zelenay, Piotr; Choi, Jong-Ho; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas; Wieckowski, Andrzej; Cao, Dianxue

    2010-08-24

    A methanol-tolerant cathode catalyst and a membrane electrode assembly for fuel cells that includes such a cathode catalyst. The cathode catalyst includes a support having at least one transition metal in elemental form and a chalcogen disposed on the support. Methods of making the cathode catalyst and membrane electrode assembly are also described.

  10. Textured catalysts, methods of making textured catalysts, and methods of catalyzing reactions conducted in hydrothermal conditions

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd [West Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2003-12-30

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  11. High Temperature Membrane & Advanced Cathode Catalyst Development

    SciTech Connect

    Protsailo, Lesia

    2006-04-20

    Current project consisted of three main phases and eighteen milestones. Short description of each phase is given below. Table 1 lists program milestones. Phase 1--High Temperature Membrane and Advanced Catalyst Development. New polymers and advanced cathode catalysts were synthesized. The membranes and the catalysts were characterized and compared against specifications that are based on DOE program requirements. The best-in-class membranes and catalysts were downselected for phase 2. Phase 2--Catalyst Coated Membrane (CCM) Fabrication and Testing. Laboratory scale catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) were fabricated and tested using the down-selected membranes and catalysts. The catalysts and high temperature membrane CCMs were tested and optimized. Phase 3--Multi-cell stack fabrication. Full-size CCMs with the down-selected and optimized high temperature membrane and catalyst were fabricated. The catalyst membrane assemblies were tested in full size cells and multi-cell stack.

  12. The electron is a catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, Armido; Curran, Dennis P.

    2014-09-01

    The electron is an efficient catalyst for conducting various types of radical cascade reaction that proceed by way of radical and radical ion intermediates. But because electrons are omnipresent, catalysis by electrons often passes unnoticed. In this Review, a simple analogy between acid/base catalysis and redox catalysis is presented. Conceptually, the electron is a catalyst in much the same way that a proton is a catalyst. The 'electron is a catalyst' paradigm unifies mechanistically an assortment of synthetic transformations that otherwise have little or no apparent relationship. Diverse radical cascades, including unimolecular radical substitution reactions (SRN1-type chemistry), base-promoted homolytic aromatic substitutions (BHAS), radical Heck-type reactions, radical cross-dehydrogenative couplings (CDC), direct arene trifluoromethylations and radical alkoxycarbonylations, can all be viewed as electron-catalysed reactions.

  13. Secret Lives of Catalysts Revealed

    SciTech Connect

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai

    2008-10-15

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division discuss the first-ever glimpse of nanoscale catalysts in action. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-relea...

  14. Secret Lives of Catalysts Revealed

    ScienceCinema

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai

    2016-07-12

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division discuss the first-ever glimpse of nanoscale catalysts in action. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-relea...

  15. Catalyst for sodium chlorate decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    Production of oxygen by rapid decomposition of cobalt oxide and sodium chlorate mixture is discussed. Cobalt oxide serves as catalyst to accelerate reaction. Temperature conditions and chemical processes involved are described.

  16. Separately supported polymetallic reforming catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kresge, C. T.; Krishnamurthy, S.; McHale, W. D.

    1985-01-15

    There is provided, in accordance with the present invention, a catalyst composition made up of a mixture of two components, one component comprising a minor proportion of platinum and rhenium on a support and the second component comprising a minor proportion of iridium and rhenium on a separate support. A process for reforming a charge stock, such as naphtha, utilizing such catalyst is also provided.

  17. Catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Brown, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Vannorman, John D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A catalyst for the combination of CO and O2 to form CO2 which includes a platinum group metal, e.g., platinum; a reducible metal oxide having mulitple valence states, e.g., SnO2; and a compound which can bind water to its structure, e.g., silica gel. This catalyst is ideally suited for application to high powered, pulsed, CO2 lasers operating in a sealed or closed cycle condition.

  18. Catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Brown, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Vannorman, John D. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A catalyst is disclosed for the combination of CO and O2 to form CO2, which includes a platinum group metal (e.g., platinum); a reducable metal oxide having multiple valence states (e.g., SnO2); and a compound which can bind water to its structure (e.g., silica gel). This catalyst is ideally suited for application to high-powered pulsed, CO2 lasers operating in a sealed or closed-cycle condition.

  19. Clay complexes support HDS catalyst.

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, C. L.; Carrado, K.; Chemical Engineering

    2000-01-01

    Hydroprocessing represents a crucial component of petroleum refining operations both in terms of environmental and economic considerations. Regulations concerning maximum amount of sulfur content of gasoline and emissions of sulfur-oxide compounds upon combustion are becoming more and more stringent. One 1994-2000 focus of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been the development of catalysts for hydrodesulfurization (HDS). Typical HDS catalysts are comprised of Co-Mo sulfides or Ni-Mo sulfides on an alumina support. Modification of the pore structure of the support has generated great attention among researchers. Most desulfurization test reactions have used dibenzothiophene (DBT) as the model compound to test various configurations of support material with Co-Mo-S and Ni-Mo-S catalysts. In this testing, the desired product would be biphenyl and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S). A competing reaction creates cyclohexylbenzene by saturating one aromatic ring prior to desulfurization. Ring saturation requires more costly hydrogen and is not desirable. Fortunately, a more effective catalyst for adding hydrogen at the sulfur site with hydrogenating the aromatic rings has been found. However, this has only been tested on DBT. HDS uses various types of catalysts to add hydrogen to reduce unwanted sulfur compounds. Typically this requires expensive, high-pressure, high-temperature equipment to produce the environmentally friendly low-sulfur fuels. ANL scientists identified several new desulfurization catalysts with improved HDS activity and selectivity. From these new catalysts, it may be possible to achieve HDS processing at lower temperature and pressure. The catalysts used for HDS at ANL are various clay complexes. Natural clays have a history of use in the hydroprocessing industry since they are abundant and inexpensive. ANL's approach is to create synthetic organo-clay complexes (SOCC). An advantage of SOCCs is that the pore size and distribution can be controlled by

  20. The innovation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Martin, Roger L

    2011-06-01

    A few years ago the software development company Intuit realized that it needed a new approach to galvanizing customers. The company's Net Promoter Score was faltering, and customer recommendations of new products were especially disappointing. Intuit decided to hold a two-day, off-site meeting for the company's top 300 managers with a focus on the role of design in innovation. One of the days was dedicated to a program called Design for Delight. The centerpiece of the day was a PowerPoint presentation by Intuit founder Scott Cook, who realized midway through that he was no Steve Jobs: The managers listened dutifully, but there was little energy in the room. By contrast, a subsequent exercise in which the participants worked through a design challenge by creating prototypes, getting feedback, iterating, and refining, had them mesmerized. The eventual result was the creation of a team of nine design-thinking coaches--"innovation catalysts"--from across Intuit who were made available to help any work group create prototypes, run experiments, and learn from customers. The process includes a "painstorm" (to determine the customer's greatest pain point), a "soljam" (to generate and then winnow possible solutions), and a "code-jam" (to write code "good enough" to take to customers within two weeks). Design for Delight has enabled employees throughout Intuit to move from satisfying customers to delighting them.

  1. Nanostructured catalysts for organic transformations.

    PubMed

    Chng, Leng Leng; Erathodiyil, Nandanan; Ying, Jackie Y

    2013-08-20

    The development of green, sustainable and economical chemical processes is one of the major challenges in chemistry. Besides the traditional need for efficient and selective catalytic reactions that will transform raw materials into valuable chemicals, pharmaceuticals and fuels, green chemistry also strives for waste reduction, atomic efficiency and high rates of catalyst recovery. Nanostructured materials are attractive candidates as heterogeneous catalysts for various organic transformations, especially because they meet the goals of green chemistry. Researchers have made significant advances in the synthesis of well-defined nanostructured materials in recent years. Among these are novel approaches that have permitted the rational design and synthesis of highly active and selective nanostructured catalysts by controlling the structure and composition of the active nanoparticles (NPs) and by manipulating the interaction between the catalytically active NP species and their support. The ease of isolation and separation of the heterogeneous catalysts from the desired organic product and the recovery and reuse of these NPs further enhance their attractiveness as green and sustainable catalysts. This Account reviews recent advances in the use of nanostructured materials for catalytic organic transformations. We present a broad overview of nanostructured catalysts used in different types of organic transformations including chemoselective oxidations and reductions, asymmetric hydrogenations, coupling reactions, C-H activations, oxidative aminations, domino and tandem reactions, and more. We focus on recent research efforts towards the development of the following nanostructured materials: (i) nanostructured catalysts with controlled morphologies, (ii) magnetic nanocomposites, (iii) semiconductor-metal nanocomposites, and (iv) hybrid nanostructured catalysts. Selected examples showcase principles of nanoparticle design such as the enhancement of reactivity, selectivity

  2. Pretreatment of CO oxidation catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannorman, John D.

    1988-01-01

    CO oxidation catalysts with high activity in the range of 25 C to 100 C are important for long-life, closed-cycle operation of pulsed carbon dioxide 2 lasers. A reductive pretreatment with either CO or H sub 2 was shown to significantly enhance the activity of a commerically-available platinum on tin (IV) oxide (Pt/SnO2) catalyst relative to an oxidative or inert pretreatment or no pretreatment. Pretreatment at temperatures of 175 C and above caused an initial dip in observed CO or O sub 2 loss or CO sub 2 formation in a test gas mixture of 1 percent CO and 0.5 percent O sub 2 in a He gas matrix before a steady-state yield was obtained. This dip was found to be caused by dehydration of the surface of the catalyst and was readily eliminated by humidifying the catalyst or the test gas mixture. It was also found that too much moisture resulted in a lower overall yield of CO sub 2. Under similar conditions, it is hypothesized that the effect of the humidification is to increase the concentration of OH groups on the surface of the catalyst. The effect of having high concentration of CO sub 2 in the test gas mixture upon the loss of CO and O sub 2 as well as the effect of periods of relaxation of the catalyst under non-test gas conditions was studied. The purpose of these studies was to gain an insight into the mechanism of CO oxidation on this type of catalyst.

  3. Catalyst for coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Huibers, Derk T. A.; Kang, Chia-Chen C.

    1984-01-01

    An improved catalyst for a coal liquefaction process; e.g., the H-Coal Process, for converting coal into liquid fuels, and where the conversion is carried out in an ebullated-catalyst-bed reactor wherein the coal contacts catalyst particles and is converted, in addition to liquid fuels, to gas and residual oil which includes preasphaltenes and asphaltenes. The improvement comprises a catalyst selected from the group consisting of the oxides of nickel molybdenum, cobalt molybdenum, cobalt tungsten, and nickel tungsten on a carrier of alumina, silica, or a combination of alumina and silica. The catalyst has a total pore volume of about 0.500 to about 0.900 cc/g and the pore volume comprises micropores, intermediate pores and macropores, the surface of the intermediate pores being sufficiently large to convert the preasphaltenes to asphaltenes and lighter molecules. The conversion of the asphaltenes takes place on the surface of micropores. The macropores are for metal deposition and to prevent catalyst agglomeration. The micropores have diameters between about 50 and about 200 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 50 to about 80% of the pore volume, whereas the intermediate pores have diameters between about 200 and 2000 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 10 to about 25% of the pore volume, and the macropores have diameters between about 2000 and about 10,000 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 10 to about 25% of the pore volume. The catalysts are further improved where they contain promoters. Such promoters include the oxides of vanadium, tungsten, copper, iron and barium, tin chloride, tin fluoride and rare earth metals.

  4. Coking characteristics of reforming catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mieville, R.L.

    1986-08-01

    Coking rates were measured for two different ..gamma..-aluminas, each with and without platinum, under near commercial conditions using a gravimetric reactor. Coke on catalyst was characterized by a Temperature-Programmed Oxidation (TPO) technique. With a naphtha feed, coke formed on both aluminas at rates related to the respective population of ..cap alpha..-sites as measured by IR. For the corresponding Pt on alumina catalysts, coke, as measured by TPO, predominantly formed on sites associated with alumina (alumina coke), while coke associated with Pt (Pt coke), was relatively minor. With a n-heptane feed, under the same conditions, coke formation on both aluminas was much less than with the naphtha feed. However, the corresponding Pt on alumina catalysts generated comparatively more coke with a higher proportion associated with Pt. A correspondence between this proportion of Pt coke and the decline in reforming activity was observed. It is postulated that most of the coke produced during naphtha reforming with an active catalyst is formed by a reaction between ..cap alpha..-sites on alumina and certain components in the feed via a polymerization mechanism. This type of coke has minimal effect on the reforming reactivity of the catalyst. However, in n-heptane reforming, about 50% of the coke also results from precursors formed from reactions with Pt. In either case, coke associated with Pt appears to be the probable cause of deactivation. 22 references.

  5. Bound zeolite catalyst and process for using the catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, J.L.; Poeppelmeier, K.R.; Funk, W.G.; Steger, J.J.; Fung, S.C.; Cross, V.R.

    1987-03-10

    A process is described for reforming naphtha. The process comprises (a) contacting the naphtha in the presence of hydrogen at elevated temperatures with a catalyst comprising a binder, a type L zeolite containing exchangeable cations of which at least 75% are selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, calcium and barium, at least one Group VIII noble metal, the particles of which are well dispersed over the surface of the catalyst and at least 90% of the noble metal associated with the zeolite is in the form of particles having a diameter of less than about 7 A; and (b) recovering reformed product.

  6. Regeneration of Hydrotreating and FCC Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    CM Wai; JG Frye; JL Fulton; LE Bowman; LJ Silva; MA Gerber

    1999-09-30

    Hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts are important components of petroleum refining processes. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts are used to improve the yield of high-quality light oil fractions from heavier crude oil and petroleum feedstocks containing high levels of impurities. FCC catalysts improve the yield of higher octane gasoline from crude oil. Residuum hydrotreating and cracking catalysts are susceptible to irreversible deactivation caused by adsorption of sulfur and by metals impurities, such as vanadium and nickel. The gradual buildup of these impurities in a hydrotreating catalyst eventually plugs the pores and deactivates it. Nickel and vanadium adversely affect the behavior of cracking catalysts, reducing product yield and quality. Replacing deactivated catalysts represents a significant cost in petroleum refining. Equally important are the costs and potential liabilities associated with treating and disposing spent catalysts. For example, recent US Environmental Protection Agency rulings have listed spent hydrotreating and hydrorefining catalysts as hazardous wastes. FCC catalysts, though more easily disposed of as road-base or as filler in asphalt and cement, are still an economic concern mainly because of the large volumes of spent catalysts generated. New processes are being considered to increase the useful life of catalysts or for meeting more stringent disposal requirements for spent catalysts containing metals. This report discusses a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Phillips Petroleum, Inc., to identify promising chemical processes for removing metals adhered to spent hydrodesulfurization (HDS, a type of hydrotreating catalyst) and FCC catalysts. This study, conducted by PNNL, was funded by the US Department of Energy's Bartlesville Project Office. Fresh and spent catalysts were provided by Phillips Petroleum. The FCC catalyst was a rare-earth exchanged

  7. Microreactor for efficient catalyst evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besser, Ronald S.; Ouyang, Sean; Surangalikar, Harshal; Prevot, Michelle

    2001-09-01

    This paper describes ongoing work in the development of microreactor-based systems for applications in the chemical process industry. The microreactors discussed here are formed from silicon using robust micromachining processes to produce devices with micrometer-scale fluidic structures including passageways for the introduction and removal of gases, and a reaction zone with a thin-film catalyst. We describe experiments done to characterize these reactors for use as development tools for industrial catalytic processes in terms of catalyst screening, acquisition of rate laws, and determination of optimal process conditions. The system studied here, the reaction of a cyclic olefin (cyclohexene) with hydrogen in the presence of platinum catalyst, is a model for industrially important catalytic hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions.

  8. Catalysts for improved fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, R.L.; Inbody, M.A.

    2000-09-01

    This report covers our technical progress on fuel processing catalyst characterization for the specific purpose of hydrogen production for proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells. These development efforts support DOE activities in the development of compact, transient capable reformers for on-board hydrogen generation starting from candidate fuels. The long-term objective includes increased durability and lifetime, in addition to smaller volume, improved performance, and other specifications required meeting fuel processor goals. The technical barriers of compact fuel processor size, transient capability, and compact, efficient thermal management all are functions of catalyst performance. Significantly, work at LANL now tests large-scale fuel processors for performance and durability, as influenced by fuels and fuel constituents, and complements that testing with micro-scale catalyst evaluation which is accomplished under well controlled conditions.

  9. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    DOEpatents

    Lane, Jonathan A.; Wilson, Jamie R.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Petigny, Nathalie; Sarantopoulos, Christos

    2017-02-07

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a microstructure exhibiting substantially uniform pore size distribution as a result of using PMMA pore forming materials or a bi-modal particle size distribution of the porous support layer materials. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  10. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    DOEpatents

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

    2012-12-04

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  11. Catalysts for carbon and coal gasification

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Douglas W.; Spiro, Clifford L.; Kosky, Philip G.

    1985-01-01

    Catalyst for the production of methane from carbon and/or coal by means of catalytic gasification. The catalyst compostion containing at least two alkali metal salts. A particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used.

  12. Catalyst for Decomposition of Nitrogen Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Ates (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Jale (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a platinized tin oxide-based catalyst. It relates particularly to an improved platinized tin oxide-based catalyst able to decompose nitric oxide to nitrogen and oxygen without the necessity of a reducing gas.

  13. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. [DOE patent

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, K.P.C.; Perkins, P.

    Novel compounds are described which are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO + H/sub 2/ to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  14. Magnetically retrievable catalysts for organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Baig, R B Nasir; Varma, Rajender S

    2013-01-28

    The use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as a catalyst support in organic synthesis is summarized. The recovery of expensive catalysts after catalytic reaction and reusing them without losing their activity is an essential feature in the sustainable process development. The aim of this article is to highlight the progress in the synthesis and catalytic applications of magnetic catalysts in organic synthesis. The heterogenization of the catalyst using magnetic nanoparticles allows it to be recovered and reused using an external magnet.

  15. Experts reveal catalyst-selection methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-14

    Refining catalyst selection procedure were discussed in detail at Oil and Gas Journal`s International Catalyst Conference, Feb. 1--2, in Houston. Marathon Oil Co.`s James P. Wick revealed details of Marathon`s program for review and optimization of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) and hydrotreating catalysts. And renowned FCC expert Del Tolen outlined a step-by-step procedure for choosing an FCC catalyst. The paper describes Marathon`s program and Tolen`s selection process.

  16. Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, S.; Jothimurugesan, K.

    1999-07-27

    A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption process, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gases from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or passivating the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

  17. Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh; Jothimurugesan, Kandaswamy

    1999-01-01

    A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption processes, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gasses from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or "passivating" the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

  18. Silver doped catalysts for treatment of exhaust

    DOEpatents

    Park, Paul Worn; Hester, Virgil Raymond; Ragle, Christie Susan; Boyer, Carrie L.

    2009-06-02

    A method of making an exhaust treatment element includes washcoating a substrate with a slurry that includes a catalyst support material. At least some of the catalyst support material from the slurry may be transferred to the substrate, and silver metal (Ag) is dispersed within the catalyst support material.

  19. Catalysts and methods of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-02-14

    The present invention provides a catalyst including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle and a catalytic material comprising iron. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the catalyst. In some examples, the catalyst can be used to hydrotreat fatty acids or to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks.

  20. 40 CFR 721.9665 - Organotin catalysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Organotin catalysts. 721.9665 Section... Substances § 721.9665 Organotin catalysts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as organotin catalysts (PMNs P-93-853,...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9665 - Organotin catalysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Organotin catalysts. 721.9665 Section... Substances § 721.9665 Organotin catalysts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as organotin catalysts (PMNs P-93-853,...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9665 - Organotin catalysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Organotin catalysts. 721.9665 Section... Substances § 721.9665 Organotin catalysts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as organotin catalysts (PMNs P-93-853,...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9665 - Organotin catalysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organotin catalysts. 721.9665 Section... Substances § 721.9665 Organotin catalysts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as organotin catalysts (PMNs P-93-853,...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9665 - Organotin catalysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Organotin catalysts. 721.9665 Section... Substances § 721.9665 Organotin catalysts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as organotin catalysts (PMNs P-93-853,...

  5. Catalyst. Issue 1, Spring 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, B. Denise, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Catalyst, a quarterly newsletter from the Institute's Communications Office, contains news, information, and features about the programs and services of the National Institute for Literacy. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Spanish-Language Publication for Parents of Young Readers Among the Institute's New Titles; (2) Director's…

  6. Catalyst: Inquiry for Change, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Ruth A.; Prins, Esther

    This document contains a series of 2001 research briefs, Catalyst: Inquiry for Change (Volume 1), that is part of a research project supported by the Institute for Community College Development at Cornell University, New York. The Institute's research projects are stakeholder driven for the purpose of researching areas of the most interest to…

  7. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, K.D.

    1991-06-25

    Perovskites of the structure A[sub 2]B[sub 2]C[sub 3]O[sub 10] are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  8. Catalysts for coal liquefaction processes

    DOEpatents

    Garg, D.

    1986-10-14

    Improved catalysts for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprise a combination of zinc or copper, or a compound thereof, and a Group VI or non-ferrous Group VIII metal, or a compound thereof.

  9. Catalysts for coal liquefaction processes

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar

    1986-01-01

    Improved catalysts for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprise a combination of zinc or copper, or a compound thereof, and a Group VI or non-ferrous Group VIII metal, or a compound thereof.

