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Sample records for 6-mv laser triggered

  1. Fundamental science investigations to develop a 6-MV laser triggered gas switch for ZR: first annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Van Den Avyle, James A.; Lehr, Jane Marie; Rose, David; Krompholz, Hermann G.; Vela, Russell; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Timoshkin, Igor (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland); Woodworth, Joseph Ray; Prestwich, Kenneth Randel (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Krile, John; Given, Martin (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland); McKee, G. Randall; Rosenthal, Stephen Edgar; Struve, Kenneth William; Welch, Dale Robert (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Benwell, Andrew L. (University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri); Kovaleski, Scott; LeChien, Keith, R.; Johnson, David (Titan Pulse Sciences Division); Fouracre, R.A. (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland); Yeckel, Chris (University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri); Wakeland, Peter Eric; Miller, A. R. (Titan Pulse Sciences Division); Hodge, Keith Conquest (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Pasik, Michael Francis; Savage, Mark Edward; Maenchen, John Eric; Curry, Randy D.; Feltz, Greg; Bliss, David Emery; MacGregor, Scott (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland); Corley, J. P. (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Anaya, Victor (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Wallace, Zachariah (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Thoma, Carsten (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Neuber, Andreas. (Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX)

    2007-03-01

    In October 2005, an intensive three-year Laser Triggered Gas Switch (LTGS) development program was initiated to investigate and solve observed performance and reliability issues with the LTGS for ZR. The approach taken has been one of mission-focused research: to revisit and reassess the design, to establish a fundamental understanding of LTGS operation and failure modes, and to test evolving operational hypotheses. This effort is aimed toward deploying an initial switch for ZR in 2007, on supporting rolling upgrades to ZR as the technology can be developed, and to prepare with scientific understanding for the even higher voltage switches anticipated needed for future high-yield accelerators. The ZR LTGS was identified as a potential area of concern quite early, but since initial assessments performed on a simplified Switch Test Bed (STB) at 5 MV showed 300-shot lifetimes on multiple switch builds, this component was judged acceptable. When the Z{sub 20} engineering module was brought online in October 2003 frequent flashovers of the plastic switch envelope were observed at the increased stresses required to compensate for the programmatically increased ZR load inductance. As of October 2006, there have been 1423 Z{sub 20} shots assessing a variety of LTGS designs. Numerous incremental and fundamental switch design modifications have been investigated. As we continue to investigate the LTGS, the basic science of plastic surface tracking, laser triggering, cascade breakdown, and optics degradation remain high-priority mission-focused research topics. Significant progress has been made and, while the switch does not yet achieve design requirements, we are on the path to develop successively better switches for rolling upgrade improvements to ZR. This report summarizes the work performed in FY 2006 by the large team. A high-level summary is followed by detailed individual topical reports.

  2. Laser-triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Brannon, Paul J.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    A laser-triggered vacuum switch has a material such as a alkali metal halide on the cathode electrode for thermally activated field emission of electrons and ions upon interaction with a laser beam, the material being in contact with the cathode with a surface facing the discharge gap. The material is preferably a mixture of KCl and Ti powders. The laser may either shine directly on the material, preferably through a hole in the anode, or be directed to the material over a fiber optic cable.

  3. XI UV Laser Trigger System

    SciTech Connect

    Brickeen, B.K.; Morelli, G.L.; Paiva, R.A.; Powell, C.A.; Sundvold, P.D.

    1999-01-26

    The X1 accelerator project at Sandia National Laboratory/New Mexico utilizes SF6 insulated, multi-stage, UV laser triggered gas switches. A 265 nm UV laser system was designed and built to generate eight simultaneous output pulses of 10 mJ each with a 13 nsec pulse width. A 1061 nm solid-state Nd:Cr:GSGG laser was frequency quadrupled using a two-stage doubling process. The 1061 nm fundamental laser energy was frequency doubled with a KTP crystal to 530 nm, achieving 65% conversion efficiency. The 530 nm output was frequency doubled with KD*P crystal to 265 nm, achieving conversion efficiency of 31%. The 265 nm beam pulse was split into eight parallel channels with a system of partially reflecting mirrors. Low timing jitter and stable energy output were achieved. The entire optical system was packaged into a rugged, o-ring sealed, aluminum structure 10''x19''x2.75''. The size of the electronics was 12''x8''x8''. Subsequent accelerator system requirements dictated a redesign of the triggering system for an output beam with less angular divergence. An unstable, crossed porro prism resonator was designed and incorporated into the system. The beam divergence of the redesigned system was successfully decreased to 0.97 mrad in the UV. The resulting frequency doubling efficiencies were 55% to 530 nm and 25% to 265 nm. The optical output remained at 10 mJ in each channel with an 11 nsec pulse width.

  4. Photon spectral characteristics of dissimilar 6 MV linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Hinson, William H; Kearns, William T; deGuzman, Allan F; Bourland, J Daniel

    2008-05-01

    This work measures and compares the energy spectra of four dosimetrically matched 6 MV beams, generated from four physically different linear accelerators. The goal of this work is twofold. First, this study determines whether the spectra of dosimetrically matched beams are measurably different. This study also demonstrates that the spectra of clinical photon beams can be measured as a part of the beam data collection process for input to a three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning system. The spectra of 6 MV beams that are dosimetrically matched for clinical use were studied to determine if the beam spectra are similarly matched. Each of the four accelerators examined had a standing waveguide, but with different physical designs. The four accelerators were two Varian 2100C/Ds (one 6 MV/18 MV waveguide and one 6 MV/10 MV waveguide), one Varian 600 C with a vertically mounted waveguide and no bending magnet, and one Siemens MD 6740 with a 6 MV/10 MV waveguide. All four accelerators had percent depth dose curves for the 6 MV beam that were matched within 1.3%. Beam spectra were determined from narrow beam transmission measurements through successive thicknesses of pure aluminum along the central axis of the accelerator, made with a graphite Farmer ion chamber with a Lucite buildup cap. An iterative nonlinear fit using a Marquardt algorithm was used to find each spectrum. Reconstructed spectra show that all four beams have similar energy distributions with only subtle differences, despite the differences in accelerator design. The measured spectra of different 6 MV beams are similar regardless of accelerator design. The measured spectra show excellent agreement with those found by the auto-modeling algorithm in a commercial 3D treatment planning system that uses a convolution dose calculation algorithm. Thus, beam spectra can be acquired in a clinical setting at the time of commissioning as a part of the routine beam data collection.

  5. Laser triggering of water switches in terrawatt-class pulse power accelerators.

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, Joseph Ray; Johnson, David Lee (Titan Pulse Sciences, San Leandro, CA); Wilkins, Frank (Bechtel Nevada, Las Vegas, NV); Van De Valde, David (EG&G Technical Services, Albuquerque, NM); Sarkisov, Gennady Sergeevich; Zameroski, Nathan D.; Starbird, Robert L.

    2005-12-01

    Focused Beams from high-power lasers have been used to command trigger gas switches in pulse power accelerators for more than two decades. This Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project was aimed at determining whether high power lasers could also command trigger water switches on high-power accelerators. In initial work, we determined that focused light from three harmonics of a small pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm, 532 nm, and 355 nm could be used to form breakdown arcs in water, with the lowest breakdown thresholds of 110 J/cm{sup 2} or 14 GW/cm{sup 2} at 532 nm in the green. In laboratory-scale laser triggering experiments with a 170-kV pulse-charged water switch with a 3-mm anode-cathode gap, we demonstrated that {approx}90 mJ of green laser energy could trigger the gap with a 1-{sigma} jitter of less than 2ns, a factor of 10 improvement over the jitter of the switch in its self breaking mode. In the laboratory-scale experiments we developed optical techniques utilizing polarization rotation of a probe laser beam to measure current in switch channels and electric field enhancements near streamer heads. In the final year of the project, we constructed a pulse-power facility to allow us to test laser triggering of water switches from 0.6- MV to 2.0 MV. Triggering experiments on this facility using an axicon lens for focusing the laser and a switch with a 740 kV self-break voltage produced consistent laser triggering with a {+-} 16-ns 1-{sigma} jitter, a significant improvement over the {+-} 24-ns jitter in the self-breaking mode.

  6. Photoconductive semiconductor switches: Laser Q-switch trigger and switch-trigger laser integration

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Mar, A.; Hamil, R.A.; Zutavern, F.J.; Helgeson, W.D.

    1997-12-01

    This report provides a summary of the Pulser In a Chip 9000-Discretionary LDRD. The program began in January of 1997 and concluded in September of 1997. The over-arching goal of this LDRD is to study whether laser diode triggered photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) can be used to activate electro-optic devices such as Q-switches and Pockels cells and to study possible laser diode/switch integration. The PCSS switches we used were high gain GaAs switches because they can be triggered with small amounts of laser light. The specific goals of the LDRD were to demonstrate: (1) that small laser diode arrays that are potential candidates for laser-switch integration will indeed trigger the PCSS switch, and (2) that high gain GaAs switches can be used to trigger optical Q-switches in lasers such as the lasers to be used in the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source and the laser used for direct optical initiation (DOI) of explosives. The technology developed with this LDRD is now the prime candidate for triggering the Q switch in the multiple lasers in the laser trigger system of the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source and may be utilized in other accelerators. As part of the LDRD we developed a commercial supplier. To study laser/switch integration we tested triggering the high gain GaAs switches with: edge emitting laser diodes, vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), and transverse junction stripe (TJS) lasers. The first two types of lasers (edge emitting and VCSELs) did activate the PCSS but are harder to integrate with the PCSS for a compact package. The US lasers, while easier to integrate with the switch, did not trigger the PCSS at the US laser power levels we used. The PCSS was used to activate the Q-switch of the compact laser to be used in the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source.

  7. Spectral reconstruction for a 6 MV linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Bojórquez, M.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.; Lárraga, J. M.

    2004-09-01

    In this work we present the first results of an x-ray spectral reconstruction for a 6 MV Varian LINAC. The shape of the spectrum will be used in Monte Carlo treatment planning in order to improve the quality and accuracy of the calculated dose distributions. We based our simulation method on the formalism proposed by Francois et al. (1). In this method the spectrum is reconstructed from transmission measurements under narrow beam geometry for multiple attenuator thicknesses. These data allowed us to reconstruct the x-ray spectrum through direct solution of matrix systems using spectral algebra formalism.

  8. Design and experiment studies of a 2.6-MV diverter system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yixiang; Zeng, Jiangtao; Jiang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Zhiguo; Liang, Tianxue; Qiu, Ai'ci

    2017-01-01

    Malfunctions of the Marx pre-fire or in the event that the main switch does not close were analyzed. Principles of the diverter system for protection of those events were introduced in detail. A 2.6 MV diverter system, consisting of an oil trigger switch and a Marx-coupled trigger generator, was developed. Based on "JianGuang-I" facility, a diverter-system test stand was established. And experiments with 2.3-MV working voltages were carried out to study the performance of this diverter system. Experiment results show that the time delay of this diverter system (from the beginning of the Marx erection to the time that the diverter-switch closes) is about 320 ns and its jitter (standard deviation) is about 8.9 ns. This diverter system has been tested more than 180 shots, and no problem has been encountered yet.

  9. Design and experiment studies of a 2.6-MV diverter system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yixiang; Zeng, Jiangtao; Jiang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Zhiguo; Liang, Tianxue; Qiu, Ai'ci

    2017-01-01

    Malfunctions of the Marx pre-fire or in the event that the main switch does not close were analyzed. Principles of the diverter system for protection of those events were introduced in detail. A 2.6 MV diverter system, consisting of an oil trigger switch and a Marx-coupled trigger generator, was developed. Based on "JianGuang-I" facility, a diverter-system test stand was established. And experiments with 2.3-MV working voltages were carried out to study the performance of this diverter system. Experiment results show that the time delay of this diverter system (from the beginning of the Marx erection to the time that the diverter-switch closes) is about 320 ns and its jitter (standard deviation) is about 8.9 ns. This diverter system has been tested more than 180 shots, and no problem has been encountered yet.

  10. Laser Trigger For High Speed Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Rong-Seng; Lin, Chin-Wu; Cheng, Tung

    1987-09-01

    High speed camera coorperated with laser trigger to catch high speed unpredictable events has many applications: such as scoring system for the end game of missile interception, war head explosive study etc. When the event happening in a very short duration, the repetition rate of the laser ranging must be as high as 5K herze and the pulse duration should be less than 10 nsec. In some environment, like inside the aircraft, the abailable space for high speed camera to set up is limited, large film capacity camera could not be used. In order to use the small capacity film, the exact trigger time for the camera are especially important. The target velocity, camera acceleration characteristics, speed regulation, camera size, weight and the ruggedness are all be considered before the laser trigger be designed. Electric temporal gate is used to measure the time of flight ranging datum. The triangular distance measurement principle are also used to get the ranging when the base line i.e. the distance between the laser transmitter and receiver are large enough.

  11. Pulsed laser triggered high speed microfluidic switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Gao, Lanyu; Chen, Yue; Wei, Kenneth; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2008-10-01

    We report a high-speed microfluidic switch capable of achieving a switching time of 10 μs. The switching mechanism is realized by exciting dynamic vapor bubbles with focused laser pulses in a microfluidic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel. The bubble expansion deforms the elastic PDMS channel wall and squeezes the adjacent sample channel to control its fluid and particle flows as captured by the time-resolved imaging system. A switching of polystyrene microspheres in a Y-shaped channel has also been demonstrated. This ultrafast laser triggered switching mechanism has the potential to advance the sorting speed of state-of-the-art microscale fluorescence activated cell sorting devices.

  12. SU-E-T-221: Investigation of Lower Energy (< 6 MV) Photon Beams for Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Ming, X; Feng, Y; Zhou, L; Ahmad, M; Deng, J; Nguyen, K; Griffin, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the potential applications of the lower energy (< 6MV) photon beams in the radiotherapeutic management of pediatric cancer and lung cancer patients. Methods: Photon beams of 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6MV were first simulated with EGS4/BEAM and then used for Monte-Carlo dose calculations. For four pediatric patients with abdominal and brain lesions, six 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) plans were generated using single photon energy (2 to 6MV) or mixed energies (3 and 6MV). Furthermore, a virtual machine of 3 and 6MV was commissioned in a treatment planning system (TPS) based on Monte-Carlo simulated data. Three IMRT plans of a lung cancer patient were generated on this virtual machine. All plans were normalized to D95% of target dose for 6MV plan and then compared in terms of integral dose and OAR sparing. Results: For the four pediatric patients, the integral dose for the 2, 3, 4 and 5MV plans increased by 9%, 5%, 3.5%, 1.7%, respectively as compared to 6MV. Almost all OARs in the 2MV plan received more than 10% more doses than 6MV. Mixed energy 3DCRT plans were of the same quality as 6MV plans. For the lung IMRT plans, both the 3MV plan and the mixed beam plan showed better OAR sparing in comparison to 6MV plan. Specifically, the maximum and mean doses to the spinal cord in the mixed energy plan were lower by 21% and 16%, respectively. Conclusion: Single lower energy photon beam was found to be inferior to 6MV in the radiotherapy of pediatric patients and lung cancer patients when the integral doses and the doses to the OARs were considered. However, mixed energy plans combining low with high energy beams showed significant OAR sparing while maintaining the same PTV coverage. Investigation with more patient data is ongoing for further confirmation.

  13. SIRIUS - A new 6 MV accelerator system for IBA and AMS at ANSTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuovic, Zeljko; Button, David; Cohen, David; Fink, David; Garton, David; Hotchkis, Michael; Ionescu, Mihail; Long, Shane; Levchenko, Vladimir; Mann, Michael; Siegele, Rainer; Smith, Andrew; Wilcken, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    The Centre for Accelerator Science (CAS) facility at ANSTO has been expanded with a new 6 MV tandem accelerator system supplied by the National Electrostatic Corporation (NEC). The beamlines, end-stations and data acquisition software for the accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) were custom built by NEC for rare isotope mass spectrometry, while the beamlines with end-stations for the ion beam analysis (IBA) are largely custom designed at ANSTO. An overview of the 6 MV system and its performance during testing and commissioning phase is given with emphasis on the IBA end-stations and their applications for materials modification and characterisation.

  14. SU-E-T-308: Dosimetric Comparison of SBRT VMAT Treatment Plans Generated for 6 MV, 6 MV FFF, and 10 MV FFF Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D; Wang, B; Dunlap, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess differences in treatment plan quality between VMAT stereotactic body plans generated using the 6 MV, 6 MV FFF, and 10 MV FFF modalities available in our clinic. Plans for lung, spine, and other sites were compared to see if there is any advantage of one modality over the other. Methods: Treatment plans done for actual SBRT patients were selected. Groups of ten lung plans, five spine plans, and five plans from other sites were selected. New treatment plans were generated for each plan using the Varian Eclipse AAA algorithm. The constraints were kept the same as used in the actual plans, but the same version of software was used to generate plans for the three modalities. In addition, because there are natural variations in plans re-done with the same dose constraints, one of the lung plans was repeated ten times to assess those differences. Volumes of the 100%, 90%, 50%, 20% and 10% isodose surfaces were compared. Maximum dose two centimeters from the PTV were compared, as well as the volume of the 105% isodose surface outside of the PTV. In addition, the 20 Gray lung volume was compared for the lung plans. The values of these parameters were divided by the values for the 6 MV plans for comparison. Average and standard deviations were obtained for quantities in each group. The Student t test was done to determine if differences were seen at the 95% confidence level. Results: Comparison of the treatment plans showed no significant differences when assessing these volumes and doses. There were not any trends seen when comparing modalities as a function of PTV volume either. Conclusion: There is no obvious dosimetric advantage in selection of one modality over another for these types of SBRT plans.

  15. Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in A549 Cells Exposed to 6 MV X-rays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuning; Xu, Jing; Shao, Weixian; Geng, Chong; Li, Jia; Guo, Feng; Miao, Hui; Shen, Wenbin; Ye, Tao; Liu, Yazhou; Xu, Haiting; Zhang, Xuguang

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study is to explore the bystander effects in A549 cells that have been exposed to 6MV X-ray. Control group, irradiated group, irradiated conditioned medium (ICM)-received group, and fresh medium group were designed in this study. A549 cells in the logarithmic growth phase were irradiated with 6MV X-ray at 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2. In ICM-received group, post-irradiation A549 cells were cultured for 3 h and were transferred into non-irradiated A549 cells for further cultivation. Clone forming test was applied to detect the survival fraction of cells. Annexin V-FITC/PI double-staining assay was used to detect the apoptosis of A549 cells 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after 2-Gy 6MV X-ray irradiation, and the curves of apoptosis were drawn. The changes in the cell cycles 4, 48, 72, and 96 h after 2-Gy 6MV X-ray irradiation were detected using PI staining flow cytometry. With the increase of irradiation dose, the survival fraction of A549 cells after the application of 0.5 Gy irradiation was decreasing continuously. In comparison to the control group, the apoptosis rate of the ICM-received group was increased in a time-dependent pattern, with the highest apoptosis rate observed at 72 h (p < 0.05). Cell count in G2/M stages was obviously increased compared with that of the control group (p < 0.05), with the highest count observed at 72 h, after which G2/M stage arrest was diminished. ICM can cause apparent A549 cell damage, indicating that 6MV X-ray irradiation can induce bystander effect on A549 cells, which reaches a peak at 72 h.

  16. Model experiments of laser-triggered lightning

    SciTech Connect

    Shindo, Takatoshi; Aihara, Yoshinori; Miki, Megumu; Suzuki, Toshio )

    1993-01-01

    Experiments to guide electric discharges with a chain of apparently discrete air-breakdown plasmas (plasma channel) produced by a laser were carried out. The electric discharge was guided up to 2m with a high power CO[sub 2] laser focused by a 10-m focal length mirror. Voltage was applied at selected delay times [tau] following laser radiation. The relations between 50% flashover voltage of a gap filled with laser-produced plasmas and delay times [tau], between the guided length and the peak of the applied voltage, were obtained experimentally. The effects of the polarity of an applied voltage and the position of the plasma channel on flashover voltage are described. Development characteristics of the guided discharge were also investigated.

  17. Sensitivity of alanine dosimeters with gadolinium exposed to 6 MV photons at clinical doses.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Longo, A; Spanò, M; Bartolotta, A; D'Oca, M C; Brai, M

    2011-12-01

    In this study we analyzed the ESR signal of alanine dosimeters with gadolinium exposed to 6 MV linear accelerator photons. We observed that the addition of gadolinium brings about an improvement in the sensitivity to photons because of its high atomic number. The experimental data indicated that the addition of gadolinium increases the sensitivity of the alanine to 6 MV photons. This enhancement was better observed at high gadolinium concentrations for which the tissue equivalence is heavily reduced. However, information about the irradiation setup and of the radiation beam features allows one to correct for this difference. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to obtain information on the expected effect of the addition of gadolinium on the dose absorbed by the alanine molecules inside the pellets. These results are compared with the experimental values, and the agreement is discussed.

  18. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry on SIRIUS: New 6 MV spectrometer at ANSTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcken, K. M.; Fink, D.; Hotchkis, M. A. C.; Garton, D.; Button, D.; Mann, M.; Kitchen, R.; Hauser, T.; O'Connor, A.

    2017-09-01

    The Centre for Accelerator Science at ANSTO operates four tandem accelerator systems for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Ion Beam Analysis (IBA). The latest addition to the fleet is SIRIUS, a 6 MV combined IBA and AMS system. Following initial ion beam testing, conditioning and debugging software and hardware, SIRIUS is now commissioned. Details of the instrument design and performance data for 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl are presented.

  19. Novel 6MV X-ray photoneutron detection and dosimetry of medical accelerators.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, Mehdi; Hakimi, Amir

    2017-04-01

    Dosimetry of fast, epithermal and thermal photoneutrons in 6MV X-ray beams of two medical accelerators were studied by novel dosimetry methods. A Siemens ONCOR and an Elekta COMPACT medical accelerators were used. Fast, epithermal and thermal photoneutron dose equivalents in 10cm×10cm 6MV X-rays fields were determined in air and on surface of a polyethylene phantom in X and Y directions. Polycarbonate dosimeters as bare or with enriched (10)B convertors (with or without cadmium covers) were used applying a 50Hz-HV electrochemical etching method. Fast, epithermal and thermal photoneutron dose equivalents were efficiently determined respectively as ∼1145.8, ∼45.3 and ∼170.6μSv in air and ∼1888.5, ∼96.1 and ∼640.6μSv on phantom per 100Gy X-rays at the isocenter of Siemens ONCOR accelerator in air. The dose equivalent is maximum at the isocenter which decreases as distance from it increases reaching a constant level. Tissue-to-air ratios are constants up to 15cm from the isocenter. No photoneutrons was detected in the Elekta COMPACT accelerator. Fast, epithermal and thermal photoneutron dosimetry of 6MV X-rays were made by novel dosimetry methods in a Siemens ONCOR accelerator with sum dose equivalent per Gy of ∼0.0014% μSv with ∼0.21MeV mean energy at the isocenter; i.e. ∼150 times smaller than that of 18MV X-rays. This observation assures clinical safety of 6MV X-rays in particular in single-mode machines like Elekta COMPACT producing no photoneutrons due to no "beryllium exit window" in the head structure. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dosimetric comparison between 10MV-FFF and 6MV-FFF for lung SBRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durmus, I. F.; Atalay, E. D.

    2017-02-01

    Plans were prepared by using same non-coplanar fields and physical parameters in 6MV-FFF and 10MV-FFF energies for fourteen lung Stereotactic Body Radio Therapy (SBRT) patients. In two plans which have different energies, critic organ doses, PTV doses, quality of plans (Gradient Index (GI), Homogeneity Index (HI), Conformity Index (CI)) and Monitor Unit (MU) values were compared. Quality controls were performed with 2D-Array Iba MatriXX Evolution® dosimetry system for each plans. As a results, plan with 6MV-FFF energy give better results in terms of CI and GI values. In this way, when more conformal dose distributions were provided, there was a rapid dose decrease at out of target volume. Lower MU values were obtained in plans which was prepared with 10MV-FFF energy. In plan with 10MV-FFF energy lower MU values are obtained. Lower values in heart and spinal cord doses are founded and better results are obtained in Body and Ipsa-Lung V5, V10, V20 values with 6MV-FFF energies. When differences were very small in volume which were taken low dose (V5), these differences increased in volume which were taken high dose (V20). High dose rates can be reached by both two unfiltered energies and can be used in lung SBRT.

  1. Spectral differences in 6 MV beams with matched PDDs and the effect on chamber response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lye, J. E.; Butler, D. J.; Ramanathan, G.; Franich, R. D.

    2012-11-01

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) has installed an Elekta Synergy platform linac to establish a direct megavoltage primary standard calibration service, instead of relying on calibrations derived from 60Co. One of the 6 MV beams of the ARPANSA linac has been approximately matched to the Varian high energy platform 6 MV photon beam. The electron beam energy was adjusted to match the percentage depth dose (PDD) curve and TPR20,10. This work calculates the error introduced when using a calibration factor from this Elekta Synergy Platform linac on a Varian high-energy platform beam at 6 MV. Monte Carlo models of the Varian and matched Elekta accelerator accurately predict the measured PDDs and profiles, but show significantly different energy spectra, resulting mainly from differences in target thickness between the two accelerators. Monte Carlo modelling of the energy correction factor kQ of a secondary standard NE2561 chamber shows a difference of 0.4% between the Varian and the Varian-matched Elekta beams. Although small, this is a significant discrepancy for primary standard calibrations. Similar variations are expected for chambers of similar construction, and additional variations may occur with other linac manufacturers. The work has also investigated the design of a custom flattening filter to precisely match the energy spectrum of the Varian beam on the Elekta platform.

  2. Microwave Triggered Laser Ionization of Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadiee, Ehsan; Prasad, Sarita; Jerald Buchenauer, C.; Schamiloglu, Edl

    2012-10-01

    The goal of this work is to study the evolution and dynamics of plasma expansion when a high power microwave (HPM) pulse is overlapped in time and space on a very small, localized region of plasma formed by a high energy laser pulse. The pulsed Nd:YAG laser (8 ns, 600mJ, repetition rate 10 Hz) is focused to generate plasma filaments in air with electron density of 10^17/cm^3. When irradiated with a high power microwave pulse these electrons would gain enough kinetic energy and further escalate avalanche ionization of air due to elastic electron-neutral collisions thereby causing an increased volumetric discharge region. An X-band relativistic backward wave oscillator(RBWO) at the Pulsed Power,Beams and Microwaves laboratory at UNM is constructed as the microwave source. The RBWO produces a microwave pulse of maximum power 400 MW, frequency of 10.1 GHz, and energy of 6.8 Joules. Special care is being given to synchronize the RBWO and the pulsed laser system in order to achieve a high degree of spatial and temporal overlap. A photodiode and a microwave waveguide detector will be used to ensure the overlap. Also, a new shadowgraph technique with a nanosecond time resolution will be used to detect changes in the shock wave fronts when the HPM signal overlaps the laser pulse in time and space.

