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Sample records for 6-meter mesh reflector

  1. Shape adjustment of cable mesh reflector antennas considering modeling uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jingli; Bao, Hong; Cui, Chuanzhen

    2014-04-01

    Cable mesh antennas are the most important implement to construct large space antennas nowadays. Reflector surface of cable mesh antennas has to be carefully adjusted to achieve required accuracy, which is an effective way to compensate manufacturing and assembly errors or other imperfections. In this paper shape adjustment of cable mesh antennas is addressed. The required displacement of the reflector surface is determined with respect to a modified paraboloid whose axial vertex offset is also considered as a variable. Then the adjustment problem is solved by minimizing the RMS error with respect to the desired paraboloid using minimal norm least squares method. To deal with the modeling uncertainties, the adjustment is achieved by solving a simple worst-case optimization problem instead of directly using the least squares method. A numerical example demonstrates the worst-case method is of good convergence and accuracy, and is robust to perturbations.

  2. Coupled Elastic-Thermal Dynamics of Deployable Mesh Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, H.; Yang, B.; Thomson, M.; Fang, H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a coupled elastic-thermal dynamic model and a quasi-static strategy on the analysis of the reflector dynamics in the space mission. The linearized model, its natural frequencies and mode shapes are then derived upon the nonlinear static equilibrium of the structure. The numerical example is provided to fully adapt the strategy and investigate the dynamic behaviors of the structure. Finally the proposed method is applied on the sample of the deployable mesh reflector and the simulation results are presented. The research work delivered in the paper will be used to design the feedback surface in future.

  3. A Nonlinear Dynamic Model and Free Vibration Analysis of Deployable Mesh Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, H.; Yang, B.; Thomson, M.; Fang, H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic model of deployable mesh reflectors, in which geometric and material nonlinearities of such a space structure are fully described. Then, by linearization around an equilibrium configuration of the reflector structure, a linearized model is obtained. With this linearized model, the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a reflector can be computed. The nonlinear dynamic model of deployable mesh reflectors is verified by using commercial finite element software in numerical simulation. As shall be seen, the proposed nonlinear model is useful for shape (surface) control of deployable mesh reflectors under thermal loads.

  4. Exact mesh shape design of large cable-network antenna reflectors with flexible ring truss supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wang; Li, Dong-Xu; Yu, Xin-Zhan; Jiang, Jian-Ping

    2014-04-01

    An exact-designed mesh shape with favorable surface accuracy is of practical significance to the performance of large cable-network antenna reflectors. In this study, a novel design approach that could guide the generation of exact spatial parabolic mesh configurations of such reflector was proposed. By incorporating the traditional force density method with the standard finite element method, this proposed approach had taken the deformation effects of flexible ring truss supports into consideration, and searched for the desired mesh shapes that can satisfy the requirement that all the free nodes are exactly located on the objective paraboloid. Compared with the conventional design method, a remarkable improvement of surface accuracy in the obtained mesh shapes had been demonstrated by numerical examples. The present work would provide a helpful technical reference for the mesh shape design of such cable-network antenna reflector in engineering practice. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Development of improved analytical models for mesh reflector surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, J. C.; Kauffman, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    Several methods for computing the reflection coefficients from mesh surfaces are discussed. Some methods mentioned have severe limitations, and the spectral approach appears to be the most attractive alternative. In spite of some inherent problems, the solutions obtained with this method will offer not only the reflection coefficients but also the currents carried on the mesh. This would allow separation of the power lost to resistive terms from that due to transmission loss. Overall, good results and rapid convergence should be obtained from this method when proper care is applied.

  6. Lightweight 3.66-meter-diameter conical mesh antenna reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D. M.

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of a 3.66 m diameter nonfurlable conical mesh antenna incorporating the line source feed principle recently developed. The weight of the mesh reflector and its support structure is 162 N. An area weighted RMS surface deviation of 0.28 mm was obtained. The RF performance measurements show a gain of 48.3 db at 8.448 GHz corresponding to an efficiency of 66%. During the design and development of this antenna, the technology for fabricating the large conical membranes of knitted mesh was developed. As part of this technology a FORTRAN computer program, COMESH, was developed which permits the user to predict the surface accuracy of a stretched conical membrane.

  7. Temperature Knowledge and Model Correlation for the Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Reflector Mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikhaylov, Rebecca; Dawson, Douglas; Kwack, Eug

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Earth observing Soil Moisture Active & Passive (SMAP) Mission is scheduled to launch in November 2014 into a 685 km near-polar, sun synchronous orbit. SMAP will provide comprehensive global mapping measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state in order to enhance understanding of the processes that link the water, energy, and carbon cycles. The primary objectives of SMAP are to improve worldwide weather and flood forecasting, enhance climate prediction, and refine drought and agriculture monitoring during its 3 year mission. The SMAP instrument architecture incorporates an L-band radar and an L-band radiometer which share a common feed horn and parabolic mesh reflector. The instrument rotates about the nadir axis at approximately 15 rpm, thereby providing a conically scanning wide swath antenna beam that is capable of achieving global coverage within 3 days. In order to make the necessary precise surface emission measurements from space, a temperature knowledge of 60 deg C for the mesh reflector is required. In order to show compliance, a thermal vacuum test was conducted using a portable solar simulator to illuminate a non flight, but flight-like test article through the quartz window of the vacuum chamber. The molybdenum wire of the antenna mesh is too fine to accommodate thermal sensors for direct temperature measurements. Instead, the mesh temperature was inferred from resistance measurements made during the test. The test article was rotated to five separate angles between 10 deg and 90 deg via chamber breaks to simulate the maximum expected on-orbit solar loading during the mission. The resistance measurements were converted to temperature via a resistance versus temperature calibration plot that was constructed from data collected in a separate calibration test. A simple thermal model of two different representations of the mesh (plate and torus) was created to correlate the mesh temperature predictions to within 60 deg C. The on-orbit mesh

  8. Feedback shape control for deployable mesh reflectors using gain scheduling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangmin; Shi, Hang; Alleyne, Andrew; Yang, Bingen

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study on the dynamic shape control problem of deployable mesh reflectors (DMRs) via feedback approaches. The reflector structure is simplified from a nonlinear model to be quasi-static with respect to temperature variations but dynamic with respect to mechanical vibrations. The orbital cycle is segmented into multiple temperature zones, and an H∞ robust state feedback controller is designed for each zone to guarantee the local stability of the system under the model uncertainty caused by thermal effects and to reject external force disturbances. At the same time, gain scheduling control method is adopted to compensate thermal distortions and to ensure smooth transition response when switching among the local robust controllers. A DMR model is considered in the case study to show the effectiveness of the control approach. The structural vibrations caused by external force disturbances can be sufficiently suppressed in a much shorter time. The closed loop response of the DMR structure shows that much higher surface accuracy is obtained during the orbiting mission compared to the open-loop configuration, and transient focal length and transient de-focus of the reflector are well controlled within the satisfactory bounds, demonstrating the numerical feasibility of the proposed method to solve the dynamic shape control problem of DMRs.

  9. The integration of a mesh reflector to a 15-foot box truss structure. Task 3: Box truss analysis and technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachtell, E. E.; Thiemet, W. F.; Morosow, G.

    1987-01-01

    To demonstrate the design and integration of a reflective mesh surface to a deployable truss structure, a mesh reflector was installed on a 15 foot box truss cube. The specific features demonstrated include: (1) sewing seams in reflective mesh; (2) mesh stretching to desired preload; (3) installation of surface tie cords; (4) installation of reflective surface on truss; (5) setting of reflective surface; (6) verification of surface shape/accuracy; (7) storage and deployment; (8) repeatability of reflector surface; and (9) comparison of surface with predicted shape using analytical methods developed under a previous task.

  10. Effective conductivity of wire mesh reflectors for space deployable antenna systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, William A.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes efforts to characterize the measurement of conductive mesh and smooth surfaces using proximity measurements for a dielectric resonator. The resonator operates in the HEM11 mode and is shown to have an evanescent field behavior in the vicinity of the sample surface, raising some question to the validity of measurements requiring near normal incidence on the material. In addition, the slow radial field decay outside of the dielectric resonator validates the sensitivity to the planar supporting structure and potential radiation effects. Though these concerns become apparent along with the sensitivity to the gap between the dielectric and the material surface, the basic concept of the material measurement using dielectric resonators has been verified for useful comparison of material surface properties. The properties, particularly loss, may be obtained by monitoring the resonant frequency along with the resonator quality factor (Q), 3 dB bandwidth, or the midband transmission amplitude. Comparison must be made to known materials to extract the desired data.

  11. Design concepts for large reflector antenna structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Adams, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    Practical approaches for establishing large, precise antenna reflectors in space are described. Reflector surfaces consisting of either solid panels or knitted mesh are considered. The approach using a deep articulated truss structure to support a mesh reflector is selected for detailed investigations. A new sequential deployment concept for the tetrahedral truss is explained. Good joint design is discussed, and examples are described both analytically and by means of demonstration models. The influence of curvature on the design and its vibration characteristics are investigated.

  12. Solar reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, D. C.

    1981-02-17

    A solar reflector having a flexible triangular reflective sheet or membrane for receiving and reflecting solar energy therefrom. The reflector is characterized by the triangular reflective sheet which is placed under tension thereby defining a smooth planar surface eliminating surface deflection which heretofore has reduced the efficiency of reflectors or heliostats used in combination for receiving and transmitting solar energy to an absorber tower.

  13. Membrane Shell Reflector Segment Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Im, Eastwood; Lin, John; Moore, James

    2012-01-01

    The mesh reflector is the only type of large, in-space deployable antenna that has successfully flown in space. However, state-of-the-art large deployable mesh antenna systems are RF-frequency-limited by both global shape accuracy and local surface quality. The limitations of mesh reflectors stem from two factors. First, at higher frequencies, the porosity and surface roughness of the mesh results in loss and scattering of the signal. Second, the mesh material does not have any bending stiffness and thus cannot be formed into true parabolic (or other desired) shapes. To advance the deployable reflector technology at high RF frequencies from the current state-of-the-art, significant improvements need to be made in three major aspects: a high-stability and highprecision deployable truss; a continuously curved RF reflecting surface (the function of the surface as well as its first derivative are both continuous); and the RF reflecting surface should be made of a continuous material. To meet these three requirements, the Membrane Shell Reflector Segment (MSRS) antenna was developed.

  14. Design concepts for large antenna reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    A type of antenna reflector was studied in which a stiff structure is constructed to hold a membrane like reflector mesh in the correct position. An important basic restriction is that the mesh be controlled only by the structure and that no additional local shaping be employed. Furthermore, attention is confined to structures in which no adjustments would be made on assembly. Primary attention is given to the tetrahedral truss configuration because of its outstanding stiffness and dimensional stability.

  15. Actuator Grouping Optimization on Flexible Space Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Jeffrey R.; Wang, K. W.; Fang, Houfei; Quijano, Ubaldo

    2011-01-01

    With the rapid advances in deployable membrane and mesh antenna technologies, the feasibility of developing large, lightweight reflectors has greatly improved. In order to achieve the required surface accuracy, precision surface control is needed on these lightweight reflectors. For this study, an analytical model is shown which combines a flexible Kapton reflector with Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) actuators for surface control. Surface errors are introduced that are similar to real world scenarios, and a least squares control algorithm is developed for surface control. Experimental results on a 2.4 meter reflector show that while the analytical reflector model is generally correct, due to idiosyncrasies in the reflector it cannot be used for online control. A new method called the En Mass Elimination algorithm is used to determine the optimal grouping of actuators when the number of actuators in the system exceeds the number of power supplies available.

  16. Bifocal dual reflector antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. L. J.

    1973-01-01

    A bifocal dual reflector antenna is similar to and has better scan capability than classical cassegrain reflector antenna. The method used in determining the reflector surfaces is a modification of a design method for the dielectric bifocal lens. The three dimensional dual reflector is obtained by first designing an exact (in geometrical optics sense) two-point corrected two dimensional reflector and then rotating it around its axis of symmetry. A point by point technique is used in computing the reflector surfaces. Computed radiation characteristics of the dual reflector are compared with those of a cassegrain reflector. The results confirm that the bifocal antenna has superior performance.

  17. Performance of a 16.6 Meter Diameter Modified Ringsail Parachute in a Simulated Martian Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, Charles H.; Henning, Allen B.; Coltrane, Lucille C.

    1968-01-01

    Inflation, drag, and stability characteristics of a 54.5 -foot nominal-diameter (16.6-meter) modified ringsail parachute deployed in the wake of a 15-foot-diameter (4.6-meter) spacecraft traveling at a Mach number of 1.6 and a dynamic pressure equal to 11.6 psf (555 N/m(exp 2)) were obtained from the third balloon-launched flight test of the Planetary Entry Parachute Program. After deployment, the parachute inflated rapidly to a full condition, partially collapsed, and reinflated to a stable configuration. After reinflation, an average drag coefficient near 0.6 based on nominal surface area was obtained. During descent, an aerodynamic trim angle was observed in a plane near several torn sails. Amplitude of the trim was approximately 15 degrees and oscillation about trim was less than 11 degrees.

  18. Performance of a 16.6 Meter Diameter Modified Ringsail Parachute in a Simulated Martian Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Performance of a 16.6 Meter Diameter Modified Ringsail Parachute in a Simulated Martian Environment. Inflation, drag, and stability characteristics of a 54.5 -foot nominal-diameter (16.6-meter) modified ringsail parachute deployed in the wake of a 15-foot-diameter (4.6-meter) spacecraft traveling at a Mach number of 1.6 and a dynamic pressure equal to 11.6 psf (555 N/m(exp 2)) were obtained from the third balloon-launched flight test of the Planetary Entry Parachute Program. After deployment, the parachute inflated rapidly to a full condition, partially collapsed, and reinflated to a stable configuration. After reinflation, an average drag coefficient near 0.6 based on nominal surface area was obtained. During descent, an aerodynamic trim angle was observed in a plane near several torn sails. Amplitude of the trim was approximately 15 degrees and oscillation about trim was less than 11 degrees. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030996. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  19. Performance of a 16.6 Meter Diameter Cross Parachute in a Simulated Martian Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Performance of a 16.6 Meter Diameter Cross Parachute in a Simulated Martian Environment. Inflation and drag characteristics of a 54.4-foot (16.6 meter) nominal-diameter cross parachute, deployed at a Mach number of 1.65 and a dynamic pressure of 12.68 lb/sq f t (607.1 N/m(exp2)), were obtained from the fourth balloon-launched flight test of the Planetary Entry Parachute Program (PEPP). After deployment, the parachute quickly inflated to a full condition, partially collapsed, and then gradually reinflated while undergoing rapid oscillations between over-inflation and under-inflation. The oscillations began while the parachute was still at supersonic speeds and continued to low subsonic speeds well below an altitude of 90,000 feet (27.4 km). These canopy instabilities produced large cyclic variations in the parachute's drag coefficient. The average value of drag coefficient was about 0.8 to 0.9 at subsonic speeds and slightly lower at supersonic speeds. These drag coefficient values were based on the actual fabric surface area of the parachute canopy. The parachute sustained minor damage consisting of two canopy tears and abrasions and tears on the riser line. It is believed that this damage did not produce a significant change in the performance of the parachute. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030995. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  20. Advanced deployable reflectors for communications satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Elvin; Josephs, Michael; Hedgepeth, John

    1993-02-01

    This paper discusses a concept for a deployable mesh reflector for large spacecraft antennas and the processes used in design, fabrication and testing. A set of overall reflector requirements such as stowed volume, deployed diameter and RF loss derived from system specifications are presented. The development of design and analysis tools to allow parametric studies such as facet size, number of ribs and number of rib segments is discussed. CATIA (a commercially available three-dimensional design and analysis tool) is used to perform kinematic analyses as well as to establish the database to be used by the several groups participating in the development is examined. Results of trade studies performed to reduce cost with minimum risk to product delivery are included. A thirty foot reflector has been built and tested.

  1. On the design of large space deployable modular antenna reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribble, J. W.; Woods, A. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The deployment kinematics, stowing philosophy, and deployment sequencing for large deployable antenna modules were verified. Mesh attachment methods compatible with full scale modules were devised. Parametric studies of large modular reflectors established size, mass, and aperture frequency capabilities for these assemblies. Preliminary studies were made devising means of delivering modules to orbit, and once there, of assembling the modules into complete modular antenna reflectors. The basic feasibility of creating mass efficient modules erectable into large structures in space was established.

  2. Performance of a 16.6 Meter Diameter Cross Parachute in a Simulated Martian Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundstrom, Reginald R.; Darnell, Wayne L.; Coltrane, Lucille C.

    1968-01-01

    Inflation and drag characteristics of a 54.4-foot (16.6 meter) nominal-diameter cross parachute, deployed at a Mach number of 1.65 and a dynamic pressure of 12.68 lb/sq f t (607.1 N/m(exp2)), were obtained from the fourth balloon-launched flight test of the Planetary Entry Parachute Program (PEPP). After deployment, the parachute quickly inflated to a full condition, partially collapsed, and then gradually reinflated while undergoing rapid oscillations between over-inflation and under-inflation. The oscillations began while the parachute was still at supersonic speeds and continued to low subsonic speeds well below an altitude of 90,000 feet (27.4 km). These canopy instabilities produced large cyclic variations in the parachute's drag coefficient. The average value of drag coefficient was about 0.8 to 0.9 at subsonic speeds and slightly lower at supersonic speeds. These drag coefficient values were based on the actual fabric surface area of the parachute canopy. The parachute sustained minor damage consisting of two canopy tears and abrasions and tears on the riser line. It is believed that this damage did not produce a significant change in the performance of the parachute.

  3. Multiple Reflector Scanning Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bing

    Narrow beamwidth antenna systems are important to remote sensing applications and point-to-point communication systems. In many applications the main beam of the antenna radiation pattern must be scannable over a region of space. Scanning by mechanically skewing the entire antenna assembly is difficult and in many situations is unacceptable. Performance during scan is, of course, also very important. Traditional reflector systems employing the well-focused paraboloidal -shaped main reflector accomplish scan by motion of a few feeds, or by phase steering a focal plane feed array. Such scanning systems can experience significant gain loss. Traditional reflecting systems with a spherical main reflector have low aperture efficiency and poor side lobe and cross polarization performance. This dissertation introduces a new approach to the design of scanning spherical reflector systems, in which the performance weaknesses of high cross polarization and high side lobe levels are avoided. Moreover, the low aperture utilization common in spherical reflectors is overcome. As an improvement to this new spherical main reflector configuration, a flat mirror reflector is introduced to minimize the mechanical difficulties to scan the main beam. In addition to the reflector system design, reflector antenna performance evaluation is also important. The temperature resolution issue important for earth observation radiometer antennas is studied, and a new method to evaluate and optimize such temperature resolution is introduced.

  4. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, Ronald J.; Land, John T.; Misvel, Michael C.

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

  5. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.; Misvel, M.C.

    1994-06-07

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled. 12 figs.

  6. Precision antenna reflector structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The assembly of the Large Precise Reflector Infrared Telescope is detailed. Also given are the specifications for the Aft Cargo Carrier and the Large Precision Reflector structure. Packaging concepts and options, stowage depth and support truss geometry are also considered. An example of a construction scenario is given.

  7. Spacecraft reflectors thermomechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, Viktor S.; Gerasimov, Alexander V.; Ponomarev, Sergey V.; Shendalev, Denis O.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, thermo-mechanical analysis results of the composite reflectors for the use on the geostationary Earth orbit possibility studies are described. The behavior of two different space reflector structures manufactured on composite materials is investigated. The estimates of reflecting surfaces RMS deviations for the two extreme cases orbital inclinations are presented.

  8. REFLECTOR FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.

    1963-08-01

    A reflector for nuclear reactors that comprises an assembly of closely packed graphite rods disposed with their major axes substantially perpendicular to the interface between the reactor core and the reflector is described. Each graphite rod is round in transverse cross section at (at least) its interface end and is provided, at that end, with a coaxial, inwardly tapering hole. (AEC)

  9. Beam-Steerable Flat-Panel Reflector Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choon Sae; Lee, Chanam; Miranda, Felix A.

    2005-01-01

    Many space applications require a high-gain antenna that can be easily deployable in space. Currently, the most common high-gain antenna for space-born applications is an umbrella-type reflector antenna that can be folded while being lifted to the Earth orbit. There have been a number of issues to be resolved for this type of antenna. The reflecting surface of a fine wire mesh has to be light in weight and flexible while opening up once in orbit. Also the mesh must be a good conductor at the operating frequency. In this paper, we propose a different type of high-gain antenna for easy space deployment. The proposed antenna is similar to reflector antennas except the curved main reflector is replaced by a flat reconfigurable surface for easy packing and deployment in space. Moreover it is possible to steer the beam without moving the entire antenna system.

  10. First Light Infrared Observations with the 1.6 Meter Solar Telescope in Big Bear: Origins of Space Weather Telescope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-16

    later transported toward the corona . 2)We investigated properties of magnetic fields in nearly 400 solar active regions. Time profiles of...1.6 Meter Solar Telescope in Big Bear: Origins of Space Weather Telescope. 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-09-1-0655 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...STATEMENT 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT In early 2009 at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), first light science observations were made

  11. A dielectric omnidirectional reflector

    PubMed

    Fink; Winn; Fan; Chen; Michel; Joannopoulos; Thomas

    1998-11-27

    A design criterion that permits truly omnidirectional reflectivity for all polarizations of incident light over a wide selectable range of frequencies was used in fabricating an all-dielectric omnidirectional reflector consisting of multilayer films. The reflector was simply constructed as a stack of nine alternating micrometer-thick layers of polystyrene and tellurium and demonstrates omnidirectional reflection over the wavelength range from 10 to 15 micrometers. Because the omnidirectionality criterion is general, it can be used to design omnidirectional reflectors in many frequency ranges of interest. Potential uses depend on the geometry of the system. For example, coating of an enclosure will result in an optical cavity. A hollow tube will produce a low-loss, broadband waveguide, whereas a planar film could be used as an efficient radiative heat barrier or collector in thermoelectric devices.

  12. Infrared Observations with the 1.6 Meter New Solar Telescope in Big Bear: Origins of Space Weather

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-21

    COVERED (From - To)      01-04-2012 to 31-03-2015 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE Infrared Observations with the 1.6 Meter New Solar Telescope in Big Bear : Origins...utilized the 1.6 m clear aperture solar telescope in Big Bear Lake, CA. This telescope is the largest aperture and most powerful solar telescope ever...solar telescope in Big Bear Lake, CA. This telescope is the largest aperture and most powerful solar telescope ever built, which enable the high

  13. Buckling tests of two 4.6-meter-diameter, magnesium ring-stiffened conical shells loaded under external pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. K.; DAVIS R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Two ring-stiffened magnesium conical shells with a 120 deg apex angle and a 4.6-meter diameter were loaded to failure by a uniform external pressure. The cones differed from one another only in the number of internal stiffening rings. Test specimen details, test procedure, and test results are discussed. Both buckling and prebuckling data are compared with appropriate theoretical predictions. Measured strains in skin and rings agreed well with theoretical predictions. Extensive imperfection measurements were made and reported on both cones in the as fabricated condition.

  14. Deployable Reflector for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Unfoldable-membrane-reflector concept leads to mobile photovoltaic generators. Hinged containers swing open for deployment, and counterbalance beam swings into position. Folded reflector membranes are unfolded as deployment mast is extended, until stretched out flat.

  15. The Corner Reflector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Whitney S., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the corner reflector array left on the moon by the July 1969 Apollo astronauts is described. The array was used to reflect earth-originating laser beams back to earth, and yielded a more accurate determination (to within six inches) of distance from the earth to the moon. (MP)

  16. Modular reflector concept study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of space erecting a 100 meter paraboloidal radio frequency reflector by joining a number of individually deployed structural modules. Three module design concepts were considered: (1) the deployable cell module (DCM); (2) the modular paraboloidal erectable truss antenna (Mod-PETA); and (3) the modular erectable truss antenna (META). With the space shuttle (STS) as the launch system, the methodology of packaging and stowing in the orbiter, and of dispensing, deploying and joining, in orbit, were studied and the necessary support equipment identified. The structural performance of the completed reflectors was evaluated and their overall operational capability and feasibility were evaluated and compared. The potential of the three concepts to maintain stable shape in the space environment was determined. Their ability to operate at radio frequencies of 1 GHz and higher was assessed assuming the reflector surface to consist of a number of flat, hexagonal facets. A parametric study was performed to determine figure degradation as a function of reflector size, flat facet size, and f/D ratio.

  17. Corrosion protection for silver reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Arendt, Paul N.; Scott, Marion L.

    1991-12-31

    A method of protecting silver reflectors from damage caused by contact with gaseous substances which are often present in the atmosphere and a silver reflector which is so protected. The inventive method comprises at least partially coating a reflector with a metal oxide such as aluminum oxide to a thickness of 15 .ANG. or less.

  18. Development of modular cable mesh deployable antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Akira; Mitsugi, Jin; Andou, Kazuhide

    1993-03-01

    This report describes a concept and key technologies for the modular mesh deployable antenna. The antenna reflector composed of independently manufactured and tested modules is presented. Each module consists of a mesh surface, a cable network, and a deployable truss structure. The cable network comprises three kinds of cables, surface, tie, and back cables. Adjustment of tie cable lengths improves the surface accuracy. Synchronous deployment truss structures are considered as a supporting structure. Their design method, BBM's (Bread Board Model) and deployment analysis are also explained.

  19. The Planck Telescope reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stute, Thomas

    2004-09-01

    The mechanical division of EADS-Astrium GmbH, Friedrichshafen is currently engaged with the development, manufacturing and testing of the advanced dimensionally stable composite reflectors for the ESA satellite borne telescope Planck. The objective of the ESA mission Planck is to analyse the first light that filled the universe, the cosmic microwave background radiation. Under contract of the Danish Space Research Institute and ESA EADS-Astrium GmbH is developing the all CFRP primary and secondary reflectors for the 1.5-metre telescope which is the main instrument of the Planck satellite. The operational frequency ranges from to 25 GHz to 1000 GHz. The demanding high contour accuracy and surface roughness requirements are met. The design provides the extreme dimensional stability required by the cryogenic operational environment at around 40 K. The elliptical off-axis reflectors display a classical lightweight sandwich design with CFRP core and facesheets. Isostatic mounts provide the interfaces to the telescope structure. Protected VDA provides the reflecting surface. The manufacturing is performed at the Friedrichshafen premises of EADS-Space Transportation GmbH, the former Dornier composite workshops. Advanced manufacturing technologies like true angle lay-up by CNC fibre placement and filament winding are utilized. The protected coating is applied at the CAHA facilities at the Calar Alto Observatory, Spain. The exhaustive environmental testing is performed at the facilities of IABG, Munich (mechanical testing) and for the cryo-optical tests at CSL Liege. The project is in advanced state with both Qualification Models being under environmental testing. The flight models will be delivered in 2004. The paper gives an overview over the requirements and the main structural features how these requirements are met. Special production aspects and available test results are reported.

  20. Micromachined, Electrostatically Deformable Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartman, Randall K.; Wang, Paul K. C.; Miller, Linda M.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Kaiser, William J.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Agronin, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    Micromachined, closed-loop, electrostatically actuated reflectors (microCLEARs) provide relatively simple and inexpensive alternatives to large, complex, expensive adaptive optics used to control wavefronts of beams of light in astronomy and in experimental laser weapons. Micromachining used to make deformable mirror, supporting structure, and actuation circuitry. Development of microCLEARs may not only overcome some of disadvantages and limitations of older adaptive optics but may also satisfy demands of potential market for small, inexpensive deformable mirrors in electronically controlled film cameras, video cameras, and other commercial optoelectronic instruments.

  1. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Roger

    2014-12-17

    The main project objective has been to develop an advanced gravity sag method for molding large glass solar reflectors with either line or point focus, and with long or short focal length. The method involves taking standard sized squares of glass, 1.65 m x 1.65 m, and shaping them by gravity sag into precision steel molds. The method is designed for high volume manufacture when incorporated into a production line with separate pre-heating and cooling. The performance objectives for the self-supporting glass mirrors made by this project include mirror optical accuracy of 2 mrad root mean square (RMS), requiring surface slope errors less than 1 mrad rms, a target not met by current production of solar reflectors. Our objective also included development of new methods for rapidly shaping glass mirrors and coating them for higher reflectivity and soil resistance. Reflectivity of 95% for a glass mirror with anti-soil coating was targeted, compared to the present ~94% with no anti-soil coating. Our mirror cost objective is ~$20/m2 in 2020, a significant reduction compared to the present ~$35/m2 for solar trough mirrors produced for trough solar plants.

  2. Making Curved Frequency-Selective Microwave Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Wu, Te-Kao

    1995-01-01

    Prototype curved lightweight dichroic microwave reflectors designed to be highly reflective in X and K(suba) frequency bands and highly transmissive in K(subu) and S bands. Conductive grid elements formed photolithographically on curved reflector surfaces. Intended for use as subreflectors of main paraboloidal antenna reflector to enable simultaneous operation in both prime-focus configuration in K(subu) and S bands and Cassegrain configuration in X and K(suba) bands. Basic concepts of reflectors described in "Frequency-Selective Microwave Reflectors" (NPO-18701). "Double Square-Loop Dichroic Microwave Reflector" (NPO-18676), "Triband Circular-Loop Dichroic Microwave Reflector" (NPO-18714), and "Improved Dichroic Microwave Reflector" (NPO-18664).

  3. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alff, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility and costs were determined for a 1 m to 30 m diameter ambient temperature, infrared to submillimeter orbiting astronomical telescope which is to be shuttle-deployed, free-flying, and have a 10 year orbital life. Baseline concepts, constraints on delivery and deployment, and the sunshield required are examined. Reflector concepts, the optical configuration, alignment and pointing, and materials are also discussed. Technology studies show that a 10 m to 30 m diameter system which is background and diffraction limited at 30 micron m is feasible within the stated time frame. A 10 m system is feasible with current mirror technology, while a 30 m system requires technology still in development.

  4. Reflector Surface Error Compensation in Dual-Reflector Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Imbriale, William

    2010-01-01

    By probing the field on a small subreflector at a minimal number of points, the main reflector surface errors can be obtained and subsequently used to design a phase-correction subreflector that can compensate for main reflector errors. The compensating phase-error profile across the subreflector can be achieved either by a surface deformation or by the use of an array of elements such as patch antennas that can cause a phase shift between the incoming and outgoing fields. The second option is of primary interest here, but the methodology can be applied to either case. The patch array is most easily implemented on a planar surface. Therefore, the example of a flat subreflector and a parabolic main reflector (a Newtonian dual reflector system) is considered in this work. The subreflector is assumed to be a reflector array covered with patch elements. The phase variation on a subreflector can be detected by a small number of receiving patch elements (probes). By probing the phase change at these few selected positions on the subreflector, the phase error over the entire surface can be recovered and used to change the phase of all the patch elements covering the subreflector plane to compensate for main reflector errors. This is accomplished by using a version of sampling theorem on the circular aperture. The sampling is performed on the phase-error function on the circular aperture of the main reflector by a method developed using Zernike polynomials. This method is based upon and extended from a theory previously proposed and applied to reflector aperture integration. This sampling method provides for an exact retrieval of the coefficients of up to certain orders in the expansion of the phase function, from values on a specifically calculated set of points in radial and azimuthal directions in the polar coordinate system, on the circular reflector aperture. The corresponding points on the subreflector are then obtained and, by probing the fields at these points, a

  5. SEISMIC-REFLECTOR DATABASE SOFTWARE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Evelyn L.; Hosom, John-Paul; ,

    1986-01-01

    The seismic data analysis (SDA) software system facilitates generation of marine seismic reflector databases composed of reflector depths, travel times, root-mean-square and interval velocities, geographic coordinates, and identifying information. System processes include digitizing of seismic profiles and velocity semblance curves, merging of velocity and navigation data with profile travel-time data, calculation of reflector depths in meters, profile and map graphic displays, data editing and smoothing, and entry of finalized data into a comprehensive database. An overview of concepts, file structures, and programs is presented.

  6. RF verification tasks underway at the Harris Corporation for multiple aperture reflector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutwein, T. A.

    1982-03-01

    Mesh effects on gain and patterns and adjacent aperture coupling effects for "pie" and circular apertures are discussed. Wire effects for Harris model with Langley scale model results included for assessing D/lamda effects, and wire effects with adjacent aperture coupling were determined. Reflector surface distortion effects (pillows and manufacturing roughness) were studied.

  7. RF verification tasks underway at the Harris Corporation for multiple aperture reflector system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutwein, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    Mesh effects on gain and patterns and adjacent aperture coupling effects for "pie" and circular apertures are discussed. Wire effects for Harris model with Langley scale model results included for assessing D/lamda effects, and wire effects with adjacent aperture coupling were determined. Reflector surface distortion effects (pillows and manufacturing roughness) were studied.

  8. Spherical geodesic mesh generation

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Jimmy; Kenamond, Mark Andrew; Burton, Donald E.; Shashkov, Mikhail Jurievich

    2015-02-27

    In ALE simulations with moving meshes, mesh topology has a direct influence on feature representation and code robustness. In three-dimensional simulations, modeling spherical volumes and features is particularly challenging for a hydrodynamics code. Calculations on traditional spherical meshes (such as spin meshes) often lead to errors and symmetry breaking. Although the underlying differencing scheme may be modified to rectify this, the differencing scheme may not be accessible. This work documents the use of spherical geodesic meshes to mitigate solution-mesh coupling. These meshes are generated notionally by connecting geodesic surface meshes to produce triangular-prismatic volume meshes. This mesh topology is fundamentally different from traditional mesh topologies and displays superior qualities such as topological symmetry. This work describes the geodesic mesh topology as well as motivating demonstrations with the FLAG hydrocode.

  9. Reflectors for SAR performance testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  10. Technology status of the 13 m aperture deployment antenna reflectors for Engineering Test Satellite VIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Akira; Tsujihata, Akio; Hamamoto, Naokazu; Homma, Masanori

    2000-07-01

    Large deployable antenna reflectors for Engineering Test Satellite VIII (ETS-VIII) are now stated in the critical design phase. The Fourteen 4.8m modules, which construct a 19.2 m × 16.7 m (13m aperture) antenna reflector, have been fabricated as Engineering Models. Ground testing for the fourteen modules will be performed until next spring. This paper describes results of critical design for the antenna reflectors and their validation plans. Each module consists of a gold-plated molybdenum mesh surface, spacially determined cable network, and a deployable truss structure as a supporting structure. Stowed size is 1 m (diameter) × 4 m (height). In stowed configuration, the lowest eigen frequencies of the antenna reflector are 47 Hz (longitudinal) and 69 Hz (lateral) respectively. The lowest eigen frequency is 0.14 Hz. Solar ray transparency of the reflector structure is designed to be more than 85% to avoid excessive solar pressure torque. Weight of each reflector is expected to be less than 100 kg. In addition, we will perform a piggyback deployment experiment in transfer orbit using the second stage of the first flight H-II A vehicle in 2000. Half scale seven modules antenna reflector will be used to validate its deployment reliability. Design, analysis and test results of LDR-P are also introduced in this paper.

  11. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, M.J.; Page, E.; Gould, C.T.

    1998-09-08

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope. 5 figs.

  12. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Page, Erik; Gould, Carl T.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope.

  13. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Page, Erik; Gould, Carl T.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope.

  14. Electromagnetic backscattering by corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, C. A.; Griesser, T.

    1986-01-01

    The Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD), which supplements Geometric Optics (GO), and the Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD), which supplements Physical Optics (PO), are used to predict the backscatter cross sections of dihedral corner reflectors which have right, obtuse, or acute included angles. These theories allow individual backscattering mechanisms of the dihedral corner reflectors to be identified and provide good agreement with experimental results in the azimuthal plane. The advantages and disadvantages of the geometrical and physical theories are discussed in terms of their accuracy, usefulness, and complexity. Numerous comparisons of analytical results with experimental data are presented. While physical optics alone is more accurate and more useful than geometrical optics alone, the combination of geometrical optics and geometrical diffraction seems to out perform physical optics and physical diffraction when compared with experimental data, especially for acute angle dihedral corner reflectors.

  15. Jet screech reduction with perforated flat reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Md. Tawhidul Islam; Teramoto, Kenbu; Matsuo, Shigeru; Setoguchi, Toshiaki

    2008-09-01

    In the present experimental study, investigations have been carried out to evaluate the performance of the new control technique of jet screech with different perforated flat reflectors. Mainly two types of porous flat reflectors had been used in the experiment. One reflector (reflector-V) designed for placing the reflector surface vertical to the jet axis, when, another type of reflector (reflector-H) designed for placing the reflecting surface horizontal to the jet axis. In both cases the reflectors had been placed at the nozzle (base tube with uniform cross-sectional area) exit. The diameter of the reflector-V was 15D when the diameter of the reflector-H was 10D. The porous area of the reflector-V was 6D and 4.5D for reflector-H where D indicated the diameter of the nozzle exit. The placement of the reflector at the exit of the nozzle reduces the sound pressure at the nozzle exit. Thus the muted sound can not excite the unstable disturbance at the nozzle exit and the loop of the feedback mechanism disappeared, finally, the generation of jet screech be cancelled. The suction space located at the back side of the porous surface of the reflector-V improves the efficiency of the screech control technique. However, in the case of reflector-H, the receptivity process of feedback loop had been controlled by reducing the disturbances at the effective shock fronts as well as at the nozzle exit. The performance of the proposed method was verified with a flat reflector concept and good performance in jet screech suppression has been confirmed in the case of porous reflector.

  16. Lamp bulb with integral reflector

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Izrail; Shanks, Bruce; Sumner, Thomas L.

    2001-01-01

    An improved electrodeless discharge lamp bulb includes an integral ceramic reflector as a portion of the bulb envelope. The bulb envelope further includes two pieces, a reflector portion or segment is cast quartz ceramic and a light transmissive portion is a clear fused silica. In one embodiment, the cast quartz ceramic segment includes heat sink fins or stubs providing an increased outside surface area to dissipate internal heat. In another embodiment, the quartz ceramic segment includes an outside surface fused to eliminate gas permeation by polishing.

  17. Extreme Precision Antenna Reflector Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, G. R.; Gilger, L. D.; Ard, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    Thermal and mechanical distortion degrade the RF performance of antennas. The complexity of future communications antennas requires accurate, dimensionally stable antenna reflectors and structures built from materials other than those currently used. The advantages and disadvantages of using carbon fibers in an epoxy matrix are reviewed as well as current reflector fabrications technology and adjustment. The manufacturing sequence and coefficient of thermal expansion of carbon fiber/borosilicate glass composites is described. The construction of a parabolic reflector from this material and the assembling of both reflector and antenna are described. A 3M-aperture-diameter carbon/glass reflector that can be used as a subassembly for large reflectors is depicted. The deployment sequence for a 10.5M-aperture-diameter antenna, final reflector adjustment, and the deployment sequence for large reflectors are also illustrated.

  18. Adjusting the Contour of Reflector Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, W. B.; Giebler, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    Postfabrication adjustment of contour of panels for reflector, such as parabolic reflector for radio antennas, possible with simple mechanism consisting of threaded stud, two nuts, and flexure. Contours adjusted manually.

  19. Ellipsoidal reflectors in biomedical diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezuglyi, M. A.; Bezuglaya, N. V.

    2013-11-01

    In this work were considered photometric tools for biomedical diagnostics, which contain a mirror ellipsoid of revolution. Proposed schemes with ellipsoidal reflectors for diagnostics in reflected and in reflected and transmitted light. A comparative analysis of measurement standards scattering surfaces was held.

  20. Polarization losses in reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safak, M.; Yazgan, E.

    1985-08-01

    Various definitions for polarization-loss efficiency of Cassegrainian and front-fed reflectors are compared. The effects of flare angle, feed taper and the feed pattern asymmetry on the polarization-loss efficiency are investigated. The definitions based on aperture fields are shown to be inadequate and far fields must be used for calculating the polarization losses.

  1. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  2. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  3. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  4. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  5. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  6. Primary reflector for solar energy collection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G. (Inventor); Stephens, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    A fixed, linear, ground-based primary reflector is disclosed which has an extended curved sawtooth-contoured surface covered with a metalized polymeric reflecting material. The device reflects solar energy to a movably supported collector that is kept at the concentrated line focus of the reflector primary. The primary reflector may be constructed by a process utilizing well-known freeway paving machinery.

  7. Creep and recovery behavior analysis of space mesh structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yaqiong; Li, Tuanjie; Ma, Xiaofei

    2016-11-01

    The Schapery's nonlinear viscoelastic theory and nonlinear force-density method have been investigated to analyze the creep and recovery behaviors of space deployable mesh reflectors in this paper. Based on Schapery's nonlinear viscoelastic theory, we establish the creep and recovery constitutive model for cables whose pretensions were applied stepwise in time. This constitutive model has been further used for adjustment of cables' elongation rigidity. In addition, the time-dependent tangent stiffness matrix is calculated by the partial differentiation of the corresponding load vector with respect to the nodal coordinate vector obtained by the nonlinear force-density method. An incremental-iterative solution based on the Newton-Raphson method is adopted for solving the time-dependent nonlinear statics equations. Finally, a hoop truss reflector antenna is presented as a numerical example to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed method for the creep and recovery behavior analysis of space deployable mesh structures.

  8. Use of albedo for neutron reflector regions in reactor core 3-D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanakrishnan, P.

    1989-10-01

    In this paper we present two new simplified schemes for the application of the albedo concept of replacing the reflector in 3-D reactor core simulations. Both involve the numerical derivation of albedoes from the fluxes at the core- (blanket-) reflector interface obtained from sample calculations including the reflector. Diffusion theory is used for core calculations in both cases. In the first scheme a new method for "diagonalising" the albedo matrix is demonstrated. This achieves easy applicability of the albedo parameters in core simulations of a fast breeder reactor core, resulting in significant savings in computing efforts. The second scheme, applied to light water reactors, achieves better accuracy in core periphery power predictions with the use of only uniform coarse meshes throughout the core and the numerically derived albedoes.

  9. Lamp with a truncated reflector cup

    DOEpatents

    Li, Ming; Allen, Steven C.; Bazydola, Sarah; Ghiu, Camil-Daniel

    2013-10-15

    A lamp assembly, and method for making same. The lamp assembly includes first and second truncated reflector cups. The lamp assembly also includes at least one base plate disposed between the first and second truncated reflector cups, and a light engine disposed on a top surface of the at least one base plate. The light engine is configured to emit light to be reflected by one of the first and second truncated reflector cups.

  10. Electronic Compensation For Distortion Of Antenna Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Cockrell, C.R.; Staton, L. D.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed method of obtaining approximately desired radiation or reception pattern from antenna that includes reflector based on concept of superposition of electromagnetic fields generated by multiple feedhorns or feed antenna elements arrayed at various positions near reflector and excited at electronically adjustable magnitudes and phases. In intended application, reflector nominally paraboloidal, feed elements N feedhorns in hexagonal array, and method used to compensate for deviations of real reflector surface from nominal paraboloidal shape. Method and concept also applicable to electronic beam steering and electronic antenna compensation in other situations.

  11. Low Sidelobe Scanning Beams for Parabolic Reflectors,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Parabolic antennas, *Sidelobes, *Electronic scanners, Parabolas, Far field, Antenna feeds , Reflectors, Low level, Amplitude, Distortion, Configurations, Secondary, Compensation, Feeding , Symposia, Taper

  12. Solar thermal collectors using planar reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espy, P. N.

    1978-01-01

    Specular reflectors have been used successfully with flat-plate collectors to achieve exceptionally high operating temperatures and high delivered energy per unit collector area. Optimal orientation of collectors and reflectors can result in even higher performance with an improved relationship between energy demand and supply. This paper reports on a study providing first order optimization of collector-reflector arrays in which single- and multiple-faceted reflectors in fixed or singly adjustable configurations provide delivered energy maxima in either summer or winter.

  13. A peeling mesh.

    PubMed

    Bohmer, R D; Byrne, P D; Maddern, G J

    2002-07-01

    A number of different materials are available for incisional hernia repair. Benefits of the various types are controversial and are partly dependent on the anatomical placement of the mesh. Composite mesh has been introduced to provide tissue ingrowth for strength and a non-adherent side to protect the bowel, these layers being laminated together. This report is on the separation of layers in an infected mesh and adherence of the expanded polytetrafluoroethylene layer to the small bowel.

  14. Passive solar reflector satellite revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, C.; Daly, J. C.

    1980-07-01

    Passive light weight reflectors in space which direct the incident solar energy to a specified location on the Earth surface are proposed as an alternative system for the solar power satellite to overcome conversion losses and to avoid the need for photovoltaic cells. On Earth, either photovoltaic cells or a steam turbine alternator on a solar tower, or a similar conventional, relatively high efficiency cycle are used for electricity generation. The constraints which apply to the design of the optical system if a single satellite is placed in geostationary orbit are outlined. A single lens and a two lens system are discussed.

  15. Passive solar reflector satellite revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, C.; Daly, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Passive light weight reflectors in space which direct the incident solar energy to a specified location on the Earth surface are proposed as an alternative system for the solar power satellite to overcome conversion losses and to avoid the need for photovoltaic cells. On Earth, either photovoltaic cells or a steam turbine alternator on a solar tower, or a similar conventional, relatively high efficiency cycle are used for electricity generation. The constraints which apply to the design of the optical system if a single satellite is placed in geostationary orbit are outlined. A single lens and a two lens system are discussed.

  16. Shaped cassegrain reflector antenna. [design equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Design equations are developed to compute the reflector surfaces required to produce uniform illumination on the main reflector of a cassegrain system when the feed pattern is specified. The final equations are somewhat simple and straightforward to solve (using a computer) compared to the ones which exist already in the literature. Step by step procedure for solving the design equations is discussed in detail.

