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Sample records for 6-meter mesh reflector

  1. Passive intermodulation generation in wire mesh deployable reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Gregory M.

    1993-01-01

    Deployable reflector antennas represent a proven technology with obvious benefits for mobile satellite applications. Harris Corporation has provided deployable reflector antennas for NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). These antennas utilize a rigid, radial rib unfurlable reflector with a wire mesh surface. This type of mesh has been identified as a potential design risk for multichannel communications applications based on the potential for generation of Passive Intermodulation (PIM). These concerns are based on the existence of numerous, nonpermanent metal to metal contacts that are inherent to the mesh design. To address this issue, Harris has an ongoing IR&D program to characterize mesh PIM performance. This paper presents the results of the investigation into mesh PIM performance to date and provides background information on the design and performance of the Harris radial rib deployable reflector.

  2. Vector diffraction analysis of reflector antennas with mesh surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Lee, S.-W.

    1985-01-01

    Reflector antennas with mesh surfaces are used extensively in many satellite and ground antenna systems. A strip-aperture modeling of commonly used mesh surfaces is presented which provides considerable versatility in characterizing the mesh cells. The mesh transmission coefficients are constructed using a Floquet-modal expansion in conjuction with two dominant aperture modes. To account for the mesh local coordinates, the Eulerian angle transformation is invoked to obtain the total induced current on the curved reflector surface. General formulas are presented to show how the solid surface induced current is modified due to the transmission through the mesh. The effects of a variety of mesh configurations on both the co-polar and cross-polar patterns of reflector antennas are studied by numerically evaluating the vector diffraction integral using the Jacobi-Bessel expansion. For some special cases, a comparison is made with the results of the commonly used wire-grid formulation. Many of the numerical data are tailored to the dimensions of a conceptually designed mesh deployable offset reflector of the land mobile satellite system (LMSS).

  3. Key technologies for high-accuracy large mesh antenna reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Akira; Harada, Satoshi; Watanabe, Mitsunobu

    2003-12-01

    Nippon Telephone and Telegram Corporation (NTT) continues to develop the modular mesh-type deployable antenna. Antenna diameter can be changed from 5 m to about 20 m by changing the number of modules used with surface accuracy better than 2.4 mm RMS (including all error factors) with sufficient deployment reliability. Key technologies are the antenna's structural design, the deployment mechanism, the design tool, the analysis tool, and modularized testing/evaluation methods. This paper describes our beam steering mechanism. Tests show that it yields a beam pointing accuracy of better than 0.1°. Based on the S-band modular mesh antenna reflector, the surface accuracy degradation factors that must be considered in designing the new antenna are partially identified. The influence of modular connection errors on surface accuracy is quantitatively estimated. Our analysis tool SPADE is extended to include the addition of joint gaps. The addition of gaps allows non-linear vibration characteristics due to gapping in deployment hinges to be calculated. We intend to design a new type of mesh antenna reflector. Our new goal is an antenna for Ku or Ka band satellite communication. For this mission, the surface shape must be 5 times more accurate than is required for an S-band antenna.

  4. A Nonlinear Dynamic Model and Free Vibration Analysis of Deployable Mesh Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, H.; Yang, B.; Thomson, M.; Fang, H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic model of deployable mesh reflectors, in which geometric and material nonlinearities of such a space structure are fully described. Then, by linearization around an equilibrium configuration of the reflector structure, a linearized model is obtained. With this linearized model, the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a reflector can be computed. The nonlinear dynamic model of deployable mesh reflectors is verified by using commercial finite element software in numerical simulation. As shall be seen, the proposed nonlinear model is useful for shape (surface) control of deployable mesh reflectors under thermal loads.

  5. Exact mesh shape design of large cable-network antenna reflectors with flexible ring truss supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wang; Li, Dong-Xu; Yu, Xin-Zhan; Jiang, Jian-Ping

    2014-04-01

    An exact-designed mesh shape with favorable surface accuracy is of practical significance to the performance of large cable-network antenna reflectors. In this study, a novel design approach that could guide the generation of exact spatial parabolic mesh configurations of such reflector was proposed. By incorporating the traditional force density method with the standard finite element method, this proposed approach had taken the deformation effects of flexible ring truss supports into consideration, and searched for the desired mesh shapes that can satisfy the requirement that all the free nodes are exactly located on the objective paraboloid. Compared with the conventional design method, a remarkable improvement of surface accuracy in the obtained mesh shapes had been demonstrated by numerical examples. The present work would provide a helpful technical reference for the mesh shape design of such cable-network antenna reflector in engineering practice. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Development of improved analytical models for mesh reflector surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, J. C.; Kauffman, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    Several methods for computing the reflection coefficients from mesh surfaces are discussed. Some methods mentioned have severe limitations, and the spectral approach appears to be the most attractive alternative. In spite of some inherent problems, the solutions obtained with this method will offer not only the reflection coefficients but also the currents carried on the mesh. This would allow separation of the power lost to resistive terms from that due to transmission loss. Overall, good results and rapid convergence should be obtained from this method when proper care is applied.

  7. Temperature Knowledge and Model Correlation for the Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Reflector Mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikhaylov, Rebecca; Dawson, Douglas; Kwack, Eug

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Earth observing Soil Moisture Active & Passive (SMAP) Mission is scheduled to launch in November 2014 into a 685 km near-polar, sun synchronous orbit. SMAP will provide comprehensive global mapping measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state in order to enhance understanding of the processes that link the water, energy, and carbon cycles. The primary objectives of SMAP are to improve worldwide weather and flood forecasting, enhance climate prediction, and refine drought and agriculture monitoring during its 3 year mission. The SMAP instrument architecture incorporates an L-band radar and an L-band radiometer which share a common feed horn and parabolic mesh reflector. The instrument rotates about the nadir axis at approximately 15 rpm, thereby providing a conically scanning wide swath antenna beam that is capable of achieving global coverage within 3 days. In order to make the necessary precise surface emission measurements from space, a temperature knowledge of 60 deg C for the mesh reflector is required. In order to show compliance, a thermal vacuum test was conducted using a portable solar simulator to illuminate a non flight, but flight-like test article through the quartz window of the vacuum chamber. The molybdenum wire of the antenna mesh is too fine to accommodate thermal sensors for direct temperature measurements. Instead, the mesh temperature was inferred from resistance measurements made during the test. The test article was rotated to five separate angles between 10 deg and 90 deg via chamber breaks to simulate the maximum expected on-orbit solar loading during the mission. The resistance measurements were converted to temperature via a resistance versus temperature calibration plot that was constructed from data collected in a separate calibration test. A simple thermal model of two different representations of the mesh (plate and torus) was created to correlate the mesh temperature predictions to within 60 deg C. The on-orbit mesh

  8. Feedback shape control for deployable mesh reflectors using gain scheduling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangmin; Shi, Hang; Alleyne, Andrew; Yang, Bingen

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study on the dynamic shape control problem of deployable mesh reflectors (DMRs) via feedback approaches. The reflector structure is simplified from a nonlinear model to be quasi-static with respect to temperature variations but dynamic with respect to mechanical vibrations. The orbital cycle is segmented into multiple temperature zones, and an H∞ robust state feedback controller is designed for each zone to guarantee the local stability of the system under the model uncertainty caused by thermal effects and to reject external force disturbances. At the same time, gain scheduling control method is adopted to compensate thermal distortions and to ensure smooth transition response when switching among the local robust controllers. A DMR model is considered in the case study to show the effectiveness of the control approach. The structural vibrations caused by external force disturbances can be sufficiently suppressed in a much shorter time. The closed loop response of the DMR structure shows that much higher surface accuracy is obtained during the orbiting mission compared to the open-loop configuration, and transient focal length and transient de-focus of the reflector are well controlled within the satisfactory bounds, demonstrating the numerical feasibility of the proposed method to solve the dynamic shape control problem of DMRs.

  9. The integration of a mesh reflector to a 15-foot box truss structure. Task 3: Box truss analysis and technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachtell, E. E.; Thiemet, W. F.; Morosow, G.

    1987-01-01

    To demonstrate the design and integration of a reflective mesh surface to a deployable truss structure, a mesh reflector was installed on a 15 foot box truss cube. The specific features demonstrated include: (1) sewing seams in reflective mesh; (2) mesh stretching to desired preload; (3) installation of surface tie cords; (4) installation of reflective surface on truss; (5) setting of reflective surface; (6) verification of surface shape/accuracy; (7) storage and deployment; (8) repeatability of reflector surface; and (9) comparison of surface with predicted shape using analytical methods developed under a previous task.

  10. Effective conductivity of wire mesh reflectors for space deployable antenna systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, William A.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes efforts to characterize the measurement of conductive mesh and smooth surfaces using proximity measurements for a dielectric resonator. The resonator operates in the HEM11 mode and is shown to have an evanescent field behavior in the vicinity of the sample surface, raising some question to the validity of measurements requiring near normal incidence on the material. In addition, the slow radial field decay outside of the dielectric resonator validates the sensitivity to the planar supporting structure and potential radiation effects. Though these concerns become apparent along with the sensitivity to the gap between the dielectric and the material surface, the basic concept of the material measurement using dielectric resonators has been verified for useful comparison of material surface properties. The properties, particularly loss, may be obtained by monitoring the resonant frequency along with the resonator quality factor (Q), 3 dB bandwidth, or the midband transmission amplitude. Comparison must be made to known materials to extract the desired data.

  11. COCHISE: a 2.6 meter millimetric telescope at Concordia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbatini, L.; Dall'Oglio, G.; Pizzo, L.; Miriametro, A.; Cavaliere, F.

    COCHISE is a 2.6 meter millimetric telescope, mainly devoted to cosmological observations, located at Concordia. In this paper we report on the installation phases and preliminary operations performed with this instrument. At present, COCHISE is the largest telescope located at Concordia, for that reason it represents a pathfinder for future telescopes.

  12. Improvement of a Shape Accuracy Considering the Characteristics of Cable Network Systems for Large Mesh Antenna Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Satoshi; Meguro, Akira; Ueba, Masazumi

    This paper addressed cable network configurations to improve surface accuracies for large mesh antennas. In this study, we focused on manufacturing error, assembling error, and sensitivity to displacements of support points. To facilitate accuracy management by the lengths of cables, high stiffness cables were used in surface cable network. Then, low stiffness cables were used in other cables. The effect of the lengths of errors was estimated by analysis and experiments for a test model. Micro-gravity test was also executed to estimate the accuracy of shape adjustment on ground. The sensitivity is calculated under some variations of cable stiffness. From the results, it is clarified that the proposed configuration can reduce the surface distortion and keep high surface accuracy.

  13. Photogrammetry measurement of the AMiBA 6-meter platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yau De; Raffin, Philippe; Chen, Ming-Tang; Altamirano, Pablo; Oshiro, Peter

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the photogrammetry method as a mean to measure the deformation of the 6-meter carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) Platform of the AMiBA interferometric array telescope installed at the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii. The Platform was surveyed at a series of elevation, azimuth and polarization angles. Photogrammetry demonstrates that the deformation of the Platform is not only gravity-induced but also due to the Hexapod mount actuator. The measurement results verify the predictions of the Finite Element Analysis (FEA).

  14. Membrane Shell Reflector Segment Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Im, Eastwood; Lin, John; Moore, James

    2012-01-01

    The mesh reflector is the only type of large, in-space deployable antenna that has successfully flown in space. However, state-of-the-art large deployable mesh antenna systems are RF-frequency-limited by both global shape accuracy and local surface quality. The limitations of mesh reflectors stem from two factors. First, at higher frequencies, the porosity and surface roughness of the mesh results in loss and scattering of the signal. Second, the mesh material does not have any bending stiffness and thus cannot be formed into true parabolic (or other desired) shapes. To advance the deployable reflector technology at high RF frequencies from the current state-of-the-art, significant improvements need to be made in three major aspects: a high-stability and highprecision deployable truss; a continuously curved RF reflecting surface (the function of the surface as well as its first derivative are both continuous); and the RF reflecting surface should be made of a continuous material. To meet these three requirements, the Membrane Shell Reflector Segment (MSRS) antenna was developed.

  15. Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, M.; Kulke, B. )

    1992-06-01

    A Bragg reflector composed of periodic cylindrically symmetric corrugations can provide a reflection of nearly unity through the principles of constructive interference, allowing the formation of a frequency selective resonator. Mode conversion will occur, but can be reduced by tapering the amplitude of the corrugations. In this paper reflection measurements are compared with theoretical predictions for untapered sinusoidal and rectangular corrugation as well as a reflector tapered according to the Hamming-window prescription. Measurements of Bragg resonators are also presented.

  16. Actuator Grouping Optimization on Flexible Space Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Jeffrey R.; Wang, K. W.; Fang, Houfei; Quijano, Ubaldo

    2011-01-01

    With the rapid advances in deployable membrane and mesh antenna technologies, the feasibility of developing large, lightweight reflectors has greatly improved. In order to achieve the required surface accuracy, precision surface control is needed on these lightweight reflectors. For this study, an analytical model is shown which combines a flexible Kapton reflector with Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) actuators for surface control. Surface errors are introduced that are similar to real world scenarios, and a least squares control algorithm is developed for surface control. Experimental results on a 2.4 meter reflector show that while the analytical reflector model is generally correct, due to idiosyncrasies in the reflector it cannot be used for online control. A new method called the En Mass Elimination algorithm is used to determine the optimal grouping of actuators when the number of actuators in the system exceeds the number of power supplies available.

  17. Development of Control Softwares for the SRAO 6-Meter Telescope Based on PCs Running Linux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Do-Young; Yun, Young-Zoo

    2002-12-01

    We have developed a control system for the Seoul Radio AstronomyObservatory (SRAO) 6-meter telescope operating in the 85 115 GHzfrequency range. Four PCs running the Linux operating system control sourcetracking, take data, execute observations and handle userinterface.The control system utilizes a modular and multiprocessingstructure to facilitate easy upgrading and troubleshooting.Communication between the processes relies on the interprocesscommunication (IPC) resources on Linux such as shared memory,message queues, and TCP/IP sockets. Communication between PCs is made via an Ethernet link. We also use digital I/O lines for some status signals whichrequire a short delay.The control system supports scheduling observations, updatesobservation logs automatically and also supports graphical userinterfaces. These all makes the operation easy.By using a commercially available motion control card with anembedded microcomputer for antenna control, we achieved atracking accuracy to better than 1 arcsec.

  18. Progress on the 1.6-meter New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, C.; Goode, P. R.; Ren, D.; Saadeghvaziri, M. A.; Verdoni, A. P.; Wang, H.; Yang, G.; Abramenko, V.; Cao, W.; Coulter, R.; Fear, R.; Nenow, J.; Shoumko, S.; Spirock, T. J.; Varsik, J. R.; Chae, J.; Kuhn, J. R.; Moon, Y.; Park, Y. D.; Tritschler, A.

    2006-06-01

    The New Solar Telescope (NST) project at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) now has all major contracts for design and fabrication in place and construction of components is well underway. NST is a collaboration between BBSO, the Korean Astronomical Observatory (KAO) and Institute for Astronomy (IfA) at the University of Hawaii. The project will install a 1.6-meter, off-axis telescope at BBSO, replacing a number of older solar telescopes. The NST will be located in a recently refurbished dome on the BBSO causeway, which projects 300 meters into the Big Bear Lake. Recent site surveys have confirmed that BBSO is one of the premier solar observing sites in the world. NST will be uniquely equipped to take advantage of the long periods of excellent seeing common at the lake site. An up-to-date progress report will be presented including an overview of the project and details on the current state of the design. The report provides a detailed description of the optical design, the thermal control of the new dome, the optical support structure, the telescope control systems, active and adaptive optics systems, and the post-focus instrumentation for high-resolution spectro-polarimetry.

  19. Automatic Mesh Coarsening for Discrete Ordinates Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Scott A.

    1999-03-11

    This paper describes the use of a ''mesh potential'' function for automatic coarsening of meshes in discrete ordinates neutral particle transport codes. For many transport calculations, a user may find it helpful to have the code determine a ''good'' neutronics mesh. The complexity of a problem involving millions of mesh cells, dozens of materials, and many energy groups makes it difficult to determine an adequate level of mesh refinement with a minimum number of cells. A method has been implemented in PARTISN (Parallel Time-dependent SN) to calculate a ''mesh potential'' in each original cell of a problem, and use this information to determine the maximum coarseness allowed in the mesh while maintaining accuracy in the solution. Results are presented for a simple x-y-z fuel/control/reflector problem.

  20. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, Ronald J.; Land, John T.; Misvel, Michael C.

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

  1. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.; Misvel, M.C.

    1994-06-07

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled. 12 figs.

  2. Surgical Mesh

    MedlinePlus

    ... Device Safety Safety Communications Surgical Mesh: FDA Safety Communication Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Prolapse and Stress Urinary Incontinence More in Safety Communications Information About Heparin Preventing Tubing and Luer Misconnections ...

  3. Beam-Steerable Flat-Panel Reflector Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choon Sae; Lee, Chanam; Miranda, Felix A.

    2005-01-01

    Many space applications require a high-gain antenna that can be easily deployable in space. Currently, the most common high-gain antenna for space-born applications is an umbrella-type reflector antenna that can be folded while being lifted to the Earth orbit. There have been a number of issues to be resolved for this type of antenna. The reflecting surface of a fine wire mesh has to be light in weight and flexible while opening up once in orbit. Also the mesh must be a good conductor at the operating frequency. In this paper, we propose a different type of high-gain antenna for easy space deployment. The proposed antenna is similar to reflector antennas except the curved main reflector is replaced by a flat reconfigurable surface for easy packing and deployment in space. Moreover it is possible to steer the beam without moving the entire antenna system.

  4. Astigmatism in reflector antennas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogdell, J. R.; Davis, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    Astigmatic phase error in large parabolic reflector antennas is discussed. A procedure for focusing an antenna and diagnosing the presence and degree of astigmatism is described. Theoretical analysis is conducted to determine the nature of this error in such antennas.

  5. Buckling tests of two 4.6-meter-diameter, magnesium ring-stiffened conical shells loaded under external pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. K.; DAVIS R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Two ring-stiffened magnesium conical shells with a 120 deg apex angle and a 4.6-meter diameter were loaded to failure by a uniform external pressure. The cones differed from one another only in the number of internal stiffening rings. Test specimen details, test procedure, and test results are discussed. Both buckling and prebuckling data are compared with appropriate theoretical predictions. Measured strains in skin and rings agreed well with theoretical predictions. Extensive imperfection measurements were made and reported on both cones in the as fabricated condition.

  6. Solar Thermal Vacuum Test of Deployable Astromesh Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegman, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    On September 10, 2008, a 36-hour Solar Thermal Vacuum Test of a 5m deployable mesh reflector was completed in JPL's 25' Space Simulator by the Advanced Deployable Structures Group at JPL. The testing was performed under NASA's Innovative Partnership Program (IPP) as a risk reduction effort for two JPL Decadal Survey Missions: DESDynI and SMAP. The 5.0 m aperture Astromesh reflector was provided by Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) Astro Aerospace, our IPP industry partner. The testing utilized a state-of-the-art photogrammetry system to measure deformation of the reflector under LN2 cold soak, 0.25 Earth sun, 0.5 sun and 1.0 sun. An intricate network of thermocouples (approximately 200 in total) was used to determine the localized temperature across the mesh as well as on the perimeter truss of the reflector. Half of the reflector was in a fixed shadow to maximize thermal gradients. A mobility system was built for remotely actuating the cryo-vacuum capable photogrammetry camera around the circumference of the Solar Simulator. Photogrammetric resolution of 0.025 mm RMS (0.001") was achieved over the entire 5 meter aperture for each test case. The data will be used for thermo-elastic model correlation and validation, which will benefit the planned Earth Science Missions.

  7. Deployable Reflector for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Unfoldable-membrane-reflector concept leads to mobile photovoltaic generators. Hinged containers swing open for deployment, and counterbalance beam swings into position. Folded reflector membranes are unfolded as deployment mast is extended, until stretched out flat.

  8. Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph of the 1.6 Meter New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Jongchul; Park, Hyung-Min; Ahn, Kwangsu; Yang, Heesu; Park, Young-Deuk; Nah, Jakyoung; Jang, Bi Ho; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Cao, Wenda; Goode, Philip R.

    2013-11-01

    For high resolution spectral observations of the Sun - particularly its chromosphere, we have developed a dual-band echelle spectrograph named Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph (FISS), and installed it in a vertical optical table in the Coudé Lab of the 1.6 meter New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory. This instrument can cover any part of the visible and near-infrared spectrum, but it usually records the Hα band and the Ca ii 8542 Å band simultaneously using two CCD cameras, producing data well suited for the study of the structure and dynamics of the chromosphere and filaments/prominences. The instrument does imaging of high quality using a fast scan of the slit across the field of view with the aid of adaptive optics. We describe its design, specifics, and performance as well as data processing

  9. Modular reflector concept study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of space erecting a 100 meter paraboloidal radio frequency reflector by joining a number of individually deployed structural modules. Three module design concepts were considered: (1) the deployable cell module (DCM); (2) the modular paraboloidal erectable truss antenna (Mod-PETA); and (3) the modular erectable truss antenna (META). With the space shuttle (STS) as the launch system, the methodology of packaging and stowing in the orbiter, and of dispensing, deploying and joining, in orbit, were studied and the necessary support equipment identified. The structural performance of the completed reflectors was evaluated and their overall operational capability and feasibility were evaluated and compared. The potential of the three concepts to maintain stable shape in the space environment was determined. Their ability to operate at radio frequencies of 1 GHz and higher was assessed assuming the reflector surface to consist of a number of flat, hexagonal facets. A parametric study was performed to determine figure degradation as a function of reflector size, flat facet size, and f/D ratio.

  10. The Corner Reflector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Whitney S., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the corner reflector array left on the moon by the July 1969 Apollo astronauts is described. The array was used to reflect earth-originating laser beams back to earth, and yielded a more accurate determination (to within six inches) of distance from the earth to the moon. (MP)

  11. Corrosion protection for silver reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Arendt, Paul N.; Scott, Marion L.

    1991-12-31

    A method of protecting silver reflectors from damage caused by contact with gaseous substances which are often present in the atmosphere and a silver reflector which is so protected. The inventive method comprises at least partially coating a reflector with a metal oxide such as aluminum oxide to a thickness of 15 .ANG. or less.

  12. MeshKit

    2010-10-05

    MeshKit is an open-source library of mesh generation functionality. MeshKit has general mesh manipulation and generation functions such as Copoy, Move, Rotate and Extrude mesh. In addition, new quad mesh and embedded boundary Cartesian mesh algorithm (EB Mesh) are included. Interfaces to several public domain meshing algorithms (TetGen, netgen, triangle, Gmsh, camal) are also offered. This library interacts with mesh data mostly through iMesh including accessing the mesh in parallel. It also can interact withmore » iGeom interface to provide geometry functionality such as importing solid model based geometries. iGeom and IMesh are implemented in the CGM and MOAB packages, respectively. For some non-existing function in iMesh such as tree-construction and ray-tracing, MeshKit also interacts with MOAB functions directly.« less

  13. MeshKit

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-05

    MeshKit is an open-source library of mesh generation functionality. MeshKit has general mesh manipulation and generation functions such as Copoy, Move, Rotate and Extrude mesh. In addition, new quad mesh and embedded boundary Cartesian mesh algorithm (EB Mesh) are included. Interfaces to several public domain meshing algorithms (TetGen, netgen, triangle, Gmsh, camal) are also offered. This library interacts with mesh data mostly through iMesh including accessing the mesh in parallel. It also can interact with iGeom interface to provide geometry functionality such as importing solid model based geometries. iGeom and IMesh are implemented in the CGM and MOAB packages, respectively. For some non-existing function in iMesh such as tree-construction and ray-tracing, MeshKit also interacts with MOAB functions directly.

  14. Rim loaded reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucci, O. M.; Franceschetti, G.

    1980-05-01

    A general theory of reflector antennas loaded by surface impedances is presented. Spatial variation of primary illumination is taken into account using a generalized slope diffraction coefficient. The theory is experimentally checked on surface loaded square plate scatterers and then used for computing the radiation diagram of parabolic and hyperbolic dishes. Computer programs and computed diagrams refer to the case of focal illumination and negligible tapering of primary illumination.

  15. Determination of Electromagnetic Properties of Mesh Material Using Advanced Radiometer Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, R. F.; Blume, H. J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The need for a large diameter deployable antenna to map soil moisture with a 10 kilometer or better resolution using a microwave radiometer is discussed. A 6 meter deployable antenna is also needed to map sea surface temperature on the Navy Remote Ocean Sensor System (NROSS). Both of these deployable antennas require a mesh membrane material as the reflecting surface. The determination of the electromagnetic properties of mesh materials is a difficult problem. The Antenna and Microwave Research Branch (AMRB) of Langley Research Center was asked to measure the material to be used on MROSS by NRL. A cooperative program was initiated to measure this mesh material using two advanced radiometer techniques.

  16. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Roger

    2014-12-17

    The main project objective has been to develop an advanced gravity sag method for molding large glass solar reflectors with either line or point focus, and with long or short focal length. The method involves taking standard sized squares of glass, 1.65 m x 1.65 m, and shaping them by gravity sag into precision steel molds. The method is designed for high volume manufacture when incorporated into a production line with separate pre-heating and cooling. The performance objectives for the self-supporting glass mirrors made by this project include mirror optical accuracy of 2 mrad root mean square (RMS), requiring surface slope errors <1 mrad rms, a target not met by current production of solar reflectors. Our objective also included development of new methods for rapidly shaping glass mirrors and coating them for higher reflectivity and soil resistance. Reflectivity of 95% for a glass mirror with anti-soil coating was targeted, compared to the present ~94% with no anti-soil coating. Our mirror cost objective is ~$20/m2 in 2020, a significant reduction compared to the present ~$35/m2 for solar trough mirrors produced for trough solar plants. During the first year a custom batch furnace was built to develop the method with high power radiative heating to simulate transfer of glass into a hot slumping zone in a production line. To preserve the original high polish of the float glass on both front and back surfaces, as required for a second surface mirror, the mold surface is machined to the required shape as grooves which intersect the glass at cusps, reducing the mold contact area to significantly less than 1%. The mold surface is gold-plated to reflect thermal radiation. Optical metrology of glass replicas made with the system has been carried out with a novel, custom-built test system. This test provides collimated, vertically-oriented parallel beams from a linear array of co-aligned lasers translated in a perpendicular direction across the reflector. Deviations of

  17. Reflector antennas for ultrawideband usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, P. R.

    1993-01-01

    The provision of high gain antennas for ultrawideband systems is limited not only by the electromagnetic problems but also by the mechanical aspects such as the volume required. Single antenna elements such as TEM horns can provide gains of 20.0 dBi at the highest operating frequencies but any additional gain requires the use of other techniques. The simplest techniques are to use an array of elements or to use a reflector antenna. This paper deals with the design of reflector antennas. The transforming effect of the reflector surface is such that a constant aperture feed results in a constant gain reflector while a constant gain feed results in a constant aperture reflector. However this elegant postulate is somewhat degraded in practice by the presence of blockage, spillover and diffraction from the rim in a reflector antenna.

  18. Spherical geodesic mesh generation

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Jimmy; Kenamond, Mark Andrew; Burton, Donald E.; Shashkov, Mikhail Jurievich

    2015-02-27

    In ALE simulations with moving meshes, mesh topology has a direct influence on feature representation and code robustness. In three-dimensional simulations, modeling spherical volumes and features is particularly challenging for a hydrodynamics code. Calculations on traditional spherical meshes (such as spin meshes) often lead to errors and symmetry breaking. Although the underlying differencing scheme may be modified to rectify this, the differencing scheme may not be accessible. This work documents the use of spherical geodesic meshes to mitigate solution-mesh coupling. These meshes are generated notionally by connecting geodesic surface meshes to produce triangular-prismatic volume meshes. This mesh topology is fundamentally different from traditional mesh topologies and displays superior qualities such as topological symmetry. This work describes the geodesic mesh topology as well as motivating demonstrations with the FLAG hydrocode.

  19. The Planck Telescope reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stute, Thomas

    2004-09-01

    The mechanical division of EADS-Astrium GmbH, Friedrichshafen is currently engaged with the development, manufacturing and testing of the advanced dimensionally stable composite reflectors for the ESA satellite borne telescope Planck. The objective of the ESA mission Planck is to analyse the first light that filled the universe, the cosmic microwave background radiation. Under contract of the Danish Space Research Institute and ESA EADS-Astrium GmbH is developing the all CFRP primary and secondary reflectors for the 1.5-metre telescope which is the main instrument of the Planck satellite. The operational frequency ranges from to 25 GHz to 1000 GHz. The demanding high contour accuracy and surface roughness requirements are met. The design provides the extreme dimensional stability required by the cryogenic operational environment at around 40 K. The elliptical off-axis reflectors display a classical lightweight sandwich design with CFRP core and facesheets. Isostatic mounts provide the interfaces to the telescope structure. Protected VDA provides the reflecting surface. The manufacturing is performed at the Friedrichshafen premises of EADS-Space Transportation GmbH, the former Dornier composite workshops. Advanced manufacturing technologies like true angle lay-up by CNC fibre placement and filament winding are utilized. The protected coating is applied at the CAHA facilities at the Calar Alto Observatory, Spain. The exhaustive environmental testing is performed at the facilities of IABG, Munich (mechanical testing) and for the cryo-optical tests at CSL Liege. The project is in advanced state with both Qualification Models being under environmental testing. The flight models will be delivered in 2004. The paper gives an overview over the requirements and the main structural features how these requirements are met. Special production aspects and available test results are reported.

  20. Lightweight composite reflector panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeland, R. E.; Mcelroy, P. M.

    1988-01-01

    The Hexel Corp. has produced additional composite panels, based on JPL designs, that: (1) have increased the panel size from 0.15 to 0.40 meters, (2) have improved the as-manufactured surface precision 3.0 to approx. 1.0 micron RMS, (3) have utilized different numbers of face sheet plys, (4) have improved face sheet fiber orientation, (5) have variations of aluminum honeycomb core cell size, (6) have combined graphite/epoxy (Gr/Ep) face sheets with E-glass honeycomb cores, and (7) have used standard aluminum core with face sheets composed of combinations of glass, Kevlar, and carbon fibers. Additionally, JPL has identified candidate alternate materials for the facesheets and core, modified the baseline polymer panel matrix material, and developed new concepts for panel composite cores. Dornier designed and fabricated three 0.6 meter Gr/Ep panels, that were evaluated by JPL. Results of both the Hexel and Dornier panel work were used to characterize the state-of-the-art for Gr/Ep mirrors.

  1. Environmental Degradation of Solar Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    Report presents results of study of atmospheric degradation of large solar reflectors for power generators. Three general types of reflective surfaces investigated. Report also describes computer buildup and removal (by rain and dew) of contamination from reflectors. Data used to determine effects of soil buildup and best method and frequency of washing at various geographic locations.

  2. Freeform reflectors for architectural lighting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ruidong; Hong, Qi; Zhang, Hongxia; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2015-12-14

    We propose an improved method to design freeform reflectors for architectural lighting: one for accent lighting and another for large area wall washing. The designed freeform reflectors effectively distribute light fluxes over the target surfaces, and generate appropriate illumination patterns for comfortable visual environments, which provides greater flexibility for lighting designs, allows many challenging designs, and improves energy-efficiency simultaneously. PMID:26698974

  3. Making Curved Frequency-Selective Microwave Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Wu, Te-Kao

    1995-01-01

    Prototype curved lightweight dichroic microwave reflectors designed to be highly reflective in X and K(suba) frequency bands and highly transmissive in K(subu) and S bands. Conductive grid elements formed photolithographically on curved reflector surfaces. Intended for use as subreflectors of main paraboloidal antenna reflector to enable simultaneous operation in both prime-focus configuration in K(subu) and S bands and Cassegrain configuration in X and K(suba) bands. Basic concepts of reflectors described in "Frequency-Selective Microwave Reflectors" (NPO-18701). "Double Square-Loop Dichroic Microwave Reflector" (NPO-18676), "Triband Circular-Loop Dichroic Microwave Reflector" (NPO-18714), and "Improved Dichroic Microwave Reflector" (NPO-18664).

  4. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alff, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility and costs were determined for a 1 m to 30 m diameter ambient temperature, infrared to submillimeter orbiting astronomical telescope which is to be shuttle-deployed, free-flying, and have a 10 year orbital life. Baseline concepts, constraints on delivery and deployment, and the sunshield required are examined. Reflector concepts, the optical configuration, alignment and pointing, and materials are also discussed. Technology studies show that a 10 m to 30 m diameter system which is background and diffraction limited at 30 micron m is feasible within the stated time frame. A 10 m system is feasible with current mirror technology, while a 30 m system requires technology still in development.

  5. Reflector Surface Error Compensation in Dual-Reflector Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Imbriale, William

    2010-01-01

    By probing the field on a small subreflector at a minimal number of points, the main reflector surface errors can be obtained and subsequently used to design a phase-correction subreflector that can compensate for main reflector errors. The compensating phase-error profile across the subreflector can be achieved either by a surface deformation or by the use of an array of elements such as patch antennas that can cause a phase shift between the incoming and outgoing fields. The second option is of primary interest here, but the methodology can be applied to either case. The patch array is most easily implemented on a planar surface. Therefore, the example of a flat subreflector and a parabolic main reflector (a Newtonian dual reflector system) is considered in this work. The subreflector is assumed to be a reflector array covered with patch elements. The phase variation on a subreflector can be detected by a small number of receiving patch elements (probes). By probing the phase change at these few selected positions on the subreflector, the phase error over the entire surface can be recovered and used to change the phase of all the patch elements covering the subreflector plane to compensate for main reflector errors. This is accomplished by using a version of sampling theorem on the circular aperture. The sampling is performed on the phase-error function on the circular aperture of the main reflector by a method developed using Zernike polynomials. This method is based upon and extended from a theory previously proposed and applied to reflector aperture integration. This sampling method provides for an exact retrieval of the coefficients of up to certain orders in the expansion of the phase function, from values on a specifically calculated set of points in radial and azimuthal directions in the polar coordinate system, on the circular reflector aperture. The corresponding points on the subreflector are then obtained and, by probing the fields at these points, a

  6. Mesh Quality Improvement Toolkit

    2002-11-15

    MESQUITE is a linkable software library to be used by simulation and mesh generation tools to improve the quality of meshes. Mesh quality is improved by node movement and/or local topological modifications. Various aspects of mesh quality such as smoothness, element shape, size, and orientation are controlled by choosing the appropriate mesh qualtiy metric, and objective function tempate, and a numerical optimization solver to optimize the quality of meshes, MESQUITE uses the TSTT mesh interfacemore » specification to provide an interoperable toolkit that can be used by applications which adopt the standard. A flexible code design makes it easy for meshing researchers to add additional mesh quality metrics, templates, and solvers to develop new quality improvement algorithms by making use of the MESQUITE infrastructure.« less

  7. SEISMIC-REFLECTOR DATABASE SOFTWARE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Evelyn L.; Hosom, John-Paul

    1986-01-01

    The seismic data analysis (SDA) software system facilitates generation of marine seismic reflector databases composed of reflector depths, travel times, root-mean-square and interval velocities, geographic coordinates, and identifying information. System processes include digitizing of seismic profiles and velocity semblance curves, merging of velocity and navigation data with profile travel-time data, calculation of reflector depths in meters, profile and map graphic displays, data editing and smoothing, and entry of finalized data into a comprehensive database. An overview of concepts, file structures, and programs is presented.

  8. Hexahedral Mesh Untangling

    SciTech Connect

    KNUPP,PATRICK

    2000-12-13

    We investigate a well-motivated mesh untangling objective function whose optimization automatically produces non-inverted elements when possible. Examples show the procedure is highly effective on simplicial meshes and on non-simplicial (e.g., hexahedral) meshes constructed via mapping or sweeping algorithms. The current whisker-weaving (WW) algorithm in CUBIT usually produces hexahedral meshes that are unsuitable for analyses due to inverted elements. The majority of these meshes cannot be untangled using the new objective function. The most likely source of the difficulty is poor mesh topology.

  9. First light of the 1.6 meter off-axis New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenda; Gorceix, Nicolas; Coulter, Roy; Coulter, Aaron; Goode, Philip R.

    2010-07-01

    New Jersey Institute of Technology, in collaboration with the University of Hawaii and the Korea Astronomy & Space Science Institute, has successfully developed and installed a 1.6 m clear aperture, off-axis New Solar Telescope (NST) at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. The NST will be the largest aperture solar telescope in the world until the 4 m Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) and 4 m European Solar Telescope (EST) begin operation in the next decade. Meanwhile, the NST will be the largest off-axis telescope before the 8.4 m segmented Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) comes on-line. The NST is configured as an off-axis Gregorian system consisting of a parabolic primary, prime focus field stop and heat reflector, elliptical secondary and diagonal flats. The primary mirror is made of Zerodur from Schott and figured to a final residual error of 16 nm rms by Steward Observatory Mirror Lab. The final focal ratio is f/52. The 180 circular opening in the field stop defines the maximal square field-of-view. The working wavelength range will cover 0.4 to 1.7 μm in the Coud´e Lab two floors beneath the telescope, and all wavelengths including far infrared at the Nasmyth focus on an optical bench attached to the side of the telescope structure. First-light scientific observations have been attained at the Nasmyth focus and in the Coud´e Lab. This paper presents a detailed description of installation and alignment of the NST. First-light observational results are also shown to demonstrate the validity of the NST optical alignment.

  10. Reflectors for SAR performance testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  11. Mesh Excision: Is Total Mesh Excision Necessary?

    PubMed

    Wolff, Gillian F; Winters, J Christian; Krlin, Ryan M

    2016-04-01

    Nearly 29% of women will undergo a secondary, repeat operation for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) symptom recurrence following a primary repair, as reported by Abbott et al. (Am J Obstet Gynecol 210:163.e1-163.e1, 2014). In efforts to decrease the rates of failure, graft materials have been utilized to augment transvaginal repairs. Following the success of using polypropylene mesh (PPM) for stress urinary incontinence (SUI), the use of PPM in the transvaginal repair of POP increased. However, in recent years, significant concerns have been raised about the safety of PPM mesh. Complications, some specific to mesh, such as exposures, erosion, dyspareunia, and pelvic pain, have been reported with increased frequency. In the current literature, there is not substantive evidence to suggest that PPM has intrinsic properties that warrant total mesh removal in the absence of complications. There are a number of complications that can occur after transvaginal mesh placement that do warrant surgical intervention after failure of conservative therapy. In aggregate, there are no high-quality controlled studies that clearly demonstrate that total mesh removal is consistently more likely to achieve pain reduction. In the cases of obstruction and erosion, it seems clear that definitive removal of the offending mesh is associated with resolution of symptoms in the majority of cases and reasonable practice. There are a number of complications that can occur with removal of mesh, and patients should be informed of this as they formulate a choice of treatment. We will review these considerations as we examine the clinical question of whether total versus partial removal of mesh is necessary for the resolution of complications following transvaginal mesh placement. PMID:26905696

  12. Compact Mesh Generator

    2007-02-02

    The CMG is a small, lightweight, structured mesh generation code. It features a simple text input parser that allows setup of various meshes via a small set of text commands. Mesh generation data can be output to text, the silo file format, or the API can be directly queried by applications. It can run serially or in parallel via MPI. The CMG includes the ability to specify varius initial conditions on a mesh via meshmore » tags.« less

  13. Meshes: The next generation

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.; Hardin, D.; Compton, J.; Zosel, M.

    1994-08-29

    Building complex meshes for large-scale numerical simulations presents immense difficulties in exploiting high-performance computers. Industry and research leaders will describe the current state of the art for generating meshes for such large scientific problems. This will be followed by a panel and general audience discussion of the algorithmic and architectural issues surrounding the generation of meshes with10{sup 7} to 10{sup 9} grid points. (Note: The terms ``mesh`` and ``grid`` are used interchangeably in the literature.)

  14. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Page, Erik; Gould, Carl T.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope.

  15. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, M.J.; Page, E.; Gould, C.T.

    1998-09-08

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope. 5 figs.

  16. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Page, Erik; Gould, Carl T.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope.

  17. Initial global 2-D shielding analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source core and reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Bucholz, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    This document describes the initial global 2-D shielding analyses for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor, the D{sub 2}O reflector, the reflector vessel, and the first 200 mm of light water beyond the reflector vessel. Flux files generated here will later serve as source terms in subsequent shielding analyses. In addition to reporting fluxes and other data at key points of interest, a major objective of this report was to document how these analyses were performed, the phenomena that were included, and checks that were made to verify that these phenomena were properly modeled. In these shielding analyses, the fixed neutron source distribution in the core was based on the `lifetime-averaged` spatial power distribution. Secondary gamma production cross sections in the fuel were modified so as to account intrinsically for delayed fission gammas in the fuel as well as prompt fission gammas. In and near the fuel, this increased the low-energy gamma fluxes by 50 to 250%, but out near the reflector vessel, these same fluxes changed by only a few percent. Sensitivity studies with respect to mesh size were performed, and a new 2-D mesh distribution developed after some problems were discovered with respect to the use of numerous elongated mesh cells in the reflector. All of the shielding analyses were performed sing the ANSL-V 39n/44g coupled library with 25 thermal neutron groups in order to obtain a rigorous representation of the thermal neutron spectrum throughout the reflector. Because of upscatter in the heavy water, convergence was very slow. Ultimately, the fission cross section in the various materials had to be artificially modified in order to solve this fixed source problem as an eigenvalue problem and invoke the Vondy error-mode extrapolation technique which greatly accelerated convergence in the large 2-D RZ DORT analyses. While this was quite effective, 150 outer iterations (over energy) were still required.

  18. Effect of reflector location at array criticality

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.T.

    1980-11-01

    The motion of a thick reflector away from a critical array of subcritical units of fissile material results in an array reactivity loss. The fraction of the total reactivity worth of a reflector is related to the distance a reflector is located from the surfaces of an array. The magnitude of reactivity associated with the reflector location may be used in the assessment of nuclear criticality safety of operations with fissile materials to establish margins of subcriticality. An equivalence is established between the reactivity associated with reflector location and the reactivity associated with the thickness of a water reflector closely fitting an array.

  19. Electromagnetic backscattering by corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, C. A.; Griesser, T.

    1986-01-01

    The Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD), which supplements Geometric Optics (GO), and the Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD), which supplements Physical Optics (PO), are used to predict the backscatter cross sections of dihedral corner reflectors which have right, obtuse, or acute included angles. These theories allow individual backscattering mechanisms of the dihedral corner reflectors to be identified and provide good agreement with experimental results in the azimuthal plane. The advantages and disadvantages of the geometrical and physical theories are discussed in terms of their accuracy, usefulness, and complexity. Numerous comparisons of analytical results with experimental data are presented. While physical optics alone is more accurate and more useful than geometrical optics alone, the combination of geometrical optics and geometrical diffraction seems to out perform physical optics and physical diffraction when compared with experimental data, especially for acute angle dihedral corner reflectors.

  20. Optical receivers using rough reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.

    1985-01-01

    This report examines the possible use of rough, or nondiffraction-limited, reflectors for collecting optical signals. It is shown that in the absence of background radiation, the reflector's surface quality has little effect on the performance of a properly designed receiver, but that the presence of even small amounts of background radiation can lead to severe performance degradation. Techniques are suggested for improving receiver performance in high-background environments, and bounds and approximations to the exact error-probability expressions are derived.

  1. Lamp bulb with integral reflector

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Izrail; Shanks, Bruce; Sumner, Thomas L.

    2001-01-01

    An improved electrodeless discharge lamp bulb includes an integral ceramic reflector as a portion of the bulb envelope. The bulb envelope further includes two pieces, a reflector portion or segment is cast quartz ceramic and a light transmissive portion is a clear fused silica. In one embodiment, the cast quartz ceramic segment includes heat sink fins or stubs providing an increased outside surface area to dissipate internal heat. In another embodiment, the quartz ceramic segment includes an outside surface fused to eliminate gas permeation by polishing.

  2. Adjusting the Contour of Reflector Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, W. B.; Giebler, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    Postfabrication adjustment of contour of panels for reflector, such as parabolic reflector for radio antennas, possible with simple mechanism consisting of threaded stud, two nuts, and flexure. Contours adjusted manually.

  3. Monolithically integrated distributed bragg reflector laser

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, K.

    1984-08-07

    In a heterostructure distributed Bragg reflector laser, at least one multilayer waveguide substantially comprised of a silicon dielectric compound is monolithically integrated with an active semiconductor heterostructure medium. Bragg reflectors are properly disposed within the waveguide.

  4. phdMesh

    2008-01-01

    Parallel Heterogeneous Dynamic unstructured Mesh (phdMesh) data structure library and integration testing code that performs dynamic load balancing of the data structure and parallel geometric proximity search on a contrived test problem. The phdMesh library is intended to be module within a finite element or finite volume library or code. The integration testing code is intended to provide a compact and highly portable performance evaluation code for parallel computing systems.

  5. Gear mesh compliance modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Caldwell, R. J.; Wisor, G. D.; Lewicki, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    A computer model has been constructed to simulate the compliance and load sharing in a spur gear mesh. The model adds the effect of rim deflections to previously developed state-of-the-art gear tooth deflection models. The effects of deflections on mesh compliance and load sharing are examined. The model can treat gear meshes composed to two external gears or an external gear driving an internal gear. The model includes deflection contributions from the bending and shear in the teeth, the Hertzian contact deformations, and primary and secondary rotations of the gear rims. The model shows that rimmed gears increase mesh compliance and, in some cases, improve load sharing.

  6. Gear mesh compliance modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Caldwell, R. J.; Wisor, G. D.; Lewicki, D. G.

    1987-01-01

    A computer model has been constructed to simulate the compliance and load sharing in a spur gear mesh. The model adds the effect of rim deflections to previously developed state-of-the-art gear tooth deflection models. The effects of deflections on mesh compliance and load sharing are examined. The model can treat gear meshes composed of two external gears or an external gear driving an internal gear. The model includes deflection contributions from the bending and shear in the teeth, the Hertzian contact deformations, and primary and secondary rotations of the gear rims. The model shows that rimmed gears increase mesh compliance and, in some cases, improve load sharing.

  7. Construction concepts for precision segmented reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.; Withnell, Peter R.