  3. An integrated 6 MV linear accelerator model from electron gun to dose in a water tank.

    PubMed

    St Aubin, J; Steciw, S; Kirkby, C; Fallone, B G

    2010-05-01

    The details of a full simulation of an inline side-coupled 6 MV linear accelerator (linac) from the electron gun to the target are presented. Commissioning of the above simulation was performed by using the derived electron phase space at the target as an input into Monte Carlo studies of dose distributions within a water tank and matching the simulation results to measurement data. This work is motivated by linac-MR studies, where a validated full linac simulation is first required in order to perform future studies on linac performance in the presence of an external magnetic field. An electron gun was initially designed and optimized with a 2D finite difference program using Child's law. The electron gun simulation served as an input to a 6 MV linac waveguide simulation, which consisted of a 3D finite element radio-frequency field solution within the waveguide and electron trajectories determined from particle dynamics modeling. The electron gun design was constrained to match the cathode potential and electron gun current of a Varian 600C, while the linac waveguide was optimized to match the measured target current. Commissioning of the full simulation was performed by matching the simulated Monte Carlo dose distributions in a water tank to measured distributions. The full linac simulation matched all the electrical measurements taken from a Varian 600C and the commissioning process lead to excellent agreements in the dose profile measurements. Greater than 99% of all points met a 1%/1mm acceptance criterion for all field sizes analyzed, with the exception of the largest 40 x 40 cm2 field for which 98% of all points met the 1%/1mm acceptance criterion and the depth dose curves matched measurement to within 1% deeper than 1.5 cm depth. The optimized energy and spatial intensity distributions, as given by the commissioning process, were determined to be non-Gaussian in form for the inline side-coupled 6 MV linac simulated. An integrated simulation of an inline

  4. Investigation of UV Laser Triggered, Nanosecond, Surface Flashover Switches

    SciTech Connect

    Nunnally, W C; Neurath, R; Holmes, C; Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G

    2003-06-03

    Triggered, multi-channel, surface discharges or surface flashover switching have been investigated as a low inductance, low pulse rate switch for conducting large currents. This paper discusses the investigation of UV (355 nm) laser triggered, single channel, low inductance, ns closure and sub-ns jitter switches for applications in switching high dielectric constant, compact pulse forming lines into accelerator loads. The experimental arrangement for evaluating the switch performance and for measuring the high field dielectric constant of the pulse forming lines is presented. Experimental results of delay and jitter measurements versus optical energy on the flashover surface and dc electric field charge.

  5. Definitive radiotherapy for early stage glottic cancer by 6 MV photons.

    PubMed

    Tong, Chi-Chung; Au, Kwok-Hung; Ngan, Roger Kai-Cheong; Cheung, Foon-Yiu; Chow, Sin-Ming; Fu, Yiu-Tung; Au, Joseph Siu-Kei; Law, Stephen Chun-Key

    2012-05-18

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of early glottic cancer (GC) treated by primary radiotherapy (RT) with 6 MV photons. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 695 consecutive patients with T1N0 and T2N0 GC treated between 1983 and 2005 by RT in our institution. Clinical outcome in terms of local control (LC), overall survival (OS) and cause- specific survival (CSS) rate were evaluated. The median follow-up time was 10.5 years. The 10-year actuarial LC rates were as follows: T1A, 91%; T1B, 87%; T2, 77%. The 10-year OS were as follows: T1, 74.2%; T2, 70.7%. The 10-year CSS were as follows: T1, 97.7%; T2, 97.1%.Poorly differentiated histology and tumor biologically effective dose<65 Gy15 were adverse factors in both LC of T1 and T2 disease. Involvement of anterior commissure was an adverse factor in both LC and CSS of T1 disease. Subglottic extension was associated with poor LC in T2 disease whereas hemoglobin <13.0 was associated with poor LC and CSS of T2 disease. Primary RT remains an option among the various standard treatments for early GC. Clinical treatment outcome by 6MV photons is similar and comparable to historic data of Cobalt-60 and 2 MV photons.

  6. Modelling 6 MV photon beams of a stereotactic radiosurgery system for Monte Carlo treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jun; Guerrero, Thomas; Ma, C.-M.; Nath, Ravinder

    2004-05-01

    The goal of this work is to build a multiple source model to represent the 6 MV photon beams from a Cyberknife stereotactic radiosurgery system for Monte Carlo treatment planning dose calculations. To achieve this goal, the 6 MV photon beams have been characterized and modelled using the EGS4/BEAM Monte Carlo system. A dual source model has been used to reconstruct the particle phase space at a plane immediately above the secondary collimator. The proposed model consists of two circular planar sources for the primary photons and the scattered photons, respectively. The dose contribution of the contaminant electrons was found to be in the order of 10-3 of the total maximum dose and therefore has been omitted in the source model. Various comparisons have been made to verify the dual source model against the full phase space simulated using the EGS4/BEAM system. The agreement in percent depth dose (PDD) curves and dose profiles between the phase space and the source model was generally within 2%/1 mm for various collimators (5 to 60 mm in diameter) at 80 to 100 cm source-to-surface distances (SSD). Excellent agreement (within 1%/1 mm) was also found between the dose distributions in heterogeneous lung and bone geometry calculated using the original phase space and those calculated using the source model. These results demonstrated the accuracy of the dual source model for Monte Carlo treatment planning dose calculations for the Cyberknife system.

  7. Myofascial trigger point therapy: laser therapy and dry needling.

    PubMed

    Uemoto, Luciana; Nascimento de Azevedo, Rosany; Almeida Alfaya, Thays; Nunes Jardim Reis, Renata; Depes de Gouvêa, Cresus Vinicius; Cavalcanti Garcia, Marco Antonio

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present review is to discuss two forms of treatment for myofascial pain: laser therapy and dry needling. Although studies have reported the deactivation of myofascial trigger points with these two methods, clinical trials demonstrating their efficacy are scarce. The literature reports greater efficacy with the use of laser over dry needling. It has been suggested that improvements in microcirculation through the administration of laser therapy may favor the supply of oxygen to the cells under conditions of hypoxia and help remove the waste products of cell metabolism, thereby breaking the vicious cycle of pain, muscle spasm and further pain. While laser therapy is the method of choice for patients with a fear of needles and healthcare professionals inexperienced with the dry needling technique, further controlled studies are still needed to prove the greater efficacy of this method.

  8. High voltage switch triggered by a laser-photocathode subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ping; Lundquist, Martin L.; Yu, David U. L.

    2013-01-08

    A spark gap switch for controlling the output of a high voltage pulse from a high voltage source, for example, a capacitor bank or a pulse forming network, to an external load such as a high gradient electron gun, laser, pulsed power accelerator or wide band radar. The combination of a UV laser and a high vacuum quartz cell, in which a photocathode and an anode are installed, is utilized as triggering devices to switch the spark gap from a non-conducting state to a conducting state with low delay and low jitter.

  9. Triggering Excimer Lasers by Photoionization from Corona Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zhongmin; Duffey, Thomas; Brown, Daniel; Kushner, Mark

    2009-10-01

    High repetition rate ArF (192 nm) excimer lasers are used for photolithography sources in microelectronics fabrication. In highly attaching gas mixtures, preionization is critical to obtaining stable, reproducible glow discharges. Photoionization from a separate corona discharge is one technique for preionization which triggers the subsequent electron avalanche between the main electrodes. Photoionization triggering of an ArF excimer laser sustained in multi-atmosphere Ne/Ar/F2/Xe gas mixtures has been investigated using a 2-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics model including radiation transport. Continuity equations for charged and neutral species, and Poisson's equation are solved coincident with the electron temperature with transport coefficients obtained from solutions of Boltzmann's equation. Photoionizing radiation is produced by a surface discharge which propagates along a corona-bar located adjacent to the discharge electrodes. The consequences of pulse power waveform, corona bar location, capacitance and gas mixture on uniformity, symmetry and gain of the avalanche discharge will be discussed.

  10. Dosimetric Comparison in Breast Radiotherapy of 4 MV and 6 MV on Physical Chest Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Donato da Silva, Sabrina; Passos Ribeiro Campos, Tarcisio; Batista Nogueira, Luciana; Lima Souza Castro, Andre; Alves de oliveira, Marcio; Galvao Dias, Humberto

    2015-07-01

    According to the World Health Organization (2014) breast cancer is the main cause of death by cancer in women worldwide. The biggest challenge of radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer is to deposit the entire prescribed dose homogeneously in the breast, sparing the surrounding tissue. In this context, this paper aimed at evaluating and comparing internal dose distribution in the mammary gland based on experimental procedures submitted to two distinct energy spectra produced in breast cancer radiotherapy. The methodology consisted of reproducing opposite parallel fields used in the treatment of breast tumors in a chest phantom. This simulator with synthetic breast, composed of equivalent tissue material (TE), was previously developed by the NRI Research Group (UFMG). The computer tomography (CT) scan of the simulator was obtained antecedently. The radiotherapy planning systems (TPS) in the chest phantom were performed in the ECLIPSE system from Varian Medical Systems and CAT 3D system from MEVIS. The irradiations were reproduced in the Varian linear accelerator, model SL- 20 Precise, 6 MV energy and Varian linear accelerator, 4 MV Clinac 6x SN11 model. Calibrations of the absorbed dose versus optical density from radiochromic films were generated in order to obtain experimental dosimetric distribution at the films positioned within the glandular and skin equivalent tissues of the chest phantom. The spatial dose distribution showed equivalence with the TPS on measurement data performed in the 6 MV spectrum. The average dose found in radiochromic films placed on the skin ranged from 49 to 79%, and from 39 to 49% in the mammary areola, for the prescribed dose. Dosimetric comparisons between the spectra of 4 and 6 MV, keeping the constant geometry of the fields applied in the same phantom, will be presented showing their equivalence in breast radiotherapy, as well as the variations will be discussed. To sum up, the dose distribution has reached the value expected in

  11. Characterization of Al2O3 optically stimulated luminescence films for 2D dosimetry using a 6 MV photon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. F.; Shrestha, N.; Schnell, E.; Ahmad, S.; Akselrod, M. S.; Yukihara, E. G.

    2016-11-01

    This work evaluates the dosimetric properties of newly developed optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) films, fabricated with either Al2O3:C or Al2O3:C,Mg, using a prototype laser scanning reader, a developed image reconstruction algorithm, and a 6 MV therapeutic photon beam. Packages containing OSL films (Al2O3:C and Al2O3:C,Mg) and a radiochromic film (Gafchromic EBT3) were irradiated using a 6 MV photon beam using different doses, field sizes, with and without wedge filter. Dependence on film orientation of the OSL system was also tested. Diode-array (MapCHECK) and ionization chamber measurements were performed for comparison. The OSLD film doses agreed with the MapCHECK and ionization chamber data within the experimental uncertainties (<2% at 1.5 Gy). The system background and minimum detectable dose (MDD) were  <0.5 mGy, and the dose response was approximately linear from the MDD up to a few grays (the linearity correction was  <10% up to ~2-4 Gy), with no saturation up to 30 Gy. The dose profiles agreed with those obtained using EBT3 films (analyzed using the triple channel method) in the high dose regions of the images. In the low dose regions, the dose profiles from the OSLD films were more reproducible than those from the EBT3 films. We also demonstrated that the OSL film data are independent on scan orientation and field size over the investigated range. The results demonstrate the potential of OSLD films for 2D dosimetry, particularly for the characterization of small fields, due to their wide dynamic range, linear response, resolution and dosimetric properties. The negligible background and potential simple calibration make these OSLD films suitable for remote audits. The characterization presented here may motivate further commercial development of a 2D dosimetry system based on the OSL from Al2O3:C or Al2O3:C,Mg.

  12. Effect of helium-neon laser on musculoskeletal trigger points

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder-Mackler, L.; Bork, C.; Bourbon, B.; Trumbore, D.

    1986-07-01

    Cold lasers have been proposed recently as a therapeutic tool for treating a wide variety of pathological conditions, including wounds, arthritis, orthopedic problems, and pain. These proposed therapeutic effects largely have been unsubstantiated by research. A randomized, double blind study was undertaken to ascertain the effect of a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser on the resistance of areas of skin overlying musculoskeletal trigger points. These areas usually demonstrate decreased skin resistance when compared with the surrounding tissue. Thirty patients with musculoskeletal trigger points were assigned randomly to either an experimental or a placebo group. In addition to standard physical therapy, each patient received three 15-second applications of a He-Ne laser or placebo stimulation from an identical unit that did not emit a laser. The results of a two-way analysis of covariance with one repeated measure showed a statistically significant increase (p less than .007) in skin resistance. This increase in an abnormal skin resistance pattern may accompany the resolution of pathological conditions.

  13. A statistical analysis of ionometrically measured 6-MV x-ray beam parameters.

    PubMed

    Dawson, D J; Gribble, M A

    1984-01-01

    A statistical analysis has been made of ionometrically measured parameters related to the central-axis output, the beam symmetry, the beam flatness, and the depth dose for the 6-MV x-ray beam from the Therac-6 linear accelerator. The means and coefficients of variation of the measurements are determined on a monthly basis for each parameter. Mean coefficients of variation less than +/- 1% have been determined and are useful in establishing the optimal limits of acceptance of these parameters. The results of this study indicate that the long-term stability of the radiation parameters associated with this unit can be maintained within acceptable limits with a consistent quality-assurance program.

  14. Integrating a 1.5 T MRI scanner with a 6 MV accelerator: proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Raaymakers, B W; Lagendijk, J J W; Overweg, J; Kok, J G M; Raaijmakers, A J E; Kerkhof, E M; van der Put, R W; Meijsing, I; Crijns, S P M; Benedosso, F; van Vulpen, M; de Graaff, C H W; Allen, J; Brown, K J

    2009-06-21

    At the UMC Utrecht, The Netherlands, we have constructed a prototype MRI accelerator. The prototype is a modified 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) accelerator next to a modified 1.5 T Philips Achieva (Best, The Netherlands) MRI system. From the initial design onwards, modifications to both systems were aimed to yield simultaneous and unhampered operation of the MRI and the accelerator. Indeed, the simultaneous operation is shown by performing diagnostic quality 1.5 T MRI with the radiation beam on. No degradation of the performance of either system was found. The integrated 1.5 T MRI system and radiotherapy accelerator allow simultaneous irradiation and MR imaging. The full diagnostic imaging capacities of the MRI can be used; dedicated sequences for MRI-guided radiotherapy treatments will be developed. This proof of concept opens the door towards a clinical prototype to start testing MRI-guided radiation therapy (MRIgRT) in the clinic.

  15. Dosimetric Characteristics of 6 MV Modified Beams by Physical Wedges of a Siemens Linear Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Zabihzadeh, Mansour; Birgani, Mohammad Javad Tahmasebi; Hoseini-Ghahfarokhi, Mojtaba; Arvandi, Sholeh; Hoseini, Seyed Mohammad; Fadaei, Mahbube

    2016-01-01

    Physical wedges still can be used as missing tissue compensators or filters to alter the shape of isodose curves in a target volume to reach an optimal radiotherapy plan without creating a hotspot. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric properties of physical wedges filters such as off-axis photon fluence, photon spectrum, output factor and half value layer. The photon beam quality of a 6 MV Primus Siemens modified by 150 and 450 physical wedges was studied with BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code. The calculated present depth dose and dose profile curves for open and wedged photon beam were in good agreement with the measurements. Increase of wedge angle increased the beam hardening and this effect was more pronounced at the heal region. Using such an accurate MC model to determine of wedge factors and implementation of it as a calculation algorithm in the future treatment planning systems is recommended.

  16. A study of the biological effects of modulated 6 MV radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2010-03-01

    The delivery of spatially modulated radiation fields has been shown to impact on in vitro cell survival responses. To study the effect of modulated fields on cell survival, dose response curves were determined for human DU-145 prostate, T98G glioma tumour cells and normal primary AGO-1552 fibroblast cells exposed to modulated and non-modulated field configurations delivered using a 6 MV Linac with multi-leaf collimator. When exposed to uniform fields delivered as a non-modulated or modulated configuration, no significant differences in survival were observed with the exception of DU-145 cells at a dose of 8 Gy (p = 0.024). Survival responses were determined for exposure to non-uniform-modulated beams in DU-145 and T98G and showed no deviation from the survival response observed following uniform non-modulated exposures. The results of these experiments indicate no major deviation in response to modulated fields compared to uniform exposures.

  17. Laser Triggered Electron Injection into a Channel Guided Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Filip, C.

    2005-10-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated the generation of narrow energy spread (˜ few %) electron beams with considerable amount of charge (>100 pC). Stability of laser-plasma accelerators, as in the conventional accelerators, requires highly synchronized injection of electrons into the structured accelerating field. The Colliding Pulse Method[1] with pre-formed plasma channel guiding [2] can result in jitter-free injection in a dark-current-free accelerating structure. We report on experimental progress of laser triggered injection of electrons into a laser wakefield, where an intense laser pulse is guided by a pre-formed plasma channel. The experiments use the multi-beam, multi-terawatt Ti:Al2O3 laser at LOASIS facility of LBNL. The ignitor-heater method is used to first produce a pre-formed plasma channel in a hydrogen gas jet. Two counter propagating beams (wakefield driver:100-500mJ-50fs, injector:50-300mJ-50fs) then are focused onto the entrance of the channel. Preliminary results indicate that electron beam properties are affected by the second beam. Details of the experiment will be presented. [1]G.Fubiani, et al, Phys. Rev. E 70, 016402 (2004). [2]C.G.R. Geddes et al, Nature 431, 538 (2004). This work is supported by DoE under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  18. Laser-assisted vacuum arc extreme ultraviolet source: a comparison of picosecond and nanosecond laser triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyene, Girum A.; Tobin, Isaac; Juschkin, Larissa; Hayden, Patrick; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Sokell, Emma; Zakharov, Vassily S.; Zakharov, Sergey V.; O'Reilly, Fergal

    2016-06-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light generation by hybrid laser-assisted vacuum arc discharge plasmas, utilizing Sn-coated rotating-disc-electrodes, was investigated. The discharge was initiated by localized ablation of the liquid tin coating of the cathode disc by a laser pulse. The laser pulse, at 1064 nm, was generated by Nd:YAG lasers with variable energy from 1 to 100 mJ per pulse. The impact of shortening the laser pulse from 7 ns to 170 ps on the EUV generation has been investigated in detail. The use of ps pulses resulted in an increase in emission of EUV radiation. With a fixed discharge energy of ~4 J, the EUV conversion efficiency tends to plateau at ~2.4  ±  0.25% for the ps laser pulses, while for the ns pulses, it saturates at ~1.7  ±  0.3%. Under similar discharge and laser energy conditions, operating the EUV source with the ps-triggering resulted also in narrower spectral profiles of the emission in comparison to ns-triggering. The results indicate an advantage in using ps-triggering in laser-assisted discharges to produce brighter plasmas required for applications such as metrology.

  19. Variations in photon energy spectra of a 6 MV beam and their impact on TLD response

    PubMed Central

    Scarboro, Sarah B.; Followill, David S.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Measurement of the absorbed dose from radiotherapy beams is an essential component of providing safe and reproducible treatment. For an energy-dependent dosimeter such as thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), it is generally assumed that the energy spectrum is constant throughout the treatment field and is unperturbed by field size, depth, field modulation, or heterogeneities. However, this does not reflect reality and introduces error into clinical dose measurements. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the variability in the energy spectrum of a Varian 6 MV beam and to evaluate the impact of these variations in photon energy spectra on the response of a common energy-dependent dosimeter, TLD. Methods: Using Monte Carlo methods, we calculated variations in the photon energy spectra of a 6 MV beam as a result of variations of treatment parameters, including field size, measurement location, the presence of heterogeneities, and field modulation. The impact of these spectral variations on the response of the TLD is largely based on increased photoelectric effect in the dosimeter, and this impact was calculated using Burlin cavity theory. Measurements of the energy response were also made to determine the additional energy response due to all intrinsic and secondary effects. Results: For most in-field measurements, regardless of treatment parameter, the dosimeter response was not significantly affected by the spectral variations (<1% effect). For measurement points outside of the treatment field, where the spectrum is softer, the TLD over-responded by up to 12% due to an increased probability of photoelectric effect in the TLD material as well as inherent ionization density effects that play a role at low photon energies. Conclusions: It is generally acceptable to ignore the impact of variations in the photon spectrum on the measured dose for locations within the treatment field. However, outside the treatment field, the spectra are much softer, and a

  20. Effect of transverse magnetic fields on a simulated in-line 6 MV linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Aubin, J.; Steciw, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2010-08-01

    The effects of a transverse magnetic field on an in-line side-coupled 6 MV linear accelerator are given. The results are directly applicable to a linac-MR system used for real-time image guided adaptive radiotherapy. Our previously designed end-to-end linac simulation incorporated the results from the axisymmetric 2D electron gun program EGN2w. However, since the magnetic fields being investigated are non-axisymmetric in nature for the work presented here, the electron gun simulation was performed using OPERA-3d/SCALA. The simulation results from OPERA-3d/SCALA showed excellent agreement with previous results. Upon the addition of external magnetic fields to our fully 3D linac simulation, it was found that a transverse magnetic field of 6 G resulted in a 45 ± 1% beam loss, and by 14 G, no electrons were incident on the target. Transverse magnetic fields on the linac simulation produced a highly asymmetric focal spot at the target, which translated into a 13% profile asymmetry at 6 G. Upon translating the focal spot with respect to the target coordinates, profile symmetry was regained at the expense of a lateral shift in the dose profiles. It was found that all points in the penumbra failed a 1%/1 mm acceptance criterion for fields between 4 and 6 G. However, it was also found that the lateral profile shifts were corrected by adjusting the jaw positions asymmetrically.

  1. Dosimetric properties of a flattening filter-free 6-MV photon beam: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Mesbahi, Asghar; Mehnati, Parinaz; Keshtkar, Ahmad; Farajollahi, Alireza

    2007-08-01

    The dosimetric features of an unflattened 6-MV photon beam of an Elekta SL-25 linac was calculated by the Monte Carlo (MC) method. The head of the Elekta SL-25 linac was simulated using the MCNP4C MC code. The accuracy of the model was evaluated using measured dosimetric features, including depth dose values and dose profiles in a water phantom. The flattening filter was then removed, and beam dosimetric properties were calculated by the MC method and compared with those of the flattened photon beam. Our results showed a significant (twofold) increase in the dose rate for all field sizes. Also, the photon beam spectra for an unflattened beam were softer, which led to a steeper reduction in depth doses. The decrease in the out-of-field dose and increase in the contamination electrons and a buildup region dose were the other consequences of removing the flattening filter. Our study revealed that, for recent radiotherapy techniques, the use of multileaf collimators for beam shaping removing the flattening filter could offer some advantages, including an increased dose rate and decreased out-of-field dose.

  2. Structural Shielding Design of a 6 MV Flattening Filter Free Linear Accelerator: Indian Scenario.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Bibekananda; Selvam, T Palani; Sharma, P K Dash

    2017-01-01

    Detailed structural shielding of primary and secondary barriers for a 6 MV medical linear accelerator (LINAC) operated with flattening filter (FF) and flattening filter free (FFF) modes are calculated. The calculations have been carried out by two methods, one using the approach given in National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) Report No. 151 and the other based on the monitor units (MUs) delivered in clinical practice. Radiation survey of the installations was also carried out. NCRP approach suggests that the primary and secondary barrier thicknesses are higher by 24% and 26%. respectively, for a LINAC operated in FF mode to that of a LINAC operated in both FF and FFF modes with an assumption that only 20% of the workload is shared in FFF mode. Primary and secondary barrier thicknesses calculated from MUs delivered on clinical practice method also show the same trend and are higher by 20% and 19%, respectively, for a LINAC operated in FF mode to that of a LINAC operated in both FF and FFF modes. Overall, the barrier thickness for a LINAC operated in FF mode is higher about 20% to that of a LINAC operated in both FF and FFF modes.

  3. Analytical calculation of central-axis dosimetric data for a dedicated 6-MV radiosurgery linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Yang, James N; Pino, Ramiro

    2008-10-01

    Narrow beams are extensively used in stereotactic radiosurgery. The accuracy of treatment planning dose calculation depends largely on how well the dosimetric data are measured during the machine commissioning. Narrow beams are characterized by the lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. The lateral electronic disequilibrium in the radiation field and detector's finite size are likely to compromise the accuracy in dose measurements in these beams. This may have a profound impact on outcome in patients who undergo stereotactic radiosurgery. To confirm the measured commissioning data for a dedicated 6-MV linear accelerator-based radiosurgery system, we developed an analytical model to calculate the narrow photon beam central-axis dose. This model is an extension of a previously reported method of Nizin and Mooij for the calculation of the absorbed dose under lateral electronic disequilibrium conditions at depth of dmax or greater. The scatter factor and tissue-maximum ratio were calculated for narrow beams using the parametrized model and compared to carefully measured results for the same beams. For narrow beam radii ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 cm, the differences between the analytical and measured scatter factors were no greater than 1.4%. In addition, the differences between the analytical and measured tissue-maximum ratios were within 3.3% for regions greater than the maximum dose depth. The estimated error of this analytical calculation was less than 2%, which is sufficient to validate measurement results.

  4. A dose-response curve for biodosimetry from a 6 MV electron linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Lemos-Pinto, M M P; Cadena, M; Santos, N; Fernandes, T S; Borges, E; Amaral, A

    2015-10-01

    Biological dosimetry (biodosimetry) is based on the investigation of radiation-induced biological effects (biomarkers), mainly dicentric chromosomes, in order to correlate them with radiation dose. To interpret the dicentric score in terms of absorbed dose, a calibration curve is needed. Each curve should be constructed with respect to basic physical parameters, such as the type of ionizing radiation characterized by low or high linear energy transfer (LET) and dose rate. This study was designed to obtain dose calibration curves by scoring of dicentric chromosomes in peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with a 6 MV electron linear accelerator (Mevatron M, Siemens, USA). Two software programs, CABAS (Chromosomal Aberration Calculation Software) and Dose Estimate, were used to generate the curve. The two software programs are discussed; the results obtained were compared with each other and with other published low LET radiation curves. Both software programs resulted in identical linear and quadratic terms for the curve presented here, which was in good agreement with published curves for similar radiation quality and dose rates.