  17. Conformal Membrane Reflectors for Deployable Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Patrick J.; Keys, Andrew S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation reports the Phase I results on NASA's Gossamer Spacecraft Exploratory Research and Technology Program. Cornerstone Research Group, Inc., the University of Rochester, and International Photonics Consultants collaborated to investigate the feasibility of free-standing, liquid-crystal-polymer (LCP) reflectors for integration into space-based optical systems. The goal of the program was to achieve large-diameter, broadband. reflective membranes that are resistant to the effects of space, specifically cryogenic environments and gamma-ray irradiation. Additionally, we assessed the applicability of utilizing the technology as tight sails, since, by their very nature, these films offer high-reflectivity at specified wavelengths. Previous research programs have demonstrated all-polymer, narrow-band Specular reflectors and diffuse membrane reflectors. The feasibility of fabricating an all-polymer broadband specular reflector and a narrow-band specular membrane reflector was assessed in the Phase I Gossamer program. In addition, preliminary gamma irradiation studies were conducted to determine the stability of the polymer reflectors to radiation. Materials and process technology were developed to fabricate coupon-scale reflectors of both broad- and narrow-band specular reflectors in Phase 1. This presentation will report the results of these studies, including, the performance of a narrow-band specular membrane. Gamma irradiation exposures indicate limited impact on the optical performance although additional exposure studies are warranted. Plans to scale up the membrane fabrication process will be presented.

  18. An Adaptive Mesh Algorithm: Mapping the Mesh Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Scannapieco, Anthony J.

    2016-07-25

    Both thermodynamic and kinematic variables must be mapped. The kinematic variables are defined on a separate kinematic mesh; it is the duel mesh to the thermodynamic mesh. The map of the kinematic variables is done by calculating the contributions of kinematic variables on the old thermodynamic mesh, mapping the kinematic variable contributions onto the new thermodynamic mesh and then synthesizing the mapped kinematic variables on the new kinematic mesh. In this document the map of the thermodynamic variables will be described.

  19. Back surface reflectors for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chai, A. T.

    1980-01-01

    Sample solar cells were fabricated to study the effects of various back surface reflectors on the device performance. They are typical 50 micrometers thick, space quality, silicon solar cells except for variations of the back contact configuration. The back surfaces of the sample cells are polished to a mirror like finish, and have either conventional full contacts or grid finger contacts. Measurements and evaluation of various metallic back surface reflectors, as well as cells with total internal reflection, are presented. Results indicate that back surface reflectors formed using a grid finger back contact are more effective reflectors than cells with full back metallization and that Au, Ag, or Cu are better back surface reflector metals than Al.

  20. Beam diffraction by planar and parabolic reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suedan, Gibreel A.; Jull, Edward V.

    1991-04-01

    In the complex source point (CSP) technique, an omnidirectional source diffraction solution becomes that for a directive beam when the coordinates of the source position are given appropriate complex values. This is applied to include feed directivity in reflector edge diffraction. Solutions and numerical examples for planar strip and parabolic cylinder reflectors are given, including an offset parabolic reflector. The main beams of parabolic reflectors are calculated by aperture integration and the edge diffracted fields by uniform diffraction theory. In both cases, a complex source point feed in the near or far field of the reflector may be used in the pattern calculation, with improvements in accuracy in the lateral and spillover pattern lobes.

  1. Nanolaminate Membranes as Cylindrical Telescope Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Hickey, Gregory; Lih, Shyh-Shiu Lih

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to use axially stretched metal nanolaminate membranes as lightweight parabolic cylindrical reflectors in the Dual Anamorphic Reflector Telescope (DART) - a planned spaceborne telescope in which the cylindrical reflectors would be arranged to obtain a point focus. The discussion brings together a combination of concepts reported separately in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, the most relevant being "Nanolaminate Mirrors With Integral Figure-Control Actuators" NPO -30221, Vol. 26, No. 5 (May 2002), page 90; and "Reflectors Made From Membranes Stretched Between Beams" NPO -30571, Vol. 33, No. 10 (October 2009), page 11a. The engineering issues receiving the greatest emphasis in the instant document are (1) the change in curvature associated with the Poisson contraction of a stretched nanolaminate reflector membrane and (2) the feasibility of using patches of poly(vinylidene fluoride) on the rear membrane surface as piezoelectric actuators to correct the surface figure for the effect of Poisson contraction and other shape errors.

  2. Solar-powered illuminated reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.C.

    1987-05-26

    A highway traffic marker is described comprising: a housing adapted to be secured to a highway; a reflector in the housing for reflecting light in at least one predetermined direction toward highway traffic; at least one light source in the housing; a battery in circuit with the light source; a photovoltaic system is the housing for charging the battery. The housing includes window means for transmitting light from the light source outward from the housing in the predetermined direction; and optical lightguide element is mounted in the housing for guiding light from the one light source to the window means. The optical lightguide element has a generally conical shape and the window means being a Fresnel lens.

  3. Hybrid Deployable Foam Antennas and Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivellini, Tommaso; Willis, Paul; Hodges, Richard; Spitz, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    Hybrid deployable radio antennas and reflectors of a proposed type would feature rigid narrower apertures plus wider adjoining apertures comprising reflective surfaces supported by open-cell polymeric foam structures (see figure). The open-cell foam structure of such an antenna would be compressed for compact stowage during transport. To initiate deployment of the antenna, the foam structure would simply be released from its stowage mechanical restraint. The elasticity of the foam would drive the expansion of the foam structure to its full size and shape. There are several alternatives for fabricating a reflective surface supported by a polymeric foam structure. One approach would be to coat the foam with a metal. Another approach would be to attach a metal film or a metal-coated polymeric membrane to the foam. Yet another approach would be to attach a metal mesh to the foam. The hybrid antenna design and deployment concept as proposed offers significant advantages over other concepts for deployable antennas: 1) In the unlikely event of failure to deploy, the rigid narrow portion of the antenna would still function, providing a minimum level of assured performance. In contrast, most other concepts for deploying a large antenna from compact stowage are of an "all or nothing" nature: the antenna is not useful at all until and unless it is fully deployed. 2) Stowage and deployment would not depend on complex mechanisms or actuators, nor would it involve the use of inflatable structures. Therefore, relative to antennas deployed by use of mechanisms, actuators, or inflation systems, this antenna could be lighter, cheaper, amenable to stowage in a smaller volume, and more reliable. An open-cell polymeric (e.g., polyurethane) foam offers several advantages for use as a compressible/expandable structural material to support a large antenna or reflector aperture. A few of these advantages are the following: 3) The open cellular structure is amenable to compression to a very

  4. Prolene mesh mentoplasty.

    PubMed

    Ilhan, A Emre; Kayabasoglu, Gurkan; Kazikdas, K Cagdas; Goksel, Abdulkadir

    2011-04-01

    Augmentation mentoplasty is a cosmetic surgical procedure to correct chin retrusion or microgenia which usually requires placement of an alloplastic material over the pogonion, and which results in increased chin projection and a more aesthetically balanced facial profile. Polypropylene mesh is easy to purchase, widely available in a general hospital and most commonly used by general surgeons. In this series of 192 patients, we wanted to demonstrate our simple mentoplasty technique using prolene mesh that can easily be combined with a rhinoplasty procedure, with possible causes of infection and the rationale for using prolene mesh in such procedures.

  5. Optimized testing of meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malek, Miroslaw; Ozden, Banu

    1990-01-01

    Efficient testing techniques for two-dimensional mesh interconnection networks are presented. The tests cover faults in the arbitration logic of the switches; this includes an examination of fault detection in the data paths, routing, and control circuitry, including the conflict resolution capabilities of mesh interconnection networks using topological test methods. The proposed methods are not implementation specific and can be applied to any design with a mesh topology. The topology and behavior of the network are described and definitions are presented. The fault model is defined and parallel testing methods for the entire network are given.

  6. Integrated reflector antenna design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M. L.; Lee, S. W.; Ni, S.; Christensen, M.; Wang, Y. M.

    1993-01-01

    Reflector antenna design is a mature field and most aspects were studied. However, of that most previous work is distinguished by the fact that it is narrow in scope, analyzing only a particular problem under certain conditions. Methods of analysis of this type are not useful for working on real-life problems since they can not handle the many and various types of perturbations of basic antenna design. The idea of an integrated design and analysis is proposed. By broadening the scope of the analysis, it becomes possible to deal with the intricacies attendant with modem reflector antenna design problems. The concept of integrated reflector antenna design is put forward. A number of electromagnetic problems related to reflector antenna design are investigated. Some of these show how tools for reflector antenna design are created. In particular, a method for estimating spillover loss for open-ended waveguide feeds is examined. The problem of calculating and optimizing beam efficiency (an important figure of merit in radiometry applications) is also solved. Other chapters deal with applications of this general analysis. The wide angle scan abilities of reflector antennas is examined and a design is proposed for the ATDRSS triband reflector antenna. The development of a general phased-array pattern computation program is discussed and how the concept of integrated design can be extended to other types of antennas is shown. The conclusions are contained in the final chapter.

  7. Biological polarized light reflectors in stomatopod crustaceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Tsyr-Huei; Cronin, Thomas W.; Caldwell, Roy L.; Marshall, Justin

    2005-08-01

    Body parts that can reflect highly polarized light have been found in several species of stomatopod crustaceans (mantis shrimps). These polarized light reflectors can be grossly divided into two major types. The first type, usually red or pink in color to the human visual system, is located within an animal's cuticle. Reflectors of the second type, showing iridescent blue, are located beneath the exoskeleton and thus are unaffected by the molt cycle. We used reflection spectropolarimetry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to study the reflective properties and the structures that reflect highly polarized light in stomatopods. For the first type of reflector, the degree of polarization usually changes dramatically, from less than 20% to over 70%, with a change in viewing angle. TEM examination indicates that the polarization reflection is generated by multilayer thin-film interference. The second type of reflector, the blue colored ones, reflects highly polarized light to all viewing angles. However, these reflectors show a slight chromatic change with different viewing angles. TEM sections have revealed that streams of oval-shaped vesicles might be responsible for the production of the polarized light reflection. In all the reflectors we have examined so far, the reflected light is always maximally polarized at around 500 nm, which is close to the wavelength best transmitted by sea water. This suggests that the polarized light reflectors found in stomatopods are well adapted to the underwater environment. We also found that most reflectors produce polarized light with a horizontal e-vector. How these polarized light reflectors are used in stomatopod signaling remains unknown.

  8. Mesh implants: An overview of crucial mesh parameters

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei-Ming; Schuster, Philipp; Klinge, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Hernia repair is one of the most frequently performed surgical interventions that use mesh implants. This article evaluates crucial mesh parameters to facilitate selection of the most appropriate mesh implant, considering raw materials, mesh composition, structure parameters and mechanical parameters. A literature review was performed using the PubMed database. The most important mesh parameters in the selection of a mesh implant are the raw material, structural parameters and mechanical parameters, which should match the physiological conditions. The structural parameters, especially the porosity, are the most important predictors of the biocompatibility performance of synthetic meshes. Meshes with large pores exhibit less inflammatory infiltrate, connective tissue and scar bridging, which allows increased soft tissue ingrowth. The raw material and combination of raw materials of the used mesh, including potential coatings and textile design, strongly impact the inflammatory reaction to the mesh. Synthetic meshes made from innovative polymers combined with surface coating have been demonstrated to exhibit advantageous behavior in specialized fields. Monofilament, large-pore synthetic meshes exhibit advantages. The value of mesh classification based on mesh weight seems to be overestimated. Mechanical properties of meshes, such as anisotropy/isotropy, elasticity and tensile strength, are crucial parameters for predicting mesh performance after implantation. PMID:26523210

  9. Distributed Bragg Reflectors With Reduced Optical Absorption

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    A new class of distributed Bragg reflectors has been developed. These distributed Bragg reflectors comprise interlayers positioned between sets of high-index and low-index quarter-wave plates. The presence of these interlayers is to reduce photon absorption resulting from spatially indirect photon-assisted electronic transitions between the high-index and low-index quarter wave plates. The distributed Bragg reflectors have applications for use in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for use at 1.55 .mu.m and at other wavelengths of interest.

  10. Flat plate reflectors for PV collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Spielberg, J.I. )

    1989-01-01

    This article delineates experimentation establishing that fixed reflectors may be used with solar photovoltaic panels to obtain 70% of the efficiency of a dual-axis tracking system. Also described is how the power output of a stationary, non-tracking panel can be easily doubled via the addition of over-sized, overhanging wind reflectors in place of the traditional reflectors of a dual axis system. Discussion covers theory, experimental details, comparison of theory to results, and conclusions drawn. 15 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Urogynecologic Surgical Mesh Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... urogynecologic repair. Absorbable mesh will degrade and lose strength over time. It is not intended to provide long-term reinforcement to the repair site. As the material degrades, new tissue growth is intended to provide ...

  12. Hernia Surgical Mesh Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... repaired hernia. Absorbable mesh will degrade and lose strength over time. It is not intended to provide long-term reinforcement to the repair site. As the material degrades, new tissue growth is intended to provide ...

  13. 2D Mesh Manipulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    PLATE A two-dimensional flat plate mesh was created using the Gridgen software package (Ref. 13). This mesh (shown in Fig. 10) closely resembled a...desired tolerance of the projection onto the surface. The geometry file on which the geometry surface is based can be easily generated using Gridgen ...by exporting a curve (or number of curves) under the INPUT/OUTPUT commands in the Gridgen interface (Ref. 13). Initially, the floating boundary

  14. Wireless Mesh Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishmael, Johnathan; Race, Nicholas

    Wireless Mesh Networks have emerged as an important technology in building next-generation networks. They are seen to have a range of benefits over traditional wired and wireless networks including low deployment costs, high scalability and resiliency to faults. Moreover, Wireless Mesh Networks (WMNs) are often described as being autonomic with self-* (healing and configuration) properties and their popularity has grown both as a research platform and as a commercially exploitable technology.

  15. 49 CFR 393.26 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... reflectors. (a) Mounting. Reflex reflectors shall be mounted at the locations required by § 393.11. In the... mounting height range. All permanent reflex reflectors shall be securely mounted on a rigid part of the... required to be permanently mounted to a part of the vehicle. Temporary reflex reflectors on...

  16. 49 CFR 393.26 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... reflectors. (a) Mounting. Reflex reflectors shall be mounted at the locations required by § 393.11. In the... mounting height range. All permanent reflex reflectors shall be securely mounted on a rigid part of the... required to be permanently mounted to a part of the vehicle. Temporary reflex reflectors on...

  17. 49 CFR 393.26 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... reflectors. (a) Mounting. Reflex reflectors shall be mounted at the locations required by § 393.11. In the... mounting height range. All permanent reflex reflectors shall be securely mounted on a rigid part of the... required to be permanently mounted to a part of the vehicle. Temporary reflex reflectors on...

  18. 49 CFR 393.26 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... reflectors. (a) Mounting. Reflex reflectors shall be mounted at the locations required by § 393.11. In the... mounting height range. All permanent reflex reflectors shall be securely mounted on a rigid part of the... required to be permanently mounted to a part of the vehicle. Temporary reflex reflectors on...

  19. 49 CFR 393.26 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... reflectors. (a) Mounting. Reflex reflectors shall be mounted at the locations required by § 393.11. In the... mounting height range. All permanent reflex reflectors shall be securely mounted on a rigid part of the... required to be permanently mounted to a part of the vehicle. Temporary reflex reflectors on...

  20. Focal region fields of distorted reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buris, N. E.; Kauffman, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of the focal region fields scattered by an arbitrary surface reflector under uniform plane wave illumination is solved. The physical optics (PO) approximation is used to calculate the current induced on the reflector. The surface of the reflector is described by a number of triangular domain-wise 5th degree bivariate polynomials. A 2-dimensional Gaussian quadrature is employed to numerically evaluate the integral expressions of the scattered fields. No Freshnel or Fraunhofer zone approximations are made. The relation of the focal fields problem to surface compensation techniques and other applications are mentioned. Several examples of distorted parabolic reflectors are presented. The computer code developed is included, together with instructions on its usage.

  1. Ellipsoidal optical reflectors reproduced by electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hungerford, W. J.; Larmer, J. W.; Levinsohn, M.

    1964-01-01

    An accurately dimensioned convex ellipsoidal surface, which will become a master after polishing, is fabricated from 316L stainless steel. When polishing of the master is completed, it is suspended in a modified watt bath for electroforming of nickel reflectors.

  2. Pactruss support structure for precision segmented reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, John M.

    1989-01-01

    The application of the Pactruss deployable structure to the support of large paraboloidal reflectors of very high precision was studied. The Pactruss concept, originally conceived for the Space Station truss, is shown to be suitable for use in a triangular arrangement to support a reflector surface composed of hexagonal reflector panels. A hybrid of Pactruss structural and deployable single-fold beams is shown to accommodate a center body. A minor alteration in the geometry is in order to avoid lockup during deployment. To assess the capability of the hybrid Pactruss structure, an example truss supporting a full-scale (20 meter diameter) infrared telescope was analyzed for static and dynamic performance. A truss structure weighing 800 kilograms gave adequate support to a reflector surface weighing 3,000 kilograms.

  3. Semiconductor Laser With Multilayer Dielectric Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Multilayer dielectric reflector included in proposed surface-emitting, distributed-feedback, grating semiconductor laser (e.g., a GaAlAs device). Contributes to efficiency and output power of laser by reducing amount of light entering substrate, where wasted by absorption. Index of refraction in reflector sublayers alternates between higher and lower value. Higher value less than effective index of refraction of waveguide layer.

  4. Aberrations of ellipsoidal reflectors for unit magnification.

    PubMed

    Mielenz, K D

    1974-12-01

    Ellipsoidal reflectors are useful for the 1:1 imaging of small objects without spherical and chromatic aberration. The magnitude of the off-axis aberrations of such reflectors is computed by application of Fermat's principle to the Hamiltonian point characteristic. The limiting form of the mirror aperture for which these aberrations do not exceed a set tolerance is an ellipse whose semiaxes depend on object size and angle of incidence.

  5. Unstructured mesh generation and adaptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of current unstructured mesh generation and adaptivity techniques is given. Basic building blocks taken from the field of computational geometry are first described. Various practical mesh generation techniques based on these algorithms are then constructed and illustrated with examples. Issues of adaptive meshing and stretched mesh generation for anisotropic problems are treated in subsequent sections. The presentation is organized in an education manner, for readers familiar with computational fluid dynamics, wishing to learn more about current unstructured mesh techniques.

  6. Solar central receiver heliostat reflector assembly

    DOEpatents

    Horton, Richard H.; Zdeb, John J.

    1980-01-01

    A heliostat reflector assembly for a solar central receiver system comprises a light-weight, readily assemblable frame which supports a sheet of stretchable reflective material and includes mechanism for selectively applying tension to and positioning the sheet to stretch it to optical flatness. The frame is mounted on and supported by a pipe pedestal assembly that, in turn, is installed in the ground. The frame is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e. central receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The frame may include a built-in system for testing for optical flatness of the reflector. The preferable geometric configuration of the reflector is octagonal; however, it may be other shapes, such as hexagonal, pentagonal or square. Several different embodiments of means for tensioning and positioning the reflector to achieve optical flatness are disclosed. The reflector assembly is based on the stretch frame concept which provides an extremely light-weight, simple, low-cost reflector assembly that may be driven for positioning and tracking by a light-weight, inexpensive drive system.

  7. Solar central receiver heliostat reflector assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, R.H.; Zdeb, J.J.

    1980-06-24

    A heliostat reflector assembly for a solar central receiver system comprises a light-weight, readily assemblable frame which supports a sheet of stretchable reflective material and includes a mechanism for selectively applying tension to and positioning the sheet to stretch it to optical flatness. The frame is mounted on and supported by a pipe pedestal assembly that, in turn, is installed in the ground. The frame is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e. central receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The frame may include a built-in system for testing for optical flatness of the reflector. The preferable geometric configuration of the reflector is octagonal; however, it may be other shapes, such as hexagonal, pentagonal or square. Several different embodiments of means for tensioning and positioning the reflector to achieve optical flatness are disclosed. The reflector assembly is based on the stretch frame concept which provides an extremely light-weight, simple, low-cost reflector assembly that may be driven for positioning and tracking by a light-weight, inexpensive drive system. 14 figs.

  8. Solar central receiver heliostat reflector assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, R.H.; Zdeb, J.J.

    1980-06-24

    A heliostat reflector assembly for a solar central receiver system comprises a light-weight, readily assemblable frame which supports a sheet of stretchable reflective material and includes mechanism for selectively applying tension to and positioning the sheet to stretch it to optical flatness. The frame is mounted on and supported by a pipe pedestal assembly that, in turn, is installed in the ground. The frame is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e., central receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The frame may include a built-in system for testing for optical flatness of the reflector. The preferable geometric configuration of the reflector is octagonal; however, it may be other shapes, such as hexagonal, pentagonal or square. Several different embodiments of means for tensioning and positioning the reflector to achieve optical flatness are disclosed. The reflector assembly is based on the stretch frame concept which provides an extremely light-weight, simple, low-cost reflector assembly that may be driven for positioning and tracking by a light-weight, inexpensive drive system. 14 claims.

  9. Algebraic mesh quality metrics

    SciTech Connect

    KNUPP,PATRICK

    2000-04-24

    Quality metrics for structured and unstructured mesh generation are placed within an algebraic framework to form a mathematical theory of mesh quality metrics. The theory, based on the Jacobian and related matrices, provides a means of constructing, classifying, and evaluating mesh quality metrics. The Jacobian matrix is factored into geometrically meaningful parts. A nodally-invariant Jacobian matrix can be defined for simplicial elements using a weight matrix derived from the Jacobian matrix of an ideal reference element. Scale and orientation-invariant algebraic mesh quality metrics are defined. the singular value decomposition is used to study relationships between metrics. Equivalence of the element condition number and mean ratio metrics is proved. Condition number is shown to measure the distance of an element to the set of degenerate elements. Algebraic measures for skew, length ratio, shape, volume, and orientation are defined abstractly, with specific examples given. Combined metrics for shape and volume, shape-volume-orientation are algebraically defined and examples of such metrics are given. Algebraic mesh quality metrics are extended to non-simplical elements. A series of numerical tests verify the theoretical properties of the metrics defined.

  10. Documentation for MeshKit - Reactor Geometry (&mesh) Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Rajeev; Mahadevan, Vijay

    2015-09-30

    This report gives documentation for using MeshKit’s Reactor Geometry (and mesh) Generator (RGG) GUI and also briefly documents other algorithms and tools available in MeshKit. RGG is a program designed to aid in modeling and meshing of complex/large hexagonal and rectilinear reactor cores. RGG uses Argonne’s SIGMA interfaces, Qt and VTK to produce an intuitive user interface. By integrating a 3D view of the reactor with the meshing tools and combining them into one user interface, RGG streamlines the task of preparing a simulation mesh and enables real-time feedback that reduces accidental scripting mistakes that could waste hours of meshing. RGG interfaces with MeshKit tools to consolidate the meshing process, meaning that going from model to mesh is as easy as a button click. This report is designed to explain RGG v 2.0 interface and provide users with the knowledge and skills to pilot RGG successfully. Brief documentation of MeshKit source code, tools and other algorithms available are also presented for developers to extend and add new algorithms to MeshKit. RGG tools work in serial and parallel and have been used to model complex reactor core models consisting of conical pins, load pads, several thousands of axially varying material properties of instrumentation pins and other interstices meshes.

  11. Cosmology on a Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Stuart P. D.; Knebe, Alexander; Gibson, Brad K.; Flynn, Chris; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2003-04-01

    An adaptive multi grid approach to simulating the formation of structure from collisionless dark matter is described. MLAPM (Multi-Level Adaptive Particle Mesh) is one of the most efficient serial codes available on the cosmological "market" today. As part of Swinburne University's role in the development of the Square Kilometer Array, we are implementing hydrodynamics, feedback, and radiative transfer within the MLAPM adaptive mesh, in order to simulate baryonic processes relevant to the interstellar and intergalactic media at high redshift. We will outline our progress to date in applying the existing MLAPM to a study of the decay of satellite galaxies within massive host potentials.

  12. Curved mesh generation and mesh refinement using Lagrangian solid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, P.-O.; Peraire, J.

    2008-12-31

    We propose a method for generating well-shaped curved unstructured meshes using a nonlinear elasticity analogy. The geometry of the domain to be meshed is represented as an elastic solid. The undeformed geometry is the initial mesh of linear triangular or tetrahedral elements. The external loading results from prescribing a boundary displacement to be that of the curved geometry, and the final configuration is determined by solving for the equilibrium configuration. The deformations are represented using piecewise polynomials within each element of the original mesh. When the mesh is sufficiently fine to resolve the solid deformation, this method guarantees non-intersecting elements even for highly distorted or anisotropic initial meshes. We describe the method and the solution procedures, and we show a number of examples of two and three dimensional simplex meshes with curved boundaries. We also demonstrate how to use the technique for local refinement of non-curved meshes in the presence of curved boundaries.

  13. Advanced numerical methods in mesh generation and mesh adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Lipnikov, Konstantine; Danilov, A; Vassilevski, Y; Agonzal, A

    2010-01-01

    Numerical solution of partial differential equations requires appropriate meshes, efficient solvers and robust and reliable error estimates. Generation of high-quality meshes for complex engineering models is a non-trivial task. This task is made more difficult when the mesh has to be adapted to a problem solution. This article is focused on a synergistic approach to the mesh generation and mesh adaptation, where best properties of various mesh generation methods are combined to build efficiently simplicial meshes. First, the advancing front technique (AFT) is combined with the incremental Delaunay triangulation (DT) to build an initial mesh. Second, the metric-based mesh adaptation (MBA) method is employed to improve quality of the generated mesh and/or to adapt it to a problem solution. We demonstrate with numerical experiments that combination of all three methods is required for robust meshing of complex engineering models. The key to successful mesh generation is the high-quality of the triangles in the initial front. We use a black-box technique to improve surface meshes exported from an unattainable CAD system. The initial surface mesh is refined into a shape-regular triangulation which approximates the boundary with the same accuracy as the CAD mesh. The DT method adds robustness to the AFT. The resulting mesh is topologically correct but may contain a few slivers. The MBA uses seven local operations to modify the mesh topology. It improves significantly the mesh quality. The MBA method is also used to adapt the mesh to a problem solution to minimize computational resources required for solving the problem. The MBA has a solid theoretical background. In the first two experiments, we consider the convection-diffusion and elasticity problems. We demonstrate the optimal reduction rate of the discretization error on a sequence of adaptive strongly anisotropic meshes. The key element of the MBA method is construction of a tensor metric from hierarchical edge

  14. Advanced composite materials for precision segmented reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Bland A.; Bowles, David E.

    1988-01-01

    The objective in the NASA Precision Segmented Reflector (PSR) project is to develop new composite material concepts for highly stable and durable reflectors with precision surfaces. The project focuses on alternate material concepts such as the development of new low coefficient of thermal expansion resins as matrices for graphite fiber reinforced composites, quartz fiber reinforced epoxies, and graphite reinforced glass. Low residual stress fabrication methods will be developed. When coupon specimens of these new material concepts have demonstrated the required surface accuracies and resistance to thermal distortion and microcracking, reflector panels will be fabricated and tested in simulated space environments. An important part of the program is the analytical modeling of environmental stability of these new composite materials concepts through constitutive equation development, modeling of microdamage in the composite matrix, and prediction of long term stability (including viscoelasticity). These analyses include both closed form and finite element solutions at the micro and macro levels.

  15. Advanced reflector materials for solar concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G; Williams, T; Wendelin, T

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes the research and development program at the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in advanced reflector materials for solar concentrators. NREL's research thrust is to develop solar reflector materials that maintain high specular reflectance for extended lifetimes under outdoor service conditions and whose cost is significantly lower than existing products. Much of this work has been in collaboration with private-sector companies that have extensive expertise in vacuum-coating and polymer-film technologies. Significant progress and other promising developments will be discussed. These are expected to lead to additional improvements needed to commercialize solar thermal concentration systems and make them economically attractive to the solar manufacturing industry. To explicitly demonstrate the optical durability of candidate reflector materials in real-world service conditions, a network of instrumented outdoor exposure sites has been activated.

  16. Test progress on the electrostatic membrane reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihora, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An extemely lightweight type of precision reflector antenna, being developed for potential deployment from the space shuttle, uses electrostatic forces to tension a thin membrane and form it into a concave reflector surface. The typical shuttle-deployed antenna would have a diameter of 100 meters and an RMS surface smoothness of 10 to 1 mm for operation at 1 to 10 GHz. NASA Langley Research Center built and is currently testing a subscale (16 foot diameter) model of the membrane reflector portion of such an antenna. Preliminary test results and principal factors affecting surface quality are addressed. Factors included are the effect of the perimeter boundary, splicing of the membrane, the long-scale smoothness of commercial membranes, and the spatial controllability of the membrane using voltage adjustments to alter the electrostatic pressure. Only readily available commercial membranes are considered.

  17. The Freeform Reflector for Uniform Rectangular Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yi; Gu, Pei-Fu; Zheng, Zhen-Rong

    2007-12-01

    Energy from the source was rearranged through reflection by a freeform reflector, in order to get uniform rectangular illumination. The numerical results of partial differential equation sets were investigated to obtain the freeform reflector and these equations were obtained upon the determination of the characters of source and the desired illumination. As an example, a light emitting diode (LED) with a Lambertian light-emitting surface of 1 × 1 mm2 and a viewing angle of 120° was applied as the source, and the target plane was a 4:3 rectangle with uniform illumination. The projective length of the reflector on x-axis is about 23 mm, and on y-axis is about 21 mm. Thus the illumination system is very compact.

  18. Composite materials for precision space reflector panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.; Funk, Joan G.; Bowles, David E.; Towell, Timothy W.; Connell, John W.

    1992-01-01

    One of the critical technology needs of large precision reflectors for future astrophysical and optical communications satellites lies in the area of structural materials. Results from a materials research and development program at NASA Langley Research Center to provide materials for these reflector applications are discussed. Advanced materials that meet the reflector panel requirements are identified, and thermal, mechanical and durability properties of candidate materials after exposure to simulated space environments are compared. A parabolic, graphite-phenolic honeycomb composite panel having a surface accuracy of 70.8 microinches rms and an areal weight of 1.17 lbm/sq ft was fabricated with T50/ERL1962 facesheets, a PAEI thermoplastic surface film, and Al and SiO(x) coatings.

  19. Advanced reflector materials for solar concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Gary; Williams, Tom; Wendelin, Tim

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes the research and development at the US National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in advanced reflector materials for solar concentrators. NREL's research thrust is to develop solar reflector materials that maintain high specular reflectance for extended lifetimes under outdoor service conditions and whose cost is significantly lower than existing products. Much of this work has been in collaboration with private-sector companies that have extensive expertise in vacuum-coating and polymer-film technologies. Significant progress and other promising developments will be discussed. These are expected to lead to additional improvements needed to commercialize solar thermal concentration systems and make them economically attractive to the solar manufacturing industry. To explicitly demonstrate the optical durability of candidate reflector materials in real-world service conditions, a network of instrumented outdoor exposure sites has been activated.

  20. Toward An Unstructured Mesh Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei Mahdiraji, Alireza; Baumann, Peter Peter

    2014-05-01

    Unstructured meshes are used in several application domains such as earth sciences (e.g., seismology), medicine, oceanography, cli- mate modeling, GIS as approximate representations of physical objects. Meshes subdivide a domain into smaller geometric elements (called cells) which are glued together by incidence relationships. The subdivision of a domain allows computational manipulation of complicated physical structures. For instance, seismologists model earthquakes using elastic wave propagation solvers on hexahedral meshes. The hexahedral con- tains several hundred millions of grid points and millions of hexahedral cells. Each vertex node in the hexahedrals stores a multitude of data fields. To run simulation on such meshes, one needs to iterate over all the cells, iterate over incident cells to a given cell, retrieve coordinates of cells, assign data values to cells, etc. Although meshes are used in many application domains, to the best of our knowledge there is no database vendor that support unstructured mesh features. Currently, the main tool for querying and manipulating unstructured meshes are mesh libraries, e.g., CGAL and GRAL. Mesh li- braries are dedicated libraries which includes mesh algorithms and can be run on mesh representations. The libraries do not scale with dataset size, do not have declarative query language, and need deep C++ knowledge for query implementations. Furthermore, due to high coupling between the implementations and input file structure, the implementations are less reusable and costly to maintain. A dedicated mesh database offers the following advantages: 1) declarative querying, 2) ease of maintenance, 3) hiding mesh storage structure from applications, and 4) transparent query optimization. To design a mesh database, the first challenge is to define a suitable generic data model for unstructured meshes. We proposed ImG-Complexes data model as a generic topological mesh data model which extends incidence graph model to multi

  1. Nuclear Transmutations in HFIR's Beryllium Reflector and Their Impact on Reactor Operation and Reflector Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, David; Maldonado, G Ivan; Primm, Trent; Proctor, Larry Duane

    2012-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory utilizes a large cylindrical beryllium reflector that is subdivided into three concentric regions and encompasses the compact reactor core. Nuclear transmutations caused by neutron activation occur in the beryllium reflector regions, which leads to unwanted neutron absorbing and radiation emitting isotopes. During the past year, two topics related to the HFIR beryllium reflector were reviewed. The first topic included studying the neutron poison (helium-3 and lithium-6) buildup in the reflector regions and its affect on beginning-of-cycle reactivity. A new methodology was developed to predict the reactivity impact and estimated symmetrical critical control element positions as a function of outage time between cycles due to helium-3 buildup and was shown to be in better agreement with actual symmetrical critical control element position data than the current methodology. The second topic included studying the composition of the beryllium reflector regions at discharge as well as during decay to assess the viability of transporting, storing, and ultimately disposing the reflector regions currently stored in the spent fuel pool. The post-irradiation curie inventories were used to determine whether the reflector regions are discharged as transuranic waste or become transuranic waste during the decay period for disposal purposes and to determine the nuclear hazard category, which may affect the controls invoked for transportation and temporary storage. Two of the reflector regions were determined to be transuranic waste at discharge and the other region was determined to become transuranic waste in less than 2 years after being discharged due to the initial uranium content (0.0044 weight percent uranium). It was also concluded that all three of the reflector regions could be classified as nuclear hazard category 3 (potential for localized consequences only).

  2. Surgical mesh for ventral incisional hernia repairs: Understanding mesh design

    PubMed Central

    Rastegarpour, Ali; Cheung, Michael; Vardhan, Madhurima; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Butler, Charles E; Levinson, Howard

    2016-01-01

    Surgical mesh has become an indispensable tool in hernia repair to improve outcomes and reduce costs; however, efforts are constantly being undertaken in mesh development to overcome postoperative complications. Common complications include infection, pain, adhesions, mesh extrusion and hernia recurrence. Reducing the complications of mesh implantation is of utmost importance given that hernias occur in hundreds of thousands of patients per year in the United States. In the present review, the authors present the different types of hernia meshes, discuss the key properties of mesh design, and demonstrate how each design element affects performance and complications. The present article will provide a basis for surgeons to understand which mesh to choose for patient care and why, and will explain the important technological aspects that will continue to evolve over the ensuing years. PMID:27054138

  3. Surface accuracy and radiation pattern characteristics of mesh deployable refector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Miyoshi; Ebisui, Takashi; Okamato, Teruki; Orikasa, Teruaki; Sugimoto, Toshio; Iso, Akio

    To facilitate the growth of mobile satellite communications, both an increase in the Equivalent Isotropically Radiated Power (EIRP) of satellites and improved frequency reuse are required to achiveve compact size, low cost terminal usage, and high channel capacity. High gain and low sidelobe antenna technology are very important for high EIRP and frequency reuse, respectively. These requirements are expected to be met by using a large deployable mesh reflector antenna, which is the key technology for future multibeam moble communications systems. In this paper, surface accruracy and related electrical characteristics are studied using a TETRUS-(Tetra Trigonal Prism Truss) type deployable mesh reflector antenna. Surface accuracy and related electrical characteristics of reflector antennas becaue any distortion of the ideal paraboloidal configuration causes antenna patterns to deteriorate, thereby reducing reflector aperture efficiency and increasing sidelobe and grating lobe levels. The sidelobe and grating lobe characteristics are especially important in frequency reuse. First, we show the problem with the radiation pattern characteristics of TETUS antenna. We then propose a new antenna configuration called the 'HYBRID TETRUS' that improves these characteristics. The mechanical performances of two partial deployable models are also described. Mechanical testing results reveal agreement between the calculated and measured values and high rigidities.

  4. Dual annular rotating "windowed" nuclear reflector reactor control system

    DOEpatents

    Jacox, Michael G.; Drexler, Robert L.; Hunt, Robert N. M.; Lake, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core.

  5. Computer prediction of dual reflector antenna radiation properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, C.

    1981-01-01

    A program for calculating radiation patterns for reflector antennas with either smooth analytic surfaces or with surfaces composed of a number of panels. Techniques based on the geometrical optics (GO) approach were used in tracing rays over the following regions: from a feed antenna to the first reflector surface (subreflector); from this reflector to a larger reflector surface (main reflector); and from the main reflector to a mathematical plane (aperture plane) in front of the main reflector. The equations of GO were also used to calculate the reflected field components for each ray making use of the feed radiation pattern and the parameters defining the surfaces of the two reflectors. These resulting fields form an aperture distribution which is integrated numerically to compute the radiation pattern for a specified set of angles.

  6. SUPERIMPOSED MESH PLOTTING IN MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    J. HENDRICKS

    2001-02-01

    The capability to plot superimposed meshes has been added to MCNP{trademark}. MCNP4C featured a superimposed mesh weight window generator which enabled users to set up geometries without having to subdivide geometric cells for variance reduction. The variance reduction was performed with weight windows on a rectangular or cylindrical mesh superimposed over the physical geometry. Experience with the new capability was favorable but also indicated that a number of enhancements would be very beneficial, particularly a means of visualizing the mesh and its values. The mathematics for plotting the mesh and its values is described here along with a description of other upgrades.

  7. Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Diachin, L; Hornung, R; Plassmann, P; WIssink, A

    2005-03-04

    As large-scale, parallel computers have become more widely available and numerical models and algorithms have advanced, the range of physical phenomena that can be simulated has expanded dramatically. Many important science and engineering problems exhibit solutions with localized behavior where highly-detailed salient features or large gradients appear in certain regions which are separated by much larger regions where the solution is smooth. Examples include chemically-reacting flows with radiative heat transfer, high Reynolds number flows interacting with solid objects, and combustion problems where the flame front is essentially a two-dimensional sheet occupying a small part of a three-dimensional domain. Modeling such problems numerically requires approximating the governing partial differential equations on a discrete domain, or grid. Grid spacing is an important factor in determining the accuracy and cost of a computation. A fine grid may be needed to resolve key local features while a much coarser grid may suffice elsewhere. Employing a fine grid everywhere may be inefficient at best and, at worst, may make an adequately resolved simulation impractical. Moreover, the location and resolution of fine grid required for an accurate solution is a dynamic property of a problem's transient features and may not be known a priori. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a technique that can be used with both structured and unstructured meshes to adjust local grid spacing dynamically to capture solution features with an appropriate degree of resolution. Thus, computational resources can be focused where and when they are needed most to efficiently achieve an accurate solution without incurring the cost of a globally-fine grid. Figure 1.1 shows two example computations using AMR; on the left is a structured mesh calculation of a impulsively-sheared contact surface and on the right is the fuselage and volume discretization of an RAH-66 Comanche helicopter [35]. Note the

  8. Particle-mesh techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macneice, Peter

    1995-01-01

    This is an introduction to numerical Particle-Mesh techniques, which are commonly used to model plasmas, gravitational N-body systems, and both compressible and incompressible fluids. The theory behind this approach is presented, and its practical implementation, both for serial and parallel machines, is discussed. This document is based on a four-hour lecture course presented by the author at the NASA Summer School for High Performance Computational Physics, held at Goddard Space Flight Center.

  9. Delaunay Refinement Mesh Generation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-05-18

    GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...146 6.2 Related Work in Robust Computational Geometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 6.3...during my seven years at Carnegie Mellon. Most of this work was carried out at the 61c Café in Pittsburgh. v vi Chapter 1 Introduction Meshes composed

  10. Large Deployable Reflector Technologies for Future European Telecom and Earth Observation Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihle, A.; Breunig, E.; Dadashvili, L.; Migliorelli, M.; Scialino, L.; van't Klosters, K.; Santiago-Prowald, J.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents requirements, analysis and design results for European large deployable reflectors (LDR) for space applications. For telecommunications, the foreseeable use of large reflectors is associated to the continuous demand for improved performance of mobile services. On the other hand, several earth observation (EO) missions can be identified carrying either active or passive remote sensing instruments (or both), in which a large effective aperture is needed e.g. BIOMASS. From the European point of view there is a total dependence of USA industry as such LDRs are not available from European suppliers. The RESTEO study is part of a number of ESA led activities to facilitate European LDR development. This paper is focused on the structural-mechanical aspects of this study. We identify the general requirements for LDRs with special emphasis on launcher accommodation for EO mission. In the next step, optimal concepts for the LDR structure and the RF-Surface are reviewed. Regarding the RF surface, both, a knitted metal mesh and a shell membrane based on carbon fibre reinforced silicon (CFRS) are considered. In terms of the backing structure, the peripheral ring concept is identified as most promising and a large number of options for the deployment kinematics are discussed. Of those, pantographic kinematics and a conical peripheral ring are selected. A preliminary design for these two most promising LDR concepts is performed which includes static, modal and kinematic simulation and also techniques to generate the reflector nets.

  11. Advanced sunflower antenna concept development. [stowable reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of stowing large solid antenna reflectors in the shuttle was demonstrated for applications with 40 foot apertures at frequencies of 100 GHz. Concepts allowing extension of the basic concept to 80-foot apertures operable at 60 GHz were identified.

  12. Distortion compensation techniques for large reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, W. A.

    2001-01-01

    The high-frequency limit of reflector antennas is usually governed by the magnitude of the surface error. Whereas little can be done for the high-spatial frequency portion of this error, there are various techniques that can be employed to compensate for large-scale surface errors due to gravity induced distortions for spacecraft antennas.

  13. Wirelessly Controllable Inflated Electroactive Polymer (EAP) Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea

    2005-01-01

    Inflatable membrane reflectors are attractive for deployable, large aperture, lightweight optical and microwave systems in micro-gravity space environment. However, any fabrication flaw or temperature variation may results in significant aberration of the surface. Even for a perfectly fabricated inflatable membrane mirror with uniform thickness, theory shows it will form a Hencky curve surface but a desired parabolic or spherical surface. Precision control of the surfaceshape of extremely flexible membrane structures is a critical challenge for the success of this technology. Wirelessly controllable inflated reflectors made of electroactive polymers (EAP) are proposed in this paper. A finite element model was configured to predict the behavior of the inflatable EAP membranes under pre-strains, pressures and distributed electric charges on the surface. To explore the controllability of the inflatable EAP reflectors, an iteration algorism was developed to find the required electric actuation for correcting the aberration of the Hencky curve to the desired parabolic curve. The correction capability of the reflectors with available EAP materials was explored numerically and is presented in this paper.

  14. Electrically thin flat lenses and reflectors.

    PubMed

    Ruphuy, Miguel; Siddiqui, Omar; Ramahi, Omar M

    2015-09-01

    We introduce electrically thin dielectric lenses and reflectors that focus a plane wave based on the principles of phase compensation and constructive wave interference. Phase compensation is achieved by arranging thin rectangular slabs having different dielectric permittivity according to a permittivity profile obtained through analytic design equations. All incident rays parallel to the optical axis converge to a focal point with equalized optical paths resulting in constructive interference. Plane wave simulations indicate strong focusing, even in the presence of impedance mismatch between free space and the dielectric layers composing the lens. We demonstrate focusing at 9.45 GHz using a lens fabricated with commercially available dielectric materials. In addition to focusing, the flat lens proposed here demonstrates relatively high power gain at the focal point. We also present a flat reflector based on the same concept. We believe that the proposed dielectric lens and reflector are strong candidates to replace heavy metallic dishes and reflectors used in a variety of applications, especially satellites.

  15. Welding torch with arc light reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A welding torch arc light reflector is disclosed for welding torches having optical viewing systems. A schematic of a welding torch having an internal coaxial viewing system consisting of a lens which focuses the field of view of the weld scene of the workpiece onto the end of the fiberoptic bundle is provided. The transmitted image of the fiberoptic bundle is provided to a camera lens which focuses it onto a TV sensor array for transmission. To improve the parity of the image of the monitoring system, an arc light reflector is shown fitted to the end of the torch housing or gas cup. The arc light reflector has an internal conical section portion which is polished to serve as a mirror which reflects the bright arc light back onto the darker areas of the weld area and thereby provides a more detailed image for the monitoring system. The novelty of the invention lies in the use of an arc light reflector on welding torches having optical viewing systems.

  16. Welding torch with arc light reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.

    1986-12-01

    A welding torch arc light reflector is disclosed for welding torches having optical viewing systems. A schematic of a welding torch having an internal coaxial viewing system consisting of a lens which focuses the field of view of the weld scene of the workpiece onto the end of the fiberoptic bundle is provided. The transmitted image of the fiberoptic bundle is provided to a camera lens which focuses it onto a TV sensor array for transmission. To improve the parity of the image of the monitoring system, an arc light reflector is shown fitted to the end of the torch housing or gas cup. The arc light reflector has an internal conical section portion which is polished to serve as a mirror which reflects the bright arc light back onto the darker areas of the weld area and thereby provides a more detailed image for the monitoring system. The novelty of the invention lies in the use of an arc light reflector on welding torches having optical viewing systems.