  10. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  11. Toward Molecular Catalysts by Computer

    SciTech Connect

    Raugei, Simone; DuBois, Daniel L.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Chen, Shentan; Ho, Ming-Hsun; Bullock, R. Morris; Dupuis, Michel

    2015-02-17

    Rational design of molecular catalysts requires a systematic approach to designing ligands with specific functionality and precisely tailored electronic and steric properties. It then becomes possible to devise computer protocols to predict accurately the required properties and ultimately to design catalysts by computer. In this account we first review how thermodynamic properties such as oxidation-reduction potentials (E0), acidities (pKa), and hydride donor abilities (ΔGH-) form the basis for a systematic design of molecular catalysts for reactions that are critical for a secure energy future (hydrogen evolution and oxidation, oxygen and nitrogen reduction, and carbon dioxide reduction). We highlight how density functional theory allows us to determine and predict these properties within “chemical” accuracy (~ 0.06 eV for redox potentials, ~ 1 pKa unit for pKa values, and ~ 1.5 kcal/mol for hydricities). These quantities determine free energy maps and profiles associated with catalytic cycles, i.e. the relative energies of intermediates, and help us distinguish between desirable and high-energy pathways and mechanisms. Good catalysts have flat profiles that avoid high activation barriers due to low and high energy intermediates. We illustrate how the criterion of a flat energy profile lends itself to the prediction of design points by computer for optimum catalysts. This research was carried out in the Center for Molecular Electro-catalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is operated for the DOE by Battelle.

  12. Microbial recovery of metals from spent catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sperl, P.L.; Sperl, G.T.

    1990-01-01

    This project was initiated on October 1, 1989, for the purpose of recovering metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. Two catalyst types are the subject of the contract. The first is a Ni-Mo catalyst supported on alumina (Shell 324) as is used in a pilot scale coal liquefaction facility at Wilsonville, Alabama. The object of the contract is to treat these spent catalysts with microorganisms, especially Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, but also other Thiobacillus sp., to leach and remove the metals (Ni and Mo) from the spent catalysts into a form which can be readily recovered by conventional techniques.

  13. Catalyst deactivation model for residual oil hydrodesulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Takatsuka, T.; Higasino, S.; Hirohama, S.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrodesulfurization process plays a dominant role in the modern refineries to upgrade residual oil either by removing heterogeneous atoms or by hydrocracking the bottom to distillates products. The practical model is proposed to predict a catalyst life which is the most concern in the process. The catalyst is deactivated in the early stage of the operation by coke deposition on the catalyst active site. The ultimate catalyst life is determined by pore mouth plugging depending on its metal capacity. The phenomena are mathematically described by losses of catalyst surface area and effective diffusivity of feedstock molecules in catalyst pore. The model parameters were collected through the pilot plant tests with different types of catalysts and feedstocks.

  14. Isotope exchange in oxide-containing catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Hess, Robert V. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Sidney, Barry D. (Inventor); Wood, George M. (Inventor); Hoyt, Ronald F. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A method of exchanging rare-isotope oxygen for common-isotope oxygen in the top several layers of an oxide-containing catalyst is disclosed. A sample of an oxide-containing catalyst is exposed to a flowing stream of reducing gas in an inert carrier gas at a temperature suitable for the removal of the reactive common-isotope oxygen atoms from the surface layer or layers of the catalyst without damaging the catalyst structure. The reduction temperature must be higher than any at which the catalyst will subsequently operate. Sufficient reducing gas is used to allow removal of all the reactive common-isotope oxygen atoms in the top several layers of the catalyst. The catalyst is then reoxidized with the desired rare-isotope oxygen in sufficient quantity to replace all of the common-isotope oxygen that was removed.

  15. Autothermal reforming catalyst having perovskite structure

    DOEpatents

    Krumpel, Michael; Liu, Di-Jia

    2009-03-24

    The invention addressed two critical issues in fuel processing for fuel cell application, i.e. catalyst cost and operating stability. The existing state-of-the-art fuel reforming catalyst uses Rh and platinum supported over refractory oxide which add significant cost to the fuel cell system. Supported metals agglomerate under elevated temperature during reforming and decrease the catalyst activity. The catalyst is a perovskite oxide or a Ruddlesden-Popper type oxide containing rare-earth elements, catalytically active firs row transition metal elements, and stabilizing elements, such that the catalyst is a single phase in high temperature oxidizing conditions and maintains a primarily perovskite or Ruddlesden-Popper structure under high temperature reducing conditions. The catalyst can also contain alkaline earth dopants, which enhance the catalytic activity of the catalyst, but do not compromise the stability of the perovskite structure.

  16. Cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts bearing phosphine ligands.

    PubMed

    Endo, Koji; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-02-28

    The discovery of highly active catalysts and the success of ionic liquid immobilized systems have accelerated attention to a new class of cationic metathesis catalysts. We herein report the facile syntheses of cationic ruthenium catalysts bearing bulky phosphine ligands. Simple ligand exchange using silver(i) salts of non-coordinating or weakly coordinating anions provided either PPh3 or chelating Ph2P(CH2)nPPh2 (n = 2 or 3) ligated cationic catalysts. The structures of these newly reported catalysts feature unique geometries caused by ligation of the bulky phosphine ligands. Their activities and selectivities in standard metathesis reactions were also investigated. These cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts reported here showed moderate activity and very similar stereoselectivity when compared to the second generation ruthenium dichloride catalyst in ring-closing metathesis, cross metathesis, and ring-opening metathesis polymerization assays.

  17. Semisynthetic and Biomolecular Hydrogen Evolution Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kandemir, Banu; Chakraborty, Saikat; Guo, Yixing; Bren, Kara L

    2016-01-19

    There has been great interest in the development of stable, inexpensive, efficient catalysts capable of reducing aqueous protons to hydrogen (H2), an alternative to fossil fuels. While synthetic H2 evolution catalysts have been in development for decades, recently there has been great progress in engineering biomolecular catalysts and assemblies of synthetic catalysts and biomolecules. In this Forum Article, progress in engineering proteins to catalyze H2 evolution from water is discussed. The artificial enzymes described include assemblies of synthetic catalysts and photosynthetic proteins, proteins with cofactors replaced with synthetic catalysts, and derivatives of electron-transfer proteins. In addition, a new catalyst consisting of a thermophilic cobalt-substituted cytochrome c is reported. As an electrocatalyst, the cobalt cytochrome shows nearly quantitative Faradaic efficiency and excellent longevity with a turnover number of >270000.

  18. The History of Current State of the Art of Propylene Polymerization Catalysts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodall, Brian L.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines the development of the modern catalysts for propylene polymerization, considering the historical background; structure of titanium chloride catalysts; first-generation catalysts; cocatalysts; second-generation catalysts; catalysts morphology; and third-generation (supported catalysts). (JN)

  19. Catalyst for Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Patricia; Brown, Kenneth; VanNorman, John; Brown, David; Upchurch, Billy; Schryer, David; Miller, Irvin

    2010-01-01

    In many applications, it is highly desirable to operate a CO2 laser in a sealed condition, for in an open system the laser requires a continuous flow of laser gas to remove the dissociation products that occur in the discharge zone of the laser, in order to maintain a stable power output. This adds to the operating cost of the laser, and in airborne or space applications, it also adds to the weight penalty of the laser. In a sealed CO2 laser, a small amount of CO2 gas is decomposed in the electrical discharge zone into corresponding quantities of CO and O2. As the laser continues to operate, the concentration of CO2 decreases, while the concentrations of CO and O2 correspondingly increase. The increasing concentration of O2 reduces laser power, because O2 scavenges electrons in the electrical discharge, thereby causing arcing in the electric discharge and a loss of the energetic electrons required to boost CO2 molecules to lasing energy levels. As a result, laser power decreases rapidly. The primary object of this invention is to provide a catalyst that, by composition of matter alone, contains chemisorbed water within and upon its structure. Such bound moisture renders the catalyst highly active and very long-lived, such that only a small quantity of it needs to be used with a CO2 laser under ambient operating conditions. This object is achieved by a catalyst that consists essentially of about 1 to 40 percent by weight of one or more platinum group metals (Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os, Pt being preferred); about 1 to 90 percent by weight of one or more oxides of reducible metals having multiple valence states (such as Sn, Ti, Mn, Cu, and Ce, with SnO2 being preferred); and about 1 to 90 percent by weight of a compound that can bind water to its structure (such as silica gel, calcium chloride, magnesium sulfate, hydrated alumina, and magnesium perchlorate, with silica gel being preferred). Especially beneficial results are obtained when platinum is present in the

  20. Catalyst for selective conversion of synthesis gas and method of making the catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Paul N.; Pierantozzi, Ronald

    1986-01-01

    A Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst, a method of making the catalyst and an F-T process utilizing the catalyst by which synthesis gas, particularly carbon-monoxide rich synthesis gas is selectively converted to higher hydrocarbons of relatively narrow carbon number range. In general, the selective and notably stable catalyst, consists of an inert carrier first treated with a Group IV B metal compound (such as zirconium or titanium), preferably an alkoxide compound, and subsequently treated with an organic compound of an F-T metal catalyst, such as cobalt, iron or ruthenium carbonyl. Reactions with air and water and calcination are specifically avoided in the catalyst preparation procedure.

  1. Supported fischer-tropsch catalyst and method of making the catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Paul N.; Pierantozzi, Ronald; Withers, Howard P.

    1987-01-01

    A Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and a method of making the catalyst for a Fischer-Tropsch process utilizing the catalyst by which synthesis gas, particularly carbon-monoxide rich synthesis gas, is selectively converted to higher hydrocarbons of relatively narrow carbon number range is disclosed. In general, the selective and notably stable catalyst, consist of an inert carrier first treated with a Group IV B metal compound (such as zirconium or titanium), preferably an alkoxide compound, and subsequently treated with an organic compound of a Fischer-Tropsch metal catalyst, such as cobalt, iron or ruthenium carbonyl. Reactions with air and water and calcination are specifically avoided in the catalyst preparation procedure.

  2. Recombination Catalysts for Hypersonic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of commercially-viable access to space will require technologies that reduce propulsion system weight and complexity, while extracting maximum energy from the products of combustion. This work is directed toward developing effective nozzle recombination catalysts for the supersonic and hypersonic aeropropulsion engines used to provide such access to space. Effective nozzle recombination will significantly reduce rk=le length (hence, propulsion system weight) and reduce fuel requirements, further decreasing the vehicle's gross lift-off weight. Two such catalysts have been identified in this work, barium and antimony compounds, by developing chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for these materials and determining the engine performance enhancement for a typical flight trajectory. Significant performance improvements are indicated, using only 2% (mole or mass) of these compounds in the combustor product gas.

  3. Biodiesel production using heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Semwal, Surbhi; Arora, Ajay K; Badoni, Rajendra P; Tuli, Deepak K

    2011-02-01

    The production and use of biodiesel has seen a quantum jump in the recent past due to benefits associated with its ability to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG). There are large number of commercial plants producing biodiesel by transesterification of vegetable oils and fats based on base catalyzed (caustic) homogeneous transesterification of oils. However, homogeneous process needs steps of glycerol separation, washings, very stringent and extremely low limits of Na, K, glycerides and moisture limits in biodiesel. Heterogeneous catalyzed production of biodiesel has emerged as a preferred route as it is environmentally benign needs no water washing and product separation is much easier. The present report is review of the progress made in development of heterogeneous catalysts suitable for biodiesel production. This review shall help in selection of suitable catalysts and the optimum conditions for biodiesel production.

  4. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.

    1987-01-06

    A process is described for the polymerization of ethylene and alpha-olefins having from 1 to 2 carbon atoms of mixtures of ethylene, alpha-olefins or diolefins. The process comprises polymerizing one or more olefins in the presence of the catalyst system comprising (A) an organo aluminum cocatalyst, and (B) a vanadium-containing catalyst component obtained by sequentially treating an inert solid support material in an inert solvent with (i) a dihydrocarbyl magnesium compound, (ii) optionally an oxygen-containing compound which is an alcohol, ketone or aldehyde, (iii) a vanadium compound, and (iv) a Group IIIa metal halide. The process as above is described wherein the inert solid support material is an inorganic oxide or mixtures of inorganic oxides.

  5. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.

    1987-04-14

    A process is described for the polymerization of ethylene and alphaolefins having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms or mixtures of ethylene, alpha-olefins or diolefins. The process comprises polymerizing one or more olefins in the presence of the catalyst system comprising (A) an organo aluminum cocatalyst, and (B) a vanadium-containing catalyst component obtained by treating an inert support material in an inert solvent with (i) a dihydrocarbyl magnesium compound or a complex or mixture of an organic dihydrocarbyl magnesium compound and an aluminum compound, (ii) optionally an oxygen-containing compound which is an alcohol, ketone or aldehyde, (iii) a Group IIIa metal halide, (iv) at least one vanadium compound, and as the last step a second treatment with a Group IIIa metal halide.

  6. Catalyst for hydrotreating carbonaceous liquids

    DOEpatents

    Berg, Lloyd; McCandless, Frank P.; Ramer, Ronald J.

    1982-01-01

    A catalyst for denitrogenating and desulfurating carbonaceous liquid such as solvent refined coal includes catalytic metal oxides impregnated within a porous base of mostly alumina with relatively large pore diameters, surface area and pore volume. The base material includes pore volumes of 0.7-0.85 ml/g, surface areas of 200-350 m.sup.2 /g and pore diameters of 85-200 Angstroms. The catalytic metals impregnated into these base materials include the oxides of Group VI metals, molybdenum and tungsten, and the oxides of Group VIII metals, nickel and cobalt, in various combinations. These catalysts and bases in combination have effectively promoted the removal of chemically combined sulfur and nitrogen within a continuous flowing mixture of carbonaceous liquid and hydrogen gas.

  7. Cooperation of catalysts and templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. H.; Kanavarioti, A.; Nibley, C. W.; Macklin, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    In order to understand how self-reproducing molecules could have originated on the primitive Earth or extraterrestrial bodies, it would be useful to find laboratory models of simple molecules which are able to carry out processes of catalysis and templating. Furthermore, it may be anticipated that systems in which several components are acting cooperatively to catalyze each other's synthesis will have different behavior with respect to natural selection than those of purely replicating systems. As the major focus of this work, laboratory models are devised to study the influence of short peptide catalysts on template reactions which produce oligonucleotides or additional peptides. Such catalysts could have been the earliest protoenzymes of selective advantage produced by replicating oligonucleotides. Since this is a complex problem, simpler systems are also studied which embody only one aspect at a time, such as peptide formation with and without a template, peptide catalysis of nontemplated peptide synthesis, and model reactions for replication of the type pioneered by Orgel.

  8. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, Geoffrey L.; Kanazirev, Vladislav

    1996-01-01

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl.sub.2, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  9. Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    INL's patented, continuous-flow Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC) produces the highest ASTM-quality B-100 biodiesel from waste fats, oils, and greases at the site of waste generation. SSC delivers low-cost transportation fuel, avoids significant landfill costs for municipalities, and reduces potent methane and other emissions produced in landfills from these wastes. You can learn more about INL's energy research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  10. Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    INL's patented, continuous-flow Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC) produces the highest ASTM-quality B-100 biodiesel from waste fats, oils, and greases at the site of waste generation. SSC delivers low-cost transportation fuel, avoids significant landfill costs for municipalities, and reduces potent methane and other emissions produced in landfills from these wastes. You can learn more about INL's energy research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. Catalyst for Expanding Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueders, Kathryn L.

    2014-01-01

    History supplies us with many models of how and how not to commercialize an industry. This presentation draws parallels between industries with government roots, like the railroad, air transport, communications and the internet, and NASAs Commercial Crew Program. In these examples, government served as a catalyst for what became a booming industry. The building block approach the Commercial Crew Program is taking is very simple -- establish a need, laying the groundwork, enabling industry and legal framework.

  12. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, G.L.; Kanazirev, V.

    1996-12-10

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, is formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl{sub 2}, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  13. Catalyst Development for Hydrogen Peroxide Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morlan, P. W.; Wu, P.-K.; Ruttle, D. W.; Fuller, R. P.; Nejad, A. S.; Anderson, W. E.

    1999-01-01

    The development of various catalysts of hydrogen peroxide was conducted for the applications of liquid rocket engines. The catalyst development includes silver screen technology, solid catalyst technology, and homogeneous catalyst technology. The silver screen technology development was performed with 85% (by weight) hydrogen peroxide. The results of this investigation were used as the basis for the catalyst design of a pressure-fed liquid-fueled upper stage engine. Both silver-plated nickel 200 screens and pure silver screens were used as the active metal catalyst during the investigation, The data indicate that a high decomposition efficiency (greater than 90%) of 85% hydrogen peroxide can be achieved at a bed loading of 0.5 lbm/sq in/sec with both pure silver and silver plated screens. Samarium oxide coating, however, was found to retard the decomposition process and the catalyst bed was flooded at lower bed loading. A throughput of 200 lbm of hydrogen peroxide (1000 second run time) was tested to evaluate the catalyst aging issue and performance degradation was observed starting at approximately 400 seconds. Catalyst beds of 3.5 inch in diameter was fabricated using the same configuration for a 1,000-lbf rocket engine. High decomposition efficiency was obtained with a low pressure drop across the bed. Solid catalyst using precious metal was also developed for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide from 85% to 98% by weight. Preliminary results show that the catalyst has a strong reactivity even after 15 minutes of peroxide decomposition. The development effort also includes the homogeneous catalyst technology. Various non-toxic catalysts were evaluated with 98% peroxide and hydrocarbon fuels. The results of open cup drop tests indicate an ignition delay around 11 ms.

  14. 2H and 27Al solid-state NMR study of the local environments in Al-doped 2-line ferrihydrite, goethite, and lepidocrocite

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jongsik; Ilott, Andrew J.; Middlemiss, Derek S.; Chernova, Natasha A.; Pinney, Nathan; Morgan, Dane; Grey, Clare P.

    2015-05-13

    Although substitution of aluminum into iron oxides and oxyhydroxides has been extensively studied, it is difficult to obtain accurate incorporation levels. Assessing the distribution of dopants within these materials has proven especially challenging because bulk analytical techniques cannot typically determine whether dopants are substituted directly into the bulk iron oxide or oxyhydroxide phase or if they form separate, minor phase impurities. These differences have important implications for the chemistry of these iron-containing materials, which are ubiquitous in the environment. In this work, 27Al and 2H NMR experiments are performed on series of Al-substituted goethite, lepidocrocite, and 2-line ferrihydrite in order to develop an NMR method to track Al substitution. The extent of Al substitution into the structural frameworks of each compound is quantified by comparing quantitative 27Al MAS NMR results with those from elemental analysis. Magnetic measurements are performed for the goethite series to compare with NMR measurements. Static 27Al spin–echo mapping experiments are used to probe the local environments around the Al substituents, providing clear evidence that they are incorporated into the bulk iron phases. As a result, predictions of the 2H and 27Al NMR hyperfine contact shifts in Al-doped goethite and lepidocrocite, obtained from a combined first-principles and empirical magnetic scaling approach, give further insight into the distribution of the dopants within these phases.

  15. Advanced Catalysts for Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R.; Whitacre, Jay; Valdez, T. I.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the development of catalyst for Fuel Cells. The objectives of the project are to reduce the cost of stack components and reduce the amount of precious metal used in fuel cell construction. A rapid combinatorial screening technique based on multi-electrode thin film array has been developed and validated for identifying catalysts for oxygen reduction; focus shifted from methanol oxidation in FY05 to oxygen reduction in FY06. Multi-electrode arrays of thin film catalysts of Pt-Ni and Pt-Ni-Zr have been deposited. Pt-Ni and have been characterized electrochemically and structurally. Pt-Ni-Zr and Pt-Ni films show higher current density and onset potential compared to Pt. Electrocatalytic activity and onset potential are found to be strong function of the lattice constant. Thin film Pt(59)Ni(39)Zr(2) can provide 10 times the current density of thin film Pt. Thin film Pt(59)Ni(39)Zr(2) also shows 65mV higher onset potential than Pt.

  16. Toward molecular catalysts by computer.

    PubMed

    Raugei, Simone; DuBois, Daniel L; Rousseau, Roger; Chen, Shentan; Ho, Ming-Hsun; Bullock, R Morris; Dupuis, Michel

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Rational design of molecular catalysts requires a systematic approach to designing ligands with specific functionality and precisely tailored electronic and steric properties. It then becomes possible to devise computer protocols to design catalysts by computer. In this Account, we first review how thermodynamic properties such as redox potentials (E°), acidity constants (pKa), and hydride donor abilities (ΔGH(-)) form the basis for a framework for the systematic design of molecular catalysts for reactions that are critical for a secure energy future. We illustrate this for hydrogen evolution and oxidation, oxygen reduction, and CO conversion, and we give references to other instances where it has been successfully applied. The framework is amenable to quantum-chemical calculations and conducive to predictions by computer. We review how density functional theory allows the determination and prediction of these thermodynamic properties within an accuracy relevant to experimentalists (∼0.06 eV for redox potentials, ∼1 pKa unit for pKa values, and 1-2 kcal/mol for hydricities). Computation yielded correlations among thermodynamic properties as they reflect the electron population in the d shell of the metal center, thus substantiating empirical correlations used by experimentalists. These correlations point to the key role of redox potentials and other properties (pKa of the parent aminium for the proton-relay-based catalysts designed in our laboratory) that are easily accessible experimentally or computationally in reducing the parameter space for design. These properties suffice to fully determine free energies maps and profiles associated with catalytic cycles, i.e., the relative energies of intermediates. Their prediction puts us in a position to distinguish a priori between desirable and undesirable pathways and mechanisms. Efficient catalysts have flat free energy profiles that avoid high activation barriers due to low- and high

  17. Synthesis and characterization of mesoporous hydrocracking catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munir, D.; Usman, M. R.