    1993-01-01

    Three construction concepts for deployable precision segmented reflectors are presented. The designs produce reflectors with very high surface accuracies and diameters three to five times the width of the launch vehicle shroud. Of primary importance is the reliability of both the deployment process and the reflector operation. This paper is conceptual in nature, and uses these criteria to present beneficial design concepts for deployable precision segmented reflectors.

  8. Bicollimated near-field Gregorian reflector antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, J. B. L.

    1983-02-01

    A bicollimated near-field Gregorian reflector is structurally similar to a classical confocal parabolic reflector, but its surfaces are shaped to have better scan capability. A geometrical optics procedure is used in designing the reflector surfaces. A three dimensional ray tracing procedure is used in analyzing the aperture phase errors as the beam is scanned to different angles. The results show that the bicollimated configuration has about 45% greater angular scanning range than the corresponding confocal parabolic dual-reflector system.

  9. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  10. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  11. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  12. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  13. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  14. Primary reflector for solar energy collection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G. (Inventor); Stephens, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    A fixed, linear, ground-based primary reflector is disclosed which has an extended curved sawtooth-contoured surface covered with a metalized polymeric reflecting material. The device reflects solar energy to a movably supported collector that is kept at the concentrated line focus of the reflector primary. The primary reflector may be constructed by a process utilizing well-known freeway paving machinery.

  15. Optimization of tetrahedral meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Briere De L`Isle, E.; George, P.L.

    1995-12-31

    Finite element computations are all the more exact if we start from {open_quotes}good{close_quotes} elements. We are interested in meshes where the elements are tetrahedra and we shall develop utilities allowing us to improve the quality of these meshes.

  16. MEDICAL SUBJECTS HEADING (MESH)

    EPA Science Inventory

    MeSH is the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus. It consists of sets of terms naming descriptors in a hierarchical structure that permits searching at various levels of specificity. MeSH descriptors are arranged in both an alphabetic and a hierarchical ...

  17. Development of corotational formulated FEM for application to 30m class large deployable reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Satoru; Fujiwara, Yuuichi; Tsujihata, Akio

    2010-06-01

    JAXA, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, is now developing a corotational formulated finite element analysis method and its software "Origami/ETS" for the development of 30m class large deployable reflectors. For the reason that the deployable reflector is composed of beams, cables and mesh, this analysis method is generalized for finite elements with multiple nodes, which are commonly used in linear finite element analyses. The large displacement and rotation are taken into account by the corotational formulation. The tangent stiffness matrix for finite elements with multiple nodes is obtained as follows; the geometric stiffness matrix of two node elements is derived by taking variation of the element's corotational matrix from the virtual work of finite elements with large displacement; similarly the geometric stiffness matrix for three node elements is derived; as the extension of two and three node element theories, the geometric stiffness matrix for multiple node elements is derived; with the geometric stiffness matrix for multiple node elements, the tangent stiffness matrix is obtained. The analysis method is applied for the deployment analysis and static structural analysis of the 30m class large deployable reflector. In the deployment analysis, it is confirmed that this method stably analyzes the deployment motion from the deployment configuration to the stowed configuration of the reflector. In the static analysis, it is confirmed that the mesh structure is analyzed successfully. The 30m class large deployable reflector is now still being developed and is about to undergo several tests with its prototypes. This analysis method will be used in the tests and verifications of the reflector.

  18. Open-loop heliostat reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Koide, G.T.

    1980-07-30

    A microcomputer controlled heliostat driven in an elevation/azimuth gimbal arrangement with simple shaft encoders can reflect a sunlight beam to within +-two inches vertically and +-one inch horizontally at a distance of seven feet from the target, which corresponds to an arc of +-1.5/sup 0/. To minimize the error in tracking, the reflector should be aligned as accurately as possible with the north-south axis, with a transit or solar noon.

  19. Optimized testing of meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malek, Miroslaw; Ozden, Banu

    1990-01-01

    Efficient testing techniques for two-dimensional mesh interconnection networks are presented. The tests cover faults in the arbitration logic of the switches; this includes an examination of fault detection in the data paths, routing, and control circuitry, including the conflict resolution capabilities of mesh interconnection networks using topological test methods. The proposed methods are not implementation specific and can be applied to any design with a mesh topology. The topology and behavior of the network are described and definitions are presented. The fault model is defined and parallel testing methods for the entire network are given.

  20. Mesh implants: An overview of crucial mesh parameters

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei-Ming; Schuster, Philipp; Klinge, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Hernia repair is one of the most frequently performed surgical interventions that use mesh implants. This article evaluates crucial mesh parameters to facilitate selection of the most appropriate mesh implant, considering raw materials, mesh composition, structure parameters and mechanical parameters. A literature review was performed using the PubMed database. The most important mesh parameters in the selection of a mesh implant are the raw material, structural parameters and mechanical parameters, which should match the physiological conditions. The structural parameters, especially the porosity, are the most important predictors of the biocompatibility performance of synthetic meshes. Meshes with large pores exhibit less inflammatory infiltrate, connective tissue and scar bridging, which allows increased soft tissue ingrowth. The raw material and combination of raw materials of the used mesh, including potential coatings and textile design, strongly impact the inflammatory reaction to the mesh. Synthetic meshes made from innovative polymers combined with surface coating have been demonstrated to exhibit advantageous behavior in specialized fields. Monofilament, large-pore synthetic meshes exhibit advantages. The value of mesh classification based on mesh weight seems to be overestimated. Mechanical properties of meshes, such as anisotropy/isotropy, elasticity and tensile strength, are crucial parameters for predicting mesh performance after implantation. PMID:26523210

  1. Urogynecologic Surgical Mesh Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Boston Scientific's urogynecologic surgical mesh may contain counterfeit raw material. We are examining these allegations to determine any ... are currently not aware that the alleged counterfeit raw material contributes to adverse events associated with these products. ...

  2. Lamp with a truncated reflector cup

    DOEpatents

    Li, Ming; Allen, Steven C.; Bazydola, Sarah; Ghiu, Camil-Daniel

    2013-10-15

    A lamp assembly, and method for making same. The lamp assembly includes first and second truncated reflector cups. The lamp assembly also includes at least one base plate disposed between the first and second truncated reflector cups, and a light engine disposed on a top surface of the at least one base plate. The light engine is configured to emit light to be reflected by one of the first and second truncated reflector cups.

  3. System Would Keep Telescope Reflector Segments Aligned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, Edward; Eldred, Daniel B.; Briggs, Hugh C.; Agronin, Michael L.; Kiceniuk, Taras

    1991-01-01

    Proposed actuation system maintains alignments of reflector segments of large telescope. Sensors measure positions and orientations of segments. Figure-control computer calculates orientation and figure of overall reflector surface from sensor data. Responding to computer output, servocontroller for each actuator corrects piston and tilt errors of each segment. Actuators adjust segments in response to sensed positions. Concept applicable to such large segmented space-based reflectors as those used in communication and in collection of solar energy.

  4. Advanced Reflector and Absorber Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of advanced reflector and absorber materials: evaluating performance, determining degradation rates and lifetime, and developing new coatings.

  5. Solar thermal collectors using planar reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espy, P. N.

    1978-01-01

    Specular reflectors have been used successfully with flat-plate collectors to achieve exceptionally high operating temperatures and high delivered energy per unit collector area. Optimal orientation of collectors and reflectors can result in even higher performance with an improved relationship between energy demand and supply. This paper reports on a study providing first order optimization of collector-reflector arrays in which single- and multiple-faceted reflectors in fixed or singly adjustable configurations provide delivered energy maxima in either summer or winter.

  6. Cherenkov radiation oscillator without reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Wang, Y.; Wei, Y.; Yang, Z.; Hangyo, M.; Miyamoto, S.

    2014-05-12

    This Letter presents a Cherenkov radiation oscillator with an electron beam travelling over a finitely thick plate made of negative-index materials. In such a scheme, the external reflectors required in the traditional Cherenkov oscillators are not necessary, since the electromagnetic energy flows backward in the negative-index materials, leading to inherent feedback. We theoretically analyzed the interaction between the electron beam and the electromagnetic wave, and worked out the growth rate and start current through numerical calculations. With the help of particle-in-cell simulation, the theoretical predictions are well demonstrated.

  7. Study of Membrane Reflector Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, K.; Hedgepeth, J.

    1979-01-01

    Very large reflective surfaces are required by future spacecraft for such purposes as solar energy collection, antenna surfaces, thermal control, attitude and orbit control with solar pressure, and solar sailing. The performance benefits in large membrane reflector systems, which may be derived from an advancement of this film and related structures technology, are identified and qualified. The results of the study are reported and summarized. Detailed technical discussions of various aspects of the study are included in several separate technical notes which are referenced.

  8. Unstructured mesh generation and adaptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of current unstructured mesh generation and adaptivity techniques is given. Basic building blocks taken from the field of computational geometry are first described. Various practical mesh generation techniques based on these algorithms are then constructed and illustrated with examples. Issues of adaptive meshing and stretched mesh generation for anisotropic problems are treated in subsequent sections. The presentation is organized in an education manner, for readers familiar with computational fluid dynamics, wishing to learn more about current unstructured mesh techniques.

  9. Design and analysis of annular antenna arrays with different reflectors.

    PubMed

    Shi, G; Joines, W T

    2004-09-01

    The design and performance of annular antenna arrays with reflectors is presented. Arrays with three shapes of reflectors are analysed and simulated. These include the corner reflector, the circular reflector and the elliptical reflector. Power-density distributions within the annular arrays with and without reflectors are obtained by using the FDTD method. Also, the image theory method is used to verify the FDTD results in one case. By comparing the power-density distribution pattern of all four of the array designs (three with different reflectors, one without reflector), it is readily seen in each case that the array with reflectors yields better power-efficiency than the array without reflectors and the elliptical reflector yields the best performance. Comparisons of each array are made using 4, 6 and 8 antennae in the annular array. By using the optimized results of the elliptical reflector, the requirement for the input-power level to each antenna is greatly reduced. PMID:15370818

  10. Shaped cassegrain reflector antenna. [design equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Design equations are developed to compute the reflector surfaces required to produce uniform illumination on the main reflector of a cassegrain system when the feed pattern is specified. The final equations are somewhat simple and straightforward to solve (using a computer) compared to the ones which exist already in the literature. Step by step procedure for solving the design equations is discussed in detail.

  11. Diffraction Analysis Of Distorted Reflector Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Mumford, Jeffrey H.

    1990-01-01

    Effects of systematic distortions of surfaces on radiation patterns predicted. Computer program for Diffraction Analysis of Reflector Antennas Subject to Systematic Distortions predicts performance of reflector antennas subject to sinusoidal, thermal, or gravitational distortions. Provides local interpolation algorithm readily applied to nonregular distribution of data. Developed in UNIVAC FORTRAN 77 for UNIVAC computer.

  12. Conformal Membrane Reflectors for Deployable Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Patrick J.; Keys, Andrew S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation reports the Phase I results on NASA's Gossamer Spacecraft Exploratory Research and Technology Program. Cornerstone Research Group, Inc., the University of Rochester, and International Photonics Consultants collaborated to investigate the feasibility of free-standing, liquid-crystal-polymer (LCP) reflectors for integration into space-based optical systems. The goal of the program was to achieve large-diameter, broadband. reflective membranes that are resistant to the effects of space, specifically cryogenic environments and gamma-ray irradiation. Additionally, we assessed the applicability of utilizing the technology as tight sails, since, by their very nature, these films offer high-reflectivity at specified wavelengths. Previous research programs have demonstrated all-polymer, narrow-band Specular reflectors and diffuse membrane reflectors. The feasibility of fabricating an all-polymer broadband specular reflector and a narrow-band specular membrane reflector was assessed in the Phase I Gossamer program. In addition, preliminary gamma irradiation studies were conducted to determine the stability of the polymer reflectors to radiation. Materials and process technology were developed to fabricate coupon-scale reflectors of both broad- and narrow-band specular reflectors in Phase 1. This presentation will report the results of these studies, including, the performance of a narrow-band specular membrane. Gamma irradiation exposures indicate limited impact on the optical performance although additional exposure studies are warranted. Plans to scale up the membrane fabrication process will be presented.

  13. Cosmology on a Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Stuart P. D.; Knebe, Alexander; Gibson, Brad K.; Flynn, Chris; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2003-04-01

    An adaptive multi grid approach to simulating the formation of structure from collisionless dark matter is described. MLAPM (Multi-Level Adaptive Particle Mesh) is one of the most efficient serial codes available on the cosmological "market" today. As part of Swinburne University's role in the development of the Square Kilometer Array, we are implementing hydrodynamics, feedback, and radiative transfer within the MLAPM adaptive mesh, in order to simulate baryonic processes relevant to the interstellar and intergalactic media at high redshift. We will outline our progress to date in applying the existing MLAPM to a study of the decay of satellite galaxies within massive host potentials.

  14. Documentation for MeshKit - Reactor Geometry (&mesh) Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Rajeev; Mahadevan, Vijay

    2015-09-30

    This report gives documentation for using MeshKit’s Reactor Geometry (and mesh) Generator (RGG) GUI and also briefly documents other algorithms and tools available in MeshKit. RGG is a program designed to aid in modeling and meshing of complex/large hexagonal and rectilinear reactor cores. RGG uses Argonne’s SIGMA interfaces, Qt and VTK to produce an intuitive user interface. By integrating a 3D view of the reactor with the meshing tools and combining them into one user interface, RGG streamlines the task of preparing a simulation mesh and enables real-time feedback that reduces accidental scripting mistakes that could waste hours of meshing. RGG interfaces with MeshKit tools to consolidate the meshing process, meaning that going from model to mesh is as easy as a button click. This report is designed to explain RGG v 2.0 interface and provide users with the knowledge and skills to pilot RGG successfully. Brief documentation of MeshKit source code, tools and other algorithms available are also presented for developers to extend and add new algorithms to MeshKit. RGG tools work in serial and parallel and have been used to model complex reactor core models consisting of conical pins, load pads, several thousands of axially varying material properties of instrumentation pins and other interstices meshes.

  15. Nanolaminate Membranes as Cylindrical Telescope Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Hickey, Gregory; Lih, Shyh-Shiu Lih

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to use axially stretched metal nanolaminate membranes as lightweight parabolic cylindrical reflectors in the Dual Anamorphic Reflector Telescope (DART) - a planned spaceborne telescope in which the cylindrical reflectors would be arranged to obtain a point focus. The discussion brings together a combination of concepts reported separately in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, the most relevant being "Nanolaminate Mirrors With Integral Figure-Control Actuators" NPO -30221, Vol. 26, No. 5 (May 2002), page 90; and "Reflectors Made From Membranes Stretched Between Beams" NPO -30571, Vol. 33, No. 10 (October 2009), page 11a. The engineering issues receiving the greatest emphasis in the instant document are (1) the change in curvature associated with the Poisson contraction of a stretched nanolaminate reflector membrane and (2) the feasibility of using patches of poly(vinylidene fluoride) on the rear membrane surface as piezoelectric actuators to correct the surface figure for the effect of Poisson contraction and other shape errors.

  16. Geometric approaches to mesh generation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, C.M.

    1995-12-31

    We review three approaches to mesh generation that axe based on analyzing and accounting for the geometric structure of the domain. In the first approach, due to Armstrong, the domain is partitioned into subdomains based on the medial-axis transform, a tool for analyzing spatial structures. In the second approach, due to Cox, the design history defines a geometric structure of the domain. The design primitives of that structure are meshed separately, and mesh overlap is accounted for by coupling equations. The third approach argues that mesh generation ought to be integrated into the shape design process, by meshing design features separately and resolving overlapping meshes by standard geometric computations.

  17. Curved mesh generation and mesh refinement using Lagrangian solid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, P.-O.; Peraire, J.

    2008-12-31

    We propose a method for generating well-shaped curved unstructured meshes using a nonlinear elasticity analogy. The geometry of the domain to be meshed is represented as an elastic solid. The undeformed geometry is the initial mesh of linear triangular or tetrahedral elements. The external loading results from prescribing a boundary displacement to be that of the curved geometry, and the final configuration is determined by solving for the equilibrium configuration. The deformations are represented using piecewise polynomials within each element of the original mesh. When the mesh is sufficiently fine to resolve the solid deformation, this method guarantees non-intersecting elements even for highly distorted or anisotropic initial meshes. We describe the method and the solution procedures, and we show a number of examples of two and three dimensional simplex meshes with curved boundaries. We also demonstrate how to use the technique for local refinement of non-curved meshes in the presence of curved boundaries.

  18. Hybrid Deployable Foam Antennas and Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivellini, Tommaso; Willis, Paul; Hodges, Richard; Spitz, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    Hybrid deployable radio antennas and reflectors of a proposed type would feature rigid narrower apertures plus wider adjoining apertures comprising reflective surfaces supported by open-cell polymeric foam structures (see figure). The open-cell foam structure of such an antenna would be compressed for compact stowage during transport. To initiate deployment of the antenna, the foam structure would simply be released from its stowage mechanical restraint. The elasticity of the foam would drive the expansion of the foam structure to its full size and shape. There are several alternatives for fabricating a reflective surface supported by a polymeric foam structure. One approach would be to coat the foam with a metal. Another approach would be to attach a metal film or a metal-coated polymeric membrane to the foam. Yet another approach would be to attach a metal mesh to the foam. The hybrid antenna design and deployment concept as proposed offers significant advantages over other concepts for deployable antennas: 1) In the unlikely event of failure to deploy, the rigid narrow portion of the antenna would still function, providing a minimum level of assured performance. In contrast, most other concepts for deploying a large antenna from compact stowage are of an "all or nothing" nature: the antenna is not useful at all until and unless it is fully deployed. 2) Stowage and deployment would not depend on complex mechanisms or actuators, nor would it involve the use of inflatable structures. Therefore, relative to antennas deployed by use of mechanisms, actuators, or inflation systems, this antenna could be lighter, cheaper, amenable to stowage in a smaller volume, and more reliable. An open-cell polymeric (e.g., polyurethane) foam offers several advantages for use as a compressible/expandable structural material to support a large antenna or reflector aperture. A few of these advantages are the following: 3) The open cellular structure is amenable to compression to a very

  19. Electromagnetic backscattering by corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, C. A.; Griesser, T.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of the backscatter cross section of a dihedral corner reflector, using Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) and Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD), is completed in the azimuthal plane, and very good agreement with experimental results is obtained. The advantages and limitations of the GTD and PTD techniques are discussed specifically for radar cross section applications. The utilization of GTD and PTD in oblique incidence diffraction from conducting targets is discussed. Results for equivalent current off-axis diffraction from the flat rectangular plate are presented using the equivalent currents of Knott, Senior, and Michaeli. The rectangular subdivision technique of Sikta, and its extension by Sunatara, alleviate some of the limitations of the equivalent techniques. As yet, neither technique can be used in bistatic scattering or for multiple scattering of a complex target.

  20. Cryogenic metal mesh bandpass filters for submillimeter astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragovan, M.

    1984-01-01

    The design and performance of a tunable double-half-wave bandpass filter centered at 286 microns (Delta lambda/lambda = 0.16) and operating at cryogenic temperatures (for astronomy applications) are presented. The operating principle is explained, and the fabrication of the device, which comprises two identical mutually coupled Fabry-Perot filters with electroformed Ni-mesh reflectors and is tuned by means of variable spacers, is described. A drawing of the design and graphs of computed and measured performance are provided. Significantly improved bandpass characteristics are obtained relative to the single Fabry-Perot filter.

  1. Advanced numerical methods in mesh generation and mesh adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Lipnikov, Konstantine; Danilov, A; Vassilevski, Y; Agonzal, A

    2010-01-01

    Numerical solution of partial differential equations requires appropriate meshes, efficient solvers and robust and reliable error estimates. Generation of high-quality meshes for complex engineering models is a non-trivial task. This task is made more difficult when the mesh has to be adapted to a problem solution. This article is focused on a synergistic approach to the mesh generation and mesh adaptation, where best properties of various mesh generation methods are combined to build efficiently simplicial meshes. First, the advancing front technique (AFT) is combined with the incremental Delaunay triangulation (DT) to build an initial mesh. Second, the metric-based mesh adaptation (MBA) method is employed to improve quality of the generated mesh and/or to adapt it to a problem solution. We demonstrate with numerical experiments that combination of all three methods is required for robust meshing of complex engineering models. The key to successful mesh generation is the high-quality of the triangles in the initial front. We use a black-box technique to improve surface meshes exported from an unattainable CAD system. The initial surface mesh is refined into a shape-regular triangulation which approximates the boundary with the same accuracy as the CAD mesh. The DT method adds robustness to the AFT. The resulting mesh is topologically correct but may contain a few slivers. The MBA uses seven local operations to modify the mesh topology. It improves significantly the mesh quality. The MBA method is also used to adapt the mesh to a problem solution to minimize computational resources required for solving the problem. The MBA has a solid theoretical background. In the first two experiments, we consider the convection-diffusion and elasticity problems. We demonstrate the optimal reduction rate of the discretization error on a sequence of adaptive strongly anisotropic meshes. The key element of the MBA method is construction of a tensor metric from hierarchical edge

  2. Application of Quaternions for Mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2002-01-01

    A new three dimensional mesh deformation algorithm, based on quaternion algebra, is introduced. A brief overview of quaternion algebra is provided, along with some preliminary results for two-dimensional structured and unstructured viscous mesh deformation.

  3. Multigrid Methods for Mesh Relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, M J

    2006-06-12

    When generating a mesh for the initial conditions for a computer simulation, you want the mesh to be as smooth as possible. A common practice is to use equipotential mesh relaxation to smooth out a distorted computational mesh. Typically a Laplace-like equation is set up for the mesh coordinates and then one or more Jacobi iterations are performed to relax the mesh. As the zone count gets really large, the Jacobi iteration becomes less and less effective and we are stuck with our original unrelaxed mesh. This type of iteration can only damp high frequency errors and the smooth errors remain. When the zone count is large, almost everything looks smooth so relaxation cannot solve the problem. In this paper we examine a multigrid technique which effectively smooths out the mesh, independent of the number of zones.

  4. Toward An Unstructured Mesh Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei Mahdiraji, Alireza; Baumann, Peter Peter

    2014-05-01

    Unstructured meshes are used in several application domains such as earth sciences (e.g., seismology), medicine, oceanography, cli- mate modeling, GIS as approximate representations of physical objects. Meshes subdivide a domain into smaller geometric elements (called cells) which are glued together by incidence relationships. The subdivision of a domain allows computational manipulation of complicated physical structures. For instance, seismologists model earthquakes using elastic wave propagation solvers on hexahedral meshes. The hexahedral con- tains several hundred millions of grid points and millions of hexahedral cells. Each vertex node in the hexahedrals stores a multitude of data fields. To run simulation on such meshes, one needs to iterate over all the cells, iterate over incident cells to a given cell, retrieve coordinates of cells, assign data values to cells, etc. Although meshes are used in many application domains, to the best of our knowledge there is no database vendor that support unstructured mesh features. Currently, the main tool for querying and manipulating unstructured meshes are mesh libraries, e.g., CGAL and GRAL. Mesh li- braries are dedicated libraries which includes mesh algorithms and can be run on mesh representations. The libraries do not scale with dataset size, do not have declarative query language, and need deep C++ knowledge for query implementations. Furthermore, due to high coupling between the implementations and input file structure, the implementations are less reusable and costly to maintain. A dedicated mesh database offers the following advantages: 1) declarative querying, 2) ease of maintenance, 3) hiding mesh storage structure from applications, and 4) transparent query optimization. To design a mesh database, the first challenge is to define a suitable generic data model for unstructured meshes. We proposed ImG-Complexes data model as a generic topological mesh data model which extends incidence graph model to multi

  5. Lightweight composite reflectors for space optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brian E.; McNeal, Shawn R.; Ono, Russell M.

    1998-01-01

    The primary goal of this work was to advance the state of the art in lightweight, high optical quality reflectors for space- and Earth-based telescopes. This was accomplished through the combination of a precision silicon carbide (SiC) reflector surface and a high specific strength, low-mass SiC structural support. Reducing the mass of components launched into space can lead to substantial cost savings, but an even greater benefit of lightweight reflectors for both space- and Earth-based optics applications is the fact that they require far less complex and less expensive positioning systems. While Ultramet is not the first company to produce SiC by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for reflector surfaces, it is the first to propose and demonstrate a lightweight, open-cell SiC structural foam that can support a thin layer of the highly desirable polished SiC reflector material. SiC foam provides a substantial structural and mass advantage over conventional honeycomb supports and alternative finned structures. The result is a reflector component that meets or exceeds the optical properties of current high-quality glass, ceramic, and metal reflectors while maintaining a substantially lower areal density.

  6. Fabrication of Spherical Reflectors in Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu; Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Serivens, Wally

    2005-01-01

    A process is proposed for fabrication of lightweight spherical reflectors in outer space for telescopes, radio antennas, and light collectors that would be operated there. The process would obviate the relatively massive substrates and frames needed to support such reflectors in normal Earth gravitation. According to the proposal, fabrication of a reflector would begin with blowing of a bubble to the specified reflector radius. Taking advantage of the outer-space vacuum as a suitable environment for evaporative deposition of metal, a metal-evaporation source would be turned on and moved around the bubble to deposit a reflective metal film over the specified reflector area to a thickness of several microns. Then the source would be moved and aimed to deposit more metal around the edge of the reflector area, increasing the thickness there to approximately equal to 100 micron to form a frame. Then the bubble would be deflated and peeled off the metal, leaving a thin-film spherical mirror having an integral frame. The mirror would then be mounted for use. The feasibility of this technology has been proved by fabricating a prototype at JPL. As shown in the figure, a 2-in. (.5-cm) diameter hemispherical prototype reflector was made from a polymer bubble coated with silver, forming a very smooth surface.

  7. Integrated reflector antenna design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M. L.; Lee, S. W.; Ni, S.; Christensen, M.; Wang, Y. M.

    1993-01-01

    Reflector antenna design is a mature field and most aspects were studied. However, of that most previous work is distinguished by the fact that it is narrow in scope, analyzing only a particular problem under certain conditions. Methods of analysis of this type are not useful for working on real-life problems since they can not handle the many and various types of perturbations of basic antenna design. The idea of an integrated design and analysis is proposed. By broadening the scope of the analysis, it becomes possible to deal with the intricacies attendant with modem reflector antenna design problems. The concept of integrated reflector antenna design is put forward. A number of electromagnetic problems related to reflector antenna design are investigated. Some of these show how tools for reflector antenna design are created. In particular, a method for estimating spillover loss for open-ended waveguide feeds is examined. The problem of calculating and optimizing beam efficiency (an important figure of merit in radiometry applications) is also solved. Other chapters deal with applications of this general analysis. The wide angle scan abilities of reflector antennas is examined and a design is proposed for the ATDRSS triband reflector antenna. The development of a general phased-array pattern computation program is discussed and how the concept of integrated design can be extended to other types of antennas is shown. The conclusions are contained in the final chapter.

  8. Reflectors Made from Membranes Stretched Between Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Tolomeo, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Lightweight cylindrical reflectors of a proposed type would be made from reflective membranes stretched between pairs of identically curved and identically oriented end rails. In each such reflector, the curvature of the two beams would define the reflector shape required for the intended application. For example, the beams could be curved to define a reflector of parabolic cross section, so that light incident along the axis of symmetry perpendicular to the cylindrical axis would be focused to a line. In addition, by applying suitable forces to the ends of the beams, one could bend the beams to adjust the reflector surface figure to within a precision of the order of the wavelength of the radiation to be reflected. The figure depicts an example of beams shaped so that in the absence of applied forces, each would be flat on one side and would have a radius of curvature R on the opposite side. Alternatively, the curvature of the reflector-membrane side could be other than circular. In general, the initial curvature would be chosen to optimize the final reflector shape. Then by applying forces F between the beam ends in the positions and orientations shown in the figure, one could bend beams to adjust their shape to a closer approximation of the desired precise circular or noncircular curvature.

  9. Solar cell having improved back surface reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, A. T.

    1982-10-01

    The operating temperature is reduced and the output of a solar cell is increased by using a solar cell which carries electrodes in a grid finger pattern on its back surface. These electrodes are sintered at the proper temperature to provide good ohmic contact. After sintering, a reflective material is deposited on the back surface by vacuum evaporation. Thus, the application of the back surface reflector is separate from the back contact formation. Back surface reflectors formed in conjunction with separate grid finger configuration back contacts are more effective than those formed by full back metallization of the reflector material.

  10. Distributed Bragg Reflectors With Reduced Optical Absorption

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    A new class of distributed Bragg reflectors has been developed. These distributed Bragg reflectors comprise interlayers positioned between sets of high-index and low-index quarter-wave plates. The presence of these interlayers is to reduce photon absorption resulting from spatially indirect photon-assisted electronic transitions between the high-index and low-index quarter wave plates. The distributed Bragg reflectors have applications for use in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for use at 1.55 .mu.m and at other wavelengths of interest.

  11. Surgical mesh for ventral incisional hernia repairs: Understanding mesh design.

    PubMed

    Rastegarpour, Ali; Cheung, Michael; Vardhan, Madhurima; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Butler, Charles E; Levinson, Howard

    2016-01-01

    Surgical mesh has become an indispensable tool in hernia repair to improve outcomes and reduce costs; however, efforts are constantly being undertaken in mesh development to overcome postoperative complications. Common complications include infection, pain, adhesions, mesh extrusion and hernia recurrence. Reducing the complications of mesh implantation is of utmost importance given that hernias occur in hundreds of thousands of patients per year in the United States. In the present review, the authors present the different types of hernia meshes, discuss the key properties of mesh design, and demonstrate how each design element affects performance and complications. The present article will provide a basis for surgeons to understand which mesh to choose for patient care and why, and will explain the important technological aspects that will continue to evolve over the ensuing years. PMID:27054138

  12. Mesh2d

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Flach, Frank Smith

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assigns an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.

  13. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  14. SUPERIMPOSED MESH PLOTTING IN MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    J. HENDRICKS

    2001-02-01

    The capability to plot superimposed meshes has been added to MCNP{trademark}. MCNP4C featured a superimposed mesh weight window generator which enabled users to set up geometries without having to subdivide geometric cells for variance reduction. The variance reduction was performed with weight windows on a rectangular or cylindrical mesh superimposed over the physical geometry. Experience with the new capability was favorable but also indicated that a number of enhancements would be very beneficial, particularly a means of visualizing the mesh and its values. The mathematics for plotting the mesh and its values is described here along with a description of other upgrades.

  15. Particle-mesh techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macneice, Peter

    1995-01-01

    This is an introduction to numerical Particle-Mesh techniques, which are commonly used to model plasmas, gravitational N-body systems, and both compressible and incompressible fluids. The theory behind this approach is presented, and its practical implementation, both for serial and parallel machines, is discussed. This document is based on a four-hour lecture course presented by the author at the NASA Summer School for High Performance Computational Physics, held at Goddard Space Flight Center.

  16. Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Diachin, L; Hornung, R; Plassmann, P; WIssink, A

    2005-03-04

    As large-scale, parallel computers have become more widely available and numerical models and algorithms have advanced, the range of physical phenomena that can be simulated has expanded dramatically. Many important science and engineering problems exhibit solutions with localized behavior where highly-detailed salient features or large gradients appear in certain regions which are separated by much larger regions where the solution is smooth. Examples include chemically-reacting flows with radiative heat transfer, high Reynolds number flows interacting with solid objects, and combustion problems where the flame front is essentially a two-dimensional sheet occupying a small part of a three-dimensional domain. Modeling such problems numerically requires approximating the governing partial differential equations on a discrete domain, or grid. Grid spacing is an important factor in determining the accuracy and cost of a computation. A fine grid may be needed to resolve key local features while a much coarser grid may suffice elsewhere. Employing a fine grid everywhere may be inefficient at best and, at worst, may make an adequately resolved simulation impractical. Moreover, the location and resolution of fine grid required for an accurate solution is a dynamic property of a problem's transient features and may not be known a priori. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a technique that can be used with both structured and unstructured meshes to adjust local grid spacing dynamically to capture solution features with an appropriate degree of resolution. Thus, computational resources can be focused where and when they are needed most to efficiently achieve an accurate solution without incurring the cost of a globally-fine grid. Figure 1.1 shows two example computations using AMR; on the left is a structured mesh calculation of a impulsively-sheared contact surface and on the right is the fuselage and volume discretization of an RAH-66 Comanche helicopter [35]. Note the

  17. 49 CFR 393.26 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... reflectors. (a) Mounting. Reflex reflectors shall be mounted at the locations required by § 393.11. In the... mounting height range. All permanent reflex reflectors shall be securely mounted on a rigid part of the... required to be permanently mounted to a part of the vehicle. Temporary reflex reflectors on...

  18. 49 CFR 393.26 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... reflectors. (a) Mounting. Reflex reflectors shall be mounted at the locations required by § 393.11. In the... mounting height range. All permanent reflex reflectors shall be securely mounted on a rigid part of the... required to be permanently mounted to a part of the vehicle. Temporary reflex reflectors on...

  19. 49 CFR 393.26 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... reflectors. (a) Mounting. Reflex reflectors shall be mounted at the locations required by § 393.11. In the... mounting height range. All permanent reflex reflectors shall be securely mounted on a rigid part of the... required to be permanently mounted to a part of the vehicle. Temporary reflex reflectors on...

  20. 49 CFR 393.26 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... reflectors. (a) Mounting. Reflex reflectors shall be mounted at the locations required by § 393.11. In the... mounting height range. All permanent reflex reflectors shall be securely mounted on a rigid part of the... required to be permanently mounted to a part of the vehicle. Temporary reflex reflectors on...

  1. 49 CFR 393.26 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... reflectors. (a) Mounting. Reflex reflectors shall be mounted at the locations required by § 393.11. In the... mounting height range. All permanent reflex reflectors shall be securely mounted on a rigid part of the... required to be permanently mounted to a part of the vehicle. Temporary reflex reflectors on...

  2. Pactruss support structure for precision segmented reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, John M.

    1989-01-01

    The application of the Pactruss deployable structure to the support of large paraboloidal reflectors of very high precision was studied. The Pactruss concept, originally conceived for the Space Station truss, is shown to be suitable for use in a triangular arrangement to support a reflector surface composed of hexagonal reflector panels. A hybrid of Pactruss structural and deployable single-fold beams is shown to accommodate a center body. A minor alteration in the geometry is in order to avoid lockup during deployment. To assess the capability of the hybrid Pactruss structure, an example truss supporting a full-scale (20 meter diameter) infrared telescope was analyzed for static and dynamic performance. A truss structure weighing 800 kilograms gave adequate support to a reflector surface weighing 3,000 kilograms.

  3. Property of radially quadratic reflector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizusawa, M.; Katagi, T.

    1986-01-01

    This report shows that when considered in terms of optical geometry, radially parabolic and radially hyperbolic mirrors used as mirrors for Cassegrain and parabolic antennas possess values similar to common conical horn reflector antennas.

  4. Precision Segmented Reflector figure control system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, E.; Eldred, D.; Briggs, C.; Kiceniuk, T.; Agronin, M.

    1989-01-01

    A control system architecture for an actively controlled segmented reflector is described along with a design realization for achieving precision alignment of reflector panels. Performance requirements are derived in part from the Large Deployable Reflector, which is a representative mission, and error allocations are made which consider mirror panel surface errors, position measurement and figure estimation, and position control of both quasi-static and dynamic disturbances. The design uses multiple wavelength interferometric edge sensors and voice coil actuators in conjunction with a hybrid control strategy to correct panel position errors. A unit cell shown to be central to the concept is analyzed. The cell integrates the sensing, actuation, and mechanical functions of a control module together with a reflector panel to form a unitized assembly.

  5. Focal region fields of distorted reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buris, N. E.; Kauffman, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of the focal region fields scattered by an arbitrary surface reflector under uniform plane wave illumination is solved. The physical optics (PO) approximation is used to calculate the current induced on the reflector. The surface of the reflector is described by a number of triangular domain-wise 5th degree bivariate polynomials. A 2-dimensional Gaussian quadrature is employed to numerically evaluate the integral expressions of the scattered fields. No Freshnel or Fraunhofer zone approximations are made. The relation of the focal fields problem to surface compensation techniques and other applications are mentioned. Several examples of distorted parabolic reflectors are presented. The computer code developed is included, together with instructions on its usage.

  6. Uniform sunlight concentration reflectors for photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Rabady, Rabi Ibrahim

    2014-03-20

    Sunlight concentration is essential to reach high temperatures of a working fluid in solar-thermal applications and to reduce the cost of photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation systems. Commonly, sunlight concentration is realized by parabolic or cylindrical reflectors, which do not provide uniform concentration on the receiver finite surface. Uniform concentration of sunlight is favored especially for the PV conversion applications since it not only enhances the conversion efficiency of sunlight but also reduces the thermal variations along the receiving PV cell, which can be a performance and life-span limiting factor. In this paper a reflector profile that uniformly infiltrates the concentrated sunlight into the receiving unit is attempted. The new design accounts for all factors that contribute to the nonuniform concentration, like the reflector curvature, which spatially reflects the sunlight nonuniformly, and the angular dependency of both the reflector reflectivity and the sunlight transmission through the PV cell. PMID:24663464

  7. Diffraction analysis of frequency selective reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Tulintseff, Ann N.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, a unified computational technique is presented which allows the incorporation of the curved frequency-selective surface (FSS) geometry in the computation of the reflector antenna radiation pattern. The scattered fields from an illuminated FSS reflector are formalized using Huygens' principle in such a way that the 'reflecting' and the 'transparent' FSS subreflector cases are treated identically and the thickness of the FSS subreflector remains arbitrary. The analysis utilizes local surface coordinates to describe the reflection/transmission matrices of the FSS subreflector where it is assumed that these matrices are available. In most cases one may use the local tangent plane for approximating the plane of the FSS in the local coordinate surface of the reflector. The paper demonstrates how the local curved coordinate system can be introduced in the diffraction modeling of FSS reflectors and its importance in accurately predicting the side-lobe and crosspolarization levels. Results of numerical simulations are presented for several FSS subreflector configurations.

  8. An offset-fed reflector antenna with an axially symmetric main reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, D.-C.; Rusch, W. V. T.

    1984-11-01

    A design method for an offset-fed, dual reflector antenna (Cassegrain type or Gregorian type) system with an axisymmetric main reflector is presented. Geometrical optics (GO) and the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD) are used to find the surface-current density on the main reflector. A modified Jacobi-Bessel series (JBS) method is used to find the far-field pattern for the physical optics (PO) integral. In the defocused mode of operation, a new technique is developed to find the reflection point on the subreflector corresponding to the defocused feed and a general field point on the main reflector. Two sample systems are designed.

  9. On Optimal Bilinear Quadrilateral Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    D'Azevedo, E.

    1998-10-26

    The novelty of this work is in presenting interesting error properties of two types of asymptotically optimal quadrilateral meshes for bilinear approximation. The first type of mesh has an error equidistributing property where the maximum interpolation error is asymptotically the same over all elements. The second type has faster than expected super-convergence property for certain saddle-shaped data functions. The super-convergent mesh may be an order of magnitude more accurate than the error equidistributing mesh. Both types of mesh are generated by a coordinate transformation of a regular mesh of squares. The coordinate transformation is derived by interpreting the Hessian matrix of a data function as a metric tensor. The insights in this work may have application in mesh design near known corner or point singularities.

  10. On Optimal Bilinear Quadrilateral Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    D'Azevedo, E

    2000-03-17

    The novelty of this work is in presenting interesting error properties of two types of asymptotically ''optimal'' quadrilateral meshes for bilinear approximation. The first type of mesh has an error equidistributing property where the maximum interpolation error is asymptotically the same over all elements. The second type has faster than expected ''super-convergence'' property for certain saddle-shaped data functions. The ''superconvergent'' mesh may be an order of magnitude more accurate than the error equidistributing mesh. Both types of mesh are generated by a coordinate transformation of a regular mesh of squares. The coordinate transformation is derived by interpreting the Hessian matrix of a data function as a metric tensor. The insights in this work may have application in mesh design near corner or point singularities.

  11. Semiconductor Laser With Multilayer Dielectric Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Multilayer dielectric reflector included in proposed surface-emitting, distributed-feedback, grating semiconductor laser (e.g., a GaAlAs device). Contributes to efficiency and output power of laser by reducing amount of light entering substrate, where wasted by absorption. Index of refraction in reflector sublayers alternates between higher and lower value. Higher value less than effective index of refraction of waveguide layer.

  12. Aberrations of ellipsoidal reflectors for unit magnification.

    PubMed

    Mielenz, K D

    1974-12-01

    Ellipsoidal reflectors are useful for the 1:1 imaging of small objects without spherical and chromatic aberration. The magnitude of the off-axis aberrations of such reflectors is computed by application of Fermat's principle to the Hamiltonian point characteristic. The limiting form of the mirror aperture for which these aberrations do not exceed a set tolerance is an ellipse whose semiaxes depend on object size and angle of incidence. PMID:20134811

  13. Structural analysis of FAST reflector supporting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y. F.; Deng, C. G.; Li, G. Q.; He, Y. M.

    According to the deformation and movement requirements of the FAST reflector, a multi-purpose analysis, including the load-bearing behavior, deformation, construction costs of the reflector supporting structure and its model, is presented in this paper. The advantages and disadvantages of steel and aluminum alloy structures are also discussed and compared through detailed design calculations under load-bearing capacity and normal working conditions.

  14. Easily Assembled Reflector for Solar Concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.; Hasegawa, T.

    1982-01-01

    Reflectors for concentrating solar collectors are assembled quickly and inexpensively by method that employs precontoured supports, plastic film, and adhesive to form a segmented glass mirror. New method is self-focusing, and does not require skilled labor at any stage. Contoured ribs support film and mirror segments of reflector. Nine mirror segments are bonded to sheet. Combined mirror surface closely approximates a spherical surface with a radius of curvature of 36 inches (0.91 m).

  15. Mesh Algorithms for PDE with Sieve I: Mesh Distribution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Knepley, Matthew G.; Karpeev, Dmitry A.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a new programming framework, called Sieve, to support parallel numerical partial differential equation(s) (PDE) algorithms operating over distributed meshes. We have also developed a reference implementation of Sieve in C++ as a library of generic algorithms operating on distributed containers conforming to the Sieve interface. Sieve makes instances of the incidence relation, or arrows, the conceptual first-class objects represented in the containers. Further, generic algorithms acting on this arrow container are systematically used to provide natural geometric operations on the topology and also, through duality, on the data. Finally, coverings and duality are used to encode notmore » only individual meshes, but all types of hierarchies underlying PDE data structures, including multigrid and mesh partitions. In order to demonstrate the usefulness of the framework, we show how the mesh partition data can be represented and manipulated using the same fundamental mechanisms used to represent meshes. We present the complete description of an algorithm to encode a mesh partition and then distribute a mesh, which is independent of the mesh dimension, element shape, or embedding. Moreover, data associated with the mesh can be similarly distributed with exactly the same algorithm. The use of a high level of abstraction within the Sieve leads to several benefits in terms of code reuse, simplicity, and extensibility. We discuss these benefits and compare our approach to other existing mesh libraries.« less

  16. Mesh Oriented datABase

    SciTech Connect

    Tautges, Timothy J.

    2004-04-01

    MOAB is a component for representing and evaluating mesh data. MOAB can store stuctured and unstructured mesh, consisting of elements in the finite element "zoo". The functional interface to MOAB is simple yet powerful, allowing the representation of many types of metadata commonly found on the mesh. MOAB is optimized for efficiency in space and time, based on access to mesh in chunks rather than through individual entities, while also versatile enough to support individual entity access. The MOAB data model consists of a mesh interface instance, mesh entities (vertices and elements), sets, and tags. Entities are addressed through handles rather than pointers, to allow the underlying representation of an entity to change without changing the handle to that entity. Sets are arbitrary groupings of mesh entities and other sets. Sets also support parent/child relationships as a relation distinct from sets containing other sets. The directed-graph provided by set parent/child relationships is useful for modeling topological relations from a geometric model or other metadata. Tags are named data which can be assigned to the mesh as a whole, individual entities, or sets. Tags are a mechanism for attaching data to individual entities and sets are a mechanism for describing relations between entities; the combination of these two mechanisms isa powerful yet simple interface for representing metadata or application-specific data. For example, sets and tags can be used together to describe geometric topology, boundary condition, and inter-processor interface groupings in a mesh. MOAB is used in several ways in various applications. MOAB serves as the underlying mesh data representation in the VERDE mesh verification code. MOAB can also be used as a mesh input mechanism, using mesh readers induded with MOAB, or as a t’anslator between mesh formats, using readers and writers included with MOAB.

  17. Mesh Oriented datABase

    2004-04-01

    MOAB is a component for representing and evaluating mesh data. MOAB can store stuctured and unstructured mesh, consisting of elements in the finite element "zoo". The functional interface to MOAB is simple yet powerful, allowing the representation of many types of metadata commonly found on the mesh. MOAB is optimized for efficiency in space and time, based on access to mesh in chunks rather than through individual entities, while also versatile enough to support individualmore » entity access. The MOAB data model consists of a mesh interface instance, mesh entities (vertices and elements), sets, and tags. Entities are addressed through handles rather than pointers, to allow the underlying representation of an entity to change without changing the handle to that entity. Sets are arbitrary groupings of mesh entities and other sets. Sets also support parent/child relationships as a relation distinct from sets containing other sets. The directed-graph provided by set parent/child relationships is useful for modeling topological relations from a geometric model or other metadata. Tags are named data which can be assigned to the mesh as a whole, individual entities, or sets. Tags are a mechanism for attaching data to individual entities and sets are a mechanism for describing relations between entities; the combination of these two mechanisms isa powerful yet simple interface for representing metadata or application-specific data. For example, sets and tags can be used together to describe geometric topology, boundary condition, and inter-processor interface groupings in a mesh. MOAB is used in several ways in various applications. MOAB serves as the underlying mesh data representation in the VERDE mesh verification code. MOAB can also be used as a mesh input mechanism, using mesh readers induded with MOAB, or as a t’anslator between mesh formats, using readers and writers included with MOAB.« less

  18. Solar central receiver heliostat reflector assembly

    DOEpatents

    Horton, Richard H.; Zdeb, John J.