  17. Multimode Analysis of Bragg Reflectors for Cyclotron Maser Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-16

    exponentially with distance in the reflector. The spatial dependance of the TMI I mode is oscillatory. Figure 3 shows the frequency dependence of the...mode reflector for a CARM oscillator resonator. Figure 4 shows the frequency dependance of the reflection and mode conversion in the reflector. In order

  18. Mesh Algorithms for PDE with Sieve I: Mesh Distribution

    DOE PAGES

    Knepley, Matthew G.; Karpeev, Dmitry A.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a new programming framework, called Sieve, to support parallel numerical partial differential equation(s) (PDE) algorithms operating over distributed meshes. We have also developed a reference implementation of Sieve in C++ as a library of generic algorithms operating on distributed containers conforming to the Sieve interface. Sieve makes instances of the incidence relation, or arrows, the conceptual first-class objects represented in the containers. Further, generic algorithms acting on this arrow container are systematically used to provide natural geometric operations on the topology and also, through duality, on the data. Finally, coverings and duality are used to encode notmore » only individual meshes, but all types of hierarchies underlying PDE data structures, including multigrid and mesh partitions. In order to demonstrate the usefulness of the framework, we show how the mesh partition data can be represented and manipulated using the same fundamental mechanisms used to represent meshes. We present the complete description of an algorithm to encode a mesh partition and then distribute a mesh, which is independent of the mesh dimension, element shape, or embedding. Moreover, data associated with the mesh can be similarly distributed with exactly the same algorithm. The use of a high level of abstraction within the Sieve leads to several benefits in terms of code reuse, simplicity, and extensibility. We discuss these benefits and compare our approach to other existing mesh libraries.« less

  19. Silicon reflectors for external cavity lasers based on ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Li, Xia; Jin, Hao; Yu, Hui; Yang, Jianyi; Jiang, Xiaoqing

    2017-01-01

    We propose and experimentally investigate types of silicon ring reflectors on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) platform. These reflectors are used for realizing the silicon hybrid external cavity lasers. A suspended edge coupler is used to connect the reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) chip and the reflectors. The properties of the reflectors and the hybrid external cavity lasers with these reflectors are illustrated. The experimental results show that all of those reflectors have a high reflectivity and the highest reflectivity can up to be 95%. The lowest insertion loss can be as low as 0.4 dB. The output power of the hybrid external cavity lasers with these reflectors can reach mW magnitude and the highest output power is 6.1 mW. Over 30 dB side mode suppression ratio is obtained.

  20. Multi-Band Frequency-Selective Microwave Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao

    1995-01-01

    Double-loop patch and slot elements used in two different frequency-multiplexing designs. Array of double-round-loop conductive patches highly reflective at frequencies around 33 GHz (in Ka band). Array of double-square loop slots in conductive plane highly transmissive in S and Ku bands and highly reflective in X band. These frequency-selective reflectors closely related to several previous articles in NASA Tech Briefs, including "Frequency-Selective Microwave Reflectors" (NPO-18701), "Improved Dichroic Microwave Reflector" (NPO-18664), "Double-Square-Loop Dichroic Microwave Reflector" (NPO-18676), "Triband Circular-Loop Dichroic Microwave Reflector" (NPO-18714), "Making Curved Frequency-Selective Microwave Reflectors" (NPO-18755), "More Circular-Loop Dichroic Microwave Reflectors" (NPO-18940).

  1. Dynamic analysis of the deployment for mesh reflector deployable antennas with the cable-net structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiqun; Li, Na; Yang, Guigeng; Ru, Wenrui

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a dynamic analysis approach for the composite structure of a deployable truss and cable-net system. An Elastic Catenary Element is adopted to model the slack/tensioned cables. Then, from the energy standpoint, the kinetic energy, elasticity-potential energy and geopotential energy of the cable-net structure and deployable truss are derived. Thus, the flexible multi-body dynamic model of the deployable antenna is built based on the Lagrange equation. The effect of the cable-net tension on the antenna truss is discussed and compared with previous publications and a dynamic deployment analysis is performed. Both the simulation and experimental results verify the validity of the method presented.

  2. toolkit computational mesh conceptual model.

    SciTech Connect

    Baur, David G.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Cochran, William K.; Williams, Alan B.; Sjaardema, Gregory D.

    2010-03-01

    The Sierra Toolkit computational mesh is a software library intended to support massively parallel multi-physics computations on dynamically changing unstructured meshes. This domain of intended use is inherently complex due to distributed memory parallelism, parallel scalability, heterogeneity of physics, heterogeneous discretization of an unstructured mesh, and runtime adaptation of the mesh. Management of this inherent complexity begins with a conceptual analysis and modeling of this domain of intended use; i.e., development of a domain model. The Sierra Toolkit computational mesh software library is designed and implemented based upon this domain model. Software developers using, maintaining, or extending the Sierra Toolkit computational mesh library must be familiar with the concepts/domain model presented in this report.

  3. An Adaptive Mesh Algorithm: Mesh Structure and Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Scannapieco, Anthony J.

    2016-06-21

    The purpose of Adaptive Mesh Refinement is to minimize spatial errors over the computational space not to minimize the number of computational elements. The additional result of the technique is that it may reduce the number of computational elements needed to retain a given level of spatial accuracy. Adaptive mesh refinement is a computational technique used to dynamically select, over a region of space, a set of computational elements designed to minimize spatial error in the computational model of a physical process. The fundamental idea is to increase the mesh resolution in regions where the physical variables are represented by a broad spectrum of modes in k-space, hence increasing the effective global spectral coverage of those physical variables. In addition, the selection of the spatially distributed elements is done dynamically by cyclically adjusting the mesh to follow the spectral evolution of the system. Over the years three types of AMR schemes have evolved; block, patch and locally refined AMR. In block and patch AMR logical blocks of various grid sizes are overlaid to span the physical space of interest, whereas in locally refined AMR no logical blocks are employed but locally nested mesh levels are used to span the physical space. The distinction between block and patch AMR is that in block AMR the original blocks refine and coarsen entirely in time, whereas in patch AMR the patches change location and zone size with time. The type of AMR described herein is a locally refi ned AMR. In the algorithm described, at any point in physical space only one zone exists at whatever level of mesh that is appropriate for that physical location. The dynamic creation of a locally refi ned computational mesh is made practical by a judicious selection of mesh rules. With these rules the mesh is evolved via a mesh potential designed to concentrate the nest mesh in regions where the physics is modally dense, and coarsen zones in regions where the physics is modally

  4. Multigrid techniques for unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of current multigrid techniques for unstructured meshes is given. The basic principles of the multigrid approach are first outlined. Application of these principles to unstructured mesh problems is then described, illustrating various different approaches, and giving examples of practical applications. Advanced multigrid topics, such as the use of algebraic multigrid methods, and the combination of multigrid techniques with adaptive meshing strategies are dealt with in subsequent sections. These represent current areas of research, and the unresolved issues are discussed. The presentation is organized in an educational manner, for readers familiar with computational fluid dynamics, wishing to learn more about current unstructured mesh techniques.

  5. Compensation for Primary Reflector Wavefront Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinel, A. B. (Inventor); Meinel, M. P. (Inventor); Stacy, J. E. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The object of the invention is to compensate for errors in a large telescope primary reflector by making certain compensating deviations in a smaller, auxiliary reflector of the telescope. At least one intermediate element forms an image of the primary surface onto the secondary surface, so each point on the secondary surface corresponds to a point on the primary surface. The secondary surface is formed with a deviation from an ideal secondary surface, with the piston distance of each point on the actual secondary surface equal to the piston distance of a corresponding piston on the actual primary surface from the ideal primary surface. It is found that this results in electromagnetic (e.g., light) rays which strike a deviating area of the actual primary surface being brought to the same focus as if the actual primary surface did not have a diviation from an ideal primary surface.

  6. Contour mode resonators with acoustic reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; Fleming, James G.; Tuck, Melanie R.

    2008-06-10

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) resonator is disclosed which has a linear or ring-shaped acoustic resonator suspended above a substrate by an acoustic reflector. The acoustic resonator can be formed with a piezoelectric material (e.g. aluminum nitride, zinc oxide or PZT), or using an electrostatically-actuated material. The acoustic reflector (also termed an acoustic mirror) uses alternating sections of a relatively low acoustic impedance Z.sub.L material and a relatively high acoustic impedance Z.sub.H material to isolate the acoustic resonator from the substrate. The MEM resonator, which can be formed on a silicon substrate with conventional CMOS circuitry, has applications for forming oscillators, rf filters, and acoustic sensors.

  7. Isogrid Membranes for Precise, Singly Curved Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Lou, Michael

    2005-01-01

    A new type of composite material has been proposed for membranes that would constitute the reflective surfaces of planned lightweight, single-curvature (e.g., parabolic cylindrical) reflectors for some radar and radio-communication systems. The proposed composite materials would consist of polyimide membranes containing embedded grids of highstrength (e.g., carbon) fibers. The purpose of the fiber reinforcements, as explained in more detail below, is to prevent wrinkling or rippling of the membrane.

  8. Simulation of parabolic reflectors for ultraviolet phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, David Robert

    2016-08-01

    Ultraviolet (UVR) phototherapy is widely used to treat an array of skin conditions, including psoriasis, eczema and vitiligo. For such interventions, a quantified dose is vital if the treatment is to be both biologically effective and to avoid the detrimental effects of over-dosing. As dose is absorbed at surface level, the orientation of patient site with respect to the UVR lamps modulates effective dose. Previous investigations have modelled this behaviour, and examined the impact of shaped anodized aluminium reflectors typically placed around lamps in phototherapy cabins. These mirrors are effective but tend to yield complex patterns of reflection around the cabin which can result in substantial dose inhomogeneity. There has been some speculation over whether using the reflective property of parabolic mirrors might improve dose delivery or homogeneity through the treatment cabin. In this work, the effects of parabolic mirrors are simulated and compared with standard shaped mirrors. Simulation results strongly suggest that parabolic reflectors reduce total irradiance relative to standard shaped reflectors, and have a negligible impact on dose homogeneity.

  9. Analysis of Reflector Antennas in Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeap, K. H.; Loh, M. C.; Tham, C. Y.; Yiam, C. Y.; Yeong, K. C.; Lai, K. C.

    2016-11-01

    We present an analysis on the performance of the Cassegrain and Gregorian on-axis, off-axis and offset antennas. In our study, we have adopted the design parameters for the Cassegrain configuration used in the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) project. Modifications on the original parameters are made so as to meet the design requirement for the off-axis and offset configurations. To reduce spillover loss in the offset antennas, we have adjusted the angle between the axis of the primary reflector and that of the sub-reflector, so that the feed horn is placed right next to the edge of the primary reflector. This is to allow the offset antennas to receive the highest power at the feed horn. The results obtained from the physical optics simulation show that the radiation characteristics of both Cassegrain and Gregorian antennas are similar. The offset designs exhibit the best performance, followed by the on-axis, and, finally, the off-axis designs. Our analysis also shows that the performance of both offset Cassegrain and Gregorian antennas are comparable to each other.

  10. Wavefront Correction for Large, Flexible Antenna Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.; Jammejad, Vahraz; Rajagopalan, Harish; Xu, Shenheng

    2010-01-01

    A wavefront-correction system has been proposed as part of an outer-space radio communication system that would include a large, somewhat flexible main reflector antenna, a smaller subreflector antenna, and a small array feed at the focal plane of these two reflector antennas. Part of the wavefront-correction system would reside in the subreflector, which would be a planar patch-element reflectarray antenna in which the phase shifts of the patch antenna elements would be controlled via microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) radio -frequency (RF) switches. The system would include the following sensing-and-computing subsystems: a) An optical photogrammetric subsystem built around two cameras would estimate geometric distortions of the main reflector; b) A second subsystem would estimate wavefront distortions from amplitudes and phases of signals received by the array feed elements; and c) A third subsystem, built around small probes on the subreflector plane, would estimate wavefront distortions from differences among phases of signals received by the probes. The distortion estimates from the three subsystems would be processed to generate control signals to be fed to the MEMS RF switches to correct for the distortions, thereby enabling collimation and aiming of the received or transmitted radio beam to the required precision.

  11. Vacuum deposited polymer/silver reflector material

    SciTech Connect

    Affinito, J.; Martin, P.; Gross, M.; Bennett, W.

    1994-07-01

    Weatherable, low cost, front surface, solar reflectors on flexible substrates would be highly desirable for lamination to solar concentrator panels. The method to be described in this paper may permit such reflector material to be fabricated for less than 50 cents per square foot. Vacuum deposited Polymer/Silver/Polymer reflectors and Fabry-Perot interference filters were fabricated in a vacuum web coating operation on polyester substrates. Reflectivities were measured in the wavelength range from .4 {mu}m to .8 {mu}m. It is hoped that a low cost substrate can be used with the substrate laminated to the concentrator and the weatherable acrylic polymer coating facing the sun. This technique should be capable of deposition line speeds approaching 1500 linear feet/minute. Central to this technique is a new vacuum deposition process for the high rate deposition of polymer films. This polymer process involves the flash evaporation of an acrylic monomer onto a moving substrate. The monomer is subsequently cured by an electron beam or ultraviolet light. This high speed polymer film deposition process has been named the PML process - for Polymer Multi-Layer.

  12. Host response to synthetic mesh in women with mesh complications

    PubMed Central

    Nolfi, Alexis L.; Brown, Bryan N.; Liang, Rui; Palcsey, Stacy L.; Bonidie, Michael J.; Abramowitch, Steven D.; Moalli, Pamela A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite good anatomic and functional outcomes, urogynecologic polypropylene meshes that are used to treat pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence are associated with significant complications, most commonly mesh exposure and pain. Few studies have been performed that specifically focus on the host response to urogynecologic meshes. The macrophage has long been known to be the key cell type that mediates the foreign body response. Conceptually, macrophages that respond to a foreign body can be dichotomized broadly into M1 proinflammatory and M2 proremodeling subtypes. A prolonged M1 response is thought to result in chronic inflammation and the formation of foreign body giant cells with potential for ongoing tissue damage and destruction. Although a limited M2 predominant response is favorable for tissue integration and ingrowth, excessive M2 activity can lead to accelerated fibrillar matrix deposition and result in fibrosis and encapsulation of the mesh. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to define and compare the macrophage response in patients who undergo mesh excision surgery for the indication of pain vs a mesh exposure. STUDY DESIGN Patients who were scheduled to undergo a surgical excision of mesh for pain or exposure at Magee-Womens Hospital were offered enrollment. Twenty-seven mesh-vagina complexes that were removed for the primary complaint of a mesh exposure (n = 15) vs pain in the absence of an exposure (n = 12) were compared with 30 full-thickness vaginal biopsy specimens from women who underwent benign gynecologic surgery without mesh. Macrophage M1 proinflammatory vs M2 proremodeling phenotypes were examined via immunofluorescent labeling for cell surface markers CD86 (M1) vs CD206 (M2) and M1 vs M2 cytokines via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The amount of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) proteolytic enzymes were quantified by zymography and substrate degradation assays, as an

  13. Risk Factors for Mesh Exposure after Transvaginal Mesh Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Ke; Lu, Yong-Xian; Shen, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Ying-Hui; Wang, Wen-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mesh exposure after surgery continues to be a clinical challenge for urogynecological surgeons. The purpose of this study was to explore the risk factors for polypropylene (PP) mesh exposure after transvaginal mesh (TVM) surgery. Methods: This study included 195 patients with advanced pelvic organ prolapse (POP), who underwent TVM from January 2004 to December 2012 at the First Affiliated Hospital of Chinese PLA General Hospital. Clinical data were evaluated including patient's demography, TVM type, concomitant procedures, operation time, blood loss, postoperative morbidity, and mesh exposure. Mesh exposure was identified through postoperative vaginal examination. Statistical analysis was performed to identify risk factors for mesh exposure. Results: Two-hundred and nine transvaginal PP meshes were placed, including 194 in the anterior wall and 15 in the posterior wall. Concomitant tension-free vaginal tape was performed in 61 cases. The mean follow-up time was 35.1 ± 23.6 months. PP mesh exposure was identified in 32 cases (16.4%), with 31 in the anterior wall and 1 in the posterior wall. Significant difference was found in operating time and concomitant procedures between exposed and nonexposed groups (F = 7.443, P = 0.007; F = 4.307, P = 0.039, respectively). Binary logistic regression revealed that the number of concomitant procedures and operation time were risk factors for mesh exposure (P = 0.001, P = 0.043). Conclusion: Concomitant procedures and increased operating time increase the risk for postoperative mesh exposure in patients undergoing TVM surgery for POP. PMID:27453227

  14. Invisible metallic mesh

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Dexin; Lu, Ling; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Ran, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    A solid material possessing identical electromagnetic properties as air has yet to be found in nature. Such a medium of arbitrary shape would neither reflect nor refract light at any angle of incidence in free space. Here, we introduce nonscattering corrugated metallic wires to construct such a medium. This was accomplished by aligning the dark-state frequencies in multiple scattering channels of a single wire. Analytical solutions, full-wave simulations, and microwave measurement results on 3D printed samples show omnidirectional invisibility in any configuration. This invisible metallic mesh can improve mechanical stability, electrical conduction, and heat dissipation of a system, without disturbing the electromagnetic design. Our approach is simple, robust, and scalable to higher frequencies. PMID:26884208

  15. Quadrilateral finite element mesh coarsening

    SciTech Connect

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16

    Techniques for coarsening a quadrilateral mesh are described. These techniques include identifying a coarsening region within the quadrilateral mesh to be coarsened. Quadrilateral elements along a path through the coarsening region are removed. Node pairs along opposite sides of the path are identified. The node pairs along the path are then merged to collapse the path.

  16. Which mesh for hernia repair?

    PubMed Central

    Brown, CN; Finch, JG

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The concept of using a mesh to repair hernias was introduced over 50 years ago. Mesh repair is now standard in most countries and widely accepted as superior to primary suture repair. As a result, there has been a rapid growth in the variety of meshes available and choosing the appropriate one can be difficult. This article outlines the general properties of meshes and factors to be considered when selecting one. MATERIALS AND METHODS We performed a search of the medical literature from 1950 to 1 May 2009, as indexed by Medline, using the PubMed search engine (). To capture all potentially relevant articles with the highest degree of sensitivity, the search terms were intentionally broad. We used the following terms: ‘mesh, pore size, strength, recurrence, complications, lightweight, properties’. We also hand-searched the bibliographies of relevant articles and product literature to identify additional pertinent reports. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS The most important properties of meshes were found to be the type of filament, tensile strength and porosity. These determine the weight of the mesh and its biocompatibility. The tensile strength required is much less than originally presumed and light-weight meshes are thought to be superior due to their increased flexibility and reduction in discomfort. Large pores are also associated with a reduced risk of infection and shrinkage. For meshes placed in the peritoneal cavity, consideration should also be given to the risk of adhesion formation. A variety of composite meshes have been promoted to address this, but none appears superior to the others. Finally, biomaterials such as acellular dermis have a place for use in infected fields but have yet to prove their worth in routine hernia repair. PMID:20501011

  17. Properties of wideband resonant reflectors under fully conical light incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Yeong Hwan; Niraula, Manoj; Lee, Kyu Jin; Magnusson, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Applying numerical modeling coupled with experiments, we investigate the properties of wideband resonant reflectors under fully conical light incidence. We show that the wave vectors pertinent to resonant first-order diffraction under fully conical mounting vary less with incident angle than those associated with reflectors in classical mounting. Therefore, as the evanescent diffracted waves drive the leaky modes responsible for the resonance effects, fully-conical mounting imbues reflectors with larger angular tolerance than their classical counterparts. We quantify the angular-spectral performance of representative resonant wideband reflectors in conic and classic mounts by numerical calculations with improved spectra found for fully conic incidence. Moreover, these predictions are verified experimentally for wideband reflectors fashioned in crystalline and amorphous silicon in distinct spectral regions spanning the 1200-1600-nm and 1600-2400-nm spectral bands. These results will be useful in various applications demanding wideband reflectors that are efficient and materially sparse.

  18. A new approach for shaping of dual-reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Teh-Hong; Burnside, W. D.; Rudduck, Roger C.

    1987-01-01

    The shaping of 2-D dual-reflector antenna systems to generate a prescribed distribution with uniform phase at the aperture of the second reflector is examined. This method is based on the geometrical nature of Cassegrain and Gregorian dual-reflector antennas. The method of syntheses satisfies the principles of geometrical optics which are the foundations of dual-reflector designs. Instead of setting up differential equations or heuristically designing the subreflector, a set of algebraic equations is formulated and solved numerically to obtain the desired surfaces. The caustics of the reflected rays from the subreflector can be obtained and examined. Several examples of 2-D dual-reflector shaping are shown to validate the study. Geometrical optics and physical optics are used to calculate the scattered fields from the reflectors.

  19. Gravity deformation measurements of 70m reflector surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Michael; Imbriale, William A.; Britcliffe, Michael K.

    2001-01-01

    Two of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) 70-meter reflectors are measured using a Leica TDM-5000 theodolite. The main reflector surface was measured at five elevation angles so that a gravity deformation model could be derived that described the main reflector distortions over the entire range of elevation angles. The report describes the measurement equipment and accuracy and the results derived from the data.

  20. Wideband QAMC reflector's antenna for low profile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grelier, M.; Jousset, M.; Mallégol, S.; Lepage, A. C.; Begaud, X.; LeMener, J. M.

    2011-06-01

    A wideband reflector's antenna based on quasi-artificial magnetic conductor is proposed. To validate the design, an Archimedean spiral has been backed to this new reflector. In comparison to classical solution using absorbent material, the prototype presents a very low thickness of λ/15 at the lowest operating frequency and an improved gain over a 2.4:1 bandwidth. The whole methodology to design this reflector can be applied to other wideband antennas.

  1. Controlled-Shape, Ultrasonic-Angle-Beam Standard Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, J., Robertf.

    1986-01-01

    New ultrasonic angle-beam standard reflector uses impression of letter "l" steel-die stamp. NDE techniques and standard reflector apply to use of pulse-echo-type ultrasonic equipment for inspection of wrought metals including forgings and forging stock; rolled billet, bar or plate; and extruded bar, tube, and shapes. "l" reference standard reflector affords advantages of easy insertion in inspected item using common hand-tools and greatly reduced implementation time through elimination of machining operations.

  2. The DART Cylindrical, Infrared, 1 Meter Membrane Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Rhonda M.; Agnes, Greg S.; Barber, Dan; Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Hatheway, Al E.; Marcin, Marty

    2004-01-01

    The Dual Anamorphic Reflector Telescopes (DART) is an architecture for large aperture space telescopes that enables the use of membranes. A membrane can be readily shaped in one direction of curvature using a combination of boundary control and tensioning, yielding a cylindrical reflector. Two cylindrical reflectors (orthogonal and confocal) comprise the 'primary mirror' of the telescope system. The aperture is completely unobstructed and ideal for infrared and high contrast observations.

  3. Magnetron sputtering in rigid optical solar reflectors production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asainov, O. Kh; Bainov, D. D.; Krivobokov, V. P.; Sidelev, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetron sputtering was applied to meet the growing need for glass optical solar reflectors. This plasma method provided more uniform deposition of the silver based coating on glass substrates resulted in decrease of defective reflectors fraction down to 5%. For instance, such parameter of resistive evaporation was of 30%. Silver film adhesion to glass substrate was enhanced with indium tin oxide sublayer. Sunlight absorption coefficient of these rigid reflectors was 0.081-0.083.

  4. Testing the figure of parabolic reflectors for solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Bodenheimer, J S; Eisenberg, N P; Gur, J

    1982-12-15

    A novel method for testing the optical quality of large parabolic solar concentrators is presented, based on autocollimation. An optical system continuously scans the reflector along a fixed reference axis. At each position along the axis, the spread function is obtained. Analysis of the location, width, and intensity changes of this function gives quantitative information about the reflector's defects. A figure of merit describing the performance of parabolic trough reflectors is proposed.

  5. Inflatable Reflector For Solar Power And Radio Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sercel, Joel; Gilchriest, Carl; Ewell, Rich; Herman, Martin; Rascoe, Daniel L.; Nesmith, Bill J.

    1995-01-01

    Report proposes installation of lightweight inflatable reflector structure aboard spacecraft required to both derive power from sunlight and communicate with Earth by radio when apparent position of Earth is at manageably small angle from line of sight to Sun. Structure contains large-aperture paraboloidal reflector aimed toward Sun and concentrates sunlight onto photovoltaic power converter and acts as main reflector of spacecraft radio-communication system.

  6. Velocity characteristics of reflectors in solar tower systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparisi, R. R.; Tepliakov, D. I.; Khantsis, B. G.

    An analysis is presented of the velocities of azimuthal and zenithal rotations of reflectors in solar tower systems in relation to reflector arrangement, geographic latitude, and season of the year. Two methods are used in the analysis: (1) the direct calculation of heliostat rotation velocity at successive moments of time; and (2) a generalized representation of reflector velocity fields. Research and engineering applications of the calculations are discussed.

  7. Designs for the ATDRSS tri-band reflector antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Shung-Wu; Zimmerman, Martin L.; Fujikawa, Gene; Sharp, G. Richard

    1991-01-01

    Two approaches to design a tri-band reflector antenna for the Advanced TDRSS are examined. Two reflector antenna configurations utilizing frequency selective surfaces for operation in three frequency bands, S, Ku, and Ka, are proposed. Far-field patterns and the antenna feed losses were computed for each configuration. An offset-fed single reflector antenna configuration was adapted for conceptual spacecraft design. CADAM drawings were completed and a 1/13th scale model of the spacecraft was constructed.

  8. Large space reflector technology on the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankins, J. C.; Dickinson, R. M.; Freeland, R. E.; Marzwell, N. I.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of the Space Station in the evolutionary development of large space reflector technology and the accommodation of mission systems which will apply large space reflectors during the late 1990s and the early part of the next century. Reflectors which range from 10 to 100 meters in size and which span the electromagnetic spectrum for applications that include earth communications, earth observations, astrophysics and solar physics, and deep space communications are discussed. The role of the Space Station in large space reflector technology development and system performance demonstration is found to be critical; that role involves the accommodation of a wide variety of technology demonstrations and operational activities on the Station, including reflector deployment and/or assembly, mechanical performance verification and configuration refinement, systematic diagnostics of reflector surfaces, structural dynamics and controls research, overall system performance characterization and modification (including both radio frequency field pattern measurements and required end-to-end system demonstrations), and reflector-to-spacecraft integration and staging. A unique facility for Space Station-based, large space reflector research and development is proposed. A preliminary concept for such a Space Station-based Large Space Reflector Facility (LSRF) is described.

  9. Ellipsoidal reflector design of the LED vehicle projector type headlamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Shang-Ping; Lyu, Jhen-Cyun

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the design of the projector type headlamp using LEDs with different structure parameters is proposed. The ellipsoidal reflector with different major and minor axis would contribute different aperture and focal lengths of the ellipsoidal reflector, and then collimate the light to the converging lens. With specific converging lens and metal-based baffle plate in the projector type headlamp system, we systematical analysis of the ellipsoidal reflector in the projector type headlamp. The systematical analysis of the ellipsoidal reflector can be a reference to design a projector type headlamp with compact size and high photometry performance.

  10. POMESH - DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF REFLECTOR ANTENNAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    POMESH is a computer program capable of predicting the performance of reflector antennas. Both far field pattern and gain calculations are performed using the Physical Optics (PO) approximation of the equivalent surface currents. POMESH is primarily intended for relatively small reflectors. It is useful in situations where the surface is described by irregular data that must be interpolated and for cases where the surface derivatives are not known. This method is flexible and robust and also supports near field calculations. Because of the near field computation ability, this computational engine is quite useful for subreflector computations. The program is constructed in a highly modular form so that it may be readily adapted to perform tasks other than the one that is explicitly described here. Since the computationally intensive portions of the algorithm are simple loops, the program can be easily adapted to take advantage of vector processor and parallel architectures. In POMESH the reflector is represented as a piecewise planar surface comprised of triangular regions known as facets. A uniform physical optics (PO) current is assumed to exist on each triangular facet. Then, the PO integral on a facet is approximated by the product of the PO current value at the center and the area of the triangle. In this way, the PO integral over the reflector surface is reduced to a summation of the contribution from each triangular facet. The source horn, or feed, that illuminates the subreflector is approximated by a linear combination of plane patterns. POMESH contains three polarization pattern definitions for the feed; a linear x-polarized element, linear y-polarized element, and a circular polarized element. If a more general feed pattern is required, it is a simple matter to replace the subroutine that implements the pattern definitions. POMESH obtains information necessary to specify the coordinate systems, location of other data files, and parameters of the desired

  11. 21 CFR 878.3300 - Surgical mesh.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3300 Surgical mesh. (a) Identification... acetabular and cement restrictor mesh used during orthopedic surgery. (b) Classification. Class II....

  12. 21 CFR 878.3300 - Surgical mesh.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3300 Surgical mesh. (a) Identification... acetabular and cement restrictor mesh used during orthopedic surgery. (b) Classification. Class II....

  13. 21 CFR 878.3300 - Surgical mesh.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3300 Surgical mesh. (a) Identification... acetabular and cement restrictor mesh used during orthopedic surgery. (b) Classification. Class II....

  14. Streaming Compression of Hexahedral Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Isenburg, M; Courbet, C

    2010-02-03

    We describe a method for streaming compression of hexahedral meshes. Given an interleaved stream of vertices and hexahedral our coder incrementally compresses the mesh in the presented order. Our coder is extremely memory efficient when the input stream documents when vertices are referenced for the last time (i.e. when it contains topological finalization tags). Our coder then continuously releases and reuses data structures that no longer contribute to compressing the remainder of the stream. This means in practice that our coder has only a small fraction of the whole mesh in memory at any time. We can therefore compress very large meshes - even meshes that do not file in memory. Compared to traditional, non-streaming approaches that load the entire mesh and globally reorder it during compression, our algorithm trades a less compact compressed representation for significant gains in speed, memory, and I/O efficiency. For example, on the 456k hexahedra 'blade' mesh, our coder is twice as fast and uses 88 times less memory (only 3.1 MB) with the compressed file increasing about 3% in size. We also present the first scheme for predictive compression of properties associated with hexahedral cells.

  15. Free-flying solar reflector spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Results of investigations of requirements and design concepts for large solar-reflecting spacecraft are given. The emphasis is on the one kilometer diameter self contained spacecraft that can be packaged and launched in the space shuttle. The configuration consists of a compression rim stabilized by stays coming from each end of the central compression hub. The stays are stowed on reels on the ends of the hub. The hub consists of two Astromasts which are deployed after launch. The reflector membrane is a two micron thick Kapton film with a vapor deposited aluminum coating.

  16. Experiences with large CFRP-radiotelescope reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muser, D.

    1991-10-01

    Since 1986 several ground based 15 m radiotelescopes with CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic) structures and reflector panels are under operation in the millimeter wavelength range. A new submillimeter telescope with 10 m diameter is under manufacture. Analysis and design, manufacturing and qualification show the advantages of CFRP. While the assembled dishes have accuracies of some 50 micrometers rms the mean value of about 1000 panels was measured to 12 micrometer rms. These results show the possibilities of manufacturing large space based antennae with the required accuracies for millimeter and submillimeter operations.

  17. Bright color reflective displays with interlayer reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitson, Stephen; Geisow, Adrian; Rudin, John; Taphouse, Tim

    2011-08-01

    A good solution to the reflective display of color has been a major challenge for the display industry, with very limited color gamuts demonstrated to date. Conventional side-by-side red, green and blue color filters waste two-thirds of incident light. The alternative of stacking cyan, magenta and yellow layers is also challenging -- a 10% loss per layer compounds to nearly 50% overall. Here we demonstrate an architecture that interleaves absorbing-to-clear shutters with matched wavelength selective reflectors. This increases color gamut by reducing losses and more cleanly separating the color channels, and gives much wider choice of electro-optic colorants.

  18. Solar Tracking Error Analysis of Fresnel Reflector

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiantao; Yan, Junjie; Pei, Jie; Liu, Guanjie

    2014-01-01

    Depending on the rotational structure of Fresnel reflector, the rotation angle of the mirror was deduced under the eccentric condition. By analyzing the influence of the sun tracking rotation angle error caused by main factors, the change rule and extent of the influence were revealed. It is concluded that the tracking errors caused by the difference between the rotation axis and true north meridian, at noon, were maximum under certain conditions and reduced at morning and afternoon gradually. The tracking error caused by other deviations such as rotating eccentric, latitude, and solar altitude was positive at morning, negative at afternoon, and zero at a certain moment of noon. PMID:24895664

  19. Nanowire mesh solar fuels generator

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Chan, Candace; Sun, Jianwei; Liu, Bin

    2016-05-24

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to a nanowire mesh solar fuels generator. In one aspect, a nanowire mesh solar fuels generator includes (1) a photoanode configured to perform water oxidation and (2) a photocathode configured to perform water reduction. The photocathode is in electrical contact with the photoanode. The photoanode may include a high surface area network of photoanode nanowires. The photocathode may include a high surface area network of photocathode nanowires. In some embodiments, the nanowire mesh solar fuels generator may include an ion conductive polymer infiltrating the photoanode and the photocathode in the region where the photocathode is in electrical contact with the photoanode.

  20. Application of Vision Metrology to In-Orbit Measurement of Large Reflector Onboard Communication Satellite for Next Generation Mobile Satellite Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akioka, M.; Orikasa, T.; Satoh, M.; Miura, A.; Tsuji, H.; Toyoshima, M.; Fujino, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Satellite for next generation mobile satellite communication service with small personal terminal requires onboard antenna with very large aperture reflector larger than twenty meters diameter because small personal terminal with lower power consumption in ground base requires the large onboard reflector with high antenna gain. But, large deployable antenna will deform in orbit because the antenna is not a solid dish but the flexible structure with fine cable and mesh supported by truss. Deformation of reflector shape deteriorate the antenna performance and quality and stability of communication service. However, in case of digital beam forming antenna with phased array can modify the antenna beam performance due to adjustment of excitation amplitude and excitation phase. If we can measure the reflector shape precisely in orbit, beam pattern and antenna performance can be compensated with the updated excitation amplitude and excitation phase parameters optimized for the reflector shape measured every moment. Softbank Corporation and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology has started the project "R&D on dynamic beam control technique for next generation mobile communication satellite" as a contracted research project sponsored by Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communication of Japan. In this topic, one of the problem in vision metrology application is a strong constraints on geometry for camera arrangement on satellite bus with very limited space. On satellite in orbit, we cannot take many images from many different directions as ordinary vision metrology measurement and the available area for camera positioning is quite limited. Feasibility of vision metrology application and general methodology to apply to future mobile satellite communication satellite is to be found. Our approach is as follows: 1) Development of prototyping simulator to evaluate the expected precision for network design in zero order and first order 2) Trial

  1. New CPV Systems With Static Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripanagnostopoulos, Y.; Chemisana, D.; Rosell, J. I.; Souliotis, M.

    2010-10-01

    New designs of low concentrating photovoltaics have been studied, where static reflectors and moving absorbers that track the concentrated solar rays, aim to cost effective solar devices. These systems are based on the concept that strip absorbers can use the beam radiation and convert it to electricity, while the diffuse radiation is absorbed by flat absorbers and converted into heat. The work on these designs follow the research on the linear Fresnel lenses, which are combined with PV or PV/T absorbers and can be used not only for the conversion of solar radiation into electricity and heat but also to control the illumination and the temperature of interior building spaces. Design aspects and optical results give a figure of the optical performance of these new CPV collectors, which are based on the converged solar radiation distribution profiles for East-West orientation of parabolic trough reflectors. The concentration ratio depends on the geometry of the parabola axis and the higher values correspond to the axis towards the summer solstice. The results show that the new CPV designs can be effectively applied in buildings adapting energy demand in electricity and heat.

  2. Hybrid grating reflectors: Origin of ultrabroad stopband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gyeong Cheol; Taghizadeh, Alireza; Chung, Il-Sug

    2016-04-01

    Hybrid grating (HG) reflectors with a high-refractive-index cap layer added onto a high contrast grating (HCG) provide a high reflectance close to 100% over a broader wavelength range than HCGs. The combination of a cap layer and a grating layer brings a strong Fabry-Perot (FP) resonance as well as a weak guided mode (GM) resonance. Most of the reflected power results from the FP resonance, while the GM resonance plays a key role in achieving a reflectance close to 100% as well as broadening the stopband. An HG sample with 7 InGaAlAs quantum wells included in the cap layer has been fabricated by directly wafer-bonding a III-V cap layer onto a Si grating layer. Its reflection property has been characterized. This heterogeneously integrated HG reflector may allow for a hybrid III-V on Si laser to be thermally efficient, which has promising prospects for silicon photonics light sources and high-speed operation.

  3. Optical Reflectance Measurements for Commonly Used Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Janecek, Petr Martin; Moses, William

    2008-06-11

    When simulating light collection in scintillators, modeling the angular distribution of optical light reflectance from surfaces is very important. Since light reflectance is poorly understood, either purely specular or purely diffuse reflectance is generally assumed. In this paper we measure the optical reflectance distribution for eleven commonly used reflectors. A 440 nm, output power stabilized, un-polarized laser is shone onto a reflector at a fixed angle of incidence. The reflected light's angular distribution is measured by an array of silicon photodiodes. The photodiodes are movable to cover 2 pi of solid angle. The light-induced current is, through a multiplexer, read out with a digital multimeter. A LabVIEW program controls the motion of the laser and the photodiode array, the multiplexer, and the data collection. The laser can be positioned at any angle with a position accuracy of 10 arc minutes. Each photodiode subtends 6.3o, and the photodiode array can be positioned at any angle with up to 10 arc minute angular resolution. The dynamic range for the current measurements is 105:1. The measured light reflectance distribution was measured to be specular for several ESR films as well as for aluminum foil, mostly diffuse for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tape and titanium dioxide paint, and neither specular nor diffuse for Lumirror(R), Melinex(R) and Tyvek(R). Instead, a more complicated light distribution was measured for these three materials.

  4. Test progress on the electrostatic membrane reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goslee, J. W.; Mihora, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    NASA is currently developing a low mass antenna which derives its reflector surface quality from the application of electrostatic forces to form a thin membrane into the desired concave reflector surface. The shuttle-deployed antenna would have a diameter of 100 m and an RMS surface smoothness of 10 to 1 mm for operation at 1 to 10 GHz. Surface quality measurements have been made on a highly deformable elastic membrane, pressurized by electrostatic forces. Included are the effects of the perimeter boundary, splicing of the membrane, the long-scale smoothness of commercial membranes, and the spatial controllability of the membrane using voltage adjustments to alter the electrostatic forces. The electrostatic membrane was found to operate well in an open-loop sense, showing a high degree of position stability and negligible power consumption in dry air. Visco-electric creep was not evident, but the polymer membrane did expand and contract considerably due to its hygroscopic expansion coefficient. A residual roughness of about 0.75 mm existed with the polymer used in these tests; this error is attributed to seams and membrane anisotropy where the material is stiffer in one direction.

  5. Gradient scaling for nonuniform meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Margolin, L.G.; Ruppel, H.M.; Demuth, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the effect of nonuniform meshes on the accuracy of finite-difference calculations of fluid flow. In particular, when a simple shock propagates through a nonuniform mesh, one may fail to model the jump conditions across the shock even when the equations are differenced in manifestly conservative fashion. We develop an approximate dispersion analysis of the numerical equations and identify the source of the mesh dependency with the form of the artificial viscosity. We then derive an algebraic correction to the numerical equations - a scaling factor for the pressure gradient - to essentially eliminate the mesh dependency. We present several calculations to illustrate our theory. We conclude with an alternate interpretation of our results. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Mersiline mesh in premaxillary augmentation.

    PubMed

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2005-01-01

    Premaxillary retrusion may distort the aesthetic appearance of the columella, lip, and nasal tip. This defect is characteristically seen in, but not limited to, patients with cleft lip nasal deformity. This study investigated 60 patients presenting with premaxillary deficiencies in which Mersiline mesh was used to augment the premaxilla. All the cases had surgery using the external rhinoplasty technique. Two methods of augmentation with Mersiline mesh were used: the Mersiline roll technique, for the cases with central symmetric deficiencies, and the Mersiline packing technique, for the cases with asymmetric deficiencies. Premaxillary augmentation with Mersiline mesh proved to be simple technically, easy to perform, and not associated with any complications. Periodic follow-up evaluation for a mean period of 32 months (range, 12-98 months) showed that an adequate degree of premaxillary augmentation was maintained with no clinically detectable resorption of the mesh implant.

  7. Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac-Neice, Peter; Olson, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement Library (PARAMESH) is a package of Fortran 90 subroutines designed to provide a computer programmer with an easy route to extension of (1) a previously written serial code that uses a logically Cartesian structured mesh into (2) a parallel code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Alternatively, in its simplest use, and with minimal effort, PARAMESH can operate as a domain-decomposition tool for users who want to parallelize their serial codes but who do not wish to utilize adaptivity. The package builds a hierarchy of sub-grids to cover the computational domain of a given application program, with spatial resolution varying to satisfy the demands of the application. The sub-grid blocks form the nodes of a tree data structure (a quad-tree in two or an oct-tree in three dimensions). Each grid block has a logically Cartesian mesh. The package supports one-, two- and three-dimensional models.

  8. 78 FR 14357 - Certain Compact Fluorescent Reflector Lamps, Products Containing Same and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... COMMISSION Certain Compact Fluorescent Reflector Lamps, Products Containing Same and Components Thereof... importation of certain compact fluorescent reflector lamps, products containing same and components thereof by... importation of certain compact fluorescent reflector lamps, products containing same and components thereof...

  9. Unstructured mesh methods for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, J.; Morgan, K.; Peiro, J.

    1990-01-01

    Mesh generation methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are outlined. Geometric modeling is discussed. An advancing front method is described. Flow past a two engine Falcon aeroplane is studied. An algorithm and associated data structure called the alternating digital tree, which efficiently solves the geometric searching problem is described. The computation of an initial approximation to the steady state solution of a given poblem is described. Mesh generation for transient flows is described.

  10. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  11. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  12. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  13. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  14. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  15. Detail of 25' highband reflector screen poles with monopole antenna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of 25' high-band reflector screen poles with monopole antenna elements behind, note the metal sleeve bases of the reflector screen poles and the guy wire anchors from the dipole antenna elements (left foreground), view facing north northwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  16. Detail of 25' highband reflector screen pole showing the horizontal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of 25' high-band reflector screen pole showing the horizontal wood beams and vertical wires hung from ceramic insulators, note the dipole antenna element and 94' low-band reflector screen poles in background, view facing north - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  17. 33 CFR 118.120 - Radar reflectors and racons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.120 Radar reflectors and racons. The District Commander may require or authorize the installation of radar reflectors and racons on bridge structures, stakes... bridge channel piers. Racons are used to mark the centerline of the channel....

  18. 33 CFR 118.120 - Radar reflectors and racons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.120 Radar reflectors and racons. The District Commander may require or authorize the installation of radar reflectors and racons on bridge structures, stakes... bridge channel piers. Racons are used to mark the centerline of the channel....

  19. 33 CFR 118.120 - Radar reflectors and racons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.120 Radar reflectors and racons. The District Commander may require or authorize the installation of radar reflectors and racons on bridge structures, stakes... bridge channel piers. Racons are used to mark the centerline of the channel....

  20. 33 CFR 118.120 - Radar reflectors and racons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.120 Radar reflectors and racons. The District Commander may require or authorize the installation of radar reflectors and racons on bridge structures, stakes... bridge channel piers. Racons are used to mark the centerline of the channel....

  1. 33 CFR 118.120 - Radar reflectors and racons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.120 Radar reflectors and racons. The District Commander may require or authorize the installation of radar reflectors and racons on bridge structures, stakes... bridge channel piers. Racons are used to mark the centerline of the channel....

  2. Modeling Mechanical Behavior of a Prismatic Replaceable Reflector Block

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Bratton

    2009-04-01

    This report outlines the development of finite element models used to determine temperature and stresses in a prismatic core reflector block. This initial analysis determines an appropriate temperature distribution in a prismatic reflector from limiting conditions in the adjacent fuel block based on simplifying assumptions.

  3. Study variants of hard CFRP reflector for intersatellite communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosuntsov, PV; Reznik, SV; Mikhailovsky, KV; Novikov, AD; Aung, Zaw Ye

    2016-10-01

    The paper deals with the justification of space antennas reflector layout for advanced telecommunication satellites. The selection of design decisions is based on numerical simulations of heat transfer and mechanics processes characteristic of the geostationary orbit conditions. The advantages of parabolic shell of small thickness reflector scheme reinforced with star-shaped ribs on the convex side are demonstrated.

  4. X-ray resonator with pear-shaped reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Churikov, V A

    2003-11-30

    An X-ray resonator design is proposed in which peculiar pear-shaped reflectors, which are grazing-incidence X-ray mirrors, serve as optical elements. Special features of this resonator are relatively high reflector efficiencies and the axial symmetry of the output radiation. (resonators)

  5. Method and system for mesh network embedded devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ray (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and system for managing mesh network devices. A mesh network device with integrated features creates an N-way mesh network with a full mesh network topology or a partial mesh network topology.

  6. Secondary pattern computation of an offset reflector antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Reflector antennas are widely used in communications satellite systems because they provide high gain at low cost. In analyzing reflector antennas the computation of the secondary pattern is the main concern. A computer program for calculating the secondary pattern of an offset reflector has been developed and implemented at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The theoretical foundation for this program is based on the use of geometrical optics to describe the fields from the feed to the reflector surface and to the aperture plane. The resulting aperture field distribution is then transformed to the far-field zone by the fast Fourier transform algorithm. Comparing this technique with other well-known techniques (the geometrical theory of diffraction, physical optics (Jacobi-Bessel), etc.) shows good agreement for large (diameter of 100 lambda or greater) reflector antennas.