  5. Structural Shielding Design of a 6 MV Flattening Filter Free Linear Accelerator: Indian Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Bibekananda; Selvam, T. Palani; Sharma, P. K. Dash

    2017-01-01

    Detailed structural shielding of primary and secondary barriers for a 6 MV medical linear accelerator (LINAC) operated with flattening filter (FF) and flattening filter free (FFF) modes are calculated. The calculations have been carried out by two methods, one using the approach given in National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) Report No. 151 and the other based on the monitor units (MUs) delivered in clinical practice. Radiation survey of the installations was also carried out. NCRP approach suggests that the primary and secondary barrier thicknesses are higher by 24% and 26%. respectively, for a LINAC operated in FF mode to that of a LINAC operated in both FF and FFF modes with an assumption that only 20% of the workload is shared in FFF mode. Primary and secondary barrier thicknesses calculated from MUs delivered on clinical practice method also show the same trend and are higher by 20% and 19%, respectively, for a LINAC operated in FF mode to that of a LINAC operated in both FF and FFF modes. Overall, the barrier thickness for a LINAC operated in FF mode is higher about 20% to that of a LINAC operated in both FF and FFF modes. PMID:28405104

  6. Analyzing the characteristics of 6 MV photon beam at low monitor unit settings

    PubMed Central

    Nithya, L.; Raj, N. Arunai Nambi; Rathinamuthu, Sasikumar

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the characteristics of a low monitor unit (MU) setting is essential, particularly for intensity-modulated techniques. Intensity modulation can be achieved through intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). There is possibility for low MUs in the segments of IMRT and VMAT plans. The minimum MU/segment must be set by the physicist in the treatment planning system at the time of commissioning. In this study, the characteristics such as dose linearity, stability, flatness, and symmetry of 6 MV photon beam of a Synergy linear accelerator at low MU settings were investigated for different dose rates. The measurements were performed for Synergy linear accelerator using a slab phantom with a FC65-G chamber and Profiler 2. The MU linearity was studied for 1–100 MU using a field size of 10 cm ×10 cm. The linearity error for 1 MU was 4.2%. Flatness of the beam was deteriorated in 1 MU condition. The beam stability and symmetry was well within the specification. Using this study, we conclude that the treatment delivered with <3 MU may result in uncertainty in dose delivery. To ensure the correct dose delivery with less uncertainty, it is recommended to use ≥3 MU as the minimum MU per segment in IMRT and VMAT plans. PMID:27051168

  7. Analyzing the characteristics of 6 MV photon beam at low monitor unit settings.

    PubMed

    Nithya, L; Raj, N Arunai Nambi; Rathinamuthu, Sasikumar

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the characteristics of a low monitor unit (MU) setting is essential, particularly for intensity-modulated techniques. Intensity modulation can be achieved through intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). There is possibility for low MUs in the segments of IMRT and VMAT plans. The minimum MU/segment must be set by the physicist in the treatment planning system at the time of commissioning. In this study, the characteristics such as dose linearity, stability, flatness, and symmetry of 6 MV photon beam of a Synergy linear accelerator at low MU settings were investigated for different dose rates. The measurements were performed for Synergy linear accelerator using a slab phantom with a FC65-G chamber and Profiler 2. The MU linearity was studied for 1-100 MU using a field size of 10 cm ×10 cm. The linearity error for 1 MU was 4.2%. Flatness of the beam was deteriorated in 1 MU condition. The beam stability and symmetry was well within the specification. Using this study, we conclude that the treatment delivered with <3 MU may result in uncertainty in dose delivery. To ensure the correct dose delivery with less uncertainty, it is recommended to use ≥3 MU as the minimum MU per segment in IMRT and VMAT plans.

  8. Effect of transverse magnetic fields on a simulated in-line 6 MV linac.

    PubMed

    St Aubin, J; Steciw, S; Fallone, B G

    2010-08-21

    The effects of a transverse magnetic field on an in-line side-coupled 6 MV linear accelerator are given. The results are directly applicable to a linac-MR system used for real-time image guided adaptive radiotherapy. Our previously designed end-to-end linac simulation incorporated the results from the axisymmetric 2D electron gun program EGN2w. However, since the magnetic fields being investigated are non-axisymmetric in nature for the work presented here, the electron gun simulation was performed using OPERA-3d/SCALA. The simulation results from OPERA-3d/SCALA showed excellent agreement with previous results. Upon the addition of external magnetic fields to our fully 3D linac simulation, it was found that a transverse magnetic field of 6 G resulted in a 45 +/- 1% beam loss, and by 14 G, no electrons were incident on the target. Transverse magnetic fields on the linac simulation produced a highly asymmetric focal spot at the target, which translated into a 13% profile asymmetry at 6 G. Upon translating the focal spot with respect to the target coordinates, profile symmetry was regained at the expense of a lateral shift in the dose profiles. It was found that all points in the penumbra failed a 1%/1 mm acceptance criterion for fields between 4 and 6 G. However, it was also found that the lateral profile shifts were corrected by adjusting the jaw positions asymmetrically.

  9. Nonlinearity in MCF7 Cell Survival Following Exposure to Modulated 6 MV Radiation Fields

    PubMed Central

    Castiella, Marion; Franceries, Xavier; Cassol, Emmanuelle; Vieillevigne, Laure; Pereda, Veronica; Bardies, Manuel; Courtade-Saïdi, Monique

    2015-01-01

    The study of cell survival following exposure to nonuniform radiation fields is taking on particular interest because of the increasing evidence of a nonlinear relationship at low doses. We conducted in vitro experiments using the MCF7 breast cancer cell line. A 2.4 × 2.4 cm2 square area of a T25 flask was irradiated by a Varian Novalis accelerator delivering 6 MV photons. Cell survival inside the irradiation field, in the dose gradient zone and in the peripheral zone, was determined using a clonogenic assay for different radiation doses at the isocenter. Increased cell survival was observed inside the irradiation area for doses of 2, 10, and 20 Gy when nonirradiated cells were present at the periphery, while the cells at the periphery showed decreased survival compared to controls. Increased survival was also observed at the edge of the dose gradient zone for cells receiving 0.02 to 0.01 Gy when compared with cells at the periphery of the same flask, whatever the isocenter dose. These data are the first to report cell survival in the dose gradient zone. Radiotherapists must be aware of this nonlinearity in dose response. PMID:26740805

  10. Analytical calculation of central-axis dosimetric data for a dedicated 6-MV radiosurgery linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, James N.; Pino, Ramiro

    2008-10-15

    Narrow beams are extensively used in stereotactic radiosurgery. The accuracy of treatment planning dose calculation depends largely on how well the dosimetric data are measured during the machine commissioning. Narrow beams are characterized by the lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. The lateral electronic disequilibrium in the radiation field and detector's finite size are likely to compromise the accuracy in dose measurements in these beams. This may have a profound impact on outcome in patients who undergo stereotactic radiosurgery. To confirm the measured commissioning data for a dedicated 6-MV linear accelerator-based radiosurgery system, we developed an analytical model to calculate the narrow photon beam central-axis dose. This model is an extension of a previously reported method of Nizin and Mooij for the calculation of the absorbed dose under lateral electronic disequilibrium conditions at depth of d{sub max} or greater. The scatter factor and tissue-maximum ratio were calculated for narrow beams using the parametrized model and compared to carefully measured results for the same beams. For narrow beam radii ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 cm, the differences between the analytical and measured scatter factors were no greater than 1.4%. In addition, the differences between the analytical and measured tissue-maximum ratios were within 3.3% for regions greater than the maximum dose depth. The estimated error of this analytical calculation was less than 2%, which is sufficient to validate measurement results.

  11. Verification of Radiation Isocenter on Linac Beam 6 MV using Computed Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irsal, Muhammad; Hidayanto, Eko; Sutanto, Heri

    2017-06-01

    Radiation isocenter is more important part of quality assurance for the linear accelerator (Linac) due to radiation isocenter is a main location in irradiation radiotherapy, isocenter can shift when the gantry and collimator rotation. In general, the radiation isocenter verification using a special film. This research was conducted radiation isocenter verification using computed radiography with digital image processing techniques. Image acquisition was done using the modalities of Linac 6 MV with star shot method is star-shaped beam due to rotation of the collimator, gantry and couch. Then do the delineation on each beam to determine the centroid and beam diameter. By the results of verification of radiation isocenter performed on collimator and the couch, it shows that the size diameter for rotational collimator is 0.632 mm and 0.458 mm for the couch. Based on AAPM report 40 about the size of the Linac radiation isocenter diameter used in this study is still in good condition and worth to be operated because the value of the radiation isocenter diameter is below 2 mm.

  12. The design of a simulated in-line side-coupled 6 MV linear accelerator waveguide.

    PubMed

    St Aubin, Joel; Steciw, Stephen; Fallone, B G

    2010-02-01

    The design of a 3D in-line side-coupled 6 MV linac waveguide for medical use is given, and the effect of the side-coupling and port irises on the radio frequency (RF), beam dynamics, and dosimetric solutions is examined. This work was motivated by our research on a linac-MR hybrid system, where accurate electron trajectory information for a clinical medical waveguide in the presence of an external magnetic field was needed. For this work, the design of the linac waveguide was generated using the finite element method. The design outlined here incorporates the necessary geometric changes needed to incorporate a full-end accelerating cavity with a single-coupling iris, a waveguide-cavity coupling port iris that allows power transfer into the waveguide from the magnetron, as well as a method to control the RF field magnitude within the first half accelerating cavity into which the electrons from the gun are injected. With the full waveguide designed to resonate at 2998.5 +/- 0.1 MHz, a full 3D RF field solution was obtained. The accuracy of the 3D RF field solution was estimated through a comparison of important linac parameters (Q factor, shunt impedance, transit time factor, and resonant frequency) calculated for one accelerating cavity with the benchmarked program SUPERFISH. It was found that the maximum difference between the 3D solution and SUPERFISH was less than 0.03%. The eigenvalue solver, which determines the resonant frequencies of the 3D side-coupled waveguide simulation, was shown to be highly accurate through a comparison with lumped circuit theory. Two different waveguide geometries were examined, one incorporating a 0.5 mm first side cavity shift and another with a 1.5 mm first side cavity shift. The asymmetrically placed side-coupling irises and the port iris for both models were shown to introduce asymmetries in the RF field large enough to cause a peak shift and skewing (center of gravity minus peak shift) of an initially cylindrically uniform

  13. Simulation of a 6 MV Elekta Precise Linac photon beam using GATE/GEANT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevillot, L.; Frisson, T.; Maneval, D.; Zahra, N.; Badel, J.-N.; Sarrut, D.

    2011-02-01

    The GEANT4-based GATE Monte Carlo (MC) platform was initially focused on PET and SPECT simulations. The new release v6.0 (February 2010) proposes new tools dedicated for radiation therapy simulations. In this work, we investigated some part of this extension and proposed a general methodology for Linac simulations. Details of the modeling of a 6 MV photon beam delivered by an Elekta Precise Linac, with radiation fields ranging from 5 × 5 to 30 × 30 cm2 at the isocenter are presented. Comparisons were performed with measurements in water. The simulations were performed in two stages: first, the patient-independent part was simulated and a phase space (PhS) was built above the secondary collimator. Then, a multiple source model (MSM) derived from the PhS was proposed to simulate the photon fluence interacting with the patient-dependent part. The selective bremsstrahlung splitting (SBS) variance reduction technique proposed in GATE was used in order to speed up the accelerator head simulation. Further investigations showed that the SBS can be safely used without biasing the simulations. Additional comparisons with full simulations performed on the EGEE grid, in a single stage from the electron source to the water phantom, allowed the evaluation of the MSM. The proposed MSM allowed for calculating depth dose and transverse profiles in 48 hours on a single 2.8 GHz CPU, with a statistical uncertainty of 0.8% for a 10 × 10 cm2 radiation field, using voxels of 5 × 5 × 5 mm3. Good agreement between simulations and measurements in water was observed, with dose differences of about 1% and 2% for depth doses and dose profiles, respectively. Additional gamma index comparisons were performed; more than 90% of the points for all simulations passed the 3%/3 mm gamma criterion. To our knowledge, this feasibility study is the first one illustrating the potential of GATE for external radiotherapy applications.

  14. NOTE: Near surface photon energy spectra outside a 6 MV field edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, C. R.; Mountford, P. J.

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between a 6 MV linear accelerator x-ray energy spectrum outside the field edge near a phantom surface, and the corresponding spectrum on the central axis. The Monte Carlo code MCNP-4A was used to calculate the spectra on the central axis and at 1, 2, 5 and 10 cm from the edge of a 4 × 4 cm2, 10 × 10 cm2 and 15 × 15 cm2 field. Compared to the spectrum on the central axis, the spectra outside the field edge showed two distinct regions: a broad peak below about 0.5 MeV, and a lower amplitude, less rapidly changing region at higher energies from 0.5 to 6 MeV. The lower energy peak was due to scattered photons, and the higher energy component was due mainly to primary photons transmitted through the jaws of the secondary collimator. The potential impact of these spectral differences on critical organ photon dosimetry was determined by calculating the ratio of the sensitivity of a Scanditronix EDD-5 diode and of a LiF:Mg:Ti thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) outside the field edge to their respective sensitivity at the calibration position on the central axis. The lower energy peak combined with the non-uniform energy sensitivity of each detector produced up to a two-thirds overestimate of x-ray dose outside the field by the diode, whereas the response ratio of the TLD was about unity. These results indicated that a similar evaluation was required for profile measurements of a dynamic wedged field and measurements in an intensity modulated beam with either type of detector.

  15. Simulation of a 6 MV Elekta Precise Linac photon beam using GATE/GEANT4.

    PubMed

    Grevillot, L; Frisson, T; Maneval, D; Zahra, N; Badel, J-N; Sarrut, D

    2011-02-21

    The GEANT4-based GATE Monte Carlo (MC) platform was initially focused on PET and SPECT simulations. The new release v6.0 (February 2010) proposes new tools dedicated for radiation therapy simulations. In this work, we investigated some part of this extension and proposed a general methodology for Linac simulations. Details of the modeling of a 6 MV photon beam delivered by an Elekta Precise Linac, with radiation fields ranging from 5 × 5 to 30 × 30 cm(2) at the isocenter are presented. Comparisons were performed with measurements in water. The simulations were performed in two stages: first, the patient-independent part was simulated and a phase space (PhS) was built above the secondary collimator. Then, a multiple source model (MSM) derived from the PhS was proposed to simulate the photon fluence interacting with the patient-dependent part. The selective bremsstrahlung splitting (SBS) variance reduction technique proposed in GATE was used in order to speed up the accelerator head simulation. Further investigations showed that the SBS can be safely used without biasing the simulations. Additional comparisons with full simulations performed on the EGEE grid, in a single stage from the electron source to the water phantom, allowed the evaluation of the MSM. The proposed MSM allowed for calculating depth dose and transverse profiles in 48 hours on a single 2.8 GHz CPU, with a statistical uncertainty of 0.8% for a 10 × 10 cm(2) radiation field, using voxels of 5 × 5 × 5 mm(3). Good agreement between simulations and measurements in water was observed, with dose differences of about 1% and 2% for depth doses and dose profiles, respectively. Additional gamma index comparisons were performed; more than 90% of the points for all simulations passed the 3%/3 mm gamma criterion. To our knowledge, this feasibility study is the first one illustrating the potential of GATE for external radiotherapy applications.

  16. Comparison of Primary Doses Obtained in Three 6 MV Photon Beams Using a Small Attenuator.

    PubMed

    Trauernicht, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    It is a common technique in radiotherapy treatment planning systems to simplify the calculations by splitting the radiation beam into two components: namely the primary and scattered components. The contributions of the two components are evaluated separately and then summed to give the dose at the point of interest. Usually, the primary dose is obtained experimentally by extrapolating the ionization measured within the medium to zero-field size (Godden, Gamma radiation from cobalt 60 teletherapy units. Br. J. Radiol. Suppl. , 45(1983)). This approach offers the opportunity to obtain the primary component of dose without the need for an uncertain non-linear extrapolation. The primary dose can be obtained from two measurements of ionization in a large beam in a water phantom, as well as four measurements of ionization in a narrow beam geometry. The measurements were done over a range of different depths and thus the primary linear attenuation coefficient was also obtained. The calibrated output of a linear accelerator is usually 1.00 Gy per 100 monitor units (MU) at the depth of maximum dose ( d max ) in water for a 10 cm × 10 cm field. The values for the primary dose components at d max in a 10 cm × 10 cm field obtained in three different 6 MV beams using this method are D P ( d max , 10 cm × 10 cm) = 0.925-0.943 Gy/100 MU. The obtained values of the primary dose components compare well with measurements in the same beams extrapolated to zero-field size and also to literature. One can thus conclude that this method has the potential to provide an independent measurable verification of calculations of primary dose.

  17. 6 MV dosimetric characterization of the 160 MLC, the new Siemens multileaf collimator.

    PubMed

    Tacke, Martin B; Nill, Simeon; Häring, Peter; Oelfke, Uwe

    2008-05-01

    New technical developments constantly aim at improving the outcome of radiation therapy. With the use of a computer-controlled multileaf collimator (MLC), the quality of the treatment and the efficiency in patient throughput is significantly increased. New MLC designs aim to further enhance the advantages. In this article, we present the first detailed experimental investigation of the new 160 MLC, Siemens Medical Solutions. The assessment included the experimental investigation of typical MLC characteristics such as leakage, tongue-and-groove effect, penumbra, leaf speed, and leaf positioning accuracy with a 6 MV treatment beam. The leakage is remarkably low with an average of 0.37% due to a new design principle of slightly tilted leaves instead of the common tongue-and-groove design. But due to the tilt, the triangular tongue-and-groove effect occurs. Its magnitude of approximately 19% is similar to the dose defect measured for MLCs with the common tongue-and-groove design. The average longitudinal penumbra measured at depth d(max) = 15 mm with standard 100 x 100 mm2 fields is 4.1 +/- 0.5 mm for the central range and increases to 4.9 +/- 1.3 mm for the entire field range of 400 x 400 mm2. The increase is partly due to the single-focusing design and the large distance between the MLC and the isocenter enabling a large patient clearance. Regarding the leaf speed, different velocity tests were performed. The positions of the moving leaves were continuously recorded with the kilovoltage-imaging panel. The maximum leaf velocities measured were 42.9 +/- 0.6 mm/s. In addition, several typical intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatments were performed and the delivery times compared to the Siemens OPTIFOCUS MLC. An average decrease of 11% in delivery time was observed. The experimental results presented in this article indicate that the dosimetric characteristics of the 160 MLC are capable of improving the quality of dose delivery with respect to precision and dose

  18. Commissioning of a Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dirgayussa, I Gde Eka Yani, Sitti; Haryanto, Freddy; Rhani, M. Fahdillah

    2015-09-30

    Monte Carlo modelling of a linear accelerator is the first and most important step in Monte Carlo dose calculations in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo is considered today to be the most accurate and detailed calculation method in different fields of medical physics. In this research, we developed a photon beam model for Varian Clinac iX 6 MV equipped with MilleniumMLC120 for dose calculation purposes using BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo system based on the underlying EGSnrc particle transport code. Monte Carlo simulation for this commissioning head LINAC divided in two stages are design head Linac model using BEAMnrc, characterize this model using BEAMDP and analyze the difference between simulation and measurement data using DOSXYZnrc. In the first step, to reduce simulation time, a virtual treatment head LINAC was built in two parts (patient-dependent component and patient-independent component). The incident electron energy varied 6.1 MeV, 6.2 MeV and 6.3 MeV, 6.4 MeV, and 6.6 MeV and the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of source is 1 mm. Phase-space file from the virtual model characterized using BEAMDP. The results of MC calculations using DOSXYZnrc in water phantom are percent depth doses (PDDs) and beam profiles at depths 10 cm were compared with measurements. This process has been completed if the dose difference of measured and calculated relative depth-dose data along the central-axis and dose profile at depths 10 cm is ≤ 5%. The effect of beam width on percentage depth doses and beam profiles was studied. Results of the virtual model were in close agreement with measurements in incident energy electron 6.4 MeV. Our results showed that photon beam width could be tuned using large field beam profile at the depth of maximum dose. The Monte Carlo model developed in this study accurately represents the Varian Clinac iX with millennium MLC 120 leaf and can be used for reliable patient dose calculations. In this commissioning process, the good

  19. Commissioning of a Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirgayussa, I. Gde Eka; Yani, Sitti; Rhani, M. Fahdillah; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-01

    Monte Carlo modelling of a linear accelerator is the first and most important step in Monte Carlo dose calculations in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo is considered today to be the most accurate and detailed calculation method in different fields of medical physics. In this research, we developed a photon beam model for Varian Clinac iX 6 MV equipped with MilleniumMLC120 for dose calculation purposes using BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo system based on the underlying EGSnrc particle transport code. Monte Carlo simulation for this commissioning head LINAC divided in two stages are design head Linac model using BEAMnrc, characterize this model using BEAMDP and analyze the difference between simulation and measurement data using DOSXYZnrc. In the first step, to reduce simulation time, a virtual treatment head LINAC was built in two parts (patient-dependent component and patient-independent component). The incident electron energy varied 6.1 MeV, 6.2 MeV and 6.3 MeV, 6.4 MeV, and 6.6 MeV and the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of source is 1 mm. Phase-space file from the virtual model characterized using BEAMDP. The results of MC calculations using DOSXYZnrc in water phantom are percent depth doses (PDDs) and beam profiles at depths 10 cm were compared with measurements. This process has been completed if the dose difference of measured and calculated relative depth-dose data along the central-axis and dose profile at depths 10 cm is ≤ 5%. The effect of beam width on percentage depth doses and beam profiles was studied. Results of the virtual model were in close agreement with measurements in incident energy electron 6.4 MeV. Our results showed that photon beam width could be tuned using large field beam profile at the depth of maximum dose. The Monte Carlo model developed in this study accurately represents the Varian Clinac iX with millennium MLC 120 leaf and can be used for reliable patient dose calculations. In this commissioning process, the good criteria of dose

  20. Surface dose for five telecobalt machines, 6MV photon beam from four linear accelerators and a Hi-Art Tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the surface dose for five telecobalt machines (four from Best Theratronics Limited, Canada, one from Panacea Medical Technologies, India), 6 MV photon beam (static) from four linear accelerators (three Varian linear accelerators and one Siemens) and Hi-Art Tomotherapy unit. The surface dose was measured with Thermoluminescent dosimeters in phantom slabs. For Tomotherapy 6 MV beam the surface dose was estimated as 32% while it was 35%, 33%, and 36% for Clinac 6EX, Clinac 2100CD, and Clinac 2100C linear accelerators, respectively. Similarly, the surface dose for 6 MV photon beam from Primus linear accelerator was estimated as 35%. Surface doses from telecobalt machines Equinox-80, Elite-80, Th-780C, Th-780, and Bhabhatron-II was found to be 30%, 29.1%, 27.8%, 29.3%, and 29.9% for 10 cm x 10 field size, respectively. Measured surface dose from all four linear accelerators were in good agreement with that of the Tomotherapy. The surface dose measurements were useful for Tomotherapy to predict the superficial dose during helical IMRT treatments.

  1. 6.1-MV, 0.79-MA laser-triggered gas switch for multimodule, multiterawatt pulsed-power accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechien, K. R.; Stygar, W. A.; Savage, M. E.; Wakeland, P. E.; Anaya, V.; Artery, D. S.; Baremore, M. J.; Bliss, D. E.; Chavez, R.; Coombs, G. D.; Corley, J. P.; Jones, P. A.; Kipp, A. K.; Lewis, B. A.; Lott, J. A.; Lynch, J. J.; McKee, G. R.; Ploor, S. D.; Prestwich, K. R.; Roznowski, S. A.; Spencer, D. C.; White, S. D.; Woodworth, J. R.

    2010-03-01

    A 6.1-MV, 0.79-MA laser-triggered gas switch (LTGS) is used to synchronize the 36 modules of the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. Each module includes one switch, which serves as the last command-fired switch of the module, and hence is used to determine the time at which each module electrically closes relative to the other modules. The switch is ˜81-cm in length, ˜45-cm in diameter, and is immersed in mineral oil. The outer switch envelope consists of six corrugated monomer-cast acrylic insulators and five contoured stainless-steel rings. The trigger electrodes are fabricated from copper-infused tungsten. The switch is pressurized with several atmospheres of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which is turbulently purged within 2 seconds after every shot. Each switch is powered from a 6-MV, 0.78-MJ Marx generator which pulse charges a 24-nF intermediate-store water capacitor in 1.4-μs. Closure of the switch allows power to flow into pulse-forming transmission lines. The power pulse is subsequently compressed by water switches, which results in a total accelerator output power in excess of 70-TW. A previous version of the LTGS performed exceptionally at a 5.4-MV, 0.7-MA level on an engineering test module used for switch development. It exhibited a 1-σ jitter of ˜5ns, a prefire and flashover rate less than 0.1%, and a lifetime in excess of 150 shots. When installed on the Z accelerator, however, the switch exhibited a prefire probability of ˜3%, a flashover probability of ˜7%, and a 15-ns jitter. The difference in performance is attributed to several factors such as higher total charge transfer, exposure to more debris, and more stressful dynamic mechanical loading upon machine discharge. Under these conditions, the replacement lifetime was less than ten shots. Since refurbishment of Z in October 2007, there have been three LTGS design iterations to improve the performance at 6.1-MV. The most recent design exhibits a prefire rate of less than 0.1%, a

  2. Dynamics of laser self-triggered plasma shutter for shortening laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Changquan; Liu Jiansheng; Deng Aihua; Wang Wentao; Wang Cheng; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan

    2010-12-15

    The dynamics of a solid foil irradiated by a circularly polarized laser pulse in the normal incidence is investigated by performing particle-in-cell simulations. After sufficiently compressed by the light pressure, the foil becomes transparent, with a part of the incident pulse transmitted through, and then it turns opaque again, blocking the tail of the pulse. It is found that the transparency dynamically depends on the motion of the compressed foil and relies on the incident pulse. Thus, the foil can be used to shorten the incident pulse as a self-triggered shutter.

  3. Thermoluminescence responses of the Yb- and Yb-Tb-doped SiO2 optical fibers to 6-MV photons.

    PubMed

    Sahini, M H; Hossain, I; Wagiran, H; Saeed, M A; Ali, H

    2014-09-01

    Characteristics of the thermoluminescence (TL) responses of Yb- and Yb-Tb-doped optical fibers irradiated with 6MV photons are reported. The concentration of Yb in the Yb-doped optical fiber was 0.26mol%; the concentrations of Yb and Tb in the Yb-Tb-doped optical fiber were 0.62 and 0.2mol%, respectively. The TL dose responses are linear in the dose range 0.5-4Gy. The radiation sensitivity of the Yb-Tb material is almost two orders of magnitude higher than the sensitivity of the material doped with Yb alone.