    1980-01-01

    A heliostat reflector assembly for a solar central receiver system comprises a light-weight, readily assemblable frame which supports a sheet of stretchable reflective material and includes mechanism for selectively applying tension to and positioning the sheet to stretch it to optical flatness. The frame is mounted on and supported by a pipe pedestal assembly that, in turn, is installed in the ground. The frame is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e. central receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The frame may include a built-in system for testing for optical flatness of the reflector. The preferable geometric configuration of the reflector is octagonal; however, it may be other shapes, such as hexagonal, pentagonal or square. Several different embodiments of means for tensioning and positioning the reflector to achieve optical flatness are disclosed. The reflector assembly is based on the stretch frame concept which provides an extremely light-weight, simple, low-cost reflector assembly that may be driven for positioning and tracking by a light-weight, inexpensive drive system.

  19. Solar central receiver heliostat reflector assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, R.H.; Zdeb, J.J.

    1980-06-24

    A heliostat reflector assembly for a solar central receiver system comprises a light-weight, readily assemblable frame which supports a sheet of stretchable reflective material and includes mechanism for selectively applying tension to and positioning the sheet to stretch it to optical flatness. The frame is mounted on and supported by a pipe pedestal assembly that, in turn, is installed in the ground. The frame is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e., central receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The frame may include a built-in system for testing for optical flatness of the reflector. The preferable geometric configuration of the reflector is octagonal; however, it may be other shapes, such as hexagonal, pentagonal or square. Several different embodiments of means for tensioning and positioning the reflector to achieve optical flatness are disclosed. The reflector assembly is based on the stretch frame concept which provides an extremely light-weight, simple, low-cost reflector assembly that may be driven for positioning and tracking by a light-weight, inexpensive drive system. 14 claims.

  20. Solar central receiver heliostat reflector assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, R.H.; Zdeb, J.J.

    1980-06-24

    A heliostat reflector assembly for a solar central receiver system comprises a light-weight, readily assemblable frame which supports a sheet of stretchable reflective material and includes a mechanism for selectively applying tension to and positioning the sheet to stretch it to optical flatness. The frame is mounted on and supported by a pipe pedestal assembly that, in turn, is installed in the ground. The frame is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e. central receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The frame may include a built-in system for testing for optical flatness of the reflector. The preferable geometric configuration of the reflector is octagonal; however, it may be other shapes, such as hexagonal, pentagonal or square. Several different embodiments of means for tensioning and positioning the reflector to achieve optical flatness are disclosed. The reflector assembly is based on the stretch frame concept which provides an extremely light-weight, simple, low-cost reflector assembly that may be driven for positioning and tracking by a light-weight, inexpensive drive system. 14 figs.

  1. Analysis of reflector antenna system including frequency selective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, M. L.; Lee, S. W.; Fujikawa, G.

    1992-10-01

    Frequency selective surfaces (FSS's) are often used in spaceborne applications of reflector antennas due to their ability to allow multiple feeds to utilize the same reflector dish. The problems inherent in evaluating the FSS separately from the reflector system are discussed. A method of integrating the FSS effects into the reflector system analysis is presented. An example is given for the proposed Advanced Tracking and Delay Relay Satellite System (ATDRSS) single-access triband reflector antenna.

  2. Analysis of reflector antenna system including frequency selective surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M. L.; Lee, S. W.; Fujikawa, G.

    1992-01-01

    Frequency selective surfaces (FSS's) are often used in spaceborne applications of reflector antennas due to their ability to allow multiple feeds to utilize the same reflector dish. The problems inherent in evaluating the FSS separately from the reflector system are discussed. A method of integrating the FSS effects into the reflector system analysis is presented. An example is given for the proposed Advanced Tracking and Delay Relay Satellite System (ATDRSS) single-access triband reflector antenna.

  3. Backward Wave Couplers And Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassilopoulos, C.; Cozens, J. R.

    1987-09-01

    The analysis and experimental results for weakly perturbed, narrow band, backward wave couplers and fibre reflectors, will be presented. Conventional, co-directional fibre couplers - polished, fused or coaxial - can be designed to demonstrate a sufficient wavelength dependence for some filtering and multiplexing applications. While coupled bandwidths can be sufficiently reduced by weakening the coupling between the guides and hence increasing the interaction (beat) length, useful limits of a few nms are reached for interaction lengths of a few cms. These limitations in coupled bandwidth are considerably transformed for contra-directional coupling provided by a periodic perturbation of suitable pitch (half the guide wavelength) imposed on the coupler. The inverse relationship between bandwidth and interaction length still holds, but the magnitudes are substantially improved. Calculations show that we may expect sub-Angstrom bandwidths for interaction lengths in the order of 1cm. These extremely narrow band effects depend on the successful fabrication of regular, weak, periodic perturbations over relatively long fibre lengths. We have fabricated long gratings (~ 1cm) of periodicity ~ 0.27μm on D-shaped elliptical cored fibres as a first step towards narrow band couplers. These structures can be investigated by observing reflection characteristics at ~ 800nm and the latest results will be described. A contra-directional coupler may then be formed, by joining two dissimilar D-fibres in the polished-coupler configuration with a periodic structure in between them. Additionally, the design of a special twin-core fibre coupler will be described, and its potential as a backward-wave coupler will be examined.

  4. Surface accuracy and radiation pattern characteristics of mesh deployable refector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Miyoshi; Ebisui, Takashi; Okamato, Teruki; Orikasa, Teruaki; Sugimoto, Toshio; Iso, Akio

    To facilitate the growth of mobile satellite communications, both an increase in the Equivalent Isotropically Radiated Power (EIRP) of satellites and improved frequency reuse are required to achiveve compact size, low cost terminal usage, and high channel capacity. High gain and low sidelobe antenna technology are very important for high EIRP and frequency reuse, respectively. These requirements are expected to be met by using a large deployable mesh reflector antenna, which is the key technology for future multibeam moble communications systems. In this paper, surface accruracy and related electrical characteristics are studied using a TETRUS-(Tetra Trigonal Prism Truss) type deployable mesh reflector antenna. Surface accuracy and related electrical characteristics of reflector antennas becaue any distortion of the ideal paraboloidal configuration causes antenna patterns to deteriorate, thereby reducing reflector aperture efficiency and increasing sidelobe and grating lobe levels. The sidelobe and grating lobe characteristics are especially important in frequency reuse. First, we show the problem with the radiation pattern characteristics of TETUS antenna. We then propose a new antenna configuration called the 'HYBRID TETRUS' that improves these characteristics. The mechanical performances of two partial deployable models are also described. Mechanical testing results reveal agreement between the calculated and measured values and high rigidities.

  5. toolkit computational mesh conceptual model.

    SciTech Connect

    Baur, David G.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Cochran, William K.; Williams, Alan B.; Sjaardema, Gregory D.

    2010-03-01

    The Sierra Toolkit computational mesh is a software library intended to support massively parallel multi-physics computations on dynamically changing unstructured meshes. This domain of intended use is inherently complex due to distributed memory parallelism, parallel scalability, heterogeneity of physics, heterogeneous discretization of an unstructured mesh, and runtime adaptation of the mesh. Management of this inherent complexity begins with a conceptual analysis and modeling of this domain of intended use; i.e., development of a domain model. The Sierra Toolkit computational mesh software library is designed and implemented based upon this domain model. Software developers using, maintaining, or extending the Sierra Toolkit computational mesh library must be familiar with the concepts/domain model presented in this report.

  6. Cubit Adaptive Meshing Algorithm Library

    2004-09-01

    CAMAL (Cubit adaptive meshing algorithm library) is a software component library for mesh generation. CAMAL 2.0 includes components for triangle, quad and tetrahedral meshing. A simple Application Programmers Interface (API) takes a discrete boundary definition and CAMAL computes a quality interior unstructured grid. The triangle and quad algorithms may also import a geometric definition of a surface on which to define the grid. CAMAL’s triangle meshing uses a 3D space advancing front method, the quadmore » meshing algorithm is based upon Sandia’s patented paving algorithm and the tetrahedral meshing algorithm employs the GHS3D-Tetmesh component developed by INRIA, France.« less

  7. PMESH: A parallel mesh generator

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, D.D.

    1994-10-21

    The Parallel Mesh Generation (PMESH) Project is a joint LDRD effort by A Division and Engineering to develop a unique mesh generation system that can construct large calculational meshes (of up to 10{sup 9} elements) on massively parallel computers. Such a capability will remove a critical roadblock to unleashing the power of massively parallel processors (MPPs) for physical analysis. PMESH will support a variety of LLNL 3-D physics codes in the areas of electromagnetics, structural mechanics, thermal analysis, and hydrodynamics.

  8. Multigrid techniques for unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of current multigrid techniques for unstructured meshes is given. The basic principles of the multigrid approach are first outlined. Application of these principles to unstructured mesh problems is then described, illustrating various different approaches, and giving examples of practical applications. Advanced multigrid topics, such as the use of algebraic multigrid methods, and the combination of multigrid techniques with adaptive meshing strategies are dealt with in subsequent sections. These represent current areas of research, and the unresolved issues are discussed. The presentation is organized in an educational manner, for readers familiar with computational fluid dynamics, wishing to learn more about current unstructured mesh techniques.

  9. Multigrid for locally refined meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Y.

    1999-12-01

    A multilevel method for the solution of finite element schemes on locally refined meshes is introduced. For isotropic diffusion problems, the condition number of the two-level method is bounded independently of the mesh size and the discontinuities in the diffusion coefficient. The curves of discontinuity need not be aligned with the coarse mesh. Indeed, numerical applications with 10 levels of local refinement yield a rapid convergence of the corresponding 10-level, multigrid V-cycle and other multigrid cycles which are more suitable for parallelism even when the discontinuities are invisible on most of the coarse meshes.

  10. System dynamic simulation of precision segmented reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Choon-Foo; Lou, Michael C.

    1991-01-01

    A joint effort was undertaken on a Precision Segmented Reflector (PSR) Project. The missions in which the PSR is to be used will use large (up to 20 m in diameter) telescopes. The essential requirement for the telescopes is that the reflector surface of the primary mirror must be made extremely precise to allow no more than a few microns of errors and, additionally, this high surface precision must be maintained when the telescope is subjected to on-orbital mechanical and thermal disturbances. Based on the mass, size, and stability considerations, reflector surface formed by segmented, probably actively or passively controlled, composite panels are regarded as most suitable for future space based astronomical telescope applications. In addition to the design and fabrication of composite panels with a surface error of less than 3 microns RMS, PSR also develops related reflector structures, materials, control, and sensing technologies. As part of the planning effort for PSR Technology Demonstration, a system model which couples the reflector, consisting of panels, support truss and actuators, and the optical bench was assembled for dynamic simulations. Random vibration analyses using seismic data obtained from actual measurements at the test site designated for PSR Technology Demonstration are described.

  11. Freeform reflector design for LED street lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chen; Schreiber, Peter; Walkling, Andreas; Schierz, Christoph; Schwede, Maik; Gühne, Volker

    2011-10-01

    Faceted freeform reflectors were designed for intelligent street lighting with LED cluster arrays for main traffic roads. Special attention was paid to achieve highly efficient illumination on both wet and dry road surfaces. CIE reflection tables W4 and C2 were applied in the simulation for these two conditions, respectively. The reflector design started with plane facets, then - to avoid artifacts from the images of the individual LEDs - plane facets were replaced with cylindrical facets. To get even more flexibility for the design and optimization, freeform facets were employed, modeled by extruding two different conic curves together. Besides of achieving well-proportioned road luminance distribution, the basic shapes of the reflectors were formed to control stray light caused by multiple reflections within the reflector and by reflection of light from neighbor clusters within the cluster array. The merit functions include useful transmission of light to the road as well as overall and lengthwise uniformity according to road illumination standards. Due to the large amount of variables, the optimization was carried out sequentially facet by facet. The design loops included compromising with manufacturing limitations for plastics molding and thorough analysis of conformity with DIN EN 13201 standards for ME road lighting classes. The calculated reflector profiles are realized by plastic injection molding.

  12. Design of blended rolled edges for compact range main reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericksen, K. P.; Gupta, I. J.; Burnside, W. D.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure to design blended rolled edge terminations for arbitrary rim shape compact range main reflectors is presented. The reflector may be center-fed or offset-fed. The design procedure leads to a reflector which has a continuous and smooth surface. This procedure also ensures small diffracted fields from the junction between the paraboloid and the blended rolled edge while satisfying certain constraints regarding the maximum height of the reflector and minimum operating frequency of the system. The prescribed procedure is used to design several reflectors and the performance of these reflectors is presented.

  13. Critical wind effects on parabolic reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Marvin F.

    2004-09-01

    For decades designers of dish antennas and radio telescopes have known the aerodynamic properties of parabolic reflectors. However, site planners and end users are not necessarily versed in their properties, and so can place them on sites or use them in such a manner that the wind causes a maximum of disruption of the pointing and tracking performance. Parabolic reflectors make excellent airfoils, and as such act like an airplane wing in many respects. Having some knowledge of sensitive wind directions relative to the Line Of Sight (LOS) can lead a user to change his site selection or operating procedures to achieve the optimum pointing and tracking performance for most observations. This knowledge can also contribute information to help specify the necessary performance characteristics. This paper discusses the aerodynamic properties of parabolic reflectors so the reader can get a ready grasp of the issues.

  14. Test progress on the electrostatic membrane reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihora, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An extemely lightweight type of precision reflector antenna, being developed for potential deployment from the space shuttle, uses electrostatic forces to tension a thin membrane and form it into a concave reflector surface. The typical shuttle-deployed antenna would have a diameter of 100 meters and an RMS surface smoothness of 10 to 1 mm for operation at 1 to 10 GHz. NASA Langley Research Center built and is currently testing a subscale (16 foot diameter) model of the membrane reflector portion of such an antenna. Preliminary test results and principal factors affecting surface quality are addressed. Factors included are the effect of the perimeter boundary, splicing of the membrane, the long-scale smoothness of commercial membranes, and the spatial controllability of the membrane using voltage adjustments to alter the electrostatic pressure. Only readily available commercial membranes are considered.

  15. Compensation for primary reflector wavefront error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinel, Aden B. (Inventor); Meinel, Marjorie P. (Inventor); Stacy, John E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    In a telescope having primary and secondary reflectors, wherein the actual primary reflector surface deviates from an ideal primary reflector surface, such deviation is compensated for. At least one intermediate element forms an image of the primary surface onto the secondary surface, so each point on the secondary surface corresponds to a point on the primary surface. The secondary surface is formed with a deviation from an ideal secondary surface, with the piston distance of each point on the actual secondary surface equal to the piston distance of a corresponding point on the actual primary surface from the ideal primary surface. It is found that this results in electromagnetic (e.g., light) rays which strike a deviating area of the actual primary surface being brought to the same focus as if the actual primary surface did not have a deviation from an ideal primary surface.

  16. Figure control concepts for segmented reflector telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, D.; Chu, C. C.; Ih, C.-H. C.; Wang, S. J.; Ryaciotaki-Boussalis, H. A.

    1989-01-01

    Control analysis activities related to the development of figure control technologies for large space telescopes with precision segmented actively controlled primary reflectors are reviewed. The Precision Segmented Reflector (PSR) configuration is described along with the development and use of the PSR models. Geometric and dynamic models, characterization of figure estimation errors and optimal sensor placement, and the development of quasi-static and dynamic control concepts are outlined. The structure of a quasi-static controller is presented, that utilizes edge sensor measurements to estimate displacement errors at the actuator level and generates figure correction commands. The second approach considers decentralization of the reflector system at the panel level, while the third considers decentralization at the actuator level.

  17. Composite materials for precision space reflector panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.; Funk, Joan G.; Bowles, David E.; Towell, Timothy W.; Connell, John W.

    1992-01-01

    One of the critical technology needs of large precision reflectors for future astrophysical and optical communications satellites lies in the area of structural materials. Results from a materials research and development program at NASA Langley Research Center to provide materials for these reflector applications are discussed. Advanced materials that meet the reflector panel requirements are identified, and thermal, mechanical and durability properties of candidate materials after exposure to simulated space environments are compared. A parabolic, graphite-phenolic honeycomb composite panel having a surface accuracy of 70.8 microinches rms and an areal weight of 1.17 lbm/sq ft was fabricated with T50/ERL1962 facesheets, a PAEI thermoplastic surface film, and Al and SiO(x) coatings.

  18. Risk Factors for Mesh Exposure after Transvaginal Mesh Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Ke; Lu, Yong-Xian; Shen, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Ying-Hui; Wang, Wen-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mesh exposure after surgery continues to be a clinical challenge for urogynecological surgeons. The purpose of this study was to explore the risk factors for polypropylene (PP) mesh exposure after transvaginal mesh (TVM) surgery. Methods: This study included 195 patients with advanced pelvic organ prolapse (POP), who underwent TVM from January 2004 to December 2012 at the First Affiliated Hospital of Chinese PLA General Hospital. Clinical data were evaluated including patient's demography, TVM type, concomitant procedures, operation time, blood loss, postoperative morbidity, and mesh exposure. Mesh exposure was identified through postoperative vaginal examination. Statistical analysis was performed to identify risk factors for mesh exposure. Results: Two-hundred and nine transvaginal PP meshes were placed, including 194 in the anterior wall and 15 in the posterior wall. Concomitant tension-free vaginal tape was performed in 61 cases. The mean follow-up time was 35.1 ± 23.6 months. PP mesh exposure was identified in 32 cases (16.4%), with 31 in the anterior wall and 1 in the posterior wall. Significant difference was found in operating time and concomitant procedures between exposed and nonexposed groups (F = 7.443, P = 0.007; F = 4.307, P = 0.039, respectively). Binary logistic regression revealed that the number of concomitant procedures and operation time were risk factors for mesh exposure (P = 0.001, P = 0.043). Conclusion: Concomitant procedures and increased operating time increase the risk for postoperative mesh exposure in patients undergoing TVM surgery for POP. PMID:27453227

  19. Invisible metallic mesh

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Dexin; Lu, Ling; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Ran, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    A solid material possessing identical electromagnetic properties as air has yet to be found in nature. Such a medium of arbitrary shape would neither reflect nor refract light at any angle of incidence in free space. Here, we introduce nonscattering corrugated metallic wires to construct such a medium. This was accomplished by aligning the dark-state frequencies in multiple scattering channels of a single wire. Analytical solutions, full-wave simulations, and microwave measurement results on 3D printed samples show omnidirectional invisibility in any configuration. This invisible metallic mesh can improve mechanical stability, electrical conduction, and heat dissipation of a system, without disturbing the electromagnetic design. Our approach is simple, robust, and scalable to higher frequencies. PMID:26884208

  20. Invisible metallic mesh.

    PubMed

    Ye, Dexin; Lu, Ling; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin; Ran, Lixin

    2016-03-01

    A solid material possessing identical electromagnetic properties as air has yet to be found in nature. Such a medium of arbitrary shape would neither reflect nor refract light at any angle of incidence in free space. Here, we introduce nonscattering corrugated metallic wires to construct such a medium. This was accomplished by aligning the dark-state frequencies in multiple scattering channels of a single wire. Analytical solutions, full-wave simulations, and microwave measurement results on 3D printed samples show omnidirectional invisibility in any configuration. This invisible metallic mesh can improve mechanical stability, electrical conduction, and heat dissipation of a system, without disturbing the electromagnetic design. Our approach is simple, robust, and scalable to higher frequencies. PMID:26884208

  1. Controls on the Geometry of Accretion Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolovick, M.; Bell, R. E.; Buck, W. R.; Creyts, T. T.

    2012-12-01

    Basal accretion occurs when meltwater refreezes onto the base of an ice sheet. Thick packages (900-1100m) of accretion ice are identified in radio-echo sounding data as plume-shaped reflectors above the basal reflector and below isochronous layers of meteoric ice. Accretion reflectors have been imaged in both Antarctica and Greenland rising to a height of 1/3-1/2 of the ice sheet thickness and extending in the flow direction as far as 100 km. Here we use a two-dimensional thermomechanical higher order flowline model coupled to a basal hydrology model to investigate the freezing rates and energy budgets of basal accretion processes. Simple order-of-magnitude estimates for the freezing rate based on the observed height of the reflectors and the assumption that all ice under the observed reflector consists of accretion ice indicate very large freezing rates, on the order of 10-100 cm/yr. We test two end-member possibilities for the formation of the basal accretion bodies: high accretion rates and complex basal deformation. The first possibility is that the freezing rates are very large. The second possibility is that the ice under the observed reflector is a mixture of accreted and meteoric ice. If the ice below the accretion reflector is a mixture, the freezing rates can be much smaller than the simple estimates. If the freezing rates are small, then complex basal deformation must be invoked to cause accretion ice to override meteoric ice to a height of 1/3-1/2 the ice thickness. In the basal deformation case, low freezing rates predict a maximum thickness of 100-200m of accretion ice. The remaining ice beneath the reflector will be deformed meteoric ice. Both cases make testable predictions. If the accretion rates are very high and supercooling is the dominant process, accretion cannot use up all of the subglacial water. In this high rate scenario there will be water at the melting point exiting the accretion site. Alternatively if the accretion is part of a complex

  2. Nuclear Transmutations in HFIR's Beryllium Reflector and Their Impact on Reactor Operation and Reflector Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, David; Maldonado, G Ivan; Primm, Trent; Proctor, Larry Duane

    2012-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory utilizes a large cylindrical beryllium reflector that is subdivided into three concentric regions and encompasses the compact reactor core. Nuclear transmutations caused by neutron activation occur in the beryllium reflector regions, which leads to unwanted neutron absorbing and radiation emitting isotopes. During the past year, two topics related to the HFIR beryllium reflector were reviewed. The first topic included studying the neutron poison (helium-3 and lithium-6) buildup in the reflector regions and its affect on beginning-of-cycle reactivity. A new methodology was developed to predict the reactivity impact and estimated symmetrical critical control element positions as a function of outage time between cycles due to helium-3 buildup and was shown to be in better agreement with actual symmetrical critical control element position data than the current methodology. The second topic included studying the composition of the beryllium reflector regions at discharge as well as during decay to assess the viability of transporting, storing, and ultimately disposing the reflector regions currently stored in the spent fuel pool. The post-irradiation curie inventories were used to determine whether the reflector regions are discharged as transuranic waste or become transuranic waste during the decay period for disposal purposes and to determine the nuclear hazard category, which may affect the controls invoked for transportation and temporary storage. Two of the reflector regions were determined to be transuranic waste at discharge and the other region was determined to become transuranic waste in less than 2 years after being discharged due to the initial uranium content (0.0044 weight percent uranium). It was also concluded that all three of the reflector regions could be classified as nuclear hazard category 3 (potential for localized consequences only).

  3. Laparoscopic paracolostomy hernia mesh repair.

    PubMed

    Virzí, Giuseppe; Giuseppe, Virzí; Scaravilli, Francesco; Francesco, Scaravilli; Ragazzi, Salvatore; Salvatore, Ragazzi; Piazza, Diego; Diego, Piazza

    2007-12-01

    Paracolostomy hernia is a common occurrence, representing a late complication of stoma surgery. Different surgical techniques have been proposed to repair the wall defect, but the lowest recurrence rates are associated with the use of mesh. We present the case report of a patient in which laparoscopic paracolostomy hernia mesh repair has been successfully performed. PMID:18097321

  4. Quadrilateral finite element mesh coarsening

    SciTech Connect

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16

    Techniques for coarsening a quadrilateral mesh are described. These techniques include identifying a coarsening region within the quadrilateral mesh to be coarsened. Quadrilateral elements along a path through the coarsening region are removed. Node pairs along opposite sides of the path are identified. The node pairs along the path are then merged to collapse the path.

  5. Adaptive and Unstructured Mesh Cleaving

    PubMed Central

    Bronson, Jonathan R.; Sastry, Shankar P.; Levine, Joshua A.; Whitaker, Ross T.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new strategy for boundary conforming meshing that decouples the problem of building tetrahedra of proper size and shape from the problem of conforming to complex, non-manifold boundaries. This approach is motivated by the observation that while several methods exist for adaptive tetrahedral meshing, they typically have difficulty at geometric boundaries. The proposed strategy avoids this conflict by extracting the boundary conforming constraint into a secondary step. We first build a background mesh having a desired set of tetrahedral properties, and then use a generalized stenciling method to divide, or “cleave”, these elements to get a set of conforming tetrahedra, while limiting the impacts cleaving has on element quality. In developing this new framework, we make several technical contributions including a new method for building graded tetrahedral meshes as well as a generalization of the isosurface stuffing and lattice cleaving algorithms to unstructured background meshes. PMID:26137171

  6. Large Deployable Reflector Technologies for Future European Telecom and Earth Observation Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihle, A.; Breunig, E.; Dadashvili, L.; Migliorelli, M.; Scialino, L.; van't Klosters, K.; Santiago-Prowald, J.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents requirements, analysis and design results for European large deployable reflectors (LDR) for space applications. For telecommunications, the foreseeable use of large reflectors is associated to the continuous demand for improved performance of mobile services. On the other hand, several earth observation (EO) missions can be identified carrying either active or passive remote sensing instruments (or both), in which a large effective aperture is needed e.g. BIOMASS. From the European point of view there is a total dependence of USA industry as such LDRs are not available from European suppliers. The RESTEO study is part of a number of ESA led activities to facilitate European LDR development. This paper is focused on the structural-mechanical aspects of this study. We identify the general requirements for LDRs with special emphasis on launcher accommodation for EO mission. In the next step, optimal concepts for the LDR structure and the RF-Surface are reviewed. Regarding the RF surface, both, a knitted metal mesh and a shell membrane based on carbon fibre reinforced silicon (CFRS) are considered. In terms of the backing structure, the peripheral ring concept is identified as most promising and a large number of options for the deployment kinematics are discussed. Of those, pantographic kinematics and a conical peripheral ring are selected. A preliminary design for these two most promising LDR concepts is performed which includes static, modal and kinematic simulation and also techniques to generate the reflector nets.

  7. Dual annular rotating "windowed" nuclear reflector reactor control system

    DOEpatents

    Jacox, Michael G.; Drexler, Robert L.; Hunt, Robert N. M.; Lake, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core.

  8. Computer prediction of dual reflector antenna radiation properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, C.

    1981-01-01

    A program for calculating radiation patterns for reflector antennas with either smooth analytic surfaces or with surfaces composed of a number of panels. Techniques based on the geometrical optics (GO) approach were used in tracing rays over the following regions: from a feed antenna to the first reflector surface (subreflector); from this reflector to a larger reflector surface (main reflector); and from the main reflector to a mathematical plane (aperture plane) in front of the main reflector. The equations of GO were also used to calculate the reflected field components for each ray making use of the feed radiation pattern and the parameters defining the surfaces of the two reflectors. These resulting fields form an aperture distribution which is integrated numerically to compute the radiation pattern for a specified set of angles.

  9. Adaptive Skin Meshes Coarsening for Biomolecular Simulation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xinwei; Koehl, Patrice

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we present efficient algorithms for generating hierarchical molecular skin meshes with decreasing size and guaranteed quality. Our algorithms generate a sequence of coarse meshes for both the surfaces and the bounded volumes. Each coarser surface mesh is adaptive to the surface curvature and maintains the topology of the skin surface with guaranteed mesh quality. The corresponding tetrahedral mesh is conforming to the interface surface mesh and contains high quality tetrahedral that decompose both the interior of the molecule and the surrounding region (enclosed in a sphere). Our hierarchical tetrahedral meshes have a number of advantages that will facilitate fast and accurate multigrid PDE solvers. Firstly, the quality of both the surface triangulations and tetrahedral meshes is guaranteed. Secondly, the interface in the tetrahedral mesh is an accurate approximation of the molecular boundary. In particular, all the boundary points lie on the skin surface. Thirdly, our meshes are Delaunay meshes. Finally, the meshes are adaptive to the geometry. PMID:21779137

  10. Adaptive Skin Meshes Coarsening for Biomolecular Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xinwei; Koehl, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present efficient algorithms for generating hierarchical molecular skin meshes with decreasing size and guaranteed quality. Our algorithms generate a sequence of coarse meshes for both the surfaces and the bounded volumes. Each coarser surface mesh is adaptive to the surface curvature and maintains the topology of the skin surface with guaranteed mesh quality. The corresponding tetrahedral mesh is conforming to the interface surface mesh and contains high quality tetrahedral that decompose both the interior of the molecule and the surrounding region (enclosed in a sphere). Our hierarchical tetrahedral meshes have a number of advantages that will facilitate fast and accurate multigrid PDE solvers. Firstly, the quality of both the surface triangulations and tetrahedral meshes is guaranteed. Secondly, the interface in the tetrahedral mesh is an accurate approximation of the molecular boundary. In particular, all the boundary points lie on the skin surface. Thirdly, our meshes are Delaunay meshes. Finally, the meshes are adaptive to the geometry. PMID:21779137

  11. Welding torch with arc light reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A welding torch arc light reflector is disclosed for welding torches having optical viewing systems. A schematic of a welding torch having an internal coaxial viewing system consisting of a lens which focuses the field of view of the weld scene of the workpiece onto the end of the fiberoptic bundle is provided. The transmitted image of the fiberoptic bundle is provided to a camera lens which focuses it onto a TV sensor array for transmission. To improve the parity of the image of the monitoring system, an arc light reflector is shown fitted to the end of the torch housing or gas cup. The arc light reflector has an internal conical section portion which is polished to serve as a mirror which reflects the bright arc light back onto the darker areas of the weld area and thereby provides a more detailed image for the monitoring system. The novelty of the invention lies in the use of an arc light reflector on welding torches having optical viewing systems.

  12. Making Precise Antenna Reflectors For Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, G. Richard; Wanhainen, Joyce S.; Ketelsen, Dean A.

    1994-01-01

    In improved method of fabrication of precise, lightweight antenna reflectors for millimeter wavelengths, required precise contours of reflecting surfaces obtained by computer numberically controlled machining of surface layers bonded to lightweight, rigid structures. Achievable precision greater than that of older, more-expensive fabrication method involving multiple steps of low- and high-temperature molding, in which some accuracy lost at each step.

  13. Wirelessly Controllable Inflated Electroactive Polymer (EAP) Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea

    2005-01-01

    Inflatable membrane reflectors are attractive for deployable, large aperture, lightweight optical and microwave systems in micro-gravity space environment. However, any fabrication flaw or temperature variation may results in significant aberration of the surface. Even for a perfectly fabricated inflatable membrane mirror with uniform thickness, theory shows it will form a Hencky curve surface but a desired parabolic or spherical surface. Precision control of the surfaceshape of extremely flexible membrane structures is a critical challenge for the success of this technology. Wirelessly controllable inflated reflectors made of electroactive polymers (EAP) are proposed in this paper. A finite element model was configured to predict the behavior of the inflatable EAP membranes under pre-strains, pressures and distributed electric charges on the surface. To explore the controllability of the inflatable EAP reflectors, an iteration algorism was developed to find the required electric actuation for correcting the aberration of the Hencky curve to the desired parabolic curve. The correction capability of the reflectors with available EAP materials was explored numerically and is presented in this paper.

  14. Advanced sunflower antenna concept development. [stowable reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of stowing large solid antenna reflectors in the shuttle was demonstrated for applications with 40 foot apertures at frequencies of 100 GHz. Concepts allowing extension of the basic concept to 80-foot apertures operable at 60 GHz were identified.

  15. Collapsible structure for an antenna reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trubert, M. R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A collapsible support for an antenna reflector for use in supporting spacecraft antennas is described. The support has a regid base and a number of struts which are pivoted at the base. The deployment of the struts and their final configuration for supporting the antenna are illustrated.

  16. Don't Forget the Reflector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, N.

    1991-01-01

    Various modes of reflection are classified and practical examples of devices, such as cat's eyes, are discussed. Typical light rays are traced through several systems, providing exercises with varying degrees of difficulty. Corner-cube retroreflectors, glass spheres, reflecting luminaries, light concentrators, parabolic reflectors, and off-set and…

  17. Electrically thin flat lenses and reflectors.

    PubMed

    Ruphuy, Miguel; Siddiqui, Omar; Ramahi, Omar M

    2015-09-01

    We introduce electrically thin dielectric lenses and reflectors that focus a plane wave based on the principles of phase compensation and constructive wave interference. Phase compensation is achieved by arranging thin rectangular slabs having different dielectric permittivity according to a permittivity profile obtained through analytic design equations. All incident rays parallel to the optical axis converge to a focal point with equalized optical paths resulting in constructive interference. Plane wave simulations indicate strong focusing, even in the presence of impedance mismatch between free space and the dielectric layers composing the lens. We demonstrate focusing at 9.45 GHz using a lens fabricated with commercially available dielectric materials. In addition to focusing, the flat lens proposed here demonstrates relatively high power gain at the focal point. We also present a flat reflector based on the same concept. We believe that the proposed dielectric lens and reflector are strong candidates to replace heavy metallic dishes and reflectors used in a variety of applications, especially satellites. PMID:26367439

  18. Heat dissipation in water-cooled reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozai, Toyoki

    1994-01-01

    The energy balance of a lamp varies with the thermal and optical characteristics of the reflector. The photosynthetic radiation efficiency of lamps, defined as input power divided by photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm) emitted from the lamp ranges between 0.17 and 0.26. The rest of the energy input is wasted as longwave (3000 nm and over) and non-PAR shortwave radiation (from 700 nm to 3000 nm), convective, and conductive heat from the lamp, reflector, and ballast, and simply for increasing the cooling load. Furthermore, some portion of the PAR is uselessly absorbed by the inner walls, shelves, vessels, etc. and some portion of the PAR received by the plantlets is converted into sensible and latent heat. More than 98% of the energy input is probably converted into heat, with only less than 2% of the energy input being converted into chemical energy as carbohydrates by photosynthesis. Therefore, it is essential to reduce the generation of heat in the culture room in order to reduce the cooling load. Through use of a water-cooled reflector, the generation of convective and conductive heat and longwave radiation from the reflector can be reduced, without reduction of PAR.

  19. Perception for a large deployable reflector telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. M.; Swanson, P. N.; Meinel, A. B.; Meinel, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Optical science and technology concepts for a large deployable reflector for far-infrared and submillimeter astronomy from above the earth's atmosphere are discussed. Requirements given at the Asilomar Conference are reviewed. The technical challenges of this large-aperture (about 20-meter) telescope, which will be diffraction limited in the infrared, are highlighted in a brief discussion of one particular configuration.

  20. Modeling For Stabilization Of Segmented Telescope Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ih, Che-Hang C.; Boussalis, Helen A.

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses mathematical modeling of vibrations and active control to suppress vibrations of large, segmented telescope reflector. Vibrating structure treated as collection of substructures, each initially treated separately. Vibrations suppressed considerably, in comparison with open-loop vibration-attenuation mechanism.

  1. 33 CFR 118.120 - Radar reflectors and racons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Radar reflectors and racons. 118... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.120 Radar reflectors and racons. The District Commander may require or authorize the installation of radar reflectors and racons on bridge structures,...

  2. 33 CFR 118.120 - Radar reflectors and racons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Radar reflectors and racons. 118... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.120 Radar reflectors and racons. The District Commander may require or authorize the installation of radar reflectors and racons on bridge structures,...

  3. 33 CFR 118.120 - Radar reflectors and racons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Radar reflectors and racons. 118... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.120 Radar reflectors and racons. The District Commander may require or authorize the installation of radar reflectors and racons on bridge structures,...

  4. 33 CFR 118.120 - Radar reflectors and racons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Radar reflectors and racons. 118... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.120 Radar reflectors and racons. The District Commander may require or authorize the installation of radar reflectors and racons on bridge structures,...

  5. 33 CFR 118.120 - Radar reflectors and racons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Radar reflectors and racons. 118... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.120 Radar reflectors and racons. The District Commander may require or authorize the installation of radar reflectors and racons on bridge structures,...

  6. Streaming Compression of Hexahedral Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Isenburg, M; Courbet, C

    2010-02-03

    We describe a method for streaming compression of hexahedral meshes. Given an interleaved stream of vertices and hexahedral our coder incrementally compresses the mesh in the presented order. Our coder is extremely memory efficient when the input stream documents when vertices are referenced for the last time (i.e. when it contains topological finalization tags). Our coder then continuously releases and reuses data structures that no longer contribute to compressing the remainder of the stream. This means in practice that our coder has only a small fraction of the whole mesh in memory at any time. We can therefore compress very large meshes - even meshes that do not file in memory. Compared to traditional, non-streaming approaches that load the entire mesh and globally reorder it during compression, our algorithm trades a less compact compressed representation for significant gains in speed, memory, and I/O efficiency. For example, on the 456k hexahedra 'blade' mesh, our coder is twice as fast and uses 88 times less memory (only 3.1 MB) with the compressed file increasing about 3% in size. We also present the first scheme for predictive compression of properties associated with hexahedral cells.

  7. Predicted and measured performance of a shaped reflector in a dual-gridded reflector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, G. D.; Malik, D. P. S.

    Current and proposed satellite communications systems demand dual-linearly polarized transmit/receive antennas for contoured and/or multiple-beam coverages. The proven means of satisfying these requirements is by the use of dual-gridded reflectors with multiple feed blocks for a contoured beam. In this paper practical issues and advantages concerning the choice of using a shaped reflector to replace one of the multiple feed antennas (MFAs) within a dual-gridded pair are addressed. For single contoured beam applications a shaped reflector has several important advantages. Primarily it allows a single feed system to replace a whole feed cluster and associated beamforming networks. In a study for the Orion satellites this resulted in a total mass saving of 7.5 kg per feed block and a considerable reduction in hardware complexity. This resulted in a total mass saving of 15 kg which translates to an extra 6 months life for the spacecraft. The use of a single focussed feed also results in the illumination efficiency being improved by approximately 20%. Interestingly the requirements for the Orion satellites are for both spot beams of one polarization and for a contoured beam of the orthogonal polarization to cover all the spots, for both North America and Europe. These requirements have been met by the use of two dual-gridded reflector systems; one antenna in each system being a multiple-beam-antenna and the other a shaped reflector. This paper uses as an example a realistic MFA design devised during the Orion contract procurement stage and its performance is compared with that of an equivalent shaped reflector design optimized at single and multiple frequencies. The susceptibility to predict in service thermal distortions of the two designs is then assessed. Finally some recent results are presented of measured and predicted feed cross-polar radiation collimated by a gridded shaped reflector; the feed being at the focus of an unshaped reflector behind the shaped dish.

  8. 21 CFR 878.3300 - Surgical mesh.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3300 Surgical mesh. (a) Identification... acetabular and cement restrictor mesh used during orthopedic surgery. (b) Classification. Class II....

  9. 21 CFR 878.3300 - Surgical mesh.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3300 Surgical mesh. (a) Identification... acetabular and cement restrictor mesh used during orthopedic surgery. (b) Classification. Class II....

  10. 21 CFR 878.3300 - Surgical mesh.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3300 Surgical mesh. (a) Identification... acetabular and cement restrictor mesh used during orthopedic surgery. (b) Classification. Class II....

  11. Nanowire mesh solar fuels generator

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Chan, Candace; Sun, Jianwei; Liu, Bin

    2016-05-24

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to a nanowire mesh solar fuels generator. In one aspect, a nanowire mesh solar fuels generator includes (1) a photoanode configured to perform water oxidation and (2) a photocathode configured to perform water reduction. The photocathode is in electrical contact with the photoanode. The photoanode may include a high surface area network of photoanode nanowires. The photocathode may include a high surface area network of photocathode nanowires. In some embodiments, the nanowire mesh solar fuels generator may include an ion conductive polymer infiltrating the photoanode and the photocathode in the region where the photocathode is in electrical contact with the photoanode.

  12. Passive fathometer reflector identification with phase shift modeling.

    PubMed

    Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni; Gerstoft, Peter

    2016-07-01

    In passive fathometer processing, the presence of wavelets in the estimate of the medium's Green's function corresponds to the location of reflectors in the seabed; amplitudes are related to seabed properties. Bayesian methods have been successful in identifying reflectors that define layer interfaces. Further work, however, revealed that phase shifts are occasionally present in the wavelets and hinder accurate layer identification for some reflectors. With a Gibbs sampler that computes probability densities of reflector depths, strengths of the reflections, and wavelet phase shifts, the significance of phase shift modeling in successful estimation of reflectors and their strengths is demonstrated. PMID:27475201

  13. Augmentation mentoplasty using Mersilene mesh.

    PubMed

    McCollough, E G; Hom, D B; Weigel, M T; Anderson, J R

    1990-10-01

    Many different materials are available for augmentation mentoplasty. However, the optimal implant material for chin implantation has yet to be found. During the past several years, a number of experienced surgeons have turned to the use of Mersilene mesh. Mersilene mesh is a non-absorbable Dacron polyester fiber that can be conformed easily into layers to achieve tailored dimensions and shape. At the McCollough Plastic Surgery Clinic PA, Birmingham, Ala, 277 patients over a 10-year period underwent chin augmentation with Mersilene mesh implants. The material provides excellent tensile strength, durability, and surgical adaptability. The overall complication rate was 3.2% (nine patients); infection rate, 2.5% (seven patients); and removal secondary to infection, 1.7% (five patients). Based on this 10-year experience, Mersilene mesh remains our material of choice for chin augmentation. PMID:2206500

  14. Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac-Neice, Peter; Olson, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement Library (PARAMESH) is a package of Fortran 90 subroutines designed to provide a computer programmer with an easy route to extension of (1) a previously written serial code that uses a logically Cartesian structured mesh into (2) a parallel code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Alternatively, in its simplest use, and with minimal effort, PARAMESH can operate as a domain-decomposition tool for users who want to parallelize their serial codes but who do not wish to utilize adaptivity. The package builds a hierarchy of sub-grids to cover the computational domain of a given application program, with spatial resolution varying to satisfy the demands of the application. The sub-grid blocks form the nodes of a tree data structure (a quad-tree in two or an oct-tree in three dimensions). Each grid block has a logically Cartesian mesh. The package supports one-, two- and three-dimensional models.

  15. Gradient scaling for nonuniform meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Margolin, L.G.; Ruppel, H.M.; Demuth, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the effect of nonuniform meshes on the accuracy of finite-difference calculations of fluid flow. In particular, when a simple shock propagates through a nonuniform mesh, one may fail to model the jump conditions across the shock even when the equations are differenced in manifestly conservative fashion. We develop an approximate dispersion analysis of the numerical equations and identify the source of the mesh dependency with the form of the artificial viscosity. We then derive an algebraic correction to the numerical equations - a scaling factor for the pressure gradient - to essentially eliminate the mesh dependency. We present several calculations to illustrate our theory. We conclude with an alternate interpretation of our results. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Mersiline mesh in premaxillary augmentation.

    PubMed

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2005-01-01

    Premaxillary retrusion may distort the aesthetic appearance of the columella, lip, and nasal tip. This defect is characteristically seen in, but not limited to, patients with cleft lip nasal deformity. This study investigated 60 patients presenting with premaxillary deficiencies in which Mersiline mesh was used to augment the premaxilla. All the cases had surgery using the external rhinoplasty technique. Two methods of augmentation with Mersiline mesh were used: the Mersiline roll technique, for the cases with central symmetric deficiencies, and the Mersiline packing technique, for the cases with asymmetric deficiencies. Premaxillary augmentation with Mersiline mesh proved to be simple technically, easy to perform, and not associated with any complications. Periodic follow-up evaluation for a mean period of 32 months (range, 12-98 months) showed that an adequate degree of premaxillary augmentation was maintained with no clinically detectable resorption of the mesh implant. PMID:15959688

  17. Unstructured mesh methods for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, J.; Morgan, K.; Peiro, J.

    1990-01-01

    Mesh generation methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are outlined. Geometric modeling is discussed. An advancing front method is described. Flow past a two engine Falcon aeroplane is studied. An algorithm and associated data structure called the alternating digital tree, which efficiently solves the geometric searching problem is described. The computation of an initial approximation to the steady state solution of a given poblem is described. Mesh generation for transient flows is described.

  18. Unstructured mesh methods for CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peraire, J.; Morgan, K.; Peiro, J.

    Mesh generation methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are outlined. Geometric modeling is discussed. An advancing front method is described. Flow past a two engine Falcon aeroplane is studied. An algorithm and associated data structure called the alternating digital tree, which efficiently solves the geometric searching problem is described. The computation of an initial approximation to the steady state solution of a given poblem is described. Mesh generation for transient flows is described.

  19. Image-driven mesh optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, P; Turk, G

    2001-01-05

    We describe a method of improving the appearance of a low vertex count mesh in a manner that is guided by rendered images of the original, detailed mesh. This approach is motivated by the fact that greedy simplification methods often yield meshes that are poorer than what can be represented with a given number of vertices. Our approach relies on edge swaps and vertex teleports to alter the mesh connectivity, and uses the downhill simplex method to simultaneously improve vertex positions and surface attributes. Note that this is not a simplification method--the vertex count remains the same throughout the optimization. At all stages of the optimization the changes are guided by a metric that measures the differences between rendered versions of the original model and the low vertex count mesh. This method creates meshes that are geometrically faithful to the original model. Moreover, the method takes into account more subtle aspects of a model such as surface shading or whether cracks are visible between two interpenetrating parts of the model.

  20. Contour mode resonators with acoustic reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; Fleming, James G.; Tuck, Melanie R.

    2008-06-10

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) resonator is disclosed which has a linear or ring-shaped acoustic resonator suspended above a substrate by an acoustic reflector. The acoustic resonator can be formed with a piezoelectric material (e.g. aluminum nitride, zinc oxide or PZT), or using an electrostatically-actuated material. The acoustic reflector (also termed an acoustic mirror) uses alternating sections of a relatively low acoustic impedance Z.sub.L material and a relatively high acoustic impedance Z.sub.H material to isolate the acoustic resonator from the substrate. The MEM resonator, which can be formed on a silicon substrate with conventional CMOS circuitry, has applications for forming oscillators, rf filters, and acoustic sensors.

  1. Contact cleaning of polymer film solar reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansom, Christopher; Fernández-García, Aránzazu; Sutter, Florian; Almond, Heather; King, Peter

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the accelerated ageing of polymer film reflecting surfaces under the conditions to be found during contact cleaning of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) collectors in the presence of dust and sand particles. In these situations, contact cleaning using brushes and water is required to clean the reflecting surfaces. Whilst suitable for glass reflectors, this paper discusses the effects of existing cleaning processes on the optical and visual properties of polymer film surfaces, and then describes the development of a more benign but effective contact cleaning process for cleaning polymer reflectors. The effects of a range of cleaning brushes are discussed, with and without the presence of water, in the presence of sand and dust particles from selected representative locations. Reflectance measurements and visual inspection shows that a soft cleaning brush with a small amount of water can clean polymer film reflecting surfaces without inflicting surface damage or reducing specular reflectance.