  7. Self-clamping arc light reflector for welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    This invention is directed to a coaxial extending metal mirror reflector attached to the electrode housing or gas cup on a welding torch. An electric welding torch with an internal viewing system for robotic welding is provded with an annular arc light reflector to reflect light from the arc back onto the workpiece. The reflector has a vertical split or gap in its surrounding wall to permit the adjacent wall ends forming the split to be sprung open slightly to permit the reflector to be removed or slipped onto the torch housing or gas cup. The upper opening of the reflector is slightly smaller than the torch housing or gas cup and therefore, when placed on the torch housing or gas cup has that springiness to cause it to clamp tightly on the housing or gas cup. The split or gap also serves to permit the feed of weld wire through to the weld area,

  8. Self-clamping arc light reflector for welding torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.

    1987-07-01

    This invention is directed to a coaxial extending metal mirror reflector attached to the electrode housing or gas cup on a welding torch. An electric welding torch with an internal viewing system for robotic welding is provded with an annular arc light reflector to reflect light from the arc back onto the workpiece. The reflector has a vertical split or gap in its surrounding wall to permit the adjacent wall ends forming the split to be sprung open slightly to permit the reflector to be removed or slipped onto the torch housing or gas cup. The upper opening of the reflector is slightly smaller than the torch housing or gas cup and therefore, when placed on the torch housing or gas cup has that springiness to cause it to clamp tightly on the housing or gas cup. The split or gap also serves to permit the feed of weld wire through to the weld area,

  9. Deployment simulation of a deployable reflector for earth science application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaokai; Fang, Houfei; Cai, Bei; Ma, Xiaofei

    2015-10-01

    A novel mission concept namely NEXRAD-In-Space (NIS) has been developed for monitoring hurricanes, cyclones and other severe storms from a geostationary orbit. It requires a space deployable 35-meter diameter Ka-band (35 GHz) reflector. NIS can measure hurricane precipitation intensity, dynamics and its life cycle. These information is necessary for predicting the track, intensity, rain rate and hurricane-induced floods. To meet the requirements of the radar system, a Membrane Shell Reflector Segment (MSRS) reflector technology has been developed and several technologies have been evaluated. However, the deployment analysis of this large size and high-precision reflector has not been investigated. For a pre-studies, a scaled tetrahedral truss reflector with spring driving deployment system has been made and tested, deployment dynamics analysis of this scaled reflector has been performed using ADAMS to understand its deployment dynamic behaviors. Eliminating the redundant constraints in the reflector system with a large number of moving parts is a challenging issue. A primitive joint and flexible struts were introduced to the analytical model and they can effectively eliminate over constraints of the model. By using a high-speed camera and a force transducer, a deployment experiment of a single-bay tetrahedral module has been conducted. With the tested results, an optimization process has been performed by using the parameter optimization module of ADAMS to obtain the parameters of the analytical model. These parameters were incorporated to the analytical model of the whole reflector. It is observed from the analysis results that the deployment process of the reflector with a fixed boundary experiences three stages. These stages are rapid deployment stage, slow deployment stage and impact stage. The insight of the force peak distributions of the reflector can help the optimization design of the structure.

  10. Impact of HFIR LEU Conversion on Beryllium Reflector Degradation Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, Dan

    2013-10-01

    An assessment of the impact of low enriched uranium (LEU) conversion on the factors that may cause the degradation of the beryllium reflector is performed for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The computational methods, models, and tools, comparisons with previous work, along with the results obtained are documented and discussed in this report. The report documents the results for the gas and neutronic poison production, and the heating in the beryllium reflector for both the highly enriched uranium (HEU) and LEU HFIR configurations, and discusses the impact that the conversion to LEU may have on these quantities. A time-averaging procedure was developed to calculate the isotopic (gas and poisons) production in reflector. The sensitivity of this approach to different approximations is gauged and documented. The results show that the gas is produced in the beryllium reflector at a total rate of 0.304 g/cycle for the HEU configuration; this rate increases by ~12% for the LEU case. The total tritium production rate in reflector is 0.098 g/cycle for the HEU core and approximately 11% higher for the LEU core. A significant increase (up to ~25%) in the neutronic poisons production in the reflector during the operation cycles is observed for the LEU core, compared to the HEU case, for regions close to the core s horizontal midplane. The poisoning level of the reflector may increase by more than two orders of magnitude during long periods of downtime. The heating rate in the reflector is estimated to be approximately 20% lower for the LEU core than for the HEU core. The decrease is due to a significantly lower contribution of the heating produced by the gamma radiation for the LEU core. Both the isotopic (gas and neutronic poisons) production and the heating rates are spatially non-uniform throughout the beryllium reflector volume. The maximum values typically occur in the removable reflector and close to the midplane.

  11. User Manual for the PROTEUS Mesh Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Micheal A.; Shemon, Emily R.

    2015-06-01

    This report describes the various mesh tools that are provided with the PROTEUS code giving both descriptions of the input and output. In many cases the examples are provided with a regression test of the mesh tools. The most important mesh tools for any user to consider using are the MT_MeshToMesh.x and the MT_RadialLattice.x codes. The former allows the conversion between most mesh types handled by PROTEUS while the second allows the merging of multiple (assembly) meshes into a radial structured grid. Note that the mesh generation process is recursive in nature and that each input specific for a given mesh tool (such as .axial or .merge) can be used as “mesh” input for any of the mesh tools discussed in this manual.

  12. Single port laparoscopic mesh rectopexy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Traditionally, laparoscopic mesh rectopexy is performed with four ports, in an attempt to improve cosmetic results. Following laparoscopic mesh rectopexy there is a new operative technique called single-port laparoscopic mesh rectopexy. Aim To evaluate the single-port laparoscopic mesh rectopexy technique in control of rectal prolapse and the cosmesis and body image issues of this technique. Material and methods The study was conducted in El Fayoum University Hospital between July 2013 and November 2014 in elective surgery for symptomatic rectal prolapse with single-port laparoscopic mesh rectopexy on 10 patients. Results The study included 10 patients: 3 (30%) males and 7 (70%) females. Their ages ranged between 19 years and 60 years (mean: 40.3 ±6 years), and they all underwent laparoscopic mesh rectopexy. There were no conversions to open technique, nor injuries to the rectum or bowel, and there were no mortalities. Mean operative time was 120 min (range: 90–150 min), and mean hospital stay was 2 days (range: 1–3 days). Preoperatively, incontinence was seen in 5 (50%) patients and constipation in 4 (40%). Postoperatively, improvement in these symptoms was seen in 3 (60%) patients for incontinence and in 3 (75%) for constipation. Follow-up was done for 6 months and no recurrence was found with better cosmetic appearance for all patients. Conclusions Single-port laparoscopic mesh rectopexy is a safe procedure with good results as regards operative time, improvement in bowel function, morbidity, cost, and recurrence, and with better cosmetic appearance. PMID:27350840

  13. Integrated 222-GHz corner-reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gearhart, Steven S.; Ling, Curtis C.; Rebeiz, Gabriel M.

    1991-01-01

    A high-gain monolithic millimeter-wave antenna has been designed, fabricated, and tested at 222 GHz. The structure consists of a traveling-wave antenna integrated on a 1.2-micron dielectric membrane and suspended in a longitudinal cavity etched in a silicon wafer. A new traveling-wave antenna design yields a wideband input impedance and a low cross-polarization component in the E- and quasi-H-plane patterns. A directivity of 17.7 dB and a main-beam efficiency of 88.5 percent are calculated from the 222-GHz pattern measurements. The integrated corner-reflector antenna is well suited for millimeter- and submillimeter-wave imaging applications in large f-number systems.

  14. Imaging with Spherically Bent Crystals or Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Scott, S; Ince-Cushman, A; Reinke, M; Podpaly, Y; Rice, J E; Beiersdorfer, P

    2010-06-01

    This paper consists of two parts: Part I describes the working principle of a recently developed x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, where the astigmatism of spherically bent crystals is being used with advantage to record spatially resolved spectra of highly charged ions for Doppler measurements of the ion-temperature and toroidal plasmarotation- velocity profiles in tokamak plasmas. This type of spectrometer was thoroughly tested on NSTX and Alcator C-Mod, and its concept was recently adopted for the design of the ITER crystal spectrometers. Part II describes imaging schemes, where the astigmatism has been eliminated by the use of matched pairs of spherically bent crystals or reflectors. These imaging schemes are applicable over a wide range of the electromagnetic radiation, which includes microwaves, visible light, EUV radiation, and x-rays. Potential applications with EUV radiation and x-rays are the diagnosis of laserproduced plasmas, imaging of biological samples with synchrotron radiation, and lithography.

  15. Multiple seismic reflectors in Earth's lowermost mantle.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xuefeng; Shim, Sang-Heon; de Hoop, Maarten; van der Hilst, Robert

    2014-02-18

    The modern view of Earth's lowermost mantle considers a D″ region of enhanced (seismologically inferred) heterogeneity bounded by the core-mantle boundary and an interface some 150-300 km above it, with the latter often attributed to the postperovskite phase transition (in MgSiO3). Seismic exploration of Earth's deep interior suggests, however, that this view needs modification. So-called ScS and SKKS waves, which probe the lowermost mantle from above and below, respectively, reveal multiple reflectors beneath Central America and East Asia, two areas known for subduction of oceanic plates deep into Earth's mantle. This observation is inconsistent with expectations from a thermal response of a single isochemical postperovskite transition, but some of the newly observed structures can be explained with postperovskite transitions in differentiated slab materials. Our results imply that the lowermost mantle is more complex than hitherto thought and that interfaces and compositional heterogeneity occur beyond the D″ region sensu stricto.

  16. Method of making reflecting film reflector

    DOEpatents

    Cottingham, James G.

    1980-01-01

    A reflector of the reflecting film type is disclosed and which may be used in a heliostatic system for concentrating solar energy and comprising a reflecting film bonded to an appropriate rigid substrate in such a way that specularity of a very high order is achieved. A method of bonding the reflecting film to the substrate is also disclosed and comprises the steps of initially adhering the film to a smooth, clean flat rigid surface with a non-bonding liquid between the rigid surface and film, and then bonding the substrate and film. The non-bonding liquid has a molecular adhesion greater than any stresses due to handling or curing of the bonding agent which is applied between the film and the opposing surface of the rigid substrate.

  17. Inline microring reflector for photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Young Mo

    The microring is a compact resonator that is used as a versatile building block in photonic circuits ranging from filters, modulators, logic gates, sensors, switches, multiplexers, and laser cavities. The Bragg grating is a periodic structure that allows the selection of a narrow bandwidth of spectrum for stable lasing operation. In this dissertation, we study analysis and simulations of a compact microring based reflector assembled by forming a Bragg grating into a loop. With the appropriate design, the microring resonance can precisely align with the reflection peak of the grating while all other peaks are suppressed by reflection nulls of the grating. The field buildup at the resonance effectively amplifies small reflection of the grating, thereby producing significant overall reflection from the ring, and it is possible to achieve a stable narrow linewidth compact laser by forming a single mode laser cavity. The device operation principle is studied from two distinct perspectives; the first looks at coupling of two contra-directional traveling waves within the ring whereas the second aspect investigates relative excitation of the two competing microring resonant modes. In the former method, we relate the steady state amplitudes of the two traveling waves to the reflection spectrum of the grating and solve for the reflection and transmission response for each wavelength of interest. In the latter approach, we expand the field in terms of the resonant modes of the ring cavity and derive transfer functions for reflection and transmission from the nearby mode frequencies. The angular periodicity of the reflective microring geometry allows us to effectively simulate the resonant modes from a computational domain of a single period grating when the continuity boundary condition is applied. We successfully predict the reflection and transmission response of a Si3N 4/SiO2 microring reflector using this method---otherwise too large to carry out full-wave simulation

  18. Successful repair of a 6 meter battery

    SciTech Connect

    Nay, K.; Gratson, M.; Wash, S.; Sundholm, J.L.; Hippe, W.; Ramani, R.V.

    1996-12-31

    Following a two-year construction period, LTV Steel Company commissioned a new six-meter coke oven battery and ancillary facilities in December 1981 at the S. Chicago Works. The battery is a 60-oven Didier grouped flue underjet design capable of firing coke oven gas and blast furnace gas. In late 1990, coke side refractory damage in the form of severe spalls and holes in the walls were observed. Numerous repair techniques--welding, guniting, panel patching, end flue repairs using zero expansion brick--were employed as interim measures until a comprehensive repair plan could be implemented. A repair plan (primarily for coke side flues) was developed which envisioned end flue repairs on six walls per year beginning in late 1991, early 1992 depending on refractory delivery. However, in late 1992 it became apparent that the coke side deterioration was occurring faster than expected and that extensive pusher side deterioration was also occurring. Because of these developments, another battery inspection was performed. On the basis of this inspection, it was determined that a major rehabilitation would be required to assure long-term, environmentally acceptable operation of the battery.

  19. Cache-oblivious mesh layouts

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sung-Eui; Lindstrom, Peter; Pascucci, Valerio; Manocha, Dinesh

    2005-07-01

    We present a novel method for computing cache-oblivious layouts of large meshes that improve the performance of interactive visualization and geometric processing algorithms. Given that the mesh is accessed in a reasonably coherent manner, we assume no particular data access patterns or cache parameters of the memory hierarchy involved in the computation. Furthermore, our formulation extends directly to computing layouts of multi-resolution and bounding volume hierarchies of large meshes. We develop a simple and practical cache-oblivious metric for estimating cache misses. Computing a coherent mesh layout is reduced to a combinatorial optimization problem. We designed and implemented an out-of-core multilevel minimization algorithm and tested its performance on unstructured meshes composed of tens to hundreds of millions of triangles. Our layouts can significantly reduce the number of cache misses. We have observed 2-20 times speedups in view-dependent rendering, collision detection, and isocontour extraction without any modification of the algorithms or runtime applications.

  20. Offset dual-shaped reflectors for dual chamber compact ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo-Israel, Victor; Imbriale, William A.; Rengarajan, Sembiam R.; Mittra, Raj

    1991-01-01

    The application of the theory of the synthesis of offset dual-shaped reflectors to the design of compact ranges is examined. The object of the compact range is to provide a uniform plane wave with minimum amplitude and phase ripple over as large a volume as possible for a given size reflector. Ripple can be lowered by reducing the edge diffraction from the reflector producing the plane wave. This has been done either by serrating or rolling the edge. An alternative approach is to use dual offset-shaped reflector synthesis techniques to produce a reflector aperture distribution that is uniform over most of the aperture, but with a Gaussian taper near the edge. This approach can be used together with rolling and/or serration if desirable. The amount of phase and amplitude ripple obtained with two different dual-shaped reflector designs is studied as a function of position in the plane wave zone and reflector size in wavelengths. The amount of both transverse and longitudinal (z-component) cross polarization is studied.

  1. Deployable reflector design for Ku-band operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tankersley, B. C.

    1974-01-01

    A project was conducted to extend the deployable antenna technology state-of-the art through the design, analysis, construction, and testing of a lightweight, high surface tolerance, 12.5 foot diameter reflector for Ku-band operation. The applicability of the reflector design to the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) program was one requirement to be met. A documentary of the total program is presented. The performance requirements used to guide and constrain the design are discussed. The radio frequency, structural/dynamic, and thermal performance results are reported. Appendices are used to provide test data and detailed fabrication drawings of the reflector.

  2. Incidental Reflector Comparison of Containerized Dry Fire Extinguishing Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Bryan Scott; Wysong, Andrew Russell

    2016-12-14

    This document addresses the incidental reflector reactivity worth of containerized fire extinguishing agents authorized for use in PF-4 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The intent of the document is to analyze dry fire extinguishing agent that remains in a container and is not actively being used in a fire emergency. The incidental reflector reactivity worth is determined by comparison to various thicknesses of close fitting water reflection which is commonly used to bound incidental reflectors in criticality safety evaluations. The conclusion is that even in unlimited quantities, when containerized the authorized dry fire extinguishing agents are bound by 0.4 inches of close fitting water.

  3. Pressure surge reflector for pipe type cable system

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, H.; El Badaly, H.A.; Ghafurian, R. ); Aabo, T.; Ringlee, R.R.; Williams, J.A. ); Melcher, J. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes work performed on the development and testing of a pressure surge reflector, designed to reduce the pressure seen at potheads during an electrical failure in a pipe type cable system. The reflector is designed to protect the potheads from failing due to the pressure surge that may be large enough to fracture the porcelain, particularly when the electrical failure is physically close to the pothead. Test results show that the prototype reflector will lower the pressure significantly, bringing the pressure surge below the factory pressure test level for standard potheads.

  4. REFLECTOR CONTROL OF A BOILING-WATER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1962-05-22

    A line connecting the reactor with a spent steam condenser contains a valve set to open when the pressure in the reactor exceeds a predetermined value and an orifice on the upstream side of the valve. Another line connects the reflector with this line between the orifice and the valve. An excess steam pressure causes the valve to open and the flow of steam through the line draws water out of the reflector. Provision is also made for adding water to the reflector when the steam pressure drops. (AEC)

  5. Adaptive feed array compensation system for reflector antenna surface distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Zaman, A.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of a closed loop adaptive feed array system for compensating reflector surface deformations has been investigated. The performance characteristics (gain, sidelobe level, pointing, etc.) of large communication antenna systems degrade as the reflector surface distorts mainly due to thermal effects from a varying solar flux. The compensating systems described in this report can be used to maintain the design performance characteristics independent of thermal effects on the reflector surface. The proposed compensating system employs the concept of conjugate field matching to adjust the feed array complex excitation coefficients.

  6. Omental Lipid-Coated Mesh

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-16

    infection. If benefit is proven, this method will be a cost- effective way to prepare biologic and possibly synthetic meshes for use in hernia repair...omental coating is encouraging. 10. ::’UD./CI.I I CI’IIVI::’ Omentum, Mesh , Hernia 𔃺. ::.CI.Utill , I.LA::’::’II"II.A IIUN UI": I-­ a -.-I’I-c­...-u...abdominal wall hernia repair. If cheap and effective promotion of neovascularization could be initiated, we might be able to improve upon current

  7. Multiscale mesh generation on the sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrechts, Jonathan; Comblen, Richard; Legat, Vincent; Geuzaine, Christophe; Remacle, Jean-François

    2008-12-01

    A method for generating computational meshes for applications in ocean modeling is presented. The method uses a standard engineering approach for describing the geometry of the domain that requires meshing. The underlying sphere is parametrized using stereographic coordinates. Then, coastlines are described with cubic splines drawn in the stereographic parametric space. The mesh generation algorithm builds the mesh in the parametric plane using available techniques. The method enables to import coastlines from different data sets and, consequently, to build meshes of domains with highly variable length scales. The results include meshes together with numerical simulations of various kinds.

  8. Space Reflector Materials for Prometheus Application

    SciTech Connect

    J. Nash; V. Munne; LL Stimely

    2006-01-31

    The two materials studied in depth which appear to have the most promise in a Prometheus reflector application are beryllium (Be) and beryllium oxide (BeO). Three additional materials, magnesium oxide (MgO), alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) were also recently identified to be of potential interest, and may have promise in a Prometheus application as well, but are expected to be somewhat higher mass than either a Be or BeO based reflector. Literature review and analysis indicates that material properties for Be are largely known, but there are gaps in the properties of Be0 relative to the operating conditions for a Prometheus application. A detailed preconceptual design information document was issued providing material properties for both materials (Reference (a)). Beryllium oxide specimens were planned to be irradiated in the JOY0 Japanese test reactor to partially fill the material property gaps, but more testing in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) test reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was expected to be needed. A key issue identified for BeO was obtaining material for irradiation testing with an average grain size of {approx}5 micrometers, reminiscent of material for which prior irradiation test results were promising. Current commercially available material has an average grain size of {approx}10 micrometers. The literature indicated that improved irradiation performance could be expected (e.g., reduced irradiation-induced swelling) with the finer grain size material. Confirmation of these results would allow the use of historic irradiated materials test results from the literature, reducing the extent of required testing and therefore the cost of using this material. Environmental, safety and health (ES&H) concerns associated with manufacturing are significant but manageable for Be and BeO. Although particulate-generating operations (e.g., machining, grinding, etc.) involving Be

  9. Hybrid Mesh for Nasal Airflow Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Mohammed; Abdullah, Mohammed Zulkifly; Ahmad, Kamarul Arifin

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of the numerical result is closely related to mesh density as well as its distribution. Mesh plays a very significant role in the outcome of numerical simulation. Many nasal airflow studies have employed unstructured mesh and more recently hybrid mesh scheme has been utilized considering the complexity of anatomical architecture. The objective of this study is to compare the results of hybrid mesh with unstructured mesh and study its effect on the flow parameters inside the nasal cavity. A three-dimensional nasal cavity model is reconstructed based on computed tomographic images of a healthy Malaysian adult nose. Navier-Stokes equation for steady airflow is solved numerically to examine inspiratory nasal flow. The pressure drop obtained using the unstructured computational grid is about 22.6 Pa for a flow rate of 20 L/min, whereas the hybrid mesh resulted in 17.8 Pa for the same flow rate. The maximum velocity obtained at the nasal valve using unstructured grid is 4.18 m/s and that with hybrid mesh is around 4.76 m/s. Hybrid mesh reported lower grid convergence index (GCI) than the unstructured mesh. Significant differences between unstructured mesh and hybrid mesh are determined highlighting the usefulness of hybrid mesh for nasal airflow studies. PMID:23983811

  10. Secondary pattern computation of an arbitrarily shaped main reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, P. T. C.; Lee, S. W.; Acosta, R.

    1984-01-01

    The secondary pattern of a perfectly conducting offset main reflector being illuminated by a point feed at an arbitrary location was studied. The method of analysis is based upon the application of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to the aperture fields obtained using geometrical optics (GO) and geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD). Key features of the reflector surface is completely arbitrary, the incident field from the feed is most general with arbitrary polarization and location, and the edge diffraction is calculated by either UAT or by UTD. Comparison of this technique for an offset parabolic reflector with the Jacobi-Bessel and Fourier-Bessel techniques shows good agreement. Near field, far field, and scan data of a large reflector are presented.

  11. Preliminary design approach for large high precision segmented reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.; Collins, Timothy J.; Hedgepeth, John M.

    1990-01-01

    A simplified preliminary design capability for erectable precision segmented reflectors is presented. This design capability permits a rapid assessment of a wide range of reflector parameters as well as new structural concepts and materials. The preliminary design approach was applied to a range of precision reflectors from 10 meters to 100 meters in diameter while considering standard design drivers. The design drivers considered were: weight, fundamental frequency, launch packaging volume, part count, and on-orbit assembly time. For the range of parameters considered, on-orbit assembly time was identified as the major design driver. A family of modular panels is introduced which can significantly reduce the number of reflector parts and the on-orbit assembly time.

  12. Elevation of a portion of the reflector screen and antenna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation of a portion of the reflector screen and antenna circles from the interior, view facing southeast - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  13. 6. GENE WASH DAM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. SURVEY REFLECTOR IN FOREGROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. GENE WASH DAM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. SURVEY REFLECTOR IN FOREGROUND FOR MONITORING MOVEMENT OF DAM AND EARTH. - Gene Wash Reservoir & Dam, 2 miles west of Parker Dam, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

  14. Optical biometry of biological tissues by ellipsoidal reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezuglyi, M. A.; Pavlovets, N. V.

    2013-06-01

    Possibilities of measuring systems that uses ellipsoidal reflectors for determining the optical parameters of biological tissue are studied. The modified inverse Monte Carlo method was designed for biomedical photometric system "biological tissue - ellipsoidal mirror."

  15. 16 CFR 1512.16 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... sidewalls or, alternatively, reflectors mounted on the spokes of each wheel, or, for non-caliper rim brake... must break before additional separation (peeling) from the rim is observed. (3) After...

  16. 16 CFR 1512.16 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... sidewalls or, alternatively, reflectors mounted on the spokes of each wheel, or, for non-caliper rim brake... must break before additional separation (peeling) from the rim is observed. (3) After...

  17. 16 CFR 1512.16 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... sidewalls or, alternatively, reflectors mounted on the spokes of each wheel, or, for non-caliper rim brake... must break before additional separation (peeling) from the rim is observed. (3) After...

  18. 16 CFR 1512.16 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... sidewalls or, alternatively, reflectors mounted on the spokes of each wheel, or, for non-caliper rim brake... must break before additional separation (peeling) from the rim is observed. (3) After...

  19. 16 CFR 1512.16 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... sidewalls or, alternatively, reflectors mounted on the spokes of each wheel, or, for non-caliper rim brake... must break before additional separation (peeling) from the rim is observed. (3) After...

  20. Multigrid for refined triangle meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Yair

    1997-02-01

    A two-level preconditioning method for the solution of (locally) refined finite element schemes using triangle meshes is introduced. In the isotropic SPD case, it is shown that the condition number of the preconditioned stiffness matrix is bounded uniformly for all sufficiently regular triangulations. This is also verified numerically for an isotropic diffusion problem with highly discontinuous coefficients.

  1. Mesh Size Control of Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitenis, Angela; Uruena, Juan Manuel; Schulze, Kyle D.; Cooper, Andrew C.; Angelini, Thomas E.; Sawyer, W. Gregory

    Soft, permeable sliding interfaces in aqueous environments are ubiquitous in nature but their ability to maintain high lubricity in a poor lubricant (water) has not been well understood. Hydrogels are excellent materials for fundamental soft matter and biotribology studies due to their high water content. While mesh size controls the material and transport properties of a hydrogel, its effects on friction were only recently explored. Polyacrylamide hydrogels slid in a Gemini (self-mated) interface produced low friction under low speeds, low pressures, macroscopic contact areas, and room temperature aqueous environments. The friction coefficients at these interfaces are lowest at low speeds and are speed-independent. This behavior is due to thermal fluctuations at the interface separating the surfaces, with water shearing in this region being the main source of dissipation. We found that mesh size had an inverse correlation with friction. We further investigated a transition from this behavior at higher speeds, and found that the transition speed correlated with the mesh size and relaxation time of the polymer network. Very soft and correspondingly large mesh size Gemini hydrogels show superlubricity under specific conditions with friction being less than 0.005.

  2. A bionic approach to mathematical modeling the fold geometry of deployable reflector antennas on satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, C. M.; Liu, T. S.

    2014-10-01

    Inspired from biology, this study presents a method for designing the fold geometry of deployable reflectors. Since the space available inside rockets for transporting satellites with reflector antennas is typically cylindrical in shape, and its cross-sectional area is considerably smaller than the reflector antenna after deployment, the cross-sectional area of the folded reflector must be smaller than the available rocket interior space. Membrane reflectors in aerospace are a type of lightweight structure that can be packaged compactly. To design membrane reflectors from the perspective of deployment processes, bionic applications from morphological changes of plants are investigated. Creating biologically inspired reflectors, this paper deals with fold geometry of reflectors, which imitate flower buds. This study uses mathematical formulation to describe geometric profiles of flower buds. Based on the formulation, new designs for deployable membrane reflectors derived from bionics are proposed. Adjusting parameters in the formulation of these designs leads to decreases in reflector area before deployment.

  3. Reflectors for SAR performance testing-second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-02-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  4. Aluminum honeycomb reflector panels on James Clerk Maxwell Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhalgh, R. Justin S.

    1993-10-01

    The accuracy requirements and design philosophy of the JCMT reflector structure are briefly reviewed, leading to a steel space-frame with separate reflector panels. The choice of material for the panels is discussed, with particular emphasis on the properties of aluminum honeycomb composites. The development of the manufacturing process and the details of the process are described. Finally, statistics on the results of the manufacturing process are given.

  5. Ultralightweight Space Deployable Primary Reflector Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Edward E., IV; Zeiders, Glenn W.; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A concept has been developed and analyzed and several generational prototypes built for a gossamer-class deployable truss for a mirror or reflector with many smaller precisely-figured solid elements attached will, for at least the next several decades, minimize the mass of a large primary mirror assembly while still providing the high image quality essential for planet-finding and cosmological astronomical missions. Primary mirror segments are mounted in turn on ultralightweight thermally-formed plastic panels that hold clusters of mirror segments in rigid arrays whose tip/tilt and piston would be corrected over the scale of the plastic panels by the control segments. Prototype panels developed under this program are 45 cm wide and fabricated from commercially available Kaplan sheets. A three-strut octahedral tensegrity is the basis for the overall support structure. Each fundamental is composed of two such octahedrons, rotated oppositely about a common triangular face. Adjacent modules are joined at the nodes of the upper and lower triangles to form a deployable structure that could be made arbitrarily large. A seven-module dowel-and-wire prototype has been constructed. Deployment techniques based on the use of collapsing toggled struts with diagonal tensional elements allows an assembly of tensegrities to be fully collapsed and redeployed. The prototype designs will be described and results of a test program for measuring strength and deformation will be presented.

  6. Improved Monoblock laser brightness using external reflector.

    PubMed

    Hays, A D; Nettleton, John; Barr, Nick; Hough, Nathaniel; Goldberg, Lew

    2014-03-01

    The Monoblock laser has become the laser of choice in long-range, eye-safe laser range finders. It is eye-safe with emission at 1570 nm, high pulse energy, simple construction, and high efficiency when pumped by a laser-diode stack. Although the output beam divergence of a typical Monoblock with a 3  mm×3  mm cross section is relatively large (10-12 mrad), it can be reduced to <1  mrad using a telescope with large magnification. In this paper we present a simple and compact technique for achieving significant reduction in the Monoblock beam divergence using a partial reflector that is placed a short distance from the optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Using a 38 mm long Monoblock with a 10 mm long potassium titanyl phosphate OPO, we achieved a beam divergence of <4  mrad, corresponding to a >2.5× reduction from the unmodified laser. Performance using this technique with various feedback and etalon spacings is presented.

  7. Differential correction method applied to measurement of the FAST reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Yi; Zhu, Li-Chun; Hu, Jin-Wen; Li, Zhi-Heng

    2016-08-01

    The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) adopts an active deformable main reflector which is composed of 4450 triangular panels. During an observation, the illuminated area of the reflector is deformed into a 300-m diameter paraboloid and directed toward a source. To achieve accurate control of the reflector shape, positions of 2226 nodes distributed around the entire reflector must be measured with sufficient precision within a limited time, which is a challenging task because of the large scale. Measurement of the FAST reflector makes use of stations and node targets. However, in this case the effect of the atmosphere on measurement accuracy is a significant issue. This paper investigates a differential correction method for total stations measurement of the FAST reflector. A multi-benchmark differential correction method, including a scheme for benchmark selection and weight assignment, is proposed. On-site evaluation experiments show there is an improvement of 70%-80% in measurement accuracy compared with the uncorrected measurement, verifying the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Disordered animal multilayer reflectors and the localization of light

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, T. M.; Partridge, J. C.; Roberts, N. W.

    2014-01-01

    Multilayer optical reflectors constructed from ‘stacks’ of alternating layers of high and low refractive index dielectric materials are present in many animals. For example, stacks of guanine crystals with cytoplasm gaps occur within the skin and scales of fish, and stacks of protein platelets with cytoplasm gaps occur within the iridophores of cephalopods. Common to all these animal multilayer reflectors are different degrees of random variation in the thicknesses of the individual layers in the stack, ranging from highly periodic structures to strongly disordered systems. However, previous discussions of the optical effects of such thickness disorder have been made without quantitative reference to the propagation of light within the reflector. Here, we demonstrate that Anderson localization provides a general theoretical framework to explain the common coherent interference and optical properties of these biological reflectors. Firstly, we illustrate how the localization length enables the spectral properties of the reflections from more weakly disordered ‘coloured’ and more strongly disordered ‘silvery’ reflectors to be explained by the same physical process. Secondly, we show how the polarization properties of reflection can be controlled within guanine–cytoplasm reflectors, with an interplay of birefringence and thickness disorder explaining the origin of broadband polarization-insensitive reflectivity. PMID:25339688

  9. A Cassegrain reflector system for compact range applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rader, Mark D.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1986-01-01

    An integral part of a compact range is the means of providing a uniform plane wave. A Cassegrain reflector system is one alternative for achieving this goal. Theoretically, this system offers better performance than a simple reflector system. The longer pathlengths in the Cassegrain system lead to a more uniform field in the plane of interest. The addition of the subreflector creates several problems, though. System complexity is increased both in terms of construction and performance analysis. The subreflector also leads to aperture blockage and the orientation of the feed now results in spillover illuminating the target areas as well as the rest of the range. Finally, the addition of the subreflector leads to interaction between the two reflectors resulting in undesired field variations in the plane of interest. These difficulties are addressed and through the concept of blending the surfaces, a Cassegrain reflector system is developed that will provide a uniform plane wave that offers superior performance over large target areas for a given size reflector system. Design and analysis is implemented by considering the main reflector and subreflector separately. Then the system may be put together and the final design and system analysis completed.

  10. Disordered animal multilayer reflectors and the localization of light.

    PubMed

    Jordan, T M; Partridge, J C; Roberts, N W

    2014-12-06

    Multilayer optical reflectors constructed from 'stacks' of alternating layers of high and low refractive index dielectric materials are present in many animals. For example, stacks of guanine crystals with cytoplasm gaps occur within the skin and scales of fish, and stacks of protein platelets with cytoplasm gaps occur within the iridophores of cephalopods. Common to all these animal multilayer reflectors are different degrees of random variation in the thicknesses of the individual layers in the stack, ranging from highly periodic structures to strongly disordered systems. However, previous discussions of the optical effects of such thickness disorder have been made without quantitative reference to the propagation of light within the reflector. Here, we demonstrate that Anderson localization provides a general theoretical framework to explain the common coherent interference and optical properties of these biological reflectors. Firstly, we illustrate how the localization length enables the spectral properties of the reflections from more weakly disordered 'coloured' and more strongly disordered 'silvery' reflectors to be explained by the same physical process. Secondly, we show how the polarization properties of reflection can be controlled within guanine-cytoplasm reflectors, with an interplay of birefringence and thickness disorder explaining the origin of broadband polarization-insensitive reflectivity.

  11. Design method for four-reflector type beam waveguide systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betsudan, S.; Katagi, T.; Urasaki, S.

    1986-01-01

    Discussed is a method for the design of four reflector type beam waveguide feed systems, comprised of a conical horn and 4 focused reflectors, which are used widely as the primary reflector systems for communications satellite Earth station antennas. The design parameters for these systems are clarified, the relations between each parameter are brought out based on the beam mode development, and the independent design parameters are specified. The characteristics of these systems, namely spillover loss, crosspolarization components, and frequency characteristics, and their relation to the design parameters, are also shown. It is also indicated that design parameters which decide the dimensions of the conical horn or the shape of the focused reflectors can be unerringly established once the design standard for the system has been selected as either: (1) minimizing the crosspolarization component by keeping the spillover loss to within acceptable limits, or (2) minimizing the spillover loss by maintaining the crossover components below an acceptable level and the independent design parameters, such as the respective sizes of the focused reflectors and the distances between the focussed reflectors, etc., have been established according to mechanical restrictions. A sample design is also shown. In addition to being able to clarify the effects of each of the design parameters on the system and improving insight into these systems, the efficiency of these systems will also be increased with this design method.

  12. Large deployable reflectors for telecom and earth observation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scialino, L.; Ihle, A.; Migliorelli, M.; Gatti, N.; Datashvili, L.; van `t Klooster, K.; Santiago Prowald, J.

    2013-12-01

    Large deployable antennas are one of the key components for advanced missions in the fields of telecom and earth observation. In the recent past, missions have taken on board large deployable reflector (LDR) up to 22 m of diameter and several missions have already planned embarking large reflectors, such as the 12 m of INMARSAT XL or BIOMASS. At the moment, no European LDR providers are available and the market is dominated by Northrop-Grumman and Harris. Consequently, the development of European large reflector technology is considered a key step to maintain commercial and strategic competitiveness (ESA Large Reflector Antenna Working Group Final Report, TEC-EEA/2010.595/CM, 2010). In this scenario, the ESA General Study Project RESTEO (REflector Synergy between Telecom and Earth Observation), starting from the identification of future missions needs, has identified the most promising reflector concepts based on European heritage/technology, able to cover the largest range of potential future missions for both telecom and earth observation. This paper summarizes the activities and findings of the RESTEO Study.

  13. 6th International Meshing Roundtable '97

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.

    1997-09-01

    The goal of the 6th International Meshing Roundtable is to bring together researchers and developers from industry, academia, and government labs in a stimulating, open environment for the exchange of technical information related to the meshing process. In the pas~ the Roundtable has enjoyed significant participation born each of these groups from a wide variety of countries. The Roundtable will consist of technical presentations from contributed papers and abstracts, two invited speakers, and two invited panels of experts discussing topics related to the development and use of automatic mesh generation tools. In addition, this year we will feature a "Bring Your Best Mesh" competition and poster session to encourage discussion and participation from a wide variety of mesh generation tool users. The schedule and evening social events are designed to provide numerous opportunities for informal dialog. A proceedings will be published by Sandia National Laboratories and distributed at the Roundtable. In addition, papers of exceptionally high quaIity will be submitted to a special issue of the International Journal of Computational Geometry and Applications. Papers and one page abstracts were sought that present original results on the meshing process. Potential topics include but are got limited to: Unstructured triangular and tetrahedral mesh generation Unstructured quadrilateral and hexahedral mesh generation Automated blocking and structured mesh generation Mixed element meshing Surface mesh generation Geometry decomposition and clean-up techniques Geometry modification techniques related to meshing Adaptive mesh refinement and mesh quality control Mesh visualization Special purpose meshing algorithms for particular applications Theoretical or novel ideas with practical potential Technical presentations from industrial researchers.

  14. [Late vaginal mesh exposure after prolapse repair].

    PubMed

    Chanelles, O; Poncelet, C

    2010-12-01

    Mesh exposure is the major complication of vaginal prolapse repair. Incidence rates are variable according to the series. Mesh exposure usually occurs during the year following the intervention. We report here the first case of a patient with a late exposure of an anterior vaginal mesh 4 years after a surgical cystocele repair. The mesh has been easily removed at the operative theatre by vaginal approach.

  15. Hybrid mesh generation using advancing reduction technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study presents an extension of the application of the advancing reduction technique to the hybrid mesh generation. The proposed algorithm is based on a pre-generated rectangle mesh (RM) with a certain orientation. The intersection points between the two sets of perpendicular mesh lines in RM an...

  16. Cryogenic systems for the large deployable reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Peter V.

    1988-01-01

    There are five technologies which may have application for Large Deployable Reflector (LDR), one passive and four active. In order of maturity, they are passive stored cryogen systems, and mechanical, sorption, magnetic, and pulse-tube refrigerators. In addition, deep space radiators will be required to reject the heat of the active systems, and may be useful as auxiliary coolers for the stored cryogen systems. Hybrid combinations of these technologies may well be more efficient than any one alone, and extensive system studies will be required to determine the best trade-offs. Stored cryogen systems were flown on a number of missions. The systems are capable of meeting the temperature requirements of LDR. The size and weight of stored cryogen systems are proportional to heat load and, as a result, are applicable only if the low-temperature heat load can be kept small. Systems using chemisorption and physical adsorption for compressors and pumps have received considerable attention in the past few years. Systems based on adiabatic demagnetization of paramagnetic salts were used for refrigeration for many years. Pulse-tube refrigerators were recently proposed which show relatively high efficiency for temperatures in the 60 to 80 K range. The instrument heat loads and operating temperatures are critical to the selection and design of the cryogenic system. Every effort should be made to minimize heat loads, raise operating temperatures, and to define these precisely. No one technology is now ready for application to LDR. Substantial development efforts are underway in all of the technologies and should be monitored and advocated. Magnetic and pulse-tube refrigerators have high potential.

  17. Confined helium on Lagrange meshes.

    PubMed

    Baye, D; Dohet-Eraly, J

    2015-12-21

    The Lagrange-mesh method has the simplicity of a calculation on a mesh and can have the accuracy of a variational method. It is applied to the study of a confined helium atom. Two types of confinement are considered. Soft confinements by potentials are studied in perimetric coordinates. Hard confinement in impenetrable spherical cavities is studied in a system of rescaled perimetric coordinates varying in [0,1] intervals. Energies and mean values of the distances between electrons and between an electron and the helium nucleus are calculated. A high accuracy of 11 to 15 significant figures is obtained with small computing times. Pressures acting on the confined atom are also computed. For sphere radii smaller than 1, their relative accuracies are better than 10(-10). For larger radii up to 10, they progressively decrease to 10(-3), still improving the best literature results.

  18. The moving mesh code SHADOWFAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbroucke, B.; De Rijcke, S.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce the moving mesh code SHADOWFAX, which can be used to evolve a mixture of gas, subject to the laws of hydrodynamics and gravity, and any collisionless fluid only subject to gravity, such as cold dark matter or stars. The code is written in C++ and its source code is made available to the scientific community under the GNU Affero General Public Licence. We outline the algorithm and the design of our implementation, and demonstrate its validity through the results of a set of basic test problems, which are also part of the public version. We also compare SHADOWFAX with a number of other publicly available codes using different hydrodynamical integration schemes, illustrating the advantages and disadvantages of the moving mesh technique.

  19. Unstructured mesh algorithms for aerodynamic calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    The use of unstructured mesh techniques for solving complex aerodynamic flows is discussed. The principle advantages of unstructured mesh strategies, as they relate to complex geometries, adaptive meshing capabilities, and parallel processing are emphasized. The various aspects required for the efficient and accurate solution of aerodynamic flows are addressed. These include mesh generation, mesh adaptivity, solution algorithms, convergence acceleration, and turbulence modeling. Computations of viscous turbulent two-dimensional flows and inviscid three-dimensional flows about complex configurations are demonstrated. Remaining obstacles and directions for future research are also outlined.

  20. Adaptive Mesh Refinement in CTH

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, David

    1999-05-04

    This paper reports progress on implementing a new capability of adaptive mesh refinement into the Eulerian multimaterial shock- physics code CTH. The adaptivity is block-based with refinement and unrefinement occurring in an isotropic 2:1 manner. The code is designed to run on serial, multiprocessor and massive parallel platforms. An approximate factor of three in memory and performance improvements over comparable resolution non-adaptive calculations has-been demonstrated for a number of problems.

  1. Grating droplets with a mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Dan; Le Helloco, Antoine; Clanet, Cristophe; Quere, David; Varanasi, Kripa

    2016-11-01

    A drop thrown against a mesh can pass through its holes if impacting with enough inertia. As a result, although part of the droplet may remain on one side of the sieve, the rest will end up grated through the other side. This inexpensive method to break up millimetric droplets into micrometric ones may be of particular interest in a wide variety of applications: enhancing evaporation of droplets launched from the top of an evaporative cooling tower or preventing drift of pesticides sprayed above crops by increasing their initial size and atomizing them at the very last moment with a mesh. In order to understand how much liquid will be grated we propose in this presentation to start first by studying a simpler situation: a drop impacting a plate pierced with a single off centered hole. The study of the role of natural parameters such as the radius drop and speed or the hole position, size and thickness allows us to discuss then the more general situation of a plate pierced with multiple holes: the mesh.

  2. SHARP/PRONGHORN Interoperability: Mesh Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Avery Bingham; Javier Ortensi

    2012-09-01

    Progress toward collaboration between the SHARP and MOOSE computational frameworks has been demonstrated through sharing of mesh generation and ensuring mesh compatibility of both tools with MeshKit. MeshKit was used to build a three-dimensional, full-core very high temperature reactor (VHTR) reactor geometry with 120-degree symmetry, which was used to solve a neutron diffusion critical eigenvalue problem in PRONGHORN. PRONGHORN is an application of MOOSE that is capable of solving coupled neutron diffusion, heat conduction, and homogenized flow problems. The results were compared to a solution found on a 120-degree, reflected, three-dimensional VHTR mesh geometry generated by PRONGHORN. The ability to exchange compatible mesh geometries between the two codes is instrumental for future collaboration and interoperability. The results were found to be in good agreement between the two meshes, thus demonstrating the compatibility of the SHARP and MOOSE frameworks. This outcome makes future collaboration possible.

  3. Large deployable antenna reflector trimming mechanism (LDA-RTM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingo, Miguel; Vázquez, Jorge

    2003-09-01

    Future projects dealing with radars or telecommunications require deployable antennas. ESA Contract no. 15230 for the "Development of Large Deployable Antenna Reflector for Advanced Mobile Communication" has the objective of developing this critical technology in Europe for the commercial market. The Reflector Trimming Mechanism (RTM) allows the fine adjustment of the huge Reflector Dish (12 meters projected aperture diameter) in such a way to recover the mispointing induced by all sources inclusive of the S/C, the Antenna Arm, the feed and the Reflector. The RTM design is modular and allows its implementation in different reflector types and dimensions changing the distance between movable and fixed points and the lateral stiffener. In each linear actuator, it is implemented a device which is able to decouple the top and the bottom part. This is required because of imposed displacements of the interfaces during launch. The decoupling device is latched before starting normal operating condition. It is actuated with the same stepper motor used for trimming. The RTM has been designed to be operated with the electronic box already developed for moving the Antenna Pointing Mechanism in Hispasat 1-C.

  4. A computer program to calculate radiation properties of reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, P. K.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program to calculate the radiation properties of the reflector antennas is presented. It can be used for paraboloidal, spherical, or ellipsoidal reflector surfaces and is easily modified to handle any surface that can be expressed analytically. The program is general enough to allow any arbitrary location and pointing angle for the feed antenna. The effect of blockage due to the feed horn is also included in the computations. The computer program is based upon the technique of tracing the rays from the feed antenna to the reflector to an aperture plane. The far field radiation properties are then calculated by performing a double integration over the field points in the aperture plane. To facilitate the computation of double intergral, the field points are first aligned along the equispaced straight lines in the aperture plane. The computation time is relatively insensitive to the absolute size of the aperture and even though no limits on the largest reflector size have been determined, the program was used for reflector diameters of 1000 wavelenghts.

  5. Computer prediction of large reflector antenna radiation properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botula, A.

    1980-01-01

    A FORTRAN program for calculating reflector antenna radiation patterns was rewritten and extended to include reflectors composed of a number of panels. These individual panels must be analytic surfaces. The theoretical foundation for the program is as follows: Geometrical optics techniques are used to trace rays from a feed antenna to the reflector surface and back to a mathematical plane just in front of the reflector. The resulting tangential electric field distribution, assumed to be the only source of forward radiation, is integrated numerically to calculate the radiation pattern for a desired set of angles. When the reflector is composed of more than one panel, each panel is treated as a separated antenna, the ray-tracing procedure and integration being repeated for each panel. The results of the individual aperture plane integrations are stored and summed to yield the relative electric field strength over the angles of interest. An example and several test cases are included to demonstrate the use of the program and verify the new method of computation.

  6. Mesh for prolapse surgery: Why the fuss?

    PubMed

    Rajshekhar, Smita; Mukhopadhyay, Sambit; Klinge, Uwe

    2015-06-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse is a common gynaecological problem. Surgical techniques to repair prolapse have been constantly evolving to reduce the recurrence of prolapse and need for reoperation. Grafts made of synthetic and biological materials became popular in the last decade as they were intended to provide extra support to native tissue repairs. However, serious complications related to use of synthetic meshes have been reported and there is increasing medico-legal concern about mesh use in prolapse surgery. Some mesh products already have been withdrawn from the market and the FDA has introduced stricter surveillance of new and existing products. Large randomized studies comparing mesh with non-mesh procedures are lacking which creates uncertainty for the surgeon and their patients.The small cohorts of the RCTs available with short follow-up periods just allow the conclusion that the mesh repair can be helpful in the short to medium term but unfortunately are not able to prove safety for all patients. In particular, current clinical reports cannot define for which indication what material may be superior compared to non-mesh repair.Quality control through long-term individual and national mesh registries is needed to keep a record of all surgeons using mesh and all devices being used, monitoring their effectiveness and safety data. Meshes with better biocompatibility designed specifically for use in vaginal surgery may provide superior clinical results, where the reduction of complications may allow a wider range of indications.