  4. Evaluation of dosimetric properties of 6 MV & 10 MV photon beams from a linear accelerator with no flattening filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, David

    A linear accelerator manufactured by Elekta, equipped with a multi leaf collimation (MLC) system has been modelled using Monte Carlo simulations with the photon flattening filter removed. The purpose of this investigation was to show that more efficient and more accurate Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) treatments can be delivered from a standard linear accelerator with the flattening filter removed from the beam. A range of simulations of 6 MV and 10 MV photon were studied and compared to a model of a standard accelerator which included the flattening filter for those beams. Measurements using a scanning water phantom were also performed after the flattening filter had been removed. We show here that with the flattening filter removed, an increase to the dose on the central axis by a factor of 2.35 and 4.18 is achieved for 6 MV and 10 MV photon beams respectively using a standard 10x 10cm2 field size. A comparison of the dose at points at the field edges led to the result that, removal of the flattening filter reduced the dose at these points by approximately 10% for the 6 MV beam over the clinical range of field sizes. A further consequence of removing the flattening filter was the softening of the photon energy spectrum leading to a steeper reduction in dose at depths greater than dmax. Also studied was the electron contamination brought about by the removal of the filter. To reduce this electron contamination and thus reduce the skin dose to the patient we consider the use of an electron scattering foil in the beam path. The electron scattering foil had very little effect on dmax. From simulations of a standard 6MV beam, a filter-free beam and a filter-free beam with electron scattering foil, we deduce that the proportion of electrons in the photon beam is 0.35%, 0.28% and 0.27%, consecutively. In short, higher dose rates will result in decreased treatment times and the reduced dose outside of the field is indicative of reducing the dose to the

  5. Impact of tissue inhomogeneity on dose distribution in the canine carpal and tarsal regions for cobalt and 6 MV photons.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Monique N; Yoshikawa, Hiroto; Sidhu, Narinder

    2009-01-01

    We quantified the effect of tissue inhomogeneity on dose distribution in a canine distal extremity resulting from treatment with cobalt photons and photons from a 6MV accelerator. Monitor units for a typical distal extremity treatment were calculated by two methods, using equally weighted, parallel-opposed fields. The first method was a computed tomography (CT)-based, computerized treatment plan, calculated without inhomogeneity correction. The second method was a manual point dose calculation to the isocenter. A computerized planning system was then used to assess the dose distribution achieved by these two methods when tissue inhomogeneity was taken into account. For cobalt photons, the median percentage of the planning target volume (PTV) that received < 95% of the prescribed dose was 4.5% for the CT-based treatment plan, and 26.2% for the manually calculated plan. For 6 MV photons, the median percentage of the PTV that received < 95% of the prescribed dose was < 1% for both planning methods. The PTV dose achieved without using inhomogeneity correction for cobalt photons results in potentially significant under dosing of portions of the PTV.

  6. Study of the dosimetric properties of an unflattened 6-MV photon beam by using the BEAMnrc code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajaria, Ankit; Sharma, Neeraj; Sharma, Shiru; Pradhan, Satyajit; Mandal, Abhijit; Aggarwal, Lalit. M.

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the basic dosimetric properties of a Flattening-filter-free 6-MV photon beam based on the unique performance model of the Varian Clinic 600 linac operated with and without a flattening filter. Dosimetric features, including the central-axis absorbed dose, the beam profiles and the photon and electron fluences were calculated for the flattened and unflattened cases separately by using Monte Carlo simulations. We observe that the dosimetric field size and penumbra were slightly smaller for the unflattened beam, but the beam's non-flatness is unlikely to present a problem for treatments with small fields. Absolute depth dose calculations showed an increase in the dose rate by a factor of more than 2.4 for the unflattened 6-MV beam which depended on the depth. These results suggest that the removal of the filter could result in higher central-axis dose rates and hence, shorter beam delivery times for treatments. Surface doses were found to be higher for the unflattened beam due to more contamination electrons and low-energy photons being present in the beam. The total scatter factor, SCP, varies less with the field sizes, indicating that removing the filter from the beam line can reduce significantly the amount of head scatter photons and therefore, doses to normal tissues and organs.

  7. NOTE: Variations in skin dose associated with linac bed material at 6 MV x-ray energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butson, Martin J.; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K. N.; Webb, Belinda

    2002-01-01

    Treatment with radiotherapy x-rays at 6 MV energy produces a build-up effect whereby a smaller dose is delivered to the patient's skin compared to the tumour dose. With anterior fields, no material is normally placed over the patient's skin, thus providing the maximum skin sparing possible with the beam configuration used. A posterior beam normally passes through the treatment couch top and increases the dose delivered to the patient's skin. Both the Mylar sheeting and the support ribbing material produce a significant increase in skin dose. Measurements at 6 MV have shown that the basal cell layer dose can be increased by up to 51% of maximum dose with a carbon fibre/Mylar couch and by 28% for a tennis string/Mylar couch when compared to anterior beams. These values are associated with the position of the carbon fibre or tennis string ribbing. Dermal layer doses are increased by up to 30 and 24% of maximum dose for carbon fibre and tennis string, respectively. These values include a combination of dose due to the support ribbing and the Mylar sheeting. Due to the variability in patient positioning on the couch top, these increases would be spread out over the skin surface producing an average increase per unit area at the basal layer of up to 32 and 20% of the maximum, respectively, for carbon fibre and tennis string couch tops and 21 and 12% at the dermal layer compared to dose at Dmax.

  8. Compact 180-kV Marx generator triggered in atmospheric air by femtosecond laser filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Arantchouk, L. Larour, J.; Point, G.; Brelet, Y.; Carbonnel, J.; André, Y.-B.; Mysyrowicz, A.; Houard, A.

    2014-03-10

    We developed a compact Marx generator triggered in atmospheric air by a single femtosecond laser beam undergoing filamentation. Voltage pulses of 180 kV could be generated with a subnanosecond jitter. The same laser beam was also used to initiate simultaneously guided discharges up to 21 cm long at the output of the generator.

  9. Compact 180-kV Marx generator triggered in atmospheric air by femtosecond laser filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arantchouk, L.; Point, G.; Brelet, Y.; Larour, J.; Carbonnel, J.; André, Y.-B.; Mysyrowicz, A.; Houard, A.

    2014-03-01

    We developed a compact Marx generator triggered in atmospheric air by a single femtosecond laser beam undergoing filamentation. Voltage pulses of 180 kV could be generated with a subnanosecond jitter. The same laser beam was also used to initiate simultaneously guided discharges up to 21 cm long at the output of the generator.

  10. Photothermal therapy using folate conjugated gold nanoparticles enhances the effects of 6MV X-ray on mouth epidermal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Neshastehriz, Ali; Tabei, Mousa; Maleki, Shayan; Eynali, Samira; Shakeri-Zadeh, Ali

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an optimized method for preparation of folate conjugated gold nanoparticles (F-AuNPs) and to investigate its cytotoxic effects and cell apoptosis in combination with photothermal therapy (PTT) and radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of mouth epidermal carcinoma cells KB. For this purpose, cells were treated with synthesized F-AuNPs at different concentrations for 6h and then irradiated them with laser beam (532nm, 0.5W/cm(2), 15min). After photothermal therapy, the cells were exposed to 6MV X-ray with a single dose of 2Gy. MTT assay were performed to evaluate the cell survival rate and apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry using an annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide apoptosis detection kit. No significant cell damage or cell apoptosis from the individual treatment of laser light or F-AuNPs was observed, while viability of cells incubated with F-AuNPs and then exposed to the laser was significantly decreased. Additionally, our results demonstrated that F-AuNPs is good radiosensitizers even at a low concentration such as 20μM when megavoltage X-ray is used. Also, when KB cells were treated with F-AuNPs under both laser and X-ray irradiation, the cell viability substantially decreased more than F-AuNPs-enhanced PTT alone or F-AuNPs-enhanced RT alone. Flow cytometry assay clearly indicated that F-AuNPs-mediated photo-thermo-radio therapy significantly induced apoptosis. These results confirm that F-AuNPs is a promising and research-worthy nanoconjugate in the field of targeted photo-thermo-radiotherapy of cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Kinetic simulation studies of laser-triggering in the Z gas switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, D. R.; Rose, D. V.; Thoma, C.; Clark, R. E.; Miller, C.; Madrid, E. A.; Zimmerman, W. R.; Rambo, P. K.; Schwarz, J.; Savage, M.; Atherton, B. W.

    2013-08-01

    Advanced z-pinch accelerators require precise timing of multiple mega-ampere drivers to deliver terawatt power. The triggering of these drivers is now largely initiated by laser ionization of gas switches. In this paper, we discuss detailed fully kinetic simulation of the Z laser-triggered gas switch involving detailed finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell Monte Carlo modeling of the trigger section of the switch. Other components of the accelerator from the Marx bank through the pulse-forming line are described as circuit elements. The simulations presented here build on a recently developed model of electro-negative gas breakdown and streamer propagation that included photons produced from de-excited neutrals. New effects include multi-photon ionization of the gas in a prescribed laser field. The simulations show the sensitivity of triggering to laser parameters including focal plane within the anode-cathode gap of the trigger section of the switch, intensity at focus, and laser pulse length. Detailed electromagnetic simulations of the trigger section with circuit modeling of the upstream and downstream components are largely in agreement with Z data and demonstrate a new capability.

  12. Kinetic simulation studies of laser-triggering in the Z gas switch

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D. R.; Rose, D. V.; Thoma, C.; Clark, R. E.; Miller, C.; Madrid, E. A.; Zimmerman, W. R.; Rambo, P. K.; Schwarz, J.; Savage, M.; Atherton, B. W.

    2013-08-15

    Advanced z-pinch accelerators require precise timing of multiple mega-ampere drivers to deliver terawatt power. The triggering of these drivers is now largely initiated by laser ionization of gas switches. In this paper, we discuss detailed fully kinetic simulation of the Z laser-triggered gas switch involving detailed finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell Monte Carlo modeling of the trigger section of the switch. Other components of the accelerator from the Marx bank through the pulse-forming line are described as circuit elements. The simulations presented here build on a recently developed model of electro-negative gas breakdown and streamer propagation that included photons produced from de-excited neutrals. New effects include multi-photon ionization of the gas in a prescribed laser field. The simulations show the sensitivity of triggering to laser parameters including focal plane within the anode-cathode gap of the trigger section of the switch, intensity at focus, and laser pulse length. Detailed electromagnetic simulations of the trigger section with circuit modeling of the upstream and downstream components are largely in agreement with Z data and demonstrate a new capability.

  13. Optically triggered Cr:YAG Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Brian; Hays, Alan; Lei, Jonathan; Schilling, Bradley; Goldberg, Lew

    2011-02-01

    The method of optical triggering using a brass board architecture for a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser by direct bleaching of a Cr:YAG saturable absorber was determined to be effective in reducing the pulse-to-pulse timing jitter. A miniaturized triggering setup was employed to enable the brass board operation of the optically triggered laser. A 3mm wide minilaser diode bar (1024nm) with collimated emission was mounted on a compact heat sink and used to bleach the Cr:YAG saturable absorber from a direction orthogonal to the lasing axis. A compact 300A pulse driver, with <0.5 μs rise time and 3-5 μs duration, was developed for pulsing the 3mm diode bar. These components were combined to demonstrate a compact brassboard implementation of the optically triggered passively Q-switched laser.

  14. Optical breakdown of air triggered by femtosecond laser filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polynkin, Pavel; Moloney, Jerome V.

    2011-10-01

    We report experiments on the generation of dense plasma channels in ambient air using a dual laser pulse excitation scheme. The dilute plasma produced through the filamentation of an ultraintense femtosecond laser pulse is densified via avalanche ionization driven by a co-propagating multi-Joule nanosecond pulse.

  15. Air cavity effects on the radition dose to the larynx using Co-60, 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Niroomand-Rad, A.; Harter, K.W.; Thobejane, S.; Bertrand, K.

    1994-07-30

    The purpose was to determine the perturbation effect in the surface layers of lesions located in the air-tumor tissues interface of larynx using {sup 60}Co, 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were embedded at 16 measurement locations in slab no. 8 of a humanoid phantom and exposed to two lateral-opposed beams using standard 7 {times} 7 cm fields. Similarly, radiographic and radiochromic films were placed between slabs no. 7 and no. 8 of the humanoid phantom and exposed to two lateral-opposed radiation beams. The dosimeters were irradiated with {sup 60}Co, 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams. Computer tomography (CT) treatment planning without inhomogeneity correction was performed. At the tissue-air interface, the average measured percentage dose (% dose{sub m}) is about (108.7 {+-} 4.8%) with TLD data, (96.8 {+-} 2.5%) with radiographic film data, and (100.8 {+-} 4.9%) with radiochromic film data. Similarly, in the central part of the cavity, the % dose{sub m} is (98.4 {+-} 3.1)% with TLD data, (94.3 {+-} 3.3)% with radiographic film data, and (91.7 {+-} 5.0)% with radiochromic film data. Using the CT-based generated dose distribution (without inhomogeneity correction), the average calculated percentage dose (% dose{sub c}) is (98.7 {+-} 1.0%) at the tissue-air interface and 98% in the central part of the air cavity. For the beam energies studied, the variation from the % dose {sub m} at the tissue-air interface for a given dosimetry technique is relatively small and therefore should not be significant in clinical settings. The variation from the % dose{sub m} at the tissue-air interface is more significant for lower energies. This variation is about 4.3% for 10 MV photon beam, therefore, while institutional practice favors lower energy ({sup 60}Co to 6 MV) for node-negative glottic cancers, physical/dosimetric evidence offers no disadvantage to the use of higher energy photons. 10 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. NOTE: Integrating a 1.5 T MRI scanner with a 6 MV accelerator: proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raaymakers, B. W.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Overweg, J.; Kok, J. G. M.; Raaijmakers, A. J. E.; Kerkhof, E. M.; van der Put, R. W.; Meijsing, I.; Crijns, S. P. M.; Benedosso, F.; van Vulpen, M.; de Graaff, C. H. W.; Allen, J.; Brown, K. J.

    2009-06-01

    At the UMC Utrecht, The Netherlands, we have constructed a prototype MRI accelerator. The prototype is a modified 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) accelerator next to a modified 1.5 T Philips Achieva (Best, The Netherlands) MRI system. From the initial design onwards, modifications to both systems were aimed to yield simultaneous and unhampered operation of the MRI and the accelerator. Indeed, the simultaneous operation is shown by performing diagnostic quality 1.5 T MRI with the radiation beam on. No degradation of the performance of either system was found. The integrated 1.5 T MRI system and radiotherapy accelerator allow simultaneous irradiation and MR imaging. The full diagnostic imaging capacities of the MRI can be used; dedicated sequences for MRI-guided radiotherapy treatments will be developed. This proof of concept opens the door towards a clinical prototype to start testing MRI-guided radiation therapy (MRIgRT) in the clinic.

  17. Correction to BrainSCAN central axis dose calculations for 6-MV photon beams to lung with lateral electron disequilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, Peter . E-mail: peter.geyer@mailbox.tu-dresden.de; Blank, Hilbert; Zips, Daniel; Alheit, Horst

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a correction method for lateral electron disequilibrium and tissue inhomogeneities in lung tissues applicable to the BrainSCAN treatment planning system. Methods and Materials: Four noncoplanar 6-MV photon beams with different beam diameters were applied to the right lung of a thorax phantom. The measured/calculated dose value ratio was evaluated as a function of a parameter that describes the degree of the lateral electron disequilibrium based on the primary dose. Results: The dose ratio showed a clearcut linear dependency on the disequilibrium parameter. Applying the proposed correction method, only minor differences between the measured and calculated doses were found for lesions >1 cm. However, for lesions <1 cm surrounded by lung tissue the difference was {<=}15%. Conclusion: The data have indicated a relevant magnitude of the correction factor only for lung lesions <1 cm.

  18. Direct detection of 6 MV x-rays from a medical linear accelerator using a semiconducting polymer diode.

    PubMed

    Mills, Christopher A; Chan, Yit-Fong; Intaniwet, Akarin; Shkunov, Maxim; Nisbet, Andrew; Keddie, Joseph L; Sellin, Paul J

    2013-07-07

    Recently, a new family of low-cost x-radiation detectors have been developed, based on semiconducting polymer diodes, which are easy to process, mechanically flexible, relatively inexpensive, and able to cover large areas. To test their potential for radiotherapy applications such as beam monitors or dosimeters, as an alternative to the use of solid-state inorganic detectors, we present the direct detection of 6 MV x-rays from a medical linear accelerator using a thick film, semiconducting polymer detector. The diode was subjected to 4 ms pulses of 6 MV x-rays at a rate of 60 Hz, and produces a linear increase in photocurrent with increasing dose rate (from 16.7 to 66.7 mGy s(-1)). The sensitivity of the diode was found to range from 13 to 20 nC mGy(-1) cm(-3), for operating voltages from -50 to -150 V, respectively. The diode response was found to be stable after exposure to doses up to 15 Gy. Testing beyond this dose range was not carried out. Theoretical calculations show that the addition of heavy metallic nanoparticles to polymer films, even at low volume fractions, increases the x-ray sensitivity of the polymer film/nanoparticle composite so that it exceeds that for silicon over a wide range of x-ray energies. The possibility of detecting x-rays with energies relevant to medical oncology applications opens up the potential for these polymer detectors to be used in detection and imaging applications using medical x-ray beams.

  19. A Monte Carlo model for calculating out-of-field dose from a varian 6 MV beam.

    PubMed

    Kry, Stephen F; Titt, Uwe; Pönisch, Falk; Followill, David; Vassiliev, Oleg N; White, R Allen; Mohan, Radhe; Salehpour, Mohammad

    2006-11-01

    Dose to the patient outside of the treatment field is important when evaluating the outcome of radiotherapy treatments. However, determining out-of-field doses for any particular treatment plan currently requires either time-consuming measurements or calculated estimations that may be highly uncertain. A Monte Carlo model may allow these doses to be determined quickly, accurately, and with a great degree of flexibility. MCNPX was used to create a Monte Carlo model of a Varian Clinac 2100 accelerator head operated at 6 MV. Simulations of the dose out-of-field were made and measurements were taken with thermoluminescent dosimeters in an acrylic phantom and with an ion chamber in a water tank to validate the Monte Carlo model. Although local differences between the out-of-field doses calculated by the model and those measured did exceed 50% at some points far from the treatment field, the average local difference was only 16%. This included a range of doses as low as 0.01% of the central axis dose, and at distances in excess of 50 cm from the central axis of the treatment field. The out-of-field dose was found to vary with field size and distance from the central axis, but was almost independent of the depth in the phantom except where the dose increased substantially at depths less than dmax. The relationship between dose and kerma was also investigated, and kerma was found to be a good estimate of dose (within 3% on average) except near the surface and in the field penumbra. Our Monte Carlo model was found to well represent typical Varian 2100 accelerators operated at 6 MV.

  20. Direct detection of 6 MV x-rays from a medical linear accelerator using a semiconducting polymer diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Christopher A.; Chan, Yit-Fong; Intaniwet, Akarin; Shkunov, Maxim; Nisbet, Andrew; Keddie, Joseph L.; Sellin, Paul J.

    2013-07-01

    Recently, a new family of low-cost x-radiation detectors have been developed, based on semiconducting polymer diodes, which are easy to process, mechanically flexible, relatively inexpensive, and able to cover large areas. To test their potential for radiotherapy applications such as beam monitors or dosimeters, as an alternative to the use of solid-state inorganic detectors, we present the direct detection of 6 MV x-rays from a medical linear accelerator using a thick film, semiconducting polymer detector. The diode was subjected to 4 ms pulses of 6 MV x-rays at a rate of 60 Hz, and produces a linear increase in photocurrent with increasing dose rate (from 16.7 to 66.7 mGy s-1). The sensitivity of the diode was found to range from 13 to 20 nC mGy-1 cm-3, for operating voltages from -50 to -150 V, respectively. The diode response was found to be stable after exposure to doses up to 15 Gy. Testing beyond this dose range was not carried out. Theoretical calculations show that the addition of heavy metallic nanoparticles to polymer films, even at low volume fractions, increases the x-ray sensitivity of the polymer film/nanoparticle composite so that it exceeds that for silicon over a wide range of x-ray energies. The possibility of detecting x-rays with energies relevant to medical oncology applications opens up the potential for these polymer detectors to be used in detection and imaging applications using medical x-ray beams.

  1. SU-E-T-276: Treatment Planning Strategies for Lung Injury Studies in Rat Models in 6 MV Delivery.

    PubMed

    Serban, M; Ybarra, N; Lee, S; Jeyaseelan, K; Seuntjens, J

    2012-06-01

    To study planning strategies that can be used in small animal radiation-induced lung toxicity experiments using 6 MV accelerator with high density MLC. Three different types of plans were designed on CT images of a Sprague Dawley rat model to irradiate 50% of the total lung volume (lung divided into apex and base) with a prescription dose of 24 Gy to the partial lung. Two VMAT arc therapy plans were optimized to cover to the prescription dose, either the apex or base of the lung. Two AP- PA plans were designed to completely block either lung apex or base while irradiating the remaining 50% of the lung. Finally, two AP-PA plans were designed to cover, to the prescription dose, the apex or base of the lung. The plans were designed and optimized using the Eclipse AAA algorithm and recalculated using the MMCTP/EGS/Beam Monte Carlo system. When completely blocking the lung base, the apex will be underdosed by up to 30%; when completely covering the apex by the prescribed dose, the base will receive overdosing (V50%=73%). The VMAT plan leads to a more conformal dose distribution and spares unnecessary skin exposure when compared to AP-PA MV or kV delivery. Despite the small size of rat model, the 6 MV VMAT delivery is superior in terms of dose conformality and sparing of the heart and the non-irradiated 50% of the lung compared to the standard, simpler, AP-PA delivery. MC dosimetry in lung shows that the delivered dose is 10% higher than predicted by AAA because of the predominance of small fields in the delivery. Clinical state-of- the-art planning and delivery techniques can be scaled down accurately to rats. The use of these techniques is essential in small animal studies to render conclusions of radiation response investigations translatable to human studies. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  2. Equivalent square formula for determining the surface dose of rectangular field from 6 MV therapeutic photon beam.

    PubMed

    Apipunyasopon, Lukkana; Srisatit, Somyot; Phaisangittisakul, Nakorn

    2013-09-06

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the use of the equivalent square formula for determining the surface dose from a rectangular photon beam. A 6 MV therapeutic photon beam delivered from a Varian Clinac 23EX medical linear accelerator was modeled using the EGS4nrc Monte Carlo simulation package. It was then used to calculate the dose in the build-up region from both square and rectangular fields. The field patterns were defined by various settings of the X- and Y-collimator jaw ranging from 5 to 20 cm. Dose measurements were performed using a thermoluminescence dosimeter and a Markus parallel-plate ionization chamber on the four square fields (5 × 5, 10 × 10, 15 × 15, and 20 × 20 cm2). The surface dose was acquired by extrapolating the build-up doses to the surface. An equivalent square for a rectangular field was determined using the area-to-perimeter formula, and the surface dose of the equivalent square was estimated using the square-field data. The surface dose of square field increased linearly from approximately 10% to 28% as the side of the square field increased from 5 to 20 cm. The influence of collimator exchange on the surface dose was found to be not significant. The difference in the percentage surface dose of the rectangular field compared to that of the relevant equivalent square was insignificant and can be clinically neglected. The use of the area-to-perimeter formula for an equivalent square field can provide a clinically acceptable surface dose estimation for a rectangular field from a 6 MV therapy photon beam.

  3. Low-jitter, high-voltage, infrared, laser-triggered, vacuum switch

    SciTech Connect

    Earley, L.M.; Barnes, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    A laser-triggered, high-voltage vacuum switch using a triggering pellet embedded in the cathode has been developed. The switch was constructed with tungsten electrodes and used either KC1 or Poco graphite pellets. An aperture in the anode allowed the laser beam to strike the pellet on the cathode surface. Reliable triggering was achieved with only 200 {mu}J of laser energy at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The switch was operated with an A-K gap voltage ranging from 5- to 30-kV with switching currents up to 15 kA peak. The delay time of the switch vaired from 70 {plus minus} 3 ns at 25 kv to 500 {plus minus} 100 ns at 5 kV. 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Ultrafast laser-triggered emission from hafnium carbide tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kealhofer, Catherine; Foreman, Seth M.; Gerlich, Stefan; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2012-07-01

    Electron emission from hafnium carbide (HfC) field emission tips induced by a sub-10-fs, 150-MHz repetition rate Ti:sapphire laser is studied. Two-photon emission is observed at low power with a moderate electric bias field applied to the tips. As the bias field and/or laser power is increased, the average current becomes dominated by thermally enhanced field emission due to laser heating: both the low thermal conductivity of HfC and the laser's high repetition rate can lead to a temperature rise of several hundred Kelvin at the tip apex. The contribution of current from a thermal transient at times shorter than the electron-phonon coupling time is considered in the context of the two-temperature model (TTM). Under the conditions of this experiment, the integrated current from the thermal transient is shown to be negligible in comparison with the two-photon emission. A finite element model of the laser heating and thermal conduction supports these conclusions and is also used to compare the nature of thermal effects in HfC, tungsten, and gold tips.

  5. Proton focusing driven by laser triggered Coulomb explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. Q.; Yin, Y.; Zou, D. B.; Yu, T. P.; Ge, Z. Y.; Xu, H.; Zhuo, H. B.; Shao, F. Q.

    2017-03-01

    A mechanism of the acceleration and focusing of quasi-monoenergetic proton beams from a thin arched carbon-hydrogen target irradiated by a relativistic-intensity laser pulse is investigated by multi-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. As an intense linearly polarized laser pulse impinges on the thin target, a considerable number of electrons are evacuated, leading to Coulomb explosion in the excess positive charges left behind. Accompanying with the acceleration, the protons are focused ballistically in the Coulomb field, which is mainly contributed by the carbon ions. It is demonstrated that a quasi-monoenergetic proton bunch with the energy-density as high as 1017 J/m3 is produced by using a laser pulse with the intensity of 1021 W/cm2. An analytical model is proposed to predict the proton energy and the focal position, which is fairly consistent with PIC simulations.

  6. Experimental study on artificially triggered lightning using high power lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, S.; Shimada, Y.; Yasuda, H.; Yamanaka, C.; Fujita, H.; Izawa, Y.; Yamanaka, T.; Wang, D.; Kawasaki, Z.; Matsu-ura, K.; Ishikubo, Y.; Adachi, M.

    1996-05-01

    A series of laboratory experiments has been conducted to investigate the initiating effects of laser plasma channel on electrical discharge. It was confirmed that the plasma channels reduce the required electrical field strength for electrical discharges to occur by a factor of 6. A field experimental site targeting natural lightning is being prepared. The thunderstorm monitoring system and the laser and optical systems have been developed and tested against various weather conditions. The results from the laboratory experiments and field experiments will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Measurement of laser power for photo-triggered drug delivery in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.; Zhang, X. L.; Liu, F.; Zhang, Z. L.; Chen, Y. J.; Zhao, E. M.; Liu, L.