  2. Ideal distributed Bragg reflectors and resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.J.

    1988-05-17

    The method of designing an ideal distributed-Bragg reflector for a microwave waveguide is described comprising the steps of: selecting a signal waveform for propagation as a symmetric traveling wave within the reflector; and determining those surfaces which do not interfere with the symmetric traveling wave having a transverse magnetic polarization by solving the equation sin(k/sub y/Y)=sin(ky..delta..)sinP(k/sub x/x) for horizontally aligned surfaces and the equation sin(k/sub x/x)=sin(k/sub x/..delta..)sin/sup r/(k/sub y/Y) for vertically aligned surfaces; where k/sub y/ is the transverse wave number, k/sub x/ is the axial wave number, p=ky/kx, r=kx,ky, and ..delta.. is set equal to the amplitude of the corrugation, being the transverse spacing at a surface boundary between adjacent horizontally aligned surfaces.

  3. Method and system for mesh network embedded devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ray (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and system for managing mesh network devices. A mesh network device with integrated features creates an N-way mesh network with a full mesh network topology or a partial mesh network topology.

  4. Adjusting Surfaces Of Large Antenna Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Adelman, Howard M.; Bailey, Marion C.; Hoftka, Raphael T.

    1989-01-01

    New approach more effective than traditional rms-surface-distortion approach. Optimization procedure for control of shape of reflector of large space antenna (LSA). Main feature is shape-controlling mathematical mechanism driven by need to satisfy explicit EM design requirements. Uses standard finite-element structural analysis, aperture-integration EM analysis, and constrained optimization techniques to predict set of actuator inputs that improves performance of antenna while minimizing applied control effort. Procedure applicable to wide variety of LSA concepts.

  5. Measuring Shapes Of Reflectors By Microwave Holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Pair of reports discusses theoretical foundation and recent theoretical and practical developments in use of microwave holography to measure surfaces of microwave antennas. (Second report abbreviated version of first report.) Microwave holographic measurements provide acceptable accuracy and are more convenient and less time consuming than optical and mechanical measurements, especially where measurements repeated. Microwave holographyic metrology of lare reflectors, first reported in 1976, improved into accurate technique with potential industrial applications.

  6. Vacuum deposited polymer/silver reflector material

    SciTech Connect

    Affinito, J.; Martin, P.; Gross, M.; Bennett, W.

    1994-07-01

    Weatherable, low cost, front surface, solar reflectors on flexible substrates would be highly desirable for lamination to solar concentrator panels. The method to be described in this paper may permit such reflector material to be fabricated for less than 50 cents per square foot. Vacuum deposited Polymer/Silver/Polymer reflectors and Fabry-Perot interference filters were fabricated in a vacuum web coating operation on polyester substrates. Reflectivities were measured in the wavelength range from .4 {mu}m to .8 {mu}m. It is hoped that a low cost substrate can be used with the substrate laminated to the concentrator and the weatherable acrylic polymer coating facing the sun. This technique should be capable of deposition line speeds approaching 1500 linear feet/minute. Central to this technique is a new vacuum deposition process for the high rate deposition of polymer films. This polymer process involves the flash evaporation of an acrylic monomer onto a moving substrate. The monomer is subsequently cured by an electron beam or ultraviolet light. This high speed polymer film deposition process has been named the PML process - for Polymer Multi-Layer.

  7. Simulation of parabolic reflectors for ultraviolet phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Robert Grimes, David

    2016-08-21

    Ultraviolet (UVR) phototherapy is widely used to treat an array of skin conditions, including psoriasis, eczema and vitiligo. For such interventions, a quantified dose is vital if the treatment is to be both biologically effective and to avoid the detrimental effects of over-dosing. As dose is absorbed at surface level, the orientation of patient site with respect to the UVR lamps modulates effective dose. Previous investigations have modelled this behaviour, and examined the impact of shaped anodized aluminium reflectors typically placed around lamps in phototherapy cabins. These mirrors are effective but tend to yield complex patterns of reflection around the cabin which can result in substantial dose inhomogeneity. There has been some speculation over whether using the reflective property of parabolic mirrors might improve dose delivery or homogeneity through the treatment cabin. In this work, the effects of parabolic mirrors are simulated and compared with standard shaped mirrors. Simulation results strongly suggest that parabolic reflectors reduce total irradiance relative to standard shaped reflectors, and have a negligible impact on dose homogeneity. PMID:27445095

  8. User Manual for the PROTEUS Mesh Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Micheal A.; Shemon, Emily R.

    2015-06-01

    This report describes the various mesh tools that are provided with the PROTEUS code giving both descriptions of the input and output. In many cases the examples are provided with a regression test of the mesh tools. The most important mesh tools for any user to consider using are the MT_MeshToMesh.x and the MT_RadialLattice.x codes. The former allows the conversion between most mesh types handled by PROTEUS while the second allows the merging of multiple (assembly) meshes into a radial structured grid. Note that the mesh generation process is recursive in nature and that each input specific for a given mesh tool (such as .axial or .merge) can be used as “mesh” input for any of the mesh tools discussed in this manual.

  9. Simulation of parabolic reflectors for ultraviolet phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, David Robert

    2016-08-01

    Ultraviolet (UVR) phototherapy is widely used to treat an array of skin conditions, including psoriasis, eczema and vitiligo. For such interventions, a quantified dose is vital if the treatment is to be both biologically effective and to avoid the detrimental effects of over-dosing. As dose is absorbed at surface level, the orientation of patient site with respect to the UVR lamps modulates effective dose. Previous investigations have modelled this behaviour, and examined the impact of shaped anodized aluminium reflectors typically placed around lamps in phototherapy cabins. These mirrors are effective but tend to yield complex patterns of reflection around the cabin which can result in substantial dose inhomogeneity. There has been some speculation over whether using the reflective property of parabolic mirrors might improve dose delivery or homogeneity through the treatment cabin. In this work, the effects of parabolic mirrors are simulated and compared with standard shaped mirrors. Simulation results strongly suggest that parabolic reflectors reduce total irradiance relative to standard shaped reflectors, and have a negligible impact on dose homogeneity.

  10. A novel radar reflector with variable RCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotajima, H.; Fujita, H.

    1981-06-01

    It is shown that a radar reflector is obtained for which the radar cross section is variable linearly in decibels in accordance with the rotating angle of the Luneburg lens if use is made of the focusing ability and the spherical symmetry of the lens. The reflector consists of a special reflecting strip attached to the Luneburg lens. A prototype radar reflector was designed and fabricated, and the design method is described. The specifications of the prototype, including the maximum and minimum values of the radar cross section, the usable rotating angle in the horizontal plane, and the allowable rotating angle in the elevation are listed and the determination of their values is described. The reflection pattern was measured by the magic-T method in an anechoic chamber with a horizontally polarized 9375 MHz signal. The most important linearity was found to be within + or -0.2 dB of the design value. The linearity over the entire range is satisfactory.

  11. Wavefront Correction for Large, Flexible Antenna Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.; Jammejad, Vahraz; Rajagopalan, Harish; Xu, Shenheng

    2010-01-01

    A wavefront-correction system has been proposed as part of an outer-space radio communication system that would include a large, somewhat flexible main reflector antenna, a smaller subreflector antenna, and a small array feed at the focal plane of these two reflector antennas. Part of the wavefront-correction system would reside in the subreflector, which would be a planar patch-element reflectarray antenna in which the phase shifts of the patch antenna elements would be controlled via microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) radio -frequency (RF) switches. The system would include the following sensing-and-computing subsystems: a) An optical photogrammetric subsystem built around two cameras would estimate geometric distortions of the main reflector; b) A second subsystem would estimate wavefront distortions from amplitudes and phases of signals received by the array feed elements; and c) A third subsystem, built around small probes on the subreflector plane, would estimate wavefront distortions from differences among phases of signals received by the probes. The distortion estimates from the three subsystems would be processed to generate control signals to be fed to the MEMS RF switches to correct for the distortions, thereby enabling collimation and aiming of the received or transmitted radio beam to the required precision.

  12. The Lagrange-mesh method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baye, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    The Lagrange-mesh method is an approximate variational method taking the form of equations on a grid thanks to the use of a Gauss-quadrature approximation. The variational basis related to this Gauss quadrature is composed of Lagrange functions which are infinitely differentiable functions vanishing at all mesh points but one. This method is quite simple to use and, more importantly, can be very accurate with small number of mesh points for a number of problems. The accuracy may however be destroyed by singularities of the potential term. This difficulty can often be overcome by a regularization of the Lagrange functions which does not affect the simplicity and accuracy of the method. The principles of the Lagrange-mesh method are described, as well as various generalizations of the Lagrange functions and their regularization. The main existing meshes are reviewed and extensive formulas are provided which make the numerical calculations simple. They are in general based on classical orthogonal polynomials. The extensions to non-classical orthogonal polynomials and periodic functions are also presented. Applications start with the calculations of energies, wave functions and some observables for bound states in simple solvable models which can rather easily be used as exercises by the reader. The Dirac equation is also considered. Various problems in the continuum can also simply and accurately be solved with the Lagrange-mesh technique including multichannel scattering or scattering by non-local potentials. The method can be applied to three-body systems in appropriate systems of coordinates. Simple atomic, molecular and nuclear systems are taken as examples. The applications to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, to the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and to Hartree-Fock calculations are also discussed as well as translations and rotations on a Lagrange mesh.

  13. Single port laparoscopic mesh rectopexy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Traditionally, laparoscopic mesh rectopexy is performed with four ports, in an attempt to improve cosmetic results. Following laparoscopic mesh rectopexy there is a new operative technique called single-port laparoscopic mesh rectopexy. Aim To evaluate the single-port laparoscopic mesh rectopexy technique in control of rectal prolapse and the cosmesis and body image issues of this technique. Material and methods The study was conducted in El Fayoum University Hospital between July 2013 and November 2014 in elective surgery for symptomatic rectal prolapse with single-port laparoscopic mesh rectopexy on 10 patients. Results The study included 10 patients: 3 (30%) males and 7 (70%) females. Their ages ranged between 19 years and 60 years (mean: 40.3 ±6 years), and they all underwent laparoscopic mesh rectopexy. There were no conversions to open technique, nor injuries to the rectum or bowel, and there were no mortalities. Mean operative time was 120 min (range: 90–150 min), and mean hospital stay was 2 days (range: 1–3 days). Preoperatively, incontinence was seen in 5 (50%) patients and constipation in 4 (40%). Postoperatively, improvement in these symptoms was seen in 3 (60%) patients for incontinence and in 3 (75%) for constipation. Follow-up was done for 6 months and no recurrence was found with better cosmetic appearance for all patients. Conclusions Single-port laparoscopic mesh rectopexy is a safe procedure with good results as regards operative time, improvement in bowel function, morbidity, cost, and recurrence, and with better cosmetic appearance. PMID:27350840

  14. Improvements to the Unstructured Mesh Generator MESH3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Scott D.; Baker, Timothy J.; Cliff, Susan E.

    1999-01-01

    The AIRPLANE process starts with an aircraft geometry stored in a CAD system. The surface is modeled with a mesh of triangles and then the flow solver produces pressures at surface points which may be integrated to find forces and moments. The biggest advantage is that the grid generation bottleneck of the CFD process is eliminated when an unstructured tetrahedral mesh is used. MESH3D is the key to turning around the first analysis of a CAD geometry in days instead of weeks. The flow solver part of AIRPLANE has proven to be robust and accurate over a decade of use at NASA. It has been extensively validated with experimental data and compares well with other Euler flow solvers. AIRPLANE has been applied to all the HSR geometries treated at Ames over the course of the HSR program in order to verify the accuracy of other flow solvers. The unstructured approach makes handling complete and complex geometries very simple because only the surface of the aircraft needs to be discretized, i.e. covered with triangles. The volume mesh is created automatically by MESH3D. AIRPLANE runs well on multiple platforms. Vectorization on the Cray Y-MP is reasonable for a code that uses indirect addressing. Massively parallel computers such as the IBM SP2, SGI Origin 2000, and the Cray T3E have been used with an MPI version of the flow solver and the code scales very well on these systems. AIRPLANE can run on a desktop computer as well. AIRPLANE has a future. The unstructured technologies developed as part of the HSR program are now targeting high Reynolds number viscous flow simulation. The pacing item in this effort is Navier-Stokes mesh generation.

  15. Cache-oblivious mesh layouts

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sung-Eui; Lindstrom, Peter; Pascucci, Valerio; Manocha, Dinesh

    2005-07-01

    We present a novel method for computing cache-oblivious layouts of large meshes that improve the performance of interactive visualization and geometric processing algorithms. Given that the mesh is accessed in a reasonably coherent manner, we assume no particular data access patterns or cache parameters of the memory hierarchy involved in the computation. Furthermore, our formulation extends directly to computing layouts of multi-resolution and bounding volume hierarchies of large meshes. We develop a simple and practical cache-oblivious metric for estimating cache misses. Computing a coherent mesh layout is reduced to a combinatorial optimization problem. We designed and implemented an out-of-core multilevel minimization algorithm and tested its performance on unstructured meshes composed of tens to hundreds of millions of triangles. Our layouts can significantly reduce the number of cache misses. We have observed 2-20 times speedups in view-dependent rendering, collision detection, and isocontour extraction without any modification of the algorithms or runtime applications.

  16. Self-Organizing Mesh Generation

    1991-11-01

    A set of five programs which make up a self organizing mesh generation package. QMESH generates meshes having quadrilateral elements on arbitrarily shaped two-dimensional (planar or axisymmetric) bodies. It is designed for use with two-dimensional finite element analysis applications. A flexible hierarchal input scheme is used to describe bodies to QMESH as collections of regions. A mesh for each region is developed independently, with the final assembly and bandwidth minimization performed by the independent program,more » RENUM or RENUM8. RENUM is applied when four-node elements are desired. Eight node elements (with mid side nodes) may be obtained with RENUM8. QPLOT and QPLOT8 are plot programs for meshes generated by the QMESH/RENUM and QMESH/RENUM8 program pairs respectively. QPLOT and QPLOT8 automatically section the mesh into appropriately-sized sections for legible display of node and element numbers, An overall plot showing the position of the selected plot areas is produced.« less

  17. Parallel automated adaptive procedures for unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, M. S.; Flaherty, J. E.; Decougny, H. L.; Ozturan, C.; Bottasso, C. L.; Beall, M. W.

    1995-01-01

    Consideration is given to the techniques required to support adaptive analysis of automatically generated unstructured meshes on distributed memory MIMD parallel computers. The key areas of new development are focused on the support of effective parallel computations when the structure of the numerical discretization, the mesh, is evolving, and in fact constructed, during the computation. All the procedures presented operate in parallel on already distributed mesh information. Starting from a mesh definition in terms of a topological hierarchy, techniques to support the distribution, redistribution and communication among the mesh entities over the processors is given, and algorithms to dynamically balance processor workload based on the migration of mesh entities are given. A procedure to automatically generate meshes in parallel, starting from CAD geometric models, is given. Parallel procedures to enrich the mesh through local mesh modifications are also given. Finally, the combination of these techniques to produce a parallel automated finite element analysis procedure for rotorcraft aerodynamics calculations is discussed and demonstrated.

  18. A new approach for shaping of dual-reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Teh-Hong; Burnside, W. D.; Rudduck, Roger C.

    1987-01-01

    The shaping of 2-D dual-reflector antenna systems to generate a prescribed distribution with uniform phase at the aperture of the second reflector is examined. This method is based on the geometrical nature of Cassegrain and Gregorian dual-reflector antennas. The method of syntheses satisfies the principles of geometrical optics which are the foundations of dual-reflector designs. Instead of setting up differential equations or heuristically designing the subreflector, a set of algebraic equations is formulated and solved numerically to obtain the desired surfaces. The caustics of the reflected rays from the subreflector can be obtained and examined. Several examples of 2-D dual-reflector shaping are shown to validate the study. Geometrical optics and physical optics are used to calculate the scattered fields from the reflectors.

  19. Radar polarimeter measures orientation of calibration corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Norikane, Lynne

    1987-01-01

    Radar polarimeter signals from a set of trihedral corner reflectors located in the Goldstone Dry Lake in California were analyzed, and three types of scattering behavior were observed: (1) Bragg-like slightly rough surface scattering that represents the background signal from the dry lake, (2) trihedral corner reflector scattering that returns the incident polarization, and (3) two-bounce corner reflector scattering resulting from a particular alignment of a trihedral reflector. A radar calibration approach using trihedral corner reflectors should be designed such that precise alignment of the reflectors is ensured, as three-bounce and two-bounce geometries lead to very different cross sections and hence very different inferred calibration factors.

  20. Automated design of a uniform distribution using faceted reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassarly, William J.; David, Stuart R.; Jenkins, David G.; Riser, Andrew; Davenport, Thomas L.

    2000-07-01

    Faceted reflectors are a ubiquitous means for providing uniform illumination in many commercial lighting products, examples being newer flashlights, department-store display lighting, and the faceted reflectors found in overhead projectors. However, the design of faceted reflectors using software has often been more limited by the tools available to design them than by the imagination of the designers. One of the keys to enabling a broader range of design options has been to allow more complex surfaces using constructive solid geometry (CSG). CSG uses Boolean operations on basic geometric primitives to define shapes to create individual facets. In this paper, we describe an improved faceted reflector design algorithm and use it to create a wide range of CSG-based reflectors. The performance of various reflectors is compared using a Monte Carlo ray-trace method.

  1. Design of partially optically stable reflector systems and prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chuang-Yu

    2010-09-01

    The characteristics and design method of the total optically stable (TOS) reflector systems/prisms were introduced in an early paper (Tsai and Lin in Appl. Opt. 47:4158-4163, 2008), where only two types of TOS reflector system exist, namely preservation or retroreflection. In this paper, we introduce the partially optically stable (POS) reflector system, which is only optically stable about a specific directional vector; nevertheless, the exiting light ray is not restricted to preservation or retroreflection. The proposed paper also presents an analytic method for the design of POS reflector systems comprised of multiple reflectors. Furthermore, it is shown that a POS prism can be obtained by adding two refracting flat boundary surfaces with specific conditions at the entrance and exit positions of the light ray in an optical system with multiple reflectors.

  2. Feasibility study of a synthesis procedure for array feeds to improve radiation performance of large distorted reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Takamizawa, K.; Werntz, P.; Lapean, J.; Barts, R.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: General Reflector Antenna Systems Program version 7(GRASP7); Multiple Reflector Analysis Program for Cylindrical Antennas (MRAPCA); Tri-Reflector 2D Synthesis Code (TRTDS); a geometrical optics and a physical optics synthesis techniques; beam scanning reflector, the type 2 and 6 reflectors, spherical reflector, and multiple reflector imaging systems; and radiometric array design.

  3. Issues in adaptive mesh refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, William Wenlong

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present an approach for a patch-based adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) for multi-physics simulations. The approach consists of clustering, symmetry preserving, mesh continuity, flux correction, communications, and management of patches. Among the special features of this patch-based AMR are symmetry preserving, efficiency of refinement, special implementation offlux correction, and patch management in parallel computing environments. Here, higher efficiency of refinement means less unnecessarily refined cells for a given set of cells to be refined. To demonstrate the capability of the AMR framework, hydrodynamics simulations with many levels of refinement are shown in both two- and three-dimensions.

  4. Controlled-Shape, Ultrasonic-Angle-Beam Standard Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, J., Robertf.

    1986-01-01

    New ultrasonic angle-beam standard reflector uses impression of letter "l" steel-die stamp. NDE techniques and standard reflector apply to use of pulse-echo-type ultrasonic equipment for inspection of wrought metals including forgings and forging stock; rolled billet, bar or plate; and extruded bar, tube, and shapes. "l" reference standard reflector affords advantages of easy insertion in inspected item using common hand-tools and greatly reduced implementation time through elimination of machining operations.

  5. Preliminary design of large reflectors with flat facets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, P. K.; Anderson, M. S.; Card, M. F.

    1980-01-01

    A concept for approximating curved antenna surfaces using flat facets is discussed. A preliminary design technique for determining the size of the reflector surface facets necessary to meet antenna surface accuracy requirements is presented. A proposed large Microwave Radiometer Satellite is selected as an application, and the far field electromagnetic response of a faceted reflector surface is compared with that from a spherical reflector surface.

  6. Preliminary design of large reflectors with flat facets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, P. K.; Anderson, M. S.; Card, M. F.

    1981-01-01

    A concept for approximating curved antenna surfaces using flat facets is discussed. A preliminary design technique for determining the size of the reflector surface facets necessary to meet antenna surface accuracy requirements is presented. A proposed large microwave radiometer satellite (MRS) is selected as an application, and the far-field electromagnetic response of a faceted reflector surface is compared with that from a spherical reflector surface.

  7. Inflatable Reflector For Solar Power And Radio Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sercel, Joel; Gilchriest, Carl; Ewell, Rich; Herman, Martin; Rascoe, Daniel L.; Nesmith, Bill J.

    1995-01-01

    Report proposes installation of lightweight inflatable reflector structure aboard spacecraft required to both derive power from sunlight and communicate with Earth by radio when apparent position of Earth is at manageably small angle from line of sight to Sun. Structure contains large-aperture paraboloidal reflector aimed toward Sun and concentrates sunlight onto photovoltaic power converter and acts as main reflector of spacecraft radio-communication system.

  8. Magnetron sputtering in rigid optical solar reflectors production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asainov, O. Kh; Bainov, D. D.; Krivobokov, V. P.; Sidelev, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetron sputtering was applied to meet the growing need for glass optical solar reflectors. This plasma method provided more uniform deposition of the silver based coating on glass substrates resulted in decrease of defective reflectors fraction down to 5%. For instance, such parameter of resistive evaporation was of 30%. Silver film adhesion to glass substrate was enhanced with indium tin oxide sublayer. Sunlight absorption coefficient of these rigid reflectors was 0.081-0.083.

  9. Bandwidth Study of the Microwave Reflectors with Rectangular Corrugations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; He, Wenlong; Donaldson, Craig R.; Cross, Adrian W.

    2016-09-01

    The mode-selective microwave reflector with periodic rectangular corrugations in the inner surface of a circular metallic waveguide is studied in this paper. The relations between the bandwidth and reflection coefficient for different numbers of corrugation sections were studied through a global optimization method. Two types of reflectors were investigated. One does not consider the phase response and the other does. Both types of broadband reflectors operating at W-band were machined and measured to verify the numerical simulations.

  10. A soft actuation system for segmented reflector articulation and isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agronin, Michael L.; Jandura, Louise

    1990-01-01

    Segmented reflectors have been proposed for space based applications such as optical communication and large diameter telescopes. An actuation system for mirrors in a space based segmented mirror array was developed as part of NASA's Precision Segmented Reflector program. The actuation system, called the Articulated Panel Module (APM), provides 3 degrees of freedom mirror articulation, gives isolation from structural motion, and simplifies space assembly of the mirrors to the reflector backup truss. A breadboard of the APM was built and is described.

  11. Shaping techniques for offset fed dual reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. J.; Chu, R. S.

    A shaping scheme is presented for the design of offset-fed dual reflector antennas for substantial performance improvement. The design procedure of a shaped system starts with a proper choice of a nonshaped offset system as a reference. This baseline is used to optimize the location of the feedhorn and the centers of the reflectors. The shaping program then uses these inputs and generates the numerical profiles of the reflectors to achieve the desired aperture distribution. After shaping, the reflector profiles would deviate from that of the baseline system by only a small amount compared to the dimensions of the antenna.

  12. Solgel grating waveguides for distributed Bragg reflector lasers.

    PubMed

    Fardad, M A; Luo, H; Beregovski, Y; Fallahi, M

    1999-04-01

    Solgel grating waveguides and their application to the fabrication of external-cavity distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) lasers are demonstrated. A new composition of aluminosilicate material is developed for the fabrication of single-mode waveguides and Bragg reflectors. An average loss of <0.2 dB/cm is measured in the single-mode waveguides at 1550 nm. The reflectors show filtering greater than 97% near 1530 nm, with a bandwidth of ~0.6 nm . The Bragg reflectors are used as feedback resonators for DBR lasers. Single-mode lasing with a sidemode suppression of better than 25 dB is demonstrated. PMID:18071539

  13. Jacobi-Bessel analysis of reflector antennas with elliptical apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    1987-01-01

    Although many reflector antennas possess circular projected apertures, there are recent satellite and ground antenna applications for which it is desirable to employ reflectors with elliptical apertures. Here a modification of the Jacobi-Bessel expansion is presented for the diffraction analysis of reflectors with elliptical apertures. A comparative study is also performed between this modified Jacobi-Bessel algorithm and the one which uses the Jacobi-Bessel expansion over a circumscribing circular region. Numerical results are presented for offset reflectors with elliptical and circular apertures and the improved convergence properties of the modified algorithm are highlighted.

  14. Null generation using discs on a reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudisill, M. D.

    1984-12-01

    It has been shown possible experimentally to produce nulls in the pattern of a prime focus reflector antenna using discs mounted on the dish. A model of this antenna system is developed to evaluate optimal configurations and ideal performance. Aperture integration is the method of analysis used. Discs' effects are modeled as a phase shift on the aperture. No secondary effects, such as diffraction, are considered. Based on the model developed, guidelines are presented for antenna design. A computer code was written to implement the model and a prediction of antenna the system's performance is presented.

  15. Improved Dichroics For Microwave Reflector Antenna Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao

    1995-01-01

    Panel contains array of grid and square conductive loops as array elements designed to reflect most of incident electromagnetic radiation in K(subu) band (13.5 to 15.5 GHz) and to pass that in X band (7 to 9 GHz). Designed to exhibit this dichroic property at angles of incidence up to 40 degrees in transverse electric, transverse magnetic, or circular polarization. Concept of gridded-square-loop dichroic array related to double-loop dichroic arrays described in "Frequency-Selective Microwave Reflectors" (NPO-18701). Improved version exhibits smaller shift of resonant frequency with angle of incidence.

  16. Focal axis resolver for offset reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    Described are electrical means for determining the focal axis of an offset reflector antenna whose physical rim is not coincident with the boundary of the electrical aperture. Even and odd sensing functions are employed in the focal region, leading to both amplitude and phase criteria for resolving a focal axis generally inclined with respect to the system axis. The analytical aspects of the problem are discussed, and an example related to a 4-meter Large-Antenna Multiple-Frequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) is included. The technique is useful for focal axis determination in mathematical simulations and in the physical world.

  17. Bright color reflective displays with interlayer reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitson, Stephen; Geisow, Adrian; Rudin, John; Taphouse, Tim

    2011-08-01

    A good solution to the reflective display of color has been a major challenge for the display industry, with very limited color gamuts demonstrated to date. Conventional side-by-side red, green and blue color filters waste two-thirds of incident light. The alternative of stacking cyan, magenta and yellow layers is also challenging -- a 10% loss per layer compounds to nearly 50% overall. Here we demonstrate an architecture that interleaves absorbing-to-clear shutters with matched wavelength selective reflectors. This increases color gamut by reducing losses and more cleanly separating the color channels, and gives much wider choice of electro-optic colorants.

  18. Solar Tracking Error Analysis of Fresnel Reflector

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiantao; Yan, Junjie; Pei, Jie; Liu, Guanjie

    2014-01-01

    Depending on the rotational structure of Fresnel reflector, the rotation angle of the mirror was deduced under the eccentric condition. By analyzing the influence of the sun tracking rotation angle error caused by main factors, the change rule and extent of the influence were revealed. It is concluded that the tracking errors caused by the difference between the rotation axis and true north meridian, at noon, were maximum under certain conditions and reduced at morning and afternoon gradually. The tracking error caused by other deviations such as rotating eccentric, latitude, and solar altitude was positive at morning, negative at afternoon, and zero at a certain moment of noon. PMID:24895664

  19. Hybrid mesh for nasal airflow studies.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Mohammed; Abdullah, Mohammed Zulkifly; Ahmad, Kamarul Arifin

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of the numerical result is closely related to mesh density as well as its distribution. Mesh plays a very significant role in the outcome of numerical simulation. Many nasal airflow studies have employed unstructured mesh and more recently hybrid mesh scheme has been utilized considering the complexity of anatomical architecture. The objective of this study is to compare the results of hybrid mesh with unstructured mesh and study its effect on the flow parameters inside the nasal cavity. A three-dimensional nasal cavity model is reconstructed based on computed tomographic images of a healthy Malaysian adult nose. Navier-Stokes equation for steady airflow is solved numerically to examine inspiratory nasal flow. The pressure drop obtained using the unstructured computational grid is about 22.6 Pa for a flow rate of 20 L/min, whereas the hybrid mesh resulted in 17.8 Pa for the same flow rate. The maximum velocity obtained at the nasal valve using unstructured grid is 4.18 m/s and that with hybrid mesh is around 4.76 m/s. Hybrid mesh reported lower grid convergence index (GCI) than the unstructured mesh. Significant differences between unstructured mesh and hybrid mesh are determined highlighting the usefulness of hybrid mesh for nasal airflow studies. PMID:23983811

  20. Hybrid Mesh for Nasal Airflow Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Mohammed; Abdullah, Mohammed Zulkifly; Ahmad, Kamarul Arifin

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of the numerical result is closely related to mesh density as well as its distribution. Mesh plays a very significant role in the outcome of numerical simulation. Many nasal airflow studies have employed unstructured mesh and more recently hybrid mesh scheme has been utilized considering the complexity of anatomical architecture. The objective of this study is to compare the results of hybrid mesh with unstructured mesh and study its effect on the flow parameters inside the nasal cavity. A three-dimensional nasal cavity model is reconstructed based on computed tomographic images of a healthy Malaysian adult nose. Navier-Stokes equation for steady airflow is solved numerically to examine inspiratory nasal flow. The pressure drop obtained using the unstructured computational grid is about 22.6 Pa for a flow rate of 20 L/min, whereas the hybrid mesh resulted in 17.8 Pa for the same flow rate. The maximum velocity obtained at the nasal valve using unstructured grid is 4.18 m/s and that with hybrid mesh is around 4.76 m/s. Hybrid mesh reported lower grid convergence index (GCI) than the unstructured mesh. Significant differences between unstructured mesh and hybrid mesh are determined highlighting the usefulness of hybrid mesh for nasal airflow studies. PMID:23983811

  1. Mesh Size Control of Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitenis, Angela; Uruena, Juan Manuel; Schulze, Kyle D.; Cooper, Andrew C.; Angelini, Thomas E.; Sawyer, W. Gregory

    Soft, permeable sliding interfaces in aqueous environments are ubiquitous in nature but their ability to maintain high lubricity in a poor lubricant (water) has not been well understood. Hydrogels are excellent materials for fundamental soft matter and biotribology studies due to their high water content. While mesh size controls the material and transport properties of a hydrogel, its effects on friction were only recently explored. Polyacrylamide hydrogels slid in a Gemini (self-mated) interface produced low friction under low speeds, low pressures, macroscopic contact areas, and room temperature aqueous environments. The friction coefficients at these interfaces are lowest at low speeds and are speed-independent. This behavior is due to thermal fluctuations at the interface separating the surfaces, with water shearing in this region being the main source of dissipation. We found that mesh size had an inverse correlation with friction. We further investigated a transition from this behavior at higher speeds, and found that the transition speed correlated with the mesh size and relaxation time of the polymer network. Very soft and correspondingly large mesh size Gemini hydrogels show superlubricity under specific conditions with friction being less than 0.005.

  2. Multigrid for refined triangle meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Yair

    1997-02-01

    A two-level preconditioning method for the solution of (locally) refined finite element schemes using triangle meshes is introduced. In the isotropic SPD case, it is shown that the condition number of the preconditioned stiffness matrix is bounded uniformly for all sufficiently regular triangulations. This is also verified numerically for an isotropic diffusion problem with highly discontinuous coefficients.

  3. Application of Vision Metrology to In-Orbit Measurement of Large Reflector Onboard Communication Satellite for Next Generation Mobile Satellite Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akioka, M.; Orikasa, T.; Satoh, M.; Miura, A.; Tsuji, H.; Toyoshima, M.; Fujino, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Satellite for next generation mobile satellite communication service with small personal terminal requires onboard antenna with very large aperture reflector larger than twenty meters diameter because small personal terminal with lower power consumption in ground base requires the large onboard reflector with high antenna gain. But, large deployable antenna will deform in orbit because the antenna is not a solid dish but the flexible structure with fine cable and mesh supported by truss. Deformation of reflector shape deteriorate the antenna performance and quality and stability of communication service. However, in case of digital beam forming antenna with phased array can modify the antenna beam performance due to adjustment of excitation amplitude and excitation phase. If we can measure the reflector shape precisely in orbit, beam pattern and antenna performance can be compensated with the updated excitation amplitude and excitation phase parameters optimized for the reflector shape measured every moment. Softbank Corporation and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology has started the project "R&D on dynamic beam control technique for next generation mobile communication satellite" as a contracted research project sponsored by Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communication of Japan. In this topic, one of the problem in vision metrology application is a strong constraints on geometry for camera arrangement on satellite bus with very limited space. On satellite in orbit, we cannot take many images from many different directions as ordinary vision metrology measurement and the available area for camera positioning is quite limited. Feasibility of vision metrology application and general methodology to apply to future mobile satellite communication satellite is to be found. Our approach is as follows: 1) Development of prototyping simulator to evaluate the expected precision for network design in zero order and first order 2) Trial

  4. Successful repair of a 6 meter battery

    SciTech Connect

    Nay, K.; Gratson, M.; Wash, S.; Sundholm, J.L.; Hippe, W.; Ramani, R.V.

    1996-12-31

    Following a two-year construction period, LTV Steel Company commissioned a new six-meter coke oven battery and ancillary facilities in December 1981 at the S. Chicago Works. The battery is a 60-oven Didier grouped flue underjet design capable of firing coke oven gas and blast furnace gas. In late 1990, coke side refractory damage in the form of severe spalls and holes in the walls were observed. Numerous repair techniques--welding, guniting, panel patching, end flue repairs using zero expansion brick--were employed as interim measures until a comprehensive repair plan could be implemented. A repair plan (primarily for coke side flues) was developed which envisioned end flue repairs on six walls per year beginning in late 1991, early 1992 depending on refractory delivery. However, in late 1992 it became apparent that the coke side deterioration was occurring faster than expected and that extensive pusher side deterioration was also occurring. Because of these developments, another battery inspection was performed. On the basis of this inspection, it was determined that a major rehabilitation would be required to assure long-term, environmentally acceptable operation of the battery.

  5. Optical Reflectance Measurements for Commonly Used Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Janecek, Petr Martin; Moses, William

    2008-06-11

    When simulating light collection in scintillators, modeling the angular distribution of optical light reflectance from surfaces is very important. Since light reflectance is poorly understood, either purely specular or purely diffuse reflectance is generally assumed. In this paper we measure the optical reflectance distribution for eleven commonly used reflectors. A 440 nm, output power stabilized, un-polarized laser is shone onto a reflector at a fixed angle of incidence. The reflected light's angular distribution is measured by an array of silicon photodiodes. The photodiodes are movable to cover 2 pi of solid angle. The light-induced current is, through a multiplexer, read out with a digital multimeter. A LabVIEW program controls the motion of the laser and the photodiode array, the multiplexer, and the data collection. The laser can be positioned at any angle with a position accuracy of 10 arc minutes. Each photodiode subtends 6.3o, and the photodiode array can be positioned at any angle with up to 10 arc minute angular resolution. The dynamic range for the current measurements is 105:1. The measured light reflectance distribution was measured to be specular for several ESR films as well as for aluminum foil, mostly diffuse for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tape and titanium dioxide paint, and neither specular nor diffuse for Lumirror(R), Melinex(R) and Tyvek(R). Instead, a more complicated light distribution was measured for these three materials.

  6. Test progress on the electrostatic membrane reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goslee, J. W.; Mihora, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    NASA is currently developing a low mass antenna which derives its reflector surface quality from the application of electrostatic forces to form a thin membrane into the desired concave reflector surface. The shuttle-deployed antenna would have a diameter of 100 m and an RMS surface smoothness of 10 to 1 mm for operation at 1 to 10 GHz. Surface quality measurements have been made on a highly deformable elastic membrane, pressurized by electrostatic forces. Included are the effects of the perimeter boundary, splicing of the membrane, the long-scale smoothness of commercial membranes, and the spatial controllability of the membrane using voltage adjustments to alter the electrostatic forces. The electrostatic membrane was found to operate well in an open-loop sense, showing a high degree of position stability and negligible power consumption in dry air. Visco-electric creep was not evident, but the polymer membrane did expand and contract considerably due to its hygroscopic expansion coefficient. A residual roughness of about 0.75 mm existed with the polymer used in these tests; this error is attributed to seams and membrane anisotropy where the material is stiffer in one direction.

  7. Interpolation methods for shaped reflector analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo-Israel, Victor; Imbriale, William A.; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Veruttipong, Thavath

    1988-01-01

    The diffraction analysis of reflector surfaces which are described only at a discrete set of locations usually leads to the requirement of an interpolation to determine the surface characteristics over a continuum of locations. Two methods of interpolation, the global and the local methods, are presented. The global interpolation representation is a closed-form or series expression valid over the entire surface. The coefficients of a series expression are found by an integration of all of the raw data. Since the number of coefficients used to describe the surface is much smaller than the number of raw data points, the integration effectively provides a smoothing of the raw data. The local interpolation provides a closed-form expression for only a small area of the reflector surface. The subreflector is divided into sectors each of which has constant discretized data. Each area segment is then locally described by a two-dimensional quadratic surface. The second derivative data give the desired smoothed values.

  8. Hybrid grating reflectors: Origin of ultrabroad stopband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gyeong Cheol; Taghizadeh, Alireza; Chung, Il-Sug

    2016-04-01

    Hybrid grating (HG) reflectors with a high-refractive-index cap layer added onto a high contrast grating (HCG) provide a high reflectance close to 100% over a broader wavelength range than HCGs. The combination of a cap layer and a grating layer brings a strong Fabry-Perot (FP) resonance as well as a weak guided mode (GM) resonance. Most of the reflected power results from the FP resonance, while the GM resonance plays a key role in achieving a reflectance close to 100% as well as broadening the stopband. An HG sample with 7 InGaAlAs quantum wells included in the cap layer has been fabricated by directly wafer-bonding a III-V cap layer onto a Si grating layer. Its reflection property has been characterized. This heterogeneously integrated HG reflector may allow for a hybrid III-V on Si laser to be thermally efficient, which has promising prospects for silicon photonics light sources and high-speed operation.

  9. Compact directed percolation with movable partial reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Ronald; ben-Avraham, Daniel

    2002-09-01

    We study a version of compact directed percolation (CDP) in one dimension in which occupation of a site for the first time requires that a 'mine' or an antiparticle be eliminated. This process is analogous to the variant of directed percolation with a long-time memory, proposed by Grassberger et al (1997 Phys. Rev. E 55 2488) in order to understand spreading at a critical point involving an infinite number of absorbing configurations. The problem is equivalent to that of a pair of random walkers in the presence of movable partial reflectors. The walkers, which are unbiased, start one lattice spacing apart and annihilate on their first contact. Each time one of the walkers tries to visit a new site, it is reflected (with probability r) back to its previous position, while the reflector is simultaneously pushed one step away from the walker. Iteration of the discrete-time evolution equation for the probability distribution yields the survival probability S(t). We find that S(t) ~ t-δ, with δ varying continuously between 1/2 and 1.160 as the reflection probability varies between 0 and 1.

  10. Optimizing the geometrical accuracy of curvilinear meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toulorge, Thomas; Lambrechts, Jonathan; Remacle, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a method to generate valid high order meshes with optimized geometrical accuracy. The high order meshing procedure starts with a linear mesh, that is subsequently curved without taking care of the validity of the high order elements. An optimization procedure is then used to both untangle invalid elements and optimize the geometrical accuracy of the mesh. Standard measures of the distance between curves are considered to evaluate the geometrical accuracy in planar two-dimensional meshes, but they prove computationally too costly for optimization purposes. A fast estimate of the geometrical accuracy, based on Taylor expansions of the curves, is introduced. An unconstrained optimization procedure based on this estimate is shown to yield significant improvements in the geometrical accuracy of high order meshes, as measured by the standard Hausdorff distance between the geometrical model and the mesh. Several examples illustrate the beneficial impact of this method on CFD solutions, with a particular role of the enhanced mesh boundary smoothness.

  11. Application of Quaternions for Mesh Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2002-01-01

    A new three-dimensional mesh deformation algorithm, based on quaternion algebra, is introduced. A brief overview of quaternion algebra is provided, along with some preliminary results for two-dimensional structured and unstructured viscous mesh deformation.

  12. 6th International Meshing Roundtable '97

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.

    1997-09-01

    The goal of the 6th International Meshing Roundtable is to bring together researchers and developers from industry, academia, and government labs in a stimulating, open environment for the exchange of technical information related to the meshing process. In the pas~ the Roundtable has enjoyed significant participation born each of these groups from a wide variety of countries. The Roundtable will consist of technical presentations from contributed papers and abstracts, two invited speakers, and two invited panels of experts discussing topics related to the development and use of automatic mesh generation tools. In addition, this year we will feature a "Bring Your Best Mesh" competition and poster session to encourage discussion and participation from a wide variety of mesh generation tool users. The schedule and evening social events are designed to provide numerous opportunities for informal dialog. A proceedings will be published by Sandia National Laboratories and distributed at the Roundtable. In addition, papers of exceptionally high quaIity will be submitted to a special issue of the International Journal of Computational Geometry and Applications. Papers and one page abstracts were sought that present original results on the meshing process. Potential topics include but are got limited to: Unstructured triangular and tetrahedral mesh generation Unstructured quadrilateral and hexahedral mesh generation Automated blocking and structured mesh generation Mixed element meshing Surface mesh generation Geometry decomposition and clean-up techniques Geometry modification techniques related to meshing Adaptive mesh refinement and mesh quality control Mesh visualization Special purpose meshing algorithms for particular applications Theoretical or novel ideas with practical potential Technical presentations from industrial researchers.

  13. 78 FR 14357 - Certain Compact Fluorescent Reflector Lamps, Products Containing Same and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... COMMISSION Certain Compact Fluorescent Reflector Lamps, Products Containing Same and Components Thereof... importation of certain compact fluorescent reflector lamps, products containing same and components thereof by... importation of certain compact fluorescent reflector lamps, products containing same and components thereof...

  14. Conservation properties of unstructured staggered mesh schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Perot, B.

    2000-03-20

    Classic Cartesian staggered mesh schemes have a number of attractive properties. They do not display spurious pressure modes and they have been shown to locally conserve, mass, momentum, kinetic energy, and circulation to machine precision. Recently, a number of generalizations of the staggered mesh approach have been proposed for unstructured (triangular or tetrahedral) meshes. These unstructured staggered mesh methods have been created to retain the attractive pressure aspects and mass conservation properties of the classic Cartesian mesh method. This work addresses the momentum, kinetic energy, and circulation conservation properties of unstructured staggered mesh methods. It is shown that with certain choices of the velocity interpolation, unstructured staggered mesh discretization of the divergence form of the Navier-Stokes equations can conserve kinetic energy and momentum both locally and globally. In addition, it is shown that unstructured staggered mesh discretization of the rotational form of the Navier-Stokes equations can conserve kinetic energy and circulation both locally and globally. The analysis includes viscous terms and a generalization of the concept of conservation in the presence of viscosity to include a negative definite dissipation term in the kinetic energy equation. These novel conserving unstructured staggered mesh schemes have not been previously analyzed. It is shown that they are first-order accurate on nonuniform two-dimensional unstructured meshes and second-order accurate on uniform unstructured meshes. Numerical confirmation of the conservation properties and the order of accuracy of these unstructured staggered mesh methods is presented.

  15. Hybrid mesh generation using advancing reduction technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study presents an extension of the application of the advancing reduction technique to the hybrid mesh generation. The proposed algorithm is based on a pre-generated rectangle mesh (RM) with a certain orientation. The intersection points between the two sets of perpendicular mesh lines in RM an...

  16. Computing The Compliances Of Gear Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, D. G.; Savage, M.; Caldwell, R. J.; Wisor, G. D.

    1988-01-01

    Computer model simulates compliance and sharing of loads in spur-gear mesh. Use of solid-body analysis as lower bound and rim analysis as upper bound for mesh compliance, reasonable approximations obtained for compliance in spur-gear mesh.

  17. 16 CFR 1512.16 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for reflectors. 1512.16 Section 1512.16 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.16 Requirements for reflectors. Bicycles shall...

  18. 16 CFR 1512.16 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirements for reflectors. 1512.16 Section 1512.16 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.16 Requirements for reflectors. Bicycles shall...

  19. 16 CFR 1512.16 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for reflectors. 1512.16 Section 1512.16 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.16 Requirements for reflectors. Bicycles shall...

  20. 16 CFR 1512.16 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for reflectors. 1512.16 Section 1512.16 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.16 Requirements for reflectors. Bicycles shall...

  1. 16 CFR 1512.16 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for reflectors. 1512.16 Section 1512.16 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.16 Requirements for reflectors. Bicycles shall...

  2. Special test equipment and fixturing for MSAT reflector assembly alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Jeffrey A.; Zinn, Michael R.; Mccarten, David R.

    1994-01-01

    The MSAT Reflector Assembly is a state of the art subsystem for Mobile Satellite (MSAT), a geosynchronous-based commercial mobile telecommunication satellite program serving North America. The Reflector Assembly consisted of a deployable, three-hinge, folding-segment Boom, deployable 5.7 x 5.3-meter 16-rib Wrap-Rib Reflector, and a Reflector Pointing Mechanism (RPM). The MSAT spacecraft was based on a Hughes HS601 spacecraft bus carrying two Reflector Assemblies independently dedicated for L-band transmit and receive operations. Lockheed Missiles and Space Company (LMSC) designed and built the Reflector Assembly for MSAT under contract to SPAR Aerospace Ltd. Two MSAT satellites were built jointly by SPAR Aerospace Ltd. and Hughes Space and Communications Co. for this program, the first scheduled for launch in 1994. When scaled for wavelength, the assembly and alignment requirements for the Reflector Assembly were in many instances equivalent to or exceeded that of a diffraction-limited visible light optical system. Combined with logistical constraints inherent to large, compliant, lightweight structures; 'bolt-on' alignment; and remote, indirect spacecraft access; the technical challenges were formidable. This document describes the alignment methods, the special test equipment, and fixturing for Reflector Assembly assembly and alignment.