  7. Pre-Launch phase 2 rehearsal of the calibration and validation of soil moisture active passive (SMAP) geophysical data products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission is scheduled for launch in early November 2014. The objective of the mission is global mapping of soil moisture and landscape freeze/thaw state. SMAP utilizes L-band radar and radiometer measurements sharing a rotating 6-meter mesh reflector antenna...

  8. Secondary pattern computation of an arbitrarily shaped main reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. W.; Lam, P. T. C.; Acosta, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The secondary pattern of a perfectly conducting offset main reflector being illuminated by a point feed at an arbitrary location is studied. The method of analysis is based upon the application of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to the aperture fields obtained using geometrical optics (GO) and geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD). Key features of the present work are (1) the reflector surface is completely arbitrary, (2) the incident field from the feed is most general with arbitrary polarization and location, and (3) the edge diffraction is calculated by either UAT or by UTD. Comparison of this technique for an offset parabolic reflector with the Jacobi-Bessel and Fourier-Bessel techniques shows good agreement. Near field, far field, and scan data of a large refelctor are presented.

  9. Search radar reflector antennas with extremely low sidelobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, E.; Derneryd, A.; Karlsson, E. R.; Larsson, J.-O.

    Several different search radar reflector antennas have been developed for varying elevation coverage and frequency requirements. The trend has been towards extremely low azimuth sidelobes. This paper treats electrical and mechanical design of such antennas including results achieved using computer aided optimization procedures (CAD). The definition of reflector shape and contour and the associated electrical performance, are presented. Furthermore, theoretical analyses concerning reflector surface imperfections and frequency dependence are given. Mechanical analyses for minimizing mass and deformations at high wind velocities, by means of computer simulations, wind tunnel tests and careful material selection are also presented. The antennas are manufactured in a sandwich GFRP construction on precision moulds which have been milled using NC-machines. Input data tapes are generated directly from the theoretical design computations (CAM). These antennas have been tested at a computer controlled test range and sidelobe performance down to -60 dB has been demonstrated.

  10. Improving the Efficiency of Quasi-Optical Bragg Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khozin, M. A.; Denisov, G. G.; Belousov, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    In the analysis of propagation of wave beams in quasi-optical transmission lines, the loss rate and transformation of modes by various elements of the transmission line are of great importance. The effects occurring when a spatially bounded, obliquely incident wave beam is reflected from a Bragg resonator being a periodic, plane-layered medium with varied dielectric permittivity are considered. Such a reflector can be used as a frequency-selective element of the transmission line. Since the reflection coefficient of a plane wave from the Bragg reflector depends on its incidence angle, there occurs a transformation of the reflected beam. Analytical expressions for the beam displacement, the angle of deflection of the beam from the mirror reflection direction, and the wavefront curvature variation have been obtained. The influence of the mentioned effects on characteristics of the reflected wave beam in the main band of the Bragg reflector is numerically analyzed. The possibility of compensation for these distortions is considered.

  11. KuDGR- Dual Gridded Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic Reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihle, Alexander; Reichmann, O.; Lori, M.; Nathrath, N.; Pereira, C.; Linke, S.; Rinous, P.

    2014-06-01

    In the frame of an ESA-funded TRP activity HPS GmbH, together with INVENT GmbH and INEGI, has developed an advanced concept for dual gridded reflectors. The target frequency band is the Ku-band requiring high in-orbit thermo-elastic stability. It is a follow-on of the previous KaDGR [1] activity. The concept concerns the polarisation grid of the front and rear reflector. The grids are connected by a full CFRP monolithic peripheral ring. The demonstrator has an overall diameter of 1.4 x 1.2 m and a weight of only 4.23 kg. The design of this concept allows for smaller and larger reflectors.In the following we will present the results of the different development steps and current status of the TRP activity.

  12. Large-Scale All-Dielectric Metamaterial Perfect Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Moitra, Parikshit; Slovick, Brian A.; li, Wei; Kravchencko, Ivan I.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Valentine, Jason

    2015-05-08

    All-dielectric metamaterials offer a potential low-loss alternative to plasmonic metamaterials at optical frequencies. In this paper, we take advantage of the low absorption loss as well as the simple unit cell geometry to demonstrate large-scale (centimeter-sized) all-dielectric metamaterial perfect reflectors made from silicon cylinder resonators. These perfect reflectors, operating in the telecommunications band, were fabricated using self-assembly based nanosphere lithography. In spite of the disorder originating from the self-assembly process, the average reflectance of the metamaterial perfect reflectors is 99.7% at 1530 nm, surpassing the reflectance of metallic mirrors. Moreover, the spectral separation of the electric and magnetic resonances can be chosen to achieve the required reflection bandwidth while maintaining a high tolerance to disorder. Finally, the scalability of this design could lead to new avenues of manipulating light for low-loss and large-area photonic applications.

  13. Integrated structural electromagnetic optimization of large space antenna reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, S. L.; Adelman, H. M.; Bailey, M. C.

    1987-01-01

    The requirements for extremely precise and powerful large space antenna reflectors have motivated the development of a procedure for shape control of the reflector surface. A mathematical optimization procedure has been developed which improves antenna performance while minimizing necessary shape correction effort. In contrast to previous work which proposed controlling the rms distortion error of the surface thereby indirectly improving antenna performance, the current work includes electromagnetic (EM) performance calculations as an integral part of the control procedure. The application of the procedure to a radiometer design with a tetrahedral truss backup structure demonstrates the potential for significant improvement. The results indicate the benefit of including EM performance calculations in procedures for shape control of large space antenna reflectors.

  14. Integrated structure electromagnetic optimization of large space antenna reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Adelman, Howard M.; Bailey, M. C.

    1987-01-01

    The requirements for extremely precise and powerful large space antenna reflectors have motivated the development of a procedure for shape control of the reflector surface. A mathematical optimization procedure has been developed which improves antenna performance while minimizing necessary shape correction effort. In contrast to previous work which proposed controlling the rms distortion error of the surface thereby indirectly improving antenna performance, the current work includes electromagnetic (EM) performance calculations as an integral of the control procedure. The application of the procedure to a radiometer design with a tetrahedral truss backup structure demonstrates the potential for significant improvement. The results indicate the benefit of including EM performance calculations in procedures for shape control of large space antenna reflectors.

  15. Large-Scale All-Dielectric Metamaterial Perfect Reflectors

    DOE PAGES

    Moitra, Parikshit; Slovick, Brian A.; li, Wei; ...

    2015-05-08

    All-dielectric metamaterials offer a potential low-loss alternative to plasmonic metamaterials at optical frequencies. In this paper, we take advantage of the low absorption loss as well as the simple unit cell geometry to demonstrate large-scale (centimeter-sized) all-dielectric metamaterial perfect reflectors made from silicon cylinder resonators. These perfect reflectors, operating in the telecommunications band, were fabricated using self-assembly based nanosphere lithography. In spite of the disorder originating from the self-assembly process, the average reflectance of the metamaterial perfect reflectors is 99.7% at 1530 nm, surpassing the reflectance of metallic mirrors. Moreover, the spectral separation of the electric and magnetic resonances canmore » be chosen to achieve the required reflection bandwidth while maintaining a high tolerance to disorder. Finally, the scalability of this design could lead to new avenues of manipulating light for low-loss and large-area photonic applications.« less

  16. Illumination from space with orbiting solar-reflector spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canady, J. E., Jr.; Allen, J. L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of using orbiting mirrors to reflect sunlight to Earth for several illumination applications is studied. A constellation of sixteen 1 km solar reflector spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit can illuminate a region 333 km in diameter to 8 lux, which is brighter than most existing expressway lighting systems. This constellation can serve one region all night long or can provide illumination during mornings and evenings to five regions across the United States. Preliminary cost estimates indicate such an endeavor is economically feasible. The studies also explain how two solar reflectors can illuminate the in-orbit nighttime operations of Space Shuttle. An unfurlable, 1 km diameter solar reflector spacecraft design concept was derived. This spacecraft can be packaged in the Space, Shuttle, transported to low Earth orbit, unfurled, and solar sailed to operational orbits up to geosynchronous. The necessary technical studies and improvements in technology are described, and potential environmental concerns are discussed.

  17. Compositionally-Graded Shape Memory Film for Self-Deployment of Membrane Reflectors and Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Lisa; Carman, Greg; Brantley, Lott W., Sr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The next generation of space systems will require large apertures in order to image faint targets or cover large areas of Earth. These large apertures must be able to fit inside a launch vehicle fairing, be light enough for launch into orbit, and deploy on orbit with repeatability and reliability. The current state-of-the-art in flight optics is represented by the 4 meter LAMP telescope, with an areal density of 10 km sq m. Development of a Beryllium mirror demonstration article for NGST (Next Generation Space Telescope) at the University of Arizona indicate areal densities of 0.5 kg sq m with flight hardware in the 12 meter range. With progressive improvements in existing deployment, packaging, and structural technologies, the size of optics and reflectors will continue to increase, while mass is reduced. However, without a breakthrough in materials, packaging and/or deployment technologies, the goal for Gossamer structures of 0.1 kg sq m is unachievable for the near and mid-term NASA missions. Membrane technology provides the best hope of achieving such low areal densities. In combination with advances in membrane materials and structures, development of revolutionary techniques for deployment systems can provide significant improvements in large aperture technology. In this paper, the results of a six-month Phase I research effort to demonstrate the application of thin film NiTi to aerospace-qualified membrane and mesh materials are presented. Deposition of shape memory thin film was achieved Astromesh (trademark) metal mesh and CP-1, and optical-quality polymer membrane. Not only was full-coating deposition demonstrated, but also small segment deposition which holds potential for local surface control. Deployment of these materials was also demonstrated, setting the stage for the development of a larger test article.

  18. Fiber-mesh photonic molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Subodha; Satpathy, Sashi

    2008-03-01

    Analogous to the photonic crystal, we introduce the concept of a fiber-mesh photonic molecule made up of optical fibers and study its transmission characteristics. We consider a specific example of a photonic molecule, inspired by the well-known C60 molecule, with the arms of the molecule formed out of single-moded optical fibers. The transmittance consists of sharp peaks determined by the pole structure of the scattering matrix in the complex energy plane. A molecule can be designed to control the positions and the widths of the transmission peaks, opening up the possibility of building new photonic devices such as high quality band-pass filters.

  19. Novel array-feed distortion compensation techniques for reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    1991-01-01

    Degradation of antenna performance by reflector surface distortion, which lowers gain and increases sidelobe levels, is addressed. Distortion compensation concepts based on the applications of properly matched array feeds are presented. Results of conceptual developments, numerical simulations, and measurement verifications are presented in support of this approach, with particular attention to the measurement technique. It is shown that the concept is most useful for overcoming the deterioration effects of slowly varying surface distortions, which would make the method very useful for future large space and ground antennas. It is further shown that for a typical, slowly varying thermal or gravitational surface distortion, a 19-element array feed can improve the reflector performance considerably.

  20. Caustic Singularities Of High-Gain, Dual-Shaped Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo, Victor; Veruttipong, Thavath W.; Imbriale, William A.; Rengarajan, Sambiam

    1991-01-01

    Report presents study of some sources of error in analysis, by geometric theory of diffraction (GTD), of performance of high-gain, dual-shaped antenna reflector. Study probes into underlying analytic causes of singularity, with view toward devising and testing practical methods to avoid problems caused by singularity. Hybrid physical optics (PO) approach used to study near-field spillover or noise-temperature characteristics of high-gain relector antenna efficiently and accurately. Report illustrates this approach and underlying principles by presenting numerical results, for both offset and symmetrical reflector systems, computed by GTD, PO, and PO/GO methods.

  1. Design of subreflectors to compensate for Cassegrain main reflector deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, M. O.; Bates, R. H. T.

    1980-10-01

    There can be economic and technical advantages in compensating for measured errors in the main reflector of a Cassegrain antenna by refiguring the subreflector. A design procedure (realized as a software package) is described whereby, given a set of measured main reflector errors, ordinates defining a comprehensively checked redesign for the subreflector are provided. Efficient ray tracing and interpolation algorithms are included in the software package, which is illustrated with numerical results indicating the improvements in antenna performance to be expected when a Cassegrain subreflector is redesigned.

  2. Static and dynamic characteristics of large deployable space reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, M.; Wagner, P.

    1981-01-01

    A linear numerical model of the structural characteristics of deployable reflectors was developed. Due to cyclic symmetry of the reflector structure about its axis, only one of many segments is modeled using finite elements. The succeeding segments satisfy continuity of displacement and slope at the interface between consecutive segments. This process leads to (N/2+1) static or dynamic problems of smaller order and bandwidth where N is the number of segments. The solution of each reduced problem leads to motions having a distinct circumferential wave number. The dynamic coupling to the feed support structure is studied adopting modal synthesis.

  3. Dichroic Bragg reflectors based on birefringent porous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, J.; Kunzner, N.; Kovalev, D.; Gross, E.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Polisski, G.; Koch, F.

    2001-06-11

    Multilayers of anisotropically nanostructured silicon (Si) have been fabricated and studied by polarization-resolved reflection measurements. Alternating layers having different refractive indices exhibit additionally a strong in-plane anisotropy of their refractive index (birefringence). Therefore, a stack of layers, acting as a distributed Bragg reflector, has two distinct reflection bands, depending on the polarization of the incident linearly polarized light. This effect is governed by a three-dimensional (in-plane and in-depth) variation of the refractive index. These structures can yield optical effects which are difficult to achieve with conventional Bragg reflectors. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  4. New Developments in Large High Performance Shaped Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abegg, C.; Baril, S.

    2002-01-01

    The large shaped reflectors, currently designed and manufactured at EADS LAUNCH VEHICLES, belong to a new generation of highly precise, highly stable and low mass reflectors for C/Ku-band and up to Ka-band missions. The previous EADS LAUNCH VEHICLES flight proven design was the one presented in the past at IAF and especially in 1994 and 1995, which was already at his time the in-orbit largest (3.5m x 2.6m) rigid reflector in the world for C/Ku-band missions. Operators require higher and higher performances for telecommunication antenna. And since the antenna performances are very dependent on the reflector ones, several developments of a new generation of large shaped reflectors started in the late 1990's. The first development consists in a new concept which particularly enhances the manufacturing easiness, the manufacturing distortion performances, the in-orbit distortion performances, the mass, the versatility versus a late change of coverage and versus implementation on different platforms. An extensive qualification test campaign has been successfully achieved in 2001, with outstanding performances: 30% mass gain and 50% gain of manufacturing and in-orbit accuracy with respect to previous 1995's design for the largest 3.5m x 2.6m reflectors. In parallel, developments have been led at EADS LAUNCH VEHICLES for large Ka-band mission antenna reflectors. These developments include single and dual shell reflectors with diameters up to 1.8 m. Furthermore, antenna requirements have recently led to more and more shaped profiles to fulfil RF needs. EADS LAUNCH VEHICLES has then started a development to verify the capability to manufacture very small curvature radius around 30mm, in order to provide the best product for the satellite missions. All the necessary analyses and material/processes characterisation tests have been carried out for these developments. Qualification tests have been performed or are under progress in profile measurements, sine vibration, acoustic

  5. High Performance Woven Mesh Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirtz, Richard A.; Li, Chen; Park, Ji-Wook; Xu, Jun

    2002-07-01

    Simple-to-fabricate woven mesh structures, consisting of bonded laminates of two-dimensional plain-weave conductive screens, or three-dimensional orthogonal weaves are described. Geometric equations show that these porous matrices can be fabricated to have a wide range of porosity and a highly anisotropic thermal conductivity vector. A mathematical model of the thermal performance of such a mesh, deployed as a heat exchange surface, is developed. Measurements of pressure drop and overall heat transfer rate are reported and used with the performance model to develop correlation equations of mesh friction factor and Colburn j-factor as a function of coolant properties, mesh characteristics and flow rate through the mesh. A heat exchanger performance analysis delineates conditions where the two mesh technologies offer superior performance.

  6. Mesh networking optimized for robotic teleoperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Abraham; Pezeshkian, Narek; Nguyen, Hoa

    2012-06-01

    Mesh networks for robot teleoperation pose different challenges than those associated with traditional mesh networks. Unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) are mobile and operate in constantly changing and uncontrollable environments. Building a mesh network to work well under these harsh conditions presents a unique challenge. The Manually Deployed Communication Relay (MDCR) mesh networking system extends the range of and provides non-line-of-sight (NLOS) communications for tactical and explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) robots currently in theater. It supports multiple mesh nodes, robots acting as nodes, and works with all Internet Protocol (IP)-based robotic systems. Under MDCR, the performance of different routing protocols and route selection metrics were compared resulting in a modified version of the Babel mesh networking protocol. This paper discusses this and other topics encountered during development and testing of the MDCR system.

  7. Are meshes with lightweight construction strong enough?

    PubMed

    Holste, Joerg L

    2005-01-01

    The use of mesh has become essential in the repair of abdominal wall incisional hernias. Suture techniques, reapplied after failure of a primary repair, are characterized by recurrence rates of up to 50 percent, whereas the reinforcement of the abdominal wall with surgical mesh has significantly decreased these rates to <10 percent. This article describes the background for the development of mesh with lightweight construction and physiological biomechanical performance.

  8. Unstructured Polyhedral Mesh Thermal Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T.S.; Zika, M.R.; Madsen, N.K.

    2000-07-27

    Unstructured mesh particle transport and diffusion methods are gaining wider acceptance as mesh generation, scientific visualization and linear solvers improve. This paper describes an algorithm that is currently being used in the KULL code at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to solve the radiative transfer equations. The algorithm employs a point-centered diffusion discretization on arbitrary polyhedral meshes in 3D. We present the results of a few test problems to illustrate the capabilities of the radiation diffusion module.

  9. [Treatment of paracolostomic hernias using polypropylene mesh].

    PubMed

    Grigoriuk, A A; Ishchenko, V N; Matveev, A V; Kovalev, V A; Krasnobaev, A E; Stuzhin, S A

    2015-01-01

    It was analyzed the results of treatment of 23 patients with large paracolostomic hernias. Twenty patients underwent colostomy suturing and hernial ring Onlay-plasty with polypropylene mesh without tension. Onlay-plasty of hernial ring with own tissues and polypropylene mesh and colostomy reconstruction outside of implant were performed in 3 patients. Onlay-alloplasty with polypropylene mesh "PROLENE" is effective method of treatment of postoperative paracolostomic ventral hernias with colostomy closing as well as with its reconstruction outside of implant.

  10. Floating shock fitting via Lagrangian adaptive meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanrosendale, John

    1995-01-01

    In recent work we have formulated a new approach to compressible flow simulation, combining the advantages of shock-fitting and shock-capturing. Using a cell-centered on Roe scheme discretization on unstructured meshes, we warp the mesh while marching to steady state, so that mesh edges align with shocks and other discontinuities. This new algorithm, the Shock-fitting Lagrangian Adaptive Method (SLAM), is, in effect, a reliable shock-capturing algorithm which yields shock-fitted accuracy at convergence.

  11. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 224 - Reflectorization Implementation Compliance Report

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reflectorization Implementation Compliance Report B Appendix B to Part 224 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REFLECTORIZATION OF RAIL FREIGHT...

  12. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 224 - Reflectorization Implementation Compliance Report

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reflectorization Implementation Compliance Report B Appendix B to Part 224 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REFLECTORIZATION OF RAIL FREIGHT...

  13. Design of electrospinning mesh devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Giuseppina; Peters, Gerrit W. M.; Solberg, Ramon H. M.; Vittoria, Vittoria

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the features of new membranes that can act as local biomedical devices owing to their peculiar shape in the form of mesh structure. These materials are designed to provide significant effects to reduce local inflammations and improve the tissue regeneration. Lamellar Hydrotalcite loaded with Diclofenac Sodium (HTLc-DIK) was homogenously dispersed inside a polymeric matrix of Poly-caprolactone (PCL) to manufacture membranes by electrospinning technique. The experimental procedure and the criteria employed have shown to be extremely effective at increasing potentiality and related applications. The employed technique has proved to be very useful to manufacture polymeric fibers with diameters in the range of nano-micro scale. In this work a dedicated collector based on a proprietary technology of IME Technologies and Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) was used. It allowed to obtain devices with a macro shape of a 3D-mesh. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) highlights a very interesting texture of the electrospun fibers. They show a lamellar morphology that is only slightly modified by the inclusion of the interclay embedded in the devices to control the drug release phenomena.

  14. Method of generating a surface mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, Jason F.; Benzley, Steven; Grover, Benjamin T.

    2008-03-04

    A method and machine-readable medium provide a technique to generate and modify a quadrilateral finite element surface mesh using dual creation and modification. After generating a dual of a surface (mesh), a predetermined algorithm may be followed to generate and modify a surface mesh of quadrilateral elements. The predetermined algorithm may include the steps of generating two-dimensional cell regions in dual space, determining existing nodes in primal space, generating new nodes in the dual space, and connecting nodes to form the quadrilateral elements (faces) for the generated and modifiable surface mesh.

  15. Conformal refinement of unstructured quadrilateral meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Garmella, Rao

    2009-01-01

    We present a multilevel adaptive refinement technique for unstructured quadrilateral meshes in which the mesh is kept conformal at all times. This means that the refined mesh, like the original, is formed of only quadrilateral elements that intersect strictly along edges or at vertices, i.e., vertices of one quadrilateral element do not lie in an edge of another quadrilateral. Elements are refined using templates based on 1:3 refinement of edges. We demonstrate that by careful design of the refinement and coarsening strategy, we can maintain high quality elements in the refined mesh. We demonstrate the method on a number of examples with dynamically changing refinement regions.

  16. Mesh infrastructure for coupled multiprocess geophysical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Garimella, Rao V.; Perkins, William A.; Buksas, Mike W.; Berndt, Markus; Lipnikov, Konstantin; Coon, Ethan; Moulton, John D.; Painter, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a sophisticated mesh infrastructure capability to support large scale multiphysics simulations such as subsurface flow and reactive contaminant transport at storage sites as well as the analysis of the effects of a warming climate on the terrestrial arctic. These simulations involve a wide range of coupled processes including overland flow, subsurface flow, freezing and thawing of ice rich soil, accumulation, redistribution and melting of snow, biogeochemical processes involving plant matter and finally, microtopography evolution due to melting and degradation of ice wedges below the surface. In addition to supporting the usual topological and geometric queries about the mesh, the mesh infrastructure adds capabilities such as identifying columnar structures in the mesh, enabling deforming of the mesh subject to constraints and enabling the simultaneous use of meshes of different dimensionality for subsurface and surface processes. The generic mesh interface is capable of using three different open source mesh frameworks (MSTK, MOAB and STKmesh) under the hood allowing the developers to directly compare them and choose one that is best suited for the application's needs. We demonstrate the results of some simulations using these capabilities as well as present a comparison of the performance of the different mesh frameworks.

  17. Mesh infrastructure for coupled multiprocess geophysical simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Garimella, Rao V.; Perkins, William A.; Buksas, Mike W.; ...

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a sophisticated mesh infrastructure capability to support large scale multiphysics simulations such as subsurface flow and reactive contaminant transport at storage sites as well as the analysis of the effects of a warming climate on the terrestrial arctic. These simulations involve a wide range of coupled processes including overland flow, subsurface flow, freezing and thawing of ice rich soil, accumulation, redistribution and melting of snow, biogeochemical processes involving plant matter and finally, microtopography evolution due to melting and degradation of ice wedges below the surface. In addition to supporting the usual topological and geometric queries about themore » mesh, the mesh infrastructure adds capabilities such as identifying columnar structures in the mesh, enabling deforming of the mesh subject to constraints and enabling the simultaneous use of meshes of different dimensionality for subsurface and surface processes. The generic mesh interface is capable of using three different open source mesh frameworks (MSTK, MOAB and STKmesh) under the hood allowing the developers to directly compare them and choose one that is best suited for the application's needs. We demonstrate the results of some simulations using these capabilities as well as present a comparison of the performance of the different mesh frameworks.« less

  18. MOAB : a mesh-oriented database.

    SciTech Connect

    Tautges, Timothy James; Ernst, Corey; Stimpson, Clint; Meyers, Ray J.; Merkley, Karl

    2004-04-01

    A finite element mesh is used to decompose a continuous domain into a discretized representation. The finite element method solves PDEs on this mesh by modeling complex functions as a set of simple basis functions with coefficients at mesh vertices and prescribed continuity between elements. The mesh is one of the fundamental types of data linking the various tools in the FEA process (mesh generation, analysis, visualization, etc.). Thus, the representation of mesh data and operations on those data play a very important role in FEA-based simulations. MOAB is a component for representing and evaluating mesh data. MOAB can store structured and unstructured mesh, consisting of elements in the finite element 'zoo'. The functional interface to MOAB is simple yet powerful, allowing the representation of many types of metadata commonly found on the mesh. MOAB is optimized for efficiency in space and time, based on access to mesh in chunks rather than through individual entities, while also versatile enough to support individual entity access. The MOAB data model consists of a mesh interface instance, mesh entities (vertices and elements), sets, and tags. Entities are addressed through handles rather than pointers, to allow the underlying representation of an entity to change without changing the handle to that entity. Sets are arbitrary groupings of mesh entities and other sets. Sets also support parent/child relationships as a relation distinct from sets containing other sets. The directed-graph provided by set parent/child relationships is useful for modeling topological relations from a geometric model or other metadata. Tags are named data which can be assigned to the mesh as a whole, individual entities, or sets. Tags are a mechanism for attaching data to individual entities and sets are a mechanism for describing relations between entities; the combination of these two mechanisms is a powerful yet simple interface for representing metadata or application

  19. Antibiotic Coating of Hernia Meshes: The Next Step Toward Preventing Mesh Infection.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Arnab; Neupane, Ruel; Novitsky, Yuri W

    2015-11-01

    Mesh bacterial colonization/infection remains a critical issue in complex ventral hernia repair. Despite the recent emergence of biologic meshes, current strategies to prevent and treat mesh infection are largely ineffective, often leading to device failure and subsequent explantation along with the associated costs and effect on patient welfare. Unacceptably high rates of morbidity and hernia recurrence following mesh infection highlight the need for innovation in the area of hernia repair for the complex patient. One recent strategy to address such shortcomings is local antibiosis in the form of polymer coatings applied to the mesh itself. Current literature regarding the use of antibiotic-coated hernia mesh is limited but does illustrate the ability of these devices to inhibit bacterial growth and prevent mesh infection in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Although there is a paucity of literature regarding long-term clinical efficacy, this provides opportunity for further inquiry into a promising new development to combat mesh infective complications.

  20. Ultra-thin distributed Bragg reflectors via stacked single-crystal silicon nanomembranes

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Minkyu; Seo, Jung-Hun; Lee, Jaeseong; Mi, Hongyi; Kim, Munho; Ma, Zhenqiang; Zhao, Deyin; Zhou, Weidong; Yin, Xin; Wang, Xudong

    2015-05-04

    In this paper, we report ultra-thin distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) via stacked single-crystal silicon (Si) nanomembranes (NMs). Mesh hole-free single-crystal Si NMs were released from a Si-on-insulator substrate and transferred to quartz and Si substrates. Thermal oxidation was applied to the transferred Si NM to form high-quality SiO{sub 2} and thus a Si/SiO{sub 2} pair with uniform and precisely controlled thicknesses. The Si/SiO{sub 2} layers, as smooth as epitaxial grown layers, minimize scattering loss at the interface and in between the layers. As a result, a reflection of 99.8% at the wavelength range from 1350 nm to 1650 nm can be measured from a 2.5-pair DBR on a quartz substrate and 3-pair DBR on a Si substrate with thickness of 0.87 μm and 1.14 μm, respectively. The high reflection, ultra-thin DBRs developed here, which can be applied to almost any devices and materials, holds potential for application in high performance optoelectronic devices and photonics applications.

  1. Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing for Solar Reflectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.; Elmore, R.; Lee, J.; Kennedy, C.

    2011-09-01

    To meet the challenge to reduce the cost of electricity generated with concentrating solar power (CSP) new low-cost reflector materials are being developed including metalized polymer reflectors and must be tested and validated against appropriate failure mechanisms. We explore the application of testing methods and statistical inference techniques for quantifying estimates and improving lifetimes of concentrating solar power (CSP) reflectors associated with failure mechanisms initiated by exposure to the ultraviolet (UV) part of the solar spectrum. In general, a suite of durability and reliability tests are available for testing a variety of failure mechanisms where the results of a set are required to understand overall lifetime of a CSP reflector. We will focus on the use of the Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System (UAWS) as a testing device for assessing various degradation patterns attributable to accelerated UV exposure. Depending on number of samples, test conditions, degradation and failure patterns, test results may be used to derive insight into failure mechanisms, associated physical parameters, lifetimes and uncertainties. In the most complicated case warranting advanced planning and statistical inference, step-stress accelerated degradation (SSADT) methods may be applied.

  2. Advanced reflector characterization with ultrasonic phased arrays in NDE applications.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Paul D; Holmes, Caroline; Drinkwater, Bruce W

    2007-08-01

    Ultrasonic arrays are increasingly widely used in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) due to their greater flexibility and potentially superior performance compared to conventional monolithic probes. The characterization of small defects remains a challenge for NDE and is of great importance for determining the impact of a defect on the integrity of a structure. In this paper, a technique for characterizing reflectors with subwavelength dimensions is described. This is achieved by post-processing the complete data set of time traces obtained from an ultrasonic array using two algorithms. The first algorithm is used to obtain information about reflector orientation and the second algorithm is used to distinguish between point-like reflectors that reflect uniformly in all directions and specular reflectors that have distinct orientations. Experimental results are presented using a commercial 64-element, 5-MHZ array on two aluminum test specimens that contain a number of machined slots and side-drilled holes. The results show that the orientation of 1-mm-long slots can be determined to within a few degrees and that the signals from 1-mm-long slots can be distinguished from that from a 1-mm-diameter circular hole. Techniques for quantifying both the orientation and the specularity of measured signals are presented and the effect of processing parameters on the accuracy of results is discussed.

  3. Long-Life Self-Renewing Solar Reflector Stack

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Barry Lynn

    1997-07-08

    A long-life solar reflector includes a solar collector substrate and a base layer bonded to a solar collector substrate. The first layer includes a first reflective layer and a first acrylic or transparent polymer layer covering the first reflective layer to prevent exposure of the first reflective layer. The reflector also includes at least one upper layer removably bonded to the first acrylic or transparent polymer layer of the base layer. The upper layer includes a second reflective layer and a second acrylic or transparent polymer layer covering the second reflective layer to prevent exposure of the second reflective layer. The upper layer may be removed from the base reflective layer to expose the base layer, thereby lengthening the useful life of the solar reflector. A method of manufacturing a solar reflector includes the steps of bonding a base layer to a solar collector substrate, wherein the base reflective layer includes a first reflective layer and a first transparent polymer or acrylic layer covering the first reflective layer; and removably bonding a first upper layer to the first transparent polymer or acrylic layer of the base layer. The first upper layer includes a second reflective layer and a second transparent polymer or acrylic layer covering the second reflective layer to prevent exposure of the second reflective layer.

  4. Detail of 94' lowband reflector screen posts, note the concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of 94' low-band reflector screen posts, note the concrete curb and vertical wires between posts, view facing north northeast - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  5. Detail of dipole antenna element (right) and 94' lowband reflector ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of dipole antenna element (right) and 94' low-band reflector screen poles (left), note the guy wires from the antenna element, view facing north northeast - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  6. Beam spoiling a reflector antenna with conducting shim.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-12-01

    A horn-fed dish reflector antenna has characteristics including beam pattern that are a function of its mechanical form. The beam pattern can be altered by changing the mechanical configuration of the antenna. One way to do this is with a reflecting insert or shim added to the face of the original dish.

  7. Process sequence produces strong, lightweight reflectors of excellent quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reader, A. F.; Russell, W. E.; Werner, E. A.

    1967-01-01

    Large compound curved surfaces for collecting and concentrating radiation are fabricated by the use of several common machining and forming processes. Lightweight sectors are assembled into large reflectors. With this concept of fabrication, integrally stiffened reflective sectors up to 25 square feet in area have been produced.

  8. Geometry adaptive control of a composite reflector using PZT actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Lan; Jiang, Shuidong; Zhou, Yang; Fang, Houfei; Tan, Shujun; Wu, Zhigang

    2015-04-01

    Maintaining geometrical high precision for a graphite fiber reinforced composite (GFRC) reflector is a challenging task. Although great efforts have been placed to improve the fabrication precision, geometry adaptive control for a reflector is becoming more and more necessary. This paper studied geometry adaptive control for a GFRC reflector with piezoelectric ceramic transducer (PZT) actuators assembled on the ribs. In order to model the piezoelectric effect in finite element analysis (FEA), a thermal analogy was used in which the temperature was applied to simulate the actuation voltage, and the piezoelectric constant was mimicked by a Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE). PZT actuator's equivalent model was validated by an experiment. The deformations of a triangular GFRC specimen with three PZT actuators were also measured experimentally and compared with that of simulation. This study developed a multidisciplinary analytical model, which includes the composite structure, thermal, thermal deformation and control system, to perform an optimization analysis and design for the adaptive GFRC reflector by considering the free vibration, gravity deformation and geometry controllability.

  9. Prelaunch testing of the GEOS-3 laser reflector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, P. O.; Fitzmaurice, M. W.; Abshire, J. B.; Rowe, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    The prelaunch testing performed on the Geos-3 laser reflector array before launch was used to determine the lidar cross section of the array and the distance of the center of gravity of the satellite from the center of gravity of reflected laser pulses as a function of incidence angle. Experimental data are compared to computed results.

  10. Optical Phased Array Using Guided Resonance with Backside Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horie, Yu (Inventor); Arbabi, Amir (Inventor); Faraon, Andrei (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods and systems for controlling the phase of electromagnetic waves are disclosed. A device can consist of a guided resonance grating layer, a spacer, and a reflector. A plurality of devices, arranged in a grid pattern, can control the phase of reflected electromagnetic phase, through refractive index control. Carrier injection, temperature control, and optical beams can be applied to control the refractive index.

  11. The Proposed DESDynI Array-Fed Reflector Feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Hodges, R.; Vacchione, J.; Zawadzki, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the feed antenna for a proposed NASA Earth orbiting radar sensor currently in formulation at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The proposed array-fed reflector antenna architecture would enable large physical aperture imaging from space at relatively low cost and high technology readiness. Design, construction, and modeling of the feed antenna are described.

  12. The design of the central-axis reflector (ZAS).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hügenell, H.

    1988-10-01

    The central-axis reflector (ZAS), the design principle which is presented in the paper is a segmented-mirror telescope. The inventions relate mainly to the optical system and to the tracking apparatus. A large number of small individual mirror bodies, ground off-axis (hexagonal/polygonal) produce one primary mirror with closed circular aperture when joined together.

  13. Hollow optical waveguides with omni-directional reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Shou; Hou, Chia-Hung; Chien, Hung-Ta; Hsiao, Fu-Li; Chen, Chii-Chang

    2005-03-01

    In this study, we design and fabricate a hollow optical waveguide with omni-directional reflectors in silicon-based materials. A groove is etched by inductive coupled plasma (ICP) with photolithographic process on (100) silicon wafer. The width of the groove is varied from 3.5 to 5.5 micrometer for different waveguide designs. The depth of the groove is 1.2 micrometers. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is used to deposit six pairs of Si/SiO2(0.111/0.258micrometers) on the samples. Finally, the top of the sample is covered by another silicon substrate on which the identical omni-directional reflector has been also deposited. By wafer bonding technology, the top omni-directional reflector can be combined with the groove to form a hollow optical waveguide. Light with the wavelength at 1.55 micrometers can be confined by the omni-directional reflectors at single mode operation. Polarization independent hollow optical waveguides can be achieved with this fabrication process.

  14. Geometrically Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of a Composite Space Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kee-Joo; Leet, Sung W.; Clark, Greg; Broduer, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Lightweight aerospace structures, such as low areal density composite space reflectors, are highly flexible and may undergo large deflection under applied loading, especially during the launch phase. Accordingly, geometrically nonlinear analysis that takes into account the effect of finite rotation may be needed to determine the deformed shape for a clearance check and the stress and strain state to ensure structural integrity. In this study, deformation of the space reflector is determined under static conditions using a geometrically nonlinear solid shell finite element model. For the solid shell element formulation, the kinematics of deformation is described by six variables that are purely vector components. Because rotational angles are not used, this approach is free of the limitations of small angle increments. This also allows easy connections between substructures and large load increments with respect to the conventional shell formulation using rotational parameters. Geometrically nonlinear analyses were carried out for three cases of static point loads applied at selected points. A chart shows results for a case when the load is applied at the center point of the reflector dish. The computed results capture the nonlinear behavior of the composite reflector as the applied load increases. Also, they are in good agreement with the data obtained by experiments.

  15. Optical phased array using guided resonance with backside reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Horie, Yu; Arbabi, Amir; Faraon, Andrei

    2016-11-01

    Methods and systems for controlling the phase of electromagnetic waves are disclosed. A device can consist of a guided resonance grating layer, a spacer, and a reflector. A plurality of devices, arranged in a grid pattern, can control the phase of reflected electromagnetic phase, through refractive index control. Carrier injection, temperature control, and optical beams can be applied to control the refractive index.

  16. Project Echo: Horn-Reflector Antenna for Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, A. B.; Hogg, D. C.; Hunt, L. E.

    1961-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical features of the horn- reflector antenna used for receiving signals reflected from the Project Echo balloon satellite, and presents in some detail the electrical characteristics (radiation patterns and gain) measured at a frequency of 2390 Mc. Theoretically derived characteristics which agree very well with the measurements are also presented; details of the calculations are given in the appendices.

  17. 49 CFR 393.22 - Combination of lighting devices and reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Combination of lighting devices and reflectors... Wiring § 393.22 Combination of lighting devices and reflectors. (a) Permitted combinations. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, two or more lighting devices and reflectors (whether or...

  18. 49 CFR 393.22 - Combination of lighting devices and reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Combination of lighting devices and reflectors... Wiring § 393.22 Combination of lighting devices and reflectors. (a) Permitted combinations. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, two or more lighting devices and reflectors (whether or...

  19. 49 CFR 393.22 - Combination of lighting devices and reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Combination of lighting devices and reflectors... Wiring § 393.22 Combination of lighting devices and reflectors. (a) Permitted combinations. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, two or more lighting devices and reflectors (whether or...

  20. 49 CFR 393.22 - Combination of lighting devices and reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Combination of lighting devices and reflectors... Wiring § 393.22 Combination of lighting devices and reflectors. (a) Permitted combinations. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, two or more lighting devices and reflectors (whether or...

  1. 49 CFR 393.22 - Combination of lighting devices and reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Combination of lighting devices and reflectors... Wiring § 393.22 Combination of lighting devices and reflectors. (a) Permitted combinations. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, two or more lighting devices and reflectors (whether or...

  2. 49 CFR 393.13 - Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors... sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers manufactured before December 1...-towaway operation, must be equipped with retroreflective sheeting or an array of reflex reflectors...

  3. 49 CFR 393.13 - Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors... sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers manufactured before December 1...-towaway operation, must be equipped with retroreflective sheeting or an array of reflex reflectors...

  4. 49 CFR 393.13 - Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors... sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers manufactured before December 1...-towaway operation, must be equipped with retroreflective sheeting or an array of reflex reflectors...

  5. 49 CFR 393.13 - Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors... sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers manufactured before December 1...-towaway operation, must be equipped with retroreflective sheeting or an array of reflex reflectors...

  6. 49 CFR 393.13 - Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors... sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers manufactured before December 1...-towaway operation, must be equipped with retroreflective sheeting or an array of reflex reflectors...

  7. Choosing corners of rectangles for mapped meshing

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, S.A.

    1996-12-16

    Consider mapping a regular i x j quadrilateral mesh of a rectangle onto a surface. The quality of the mapped mesh of the surface depends heavily on which vertices of the surface correspond to corners of the rectangle. The authors problem is, given an n-sided surface, chose as corners four vertices such that the surface resembles a rectangle with corners at those vertices. Note that n could be quite large, and the length and width of the rectangle, i and j, are not prespecified. In general, there is either a goal number or a prescribed number of mesh edges for each bounding curve of the surface. The goals affect the quality of the mesh, and the prescribed edges may make finding a feasible set of corners difficult. The algorithm need only work for surfaces that are roughly rectangular, particular those without large reflex angles, as otherwise an unstructured meshing algorithm is used instead. The authors report on the theory and implementation of algorithms for this problem. They also given an overview of a solution to a related problem called interval assignment: given a complex of surfaces sharing curves, globally assign the number of mesh edges or intervals for each curve such that it is possible to mesh each surface according to its prescribed quadrilateral meshing algorithm, and assigned and user-prescribed boundary mesh edges and corners. They also note a practical, constructive technique that relies on interval assignment that can generate a quadrilateral mesh of a complex of surfaces such that a compatible hexahedral mesh of the enclosed volume exists.

  8. Control of active reflector system for radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guo-hua; Li, Guo-ping; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Zhen-chao

    2016-10-01

    According to the control requirements of the active reflector surface in the 110 m radio telescope at QiTai(QTT) Xinjiang, a new displacement actuator and a new displacement control system were designed and manufactured and then their characteristics were tested by a dual-frequency laser interferometer in the micro-displacement laboratory. The displacement actuator was designed by a scheme of high precision worm and roller screw structures, and the displacement control system was based on a ARM micro-processor. Finally, the S curve acceleration control methods were used to design the hardware platform and software algorithm for the active reflection surface of the control system. The test experiments were performed based on the laser metrology system on an active reflector close-loop antenna prototype for large radio telescope. Experimental results indicate that it achieves a 30 mm working stroke and 5 μm RMS motion resolution. The accuracy (standard deviation) is 3.67 mm, and the error between the determined and theoretical values is 0.04% when the rated load is 300 kg, the step is 2 mm and the stroke is 30mm. Furthermore, the active reflector integrated system was tested by the laser sensors with the accuracy of 0.25 μm RMS on 4-panel radio telescope prototype, the measurement results show that the integrated precision of the active reflector closed-loop control system is less than 5 μm RMS, and well satisfies the technical requirements of active reflector control system of the QTT radio telescope in 3 mm wavelength.

  9. Suzaku observations of Markarian 335: evidence for a distributed reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, J.; Miniutti, G.; Fabian, A. C.; Miller, J. M.; Reynolds, C. S.; Ponti, G.

    2008-03-01

    We report on a 151-ks net exposure Suzaku observation of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 335. The 0.5-40 keV spectrum contains a broad Fe line, a strong soft excess below about 2 keV and a Compton hump around 20-30 keV. We find that a model consisting of a power law and two reflectors provides the best fit to the time-averaged spectrum. In this model, an ionized, heavily blurred, inner reflector produces most of the soft excess, while an almost neutral outer reflector (outside ~ 40rg) produces most of the Fe line emission. The spectral variability of the observation is characterized by spectral hardening at very low count rates. In terms of our power-law + two-reflector model it seems like this hardening is mainly caused by pivoting of the power law. The rms spectrum of the entire observation has the curved shape commonly observed in active galactic nuclei, although the shape is significantly flatter when an interval which does not contain any deep dip in the light curve is considered. We also examine a previous 133-ks XMM-Newton observation of Mrk 335. We find that the XMM-Newton spectrum can be fitted with a similar two-reflector model as the Suzaku data and we confirm that the rms spectrum of the observation is flat. The flat rms spectra, as well as the high-energy data from the Suzaku PIN detector, disfavour an absorption origin for the soft excess in Mrk 335.

  10. Adaptive mesh refinement in titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Colella, Phillip; Wen, Tong

    2005-01-21

    In this paper, we evaluate Titanium's usability as a high-level parallel programming language through a case study, where we implement a subset of Chombo's functionality in Titanium. Chombo is a software package applying the Adaptive Mesh Refinement methodology to numerical Partial Differential Equations at the production level. In Chombo, the library approach is used to parallel programming (C++ and Fortran, with MPI), whereas Titanium is a Java dialect designed for high-performance scientific computing. The performance of our implementation is studied and compared with that of Chombo in solving Poisson's equation based on two grid configurations from a real application. Also provided are the counts of lines of code from both sides.

  11. Matrix computations on mesh arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the systematic derivation of mesh arrays for matrix computations, in particular realizing the algorithm-specific arrays and mapping algorithms onto class-specific arrays. A data-dependency graph-based transformational method is proposed in a design frame work consisting of two stages, namely algorithm regularization and derivation of arrays. The first stage derives the fully-parallel data-dependency graph (FPG) of an algorithm and transforms this graph into a three-dimensional one with unidirectional nearest-neighbor dependencies (a multi-mesh graph MMG). The second stage transforms the MMG into a two-dimensional G-graph, which is realized as an algorithm-specific array or mapped onto a class-specific array. This stage allows the incorporation of implementation restrictions and the evaluation of tradeoffs in properties of cells, as well as the derivation of arrays for fixed-size data and partitioned problems, while performing optimization of specific performance/cost measures. The proposed method is formalized by presenting a sufficient set of transformations and demonstrating the equivalence of graphs obtained from those transformations. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the MMG representation is always possible, due to the characteristics of the operators. The method has been applied to a collection of matrix algorithms, including matrix multiplication, convolution, matrix decompositions, transitive closure, the Faddeev algorithm, and BBA{sup {minus}1}. The examples show that, in addition to the features listed earlier, this method is easy to apply. Moreover, the method is compared with other techniques, concluding that it is advantageous because it meets evaluation criteria and produces more efficient arrays.

  12. Structured mesh generation with smoothness controls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In geometrically complex domains, the RL (Ryskin and Leal) orthogonal mesh generation system may cause mesh distortion and overlapping problems when using the “weak constraint” method with specified boundary point distribution for all boundaries. To resolve these problems, an improved RL system with...