    2016-07-01

    Thus far, despite many investigations have been carried out for photo-triggered drug delivery systems, most of them suffer from an intrinsic drawback of without real-time monitoring mechanism. Incident intensity of light is a feasible parameter to monitor the drug release profiles. However, it is difficult to measure the incident laser power irradiated onto the photo-triggered carriers in drug delivery systems during in vivo therapy. We design an online measurement method based on the fluorescence intensity ratio (FIR) technique through upconversion nanoparticles. FIR value varies with temperature of sample due to the thermal effect induced by the incident laser, which validates the laser power measurement. Effects of rare earth doping concentration, as well as experimental conditions including laser spots and wavelengths on the measurement behavior were also investigated.

  8. Measurement of laser power for photo-triggered drug delivery in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, R.; Zhang, X. L.; Liu, F.; Zhang, Z. L.; Chen, Y. J.; Zhao, E. M.; Liu, L.

    2016-07-14

    Thus far, despite many investigations have been carried out for photo-triggered drug delivery systems, most of them suffer from an intrinsic drawback of without real-time monitoring mechanism. Incident intensity of light is a feasible parameter to monitor the drug release profiles. However, it is difficult to measure the incident laser power irradiated onto the photo-triggered carriers in drug delivery systems during in vivo therapy. We design an online measurement method based on the fluorescence intensity ratio (FIR) technique through upconversion nanoparticles. FIR value varies with temperature of sample due to the thermal effect induced by the incident laser, which validates the laser power measurement. Effects of rare earth doping concentration, as well as experimental conditions including laser spots and wavelengths on the measurement behavior were also investigated.

  9. Microdosimetric study on influence of low energy photons on relative biological effectiveness under therapeutic conditions using 6 MV linac.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kase, Yuki; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Fujita, Yukio; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Itami, Jun

    2011-08-01

    Microdosimetry has been developed for the evaluation of radiation quality, and single-event dose-mean lineal energy y(D) is well-used to represent the radiation quality. In this study, the changes of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values under the therapeutic conditions using a 6 MV linac were investigated with a microdosimetric method. The y(D) values under the various irradiation conditions for x-rays from a 6 MV linac were measured with a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) at an extremely low dose rate of a few tens of microGy/min by decreasing the gun grid voltage of the linac. According to the microdosimetric kinetic model (MK model), the RBE(MK) values for cell killing of the human salivary gland (HSG) tumor cells can be derived if the y(D) values are obtained from TEPC measurements. The Monte Carlo code GEANT4 was also used to calculate the photon energy distributions and to investigate the changes of the y(D) values under the various conditions. The changes of the y(D) values were less than approximately 10% when the field size and the depth in a phantom varied. However, in the measurements perpendicular to a central beam axis, large changes were observed between the y(D) values inside the field and those outside the field. The maximum increase of approximately 50% in the y(D) value outside the field was obtained compared with those inside the field. The GEANT4 calculations showed that there existed a large relative number of low energy photons outside of the field as compared with inside of the field. The percentages of the photon fluences below 200 keV outside the field were approximately 40% against approximately 8% inside the field. By using the MK model, the field size and the depth dependence of the RBEMK values were less than approximately 2% inside the field. However, the RBEMK values outside the field were 6.6% higher than those inside the field. The increase of the RBE(MK) values by 6.6% outside the field was observed. This

  10. Microdosimetric study on influence of low energy photons on relative biological effectiveness under therapeutic conditions using 6 MV linac

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kase, Yuki; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Fujita, Yukio; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Itami, Jun

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: Microdosimetry has been developed for the evaluation of radiation quality, and single-event dose-mean lineal energy y{sub D} is well-used to represent the radiation quality. In this study, the changes of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values under the therapeutic conditions using a 6 MV linac were investigated with a microdosimetric method. Methods: The y{sub D} values under the various irradiation conditions for x-rays from a 6 MV linac were measured with a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) at an extremely low dose rate of a few tens of {mu}Gy/min by decreasing the gun grid voltage of the linac. According to the microdosimetric kinetic model (MK model), the RBE{sub MK} values for cell killing of the human salivary gland (HSG) tumor cells can be derived if the y{sub D} values are obtained from TEPC measurements. The Monte Carlo code GEANT4 was also used to calculate the photon energy distributions and to investigate the changes of the y{sub D} values under the various conditions. Results: The changes of the y{sub D} values were less than approximately 10% when the field size and the depth in a phantom varied. However, in the measurements perpendicular to a central beam axis, large changes were observed between the y{sub D} values inside the field and those outside the field. The maximum increase of approximately 50% in the y{sub D} value outside the field was obtained compared with those inside the field. The GEANT4 calculations showed that there existed a large relative number of low energy photons outside of the field as compared with inside of the field. The percentages of the photon fluences below 200 keV outside the field were approximately 40% against approximately 8% inside the field. By using the MK model, the field size and the depth dependence of the RBE{sub MK} values were less than approximately 2% inside the field. However, the RBE{sub MK} values outside the field were 6.6% higher than those inside the field

  11. Investigation of GaAs photoconductive switches triggered by 900nm semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Deming; Shi, Wei; Ma, Xiangrong; Wang, Xinmei; Pei, Tao

    2008-12-01

    Experiment of a lateral semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch (SI-GaAs PCSS) with different electrode gaps triggered by 900nm semiconductor laser is reported. With the biased voltage of 0.2KV~3.0KV, the linear electrical pulse is outputted by SI-GaAs PCSS. When laser energy is very low, the semi-insulating GaAs PCSS with 1.5mm electrode gap is triggered by laser pulse, the output electrical pulse samples is instable. When the energy of the laser increases, the amplitude and the width of the electrical pulse also increase. It indicates that a stable electrical pulse is obtained while laser energy is high. With the biased voltage of 2.8kV, the SI-GaAs PCSS with 3mm electrode gap is triggered by laser pulse about 10nJ in 200ns at 900nm. The SI-GaAs PCSS switches a electrical pulse with a voltage up to 80V. The absorption mechanism by Franz-Keldysh effect under high-intensity electric field and EL2 deep level defects is discussed.

  12. Intracerebral delivery of carboplatin in combination with either 6 MV photons or monoenergetic synchrotron X-rays are equally efficacious for treatment of the F98 rat glioma.

    PubMed

    Bobyk, Laure; Edouard, Magali; Deman, Pierre; Rousseau, Julia; Adam, Jean-François; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Estève, François; Balosso, Jacques; Barth, Rolf F; Elleaume, Hélène

    2012-09-20

    The purpose of the present study was to compare side-by-side the therapeutic efficacy of a 6-day infusion of carboplatin, followed by X-irradiation with either 6 MV photons or synchrotron X-rays, tuned above the K-edge of Pt, for treatment of F98 glioma bearing rats. Carboplatin was administered intracerebrally (i.c.) to F98 glioma bearing rats over 6 days using AlzetTM osmotic pumps starting 7 days after tumor implantation. Radiotherapy was delivered in a single 15 Gy fraction on day 14 using a conventional 6 MV linear accelerator (LINAC) or 78.8 keV synchrotron X-rays. Untreated control animals had a median survival time (MeST) of 33 days. Animals that received either carboplatin alone or irradiation alone with either 78.8 keV or 6 MV had a MeSTs 38 and 33 days, respectively. Animals that received carboplatin in combination with X-irradiation had a MeST of > 180 days with a 55% cure rate, irrespective of whether they were irradiated with either 78.8 KeV synchrotron X-rays or 6MV photons. These studies have conclusively demonstrated the equivalency of i.c. delivery of carboplatin in combination with X-irradiation with either 6 MV photons or synchrotron X-rays.

  13. A nanoscale vacuum-tube diode triggered by few-cycle laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Takuya Hommelhoff, Peter; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Liehl, Andreas; Dombi, Péter

    2015-02-02

    We propose and demonstrate a nanoscale vacuum-tube diode triggered by few-cycle near-infrared laser pulses. It represents an ultrafast electronic device based on light fields, exploiting near-field optical enhancement at surfaces of two metal nanotips. The sharper of the two tips displays a stronger field-enhancement, resulting in larger photoemission yields at its surface. One laser pulse with a peak intensity of 4.7 × 10{sup 11 }W/cm{sup 2} triggers photoemission of ∼16 electrons from the sharper cathode tip, while emission from the blunter anode tip is suppressed by 19 dB to ∼0.2 electrons per pulse. Thus, the laser-triggered current between two tips exhibit a rectifying behavior, in analogy to classical vacuum-tube diodes. According to the kinetic energy of the emitted electrons and the distance between the tips, the total operation time of this laser-triggered nanoscale diode is estimated to be below 1 ps.

  14. Infrared laser triggered release of bioactive compounds from single hard shell microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Vöpel, Tobias; Scholz, Rebecca; Davico, Luca; Gross, Magdalena; Büning, Steffen; Kareth, Sabine; Weidner, Eckhard; Ebbinghaus, Simon

    2015-04-25

    Micro composites are commonly characterized in bulk. Here we study the temperature triggered release of a bioactive compound from single isolated microcapsules. We monitor the release process in real-time using a novel thermal microscopy method combining laser-induced heating and fluorescence imaging.

  15. Dosimetric evaluation of the clinical implementation of the first commercial IMRT Monte Carlo treatment planning system at 6 MV

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Emily; Seuntjens, Jan; Sheikh-Bagheri, Daryoush

    2004-10-01

    In this work we dosimetrically evaluated the clinical implementation of a commercial Monte Carlo treatment planning software (PEREGRINE, North American Scientific, Cranberry Township, PA) intended for quality assurance (QA) of intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment plans. Dose profiles calculated in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms using this system were compared to both measurements and simulations using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code for the 6 MV beam of a Varian CL21EX linear accelerator. For simple jaw-defined fields, calculations agree within 2% of the dose at d{sub max} with measurements in homogeneous phantoms with the exception of the buildup region where the calculations overestimate the dose by up to 8%. In heterogeneous lung and bone phantoms the agreement is within 3%, on average, up to 5% for a 1x1 cm{sup 2} field. We tested two consecutive implementations of the MLC model. After matching the calculated and measured MLC leakage, simulations of static and dynamic MLC-defined fields using the most recent MLC model agreed to within 2% with measurements.

  16. Simulation of the 6 MV Elekta Synergy Platform linac photon beam using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission

    PubMed Central

    Didi, Samir; Moussa, Abdelilah; Yahya, Tayalati; Mustafa, Zerfaoui

    2015-01-01

    The present work validates the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission Monte Carlo software for the simulation of a 6 MV photon beam given by Elekta Synergy Platform medical linear accelerator treatment head. The simulation includes the major components of the linear accelerator (LINAC) with multi-leaf collimator and a homogeneous water phantom. Calculations were performed for the photon beam with several treatment field sizes ranging from 5 cm × 5 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm at 100 cm distance from the source. The simulation was successfully validated by comparison with experimental distributions. Good agreement between simulations and measurements was observed, with dose differences of about 0.02% and 2.5% for depth doses and lateral dose profiles, respectively. This agreement was also emphasized by the Kolmogorov–Smirnov goodness-of-fit test and by the gamma-index comparisons where more than 99% of the points for all simulations fulfill the quality assurance criteria of 2 mm/2%. PMID:26500399

  17. Effect of electron contamination of a 6 MV x-ray beam on near surface diode dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C R; Mountford, P J; Moloney, A J

    2006-12-21

    In critical organ in vivo x-ray dosimetry, the relative contaminating electron contribution to the total dose and total detector response outside the field will be different to the corresponding contributions at the central axis detector calibration position, mainly due to the effects of shielding in the linear accelerator head on the electron and x-ray energy spectrum. To investigate these contributions, the electron energy response of a Scanditronix PFD diode was measured using electrons with mean energies from 0.45 to 14.6 MeV, and the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4C was used to calculate the electron energy spectra on the central axis, and at 1 and 10 cm outside the edge of a 4 x 4, 10 x 10 and a 15 x 15 cm(2) 6 MV x-ray field. The electron contribution to the total dose varied from about 8% on the central axis of the smallest field to about 76% at 10 cm outside the edge of the largest field. The electron contribution to the total diode response varied from about 7-8% on the central axis of all three fields to about 58% at 10 cm outside the edge of the smallest field. The results indicated that a near surface x-ray dose measurement with a diode outside the treatment field has to be interpreted with caution and requires knowledge of the relative electron contribution specific to the measurement position and field size.

  18. Monte Carlo Simulation of a 6 MV X-Ray Beam for Open and Wedge Radiation Fields, Using GATE Code

    PubMed Central

    Bahreyni-Toosi, Mohammad-Taghi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Momennezhad, Mahdi; Hasanabadi, Fatemeh; Gholamhosseinian, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a control software system, based on Monte Carlo simulation, and calculations of dosimetric parameters of standard and wedge radiation fields, using a Monte Carlo method. GATE version 6.1 (OpenGATE Collaboration), was used to simulate a compact 6 MV linear accelerator system. In order to accelerate the calculations, the phase-space technique and cluster computing (Condor version 7.2.4, Condor Team, University of Wisconsin–Madison) were used. Dosimetric parameters used in treatment planning systems for the standard and wedge radiation fields (10 cm × 10 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm and a 60° wedge), including the percentage depth dose and dose profiles, were measured by both computational and experimental methods. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results with 3%/3 mm criteria. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results. Almost all calculated data points have satisfied gamma index criteria of 3% to 3 mm. Based on the good agreement between calculated and measured results obtained for various radiation fields in this study, GATE may be used as a useful tool for quality control or pretreatment verification procedures in radiotherapy. PMID:25426430

  19. Monte Carlo Simulation of a 6 MV X-Ray Beam for Open and Wedge Radiation Fields, Using GATE Code.

    PubMed

    Bahreyni-Toosi, Mohammad-Taghi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Momennezhad, Mahdi; Hasanabadi, Fatemeh; Gholamhosseinian, Hamid

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a control software system, based on Monte Carlo simulation, and calculations of dosimetric parameters of standard and wedge radiation fields, using a Monte Carlo method. GATE version 6.1 (OpenGATE Collaboration), was used to simulate a compact 6 MV linear accelerator system. In order to accelerate the calculations, the phase-space technique and cluster computing (Condor version 7.2.4, Condor Team, University of Wisconsin-Madison) were used. Dosimetric parameters used in treatment planning systems for the standard and wedge radiation fields (10 cm × 10 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm and a 60° wedge), including the percentage depth dose and dose profiles, were measured by both computational and experimental methods. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results with 3%/3 mm criteria. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results. Almost all calculated data points have satisfied gamma index criteria of 3% to 3 mm. Based on the good agreement between calculated and measured results obtained for various radiation fields in this study, GATE may be used as a useful tool for quality control or pretreatment verification procedures in radiotherapy.

  20. Measurement of the response of Gd2O2S:Tb phosphor to 6 MV x-rays.

    PubMed

    Glendinning, A G; Hunt, S G; Bonnett, D E

    2001-02-01

    The phosphor GdO2S:Tb is widely used in camera-based electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). There is considerable interest in the application of EPIDs to dosimetry and the verification of intensity modulated radiation therapy produced by dynamic multileaf collimation (DMLC). This paper presents direct measurement of Gd2O2S:Tb phosphor luminescence under 6 MV x-ray irradiation from a linear accelerator using a photomultiplier tube. The luminescence following each radiation pulse (3 micros duration) was observed to decay with a dominant lifetime of 558 micros. Using a specialized electrometer, the temporal variation of the optical signal has been compared with the dose rate incident on the phosphor measured using a semiconductor diode detector. Under dose rates typical of those used in the clinic (1.2 Gy min(-1) to the phosphor), measurements at beam-start confirmed that the optical signal is linear with dose per radiation pulse. Measurements at beam termination following phosphor doses up to 4.4 Gy showed no residual signal associated with long-lived luminescence (afterglow) from the phosphor above the noise level of the optical signal (0.17% standard deviation). This measurement demonstrates that afterglow from Gd2O2S:Tb is not of significance for its application to DMLC verification. Additionally, it was confirmed that the accelerator pulse repetition frequency has no effect on the optical signal from the phosphor in the range 25-400 Hz.

  1. Effect of electron contamination of a 6 MV x-ray beam on near surface diode dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, C. R.; Mountford, P. J.; Moloney, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    In critical organ in vivo x-ray dosimetry, the relative contaminating electron contribution to the total dose and total detector response outside the field will be different to the corresponding contributions at the central axis detector calibration position, mainly due to the effects of shielding in the linear accelerator head on the electron and x-ray energy spectrum. To investigate these contributions, the electron energy response of a Scanditronix PFD diode was measured using electrons with mean energies from 0.45 to 14.6 MeV, and the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4C was used to calculate the electron energy spectra on the central axis, and at 1 and 10 cm outside the edge of a 4 × 4, 10 × 10 and a 15 × 15 cm2 6 MV x-ray field. The electron contribution to the total dose varied from about 8% on the central axis of the smallest field to about 76% at 10 cm outside the edge of the largest field. The electron contribution to the total diode response varied from about 7-8% on the central axis of all three fields to about 58% at 10 cm outside the edge of the smallest field. The results indicated that a near surface x-ray dose measurement with a diode outside the treatment field has to be interpreted with caution and requires knowledge of the relative electron contribution specific to the measurement position and field size.

  2. Measurement of the response of Gd2O2S:Tb phosphor to 6 MV x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendinning, A. G.; Hunt, S. G.; Bonnett, D. E.

    2001-02-01

    The phosphor Gd2O2S:Tb is widely used in camera-based electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). There is considerable interest in the application of EPIDs to dosimetry and the verification of intensity modulated radiation therapy produced by dynamic multileaf collimation (DMLC). This paper presents direct measurement of Gd2O2S:Tb phosphor luminescence under 6 MV x-ray irradiation from a linear accelerator using a photomultiplier tube. The luminescence following each radiation pulse (3 µs duration) was observed to decay with a dominant lifetime of 558 µs. Using a specialized electrometer, the temporal variation of the optical signal has been compared with the dose rate incident on the phosphor measured using a semiconductor diode detector. Under dose rates typical of those used in the clinic (1.2 Gy min -1 to the phosphor), measurements at beam-start confirmed that the optical signal is linear with dose per radiation pulse. Measurements at beam termination following phosphor doses up to 4.4 Gy showed no residual signal associated with long-lived luminescence (afterglow) from the phosphor above the noise level of the optical signal (0.17% standard deviation). This measurement demonstrates that afterglow from Gd2O2S:Tb is not of significance for its application to DMLC verification. Additionally, it was confirmed that the accelerator pulse repetition frequency has no effect on the optical signal from the phosphor in the range 25-400 Hz.

  3. Simulation of the 6 MV Elekta Synergy Platform linac photon beam using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission.

    PubMed

    Didi, Samir; Moussa, Abdelilah; Yahya, Tayalati; Mustafa, Zerfaoui

    2015-01-01

    The present work validates the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission Monte Carlo software for the simulation of a 6 MV photon beam given by Elekta Synergy Platform medical linear accelerator treatment head. The simulation includes the major components of the linear accelerator (LINAC) with multi-leaf collimator and a homogeneous water phantom. Calculations were performed for the photon beam with several treatment field sizes ranging from 5 cm × 5 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm at 100 cm distance from the source. The simulation was successfully validated by comparison with experimental distributions. Good agreement between simulations and measurements was observed, with dose differences of about 0.02% and 2.5% for depth doses and lateral dose profiles, respectively. This agreement was also emphasized by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit test and by the gamma-index comparisons where more than 99% of the points for all simulations fulfill the quality assurance criteria of 2 mm/2%.

  4. Integrating a MRI scanner with a 6 MV radiotherapy accelerator: dose deposition in a transverse magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Raaymakers, B W; Raaijmakers, A J E; Kotte, A N T J; Jette, D; Lagendijk, J J W

    2004-09-07

    Integrating magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) functionality with a radiotherapy accelerator can facilitate on-line, soft-tissue based, position verification. A technical feasibility study, in collaboration with Elekta Oncology Systems and Philips Medical Systems, led to the preliminary design specifications of a MRI accelerator. Basically the design is a 6 MV accelerator rotating around a 1.5 T MRI system. Several technical issues and the clinical rational are currently under investigation. The aim of this paper is to determine the impact of the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field on the dose deposition. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the dose deposition kernel in the presence of 1.5 T. This kernel in turn was used to determine the dose deposition for larger fields. Also simulations and measurements were done in the presence of 1.1 T. The pencil beam dose deposition is asymmetric. For larger fields the asymmetry persists but decreases. For the latter the distance to dose maximum is reduced by approximately 5 mm, the penumbra is increased by approximately 1 mm, and the 50% isodose line is shifted approximately 1 mm. The dose deposition in the presence of 1.5 T is affected, but the effect can be taken into account in a conventional treatment planning procedure. The impact of the altered dose deposition for clinical IMRT treatments is the topic of further research.

  5. Accelerator mass spectrometry of 26Al at 6 MV using AlO- ions and a gas-filled magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miltenberger, Klaus-Ulrich; Müller, Arnold Milenko; Suter, Martin; Synal, Hans-Arno; Vockenhuber, Christof

    2017-09-01

    For accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements of 26Al the use of AlO- ions holds considerable promise given their ionization yield which is about an order of magnitude higher compared to the commonly used Al- ions. However, the strong isobaric interference introduced by 26MgO- ions must be reduced before the identification in a gas ionization chamber (GIC). At the ETH Zurich 6 MV EN-TANDEM accelerator the foil degrader method as well as the gas-filled magnet (GFM) method were systematically investigated with respect to suppression of 26Mg and acceptance of 26Al. Additionally a new, large-acceptance GIC was designed to capture as large a fraction of the broad beams as possible. The GFM method achieves a 26Mg suppression factor of 103 and an acceptance of 26Al of > 50 % and therefore provides a significant advantage over the degrader foil method (sFoil (26Mg) ≈ 3 ·102,τFoil (26Al) ≈ 30 %). In combination with the 26Mg separation of 104 in the GIC it is now possible to measure samples with a Mg content in the ppm range down to 26Al/27Al ≈10-14 with an overall efficiency that is approximately 5 × improved with respect to the previous TANDEM setup.

  6. Design and investigation of a multichannel laser-triggered vacuum switch.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenfang; He, Zhenghao; Mao, Xiaopo

    2016-03-01

    A laser-triggered vacuum switch (LTVS) is an advanced closing switch with nanosecond delay and jitter. In order to enhance hold-off voltage and extend the service lifetime of an LTVS, we designed a multichannel laser-triggered vacuum switch (MLTVS) utilizing a cone-shaped target electrode placed on the cathode platform. The fabrication and testing of the MLTVS is described in this paper. Experimental results show that the working voltage of the MLTVS with a gap distance of 12 mm is from 30 V to 20 kV. The threshold energy for triggering the switch is 0.4 mJ corresponding to a peak power density of 27.9 MW/cm(2). The triggering lifetime of a spot can reach up to 18,000 shots. In addition, the relationship between triggering lifetime and target materials is analyzed using a field emission scanning electron microscope. A hypothesis of the vacuum gap's triggering mechanism is discussed based on the measured results.

  7. Design and investigation of a multichannel laser-triggered vacuum switch

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Wenfang He, Zhenghao; Mao, Xiaopo

    2016-03-15

    A laser-triggered vacuum switch (LTVS) is an advanced closing switch with nanosecond delay and jitter. In order to enhance hold-off voltage and extend the service lifetime of an LTVS, we designed a multichannel laser-triggered vacuum switch (MLTVS) utilizing a cone-shaped target electrode placed on the cathode platform. The fabrication and testing of the MLTVS is described in this paper. Experimental results show that the working voltage of the MLTVS with a gap distance of 12 mm is from 30 V to 20 kV. The threshold energy for triggering the switch is 0.4 mJ corresponding to a peak power density of 27.9 MW/cm{sup 2}. The triggering lifetime of a spot can reach up to 18 000 shots. In addition, the relationship between triggering lifetime and target materials is analyzed using a field emission scanning electron microscope. A hypothesis of the vacuum gap’s triggering mechanism is discussed based on the measured results.

  8. Process Properties of Electronic High Voltage Discharges Triggered by Ultra-short Pulsed Laser Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvecek, Kristian; Gröschel, Benjamin; Schmidt, Michael

    Remote processing of metallic workpieces by techniques based on electric arc discharge or laser irradiation for joining or cutting has a long tradition and is still being intensively investigated in present-day research. In applications that require high power processing, both approaches exhibit certain advantages and disadvantages that make them specific for a given task. While several hybrid approaches exist that try to combine the benefits of both techniques, none were as successful in providing a fixed electric discharge direction as discharges triggered by plasma filaments generated by ultra-short pulsed lasers. In this work we investigate spatial and temporal aspects of laser filament guided discharges and give an upper time delay between the filament creation and the electrical build-up of a dischargeable voltage for a successful filament triggered discharge.

  9. Lifetime of high-power GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch triggered by laser of different power density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Wei; Shen, Yi; Shi, Jinshui; Zhang, Linwen; Xia, Liansheng

    2015-02-01

    Conduction modes of GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) and their conditions are expounded. Laser diode and high-power picosecond Nd:YAG lasers are used as triggers for nonlinear mode and quasi-linear mode respectively in high-power conduction experiment. GaAs PCSS`s failure mechanisms and factors influencing lifetime in both modes are analyzed. It is found that the power density of laser at trigger time determines in which mode GaAs PCSS operates. Low-power laser triggers a nonlinear mode conduction in which GaAs PCSS`s lifetime is only 103, while high-power laser triggers a quasi-linear mode conduction in which GaAs PCSS`s lifetime is up to 105. According to the findings, the compact high-power pulsed power system based on mass of GaAs PCSSs demands for miniature high-power laser generators.

  10. Density and lifetime evaluation of weakly ionized plasma for laser-triggered lightning by means of laser absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaura, Michiteru

    2006-10-01

    The potential ability of lasers to control lightning can be improved by using a train of pulses with sub-millisecond separations [1-2]. Laser-triggered experiments in a small-scale (10 mm gap) atmospheric discharge facility show that the triggering is dramatically enhanced when a five-pulse train of sub-Joule energy is used instead of a single pulse. This effect increases rapidly as the pulse interval is reduced. In order to evaluate the trigger effect quantitatively, the plasma density produced by a pulsed KrF excimer laser with high repetition rate of kHz order was measured by means of laser absorption [3-4]. It appears that at a sub-millisecond pulse interval, sufficient positive and negative ions survive in subsequent pulses, thus enabling easy deionization. Hence, significant plasma build-up occurs from one pulse to the next. However, this persistence of ions would appear to imply that the rate of recombination (effectively a charge transfer between ions) is considerably lower than previously believed. References [1] M.Yamaura, et al: J.Appl.Phys. 95, 6007 (2004). [2] M.Yamaura,et al : Appl.Phys Lett. 86 131502 (2005). [3] M.Yamaura: J.Appl.Phys.98 043101 (2005) [4] M.Yamaura,et al : Appl.Phys Lett. 88 to be appeared in June (2006)

  11. Accurate dosimetry with GafChromic EBT film of a 6 MV photon beam in water: What level is achievable?

    SciTech Connect

    Battum, L. J. van; Hoffmans, D.; Piersma, H.; Heukelom, S.