  3. Detail of 25' highband reflector screen poles with monopole antenna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of 25' high-band reflector screen poles with monopole antenna elements behind, note the metal sleeve bases of the reflector screen poles and the guy wire anchors from the dipole antenna elements (left foreground), view facing north northwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  4. Detail of 25' highband reflector screen pole showing the horizontal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of 25' high-band reflector screen pole showing the horizontal wood beams and vertical wires hung from ceramic insulators, note the dipole antenna element and 94' low-band reflector screen poles in background, view facing north - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  5. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  6. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  7. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  8. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  9. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  10. Modeling Mechanical Behavior of a Prismatic Replaceable Reflector Block

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Bratton

    2009-04-01

    This report outlines the development of finite element models used to determine temperature and stresses in a prismatic core reflector block. This initial analysis determines an appropriate temperature distribution in a prismatic reflector from limiting conditions in the adjacent fuel block based on simplifying assumptions.

  11. X-ray resonator with pear-shaped reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Churikov, V A

    2003-11-30

    An X-ray resonator design is proposed in which peculiar pear-shaped reflectors, which are grazing-incidence X-ray mirrors, serve as optical elements. Special features of this resonator are relatively high reflector efficiencies and the axial symmetry of the output radiation. (resonators)

  12. Self-clamping arc light reflector for welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    This invention is directed to a coaxial extending metal mirror reflector attached to the electrode housing or gas cup on a welding torch. An electric welding torch with an internal viewing system for robotic welding is provded with an annular arc light reflector to reflect light from the arc back onto the workpiece. The reflector has a vertical split or gap in its surrounding wall to permit the adjacent wall ends forming the split to be sprung open slightly to permit the reflector to be removed or slipped onto the torch housing or gas cup. The upper opening of the reflector is slightly smaller than the torch housing or gas cup and therefore, when placed on the torch housing or gas cup has that springiness to cause it to clamp tightly on the housing or gas cup. The split or gap also serves to permit the feed of weld wire through to the weld area,

  13. Compensation of reflector surface distortions using conjugate field matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of compensating for reflector surface distortions has been investigated. The performance characteristics (gain, sidelobe level, null location, beamwidth, etc.) of space communication reflector antenna systems degrade as the reflector surface distorts due to thermal effects from a varying solar flux. The technique reported here will maintain the design radiation performance independently of thermal effects on the reflector surface. With the advent of monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC), a greater flexibility in array-fed reflector system design can be achieved. MMIC arrays provides independent control of amplitude and phase for each of many radiating elements of the feed array. The conjugate field matching technique provide a basis for obtaining the required element excitations under surface distortion for maintaining the design radiation performance. It is assumed that the surface characteristics (x, y, z, first derivatives, and second derivatives) under distortion are known.

  14. Secondary pattern computation of an offset reflector antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Reflector antennas are widely used in communications satellite systems because they provide high gain at low cost. In analyzing reflector antennas the computation of the secondary pattern is the main concern. A computer program for calculating the secondary pattern of an offset reflector has been developed and implemented at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The theoretical foundation for this program is based on the use of geometrical optics to describe the fields from the feed to the reflector surface and to the aperture plane. The resulting aperture field distribution is then transformed to the far-field zone by the fast Fourier transform algorithm. Comparing this technique with other well-known techniques (the geometrical theory of diffraction, physical optics (Jacobi-Bessel), etc.) shows good agreement for large (diameter of 100 lambda or greater) reflector antennas.

  15. Impact of HFIR LEU Conversion on Beryllium Reflector Degradation Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, Dan

    2013-10-01

    An assessment of the impact of low enriched uranium (LEU) conversion on the factors that may cause the degradation of the beryllium reflector is performed for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The computational methods, models, and tools, comparisons with previous work, along with the results obtained are documented and discussed in this report. The report documents the results for the gas and neutronic poison production, and the heating in the beryllium reflector for both the highly enriched uranium (HEU) and LEU HFIR configurations, and discusses the impact that the conversion to LEU may have on these quantities. A time-averaging procedure was developed to calculate the isotopic (gas and poisons) production in reflector. The sensitivity of this approach to different approximations is gauged and documented. The results show that the gas is produced in the beryllium reflector at a total rate of 0.304 g/cycle for the HEU configuration; this rate increases by ~12% for the LEU case. The total tritium production rate in reflector is 0.098 g/cycle for the HEU core and approximately 11% higher for the LEU core. A significant increase (up to ~25%) in the neutronic poisons production in the reflector during the operation cycles is observed for the LEU core, compared to the HEU case, for regions close to the core s horizontal midplane. The poisoning level of the reflector may increase by more than two orders of magnitude during long periods of downtime. The heating rate in the reflector is estimated to be approximately 20% lower for the LEU core than for the HEU core. The decrease is due to a significantly lower contribution of the heating produced by the gamma radiation for the LEU core. Both the isotopic (gas and neutronic poisons) production and the heating rates are spatially non-uniform throughout the beryllium reflector volume. The maximum values typically occur in the removable reflector and close to the midplane.

  16. Deployment simulation of a deployable reflector for earth science application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaokai; Fang, Houfei; Cai, Bei; Ma, Xiaofei

    2015-10-01

    A novel mission concept namely NEXRAD-In-Space (NIS) has been developed for monitoring hurricanes, cyclones and other severe storms from a geostationary orbit. It requires a space deployable 35-meter diameter Ka-band (35 GHz) reflector. NIS can measure hurricane precipitation intensity, dynamics and its life cycle. These information is necessary for predicting the track, intensity, rain rate and hurricane-induced floods. To meet the requirements of the radar system, a Membrane Shell Reflector Segment (MSRS) reflector technology has been developed and several technologies have been evaluated. However, the deployment analysis of this large size and high-precision reflector has not been investigated. For a pre-studies, a scaled tetrahedral truss reflector with spring driving deployment system has been made and tested, deployment dynamics analysis of this scaled reflector has been performed using ADAMS to understand its deployment dynamic behaviors. Eliminating the redundant constraints in the reflector system with a large number of moving parts is a challenging issue. A primitive joint and flexible struts were introduced to the analytical model and they can effectively eliminate over constraints of the model. By using a high-speed camera and a force transducer, a deployment experiment of a single-bay tetrahedral module has been conducted. With the tested results, an optimization process has been performed by using the parameter optimization module of ADAMS to obtain the parameters of the analytical model. These parameters were incorporated to the analytical model of the whole reflector. It is observed from the analysis results that the deployment process of the reflector with a fixed boundary experiences three stages. These stages are rapid deployment stage, slow deployment stage and impact stage. The insight of the force peak distributions of the reflector can help the optimization design of the structure.

  17. Confined helium on Lagrange meshes.

    PubMed

    Baye, D; Dohet-Eraly, J

    2015-12-21

    The Lagrange-mesh method has the simplicity of a calculation on a mesh and can have the accuracy of a variational method. It is applied to the study of a confined helium atom. Two types of confinement are considered. Soft confinements by potentials are studied in perimetric coordinates. Hard confinement in impenetrable spherical cavities is studied in a system of rescaled perimetric coordinates varying in [0,1] intervals. Energies and mean values of the distances between electrons and between an electron and the helium nucleus are calculated. A high accuracy of 11 to 15 significant figures is obtained with small computing times. Pressures acting on the confined atom are also computed. For sphere radii smaller than 1, their relative accuracies are better than 10(-10). For larger radii up to 10, they progressively decrease to 10(-3), still improving the best literature results. PMID:25732054

  18. The moving mesh code SHADOWFAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbroucke, B.; De Rijcke, S.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce the moving mesh code SHADOWFAX, which can be used to evolve a mixture of gas, subject to the laws of hydrodynamics and gravity, and any collisionless fluid only subject to gravity, such as cold dark matter or stars. The code is written in C++ and its source code is made available to the scientific community under the GNU Affero General Public Licence. We outline the algorithm and the design of our implementation, and demonstrate its validity through the results of a set of basic test problems, which are also part of the public version. We also compare SHADOWFAX with a number of other publicly available codes using different hydrodynamical integration schemes, illustrating the advantages and disadvantages of the moving mesh technique.

  19. Implicit solvers for unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1991-01-01

    Implicit methods were developed and tested for unstructured mesh computations. The approximate system which arises from the Newton linearization of the nonlinear evolution operator is solved by using the preconditioned GMRES (Generalized Minimum Residual) technique. Three different preconditioners were studied, namely, the incomplete LU factorization (ILU), block diagonal factorization, and the symmetric successive over relaxation (SSOR). The preconditioners were optimized to have good vectorization properties. SSOR and ILU were also studied as iterative schemes. The various methods are compared over a wide range of problems. Ordering of the unknowns, which affects the convergence of these sparse matrix iterative methods, is also studied. Results are presented for inviscid and turbulent viscous calculations on single and multielement airfoil configurations using globally and adaptively generated meshes.

  20. Unstructured mesh algorithms for aerodynamic calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    The use of unstructured mesh techniques for solving complex aerodynamic flows is discussed. The principle advantages of unstructured mesh strategies, as they relate to complex geometries, adaptive meshing capabilities, and parallel processing are emphasized. The various aspects required for the efficient and accurate solution of aerodynamic flows are addressed. These include mesh generation, mesh adaptivity, solution algorithms, convergence acceleration, and turbulence modeling. Computations of viscous turbulent two-dimensional flows and inviscid three-dimensional flows about complex configurations are demonstrated. Remaining obstacles and directions for future research are also outlined.

  1. Adaptive Mesh Refinement in CTH

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, David

    1999-05-04

    This paper reports progress on implementing a new capability of adaptive mesh refinement into the Eulerian multimaterial shock- physics code CTH. The adaptivity is block-based with refinement and unrefinement occurring in an isotropic 2:1 manner. The code is designed to run on serial, multiprocessor and massive parallel platforms. An approximate factor of three in memory and performance improvements over comparable resolution non-adaptive calculations has-been demonstrated for a number of problems.

  2. Mesh networked unattended ground sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colling, Kent; Calcutt, Wade; Winston, Mark; Jones, Barry

    2006-05-01

    McQ has developed a family of low cost unattended ground sensors that utilize self-configured, mesh network communications for wireless sensing. Intended for use in an urban environment, the area monitored by the sensor system poses a communication challenge. A discussion into the sensor's communication performance and how it affects sensor installation and the operation of the system once deployed is presented.

  3. Focal axis resolver for offset reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the focal axis of an asymmetrical antenna such as an offset paraboloid reflector whose physical rim is not coincident with the boundary of the electrical aperture but whose focal point is known is provided. A transmitting feed horn array consisting of at least two feed horn elements is positioned asymmetrically on either side of an estimated focal axis which is generally inclined with respect to the boresight axis of the antenna. The feed horn array is aligned with the estimated focal axis so that the phase centers (CP sub 1, CP sub 2) of the two feed horn elements are located on a common line running through the focal point (F) orthogonally with respect to the estimated focal axis.

  4. Identification of a precision segmented reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Eric K.

    A major example of control/structure interaction in future active optics occurs in precision segmented reflectors. The Advanced Structures/Controls Integrated Experiment (ASCIE) is designed as a testbed for controls/structures technology for such systems. The desire for greater performance motivates this research to model and verify the ASCIE dynamics. First, an analytical model of the open-loop dynamics of the segment alignment system is constructed from an FEM. This model predicts the modes that the alignment control would destabilize, which are critical for the control design. Subsequently, comparison of predicted and measured transfer functions indicates errors in the analytical model that adjustments to the FEM and system identification need to correct. Finally, the paper gives a brief description of a systematic approach for improving the ASCIE structural dynamic model.

  5. Imaging with Spherically Bent Crystals or Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Scott, S; Ince-Cushman, A; Reinke, M; Podpaly, Y; Rice, J E; Beiersdorfer, P

    2010-06-01

    This paper consists of two parts: Part I describes the working principle of a recently developed x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, where the astigmatism of spherically bent crystals is being used with advantage to record spatially resolved spectra of highly charged ions for Doppler measurements of the ion-temperature and toroidal plasmarotation- velocity profiles in tokamak plasmas. This type of spectrometer was thoroughly tested on NSTX and Alcator C-Mod, and its concept was recently adopted for the design of the ITER crystal spectrometers. Part II describes imaging schemes, where the astigmatism has been eliminated by the use of matched pairs of spherically bent crystals or reflectors. These imaging schemes are applicable over a wide range of the electromagnetic radiation, which includes microwaves, visible light, EUV radiation, and x-rays. Potential applications with EUV radiation and x-rays are the diagnosis of laserproduced plasmas, imaging of biological samples with synchrotron radiation, and lithography.

  6. Method of making reflecting film reflector

    DOEpatents

    Cottingham, James G.

    1980-01-01

    A reflector of the reflecting film type is disclosed and which may be used in a heliostatic system for concentrating solar energy and comprising a reflecting film bonded to an appropriate rigid substrate in such a way that specularity of a very high order is achieved. A method of bonding the reflecting film to the substrate is also disclosed and comprises the steps of initially adhering the film to a smooth, clean flat rigid surface with a non-bonding liquid between the rigid surface and film, and then bonding the substrate and film. The non-bonding liquid has a molecular adhesion greater than any stresses due to handling or curing of the bonding agent which is applied between the film and the opposing surface of the rigid substrate.

  7. Multiple seismic reflectors in Earth's lowermost mantle.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xuefeng; Shim, Sang-Heon; de Hoop, Maarten; van der Hilst, Robert

    2014-02-18

    The modern view of Earth's lowermost mantle considers a D″ region of enhanced (seismologically inferred) heterogeneity bounded by the core-mantle boundary and an interface some 150-300 km above it, with the latter often attributed to the postperovskite phase transition (in MgSiO3). Seismic exploration of Earth's deep interior suggests, however, that this view needs modification. So-called ScS and SKKS waves, which probe the lowermost mantle from above and below, respectively, reveal multiple reflectors beneath Central America and East Asia, two areas known for subduction of oceanic plates deep into Earth's mantle. This observation is inconsistent with expectations from a thermal response of a single isochemical postperovskite transition, but some of the newly observed structures can be explained with postperovskite transitions in differentiated slab materials. Our results imply that the lowermost mantle is more complex than hitherto thought and that interfaces and compositional heterogeneity occur beyond the D″ region sensu stricto. PMID:24550266

  8. Inline microring reflector for photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Young Mo

    The microring is a compact resonator that is used as a versatile building block in photonic circuits ranging from filters, modulators, logic gates, sensors, switches, multiplexers, and laser cavities. The Bragg grating is a periodic structure that allows the selection of a narrow bandwidth of spectrum for stable lasing operation. In this dissertation, we study analysis and simulations of a compact microring based reflector assembled by forming a Bragg grating into a loop. With the appropriate design, the microring resonance can precisely align with the reflection peak of the grating while all other peaks are suppressed by reflection nulls of the grating. The field buildup at the resonance effectively amplifies small reflection of the grating, thereby producing significant overall reflection from the ring, and it is possible to achieve a stable narrow linewidth compact laser by forming a single mode laser cavity. The device operation principle is studied from two distinct perspectives; the first looks at coupling of two contra-directional traveling waves within the ring whereas the second aspect investigates relative excitation of the two competing microring resonant modes. In the former method, we relate the steady state amplitudes of the two traveling waves to the reflection spectrum of the grating and solve for the reflection and transmission response for each wavelength of interest. In the latter approach, we expand the field in terms of the resonant modes of the ring cavity and derive transfer functions for reflection and transmission from the nearby mode frequencies. The angular periodicity of the reflective microring geometry allows us to effectively simulate the resonant modes from a computational domain of a single period grating when the continuity boundary condition is applied. We successfully predict the reflection and transmission response of a Si3N 4/SiO2 microring reflector using this method---otherwise too large to carry out full-wave simulation

  9. SHARP/PRONGHORN Interoperability: Mesh Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Avery Bingham; Javier Ortensi

    2012-09-01

    Progress toward collaboration between the SHARP and MOOSE computational frameworks has been demonstrated through sharing of mesh generation and ensuring mesh compatibility of both tools with MeshKit. MeshKit was used to build a three-dimensional, full-core very high temperature reactor (VHTR) reactor geometry with 120-degree symmetry, which was used to solve a neutron diffusion critical eigenvalue problem in PRONGHORN. PRONGHORN is an application of MOOSE that is capable of solving coupled neutron diffusion, heat conduction, and homogenized flow problems. The results were compared to a solution found on a 120-degree, reflected, three-dimensional VHTR mesh geometry generated by PRONGHORN. The ability to exchange compatible mesh geometries between the two codes is instrumental for future collaboration and interoperability. The results were found to be in good agreement between the two meshes, thus demonstrating the compatibility of the SHARP and MOOSE frameworks. This outcome makes future collaboration possible.

  10. Bioprosthetic Mesh in Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Mesh materials have undergone a considerable evolution over the last several decades. There has been enhancement of biomechanical properties, improvement in manufacturing processes, and development of antiadhesive laminate synthetic meshes. The evolution of bioprosthetic mesh materials has markedly changed our indications and methods for complex abdominal wall reconstruction. The authors review the optimal properties of bioprosthetic mesh materials, their evolution over time, and their indications for use. The techniques to optimize outcomes are described using bioprosthetic mesh for complex abdominal wall reconstruction. Bioprosthetic mesh materials clearly have certain advantages over other implantable mesh materials in select indications. Appropriate patient selection and surgical technique are critical to the successful use of bioprosthetic materials for abdominal wall repair. PMID:23372454

  11. Parallelization of irregularly coupled regular meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, Craig; Crowley, Kay; Saltz, Joel; Reeves, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    Regular meshes are frequently used for modeling physical phenomena on both serial and parallel computers. One advantage of regular meshes is that efficient discretization schemes can be implemented in a straight forward manner. However, geometrically-complex objects, such as aircraft, cannot be easily described using a single regular mesh. Multiple interacting regular meshes are frequently used to describe complex geometries. Each mesh models a subregion of the physical domain. The meshes, or subdomains, can be processed in parallel, with periodic updates carried out to move information between the coupled meshes. In many cases, there are a relatively small number (one to a few dozen) subdomains, so that each subdomain may also be partitioned among several processors. We outline a composite run-time/compile-time approach for supporting these problems efficiently on distributed-memory machines. These methods are described in the context of a multiblock fluid dynamics problem developed at LaRC.

  12. Local, Optimization-based Simplicial Mesh Smoothing

    1999-12-09

    OPT-MS is a C software package for the improvement and untangling of simplicial meshes (triangles in 2D, tetrahedra in 3D). Overall mesh quality is improved by iterating over the mesh vertices and adjusting their position to optimize some measure of mesh quality, such as element angle or aspect ratio. Several solution techniques (including Laplacian smoothing, "Smart" Laplacian smoothing, optimization-based smoothing and several combinations thereof) and objective functions (for example, element angle, sin (angle), and aspectmore » ratio) are available to the user for both two and three-dimensional meshes. If the mesh contains invalid elements (those with negative area) a different optimization algorithm for mesh untangling is provided.« less

  13. Detection of reflector surface from near field phase measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ida, Nathan

    1991-01-01

    The deviation of a reflector antenna surface from a perfect parabolic shape causes degradation of the performance of the antenna. The problem of determining the shape of the reflector surface in a reflector antenna using near field phase measurements is not a new one. A recent issue of the IEEE tansactions on Antennas and Propagation (June 1988) contained numerous descriptions of the use of these measurements: holographic reconstruction or inverse Fourier transform. Holographic reconstruction makes use of measurement of the far field of the reflector and then applies the Fourier transform relationship between the far field and the current distribution on the reflector surface. Inverse Fourier transformation uses the phase measurements to determine the far field pattern using the method of Kerns. After the far field pattern is established, an inverse Fourier transform is used to determine the phases in a plane between the reflector surface and the plane in which the near field measurements were taken. These calculations are time consuming since they involve a relatively large number of operations. A much faster method can be used to determine the position of the reflector. This method makes use of simple geometric optics to determine the path length of the ray from the feed to the reflector and from the reflector to the measurement point. For small physical objects and low frequencies, diffraction effects have a major effect on the error, and the algorithm provides incorrect results. It is believed that the effect is less noticeable for large distortions such as antenna warping, and more noticeable for small, localized distortions such as bumps and depressions such as might be caused by impact damage.

  14. Mesh for prolapse surgery: Why the fuss?

    PubMed

    Rajshekhar, Smita; Mukhopadhyay, Sambit; Klinge, Uwe

    2015-06-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse is a common gynaecological problem. Surgical techniques to repair prolapse have been constantly evolving to reduce the recurrence of prolapse and need for reoperation. Grafts made of synthetic and biological materials became popular in the last decade as they were intended to provide extra support to native tissue repairs. However, serious complications related to use of synthetic meshes have been reported and there is increasing medico-legal concern about mesh use in prolapse surgery. Some mesh products already have been withdrawn from the market and the FDA has introduced stricter surveillance of new and existing products. Large randomized studies comparing mesh with non-mesh procedures are lacking which creates uncertainty for the surgeon and their patients.The small cohorts of the RCTs available with short follow-up periods just allow the conclusion that the mesh repair can be helpful in the short to medium term but unfortunately are not able to prove safety for all patients. In particular, current clinical reports cannot define for which indication what material may be superior compared to non-mesh repair.Quality control through long-term individual and national mesh registries is needed to keep a record of all surgeons using mesh and all devices being used, monitoring their effectiveness and safety data. Meshes with better biocompatibility designed specifically for use in vaginal surgery may provide superior clinical results, where the reduction of complications may allow a wider range of indications. PMID:25952907

  15. Deployable reflector design for Ku-band operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tankersley, B. C.

    1974-01-01

    A project was conducted to extend the deployable antenna technology state-of-the art through the design, analysis, construction, and testing of a lightweight, high surface tolerance, 12.5 foot diameter reflector for Ku-band operation. The applicability of the reflector design to the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) program was one requirement to be met. A documentary of the total program is presented. The performance requirements used to guide and constrain the design are discussed. The radio frequency, structural/dynamic, and thermal performance results are reported. Appendices are used to provide test data and detailed fabrication drawings of the reflector.

  16. Pressure surge reflector for pipe type cable system

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, H.; El Badaly, H.A.; Ghafurian, R. ); Aabo, T.; Ringlee, R.R.; Williams, J.A. ); Melcher, J. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes work performed on the development and testing of a pressure surge reflector, designed to reduce the pressure seen at potheads during an electrical failure in a pipe type cable system. The reflector is designed to protect the potheads from failing due to the pressure surge that may be large enough to fracture the porcelain, particularly when the electrical failure is physically close to the pothead. Test results show that the prototype reflector will lower the pressure significantly, bringing the pressure surge below the factory pressure test level for standard potheads.

  17. New Reflector CFLs that Can Take the Heat

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, Susan

    2005-03-01

    Reflector compact fluorescent bulbs (R-CFLs) are a wise choice for the energy savvy because they offer energy savings of up to 66 percent compared to incandescent reflectors. But some R-CFLs have suffered performance problems (including premature failure) when used in high-temperature environments, such as recessed downlight fixtures located in insulated ceilings with airtight housings. To help address this issue, the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) is working with lamp manufacturers to improve the quality and performance of screw-based reflector CFLs in high-heat applications.

  18. Highly Enriched uranium Metal Spheres Surrounded by Various Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jessica Feener; J. Blair Briggs; Leland Montierth

    2007-05-01

    A series of experiments was performed at the Los Alamos critical assembly facility in the early 1950s to determine the critical mass of highly enriched uranium spheres surrounded by thin reflectors of various materials. The objective of these experiments was to obtain a precision graph of the critical mass of highly enriched uranium metal as a function of reflector thickness and to generate transport cross sections for the reflector material. Thirteen configurations are described and evaluated under ICSBEP identifier, HEU-MET-FAST-085; two with 1.98-inch-thick and 4.158-inch-thick copper reflectors, two with 2- and 4-inch-thick cast iron reflectors, one with a 1.945-inch-thick nickel reflector, two with 1.88- and 2.02-inch-thick nickel-copper-zinc alloy reflectors, one with a 1.81-inch-thick thorium reflector, two with 2-inch-thick and 4-inch-thick tungsten alloy reflectors, two with 2-inch-thick and 4.075-inch-thick zinc reflectors, and one with a 2-inch-thick tungsten alloy reflector surrounded by a 2-inch-thick cast iron reflector. All configurations were slightly subcritical with measured multiplications ranging from 20 to 162. Analyses were performed in which uncertainty associated with six different parameters was evaluated; namely, extrapolation to uranium critical mass, uranium density, 235U enrichment, reflector density, reflector thickness, and reflector impurities were considered. Uncertainty in cast-iron alloying elements was also considered when appropriate. In addition to the idealizations made by the experimenters, two simplifications were also made to the benchmark models that resulted in a small bias and additional uncertainty. First of all, since impurities in core and reflector materials are only estimated, they are not included in the benchmark models. Secondly, the room, support structure, and other possible surrounding equipment were not included in the model. Bias values that result from these two simplifications were determined and

  19. Space Reflector Materials for Prometheus Application

    SciTech Connect

    J. Nash; V. Munne; LL Stimely

    2006-01-31

    The two materials studied in depth which appear to have the most promise in a Prometheus reflector application are beryllium (Be) and beryllium oxide (BeO). Three additional materials, magnesium oxide (MgO), alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) were also recently identified to be of potential interest, and may have promise in a Prometheus application as well, but are expected to be somewhat higher mass than either a Be or BeO based reflector. Literature review and analysis indicates that material properties for Be are largely known, but there are gaps in the properties of Be0 relative to the operating conditions for a Prometheus application. A detailed preconceptual design information document was issued providing material properties for both materials (Reference (a)). Beryllium oxide specimens were planned to be irradiated in the JOY0 Japanese test reactor to partially fill the material property gaps, but more testing in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) test reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was expected to be needed. A key issue identified for BeO was obtaining material for irradiation testing with an average grain size of {approx}5 micrometers, reminiscent of material for which prior irradiation test results were promising. Current commercially available material has an average grain size of {approx}10 micrometers. The literature indicated that improved irradiation performance could be expected (e.g., reduced irradiation-induced swelling) with the finer grain size material. Confirmation of these results would allow the use of historic irradiated materials test results from the literature, reducing the extent of required testing and therefore the cost of using this material. Environmental, safety and health (ES&H) concerns associated with manufacturing are significant but manageable for Be and BeO. Although particulate-generating operations (e.g., machining, grinding, etc.) involving Be

  20. Monthly optimum inclination of glass cover and external reflector of a basin type solar still with internal and external reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2010-11-15

    In this report, we present a theoretical analysis of a basin type solar still with internal and external reflectors. The external reflector is a flat plate that extends from the back wall of the still, and can presumably be inclined forwards or backwards according to the month. We have theoretically predicted the daily amount of distillate produced by the still throughout the year, which varies according to the inclination angle of both the glass cover and the external reflector, at 30 N latitude. We found the optimum external reflector inclination for each month for a still with a glass cover inclination of 10-50 deg. The increase in the average daily amount of distillate throughout the year of a still with inclined external reflector with optimum inclination in addition to an internal reflector, compared to a conventional basin type still was predicted to be 29%, 43% or 67% when the glass cover inclination is 10 deg, 30 deg or 50 deg and the length of external reflector is half the still's length. (author)

  1. Harms titanium mesh cage fracture

    PubMed Central

    Klezl, Zdenek; Bookland, Markus J.; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Rezek, Zdenek; Gokaslan, Ziya L.

    2007-01-01

    Interbody fusion has become a mainstay of surgical management for lumbar fractures, tumors, spondylosis, spondylolisthesis and deformities. Over the years, it has undergone a number of metamorphoses, as novel instrumentation and approaches have arisen to reduce complications and enhance outcomes. Interbody fusion procedures are common and successful, complications are rare and most often do not involve the interbody device itself. We present here a patient who underwent an anterior L4 corpectomy with Harms cage placement and who later developed a fracture of the lumbar titanium mesh cage (TMC). This report details the presentation and management of this rare complication, as well as discusses the biomechanics underlying this rare instrumentation failure. PMID:17497187

  2. Mesh networking optimized for robotic teleoperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Abraham; Pezeshkian, Narek; Nguyen, Hoa

    2012-06-01

    Mesh networks for robot teleoperation pose different challenges than those associated with traditional mesh networks. Unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) are mobile and operate in constantly changing and uncontrollable environments. Building a mesh network to work well under these harsh conditions presents a unique challenge. The Manually Deployed Communication Relay (MDCR) mesh networking system extends the range of and provides non-line-of-sight (NLOS) communications for tactical and explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) robots currently in theater. It supports multiple mesh nodes, robots acting as nodes, and works with all Internet Protocol (IP)-based robotic systems. Under MDCR, the performance of different routing protocols and route selection metrics were compared resulting in a modified version of the Babel mesh networking protocol. This paper discusses this and other topics encountered during development and testing of the MDCR system.

  3. Advancing tandem solar cells by spectrally selective multilayer intermediate reflectors.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Andre; Paetzold, Ulrich W; Zhang, Chao; Merdzhanova, Tsvetelina; Lambertz, Andreas; Ulbrich, Carolin; Bittkau, Karsten; Rau, Uwe

    2014-08-25

    Thin-film silicon tandem solar cells are composed of an amorphous silicon top cell and a microcrystalline silicon bottom cell, stacked and connected in series. In order to match the photocurrents of the top cell and the bottom cell, a proper photon management is required. Up to date, single-layer intermediate reflectors of limited spectral selectivity are applied to match the photocurrents of the top and the bottom cell. In this paper, we design and prototype multilayer intermediate reflectors based on aluminum doped zinc oxide and doped microcrystalline silicon oxide with a spectrally selective reflectance allowing for improved current matching and an overall increase of the charge carrier generation. The intermediate reflectors are successfully integrated into state-of-the-art tandem solar cells resulting in an increase of overall short-circuit current density by 0.7 mA/cm(2) in comparison to a tandem solar cell with the standard single-layer intermediate reflector. PMID:25322181

  4. RCS analysis and reduction for lossy dihedral corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griesser, Timothy; Balanis, Constantine A.; Liu, Kefeng

    1989-01-01

    The radar-cross-section (RCS) patterns of lossy dihedral corner reflectors are calculated, using a uniform geometrical theory of diffraction for impedance surfaces. All terms of up to third-order reflections and diffractions are considered for patterns in the principal plane. The surface waves are included whenever they exist for reactive surface impedances. The dihedral corner reflectors examined have right, obtuse, and acute interior angles, and patterns over the entire 360 deg azimuthal plane are calculated. The surface impedances can be different on the four faces of the dihedral corner reflector; however, the surface impedance must be uniform over each face. Computed cross sections are compared with the results of a moment-method technique for a dielectric/ferrite absorber coating on a metallic corner reflector.

  5. The localized surface plasmon resonances based on a Bragg reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Liu, Yumin; Yu, Zhongyuan; Ye, Chunwei; Lv, Hongbo; Shu, Changgan

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present the theoretical analysis on how the wavelength of the localized surface plasmon resonances of gold nanoparticle can lead shift for the resonance wavelength. In our results, we calculate the scattering cross-section, the absorption cross-section and the field enhancement due to the nanoparticle. Numerical simulation were done using the finite element method (FEM). The work that we do here is different from the previous work because we use the Bragg reflector as a substrate. The Bragg reflector has a property of high reflectivity in some certain frequency bandwidth because of its periodic structure. The coherence interference of the Bragg reflector contributes to the plasmon resonances and results in some special character for a wide variety application, from sensing to photovoltaic. The periodic number of the Bragg reflector substrate and shapes of the nanoparticles are also discussed that result in a shift of the resonance wavelength.

  6. Preliminary design approach for large high precision segmented reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.; Collins, Timothy J.; Hedgepeth, John M.

    1990-01-01

    A simplified preliminary design capability for erectable precision segmented reflectors is presented. This design capability permits a rapid assessment of a wide range of reflector parameters as well as new structural concepts and materials. The preliminary design approach was applied to a range of precision reflectors from 10 meters to 100 meters in diameter while considering standard design drivers. The design drivers considered were: weight, fundamental frequency, launch packaging volume, part count, and on-orbit assembly time. For the range of parameters considered, on-orbit assembly time was identified as the major design driver. A family of modular panels is introduced which can significantly reduce the number of reflector parts and the on-orbit assembly time.

  7. Tunable plasmonic Bragg reflector with different graphene nanoribbon widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Huawei; Kong, Fanmin; Li, Kang; Sheng, Shiwei

    2015-09-01

    We propose and numerically analyze a Bragg reflector composed of periodically arranged graphene nanoribbon waveguides with different widths. Because of the unique property of the graphene edge mode, the effective index contrast used for the reflector can be obtained by designing graphene nanoribbons with different widths without changing the dielectric substrate structure. Good band stop filtering characteristics are shown at the band gap of the transmission spectrum by numerical simulation. The performance of the proposed Bragg reflector is analyzed in terms of different parameters, such as the chemical potential, the number of periods, and the size of the unit cell. The proposed Bragg reflector will be expected to have important potential applications in the highly integrated SPP-based photonic devices.

  8. Fano resonances in integrated silicon Bragg reflectors for sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Solgaard, Olav

    2013-11-01

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally Fano resonances in integrated silicon Bragg reflectors. These asymmetric resonances are obtained by interference between light reflected from the Bragg waveguide and from the end facet. The Bragg reflectors were designed and modeled using the 1D transfer matrix method, and they were fabricated in standard silicon wafers using a CMOS-compatible process. The results show that the shape and asymmetry of the Fano resonances depend on the relative phase of the reflected light from the Bragg reflectors and end facet. This phase relationship can be controlled to optimize the lineshapes for sensing applications. Temperature sensing in these integrated Bragg reflectors are experimentally demonstrated with a temperature sensitivity of 77 pm/°C based on the thermo-optic effect of silicon. PMID:24216944

  9. Elevation of a portion of the reflector screen and antenna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation of a portion of the reflector screen and antenna circles from the interior, view facing southeast - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  10. Distributed Bragg reflector laser for frequency modulated communication systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chraplyvy, A.R.; Koch, T.L.; Tkach, R.W.

    1990-02-27

    This patent describes a lightwave transmitter. It includes a distributed Bragg reflector laser and means for frequency modulating said laser. The laser comprises first and second semiconductor heterostructure regions.

  11. Single-mode properties of distributed-reflector lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Komori, K.; Arai, S.; Suematsu, Y.; Arima, Y.; Aoki, M.

    1989-06-01

    The fundamental properties of a distributed-reflector (DR) laser, consisting of an active section and a passive distributed reflector section are theoretically investigated. The DR laser, in principle, has the properties of high efficiency and high-power performance in dynamic-single-mode operation, thus eliminating the problems of low device efficiency in DFB lasers and low output power in DBR lasers. The effective length of a distributed reflector including gain and loss is introduced as a novel concept and is applied for the analytical determination of the lasing condition. The conditions required for dynamic-single-mode operation with one-facet output are given in terms of the propagation constant difference between the active and passive regions related to the coupling coefficient of the passive reflector. This condition is experimentally found to be attainable by utilizing a conventional fabrication process.

  12. Analytical models for electrically thin flat lenses and reflectors.

    PubMed

    Ruphuy, Miguel; Ramahi, Omar M

    2015-04-01

    This work presents analytical models for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) electrically thin lenses and reflectors. The 2D formulation is based on infinite current line sources, whereas the 3D formulation is based on electrically small dipoles. These models emulate the energy convergence of an electrically thin flat lens and reflector when illuminated by a plane wave with specific polarization. The advantages of these models are twofold: first, prediction of the performance of electrically thin flat lenses and reflectors can be made significantly faster than full-wave simulators, and second, providing insight on the performance of these electrically thin devices. The analytic models were validated by comparison with full-wave simulation for several interesting examples. The validation results show that the focal point of the electrically thin flat lenses and reflectors can be accurately predicted through a design that assumes low coupling between different layers of an inhomogeneous media. PMID:26366759

  13. STEP flight experiments Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    Flight testing plans for a large deployable infrared reflector telescope to be tested on a space platform are discussed. Subsystem parts, subassemblies, and whole assemblies are discussed. Assurance of operational deployability, rigidization, alignment, and serviceability will be sought.

  14. A figure control sensor for the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartman, R.; Dubovitsky, S.

    1988-01-01

    A sensing and control system is required to maintain high optical figure quality in a segmented reflector. Upon detecting a deviation of the segmented surface from its ideal form, the system drives segment mounted actuators to realign the individual segments and thereby return the surface to its intended figure. When the reflector is in use, a set of figure sensors will determine positions of a number of points on the back surface of each of the reflector's segments, each sensor being assigned to a single point. By measuring the positional deviations of these points from previously established nominal values, the figure sensors provide the control system with the information required to maintain the reflector's optical figure. The optical lever, multiple wavelength interferometer, and electronic capacitive sensor, the most promising technologies for the development of the figure sensor, are illustrated. It is concluded that to select a particular implementation of the figure sensors, performance requirement will be refined and relevant technologies investigated further.

  15. 6. GENE WASH DAM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. SURVEY REFLECTOR IN FOREGROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. GENE WASH DAM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. SURVEY REFLECTOR IN FOREGROUND FOR MONITORING MOVEMENT OF DAM AND EARTH. - Gene Wash Reservoir & Dam, 2 miles west of Parker Dam, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

  16. Acoustic levitation with self-adaptive flexible reflectors.

    PubMed

    Hong, Z Y; Xie, W J; Wei, B

    2011-07-01

    Two kinds of flexible reflectors are proposed and examined in this paper to improve the stability of single-axis acoustic levitator, especially in the case of levitating high-density and high-temperature samples. One kind is those with a deformable reflecting surface, and the other kind is those with an elastic support, both of which are self-adaptive to the change of acoustic radiation pressure. High-density materials such as iridium (density 22.6 gcm(-3)) are stably levitated at room temperature with a soft reflector made of colloid as well as a rigid reflector supported by a spring. In addition, the containerless melting and solidification of binary In-Bi eutectic alloy (melting point 345.8 K) and ternary Ag-Cu-Ge eutectic alloy (melting point 812 K) are successfully achieved by applying the elastically supported reflector with the assistance of a laser beam. PMID:21806218

  17. Secondary pattern computation of an arbitrarily shaped main reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, P. T. C.; Lee, S. W.; Acosta, R.

    1984-01-01

    The secondary pattern of a perfectly conducting offset main reflector being illuminated by a point feed at an arbitrary location was studied. The method of analysis is based upon the application of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to the aperture fields obtained using geometrical optics (GO) and geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD). Key features of the reflector surface is completely arbitrary, the incident field from the feed is most general with arbitrary polarization and location, and the edge diffraction is calculated by either UAT or by UTD. Comparison of this technique for an offset parabolic reflector with the Jacobi-Bessel and Fourier-Bessel techniques shows good agreement. Near field, far field, and scan data of a large reflector are presented.

  18. Scan performance of dual offset reflector antennas for satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Galindo-Israel, V.

    1981-01-01

    The basic numerical steps of a method to analyze dual offset reflector antennas are reviewed. The technique employs an alternative approach to calculating the secondary pattern of an arbitrarily shaped offset dual reflector antenna, and is based on the application of the geometrical theory of diffraction from the subreflector and physical optics (PO) scattering from the main reflector. The PO integral is evaluated using the Jacobi-Bessel series expansions, and numerical results are presented for the off-axis scan performance of an offset clear aperture Cassegrain antenna. Results indicate that the equivalent paraboloid concept can be used to determine the location of displaced feed and define the local optimal focal plane, and the scan performance of the Cassegrain reflector can be improved if the feed is located on the true opimal surface.

  19. Unstructured Polyhedral Mesh Thermal Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T.S.; Zika, M.R.; Madsen, N.K.

    2000-07-27

    Unstructured mesh particle transport and diffusion methods are gaining wider acceptance as mesh generation, scientific visualization and linear solvers improve. This paper describes an algorithm that is currently being used in the KULL code at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to solve the radiative transfer equations. The algorithm employs a point-centered diffusion discretization on arbitrary polyhedral meshes in 3D. We present the results of a few test problems to illustrate the capabilities of the radiation diffusion module.

  20. Auto-adaptive finite element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Roland; Leyland, Penelope

    1995-01-01

    Accurate capturing of discontinuities within compressible flow computations is achieved by coupling a suitable solver with an automatic adaptive mesh algorithm for unstructured triangular meshes. The mesh adaptation procedures developed rely on non-hierarchical dynamical local refinement/derefinement techniques, which hence enable structural optimization as well as geometrical optimization. The methods described are applied for a number of the ICASE test cases are particularly interesting for unsteady flow simulations.

  1. Floating shock fitting via Lagrangian adaptive meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanrosendale, John

    1995-01-01

    In recent work we have formulated a new approach to compressible flow simulation, combining the advantages of shock-fitting and shock-capturing. Using a cell-centered on Roe scheme discretization on unstructured meshes, we warp the mesh while marching to steady state, so that mesh edges align with shocks and other discontinuities. This new algorithm, the Shock-fitting Lagrangian Adaptive Method (SLAM), is, in effect, a reliable shock-capturing algorithm which yields shock-fitted accuracy at convergence.

  2. Improved Monoblock laser brightness using external reflector.

    PubMed

    Hays, A D; Nettleton, John; Barr, Nick; Hough, Nathaniel; Goldberg, Lew

    2014-03-01

    The Monoblock laser has become the laser of choice in long-range, eye-safe laser range finders. It is eye-safe with emission at 1570 nm, high pulse energy, simple construction, and high efficiency when pumped by a laser-diode stack. Although the output beam divergence of a typical Monoblock with a 3  mm×3  mm cross section is relatively large (10-12 mrad), it can be reduced to <1  mrad using a telescope with large magnification. In this paper we present a simple and compact technique for achieving significant reduction in the Monoblock beam divergence using a partial reflector that is placed a short distance from the optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Using a 38 mm long Monoblock with a 10 mm long potassium titanyl phosphate OPO, we achieved a beam divergence of <4  mrad, corresponding to a >2.5× reduction from the unmodified laser. Performance using this technique with various feedback and etalon spacings is presented. PMID:24663350

  3. Ultralightweight Space Deployable Primary Reflector Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Edward E., IV; Zeiders, Glenn W.; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A concept has been developed and analyzed and several generational prototypes built for a gossamer-class deployable truss for a mirror or reflector with many smaller precisely-figured solid elements attached will, for at least the next several decades, minimize the mass of a large primary mirror assembly while still providing the high image quality essential for planet-finding and cosmological astronomical missions. Primary mirror segments are mounted in turn on ultralightweight thermally-formed plastic panels that hold clusters of mirror segments in rigid arrays whose tip/tilt and piston would be corrected over the scale of the plastic panels by the control segments. Prototype panels developed under this program are 45 cm wide and fabricated from commercially available Kaplan sheets. A three-strut octahedral tensegrity is the basis for the overall support structure. Each fundamental is composed of two such octahedrons, rotated oppositely about a common triangular face. Adjacent modules are joined at the nodes of the upper and lower triangles to form a deployable structure that could be made arbitrarily large. A seven-module dowel-and-wire prototype has been constructed. Deployment techniques based on the use of collapsing toggled struts with diagonal tensional elements allows an assembly of tensegrities to be fully collapsed and redeployed. The prototype designs will be described and results of a test program for measuring strength and deformation will be presented.

  4. Coaxial prime focus feeds for paraboloidal reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collin, R. E.; Schilling, H.; Hebert, L.

    1982-01-01

    A TE11 - TM11 dual mode coaxial feed for use in prime focus paraboloidal antenna systems is investigated. The scattering matrix parameters of the internal bifurcation junction was determined by the residue calculus technique. The scattering parameters and radiation fields of the aperture were found from the Weinstein solution. The optimum modeing ratio for minimum cross-polarization was determined along with the corresponding optimum feed dimensions. A peak cross-polarization level of -58 dB is predicted. The frequency characteristics were also investigated and a bandwidth of 5% is predicted over which the cross-polarization remains below -30 dB, the input VSWR is below 1.15, and the phase error is less than 10 deg. Theoretical radiation patterns and efficiency curves for a paraboloidal reflector illuminated by this feed were computed. The predicted sidelobe level is below -30 dB and aperture efficiencies greater than 70% are possible. Experimental results are also presented that substantiates the theoretical results. In addition, experimental results for a 'short-cup' coaxial feed are given. The report includes extensive design data for the dual-mode feed along with performance curves showing cross-polarization as a function of feed parameters. The feed is useful for low-cost ground based receiving antennas for use in direct television satellite broadcasting service.

  5. Design of electrospinning mesh devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Giuseppina; Peters, Gerrit W. M.; Solberg, Ramon H. M.; Vittoria, Vittoria

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the features of new membranes that can act as local biomedical devices owing to their peculiar shape in the form of mesh structure. These materials are designed to provide significant effects to reduce local inflammations and improve the tissue regeneration. Lamellar Hydrotalcite loaded with Diclofenac Sodium (HTLc-DIK) was homogenously dispersed inside a polymeric matrix of Poly-caprolactone (PCL) to manufacture membranes by electrospinning technique. The experimental procedure and the criteria employed have shown to be extremely effective at increasing potentiality and related applications. The employed technique has proved to be very useful to manufacture polymeric fibers with diameters in the range of nano-micro scale. In this work a dedicated collector based on a proprietary technology of IME Technologies and Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) was used. It allowed to obtain devices with a macro shape of a 3D-mesh. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) highlights a very interesting texture of the electrospun fibers. They show a lamellar morphology that is only slightly modified by the inclusion of the interclay embedded in the devices to control the drug release phenomena.

  6. Determining The Slope Error Of A Parabolic Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christ, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    Approximate slope error determined with minimal test equipment. Test Setup for Determining Slope Error for Point-Focusing Dish includes pinhole camera at center of curvature and color-coded target mounted around pinhole. Floodlights illuminate target to minimize exposure time. New procedure provides good approximation of reflector slope error and is excellent tool for comparative analysis of reflectors used as solar collectors for microwave receivers.