    2016-08-01

    Mesoporous catalysts have shown great prospective for catalytic reactions due to their high surface area that aids better distribution of impregnated metal. They have been found to contain more adsorption sites and controlled pore diameter. Hydrocracking, in the presence of mesoporous catalyst is considered more efficient and higher conversion of larger molecules is observed as compared to the cracking reactions in smaller microporous cavities of traditional zeolites. In the present study, a number of silica-alumina based mesoporous catalysts are synthesized in the laboratory. The concentration and type of surfactants and quantities of silica and alumina sources are the variables studied in the preparation of catalyst supports. The supports prepared are well characterized using SEM, EDX, and N2-BET techniques. Finally, the catalysts are tested in a high pressure autoclave reactor to study the activity and selectivity of the catalysts for the hydrocracking of a model mixture of plastics comprising of LDPE, HDPE, PP, and PS.

  18. Hydrazine Catalyst Production: Sustaining S-405 Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wucherer, E. J.; Cook, Timothy; Stiefel, Mark; Humphries, Randy, Jr.; Parker, Janet

    2003-01-01

    The development of the iridium-based Shell 405 catalyst for spontaneous decomposition of hydrazine was one of the key enabling technologies for today's spacecraft and launch vehicles. To ensure that this crucial technology was not lost when Shell elected to exit the business, Aerojet, supported by NASA, has developed a dedicated catalyst production facility that will supply catalyst for future spacecraft and launch vehicle requirements. We have undertaken a program to transfer catalyst production from Shell Chemical USA (Houston, TX) to Aerojet's Redmond, WA location. This technology transition was aided by Aerojet's 30 years of catalyst manufacturing experience and NASA diligence and support in sustaining essential technologies. The facility has produced and tested S-405 catalyst to existing Shell 405 specifications and standards. Our presentation will describe the technology transition effort including development of the manufacturing facility, capture of the manufacturing process, test equipment validation, initial batch build and final testing.

  19. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

    1986-09-30

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160 C) and preferably in the range 80--120 C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen are disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa-M(OAc)[sub 2] where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1--6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)[sub 6] is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  20. Catalysts for Dehydrogenation of ammonia boranes

    SciTech Connect

    Heinekey, Dennis M.

    2009-10-31

    Several effective homogeneous catalysts for the dehydrogenation of amine boranes have been developed. The best catalyst uses an iridium complex, and is capable of dehydrogenating H3NBH3 (AB) and CH3NH2BH3 (MeAB) at comparable rates. Thermodynamic measurements using this catalyst demonstrate that the dehydrogenation of AB and MeAB is substantially exothermic, which has important implications for regeneration.

  1. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    DOEpatents

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  2. Bifunctional Catalysts for CO2 Reduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0243 Bifunctional catalysts for CO2 reduction Theodore Betley HARVARD COLLEGE PRESIDENT & FELLOWS OF Final Report 09/30/2014...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 PI: Theodore A. Betley Project: Bifunctional Catalysts for CO2 Reduction Project #: 130214 A. Specific Aims 1... catalyst platforms. Details for the construction of these materials, as they deviate from the salen/salan platforms will be described below. 2. Probe

  3. Single pellet crush strength testing of catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Brienza, P.K. )

    1988-09-01

    ASTM D-32 Committee on Catalysts has developed a standard test method for single pellet crush strength for formed catalyst shapes. This standard was issued under the fixed designation D 4179. The method is applicable to regular catalyst shapes such as tablets and spheres. Extrudates, granular materials, and other irregular shapes are excluded. The committee continues to work on the development of a method for the single pellet crush testing of extrudates.

  4. Hydrocarbon synthesis catalyst and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Sansone, M.J.; Slegeir, W.A.R.

    1983-08-02

    A catalyst for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen composed of palladium or platinum and cobalt supported on a solid phase is disclosed. The catalyst is prepared by heating a heterogeneous component of the palladium or platinum deposited on the solid support in a solution of cobalt carbonyl or precursors thereof. The catalyst exhibits excellent activity, stability in air, and produces highly desirable product fractions even with dilute gaseous reactants. The catalyst is preferably used in dilute slurry form, which is desirable from a heat transfer standpoint. 9 figs.

  5. Hydrocarbon synthesis catalyst and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Sansone, Michael J.; Slegeir, William A. R.

    1983-08-02

    A catalyst for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen composed of palladium or platinum and cobalt supported on a solid phase is disclosed. The catalyst is prepared by heating a heterogeneous component of the palladium or platinum deposited on the solid support in a solution of cobalt carbonyl or precursors thereof. The catalyst exhibits excellent activity, stability in air, and produces highly desirable product fractions even with dilute gaseous reactants. The catalyst is preferably used in dilute slurry form, which is desirable from a heat transfer standpoint.

  6. Polyfunctional catalyst for processiing benzene fractions

    SciTech Connect

    G. Byakov; B.D. Zubitskii; B.G. Tryasunov; I.Ya. Petrov

    2009-05-15

    A by-product of the coke industry is a raw benzene fraction benzene- 1 which may serve as for catalytic processes. The paper reports a study on the influence of the composition and temperatures on the activity and selectivity of NiO-V{sub 2}O{sub 6}-MoO{sub 3}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and the corresponding binary and tertiary subsystems are studied by a pulse method in model reactions; the hydrodealkylating of toluene and the hydrodesulfurizing of thioprhene. The optimal catalyst composition is established. The new catalyst is compared with industrial catalysts.

  7. Recent advances in CO2 laser catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, B. T.; Schryer, D. R.; Brown, K. G.; Kielin, E. J.; Hoflund, G. B.; Gardner, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses several recent advances in CO2 laser catalysts including comparisons of the activity of Au/MnO2 to Pt/SnO2 catalysts with possible explanations for observed differences. The catalysts are compared for the effect of test gas composition, pretreatment temperature, isotopic integrity, long term activity, and gold loading effects on the Au/MnO2 catalyst activity. Tests conducted to date include both long-term tests of up to six months continuous operation and short-term tests of one week or more that include isotopic integrity testing.

  8. Nitrogen oxides storage catalysts containing cobalt

    DOEpatents

    Lauterbach, Jochen; Snively, Christopher M.; Vijay, Rohit; Hendershot, Reed; Feist, Ben

    2010-10-12

    Nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) storage catalysts comprising cobalt and barium with a lean NO.sub.x storage ratio of 1.3 or greater. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be used to reduce NO.sub.x emissions from diesel or gas combustion engines by contacting the catalysts with the exhaust gas from the engines. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be one of the active components of a catalytic converter, which is used to treat exhaust gas from such engines.

  9. Process for coal liquefaction using electrodeposited catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Raymond H.

    1978-01-01

    A process for the liquefaction of solid hydrocarbonaceous materials is disclosed. Particles of such materials are electroplated with a metal catalyst and are then suspended in a hydrocarbon oil and subjected to hydrogenolysis to liquefy the solid hydrocarbonaceous material. A liquid product oil is separated from residue solid material containing char and the catalyst metal. The catalyst is recovered from the solid material by electrolysis for reuse. A portion of the product oil can be employed as the hydrocarbon oil for suspending additional particles of catalyst coated solid carbonaceous material for hydrogenolysis.

  10. Thermodynamic Properties of Supported Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gorte, Raymond J.

    2014-03-26

    The goals of this work were to develop Coulometric Titration as a method for characterizing the thermodynamic redox properties of oxides and to apply this technique to the characterization of ceria- and vanadia-based catalysts. The redox properties of ceria and vanadia are a major part of what makes these materials catalytically active but their properties are also dependent on their structure and the presence of other oxides. Quantifying these properties through the measurement of oxidation energetics was the goal of this work.

  11. Formation of alcohol conversion catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Wachs, Israel E.; Cai, Yeping

    2001-01-01

    The method of the present invention involves a composition containing an intimate mixture of (a) metal oxide support particles and (b) a catalytically active metal oxide from Groups VA, VIA, or VIIA, its method of manufacture, and its method of use for converting alcohols to aldehydes. During the conversion process, catalytically active metal oxide from the discrete catalytic metal oxide particles migrates to the oxide support particles and forms a monolayer of catalytically active metal oxide on the oxide support particle to form a catalyst composition having a higher specific activity than the admixed particle composition.

  12. Attrition resistant fluidizable reforming catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Parent, Yves O.; Magrini, Kim; Landin, Steven M.; Ritland, Marcus A.

    2011-03-29

    A method of preparing a steam reforming catalyst characterized by improved resistance to attrition loss when used for cracking, reforming, water gas shift and gasification reactions on feedstock in a fluidized bed reactor, comprising: fabricating the ceramic support particle, coating a ceramic support by adding an aqueous solution of a precursor salt of a metal selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pt, Pd, Ru, Rh, Cr, Co, Mn, Mg, K, La and Fe and mixtures thereof to the ceramic support and calcining the coated ceramic in air to convert the metal salts to metal oxides.

  13. New catalyst, improved presulfiding result in 4+ year hydrotreater run

    SciTech Connect

    Gorra, F. ); Scribano, G. ); Christensen, P.; Anderson, K.V.; Corsaro, O.G. )

    1993-08-23

    Prompted by decreasing catalyst activity and unit run lengths, an Italian refiner made several modifications to its coker gas oil desulfurization unit equipment, catalyst, and operations. Results of the project include improved catalyst activity at start-of-run, increased unit capacity of end-of-run, and improved plant economics. The paper describes the background of the problem, the process, operational history, catalyst testing, unit modifications, catalyst loading, catalyst service life, and economics.

  14. Highly Stable and Active Catalyst for Sabatier Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Jianli; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2012-01-01

    Highly active Ru/TiO2 catalysts for Sabatier reaction have been developed. The catalysts have shown to be stable under repeated shutting down/startup conditions. When the Ru/TiO2 catalyst is coated on the engineered substrate Fe-CrAlY felt, activity enhancement is more than doubled when compared with an identically prepared engineered catalyst made from commercial Degussa catalyst. Also, bimetallic Ru-Rh/TiO2 catalysts show high activity at high throughput.

  15. Novel metalloporphyrin catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, M.C.; Nenoff, T.M.; Shelnutt, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    Work was done for developing biomimetic oxidation catalysts. Two classes of metalloporphyrin catalysts were studied. The first class of catalysts studied were a novel series of highly substituted metalloporphyrins, the fluorinated iron dodecaphenylporphyrins. These homogeneous metalloporphyrin catalysts were screened for activity as catalysts in the oxidation of hydrocarbons by dioxygen. Results are discussed with respect to catalyst structural features. The second type of catalysts studied were heterogeneous catalysts consisting of metalloporphyrins applied to inorganic supports. Preliminary catalytic testing results with these materials are presented.

  16. Membrane catalyst layer for fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1993-01-01

    A gas reaction fuel cell incorporates a thin catalyst layer between a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) membrane and a porous electrode backing. The catalyst layer is preferably less than about 10 .mu.m in thickness with a carbon supported platinum catalyst loading less than about 0.35 mgPt/cm.sup.2. The film is formed as an ink that is spread and cured on a film release blank. The cured film is then transferred to the SPE membrane and hot pressed into the surface to form a catalyst layer having a controlled thickness and catalyst distribution. Alternatively, the catalyst layer is formed by applying a Na.sup.+ form of a perfluorosulfonate ionomer directly to the membrane, drying the film at a high temperature, and then converting the film back to the protonated form of the ionomer. The layer has adequate gas permeability so that cell performance is not affected and has a density and particle distribution effective to optimize proton access to the catalyst and electronic continuity for electron flow from the half-cell reaction occurring at the catalyst.

  17. Chemical engineering design of CO oxidation catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herz, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    How a chemical reaction engineer would approach the challenge of designing a CO oxidation catalyst for pulsed CO2 lasers is described. CO oxidation catalysts have a long history of application, of course, so it is instructive to first consider the special requirements of the laser application and then to compare them to the characteristics of existing processes which utilize CO oxidation catalysts. All CO2 laser applications require a CO oxidation catalyst with the following characteristics: (1) active at stoichiometric ratios of O2 and CO, (2) no inhibition by CO2 or other components of the laser environment, (3) releases no particulates during vibration or thermal cycling, and (4) long lifetime with a stable activity. In all applications, low consumption of power is desirable, a characteristic especially critical in aerospace applications and, thus, catalyst activity at low temperatures is highly desirable. High power lasers with high pulse repetition rates inherently require circulation of the gas mixture and this forced circulation is available for moving gas past the catalyst. Low repetition rate lasers, however, do not inherently require gas circulation, so a catalyst that did not require such circulation would be favorable from the standpoint of minimum power consumption. Lasers designed for atmospheric penetration of their infrared radiation utilize CO2 formed from rare isotopes of oxygen and this application has the additional constraint that normal abundance oxygen isotopes in the catalyst must not exchange with rare isotopes in the gas mixture.

  18. Formation of alumina-nickel-molybdenum catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Erofeev, V.I.; Basov, V.G.; Vagin, A.I.; Kalechits, I.V.

    1982-06-01

    On the basis of the results obtained in physical and chemical studies of alumina-nickel-molybdenum oxide catalysts as well as binary system and the individual oxides, the conclusions show that the commercial catalyst consists mainly of nickel and aluminium molybdates, aluminium molybdates, molybdenum oxide, and the alumina support. 4 figures.

  19. Catalyst and process for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, R.H.; Ward, J.W.

    1984-04-24

    Catalysts comprising bismuth and vanadium components are highly active and stable, especially in the presence of water vapor, for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide to sulfur or SO/sub 2/. Such catalysts have been found to be especially active for the conversion of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur by reaction with oxygen or SO/sub 2/.

  20. Catalyst. Volume 9, Number 2, Fall 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Barbara E., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education's Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention publishes "Catalyst," a newsletter covering current Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence (AODV) prevention issues at institutions of higher education. "Catalyst" discusses emerging issues and highlights innovative efforts on…

  1. Novel supports for coal liquefaction catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, H.W. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This research is divided into three parts: (1) Evaluation of Alkaline-Earth-Promoted CoMo/Alumina Catalysts in a Bench Scale Hydrotreater, (2) Development of a Novel Catalytic Coal Liquefaction Microreactor (CCLM) Unit, and (3) Evaluation of Novel Catalyst Preparations for Direct Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  2. Catalyst and method for production of methylamines

    DOEpatents

    Klier, Kamil; Herman, Richard G.; Vedage, Gamini A.

    1987-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved catalyst and method for the selective production of methylamines. More particularly, it is concerned with the preparation of stable highly active catalysts for producing methylamines by a catalytic reaction of ammonia or substituted amines and binary synthesis gas (CO+H.sub.2).

  3. Integrated current collector and catalyst support

    DOEpatents

    Bregoli, Lawrence J.

    1985-10-22

    An integrated current collecting electrode for a molten carbonate fuel cell includes a corrugated metal conductive strip positioned in contact with a catalyst layer. The corrugations of the metal strip form a plurality of gas channels immediately adjacent the surface of the catalyst through which a reactant gas flows. Each channel is filled with a particulate material to maintain separation between the metal strip and the catalyst in ensuring gas channel integrity. The catalyst may be in the form of a compacted, particulate material provided the particle size of the material within the gas channels is larger than that of the catalyst particles to prevent catalyst migration to the metal conductor and provide reactant gas access to the catalyst layer. The gas channels formed by the corrugations of the metal strip are arranged in an offset pattern along the direction of gas flow for improved reactant gas distribution to the catalyst layer. The particulate material positioned within the gas flow channels may be a ceramic conductor such as a perovskite or a spinel for enhanced current collection.

  4. Integrated current collector and catalyst support

    DOEpatents

    Bregoli, L.J.

    1984-10-17

    An integrated current collecting electrode for a molten carbonate fuel cell includes a corrugated metal conductive strip positioned in contact with a catalyst layer. The corrugations of the metal strip form a plurality of gas channels immediately adjacent the surface of the catalyst through which a reactant gas flows. Each channel is filled with a particulate material to maintain separation between the metal strip and the catalyst in ensuring gas channel integrity. The catalyst may be in the form of a compacted, particulate material provided the particle size of the material within the gas channels is larger than that of the catalyst particles to prevent catalyst migration to the metal conductor and provide reactant gas access to the catalyst layer. The gas channels formed by the corrugations of the metal strip are arranged in an offset pattern along the direction of gas flow for improved reactant gas distribution to the catalyst layer. The particulate material positioned within the gas flow channels may be a ceramic conductor such as a perovskite or a spinel for enhanced current collection.

  5. Magnetically retrievable catalysts for organic synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as a catalyst in organic synthesis has become a subject of intense investigation. The recovery of expensive catalysts after catalytic reaction and reusing it without losing its activity is an important feature in the sustainable process de...

  6. Thin film hydrous metal oxide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.

    1995-01-01

    Thin film (<100 nm) hydrous metal oxide catalysts are prepared by 1) synthesis of a hydrous metal oxide, 2) deposition of the hydrous metal oxide upon an inert support surface, 3) ion exchange with catalytically active metals, and 4) activating the hydrous metal oxide catalysts.

  7. Ligand iron catalysts for selective hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Casey, Charles P.; Guan, Hairong

    2010-11-16

    Disclosed are iron ligand catalysts for selective hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines. A catalyst such as dicarbonyl iron hydride hydroxycyclopentadiene) complex uses the OH on the five member ring and hydrogen linked to the iron to facilitate hydrogenation reactions, particularly in the presence of hydrogen gas.

  8. Catalyst, Volume 9, Number 3, Winter 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Barbara E., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education's Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention publishes "Catalyst," a newsletter covering current Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence (AODV) prevention issues at institutions of higher education. "Catalyst" discusses emerging issues and highlights innovative efforts on…

  9. Catalyst, Volume 10, Number 2, Fall 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Barbara E., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education's Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention publishes "Catalyst," a newsletter covering current Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence (AODV) prevention issues at institutions of higher education. "Catalyst" discusses emerging issues and highlights innovative efforts on…

  10. Catalyst, Volume 10, Number 1, Spring 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Barbara E., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education's Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention publishes "Catalyst," a newsletter covering current Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence (AODV) prevention issues at institutions of higher education. "Catalyst" discusses emerging issues and highlights…

  11. Improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification

    DOEpatents

    McKee, D.W.; Spiro, C.L.; Kosky, P.G.

    1984-05-25

    This invention relates to improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification and improved processes for catalytic coal gasification for the production of methane. The catalyst is composed of at least two alkali metal salts and a particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used. 10 figures, 2 tables.

  12. Catalyst, Volume 7, Number 2, Winter 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Barbara E., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education's Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention publishes "Catalyst," a newsletter covering current Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence (AODV) prevention issues at institutions of higher education. "Catalyst" discusses emerging issues and highlights…

  13. Alkene Metalates as Hydrogenation Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Büschelberger, Philipp; Gärtner, Dominik; Reyes-Rodriguez, Efrain; Kreyenschmidt, Friedrich; Koszinowski, Konrad; Jacobi von Wangelin, Axel; Wolf, Robert

    2017-03-02

    First-row transition-metal complexes hold great potential as catalysts for hydrogenations and related reductive reactions. Homo- and heteroleptic arene/alkene metalates(1-) (M=Co, Fe) are a structurally distinct catalyst class with good activities in hydrogenations of alkenes and alkynes. The first syntheses of the heteroleptic cobaltates [K([18]crown-6)][Co(η(4) -cod)(η(2) -styrene)2 ] (5) and [K([18]crown-6)][Co(η(4) -dct)(η(4) -cod)] (6), and the homoleptic complex [K(thf)2 ][Co(η(4) -dct)2 ] (7; dct=dibenzo[a,e]cyclooctatetraene, cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene), are reported. For comparison, two cyclopentadienylferrates(1-) were synthesized according to literature procedures. The isolated and fully characterized monoanionic complexes were competent precatalysts in alkene hydrogenations under mild conditions (2 bar H2 , r.t., THF). Mechanistic studies by NMR spectroscopy, ESI mass spectrometry, and poisoning experiments documented the operation of a homogeneous mechanism, which was initiated by facile redox-neutral π-ligand exchange with the substrates followed by H2 activation. The substrate scope of the investigated precatalysts was also extended to polar substrates (ketones and imines).

  14. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.; Etherton, B.P.; Kaus, M.J.

    1989-09-12

    This patent describes a polymerization process. It comprises polymerizing ethylene, alpha-olefins of 3 to 20 carbon atoms or mixtures of ethylene and the alpha-olefins in the presence of a catalyst system. The system comprising: an organo aluminum compound of the formula AIR'''/sub eta/X'''/sub 3-eta/ wherein R''' is hydrogen, hydrocarbyl, or substituted hydrocarbyl having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms, X''' is a halogen and eta is a number from 1 to 3, and a transition metal-containing catalyst component. The component comprising the solid reaction product obtained by treating an inert solid support material in an inert solvent with an organonmetallic compound represented by the formula R/sup 1/MgR/sup 2/ wherein R/sup 1/ and R/sup 2/, which may be the same of different,contain 1 to 20 carbon atoms and are selected from alkyl group, aryl group, cycloalkyl group, aralkyl group, alkadienyl group of group; an alcohol; an acyl halide; a titanium halide; Cl/sub 2/, and prereducing the transition metal-containing product with an aluminum alkyl, with the proviso that the first two ingredients can be added to the inert solid simultaneously, as the reaction product of the first two steps or treatment with step two immediately precedes treatment with step one.

  15. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.