  13. 50 CFR 300.110 - Mesh size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... either with a manual force or using a weight or dynamometer, until it is stopped at the tapering edges by... without using a weight or dynamometer. The mesh size of the net will then be determined in accordance with... for the determination of the mesh size and the net will be remeasured. (A) A weight or...

  14. 50 CFR 300.110 - Mesh size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... either with a manual force or using a weight or dynamometer, until it is stopped at the tapering edges by... without using a weight or dynamometer. The mesh size of the net will then be determined in accordance with... for the determination of the mesh size and the net will be remeasured. (A) A weight or...

  15. Exploring the basic science of prolapse meshes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rui; Knight, Katrina; Abramowitch, Steve; Moalli, Pamela A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Polypropylene mesh has been widely used in the surgical repair of pelvic organ prolapse. However, low but persistent rates of complications related to mesh, most commonly mesh exposure and pain, have hampered its use. Complications are higher following transvaginal implantation prompting the Food and Drug Administration to release two public health notifications warning of complications associated with transvaginal mesh use (PHN 2008 and 2011) and to upclassify transvaginal prolapse meshes from Class II to Class III devices. Although there have been numerous studies to determine the incidence and management of mesh complications as well as impact on quality of life, few studies have focused on mechanisms. Recent findings In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how mesh textile properties and mechanical behavior impact vaginal structure and function, as well as the local immune response. We also discuss how mesh properties change in response to loading. Summary We highlight a few areas of current and future research to emphasize collaborative strategies that incorporate basic science research to improve patient outcomes. PMID:27517341

  16. Mesh Sutured Repairs of Abdominal Wall Defects

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Steven T.; Jordan, Sumanas W.; Miller, Kyle R.; Ali, Nada A.; Stock, Stuart R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A new closure technique is introduced, which uses strips of macroporous polypropylene mesh as a suture for closure of abdominal wall defects due to failures of standard sutures and difficulties with planar meshes. Methods: Strips of macroporous polypropylene mesh of 2 cm width were passed through the abdominal wall and tied as simple interrupted sutures. The surgical technique and surgical outcomes are presented. Results: One hundred and seven patients underwent a mesh sutured abdominal wall closure. Seventy-six patients had preoperative hernias, and the mean hernia width by CT scan for those with scans was 9.1 cm. Forty-nine surgical fields were clean-contaminated, contaminated, or dirty. Five patients had infections within the first 30 days. Only one knot was removed as an office procedure. Mean follow-up at 234 days revealed 4 recurrent hernias. Conclusions: Mesh sutured repairs reliably appose tissue under tension using concepts of force distribution and resistance to suture pull-through. The technique reduces the amount of foreign material required in comparison to sheet meshes, and avoids the shortcomings of monofilament sutures. Mesh sutured closures seem to be tolerant of bacterial contamination with low hernia recurrence rates and have replaced our routine use of mesh sheets and bioprosthetic grafts. PMID:27757361

  17. 21 CFR 878.3300 - Surgical mesh.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Surgical mesh. 878.3300 Section 878.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3300 Surgical mesh. (a)...

  18. 21 CFR 878.3300 - Surgical mesh.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Surgical mesh. 878.3300 Section 878.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3300 Surgical mesh. (a)...

  19. Robust diamond meshes with unique wettability properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yizhou; Li, Hongdong; Cheng, Shaoheng; Zou, Guangtian; Wang, Chuanxi; Lin, Quan

    2014-03-18

    Robust diamond meshes with excellent superhydrophobic and superoleophilic properties have been fabricated. Superhydrophobicity is observed for water with varying pH from 1 to 14 with good recyclability. Reversible superhydrophobicity and hydrophilicity can be easily controlled. The diamond meshes show highly efficient water-oil separation and water pH droplet transference.

  20. 7th International Meshing Roundtable '98

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, T.J.

    1998-10-01

    The goal of the 7th International Meshing Roundtable is to bring together researchers and developers from industry, academia, and government labs in a stimulating, open environment for the exchange of technical information related to the meshing process. In the past, the Roundtable has enjoyed significant participation from each of these groups from a wide variety of countries.

  1. Mesh deformation based on artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, Domen; Kosel, Franc; Čelič, Damjan; Lipej, Andrej

    2011-09-01

    In the article a new mesh deformation algorithm based on artificial neural networks is introduced. This method is a point-to-point method, meaning that it does not use connectivity information for calculation of the mesh deformation. Two already known point-to-point methods, based on interpolation techniques, are also presented. In contrast to the two known interpolation methods, the new method does not require a summation over all boundary nodes for one displacement calculation. The consequence of this fact is a shorter computational time of mesh deformation, which is proven by different deformation tests. The quality of the deformed meshes with all three deformation methods was also compared. Finally, the generated and the deformed three-dimensional meshes were used in the computational fluid dynamics numerical analysis of a Francis water turbine. A comparison of the analysis results was made to prove the applicability of the new method in every day computation.

  2. A comparison of tetrahedral mesh improvement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Freitag, L.A.; Ollivier-Gooch, C.

    1996-12-01

    Automatic mesh generation and adaptive refinement methods for complex three-dimensional domains have proven to be very successful tools for the efficient solution of complex applications problems. These methods can, however, produce poorly shaped elements that cause the numerical solution to be less accurate and more difficult to compute. Fortunately, the shape of the elements can be improved through several mechanisms, including face-swapping techniques that change local connectivity and optimization-based mesh smoothing methods that adjust grid point location. The authors consider several criteria for each of these two methods and compare the quality of several meshes obtained by using different combinations of swapping and smoothing. Computational experiments show that swapping is critical to the improvement of general mesh quality and that optimization-based smoothing is highly effective in eliminating very small and very large angles. The highest quality meshes are obtained by using a combination of swapping and smoothing techniques.

  3. Update on Development of Mesh Generation Algorithms in MeshKit

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Rajeev; Vanderzee, Evan; Mahadevan, Vijay

    2015-09-30

    MeshKit uses a graph-based design for coding all its meshing algorithms, which includes the Reactor Geometry (and mesh) Generation (RGG) algorithms. This report highlights the developmental updates of all the algorithms, results and future work. Parallel versions of algorithms, documentation and performance results are reported. RGG GUI design was updated to incorporate new features requested by the users; boundary layer generation and parallel RGG support were added to the GUI. Key contributions to the release, upgrade and maintenance of other SIGMA1 libraries (CGM and MOAB) were made. Several fundamental meshing algorithms for creating a robust parallel meshing pipeline in MeshKit are under development. Results and current status of automated, open-source and high quality nuclear reactor assembly mesh generation algorithms such as trimesher, quadmesher, interval matching and multi-sweeper are reported.

  4. Automatic Mesh Generation of Hybrid Mesh on Valves in Multiple Positions in Feedline Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Douglass H.; Ito, Yasushi; Dorothy, Fredric W.; Shih, Alan M.; Peugeot, John

    2010-01-01

    Fluid flow simulations through a valve often require evaluation of the valve in multiple opening positions. A mesh has to be generated for the valve for each position and compounding. The problem is the fact that the valve is typically part of a larger feedline system. In this paper, we propose to develop a system to create meshes for feedline systems with parametrically controlled valve openings. Herein we outline two approaches to generate the meshes for a valve in a feedline system at multiple positions. There are two issues that must be addressed. The first is the creation of the mesh on the valve for multiple positions. The second is the generation of the mesh for the total feedline system including the valve. For generation of the mesh on the valve, we will describe the use of topology matching and mesh generation parameter transfer. For generation of the total feedline system, we will describe two solutions that we have implemented. In both cases the valve is treated as a component in the feedline system. In the first method the geometry of the valve in the feedline system is replaced with a valve at a different opening position. Geometry is created to connect the valve to the feedline system. Then topology for the valve is created and the portion of the topology for the valve is topology matched to the standard valve in a different position. The mesh generation parameters are transferred and then the volume mesh for the whole feedline system is generated. The second method enables the user to generate the volume mesh on the valve in multiple open positions external to the feedline system, to insert it into the volume mesh of the feedline system, and to reduce the amount of computer time required for mesh generation because only two small volume meshes connecting the valve to the feedline mesh need to be updated.

  5. Concepts and analysis for precision segmented reflector and feed support structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Richard K.; Thomson, Mark W.; Hedgepeth, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Several issues surrounding the design of a large (20-meter diameter) Precision Segmented Reflector are investigated. The concerns include development of a reflector support truss geometry that will permit deployment into the required doubly-curved shape without significant member strains. For deployable and erectable reflector support trusses, the reduction of structural redundancy was analyzed to achieve reduced weight and complexity for the designs. The stiffness and accuracy of such reduced member trusses, however, were found to be affected to a degree that is unexpected. The Precision Segmented Reflector designs were developed with performance requirements that represent the Reflector application. A novel deployable sunshade concept was developed, and a detailed parametric study of various feed support structural concepts was performed. The results of the detailed study reveal what may be the most desirable feed support structure geometry for Precision Segmented Reflector/Large Deployable Reflector applications.

  6. Correcting Thermal Deformations in an Active Composite Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Samuel C.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Wilkie, William K.

    2011-01-01

    Large, high-precision composite reflectors for future space missions are costly to manufacture, and heavy. An active composite reflector capable of adjusting shape in situ to maintain required tolerances can be lighter and cheaper to manufacture. An active composite reflector testbed was developed that uses an array of piezoelectric composite actuators embedded in the back face sheet of a 0.8-m reflector panel. Each individually addressable actuator can be commanded from 500 to +1,500 V, and the flatness of the panel can be controlled to tolerances of 100 nm. Measuring the surface flatness at this resolution required the use of a speckle holography interferometer system in the Precision Environmental Test Enclosure (PETE) at JPL. The existing testbed combines the PETE for test environment stability, the speckle holography system for measuring out-of-plane deformations, the active panel including an array of individually addressable actuators, a FLIR thermal camera to measure thermal profiles across the reflector, and a heat source. Use of an array of flat piezoelectric actuators to correct thermal deformations is a promising new application for these actuators, as is the use of this actuator technology for surface flatness and wavefront control. An isogrid of these actuators is moving one step closer to a fully active face sheet, with the significant advantage of ease in manufacturing. No extensive rib structure or other actuation backing structure is required, as these actuators can be applied directly to an easy-to-manufacture flat surface. Any mission with a surface flatness requirement for a panel or reflector structure could adopt this actuator array concept to create lighter structures and enable improved performance on orbit. The thermal environment on orbit tends to include variations in temperature during shadowing or changes in angle. Because of this, a purely passive system is not an effective way to maintain flatness at the scale of microns over several

  7. Constrained CVT Meshes and a Comparison of Triangular Mesh Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Hoa; Burkardt, John; Gunzburger, Max; Ju, Lili; Saka, Yuki

    2009-01-01

    Mesh generation in regions in Euclidean space is a central task in computational science, and especially for commonly used numerical methods for the solution of partial differential equations, e.g., finite element and finite volume methods. We focus on the uniform Delaunay triangulation of planar regions and, in particular, on how one selects the positions of the vertices of the triangulation. We discuss a recently developed method, based on the centroidal Voronoi tessellation (CVT) concept, for effecting such triangulations and present two algorithms, including one new one, for CVT-based grid generation. We also compare several methods, including CVT-based methods, for triangulating planar domains. To this end, we define several quantitative measures of the quality of uniform grids. We then generate triangulations of several planar regions, including some having complexities that are representative of what one may encounter in practice. We subject the resulting grids to visual and quantitative comparisons and conclude that all the methods considered produce high-quality uniform grids and that the CVT-based grids are at least as good as any of the others.

  8. Spaceborne Microwave Instrument for High Resolution Remote Sensing of the Earth's Surface Using a Large-Aperture Mesh Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E.; Wilson, W.; Yueh, S.; Freeland, R.; Helms, R.; Edelstein, W.; Sadowy, G.; Farra, D.; West, R.; Oxnevad, K.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a two-year study of a large-aperture, lightweight, deployable mesh antenna system for radiometer and radar remote sensing of the Earth from space. The study focused specifically on an instrument to measure ocean salinity and Soil moisture. Measurements of ocean salinity and soil moisture are of critical . importance in improving knowledge and prediction of key ocean and land surface processes, but are not currently obtainable from space. A mission using this instrument would be the first demonstration of deployable mesh antenna technology for remote sensing and could lead to potential applications in other remote sensing disciplines that require high spatial resolution measurements. The study concept features a rotating 6-m-diameter deployable mesh antenna, with radiometer and radar sensors, to measure microwave emission and backscatter from the Earth's surface. The sensors operate at L and S bands, with multiple polarizations and a constant look angle, scanning across a wide swath. The study included detailed analyses of science requirements, reflector and feedhorn design and performance, microwave emissivity measurements of mesh samples, design and test of lightweight radar electronic., launch vehicle accommodations, rotational dynamics simulations, and an analysis of attitude control issues associated with the antenna and spacecraft, The goal of the study was to advance the technology readiness of the overall concept to a level appropriate for an Earth science emission.

  9. Method of modifying a volume mesh using sheet extraction

    DOEpatents

    Borden, Michael J.; Shepherd, Jason F.

    2007-02-20

    A method and machine-readable medium provide a technique to modify a hexahedral finite element volume mesh using dual generation and sheet extraction. After generating a dual of a volume stack (mesh), a predetermined algorithm may be followed to modify the volume mesh of hexahedral elements. The predetermined algorithm may include the steps of determining a sheet of hexahedral mesh elements, generating nodes for merging, and merging the nodes to delete the sheet of hexahedral mesh elements and modify the volume mesh.

  10. Feasibility study of a synthesis procedure for array feeds to improve radiation performance of large distorted reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Takamizawa, K.; Werntz, P.; Lapean, J.; Barts, R.; Shen, B.; Dunn, D.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) performance analysis of the Gregorian tri-reflector; (2) design and performance of the type 6 reflector antenna; (3) a new spherical main reflector system design; (4) optimization of reflector configurations using physical optics; (5) radiometric array design; and (7) beam efficiency studies.

  11. Evolution of the mandibular mesh implant.

    PubMed

    Salyer, K E; Johns, D F; Holmes, R E; Layton, J G

    1977-07-01

    Between 1960 and 1972, the Dallas Veterans Administration Hospital Maxillofacial Research Laboratory developed and made over 150 cast-mesh implants. Successive designs were ovoid, circular, and double-lumened in cross section to improve implant strength, surface area for bioattachment, and adjustability. Sleeves, collars, and bows were employed in the assembly of these implants, with an acrylic condylar head attached when indicated. In 1972, our laboratory developed a mandibular mesh tray, cast in one piece on a single sprue, with preservation of the vertically adjustable ramus. Stainless steel replaced Vitallium because of its greater malleability. Essentially, a lost-wax technique is used to cast the mesh tray. The model of a mandibular segment is duplicated as a refractory model. Mesh wax, made in our own custom-made die, is adapted to the refractory model. The unit is then sprued and invested. The wax is fired our of the mold in a gas furnace. Casting is done by the transferral of molten stainless steel from the crucible to the mold by centrifugal force in an electro-induction casting machine. Other mesh implants that have been developed are made from wire mesh, Dacron mesh, cast Ticonium, and hydroformed titanium.

  12. High contrast reflective liquid crystal display using a thermochromic reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Kyong Chan; Yi, Jonghoon; Kwon, Jin Hyuk; Seog Gwag, Jin

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a reflective liquid crystal display (LCD) with a high contrast ratio (CR) combined with mono-type thermochromic materials to solve the low CR of reflective type LCDs. Here, reflective, wide-band, electrically controlled birefringence mode was used as the optical liquid crystal (LC) mode, and a thermochromic material was used as the reflector for the white state and an absorber for the dark state. The combination of LCD and thermochromic material can have a synergistic effect in achieving a better display. By controlling the reflectance of the thermochromic reflector using Joule heating, the proposed reflective LC cell exhibited a high CR of approximately 70:1. The figure was extremely high compared to the approximately 10:1 of a typical reflective LC cell with an optically wide band design. The proposed LC cell configuration is expected to find many outdoor applications which can admit slow response speed.

  13. Cavity optomechanics with 2D photonic crystal membrane reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingaraju, Navin B.; Shuai, Yichen; Lawall, John

    2016-03-01

    Membranes made from silicon nitride have significantly higher mechanical Q-factors under tensile stress than those made of other dielectric materials. This makes them ideal candidates for membrane reflectors that provide high finesse in Fabry-Perot cavities or membrane-in-the-middle optomechanical systems. Building on our previous work with one-dimensional gratings on suspended membranes, we patterned two-dimensional photonic crystal gratings on monolithic, suspended membranes made from silicon nitride. These high-Q membranes exhibited high reflectivity, upwards of 99%, over several nanometers in the telecom band. To probe their optical response in a cavity environment, we used these membrane reflectors as the moving mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity. We were able to realize cavities with a finesse of over 4,500.

  14. Gratings and Random Reflectors for Near-Infrared PIN Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath; Bandara, Sumith; Liu, John; Ting, David

    2007-01-01

    Crossed diffraction gratings and random reflectors have been proposed as means to increase the quantum efficiencies of InGaAs/InP positive/intrinsic/ negative (PIN) diodes designed to operate as near-infrared photodetectors. The proposal is meant especially to apply to focal-plane imaging arrays of such photodetectors to be used for near-infrared imaging. A further increase in quantum efficiency near the short-wavelength limit of the near-infrared spectrum of such a photodetector array could be effected by removing the InP substrate of the array. The use of crossed diffraction gratings and random reflectors as optical devices for increasing the quantum efficiencies of quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) was discussed in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. While the optical effects of crossed gratings and random reflectors as applied to PIN photodiodes would be similar to those of crossed gratings and random reflectors as applied to QWIPs, the physical mechanisms by which these optical effects would enhance efficiency differ between the PIN-photodiode and QWIP cases: In a QWIP, the multiple-quantum-well layers are typically oriented parallel to the focal plane and therefore perpendicular or nearly perpendicular to the direction of incidence of infrared light. By virtue of the applicable quantum selection rules, light polarized parallel to the focal plane (as normally incident light is) cannot excite charge carriers and, hence, cannot be detected. A pair of crossed gratings or a random reflector scatters normally or nearly normally incident light so that a significant portion of it attains a component of polarization normal to the focal plane and, hence, can excite charge carriers. A pair of crossed gratings or a random reflector on a PIN photodiode would also scatter light into directions away from the perpendicular to the focal plane. However, in this case, the reason for redirecting light away from the perpendicular is to increase the length of the

  15. The design of the Central-Axis Reflector (ZAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huegenell, Hermann

    1989-10-01

    This paper discusses the design principles of the Central-Axis Reflector (ZAS), a segmented-mirror telescope designed to produce large light-gathering areas, with particular attention given to the optical system and the tracking apparatus of the ZAS. The paper also describes the manufacturing method for the primary mirror of the ZAS, the structure of the mirror bodies, the grinding and polishing method, and the structures and procedures used for mounting and adjustment of the individual mirror bodies. Consideration is also given to sensors and control systems, the optical path of the incident light, and a protecting dome. A variant of the ZAS, the Central-Axis Inclined Reflector, is also described.

  16. Reflectors for canning a BaF 2 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, B. K.; Bhattacharya, R.

    1989-03-01

    The performance of BaF 2 crystals with various reflectors like teflon tape, ZrO 2, Al 2O 3 and CaF 2 powders is tested by measuring the energy and time resolution at different energies. It is shown that CaF 2 powder is a somewhat better reflector than the Al 2O 3 powder so far used by different workers. It is also seen that the reflectivity of CaF 2 powder for the BaF 2 emission spectrum is not much inferior to that of teflon tape which is, however, the best reported so far. Based on these observations a method of canning a BaF 2 crystal is proposed.

  17. Semiconductor hollow optical waveguides formed by omni-directional reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Shou; Wang, Mou-Sian; Chen, Chii-Chang

    2004-12-01

    In this study, a hollow optical waveguide with omni-directional reflectors in silicon-based materials was design, fabricated and characterized. By using dry etching technique, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition for Si/SiO2 thin films and covering another wafer with omni-directional reflector together, the waveguides can be formed with an air core of 1.2μm x 1.3μm. A uniform propagation loss of the waveguide to be around 1.7dB/cm for C+L band was found for the TE and TM modes. Polarization-independent hollow optical waveguides were obtained with the hollow waveguide structure.

  18. Conceptual Design of the Aluminum Reflector Antenna for DATE5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yuan; Kan, Frank W.; Sarawit, Andrew T.; Lou, Zheng; Cheng, Jing-Quan; Wang, Hai-Ren; Zuo, Ying-Xi; Yang, Ji

    2016-08-01

    DATE5, a 5 m telescope for terahertz exploration, was proposed for acquiring observations at Dome A, Antarctica. In order to observe the terahertz spectrum, it is necessary to maintain high surface accuracy in the the antenna when it is exposed to Antarctic weather conditions. Structural analysis shows that both machined aluminum and carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels can meet surface accuracy requirements. In this paper, one design concept based on aluminum panels is introduced. This includes panel layout, details on panel support, design of a CFRP backup structure, and detailed finite element analysis. Modal, gravity and thermal analysis are all performed and surface deformations of the main reflector are evaluated for all load cases. At the end of the paper, the manufacture of a prototype panel is also described. Based on these results, we found that using smaller aluminum reflector panels has the potential to meet the surface requirements in the harsh Dome A environment.

  19. Central mesh recurrence after incisional hernia repair with Marlex--are the meshes strong enough?

    PubMed

    Langer, C; Neufang, T; Kley, C; Liersch, T; Becker, H

    2001-09-01

    The use of biomaterial meshes in the repair of incisional abdominal wall hernias is now widely accepted internationally. The introduction of synthetic meshes to achieve tension-free repair has led to a satisfactory reduction in the recurrence rate to less than 10%. However, the use of such biomaterials can result in the occurrence of undesirable complications such as increased risk of infection, seromas, restriction of the abdominal wall and failure caused by mesh shrinkage. Additionally, at the time of writing there is much discussion concerning the potential risk of a persistent foreign body reaction directly associated with the meshes with regard to possible malignant transformation. As such, the trend seems to be toward the use of lighter meshes utilizing less non-absorbable material. One particular novel mesh theoretically capable of guaranteeing the necessary mechanical stability uses 70% less biomaterial. Against this background, we report a central mesh recurrence through the mesh following incisional hernia repair with a Marlex mesh. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a central mesh recurrence, and we discuss a possible mechanism with particular emphasis on the required abdominal wall forces both physiologically and after incisional hernia repair.

  20. Mesh optimization for microbial fuel cell cathodes constructed around stainless steel mesh current collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang; Merrill, Matthew D.; Tokash, Justin C.; Saito, Tomonori; Cheng, Shaoan; Hickner, Michael A.; Logan, Bruce E.

    Mesh current collectors made of stainless steel (SS) can be integrated into microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes constructed of a reactive carbon black and Pt catalyst mixture and a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) diffusion layer. It is shown here that the mesh properties of these cathodes can significantly affect performance. Cathodes made from the coarsest mesh (30-mesh) achieved the highest maximum power of 1616 ± 25 mW m -2 (normalized to cathode projected surface area; 47.1 ± 0.7 W m -3 based on liquid volume), while the finest mesh (120-mesh) had the lowest power density (599 ± 57 mW m -2). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed that charge transfer and diffusion resistances decreased with increasing mesh opening size. In MFC tests, the cathode performance was primarily limited by reaction kinetics, and not mass transfer. Oxygen permeability increased with mesh opening size, accounting for the decreased diffusion resistance. At higher current densities, diffusion became a limiting factor, especially for fine mesh with low oxygen transfer coefficients. These results demonstrate the critical nature of the mesh size used for constructing MFC cathodes.

  1. Algebraic surface design and finite element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajaj, Chandrajit L.

    1992-01-01

    Some of the techniques are summarized which are used in constructing C sup 0 and C sup 1 continuous meshes of low degree, implicitly defined, algebraic surface patches in three dimensional space. These meshes of low degree algebraic surface patches are used to construct accurate computer models of physical objects. These meshes are also used in the finite element simulation of physical phenomena (e.g., heat dissipation, stress/strain distributions, fluid flow characteristics) required in the computer prototyping of both the manufacturability and functionality of the geometric design.

  2. Composite mesh generator for CFD problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, E. I.; Mazo, A. B.; Isaev, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    In present paper a brief introduction of HybMesh grid generator which uses composite approach is given. The process of complicated area meshing using HybMesh generator consists of sequential building structured prototype grids in relatively simple geometry, mapping them to a non-regular domains and superposing to assemble resulting grid. Transitional areas between two superposed low level grids are filled with triangular cells. Currently only 2D algorithms of such approach are implemented; 3D grids can only be restored as a result of extrusion or revolution of 2D objects.

  3. Engagement of Metal Debris into Gear Mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    handschuh, Robert F.; Krantz, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    A series of bench-top experiments was conducted to determine the effects of metallic debris being dragged through meshing gear teeth. A test rig that is typically used to conduct contact fatigue experiments was used for these tests. Several sizes of drill material, shim stock and pieces of gear teeth were introduced and then driven through the meshing region. The level of torque required to drive the "chip" through the gear mesh was measured. From the data gathered, chip size sufficient to jam the mechanism can be determined.

  4. H(curl) Auxiliary Mesh Preconditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Kolev, T V; Pasciak, J E; Vassilevski, P S

    2006-08-31

    This paper analyzes a two-level preconditioning scheme for H(curl) bilinear forms. The scheme utilizes an auxiliary problem on a related mesh that is more amenable for constructing optimal order multigrid methods. More specifically, we analyze the case when the auxiliary mesh only approximately covers the original domain. The latter assumption is important since it allows for easy construction of nested multilevel spaces on regular auxiliary meshes. Numerical experiments in both two and three space dimensions illustrate the optimal performance of the method.

  5. Grating-assisted silicon-on-insulator racetrack resonator reflector.

    PubMed

    Boeck, Robert; Caverley, Michael; Chrostowski, Lukas; Jaeger, Nicolas A F

    2015-10-05

    We experimentally demonstrate a grating-assisted silicon-on-insulator (SOI) racetrack resonator reflector with a reflect port suppression of 10.3 dB and no free spectral range. We use contra-directional grating couplers within the coupling regions of the racetrack resonator to enable suppression of all but one of the peaks within the reflect port spectrum as well as all but one of the notches within the through port spectrum.

  6. Simplified Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) system

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatt, W.C.; Stanton, P.L.; Crump, O.B. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A simplified, rugged VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) system has been developed using a non-removable delay element and an essentially non-adjustable interferometer cavity. In this system, the critical interference adjustments are performed during fabrication of the cavity, freeing the user from this task. Prototype systems are easy to use and give extremely high quality results. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Polarization properties of reflector antennas used as radio telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, T.; Landecker, T. L.; Cazzolato, F.; Routledge, D.; Gray, A. D.; Reid, R. I.; Veidt, B. G.

    2005-10-01

    The distribution of cross polarization across the main beam and near sidelobes of a reflector antenna is calculated. Results are expressed in terms relevant to imaging in radio astronomy, using Stokes parameters, as plots of instrumental polarization Q/I, U/I, and V/I, showing conversion of total intensity of a signal which is unpolarized into apparent linear and circular polarization. The calculations use GRASP8, software that is based on physical optics and the physical theory of diffraction. For purposes of calculation, the symmetrical paraboloidal reflector (diameter ~40 wavelengths) is fed at the prime focus with a linearly polarized signal. Computed radiation patterns at a number of feed orientations are averaged to establish the antenna response to an unpolarized radio astronomy signal. The results of the computations are consistent with measurements of instrumental polarization of the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory Synthesis Telescope at 1420 MHz made using unpolarized radio sources. For this telescope, the dominant source of instrumental polarization across the field is the cross polarization of the feed. The next most significant effect is scattering by the feed struts; both three-strut and four-strut configurations are examined. Struts affect performance in linear polarization but also introduce some instrumental circular polarization. The contribution to instrumental polarization from the reflector itself is comparatively small. Roughness of the reflector surface has relatively little effect in the main beam in Q and U but introduces V and also randomizes the polarization of the sidelobes. In all cases considered, the computations show that the first and subsequent sidelobes are highly polarized, with levels of instrumental polarization up to 50%.

  8. Aquarius Reflector Surface Temperature Monitoring Test and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Jamie; Lee, Siu-Chun; Becker, Ray

    2008-01-01

    The presentation addresses how to infer the front side temperatures for the Aquarius L-band reflector based upon backside measurement sites. Slides discussing the mission objectives and design details are at the same level found on typical project outreach websites and in conference papers respectively. The test discussion provides modest detail of an ordinary thermal balance test using mockup hardware. The photographs show an off-Lab vacuum chamber facility with no compromising details.

  9. Vibration suppression for Precision Segmented Reflector backup structure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G. S.; Garba, J. A.; Wada, B. K.

    1989-09-01

    This paper describes an ongoing effort at the JPL on the vibration suppression for the Precision Segmented Reflector backup structure. The effort is centered on the vibration damping augmentation through a system consisting of active and passive damping members. An active member is a structural member with built-in piezoelectric actuator and sensors. A bridge feedback technique developed in the communication engineering is applied locally to the active member for active damping augmentation.

  10. Cube-corner reflectors with interference dielectric coating

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, A L; Murashkin, V V; Akent'ev, A S; Karaseva, E A

    2013-09-30

    The cube-corner reflectors (CCRs) with a special interference dielectric coating intended for ring retroreflector systems of space vehicles with uniaxial orientation are considered. The diffraction patterns of radiation reflected from the CCRs with different face coatings are studied. It is shown that the choice of the angle between the faces, the size and the coating of CCR faces allow essential variation in the diffraction pattern, thereby providing its optimisation for solving different navigation problems. (nanogradient dielectric coatings and metamaterials)

  11. Beam scanning offset Cassegrain reflector antennas by subreflector movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapean, James W., Jr.; Stutzman, Warren L.

    1994-01-01

    In 1987 a NASA panel recommended the creation of the Mission to Planet Earth. This mission was intended to apply to remote sensing experience of the space community to earth remote sensing to enhance the understanding of the climatological processes of our planet and to determine if, and to what extent, the hydrological cycle of Earth is being affected by human activity. One of the systems required for the mission was a wide scanning, high gain reflector antenna system for use in radiometric remote sensing from geostationary orbit. This work describes research conducted at Virginia Tech into techniques for beam scanning offset Cassegrain reflector antennas by subreflector translation and rotation. Background material relevant to beam scanning antenna systems and offset Cassegrain reflector antenna system is presented. A test case is developed based on the background material. The test case is beam scanned using two geometrical optics methods of determining the optimum subreflector position for the desired scanned beam direction. Physical optics far-field results are given for the beam scanned systems. The test case system is found to be capable of beam scanning over a range of 35 half-power beamwidths while maintaining a 90 percent beam efficiency or 50 half-power beamwidths while maintaining less than l dB of gain loss during scanning.

  12. Shape control of distributed parameter reflectors using sliding mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Fukashi; Washington, Gregory N.; Utkin, Vadim

    2001-08-01

    Sliding mode control has become one of the most powerful control methods for variable structure systems, a set of continuous systems with an appropriate switching logic. Its robustness properties and order reduction capability have made sliding mode control one of the most efficient tools for relatively higher order nonlinear plants operating under uncertain conditions. Piezo-electric materials possess the property of creating a charge when subjected to a mechanical strain, and of generating a strain when subjected to an electric field. Piezo-electric actuators are known to have a hysteresis due to the thermal motion and Coulomb interaction of Weiss domains. Because of the thermal effect the hysteresis of piezo-electric actuators is reproducible only with some uncertainty in experiments. The robustness of sliding mode control under uncertain conditions has an advantage in handling the hysteresis of piezo-electric actuators. In this research sliding mode control is used to control the shape of one- and two-dimensionally curved adaptive reflectors with piezo-electric actuators. Four discrete linear actuators for the one-dimensionally curved reflector and eight actuators for the two-dimensionally curved reflector are assumed.

  13. Diffractive surfaces for cat-eye array retro-reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, I.

    2008-09-01

    Cat-eye-array retro-reflectors, combining a lenslet array with a reflective surface at the common focal plane of the lenslets, are widely used due to their simple structure and low cost. While for many applications the performance (brightness, acceptance angle range and directionality) is acceptable, others could benefit from better performance. Improving these retroreflectors is difficult because their simplicity results in too few degrees of freedom. Here, we show how the use of one or two diffractive surfaces can significantly increase the brightness of the reflected beam and/or the acceptance angle while still allowing inexpensive manufacturing by molding or replication. Specifically, we focus here on one potential application of cat-eye-array retro-reflectors: semipassive optical communication units. Semi-passive communication units combine a retroreflector with a light modulator. The directional auto-aligned retro-reflected signal enhances security and power efficiency. Furthermore, many modulators use very low power: far lower than light emitter. Modulated retro-reflectors have already been demonstrated for space and military communication. Here we focus on a different application: optical smart cards. These devices described elsewhere, can be used, for example, for access control identification or as non-contact secure teller machine ID. Such devices must have an optical modulator in the optical path, so the effect of the modulator must also be accounted for in the design. As a consumer product, low cost manufacturability is another requirement. Design examples are presented.

  14. Modulating Retro-Reflectors: Technology, Link Budgets and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, Alberto Guillen; Stupl, Jan; Mason, James

    2012-01-01

    Satellite communications systems today -- usually radio frequency (RF) -- tend to have low data rates and use a lot of on-board power. For CubeSats, communications often dominate the power budget. We investigate the use of modulating retro-reflectors (MRRs), previously demonstrated on the ground, for high data-rate communication downlinks from small satellites. A laser ground station would illuminate a retro-reflector on-board the satellite while an element in the retro-reflector modulates the intensity of the reflected signal, thereby encoding a data stream on the returning beam. A detector on the ground receives the data, keeping the complex systems and the vast majority of power consumption on the ground. Reducing the power consumption while increasing data rates would relax constraints on power budgets for small satellites, leaving more power available for payloads. In the future, this could enable the use of constellations of nano-satellites for a variety of missions, possibly leading to a paradigm shift in small satellite applications.

  15. Shape control of slack space reflectors using modulated solar pressure.

    PubMed

    Borggräfe, Andreas; Heiligers, Jeannette; Ceriotti, Matteo; McInnes, Colin R

    2015-07-08

    The static deflection profile of a large spin-stabilized space reflector because of solar radiation pressure acting on its surface is investigated. Such a spacecraft consists of a thin reflective circular film, which is deployed from a supporting hoop structure in an untensioned, slack manner. This paper investigates the use of a variable reflectivity distribution across the surface to control the solar pressure force and hence the deflected shape. In this first analysis, the film material is modelled as one-dimensional slack radial strings with no resistance to bending or transverse shear, which enables a semi-analytic derivation of the nominal deflection profile. An inverse method is then used to find the reflectivity distribution that generates a specific, for example, parabolic deflection shape of the strings. Applying these results to a parabolic reflector, short focal distances can be obtained when large slack lengths of the film are employed. The development of such optically controlled reflector films enables future key mission applications such as solar power collection, radio-frequency antennae and optical telescopes.

  16. Silicon solar cell using optimized intermediate reflector layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Ahmed E.; Swillam, Mohamed A.

    2016-03-01

    Thin film silicon based photovoltaic cells have the advantages of using low cost nontoxic abundant constituents and low thermal manufacturing budget. However, better long-term efficiencies need to be achieved overcoming its inherent bad electrical properties of amorphous and/or microcrystalline Silicon. For the goal of achieving best results, multijunction cells of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon thin layers are industrially and lab utilized in addition to using one or more light management techniques such as textured layers, periodic and plasmonic back reflectors, flattened reflective substrates and intermediate reflector layer (IRL) between multijunction cells. The latter, IRL, which is the focus of this paper, serves as spectrally selective layer between different cells of the multijunction silicon thin film solar cell. IRL, reflects to the top cell short wavelength while permitting and scattering longer ones to achieve the best possible short circuit current. In this study, a new optimized periodic design of Intermediate reflector layer in micromorph (two multijunction cells of Microcrystalline and Amorphous Silicon) thin film solar cells is proposed. The optically simulated short circuit current reaches record values for same thickness designs when using all-ZnO design and even better results is anticipated if Lacquer material is used in combination with ZnO. The design methodology used in the paper can be easily applied to different types of IRL materials and also extended to triple and the relatively newly proposed quadruple thin films solar cells.

  17. Shape control of slack space reflectors using modulated solar pressure

    PubMed Central

    Borggräfe, Andreas; Heiligers, Jeannette; Ceriotti, Matteo; McInnes, Colin R.

    2015-01-01

    The static deflection profile of a large spin-stabilized space reflector because of solar radiation pressure acting on its surface is investigated. Such a spacecraft consists of a thin reflective circular film, which is deployed from a supporting hoop structure in an untensioned, slack manner. This paper investigates the use of a variable reflectivity distribution across the surface to control the solar pressure force and hence the deflected shape. In this first analysis, the film material is modelled as one-dimensional slack radial strings with no resistance to bending or transverse shear, which enables a semi-analytic derivation of the nominal deflection profile. An inverse method is then used to find the reflectivity distribution that generates a specific, for example, parabolic deflection shape of the strings. Applying these results to a parabolic reflector, short focal distances can be obtained when large slack lengths of the film are employed. The development of such optically controlled reflector films enables future key mission applications such as solar power collection, radio-frequency antennae and optical telescopes. PMID:26345083

  18. Tunable hollow waveguide distributed Bragg reflectors with variable air core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yasuki; Koyama, Fumio

    2004-06-01

    We demonstrate a tunable hollow waveguide distributed Bragg reflector consisting of a grating loaded slab hollow waveguide with a variable air-core. The modeling shows that a change in an air-core thickness enables a large shift of several tens of nanometers in Bragg wavelength due to a change of several percents in a propagation constant. We fabricated a slab hollow waveguide Bragg reflector with 620 μm long and, 190 nm deep 1st-order circular grating composed of SiO2, exhibiting strong Bragg reflection at 1558 nm with an air-core thickness of 10 μm for TM mode. The peak reflectivity is 65% including fiber coupling losses, the 3-dB bandwidth is 2.8 nm and the grating-induced loss is less than 0.5 dB. We demonstrate a 3 nm wavelength tuning of the fabricated hollow waveguide Bragg reflector by changing an air-core thickness from 10 μm to 7.9 μm.

  19. Terrace retro-reflector array for poloidal polarimeter on ITER.

    PubMed

    Imazawa, R; Kawano, Y; Ono, T; Kusama, Y

    2011-02-01

    A new concept of a terrace retro-reflector array (TERRA) as part of the poloidal polarimeter for ITER is proposed in this paper. TERRA reflects a laser light even from a high incident angle in the direction of the incident-light path, while a conventional retro-reflector array cannot. Besides, TERRA can be installed in a smaller space than a corner-cube retro-reflector. In an optical sense, TERRA is equivalent to a Littrow grating, the blaze angle of which varies, depending on the incident angle. The reflected light generates a bright and dark fringe, and the bright fringe is required to travel along the incident-light path to achieve the objects of laser-aided diagnostics. In order to investigate the propagation properties of laser light reflected by TERRA, we have developed a new diffraction formula. Conditions for the propagation of the bright fringe in the direction of the incident light have been obtained using the Littrow grating model and have been confirmed in a simulation applying the new diffraction formula. Finally, we have designed laser transmission optics using TERRA for the ITER poloidal polarimeter and have calculated the light propagation of the system. The optical design obtains a high transmission efficiency, with 88.6% of the incident power returned. These results demonstrate the feasibility of applying TERRA to the ITER poloidal polarimeter.

  20. A new fabrication method for precision antenna reflectors for space flight and ground test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, G. Richard; Wanhainen, Joyce S.; Ketelsen, Dean A.

    1991-01-01

    Communications satellites are using increasingly higher frequencies that require increasingly precise antenna reflectors for use in space. Traditional industry fabrication methods for space antenna reflectors employ successive modeling techniques using high- and low-temperature molds for reflector face sheets and then a final fit-up of the completed honeycomb sandwich panel antenna reflector to a master pattern. However, as new missions are planned at much higher frequencies, greater accuracies will be necessary than are achievable using these present methods. A new approach for the fabrication of ground-test solid-surface antenna reflectors is to build a rigid support structure with an easy-to-machine surface. This surface is subsequently machined to the desired reflector contour and coated with a radio-frequency-reflective surface. This method was used to fabricate a 2.7-m-diameter ground-test antenna reflector to an accuracy of better than 0.013 mm (0.0005 in.) rms. A similar reflector for use on spacecraft would be constructed in a similar manner but with space-qualified materials. The design, analysis, and fabrication of the 2.7-m-diameter precision antenna reflector for antenna ground tests and the extension of this technology to precision, space-based antenna reflectors are described.

  1. The Position and Attitude of Sub-reflector Modeling for TM65 m Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z. X.; Chen, L.; Wang, J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    In the course of astronomical observations, with changes in angle of pitch, the large radio telescope will have different degrees of deformation in the sub-reflector support, back frame, main reflector etc, which will lead to the dramatic decline of antenna efficiency in both high and low elevation. A sub-reflector system of the Tian Ma 65 m radio telescope has been installed in order to compensate for the gravitational deformations of the sub-reflector support and the main reflector. The position and attitude of the sub-reflector are variable in order to improve the pointing performance and the efficiency at different elevations. In this paper, it is studied that the changes of position and attitude of the sub-reflector have influence on the efficiency of antenna in the X band and Ku band. A model has been constructed to determine the position and attitude of the sub-reflector with elevation, as well as the point compensation model, by observing the radio source. In addition, antenna efficiency was tested with sub-reflector position adjusted and fixed. The results show that the model of sub-reflector can effectively improve the efficiency of the 65 m radio telescope. In X band, the aperture efficiency of the radio telescope reaches more than 60% over the entire elevation range.

  2. Reflector Technology Development and System Design for Concentrating Solar Power Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Schaut Philip Smith

    2011-12-30

    deemed the most important attribute to successfully validate Alcoa's advanced trough architecture. To validate the performance of the Wing Box trough, a 6 meter aperture by 14 meter long prototype trough was built. For ease of shipping to and assembly at NREL's test facility, the prototype was fabricated in two half modules and joined along the centerline to create the Wing Box trough. The trough components were designed to achieve high precision of the reflective surface while leveraging high volume manufacturing and assembly techniques.

  3. 50 CFR 300.110 - Mesh size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... will be stretched in the direction of the long diagonal of the meshes. (ii) A gauge as described in.... This distance will be measured perpendicular to the lacings, ropes or codline with the net stretched...

  4. LR: Compact connectivity representation for triangle meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Gurung, T; Luffel, M; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J

    2011-01-28

    We propose LR (Laced Ring) - a simple data structure for representing the connectivity of manifold triangle meshes. LR provides the option to store on average either 1.08 references per triangle or 26.2 bits per triangle. Its construction, from an input mesh that supports constant-time adjacency queries, has linear space and time complexity, and involves ordering most vertices along a nearly-Hamiltonian cycle. LR is best suited for applications that process meshes with fixed connectivity, as any changes to the connectivity require the data structure to be rebuilt. We provide an implementation of the set of standard random-access, constant-time operators for traversing a mesh, and show that LR often saves both space and traversal time over competing representations.

  5. A mesh gradient technique for numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, E. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A class of successive-improvement optimization methods in which directions of descent are defined in the state space along each trial trajectory are considered. The given problem is first decomposed into two discrete levels by imposing mesh points. Level 1 consists of running optimal subarcs between each successive pair of mesh points. For normal systems, these optimal two-point boundary value problems can be solved by following a routine prescription if the mesh spacing is sufficiently close. A spacing criterion is given. Under appropriate conditions, the criterion value depends only on the coordinates of the mesh points, and its gradient with respect to those coordinates may be defined by interpreting the adjoint variables as partial derivatives of the criterion value function. In level 2, the gradient data is used to generate improvement steps or search directions in the state space which satisfy the boundary values and constraints of the given problem.

  6. Lagrange-mesh calculations in momentum space.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Gwendolyn; Semay, Claude; Buisseret, Fabien

    2012-08-01

    The Lagrange-mesh method is a powerful method to solve eigenequations written in configuration space. It is very easy to implement and very accurate. Using a Gauss quadrature rule, the method requires only the evaluation of the potential at some mesh points. The eigenfunctions are expanded in terms of regularized Lagrange functions which vanish at all mesh points except one. It is shown that this method can be adapted to solve eigenequations written in momentum space, keeping the convenience and the accuracy of the original technique. In particular, the kinetic operator is a diagonal matrix. Observables and wave functions in both configuration space and momentum space can also be easily computed with good accuracy using only eigenfunctions computed in the momentum space. The method is tested with Gaussian and Yukawa potentials, requiring, respectively, a small and a large mesh to reach convergence. Corresponding wave functions in both spaces are compared with each other using the Fourier transform.

  7. Efficiently Sorting Zoo-Mesh Data Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R; Max, N; Silva, C; Williams, P

    2001-03-26

    The authors describe the SXMPVO algorithm for performing a visibility ordering zoo-meshed polyhedra. The algorithm runs in practice in linear time and the visibility ordering which it produces is exact.

  8. Some mesh generation requirements and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickson, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    Discretized solution algorithms, which find solutions of field equations in a two or three dimensional field, generally use meshes which are fitted to the field boundary to allow convenient formulation of boundary conditions there. A mesh is defined to be the image of a rectangular grid in computational space under a mesh mapping which maps computational space into physical space. It is not necessary that all of computational space be mapped onto the region of interest in physical space. Parts of it can be excised to give a better fit to the boundary. Many different excisions can be made to fit a single boundary; the choice depends on the mesh arrangement desired in the field.

  9. Grid adaption using Chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite over-lapping meshes in regions of large gradient to capture the salient features accurately during computation. The Chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using tri-linear interpolation. Applications to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to a shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well resolved.

  10. Grid adaptation using chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite overlapping meshes in regions of large gradient to accurately capture the salient features during computation. The chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using trilinear interpolation. Application to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well-resolved.

  11. Grid adaptation using Chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite over-lapping meshes in regions of large gradient to capture the salient features accurately during computation. The Chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using tri-linear interpolation. Applications to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to a shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well resolved.