    2008-02-15

    This paper focuses on the accuracy, in absolute dose measurements, with GafChromic EBT film achievable in water for a 6 MV photon beam up to a dose of 2.3 Gy. Motivation is to get an absolute dose detection system to measure up dose distributions in a (water) phantom, to check dose calculations. An Epson 1680 color (red green blue) transmission flatbed scanner has been used as film scanning system, where the response in the red color channel has been extracted and used for the analyses. The influence of the flatbed film scanner on the film based dose detection process was investigated. The scan procedure has been optimized; i.e. for instance a lateral correction curve was derived to correct the scan value, up to 10%, as a function of optical density and lateral position. Sensitometric curves of different film batches were evaluated in portrait and landscape scan mode. Between various batches important variations in sensitometric curve were observed. Energy dependence of the film is negligible, while a slight variation in dose response is observed for very large angles between film surface and incident photon beam. Improved accuracy in absolute dose detection can be obtained by repetition of a film measurement to tackle at least the inherent presence of film inhomogeneous construction. We state that the overall uncertainty is random in absolute EBT film dose detection and of the order of 1.3% (1 SD) under the condition that the film is scanned in a limited centered area on the scanner and at least two films have been applied. At last we advise to check a new film batch on its characteristics compared to available information, before using that batch for absolute dose measurements.

  12. Impact of 6MV photon beam attenuation by carbon fiber couch and immobilization devices in IMRT planning and dose delivery.

    PubMed

    Munjal, R K; Negi, P S; Babu, A G; Sinha, S N; Anand, A K; Kataria, T

    2006-04-01

    Multiple fields in IMRT and optimization allow conformal dose to the target and reduced dose to the surroundings and the regions of interest. Thus we can escalate the dose to the target to achieve better tumor control with low morbidity. Orientation of multiple beams can be achieved by i) different gantry angles, ii) rotating patient's couch isocentrically. In doing so, one or more beam may pass through different materials like the treatment couch, immobilization cast fixation plate, head and neck rest or any other supportive device. Our observations for 6MV photon beam on PRIMUS-KXE2 with MED-TEC carbon fiber tabletop and 10 × 10 cm(2) field size reveals that the maximum dose attenuation by the couch was of the order of 2.96% from gantry angle 120-160°. Attenuation due to cast fixation base plate of PMMA alone was of the order of 5.8-10.55% at gantry angle between 0 and 90°. Attenuation due to carbon fiber base plate alone was 3.8-7.98%. Attenuation coefficient of carbon fiber and PMMA was evaluated and was of the order of 0.082 cm(-1) and 0.064 cm(-1) respectively. Most of the TPS are configured for direct beam incidence attenuation correction factors only. Whereas when the beam is obliquely incident on the couch, base plate, headrest and any other immobilization device get attenuated more than the direct beam incidence. The correction factors for oblique incidence beam attenuation are not configured in most of the commercially available treatment planning systems. Therefore, such high variations in dose delivery could lead to under-dosage to the target volume for treatments requiring multiple fields in IMRT and 3D-CRT and need to be corrected for monitor unit calculations.

  13. A new range of high-current Tandetron TM accelerator systems with terminal voltages of 1-6 MV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mous, D. J. W.; Visser, J.; Gottdang, A.; Haitsma, R. G.

    2004-06-01

    HVE has designed a range of high-current Tandetrons TM with terminal voltages of 1 MV up to 6 MV. Characteristic for the accelerator design is the coaxial construction of the all-solid-state power supply that is wrapped around the high-energy acceleration tube. Equipped with a new all-solid-state RF driver, the Tandetrons TM are able to provide ion beams with output powers in excess of 10 kW and are as such suitable for applications like neutron production in biomedical research, boron neutron capture therapy, isotope production for positron emission tomography, as well as explosives detection using pulsed fast neutron analysis. Recently, a 1.25 MV version has passed the pre-delivery factory tests during which it was conditioned up to 1.5 MV and has delivered more than 1 mA target current. It will be used as a source of intermediate energy neutrons for the quantification of Al in human tissues. This specific application draws on the high-current capability of the Tandetron TM. The injector is equipped with one multi-cusp ion source, but injectors can comprise two multi-cusp ion sources with output currents of up to several mA's for H/D and more than 100 μA for He. A 2 MV/1 mA version of the high-current range is currently under construction for the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. A recently installed 5 MV version of this range of Tandetrons TM dedicated to scientific research has demonstrated terminal voltage ripple below 10 -5 as well as an extremely fast transient response.

  14. Accurate dosimetry with GafChromic EBT film of a 6 MV photon beam in water: what level is achievable?

    PubMed

    van Battum, L J; Hoffmans, D; Piersma, H; Heukelom, S

    2008-02-01

    This paper focuses on the accuracy, in absolute dose measurements, with GafChromicTM EBT film achievable in water for a 6 MV photon beam up to a dose of 2.3 Gy. Motivation is to get an absolute dose detection system to measure up dose distributions in a (water) phantom, to check dose calculations. An Epson 1680 color (red green blue) transmission flatbed scanner has been used as film scanning system, where the response in the red color channel has been extracted and used for the analyses. The influence of the flatbed film scanner on the film based dose detection process was investigated. The scan procedure has been optimized; i.e. for instance a lateral correction curve was derived to correct the scan value, up to 10%, as a function of optical density and lateral position. Sensitometric curves of different film batches were evaluated in portrait and landscape scan mode. Between various batches important variations in sensitometric curve were observed. Energy dependence of the film is negligible, while a slight variation in dose response is observed for very large angles between film surface and incident photon beam. Improved accuracy in absolute dose detection can be obtained by repetition of a film measurement to tackle at least the inherent presence of film inhomogeneous construction. We state that the overall uncertainty is random in absolute EBT film dose detection and of the order of 1.3% (1 SD) under the condition that the film is scanned in a limited centered area on the scanner and at least two films have been applied. At last we advise to check a new film batch on its characteristics compared to available information, before using that batch for absolute dose measurements.

  15. Commissioning of 6 MV medical linac for dynamic MLC-based IMRT on Monte Carlo code GEANT4.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Yukio; Sakama, Kyoko; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Itami, Jun; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2014-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is the most accurate tool for calculating dose distributions. In particular, the Electron Gamma shower computer code has been widely used for multi-purpose research in radiotherapy, but Monte Carlo GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) is rare for radiotherapy with photon beams and needs to be verified further under various irradiation conditions, particularly multi-leaf collimator-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (MLC-based IMRT). In this study, GEANT4 was used for modeling of a 6 MV linac for dynamic MLC-based IMRT. To verify the modeling of our linac, we compared the calculated data with the measured depth-dose for a 10 × 10 cm(2) field and the measured dose profile for a 35 × 35 cm(2) field. Moreover, 120 MLCs were modeled on the GEANT4. Five tests of MLC modeling were performed: (I) MLC transmission, (II) MLC transmission profile including intra- and inter-leaf leakage, (III) tongue-and-groove leakage, (IV) a simple field with different field sizes by use of MLC and (V) a dynamic MLC-based IMRT field. For all tests, the calculations were compared with measurements of an ionization chamber and radiographic film. The calculations agreed with the measurements: MLC transmissions by calculations and measurements were 1.76 ± 0.01 and 1.87 ± 0.01 %, respectively. In gamma evaluation method (3 %/3 mm), the pass rates of the (IV) and (V) tests were 98.5 and 97.0 %, respectively. Furthermore, tongue-and-groove leakage could be calculated by GEANT4, and it agreed with the film measurements. The procedure of commissioning of dynamic MLC-based IMRT for GEANT4 is proposed in this study.

  16. A comparison of small-field tissue phantom ratio data generation methods for an Elekta Agility 6 MV photon beam.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Neil; Brackenridge, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-phantom ratios (TPRs) are a common dosimetric quantity used to describe the change in dose with depth in tissue. These can be challenging and time consuming to measure. The conversion of percentage depth dose (PDD) data using standard formulae is widely employed as an alternative method in generating TPR. However, the applicability of these formulae for small fields has been questioned in the literature. Functional representation has also been proposed for small-field TPR production. This article compares measured TPR data for small 6 MV photon fields against that generated by conversion of PDD using standard formulae to assess the efficacy of the conversion data. By functionally fitting the measured TPR data for square fields greater than 4cm in length, the TPR curves for smaller fields are generated and compared with measurements. TPRs and PDDs were measured in a water tank for a range of square field sizes. The PDDs were converted to TPRs using standard formulae. TPRs for fields of 4 × 4cm(2) and larger were used to create functional fits. The parameterization coefficients were used to construct extrapolated TPR curves for 1 × 1 cm(2), 2 × 2-cm(2), and 3 × 3-cm(2) fields. The TPR data generated using standard formulae were in excellent agreement with direct TPR measurements. The TPR data for 1 × 1-cm(2), 2 × 2-cm(2), and 3 × 3-cm(2) fields created by extrapolation of the larger field functional fits gave inaccurate initial results. The corresponding mean differences for the 3 fields were 4.0%, 2.0%, and 0.9%. Generation of TPR data using a standard PDD-conversion methodology has been shown to give good agreement with our directly measured data for small fields. However, extrapolation of TPR data using the functional fit to fields of 4 × 4cm(2) or larger resulted in generation of TPR curves that did not compare well with the measured data.

  17. SU-E-J-38: Comparison of 6MV Photon Dose in a Perpendicular and Parallel Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Ghila, A; Fallone, B; Rathee, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Integrating a linac with an MRI system would allow for real time tumour tracking however the patient will be irradiated in the presence of a magnetic field. The present study experimentally investigates the magnetic field effects on entrance, exit, and interface dose for both transverse and parallel magnetic fields. Methods: Polystyrene was used to construct a set of phantoms for Gafchromic film measurements. One phantom had an adjustable air gap and four other phantoms had one surface at various angles. The linac-MR prototype consisting of a biplanar permanent magnet coupled to a linac was used for the transverse magnetic field measurements. A couple of solenoid electromagnets, stacked on top of each other and irradiated along their bore, were used for the parallel field measurements. Results: All doses are relative to no magnetic field. The transverse magnetic field reduced the entrance dose for all surface angles by strongly deflecting the contaminant electrons. The exit dose in a transverse magnetic field was found to be significantly higher. The entrance dose with a parallel magnetic field present is higher due to the contaminant electrons being concentrated within the beam area. The air gap phantom measurements, done in a transverse magnetic field, show a significant increase of the dose at the proximal side of the air gap and a decrease at the distal side. The measurements, done in the parallel magnetic field, show the concentration of secondary electrons in the air gap. Conclusion: The radiation dose measurements of a 6MV beam in a parallel and transverse magnetic field presented here are currently being replicated using Monte Carlo simulations. This verified Monte Carlo system could provide the dose calculation basis for future linac-MR systems.

  18. Triggering GaAs lock-on switches with laser diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Buttram, M.T.; Helgeson, W.D.; McLaughlin, D.L.; O'Malley, M.W.; Zutavern, F.J. ); Rosen, A.; Stabile, P.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Laser diode arrays have been used to trigger GaAs Photoconducting Semiconductor Switches (PCSS) charged to voltages of up to 60 kV and conducting currents of 580 A. The driving forces behind the use of laser diode arrays are compactness, elimination of complicated optics, and the ability to run at high repetition rates. Laser diode arrays are compactness, elimination of complicated optics, and the ability to run at high repetition rates. Laser diode arrays can trigger GaAs at high fields as the result of a new switching mode (lock-on) with very high carrier number gain. We have achieved switching of up to 10 MW in a 60 {Omega} system, with a pulse rise time of 500 ps. At 1.2 MW we have achieved repetition rates of 1 kHz with switch rise time of 500 ps for 10{sup 5} shots. The laser diode array used for these experiments delivers a 166 W pulse. In a single shot mode we have switched 4 kA with a flash lamp pumped laser and 600 A with the 166 W array. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Triggering GaAs lock-on switches with laser diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loubriel, G. M.; Helgeson, W. D.; McLaughlin, D. L.; Omalley, M. W.; Zutavern, F. J.; Rosen, A.; Stabile, P. J.

    Many of the applications that require the unique capabilities of Photoconductive Semiconductor Switches (PCSS) demand a compact package. We have been able to demonstrate that GaAs switches operated in the high gain mode called lock-on meet the required electrical switching parameters of several such applications using small switch sizes. The only light source that has enough power to trigger a PCSS and is compatible with a small package is a laser diode. This paper will describe the progress that leads to the triggering of high power PCSS switches with laser diodes. Our goal is to switch up to 5 kA in a single shot mode and up to 100 MW repetitively at up to 10 kHz. These goals are feasible since the switches can be used in parallel or in series. Low light level triggering became possible after the discovery of a high electric field, high gain switching mode in GaAs (and later in InP). At electric fields below 3 kV/cm GaAs switches are activated by creation of, at most, only one conduction electron-valence hole pair per photon absorbed in the sample. This linear mode demands high laser power and, after the light is extinguished, the carriers live for only a few nanoseconds. At higher electric fields GaAs behaves as a light activated Zener diode. The laser light generates carriers as in the linear mode and the field induces gain such that the amount of light required to trigger the switch is reduced by a factor of up to 500. The gain continues until the field across the sample drops to a material dependent lock-on field. At this point the switch will carry as much current as, and for as long as, the circuit can maintain the lock-on field. The gain in the switch allows for the use of laser diodes.

  20. Triggering GaAs lock-on switches with laser diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Helgeson, W.D.; McLaughlin, D.L.; O'Malley, M.W.; Zutavern, F.J. ); Rosen, A.; Stabile, P.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Many of the applications that require the unique capabilities of Photoconductive Semiconductor Switches (PCSS) demand a compact package. We have been able to demonstrate that GaAs switches operated in the high gain mode called lock-on'' meet the required electrical switching parameters of several such applications using small switch sizes. The only light source that has enough power to trigger a PCSS and is compatible with a small package is a laser diode. This paper will describe the progress that leads to the triggering of high power PCSS switches with laser diodes. Our goal is to switch up to 5 kA in a single shot mode and up to 100 MW repetitively at up to 10 kHz. These goals are feasible since the switches can be used in parallel or in series. Low light level triggering became possible after the discovery of a high electric field, high gain switching mode in GaAs (and later in InP). At electric fields below 3 kV/cm GaAs switches are activated by creation of, at most, only one conduction electron- valence hole pair per photon absorbed in the sample. This linear mode demands high laser power and, after the light is extinguished, the carriers live for only a few nanoseconds. At higher electric fields GaAs behaves as a light activated Zener diode. The laser light generates carriers as in the linear mode and the field induces gain such that the amount of light required to trigger the switch is reduced by a factor of up to 500. The gain continues until the field across the sample drops to a material dependent lock-on field. At this point the switch will carry as much current as, and for as long as, the circuit can maintain the lock-on field. The gain in the switch allows for the use of laser diodes. 8 refs., 11 figs.

  1. Density and lifetime evaluation of weakly ionized plasma for laser-triggered lightning by means of laser absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaura, Michiteru

    2007-10-01

    The potential ability of lasers to control lightning can be improved by using a train of pulses with sub-millisecond separations [1-2]. Laser-triggered experiments in a small-scale (10 mm gap) atmospheric discharge facility show that the triggering is dramatically enhanced when a five-pulse train of sub-Joule energy is used instead of a single pulse. This effect increases rapidly as the pulse interval is reduced. It appears that at a sub-millisecond pulse interval, sufficient positive and negative ions survive in subsequent pulses, thus enabling easy deionization. Hence, significant plasma build-up occurs from one pulse to the next. However, this persistence of ions would appear to imply that the rate of recombination (effectively a charge transfer between ions) is considerably lower than previously believed. [1] M. Yamaura: Appl. Phys Lett. 88 251501 (2006). [2] M. Yamaura: J. Appl. Phys. 98 043101 (2005).

  2. Improvement of the atmospheric discharge laser-triggered ability using multiple pulses from a kilohertz KrF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaura, Michiteru

    2005-08-01

    The potential ability of lasers to control lightning can be improved by using a train of pulses with submillisecond separations. Laser-triggered experiments in a small-scale (10-mm gap) atmospheric discharge facility show that the triggering is dramatically enhanced when a five-pulse train of sub-Joule energy is used instead of a single pulse. This effect increases rapidly as the pulse interval is reduced. It appears that at a submillisecond pulse interval, sufficient positive and negative ions survive in subsequent pulses, thus enabling easy deionization. Hence, significant plasma buildup occurs from one pulse to the next. However, this persistence of ions would appear to imply that the rate of recombination (effectively a charge transfer between ions) is considerably lower than previously believed.

  3. Laser-triggered release of encapsulated molecules from polylactic-co-glycolic acid microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyasu, Kazumasa; Ishii, Atsuhiro; Umemoto, Taiga; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2016-08-01

    The controlled release of encapsulated molecules from a microcapsule is a promising method of targeted drug delivery. Laser-triggered methods for the release of encapsulated molecules have the advantage of spatial and temporal controllability. In this study, we demonstrated the release of encapsulated molecules from biodegradable polymer-based microcapsules using near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses. The polylactic-co-glycolic acid microcapsules encapsulating fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran molecules were fabricated using a dual-coaxial nozzle system. Irradiation of femtosecond laser pulses enhanced the release of the molecules from the microcapsules, which was accompanied by a decrease in the residual ratio of the microcapsules. The laser-induced modification of the surface of the shell of the microcapsules indicated the potential for sustained release as well as burst release.

  4. Characteristics of moderate current vacuum discharge triggered by multipicosecond and nanosecond duration laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Moorti, A.; Kumbhare, S.R.; Naik, P.A.; Gupta, P.D.; Romanov, I.V.; Korobkin, Yu.V.; Rupasov, A.A.; Shikanov, A.S.

    2005-02-15

    A comparative study of the characteristics of moderate-current ({approx}10 kA), low-energy ({<=}20 J) vacuum discharge triggered by multipicosecond and nanosecond duration laser pulses is performed. Temporal profiles of the x-ray emission, discharge current, and anode voltage measured in vacuum discharge created between a planar titanium cathode and a conical point-tip anode are observed to be quite different for the two regimes of the laser pulse duration. While cathode plasma jet pinching is clearly observed in the discharge created by low-energy ({approx}5 mJ), 27 ps full width at half-maximum (FWHM) laser pulses, a feeble pinching occurred for 4 ns (FWHM) laser pulses only above a threshold energy of {approx}250 mJ. In addition to the multiple K-shell x-ray pulses emitted from the titanium anode up to 100 ns, evidence of a much harder x-ray component (h{nu}>100 keV) is also seen in the discharge triggered by picosecond laser pulses.

  5. Pulsed laser triggered high speed microfluidic fluorescence activated cell sorter†‡

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Chen, Yue; Park, Sung-Yong; Hong, Jason; Teslaa, Tara; Zhong, Jiang F.; Di Carlo, Dino; Teitell, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    We report a high speed and high purity pulsed laser triggered fluorescence activated cell sorter (PLACS) with a sorting throughput up to 20 000 mammalian cells s−1 with 37% sorting purity, 90% cell viability in enrichment mode, and >90% purity in high purity mode at 1500 cells s−1 or 3000 beads s−1. Fast switching (30 μs) and a small perturbation volume (~90 pL) is achieved by a unique sorting mechanism in which explosive vapor bubbles are generated using focused laser pulses in a single layer microfluidic PDMS channel. PMID:22361780

  6. A comparison of small-field tissue phantom ratio data generation methods for an Elekta Agility 6 MV photon beam

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Neil Brackenridge, Robert

    2014-04-01

    Tissue-phantom ratios (TPRs) are a common dosimetric quantity used to describe the change in dose with depth in tissue. These can be challenging and time consuming to measure. The conversion of percentage depth dose (PDD) data using standard formulae is widely employed as an alternative method in generating TPR. However, the applicability of these formulae for small fields has been questioned in the literature. Functional representation has also been proposed for small-field TPR production. This article compares measured TPR data for small 6 MV photon fields against that generated by conversion of PDD using standard formulae to assess the efficacy of the conversion data. By functionally fitting the measured TPR data for square fields greater than 4 cm in length, the TPR curves for smaller fields are generated and compared with measurements. TPRs and PDDs were measured in a water tank for a range of square field sizes. The PDDs were converted to TPRs using standard formulae. TPRs for fields of 4 × 4 cm{sup 2} and larger were used to create functional fits. The parameterization coefficients were used to construct extrapolated TPR curves for 1 × 1 cm{sup 2}, 2 × 2-cm{sup 2}, and 3 × 3-cm{sup 2} fields. The TPR data generated using standard formulae were in excellent agreement with direct TPR measurements. The TPR data for 1 × 1-cm{sup 2}, 2 × 2-cm{sup 2}, and 3 × 3-cm{sup 2} fields created by extrapolation of the larger field functional fits gave inaccurate initial results. The corresponding mean differences for the 3 fields were 4.0%, 2.0%, and 0.9%. Generation of TPR data using a standard PDD-conversion methodology has been shown to give good agreement with our directly measured data for small fields. However, extrapolation of TPR data using the functional fit to fields of 4 × 4 cm{sup 2} or larger resulted in generation of TPR curves that did not compare well with the measured data.

  7. Study of the response of plastic scintillation detectors in small-field 6 MV photon beams by Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lilie L. W.; Beddar, Sam

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the response of plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) in a 6 MV photon beam of various field sizes using Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Three PSDs were simulated: A BC-400 and a BCF-12, each attached to a plastic-core optical fiber, and a BC-400 attached to an air-core optical fiber. PSD response was calculated as the detector dose per unit water dose for field sizes ranging from 10x10 down to 0.5x0.5 cm{sup 2} for both perpendicular and parallel orientations of the detectors to an incident beam. Similar calculations were performed for a CC01 compact chamber. The off-axis dose profiles were calculated in the 0.5x0.5 cm{sup 2} photon beam and were compared to the dose profile calculated for the CC01 chamber and that calculated in water without any detector. The angular dependence of the PSDs' responses in a small photon beam was studied. Results: In the perpendicular orientation, the response of the BCF-12 PSD varied by only 0.5% as the field size decreased from 10x10 to 0.5x0.5 cm{sup 2}, while the response of BC-400 PSD attached to a plastic-core fiber varied by more than 3% at the smallest field size because of its longer sensitive region. In the parallel orientation, the response of both PSDs attached to a plastic-core fiber varied by less than 0.4% for the same range of field sizes. For the PSD attached to an air-core fiber, the response varied, at most, by 2% for both orientations. Conclusions: The responses of all the PSDs investigated in this work can have a variation of only 1%-2% irrespective of field size and orientation of the detector if the length of the sensitive region is not more than 2 mm long and the optical fiber stems are prevented from pointing directly to the incident source.

  8. UV laser triggering of crowbars used in the Sandia lightning simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, M. J.; Brigham, W. P.

    The techniques of IR and UV laser triggered switching of gaps were applied to crowbar switching two Marx generators, delivering greater than or equal to 250 to 50 kA in small and large impedance loads. Crowbar switching delays of 0.08 to 0.28 (MU)s were observed if the laser radiation arrived in the crowbar gaps when its voltage was 44% of its maximum applied voltage or at 23 to 68% of its self break voltage. A 5.0 cm crowbar gap with 35 mJ of lambda = 249 nm radiation was successfully triggered when filled with 80 psig of SF6. Electrodes operated with 40 Coulombs of charge for 47 shots without detrimental surface damage.

  9. Fast ion generation in the cathode plasma jet of a multipicosecond laser-triggered vacuum discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Moorti, A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2010-03-15

    Ion generation in the cathode plasma jet of a moderate-current ({approx}2.3 kA), low-energy ({<=}20 J) vacuum spark discharge triggered by {approx}27 ps, 10 mJ laser pulses is studied using time of flight technique. Fastest ion velocity and velocity corresponding to the peak of the time of flight signals for Al cathode were measured to be {approx}5.25x10{sup 8} cm/s (energy of {approx}143 keV/u) and {approx}8.1x10{sup 7} cm/s (energy of {approx}3.4 keV/u), respectively. Corresponding velocities in the case of ions generated from laser-produced Al plasma (energy of {approx}550 mJ, intensity of {approx}10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) were found to be much smaller, viz., {approx}1.05x10{sup 8} cm/s (energy of {approx}5.75 keV/u) and {approx}2.63x10{sup 7} cm/s (energy of {approx}0.36 keV/u), respectively. Study shows efficient acceleration of ions in a current-carrying cathode plasma jet of a small-energy multipicosecond laser-triggered spark discharge as compared with that in a high-energy multipicosecond laser-produced plasma plume.

  10. Skin dose estimation for various beam modifiers and source-to-surface distances for 6MV photons

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Girigesh; Yadav, R. S.; Kumar, Alok

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to learn the skin dose estimation for various beam modifiers at various source-to-surface distances (SSDs) for a 6 MV photon. Surface and buildup region doses were measured with an acrylic slab phantom and Markus 0.055 cc parallel plate (PP) ionization chamber. Measurements were carried out for open fields, motorized wedge fields, acrylic block tray fields ranging from 3 × 3 cm2 to 30 × 30 cm2. Twenty-five percent of the field was blocked with a cerrobend block and a Multileaf collimator (MLC). The effect of the blocks on the skin dose was measured for a 20 × 20 cm2 field size, at 80 cm, 100 cm and 120 cm SSD. During the use of isocentric treatments, whereby the tumor is positioned at 100 cm from the source, depending on the depth of the tumor and size of the patient, the SSD can vary from 80 cm to 100 cm. To achieve a larger field size, the SSD can also be extended up to 120 cm at times. The skin dose increased as field size increased. The skin dose for the open 10 ×10 cm2 field was 15.5%, 14.8% and 15.5% at 80 cm, 100 cm and 120 cm SSDs, respectively. The skin dose due to a motorized 60° wedge for the 10 × 10 cm2 field was 9.9%, 9.5%, and 9.5% at 80 cm, 100 cm and 120 cm SSDs. The skin dose due to acrylic block tray, of thickness 1.0 cm for a 10 × 10 cm2 field was 27.0%, 17.2% and 16.1% at 80, 100 and 120 cm SSD respectively. Due to the use of an acrylic block tray, the surface dose was increased for all field sizes at the above three SSDs and the percentage skin dose was more dominant at the lower SSD and larger field size. The skin dose for a 30 × 30 cm2 field size at 80 cm SSD was 38.3% and it was 70.4% for the open and acrylic block tray fields, respectively. The skin doses for motorized wedge fields were lower than for open fields. The effect of SSDs on the surface dose for motorized 60° wedge fields was not significant for a small field size (difference was less than 1% up to a 15 × 15 cm2 field size), but for a

  11. Technical Note: Comparison of peripheral patient dose from MR-guided (60) Co therapy and 6 MV linear accelerator IGRT.