    1987-01-06

    A process is described for the polymerization of ethylene and alpha-olefins having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms or mixtures of ethylene, alpha-olefins and diolefins. The process comprises polymerizing in the presence of a catalyst system comprising (a) an organo aluminum compound of the formula ALR''/sub n/X''/sub 3-n/ wherein R is hydrogen or a hydrocarbyl group having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms, X is halogen and is a number from 1 to 3, and (b) a transition metal containing catalyst component comprising the solid reaction product obtained by treating an inert solid support material in an inert solvent. This is done sequentially with (A) an organometallic compounds of a Group IIa, IIb or IIIa metal wherein all the metal valencies are satisfied with a hydrocarbon group, (B) an oxygen containing compound selected from ketones, aldehydes, alcohols or mixtures thereof, (C) an acyl halide, (D) at least one transition metal compound of a Group IVb, Vb, VIb or VIII metal, and (E) a group IIIa metal hydrocarbyl dihalide.

  16. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.

    1987-01-06

    A process is described for the polymerization of ethylene and alpha-olefins having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms or mixtures of ethylene, alpha-olefins and diolefins. The process comprises polymerizing in the presence of a catalyst system comprising (a) an organo aluminum compound of the formula AIR''/sub n/X''/sub 3-n/ wherein R'' is hydrogen or a hydrocarbyl group having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms, X is halogen and n is a number from 1 to 3, and (B) a transition metal containing catalyst component comprising the solid reaction product obtained by treating an inert solid support material in an inert solvent. This is done sequentially with, optionally (A) Cl/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/, an interhalogen or mixtures thereof, (B) an organometallic compound of a Group IIa, IIb or IIIa metal wherein all the metal valencies are satisfied with a hydrocarbon group, (C) an oxygen containing compound selected from ketones, aldehydes, alcohols or mixtures thereof, (D) an acyl halide, (E) at least one transition metal compound of a Group IVb, VB, VIb or VIII metal, and (F) Cl/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/, an interhalogen or mixtures thereof.

  17. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.

    1987-01-06

    A process is described for the polymerization of ethylene and alpha-olefins having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms or mixtures of ethylene, alpha-olefins and diolefins. The process comprises polymerizing in the presence of a catalyst system comprising (a) an organo aluminum compounds of the formula AIR''/sub n/X''/sub 3-n/ wherein R'' is hydrogen or a hydrocarbyl group having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms, X is halogen and n is a number from 1 to 3, and (b) a transition metal containing catalyst component comprising the solid reaction product obtained by treating an inert solid support material in an inert solvent. This is done sequentially with (A) an organometallic compound of a Group IIa, IIb, or IIIa metal wherein all the metal valencies are satisfied with a hydrocarbon group, optionally (B) an oxygen containing compound selected from ketones, aldehydes, alcohols, siloxanes or mixtures thereof, (C) at least one transition metal compound of a Group IVb, Vb, VIb or VIII metal, and (D) a group IIIa metal hydrocarbyl dihalide.

  18. Method for reactivating catalysts and a method for recycling supercritical fluids used to reactivate the catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2008-08-05

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  19. Pillared montmorillonite catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.K.; Olson, E.S.

    1994-12-31

    Pillared clays contain large micropores and have considerable potential for catalytic hydrogenation and cleavage of coal macromolecules. Pillared montmorillonite-supported catalysts were prepared by the intercalation of polynuclear hydroxychromium cations and subsequent impregnation of nickel and molybdenum. Infrared and thermogravimetric studies of pyridine-adsorbed catalysts indicated the presence of both Lewis and Bronsted acid sites. Thus, the catalysts have both acidic properties that can aid in hydrocracking and cleavage of carbon-heteroatom bonds as well as hydrogen-activating bimetallic sites. These catalysts were applied to the hydrodesulfurization and liquefaction of coal-derived intermediates. The reactions of model organosulfur compounds and coal liquids were carried out at 300{degrees}-400{degrees}C for 3 hours in the presence of 1000 psi of molecular hydrogen. Reaction products were analyzed by GC/FT-IR/MS/AED. The catalysts have been found to be very effective in removing sulfur from model compounds as well as liquefaction products.

  20. Nanostructured Basic Catalysts: Opportunities for Renewable Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, William C; Huber, George; Auerbach, Scott

    2009-06-30

    This research studied and developed novel basic catalysts for production of renewable chemicals and fuels from biomass. We focused on the development of unique porous structural-base catalysts zeolites. These catalysts were compared to conventional solid base materials for aldol condensation, that were being commercialized for production of fuels from biomass and would be pivotal in future biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals. Specifically, we had studied the aldolpyrolysis over zeolites and the trans-esterification of vegetable oil with methanol over mixed oxide catalysts. Our research has indicated that the base strength of framework nitrogen in nitrogen substituted zeolites (NH-zeolites) is nearly twice as strong as in standard zeolites. Nitrogen substituted catalysts have been synthesized from several zeolites (including FAU, MFI, BEA, and LTL) using NH3 treatment.

  1. Nanoengineering Heterogeneous Catalysts by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Singh, Joseph A; Yang, Nuoya; Bent, Stacey F

    2017-02-27

    A new generation of catalysts is needed to meet society's energy and resource requirements. Current catalyst synthesis does not fully achieve optimum control of composition, size, and structure. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is an emerging technique that allows synthesizing of highly controlled catalysts in the forms of films, nanoparticles, and single sites. The addition of ALD coatings can also be used to introduce promoters and improve the stability of traditional catalysts. Evolving research shows promise for applying ALD to understand catalytically active sites and create next-generation catalysts using advanced 3D nanostructures. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Volume 8 is June 7, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  2. Process for magnetic beneficiating petroleum cracking catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Doctor, R.D.

    1993-10-05

    A process is described for beneficiating a particulate zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst having metal values in excess of 1000 ppm nickel equivalents. The particulate catalyst is passed through a magnetic field in the range of from about 2 Tesla to about 5 Tesla generated by a superconducting quadrupole open-gradient magnetic system for a time sufficient to effect separation of said catalyst into a plurality of zones having different nickel equivalent concentrations. A first zone has nickel equivalents of about 6,000 ppm and greater, a second zone has nickel equivalents in the range of from about 2000 ppm to about 6000 ppm, and a third zone has nickel equivalents of about 2000 ppm and less. The zones of catalyst are separated and the second zone material is recycled to a fluidized bed of zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst. The low nickel equivalent zone is treated while the high nickel equivalent zone is discarded. 1 figures.

  3. Process for magnetic beneficiating petroleum cracking catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Doctor, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A process for beneficiating a particulate zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst having metal values in excess of 1000 ppm nickel equivalents. The particulate catalyst is passed through a magnetic field in the range of from about 2 Tesla to about 5 Tesla generated by a superconducting quadrupole open-gradient magnetic system for a time sufficient to effect separation of said catalyst into a plurality of zones having different nickel equivalent concentrations. A first zone has nickel equivalents of about 6,000 ppm and greater, a second zone has nickel equivalents in the range of from about 2000 ppm to about 6000 ppm, and a third zone has nickel equivalents of about 2000 ppm and less. The zones of catalyst are separated and the second zone material is recycled to a fluidized bed of zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst. The low nickel equivalent zone is treated while the high nickel equivalent zone is discarded.

  4. Amorphous molybdenum sulfides as hydrogen evolution catalysts.

    PubMed

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Hu, Xile

    2014-08-19

    Providing energy for a population projected to reach 9 billion people within the middle of this century is one of the most pressing societal issues. Burning fossil fuels at a rate and scale that satisfy our near-term demand will irreversibly damage the living environment. Among the various sources of alternative and CO2-emission-free energies, the sun is the only source that is capable of providing enough energy for the whole world. Sunlight energy, however, is intermittent and requires an efficient storage mechanism. Sunlight-driven water splitting to make hydrogen is widely considered as one of the most attractive methods for solar energy storage. Water splitting needs a hydrogen evolution catalyst to accelerate the rate of hydrogen production and to lower the energy loss in this process. Precious metals such as Pt are superior catalysts, but they are too expensive and scarce for large-scale applications. In this Account, we summarize our recent research on the preparation, characterization, and application of amorphous molybdenum sulfide catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction. The catalysts can be synthesized by electrochemical deposition under ambient conditions from readily available and inexpensive precursors. The catalytic activity is among the highest for nonprecious catalysts. For example, at a loading of 0.2 mg/cm(2), the optimal catalyst delivers a current density of 10 mA/cm(2) at an overpotential of 160 mV. The growth mechanism of the electrochemically deposited film catalysts was revealed by an electrochemical quartz microcrystal balance study. While different electrochemical deposition methods produce films with different initial compositions, the active catalysts are the same and are identified as a "MoS(2+x)" species. The activity of the film catalysts can be further promoted by divalent Fe, Co, and Ni ions, and the origins of the promotional effects have been probed. Highly active amorphous molybdenum sulfide particles can also be prepared

  5. High temperature durable catalyst development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, G. C.; Tong, H.

    1981-01-01

    A program has been carried out to develop a catalytic reactor capable of operation in environments representative of those anticipated for advanced automotive gas turbine engines. A reactor consisting of a graded cell honeycomb support with a combination of noble metal and metal oxide catalyst coatings was built and successfully operated for 1000 hr. At an air preheat temperature of 740 K and a propane/air ratio of 0.028 by mass, the adiabatic flame temperature was held at about 1700 K. The graded cell monolithic reaction measured 5 cm in diameter by 10.2 cm in length and was operated at a reference velocity of 14.0 m/s at 1 atm. Measured NOx levels remained below 5 ppm, while unburned hydrocarbon concentrations registered near zero and carbon monoxide levels were nominally below 20 ppm.

  6. Catalyst for producing lower alcohols

    DOEpatents

    Rathke, Jerome W.; Klingler, Robert J.; Heiberger, John J.

    1987-01-01

    A process and system for the production of the lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol and propanol involves the reaction of carbon monoxide and water in the presence of a lead salt and an alkali metal formate catalyst combination. The lead salt is present as solid particles such as lead titanate, lead molybdate, lead vanadate, lead zirconate, lead tantalate and lead silicates coated or in slurry within molten alkali metal formate. The reactants, carbon monoxide and steam are provided in gas form at relatively low pressures below 100 atmospheres and at temperatures of 200-400.degree. C. The resulted lower alcohols can be separated into boiling point fractions and recovered from the excess reactants by distillation.

  7. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, Kurt P. C.; Perkins, Patrick

    1981-01-01

    Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula PS -R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS -H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS -Br; treating said PS -Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS -Li; substituting said PS - Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  8. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, Kurt P. C.; Perkins, Patrick

    1980-01-01

    Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula: PS --R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS --H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS --Br; treating said PS --Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS --Li; substituting said PS-- Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  9. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, Kurt P. C.; Perkins, Patrick

    1981-01-01

    Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula: PS --R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS --H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS --Br; treating said PS --Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS --Li; substituting said PS-- Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  10. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and the solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will be performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing.

  11. Microbial recovery of metals from spent catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sperl, P.L.; Sperl, G.T.

    1990-01-01

    This project was initiated on October 1, 1989, for the purpose of recovering metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. Two catalyst types are the subject of the contract. The first is a Ni-Mo catalyst supported on alumina (Shell 324) as is used in a pilot scale coal liquefaction facility at Wilsonville, Alabama. This plant is run and operated by Southern Clean Fuels. A large sample of spent catalyst from this facility has been obtained. The second material is an unsupported ammonium molybdate catalyst used in a pilot process by the Department of Energy at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. This material was obtained in late February 1990 but has not been pursued since the No content of this particular sample is too low for the current studies. The object of the contract is to treat these spent catalysts with microorganisms, especially Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, but also other Thiobacillus sp. and possibly Sulfolobus, to leach and remove the metals (Ni and Mo) from the spent catalysts into a form which can be readily recovered by conventional techniques.

  12. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Enhanced Oxidation Catalysts for Water Reclamation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Clifford D.

    1999-01-01

    This effort seeks to develop and test high-performance, long operating life, physically stable catalysts for use in spacecraft water reclamation systems. The primary goals are to a) reduce the quantity of expendable water filters used to purify water aboard spacecraft, b) to extend the life of the oxidation catalysts used for eliminating organic contaminants in the water reclamation systems, and c) reduce the weight/volume of the catalytic oxidation systems (e.g. VRA) used. This effort is targeted toward later space station utilization and will consist of developing flight-qualifiable catalysts and long-term ground tests of the catalyst prior to their utilization in flight. Fixed -bed catalytic reactors containing 5% platinum on granular activated carbon have been subjected to long-term dynamic column tests to measure catalyst stability vs throughput. The data generated so far indicate that an order of magnitude improvement can be obtained with the treated catalysts vs the control catalyst, at only a minor loss (approx 10%) in the initial catalytic activity.

  14. Microbial recovery of metals from spent catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sperl, P.L.; Sperl, G.T.

    1990-01-01

    The second quarter of 1990 was one of peripheral progress on the project of reclaiming molybdenum and nickel from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. We defined some important parameters for future research and we were able to clear up ambiguities in some of the past approaches and the problems uniquely associated with the ability of T. ferrooxidans to leach both Ni{sup ++} and molybdate from spent, alumina supported catalyst from the Wilsonville pilot project. We were also able to show the T. ferrooxidans was very sensitive to molybdate and extremely sensitive to tungstate, but showed relatively little sensitivity for the related elements chromate, vanadate and for the catalyst associated metal, Ni{sup ++}. There appears to be no negative synergistic effects between Ni{sup ++} and molybdate for growth, which bodies well for processes to reclaim both these metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. We have shown that T. ferrooxidans is indeed capable of leaching molybdate and Ni{sup ++} from spent catalysts if the catalyst is washed extensively with both an organic solvent such as tetrahydrofuran to remove the oily contaminants and an aqueous acidic medium to remove readily solubilized N{sup ++} and molybdate. It is possible to extract into an acidic medium enough molybdate from THF washed spent catalyst within 24 hr to completely inhibit the growth of all tested T. ferrooxidans strains. The stage is now set for the development of a molybdate tolerant strain to be used for actual leaching of the spent catalyst. We are currently seeking simpler ways of pretreating the raw spent catalyst in order to make it more amenable to microbial leaching and possibly produce an economic and feasible technology.

  15. Clean gasoline reforming with superacid catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Three barrels of a naphtha derived from processing an Illinois {number sign}6 coal during the most recent run at the Wilsonville liquefaction facility were obtained for hydrotreatment in the CAER pilot plant. Both the previously hydrotreated Black Thunder and the virgin Illinois {number sign}6 naphtha were processed in the latest 400 hour run of the CAER pilot plant. The catalyst used for hydrotreatment of the two naphthas was a commercial Ni/Mo catalyst. The Ni/Mo catalyst was sulfided using a mixture of 3 mole {percent} H{sub 2}S in hydrogen. Resulting oxygen and nitrogen content of the naphtha is discussed. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Hydrodesulfurization catalyst by Chevrel phase compounds

    DOEpatents

    McCarty, K.F.; Schrader, G.L.

    1985-05-20

    A process is disclosed for the hydrodesulfurization of sulfur-containing hydrocarbon fuel with reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides, known as Chevrel phase compounds. Chevrel phase compounds of the general composition M/sub x/Mo/sub 6/S/sub 8/, with M being Ho, Pb, Sn, Ag, In, Cu, Fe, Ni, or Co, were found to have hydrodesulfurization activities comparable to model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS/sub 2/ catalysts. The most active catalysts were the ''large'' cation compounds (Ho, Pb, Sn), and the least active catalysts were the ''small'' cation compounds (Cu, Fe, Ni, Co.).

  17. Modified MTS MRB500 CATALYST PERFORMANCE TEST

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst; Robert J. Pawelko

    2008-10-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine if the oxygen supply in a CuO catalyst considered for use in the TMIST-2 irradiation test would be sufficient to convert all the hydrogen isotopes coming from the irradiation test to water. A mixture of 2% H2 in Ar was supplied to a modified MRB 500 stack m onitor from Mound Techology Solutions, Miamisburg, OH. It was found that the catalyst could convert 3.75E-03 moles of H2 before losing its effectiveness. Conversion was found to begin at a catalyst temperature of about 220 deg C and to be fully effective at about 300 deg C.

  18. Characterization of three-way automotive catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kenik, E.A.; More, K.L.; LaBarge, W.

    1995-05-01

    This has been the second year of a CRADA between General Motors - AC Delco Systems (GM-ACDS) and Martin Marietta Energy Systems (MMES) aimed at improved performance/lifetime of platinum-rhodium based three-way-catalysts (TWC) for automotive emission control systems. While current formulations meet existing emission standards, higher than optimum Pt-Rh loadings are often required. In additionk, more stringent emission standards have been imposed for the near future, demanding improved performance and service life from these catalysts. Understanding the changes of TWC conversion efficiency with ageing is a critical need in improving these catalysts.

  19. Synthesis of iron based hydrocracking catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Farcasiu, Malvina; Eldredge, Patricia A.; Ladner, Edward P.

    1993-01-01

    A method of preparing a fine particle iron based hydrocracking catalyst and the catalyst prepared thereby. An iron (III) oxide powder and elemental sulfur are reacted with a liquid hydrogen donor having a hydroaromatic structure present in the range of from about 5 to about 50 times the weight of iron (III) oxide at a temperature in the range of from about 180.degree. C. to about 240.degree. C. for a time in the range of from about 0 to about 8 hours. Various specific hydrogen donors are disclosed. The catalysts are active at low temperature (<350.degree. C.) and low pressure.

  20. Formic acid fuel cells and catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Masel, Richard I.; Larsen, Robert; Ha, Su Yun

    2010-06-22

    An exemplary fuel cell of the invention includes a formic acid fuel solution in communication with an anode (12, 134), an oxidizer in communication with a cathode (16, 135) electrically linked to the anode, and an anode catalyst that includes Pd. An exemplary formic acid fuel cell membrane electrode assembly (130) includes a proton-conducting membrane (131) having opposing first (132) and second surfaces (133), a cathode catalyst on the second membrane surface, and an anode catalyst including Pd on the first surface.

  1. Characteristics of catalyst shapes and their application to hydrotreating

    SciTech Connect

    Phansalkar, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of catalysts with special shapes and their advantages in hydrotreating are discussed. Relative activity and pressure drop comparisons are presented for the several catalyst shapes tested. In addition, the important physical properties of specially shaped catalysts are discussed and the calculation of catalyst bed pressure drop for specially shaped catalysts is reviewed. Among the shapes investigated, it is concluded that the three leaf clover (TLC) shape incorporated by TRILOBE/sup */ catalyst and the helically wound TLC shape incorporated by RIFLED/sup */ TRILOBE catalyst offer 15-20 percent higher catalyst activity when compared with a cylinder shape catalyst. Catalyst particles with both shapes can offer a greater tolerance to metals contamination versus a cylinder shape catalyst, due to a higher geometric surface area-to-volume ratio (S/sub p//V/sub p/). The helical winding of the lobes of a TLC shape catalyst extrudate increases its S/sub p//V/sub p/ ratio by about 10 percent. The primary advantage of helically winding the TLC shape extrudate is that it increases the catalyst bed void fraction and lowers the packed catalyst bed pressure drop. RIFLED TRILOBE catalyst offers a 40 percent lower pressure drop than an equivalent size standard TRILOBE catalyst.

  2. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of... catalyst conversion efficiency for Phase 1 engines. The thermal stress is imposed on the test catalyst...

  3. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of... catalyst conversion efficiency for Phase 1 engines. The thermal stress is imposed on the test catalyst...

  4. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of... catalyst conversion efficiency for Phase 1 engines. The thermal stress is imposed on the test catalyst...

  5. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of... catalyst conversion efficiency for Phase 1 engines. The thermal stress is imposed on the test catalyst...

  6. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of... catalyst conversion efficiency for Phase 1 engines. The thermal stress is imposed on the test catalyst...

  7. Durability testing at 5 atmospheres of advanced catalysts and catalyst supports for gas turbine engine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, B. A.; Lee, H. C.; Osgerby, I. T.; Heck, R. M.; Hess, H.

    1980-01-01

    The durability of CATCOM catalysts and catalyst supports was experimentally demonstrated in a combustion environment under simulated gas turbine engine combustor operating conditions. A test of 1000 hours duration was completed with one catalyst using no. 2 diesel fuel and operating at catalytically-supported thermal combustion conditions. The performance of the catalyst was determined by monitoring emissions throughout the test, and by examining the physical condition of the catalyst core at the conclusion of the test. Tests were performed periodically to determine changes in catalytic activity of the catalyst core. Detailed parametric studies were also run at the beginning and end of the durability test, using no. 2 fuel oil. Initial and final emissions for the 1000 hours test respectively were: unburned hydrocarbons (C3 vppm):0, 146, carbon monoxide (vppm):30, 2420; nitrogen oxides (vppm):5.7, 5.6.

  8. Supported catalyst systems and method of making biodiesel products using such catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Manhoe; Yan, Shuli; Salley, Steven O.; Ng, K. Y. Simon

    2015-10-20

    A heterogeneous catalyst system, a method of preparing the catalyst system and a method of forming a biodiesel product via transesterification reactions using the catalyst system is disclosed. The catalyst system according to one aspect of the present disclosure represents a class of supported mixed metal oxides that include at least calcium oxide and another metal oxide deposited on a lanthanum oxide or cerium oxide support. Preferably, the catalysts include CaO--CeO.sub.2ZLa.sub.2O.sub.3 or CaO--La.sub.2O.sub.3/CeO.sub.2. Optionally, the catalyst may further include additional metal oxides, such as CaO--La.sub.2O.sub.3--GdOxZLa.sub.2O.sub.3.