  12. Lithium-6 coated wire mesh neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.A.; Geelhood, B.D.

    1984-11-06

    A neutron detection apparatus is provided which includes a selected number of surfaces of Lithium-6 coated wire mesh and which further includes a gas mixture in contact with each sheet of Lithium-6 coated wire mesh for selectively reacting to charged particles emitted or radiated by the Lithium-6 coated mesh. A container is provided to seal the Lithium-6 coated mesh and the gas mixture in a volume from which water vapor and atmospheric gases are excluded, the container having one or more walls which are transmissive to neutrons. Monitoring equipment in contact with the gas mixture detects the generation of charged particles in the gas mixture and, in response to such charged particles, provides an indication of the flux of neutrons passing through the volume of the detector.

  13. Surface Generation and Cartesian Mesh Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This document serves as the final report for the grant titled Surface Generation and Cartesian Mesh Support . This completed work was in algorithmic research into automatically generating surface triangulations from CAD geometries. NASA's OVERFLOW and Cart3D simulation packages use surface triangulations as an underlying geometry description and the ability to automatically generate these from CAD files (without translation) substantially reduces both the wall-clock time and expertise required to get geometry out of CAD and into mesh generation. This surface meshing was exercised greatly during the Shuttle investigation during the last year with success. The secondary efforts performed in this grant involve work on a visualization system cut-cell handling for Cartesian Meshes with embedded boundaries.

  14. MHD simulations on an unstructured mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H.R.; Park, W.; Belova, E.; Fu, G.Y.; Longcope, D.W.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1998-12-31

    Two reasons for using an unstructured computational mesh are adaptivity, and alignment with arbitrarily shaped boundaries. Two codes which use finite element discretization on an unstructured mesh are described. FEM3D solves 2D and 3D RMHD using an adaptive grid. MH3D++, which incorporates methods of FEM3D into the MH3D generalized MHD code, can be used with shaped boundaries, which might be 3D.

  15. 3D-Meshes aus medizinischen Volumendaten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelzer, Sascha; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    Diese Arbeit beschreibt eine template-basierte Methode zur Erzeugung von adaptiven Hexaeder-Meshes aus Volumendaten, welche komplizierte konkave Strukturen aufweisen können. Es wird ein vollständiger Satz von Templates generiert der es erlaubt, die Ränder konkaver Regionen feiner zu zerlegen als angrenzende Bereiche und somit die Gesamtzahl an Hexaeder verringert. Der Algorithmus arbeitet mit beliebigen gelabelten Volumendaten und erzeugt ein adaptives, konformes, reines Hexaeder-Mesh.

  16. Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Microelectronic Device Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom; Lou, John; Norton, Charles

    1999-01-01

    Finite element and finite volume methods are used in a variety of design simulations when it is necessary to compute fields throughout regions that contain varying materials or geometry. Convergence of the simulation can be assessed by uniformly increasing the mesh density until an observable quantity stabilizes. Depending on the electrical size of the problem, uniform refinement of the mesh may be computationally infeasible due to memory limitations. Similarly, depending on the geometric complexity of the object being modeled, uniform refinement can be inefficient since regions that do not need refinement add to the computational expense. In either case, convergence to the correct (measured) solution is not guaranteed. Adaptive mesh refinement methods attempt to selectively refine the region of the mesh that is estimated to contain proportionally higher solution errors. The refinement may be obtained by decreasing the element size (h-refinement), by increasing the order of the element (p-refinement) or by a combination of the two (h-p refinement). A successful adaptive strategy refines the mesh to produce an accurate solution measured against the correct fields without undue computational expense. This is accomplished by the use of a) reliable a posteriori error estimates, b) hierarchal elements, and c) automatic adaptive mesh generation. Adaptive methods are also useful when problems with multi-scale field variations are encountered. These occur in active electronic devices that have thin doped layers and also when mixed physics is used in the calculation. The mesh needs to be fine at and near the thin layer to capture rapid field or charge variations, but can coarsen away from these layers where field variations smoothen and charge densities are uniform. This poster will present an adaptive mesh refinement package that runs on parallel computers and is applied to specific microelectronic device simulations. Passive sensors that operate in the infrared portion of

  17. Quadrilateral/hexahedral finite element mesh coarsening

    DOEpatents

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Scott, Michael A; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16

    A technique for coarsening a finite element mesh ("FEM") is described. This technique includes identifying a coarsening region within the FEM to be coarsened. Perimeter chords running along perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region are identified. The perimeter chords are redirected to create an adaptive chord separating the coarsening region from a remainder of the FEM. The adaptive chord runs through mesh elements residing along the perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region. The adaptive chord is then extracted to coarsen the FEM.

  18. Airplane Mesh Development with Grid Density Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Baker, Timothy J.; Thomas, Scott D.; Lawrence, Scott L.; Rimlinger, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    Automatic Grid Generation Wish List Geometry handling, including CAD clean up and mesh generation, remains a major bottleneck in the application of CFD methods. There is a pressing need for greater automation in several aspects of the geometry preparation in order to reduce set up time and eliminate user intervention as much as possible. Starting from the CAD representation of a configuration, there may be holes or overlapping surfaces which require an intensive effort to establish cleanly abutting surface patches, and collections of many patches may need to be combined for more efficient use of the geometrical representation. Obtaining an accurate and suitable body conforming grid with an adequate distribution of points throughout the flow-field, for the flow conditions of interest, is often the most time consuming task for complex CFD applications. There is a need for a clean unambiguous definition of the CAD geometry. Ideally this would be carried out automatically by smart CAD clean up software. One could also define a standard piece-wise smooth surface representation suitable for use by computational methods and then create software to translate between the various CAD descriptions and the standard representation. Surface meshing remains a time consuming, user intensive procedure. There is a need for automated surface meshing, requiring only minimal user intervention to define the overall density of mesh points. The surface mesher should produce well shaped elements (triangles or quadrilaterals) whose size is determined initially according to the surface curvature with a minimum size for flat pieces, and later refined by the user in other regions if necessary. Present techniques for volume meshing all require some degree of user intervention. There is a need for fully automated and reliable volume mesh generation. In addition, it should be possible to create both surface and volume meshes that meet guaranteed measures of mesh quality (e.g. minimum and maximum

  19. TVD differencing on three-dimensional unstructured meshes with monotonicity-preserving correction of mesh skewness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denner, Fabian; van Wachem, Berend G. M.

    2015-10-01

    Total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes are a widely applied group of monotonicity-preserving advection differencing schemes for partial differential equations in numerical heat transfer and computational fluid dynamics. These schemes are typically designed for one-dimensional problems or multidimensional problems on structured equidistant quadrilateral meshes. Practical applications, however, often involve complex geometries that cannot be represented by Cartesian meshes and, therefore, necessitate the application of unstructured meshes, which require a more sophisticated discretisation to account for their additional topological complexity. In principle, TVD schemes are applicable to unstructured meshes, however, not all the data required for TVD differencing is readily available on unstructured meshes, and the solution suffers from considerable numerical diffusion as a result of mesh skewness. In this article we analyse TVD differencing on unstructured three-dimensional meshes, focusing on the non-linearity of TVD differencing and the extrapolation of the virtual upwind node. Furthermore, we propose a novel monotonicity-preserving correction method for TVD schemes that significantly reduces numerical diffusion caused by mesh skewness. The presented numerical experiments demonstrate the importance of accounting for the non-linearity introduced by TVD differencing and of imposing carefully chosen limits on the extrapolated virtual upwind node, as well as the efficacy of the proposed method to correct mesh skewness.

  20. Adaptive Meshing Techniques for Viscous Flow Calculations on Mixed Element Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    An adaptive refinement strategy based on hierarchical element subdivision is formulated and implemented for meshes containing arbitrary mixtures of tetrahendra, hexahendra, prisms and pyramids. Special attention is given to keeping memory overheads as low as possible. This procedure is coupled with an algebraic multigrid flow solver which operates on mixed-element meshes. Inviscid flows as well as viscous flows are computed an adaptively refined tetrahedral, hexahedral, and hybrid meshes. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by generating an adapted hexahedral mesh containing 3 million vertices on a relatively inexpensive workstation.

  1. Robust moving mesh algorithms for hybrid stretched meshes: Application to moving boundaries problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Jonathan; Soulaïmani, Azzeddine; Luke, Edward; Ben Haj Ali, Amine

    2016-12-01

    A robust Mesh-Mover Algorithm (MMA) approach is designed to adapt meshes of moving boundaries problems. A new methodology is developed from the best combination of well-known algorithms in order to preserve the quality of initial meshes. In most situations, MMAs distribute mesh deformation while preserving a good mesh quality. However, invalid meshes are generated when the motion is complex and/or involves multiple bodies. After studying a few MMA limitations, we propose the following approach: use the Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) function to produce the displacement field, then apply the Geometric Element Transformation Method (GETMe) smoothing algorithms to improve the resulting mesh quality, and use an untangler to revert negative elements. The proposed approach has been proven efficient to adapt meshes for various realistic aerodynamic motions: a symmetric wing that has suffered large tip bending and twisting and the high-lift components of a swept wing that has moved to different flight stages. Finally, the fluid flow problem has been solved on meshes that have moved and they have produced results close to experimental ones. However, for situations where moving boundaries are too close to each other, more improvements need to be made or other approaches should be taken, such as an overset grid method.

  2. Automatic scheme selection for toolkit hex meshing

    SciTech Connect

    WHITE,DAVID R.; TAUTGES,TIMOTHY J.

    2000-02-17

    Current hexahedral mesh generation techniques rely on a set of meshing tools, which when combined with geometry decomposition leads to an adequate mesh generation process. Of these tools, sweeping tends to be the workhorse algorithm, accounting for at least 50% of most meshing applications. Constraints which must be met for a volume to be sweepable are derived, and it is proven that these constraints are necessary but not sufficient conditions for sweepability. This paper also describes a new algorithm for detecting extruded or sweepable geometries. This algorithm, based on these constraints, uses topological and local geometric information, and is more robust than feature recognition-based algorithms. A method for computing sweep dependencies in volume assemblies is also given. The auto sweep detect and sweep grouping algorithms have been used to reduce interactive user time required to generate all-hexahedral meshes by filtering out non-sweepable volumes needing further decomposition and by allowing concurrent meshing of independent sweep groups. Parts of the auto sweep detect algorithm have also been used to identify independent sweep paths, for use in volume-based interval assignment.

  3. Hybrid Surface Mesh Adaptation for Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed Khamayseh; Valmor de Almeida; Glen Hansen

    2008-10-01

    Solution-driven mesh adaptation is becoming quite popular for spatial error control in the numerical simulation of complex computational physics applications, such as climate modeling. Typically, spatial adaptation is achieved by element subdivision (h adaptation) with a primary goal of resolving the local length scales of interest. A second, less-popular method of spatial adaptivity is called “mesh motion” (r adaptation); the smooth repositioning of mesh node points aimed at resizing existing elements to capture the local length scales. This paper proposes an adaptation method based on a combination of both element subdivision and node point repositioning (rh adaptation). By combining these two methods using the notion of a mobility function, the proposed approach seeks to increase the flexibility and extensibility of mesh motion algorithms while providing a somewhat smoother transition between refined regions than is produced by element subdivision alone. Further, in an attempt to support the requirements of a very general class of climate simulation applications, the proposed method is designed to accommodate unstructured, polygonal mesh topologies in addition to the most popular mesh types.

  4. 50 CFR 622.208 - Minimum mesh size applicable to rock shrimp off Georgia and Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... mesh size applicable to rock shrimp off Georgia and Florida. (a) The minimum mesh size for the cod end...), stretched mesh. This minimum mesh size is required in at least the last 40 meshes forward of the cod...

  5. The 2D and 3D hypersonic flows with unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thareja, Rajiv

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on 2D and 3D hypersonic flows with unstructured meshes are presented. Topics covered include: mesh generation, mesh refinement, shock-shock interaction, velocity contours, mesh movement, vehicle bottom surface, and adapted meshes.

  6. Method of modifying a volume mesh using sheet insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, Michael J.; Shepherd, Jason F.

    2006-08-29

    A method and machine-readable medium provide a technique to modify a hexahedral finite element volume mesh using dual generation and sheet insertion. After generating a dual of a volume stack (mesh), a predetermined algorithm may be followed to modify (refine) the volume mesh of hexahedral elements. The predetermined algorithm may include the steps of locating a sheet of hexahedral mesh elements, determining a plurality of hexahedral elements within the sheet to refine, shrinking the plurality of elements, and inserting a new sheet of hexahedral elements adjacently to modify the volume mesh. Additionally, another predetermined algorithm using mesh cutting may be followed to modify a volume mesh.

  7. Cassegrainian/Gregorian-type null correctors for surface measurements of radio telescope reflectors.

    PubMed

    Greve, A

    1997-08-01

    The (sub)millimeter wavelength radio observatory of the next generation will probably be an interferometer array of some 50 telescopes with parabolic reflectors 10-15 m in diameter. At this scale of mass production it is convenient to have at hand for workshop assembly a reflector surface measurement technique that is precise and easy to operate. We discuss the possibility of reflector measurements based on 10.6-microm CO2 laser interferometry using Cassegrainian/Gregorian-type null correctors.

  8. An array fed dual reflector antenna for limited sector electronic beam scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, R. A.; Davies, D. E. N.; Cullen, A. L.

    A dual reflector configuration capable of electronic beam deflection is described. It was found that, in two dimensions, the performance of a confocal reflector arrangement can be significantly improved by shaping the subreflector. A computationally efficient method for analyzing the three-dimensional antenna has been demonstrated which combines an accurate array representation with a minimal amount of ray tracing to overcome the difficulties of modeling the array fed dual reflector antenna.

  9. Radar Cross-Section Measurements of V22 Blade Tip with and without LLNL Tipcap Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Poland, D; Simpson, R

    2000-07-01

    It is desired to quantify the effect, in terms of radar cross-section (RCS), of the addition of a small aluminum reflector to the end of the V22 blades. This reflector was designed and manufactured in order to facilitate blade lag measurements by the 95 GHz Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Radar Blade Tracker (RBT) system. The reflector used in these measurements was designed and fabricated at LLNL and is pictured in Figure 1.

  10. Demonstration of a single-crystal reflector-filter for enhancing slow neutron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhrer, G.; Schönfeldt, T.; Iverson, E. B.; Mocko, M.; Baxter, D. V.; Hügle, Th.; Gallmeier, F. X.; Klinkby, E. B.

    2016-09-01

    The cold polycrystalline beryllium reflector-filter concept has been used to enhance the cold neutron emission of cryogenic hydrogen moderators, while suppressing the intermediate wavelength and fast neutron emission at the same time. While suppressing the fast neutron emission is often desired, the suppression of intermediate wavelength neutrons is often unwelcome. It has been hypothesized that replacing the polycrystalline reflector-filter concept with a single-crystal reflector-filter concept would overcome the suppression of intermediate wavelength neutrons and thereby extend the usability of the reflector-filter concept to shorter but still important wavelengths. In this paper we present the first experimental data on a single-crystal reflector-filter at a reflected neutron source and compare experimental results with hypothesized performance. We find that a single-crystal reflector-filter retains the long-wavelength benefit of the polycrystalline reflector-filter, without suffering the same loss of important intermediate wavelength neutrons. This finding extends the applicability of the reflector-filter concept to intermediate wavelengths, and furthermore indicates that the reflector-filter benefits arise from its interaction with fast (background) neutrons, not with intermediate wavelength neutrons of potential interest in many types of neutron scattering.

  11. Structural Characterization of a Mo/Ru/Si Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Reflector by Optical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, In-Yong; Kim, Tae Geun; Lee, Seung Yoon; Ahn, Jinho; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2004-06-01

    The performance of a multilayer extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflector has a direct bearing on process throughput and the cost of new technology. Using measured data from an experimentally manufactured reflector, we intend, in this work, to show that the reflectivity of the Bragg reflector can be characterized by using structural parameters such as the d-spacing, density, thicknesses of the interdiffusion layers and oxidation layer. This quantitative analysis of the reflectivity derived from the structural parameters can be utilized to optimize the optical properties of the existing Mo/Ru/Si system and to provide fundamental insights into the science involved in a Bragg EUV reflector.

  12. Large space-borne reflector antenna characterization: Evaluation and distortion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoferer, Robert Alois

    For space-borne reflector antenna applications, both size and weight of the antenna is restricted to the payload capacity of the launch vehicle. Advantages in the material and manufacturing capabilities of large reflector antennas over the recent years have made it possible to propose antenna systems with ever increasing size and operating frequency. Before deployment, however, it is crucial to accurately evaluate the radiation characteristics of these antennas. Also, if compensatory measures are applied to compensate for structural distortions, it is necessary to assess its effectiveness for a particular the examined antenna configuration. In this dissertation, an effective dual reflector analysis technique has been developed, using a combination of Physical Optics, Geometrical Optics and Fourier-Jacobi surface expansion. This analysis technique has been applied to two classes of reflector antenna applications. First, two challenging single reflector antenna configurations have been designed and analyzed. Second, the analysis technique is used for subreflector shaping in the process of main reflector distortion compensation for an electrically large dual reflector antenna configuration. Note that the inflatable reflector antenna configurations investigated in this thesis belong to the class reflector antennas larger than 20 m, which are now being considered for future space missions.

  13. Surface measuring technique. [using a laser to scan the surface of a reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, R. B., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Measurement of the surface contour of a large electrostatically formed concave reflector using a modified Foucault or knife edge test is described. The curve of the actual electrostatically formed reflector surface is compared to a curve representing a reference sphere. Measurements of surface slope and deviation are calculated every 15 cm along the reflector's horizontal and vertical diameters. Characterization of surface roughness on a small scale compared to the laser spot size at the reflector are obtained from the increased laser spot size at a distant projection screen.

  14. Demonstration of a Single-Crystal Reflector-Filter for Enhancing Slow Neutron Beams

    DOE PAGES

    Muhrer, Guenter; Schönfeldt, Troels; Iverson, Erik B.; ...

    2016-06-14

    The cold polycrystalline beryllium reflector-filter concept has been used to enhance the cold neutron emission of cryogenic hydrogen moderators, while suppressing the intermediate wavelength and fast neutron emission at the same time. While suppressing the fast neutron emission is often desired, the suppression of intermediate wavelength neutrons is often unwelcome. It has been hypothesized that replacing the polycrystalline reflector-filter concept with a single-crystal reflector-filter concept would overcome the suppression of intermediate wavelength neutrons and thereby extend the usability of the reflector-filter concept to shorter but still important wavelengths. In this paper we present the first experimental data on a single-crystalmore » reflector-filter and compare experimental results with hypothesized performance. We find that a single-crystal reflector-filter retains the long-wavelength benefit of the polycrystalline reflector-filter, without suffering the same loss of important intermediate wavelength neutrons. Ultimately, this finding extends the applicability of the reflector-filter concept to intermediate wavelengths, and furthermore indicates that the reflector-filter benefits arise from its interaction with fast (background) neutrons, not with intermediate wavelength neutrons of potential interest in many types of neutron scattering.« less

  15. Demonstration of a Single-Crystal Reflector-Filter for Enhancing Slow Neutron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Muhrer, Guenter; Schönfeldt, Troels; Iverson, Erik B.; Mocko, Michal; Baxter, David V.; Hügle, Thomas; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Klinkby, Esben

    2016-06-14

    The cold polycrystalline beryllium reflector-filter concept has been used to enhance the cold neutron emission of cryogenic hydrogen moderators, while suppressing the intermediate wavelength and fast neutron emission at the same time. While suppressing the fast neutron emission is often desired, the suppression of intermediate wavelength neutrons is often unwelcome. It has been hypothesized that replacing the polycrystalline reflector-filter concept with a single-crystal reflector-filter concept would overcome the suppression of intermediate wavelength neutrons and thereby extend the usability of the reflector-filter concept to shorter but still important wavelengths. In this paper we present the first experimental data on a single-crystal reflector-filter and compare experimental results with hypothesized performance. We find that a single-crystal reflector-filter retains the long-wavelength benefit of the polycrystalline reflector-filter, without suffering the same loss of important intermediate wavelength neutrons. Ultimately, this finding extends the applicability of the reflector-filter concept to intermediate wavelengths, and furthermore indicates that the reflector-filter benefits arise from its interaction with fast (background) neutrons, not with intermediate wavelength neutrons of potential interest in many types of neutron scattering.

  16. A method to design blended rolled edges for compact range reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Inder J.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1989-01-01

    A method to design blended rolled edges for arbitrary rim shape compact range reflectors is presented. The reflectors may be center-fed or offset-fed. The method leads to rolled edges with minimal surface discontinuities. It is shown that the reflectors designed using the prescribed method can be defined analytically using simple expressions. A procedure to obtain optimum rolled edges parameter is also presented. The procedure leads to blended rolled edges that minimize the diffracted fields emanating from the junction between the paraboloid and the rolled edge surface while satisfying certain constraints regarding the reflector size and the minimum operating frequency of the system.

  17. Automatic finite-element mesh generation using artificial neural networks. Part 1: Prediction of mesh density

    SciTech Connect

    Chedid, R.; Najjar, N.

    1996-09-01

    One of the inconveniences associated with the existing finite-element packages is the need for an educated user to develop a correct mesh at the preprocessing level. Procedures which start with a coarse mesh and attempt serious refinements, as is the case in most adaptive finite-element packages, are time consuming and costly. Hence, it is very important to develop a tool that can provide a mesh that either leads immediately to an acceptable solution, or would require fewer correcting steps to achieve better results. In this paper, the authors present a technique for automatic mesh generation based on artificial neural networks (ANN). The essence of this technique is to predict the mesh density distribution of a given model, and then supply this information to a Kohonen neural network which provides the final mesh. Prediction of mesh density is accomplished by a simple feedforward neural network which has the ability to learn the relationship between mesh density and model geometric features. It will be shown that ANN are able to recognize delicate areas where a sharp variation of the magnetic field is expected. Examples of 2-D models are provided to illustrate the usefulness of the proposed technique.

  18. A nanobursa mesh: a graded electrospun nanofiber mesh with metal nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senturk-Ozer, Semra; Chen, Tao; Degirmenbasi, Nebahat; Gevgilili, Halil; Podkolzin, Simon G.; Kalyon, Dilhan M.

    2014-07-01

    A new type of material, a ``nanobursa'' mesh (from ``bursa'' meaning ``sac or pouch''), is introduced. This material consists of sequential layers of porous polymeric nanofibers encapsulating carbon nanotubes, which are functionalized with different metal nanoparticles in each layer. The nanobursa mesh is fabricated via a novel combination of twin-screw extrusion and electrospinning. Use of this hybrid process at industrially-relevant rates is demonstrated by producing a nanobursa mesh with graded layers of Pd, Co, Ag, and Pt nanoparticles. The potential use of the fabricated nanobursa mesh is illustrated by modeling of catalytic hydrocarbon oxidation.A new type of material, a ``nanobursa'' mesh (from ``bursa'' meaning ``sac or pouch''), is introduced. This material consists of sequential layers of porous polymeric nanofibers encapsulating carbon nanotubes, which are functionalized with different metal nanoparticles in each layer. The nanobursa mesh is fabricated via a novel combination of twin-screw extrusion and electrospinning. Use of this hybrid process at industrially-relevant rates is demonstrated by producing a nanobursa mesh with graded layers of Pd, Co, Ag, and Pt nanoparticles. The potential use of the fabricated nanobursa mesh is illustrated by modeling of catalytic hydrocarbon oxidation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental methods and computational details. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01145g

  19. Compensation for Phase Anisotropy of a Metal Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, John

    2007-01-01

    A method of compensation for the polarization- dependent phase anisotropy of a metal reflector has been proposed. The essence of the method is to coat the reflector with multiple thin alternating layers of two dielectrics that have different indices of refraction, so as to introduce an opposing polarization-dependent phase anisotropy. The anisotropy in question is a phenomenon that occurs in reflection of light at other than normal incidence: For a given plane wave having components polarized parallel (p) and perpendicular (s) to the plane of incidence, the phase of s-polarized reflected light differs from the phase p-polarized light by an amount that depends on the angle of incidence and the complex index of refraction of the metal. The magnitude of the phase difference is zero at zero angle of incidence (normal incidence) and increases with the angle of incidence. This anisotropy is analogous to a phase anisotropy that occurs in propagation of light through a uniaxial dielectric crystal. In such a case, another uniaxial crystal that has the same orientation but opposite birefringence can be used to cancel the phase anisotropy. Although it would be difficult to prepare a birefringent material in a form suitable for application to the curved surface of a typical metal reflector in an optical instrument, it should be possible to effect the desired cancellation of phase anisotropy by exploiting the form birefringence of multiple thin dielectric layers. (The term "form birefringence" can be defined loosely as birefringence arising, in part, from a regular array of alternating subwavelength regions having different indices of refraction.)

  20. Parametric x-ray FEL operating with external Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshevsky, V.G.; Batrakov, K.G.; Dubovskaya, I.Ya.

    1995-12-31

    In the crystal X-ray FELs using channeling and parametric quasi-Cherenkov mechanisms of spontaneous radiation were considered as versions of FEL allowing, in principle, to obtain coherent X-ray source. In this case a crystal is both radiator and resonator for X-rays emitted by a particle beam passing through crystal. However, it is well-known that a beam current density required for lasing is extremely high in X-ray spectral range for any radiation mechanisms and it is very important to find a way to lower its magnitude. The application of three-dimensional distributed feedback formed by dynamical diffraction of emitted photons permitted to reduce starting beam current density 10{sup 2}-10{sup 4} times up to 10{sup 9}. One of ways to lower the starting current is the formation of multi-wave distributed feedback the another one is the application of external reflectors. The thing is that lasing regime was shown to be produced at frequencies in the vicinity of degeneration point for roots of dispersion equation describing radiation modes excited in an active medium (crystal plus particle beam). Unfortunately, in case of parametric quasi-Cherenkov FEL this region coincides with the region of strong self-absorption of radiation inside a crystal. That fact, obviously, increases the starting beam current. In this report we have shown that the application of external Bragg reflectors gives the possibility to lower radiation self-absorption inside a crystal by modifying radiation modes excited in the active medium under consideration. The corresponding dispersion equation and the expression for excited modes are derived. The generation equation determining starting conditions for lasing is obtained. Using these expressions we have shown that the application of external Bragg reflectors permits to reduce starting beam current density more than 10 times.

  1. Reflectance and unsteady temperature distribution of diffuse reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weston, K. C.; Reddy, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    The applicability of a previously derived solution of the Kubelka-Munk differential equations for the reflectance of an absorbing and scattering material for the case of a zero absorption coefficient to the description of the reflectance of a weakly absorbing, highly scattering material is examined. A solution for the transient heating of a one-dimensional volume reflector is obtained, and the error incurred in the use of the zero absorption coefficient solution is assessed for early times appropriate to the entry heat protection system application. It is found that the small difference in reflectance causes a significant difference in internal temperature.

  2. Recent BeO-reflector-controlled reactor experiments in ZPPR

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, H.F.; Brumbach, S.B.; Carpenter, S.G.; Collins, P.J.; McKnight, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Integral reactor physics measurements were performed on a BeO-reflected fast reactor assembly in the ZPPR facility during January and February of 1985. The measurements emphasized power distributions and reflector control worths in two different critical states. The measurements have been analyzed using three-dimensional deterministic and Monte Carlo methods and the ENDF/B-V.2 nuclear data library. Together the measurements and analyses form a modern, reliable, benchmark data set for testing calculational methods that will be used in predicting some of the design parameters for future space reactors.

  3. Short History of Fixed-Reflector Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, R. G.

    2016-02-01

    From the 66 m parabolic reflector built in 1947 at Jodrell Bank to the 305 m Arecibo dish completed nearly two decades later, radio astronomers in the early days experimented with fixed reflecting mirrors to achieve large collecting areas. In this brief history I will consider the over half-dozen such instruments (of which I am aware) built by 1970, and their main achievements. I will discuss the likely reasons for the success of some of these telescopes, as well as their short-comings, and the lessons for future instruments like FAST.

  4. Reflector and Shield Material Properties for Project Prometheus

    SciTech Connect

    J. Nash

    2005-11-02

    This letter provides updated reflector and shield preliminary material property information to support reactor design efforts. The information provided herein supersedes the applicable portions of Revision 1 to the Space Power Program Preliminary Reactor Design Basis (Reference (a)). This letter partially answers the request in Reference (b) to provide unirradiated and irradiated material properties for beryllium, beryllium oxide, isotopically enriched boron carbide ({sup 11}B{sub 4}C) and lithium hydride. With the exception of {sup 11}B{sub 4}C, the information is provided in Attachments 1 and 2. At the time of issuance of this document, {sup 11}B{sub 4}C had not been studied.

  5. The Design Of The Central-Axis Reflector (ZAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenell, Hermann

    1990-07-01

    The central-axis reflector (LAS) , the design principle which is pre-sented below is a segmented-mirror telescope.The inventions relate main-ly to the optical system and to the tracking apparatus. A large number of small individual mirror bodies , ground off-axis (hexagonal/polygonal) produce one primary mirror with closed circular aperture when joined together. The overall design of the tracking apparatus results directly-and thus without unnecessary adornment- from the two planes of motion which have been reduced to a minimum but which are required for tracking of the telescope.

  6. The design of the central-axis reflector (ZAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huegenell, Hermann

    1989-04-01

    The design principle of the central-axis reflector, a segmented-mirror telescope, is presented. The inventions relate mainly to the optical system and to the tracking apparatus. A large number of small individual mirror bodies, ground off-axis (hexagonal/polygonal), produce one primary mirror with closed circular aperture when joined together. The overall design of the tracking apparatus results directly (and thus without unnecessary adornment) from the two planes of motion which have been reduced to a minimum but which are required for tracking of the telescope.

  7. VSHOT: a tool for characterizing large, imprecise reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.A.; Neal, D.R.; Gruetzner, J.K.; Houser, R.M.; Edgar, R.M.; Wendelin, T.J.

    1996-11-01

    A prototype Video Scanning Hartmann Optical Tester (VSHOT) has been developed to characterize the optics of dish-type solar concentrators. VSHOT is a flexible platform that may characterize any large reflector with a focal length over diameter ratio (f{number_sign}) greater than 0. 45, and RMS optical error in the 0. I - I 0 milliradian range. The VSHOT hardware, software, and operation are described. Measurement uncertainty and preliminary test results are discussed. Another potential application being explored for the VSHOT is the quality assurance of slumped-glass automobile windshields. Preliminary test results from a reference optic and a section of a windshield are presented.

  8. Giant Bragg Wavelength Tuning of Tunable Hollow Waveguide Bragg Reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yasuki; Matsutani, Akihiro; Sakaguchi, Takahiro; Koyama, Fumio

    2005-09-01

    We demonstrate a giant Bragg wavelength tuning with a grating loaded hollow waveguide Bragg reflector. An air-core thickness change of a hollow waveguide enables us to achieve a large propagation constant change over few tens percent, which would be useful for various tunable optical devices. Our observed Bragg-wavelength tuning range is over 160 nm at an air-core thickness change from 10.7 to 1.8 μm, which corresponds to a propagation constant change of over 10%. This is the record large tuning value ever reported in conventional tuning schemes such as thermo-optic or electro-optic effects.

  9. Air-core hollow optical waveguides with omnidirectional reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Shou; Chen, Chii-Chang

    2006-04-01

    We have designed and fabricated a hollow optical waveguide with omnidirectional reflectors (ODRs) on a silicon substrate. The pattern is defined by photolithography on a (100) silicon wafer. The groove is etched by inductive coupled plasma. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology is used to deposit six-pair Si/SiO2 (0.111/0.258 µm) multilayer stacks on the sample. Finally, the top of the sample is covered with an identical ODR. Hence, the light is confined in a hollow waveguide.

  10. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance bragg reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Lear, Kevin L.

    1996-01-01

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors.

  11. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance Bragg reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Lear, K.L.

    1996-10-22

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method are disclosed. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors. 16 figs.

  12. Enhanced imaging of reflector antenna surface distortion using microwave holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmore, Sean W.; Rudduck, Roger C.

    1989-01-01

    Two signal processing techniques are discussed that improve the accuracy of a microwave holographic measurement by removing unwanted signals from the aperture distribution: pattern simulation and subtraction, and time domain filtering. Pattern simulation and subtraction involves modeling unwanted scattering mechanisms and then removing them from the measured far-field data. Measurements taken on a focal point geometry and a Cassegrain geometry at 11 GHz were processed by the holographic analysis system. Pattern simulation and subtraction was applied to both geometries. Surface deformation profiles generated for the Cassegrain antenna by this system were compared to an optical measurement of the main reflector surface.

  13. User's manual for semi-circular compact range reflector code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Inder J.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1986-01-01

    A computer code was developed to analyze a semi-circular paraboloidal reflector antenna with a rolled edge at the top and a skirt at the bottom. The code can be used to compute the total near field of the antenna or its individual components at a given distance from the center of the paraboloid. Thus, it is very effective in computing the size of the sweet spot for RCS or antenna measurement. The operation of the code is described. Various input and output statements are explained. Some results obtained using the computer code are presented to illustrate the code's capability as well as being samples of input/output sets.

  14. Formation of a chronic pain syndrome due to mesh shrinkage after laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM).

    PubMed

    Klein, Fritz; Ospina, Carlos; Rudolph, Birgit; Wüstefeld, Joost; Denecke, Timm; Neuhaus, Peter; Schmidt, Sven-Christian

    2012-10-01

    The case of a 58-year-old male patient who developed a chronic pain syndrome after laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh for treatment of a large symptomatic umbilical hernia combined with rectus diastasis is reported. Twelve months after an uncomplicated initial surgery, the patient presented with progressive signs of a foreign body sensation and pain in the anterior abdominal wall. Computed tomography examination revealed no pathologic findings but a marked shrinkage of the mesh implant. Because of further progressive symptoms, explorative laparotomy was performed. Mesh shrinkage and adhesions with a surrounding chronic tissue reaction were found as the cause of the pain syndrome. This case demonstrates a case of a chronic pain syndrome due to mesh shrinkage 12 months after initial ventral hernia repair. Mesh shrinkage should therefore be taken into consideration in patients with progressive pain chronic syndromes after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

  15. 2D nearly orthogonal mesh generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaoxin; Jia, Yafei; Wang, Sam S. Y.

    2004-11-01

    The Ryskin and Leal (RL) system is the most widely used mesh generation system for the orthogonal mapping. However, when this system is used in domains with complex geometry, particularly in those with sharp corners and strong curvatures, serious distortion or overlapping of mesh lines may occur and an acceptable solution may not be possible. In the present study, two methods are proposed to generate nearly orthogonal meshes with the smoothness control. In the first method, the original RL system is modified by introducing smoothness control functions, which are formulated through the blending of the conformal mapping and the orthogonal mapping; while in the second method, the RL system is modified by introducing the contribution factors. A hybrid system of both methods is also developed. The proposed methods are illustrated by several test examples. Applications of these methods in a natural river channel are demonstrated. It is shown that the modified RL systems are capable of producing meshes with an adequate balance between the orthogonality and the smoothness for complex computational domains without mesh distortions and overlapping.

  16. Multislope MUSCL method for general unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Touze, C.; Murrone, A.; Guillard, H.

    2015-03-01

    The multislope concept has been recently introduced in the literature to deal with MUSCL reconstructions on triangular and tetrahedral unstructured meshes in the finite volume cell-centered context. Dedicated scalar slopes are used to compute the interpolations on each face of a given element, in opposition to the monoslope methods in which a unique limited gradient is used. The multislope approach reveals less expensive and potentially more accurate than the classical gradient techniques. Besides, it may also help the robustness when dealing with hyperbolic systems involving complex solutions, with large discontinuities and high density ratios. However some important limitations on the mesh topology still have to be overcome with the initial multislope formalism. In this paper, a generalized multislope MUSCL method is introduced for cell-centered finite volume discretizations. The method is freed from constraints on the mesh topology, thereby operating on completely general unstructured meshes. Moreover optimal second-order accuracy is reached at the faces centroids. The scheme can be written with nonnegative coefficients, which makes it L∞-stable. Special attention has also been paid to equip the reconstruction procedure with well-adapted dedicated limiters, potentially CFL-dependent. Numerical tests are provided to prove the ability of the method to deal with completely general meshes, while exhibiting second-order accuracy.

  17. Hydrophobic meshes for oil spill recovery devices.

    PubMed

    Deng, Da; Prendergast, Daniel P; MacFarlane, John; Bagatin, Roberto; Stellacci, Francesco; Gschwend, Philip M

    2013-02-01

    Widespread use of petrochemicals often leads to accidental releases in aquatic environments, occasionally with disastrous results. We have developed a hydrophobic and oleophilic mesh that separates oil from water continuously in situ via capillary action, providing a means of recovering spilt oil from surface waters. Steel mesh is dip-coated in a xylene solution of low-density polyethylene, creating a hydrophobic surface with tunable roughness and opening size. The hydrophobic mesh allows oil to pass through the openings while preventing the concomitant passage of water. A bench-top prototype demonstrated the efficacy of such an oil recovery device and allowed us to quantify the factors governing the ability of the mesh to separate oil and water. Preliminary data analysis suggested that the oleophilic openings behave somewhat like capillary tubes: the oil flux is inversely proportional to oil viscosity, and directly proportional to the size of the mesh openings. An unpinned meniscus model was found to predict the water intrusion pressure successfully, which increased as the opening size decreased. The trade-off between water intrusion and oil flow rate suggests an optimal pore size for given oil properties and sea conditions.

  18. Floating shock fitting via Lagrangian adaptive meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanrosendale, John

    1994-01-01

    In recent works we have formulated a new approach to compressible flow simulation, combining the advantages of shock-fitting and shock-capturing. Using a cell-centered Roe scheme discretization on unstructured meshes, we warp the mesh while marching to steady state, so that mesh edges align with shocks and other discontinuities. This new algorithm, the Shock-fitting Lagrangian Adaptive Method (SLAM) is, in effect, a reliable shock-capturing algorithm which yields shock-fitted accuracy at convergence. Shock-capturing algorithms like this, which warp the mesh to yield shock-fitted accuracy, are new and relatively untried. However, their potential is clear. In the context of sonic booms, accurate calculation of near-field sonic boom signatures is critical to the design of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). SLAM should allow computation of accurate N-wave pressure signatures on comparatively coarse meshes, significantly enhancing our ability to design low-boom configurations for high-speed aircraft.

  19. Conservative interpolation between general spherical meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritsikis, Evaggelos; Aechtner, Matthias; Meurdesoif, Yann; Dubos, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    An efficient, local, explicit, second-order, conservative interpolation algorithm between spherical meshes is presented. The cells composing the source and target meshes may be either spherical polygons or latitude-longitude quadrilaterals. Second-order accuracy is obtained by piece-wise linear finite-volume reconstruction over the source mesh. Global conservation is achieved through the introduction of a supermesh, whose cells are all possible intersections of source and target cells. Areas and intersections are computed exactly to yield a geometrically exact method. The main efficiency bottleneck caused by the construction of the supermesh is overcome by adopting tree-based data structures and algorithms, from which the mesh connectivity can also be deduced efficiently.The theoretical second-order accuracy is verified using a smooth test function and pairs of meshes commonly used for atmospheric modelling. Experiments confirm that the most expensive operations, especially the supermesh construction, have O(NlogN) computational cost. The method presented is meant to be incorporated in pre- or post-processing atmospheric modelling pipelines, or directly into models for flexible input/output. It could also serve as a basis for conservative coupling between model components, e.g., atmosphere and ocean.

  20. Laparoscopic-assisted Ventral Hernia Repair: Primary Fascial Repair with Polyester Mesh versus Polyester Mesh Alone.

    PubMed

    Karipineni, Farah; Joshi, Priya; Parsikia, Afshin; Dhir, Teena; Joshi, Amit R T

    2016-03-01

    Laparoscopic-assisted ventral hernia repair (LAVHR) with mesh is well established as the preferred technique for hernia repair. We sought to determine whether primary fascial closure and/or overlap of the mesh reduced recurrence and/or complications. We conducted a retrospective review on 57 LAVHR patients using polyester composite mesh between August 2010 and July 2013. They were divided into mesh-only (nonclosure) and primary fascial closure with mesh (closure) groups. Patient demographics, prior surgical history, mesh overlap, complications, and recurrence rates were compared. Thirty-nine (68%) of 57 patients were in the closure group and 18 (32%) in the nonclosure group. Mean defect sizes were 15.5 and 22.5 cm(2), respectively. Participants were followed for a mean of 1.3 years [standard deviation (SD) = 0.7]. Recurrence rates were 2/39 (5.1%) in the closure group and 1/18 (5.6%) in the nonclosure group (P = 0.947). There were no major postoperative complications in the nonclosure group. The closure group experienced four (10.3%) complications. This was not a statistically significant difference (P = 0.159). The median mesh-to-hernia ratio for all repairs was 15.2 (surface area) and 3.9 (diameter). Median length of stay was 14.5 hours (1.7-99.3) for patients with nonclosure and 11.9 hours (6.9-90.3 hours) for patients with closure (P = 0.625). In conclusion, this is one of the largest series of LAVHR exclusively using polyester dual-sided mesh. Our recurrence rate was about 5 per cent. Significant mesh overlap is needed to achieve such low recurrence rates. Primary closure of hernias seems less important than adequate mesh overlap in preventing recurrence after LAVHR.

  1. Mesh saliency with adaptive local patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Anass; Charrier, Christophe; Lézoray, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    3D object shapes (represented by meshes) include both areas that attract the visual attention of human observers and others less or not attractive at all. This visual attention depends on the degree of saliency exposed by these areas. In this paper, we propose a technique for detecting salient regions in meshes. To do so, we define a local surface descriptor based on local patches of adaptive size and filled with a local height field. The saliency of mesh vertices is then defined as its degree measure with edges weights computed from adaptive patch similarities. Our approach is compared to the state-of-the-art and presents competitive results. A study evaluating the influence of the parameters establishing this approach is also carried out. The strength and the stability of our approach with respect to noise and simplification are also studied.

  2. GRChombo: Numerical relativity with adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, Katy; Figueras, Pau; Finkel, Hal; Kunesch, Markus; Lim, Eugene A.; Tunyasuvunakool, Saran

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we introduce {\\mathtt{GRChombo}}: a new numerical relativity code which incorporates full adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) using block structured Berger-Rigoutsos grid generation. The code supports non-trivial ‘many-boxes-in-many-boxes’ mesh hierarchies and massive parallelism through the message passing interface. {\\mathtt{GRChombo}} evolves the Einstein equation using the standard BSSN formalism, with an option to turn on CCZ4 constraint damping if required. The AMR capability permits the study of a range of new physics which has previously been computationally infeasible in a full 3 + 1 setting, while also significantly simplifying the process of setting up the mesh for these problems. We show that {\\mathtt{GRChombo}} can stably and accurately evolve standard spacetimes such as binary black hole mergers and scalar collapses into black holes, demonstrate the performance characteristics of our code, and discuss various physics problems which stand to benefit from the AMR technique.

  3. Design of the Central-Axis Reflector (ZAS) and results leading to the Off-Axis Reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huegenell, Hermann

    1990-07-01

    The Central-Axis Reflector (ZAS), the design of which is presented, is a segmented mirror telescope. The inventions relate mainly to the optical system and to the tracking apparatus. A number of individual mirror bodies, ground off-axis (hexagonal/polygonal) produce one primary mirror with closed circular aperture when joined together. The overall design of the tracking apparatus results directly (and thus without unnecessary adornment) from the two planes of motion which have been reduced to an obligatory minimum but which are required for tracking of the telescope.

  4. Design, Development and Testing of the GMI Reflector Deployment Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, Larry; Foster, Mike; McEachen, Mike; Pellicciotti, Joseph; Kubitschek, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The GMI Reflector Deployment Assembly (RDA) is an articulating structure that accurately positions and supports the main reflector of the Global Microwave Imager (GMI) throughout the 3 year mission life. The GMI instrument will fly on the core Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) spacecraft and will be used to make calibrated radiometric measurements at multiple microwave frequencies and polarizations. The GPM mission is an international effort managed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to improve climate, weather, and hydrometeorological predictions through more accurate and frequent precipitation measurements1. Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation (BATC) was selected by NASA Goddard to design, build, and test the GMI instrument. The RDA was designed and manufactured by ATK Aerospace Systems Group to meet a number of challenging packaging and performance requirements. ATK developed a flight-like engineering development unit (EDU) and two flight mechanisms that have been delivered to BATC. This paper will focus on driving GMI instrument system requirements, the RDA design, development, and test activities performed to demonstrate that requirements have been met.

  5. Innovative design of parabolic reflector light guiding structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whang, Allen J.; Tso, Chun-Hsien; Chen, Yi-Yung

    2008-02-01

    Due to the idea of everlasting green architecture, it is of increasing importance to guild natural light into indoors. The advantages are multifold - to have better color rendering index, excellent energy savings from environments viewpoints and make humans more healthy, etc. Our search is to design an innovative structure, to convert outdoor sun light impinges on larger surfaces, into near linear light beam sources, later convert this light beam into near point sources which enters the indoor spaces then can be used as lighting sources indoors. We are not involved with the opto-electrical transformation, to the guild light into to the building, to perform the illumination, as well as the imaging function. Because non-imaging optics, well known for apply to the solar concentrators, that can use non-imaging structures to fulfill our needs, which can also be used as energy collectors in solar energy devices. Here, we have designed a pair of large and small parabolic reflector, which can be used to collect daylight and change area from large to small. Then we make a light-guide system that is been designed by us use of this parabolic reflector to guide the collection light, can pick up the performance for large surface source change to near linear source and a larger collection area.

  6. Iterative alignment of reflector segments using a laser tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera Cuevas, Lizeth; Lucero Alvarez, Maribel; Leon-Huerta, Andrea; Hernandez Rios, Emilio; Hernandez Lázaro, Josefina; Tzile Torres, Carlos; Castro Santos, David; Gale, David M.; Wilson, Grant; Narayanan, Gopal; Smith, David R.