  7. Solar cell comprising a plasmonic back reflector and method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Ding, I-Kang; Zhu, Jia; Cui, Yi; McGehee, Michael David

    2014-11-25

    A method for forming a solar cell having a plasmonic back reflector is disclosed. The method includes the formation of a nanoimprinted surface on which a metal electrode is conformally disposed. The surface structure of the nanoimprinted surface gives rise to a two-dimensional pattern of nanometer-scale features in the metal electrode enabling these features to collectively form the plasmonic back reflector.

  8. Power conservation for reflector antennas with truncated feed patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, W. V. T.; Cramer, P.

    1976-01-01

    Reflector-antenna calculations using idealised truncated feed patterns can lead to incorrect values of total secondary radiated power. It is demonstrated that this discrepancy is due to the presence of higher-order spherical modes incident on the reflector. When a proper spherical-wave expansion of the incident field is used, in conjunction with the physical-optics technique, to determine the scattered field, the total power of the scattered field will equal the power radiated by the feed.

  9. Reflectors for SAR performance testing-second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-02-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  10. Mesh infrastructure for coupled multiprocess geophysical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Garimella, Rao V.; Perkins, William A.; Buksas, Mike W.; Berndt, Markus; Lipnikov, Konstantin; Coon, Ethan; Moulton, John D.; Painter, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a sophisticated mesh infrastructure capability to support large scale multiphysics simulations such as subsurface flow and reactive contaminant transport at storage sites as well as the analysis of the effects of a warming climate on the terrestrial arctic. These simulations involve a wide range of coupled processes including overland flow, subsurface flow, freezing and thawing of ice rich soil, accumulation, redistribution and melting of snow, biogeochemical processes involving plant matter and finally, microtopography evolution due to melting and degradation of ice wedges below the surface. In addition to supporting the usual topological and geometric queries about the mesh, the mesh infrastructure adds capabilities such as identifying columnar structures in the mesh, enabling deforming of the mesh subject to constraints and enabling the simultaneous use of meshes of different dimensionality for subsurface and surface processes. The generic mesh interface is capable of using three different open source mesh frameworks (MSTK, MOAB and STKmesh) under the hood allowing the developers to directly compare them and choose one that is best suited for the application's needs. We demonstrate the results of some simulations using these capabilities as well as present a comparison of the performance of the different mesh frameworks.

  11. Mesh infrastructure for coupled multiprocess geophysical simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Garimella, Rao V.; Perkins, William A.; Buksas, Mike W.; Berndt, Markus; Lipnikov, Konstantin; Coon, Ethan; Moulton, John D.; Painter, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a sophisticated mesh infrastructure capability to support large scale multiphysics simulations such as subsurface flow and reactive contaminant transport at storage sites as well as the analysis of the effects of a warming climate on the terrestrial arctic. These simulations involve a wide range of coupled processes including overland flow, subsurface flow, freezing and thawing of ice rich soil, accumulation, redistribution and melting of snow, biogeochemical processes involving plant matter and finally, microtopography evolution due to melting and degradation of ice wedges below the surface. In addition to supporting the usual topological and geometric queries about themore » mesh, the mesh infrastructure adds capabilities such as identifying columnar structures in the mesh, enabling deforming of the mesh subject to constraints and enabling the simultaneous use of meshes of different dimensionality for subsurface and surface processes. The generic mesh interface is capable of using three different open source mesh frameworks (MSTK, MOAB and STKmesh) under the hood allowing the developers to directly compare them and choose one that is best suited for the application's needs. We demonstrate the results of some simulations using these capabilities as well as present a comparison of the performance of the different mesh frameworks.« less

  12. RGG: Reactor geometry (and mesh) generator

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, R.; Tautges, T.

    2012-07-01

    The reactor geometry (and mesh) generator RGG takes advantage of information about repeated structures in both assembly and core lattices to simplify the creation of geometry and mesh. It is released as open source software as a part of the MeshKit mesh generation library. The methodology operates in three stages. First, assembly geometry models of various types are generated by a tool called AssyGen. Next, the assembly model or models are meshed by using MeshKit tools or the CUBIT mesh generation tool-kit, optionally based on a journal file output by AssyGen. After one or more assembly model meshes have been constructed, a tool called CoreGen uses a copy/move/merge process to arrange the model meshes into a core model. In this paper, we present the current state of tools and new features in RGG. We also discuss the parallel-enabled CoreGen, which in several cases achieves super-linear speedups since the problems fit in available RAM at higher processor counts. Several RGG applications - 1/6 VHTR model, 1/4 PWR reactor core, and a full-core model for Monju - are reported. (authors)

  13. Mesh plug repair and groin hernia surgery.

    PubMed

    Robbins, A W; Rutkow, I M

    1998-12-01

    Since the mid-1980s, dramatic progress has been made in the evolution of hernia surgery, highlighted by the increasing use of prosthetic mesh. Among the mesh-based "tension-free" hernioplasties, the use of mesh plugs has garnered a large number of spirited enthusiasts, and plug herniorrhaphy has become the fastest growing hernia repair currently employed by the American surgeon. To demonstrate the simplicity and effectiveness of mesh plugs, a 9-year experience with almost 3300 patients is reported. Technical details are discussed and presentation of a literature search serves to further emphasize the utilitarian nature of this elegantly unsophisticated surgical operation. PMID:9927981

  14. Method of generating a surface mesh

    DOEpatents

    Shepherd, Jason F.; Benzley, Steven; Grover, Benjamin T.

    2008-03-04

    A method and machine-readable medium provide a technique to generate and modify a quadrilateral finite element surface mesh using dual creation and modification. After generating a dual of a surface (mesh), a predetermined algorithm may be followed to generate and modify a surface mesh of quadrilateral elements. The predetermined algorithm may include the steps of generating two-dimensional cell regions in dual space, determining existing nodes in primal space, generating new nodes in the dual space, and connecting nodes to form the quadrilateral elements (faces) for the generated and modifiable surface mesh.

  15. Conformal refinement of unstructured quadrilateral meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Garmella, Rao

    2009-01-01

    We present a multilevel adaptive refinement technique for unstructured quadrilateral meshes in which the mesh is kept conformal at all times. This means that the refined mesh, like the original, is formed of only quadrilateral elements that intersect strictly along edges or at vertices, i.e., vertices of one quadrilateral element do not lie in an edge of another quadrilateral. Elements are refined using templates based on 1:3 refinement of edges. We demonstrate that by careful design of the refinement and coarsening strategy, we can maintain high quality elements in the refined mesh. We demonstrate the method on a number of examples with dynamically changing refinement regions.

  16. Low-dispersion meshes for scattering problems

    SciTech Connect

    Hakula, H.

    1996-12-31

    For scattering problems, e.g. the Helmholtz equation, the ideal mesh in 2D is a structured mesh of equilateral triangles, since the numerical dispersion and internal reflections caused by the mesh are then minimal. However, if the scattering body does not conform to the mesh, one has to add unstructured elements to the mesh. In this paper we describe a simple modification to the Rebay`s method which leads to meshes of high quality in the context of the application. Even though the Rebay`s method is a variant of Delaunay algorithms, it does include the concept of a front. By controlling the generation of fronts in the mesh we can always choose the outer boundary of the computational domain so that the mesh will be structured far from the scattering body and the only anisotropic elements are close to the body. As a result of this, one can use the same generator both for electromagnetic and flow simulations in 2D. In multi-body configurations the meshes are intimately dependent on the relative distances between the bodies.

  17. MOAB : a mesh-oriented database.

    SciTech Connect

    Tautges, Timothy James; Ernst, Corey; Stimpson, Clint; Meyers, Ray J.; Merkley, Karl

    2004-04-01

    A finite element mesh is used to decompose a continuous domain into a discretized representation. The finite element method solves PDEs on this mesh by modeling complex functions as a set of simple basis functions with coefficients at mesh vertices and prescribed continuity between elements. The mesh is one of the fundamental types of data linking the various tools in the FEA process (mesh generation, analysis, visualization, etc.). Thus, the representation of mesh data and operations on those data play a very important role in FEA-based simulations. MOAB is a component for representing and evaluating mesh data. MOAB can store structured and unstructured mesh, consisting of elements in the finite element 'zoo'. The functional interface to MOAB is simple yet powerful, allowing the representation of many types of metadata commonly found on the mesh. MOAB is optimized for efficiency in space and time, based on access to mesh in chunks rather than through individual entities, while also versatile enough to support individual entity access. The MOAB data model consists of a mesh interface instance, mesh entities (vertices and elements), sets, and tags. Entities are addressed through handles rather than pointers, to allow the underlying representation of an entity to change without changing the handle to that entity. Sets are arbitrary groupings of mesh entities and other sets. Sets also support parent/child relationships as a relation distinct from sets containing other sets. The directed-graph provided by set parent/child relationships is useful for modeling topological relations from a geometric model or other metadata. Tags are named data which can be assigned to the mesh as a whole, individual entities, or sets. Tags are a mechanism for attaching data to individual entities and sets are a mechanism for describing relations between entities; the combination of these two mechanisms is a powerful yet simple interface for representing metadata or application

  18. A bionic approach to mathematical modeling the fold geometry of deployable reflector antennas on satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, C. M.; Liu, T. S.

    2014-10-01

    Inspired from biology, this study presents a method for designing the fold geometry of deployable reflectors. Since the space available inside rockets for transporting satellites with reflector antennas is typically cylindrical in shape, and its cross-sectional area is considerably smaller than the reflector antenna after deployment, the cross-sectional area of the folded reflector must be smaller than the available rocket interior space. Membrane reflectors in aerospace are a type of lightweight structure that can be packaged compactly. To design membrane reflectors from the perspective of deployment processes, bionic applications from morphological changes of plants are investigated. Creating biologically inspired reflectors, this paper deals with fold geometry of reflectors, which imitate flower buds. This study uses mathematical formulation to describe geometric profiles of flower buds. Based on the formulation, new designs for deployable membrane reflectors derived from bionics are proposed. Adjusting parameters in the formulation of these designs leads to decreases in reflector area before deployment.

  19. Large deployable reflectors for telecom and earth observation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scialino, L.; Ihle, A.; Migliorelli, M.; Gatti, N.; Datashvili, L.; 't Klooster, K.; Santiago Prowald, J.

    2013-12-01

    Large deployable antennas are one of the key components for advanced missions in the fields of telecom and earth observation. In the recent past, missions have taken on board large deployable reflector (LDR) up to 22 m of diameter and several missions have already planned embarking large reflectors, such as the 12 m of INMARSAT XL or BIOMASS. At the moment, no European LDR providers are available and the market is dominated by Northrop-Grumman and Harris. Consequently, the development of European large reflector technology is considered a key step to maintain commercial and strategic competitiveness (ESA Large Reflector Antenna Working Group Final Report, TEC-EEA/2010.595/CM, 2010). In this scenario, the ESA General Study Project RESTEO (REflector Synergy between Telecom and Earth Observation), starting from the identification of future missions needs, has identified the most promising reflector concepts based on European heritage/technology, able to cover the largest range of potential future missions for both telecom and earth observation. This paper summarizes the activities and findings of the RESTEO Study.

  20. Disordered animal multilayer reflectors and the localization of light

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, T. M.; Partridge, J. C.; Roberts, N. W.

    2014-01-01

    Multilayer optical reflectors constructed from ‘stacks’ of alternating layers of high and low refractive index dielectric materials are present in many animals. For example, stacks of guanine crystals with cytoplasm gaps occur within the skin and scales of fish, and stacks of protein platelets with cytoplasm gaps occur within the iridophores of cephalopods. Common to all these animal multilayer reflectors are different degrees of random variation in the thicknesses of the individual layers in the stack, ranging from highly periodic structures to strongly disordered systems. However, previous discussions of the optical effects of such thickness disorder have been made without quantitative reference to the propagation of light within the reflector. Here, we demonstrate that Anderson localization provides a general theoretical framework to explain the common coherent interference and optical properties of these biological reflectors. Firstly, we illustrate how the localization length enables the spectral properties of the reflections from more weakly disordered ‘coloured’ and more strongly disordered ‘silvery’ reflectors to be explained by the same physical process. Secondly, we show how the polarization properties of reflection can be controlled within guanine–cytoplasm reflectors, with an interplay of birefringence and thickness disorder explaining the origin of broadband polarization-insensitive reflectivity. PMID:25339688

  1. Light Readout Optimisation using Wavelength Shifter - Reflector Combinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavrokoridis, Konstantinos

    2011-07-01

    The use of reflectors coated with a wavelength shifter (WLS) along with standard bialkali PMTs is an economical method for an efficient readout system for vacuum ultra violet (VUV) light produced in large liquid argon detectors. Various thicknesses of tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) were deposited by spraying and vacuum evaporation onto both specular 3MTM-foil and diffuse TetratexTM (TTX) reflectors. 128 nm VUV light generated in 1 bar argon gas by a 5.4 MeV α source was detected by a 3-inch bialkali borosilicate PMT within a 1 m tube lined internally with a TPB coated reflector. The light collection was recorded as a function of separation between source and PMT for each combination of coating and reflector for distances up to 1m. Reflection coefficients of TPB coated reflectors were measured using a spectroradiometer. WLS coating on the PMT window was also studied. The optimum coating and reflector combination was TPB evaporated on TTX. Measurements with coating thicknesses of 0.2 mg/cm2 and 1.0 mg/cm2 yielded a similar performance. The best PMT window coating is obtained by TPB evaporation of 0.05 mg/cm2.

  2. Differential correction method applied to measurement of the FAST reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Yi; Zhu, Li-Chun; Hu, Jin-Wen; Li, Zhi-Heng

    2016-08-01

    The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) adopts an active deformable main reflector which is composed of 4450 triangular panels. During an observation, the illuminated area of the reflector is deformed into a 300-m diameter paraboloid and directed toward a source. To achieve accurate control of the reflector shape, positions of 2226 nodes distributed around the entire reflector must be measured with sufficient precision within a limited time, which is a challenging task because of the large scale. Measurement of the FAST reflector makes use of stations and node targets. However, in this case the effect of the atmosphere on measurement accuracy is a significant issue. This paper investigates a differential correction method for total stations measurement of the FAST reflector. A multi-benchmark differential correction method, including a scheme for benchmark selection and weight assignment, is proposed. On-site evaluation experiments show there is an improvement of 70%–80% in measurement accuracy compared with the uncorrected measurement, verifying the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Design method for four-reflector type beam waveguide systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betsudan, S.; Katagi, T.; Urasaki, S.

    1986-01-01

    Discussed is a method for the design of four reflector type beam waveguide feed systems, comprised of a conical horn and 4 focused reflectors, which are used widely as the primary reflector systems for communications satellite Earth station antennas. The design parameters for these systems are clarified, the relations between each parameter are brought out based on the beam mode development, and the independent design parameters are specified. The characteristics of these systems, namely spillover loss, crosspolarization components, and frequency characteristics, and their relation to the design parameters, are also shown. It is also indicated that design parameters which decide the dimensions of the conical horn or the shape of the focused reflectors can be unerringly established once the design standard for the system has been selected as either: (1) minimizing the crosspolarization component by keeping the spillover loss to within acceptable limits, or (2) minimizing the spillover loss by maintaining the crossover components below an acceptable level and the independent design parameters, such as the respective sizes of the focused reflectors and the distances between the focussed reflectors, etc., have been established according to mechanical restrictions. A sample design is also shown. In addition to being able to clarify the effects of each of the design parameters on the system and improving insight into these systems, the efficiency of these systems will also be increased with this design method.

  4. A Cassegrain reflector system for compact range applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rader, Mark D.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1986-01-01

    An integral part of a compact range is the means of providing a uniform plane wave. A Cassegrain reflector system is one alternative for achieving this goal. Theoretically, this system offers better performance than a simple reflector system. The longer pathlengths in the Cassegrain system lead to a more uniform field in the plane of interest. The addition of the subreflector creates several problems, though. System complexity is increased both in terms of construction and performance analysis. The subreflector also leads to aperture blockage and the orientation of the feed now results in spillover illuminating the target areas as well as the rest of the range. Finally, the addition of the subreflector leads to interaction between the two reflectors resulting in undesired field variations in the plane of interest. These difficulties are addressed and through the concept of blending the surfaces, a Cassegrain reflector system is developed that will provide a uniform plane wave that offers superior performance over large target areas for a given size reflector system. Design and analysis is implemented by considering the main reflector and subreflector separately. Then the system may be put together and the final design and system analysis completed.

  5. Optimum Reflector Configurations for Minimizing Fission Power Peaking in a Lithium-Cooled, Liquid-Metal Reactor with Sliding Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael L.; Poston, David I.

    2005-02-06

    Many design constraints limit the development of a space fission power system optimized for fuel performance, system reliability, and mission cost. These design constraints include fuel mass provisions to meet cycle-length requirements, fuel centerline and clad temperatures, and clad creep from fission gas generation. Decreasing the fission power peaking of the reactor system enhances all of the mentioned parameters. This design study identifies the cause, determines the reflector configurations for reactor criticality, and generates worth curves for minimized fission-power-peaking configuration in a lithium-cooled liquid-metal reactor that uses sliding reflectors. Because of the characteristics of the core axial power distribution and axial power distortions inherent to the sliding reflector design, minimizing the power peaking of the reactor involves placing the reflectors in a position that least distorts the axial power distribution. The views expressed in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect agreement by the Government.

  6. Pre-Launch phase 2 rehearsal of the calibration and validation of soil moisture active passive (SMAP) geophysical data products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission is scheduled for launch in early November 2014. The objective of the mission is global mapping of soil moisture and landscape freeze/thaw state. SMAP utilizes L-band radar and radiometer measurements sharing a rotating 6-meter mesh reflector antenna...

  7. Choosing corners of rectangles for mapped meshing

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, S.A.

    1996-12-16

    Consider mapping a regular i x j quadrilateral mesh of a rectangle onto a surface. The quality of the mapped mesh of the surface depends heavily on which vertices of the surface correspond to corners of the rectangle. The authors problem is, given an n-sided surface, chose as corners four vertices such that the surface resembles a rectangle with corners at those vertices. Note that n could be quite large, and the length and width of the rectangle, i and j, are not prespecified. In general, there is either a goal number or a prescribed number of mesh edges for each bounding curve of the surface. The goals affect the quality of the mesh, and the prescribed edges may make finding a feasible set of corners difficult. The algorithm need only work for surfaces that are roughly rectangular, particular those without large reflex angles, as otherwise an unstructured meshing algorithm is used instead. The authors report on the theory and implementation of algorithms for this problem. They also given an overview of a solution to a related problem called interval assignment: given a complex of surfaces sharing curves, globally assign the number of mesh edges or intervals for each curve such that it is possible to mesh each surface according to its prescribed quadrilateral meshing algorithm, and assigned and user-prescribed boundary mesh edges and corners. They also note a practical, constructive technique that relies on interval assignment that can generate a quadrilateral mesh of a complex of surfaces such that a compatible hexahedral mesh of the enclosed volume exists.

  8. High Q-factor distributed bragg reflector resonators with reflectors of arbitrary thickness.

    PubMed

    Le Floch, Jean-Michel; Tobar, Michael E; Cros, Dominique; Krupka, Jerzy

    2007-12-01

    The Bragg reflection technique improves the Q-factor of a resonator by reducing conductor and dielectric losses. This is achieved by designing a low-loss inner resonant region (usually free space) surrounded by an outer anti-resonant region made of distributed Bragg reflector layers. In this paper we develop a simple non-Maxwellian model and apply it to design three distinct cylindrical Bragg resonators based on the same set of single-crystal sapphire plates and rings by changing only the dimension of the cavity that supports the structure. To accomplish this, the simple model allows an arbitrary thickness for either the horizontal or the cylindrical dielectric reflectors by relaxing the condition that they must be lambda/4 thick. The model also allows for higher-order field variations in both the resonant and the anti-resonant regions. The resonators were constructed and experimental results were compared with the simple model and the rigorous method of lines analysis. For the fundamental mode, an unloaded Q-factor of 234,000 at 9.7 GHz was obtained. This is larger than that for a whispering gallery mode resonator. The resonator also exhibited a greatly reduced spurious mode density when compared to an overmoded whispering gallery mode resonator. PMID:18276575

  9. Cryogenic systems for the large deployable reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Peter V.

    1988-01-01

    There are five technologies which may have application for Large Deployable Reflector (LDR), one passive and four active. In order of maturity, they are passive stored cryogen systems, and mechanical, sorption, magnetic, and pulse-tube refrigerators. In addition, deep space radiators will be required to reject the heat of the active systems, and may be useful as auxiliary coolers for the stored cryogen systems. Hybrid combinations of these technologies may well be more efficient than any one alone, and extensive system studies will be required to determine the best trade-offs. Stored cryogen systems were flown on a number of missions. The systems are capable of meeting the temperature requirements of LDR. The size and weight of stored cryogen systems are proportional to heat load and, as a result, are applicable only if the low-temperature heat load can be kept small. Systems using chemisorption and physical adsorption for compressors and pumps have received considerable attention in the past few years. Systems based on adiabatic demagnetization of paramagnetic salts were used for refrigeration for many years. Pulse-tube refrigerators were recently proposed which show relatively high efficiency for temperatures in the 60 to 80 K range. The instrument heat loads and operating temperatures are critical to the selection and design of the cryogenic system. Every effort should be made to minimize heat loads, raise operating temperatures, and to define these precisely. No one technology is now ready for application to LDR. Substantial development efforts are underway in all of the technologies and should be monitored and advocated. Magnetic and pulse-tube refrigerators have high potential.

  10. Adaptive mesh refinement in titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Colella, Phillip; Wen, Tong

    2005-01-21

    In this paper, we evaluate Titanium's usability as a high-level parallel programming language through a case study, where we implement a subset of Chombo's functionality in Titanium. Chombo is a software package applying the Adaptive Mesh Refinement methodology to numerical Partial Differential Equations at the production level. In Chombo, the library approach is used to parallel programming (C++ and Fortran, with MPI), whereas Titanium is a Java dialect designed for high-performance scientific computing. The performance of our implementation is studied and compared with that of Chombo in solving Poisson's equation based on two grid configurations from a real application. Also provided are the counts of lines of code from both sides.

  11. Parallel mesh management using interoperable tools.

    SciTech Connect

    Tautges, Timothy James; Devine, Karen Dragon

    2010-10-01

    This presentation included a discussion of challenges arising in parallel mesh management, as well as demonstrated solutions. They also described the broad range of software for mesh management and modification developed by the Interoperable Technologies for Advanced Petascale Simulations (ITAPS) team, and highlighted applications successfully using the ITAPS tool suite.

  12. Conforming quadrilaterals meshes on the cubed sphere.

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Mark A.; Levy, Michael Nathan; Overfelt, James Robert

    2010-08-01

    The cubed sphere geometry, obtained by inscribing a cube in a sphere and mapping points between the two surfaces using a gnomonic (central) projection, is commonly used in atmospheric models because it is free of polar singularities and is well-suited for parallel computing. Global meshes on the cubed-sphere typically project uniform (square) grids from each face of the cube onto the sphere, and if refinement is desired then it is done with non-conforming meshes - overlaying the area of interest with a finer uniform mesh, which introduces so-called hanging nodes on edges along the boundary of the fine resolution area. An alternate technique is to tile each face of the cube with quadrilaterals without requiring the quads to be rectangular. These meshes allow for refinement in areas of interest with a conforming mesh, providing a smoother transition between high and low resolution portions of the grid than non-conforming refinement. The conforming meshes are demonstrated in HOMME, NCAR's High Order Method Modeling Environment, where two modifications have been made: the dependence on uniform meshes has been removed, and the ability to read arbitrary quadrilateral meshes from a previously-generated file has been added. Numerical results come from a conservative spectral element method modeling a selection of the standard shallow water test cases.

  13. Computational results for parallel unstructured mesh computations

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.T.; Plassmann, P.E.

    1994-12-31

    The majority of finite element models in structural engineering are composed of unstructured meshes. These unstructured meshes are often very large and require significant computational resources; hence they are excellent candidates for massively parallel computation. Parallel solution of the sparse matrices that arise from such meshes has been studied heavily, and many good algorithms have been developed. Unfortunately, many of the other aspects of parallel unstructured mesh computation have gone largely ignored. The authors present a set of algorithms that allow the entire unstructured mesh computation process to execute in parallel -- including adaptive mesh refinement, equation reordering, mesh partitioning, and sparse linear system solution. They briefly describe these algorithms and state results regarding their running-time and performance. They then give results from the 512-processor Intel DELTA for a large-scale structural analysis problem. These results demonstrate that the new algorithms are scalable and efficient. The algorithms are able to achieve up to 2.2 gigaflops for this unstructured mesh problem.

  14. 7th International Meshing Roundtable '98

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, T.J.

    1998-10-01

    The goal of the 7th International Meshing Roundtable is to bring together researchers and developers from industry, academia, and government labs in a stimulating, open environment for the exchange of technical information related to the meshing process. In the past, the Roundtable has enjoyed significant participation from each of these groups from a wide variety of countries.

  15. Structured mesh generation with smoothness controls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In geometrically complex domains, the RL (Ryskin and Leal) orthogonal mesh generation system may cause mesh distortion and overlapping problems when using the “weak constraint” method with specified boundary point distribution for all boundaries. To resolve these problems, an improved RL system with...

  16. 21 CFR 878.3300 - Surgical mesh.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Surgical mesh. 878.3300 Section 878.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3300 Surgical mesh. (a)...

  17. 21 CFR 878.3300 - Surgical mesh.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Surgical mesh. 878.3300 Section 878.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3300 Surgical mesh. (a)...

  18. Feature recognition applications in mesh generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tautges, T.J.; Liu, S.S.; Lu, Y.; Kraftcheck, J.; Gadh, R.

    1997-06-01

    The use of feature recognition as part of an overall decomposition-based hexahedral meshing approach is described in this paper. The meshing approach consists of feature recognition, using a c-loop or hybrid c-loop method, and the use of cutting surfaces to decompose the solid model. These steps are part of an iterative process, which proceeds either until no more features can be recognized or until the model has been completely decomposed into meshable sub-volumes. This method can greatly reduce the time required to generate an all-hexahedral mesh, either through the use of more efficient meshing algorithms on more of the geometry or by reducing the amount of manual decomposition required to mesh a volume.

  19. Mesh deformation based on artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, Domen; Kosel, Franc; Čelič, Damjan; Lipej, Andrej

    2011-09-01

    In the article a new mesh deformation algorithm based on artificial neural networks is introduced. This method is a point-to-point method, meaning that it does not use connectivity information for calculation of the mesh deformation. Two already known point-to-point methods, based on interpolation techniques, are also presented. In contrast to the two known interpolation methods, the new method does not require a summation over all boundary nodes for one displacement calculation. The consequence of this fact is a shorter computational time of mesh deformation, which is proven by different deformation tests. The quality of the deformed meshes with all three deformation methods was also compared. Finally, the generated and the deformed three-dimensional meshes were used in the computational fluid dynamics numerical analysis of a Francis water turbine. A comparison of the analysis results was made to prove the applicability of the new method in every day computation.

  20. Modified mesh-connected parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, D.A. )

    1988-10-01

    The mesh-connected parallel computer is an important parallel processing organization that has been used in the past for the design of supercomputing systems. In this paper, the authors explore modifications of a mesh-connected parallel computer for the purpose of increasing the efficiency of executing important application programs. These modifications are made by adding one or more global mesh structures to the processing array. They show how our modifications allow asymptotic improvements in the efficiency of executing computations having low to medium interprocessor communication requirements (e.g., tree computations, prefix computations, finding the connected components of a graph). For computations with high interprocessor communication requirements such as sorting, they show that they offer no speedup. They also compare the modified mesh-connected parallel computer to other similar organizations including the pyramid, the X-tree, and the mesh-of-trees.

  1. A comparison of tetrahedral mesh improvement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Freitag, L.A.; Ollivier-Gooch, C.

    1996-12-01

    Automatic mesh generation and adaptive refinement methods for complex three-dimensional domains have proven to be very successful tools for the efficient solution of complex applications problems. These methods can, however, produce poorly shaped elements that cause the numerical solution to be less accurate and more difficult to compute. Fortunately, the shape of the elements can be improved through several mechanisms, including face-swapping techniques that change local connectivity and optimization-based mesh smoothing methods that adjust grid point location. The authors consider several criteria for each of these two methods and compare the quality of several meshes obtained by using different combinations of swapping and smoothing. Computational experiments show that swapping is critical to the improvement of general mesh quality and that optimization-based smoothing is highly effective in eliminating very small and very large angles. The highest quality meshes are obtained by using a combination of swapping and smoothing techniques.

  2. Update on Development of Mesh Generation Algorithms in MeshKit

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Rajeev; Vanderzee, Evan; Mahadevan, Vijay

    2015-09-30

    MeshKit uses a graph-based design for coding all its meshing algorithms, which includes the Reactor Geometry (and mesh) Generation (RGG) algorithms. This report highlights the developmental updates of all the algorithms, results and future work. Parallel versions of algorithms, documentation and performance results are reported. RGG GUI design was updated to incorporate new features requested by the users; boundary layer generation and parallel RGG support were added to the GUI. Key contributions to the release, upgrade and maintenance of other SIGMA1 libraries (CGM and MOAB) were made. Several fundamental meshing algorithms for creating a robust parallel meshing pipeline in MeshKit are under development. Results and current status of automated, open-source and high quality nuclear reactor assembly mesh generation algorithms such as trimesher, quadmesher, interval matching and multi-sweeper are reported.

  3. Automatic Mesh Generation of Hybrid Mesh on Valves in Multiple Positions in Feedline Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Douglass H.; Ito, Yasushi; Dorothy, Fredric W.; Shih, Alan M.; Peugeot, John

    2010-01-01

    Fluid flow simulations through a valve often require evaluation of the valve in multiple opening positions. A mesh has to be generated for the valve for each position and compounding. The problem is the fact that the valve is typically part of a larger feedline system. In this paper, we propose to develop a system to create meshes for feedline systems with parametrically controlled valve openings. Herein we outline two approaches to generate the meshes for a valve in a feedline system at multiple positions. There are two issues that must be addressed. The first is the creation of the mesh on the valve for multiple positions. The second is the generation of the mesh for the total feedline system including the valve. For generation of the mesh on the valve, we will describe the use of topology matching and mesh generation parameter transfer. For generation of the total feedline system, we will describe two solutions that we have implemented. In both cases the valve is treated as a component in the feedline system. In the first method the geometry of the valve in the feedline system is replaced with a valve at a different opening position. Geometry is created to connect the valve to the feedline system. Then topology for the valve is created and the portion of the topology for the valve is topology matched to the standard valve in a different position. The mesh generation parameters are transferred and then the volume mesh for the whole feedline system is generated. The second method enables the user to generate the volume mesh on the valve in multiple open positions external to the feedline system, to insert it into the volume mesh of the feedline system, and to reduce the amount of computer time required for mesh generation because only two small volume meshes connecting the valve to the feedline mesh need to be updated.

  4. Constrained CVT Meshes and a Comparison of Triangular Mesh Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Hoa; Burkardt, John; Gunzburger, Max; Ju, Lili; Saka, Yuki

    2009-01-01

    Mesh generation in regions in Euclidean space is a central task in computational science, and especially for commonly used numerical methods for the solution of partial differential equations, e.g., finite element and finite volume methods. We focus on the uniform Delaunay triangulation of planar regions and, in particular, on how one selects the positions of the vertices of the triangulation. We discuss a recently developed method, based on the centroidal Voronoi tessellation (CVT) concept, for effecting such triangulations and present two algorithms, including one new one, for CVT-based grid generation. We also compare several methods, including CVT-based methods, for triangulating planar domains. To this end, we define several quantitative measures of the quality of uniform grids. We then generate triangulations of several planar regions, including some having complexities that are representative of what one may encounter in practice. We subject the resulting grids to visual and quantitative comparisons and conclude that all the methods considered produce high-quality uniform grids and that the CVT-based grids are at least as good as any of the others.

  5. Large deployable antenna reflector trimming mechanism (LDA-RTM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingo, Miguel; Vázquez, Jorge

    2003-09-01

    Future projects dealing with radars or telecommunications require deployable antennas. ESA Contract no. 15230 for the "Development of Large Deployable Antenna Reflector for Advanced Mobile Communication" has the objective of developing this critical technology in Europe for the commercial market. The Reflector Trimming Mechanism (RTM) allows the fine adjustment of the huge Reflector Dish (12 meters projected aperture diameter) in such a way to recover the mispointing induced by all sources inclusive of the S/C, the Antenna Arm, the feed and the Reflector. The RTM design is modular and allows its implementation in different reflector types and dimensions changing the distance between movable and fixed points and the lateral stiffener. In each linear actuator, it is implemented a device which is able to decouple the top and the bottom part. This is required because of imposed displacements of the interfaces during launch. The decoupling device is latched before starting normal operating condition. It is actuated with the same stepper motor used for trimming. The RTM has been designed to be operated with the electronic box already developed for moving the Antenna Pointing Mechanism in Hispasat 1-C.

  6. Unpolarized resonance grating reflectors with 44% fractional bandwidth.

    PubMed

    Niraula, Manoj; Magnusson, Robert

    2016-06-01

    There is immense scientific interest in the properties of resonant thin films embroidered with periodic nanoscale features. This device class possesses considerable innovation potential. Accordingly, we report unpolarized broadband reflectors enabled by a serial arrangement of a pair of polarized subwavelength gratings. Optimized with numerical methods, our elemental gratings consist of a partially etched crystalline-silicon film on a quartz substrate. The resulting reflectors exhibit extremely wide spectral reflection bands in one polarization. By arranging two such reflectors sequentially with orthogonal periodicities, there results an unpolarized spectral band that exceeds those of the individual polarized bands. In the experiments reported herein, we achieve zero-order reflectance exceeding 97% under unpolarized light incidence over a 500 nm wide wavelength band. This wideband represents a ∼44% fractional band in the near infrared. Moreover, the resonant unpolarized broadband accommodates an ultra-high reflection band spanning ∼85  nm and exceeding 99.9% in efficiency. The elemental polarization-sensitive reflectors based on one-dimensional (1D) resonant gratings have a simple design and robust performance, and are straightforward to fabricate. Hence, this technology is a promising alternative to traditional multilayer thin-film reflectors, especially at longer wavelengths of light where multilayer deposition may be infeasible or impractical. PMID:27244394

  7. A computer program to calculate radiation properties of reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, P. K.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program to calculate the radiation properties of the reflector antennas is presented. It can be used for paraboloidal, spherical, or ellipsoidal reflector surfaces and is easily modified to handle any surface that can be expressed analytically. The program is general enough to allow any arbitrary location and pointing angle for the feed antenna. The effect of blockage due to the feed horn is also included in the computations. The computer program is based upon the technique of tracing the rays from the feed antenna to the reflector to an aperture plane. The far field radiation properties are then calculated by performing a double integration over the field points in the aperture plane. To facilitate the computation of double intergral, the field points are first aligned along the equispaced straight lines in the aperture plane. The computation time is relatively insensitive to the absolute size of the aperture and even though no limits on the largest reflector size have been determined, the program was used for reflector diameters of 1000 wavelenghts.

  8. Computer prediction of large reflector antenna radiation properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botula, A.

    1980-01-01

    A FORTRAN program for calculating reflector antenna radiation patterns was rewritten and extended to include reflectors composed of a number of panels. These individual panels must be analytic surfaces. The theoretical foundation for the program is as follows: Geometrical optics techniques are used to trace rays from a feed antenna to the reflector surface and back to a mathematical plane just in front of the reflector. The resulting tangential electric field distribution, assumed to be the only source of forward radiation, is integrated numerically to calculate the radiation pattern for a desired set of angles. When the reflector is composed of more than one panel, each panel is treated as a separated antenna, the ray-tracing procedure and integration being repeated for each panel. The results of the individual aperture plane integrations are stored and summed to yield the relative electric field strength over the angles of interest. An example and several test cases are included to demonstrate the use of the program and verify the new method of computation.

  9. Method of modifying a volume mesh using sheet extraction

    DOEpatents

    Borden, Michael J.; Shepherd, Jason F.

    2007-02-20

    A method and machine-readable medium provide a technique to modify a hexahedral finite element volume mesh using dual generation and sheet extraction. After generating a dual of a volume stack (mesh), a predetermined algorithm may be followed to modify the volume mesh of hexahedral elements. The predetermined algorithm may include the steps of determining a sheet of hexahedral mesh elements, generating nodes for merging, and merging the nodes to delete the sheet of hexahedral mesh elements and modify the volume mesh.

  10. Compositionally-Graded Shape Memory Film for Self-Deployment of Membrane Reflectors and Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Lisa; Carman, Greg; Brantley, Lott W., Sr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The next generation of space systems will require large apertures in order to image faint targets or cover large areas of Earth. These large apertures must be able to fit inside a launch vehicle fairing, be light enough for launch into orbit, and deploy on orbit with repeatability and reliability. The current state-of-the-art in flight optics is represented by the 4 meter LAMP telescope, with an areal density of 10 km sq m. Development of a Beryllium mirror demonstration article for NGST (Next Generation Space Telescope) at the University of Arizona indicate areal densities of 0.5 kg sq m with flight hardware in the 12 meter range. With progressive improvements in existing deployment, packaging, and structural technologies, the size of optics and reflectors will continue to increase, while mass is reduced. However, without a breakthrough in materials, packaging and/or deployment technologies, the goal for Gossamer structures of 0.1 kg sq m is unachievable for the near and mid-term NASA missions. Membrane technology provides the best hope of achieving such low areal densities. In combination with advances in membrane materials and structures, development of revolutionary techniques for deployment systems can provide significant improvements in large aperture technology. In this paper, the results of a six-month Phase I research effort to demonstrate the application of thin film NiTi to aerospace-qualified membrane and mesh materials are presented. Deposition of shape memory thin film was achieved Astromesh (trademark) metal mesh and CP-1, and optical-quality polymer membrane. Not only was full-coating deposition demonstrated, but also small segment deposition which holds potential for local surface control. Deployment of these materials was also demonstrated, setting the stage for the development of a larger test article.

  11. Layered superhydrophobic meshes for controlled drug release.

    PubMed

    Falde, Eric J; Freedman, Jonathan D; Herrera, Victoria L M; Yohe, Stefan T; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2015-09-28

    Layered superhydrophobic electrospun meshes composed of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(glycerol monostearate-co-ε-caprolactone) (PGC-C18) are described as a local source of chemotherapeutic delivery. Specifically, the chemotherapeutic agent SN-38 is incorporated into a central 'core' layer, between two 'shield' layers of mesh without drug. This mesh is resistant to wetting of the surface and throughout the bulk due to the pronounced hydrophobicity imparted by the high roughness of a hydrophobic polymer, PGC-C18. In serum solution, these meshes exhibit slow initial drug release over 10days corresponding to media infiltrating the shield layer, followed by steady release over >30days, as the drug-loaded core layer is wetted. This sequence of events is supported by X-ray computed tomography imaging of a contrast agent solution infiltrating the mesh. In vitro cytotoxicity data collected with Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) cells are consistent with this release profile, remaining cytotoxic for over 20days, longer than the unlayered version. Finally, after subcutaneous implantation in rats, histology of meshes with and without drug demonstrated good integration and lack of adverse reaction over 28days. The drug release rates, robust superhydrophobicity, in vitro cytotoxicity of SN-38 loaded meshes, and compatibility provide key design parameters for the development of an implantable chemotherapeutic-loaded device for the prevention of local lung cancer recurrence following surgical resection. PMID:26160309

  12. Vibration Characteristics of Acoustically Levitated Object with Rigid and Elastic Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Zhen-Yu; Xie, Wen-Jun; Wei, Bing-Bo

    2010-01-01

    Levitation stability is a crucial factor that influences acoustic levitation capability. We present two sample-including models for a single-axis acoustic levitator with either a rigid or elastic reflector. Numerical analysis shows that, with the rigid reflector, both the decay time from initial disturbance and the vibration amplitude increase with sample density, which is unfavorable for levitation stability. However, with the elastic reflector, the decay time and the vibration amplitude are greatly reduced by choosing appropriate parameters of the reflector. Experimental results agree well with theoretical predictions, indicating that levitation stability can be remarkably enhanced by replacing the rigid reflector with an elastic reflector.

  13. Size, gain and bandwidth trade-offs for wideband diamond dipole with AMC reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Chetan; Lepage, Anne Claire; Sarrazin, Julien; Begaud, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Compact and directive ultra-wideband antennas are required in variety of applications. Directional wideband antennas can be designed by using a reflector to redirect the energy back in half space and increase the gain. Use of artificial magnetic conductors (AMC) as reflectors for antennas allows reduction in the thickness of an antenna using traditional perfect electrical conductors (PEC) reflectors. The lateral size of the reflector also has an important effect on the antenna performance. In this paper, we study the trade-offs involved in the design of an AMC used as a reflector for broadband diamond dipole antenna by simulating various sizes of the reflector.

  14. Mesh optimization for microbial fuel cell cathodes constructed around stainless steel mesh current collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang; Merrill, Matthew D.; Tokash, Justin C.; Saito, Tomonori; Cheng, Shaoan; Hickner, Michael A.; Logan, Bruce E.

    Mesh current collectors made of stainless steel (SS) can be integrated into microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes constructed of a reactive carbon black and Pt catalyst mixture and a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) diffusion layer. It is shown here that the mesh properties of these cathodes can significantly affect performance. Cathodes made from the coarsest mesh (30-mesh) achieved the highest maximum power of 1616 ± 25 mW m -2 (normalized to cathode projected surface area; 47.1 ± 0.7 W m -3 based on liquid volume), while the finest mesh (120-mesh) had the lowest power density (599 ± 57 mW m -2). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed that charge transfer and diffusion resistances decreased with increasing mesh opening size. In MFC tests, the cathode performance was primarily limited by reaction kinetics, and not mass transfer. Oxygen permeability increased with mesh opening size, accounting for the decreased diffusion resistance. At higher current densities, diffusion became a limiting factor, especially for fine mesh with low oxygen transfer coefficients. These results demonstrate the critical nature of the mesh size used for constructing MFC cathodes.

  15. Secondary pattern computation of an arbitrarily shaped main reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. W.; Lam, P. T. C.; Acosta, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The secondary pattern of a perfectly conducting offset main reflector being illuminated by a point feed at an arbitrary location is studied. The method of analysis is based upon the application of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to the aperture fields obtained using geometrical optics (GO) and geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD). Key features of the present work are (1) the reflector surface is completely arbitrary, (2) the incident field from the feed is most general with arbitrary polarization and location, and (3) the edge diffraction is calculated by either UAT or by UTD. Comparison of this technique for an offset parabolic reflector with the Jacobi-Bessel and Fourier-Bessel techniques shows good agreement. Near field, far field, and scan data of a large refelctor are presented.

  16. Large-Scale All-Dielectric Metamaterial Perfect Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Moitra, Parikshit; Slovick, Brian A.; li, Wei; Kravchencko, Ivan I.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Valentine, Jason

    2015-05-08

    All-dielectric metamaterials offer a potential low-loss alternative to plasmonic metamaterials at optical frequencies. In this paper, we take advantage of the low absorption loss as well as the simple unit cell geometry to demonstrate large-scale (centimeter-sized) all-dielectric metamaterial perfect reflectors made from silicon cylinder resonators. These perfect reflectors, operating in the telecommunications band, were fabricated using self-assembly based nanosphere lithography. In spite of the disorder originating from the self-assembly process, the average reflectance of the metamaterial perfect reflectors is 99.7% at 1530 nm, surpassing the reflectance of metallic mirrors. Moreover, the spectral separation of the electric and magnetic resonances can be chosen to achieve the required reflection bandwidth while maintaining a high tolerance to disorder. Finally, the scalability of this design could lead to new avenues of manipulating light for low-loss and large-area photonic applications.

  17. Integrated structure electromagnetic optimization of large space antenna reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Adelman, Howard M.; Bailey, M. C.

    1987-01-01

    The requirements for extremely precise and powerful large space antenna reflectors have motivated the development of a procedure for shape control of the reflector surface. A mathematical optimization procedure has been developed which improves antenna performance while minimizing necessary shape correction effort. In contrast to previous work which proposed controlling the rms distortion error of the surface thereby indirectly improving antenna performance, the current work includes electromagnetic (EM) performance calculations as an integral of the control procedure. The application of the procedure to a radiometer design with a tetrahedral truss backup structure demonstrates the potential for significant improvement. The results indicate the benefit of including EM performance calculations in procedures for shape control of large space antenna reflectors.

  18. A silicon-based wideband multisubpart profile grating reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Liang, D.; Zeng, J.; Xiao, Y.; Wu, H.; Xiao, W.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a multilayer configuration high-performance reflector utilizing a multisubpart profile grating structure is presented. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) for multilayered grating is adopted to design and optimize the structure. And experimental verification of theoretical design is accomplished. It is shown that, for transverse magnetic (TM) polarization, over a broadband spectrum from 1.65 to 1.72 μm, the reflector experimentally demonstrates combined merits of high reflectivity (>97%) and good angular insensitivity of about 24.6°. Moreover, it is found by RCWA that the reflector proposed here has a reasonably good tolerance of fabrication error, which provides a favorable advantage in the fabrication process.

  19. A powerful reflector in relativistic backward wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yibing; Sun, Jun; Teng, Yan; Zhang, Yuchuan; Zhang, Lijun; Shi, Yanchao; Ye, Hu; Chen, Changhua

    2014-09-01

    An improved TM021 resonant reflector is put forward. Similarly with most of the slow wave structures used in relativistic backward wave oscillator, the section plane of the proposed reflector is designed to be trapezoidal. Compared with the rectangular TM021 resonant reflector, such a structure can depress RF breakdown more effectively by weakening the localized field convergence and realizing good electrostatic insulation. As shown in the high power microwave (HPM) generation experiments, with almost the same output power obtained by the previous structure, the improved structure can increase the pulse width from 25 ns to over 27 ns and no obvious surface damage is observed even if the generated HPM pulses exceed 1000 shots.

  20. A new approach for synthesizing dual reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittra, R.; Hyjazie, F.; Galindo-Israel, V.

    It is pointed out that the offset geometry for dual reflector antennas is attractive for satellite communications where low side lobes are necessary to achieve good isolation between adjacent main lobes operating over the same frequency band. A description is presented of a new, numerically rigorous technique for synthesizing dual offset reflectors. The objective of the synthesis procedure is to transform a given primary feed pattern into a desired aperture distribution through two reflections in an offset dual reflector system. It is found that a given specification for the aperture distribution does not always lead to a smooth solution for the two surfaces. In this event, the so-called energy condition on the specified amplitude distribution is relaxed, and an approximate solution which satisfies the energy condition only within a certain numerical tolerance is derived.