  9. Enhancement of water-gas shift reaction efficiency: catalysts and the catalyst bed arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baronskaya, Natal'ya A.; Minyukova, Tat'yana P.; Khassin, Aleksandr A.; Yurieva, Tamara M.; Parmon, Valentin N.

    2010-12-01

    The results of studies devoted to the search for catalysts of water-gas shift (WGS) reaction that are highly active in a wide temperature interval are generalized. New compositions based on traditional and alternative, as regards the chemical composition, catalysts of high- and low-temperature WGS reaction are considered in detail. The single-stage arrangement of WGS reaction ensuring small temperature gradients in the radial direction of the catalyst bed are discussed.

  10. Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    DOEpatents

    Coughlin, Peter K.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1985-01-01

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

  11. Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    DOEpatents

    Coughlin, P.K.; Rabo, J.A.

    1985-12-03

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C[sub 5][sup +] hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising a SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

  12. Eggshell waste as catalyst: A review.

    PubMed

    Laca, Amanda; Laca, Adriana; Díaz, Mario

    2017-04-10

    Agricultural wastes are some of the most emerging problems in food industries because of their disposal cost. However, it is also an opportunity for the bioeconomy society if new uses for these residual materials can be found. Eggshells, considered a hazardous waste by UE regulations, are discarded, amounting hundreds of thousands of tonnes worldwide. This egg processing waste is a valuable source material, which can be used in different fields such as fodder or fertilizer production. Additionally, this residue offers interesting characteristics to be used in other applications, like its employment as an environment-friendly catalyst. In the present review we provide a global view of eggshell waste uses as catalyst in different processes. According to reviewed researching works, a huge variety of added value products can be obtained by using this catalyst which emphasised the interest of further investigations in order to widen the possible uses of this cheap green catalyst.

  13. Selective rhenium recovery from spent reforming catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Angelidis, T.N.; Rosopoulou, D.; Tzitzios, V.

    1999-05-01

    Reforming catalysts (0.3% Pt, 0.3% Re) are used extensively in industry for the improvement of the octane number of fuels. After deactivation the catalysts are treated for the recovery of Pt and Re. The aim of this study was to simplify the conventional recovery process by the application of a slight alkali solution (NaHCO{sub 3}) for the selective dissolution of Re. The process was tested in batch and packed column reactors with crushed and uncrushed catalyst extrudes. The influence on the reaction yield of NaHCO{sub 3} concentration, pH, temperature and space velocity was examined and the optimum conditions were determined. The Re dissolution process seemed to follow first-order kinetics, and the recovery yield was up to 97% for crushed and up to 87% for uncrushed catalyst samples.

  14. Clean gasoline reforming with superacid catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to: (a) determine if a coal-derived naphtha can be hydrotreated to produce a product with a sufficiently low heteroatom content that can be used for reforming, (b) identify hydrocarbon compounds in the naphtha with concentrations greater than 0.5 wt %, (c) develop a Pt/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] heavily chlorided catalyst and determine the activity, selectivity and deactivation of this catalyst using model compounds and the hydrotreated naphtha, and (d) develop both a sulfated Pt/ZrO[sub 2] and Fe/Mn/ZrO[sub 2] catalyst formulations and determine the activity, selectivity and deactivation of these catalysts using model compounds and d warranted, the hydrotreated naphtha.

  15. Catalyst regeneration process including metal contaminants removal

    DOEpatents

    Ganguli, Partha S.

    1984-01-01

    Spent catalysts removed from a catalytic hydrogenation process for hydrocarbon feedstocks, and containing undesired metals contaminants deposits, are regenerated. Following solvent washing to remove process oils, the catalyst is treated either with chemicals which form sulfate or oxysulfate compounds with the metals contaminants, or with acids which remove the metal contaminants, such as 5-50 W % sulfuric acid in aqueous solution and 0-10 W % ammonium ion solutions to substantially remove the metals deposits. The acid treating occurs within the temperature range of 60.degree.-250.degree. F. for 5-120 minutes at substantially atmospheric pressure. Carbon deposits are removed from the treated catalyst by carbon burnoff at 800.degree.-900.degree. F. temperature, using 1-6 V % oxygen in an inert gas mixture, after which the regenerated catalyst can be effectively reused in the catalytic process.

  16. Pf/Zeolite Catalyst for Tritium Stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, R.H.

    2001-03-26

    This report described promising hydrogen (protium and tritium) stripping results obtained with a Pd/zeolite catalyst at ambient temperature. Preliminary results show 90-99+ percent tritium stripping efficiency may be obtained, with even better performance expected as bed configuration and operating conditions are optimized. These results suggest that portable units with single beds of the Pd/zeolite catalyst may be utilized as ''catalytic absorbers'' to clean up both tritium gas and tritiated water. A cart-mounted prototype stripper utilizing this catalyst has been constructed for testing. This portable stripper has potential applications in maintenance-type jobs such as tritium line breaks. This catalyst can also potentially be utilized in an emergency stripper for the Replacement Tritium Facility.

  17. Moderated ruthenium fischer-tropsch synthesis catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Abrevaya, Hayim

    1991-01-01

    The subject Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprises moderated ruthenium on an inorganic oxide support. The preferred moderator is silicon. Preferably the moderator is effectively positioned in relationship to ruthenium particles through simultaneous placement on the support using reverse micelle impregnation.

  18. Synthesis and Understanding of Novel Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Stair, Peter C.

    2013-07-09

    The research took advantage of our capabilities to perform in-situ and operando Raman spectroscopy on complex systems along with our developing expertise in the synthesis of uniform, supported metal oxide materials to investigate relationships between the catalytically active oxide composition, atomic structure, and support and the corresponding chemical and catalytic properties. The project was organized into two efforts: 1) Synthesis of novel catalyst materials by atomic layer deposition (ALD). 2) Spectroscopic and chemical investigations of coke formation and catalyst deactivation. ALD synthesis was combined with conventional physical characterization, Raman spectroscopy, and probe molecule chemisorption to study the effect of supported metal oxide composition and atomic structure on acid-base and catalytic properties. Operando Raman spectroscopy studies of olefin polymerization leading to coke formation and catalyst deactivation clarified the mechanism of coke formation by acid catalysts.

  19. Extended Platinum Nanotubes as Fuel Cell Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Alia, S.; Pivovar, B. S.; Yan, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Energy consumption has relied principally on fossil fuels as an energy source; fuel cells, however, can provide a clean and sustainable alternative, an answer to the depletion and climate change concerns of fossil fuels. Within proton exchange membrane fuel cells, high catalyst cost and poor durability limit the commercial viability of the device. Recently, platinum nanotubes (PtNTs) were studied as durable, active catalysts, providing a platform to meet US Department of Energy vehicular activity targets.[1] Porous PtNTs were developed to increase nanotube surface area, improving mass activity for oxygen reduction without sacrificing durability.[2] Subsurface platinum was then replaced with palladium, forming platinum-coated palladium nanotubes.[3] By forming a core shell structure, platinum utilization was increased, reducing catalyst cost. Alternative substrates have also been examined, modifying platinum surface facets and increasing oxygen reduction specific activity. Through modification of the PtNT platform, catalyst limitations can be reduced, ensuring a commercially viable device.

  20. Evaluation of Low Temperature CO Removal Catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    CO removal from spacecraft gas streams was evaluated for three commercial, low temperature oxidation catalysts: Carulite 300, Sofnocat 423, and Hamilton Sundstrand Pt1. The catalysts were challenged with CO concentrations (1-100 ppm) under dry and wet (50% humidity) conditions using 2-3 % O2. CO removal and CO2 concentration were measured at constant feed composition using a FTIR. Water vapor affected the CO conversion of each catalyst differently. An initial screening found that Caulite 300 could not operate in humid conditions. The presence of water vapor affected CO conversion of Sofnocat 423 for challenge concentrations below 40 ppm. The conversion of CO by Sofnocat 423 was 80% at CO concentrations greater than 40 ppm under both dry and moist conditions. The HS Pt1 catalyst exhibited CO conversion levels of 100% under both dry and moist conditions.

  1. Anatomy of gold catalysts: facts and myths

    PubMed Central

    Ranieri, Beatrice; Escofet, Imma

    2015-01-01

    This review article covers the main types of gold(i) complexes used as precatalysts under homogeneous conditions in organic synthesis and discusses the different ways of catalyst activation as well as ligand, silver, and anion effects. PMID:26055272

  2. Durability testing at one atmosphere of advanced catalysts and catalyst supports for automotive gas turbine engine combustors, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heck, R. M.; Chang, M.; Hess, H.; Carrubba, R.

    1977-01-01

    The durability of catalysts and catalyst supports in a combustion environment was experimentally demonstrated. A test of 1000 hours duration was completed with two catalysts, using diesel fuel and operating at catalytically supported thermal combustion conditions. The performance of the catalysts was determined by monitoring emissions throughout the test, and by examining the physical condition of the catalyst core at the conclusion of the test. The test catalysts proved to be capable of low emissions operation after 1000 hours diesel aging, with no apparent physical degradation of the catalyst support.

  3. Catalyst and method for aqueous phase reactions

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a catalyst in the form of a plurality of porous particles wherein each particle is a support having nickel metal catalytic phase or reduced nickel deposited thereon in a first dispersed phase and an additional metal deposited onto the support in a second dispersed phase. The additional metal is effective in retarding or reducing agglomeration or sintering of the nickel metal catalytic phase without substantially affecting the catalytic activity, thereby increasing the life time of the catalyst.

  4. Support effects studied on model supported catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gorte, R.J.

    1993-02-01

    Composition and structure of oxide support materials can change the catalytic behavior of metal and oxide catalysts. Model catalysts are being studied in which the active phase is deposited on flat oxide substrates, with emphasis on metals catalysis for automotive emissions control and acidity in supported oxides. Research is reported in the following areas: particle-size effects, support effects on ZnO and zirconia, support effects on ceria, supported oxides, and low energy ion scattering (no results in the latter).

  5. Bimetallic complexes and polymerization catalysts therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Patton, Jasson T.; Marks, Tobin J.; Li, Liting

    2000-11-28

    Group 3-6 or Lanthanide metal complexes possessing two metal centers, catalysts derived therefrom by combining the same with strong Lewis acids, Bronsted acid salts, salts containing a cationic oxidizing agent or subjected to bulk electrolysis in the presence of compatible, inert non-coordinating anions and the use of such catalysts for polymerizing olefins, diolefins and/or acetylenically unsaturated monomers are disclosed.

  6. Single-layer transition metal sulfide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thoma, Steven G.

    2011-05-31

    Transition Metal Sulfides (TMS), such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2), are the petroleum industry's "workhorse" catalysts for upgrading heavy petroleum feedstocks and removing sulfur, nitrogen and other pollutants from fuels. We have developed an improved synthesis technique to produce SLTMS catalysts, such as molybdenum disulfide, with potentially greater activity and specificity than those currently available. Applications for this technology include heavy feed upgrading, in-situ catalysis, bio-fuel conversion and coal liquefaction.

  7. Calcium-based Lewis acid catalysts.

    PubMed

    Begouin, Jeanne-Marie; Niggemann, Meike

    2013-06-17

    Recently, Lewis acidic calcium salts bearing weakly coordinating anions such as Ca(NTf₂)₂, Ca(OTf)₂, CaF₂ and Ca[OCH(CF₃)₂]₂ have been discovered as catalysts for the transformation of alcohols, olefins and carbonyl compounds. High stability towards air and moisture, selectivity and high reactivity under mild reaction conditions render these catalysts a sustainable and mild alternative to transition metals, rare-earth metals or strong Brønsted acids.

  8. Catalysts for electrochemical generation of oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogrady, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation of more effective catalysts for the electrolytic evolution of oxygen was made to understand the mechanism and kinetics for the electrocatalysis in relation to the surface electronic and lattice properties of the catalyst. An understanding was obtained for the structural features of the electrocatalysts. The kinetics and mechanism of anodic generation of O2 under well defined conditions in relation to the properties of electrode surface were evaluated.

  9. Design better cerium-based oxidation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Trovarelli, A.; Leitenburg, C. de; Dolcetti, G.

    1997-06-01

    Structural and energetic factors play an important role in the development of a new generation of automobile exhaust catalysts containing CeO{sub 2} doped with ZrO{sub 2} and/or other rare earth oxides such as PrO{sub x}, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and La{sub 2}O{sub 3}. These new catalysts possess high oxygen storage capacity, improved thermal stability, and enhanced catalytic properties. These properties are discussed.

  10. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

    1985-03-12

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160/sup 0/C) and preferably in the range 80 to 120/sup 0/C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen is disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH-RONa-M(OAc)/sub 2/ where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1 to 6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)/sub 6/ is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  11. Carbon-based metal-free catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xien; Dai, Liming

    2016-11-01

    Metals and metal oxides are widely used as catalysts for materials production, clean energy generation and storage, and many other important industrial processes. However, metal-based catalysts suffer from high cost, low selectivity, poor durability, susceptibility to gas poisoning and have a detrimental environmental impact. In 2009, a new class of catalyst based on earth-abundant carbon materials was discovered as an efficient, low-cost, metal-free alternative to platinum for oxygen reduction in fuel cells. Since then, tremendous progress has been made, and carbon-based metal-free catalysts have been demonstrated to be effective for an increasing number of catalytic processes. This Review provides a critical overview of this rapidly developing field, including the molecular design of efficient carbon-based metal-free catalysts, with special emphasis on heteroatom-doped carbon nanotubes and graphene. We also discuss recent advances in the development of carbon-based metal-free catalysts for clean energy conversion and storage, environmental protection and important industrial production, and outline the key challenges and future opportunities in this exciting field.

  12. Low Cost Autothermal Diesel Reforming Catalyst Development

    SciTech Connect

    Shihadeh, J.; Liu, D.

    2004-01-01

    Catalytic autothermal reforming (ATR) represents an important step of converting fossil fuel to hydrogen rich reformate for use in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. The state-of-the-art reforming catalyst, at present, is a Rh based material which is effective but costly. The objective of our current research is to reduce the catalyst cost by finding an efficient ATR catalyst containing no rhodium. A group of perovskite based catalysts have been synthesized and evaluated under the reforming condition of a diesel surrogate fuel. Hydrogen yield, reforming efficiency, and conversion selectivity to carbon oxides of the catalyst ATR reaction are calculated and compared with the benchmark Rh based material. Several catalyst synthesis improvements were carried out including: 1) selectively doping metals on the A-site and B-site of the perovskite structure, 2) changing the support from perovskite to alumina, 3) altering the method of metal addition, and 4) using transition metals instead of noble metals. It was found that the catalytic activity changed little with modification of the A-site metal, while it displayed considerable dependence on the B-site metal. Perovskite supports performed much better than alumina based supports.

  13. Deactivation and poisoning of fuel cell catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, P. N., Jr.

    1985-06-01

    The deactivation and poisoning phenomena reviewed are: the poisoning of anode (fuel electrode) catalyst by carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide; the deactivation of the cathode (air electrode) catalyst by sintering; and the deactivation of the cathode by corrosion of the support. The anode catalyst is Pt supported on a conductive, high area carbon black, usually at a loading of 10 w/o. This catalyst is tolerant to some level of carbon monoxide or hydrogen sulfide or both in combination, the level depending on temperature and pressure. Much less is known about hydrogen sulfide poisoning. Typical tolerance levels are 2% CO, and 10 ppM H2S. The cathode catalyst is typically Pt supported on a raphitic carbon black, usually a furnace black heat-treated to 2700 C. The Pt loading is typically 10 w/o, and the dispersion (or percent exposed) as-prepared is typically 30%. The loss of dispersion in use depends on the operational parameters, most especially the cathode potential history, i.e., higher potentials cause more rapid decrease in dispersion. The mechanism of loss of dispersion is not well known. The graphitic carbon support corrodes at a finite rate that is also potential dependent. Support corrosion causes thickening of the electrolyte film between the gas pores and the catalyst particles, which in turn causes increased diffusional resistance and performance loss.

  14. Hollow Nano- and Microstructures as Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Gonzalo; Tüysüz, Harun; Duyckaerts, Nicolas; Knossalla, Johannes; Wang, Guang-Hui; Schüth, Ferdi

    2016-11-23

    Catalysis is at the core of almost every established and emerging chemical process and also plays a central role in the quest for novel technologies for the sustainable production and conversion of energy. Particularly since the early 2000s, a great surge of interest exists in the design and application of micro- and nanometer-sized materials with hollow interiors as solid catalysts. This review provides an updated and critical survey of the ever-expanding material architectures and applications of hollow structures in all branches of catalysis, including bio-, electro-, and photocatalysis. First, the main synthesis strategies toward hollow materials are succinctly summarized, with emphasis on the (regioselective) incorporation of various types of catalytic functionalities within their different subunits. The principles underlying the scientific and technological interest in hollow materials as solid catalysts, or catalyst carriers, are then comprehensively reviewed. Aspects covered include the stabilization of catalysts by encapsulation, the introduction of molecular sieving or stimuli-responsive "auxiliary" functionalities, as well as the single-particle, spatial compartmentalization of various catalytic functions to create multifunctional (bio)catalysts. Examples are also given on the applications which hollow structures find in the emerging fields of electro- and photocatalysis, particularly in the context of the sustainable production of chemical energy carriers. Finally, a critical perspective is provided on the plausible evolution lines for this thriving scientific field, as well as the main practical challenges relevant to the reproducible and scalable synthesis and utilization of hollow micro- and nanostructures as solid catalysts.

  15. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.; Mahajan, Devinder

    1986-01-01

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160.degree. C.) and preferably in the range 80.degree.-120.degree. C. used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen is disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa--M(OAc).sub.2 where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1-6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M=Ni and R=tertiary amyl). Mo(CO).sub.6 is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  16. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

    1986-10-28

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160 C) and preferably in the range 80--120 C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen are disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa-M(OAc)[sub 2] where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1-6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is NiC (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)[sub 6] is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  17. Neutral nickel ethylene oligo- and polymerization catalysts: towards computational catalyst prediction and design.

    PubMed

    Heyndrickx, Wouter; Occhipinti, Giovanni; Jensen, Vidar R

    2014-06-23

    DFT calculations have been used to elucidate the chain termination mechanisms for neutral nickel ethylene oligo- and polymerization catalysts and to rationalize the kind of oligomers and polymers produced by each catalyst. The catalysts studied are the (κ(2)-O,O)-coordinated (1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-acetylacetonato)nickel catalyst I, the (κ(2)-P,O)-coordinated SHOP-type nickel catalyst II, the (κ(2)-N,O)-coordinated anilinotropone and salicylaldiminato nickel catalysts III and IV, respectively, and the (κ(2)-P,N)-coordinated phosphinosulfonamide nickel catalyst V. Numerous termination pathways involving β-H elimination and β-H transfer steps have been investigated, and the most probable routes identified. Despite the complexity and multitude of the possible termination pathways, the information most critical to chain termination is contained in only few transition states. In addition, by consideration of the propagation pathway, we have been able to estimate chain lengths and discriminate between oligo- and polymerization catalysts. In agreement with experiment, we found the Gibbs free energy difference between the overall barrier for the most facile propagation and termination pathways to be close to 0 kcal mol(-1) for the ethylene oligomerization catalysts I and V, whereas values of at least 7 kcal mol(-1) in favor of propagation were determined for the polymerization catalysts III and IV. Because of the shared intermediates between the termination and branching pathways, we have been able to identify the preferred cis/trans regiochemistry of β-H elimination and show that a pronounced difference in σ donation of the two bridgehead atoms of the bidentate ligand can suppress hydride formation and thus branching. The degree of rationalization obtained here from a handful of key intermediates and transition states is promising for the use of computational methods in the screening and prediction of new catalysts of the title class.

  18. Methane activation on supported transition metal catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstens, Jason Ned

    At present, there is considerable interest in utilizing methane more efficiently as both a fuel source and as a starting material for the production of other, more valuable products. However, methane is a very stable molecule with strong C-H bonds that are difficult to break. This makes methane combustion or the formation of carbon-carbon bonds quite difficult. The present work focuses on the use of supported transition metal catalysts as a means of activating methane (i.e. breaking C-H bonds) at low temperatures to produce valuable products or energy. The conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. A low temperature (<750 K), direct process to effectively convert methane into higher hydrocarbons would be quite desirable. Such a process is thermodynamically feasible if the reaction is broken up into two separate steps. The first step is the adsorption of methane onto a transition metal catalyst at temperatures above about 600 K to produce a surface carbon species. The second step is a low temperature (<373 K) hydrogenation to convert the carbon species into higher hydrocarbons. T. Koerts et al. have pursued this approach by dissociatively absorbing methane onto silica supported transition metal catalysts at temperatures ranging between 573 K and 773 K. The result was a surface carbonaceous species and hydrogen. In the second step, the carbonaceous intermediates produced small alkanes upon hydrogenation around 373 K. A maximum yield to higher hydrocarbons of 13% was obtained on a ruthenium catalyst. The present study was conducted to further investigate the nature of the carbonaceous species reported by Koerts. Methane combustion. This investigation was conducted in an effort to better understand the mechanism of methane combustion on Pd catalysts. In the first part of this study, temperature programmed reduction (TPR) was used to investigate the oxidation and reduction dynamics of a 10 wt% Pd/ZrOsb2 catalyst used for methane combustion. TPR experiments indicate

  19. Catalysts by the meter: rapid screening approach of N-heterocyclic carbene ligand based catalysts.

    PubMed

    Lang, Carolin; Gärtner, Ute; Trapp, Oliver

    2011-01-07

    Here, we demonstrate a versatile screening platform for NHC ligand based catalysts by coating fused-silica micro capillaries with a bonded 1,3-bismesityl-2-imidazolidinylidene ligand. Such micro capillaries can be efficiently converted into (pre)-catalysts from various organometallic precursors by solid-phase chemistry techniques and can be quantitatively screened using on-column reaction chromatography.