    PubMed

    Hauri, Pascal; Hälg, Roger A; Schneider, Uwe

    2017-07-01

    The use of X-ray imaging in radiation therapy can give a substantial dose to the patient. A Cobalt machine combined with an magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was recently introduced to clinical work. One positive aspect of using non-ionizing imaging devices is the reduction of the patient exposure. The purpose of this study was to quantify the difference in out-of-field dose to the patient between the image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) treatment applied with a linear accelerator with cone beam CT (CBCT) equipment and a Cobalt machine combined with an MRI. The treatment of a rhabdomyosarcoma in the prostate was planned and irradiated using different modalities and radiation therapy machines. The whole-body dose was measured for a 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and a volumetric-modulated arc therapy plan applied with a conventional linear accelerator operated at 6 MV beam energy. Additionally, the dose of an IMRT plan applied with a (60) Co machine combined with an MRI was measured. Furthermore, the dose of one CBCT scan using the linear accelerator's on-board imaging system was determined. The 3D dose measurements were performed in an anthropomorphic phantom containing 168 slots for thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs). A combination of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD100) and LiF:Mg,Cu,P (TLD100H) was used to accurately determine the in- and out-of-field dose. The plans were rescaled to different fractionation schemes (2 Gy, 3 Gy, and 5 Gy fraction dose) and the dose of one CBCT scan was additionally added to the treatment dose per fraction applied with the linear accelerator. The resulting absorbed doses per fraction of the two machines were compared. In the target region, all measured treatment plans presented the same magnitude of dose, while the CBCT dose was a factor of 100 smaller. Close to the planned target volume (PTV), the dose from the (60) Co machine was a factor of two higher compared with the 3DCRT + CBCT dose

  12. Comparison of Head Scatter Factor for 6MV and 10MV flattened (FB) and Unflattened (FFF) Photon Beam using indigenously Designed Columnar Mini Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Ashokkumar, Sigamani; Nambi Raj, N Arunai; Sinha, Sujit Nath; Yadav, Girigesh; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Raman, Kothanda; Mishra, Manindra Bhushan

    2014-01-01

    To measure and compare the head scatter factor for flattened (FB) and unflattened (FFF) of 6MV and 10MV photon beam using indigenously designed mini phantom. A columnar mini phantom was designed as recommended by AAPM Task Group 74 with low and high atomic number materials at 10 cm (mini phantom) and at approximately twice the depth of maximum dose water equivalent thickness (brass build-up cap). Scatter in the accelerator (Sc) values of 6MV-FFF photon beams are lesser than that of the 6MV-FB photon beams (0.66-2.8%; Clinac iX, 2300CD) and (0.47-1.74%; True beam) for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2. Sc values of 10MV-FFF photon beams are lesser (0.61-2.19%; True beam) than that of the 10MV-FB photons beams for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2. The SSD had no influence on head scatter for both flattened and unflattened beams and irrespective of head design of the different linear accelerators. The presence of field shaping device influences the Sc values. The collimator exchange effect reveals that the opening of the upper jaw increases Sc irrespective of FB or FFF photon beams and different linear accelerators, and it is less significant in FFF beams. Sc values of 6MV-FB square field were in good agreement with that of AAPM, TG-74 published data for Varian (Clinac iX, 2300CD) accelerator. Our results confirm that the removal of flattening filter decreases in the head scatter factor compared to flattened beam. This could reduce the out-of-field dose in advanced treatment delivery techniques. PMID:25190997

  13. Output factor comparison of Monte Carlo and measurement for Varian TrueBeam 6 MV and 10 MV flattening filter-free stereotactic radiosurgery system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jason Y; Ning, Holly; Arora, Barbara C; Zhuge, Ying; Miller, Robert W

    2016-05-08

    The dose measurements of the small field sizes, such as conical collimators used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), are a significant challenge due to many factors including source occlusion, detector size limitation, and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. One useful tool in dealing with the small field effect is Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. In this study, we report a comparison of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements of output factors for the Varian SRS system with conical collimators for energies of 6 MV flattening filter-free (6 MV) and 10 MV flattening filter-free (10 MV) on the TrueBeam accelerator. Monte Carlo simulations of Varian's SRS system for 6 MV and 10 MV photon energies with cones sizes of 17.5 mm, 15.0 mm, 12.5 mm, 10.0 mm, 7.5 mm, 5.0 mm, and 4.0 mm were performed using EGSnrc (release V4 2.4.0) codes. Varian's version-2 phase-space files for 6 MV and 10 MV of TrueBeam accelerator were utilized in the Monte Carlo simulations. Two small diode detectors Edge (Sun Nuclear) and Small Field Detector (SFD) (IBA Dosimetry) were applied to measure the output factors. Significant errors may result if detector correction factors are not applied to small field dosimetric measurements. Although it lacked the machine-specific kfclin,fmsrQclin,Qmsr correction factors for diode detectors in this study, correction factors were applied utilizing published studies conducted under similar conditions. For cone diameters greater than or equal to 12.5 mm, the differences between output factors for the Edge detector, SFD detector, and MC simulations are within 3.0% for both energies. For cone diameters below 12.5 mm, output factors differences exhibit greater variations.

  14. Output factor comparison of Monte Carlo and measurement for Varian TrueBeam 6 MV and 10 MV flattening filter-free stereotactic radiosurgery system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jason Y; Ning, Holly; Arora, Barbara C; Zhuge, Ying; Miller, Robert W

    2016-05-01

    The dose measurements of the small field sizes, such as conical collimators used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), are a significant challenge due to many factors including source occlusion, detector size limitation, and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. One useful tool in dealing with the small field effect is Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. In this study, we report a comparison of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements of output factors for the Varian SRS system with conical collimators for energies of 6 MV flattening filter-free (6 MV) and 10 MV flattening filter-free (10 MV) on the TrueBeam accelerator. Monte Carlo simulations of Varian's SRS system for 6 MV and 10 MV photon energies with cones sizes of 17.5 mm, 15.0 mm, 12.5 mm, 10.0 mm, 7.5 mm, 5.0 mm, and 4.0 mm were performed using EGSnrc (release V4 2.4.0) codes. Varian's version-2 phase-space files for 6 MV and 10 MV of TrueBeam accelerator were utilized in the Monte Carlo simulations. Two small diode detectors Edge (Sun Nuclear) and Small Field Detector (SFD) (IBA Dosimetry) were applied to measure the output factors. Significant errors may result if detector correction factors are not applied to small field dosimetric measurements. Although it lacked the machine-specific kQclin,Qmsrfclin,fmsr correction factors for diode detectors in this study, correction factors were applied utilizing published studies conducted under similar conditions. For cone diameters greater than or equal to 12.5 mm, the differences between output factors for the Edge detector, SFD detector, and MC simulations are within 3.0% for both energies. For cone diameters below 12.5 mm, output factors differences exhibit greater variations. PACS number(s): 87.55.k, 87.55.Qr.

  15. Comparison of Head Scatter Factor for 6MV and 10MV flattened (FB) and Unflattened (FFF) Photon Beam using indigenously Designed Columnar Mini Phantom.

    PubMed

    Ashokkumar, Sigamani; Nambi Raj, N Arunai; Sinha, Sujit Nath; Yadav, Girigesh; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Raman, Kothanda; Mishra, Manindra Bhushan

    2014-07-01

    To measure and compare the head scatter factor for flattened (FB) and unflattened (FFF) of 6MV and 10MV photon beam using indigenously designed mini phantom. A columnar mini phantom was designed as recommended by AAPM Task Group 74 with low and high atomic number materials at 10 cm (mini phantom) and at approximately twice the depth of maximum dose water equivalent thickness (brass build-up cap). Scatter in the accelerator (Sc) values of 6MV-FFF photon beams are lesser than that of the 6MV-FB photon beams (0.66-2.8%; Clinac iX, 2300CD) and (0.47-1.74%; True beam) for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm(2) to 40 × 40 cm(2). Sc values of 10MV-FFF photon beams are lesser (0.61-2.19%; True beam) than that of the 10MV-FB photons beams for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm(2) to 40 × 40 cm(2). The SSD had no influence on head scatter for both flattened and unflattened beams and irrespective of head design of the different linear accelerators. The presence of field shaping device influences the Sc values. The collimator exchange effect reveals that the opening of the upper jaw increases Sc irrespective of FB or FFF photon beams and different linear accelerators, and it is less significant in FFF beams. Sc values of 6MV-FB square field were in good agreement with that of AAPM, TG-74 published data for Varian (Clinac iX, 2300CD) accelerator. Our results confirm that the removal of flattening filter decreases in the head scatter factor compared to flattened beam. This could reduce the out-of-field dose in advanced treatment delivery techniques.

  16. Technique charts for Kodak EC-L film screen system for portal localization in a 6MV X-ray beam.

    PubMed

    Sandilos, P; Antypas, C; Paraskevopoulou, C; Kouvaris, J; Vlachos, L

    2006-01-01

    Port films are used in radiotherapy for visual evaluation of the radiation fields and subsequent quantitative analysis. Common port films suffer from poor image quality compared to the simulator-diagnostic films and is desirable to determine the appropriate exposure required for the best image contrast. The aim of this work is to generate technique charts for the Kodak EC-L film screen system for use in a 6MV x-ray beam. Three homogeneous water phantoms were used to simulate head-neck, thorax and abdomen dimensions of adult human, correspondingly. The film screen system was calibrated in a 6MV x-ray beam and under various irradiation conditions. The film screen system behavior was studied as a function of phantom thickness, field size and air gap between the phantom and the film screen system. In each case the optimum film exposure which produces the maximum image contrast was determined. The generated technique charts for the EC-L film screen system and for a 6 MV x-ray beam are used in our radiotherapy department for daily quality assurance of the radiotherapy procedure.

  17. Comparison of dicentric dose response curves of 6MV LINAC X-rays and (60)Co γ-rays for biodosimetry application.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A Arul Anantha; Bakkiam, D; Sonwani, Swetha; Seenisamy, R; Sivasubramanian, K; Venkatraman, B

    2017-11-01

    In vitro Dicentric (DC) dose response curves of 6MV X-rays (3Gy/min) and (60)Co γ-rays (0.63Gy/min) were generated and compared (intra-laboratory) to understand their similarities and differences. Human peripheral blood samples exposed to ten different doses (0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5Gy) of 6MV X-rays and (60)Co γ-rays were subjected to Dicentric Chromosome Assay (DCA) and dicentrics, excess acentric fragments (AF) and chromatid breaks (CB) were scored. Totally about 31,553 metaphase spreads were scored for the purpose. Dose response curves of both radiation qualities were almost same except for a 13.8% higher β value for 6MV X-rays. However, blind tests results revealed that both these curves are biologically equivalent and exhibited good dose prediction accuracy for the entire dose range. This demonstrated the feasibility of interchangeable use of these curves in biodosimetry. Consequently it has been suggested that LINAC facilities worldwide can be roped in for biodosimetry capacity augmentation towards managing nuclear emergency situations involving γ-radiation exposures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Infrared laser pulse triggers increased singlet oxygen production in tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Sokolovski, S. G.; Zolotovskaya, S. A.; Goltsov, A.; Pourreyron, C.; South, A. P.; Rafailov, E. U.

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a technique developed to treat the ever-increasing global incidence of cancer. This technique utilises singlet oxygen (1O2) generation via a laser excited photosensitiser (PS) to kill cancer cells. However, prolonged sensitivity to intensive light (6–8 weeks for lung cancer), relatively low tissue penetration by activating light (630 nm up to 4 mm), and the cost of PS administration can limit progressive PDT applications. The development of quantum-dot laser diodes emitting in the highest absorption region (1268 nm) of triplet oxygen (3O2) presents the possibility of inducing apoptosis in tumour cells through direct 3O2 → 1O2 transition. Here we demonstrate that a single laser pulse triggers dose-dependent 1O2 generation in both normal keratinocytes and tumour cells and show that tumour cells yield the highest 1O2 far beyond the initial laser pulse exposure. Our modelling and experimental results support the development of direct infrared (IR) laser-induced tumour treatment as a promising approach in tumour PDT. PMID:24336590

  19. Effect of triggered discharge using an excimer laser with high-repetition-rate of the order of kilohertz

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaura, Michiteru; Watanabe, Takashi; Hayashi, Nobuya; Ihara, Satoshi

    2005-03-28

    The triggering ability of the laser-triggered lightning method is improved by using a KrF excimer laser with a high-repetition-rate of the order of kHz order. It is clarified that the effect of a triggered discharge is considerably enhanced when the plasma density is greater than 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}. Thus far, the laser-triggered lightning method has not been expected to display a triggering ability since one pulse of an excimer laser possesses energy of less than 1 J, and the produced plasma has a low density of 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}, its plasma density is one order lower than that required for its application in the triggering and guiding of lightning discharge. The enhancement of plasma density achieved by utilizing the accumulation effect of charged particles generated by the high-repetition-rate laser was 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}. This led to an effective a 50% reduction in the self-breakdown voltage.

  20. Dosimetric comparison of a 6-MV flattening-filter and a flattening-filter-free beam for lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yon-Lae; Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Jin-Young; Kang, Sang-Won; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of clinical usage of a flattening-filter-free (FFF) beam for treatment with lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). Ten patients were treated with SABR and a 6-MV FFF beam for this study. All plans using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were optimized in the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) by using the Acuros XB (AXB) dose calculation algorithm and were delivered by using a Varian TrueBeam ™ linear accelerator equipped with a high-definition (HD) multi-leaf collimator. The prescription dose used was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. In order to compare the plan using a conventional 6-MV flattening-filter (FF) beam, the SABR plan was recalculated under the condition of the same beam settings used in the plan employing the 6-MV FFF beam. All dose distributions were calculated by using Acuros XB (AXB, version 11) and a 2.5-mm isotropic dose grid. The cumulative dosevolume histograms (DVH) for the planning target volume (PTV) and all organs at risk (OARs) were analyzed. Technical parameters, such as total monitor units (MUs) and the delivery time, were also recorded and assessed. All plans for target volumes met the planning objectives for the PTV ( i.e., V95% > 95%) and the maximum dose ( i.e., Dmax < 110%) revealing adequate target coverage for the 6-MV FF and FFF beams. Differences in DVH for target volumes (PTV and clinical target volume (CTV)) and OARs on the lung SABR plans from the interchange of the treatment beams were small, but showed a marked reduction (52.97%) in the treatment delivery time. The SABR plan with a FFF beam required a larger number of MUs than the plan with the FF beam, and the mean difference in MUs was 4.65%. This study demonstrated that the use of the FFF beam for lung SABR plan provided better treatment efficiency relative to 6-MV FF beam. This strategy should be particularly beneficial for high dose conformity to the lung and decreased intra-fraction movements because of

  1. Effects of trigger laser pulse width on the jitter time of GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Gui, Huaimeng; Zhang, Lin; Ma, Cheng; Li, Mengxia; Xu, Ming; Wang, Luyi

    2013-07-01

    The effects of trigger laser pulse width on the jitter time of a GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) is investigated in the experiment. The laser is split into two optical beams by a cross grating to excite two 3 mm gap GaAs PCSSs in parallel at the same time. This work reveals that the jitter time of the GaAs PCSS is reduced as the trigger laser pulse width decreases. Our results overcome a significant obstacle that hinders the testing and theory of GaAs PCSSs in high-time-precision synchronous control.

  2. A Laser-Triggered Mini-Marx for Low-Jitter, High-Voltage Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-01

    switch in a compact, eight-stage Marx generator. The spark gap is pressurized with a mixture of sulfur hexafluoride and air. The UV (266 nm) laser...remaining, self-breaking spark-gap switches in the Marx , pre-ionizing them. The Marx output is approximately 200 kV into 50 ohms, with a risetime of 2...ns. A single Marx is capable of triggering six 100-kV spark gaps via six 65-ohm cables in parallel, with an overall jitter of (+ or -) 1 ns. A single

  3. Triggering and guiding high-voltage large-scale leader discharges with sub-joule ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pépin, Henri

    2000-10-01

    Lasers are promising tools for triggering and guiding lightning strikes. In this context, Hydro-Québec and INRS have undertaken a feasibility study of laser triggered lightning using ultrashort laser pulses in Megavolt electrode configurations (3-7 m rod-plane air gap). A sub-Joule sub-picosecond laser beam focussed close to the rod electrode has been found to be able to trigger and guide leader discharges over distances of 3-4 m, lower the leader inception voltage by 50%, increase the leader velocity by a factor of 10. It has also been found that highly ionized filaments generated by the propagation of an ultrashort pulse in air have the ability to guide electric discharges over large distances. The basic physical processes involved in the formation of streamers and in the leader propagation have been observed using time-resolved optical diagnostics, as well as electric field and current probes. The discharge process triggered by the laser pulse has been successfully described using a leader propagation model in presence of the laser plasma channel. Numerical simulations have successfully reproduced the experimental results obtained with and without the ultrashort laser pulse.

  4. Laser-triggered high-voltage plasma switching with diffractive optics.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, M; Sunesson, A; Bergkvist, M; Gustavsson, A; Isberg, J; Bernhoff, H; Skytt, P; Bengtsson, J; Hård, S; Larsson, M

    2001-06-01

    High-power lasers can be used to induce ionization of gases and thereby enable rapid triggering of electrical discharge devices, potentially faster than any devices based on mechanical or solid-state switching. With diffractive optical elements (DOEs) the laser light can conveniently be directed to positions within the gas so that an electrical discharge between two high-voltage electrodes is triggered reliably and rapidly. Here we report on two different types of DOE used for creating an electrical discharge in pure argon for potential high-voltage applications. One is the diffractive equivalent of a conventional axicon that yields an extended, and continuous, high-intensity focal region between the electrodes. The other is a multiple-focal-distance kinoform--a DOE that is designed to produce a linear array of 20 discrete foci, with high peak intensities, between the electrodes. We show that DOEs enable efficient, rapid switching and may provide increased flexibility in the design of novel electrode configurations.

  5. Irradiation with x-rays of the energy 18 MV induces radioactivity in transfusion blood: Proposal of a safe method using 6 MV.

    PubMed

    Frentzel, Katharina; Badakhshi, Harun

    2016-12-01

    To prevent a fatal transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease, it is recommended to irradiate transfusion blood and blood components with ionizing radiation. Using x-rays from a linear accelerator of the radiotherapy department is an accepted alternative to gamma irradiation devices of the blood bank and to the orthovoltage units that are replacing the gamma irradiators today. However, the use of high energy x-rays may carry a potential risk of induced radioactivity. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of two different energy levels, 6 and 18 MV, which are executed in routine clinical settings. The research question was if induced radioactivity occurs at one of these standard energy levels. The authors aimed to give a proposal for a blood irradiation procedure that certainly avoids induced radioactivity. For this study, the authors developed a blood bag phantom, irradiated it with x-ray energies of 6 and 18 MV, and measured the induced radioactivity in a well counter. Thereafter, the same irradiation and measuring procedure was performed with a unit of packed red blood cells. A feasible clinical procedure was developed using 6 MV and an acrylic box. With the irradiation planning system XiO, the authors generated an irradiation protocol for the linear accelerator Siemens ONCOR Anvant-Garde. Both measurement setups showed that there was induced radioactivity for 18 MV but not for 6 MV. The induced radioactivity for 18 MV was up to 190 times the background. This is significant and of clinical relevance especially since there are newborn and fetal blood recipients for whom every radiation exposure has to be strictly avoided. The irradiation of blood with x-rays from a linear accelerator of the radiotherapy department is safe and feasible, but by the current state of scientific knowledge, the authors recommend to use an x-ray energy of 6 MV or less to avoid induced radioactivity in transfusion blood.

  6. Low level laser therapy with trigger points technique: a clinical study on 243 patients.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Z

    1996-08-01

    Among the various methods of application techniques in low level laser therapy (LLLT) (HeNe 632.8 nm visible red or infrared 820-830 nm continuous wave and 904 nm pulsed emission) there are very promising "trigger points" (TPs), i.e., myofascial zones of particular sensibility and of highest projection of focal pain points, due to ischemic conditions. The effect of LLLT and the results obtained after clinical treatment of more than 200 patients (headaches and facial pain, skeletomuscular ailments, myogenic neck pain, shoulder and arm pain, epicondylitis humery, tenosynovitis, low back and radicular pain, Achilles tendinitis) to whom the "trigger points" were applied were better than we had ever expected. According to clinical parameters, it has been observed that the rigidity decreases, the mobility is restored (functional recovery), and the spontaneous or induced pain decreases or even disappears, by movement, too. LLLT improves local microcirculation and it can also improve oxygen supply to hypoxic cells in the TP areas and at the same time it can remove the collected waste products. The normalization of the microcirculation, obtained due to laser applications, interrupts the "circulus vitiosus" of the origin of the pain and its development (Melzak: muscular tension > pain > increased tension > increased pain, etc.). Results measured according to VAS/VRS/PTM: in acute pain, diminished more than 70%; in chronic pain more than 60%. Clinical effectiveness (success or failure) depends on the correctly applied energy dose--over/underdosage produces opposite, negative effects on cellular metabolism. We did not observe any negative effects on the human body and the use of analgesic drugs could be reduced or completely excluded. LLLT suggests that the laser beam can be used as monotherapy or as a supplementary treatment to other therapeutic procedures for pain treatment.

  7. SU-E-J-14: A Comparison of a 2.5MV Imaging Beam to KV and 6MV Imaging Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Nitsch, P; Robertson, D; Balter, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare image quality metrics and dose of TrueBeam V2.0’s 2.5MV imaging beam and kV and 6MV images. Methods: To evaluate the MV image quality, the Standard Imaging QC-3 and Varian Las Vegas (LV) phantoms were imaged using the ‘quality’ and ‘low dose’ modes and then processed using RIT113 V6.3. The LEEDS phantom was used to evaluate the kV image quality. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) was also evaluated in patient images using Matlab. In addition, dose per image was evaluated at a depth of 5cm using solid water for a 28.6 cm × 28.6 cm field size, which is representative of the largest jaw settings at an SID of 150cm. Results: The 2.5MV images had lower dose than the 6 MV images and a contrast to noise ratio (CNR) about 1.4 times higher, when evaluated using the QC-3. When energy was held constant but dose varied, the different modes, ‘low dose’ and ‘quality’, showed less than an 8% difference in CNR. The ‘quality’ modes demonstrated better spatial resolution than the ‘low dose’; however, even with the ‘low dose’ all line pairs were distinct except for the 0.75lp/mm on the 2.5MV. The LV phantom was used to measure low contrast detectability and showed similar results to the QC-3. Several patient images all confirmed that SNR were highest in kV images followed by 2.5MV and then 6MV. Qualitatively, for anatomical areas with large variability in thickness, like lateral head and necks, 2.5MV images show more anatomy, such as shoulder position, than kV images. Conclusions: The kV images clearly provide the best image metrics per unit dose. The 2.5MV beam showed excellent contrast at a lower dose than 6MV and may be superior to kV for difficult to image areas that include large changes in anatomical thickness. P Balter: Varian, Sun Nuclear, Philips, CPRIT.

  8. Photo-triggering and secondary electron produced ionization in electric discharge ArF* excimer lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J.

    2011-10-01

    Electric discharge excimer lasers are sustained in multi-atmosphere attaching gas mixtures that are typically preionized to enable a reproducible, uniform glow, which maximizes optical quality and gain. This preionization is often accomplished using UV light produced by a corona discharge within the plasma cavity. To quantify the relationship between corona discharge properties and those of the laser discharge, the triggering of electron avalanche by preionizing UV light in an electric discharge-pumped ArF* excimer laser was numerically investigated using a two-dimensional model. The preionizing UV fluxes were generated by a corona-bar discharge driven by the same voltage pulse as the main discharge sustained in a multi-atmospheric Ne/Ar/Xe/F2 gas mixture. The resulting peak photo-electron density in the inter-electrode spacing is around 108 cm-3, and its distribution is biased toward the UV source. The preionization density increases with increasing dielectric constant and capacitance of the corona bar. The symmetry and uniformity of the discharge are, however, improved significantly once the main avalanche develops. In addition to bulk electron impact ionization, the ionization generated by sheath accelerated secondary electrons was found to be important in sustaining the discharge current at experimentally observed values. At peak current, the magnitude of the ionization by sheath accelerated electrons is comparable to that from bulk electron impact in the vicinity of the cathode.

  9. Investigating MALDI MSI parameters (Part 2) - On the use of a mechanically shuttered trigger system for improved laser energy stability.

    PubMed

    Steven, Rory T; Dexter, Alex; Bunch, Josephine

    2016-07-15

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is now widely used to desorb, ionize and detect molecules from complex samples and tissue sections. The detected ion intensity within MALDI MS and MSI is intimately linked to the laser energy per pulse incident upon the sample during analysis. Laser energy/power stability can be significantly affected by the manner in which the laser is operated. High-repetition rate diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) lasers are being increasingly adopted to enable high-throughput MALDI MSI analysis. Within this work two different laser-triggering setups are used to demonstrate the effect of laser energy instabilities due to spiking and thermal control phenomena and a setup with a shutter to remove these effects. The effect of non-equilibrium laser operation on MALDI MSI data versus the more stable laser pulse energy of the shutter-triggered system is demonstrated in thin films of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) and for imaging of murine brain tissue sections. Significant unwanted variations in absolute and relative detected ion intensity are shown where energy variation is introduced by these phenomena, which return to equilibrium within the setup employed here over timescales relevant to MALDI MS analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact and relationship of anterior commissure and time-dose factor on the local control of T1N0 glottic cancer treated by 6 MV photons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To evaluate prognostic factors that may influence local control (LC) of T1N0 glottic cancer treated by primary radiotherapy (RT) with 6 MV photons. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 433 consecutive patients with T1N0 glottic cancer treated between 1983 and 2005 by RT in our institution. All patients were treated with 6 MV photons. One hundred and seventy seven (41%) patients received 52.5 Gy in 23 fractions with 2.5 Gy/fraction, and 256 (59%) patients received 66 Gy in 33 fractions with 2 Gy/fraction. Results The median follow-up time was 10.5 years. The 10-year LC rates were 91% and 87% for T1a and T1b respectively. Multivariate analysis showed LC rate was adversely affected by poorly differentiated histology (Hazard Ratio [HR]: 7.5, p = 0.035); involvement of anterior commissure (HR: 2.34, p = 0.011); fraction size of 2.0 Gy (HR: 2.17, p = 0.035) and tumor biologically effective dose (BED) < 65 Gy15 (HR: 3.38, p = 0.017). Conclusions The negative impact of anterior commissure involvement could be overcome by delivering a higher tumor BED through using fraction size of > 2.0 Gy. We recommend that fraction size > 2.0 Gy should be utilized, for radiation schedules with five daily fractions each week. PMID:21600025

  11. SU-E-T-322: The Evaluation of the Gafchromic EBT3 Film in Low Dose 6 MV X-Ray Beams with Different Scanning Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H; Sung, J; Yoon, M; Kim, D; Chung, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We have evaluated the response of the Gafchromic EBT3 film in low dose for 6 MV x-ray beams with two scanning modes, the reflection scanning mode and the transmission scanning mode. Methods: We irradiated the Gafcromic EBT3 film using a 60 degree enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) with 6 MV x-ray beams from Clinac iX Linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The irradiated Gafchromic EBT3 film was scanned with different scanning modes, the reflection scanning mode and the transmission scanning mode. The scanned Gafchromic EBT3 film was analyzed with MATLAB. Results: When 7.2 cGy was irradiated to the Gafchromic EBT3 film, the uncertainty was 0.54 cGy with reflection scanning mode and was 0.88 cGy with transmission scanning mode. When 24 cGy was irradiated to the Gafchromic EBT3 film, the uncertainty was similar to the case of 7.2 cGy irradiation showing 0.51 cGy of uncertainty with reflection scanning mode and 0.87 cGy of uncertainty with transmission scanning mode. The result suggests that the reflection mode should be used in Gafchromic EBT3 film for low irradiation. Conclusion: The result suggests that the reflection mode should be used in Gafchromic EBT3 film for low irradiation.