  1. A new approach for synthesizing dual reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.; Hyjazie, F.; Galindo-Israel, V.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that the offset geometry for dual reflector antennas is attractive for satellite communications where low side lobes are necessary to achieve good isolation between adjacent main lobes operating over the same frequency band. A description is presented of a new, numerically rigorous technique for synthesizing dual offset reflectors. The objective of the synthesis procedure is to transform a given primary feed pattern into a desired aperture distribution through two reflections in an offset dual reflector system. It is found that a given specification for the aperture distribution does not always lead to a smooth solution for the two surfaces. In this event, the so-called energy condition on the specified amplitude distribution is relaxed, and an approximate solution which satisfies the energy condition only within a certain numerical tolerance is derived.

  2. Illumination from space with orbiting solar-reflector spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canady, J. E., Jr.; Allen, J. L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of using orbiting mirrors to reflect sunlight to Earth for several illumination applications is studied. A constellation of sixteen 1 km solar reflector spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit can illuminate a region 333 km in diameter to 8 lux, which is brighter than most existing expressway lighting systems. This constellation can serve one region all night long or can provide illumination during mornings and evenings to five regions across the United States. Preliminary cost estimates indicate such an endeavor is economically feasible. The studies also explain how two solar reflectors can illuminate the in-orbit nighttime operations of Space Shuttle. An unfurlable, 1 km diameter solar reflector spacecraft design concept was derived. This spacecraft can be packaged in the Space, Shuttle, transported to low Earth orbit, unfurled, and solar sailed to operational orbits up to geosynchronous. The necessary technical studies and improvements in technology are described, and potential environmental concerns are discussed.

  3. Large-Scale All-Dielectric Metamaterial Perfect Reflectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Moitra, Parikshit; Slovick, Brian A.; li, Wei; Kravchencko, Ivan I.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Valentine, Jason

    2015-05-08

    All-dielectric metamaterials offer a potential low-loss alternative to plasmonic metamaterials at optical frequencies. In this paper, we take advantage of the low absorption loss as well as the simple unit cell geometry to demonstrate large-scale (centimeter-sized) all-dielectric metamaterial perfect reflectors made from silicon cylinder resonators. These perfect reflectors, operating in the telecommunications band, were fabricated using self-assembly based nanosphere lithography. In spite of the disorder originating from the self-assembly process, the average reflectance of the metamaterial perfect reflectors is 99.7% at 1530 nm, surpassing the reflectance of metallic mirrors. Moreover, the spectral separation of the electric and magnetic resonances canmore » be chosen to achieve the required reflection bandwidth while maintaining a high tolerance to disorder. Finally, the scalability of this design could lead to new avenues of manipulating light for low-loss and large-area photonic applications.« less

  4. Path coloring on the Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Rabani, Y.

    1996-12-31

    In the minimum path coloring problem, we are given a list of pairs of vertices of a graph. We are asked to connect each pair by a colored path. Paths of the same color must be edge disjoint. Our objective is to minimize the number of colors used. This problem was raised by Aggarwal et al and Raghavan and Upfal as a model for routing in all-optical networks. It is also related to questions in circuit routing. In this paper, we improve the O (ln N) approximation result of Kleinberg and Tardos for path coloring on the N x N mesh. We give an O(1) approximation algorithm to the number of colors needed, and a poly(ln ln N) approximation algorithm to the choice of paths and colors. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first sub-logarithmic bounds for any network other than trees, rings, or trees of rings. Our results are based on developing new techniques for randomized rounding. These techniques iteratively improve a fractional solution until it approaches integrality. They are motivated by the method used by Leighton, Maggs, and Rao for packet routing.

  5. Algebraic surface design and finite element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajaj, Chandrajit L.

    1992-01-01

    Some of the techniques are summarized which are used in constructing C sup 0 and C sup 1 continuous meshes of low degree, implicitly defined, algebraic surface patches in three dimensional space. These meshes of low degree algebraic surface patches are used to construct accurate computer models of physical objects. These meshes are also used in the finite element simulation of physical phenomena (e.g., heat dissipation, stress/strain distributions, fluid flow characteristics) required in the computer prototyping of both the manufacturability and functionality of the geometric design.

  6. SUPERFISH accuracy dependence on mesh size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merson, J. L.; Boicourt, G. P.

    1989-02-01

    The RF cavity code SUPERFISH is extensively used for the design of drift-tube linac (DTL), radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and coupled-cavity linac (CCL) structures. It has been known for some time that considerably finer meshes are required near the nose of a drift tube to ensure accurate calculation of the resonant frequency and related secondary quantities. This paper discusses the results of numerical experiments designed to provide rules to set proper mesh sizes for DTL, RFQ, and CCL problems. During this work, SUPERFISH problems involving more than 100,000 mesh points were solved.

  7. Abdominal wall reconstruction with implantable meshes.

    PubMed

    Masden, Derek; Felder, John M; Iorio, Matthew L; Bhanot, Parag; Attinger, Christopher E

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal wall defects present a difficult problem for the reconstructive surgeon. Over the years, numerous implantable materials have becomes available to aid the surgeon in recreating the abdominal wall. This spectrum of implants includes permanent synthetic meshes, absorbable meshes, composite meshes and biomaterials. This review includes the pros and cons for the commercially available abdominal wall implants as well as a review of the literature regarding outcomes for each material. This review will provide the surgeon with current evidence-based information on implantable abdominal materials to be able to make a more informed decision about which implant to use. PMID:21663579

  8. Application of mesh network radios to UGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcutt, Wade; Jones, Barry; Roeder, Brent

    2008-04-01

    During the past five years McQ has been actively pursuing integrating and applying wireless mesh network radios as a communications solution for unattended ground sensor (UGS) systems. This effort has been rewarded with limited levels of success and has ultimately resulted in a corporate position regarding the use of mesh network radios for UGS systems. A discussion into the background of the effort, the challenges of implementing commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) mesh radios with UGSs, the tradeoffs involved, and an overview of the future direction is presented.

  9. H(curl) Auxiliary Mesh Preconditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Kolev, T V; Pasciak, J E; Vassilevski, P S

    2006-08-31

    This paper analyzes a two-level preconditioning scheme for H(curl) bilinear forms. The scheme utilizes an auxiliary problem on a related mesh that is more amenable for constructing optimal order multigrid methods. More specifically, we analyze the case when the auxiliary mesh only approximately covers the original domain. The latter assumption is important since it allows for easy construction of nested multilevel spaces on regular auxiliary meshes. Numerical experiments in both two and three space dimensions illustrate the optimal performance of the method.

  10. Engagement of Metal Debris into Gear Mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    handschuh, Robert F.; Krantz, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    A series of bench-top experiments was conducted to determine the effects of metallic debris being dragged through meshing gear teeth. A test rig that is typically used to conduct contact fatigue experiments was used for these tests. Several sizes of drill material, shim stock and pieces of gear teeth were introduced and then driven through the meshing region. The level of torque required to drive the "chip" through the gear mesh was measured. From the data gathered, chip size sufficient to jam the mechanism can be determined.

  11. AlP/GaP distributed Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Emberger, Valentin; Hatami, Fariba; Ted Masselink, W.; Peters, Sven

    2013-07-15

    Distributed Bragg reflectors with high reflectivity bands centered at wavelengths from 530 to 690 nm (green to red) based on AlP/GaP quarter-wave stacks are prepared on (001)GaP using gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy. Additionally, the complex refractive index of AlP is measured using spectroscopic ellipsometry within the range of 330-850 nm in order to facilitate an accurate reflector design. Structures consisting of 15 quarter-wave stacks reach a peak reflectance between 95% and 98%, depending on the spectral position of the maximum.

  12. Magnetic current loop array in a reflector antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, Edward K. N.; Lee, Wilson W. S.

    1994-04-01

    A magnetic current loop antenna array is designed, implemented, and measured. Radiation pattern, input impedance, and efficiency of the array are presented. The array is intended as a feed in a reflector antenna. Using a 360 mm solid dish, the overall gain of the reflector antenna is 24.6 dB at 9 GHz. The tolerance in placing the feed at the focal point of the dish is high. The present feed is low cost, self-supportive, robust, and easy to manufacture. It is an ideal substitute for the horn in a TVRO (television receive only) or VSAT (very small aperature terminal) antenna.

  13. Highly Enriched Uranium Metal Cylinders Surrounded by Various Reflector Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard Jones; J. Blair Briggs; Leland Monteirth

    2007-05-01

    A series of experiments was performed at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in 1958 to determine critical masses of cylinders of Oralloy (Oy) reflected by a number of materials. The experiments were all performed on the Comet Universal Critical Assembly Machine, and consisted of discs of highly enriched uranium (93.3 wt.% 235U) reflected by half-inch and one-inch-thick cylindrical shells of various reflector materials. The experiments were performed by members of Group N-2, particularly K. W. Gallup, G. E. Hansen, H. C. Paxton, and R. H. White. This experiment was intended to ascertain critical masses for criticality safety purposes, as well as to compare neutron transport cross sections to those obtained from danger coefficient measurements with the Topsy Oralloy-Tuballoy reflected and Godiva unreflected critical assemblies. The reflector materials examined in this series of experiments are as follows: magnesium, titanium, aluminum, graphite, mild steel, nickel, copper, cobalt, molybdenum, natural uranium, tungsten, beryllium, aluminum oxide, molybdenum carbide, and polythene (polyethylene). Also included are two special configurations of composite beryllium and iron reflectors. Analyses were performed in which uncertainty associated with six different parameters was evaluated; namely, extrapolation to the uranium critical mass, uranium density, 235U enrichment, reflector density, reflector thickness, and reflector impurities. In addition to the idealizations made by the experimenters (removal of the platen and diaphragm), two simplifications were also made to the benchmark models that resulted in a small bias and additional uncertainty. First of all, since impurities in core and reflector materials are only estimated, they are not included in the benchmark models. Secondly, the room, support structure, and other possible surrounding equipment were not included in the model. Bias values that result from these two simplifications were determined and associated

  14. Caustic Singularities Of High-Gain, Dual-Shaped Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo, Victor; Veruttipong, Thavath W.; Imbriale, William A.; Rengarajan, Sambiam

    1991-01-01

    Report presents study of some sources of error in analysis, by geometric theory of diffraction (GTD), of performance of high-gain, dual-shaped antenna reflector. Study probes into underlying analytic causes of singularity, with view toward devising and testing practical methods to avoid problems caused by singularity. Hybrid physical optics (PO) approach used to study near-field spillover or noise-temperature characteristics of high-gain relector antenna efficiently and accurately. Report illustrates this approach and underlying principles by presenting numerical results, for both offset and symmetrical reflector systems, computed by GTD, PO, and PO/GO methods.

  15. A note on the shaping of dual reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, M. S.; Anantharam, V.; Prasad, K. M.

    1981-05-01

    An analytical technique, based on a study by Lee et al. (1979), is used to determine the reflector profiles in a symmetrical-shaped oval reflector antenna system. The approach has computational simplicity, involving a single first-order differential equation, and uses very accurate feed pattern expressions. Shaping is carried out by the Runge-Kutta method: since computation starts from the center, numerical error is minimal in the central regions which handle most of the energy. A typical problem is solved, using both this technique and an earlier one, and results are compared.

  16. A corner-reflector mixer mount for far infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Zmuidzinas, J; Betz, A L; Boreiko, R T

    1989-01-01

    A new type of corner-reflector mixer mount, which has the advantages of ease of fabrication and assembly as well as frequency versatility, has been designed and constructed. The mixer works with arbitrary antenna lengths > or = 4 lambda with the reflector to antenna spacing adjusted to give a strong and symmetric central lobe. The predicted response patterns have been experimentally verified for various antenna lengths and operating frequencies between 800 and 2000 GHz. An important design feature is the incorporation of a microstrip matching network which eliminates IF impedance mismatch and provides mechanical isolation of the whisker antenna. PMID:11539754

  17. Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Production in the UT TRIGA Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. O'Kelly

    2000-11-12

    In December 1999, The University of Texas at Austin (UT) reported an unusual condition associated with the annular graphite reflector surrounding the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) TRIGA reactor. The aluminum container encapsulating the graphite showed signs of bulging or swelling. Further, during an investigation of this occurrence, bubbles were detected coming from a weld in the aluminum. The gas composition was approximately 2:1 hydrogen to oxygen. After safety review and equipment fabrication, the reflector was successfully vented and flooded. The ratio of the gases produced is unusual, and the gas production mechanism has not yet been explained.

  18. Tensile-strained germanium microdisks with circular Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kurdi, M.; Prost, M.; Ghrib, A.; Elbaz, A.; Sauvage, S.; Checoury, X.; Beaudoin, G.; Sagnes, I.; Picardi, G.; Ossikovski, R.; Boeuf, F.; Boucaud, P.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate the combination of germanium microdisks tensily strained by silicon nitride layers and circular Bragg reflectors. The microdisks with suspended lateral Bragg reflectors form a cavity with quality factors up to 2000 around 2 μm. This represents a key feature to achieve a microlaser with a quasi-direct band gap germanium under a 1.6% biaxial tensile strain. We show that lowering the temperature significantly improves the quality factor of the quasi-radial modes. Linewidth narrowing is observed in a range of weak continuous wave excitation powers. We finally discuss the requirements to achieve lasing with these kind of structures.

  19. Dichroic Bragg reflectors based on birefringent porous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, J.; Kunzner, N.; Kovalev, D.; Gross, E.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Polisski, G.; Koch, F.

    2001-06-11

    Multilayers of anisotropically nanostructured silicon (Si) have been fabricated and studied by polarization-resolved reflection measurements. Alternating layers having different refractive indices exhibit additionally a strong in-plane anisotropy of their refractive index (birefringence). Therefore, a stack of layers, acting as a distributed Bragg reflector, has two distinct reflection bands, depending on the polarization of the incident linearly polarized light. This effect is governed by a three-dimensional (in-plane and in-depth) variation of the refractive index. These structures can yield optical effects which are difficult to achieve with conventional Bragg reflectors. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Numerical simulation of H2/air detonation using unstructured mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togashi, Fumiya; Löhner, Rainald; Tsuboi, Nobuyuki

    2009-06-01

    To explore the capability of unstructured mesh to simulate detonation wave propagation phenomena, numerical simulation of H2/air detonation using unstructured mesh was conducted. The unstructured mesh has several adv- antages such as easy mesh adaptation and flexibility to the complicated configurations. To examine the resolution dependency of the unstructured mesh, several simulations varying the mesh size were conducted and compared with a computed result using a structured mesh. The results show that the unstructured mesh solution captures the detailed structure of detonation wave, as well as the structured mesh solution. To capture the detailed detonation cell structure, the unstructured mesh simulations required at least twice, ideally 5times the resolution of structured mesh solution.

  1. Spaceborne Microwave Instrument for High Resolution Remote Sensing of the Earth's Surface Using a Large-Aperture Mesh Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E.; Wilson, W.; Yueh, S.; Freeland, R.; Helms, R.; Edelstein, W.; Sadowy, G.; Farra, D.; West, R.; Oxnevad, K.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a two-year study of a large-aperture, lightweight, deployable mesh antenna system for radiometer and radar remote sensing of the Earth from space. The study focused specifically on an instrument to measure ocean salinity and Soil moisture. Measurements of ocean salinity and soil moisture are of critical . importance in improving knowledge and prediction of key ocean and land surface processes, but are not currently obtainable from space. A mission using this instrument would be the first demonstration of deployable mesh antenna technology for remote sensing and could lead to potential applications in other remote sensing disciplines that require high spatial resolution measurements. The study concept features a rotating 6-m-diameter deployable mesh antenna, with radiometer and radar sensors, to measure microwave emission and backscatter from the Earth's surface. The sensors operate at L and S bands, with multiple polarizations and a constant look angle, scanning across a wide swath. The study included detailed analyses of science requirements, reflector and feedhorn design and performance, microwave emissivity measurements of mesh samples, design and test of lightweight radar electronic., launch vehicle accommodations, rotational dynamics simulations, and an analysis of attitude control issues associated with the antenna and spacecraft, The goal of the study was to advance the technology readiness of the overall concept to a level appropriate for an Earth science emission.

  2. Ultra-thin distributed Bragg reflectors via stacked single-crystal silicon nanomembranes

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Minkyu; Seo, Jung-Hun; Lee, Jaeseong; Mi, Hongyi; Kim, Munho; Ma, Zhenqiang; Zhao, Deyin; Zhou, Weidong; Yin, Xin; Wang, Xudong

    2015-05-04

    In this paper, we report ultra-thin distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) via stacked single-crystal silicon (Si) nanomembranes (NMs). Mesh hole-free single-crystal Si NMs were released from a Si-on-insulator substrate and transferred to quartz and Si substrates. Thermal oxidation was applied to the transferred Si NM to form high-quality SiO{sub 2} and thus a Si/SiO{sub 2} pair with uniform and precisely controlled thicknesses. The Si/SiO{sub 2} layers, as smooth as epitaxial grown layers, minimize scattering loss at the interface and in between the layers. As a result, a reflection of 99.8% at the wavelength range from 1350 nm to 1650 nm can be measured from a 2.5-pair DBR on a quartz substrate and 3-pair DBR on a Si substrate with thickness of 0.87 μm and 1.14 μm, respectively. The high reflection, ultra-thin DBRs developed here, which can be applied to almost any devices and materials, holds potential for application in high performance optoelectronic devices and photonics applications.

  3. Ultra-thin distributed Bragg reflectors via stacked single-crystal silicon nanomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Minkyu; Seo, Jung-Hun; Lee, Jaeseong; Zhao, Deyin; Mi, Hongyi; Yin, Xin; Kim, Munho; Wang, Xudong; Zhou, Weidong; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we report ultra-thin distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) via stacked single-crystal silicon (Si) nanomembranes (NMs). Mesh hole-free single-crystal Si NMs were released from a Si-on-insulator substrate and transferred to quartz and Si substrates. Thermal oxidation was applied to the transferred Si NM to form high-quality SiO2 and thus a Si/SiO2 pair with uniform and precisely controlled thicknesses. The Si/SiO2 layers, as smooth as epitaxial grown layers, minimize scattering loss at the interface and in between the layers. As a result, a reflection of 99.8% at the wavelength range from 1350 nm to 1650 nm can be measured from a 2.5-pair DBR on a quartz substrate and 3-pair DBR on a Si substrate with thickness of 0.87 μm and 1.14 μm, respectively. The high reflection, ultra-thin DBRs developed here, which can be applied to almost any devices and materials, holds potential for application in high performance optoelectronic devices and photonics applications.

  4. Grid adaptation using chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite overlapping meshes in regions of large gradient to accurately capture the salient features during computation. The chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using trilinear interpolation. Application to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well-resolved.

  5. Grid adaptation using Chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite over-lapping meshes in regions of large gradient to capture the salient features accurately during computation. The Chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using tri-linear interpolation. Applications to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to a shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well resolved.

  6. A mesh gradient technique for numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, E. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A class of successive-improvement optimization methods in which directions of descent are defined in the state space along each trial trajectory are considered. The given problem is first decomposed into two discrete levels by imposing mesh points. Level 1 consists of running optimal subarcs between each successive pair of mesh points. For normal systems, these optimal two-point boundary value problems can be solved by following a routine prescription if the mesh spacing is sufficiently close. A spacing criterion is given. Under appropriate conditions, the criterion value depends only on the coordinates of the mesh points, and its gradient with respect to those coordinates may be defined by interpreting the adjoint variables as partial derivatives of the criterion value function. In level 2, the gradient data is used to generate improvement steps or search directions in the state space which satisfy the boundary values and constraints of the given problem.

  7. A parallel algorithm for mesh smoothing

    SciTech Connect

    Freitag, L.; Jones, M.; Plassmann, P.

    1999-07-01

    Maintaining good mesh quality during the generation and refinement of unstructured meshes in finite-element applications is an important aspect in obtaining accurate discretizations and well-conditioned linear systems. In this article, the authors present a mesh-smoothing algorithm based on nonsmooth optimization techniques and a scalable implementation of this algorithm. They prove that the parallel algorithm has a provably fast runtime bound and executes correctly for a parallel random access machine (PRAM) computational model. They extend the PRAM algorithm to distributed memory computers and report results for two-and three-dimensional simplicial meshes that demonstrate the efficiency and scalability of this approach for a number of different test cases. They also examine the effect of different architectures on the parallel algorithm and present results for the IBM SP supercomputer and an ATM-connected network of SPARC Ultras.

  8. LR: Compact connectivity representation for triangle meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Gurung, T; Luffel, M; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J

    2011-01-28

    We propose LR (Laced Ring) - a simple data structure for representing the connectivity of manifold triangle meshes. LR provides the option to store on average either 1.08 references per triangle or 26.2 bits per triangle. Its construction, from an input mesh that supports constant-time adjacency queries, has linear space and time complexity, and involves ordering most vertices along a nearly-Hamiltonian cycle. LR is best suited for applications that process meshes with fixed connectivity, as any changes to the connectivity require the data structure to be rebuilt. We provide an implementation of the set of standard random-access, constant-time operators for traversing a mesh, and show that LR often saves both space and traversal time over competing representations.

  9. Grid adaption using Chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite over-lapping meshes in regions of large gradient to capture the salient features accurately during computation. The Chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using tri-linear interpolation. Applications to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to a shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well resolved.

  10. Efficiently Sorting Zoo-Mesh Data Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R; Max, N; Silva, C; Williams, P

    2001-03-26

    The authors describe the SXMPVO algorithm for performing a visibility ordering zoo-meshed polyhedra. The algorithm runs in practice in linear time and the visibility ordering which it produces is exact.

  11. Octree based automatic meshing from CSG models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perucchio, Renato

    1987-01-01

    Finite element meshes derived automatically from solid models through recursive spatial subdivision schemes (octrees) can be made to inherit the hierarchical structure and the spatial addressability intrinsic to the underlying grid. These two properties, together with the geometric regularity that can also be built into the mesh, make octree based meshes ideally suited for efficient analysis and self-adaptive remeshing and reanalysis. The element decomposition of the octal cells that intersect the boundary of the domain is emphasized. The problem, central to octree based meshing, is solved by combining template mapping and element extraction into a procedure that utilizes both constructive solid geometry and boundary respresentation techniques. Boundary cells that are not intersected by the edge of the domain boundary are easily mapped to predefined element topology. Cells containing edges (and vertices) are first transformed into a planar polyhedron and then triangulated via element extractors. The modeling environments required for the derivation of planar polyhedra and for element extraction are analyzed.

  12. An efficient parallel algorithm for mesh smoothing

    SciTech Connect

    Freitag, L.; Plassmann, P.; Jones, M.

    1995-12-31

    Automatic mesh generation and adaptive refinement methods have proven to be very successful tools for the efficient solution of complex finite element applications. A problem with these methods is that they can produce poorly shaped elements; such elements are undesirable because they introduce numerical difficulties in the solution process. However, the shape of the elements can be improved through the determination of new geometric locations for mesh vertices by using a mesh smoothing algorithm. In this paper the authors present a new parallel algorithm for mesh smoothing that has a fast parallel runtime both in theory and in practice. The authors present an efficient implementation of the algorithm that uses non-smooth optimization techniques to find the new location of each vertex. Finally, they present experimental results obtained on the IBM SP system demonstrating the efficiency of this approach.

  13. Removal of line artifacts on mesh boundary in computer generated hologram by mesh phase matching.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Hyeung; Yeom, Han-Ju; Kim, Hee-Jae; Zhang, HuiJun; Li, BoNi; Ji, Yeong-Min; Kim, Sang-Hoo

    2015-03-23

    Mesh-based computer generated hologram enables realistic and efficient representation of three-dimensional scene. However, the dark line artifacts on the boundary between neighboring meshes are frequently observed, degrading the quality of the reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a simple technique to remove the dark line artifacts by matching the phase on the boundary of neighboring meshes. The feasibility of the proposed method is confirmed by the numerical and optical reconstruction of the generated hologram. PMID:25837138

  14. Refining quadrilateral and brick element meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Schneiders, R.; Debye, J.

    1995-12-31

    We consider the problem of refining unstructured quadrilateral and brick element meshes. We present an algorithm which is a generalization of an algorithm developed by Cheng et. al. for structured quadrilateral element meshes. The problem is solved for the two-dimensional case. Concerning three dimensions we present a solution for some special cases and a general solution that introduces tetrahedral and pyramidal transition elements.

  15. MHD simulations on an unstructured mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H.R.; Park, W.; Belova, E.; Fu, G.Y.; Longcope, D.W.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1998-12-31

    Two reasons for using an unstructured computational mesh are adaptivity, and alignment with arbitrarily shaped boundaries. Two codes which use finite element discretization on an unstructured mesh are described. FEM3D solves 2D and 3D RMHD using an adaptive grid. MH3D++, which incorporates methods of FEM3D into the MH3D generalized MHD code, can be used with shaped boundaries, which might be 3D.

  16. Implantation of the eSVS Mesh.

    PubMed

    Emery, Robert W; Solien, Eric; Jamieson, Stuart W

    2012-01-01

    The eSVS Mesh (Kipps Bay Medical, Minneapolis, MN USA) Mesh (Kipps Bay Medical, Minneapolis, MN USA) is a new concept in improving saphenous vein graft patency for coronary bypass grafting. This is a nitinol-based external support device that maintains external support of the graft and prevents detrimental expansion when exposed to arterial pressure. The implanting technique is critical to outcomes and is described in this article. Clinical testing in the United States is pending. PMID:22576039

  17. Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Microelectronic Device Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom; Lou, John; Norton, Charles

    1999-01-01

    Finite element and finite volume methods are used in a variety of design simulations when it is necessary to compute fields throughout regions that contain varying materials or geometry. Convergence of the simulation can be assessed by uniformly increasing the mesh density until an observable quantity stabilizes. Depending on the electrical size of the problem, uniform refinement of the mesh may be computationally infeasible due to memory limitations. Similarly, depending on the geometric complexity of the object being modeled, uniform refinement can be inefficient since regions that do not need refinement add to the computational expense. In either case, convergence to the correct (measured) solution is not guaranteed. Adaptive mesh refinement methods attempt to selectively refine the region of the mesh that is estimated to contain proportionally higher solution errors. The refinement may be obtained by decreasing the element size (h-refinement), by increasing the order of the element (p-refinement) or by a combination of the two (h-p refinement). A successful adaptive strategy refines the mesh to produce an accurate solution measured against the correct fields without undue computational expense. This is accomplished by the use of a) reliable a posteriori error estimates, b) hierarchal elements, and c) automatic adaptive mesh generation. Adaptive methods are also useful when problems with multi-scale field variations are encountered. These occur in active electronic devices that have thin doped layers and also when mixed physics is used in the calculation. The mesh needs to be fine at and near the thin layer to capture rapid field or charge variations, but can coarsen away from these layers where field variations smoothen and charge densities are uniform. This poster will present an adaptive mesh refinement package that runs on parallel computers and is applied to specific microelectronic device simulations. Passive sensors that operate in the infrared portion of

  18. Quadrilateral/hexahedral finite element mesh coarsening

    SciTech Connect

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Scott, Michael A; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16

    A technique for coarsening a finite element mesh ("FEM") is described. This technique includes identifying a coarsening region within the FEM to be coarsened. Perimeter chords running along perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region are identified. The perimeter chords are redirected to create an adaptive chord separating the coarsening region from a remainder of the FEM. The adaptive chord runs through mesh elements residing along the perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region. The adaptive chord is then extracted to coarsen the FEM.

  19. Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A.; Eder, D.; Masters, N.; Fisher, A.; Anderson, R.; Gunney, B.; Wang, P.; Benson, D.; Dixit, P.

    2009-09-29

    This is a simulation code involving an ALE (arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) hydrocode with AMR (adaptive mesh refinement) and pluggable physics packages for material strength, heat conduction, radiation diffusion, and laser ray tracing developed a LLNL, UCSD, and Berkeley Lab. The code is an extension of the open source SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Interface) code/library. The code can be used in laser facilities such as the National Ignition Facility. The code is alsi being applied to slurry flow (landslides).

  20. Airplane Mesh Development with Grid Density Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Baker, Timothy J.; Thomas, Scott D.; Lawrence, Scott L.; Rimlinger, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    Automatic Grid Generation Wish List Geometry handling, including CAD clean up and mesh generation, remains a major bottleneck in the application of CFD methods. There is a pressing need for greater automation in several aspects of the geometry preparation in order to reduce set up time and eliminate user intervention as much as possible. Starting from the CAD representation of a configuration, there may be holes or overlapping surfaces which require an intensive effort to establish cleanly abutting surface patches, and collections of many patches may need to be combined for more efficient use of the geometrical representation. Obtaining an accurate and suitable body conforming grid with an adequate distribution of points throughout the flow-field, for the flow conditions of interest, is often the most time consuming task for complex CFD applications. There is a need for a clean unambiguous definition of the CAD geometry. Ideally this would be carried out automatically by smart CAD clean up software. One could also define a standard piece-wise smooth surface representation suitable for use by computational methods and then create software to translate between the various CAD descriptions and the standard representation. Surface meshing remains a time consuming, user intensive procedure. There is a need for automated surface meshing, requiring only minimal user intervention to define the overall density of mesh points. The surface mesher should produce well shaped elements (triangles or quadrilaterals) whose size is determined initially according to the surface curvature with a minimum size for flat pieces, and later refined by the user in other regions if necessary. Present techniques for volume meshing all require some degree of user intervention. There is a need for fully automated and reliable volume mesh generation. In addition, it should be possible to create both surface and volume meshes that meet guaranteed measures of mesh quality (e.g. minimum and maximum

  1. Dual annular rotating [open quotes]windowed[close quotes] nuclear reflector reactor control system

    DOEpatents

    Jacox, M.G.; Drexler, R.L.; Hunt, R.N.M.; Lake, J.A.

    1994-03-29

    A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core. 4 figures.

  2. Photonic crystal intermediate reflectors for micromorph solar cells: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, P G; Chutinan, A; Leong, K; Kherani, N P; Ozin, G A; Zukotynski, S

    2010-03-01

    Wave-optics analysis is performed to investigate the benefits of utilizing Bragg-reflectors and inverted ZnO opals as intermediate reflectors in micromorph cells. The Bragg-reflector and the inverted ZnO opal intermediate reflector increase the current generated in a 100 nm thick upper a-Si:H cell within a micromorph cell by as much as 20% and 13%, respectively. The current generated in the bottom muc-Si:H cell within the micromorph is also greater when the Bragg-reflector is used as the intermediate reflector. The Bragg-reflector outperforms the ZnO inverted opal because it has a larger stop-gap, is optically thin, and due to greater absorption losses that occur in the opaline intermediate reflectors. PMID:20389460

  3. TVD differencing on three-dimensional unstructured meshes with monotonicity-preserving correction of mesh skewness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denner, Fabian; van Wachem, Berend G. M.

    2015-10-01

    Total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes are a widely applied group of monotonicity-preserving advection differencing schemes for partial differential equations in numerical heat transfer and computational fluid dynamics. These schemes are typically designed for one-dimensional problems or multidimensional problems on structured equidistant quadrilateral meshes. Practical applications, however, often involve complex geometries that cannot be represented by Cartesian meshes and, therefore, necessitate the application of unstructured meshes, which require a more sophisticated discretisation to account for their additional topological complexity. In principle, TVD schemes are applicable to unstructured meshes, however, not all the data required for TVD differencing is readily available on unstructured meshes, and the solution suffers from considerable numerical diffusion as a result of mesh skewness. In this article we analyse TVD differencing on unstructured three-dimensional meshes, focusing on the non-linearity of TVD differencing and the extrapolation of the virtual upwind node. Furthermore, we propose a novel monotonicity-preserving correction method for TVD schemes that significantly reduces numerical diffusion caused by mesh skewness. The presented numerical experiments demonstrate the importance of accounting for the non-linearity introduced by TVD differencing and of imposing carefully chosen limits on the extrapolated virtual upwind node, as well as the efficacy of the proposed method to correct mesh skewness.

  4. Mesh geometry impact on Micromegas performance with an Exchangeable Mesh prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuger, F.; Bianco, M.; Iengo, P.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Veenhof, R.; Wotschack, J.

    2016-07-01

    The reconstruction precision of gaseous detectors is limited by losses of primary electrons during signal formation. In addition to common gas related losses, like attachment, Micromegas suffer from electron absorption during its transition through the micro mesh. This study aims for a deepened understanding of electron losses and their dependency on the mesh geometry. It combines experimental results obtained with a novel designed Exchangeable Mesh Micromegas (ExMe) and advanced microscopic-tracking simulations (ANSYS and Garfield++) of electron drift and mesh transition.

  5. Adaptive Meshing Techniques for Viscous Flow Calculations on Mixed Element Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    An adaptive refinement strategy based on hierarchical element subdivision is formulated and implemented for meshes containing arbitrary mixtures of tetrahendra, hexahendra, prisms and pyramids. Special attention is given to keeping memory overheads as low as possible. This procedure is coupled with an algebraic multigrid flow solver which operates on mixed-element meshes. Inviscid flows as well as viscous flows are computed an adaptively refined tetrahedral, hexahedral, and hybrid meshes. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by generating an adapted hexahedral mesh containing 3 million vertices on a relatively inexpensive workstation.

  6. Hybrid Surface Mesh Adaptation for Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Khamayseh, Ahmed K; de Almeida, Valmor F; Hansen, Glen

    2008-01-01

    Solution-driven mesh adaptation is becoming quite popular for spatial error control in the numerical simulation of complex computational physics applications, such as climate modeling. Typically, spatial adaptation is achieved by element subdivision (h adaptation) with a primary goal of resolving the local length scales of interest. A second, less-popular method of spatial adaptivity is called "mesh motion" (r adaptation); the smooth repositioning of mesh node points aimed at resizing existing elements to capture the local length scales. This paper proposes an adaptation method based on a combination of both element subdivision and node point repositioning (rh adaptation). By combining these two methods using the notion of a mobility function, the proposed approach seeks to increase the flexibility and extensibility of mesh motion algorithms while providing a somewhat smoother transition between refined regions than is produced by element subdivision alone. Further, in an attempt to support the requirements of a very general class of climate simulation applications, the proposed method is designed to accommodate unstructured, polygonal mesh topologies in addition to the most popular mesh types.

  7. Hybrid Surface Mesh Adaptation for Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed Khamayseh; Valmor de Almeida; Glen Hansen

    2008-10-01

    Solution-driven mesh adaptation is becoming quite popular for spatial error control in the numerical simulation of complex computational physics applications, such as climate modeling. Typically, spatial adaptation is achieved by element subdivision (h adaptation) with a primary goal of resolving the local length scales of interest. A second, less-popular method of spatial adaptivity is called “mesh motion” (r adaptation); the smooth repositioning of mesh node points aimed at resizing existing elements to capture the local length scales. This paper proposes an adaptation method based on a combination of both element subdivision and node point repositioning (rh adaptation). By combining these two methods using the notion of a mobility function, the proposed approach seeks to increase the flexibility and extensibility of mesh motion algorithms while providing a somewhat smoother transition between refined regions than is produced by element subdivision alone. Further, in an attempt to support the requirements of a very general class of climate simulation applications, the proposed method is designed to accommodate unstructured, polygonal mesh topologies in addition to the most popular mesh types.

  8. How to model wireless mesh networks topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanni, M. L.; Hashim, A. A.; Anwar, F.; Ahmed, G. S. M.; Ali, S.

    2013-12-01

    The specification of network connectivity model or topology is the beginning of design and analysis in Computer Network researches. Wireless Mesh Networks is an autonomic network that is dynamically self-organised, self-configured while the mesh nodes establish automatic connectivity with the adjacent nodes in the relay network of wireless backbone routers. Researches in Wireless Mesh Networks range from node deployment to internetworking issues with sensor, Internet and cellular networks. These researches require modelling of relationships and interactions among nodes including technical characteristics of the links while satisfying the architectural requirements of the physical network. However, the existing topology generators model geographic topologies which constitute different architectures, thus may not be suitable in Wireless Mesh Networks scenarios. The existing methods of topology generation are explored, analysed and parameters for their characterisation are identified. Furthermore, an algorithm for the design of Wireless Mesh Networks topology based on square grid model is proposed in this paper. The performance of the topology generated is also evaluated. This research is particularly important in the generation of a close-to-real topology for ensuring relevance of design to the intended network and validity of results obtained in Wireless Mesh Networks researches.

  9. Automatic scheme selection for toolkit hex meshing

    SciTech Connect

    WHITE,DAVID R.; TAUTGES,TIMOTHY J.

    2000-02-17

    Current hexahedral mesh generation techniques rely on a set of meshing tools, which when combined with geometry decomposition leads to an adequate mesh generation process. Of these tools, sweeping tends to be the workhorse algorithm, accounting for at least 50% of most meshing applications. Constraints which must be met for a volume to be sweepable are derived, and it is proven that these constraints are necessary but not sufficient conditions for sweepability. This paper also describes a new algorithm for detecting extruded or sweepable geometries. This algorithm, based on these constraints, uses topological and local geometric information, and is more robust than feature recognition-based algorithms. A method for computing sweep dependencies in volume assemblies is also given. The auto sweep detect and sweep grouping algorithms have been used to reduce interactive user time required to generate all-hexahedral meshes by filtering out non-sweepable volumes needing further decomposition and by allowing concurrent meshing of independent sweep groups. Parts of the auto sweep detect algorithm have also been used to identify independent sweep paths, for use in volume-based interval assignment.

  10. Automatic Scheme Selection for Toolkit Hex Meshing

    SciTech Connect

    TAUTGES,TIMOTHY J.; WHITE,DAVID R.

    1999-09-27

    Current hexahedral mesh generation techniques rely on a set of meshing tools, which when combined with geometry decomposition leads to an adequate mesh generation process. Of these tools, sweeping tends to be the workhorse algorithm, accounting for at least 50% of most meshing applications. Constraints which must be met for a volume to be sweepable are derived, and it is proven that these constraints are necessary but not sufficient conditions for sweepability. This paper also describes a new algorithm for detecting extruded or sweepable geometries. This algorithm, based on these constraints, uses topological and local geometric information, and is more robust than feature recognition-based algorithms. A method for computing sweep dependencies in volume assemblies is also given. The auto sweep detect and sweep grouping algorithms have been used to reduce interactive user time required to generate all-hexahedral meshes by filtering out non-sweepable volumes needing further decomposition and by allowing concurrent meshing of independent sweep groups. Parts of the auto sweep detect algorithm have also been used to identify independent sweep paths, for use in volume-based interval assignment.

  11. Discrete differential geometry: The nonplanar quadrilateral mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twining, Carole J.; Marsland, Stephen

    2012-06-01

    We consider the problem of constructing a discrete differential geometry defined on nonplanar quadrilateral meshes. Physical models on discrete nonflat spaces are of inherent interest, as well as being used in applications such as computation for electromagnetism, fluid mechanics, and image analysis. However, the majority of analysis has focused on triangulated meshes. We consider two approaches: discretizing the tensor calculus, and a discrete mesh version of differential forms. While these two approaches are equivalent in the continuum, we show that this is not true in the discrete case. Nevertheless, we show that it is possible to construct mesh versions of the Levi-Civita connection (and hence the tensorial covariant derivative and the associated covariant exterior derivative), the torsion, and the curvature. We show how discrete analogs of the usual vector integral theorems are constructed in such a way that the appropriate conservation laws hold exactly on the mesh, rather than only as approximations to the continuum limit. We demonstrate the success of our method by constructing a mesh version of classical electromagnetism and discuss how our formalism could be used to deal with other physical models, such as fluids.

  12. Discrete differential geometry: the nonplanar quadrilateral mesh.

    PubMed

    Twining, Carole J; Marsland, Stephen

    2012-06-01

    We consider the problem of constructing a discrete differential geometry defined on nonplanar quadrilateral meshes. Physical models on discrete nonflat spaces are of inherent interest, as well as being used in applications such as computation for electromagnetism, fluid mechanics, and image analysis. However, the majority of analysis has focused on triangulated meshes. We consider two approaches: discretizing the tensor calculus, and a discrete mesh version of differential forms. While these two approaches are equivalent in the continuum, we show that this is not true in the discrete case. Nevertheless, we show that it is possible to construct mesh versions of the Levi-Civita connection (and hence the tensorial covariant derivative and the associated covariant exterior derivative), the torsion, and the curvature. We show how discrete analogs of the usual vector integral theorems are constructed in such a way that the appropriate conservation laws hold exactly on the mesh, rather than only as approximations to the continuum limit. We demonstrate the success of our method by constructing a mesh version of classical electromagnetism and discuss how our formalism could be used to deal with other physical models, such as fluids. PMID:23005244

  13. Intra-oceanic crustal seismic reflecting zone below the dipping reflectors on Lofoten margin

    SciTech Connect

    Sellevoll, M.A.; Mokhtari, M.

    1988-07-01

    Multichannel seismic reflection measurements off Lofoten, Northern Norway, show an uneven, discontinuous reflector within the crystalline oceanic crust at a depth of 7-8 s (two-way travel time). This intra-oceanic crustal reflector is observed seaward as well as beneath sub-basement dipping reflectors, which are of disputed (oceanic or continental) origin. These observations indicate that the dipping reflectors are an integrated part of the oceanic crust.

  14. Geometry adaptive control of a composite reflector using PZT actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Lan; Jiang, Shuidong; Zhou, Yang; Fang, Houfei; Tan, Shujun; Wu, Zhigang

    2015-04-01

    Maintaining geometrical high precision for a graphite fiber reinforced composite (GFRC) reflector is a challenging task. Although great efforts have been placed to improve the fabrication precision, geometry adaptive control for a reflector is becoming more and more necessary. This paper studied geometry adaptive control for a GFRC reflector with piezoelectric ceramic transducer (PZT) actuators assembled on the ribs. In order to model the piezoelectric effect in finite element analysis (FEA), a thermal analogy was used in which the temperature was applied to simulate the actuation voltage, and the piezoelectric constant was mimicked by a Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE). PZT actuator's equivalent model was validated by an experiment. The deformations of a triangular GFRC specimen with three PZT actuators were also measured experimentally and compared with that of simulation. This study developed a multidisciplinary analytical model, which includes the composite structure, thermal, thermal deformation and control system, to perform an optimization analysis and design for the adaptive GFRC reflector by considering the free vibration, gravity deformation and geometry controllability.

  15. Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing for Solar Reflectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.; Elmore, R.; Lee, J.; Kennedy, C.

    2011-09-01

    To meet the challenge to reduce the cost of electricity generated with concentrating solar power (CSP) new low-cost reflector materials are being developed including metalized polymer reflectors and must be tested and validated against appropriate failure mechanisms. We explore the application of testing methods and statistical inference techniques for quantifying estimates and improving lifetimes of concentrating solar power (CSP) reflectors associated with failure mechanisms initiated by exposure to the ultraviolet (UV) part of the solar spectrum. In general, a suite of durability and reliability tests are available for testing a variety of failure mechanisms where the results of a set are required to understand overall lifetime of a CSP reflector. We will focus on the use of the Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System (UAWS) as a testing device for assessing various degradation patterns attributable to accelerated UV exposure. Depending on number of samples, test conditions, degradation and failure patterns, test results may be used to derive insight into failure mechanisms, associated physical parameters, lifetimes and uncertainties. In the most complicated case warranting advanced planning and statistical inference, step-stress accelerated degradation (SSADT) methods may be applied.

  16. Application of parabolic reflector on Raman analysis of gas samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Anlan; Zuo, Duluo; Gao, Jun; Li, Bin; Wang, Xingbing

    2016-05-01

    Studies on the application of a parabolic reflector in spontaneous Raman scattering for low background Raman analysis of gas samples are reported. As an effective signal enhancing sample cell, photonic bandgap fiber (HC-PBF) or metallined capillary normally result in a strong continuous background in spectra caused by the strong Raman/fluorescence signal from the silica wall and the polymer protective film. In order to obtain enhanced signal with low background, a specially designed sample cell with double-pass and large collecting solid angle constructed by a parabolic reflector and a planar reflector was applied, of which the optical surfaces had been processed by diamond turning and coated by silver film and protective film of high-purity alumina. The influences of optical structure, polarization characteristic, collecting solid-angle and collecting efficiency of the sample cell on light propagation and signal enhancement were studied. A Raman spectrum of ambient air with signal to background ratio of 94 was acquired with an exposure time of 1 sec by an imaging spectrograph. Besides, the 3σ limits of detection (LOD) of 7 ppm for H2, 8 ppm for CO2 and 12 ppm for CO were also obtained. The sample cell mainly based on parabolic reflector will be helpful for compact and high-sensitive Raman system.

  17. Long-Life Self-Renewing Solar Reflector Stack

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Barry Lynn

    1997-07-08

    A long-life solar reflector includes a solar collector substrate and a base layer bonded to a solar collector substrate. The first layer includes a first reflective layer and a first acrylic or transparent polymer layer covering the first reflective layer to prevent exposure of the first reflective layer. The reflector also includes at least one upper layer removably bonded to the first acrylic or transparent polymer layer of the base layer. The upper layer includes a second reflective layer and a second acrylic or transparent polymer layer covering the second reflective layer to prevent exposure of the second reflective layer. The upper layer may be removed from the base reflective layer to expose the base layer, thereby lengthening the useful life of the solar reflector. A method of manufacturing a solar reflector includes the steps of bonding a base layer to a solar collector substrate, wherein the base reflective layer includes a first reflective layer and a first transparent polymer or acrylic layer covering the first reflective layer; and removably bonding a first upper layer to the first transparent polymer or acrylic layer of the base layer. The first upper layer includes a second reflective layer and a second transparent polymer or acrylic layer covering the second reflective layer to prevent exposure of the second reflective layer.

  18. Prelaunch testing of the GEOS-3 laser reflector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, P. O.; Fitzmaurice, M. W.; Abshire, J. B.; Rowe, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    The prelaunch testing performed on the Geos-3 laser reflector array before launch was used to determine the lidar cross section of the array and the distance of the center of gravity of the satellite from the center of gravity of reflected laser pulses as a function of incidence angle. Experimental data are compared to computed results.