  20. The capacity of modified nickel catalysts derived from discharged catalyst of fertilizer plants for NOx treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, T. M. P.; Luong, N. T.; Le, P. N.

    2016-11-01

    In Vietnam for recent years, a large amount of hazardous waste containing nickel (Ni) derived from discharged catalyst of fertilizer plants has caused environmental problems in landfill overloading and the risk of soil or surface water sources pollution. Taking advantage of discharged catalyst, recycling Ni components and then synthesizing new catalysts apply for mono-nitrogen oxides (NOx) treatments is an approach to bring about both economic and environmental benefits. This study was carried out with the main objective: Evaluate the performance of modified catalysts (using recovered Ni from the discharged RKS-2-7H catalyst of Phu My Fertilizer Plant) on NOx treatment. The catalysts was synthesized and modified with active phases consist of recovered Ni and commercial Barium oxide (BaO), Manganese dioxide (MnO2) / Cerium (IV) oxide (CeO2) on the support Aluminium oxide (γ-Al2O3). The results show that the modified catalysts with Ni, Ba, Ce was not more beneficial for NOx removal than which with Ni, Ba, Mn. 98% NOx removal at 350°C with the start temperature at 115°C and the T60 value at 307°C can be obtained with 10Ni10Ba10Mn/Al catalyst.

  1. A chromium catalyst for the polymerization of ethylene as a homogeneous model for the phillips catalyst.

    PubMed

    MacAdams, Leonard A; Buffone, Gerald P; Incarvito, Christopher D; Rheingold, Arnold L; Theopold, Klaus H

    2005-02-02

    A structurally characterized cationic chromium(III) alkyl featuring a bulky nacnac ligand catalyzes the polymerization of ethylene as well as the copolymerization of ethylene with alpha-olefins. This well-characterized homogeneous catalyst constitutes a structural as well as functional model of the widely used heterogeneous Phillips olefin polymerization catalyst.

  2. Fuel cell development for transportation: Catalyst development

    SciTech Connect

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1996-12-31

    Fuel cells are being considered as alternative power sources for transportation and stationary applications. The degradation of commonly used electrode catalysts (e.g. Pt, Ag, and others) and corrosion of carbon substrates are making commercialization of fuel cells incorporating present day technologies economically problematic. Furthermore, due to the instability of the Pt catalyst, the performance of fuel cells declines on long-term operation. When methanol is used as the fuel, a voltage drop, as well as significant thermal management problems can be encountered, the later being due to chemical oxidation of methanol at the platinized carbon at the cathode. Though extensive work was conducted on platinized electrodes for both the oxidation and reduction reactions, due to the problems mentioned above, fuel cells have not been fully developed for widespread commercial use. Several investigators have previously evaluated metal macrocyclic complexes as alternative catalysts to Pt and Pt/Ru in fuel cells. Unfortunately, though they have demonstrated catalytic activity, these materials were found to be unstable on long term use in the fuel cell environment. In order to improve the long-term stability of metal macrocyclic complexes, we have chemically bonded these complexes to the carbon substrate, thereby enhancing their catalytic activity as well as their chemical stability in the fuel cell environment. We have designed, synthesized, and evaluated these catalysts for O{sub 2} reduction, H{sub 2} oxidation, and direct methanol oxidation in Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) and aqueous carbonate fuel cells. These catalysts exhibited good catalytic activity and long-term stability. In this paper we confine our discussion to the initial performance results of some of these catalysts in H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} PEM fuel cells, including their long-term performance characteristics as well as CO poisoning effects on these catalysts.

  3. Homogeneous catalysts in hypersonic combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Harradine, D.M.; Lyman, J.L.; Oldenborg, R.C.; Pack, R.T.; Schott, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    Density and residence time both become unfavorably small for efficient combustion of hydrogen fuel in ramjet propulsion in air at high altitude and hypersonic speed. Raising the density and increasing the transit time of the air through the engine necessitates stronger contraction of the air flow area. This enhances the kinetic and thermodynamic tendency of H/sub 2/O to form completely, accompanied only by N/sub 2/ and any excess H/sub 2/(or O/sub 2/). The by-products to be avoided are the energetically expensive fragment species H and/or O atoms and OH radicals, and residual (2H/sub 2/ plus O/sub 2/). However, excessive area contraction raises air temperature and consequent combustion-product temperature by adiabatic compression. This counteracts and ultimately overwhelms the thermodynamic benefit by which higher density favors the triatomic product, H/sub 2/O, over its monatomic and diatomic alternatives. For static pressures in the neighborhood of 1 atm, static temperature must be kept or brought below ca. 2400 K for acceptable stability of H/sub 2/O. Another measure, whose requisite chemistry we address here, is to extract propulsive work from the combustion products early in the expansion. The objective is to lower the static temperature of the combustion stream enough for H/sub 2/O to become adequately stable before the exhaust flow is massively expanded and its composition ''frozen.'' We proceed to address this mechanism and its kinetics, and then examine prospects for enhancing its rate by homogeneous catalysts. 9 refs.

  4. Synthesis H-Zeolite catalyst by impregnation KI/KIO3 and performance test catalyst for biodiesel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widayat, W.; Rizky Wicaksono, Adit; Hakim Firdaus, Lukman; Okvitarini, Ndaru

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this research is to produce H-catalyst catalyst that was impregnated with KI/KIO3. The catalyst was analyzed about surface area, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and performance test of catalyst for biodiesel production. An H-Zeolite catalyst was synthesized from natural zeolite with chemical treatment processing, impregnation KI/KIO3 and physical treatment. The results shows that the surface area of the catalyst by 27.236 m2/g at a concentration of 5% KI. XRD analysis shows peak 2-θ at 23.627o indicating that KI was impregnated on H-zeolite catalyst. The catalyst was tested in production of biodiesel using palm oil with conventional methods for 3 hour at temperature of 70-80 oC. The result for conversion Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) reached maximum value on 87.91% under production process using catalyst 5% KIO3-H zeolite.

  5. Catalyst and electrode research for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, A. C.; King, R. B.

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of the development status of phosphoric acid fuel cells' high performance catalyst and electrode materials. Binary alloys have been identified which outperform the baseline platinum catalyst; it has also become apparent that pressurized operation is required to reach the desired efficiencies, calling in turn for the use of graphitized carbon blacks in the role of catalyst supports. Efforts to improve cell performance and reduce catalyst costs have led to the investigation of a class of organometallic cathode catalysts represented by the tetraazaannulenes, and a mixed catalyst which is a mixture of carbons catalyzed with an organometallic and a noble metal.

  6. Relations between coke deposition and activity of HDS catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Brito, J.; Golding, R.; Severino, F.; Laine, J.

    1982-09-01

    Results of studies of coke deposition due to degradation of 1,3-butadiene at 400/sup 0/C are reported for studies employing supported molybdate catalysts, with and without promoters (Co and Ni) and with or without presulfiding. Initial hydrosulfurization (HDS) behavior of the catalysts was also examined. The results suggest that deposition of coke is one of the reasons for the difference in catalyst activity, and higher initial and steady state activities of presulfided catalysts suggest that H/sub 2/S treatment reduces the deactivation processes such as coke deposition. The cobalt promoted catalysts were found to be more prone to coke formation that the nickel promoted catalysts. (BLM)

  7. New applications of noble metal catalysts in hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, D.H.G.; Bertram, R.V.; Dencker, G.D.

    1995-09-01

    The paper explores how a noble metal hydrocracking catalyst functions stably in a hydrogen sulfide and ammonia environment and, in particular, how the physical positioning of the noble metal molecules affects catalyst performance. A commercial example, HC-28 catalyst in the Unicracking unit at Marathon Oil Refinery in Robinson, Illinois, demonstrates the success of the noble metal catalyst approach for naphtha production. In addition, a new Unicracking catalyst, HC-35, which uses a noble metal component to produce high-quality middle distillates, is introduced. The paper also shows how refiners may derive increased economic and operational benefits from their catalyst investment by using the latest developments in reactor internals design.

  8. Method of depositing a catalyst on a fuel cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Dearnaley, Geoffrey; Arps, James H.

    2000-01-01

    Fuel cell electrodes comprising a minimal load of catalyst having maximum catalytic activity and a method of forming such fuel cell electrodes. The method comprises vaporizing a catalyst, preferably platinum, in a vacuum to form a catalyst vapor. A catalytically effective amount of the catalyst vapor is deposited onto a carbon catalyst support on the fuel cell electrode. The electrode preferably is carbon cloth. The method reduces the amount of catalyst needed for a high performance fuel cell electrode to about 0.3 mg/cm.sup.2 or less.

  9. Chemical interactions in multimetal/zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sachtler, W.M.H.

    1992-12-21

    Research is proposed on two groups of zeolite based catalysts that contain two transition elements. In one group both metals are fully reduced, in the other group one element is left as a positive ion; it can act as a chemical anchor'', or as a catalyst promoter for the reduced metal. The objective is to explore the potential of such materials for designing superior catalysts for synthesis and conversion of hydrocarbons and other energy carriers. ENDOR, EXAFS, CO-FTIR and TPD will be used to identify the interaction of Mn[sup 2+] ions with Rh[sub n] particles in the same zeolite cage. EXAFS at the Kedge of Fe and Pd, FTIR and Moessbauer spectroscopy will be used to characterize Fe ions and alloyed Fe atoms in PdFe/NaHY. The catalysts will be probed with CO hydrogenation and conversion of hydrocarbons. Methods Which proved successful in our study of Y supported bimetal systems will be applied to identify the state of Pt and Cu in ZSM-5, a catalyst system holding large promise for NO abatement, even in the presence of oxygen.

  10. Catalyst cartridge for carbon dioxide reduction unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A catalyst cartridge, for use in a carbon dioxide reducing apparatus in a life support system for space vehicles, is described. The catalyst cartridge includes an inner perforated metal wall, an outer perforated wall space outwardly from the inner wall, a base plate closing one end of the cartridge, and a cover plate closing the other end of the cartridge. The cover plate has a central aperture through which a supply line with a heater feeds a gaseous reaction mixture comprising hydrogen and carbon dioxide at a temperature from about 1000 to about 1400 F. The outer surfaces of the internal wall and the inner surfaces of the outer wall are lined with a ceramic fiber batting material of sufficient thickness to prevent carbon formed in the reaction from passing through it. The portion of the surfaces of the base and cover plates defined within the inner and outer walls are also lined with ceramic batting. The heated reaction mixture passes outwardly through the inner perforated wall and ceramic batting and over the catalyst. The solid carbon product formes is retained within the enclosure containing the catalyst. The solid carbon product formed is retained within the enclosure containing the catalyst. The water vapor and unreacted carbon dioxide and any intermediate products pass through the perforations of the outer wall.

  11. Process and catalyst for carbonylating olefins

    DOEpatents

    Zoeller, Joseph Robert

    1998-06-02

    Disclosed is an improved catalyst system and process for preparing aliphatic carbonyl compounds such as aliphatic carboxylic acids, alkyl esters of aliphatic carboxylic acids and anhydrides of aliphatic carboxylic acids by carbonylating olefins in the presence of a catalyst system comprising (1) a first component selected from at least one Group 6 metal, i.e., chromium, molybdenum, and/or tungsten and (2) a second component selected from at least one of certain halides and tertiary and quaternary compounds of a Group 15 element, i.e., nitrogen, phosphorus and/or arsenic, and (3) as a third component, a polar, aprotic solvent. The process employing the improved catalyst system is carried out under carbonylating conditions of pressure and temperature discussed herein. The process constitutes and improvement over known processes since it can be carried out at moderate carbonylation conditions without the necessity of using an expensive noble metal catalyst, volatile, toxic materials such as nickel tetracarbonyl, formic acid or a formate ester. Further, the addition of a polar, aprotic solvent to the catalyst system significantly increases, or accelerates, the rate at which the carbonylation takes place.

  12. Monolithic Hydrogen Peroxide Catalyst Bed Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponzo, J. B.

    2003-01-01

    With recent increased industry and government interest in rocket grade hydrogen peroxide as a viable propellant, significant effort has been expended to improve on earlier developments. This effort has been predominately centered in improving heterogeneous. typically catalyst beds; and homogeneous catalysts, which are typically solutions of catalytic substances. Heterogeneous catalyst beds have traditionally consisted of compressed wire screens plated with a catalytic substance, usually silver, and were used m many RCS applications (X-1, Mercury, and Centaur for example). Aerojet has devised a heterogeneous catalyst design that is monolithic (single piece), extremely compact, and has pressure drops equal to or less than traditional screen beds. The design consists of a bonded stack of very thin, photoetched metal plates, silver coated. This design leads to a high surface area per unit volume and precise flow area, resulting in high, stable, and repeatable performance. Very high throughputs have been demonstrated with 90% hydrogen peroxide. (0.60 lbm/s/sq in at 1775-175 psia) with no flooding of the catalyst bed. Bed life of over 900 seconds has also been demonstrated at throughputs of 0.60 lbm/s/sq in across varying chamber pressures. The monolithic design also exhibits good starting performance, short break-in periods, and will easily scale to various sizes.

  13. Characterization of three-way automotive catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kenik, E.A.; More, K.L.; LaBarge, W.

    1997-04-01

    The CRADA between Delphi Automotive Systems (Delphi; formerly General Motors - AC Delco, Systems) and Lockheed Martin Energy Research (LMER) on automotive catalysts was completed at the end of FY96, after a ten month, no-cost extension. The CRADA was aimed at improved performance and lifetime of noble metal based three-way-catalysts (TWC), which are the primary catalytic system for automotive emission control systems. While these TWC can meet the currently required emission standards, higher than optimum noble metal loadings are often required to meet lifetime requirements. In addition, more stringent emission standards will be imposed in the near future, demanding improved performance and service life from these catalysts. Understanding the changes of TWC conversion efficiency with ageing is a critical need in improving these catalysts. Initially in a fresh catalyst, the active material is often distributed on a very fine scale, approaching single atoms or small atomic clusters. As such, a wide range of analytical techniques have been employed to provide high spatial resolution characterization of the evolving state of the catalytic material.

  14. Thermally Stable, Latent Olefin Metathesis Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Renee M.; Fedorov, Alexey; Keitz, Benjamin K.

    2011-01-01

    Highly thermally stable N-aryl,N-alkyl N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ruthenium catalysts were designed and synthesized for latent olefin metathesis. These catalysts showed excellent latent behavior toward metathesis reactions, whereby the complexes were inactive at ambient temperature and initiated at elevated temperatures, a challenging property to achieve with second generation catalysts. A sterically hindered N-tert-butyl substituent on the NHC ligand of the ruthenium complex was found to induce latent behavior toward cross-metathesis reactions, and exchange of the chloride ligands for iodide ligands was necessary to attain latent behavior during ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). Iodide-based catalysts showed no reactivity toward ROMP of norbornene-derived monomers at 25 °C, and upon heating to 85 °C gave complete conversion of monomer to polymer in less than 2 hours. All of the complexes were very stable to air, moisture, and elevated temperatures up to at least 90 °C, and exhibited a long catalyst lifetime in solution at elevated temperatures. PMID:22282652

  15. Weyl Semimetals as Hydrogen Evolution Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Rajamathi, Catherine R; Gupta, Uttam; Kumar, Nitesh; Yang, Hao; Sun, Yan; Süß, Vicky; Shekhar, Chandra; Schmidt, Marcus; Blumtritt, Horst; Werner, Peter; Yan, Binghai; Parkin, Stuart; Felser, Claudia; Rao, C N R

    2017-03-15

    The search for highly efficient and low-cost catalysts is one of the main driving forces in catalytic chemistry. Current strategies for the catalyst design focus on increasing the number and activity of local catalytic sites, such as the edge sites of molybdenum disulfides in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Here, the study proposes and demonstrates a different principle that goes beyond local site optimization by utilizing topological electronic states to spur catalytic activity. For HER, excellent catalysts have been found among the transition-metal monopnictides-NbP, TaP, NbAs, and TaAs-which are recently discovered to be topological Weyl semimetals. Here the study shows that the combination of robust topological surface states and large room temperature carrier mobility, both of which originate from bulk Dirac bands of the Weyl semimetal, is a recipe for high activity HER catalysts. This approach has the potential to go beyond graphene based composite photocatalysts where graphene simply provides a high mobility medium without any active catalytic sites that have been found in these topological materials. Thus, the work provides a guiding principle for the discovery of novel catalysts from the emerging field of topological materials.

  16. Development of hydrous titanium oxide catalysts for upgrading coal liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, S.; Dosch, R.

    1993-07-01

    Improved efficiency in direct coal liquefaction processes can be obtained by developing catalysts with better activity, selectivity, and life. In previous exploratory research at Sandia National Laboratories, catalysts prepared via hydrous metal oxide (HMO) ion exchangers have been shown to have potential for application to a number of reactions associated with the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. In the present effort, one member of this class of catalysts, hydrous titanium oxide (HTO), has been developed for use in hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of coal liquids. The unsupported (or bulk) NiMo-HTO catalyst performed well for HDS/HDN of a coal derived liquid as compared to the benchmark Shell 324 catalyst. The CoMo-HTO, while performing better than the Shell 324 catalyst, did not perform quite as well as the NiMo-HTO. In a side-by-side comparison of supported NiMo-HTO catalysts with commercial counterparts, the supported NiMo-HTO catalysts outperformed the Shell 324 and Amocat 1C catalysts on a weight of Mo basis. On a catalyst weight basis, the NiMo-HTO coated catalyst on a Shell 324 blank under performed Shell 324, while the NiMo-HTO coated catalyst on an Amocat 1C support performed as well as the Amocat 1C catalyst.

  17. Diesel Fuel Sulfur Effects on the Performance of Diesel Oxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Whitacre, Shawn D.

    2000-08-20

    Research focus: - Impact of sulfur on: Catalyst performance; Short term catalyst durability. This presentation summarizes results from fresh catalyst performance evaluations - WVU contracted to conduct DOC and Lean NOx catalyst testing for DECSE DECSE program. (experimental details discussed previously)

  18. Catalytic reforming with improved zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y.F.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a method for reforming a naphtha. It comprises contacting the naphtha with a noble metal/alkali metal-containing zeolite naphtha reforming catalyst the catalyst containing from about 0.1--1.0 wt % of the noble metal and an amount of the alkali metal which exceeds the cationic exchange capacity of the zeolite, a pressure of from about 0 to about 2000 psig, a temperature of about 750{degrees} F. to about 1200{degrees} F., a hydrogen to hydrocarbon molar ratio of about 0.1 to 1 to about 15 to 1 and a weight hourly spaced velocity of about 0.5 to about 20, whereby naphtha reforming activity of the catalyst is enhanced by the zeolite resulting in significantly improved C{sub 4}{sup +} gasoline yields.

  19. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.13 ), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  20. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1991-02-12

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.-), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  1. Unsupported catalysts in the production of olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuter, W.; Wernicke, H.

    1980-07-01

    A description is given of a process for the production of olefins in two stages wherein, in the first stage, a heavy petroleum fraction is hydrogenated essentially in the liquid phase in the presence of hydrogen and a hydrogenation catalyst and, in the second stage, the thus-hydrogenated fraction is subjected to thermal cracking in the vapor phase in the presence of steam, the improvement which comprises employing as the hydrogenation catalyst a support-free catalyst consisting essentially of at least one of Co-Mo, Ni-Mo, Co-Mo sulfide, Ni-Co-Mo sulfide, Ni-Mo sulfide, Ni-Co sulfide, Co-mo oxide, Ni-Co-Mo oxide, Ni-Mo oxide, Ni-Co oxide, Ni-W sulfide, Ni-W oxide, or organometallic complexes of aforementioned metallic mixtures.

  2. Ambient-temperature co-oxidation catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T.; Schryer, David R.; Brown, Kenneth G.; Kielin, Erik J.

    1991-01-01

    Oxidation catalysts which operate at ambient temperature were developed for the recombination of carbon monoxide (CO) and oxygen (O2) dissociation products which are formed during carbon dioxide (CO2) laser operation. Recombination of these products to regenerate CO2 allows continuous operation of CO2 lasers in a closed cycle mode. Development of these catalyst materials provides enabling technology for the operation of such lasers from space platforms or in ground based facilities without constant gas consumption required for continuous open cycle operation. Such catalysts also have other applications in various areas outside the laser community for removal of CO from other closed environments such as indoor air and as an ambient temperature catalytic converter for control of auto emissions.

  3. Method for dispersing catalyst onto particulate material

    DOEpatents

    Utz, Bruce R.; Cugini, Anthony V.

    1992-01-01

    A method for dispersing finely divided catalyst precursors onto the surface of coal or other particulate material includes the steps of forming a wet paste mixture of the particulate material and a liquid solution containing a dissolved transition metal salt, for instance a solution of ferric nitrate. The wet paste mixture is in a state of incipient wetness with all of this solution adsorbed onto the surfaces of the particulate material without the presence of free moisture. On adding a precipitating agent such as ammonia, a catalyst precursor such as hydrated iron oxide is deposited on the surfaces of the coal. The catalyst is activated by converting it to the sulfide form for the hydrogenation or direct liquefaction of the coal.