    2013-04-01

    The Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) is a 50m diameter millimetre-wave radio telescope situated on the summit of Sierra Negra, Puebla, at an altitude of 4600 meters. The reflector surface of the LMT currently employs84 segments arranged in three annular rings. Each segment is comprised of 8 precision composite subpanels located on five threaded adjusters. During the current primary surface refurbishment, individual segments are aligned in the telescope basement using a laser tracker. This allows increased spatial resolution in shorter timescales, resulting in the opportunity for improved logistics and increased alignment precision. To perform segment alignment an iterative process is carried out whereby the surface is measured and subpanel deformations are corrected with the goal of 40 microns RMS. In practice we have been able to achieve RMS errors of almost 20 microns, with 35 microns typical. The number of iterations varies from around ten to over 20, depending mainly on the behaviour of the mechanical adjusters that support the individual subpanels. Cross marks scribed on the reflector surface are used as fiducials, because their positions on the paraboloid are well known. Measurement data is processed using a robust curve fitting algorithm which provides a map of the surface showing the subpanel deviations. From this map the required subpanel adjuster movements are calculated allowing surface improvement in a stepwise manner.

  7. Concentricity calibration of photogrammetry retro-reflector target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hengzheng; Wang, Weinong; Pei, Limei; Ren, Guoying

    2016-11-01

    Close range digital photogrammetry is being widely used in industrial measurements. The measurements are usually carried out with a mobile retro-reflector target, which is consists of a shaft and reflective target fixed in the center of the shaft. When the center of the target and the axis of the shaft is not consistent, it will introduce measurement error. Therefore, the concentricity of target is an important parameter for the measurement results. To achieve the concentricity of retro-reflector target a multi-sensor coordinate measurement machine with imaging probe and touch probe is used. In this combined measurement system the touch probe measure the axis of the shaft, and imaging probe measure the center of reflective target. An artifact is designed to evaluate the performance of combined system. This artifact is defined as a sharp edged hole in a metal plate. It is suitable to measure with touch probe as well as imaging probe. The touch probe measures 25 points on the hole and then with the imaging probe. With all the points measured by two kinds of probe the evaluation parameters including combination size error, form error and location error are calculated. These parameters are consistent with the ISO standard 10360-9. It indicates that combined measurement uncertainty is 3.2 microns which can meet the calibration requirements of target concentricity.

  8. Some Broadband Calculated RF Scatter from the Trihedral Corner Reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokole, E. L.; Gold, B. T.; Taylor, D. J.; Sarkar, T. K.; Hansen, J. P.

    To understand the target-like artifacts in radar returns called sea spikes 1 that are induced by ocean scatter,2 the WIPL-D3 and WIPL-DP4 electromagnetics codes are used to calculate monostatic and bistatic radar cross sections (RCSs) of a trihedral comer reflector at 1.5, 3.8, and 7 GHz for vertically and horizontally polarized fields. These computations are part of a larger effort to provide theoretical comparisons for recent scatter data from a 1-m trihedral reflector that was collected over 1.9 to 11.5 GHz in the open ocean with a short-pulse ultrawideband (UWB) system. Over the last eight years, this UWB experimental radar, called the microwave microscope (MWM), has been used in a series of measurements at the Atlantic Underwater Test and Experiment Center (AUTEC) in the Bahamas to investigate the low-elevation (grazing angles less than 4°)scatter of RF signals from the open ocean in an attempt to understand and mitigate the sea-spike phenomenon.

  9. Strong reflector-based beamforming in ultrasound medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Szasz, Teodora; Basarab, Adrian; Kouamé, Denis

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates the use of sparse priors in creating original two-dimensional beamforming methods for ultrasound imaging. The proposed approaches detect the strong reflectors from the scanned medium based on the well known Bayesian Information Criteria used in statistical modeling. Moreover, they allow a parametric selection of the level of speckle in the final beamformed image. These methods are applied on simulated data and on recorded experimental data. Their performance is evaluated considering the standard image quality metrics: contrast ratio (CR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A comparison is made with the classical delay-and-sum and minimum variance beamforming methods to confirm the ability of the proposed methods to precisely detect the number and the position of the strong reflectors in a sparse medium and to accurately reduce the speckle and highly enhance the contrast in a non-sparse medium. We confirm that our methods improve the contrast of the final image for both simulated and experimental data. In all experiments, the proposed approaches tend to preserve the speckle, which can be of major interest in clinical examinations, as it can contain useful information. In sparse mediums we achieve a highly improvement in contrast compared with the classical methods.

  10. Simulation requirements for the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soosaar, K.

    1984-01-01

    Simulation tools for the large deployable reflector (LDR) are discussed. These tools are often the transfer function variety equations. However, transfer functions are inadequate to represent time-varying systems for multiple control systems with overlapping bandwidths characterized by multi-input, multi-output features. Frequency domain approaches are the useful design tools, but a full-up simulation is needed. Because of the need for a dedicated computer for high frequency multi degree of freedom components encountered, non-real time smulation is preferred. Large numerical analysis software programs are useful only to receive inputs and provide output to the next block, and should be kept out of the direct loop of simulation. The following blocks make up the simulation. The thermal model block is a classical heat transfer program. It is a non-steady state program. The quasistatic block deals with problems associated with rigid body control of reflector segments. The steady state block assembles data into equations of motion and dynamics. A differential raytrace is obtained to establish a change in wave aberrations. The observation scene is described. The focal plane module converts the photon intensity impinging on it into electron streams or into permanent film records.

  11. Titanium Mesh Nasal Repair without Nasal Lining.

    PubMed

    Zenga, Joseph; Kao, Katherine; Chen, Collin; Gross, Jennifer; Hahn, Samuel; Chi, John J; Branham, Gregory H

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to describe outcomes for patients who underwent titanium mesh reconstruction of full-thickness nasal defects without internal lining repair. This is a retrospective cohort study. Patients with through-and-through nasal defects were identified at a single academic institution between 2008 and 2016. Nasal reconstruction was performed with either titanium mesh and external skin reconstruction without repair of the intranasal lining or traditional three-layer closure. Five patients underwent titanium mesh reconstruction and 11 underwent traditional three-layer repair. Median follow-up was 11 months (range, 2-66 months). The only significant difference between groups was older age in patients undergoing titanium reconstruction (mean, 81 vs. 63 years; difference of 18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4-32 years). Defect extent including overall size and structures removed was similar between groups (p > 0.05). Paramedian forehead flap was the most common external reconstruction in both groups (100% for titanium mesh and 73% for three-layer closure). Time under anesthesia was significantly shorter for titanium mesh reconstruction (median, 119 vs. 314 minutes; difference of 195; 95% CI, 45-237). Estimated blood loss and length of hospital stay were similar between groups (p > 0.05). Complication rates were substantial although not significantly different, 40 and 36% in titanium and three-layer reconstruction, respectively (p > 0.05). All patients with complications after titanium reconstruction had prior or postoperative radiotherapy. Titanium mesh reconstruction of through-and-through nasal defects can successfully be performed without reconstruction of the intranasal lining, significantly decreasing operative times. This reconstructive technique may not be suitable for patients who undergo radiotherapy.

  12. Unstructured Adaptive Meshes: Bad for Your Memory?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Feng, Hui-Yu; VanderWijngaart, Rob

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation explores the need for a NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) parallel benchmark for problems with irregular dynamical memory access. This benchmark is important and necessary because: 1) Problems with localized error source benefit from adaptive nonuniform meshes; 2) Certain machines perform poorly on such problems; 3) Parallel implementation may provide further performance improvement but is difficult. Some examples of problems which use irregular dynamical memory access include: 1) Heat transfer problem; 2) Heat source term; 3) Spectral element method; 4) Base functions; 5) Elemental discrete equations; 6) Global discrete equations. Nonconforming Mesh and Mortar Element Method are covered in greater detail in this presentation.

  13. Shuffle-exchanges on augmented meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, S. H.

    1984-01-01

    A mesh connected array of size N = two to the Kth power, K an integer, can be augmented by adding at most one edge per node such that it can perform a shuffle-exchange of size N/2 in constant time. A shuffle-exchange of size N is performed on this augmented array in constant time. This is done by combining the available perfect shuffle of size N/2 with the existing nearest neighbor connections of the mesh. By carefully scheduling the different permutations that are composed in order to achieve the shuffle, the time required is reduced to 5 steps, which is optimal for this network.

  14. Multigrid solution strategies for adaptive meshing problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the issues which arise when combining multigrid strategies with adaptive meshing techniques for solving steady-state problems on unstructured meshes. A basic strategy is described, and demonstrated by solving several inviscid and viscous flow cases. Potential inefficiencies in this basic strategy are exposed, and various alternate approaches are discussed, some of which are demonstrated with an example. Although each particular approach exhibits certain advantages, all methods have particular drawbacks, and the formulation of a completely optimal strategy is considered to be an open problem.

  15. Rarefield gas flows through meshes and implications for atmospheric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumbel, J.

    2001-05-01

    Meshes are commonly used as part of instruments for in situ atmospheric measurements. This study analyses the aerodynamic effect of meshes by means of wind tunnel experiments and numerical simulations. Based on the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method, a simple mesh parameterisation is described and applied to a number of representative flow conditions. For open meshes freely exposed to the flow, substantial compression effects are found both upstream and downstream of the mesh. Meshes attached to close instrument structures, on the other hand, cause only minor flow disturbances. In an accompanying paper, the approach developed here is applied to the quantitative analysis of rocket-borne density measurements in the middle atmosphere.

  16. Reflector for efficient coupling of a laser beam to air or other fluids

    DOEpatents

    Kare, Jordin T.

    1992-01-01

    A reflector array is disclosed herein that provides a controlled region or regions of plasma breakdowns from a laser beam produced at a remotely-based laser source. The plasma may be applied to produce thrust to propel a spacecraft, or to diagnose a laser beam, or to produce shockwaves. The spacecraft propulsion system comprises a reflector array attached to the vehicle. The reflector array comprises a plurality of reflectors spaced apart on a reflective surface, with each reflector acting as an independent focusing mirror. The reflectors are spaced closely together to form a continuous or partially-continuous surface. The reflector array may be formed from a sheet of reflective material, such as copper or aluminum. In operation, a beam of electromagnetic energy, such as a laser beam, is directed at the reflectors which focus the reflected electromagnetic energy at a plurality of regions off the surface. The energy concentrated in the focal region causes a breakdown of the air or other fluid in the focal region, creating a plasma. Electromagnetic energy is absorbed in the plasma and it grows in volume, compressing and heating the adjacent fluid thereby providing thrust. Laser pulses may be applied repetitively. After each such thrust pulse, fresh air can be introduced next to the surface either laterally, or through a perforated surface. If air or some other gas or vapor is supplied, for example from a tank carried on board a vehicle, this invention may also be used to provide thrust in a vacuum environment.

  17. Theoretical modeling of the dynamics of a semiconductor laser subject to double-reflector optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakry, A.; Abdulrhmann, S.; Ahmed, M.

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically model the dynamics of semiconductor lasers subject to the double-reflector feedback. The proposed model is a new modification of the time-delay rate equations of semiconductor lasers under the optical feedback to account for this type of the double-reflector feedback. We examine the influence of adding the second reflector to dynamical states induced by the single-reflector feedback: periodic oscillations, period doubling, and chaos. Regimes of both short and long external cavities are considered. The present analyses are done using the bifurcation diagram, temporal trajectory, phase portrait, and fast Fourier transform of the laser intensity. We show that adding the second reflector attracts the periodic and perioddoubling oscillations, and chaos induced by the first reflector to a route-to-continuous-wave operation. During this operation, the periodic-oscillation frequency increases with strengthening the optical feedback. We show that the chaos induced by the double-reflector feedback is more irregular than that induced by the single-reflector feedback. The power spectrum of this chaos state does not reflect information on the geometry of the optical system, which then has potential for use in chaotic (secure) optical data encryption.

  18. Simulation of Locking Space Truss Deployments for a Large Deployable Sparse Aperture Reflector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    solar cells , there exists the potential to increase the signal gain by using a larger antenna reflector aperture. However, the use of large reflectors, or...and Focus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.3 Assumptions and Limitations ...69 Initial Displacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 First Cell Lockout Event

  19. A Theoretical Analysis of the Radar Cross Section of the Biconical Corner Reflector.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    of normal incidence on a symmetrical reflector are corrected. Approved for Public Release POSTAL ADDRESS: Chief Superintendent, Electronics Research... CODE : Electronic Research Laboratory 01 34-TR____________________ 10 rIMPRINT (Publishing organisation) I I COMPUTER PROGRAM(S) Defence Research Centre...limitation. 141 DESCRIPTORS: Radar cross section I COSATI CODES a. EIC Thesaurus Biconical corner reflectors Terms Reference targets b. Non-Thesaurus

  20. Shaped reflector antenna analysis using the Jacobi-Bessel series. [design for space and satellite communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Galindo-Israel, V.

    1980-01-01

    A vector radiation integral is derived for an offset shaped reflector illuminated by an arbitrarily located and oriented source. A procedure for expressing the integral in terms of a series of the Fourier transforms of an effective aperture distribution is discussed. The Jacobi-Bessel series is used to evaluate the Fourier transforms. Numerical results are presented for different reflector configurations and source locations.

  1. 10 CFR 429.35 - Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact....35 Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to bare or covered...

  2. 10 CFR 429.35 - Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact....35 Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to bare or covered...

  3. 10 CFR 429.35 - Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact....35 Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to bare or covered...

  4. Flexible, angle-independent, structural color reflectors inspired by morpho butterfly wings.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyungjae; Yu, Sunkyu; Heo, Chul-Joon; Shim, Jae Won; Yang, Seung-Man; Han, Moon Gyu; Lee, Hong-Seok; Jin, Yongwan; Lee, Sang Yoon; Park, Namkyoo; Shin, Jung H

    2012-05-08

    Thin-film color reflectors inspired by Morpho butterflies are fabricated. Using a combination of directional deposition, silica microspheres with a wide size distribution, and a PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) encasing, a large, flexible reflector is created that actually provides better angle-independent color characteristics than Morpho butterflies and which can even be bent and folded freely without losing its Morpho-mimetic photonic properties.

  5. The effects of stainless steel radial reflector on core reactivity for small modular reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Jung Kil Hah, Chang Joo; Cho, Sung Ju Seong, Ki Bong

    2016-01-22

    Commercial PWR core is surrounded by a radial reflector, which consists of a baffle and water. Radial reflector is designed to reflect neutron back into the core region to improve the neutron efficiency of the reactor and to protect the reactor vessels from the embrittling effects caused by irradiation during power operation. Reflector also helps to flatten the neutron flux and power distributions in the reactor core. The conceptual nuclear design for boron-free small modular reactor (SMR) under development in Korea requires to have the cycle length of 4∼5 years, rated power of 180 MWth and enrichment less than 5 w/o. The aim of this paper is to analyze the effects of stainless steel radial reflector on the performance of the SMR using UO{sub 2} fuels. Three types of reflectors such as water, water/stainless steel 304 mixture and stainless steel 304 are selected to investigate the effect on core reactivity. Additionally, the thickness of stainless steel and double layer reflector type are also investigated. CASMO-4/SIMULATE-3 code system is used for this analysis. The results of analysis show that single layer stainless steel reflector is the most efficient reflector.

  6. Evaluation of Hardware and Procedures for Astronaut Assembly and Repair of Large Precision Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Watson, Judith J.; Collins, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    A detailed procedure is presented that enables astronauts in extravehicular activity (EVA) to efficiently assemble and repair large (i.e., greater than 10m-diameter) segmented reflectors, supported by a truss, for space-based optical or radio-frequency science instruments. The procedure, estimated timelines, and reflector hardware performance are verified in simulated 0-g (neutral buoyancy) assembly tests of a 14m-diameter, offset-focus, reflector test article. The test article includes a near-flight-quality, 315-member, doubly curved support truss and 7 mockup reflector panels (roughly 2m in diameter) representing a portion of the 37 total panels needed to fully populate the reflector. Data from the tests indicate that a flight version of the design (including all reflector panels) could be assembled in less than 5 hours - less than the 6 hours normally permitted for a single EVA. This assembly rate essentially matches pre-test predictions that were based on a vast amount of historical data on EVA assembly of structures produced by NASA Langley Research Center. Furthermore, procedures and a tool for the removal and replacement of a damaged reflector panel were evaluated, and it was shown that EVA repair of this type of reflector is feasible with the use of appropriate EVA crew aids.

  7. Effect of disc reflectors on radiation impedance of short-backfire antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marougi, S. D.

    1982-02-01

    Using near-field analysis, the influence of large and small disc reflectors used in short-backfire antennas on the radiation impedance of a dipole feed element has been investigated. The effect of each reflector is evaluated separately, and the overall change in the radiation impedance of the dipole is predicted.

  8. Reflector for efficient coupling of a laser beam to air or other fluids

    DOEpatents

    Kare, J.T.

    1992-10-06

    A reflector array is disclosed herein that provides a controlled region or regions of plasma breakdowns from a laser beam produced at a remotely-based laser source. The plasma may be applied to produce thrust to propel a spacecraft, or to diagnose a laser beam, or to produce shock waves. The spacecraft propulsion system comprises a reflector array attached to the vehicle. The reflector array comprises a plurality of reflectors spaced apart on a reflective surface, with each reflector acting as an independent focusing mirror. The reflectors are spaced closely together to form a continuous or partially-continuous surface. The reflector array may be formed from a sheet of reflective material, such as copper or aluminum. In operation, a beam of electromagnetic energy, such as a laser beam, is directed at the reflectors which focus the reflected electromagnetic energy at a plurality of regions off the surface. The energy concentrated in the focal region causes a breakdown of the air or other fluid in the focal region, creating a plasma. Electromagnetic energy is absorbed in the plasma and it grows in volume, compressing and heating the adjacent fluid thereby providing thrust. Laser pulses may be applied repetitively. After each such thrust pulse, fresh air can be introduced next to the surface either laterally, or through a perforated surface. If air or some other gas or vapor is supplied, for example from a tank carried on board a vehicle, this invention may also be used to provide thrust in a vacuum environment. 10 figs.

  9. The effects of stainless steel radial reflector on core reactivity for small modular reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jung Kil; Hah, Chang Joo; Cho, Sung Ju; Seong, Ki Bong

    2016-01-01

    Commercial PWR core is surrounded by a radial reflector, which consists of a baffle and water. Radial reflector is designed to reflect neutron back into the core region to improve the neutron efficiency of the reactor and to protect the reactor vessels from the embrittling effects caused by irradiation during power operation. Reflector also helps to flatten the neutron flux and power distributions in the reactor core. The conceptual nuclear design for boron-free small modular reactor (SMR) under development in Korea requires to have the cycle length of 4˜5 years, rated power of 180 MWth and enrichment less than 5 w/o. The aim of this paper is to analyze the effects of stainless steel radial reflector on the performance of the SMR using UO2 fuels. Three types of reflectors such as water, water/stainless steel 304 mixture and stainless steel 304 are selected to investigate the effect on core reactivity. Additionally, the thickness of stainless steel and double layer reflector type are also investigated. CASMO-4/SIMULATE-3 code system is used for this analysis. The results of analysis show that single layer stainless steel reflector is the most efficient reflector.

  10. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 224 - Guidelines for Electronic Submission of Reflectorization Implementation Compliance Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Guidelines for Electronic Submission of Reflectorization Implementation Compliance Reports C Appendix C to Part 224 Transportation Other Regulations... REFLECTORIZATION OF RAIL FREIGHT ROLLING STOCK Pt. 224, App. C Appendix C to Part 224—Guidelines for...

  11. MeshEZW: an image coder using mesh and finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landais, Thomas; Bonnaud, Laurent; Chassery, Jean-Marc

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, we present a new method to compress the information in an image, called MeshEZW. The proposed approach is based on the finite elements method, a mesh construction and a zerotree method. The zerotree method is an adaptive of the EZW algorithm with two new symbols for increasing the performance. These steps allow a progressive representation of the image by the automatic construction of a bitstream. The mesh structure is adapted to the image compression domain and is defined to allow video comrpession. The coder is described and some preliminary results are discussed.

  12. Weighted SAW reflector gratings for orthogonal frequency coded SAW tags and sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puccio, Derek (Inventor); Malocha, Donald (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Weighted surface acoustic wave reflector gratings for coding identification tags and sensors to enable unique sensor operation and identification for a multi-sensor environment. In an embodiment, the weighted reflectors are variable while in another embodiment the reflector gratings are apodized. The weighting technique allows the designer to decrease reflectively and allows for more chips to be implemented in a device and, consequently, more coding diversity. As a result, more tags and sensors can be implemented using a given bandwidth when compared with uniform reflectors. Use of weighted reflector gratings with OFC makes various phase shifting schemes possible, such as in-phase and quadrature implementations of coded waveforms resulting in reduced device size and increased coding.

  13. Computer-aided design of reflector antennas - The Green Bank Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Marco A. B.; Stutzman, Warren L.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the electrical performance of the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) reflector antenna, operating as single- and dual-offset configurations, as well as a general overview of the GBT system. The GBT dual-offset Gregorian configuration is designed for low cross polarization (XPOL) using the dual-offset reflector antenna (DORA) synthesis package code. The procedure implemented in DORA to upgrade an existing main reflector to a low cross-polarized dual-offset Gregorian reflector antenna is also described. All computed patterns were obtained with the parabolic reflector analysis code (PRAC) program, and with the commercial code GRASP7. The GBT radiation patterns and performance values indicate that low XPOL performance can be achieved with a dual-offset configuration, provided that a low XPOL feed is used. The GBT configuration is employed as a case example for the aforementioned procedure.

  14. Main-Reflector Manufacturing Technology for the Deep Space Optical Communications Ground Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britcliffe, M. J.; Hoppe, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) has plans to develop a 10-m-diameter optical communications receiving station. The system uses the direct detection technique, which has much different requirements from a typical astronomical telescope. The receiver must operate in daylight and nighttime conditions. This imposes special requirements on the optical system to reject stray light from the Sun and other sources. One of the biggest challenges is designing a main-reflector surface that meets these requirements and can be produced at a reasonable cost. The requirements for the performance of the reflector are presented. To date, an aspherical primary reflector has been assumed. A reflector with a spherical reflector has a major cost advantage over an aspherical design, with no sacrifice in performance. A survey of current manufacturing techniques for optical mirrors of this type was performed. Techniques including solid glass, lightweight glass, diamond-turned aluminum, and composite mirrors were investigated.

  15. Demonstration of radar reflector detection and ground clutter suppression using airborne weather and mapping radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. J.; Bull, J. S.; Chisholm, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    A navigation system which utilizes minimum ground-based equipment is especially advantageous to helicopters, which can make off-airport landings. Research has been conducted in the use of weather and mapping radar to detect large radar reflectors overland for navigation purposes. As initial studies have not been successful, investigations were conducted regarding a new concept for the detection of ground-based radar reflectors and eliminating ground clutter, using a device called an echo processor (EP). A description is presented of the problems associated with detecting radar reflectors overland, taking into account the EP concept and the results of ground- and flight-test investigations. The echo processor concept was successfully demonstrated in detecting radar reflectors overland in a high-clutter environment. A radar reflector target size of 55 dBsm was found to be adequate for detection in an urban environment.

  16. Positive focal shift of gallium nitride high contrast grating focusing reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shumin; Wang, Zhenhai; Liu, Qifa

    2016-09-01

    We design a type of metasurfaces capable of serving as a visible-light focusing reflector based on gallium nitride (GaN) high contrast gratings (HCGs). The wavefront of the reflected light is precisely manipulated by spatial variation of the grating periods along the subwavelength ridge array to achieve light focusing. Different from conventional negative focal shift effect, a positive focal shift is observed in such focusing reflectors. Detailed investigations of the influence of device size on the focusing performance, especially the focal length, are preformed via a finite element method . The results show that all performance parameters are greatly affected by the reflector size. A more concentrated focal point, or a better focusing capability, can be achieved by larger size. With increasing reflector size, the achieved focal length decreases and gradually approaches to the design, thus the corresponding positive focal shift decreases. Our results are helpful for understanding the visible-light control of the planar HCG-based focusing reflectors.

  17. Active feed array compensation for reflector antenna surface distortions. Ph.D. Thesis - Akron Univ., Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility of electromagnetic compensation for reflector antenna surface distortions is investigated. The performance characteristics of large satellite communication reflector antenna systems degrade as the reflector surface distorts, mainly due to thermal effects from solar radiation. The technique developed can be used to maintain the antenna boresight directivity and sidelobe level independent of thermal effects on the reflector surface. With the advent of monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC), a greater flexibility in array fed reflector antenna systems can be achieved. MMIC arrays provide independent control of amplitude and phase for each of the many radiating elements in the feed array. By assuming a known surface distortion profile, a simulation study is carried out to examine the antenna performance as a function of feed array size and number of elements. Results indicate that the compensation technique can effectively control boresight directivity and sidelobe level under peak surface distortion in the order of tenth of a wavelength.

  18. GaN-based high-voltage light-emitting diodes with backside reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huamao, Huang; Hong, Wang; Xiaosheng, Huang; Jinyong, Hu

    2014-07-01

    High-voltage light-emitting diodes (HV-LED) withbackside reflector, including Ti3O5/SiO2 distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) or hybrid reflector combining DBR and Al or Ag metal layer, are investigated using Monte Carlo ray tracing method. The hybrid reflector leads to more enhancement of light-extraction efficiency (LEE). Moreover, the LEE can also be improved by redesigning the thicknesses of DBR. HV-LED with four redesigned DBR pairs (4-MDBR), and those with a hybrid reflector combining 4-MDBR and Al metal layer (4-MDBR-Al), are fabricated. Compared to 4-MDBR, the enhancement of light-output power induced by 4-MDBR-Al is 4.6%, which is consistent with the simulated value of 4.9%.

  19. State-of-the-art low-cost solar reflector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C; Jorgensen, G

    1994-11-01

    Solar thermal technologies generate power by concentrating sunlight with large mirrors. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is working with industrial partners to develop the optical reflector materials needed for the successful deployment of this technology. The reflector materials must be low in cost and maintain high specular reflectance for extended lifetimes in severe outdoor environments. Currently, the best candidate materials for solar mirrors are silver-coated low-iron glass and silvered polymer films. Polymer reflectors are lighter in weight, offer greater flexibility in system design, and have the potential for lower cost than glass mirrors. In parallel with collaborative activities, several innovative candidate reflector-material constructions were investigated at NREL. The low-cost material requirement necessitates manufacturing compatible with mass-production techniques. Future cooperative efforts with the web-coating industry offers the promise of exciting new alternative materials and the potential for dramatic cost savings in developing advanced solar reflector materials.

  20. Generation of XS library for the reflector of VVER reactor core using Monte Carlo code Serpent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usheva, K. I.; Kuten, S. A.; Khruschinsky, A. A.; Babichev, L. F.

    2017-01-01

    A physical model of the radial and axial reflector of VVER-1200-like reactor core has been developed. Five types of radial reflector with different material composition exist for the VVER reactor core and 1D and 2D models were developed for all of them. Axial top and bottom reflectors are described by the 1D model. A two-group XS library for diffusion code DYN3D has been generated for all types of reflectors by using Serpent 2 Monte Carlo code. Power distribution in the reactor core calculated in DYN3D is flattened in the core central region to more extent in the 2D model of the radial reflector than in its 1D model.

  1. Highly Symmetric and Congruently Tiled Meshes for Shells and Domes

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Muhibur; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2016-01-01

    We describe the generation of all possible shell and dome shapes that can be uniquely meshed (tiled) using a single type of mesh face (tile), and following a single meshing (tiling) rule that governs the mesh (tile) arrangement with maximal vertex, edge and face symmetries. Such tiling arrangements or congruently tiled meshed shapes, are frequently found in chemical forms (fullerenes or Bucky balls, crystals, quasi-crystals, virus nano shells or capsids), and synthetic shapes (cages, sports domes, modern architectural facades). Congruently tiled meshes are both aesthetic and complete, as they support maximal mesh symmetries with minimal complexity and possess simple generation rules. Here, we generate congruent tilings and meshed shape layouts that satisfy these optimality conditions. Further, the congruent meshes are uniquely mappable to an almost regular 3D polyhedron (or its dual polyhedron) and which exhibits face-transitive (and edge-transitive) congruency with at most two types of vertices (each type transitive to the other). The family of all such congruently meshed polyhedra create a new class of meshed shapes, beyond the well-studied regular, semi-regular and quasi-regular classes, and their duals (platonic, Catalan and Johnson). While our new mesh class is infinite, we prove that there exists a unique mesh parametrization, where each member of the class can be represented by two integer lattice variables, and moreover efficiently constructable. PMID:27563368

  2. Particle Collection Efficiency for Nylon Mesh Screens

    PubMed Central

    Cena, Lorenzo G.; Ku, Bon-Ki; Peters, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Mesh screens composed of nylon fibers leave minimal residual ash and produce no significant spectral interference when ashed for spectrometric examination. These characteristics make nylon mesh screens attractive as a collection substrate for nanoparticles. A theoretical single-fiber efficiency expression developed for wire-mesh screens was evaluated for estimating the collection efficiency of submicrometer particles for nylon mesh screens. Pressure drop across the screens, the effect of particle morphology (spherical and highly fractal) on collection efficiency and single-fiber efficiency were evaluated experimentally for three pore sizes (60, 100 and 180 μm) at three flow rates (2.5, 4 and 6 Lpm). The pressure drop across the screens was found to increase linearly with superficial velocity. The collection efficiency of the screens was found to vary by less than 4% regardless of particle morphology. Single-fiber efficiency calculated from experimental data was in good agreement with that estimated from theory for particles between 40 and 150 nm but deviated from theory for particles outside this size range. New coefficients for the single-fiber efficiency model were identified that minimized the sum of square error (SSE) between the values estimated with the model and those determined experimentally. Compared to the original theory, the SSE calculated using the modified theory was at least one order of magnitude lower for all screens and flow rates with the exception of the 60-μm pore screens at 2.5 Lpm, where the decrease was threefold. PMID:26692631

  3. Stainless steel mesh-acrylic cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Tysvaer, A T; Hovind, K H

    1977-03-01

    Twenty-four steel mesh-acrylic plates have been used for repair of skull defects in 1970-73. Three plates had to be removed due to complications, two due to infection and one due to an allergic reaction. The plate is easy to mould, strong, and light. The cosmetic results are excellent.

  4. Functionalized Nanofiber Meshes Enhance Immunosorbent Assays.

    PubMed

    Hersey, Joseph S; Meller, Amit; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional substrates with high surface-to-volume ratios and subsequently large protein binding capacities are of interest for advanced immunosorbent assays utilizing integrated microfluidics and nanosensing elements. A library of bioactive and antifouling electrospun nanofiber substrates, which are composed of high-molecular-weight poly(oxanorbornene) derivatives, is described. Specifically, a set of copolymers are synthesized from three 7-oxanorbornene monomers to create a set of water insoluble copolymers with both biotin (bioactive) and triethylene glycol (TEG) (antifouling) functionality. Porous three-dimensional nanofiber meshes are electrospun from these copolymers with the ability to specifically bind streptavidin while minimizing the nonspecific binding of other proteins. Fluorescently labeled streptavidin is used to quantify the streptavidin binding capacity of each mesh type through confocal microscopy. A simplified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is presented to assess the protein binding capabilities and detection limits of these nanofiber meshes under both static conditions (26 h) and flow conditions (1 h) for a model target protein (i.e., mouse IgG) using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) colorimetric assay. Bioactive and antifouling nanofiber meshes outperform traditional streptavidin-coated polystyrene plates under flow, validating their use in future advanced immunosorbent assays and their compatibility with microfluidic-based biosensors.

  5. Hash functions and triangular mesh reconstruction*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrádek, Jan; Kuchař, Martin; Skala, Václav

    2003-07-01

    Some applications use data formats (e.g. STL file format), where a set of triangles is used to represent the surface of a 3D object and it is necessary to reconstruct the triangular mesh with adjacency information. It is a lengthy process for large data sets as the time complexity of this process is O( N log N), where N is number of triangles. Triangular mesh reconstruction is a general problem and relevant algorithms can be used in GIS and DTM systems as well as in CAD/CAM systems. Many algorithms rely on space subdivision techniques while hash functions offer a more effective solution to the reconstruction problem. Hash data structures are widely used throughout the field of computer science. The hash table can be used to speed up the process of triangular mesh reconstruction but the speed strongly depends on hash function properties. Nevertheless the design or selection of the hash function for data sets with unknown properties is a serious problem. This paper describes a new hash function, presents the properties obtained for large data sets, and discusses validity of the reconstructed surface. Experimental results proved theoretical considerations and advantages of hash function use for mesh reconstruction.

  6. Constrained and joint inversion on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doetsch, J.; Jordi, C.; Rieckh, V.; Guenther, T.; Schmelzbach, C.

    2015-12-01

    Unstructured meshes allow for inclusion of arbitrary surface topography, complex acquisition geometry and undulating geological interfaces in the inversion of geophysical data. This flexibility opens new opportunities for coupling different geophysical and hydrological data sets in constrained and joint inversions. For example, incorporating geological interfaces that have been derived from high-resolution geophysical data (e.g., ground penetrating radar) can add geological constraints to inversions of electrical resistivity data. These constraints can be critical for a hydrogeological interpretation of the inversion results. For time-lapse inversions of geophysical data, constraints can be derived from hydrological point measurements in boreholes, but it is difficult to include these hard constraints in the inversion of electrical resistivity monitoring data. Especially mesh density and the regularization footprint around the hydrological point measurements are important for an improved inversion compared to the unconstrained case. With the help of synthetic and field examples, we analyze how regularization and coupling operators should be chosen for time-lapse inversions constrained by point measurements and for joint inversions of geophysical data in order to take full advantage of the flexibility of unstructured meshes. For the case of constraining to point measurements, it is important to choose a regularization operator that extends beyond the neighboring cells and the uncertainty in the point measurements needs to be accounted for. For joint inversion, the choice of the regularization depends on the expected subsurface heterogeneity and the cell size of the parameter mesh.

  7. Details of tetrahedral anisotropic mesh adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kristian Ejlebjerg; Gorman, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    We have implemented tetrahedral anisotropic mesh adaptation using the local operations of coarsening, swapping, refinement and smoothing in MATLAB without the use of any for- N loops, i.e. the script is fully vectorised. In the process of doing so, we have made three observations related to details of the implementation: 1. restricting refinement to a single edge split per element not only simplifies the code, it also improves mesh quality, 2. face to edge swapping is unnecessary, and 3. optimising for the Vassilevski functional tends to give a little higher value for the mean condition number functional than optimising for the condition number functional directly. These observations have been made for a uniform and a radial shock metric field, both starting from a structured mesh in a cube. Finally, we compare two coarsening techniques and demonstrate the importance of applying smoothing in the mesh adaptation loop. The results pertain to a unit cube geometry, but we also show the effect of corners and edges by applying the implementation in a spherical geometry.

  8. The Factory Approach to Creating TSTT Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, T

    2003-10-21

    The factory approach (a.k.a. virtual constructor) hides the details of the class implementing the TSTT from TSTT users. In version 0.5 of TSTT.sidl, the client hard codes the name of the implementing class into their code. The client is forced to choose from the small set of possible concrete classes defined in TSTT.sidl. This approach makes it impossible to support multiple implementations of the TSTT in a single process because each implementation has to implement the same class. The factory approach hides the details of mesh creation from the client. The client does not need to know the name of the implementing class, and the client can dynamically determine which interfaces are supported by the new mesh. A factory can support multiple TSTT implementation because each implementation defines its own concrete classes to implement. The factory approach does require the TSTT compliant mesh packages to implement a MeshFactory interface, and everyone needs to link against an implementation of the Registry. The Registry only has 7 methods that are fairly easy to implement, and everyone can share one implementation of the Registry.

  9. Oxidation and degradation of polypropylene transvaginal mesh.

    PubMed

    Talley, Anne D; Rogers, Bridget R; Iakovlev, Vladimir; Dunn, Russell F; Guelcher, Scott A

    2017-04-01

    Polypropylene (PP) transvaginal mesh (TVM) repair for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) has shown promising short-term objective cure rates. However, life-altering complications have been associated with the placement of PP mesh for SUI repair. PP degradation as a result of the foreign body reaction (FBR) has been proposed as a contributing factor to mesh complications. We hypothesized that PP oxidizes under in vitro conditions simulating the FBR, resulting in degradation of the PP. Three PP mid-urethral slings from two commercial manufacturers were evaluated. Test specimens (n = 6) were incubated in oxidative medium for up to 5 weeks. Oxidation was assessed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and degradation was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). FTIR spectra of the slings revealed evidence of carbonyl and hydroxyl peaks after 5 weeks of incubation time, providing evidence of oxidation of PP. SEM images at 5 weeks showed evidence of surface degradation, including pitting and flaking. Thus, oxidation and degradation of PP pelvic mesh were evidenced by chemical and physical changes under simulated in vivo conditions. To assess changes in PP surface chemistry in vivo, fibers were recovered from PP mesh explanted from a single patient without formalin fixation, untreated (n = 5) or scraped (n = 5) to remove tissue, and analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Mechanical scraping removed adherent tissue, revealing an underlying layer of oxidized PP. These findings underscore the need for further research into the relative contribution of oxidative degradation to complications associated with PP-based TVM devices in larger cohorts of patients.

  10. [The "ideal" mesh--more than a mosquito net].

    PubMed

    Klinge, U; Klink, C D; Klosterhalfen, B

    2010-04-01

    Modern meshes permit a radical treatment of hernias, an expectation that Billroth articulated already more than 100 years ago. Because clinical trials are insufficient to evaluate the distinct effects of modified mesh materials in regard to tissue biocompatibility and functionality, a basic understanding of the physico-chemical properties is essential for a rational selection of the most appropriate device. Experimental data indicate that particularly the mesh's porosity is of outstanding importance, resulting from the demanded tensile strength as well as the employed fibre material. Considering that different operation techniques require different mesh materials, specific requirements are discussed using the example of intraabdominal meshes, of parastomal meshes, of meshes in areas with bacterial contamination and of meshes in the hiatus region. Considering the late manifestation of some complications even after many years, any thorough quality control should include an assessment of explanted implant failures in addition to clinical experience.

  11. On Adaptive Mesh Generation in Two-Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    D'Azevedo, E.

    1999-10-11

    This work considers the effectiveness of using anisotropic coordinate transformation in adaptive mesh generation. The anisotropic coordinate transformation is derived by interpreting the Hessian matrix of the data function as a metric tensor that measures the local approximation error. The Hessian matrix contains information about the local curvature of the surface and gives guidance in the aspect ratio and orientation for mesh generation. Since theoretically, an asymptotically optimally efficient mesh can be produced by transforming a regular mesh of optimal shape elements, it would be interesting to compare this approach with existing techniques in solution adaptive meshes. PLTMG , a general elliptic solver, is used to generate solution adapted triangular meshes for comparison. The solver has the capability of performing a posteriori error estimates in performing longest edge refinement, vertex unrefinement and mesh smoothing. Numerical experiments on three simple problems suggest the methodology employed in PLTMG is effective in generating near optimally efficient meshes.

  12. CUBIT mesh generation environment. Volume 1: Users manual

    SciTech Connect

    Blacker, T.D.; Bohnhoff, W.J.; Edwards, T.L.

    1994-05-01

    The CUBIT mesh generation environment is a two- and three-dimensional finite element mesh generation tool which is being developed to pursue the goal of robust and unattended mesh generation--effectively automating the generation of quadrilateral and hexahedral elements. It is a solid-modeler based preprocessor that meshes volume and surface solid models for finite element analysis. A combination of techniques including paving, mapping, sweeping, and various other algorithms being developed are available for discretizing the geometry into a finite element mesh. CUBIT also features boundary layer meshing specifically designed for fluid flow problems. Boundary conditions can be applied to the mesh through the geometry and appropriate files for analysis generated. CUBIT is specifically designed to reduce the time required to create all-quadrilateral and all-hexahedral meshes. This manual is designed to serve as a reference and guide to creating finite element models in the CUBIT environment.

  13. Cartesian-cell based grid generation and adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Cartesian-cell based grid generation and adaptive mesh refinement are presented. Topics covered include: grid generation; cell cutting; data structures; flow solver formulation; adaptive mesh refinement; and viscous flow.

  14. Conjugation of gold nanoparticles to polypropylene mesh for enhanced biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Grant, D N; Benson, J; Cozad, M J; Whelove, O E; Bachman, S L; Ramshaw, B J; Grant, D A; Grant, S A

    2011-12-01

    Polypropylene mesh materials have been utilized in hernia surgery for over 40 years. However, they are prone to degradation due to the body's aggressive foreign body reaction, which may cause pain or complications, forcing mesh removal from the patient. To mitigate these complications, gold nanomaterials were attached to polypropylene mesh in order to improve cellular response. Pristine samples of polypropylene mesh were exposed to hydrogen peroxide/cobalt chloride solutions to induce formation of surface carboxyl functional groups. Gold nanoparticles were covalently linked to the mesh. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the presence of gold nanoparticles. Differential scanning calorimetry and mechanical testing confirmed that the polypropylene did not undergo any significantly detrimental changes in physicochemical properties. A WST-1 cell culture study showed an increase in cellularity on the gold nanoparticle-polypropylene mesh as compared to pristine mesh. This study showed that biocompatibility of polypropylene mesh may be improved via the conjugation of gold nanoparticles.

  15. To mesh or not to mesh: a review of pelvic organ reconstructive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dällenbach, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a major health issue with a lifetime risk of undergoing at least one surgical intervention estimated at close to 10%. In the 1990s, the risk of reoperation after primary standard vaginal procedure was estimated to be as high as 30% to 50%. In order to reduce the risk of relapse, gynecological surgeons started to use mesh implants in pelvic organ reconstructive surgery with the emergence of new complications. Recent studies have nevertheless shown that the risk of POP recurrence requiring reoperation is lower than previously estimated, being closer to 10% rather than 30%. The development of mesh surgery – actively promoted by the marketing industry – was tremendous during the past decade, and preceded any studies supporting its benefit for our patients. Randomized trials comparing the use of mesh to native tissue repair in POP surgery have now shown better anatomical but similar functional outcomes, and meshes are associated with more complications, in particular for transvaginal mesh implants. POP is not a life-threatening condition, but a functional problem that impairs quality of life for women. The old adage “primum non nocere” is particularly appropriate when dealing with this condition which requires no treatment when asymptomatic. It is currently admitted that a certain degree of POP is physiological with aging when situated above the landmark of the hymen. Treatment should be individualized and the use of mesh needs to be selective and appropriate. Mesh implants are probably an important tool in pelvic reconstructive surgery, but the ideal implant has yet to be found. The indications for its use still require caution and discernment. This review explores the reasons behind the introduction of mesh augmentation in POP surgery, and aims to clarify the risks, benefits, and the recognized indications for its use. PMID:25848324

  16. Laser ranging retro-reflector: continuing measurements and expected results.

    PubMed

    Alley, C O; Chang, R F; Currie, D G; Poultney, S K; Bender, P L; Dicke, R H; Wilkinson, D T; Faller, J E; Kaula, W M; Macdonald, G J; Mulholland, J D; Plotkin, H H; Carrion, W; Wampler, E J

    1970-01-30

    After successful acquisition in August of reflected ruby laser pulses from the Apollo 11 laser ranging retro-reflector (LRRR) with the telescopes at the Lick and McDonald observatories, repeated measurements of the round-trip travel time of light have been made from the McDonald Observatory in September with an equivalent range precision of +/-2.5 meters. These acquisition period observations demonstrated the performance of the LRRR through lunar night and during sunlit conditions on the moon. Instrumentation activated at the McDonald Observatory in October has yielded a precision of +/-0.3 meter, and improvement to +/-0.15 meter is expected shortly. Continued monitoring of the changes in the earth-moon distance as measured by the round-trip travel time of light from suitably distributed earth stations is expected to contribute to our knowledge of the earth-moon system.

  17. Photoacoustic imaging using acoustic reflectors to enhance planar arrays.

    PubMed

    Ellwood, Robert; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul; Cox, Ben

    2014-12-01

    Planar sensor arrays have advantages when used for photoacoustic imaging: they do not require the imaging target to be enclosed, and they are easier to manufacture than curved arrays. However, planar arrays have a limited view of the acoustic field due to their finite size; therefore, not all of the acoustic waves emitted from a photoacoustic source can be recorded. This loss of data results in artifacts in the reconstructed photoacoustic image. A detection array configuration which combines a planar Fabry–Pérot sensor with perpendicular acoustic reflectors is described and experimentally implemented. This retains the detection advantages of the planar sensor while increasing the effective detection aperture in order to improve the reconstructed photoacoustic image.

  18. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) Requirements for Space Station Accommodations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, D. A.; Clayton, M. J.; Runge, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    Top level requirements for assembly and integration of the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) Observatory at the Space Station are examined. Concepts are currently under study for LDR which will provide a sequel to the Infrared Astronomy Satellite and the Space Infrared Telescope Facility. LDR will provide a spectacular capability over a very broad spectral range. The Space Station will provide an essential facility for the initial assembly and check out of LDR, as well as a necessary base for refurbishment, repair and modification. By providing a manned platform, the Space Station will remove the time constraint on assembly associated with use of the Shuttle alone. Personnel safety during necessary EVA is enhanced by the presence of the manned facility.

  19. Large Phased Array Radar Using Networked Small Parabolic Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amoozegar, Farid

    2006-01-01

    Multifunction phased array systems with radar, telecom, and imaging applications have already been established for flat plate phased arrays of dipoles, or waveguides. In this paper the design trades and candidate options for combining the radar and telecom functions of the Deep Space Network (DSN) into a single large transmit array of small parabolic reflectors will be discussed. In particular the effect of combing the radar and telecom functions on the sizes of individual antenna apertures and the corresponding spacing between the antenna elements of the array will be analyzed. A heterogeneous architecture for the DSN large transmit array is proposed to meet the radar and telecom requirements while considering the budget, scheduling, and strategic planning constrains.

  20. Array feed/reflector antenna design for intense microwave beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, Stephen J.

    1990-04-01

    It is shown that a planar-array feed has excellent potential as a solution to paraboloidal reflector distortion problems and beam-steering requirements. Numerical results from an algorithmic procedure are presented which show that, for a range of distortion models, appreciable on-axis gain restoration can be achieved with as few as seven elements. For beam-steering to + or - 1 MW, 19 elements are required. For arrays with either seven or 19 elements, high effective aperture elements give higher system gain than elements having lower effective apertures. With 37 elements, excellent gain and beam-steering performance to + or - 1.5 BW is obtained independently of assumed effective aperture of the array element. A few simple rules of thumb are presented for the design of the planar-array feed configuration.