  19. Beam spoiling a reflector antenna with conducting shim.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-12-01

    A horn-fed dish reflector antenna has characteristics including beam pattern that are a function of its mechanical form. The beam pattern can be altered by changing the mechanical configuration of the antenna. One way to do this is with a reflecting insert or shim added to the face of the original dish.

  20. Detail of dipole antenna element (right) and 94' lowband reflector ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of dipole antenna element (right) and 94' low-band reflector screen poles (left), note the guy wires from the antenna element, view facing north northeast - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  1. Unstable-Resonator Distributed-Bragg-Reflector Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed distributed-Bragg-reflector (DBR) semiconductor laser has wide curved gratings favoring single-mode operation, even with relatively wide laser stripe, enabling use of higher power. Consists of semiconductor double heterostructure laser bounded at each end by region of passive waveguide.

  2. Detail of 94' lowband reflector screen posts, note the concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of 94' low-band reflector screen posts, note the concrete curb and vertical wires between posts, view facing north northeast - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  3. Geometrically Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of a Composite Space Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kee-Joo; Leet, Sung W.; Clark, Greg; Broduer, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Lightweight aerospace structures, such as low areal density composite space reflectors, are highly flexible and may undergo large deflection under applied loading, especially during the launch phase. Accordingly, geometrically nonlinear analysis that takes into account the effect of finite rotation may be needed to determine the deformed shape for a clearance check and the stress and strain state to ensure structural integrity. In this study, deformation of the space reflector is determined under static conditions using a geometrically nonlinear solid shell finite element model. For the solid shell element formulation, the kinematics of deformation is described by six variables that are purely vector components. Because rotational angles are not used, this approach is free of the limitations of small angle increments. This also allows easy connections between substructures and large load increments with respect to the conventional shell formulation using rotational parameters. Geometrically nonlinear analyses were carried out for three cases of static point loads applied at selected points. A chart shows results for a case when the load is applied at the center point of the reflector dish. The computed results capture the nonlinear behavior of the composite reflector as the applied load increases. Also, they are in good agreement with the data obtained by experiments.

  4. The Proposed DESDynI Array-Fed Reflector Feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Hodges, R.; Vacchione, J.; Zawadzki, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the feed antenna for a proposed NASA Earth orbiting radar sensor currently in formulation at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The proposed array-fed reflector antenna architecture would enable large physical aperture imaging from space at relatively low cost and high technology readiness. Design, construction, and modeling of the feed antenna are described.

  5. The design and application of upwind schemes on unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Jespersen, Dennis C.

    1989-01-01

    Solution and mesh generation algorithms for solving the Euler equations on unstructured meshes consisting of triangle and quadrilateral control volumes are presented. Cell-centered and mesh-vertex upwind finite-volume schemes are developed which utilize multi-dimensional monotone linear reconstruction procedures. These algorithms differ from existing algorithms (even on structured meshes). Numerical results in two dimensions are presented.

  6. 50 CFR 622.208 - Minimum mesh size applicable to rock shrimp off Georgia and Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... mesh size applicable to rock shrimp off Georgia and Florida. (a) The minimum mesh size for the cod end...), stretched mesh. This minimum mesh size is required in at least the last 40 meshes forward of the cod...

  7. Method of modifying a volume mesh using sheet insertion

    DOEpatents

    Borden, Michael J.; Shepherd, Jason F.

    2006-08-29

    A method and machine-readable medium provide a technique to modify a hexahedral finite element volume mesh using dual generation and sheet insertion. After generating a dual of a volume stack (mesh), a predetermined algorithm may be followed to modify (refine) the volume mesh of hexahedral elements. The predetermined algorithm may include the steps of locating a sheet of hexahedral mesh elements, determining a plurality of hexahedral elements within the sheet to refine, shrinking the plurality of elements, and inserting a new sheet of hexahedral elements adjacently to modify the volume mesh. Additionally, another predetermined algorithm using mesh cutting may be followed to modify a volume mesh.

  8. 78 FR 7450 - Certain Fluorescent Reflector Lamps and Products and Components Containing Same; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... COMMISSION Certain Fluorescent Reflector Lamps and Products and Components Containing Same; Notice of Receipt... Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Compact Fluorescent Reflector Lamps and Products and... importation of certain fluorescent reflector lamps and products and components containing same. The...

  9. 49 CFR 393.22 - Combination of lighting devices and reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Combination of lighting devices and reflectors... Wiring § 393.22 Combination of lighting devices and reflectors. (a) Permitted combinations. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, two or more lighting devices and reflectors (whether or...

  10. 49 CFR 393.22 - Combination of lighting devices and reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Combination of lighting devices and reflectors... Wiring § 393.22 Combination of lighting devices and reflectors. (a) Permitted combinations. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, two or more lighting devices and reflectors (whether or...

  11. 49 CFR 393.22 - Combination of lighting devices and reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Combination of lighting devices and reflectors... Wiring § 393.22 Combination of lighting devices and reflectors. (a) Permitted combinations. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, two or more lighting devices and reflectors (whether or...

  12. 49 CFR 393.22 - Combination of lighting devices and reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Combination of lighting devices and reflectors... Wiring § 393.22 Combination of lighting devices and reflectors. (a) Permitted combinations. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, two or more lighting devices and reflectors (whether or...

  13. 49 CFR 393.22 - Combination of lighting devices and reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Combination of lighting devices and reflectors... Wiring § 393.22 Combination of lighting devices and reflectors. (a) Permitted combinations. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, two or more lighting devices and reflectors (whether or...

  14. Primary reflector for solar energy collection systems and method of making same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Solar energy is reflected to a movably supported collector that is kept at the concentrated line focus of the reflector primary by a fixed, linear, ground-based primary reflector having an extended curved sawtooth contoured surface covered with a metalized polymeric reflecting material. The primary reflector was constructed by a process utilizing well-known freeway paving machinery.

  15. Detecting subsurface reflectors in southwestern Japan using ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, Shiro

    2010-05-01

    We will demonstrate to detect several subsurface reflectors in southwestern Japan using ambient seismic noise. There are several subsurface reflectors or possible reflectors shown in previous studies. Examples are mid-crust reflector in Tamba area (near Osaka and Kyoto), reflective Moho discontinuity in Shikoku district (e.g. Gupta et al., 2009, JAES), and upper boundary of Philippine Sea plate which is gently subducting beneath Shikoku district (e.g. Shiomi et al., 2004, JGR). We computed the auto-correlation functions (ACF) of continuous short period seismograms obtained from Hinet (NIED) and DPRI (Kyoto Univ.) seismic networks. We divided the continuous record into 1 hour segments and applied ‘running absolute mean normalization' (Bensen et al., 2007, GJI) and band-pass filtering. In this analysis, pass band of the filter was assumed 0.5 Hz - 1.0 Hz. Then we stacked the ACFs of at least 1.5 years long for each single station. In this frequency range, the shapes of ACFs are rather temporally stable although the slight seasonal change of the input signal recognized from the corresponding cross-correlation functions among the stations. Thus we stacked the ACFs of all year around without selecting particular season. Finally we adopted automatic gain control (AGC) filter to enhance the later phases of the stacked ACFs. Preliminary result shows several phases recognized in some regions. Lag times of prominent phases of one region seem to be different from those of the other region. Although these phase are not identified in this stage, we are investigating the source of the phases. If this method is successfully applied, we would able to delineate precise distribution of subsurface reflectors beneath Japan using the dense seismic network. It will contribute to understand the behavior of possible existing fluid beneath active faults that affects the occurrence of the shallow crustal earthquakes as well as shallow plate boundary earthquakes.

  16. A nanobursa mesh: a graded electrospun nanofiber mesh with metal nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senturk-Ozer, Semra; Chen, Tao; Degirmenbasi, Nebahat; Gevgilili, Halil; Podkolzin, Simon G.; Kalyon, Dilhan M.

    2014-07-01

    A new type of material, a ``nanobursa'' mesh (from ``bursa'' meaning ``sac or pouch''), is introduced. This material consists of sequential layers of porous polymeric nanofibers encapsulating carbon nanotubes, which are functionalized with different metal nanoparticles in each layer. The nanobursa mesh is fabricated via a novel combination of twin-screw extrusion and electrospinning. Use of this hybrid process at industrially-relevant rates is demonstrated by producing a nanobursa mesh with graded layers of Pd, Co, Ag, and Pt nanoparticles. The potential use of the fabricated nanobursa mesh is illustrated by modeling of catalytic hydrocarbon oxidation.A new type of material, a ``nanobursa'' mesh (from ``bursa'' meaning ``sac or pouch''), is introduced. This material consists of sequential layers of porous polymeric nanofibers encapsulating carbon nanotubes, which are functionalized with different metal nanoparticles in each layer. The nanobursa mesh is fabricated via a novel combination of twin-screw extrusion and electrospinning. Use of this hybrid process at industrially-relevant rates is demonstrated by producing a nanobursa mesh with graded layers of Pd, Co, Ag, and Pt nanoparticles. The potential use of the fabricated nanobursa mesh is illustrated by modeling of catalytic hydrocarbon oxidation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental methods and computational details. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01145g

  17. Conservative interpolation between general spherical meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritsikis, E.; Aechtner, M.; Meurdesoif, Y.; Dubos, T.

    2015-06-01

    An efficient, local, explicit, second-order, conservative interpolation algorithm between spherical meshes is presented. The cells composing the source and target meshes may be either spherical polygons or longitude-latitude quadrilaterals. Second-order accuracy is obtained by piecewise-linear finite volume reconstruction over the source mesh. Global conservation is achieved through the introduction of a supermesh, whose cells are all possible intersections of source and target cells. Areas and intersections are computed exactly to yield a geometrically exact method. The main efficiency bottleneck caused by the construction of the supermesh is overcome by adopting tree-based data structures and algorithms, from which the mesh connectivity can also be deduced efficiently. The theoretical second-order accuracy is verified using a smooth test function and pairs of meshes commonly used for atmospheric modelling. Experiments confirm that the most expensive operations, especially the supermesh construction, have O(NlogN) computational cost. The method presented is meant to be incorporated in pre- or post-processing atmospheric modelling pipelines, or directly into models for flexible input/output. It could also serve as a basis for conservative coupling between model components, e.g. atmosphere and ocean.

  18. Light weight meshes in incisional hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Schumpelick, Volker; Klinge, Uwe; Rosch, Raphael; Junge, Karsten

    2006-01-01

    Incisional hernias remain one of the most common surgical complications with a long-term incidence of 10–20%. Increasing evidence of impaired wound healing in these patients supports routine use of an open prefascial, retromuscular mesh repair. Basic pathophysiologic principles dictate that for a successful long-term outcome and prevention of recurrence, a wide overlap underneath healthy tissue is required. Particularly in the neighborhood of osseous structures, only retromuscular placement allows sufficient subduction of the mesh by healthy tissue of at least 5 cm in all directions. Preparation must take into account the special anatomic features of the abdominal wall, especially in the area of the Linea alba and Linea semilunaris. Polypropylene is the material widely used for open mesh repair. New developments have led to low-weight, large-pore polypropylene prostheses, which are adjusted to the physiological requirements of the abdominal wall and permit proper tissue integration. These meshes provide the possibility of forming a scar net instead of a stiff scar plate and therefore help to avoid former known mesh complications. PMID:21187980

  19. Mesh insertion as an aid for pleurodesis.

    PubMed

    Sugarmann, W M; Widmann, W D; Mysh, D; Sattari, R

    1996-12-01

    With the application of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) for the treatment of pneumothorax, there has been an increase in the failure rate of treatment because of inadequate pleurodesis. We sought to determine whether mesh insertion into the pleural cavity with or without pleural abrasion results in predictable pleurodesis appropriate for clinical trial as an adjunct to VATS treatment of pneumothorax. There have been no prior studies on the use of absorbable or nonabsorbable mesh in the thoracic cavity. The effects of intra-thoracic absorbable polyglactin (Vicryl) and non-absorbable polypropylene (Marlex) mesh were studied in rats. Polyglactin without abrasion caused filmy adhesions in 5/5, 1/7, and 0/5 rats studied at 1, 2, and 3 months. Polypropylene incites an extensive and dense pleural reaction not suitable for clinical use becaues it induces a fibrothorax. Pleural abrasion alone caused variable adhesions studied at 3-4 months (4/6 none, 1/6 filmy, 1/6 firm). Polyglactin plus pleural abrasion resulted in appropriate firm adhesions in 7/8 rats studied at 3-4 months with 1/8 showing filmy adhesions. Polyglactin alone results in transient filmy adhesions. Pleural abrasion alone results in inadequate pleural symphysis. However, when absorbable mesh insertion is coupled with pleural abrasion, appropriate pleurodesis is predictably achieved. Clinical application of polyglactin mesh insertion with pleural abrasion as an adjunct in the VATS treatment of pneumothorax has begun and has been successful. PMID:10064371

  20. Floating shock fitting via Lagrangian adaptive meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanrosendale, John

    1994-01-01

    In recent works we have formulated a new approach to compressible flow simulation, combining the advantages of shock-fitting and shock-capturing. Using a cell-centered Roe scheme discretization on unstructured meshes, we warp the mesh while marching to steady state, so that mesh edges align with shocks and other discontinuities. This new algorithm, the Shock-fitting Lagrangian Adaptive Method (SLAM) is, in effect, a reliable shock-capturing algorithm which yields shock-fitted accuracy at convergence. Shock-capturing algorithms like this, which warp the mesh to yield shock-fitted accuracy, are new and relatively untried. However, their potential is clear. In the context of sonic booms, accurate calculation of near-field sonic boom signatures is critical to the design of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). SLAM should allow computation of accurate N-wave pressure signatures on comparatively coarse meshes, significantly enhancing our ability to design low-boom configurations for high-speed aircraft.

  1. Correcting Thermal Deformations in an Active Composite Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Samuel C.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Wilkie, William K.

    2011-01-01

    Large, high-precision composite reflectors for future space missions are costly to manufacture, and heavy. An active composite reflector capable of adjusting shape in situ to maintain required tolerances can be lighter and cheaper to manufacture. An active composite reflector testbed was developed that uses an array of piezoelectric composite actuators embedded in the back face sheet of a 0.8-m reflector panel. Each individually addressable actuator can be commanded from 500 to +1,500 V, and the flatness of the panel can be controlled to tolerances of 100 nm. Measuring the surface flatness at this resolution required the use of a speckle holography interferometer system in the Precision Environmental Test Enclosure (PETE) at JPL. The existing testbed combines the PETE for test environment stability, the speckle holography system for measuring out-of-plane deformations, the active panel including an array of individually addressable actuators, a FLIR thermal camera to measure thermal profiles across the reflector, and a heat source. Use of an array of flat piezoelectric actuators to correct thermal deformations is a promising new application for these actuators, as is the use of this actuator technology for surface flatness and wavefront control. An isogrid of these actuators is moving one step closer to a fully active face sheet, with the significant advantage of ease in manufacturing. No extensive rib structure or other actuation backing structure is required, as these actuators can be applied directly to an easy-to-manufacture flat surface. Any mission with a surface flatness requirement for a panel or reflector structure could adopt this actuator array concept to create lighter structures and enable improved performance on orbit. The thermal environment on orbit tends to include variations in temperature during shadowing or changes in angle. Because of this, a purely passive system is not an effective way to maintain flatness at the scale of microns over several

  2. NASA Lewis Meshed VSAT Workshop meeting summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William

    1993-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Space Electronics Division (SED) hosted a workshop to address specific topics related to future meshed very small-aperture terminal (VSAT) satellite communications networks. The ideas generated by this workshop will help to identify potential markets and focus technology development within the commercial satellite communications industry and NASA. The workshop resulted in recommendations concerning these principal points of interest: the window of opportunity for a meshed VSAT system; system availability; ground terminal antenna sizes; recommended multifrequency for time division multiple access (TDMA) uplink; a packet switch design concept for narrowband; and fault tolerance design concepts. This report presents a summary of group presentations and discussion associated with the technological, economic, and operational issues of meshed VSAT architectures that utilize processing satellites.

  3. Performance of a streaming mesh refinement algorithm.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David C.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2004-08-01

    In SAND report 2004-1617, we outline a method for edge-based tetrahedral subdivision that does not rely on saving state or communication to produce compatible tetrahedralizations. This report analyzes the performance of the technique by characterizing (a) mesh quality, (b) execution time, and (c) traits of the algorithm that could affect quality or execution time differently for different meshes. It also details the method used to debug the several hundred subdivision templates that the algorithm relies upon. Mesh quality is on par with other similar refinement schemes and throughput on modern hardware can exceed 600,000 output tetrahedra per second. But if you want to understand the traits of the algorithm, you have to read the report!

  4. GRChombo: Numerical relativity with adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, Katy; Figueras, Pau; Finkel, Hal; Kunesch, Markus; Lim, Eugene A.; Tunyasuvunakool, Saran

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we introduce {\\mathtt{GRChombo}}: a new numerical relativity code which incorporates full adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) using block structured Berger-Rigoutsos grid generation. The code supports non-trivial 'many-boxes-in-many-boxes' mesh hierarchies and massive parallelism through the message passing interface. {\\mathtt{GRChombo}} evolves the Einstein equation using the standard BSSN formalism, with an option to turn on CCZ4 constraint damping if required. The AMR capability permits the study of a range of new physics which has previously been computationally infeasible in a full 3 + 1 setting, while also significantly simplifying the process of setting up the mesh for these problems. We show that {\\mathtt{GRChombo}} can stably and accurately evolve standard spacetimes such as binary black hole mergers and scalar collapses into black holes, demonstrate the performance characteristics of our code, and discuss various physics problems which stand to benefit from the AMR technique.

  5. Concepts and analysis for precision segmented reflector and feed support structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Richard K.; Thomson, Mark W.; Hedgepeth, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Several issues surrounding the design of a large (20-meter diameter) Precision Segmented Reflector are investigated. The concerns include development of a reflector support truss geometry that will permit deployment into the required doubly-curved shape without significant member strains. For deployable and erectable reflector support trusses, the reduction of structural redundancy was analyzed to achieve reduced weight and complexity for the designs. The stiffness and accuracy of such reduced member trusses, however, were found to be affected to a degree that is unexpected. The Precision Segmented Reflector designs were developed with performance requirements that represent the Reflector application. A novel deployable sunshade concept was developed, and a detailed parametric study of various feed support structural concepts was performed. The results of the detailed study reveal what may be the most desirable feed support structure geometry for Precision Segmented Reflector/Large Deployable Reflector applications.

  6. The generation of hexahedral meshes for assembly geometries: A survey

    SciTech Connect

    TAUTGES,TIMOTHY J.

    2000-02-14

    The finite element method is being used today to model component assemblies in a wide variety of application areas, including structural mechanics, fluid simulations, and others. Generating hexahedral meshes for these assemblies usually requires the use of geometry decomposition, with different meshing algorithms applied to different regions. While the primary motivation for this approach remains the lack of an automatic, reliable all-hexahedral meshing algorithm, requirements in mesh quality and mesh configuration for typical analyses are also factors. For these reasons, this approach is also sometimes required when producing other types of unstructured meshes. This paper will review progress to date in automating many parts of the hex meshing process, which has halved the time to produce all-hex meshes for large assemblies. Particular issues which have been exposed due to this progress will also be discussed, along with their applicability to the general unstructured meshing problem.

  7. Cardiovascular and lung mesh generation based on centerlines.

    PubMed

    Marchandise, E; Geuzaine, C; Remacle, J F

    2013-06-01

    We present a fully automatic procedure for the mesh generation of tubular geometries such as blood vessels or airways. The procedure is implemented in the open-source Gmsh software and relies on a centerline description of the input geometry. The presented method can generate different type of meshes: isotropic tetrahedral meshes, anisotropic tetrahedral meshes, and mixed hexahedral/tetrahedral meshes. Additionally, a multiple layered arterial wall can be generated with a variable thickness. All the generated meshes rely on a mesh size field and a mesh metric that is based on centerline descriptions, namely the distance to the centerlines and a local reference system based on the tangent and the normal directions to the centerlines. Different examples show that the proposed method is very efficient and robust and leads to high quality computational meshes. PMID:23606344

  8. Multigrid solution strategies for adaptive meshing problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the issues which arise when combining multigrid strategies with adaptive meshing techniques for solving steady-state problems on unstructured meshes. A basic strategy is described, and demonstrated by solving several inviscid and viscous flow cases. Potential inefficiencies in this basic strategy are exposed, and various alternate approaches are discussed, some of which are demonstrated with an example. Although each particular approach exhibits certain advantages, all methods have particular drawbacks, and the formulation of a completely optimal strategy is considered to be an open problem.

  9. Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    2009-09-29

    This is a simulation code involving an ALE (arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) hydrocode with AMR (adaptive mesh refinement) and pluggable physics packages for material strength, heat conduction, radiation diffusion, and laser ray tracing developed a LLNL, UCSD, and Berkeley Lab. The code is an extension of the open source SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Interface) code/library. The code can be used in laser facilities such as the National Ignition Facility. The code is alsi being appliedmore » to slurry flow (landslides).« less

  10. Unstructured Adaptive Meshes: Bad for Your Memory?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Feng, Hui-Yu; VanderWijngaart, Rob

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation explores the need for a NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) parallel benchmark for problems with irregular dynamical memory access. This benchmark is important and necessary because: 1) Problems with localized error source benefit from adaptive nonuniform meshes; 2) Certain machines perform poorly on such problems; 3) Parallel implementation may provide further performance improvement but is difficult. Some examples of problems which use irregular dynamical memory access include: 1) Heat transfer problem; 2) Heat source term; 3) Spectral element method; 4) Base functions; 5) Elemental discrete equations; 6) Global discrete equations. Nonconforming Mesh and Mortar Element Method are covered in greater detail in this presentation.

  11. Shuffle-exchanges on augmented meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, S. H.

    1984-01-01

    A mesh connected array of size N = two to the Kth power, K an integer, can be augmented by adding at most one edge per node such that it can perform a shuffle-exchange of size N/2 in constant time. A shuffle-exchange of size N is performed on this augmented array in constant time. This is done by combining the available perfect shuffle of size N/2 with the existing nearest neighbor connections of the mesh. By carefully scheduling the different permutations that are composed in order to achieve the shuffle, the time required is reduced to 5 steps, which is optimal for this network.

  12. Conceptual Design of the Aluminum Reflector Antenna for DATE5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yuan; Kan, Frank W.; Sarawit, Andrew T.; Lou, Zheng; Cheng, Jing-Quan; Wang, Hai-Ren; Zuo, Ying-Xi; Yang, Ji

    2016-08-01

    DATE5, a 5 m telescope for terahertz exploration, was proposed for acquiring observations at Dome A, Antarctica. In order to observe the terahertz spectrum, it is necessary to maintain high surface accuracy in the the antenna when it is exposed to Antarctic weather conditions. Structural analysis shows that both machined aluminum and carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels can meet surface accuracy requirements. In this paper, one design concept based on aluminum panels is introduced. This includes panel layout, details on panel support, design of a CFRP backup structure, and detailed finite element analysis. Modal, gravity and thermal analysis are all performed and surface deformations of the main reflector are evaluated for all load cases. At the end of the paper, the manufacture of a prototype panel is also described. Based on these results, we found that using smaller aluminum reflector panels has the potential to meet the surface requirements in the harsh Dome A environment.

  13. High contrast reflective liquid crystal display using a thermochromic reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Kyong Chan; Yi, Jonghoon; Kwon, Jin Hyuk; Seog Gwag, Jin

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a reflective liquid crystal display (LCD) with a high contrast ratio (CR) combined with mono-type thermochromic materials to solve the low CR of reflective type LCDs. Here, reflective, wide-band, electrically controlled birefringence mode was used as the optical liquid crystal (LC) mode, and a thermochromic material was used as the reflector for the white state and an absorber for the dark state. The combination of LCD and thermochromic material can have a synergistic effect in achieving a better display. By controlling the reflectance of the thermochromic reflector using Joule heating, the proposed reflective LC cell exhibited a high CR of approximately 70:1. The figure was extremely high compared to the approximately 10:1 of a typical reflective LC cell with an optically wide band design. The proposed LC cell configuration is expected to find many outdoor applications which can admit slow response speed.

  14. Microwave holography of large reflector antennas - Simulation algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The performance of large reflector antennas can be improved by identifying the location and amount of their surface distortions and correcting them. To determine the accuracy of the constructed surface profiles, simulation studies are used to incorporate both the effects of systematic and random distortions, particularly the effects of the displaced surface panels. In this paper, different simulation models are investigated, emphasizing a model based on the vector diffraction analysis of a curved reflector with displaced panels. The simulated far-field patterns are then used to reconstruct the location and amount of displacement of the surface panels by employing a fast Fourier transform/iterative procedure. The sensitivity of the microwave holography technique based on the number of far-field sampled points, level of distortions, polarizations, illumination tapers, etc., is also examined.

  15. Optical absorption of thin film on a Lambertian reflector substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, P.

    1984-05-01

    A formula is derived for calculating the optical absorption of thin films deposited on a Lambertian reflector substrate. It is shown that compared with the case of flat reflecting substrate, the incoherent absorption is enhanced by a factor of m x epsilon (1) in the weak absorption limit, where epsilon (1) is the real part of the film dielectric constant and m near two is a slightly varying function of epsilon (1). For a 0.5-micron a-SiH(x) (bandgap 1.7 eV) solar cell with a Lambertian reflector substrate, the total absorption in terms of the short-circuit current is calculated to be 18.63 mA/sq cm.

  16. Gratings and Random Reflectors for Near-Infrared PIN Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath; Bandara, Sumith; Liu, John; Ting, David

    2007-01-01

    Crossed diffraction gratings and random reflectors have been proposed as means to increase the quantum efficiencies of InGaAs/InP positive/intrinsic/ negative (PIN) diodes designed to operate as near-infrared photodetectors. The proposal is meant especially to apply to focal-plane imaging arrays of such photodetectors to be used for near-infrared imaging. A further increase in quantum efficiency near the short-wavelength limit of the near-infrared spectrum of such a photodetector array could be effected by removing the InP substrate of the array. The use of crossed diffraction gratings and random reflectors as optical devices for increasing the quantum efficiencies of quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) was discussed in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. While the optical effects of crossed gratings and random reflectors as applied to PIN photodiodes would be similar to those of crossed gratings and random reflectors as applied to QWIPs, the physical mechanisms by which these optical effects would enhance efficiency differ between the PIN-photodiode and QWIP cases: In a QWIP, the multiple-quantum-well layers are typically oriented parallel to the focal plane and therefore perpendicular or nearly perpendicular to the direction of incidence of infrared light. By virtue of the applicable quantum selection rules, light polarized parallel to the focal plane (as normally incident light is) cannot excite charge carriers and, hence, cannot be detected. A pair of crossed gratings or a random reflector scatters normally or nearly normally incident light so that a significant portion of it attains a component of polarization normal to the focal plane and, hence, can excite charge carriers. A pair of crossed gratings or a random reflector on a PIN photodiode would also scatter light into directions away from the perpendicular to the focal plane. However, in this case, the reason for redirecting light away from the perpendicular is to increase the length of the

  17. Optical design of retro-reflectors by coordinate transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Li, F.

    2010-02-01

    Transformation optics based on the form-invariant coordinate transformation of Maxwell’s equations offers an unconventional approach for designing devices with unprecedented electromagnetic (EM) behaviors. In this paper, we expand the coordinate transformation method to design omni-directional (OD) retro-reflectors by extending the conventional Luneberg lens reflectors to work in a much wider angular width. The constitutive medium tensors of the transformation devices are derived. Based on full wave simulations combined with Huygen’s principle, the flat and efficient backscattering responses of the resultant devices have been evaluated quantitatively. We confirm that the proposed structures are highly visible to incident EM waves from all directions, and they can be used as good OD radar cross section (RCS) enhancers in radar applications, such as the reference target for RCS measurements, range finding and position identification.

  18. Evaluation of frequency-selective reflector antenna systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, T. K.; Lee, S. W.; Zimmerman, M. L.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of a four-frequency (S/X/Ku/Ku bands) frequency-selective surface (FSS) with double-ring elements (the type of geometry particularly well suited for the circular polarization requirement of the NASA's Cassini project) is evaluated for a planar and a curved FSS subreflector in a dual reflector antenna system. Good agreement is obtained between the calculated and measured data for the planar FSS model. The FSS effects in a four-frequency Cassegrain reflector antenna were accurately evaluated by taking into account the surface curvature and the FSS subreflector's transmitted/reflected field variation as functions of the polarization and the incident angles with respect to the local coordinates.

  19. Feasibility study of a synthesis procedure for array feeds to improve radiation performance of large distorted reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Takamizawa, K.; Werntz, P.; Lapean, J.; Barts, R.; Shen, B.; Dunn, D.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) performance analysis of the Gregorian tri-reflector; (2) design and performance of the type 6 reflector antenna; (3) a new spherical main reflector system design; (4) optimization of reflector configurations using physical optics; (5) radiometric array design; and (7) beam efficiency studies.

  20. Aquarius Reflector Surface Temperature Monitoring Test and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Jamie; Lee, Siu-Chun; Becker, Ray

    2008-01-01

    The presentation addresses how to infer the front side temperatures for the Aquarius L-band reflector based upon backside measurement sites. Slides discussing the mission objectives and design details are at the same level found on typical project outreach websites and in conference papers respectively. The test discussion provides modest detail of an ordinary thermal balance test using mockup hardware. The photographs show an off-Lab vacuum chamber facility with no compromising details.

  1. Cube-corner reflectors with interference dielectric coating

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, A L; Murashkin, V V; Akent'ev, A S; Karaseva, E A

    2013-09-30

    The cube-corner reflectors (CCRs) with a special interference dielectric coating intended for ring retroreflector systems of space vehicles with uniaxial orientation are considered. The diffraction patterns of radiation reflected from the CCRs with different face coatings are studied. It is shown that the choice of the angle between the faces, the size and the coating of CCR faces allow essential variation in the diffraction pattern, thereby providing its optimisation for solving different navigation problems. (nanogradient dielectric coatings and metamaterials)

  2. Conductive Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Distributed Bragg Reflectors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-Bo; Hu, Yun; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Zhao-Kui; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2015-11-01

    A conductive hybrid distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) is demonstrated, consisting of inorganic and organic semiconductor films and assembled by a thermal deposition technique. A maximum reflectance of 92.2% and a wide spectral width of more than 70 nm are achieved. The hybrid DBR shows good electrical conductivity, which provides the possibility of practical applications in novel optoelectronic devices, such as electrically pumped organic vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. PMID:26422597

  3. Surface Accuracy Measurement Sensor for Deployable Reflector Antennas (SAMS DRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neiswander, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Specifications, system configurations, and concept tests for surface measurement sensors for deployable reflector antennas are presented. Two approaches toward the optical measurement of remote target displacements are discussed: optical ranging, in which the basic measurement is target-to-sensor range; and in particular, optical angular sensing, in which the principle measurements are of target angular displacements lateral to the line of sight. Four representative space antennas are examined.

  4. Spatial suppression of interference in hybrid reflector antennas*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartsan, N.; Zelenkov, P. V.; Tyapkin, V. N.; Dmitriev, D. D.; Goncharov, E.

    2016-04-01

    The article describes a 7-beam hybrid reflector antenna with a 19-element feed element which forms a radiation pattern in the form of a cluster. During the research the synthesis of the amplitude-phase distribution of the antenna feed element has been conducted. A radiation pattern for three situations of interference: along the first side lobe, along the ramp of the main lobe, along the main lobe.

  5. FEATURE-BASED MULTIBLOCK FINITE ELEMENT MESH GENERATION

    PubMed Central

    Shivanna, Kiran H.; Tadepalli, Srinivas C.; Grosland, Nicole M.

    2010-01-01

    Hexahedral finite element mesh development for anatomic structures and biomedical implants can be cumbersome. Moreover, using traditional meshing techniques, detailed features may be inadequately captured. In this paper, we describe methodologies to handle multi-feature datasets (i.e., feature edges and surfaces). Coupling multi-feature information with multiblock meshing techniques has enabled anatomic structures, as well as orthopaedic implants, to be readily meshed. Moreover, the projection process, node and element set creation are automated, thus reducing the user interaction during model development. To improve the mesh quality, Laplacian- and optimization-based mesh improvement algorithms have been adapted to the multi-feature datasets. PMID:21076650

  6. Multiple reflectors based autocollimator for three-dimensional angle measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ang; Liu, Haibo; Yu, Qifeng

    2015-03-01

    This paper designs a multiple reflectors based autocollimator, and proposes a direct linear solution for three-dimensional (3D) angle measurement with the observation vectors of the reflected lights from the reflectors. In the measuring apparatus, the multiple reflectors is fixed with the object to be measured and the reflected lights are received by a CCD camera, then the light spots in the image are extracted to obtain the vectors of the reflected lights in space. Any rotation of the object will induce a change in the observation vectors of the reflected lights, which is used to solve the rotation matrix of the object by finding a linear solution of Wahba problem with the quaternion method, and then the 3D angle is obtained by decomposing the rotation matrix. This measuring apparatus can be implemented easily as the light path is simple, and the computation of 3D angle with observation vectors is efficient as there is no need to iterate. The proposed 3D angle measurement method is verified by a set of simulation experiments.

  7. Silicon solar cell using optimized intermediate reflector layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Ahmed E.; Swillam, Mohamed A.

    2016-03-01

    Thin film silicon based photovoltaic cells have the advantages of using low cost nontoxic abundant constituents and low thermal manufacturing budget. However, better long-term efficiencies need to be achieved overcoming its inherent bad electrical properties of amorphous and/or microcrystalline Silicon. For the goal of achieving best results, multijunction cells of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon thin layers are industrially and lab utilized in addition to using one or more light management techniques such as textured layers, periodic and plasmonic back reflectors, flattened reflective substrates and intermediate reflector layer (IRL) between multijunction cells. The latter, IRL, which is the focus of this paper, serves as spectrally selective layer between different cells of the multijunction silicon thin film solar cell. IRL, reflects to the top cell short wavelength while permitting and scattering longer ones to achieve the best possible short circuit current. In this study, a new optimized periodic design of Intermediate reflector layer in micromorph (two multijunction cells of Microcrystalline and Amorphous Silicon) thin film solar cells is proposed. The optically simulated short circuit current reaches record values for same thickness designs when using all-ZnO design and even better results is anticipated if Lacquer material is used in combination with ZnO. The design methodology used in the paper can be easily applied to different types of IRL materials and also extended to triple and the relatively newly proposed quadruple thin films solar cells.

  8. Shape control of slack space reflectors using modulated solar pressure

    PubMed Central

    Borggräfe, Andreas; Heiligers, Jeannette; Ceriotti, Matteo; McInnes, Colin R.

    2015-01-01

    The static deflection profile of a large spin-stabilized space reflector because of solar radiation pressure acting on its surface is investigated. Such a spacecraft consists of a thin reflective circular film, which is deployed from a supporting hoop structure in an untensioned, slack manner. This paper investigates the use of a variable reflectivity distribution across the surface to control the solar pressure force and hence the deflected shape. In this first analysis, the film material is modelled as one-dimensional slack radial strings with no resistance to bending or transverse shear, which enables a semi-analytic derivation of the nominal deflection profile. An inverse method is then used to find the reflectivity distribution that generates a specific, for example, parabolic deflection shape of the strings. Applying these results to a parabolic reflector, short focal distances can be obtained when large slack lengths of the film are employed. The development of such optically controlled reflector films enables future key mission applications such as solar power collection, radio-frequency antennae and optical telescopes. PMID:26345083

  9. Modulating Retro-Reflectors: Technology, Link Budgets and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, Alberto Guillen; Stupl, Jan; Mason, James

    2012-01-01

    Satellite communications systems today -- usually radio frequency (RF) -- tend to have low data rates and use a lot of on-board power. For CubeSats, communications often dominate the power budget. We investigate the use of modulating retro-reflectors (MRRs), previously demonstrated on the ground, for high data-rate communication downlinks from small satellites. A laser ground station would illuminate a retro-reflector on-board the satellite while an element in the retro-reflector modulates the intensity of the reflected signal, thereby encoding a data stream on the returning beam. A detector on the ground receives the data, keeping the complex systems and the vast majority of power consumption on the ground. Reducing the power consumption while increasing data rates would relax constraints on power budgets for small satellites, leaving more power available for payloads. In the future, this could enable the use of constellations of nano-satellites for a variety of missions, possibly leading to a paradigm shift in small satellite applications.

  10. Ultra efficient silicon nitride grating coupler with bottom grating reflector.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jinghui; Yu, Yu; Ye, Mengyuan; Liu, Lei; Deng, Shupeng; Zhang, Xinliang

    2015-10-01

    We theoretically propose a silicon nitride (Si(3)N(4)) grating coupler (GC) with both ultrahigh efficiency and simplified fabrication processes. Instead of using a bottom distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) or metal reflector, a bottom Si grating reflector (GR) with comparable reflectivity is utilized to improve the coupling efficiency. The fully etched Si GR is designed based on an industrially standard silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer with 220 nm top Si layer. By properly adjusting the trench width and period length of the Si GR, a high reflectivity over 90% is obtained. The Si(3)N(4) GC is optimized based on a common 400 nm Si(3)N(4) layer sitting on the Si GR with a SiO(2) separation layer. With an appropriate distance between the Si(3)N(4) GC and bottom Si GR, a low coupling loss of -1.47 dB is theoretically obtained using uniform GC structure. A further record ultralow loss of -0.88 dB is predicted by apodizing the Si(3)N(4) GC. The specific fabrication processes and tolerance are also investigated. Compared with DBR, the bottom Si GR can be easily fabricated by single step of patterning and etching, simplifying the fabrication processes. PMID:26480144

  11. Beam scanning offset Cassegrain reflector antennas by subreflector movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapean, James W., Jr.; Stutzman, Warren L.

    1994-01-01

    In 1987 a NASA panel recommended the creation of the Mission to Planet Earth. This mission was intended to apply to remote sensing experience of the space community to earth remote sensing to enhance the understanding of the climatological processes of our planet and to determine if, and to what extent, the hydrological cycle of Earth is being affected by human activity. One of the systems required for the mission was a wide scanning, high gain reflector antenna system for use in radiometric remote sensing from geostationary orbit. This work describes research conducted at Virginia Tech into techniques for beam scanning offset Cassegrain reflector antennas by subreflector translation and rotation. Background material relevant to beam scanning antenna systems and offset Cassegrain reflector antenna system is presented. A test case is developed based on the background material. The test case is beam scanned using two geometrical optics methods of determining the optimum subreflector position for the desired scanned beam direction. Physical optics far-field results are given for the beam scanned systems. The test case system is found to be capable of beam scanning over a range of 35 half-power beamwidths while maintaining a 90 percent beam efficiency or 50 half-power beamwidths while maintaining less than l dB of gain loss during scanning.

  12. Vacuum-deposited polymer/silver reflector material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affinito, John D.; Martin, Peter M.; Gross, Mark E.; Bennett, Wendy D.

    1994-09-01

    Weatherable, low cost, front surface, solar reflectors on flexible substrates would be highly desirable for lamination to solar concentrator panels. The method to be described in this paper may permit such reflector material to be fabricated for less the 50$CNT per square foot. Vacuum deposited Polymer/Silver/Polymer reflectors and Fabry-Perot interference filters were fabricated in a vacuum web coating operation on polyester substrates. Reflectivities were measured in the wavelength range from .4 micrometers to .8 micrometers . It is hoped that a low cost substrate can be used with the substrate laminated to the concentrator and the weatherable acrylic polymer coating facing the sun. This technique should be capable of deposition line speeds approaching 1500 linear feet/minute2. Central to this technique is a new vacuum deposition process for the high rate deposition of polymer films. This polymer process involves the flash evaporation of an acrylic monomer onto a moving substrate. The monomer is subsequently cured by an electron beam or ultraviolet light. This high speed polymer film deposition process has been named the PML process- for Polymer Multi- Layer.

  13. Non-polarizing broadband multilayer reflectors in fish

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, T.M.; Partridge, J.C.; Roberts, N.W.

    2012-01-01

    Dielectric multilayer reflectors that are non-polarizing are an important class of optical device and have numerous applications within optical fibres [1], dielectric waveguides [2] and LEDs [3]. Here we report analyses of a biological non-polarizing optical mechanism found in the broadband guanine-cytoplasm “silver” multilayer reflectors of three species of fish. Present in the fish stratum argenteum are two populations of birefringent guanine crystal, each with their optic axes either parallel to the long axis of the crystal or perpendicular to the plane of the crystal. This arrangement neutralizes the polarization of reflection due the different interfacial Brewster’s angles of each population. The fish reflective mechanism is distinct from existing non-polarizing mirror designs [4, 5, 6, 7] with the important feature that there is no refractive index contrast between the low index layers in the reflector and the external environment. It is a mechanism that could be readily manufactured and exploited in synthetic optical devices. PMID:23160173

  14. Highly Symmetric and Congruently Tiled Meshes for Shells and Domes

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Muhibur; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2016-01-01

    We describe the generation of all possible shell and dome shapes that can be uniquely meshed (tiled) using a single type of mesh face (tile), and following a single meshing (tiling) rule that governs the mesh (tile) arrangement with maximal vertex, edge and face symmetries. Such tiling arrangements or congruently tiled meshed shapes, are frequently found in chemical forms (fullerenes or Bucky balls, crystals, quasi-crystals, virus nano shells or capsids), and synthetic shapes (cages, sports domes, modern architectural facades). Congruently tiled meshes are both aesthetic and complete, as they support maximal mesh symmetries with minimal complexity and possess simple generation rules. Here, we generate congruent tilings and meshed shape layouts that satisfy these optimality conditions. Further, the congruent meshes are uniquely mappable to an almost regular 3D polyhedron (or its dual polyhedron) and which exhibits face-transitive (and edge-transitive) congruency with at most two types of vertices (each type transitive to the other). The family of all such congruently meshed polyhedra create a new class of meshed shapes, beyond the well-studied regular, semi-regular and quasi-regular classes, and their duals (platonic, Catalan and Johnson). While our new mesh class is infinite, we prove that there exists a unique mesh parametrization, where each member of the class can be represented by two integer lattice variables, and moreover efficiently constructable. PMID:27563368

  15. 50 CFR 300.110 - Mesh size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... indication of the width may appear at regular intervals other than 1 mm. (2) Use of the gauge. (i) The net... direction perpendicular to the plane of the net. (iii) The gauge may be inserted into the mesh opening either with a manual force or using a weight or dynamometer, until it is stopped at the tapering edges...

  16. 50 CFR 300.110 - Mesh size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... indication of the width may appear at regular intervals other than 1 mm. (2) Use of the gauge. (i) The net... direction perpendicular to the plane of the net. (iii) The gauge may be inserted into the mesh opening either with a manual force or using a weight or dynamometer, until it is stopped at the tapering edges...

  17. Functionalized Nanofiber Meshes Enhance Immunosorbent Assays.

    PubMed

    Hersey, Joseph S; Meller, Amit; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional substrates with high surface-to-volume ratios and subsequently large protein binding capacities are of interest for advanced immunosorbent assays utilizing integrated microfluidics and nanosensing elements. A library of bioactive and antifouling electrospun nanofiber substrates, which are composed of high-molecular-weight poly(oxanorbornene) derivatives, is described. Specifically, a set of copolymers are synthesized from three 7-oxanorbornene monomers to create a set of water insoluble copolymers with both biotin (bioactive) and triethylene glycol (TEG) (antifouling) functionality. Porous three-dimensional nanofiber meshes are electrospun from these copolymers with the ability to specifically bind streptavidin while minimizing the nonspecific binding of other proteins. Fluorescently labeled streptavidin is used to quantify the streptavidin binding capacity of each mesh type through confocal microscopy. A simplified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is presented to assess the protein binding capabilities and detection limits of these nanofiber meshes under both static conditions (26 h) and flow conditions (1 h) for a model target protein (i.e., mouse IgG) using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) colorimetric assay. Bioactive and antifouling nanofiber meshes outperform traditional streptavidin-coated polystyrene plates under flow, validating their use in future advanced immunosorbent assays and their compatibility with microfluidic-based biosensors. PMID:26551162

  18. Gravitational Collapse With Distributed Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebling, Steven; Lehner, Luis; Motl, Patrick; Neilsen, David; Rahman, Tanvir; Reula, Oscar

    2006-04-01

    Gravitational collapse is studied using distributed adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The AMR infrastructure includes a novel treatment of adaptive boundaries which allows for high orders of accuracy. Results of the collapse of Brill waves to black holes are presented. Combining both vertex centered and cell centered fields in the same evolution is discussed.

  19. The Factory Approach to Creating TSTT Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, T

    2003-10-21

    The factory approach (a.k.a. virtual constructor) hides the details of the class implementing the TSTT from TSTT users. In version 0.5 of TSTT.sidl, the client hard codes the name of the implementing class into their code. The client is forced to choose from the small set of possible concrete classes defined in TSTT.sidl. This approach makes it impossible to support multiple implementations of the TSTT in a single process because each implementation has to implement the same class. The factory approach hides the details of mesh creation from the client. The client does not need to know the name of the implementing class, and the client can dynamically determine which interfaces are supported by the new mesh. A factory can support multiple TSTT implementation because each implementation defines its own concrete classes to implement. The factory approach does require the TSTT compliant mesh packages to implement a MeshFactory interface, and everyone needs to link against an implementation of the Registry. The Registry only has 7 methods that are fairly easy to implement, and everyone can share one implementation of the Registry.

  20. Details of tetrahedral anisotropic mesh adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kristian Ejlebjerg; Gorman, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    We have implemented tetrahedral anisotropic mesh adaptation using the local operations of coarsening, swapping, refinement and smoothing in MATLAB without the use of any for- N loops, i.e. the script is fully vectorised. In the process of doing so, we have made three observations related to details of the implementation: 1. restricting refinement to a single edge split per element not only simplifies the code, it also improves mesh quality, 2. face to edge swapping is unnecessary, and 3. optimising for the Vassilevski functional tends to give a little higher value for the mean condition number functional than optimising for the condition number functional directly. These observations have been made for a uniform and a radial shock metric field, both starting from a structured mesh in a cube. Finally, we compare two coarsening techniques and demonstrate the importance of applying smoothing in the mesh adaptation loop. The results pertain to a unit cube geometry, but we also show the effect of corners and edges by applying the implementation in a spherical geometry.