  4. Sand consolidation methods using adsorbable catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, R. H.

    1985-04-23

    Methods are provided for selectively consolidating sand grains within a subterranean formation. First an acidic zirconium salt catalyst, such as ZrOCl/sub 2/, Zr(SO/sub 4/)/sub 2/, or ZrCl/sub 4/, is injected into the subterranean formation, wherein the acidic salt catalyst is adsorbed to the surface of the sand grains. Next a polymerizable resin composition such as furfuryl alcohol oligomer is introduced into the well formation. Polymerization of the resin occurs upon exposure to the elevated well temperatures and contact with the acid salt catalyst adsorbed to the sand grains. The polymerized resin serves to consolidate the surfaces of the sand grains while retaining permeability through the pore spaces. An ester of a weak organic acid is included with the resin compositions to control the extent of a polymerization by consuming the water by-product formed during the polymerization reaction.

  5. Ship-in-a-bottle catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Haw, James F.; Song, Weiguo

    2006-07-18

    In accordance with the present invention there is provided a novel catalyst system in which the catalytic structure is tailormade at the nanometer scale using the invention's novel ship-in-a-bottle synthesis techniques. The invention describes modified forms of solid catalysts for use in heterogeneous catalysis that have a microporous structure defined by nanocages. Examples include zeolites, SAPOs, and analogous materials that have the controlled pore dimensions and hydrothermal stability required for many industrial processes. The invention provides for modification of these catalysts using reagents that are small enough to pass through the windows used to access the cages. The small reagents are then reacted to form larger molecules in the cages.

  6. Pyrochlore catalysts for hydrocarbon fuel reforming

    DOEpatents

    Berry, David A.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Haynes, Daniel; Smith, Mark; Spivey, James J.

    2012-08-14

    A method of catalytically reforming a reactant gas mixture using a pyrochlore catalyst material comprised of one or more pyrochlores having the composition A2B2-y-zB'yB"zO7-.DELTA., where y>0 and z.gtoreq.0. Distribution of catalytically active metals throughout the structure at the B site creates an active and well dispersed metal locked into place in the crystal structure. This greatly reduces the metal sintering that typically occurs on supported catalysts used in reforming reactions, and reduces deactivation by sulfur and carbon. Further, oxygen mobility may also be enhanced by elemental exchange of promoters at sites in the pyrochlore. The pyrochlore catalyst material may be utilized in catalytic reforming reactions for the conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into synthesis gas (H2+CO) for fuel cells, among other uses.

  7. Method for producing catalysts from coal

    DOEpatents

    Farcasiu, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kaufman, P.B.; Jagtoyen, M.

    1998-02-24

    A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere. 1 fig.

  8. Process for the regeneration of metallic catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Katzer, James R.; Windawi, Hassan

    1981-01-01

    A method for the regeneration of metallic hydrogenation catalysts from the class consisting of Ni, Rh, Pd, Ir, Pt and Ru poisoned with sulfur, with or without accompanying carbon deposition, comprising subjecting the catalyst to exposure to oxygen gas in a concentration of about 1-10 ppm. intermixed with an inert gas of the group consisting of He, A, Xe, Kr, N.sub.2 and air substantially free of oxygen to an extent such that the total oxygen molecule throughout is in the range of about 10 to 20 times that of the hydrogen sulfide molecular exposure producing the catalyst poisoning while maintaining the temperature in the range of about 300.degree. to 500.degree. C.

  9. Low temperature catalyst system for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.

    1984-04-20

    This patent discloses a catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (150/sup 0/C) and preferably in the range 80 to 120/sup 0/C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The catalyst components are used in slurry form and comprise (1) a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH-ROH-M(OAc)/sub 2/ where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1 to 6 carbon atoms and (2) a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. For the first component, Nic is preferred (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). For the second component, Mo(CO)/sub 6/ is preferred. The mixture is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  10. Catalysts comprising magnesium and a transition metal

    SciTech Connect

    Bujadoux, K.

    1984-10-09

    A catalyst comprising the product obtained by bringing into contact a compound of magnesium comprising at least one species selected from the group consisting of magnesium monohalides (MgX), halo-magnesium hydrides (HMgX) and magnesium hydride (MgH/sub 2/), X being a halogen and the said species MgX or HMgX being obtained by thermal decomposition of a powdery organo-magnesium halide R/sub 1/MgX wherein R/sub 1/ is an organic radical; and at least one halide of a transistion metal selected from the group consisting of titanium and vanadium, the valency of said metal in said halide being lower than or equal to 3, the quantities being such that the atomic ratio of magnesium to said transistion metal is between 1 and 25, and a catalyst system including the catalyst that is suitable for use in the polymerization of olefins and particularly ethylene.

  11. Computational Design of Lignin Depolymerization Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Sturgeon, M.; Katahira, R.; Paton, R. S.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-01

    Lignin is a major component of plant cell walls that is typically underutilized in selective conversion strategies for renewable fuels and chemicals. The mechanisms by which thermal and catalytic treatments deconstruct lignin remain elusive, for which quantum mechanical calculations can offer fundamental insights. In this work, a computational approach has been used to elucidate the reductive deconstruction pathway of a ruthenium-catalyzed system. Transition states have been computed to determine the rate-limiting steps for a catalyst that cleaves arylether linkages. Our calculations are supported by experimental synthesis and kinetic and thermodynamic measurements of the deconstruction of model lignin dimers by a ruthenium catalyst with the ultimate objective of designing new catalysts to eventually utilize lignin in biorefineries.

  12. Protein Scaffolding for Small Molecule Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, David

    2014-09-14

    We aim to design hybrid catalysts for energy production and storage that combine the high specificity, affinity, and tunability of proteins with the potent chemical reactivities of small organometallic molecules. The widely used Rosetta and RosettaDesign methodologies will be extended to model novel protein / small molecule catalysts in which one or many small molecule active centers are supported and coordinated by protein scaffolding. The promise of such hybrid molecular systems will be demonstrated with the nickel-phosphine hydrogenase of DuBois et. al.We will enhance the hydrogenase activity of the catalyst by designing protein scaffolds that incorporate proton relays and systematically modulate the local environment of the catalyticcenter. In collaboration with DuBois and Shaw, the designs will be experimentally synthesized and characterized.

  13. Synthesis of non-stoichiometric nanocrystalline catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Tschoepe, A.; Ying, J.Y.

    1995-12-01

    Nanocrystalline catalysts may be synthesized by inert gas condensation method with magnetron sputtering technique. The source material is sputtered in a low Ar pressure, and nanoclusters of similar composition as the source target are collected effectively on a liquid nitrogen cooled modified ground shield. We have generated Ce, La-Ce and Cu-Ce nanoclusters by this approach, and controlled oxidized them to derive non-stoichiometric oxide catalysts. Such novel catalysts are constituted of crystallites < 10 nm, with an ultrahigh surface-to-volume ratio. Multicomponent systems can also be synthesized with excellent homogeneity by this approach, compared to traditional chemical preparation methods. Finally, the significant non-stoichiometry in oxides provides a high concentration of oxygen vacancies and superoxide adsorbed species, which is particularly useful in catalytic redox reactions, such as SO{sub 2} reduction by CO and CO oxidation.

  14. Homogeneous and heterogenized iridium water oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchioni, Alceo

    2014-10-01

    The development of an efficient catalyst for the oxidative splitting of water into molecular oxygen, protons and electrons is of key importance for producing solar fuels through artificial photosynthesis. We are facing the problem by means of a rational approach aimed at understanding how catalytic performance may be optimized by the knowledge of the reaction mechanism of water oxidation and the fate of the catalytic site under the inevitably harsh oxidative conditions. For the purposes of our study we selected iridium water oxidation catalysts, exhibiting remarkable performance (TOF > 5 s-1 and TON > 20000). In particular, we recently focused our attention on [Cp*Ir(N,O)X] (N,O = 2-pyridincarboxylate; X = Cl or NO3) and [IrCl(Hedta)]Na water oxidation catalysts. The former exhibited a remarkable TOF whereas the latter showed a very high TON. Furthermore, [IrCl(Hedta)]Na was heterogenized onto TiO2 taking advantage of the presence of a dandling -COOH functionality. The heterogenized catalyst maintained approximately the same catalytic activity of the homogeneous analogous with the advantage that could be reused many times. Mechanistic studies were performed in order to shed some light on the rate-determining step and the transformation of catalysts when exposed to "oxidative stress". It was found that the last oxidative step, preceding oxygen liberation, is the rate-determining step when a small excess of sacrificial oxidant is used. In addition, several intermediates of the oxidative transformation of the catalyst were intercepted and characterized by NMR, X-Ray diffractometry and ESI-MS.

  15. Modified zeolite-based catalyst for effective extinction hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, T.Y. )

    1989-10-01

    The shape selectivity of zeolites makes them generally ineffective for extinction hydrocracking of polycyclic aromatic feeds. To overcome this problem, the zeolite can be modified with an amorphous cracking component to form a composite catalyst. This composite catalyst will be effective for extinction hydrocracking and retain the superior performance characteristics of a zeolite catalyst at the same time because the zeolite and the amorphous components of the catalyst operate complementarily. To illustrate this principle, NiW/REX-NiW/SiO/sub 2/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ composite catalyst was tested in the pilot plant. It was active, low in aging rate, resistant to nitrogen poisoning and high in selectivities for naphthas. The aged catalyst could be oxidatively regenerated to fully recover the activity and the product selectivities. This composite catalyst was superior to both individual (zeolite and amorphous) components for extinction hydrocracking. Catalysts similar to this have been used commercially for many years.

  16. Highly Dispersed Metal Catalyst for Fuel Cell Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a study that will bring industrial catalyst experience to fuel cell research. Specifically, industrial catalysts, such as those used in platforming, utilize precious metal platinum as an active component in a finely dispersed form.

  17. Method of performing sugar dehydration and catalyst treatment

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Jianli [Kennewick, WA; Holladay, Johnathan E [Kennewick, WA; Zhang, Xinjie [Burlington, MA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2010-06-01

    The invention includes a method of treating a solid acid catalyst. After exposing the catalyst to a mixture containing a sugar alcohol, the catalyst is washed with an organic solvent and is then exposed to a second reaction mixture. The invention includes a process for production of anhydrosugar alcohol. A solid acid catalyst is provided to convert sugar alcohol in a first sample to an anhydrosugar alcohol. The catalyst is then washed with an organic solvent and is subsequently utilized to expose a second sample. The invention includes a method for selective production of an anhydrosugar. A solid acid catalyst is provided within a reactor and anhydrosugar alcohol is formed by flowing a starting sugar alcohol into the reactor. The acid catalyst is then exposed to an organic solvent which allows a greater amount of additional anhydrosugar to be produced than would occur without exposing the acid catalyst to the organic solvent.

  18. Catalysts for oxidation of mercury in flue gas

    DOEpatents

    Granite, Evan J.; Pennline, Henry W.

    2010-08-17

    Two new classes of catalysts for the removal of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg) from effluent gases. Both of these classes of catalysts are excellent absorbers of HCl and Cl.sub.2 present in effluent gases. This adsorption of oxidizing agents aids in the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants. The catalysts remove mercury by oxidizing the Hg into mercury (II) moieties. For one class of catalysts, the active component is selected from the group consisting of iridium (Ir) and iridum-platinum (Ir/Pt) alloys. The Ir and Ir/Pt alloy catalysts are especially corrosion resistant. For the other class of catalyst, the active component is partially combusted coal or "Thief" carbon impregnated with Cl.sub.2. Untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-activating in the presence of effluent gas streams. The Thief carbon catalyst is disposable by means of capture from the effluent gas stream in a particulate collection device (PCD).

  19. Enhancement of alkylation catalysts for improved supercritical fluid regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Petkovic, Lucia

    2009-09-22

    A method of modifying an alkylation catalyst to reduce the formation of condensed hydrocarbon species thereon. The method comprises providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a plurality of active sites. The plurality of active sites on the alkylation catalyst may include a plurality of weakly acidic active sites, intermediate acidity active sites, and strongly acidic active sites. A base is adsorbed to a portion of the plurality of active sites, such as the strongly acidic active sites, selectively poisoning the strongly acidic active sites. A method of modifying the alkylation catalyst by providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a pore size distribution that sterically constrains formation of the condensed hydrocarbon species on the alkylation catalyst or by synthesizing the alkylation catalyst to comprise a decreased number of strongly acidic active sites is also disclosed, as is a method of improving a regeneration efficiency of the alkylation catalyst.

  20. Enhancement of alkylation catalysts for improved supercritical fluid regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Petkovic, Lucia M.

    2010-12-28

    A method of modifying an alkylation catalyst to reduce the formation of condensed hydrocarbon species thereon. The method comprises providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a plurality of active sites. The plurality of active sites on the alkylation catalyst may include a plurality of weakly acidic active sites, intermediate acidity active sites, and strongly acidic active sites. A base is adsorbed to a portion of the plurality of active sites, such as the strongly acidic active sites, selectively poisoning the strongly acidic active sites. A method of modifying the alkylation catalyst by providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a pore size distribution that sterically constrains formation of the condensed hydrocarbon species on the alkylation catalyst or by synthesizing the alkylation catalyst to comprise a decreased number of strongly acidic active sites is also disclosed, as is a method of improving a regeneration efficiency of the alkylation catalyst.

  1. Calcium and lanthanum solid base catalysts for transesterification

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K. Y. Simon; Yan, Shuli; Salley, Steven O.

    2015-07-28

    In one aspect, a heterogeneous catalyst comprises calcium hydroxide and lanthanum hydroxide, wherein the catalyst has a specific surface area of more than about 10 m.sup.2/g. In another aspect, a heterogeneous catalyst comprises a calcium compound and a lanthanum compound, wherein the catalyst has a specific surface area of more than about 10 m.sup.2/g, and a total basicity of about 13.6 mmol/g. In further another aspect, a heterogeneous catalyst comprises calcium oxide and lanthanum oxide, wherein the catalyst has a specific surface area of more than about 10 m.sup.2/g. In still another aspect, a process for preparing a catalyst comprises introducing a base precipitant, a neutral precipitant, and an acid precipitant to a solution comprising a first metal ion and a second metal ion to form a precipitate. The process further comprises calcining the precipitate to provide the catalyst.

  2. Catalysts For Lean Burn Engine Exhaust Abatement

    DOEpatents

    Ott, Kevin C.; Clark, Noline C.; Paffett, Mark T.

    2004-04-06

    The present invention provides a process for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxides in an exhaust gas stream containing nitrogen oxides and a reductant material by contacting the gas stream under conditions effective to catalytically reduce the nitrogen oxides with a catalyst comprising a aluminum-silicate type material and a minor amount of a metal, the catalyst characterized as having sufficient catalytic activity so as to reduce the nitrogen oxides by at least 60 percent under temperatures within the range of from about 200.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C.

  3. Catalysts for lean burn engine exhaust abatement

    DOEpatents

    Ott, Kevin C.; Clark, Noline C.; Paffett, Mark T.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxides in an exhaust gas stream containing nitrogen oxides and a reductant material by contacting the gas stream under conditions effective to catalytically reduce the nitrogen oxides with a catalyst comprising a aluminum-silicate type material and a minor amount of a metal, the catalyst characterized as having sufficient catalytic activity so as to reduce the nitrogen oxides by at least 60 percent under temperatures within the range of from about 200.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C.

  4. Catalysts for lean burn engine exhaust abatement

    DOEpatents

    Ott, Kevin C.; Clark, Noline C.; Paffett, Mark T.

    2006-08-01

    The present invention provides a process for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxides in an exhaust gas stream containing nitrogen oxides and a reductant material by contacting the gas stream under conditions effective to catalytically reduce the nitrogen oxides with a catalyst comprising a aluminum-silicate type material and a minor amount of a metal, the catalyst characterized as having sufficient catalytic activity so as to reduce the nitrogen oxides by at least 60 percent under temperatures within the range of from about 200.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C.

  5. Method for producing iron-based catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Farcasiu, Malvina; Kaufman, Phillip B.; Diehl, J. Rodney; Kathrein, Hendrik

    1999-01-01

    A method for preparing an acid catalyst having a long shelf-life is provided comprising doping crystalline iron oxides with lattice-compatible metals and heating the now-doped oxide with halogen compounds at elevated temperatures. The invention also provides for a catalyst comprising an iron oxide particle having a predetermined lattice structure, one or more metal dopants for said iron oxide, said dopants having an ionic radius compatible with said lattice structure; and a halogen bound with the iron and the metal dopants on the surface of the particle.

  6. Metal supports for exhaust gas catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Nonnenmann, M.

    1985-01-01

    Since 1979, metal supports as pre-catalysts have been mass-produced and installed in export models of German automobiles bound for the United States and Japan. The close-to-engine installation directly behind the exhaust manifold places specially high demands on the thermal and mechanical durability of the metal supports. Sueddeutsche Kuehlerfabrik Behr produces these metal supports under the name of ''Metalit''. The development, properties and special advantages of these metal supports are covered. The successful use of hundreds of thousands of metal supports, a number of automobile manufacturers are working on programs to employ the Metalit concept for primary catalysts.

  7. Resin catalysts and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1986-01-01

    Heat stabilized catalyst compositions are prepared from nuclear sulfonic acid, for example, macroporous crosslinked polyvinyl aromatic compounds containing sulfonic acid groups are neutralized with a metal of Al, Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, ions or mixtures and alkali, alkaline earth metals or ammonium ions by contacting the resin containing the sulfonic acid with aqueous solutions of the metals salts and alkali, alkaline earth metal or ammonium salts. The catalysts have at least 50% of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with metal ions and the balance of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with alkali, alkaline earth ions or ammonium ions.

  8. Resin catalysts and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1986-12-16

    Heat stabilized catalyst compositions are prepared from nuclear sulfonic acid, for example, macroporous crosslinked polyvinyl aromatic compounds containing sulfonic acid groups are neutralized with a metal of Al, Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, ions or mixtures and alkali, alkaline earth metals or ammonium ions by contacting the resin containing the sulfonic acid with aqueous solutions of the metals salts and alkali, alkaline earth metal or ammonium salts. The catalysts have at least 50% of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with metal ions and the balance of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with alkali, alkaline earth ions or ammonium ions.

  9. Method for producing iron-based catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Farcasiu, M.; Kaufman, P.B.; Diehl, J.R.; Kathrein, H.

    1999-09-07

    A method for preparing an acid catalyst having a long shelf-life is provided comprising doping crystalline iron oxides with lattice-compatible metals and heating the now-doped oxide with halogen compounds at elevated temperatures. The invention also provides for a catalyst comprising an iron oxide particle having a predetermined lattice structure, one or more metal dopants for said iron oxide, said dopants having an ionic radius compatible with said lattice structure; and a halogen bound with the iron and the metal dopants on the surface of the particle.

  10. Ruthenium-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH-responsive ligands: External control of catalyst solubility and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balof, Shawna Lynn

    2011-12-01

    Sixteen novel, Ru-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH responsive ligands were synthesized. The pH-responsive groups employed with these catalysts included dimethylamino (NMe2) modified NHC ligands as well as N-donor dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) and 3-(o-pyridyl)propylidene ligands. These pH-responsive ligands provided the means by which the solubility and/or activity profiles of the catalysts produced could be controlled via acid addition. The main goal of this dissertation was to design catalyst systems capable of performing ring opening metathesis (ROMP) and ring closing metathesis (RCM) reactions in both organic and aqueous media. In an effort to quickly gain access to new catalyst structures, a template synthesis for functionalized NHC ligand precursors was designed, in addition to other strategies, to obtain ligand precursors with ancillary NMe2 groups. Kinetic studies for the catalysts produced from these precursors showed external control of catalyst solubility was afforded via protonation of the NMe2 groups of their NHC ligands. Additionally, this protonation afforded external control of catalyst propagation rates for several catalysts. This is the first known independent external control for the propagation rates of ROMP catalysts. The incorporation of pH-responsive N-donor ligands into catalyst structures also provided the means for the external control of metathesis activity, as the protonation of these ligands resulted in an increased initiation rate based on their fast and irreversible dissociation from the metal center. The enhanced external control makes these catalysts applicable to a wide range of applications, some of which have been explored by us and/or through collaboration. Three of the catalysts designed showed remarkable metathesis activity in aqueous media. These catalysts displayed comparable RCM activity in aqueous media to a class of water-soluble catalysts reported by Grubbs et al., considered to be the most active catalyst for

  11. Criterion buys Akzo`s naphtha reforming catalysts business

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1993-12-08

    In a move that further consolidates the refinery catalysts market, Criterion Catalyst (Houston) has bought Akzo`s reforming business for an undisclosed price. The acquisition gives Criterion-a joint venture between Shell and American Cyanamid-roughly 35% of the $50-million/year worldwide reforming market. Akzo says it is quitting the business to focus on larger refinery catalysts applications in hydroprocessing and fluid cracking catalysts.

  12. Catalyst for converting synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels

    DOEpatents

    Coughlin, Peter K.

    1986-01-01

    The addition of an inert metal component, such as gold, silver or copper, to a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprising cobalt enables said catalyst to convert synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels at about 240.degree.-370.degree. C. with advantageously reduced selectivity of said cobalt for methane in said conversion. The catalyst composition can advantageously include a support component, such as a molecular sieve, co-catalyst/support component or a combination of such support components.

  13. Recent Development of Palladium-Supported Catalysts for Chemoselective Hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Monguchi, Yasunari; Ichikawa, Tomohiro; Sajiki, Hironao

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes practical and selective hydrogenation methodologies using heterogeneous palladium catalysts. Chemoselectivity develops dependent on the catalyst activity based on the characteristic of the supports, derived from structural components, functional groups, and/or morphologies. We especially focus on our recent development of heterogeneous palladium catalysts supported on chelate resin, ceramic, and spherically shaped activated carbon. In addition, the application of flow technology for chemoselective hydrogenation using the palladium catalysts immobilized on molecular sieves 3A and boron nitride is outlined.

  14. Tethered catalysts for the hydration of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Valdez, Carlos A; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Aines, Roger D; Wong, Sergio E; Baker, Sarah E; Lightstone, Felice C; Stolaroff, Joshuah K

    2014-11-04

    A system is provided that substantially increases the efficiency of CO.sub.2 capture and removal by positioning a catalyst within an optimal distance from the air-liquid interface. The catalyst is positioned within the layer determined to be the highest concentration of carbon dioxide. A hydrophobic tether is attached to the catalyst and the hydrophobic tether modulates the position of the catalyst within the liquid layer containing the highest concentration of carbon dioxide.

  15. Sulfur Tolerance of Carbide Catalysts Under Hydrocarbon Reforming Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    dry and steam reforming methane have been determined. In particular it has been found that these catalyst can be kept stable by either operating at...oxidation. The approach was to start with a simple hydrocarbon fuel ( methane ) and investigate catalyst stability in both dry and steam reforming and...the catalyst under dry and steam reforming conditions • Determination of the kinetics of dry methane reforming over bulk Mo2C catalysts

  16. Thief carbon catalyst for oxidation of mercury in effluent stream

    SciTech Connect

    Granite, Evan J; Pennline, Henry W

    2011-12-06

    A catalyst for the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg), in an effluent stream is presented. The catalyst facilitates removal of mercury through the oxidation of elemental Hg into mercury (II) moieties. The active component of the catalyst is partially combusted coal, or "Thief" carbon, which can be pre-treated with a halogen. An untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-promoting in the presence of an effluent gas streams entrained with a halogen.

  17. Nano Catalysts for Diesel Engine Emission Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Yang, Xiaofan; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Mullins, David R; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Wu, Zili

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop durable zeolite nanocatalysts with broader operating temperature windows to treat diesel engine emissions to enable diesel engine based equipment and vehicles to meet future regulatory requirements. A second objective was to improve hydrothermal durability of zeolite catalysts to at least 675 C. The results presented in this report show that we have successfully achieved both objectives. Since it is accepted that the first step in NO{sub x} conversion under SCR (selective catalytic reduction) conditions involves NO oxidation to NO{sub 2}, we reasoned that catalyst modification that can enhance NO oxidation at low-temperatures should facilitate NO{sub x} reduction at low temperatures. Considering that Cu-ZSM-5 is a more efficient catalyst than Fe-ZSM-5 at low-temperature, we chose to modify Cu-ZSM-5. It is important to point out that the poor low-temperature efficiency of Fe-ZSM-5 has been shown to be due to selective absorption of NH{sub 3} at low-temperatures rather than poor NO oxidation activity. In view of this, we also reasoned that an increased electron density on copper in Cu-ZSM-5 would inhibit any bonding with NH{sub 3} at low-temperatures. In addition to modified Cu-ZSM-5, we synthesized a series of new heterobimetallic zeolites, by incorporating a secondary metal cation M (Sc{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 3+}, In{sup 3+}, and La{sup 3+}) in Cu exchanged ZSM-5, zeolite-beta, and SSZ-13 zeolites under carefully controlled experimental conditions. Characterization by diffuse-reflectance ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) does not permit conclusive structural determination but supports the proposal that M{sup 3+} has been incorporated in the vicinity of Cu(II). The protocols for degreening catalysts, testing under various operating conditions, and accelerated aging

  18. Structure and function of real catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klier, K.

    1984-11-01

    This paper addresses issues such as the relation between the physical and chemical nature of active centers, activation of reactant molecules, mechanisms of catalytic reactions and distribution of promoters in real catalysts which are invariably multicomponent multiphase systems. Interactions among the catalyst components and phases often result in the formation of compounds and defects that do not exist in the separate components. Although such interactions give rise to a great variety of morphologic, chemical, and electronic properties of the real catalysts, they can be controlled, mostly by careful preparation and doping procedures, to the degree that the catalyst displays reproducible activity and selectivity. Most of the examples given in this paper are based on the results from the author's laboratory concerning the activity and selectivity of copper-based catalysts for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, the water gas shift reaction, and some reactions of amines. Evidence is presented for the interactions between the copper and zinc oxide then analyzed in terms of defect equilibria using models and constants partially known from the literature and adapted for the present system. It is shown on the basis of boundary layer theory for small particles that charge transfer between copper metal particles, also present in the system, and the zinc oxide phase is insignificant. On the other hand, electron equilibria between the solute copper species and the zinc oxide matrix are dictated primarily by intrinsic ionization Cu 0 → Cu + + e - and oxygen vacancy formation. Optical absorption spectroscopy strongly corroborates the theoretical contention that a significant portion of the copper is in electron deficient state, and there is some evidence based on Auger spectroscopy for the presence of Cu + species on the catalyst surface. It is reiterated, as has been proposed before in our earlier work, that these copper species activate substrates

  19. Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts having improved selectivity

    DOEpatents

    Miller, James G.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1989-01-01

    The promoter(s) Mn oxide or Mn oxide and Zr oxide are added to a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst combined with the molecular sieve TC-103 or TC-123 such that the resultant catalyst demonstrates improved product selectivity, stability and catalyst life. The improved selectivity is evidenced by lower methane production, higher C5+ yield and increased olefin production.

  20. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Procedures § 91.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a)(1) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress on catalyst...

  1. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Procedures § 91.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a)(1) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress on catalyst...

  2. 40 CFR 90.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress test. 90.329... Equipment Provisions § 90.329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for thermally stressing the test catalyst must be capable of maintaining a temperature of 500 ±5 °C and 1000...

  3. 40 CFR 90.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress test. 90.329... Equipment Provisions § 90.329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for thermally stressing the test catalyst must be capable of maintaining a temperature of 500 ±5 °C and 1000...

  4. Coke Accumulation on Catalysts used in a Fluidized Bed Pyrolyzer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have examined the impact of various solid catalysts on the product distribution resulting from the pyrolysis of biomass. Though catalysts do have a discernible impact, this impact is small. In our bench-top pyrolyzer designed as a catalyst screening tool, we measure bulk product distribution as...

  5. 40 CFR 91.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress test. 91.329....329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for termally stressing the test catalyst must be capable of maintaining a temperature of 500 ±5 °C and 1000 ±10 °C. (b)...

  6. 40 CFR 91.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress test. 91.329....329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for termally stressing the test catalyst must be capable of maintaining a temperature of 500 ±5 °C and 1000 ±10 °C. (b)...

  7. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Procedures § 91.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a)(1) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress on catalyst...

  8. 40 CFR 90.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress test. 90.329... Equipment Provisions § 90.329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for thermally stressing the test catalyst must be capable of maintaining a temperature of 500 ±5 °C and 1000...

  9. 40 CFR 91.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress test. 91.329....329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for termally stressing the test catalyst must be capable of maintaining a temperature of 500 ±5 °C and 1000 ±10 °C. (b)...

  10. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Procedures § 91.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a)(1) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress on catalyst...

  11. 40 CFR 91.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress test. 91.329....329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for termally stressing the test catalyst must be capable of maintaining a temperature of 500 ±5 °C and 1000 ±10 °C. (b)...

  12. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Procedures § 91.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a)(1) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress on catalyst...

  13. Hydrogenation of cottonseed oil with nickel, palladium and platinum catalysts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of commercial catalysts have been used to study hydrogenation of cottonseed oil, with the goal of minimizing trans fatty acid (TFA) content. Despite the different temperatures used, catalyst levels, and reaction times, the data from each catalyst type fall on the same curve when the TFA le...

  14. Supported metal catalysts for alcohol/sugar alcohol steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Stephen; Zhang, He; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-08-21

    Despite extensive studies on hydrogen production via steam reforming of alcohols and sugar alcohols, catalysts typically suffer a variety of issues from poor hydrogen selectivity to rapid deactivation. Here, we summarize recent advances in fundamental understanding of functionality and structure of catalysts for alcohol/sugar alcohol steam reforming, and provide perspectives on further development required to design highly efficient steam reforming catalysts.

  15. 40 CFR 90.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress test. 90.329... Equipment Provisions § 90.329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for thermally stressing the test catalyst must be capable of maintaining a temperature of 500 ±5 °C and 1000...

  16. 40 CFR 91.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Catalyst thermal stress test. 91.329....329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for termally stressing the test catalyst must be capable of maintaining a temperature of 500 ±5 °C and 1000 ±10 °C. (b)...

  17. 40 CFR 90.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Catalyst thermal stress test. 90.329... Equipment Provisions § 90.329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for thermally stressing the test catalyst must be capable of maintaining a temperature of 500 ±5 °C and 1000...

  18. Ethanol synthesis and water gas shift over bifunctional sulfide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Richards-Babb, M.

    1992-06-01

    During this quarter, the high pressure (up to 100 atm), high temperature (up to 350{degrees}C) catalyst testing system was rebuilt with clean tubing, etc. A new preparation of MoS{sub 2} catalyst was carried out, and this catalyst will be doped with alkali and tested during the next quarter of research.

  19. Attrition resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and support

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Alan H.; Oukaci, Rachid; Goodwin, James G.

    2004-05-25

    A catalyst support having improved attrition resistance and a catalyst produced therefrom. The catalyst support is produced by a method comprising the step of treating calcined .gamma.-alumina having no catalytic material added thereto with an acidic aqueous solution having an acidity level effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the calcined .gamma.-alumina.

  20. The Corrosion of PEM Fuel Cell Catalyst Supports and Its Implications for Developing Durable Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yuyan; Wang, Jun; Kou, Rong; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-01-03

    Studying the corrosion behavior of catalyst support materials is of great significance for understanding the degradation of PEM fuel cell performance and developing durable catalysts. The oxidation of Vulcan carbon black (the most widely-used catalyst support for PEM fuel cells) was investigated using various electrochemical stressing methods (fixed-potential holding vs. potential step cycling), among which the potential step cycling was considered to mimic more closely the real drive cycle operation of vehicle PEM fuel cells. The oxidation of carbon was accelerated under potential step conditions as compared with the fixed-potential holding condition. Increasing potential step frequency or decreasing the lower potential limit in the potential step can further accelerate the corrosion of carbon. The accelerated corrosion of carbon black was attributed to the cycle of consumption/regeneration of some easily oxidized species. These findings are being employed to develop a test protocol for fast screening durable catalyst support.

  1. A One-Bead-One-Catalyst Approach to Aspartic Acid-Based Oxidation Catalyst Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lichtor, Phillip A.; Miller, Scott J.

    2011-01-01

    We report an approach to the high-throughput screening of asymmetric oxidation catalysts. The strategy is based on application of the one-bead-one-compound library approach, wherein each of our catalyst candidates is based on a peptide scaffold. For this purpose we rely on a recently developed catalytic cycle that employs an acid-peracid shuttle. In order to implement our approach, we developed a compatible linker and demonstrated that the library format is amenable to screening and sequencing of catalysts employing partial Edman degradation and MALDI mass spectrometry analysis. The system was applied to the discovery (and re-discovery) of catalysts for the enantioselective oxidation of a cyclohexene derivative. The system is now poised for application to unprecedented substrate classes for asymmetric oxidation reactions. PMID:21417485

  2. Matchmaking in Catalyst-Transfer Polycondensation: Optimizing Catalysts based on Mechanistic Insight.

    PubMed

    Leone, Amanda K; McNeil, Anne J

    2016-12-20

    Catalyst-transfer polycondensation (CTP) has emerged as a useful living, chain-growth polymerization method for synthesizing conjugated (hetero)arene-based polymers with targetable molecular weights, narrow dispersities, and controllable copolymer sequences-all properties that significantly influence their performance in devices. Over the past decade, several phosphine- and carbene-ligated Ni- and Pd-based precatalysts have been shown to be effective in CTP. One current limitation is that these traditional CTP catalysts lead to nonliving, non-chain-growth behavior when complex monomer scaffolds are utilized. Because these monomers are often found in the highest-performing materials, there is a significant need to identify alternative CTP catalysts. Recent mechanistic insight into CTP has laid the foundation for designing new catalysts to expand the CTP monomer scope. Building off this insight, we have designed and implemented model systems to identify effective catalysts by understanding their underlying mechanistic behaviors and systematically modifying catalyst structures to improve their chain-growth behavior. In this Account, we describe how each catalyst parameter-the ancillary ligand(s), reactive ligand(s), and transition metal-influences CTP. As an example, ancillary ligands often dictate the turnover-limiting step of the catalytic cycle, and perhaps more importantly, they can be used to promote the formation of the key intermediate (a metal-arene associative complex) and its subsequent reactivity. The fidelity of this intermediate is central to the mechanism for the living, chain-growth polymerization. Reactive ligands, on the other hand, can be used to improve catalyst solubility and accelerate initiation. Additional advantages of the reactive ligand include providing access points for postpolymerization modification and synthesizing polymers directly off surfaces. While the most frequently used CTP catalysts contain nickel, palladium-based catalysts

  3. Fuel cells and fuel cell catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Masel, Richard I.; Rice, Cynthia A.; Waszczuk, Piotr; Wieckowski, Andrzej

    2006-11-07

    A direct organic fuel cell includes a formic acid fuel solution having between about 10% and about 95% formic acid. The formic acid is oxidized at an anode. The anode may include a Pt/Pd catalyst that promotes the direct oxidation of the formic acid via a direct reaction path that does not include formation of a CO intermediate.

  4. Transition Metal Phosphide Hydroprocessing Catalysts: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, S.; Gott, T; Zhao, H; Lee, Y

    2009-01-01

    The diminishing quality of oil feedstocks coupled with increasingly more stringent environmental regulations limiting the content of sulfur in transportation fuels have given rise to a need for improved hydroprocessing technology. This review begins with a summary of the major improvements in hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) catalysts and processes that have been reported in recent years. It then describes a new class of hydroprocessing catalysts, the transition metal phosphides, which have emerged as a promising group of high-activity, stable catalysts. The phosphides have physical properties resembling ceramics, so are strong and hard, yet retain electronic and magnetic properties similar to metals. Their crystal structures are based on trigonal prisms, yet they do not form layered structures like the sulfides. They display excellent performance in HDS and HDN, with the most active phosphide, Ni{sub 2}P, having activity surpassing that of promoted sulfides on the basis of sites titrated by chemisorption (CO for the phosphides, O{sub 2} for the sulfides). In the HDS of difficult heteroaromatics like 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene Ni{sub 2}P operates by the hydrogenation pathway, while in the HDN of substituted nitrogen compounds like 2-methylpiperidine it carries out nucleophilic substitution. The active sites for hydrogenation in Ni{sub 2}P have a square pyramidal geometry, while those for direct hydrodesulfurization have a tetrahedral geometry. Overall, Ni{sub 2}P is a promising catalyst for deep HDS in the presence of nitrogen and aromatic compounds.

  5. Catalyst. Volume 11, Number 2, Spring 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Barbara E., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Catalyst" is a publication of the U.S. Department of Education's Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Redefining Resources For Prevention; (2) Message From Kevin Jennings, OSDFS Assistant Deputy Secretary; (3) Environmental Management…

  6. Catalyst. Volume 11, Number 1, Summer 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Barbara E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Catalyst" is a publication of the U.S. Department of Education's Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Campus and Community Coalitions--Getting Organized for Prevention; (2) Message From William Modzeleski, OSDFS Acting Assistant Deputy…

  7. Catalyst. Volume 12, Number 1, Winter 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "Catalyst" is a publication of the U.S. Department of Education's Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention. This issue contains the following articles: (1) What Science Tells Us About Impaired Driving Behavior And Consequences Among U.S. College Students; (2) Message From Kevin Jennings, OSDFS Assistant…

  8. Regeneration of zinc chloride hydrocracking catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Zielke, Clyde W.

    1979-01-01

    Improved rate of recovery of zinc values from the solids which are carried over by the effluent vapors from the oxidative vapor phase regeneration of spent zinc chloride catalyst is achieved by treatment of the solids with both hydrogen chloride and calcium chloride to selectively and rapidly recover the zinc values as zinc chloride.

  9. Catalyst Activity Comparison of Alcohols over Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol transformation to transportation fuel range hydrocarbon on HZSM-5 (SiO2 / Al2O3 = 30) catalyst was studied at 360oC and 300psig. Product distributions and catalyst life were compared using methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol or 1-butanol as a feed. The catalyst life for 1-propanol and 1-butanol was more than double compared to that for methanol and ethanol. For all the alcohols studied, the product distributions (classified to paraffin, olefin, napthene, aromatic and naphthalene compounds) varied with time on stream (TOS). At 24 hours TOS, liquid product from 1-propanol and 1-butanol transformation primarily contains higher olefin compounds. The alcohol transformation process to higher hydrocarbon involves a complex set of reaction pathways such as dehydration, oligomerization, dehydrocyclization, and hydrogenation. Compared to ethylene generated from methanol and ethanol, oligomerization of propylene and butylene has a lower activation energy and can readily take place on weaker acidic sites. On the other hand, dehydrocyclization of propylene and butylene to form the cyclic compounds requires the sits with stronger acid strength. Combination of the above mentioned reasons are the primary reasons for olefin rich product generated in the later stage of the time on stream and for the extended catalyst life time for 1 propanol and 1 butanol compared to methanol and ethanol conversion over HZSM-5.

  10. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  11. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been replaced with one or more nitro groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

  12. Prealloyed catalyst for growing silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Shalek, Peter D.; Katz, Joel D.; Hurley, George F.

    1988-01-01

    A prealloyed metal catalyst is used to grow silicon carbide whiskers, especially in the .beta. form. Pretreating the metal particles to increase the weight percentages of carbon or silicon or both carbon and silicon allows whisker growth to begin immediately upon reaching growth temperature.

  13. Systematic preparation of selective heterogeneous catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.

    1991-11-07

    The Single Turnover (STO) procedure, involving pulses of hydrogen and 1-butene, was developed for studying the types of active sites present on supported metal catalysts. The STO procedure was used to study direct saturated sites and other topics. Frontier molecular orbital studies were also made.

  14. Catalyst. Volume 10, Number 3, Spring 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Barbara E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Catalyst" is a publication of the U.S. Department of Education's Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention. This issue contains the following articles: (1) The National Study of Student Hazing Initial Findings; (2) The Social Norms Marketing Research Project--An Update; (3) Message From William…

  15. Refinery catalysts: Coping with performance anxiety

    SciTech Connect

    Shelley, S.

    1994-04-01

    Petroleum refiners worldwide are struggling to comply with environmental mandates that tightly dictate the composition of gasoline and diesel fuel. At the same time, many are trying to capitalize on cost advantages offered by heavy, dirty feedstocks. This is stimulating development in catalysts for resid cracking, isomerization, alkylation and hydrotreating. The paper briefly describes development efforts.

  16. Naphthene upgrading with pillared synthetic clay catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.K.; Olson, E.S.

    1995-12-31

    Catalytic hydrotreatment of methylcyclohexane was investigated to model upgrading of coal-derived naphthenes. Nickel-substituted synthetic mica montmorillonite (NiSMM), alumina-pillared NiSMM and Zirconia-pillared NiSMM were prepared and tested for hydrocracking and hydroisomerization of methylcyclohexane. Infrared and thermal desorption studies of the pyridine-adsorbed catalysts indicated the presence of Lewis and Bronsted acid sites. Total acidity and surface area increased with pillaring of NiSMM with polyoxy aluminum and polyoxy zirconium cations. Methylcyclohexane was reacted with these catalysts under a variety of conditions. Pillared clays gave higher gas yields and higher hydrocracking but lower hydroisomerization activity than nonpillared clay. The majority of the products were branched alkanes (isoparaffinic). These catalysts effectively use hydrogen as indicated by the minimal formation of aromatic hydrocarbons, coke, or other oligomeric materials. The effect of various operating conditions, i.e., reaction temperature, contact time, H{sub 2} pressure, and catalyst, on the product distribution will be described.

  17. Catalyst. Volume 11, Number 3, Summer 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Barbara E., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Catalyst" is a publication of the U.S. Department of Education's Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention. This issue contains the following articles: (1) From Competition To Collaboration College Alcohol Prevention in an Era of Competing Risks; (2) A Public Health Approach to Mental Health…

  18. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1994-01-18

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  19. Catalysts compositions for use in fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Chuang, Steven S.C.

    2015-12-01

    The present invention generally relates to the generation of electrical energy from a solid-state fuel. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a solid-oxide fuel cell for generating electrical energy from a carbon-based fuel, and to catalysts for use in a solid-oxide fuel cell.

  20. Catalysis science of supported vanadium oxide catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wachs, Israel E

    2013-09-07

    Supported vanadium oxide catalysts contain a vanadium oxide phase deposited on a high surface area oxide support (e.g., Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2, etc.) and have found extensive applications as oxidation catalysts in the chemical, petroleum and environmental industries. This review of supported vanadium oxide catalysts focuses on the fundamental aspects of this novel class of catalytic materials (molecular structures, electronic structures, surface chemistry and structure-reactivity relationships). The molecular and electronic structures of the supported vanadium oxide phases were determined by the application of modern in situ characterization techniques (Raman, IR, UV-vis, XANES, EXAFS, solid state (51)V NMR and isotopic oxygen exchange). The characterization studies revealed that the supported vanadium oxide phase consists of two-dimensional surface vanadia sites dispersed on the oxide supports. Corresponding surface chemistry and reactivity studies demonstrated that the surface vanadia sites are the catalytic active sites for oxidation reactions by supported vanadia catalysts. Combination of characterization and reactivity studies demonstrate that the oxide support controls the redox properties of the surface vanadia sites that can be varied by as much as a factor of ~10(3).