  12. Laser triggered Z-pinch broadband extreme ultraviolet source for metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, I.; Lunney, J. G.; Juschkin, L.; Sidelnikov, Y.; O'Reilly, F.; Sokell, E.; Sheridan, P.

    2013-05-20

    We compare the extreme ultraviolet emission characteristics of tin and galinstan (atomic %: Ga: 78.35, In: 14.93, Sn: 6.72) between 10 nm and 18 nm in a laser-triggered discharge between liquid metal-coated electrodes. Over this wavelength range, the energy conversion efficiency for galinstan is approximately half that of tin, but the spectrum is less strongly peaked in the 13-15 nm region. The extreme ultraviolet source dimensions were 110 {+-} 25 {mu}m diameter and 500 {+-} 125 {mu}m length. The flatter spectrum, and -19 Degree-Sign C melting point, makes this galinstan discharge a relatively simple high radiance extreme ultraviolet light source for metrology and scientific applications.

  13. Laser-mediated rupture of chlamydial inclusions triggers pathogen egress and host cell necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Markus C.; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Ferguson, Charles; Tanzer, Maria C.; Murphy, James M.; Yap, Alpha S.; Parton, Robert G.; Huston, Wilhelmina M.; Teasdale, Rohan D

    2017-01-01

    Remarkably little is known about how intracellular pathogens exit the host cell in order to infect new hosts. Pathogenic chlamydiae egress by first rupturing their replicative niche (the inclusion) before rapidly lysing the host cell. Here we apply a laser ablation strategy to specifically disrupt the chlamydial inclusion, thereby uncoupling inclusion rupture from the subsequent cell lysis and allowing us to dissect the molecular events involved in each step. Pharmacological inhibition of host cell calpains inhibits inclusion rupture, but not subsequent cell lysis. Further, we demonstrate that inclusion rupture triggers a rapid necrotic cell death pathway independent of BAK, BAX, RIP1 and caspases. Both processes work sequentially to efficiently liberate the pathogen from the host cytoplasm, promoting secondary infection. These results reconcile the pathogen's known capacity to promote host cell survival and induce cell death. PMID:28281536

  14. Synchronization of two GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switches triggered by two laser diodes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Bian, Kangkang; Ma, Cheng; Jia, Hangjuan; An, Xin; Shi, Wei

    2016-09-15

    In this Letter, we show the synchronization of two 2-mm-gap gallium arsenide (GaAs) photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS), which are in parallel and triggered by two laser diodes (LDs) independently. The comparison of the synchronization is measured by varying the bias electric field and optical excitation energy, respectively. An optimum synchronization is achieved as low as 200.5 ps, while the GaAs PCSS are biased at 1.2 kV with optical excitation energy of 1.91 μJ. The simulations demonstrate the relationship between the synchronization, the carriers average drift velocity, and the number of carriers undergoing intervalley scattering.

  15. Photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging using dual contrast perfluorocarbon nanodroplets triggered by laser pulses at 1064 nm.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Alexander S; VanderLaan, Donald; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2014-09-01

    Recently, a dual photoacoustic and ultrasound contrast agent-named photoacoustic nanodroplet-has been introduced. Photoacoustic nanodroplets consist of a perfluorocarbon core, surfactant shell, and encapsulated photoabsorber. Upon pulsed laser irradiation the perfluorocarbon converts to gas, inducing a photoacoustic signal from vaporization and subsequent ultrasound contrast from the resulting gas microbubbles. In this work we synthesize nanodroplets which encapsulate gold nanorods with a peak absorption near 1064 nm. Such nanodroplets are optimal for extended photoacoustic imaging depth and contrast, safety and system cost. We characterized the nanodroplets for optical absorption, image contrast and vaporization threshold. We then imaged the particles in an ex vivo porcine tissue sample, reporting contrast enhancement in a biological environment. These 1064 nm triggerable photoacoustic nanodroplets are a robust biomedical tool to enhance image contrast at clinically relevant depths.

  16. Two-color interferometer for the study of laser filamentation triggered electric discharges in air

    SciTech Connect

    Point, Guillaume Brelet, Yohann; Arantchouk, Leonid; Carbonnel, Jérôme; Prade, Bernard; Mysyrowicz, André; Houard, Aurélien

    2014-12-15

    We present a space and time resolved interferometric plasma diagnostic for use on plasmas where neutral-bound electron contribution to the refractive index cannot be neglected. By recording simultaneously the plasma optical index at 532 and 1064 nm, we are able to extract independently the neutral and free electron density profiles. We report a phase resolution of 30 mrad, corresponding to a maximum resolution on the order of 4×10{sup 22} m{sup −3} for the electron density, and of 10{sup 24} m{sup −3} for the neutral density. The interferometer is demonstrated on centimeter-scale sparks triggered by laser filamentation in air with typical currents of a few tens of A.

  17. Interferometric and schlieren characterization of the plasmas and shock wave dynamics during laser-triggered discharge in atmospheric air

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen Wu, Jian; Yang, Zefeng; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2014-08-15

    This paper describes our efforts to reveal the underlying physics of laser-triggered discharges in atmospheric air using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and schlieren photography. Unlike the hemispherical shock waves that are produced by laser ablation, bell-like morphologies are observed during laser-triggered discharges. Phase shifts are recovered from the interferograms at a time of 1000 ns by the 2D fast Fourier transform method, and then the values of the refractive index are deduced using the Abel inversion. An abundance of free electrons is expected near the cathode surface. The schlieren photographs visualize the formation of stagnation layers at ∼600 ns in the interaction zones of the laser- and discharge-produced plasmas. Multiple reflected waves are observed at later times with the development of shock wave propagations. Estimations using the Taylor-Sedov self-similar solution indicated that approximately 45.8% and 51.9% of the laser and electrical energies are transferred into the gas flow motions, respectively. Finally, numerical simulations were performed, which successfully reproduced the main features of the experimental observations, and provided valuable insights into the plasma and shock wave dynamics during the laser-triggered discharge.

  18. Interferometric and schlieren characterization of the plasmas and shock wave dynamics during laser-triggered discharge in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen; Wu, Jian; Yang, Zefeng; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes our efforts to reveal the underlying physics of laser-triggered discharges in atmospheric air using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and schlieren photography. Unlike the hemispherical shock waves that are produced by laser ablation, bell-like morphologies are observed during laser-triggered discharges. Phase shifts are recovered from the interferograms at a time of 1000 ns by the 2D fast Fourier transform method, and then the values of the refractive index are deduced using the Abel inversion. An abundance of free electrons is expected near the cathode surface. The schlieren photographs visualize the formation of stagnation layers at ˜600 ns in the interaction zones of the laser- and discharge-produced plasmas. Multiple reflected waves are observed at later times with the development of shock wave propagations. Estimations using the Taylor-Sedov self-similar solution indicated that approximately 45.8% and 51.9% of the laser and electrical energies are transferred into the gas flow motions, respectively. Finally, numerical simulations were performed, which successfully reproduced the main features of the experimental observations, and provided valuable insights into the plasma and shock wave dynamics during the laser-triggered discharge.

  19. SU-E-T-454: Impact of Air Gap On PDDs of 6 MV Photon Beam for Various Field Sizes in Inhomogeneous Phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Oyewale, S; Pokharel; Singh, H; Islam, M; Rana, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate how the shape of air gap and its size will impact the percent depth doses (PDDs) of a 6MV photon beam for various field sizes. Methods: Two in-house phantoms were manufactured containing rectangular (phantom A) and circular (phantom B) air gaps. Both phantoms A and B were composed of same top layer (solid-water; 30×30cm{sup 2},5cm thickness) and bottom layer (solid-water; 30×30cm {sup 2},8cm thickness), but middle layer was varied to observe air gap effects and scatter contribution to the measurement point. In phantom A, a rectangular shaped air gap (30×30cm{sup 2},7cm thickness) was created by placing Styrofoam blocks between top and bottom layers of the phantom. In phantom B, middle layer was replaced by “inhomogenous block”, composed of acrylic plate (30×30cm{sup 2}, 4cm thickness) followed by PVC(30×30cm{sup 2},3cm thickness). Additionally, circular air gap was created by drilling a hole (diameter=2.8cm, length=7cm) at the center of “inhomogenous block”. In both phantoms, measurement readings were obtained at 13cm depth (i.e., 1cm after air gap) and depth of maximum dose(6MV energy; 100 MUs; field sizes ranged from 3×3cm{sup 2} to 10×10cm{sup 2}). The PDDs at 13cm depth were compared in both phantoms. Results: The measurements in both phantoms A and B showed an almost linear increase in PDDs with increasing field size, especially for smaller field sizes (from 3×3 to 7×7cm{sup 2}). For each field size, the PDD in phantom A was smaller compared to the one in phantom B. The difference in PDDs between two phantoms decreased with an increase in field size as the PDD difference decreased from 9.0% to 6.4%. Conclusion: The shape and size of air gap affect the PDD measurements in secondary build-up region as 6 MV primary beam traverses through the center of air gap. The scatter contribution due to increase in field size was more noticeable for field sizes ≤7×7cm{sup 2}.

  20. Quantification of the In Vitro Radiosensitivity of Mung Bean Sprout Elongation to 6MV X-Ray: A Revised Target Model Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu Hwei; Kittipayak, Samrit; Lin, Yu Ting; Lin, Cheng Hsun; Pan, Lung Kwang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a revised target model for quantifying the in vitro radiosensitivity of mung bean sprout elongation to 6-MV X-rays was developed. The revised target model, which incorporated the Poisson prediction for a low probability of success, provided theoretical estimates that were highly consistent with the actual data measured in this study. The revised target model correlated different in vitro radiosensitivities to various effective target volumes and was successfully confirmed by exposing mung beans in various elongation states to various doses of 6-MV X-rays. For the experiment, 5,000 fresh mung beans were randomly distributed into 100 petri dishes, which were randomly divided into ten groups. Each group received an initial watering at a different time point prior to X-ray exposure, resulting in different effective target volumes. The bean sprouts were measured 70 hr after X-ray exposure, and the average length of the bean sprouts in each group was recorded as an index of the mung bean in vitro radiosensitivity. Mung beans that received an initial watering either six or sixteen hours before X-ray exposure had the shortest sprout length, indicating that the maximum effective target volume was formed within that specific time period. The revised target model could be also expanded to interpret the "two-hit" model of target theory, although the experimental data supported the "one-hit" model. If the "two-hit" model was sustained, theoretically, the target size would be 2.14 times larger than its original size to produce the same results.

  1. Characterization of relative biological effectiveness for conventional radiation therapy: a comparison of clinical 6 MV X-rays and 137Cs.

    PubMed

    Howard, Michelle; Beltran, Chris; Sarkaria, Jann; Herman, Michael G

    2017-04-24

    Various types of radiation are utilized in the treatment of cancer. Equal physical doses of different radiation types do not always result in the same amount of biological damage. In order to account for these differences, a scaling factor known as the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) can be used. 137Cesium (137Cs) has been used as a source of radiation in a significant body of radiation therapy research. However, high-energy X-rays, such as 6 MV X-rays, are currently used clinically to treat patients. To date, there is a gap in the literature regarding the RBE comparison of these two types of radiation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the RBE of 137Cs relative to that of 6 MV X-rays. To determine the RBE, five cell lines were irradiated [Chinese hamster ovary (CHO); human lung adenocarcinoma (A549); human glioma (U251); human glioma (T98); and human osteosarcoma (U2OS)] by both types of radiation and assessed for cell survival using a clonogenic assay. Three of the five cell lines resulted in RBE values of ~1.00 to within 11% for all survival fractions, showing the physical and biological dose for these two types of radiation were equivalent. The other two cell lines gave RBE values differing from 1.00 by up to 36%. In conclusion, the results show the range in biological effect seen between cell lines, and therefore cell type must be considered when characterizing RBE. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  2. Tumoricidal activity of low-energy 160-KV versus 6-MV X-rays against platinum-sensitized F98 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sara N; Pradhan, Anil K; Barth, Rolf F; Nahar, Sultana N; Nakkula, Robin J; Yang, Weilian; Palmer, Alycia M; Turro, Claudia; Weldon, Michael; Bell, Erica Hlavin; Mo, Xiaokui

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (i) to investigate the differences in effects between 160-kV low-energy and 6-MV high-energy X-rays, both by computational analysis and in vitro studies; (ii) to determine the effects of each on platinum-sensitized F98 rat glioma and murine B16 melanoma cells; and (iii) to describe the in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo toxicity of a Pt(II) terpyridine platinum (Typ-Pt) complex. Simulations were performed using the Monte Carlo code Geant4 to determine enhancement in absorption of low- versus high-energy X-rays by Pt and to determine dose enhancement factors (DEFs) for a Pt-sensitized tumor phantom. In vitro studies were carried out using Typ-Pt and again with carboplatin due to the unexpected in vivo toxicity of Typ-Pt. Cell survival was determined using clonogenic assays. In agreement with computations and simulations, in vitro data showed up to one log unit reduction in surviving fractions (SFs) of cells treated with 1-4 µg/ml of Typ-Pt and irradiated with 160-kV versus 6-MV X-rays. DEFs showed radiosensitization in the 50-200 keV range, which fell to approximate unity at higher energies, suggesting marginal interactions at MeV energies. Cells sensitized with 1-5 or 7 µg/ml of carboplatin and then irradiated also showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in SFs. However, it was unlikely this was due to increased interactions. Theoretical and in vitro studies presented here demonstrated that the tumoricidal activity of low-energy X-rays was greater than that of high-energy X-rays against Pt-sensitized tumor cells. Determining whether radiosensitization is a function of increased interactions will require additional studies.

  3. SU-E-T-611: Photon and Neutron Peripheral Dose Ratio for Low (6 MV) and High (15 MV) Energy for Treatment Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Irazola, L; Sanchez-Doblado, F; Terron, J; Ortiz-Seidel, M; Sanchez-Nieto, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Differences between radiotherapy techniques and energies, can offer improvements in tumor coverage and organs at risk preservation. However, a more complete decision should include peripheral doses delivered to the patient. The purpose of this work is the balance of photon and neutron peripheral doses for a prostate case solved with 6 different treatment modalities. Methods: Inverse and Forward IMRT and 3D-CRT in 6 and 15 MV for a Siemens Primus linac, using the same CT data set and contours. The methodology described in [1], was used with the TNRD thermal neutron detector [2] for neutron peripheral dose estimation at 7 relevant organs (colon, esophagus, stomach, liver, lung, thyroid and skin). Photon doses were estimated for these organs by terms of the algorithm proposed in [3]. Plans were optimized with the same restrictions and limited to 30 segments in the Inverse case. Results: A similar photon peripheral dose was found comparing 6 and 15 MV cases with slightly higher values of (1.9 ± 1.6) % in mean, for the 6 MV cases. Neutron presence when using 15 MV, represents an increase in peripheral dose of (18 ± 17) % in average. Due to the higher number of MU used in Inverse IMRT, an increasing of (22 ± 3) % in neutron dose is found related to Forward and 3D-CRT plans. This corresponds to photon doses within 44 and 255 mSv along the organs, for a dose prescription of 68 Gy at the isocenter. Conclusion: Neutron and photon peripheral doses for a prostate treatment planified in 6 different techniques have been analyzed. 6 MV plans are slightly more demanding in terms of photon peripheral doses. Inverse technique in 15 MV has Result to be the most demanding one in terms of total peripheral doses, including neutrons and photons.

  4. Quantification of the In Vitro Radiosensitivity of Mung Bean Sprout Elongation to 6MV X-Ray: A Revised Target Model Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu Hwei; Kittipayak, Samrit; Lin, Yu Ting; Lin, Cheng Hsun; Pan, Lung Kwang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a revised target model for quantifying the in vitro radiosensitivity of mung bean sprout elongation to 6-MV X-rays was developed. The revised target model, which incorporated the Poisson prediction for a low probability of success, provided theoretical estimates that were highly consistent with the actual data measured in this study. The revised target model correlated different in vitro radiosensitivities to various effective target volumes and was successfully confirmed by exposing mung beans in various elongation states to various doses of 6-MV X-rays. For the experiment, 5,000 fresh mung beans were randomly distributed into 100 petri dishes, which were randomly divided into ten groups. Each group received an initial watering at a different time point prior to X-ray exposure, resulting in different effective target volumes. The bean sprouts were measured 70 hr after X-ray exposure, and the average length of the bean sprouts in each group was recorded as an index of the mung bean in vitro radiosensitivity. Mung beans that received an initial watering either six or sixteen hours before X-ray exposure had the shortest sprout length, indicating that the maximum effective target volume was formed within that specific time period. The revised target model could be also expanded to interpret the “two-hit” model of target theory, although the experimental data supported the “one-hit” model. If the “two-hit” model was sustained, theoretically, the target size would be 2.14 times larger than its original size to produce the same results. PMID:26053016

  5. SU-E-T-409: Evaluation of Tissue Composition Effect On Dose Distribution in Radiotherapy with 6 MV Photon Beam of a Medical Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorbani, M; Tabatabaei, Z; Noghreiyan, A Vejdani; Meigooni, A Soleimani

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate soft tissue composition effect on dose distribution for various soft tissues and various depths in radiotherapy with 6 MV photon beam of a medical linac. Methods: A phantom and Siemens Primus linear accelerator were simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. In a homogeneous cubic phantom, six types of soft tissue and three types of tissue-equivalent materials were defined separately. The soft tissues were muscle (skeletal), adipose tissue, blood (whole), breast tissue, soft tissue (9-component) and soft tissue (4-component). The tissue-equivalent materials included: water, A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic and perspex. Photon dose relative to dose in 9-component soft tissue at various depths on the beam’s central axis was determined for the 6 MV photon beam. The relative dose was also calculated and compared for various MCNPX tallies including,F8, F6 and,F4. Results: The results of the relative photon dose in various materials relative to dose in 9-component soft tissue and using different tallies are reported in the form of tabulated data. Minor differences between dose distributions in various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials were observed. The results from F6 and F4 were practically the same but different with,F8 tally. Conclusion: Based on the calculations performed, the differences in dose distributions in various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials are minor but they could be corrected in radiotherapy calculations to upgrade the accuracy of the dosimetric calculations.

  6. Tumoricidal activity of low-energy 160-KV versus 6-MV X-rays against platinum-sensitized F98 glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sara N.; Pradhan, Anil K.; Barth, Rolf F.; Nahar, Sultana N.; Nakkula, Robin J.; Yang, Weilian; Palmer, Alycia M.; Turro, Claudia; Weldon, Michael; Bell, Erica Hlavin; Mo, Xiaokui

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (i) to investigate the differences in effects between 160-kV low-energy and 6-MV high-energy X-rays, both by computational analysis and in vitro studies; (ii) to determine the effects of each on platinum-sensitized F98 rat glioma and murine B16 melanoma cells; and (iii) to describe the in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo toxicity of a Pt(II) terpyridine platinum (Typ-Pt) complex. Simulations were performed using the Monte Carlo code Geant4 to determine enhancement in absorption of low- versus high-energy X-rays by Pt and to determine dose enhancement factors (DEFs) for a Pt-sensitized tumor phantom. In vitro studies were carried out using Typ-Pt and again with carboplatin due to the unexpected in vivo toxicity of Typ-Pt. Cell survival was determined using clonogenic assays. In agreement with computations and simulations, in vitro data showed up to one log unit reduction in surviving fractions (SFs) of cells treated with 1–4 µg/ml of Typ-Pt and irradiated with 160-kV versus 6-MV X-rays. DEFs showed radiosensitization in the 50–200 keV range, which fell to approximate unity at higher energies, suggesting marginal interactions at MeV energies. Cells sensitized with 1–5 or 7 µg/ml of carboplatin and then irradiated also showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in SFs. However, it was unlikely this was due to increased interactions. Theoretical and in vitro studies presented here demonstrated that the tumoricidal activity of low-energy X-rays was greater than that of high-energy X-rays against Pt-sensitized tumor cells. Determining whether radiosensitization is a function of increased interactions will require additional studies. PMID:25266332

  7. Radioprotective effects of selenium and vitamin-E against 6MV X-rays in human blood lymphocytes by micronucleus assay

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Aram; Moosavi, Seyed Akbar; Changizi, Vahid; Abbasian Ardakani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Critical macromolecules of cells such as DNA are in exposure to damage of free radicals that induced from the interaction of ionizing radiation with biological systems. Selenium and vitamin-E are natural compounds that have been shown to be a direct free radical scavenger. The aim of this study was to investigate the radioprotective effect of selenium and vitamin-E separately and synergistically against genotoxicity induced by 6MV x-rays irradiation in blood lymphocytes. Methods: Fifteen volunteers were divided into three groups include A, B and C. These groups were given selenium (800IU), vitamin-E (100mg) and selenium (400IU) + vitamin-E (50mg), respectively. Peripheral blood samples were collected from each group before (0hr) and 1, 2 and 3hr after selenium and vitamin-E administration (separately and synergistically). Then the blood samples were irradiated to 200cGy of 6MV x-rays. After that lymphocyte samples were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the chromosomal aberrations with micronucleus assay in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cells. Results: The lymphocytes in the blood samples collected at one hr after ingestion selenium and vitamin-E, exposed in vitro to x-rays exhibited a significant decrease in the incidence of micronuclei, compared with control group at 0hr. The maximum protection and decrease in frequency of micronuclei (50%) were observed at one hr after administration of selenium and vitamin-E synergistically. Conclusion: The data suggest that ingestion of selenium and vitamin-E as a radioprotector substance before exposures may reduce genetic damage caused by x-rays irradiation. PMID:27493911

  8. SU-E-T-339: Dosimetric Verification of Acuros XB Dose Calculation Algorithm On An Air Cavity for 6-MV Flattening Filter-Free Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S; Suh, T; Chung, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study was to verify the accuracy of Acuros XB (AXB) dose calculation algorithm on an air cavity for a single radiation field using 6-MV flattening filter-free (FFF) beam. Methods: A rectangular slab phantom containing an air cavity was made for this study. The CT images of the phantom for dose calculation were scanned with and without film at measurement depths (4.5, 5.5, 6.5 and 7.5 cm). The central axis doses (CADs) and the off-axis doses (OADs) were measured by film and calculated with Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) and AXB for field sizes ranging from 2 Χ 2 to 5 Χ 5 cm{sup 2} of 6-MV FFF beams. Both algorithms were divided into AXB-w and AAA -w when included the film in phantom for dose calculation, and AXB-w/o and AAA-w/o in calculation without film. The calculated OADs for both algorithms were compared with the measured OADs and difference values were determined using root means squares error (RMSE) and gamma evaluation. Results: The percentage differences (%Diffs) between the measured and calculated CAD for AXB-w was most agreement than others. Compared to the %Diff with and without film, the %Diffs with film were decreased than without within both algorithms. The %Diffs for both algorithms were reduced with increasing field size and increased relative to the depth increment. RMSEs of CAD for AXB-w were within 10.32% for both inner-profile and penumbra, while the corresponding values of AAA-w appeared to 96.50%. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the dose calculation with AXB within air cavity shows more accurate than with AAA compared to the measured dose. Furthermore, we found that the AXB-w was superior to AXB-w/o in this region when compared against the measurements.

  9. 6 MV Vacuum Voltmeter Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    reversed). The draw rod compresses o-ring seals between the insulators and rings to allow operation in vacuum. The insulator outer surfaces are coated...small-diameter ends, and have toroidal conductors attached at their large-diameter ends. The field shaper surfaces are treated to increase the...the direction to emit electrons toward the VVM insulator stack. The field magnitude is about 0.5 MV/cm, and would probably emit without the surface

  10. Comparison of DSB effects of the beta particles of iodine-131 and 6 MV X-ray at a dose of 2 Gy in the presence of 2-Methoxyestradiol, IUdR, and TPT in glioblastoma spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshasteh-Riz, Ali; Eyvazzadeh, Nazila; Koosha, Fereshteh; Cheraghi, Susan

    2017-02-01

    Glioblastoma is one of the lethal brain tumors and one of the resistant tumors against radiotherapy. Multiple treatment methods and different types of radiation and Radiosensitizers drugs have been combined to optimize the efficacy of radiotherapy. Radiosensitizers are employed to reinforce tumor cell killing and have much fewer effects on the normal tissue. Inducing DNA double strand break in tumoral cells is a major goal of radiation sensitivity. In this study, the level of DNA double strand break in glioblastoma spheroids irradiated by 2 Gy beta particles of iodine-131 and 6 MV X-rays in the presence of 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2), iodo-deoxy-uridine (IUdR) and Topotecan (TPT) was measured using the PicoGreen method. Spheroids of the U87MG cell line were cultured to reach a 300 μm diameter. In the phase one of the study, the spheroids were treated in four groups individually, including 2 Gy of iodine-131, TPT+iodine-131, IUdR+iodine-131, IUdR+2ME2+iodine-131. In the next phase, the cells were treated with 2 Gy of 6 MV X-ray, TPT+6 MV X-ray, IUdR+6 MV X-ray, TPT+IUdR+6 MV X-ray. DSB lesions were measured by the Pico Green assay. The amount of DSB lesions in groups irradiated with iodine-131 individually was greater than the group irradiated with 6 MV X-ray (p<0.05). DNA double strand breaks became more significant in combination with TPT. However, the amount of DSBs in the two independent groups of TPT+IUdR+2ME2+iodine-131 and TPT+IUdR+2ME2+6 MV X-ray was approximately in the same range (P>0.05). The level of DNA double strand breaks in cells irradiated with Iodine-131 was higher than cells irradiated with 6 MV X-ray at the same dose and Topotecan had a positive effect on inducing the damage. The role of 2ME2+IUdR in increasing the damage caused by beta particles of iodine-131 was not significant. Iodine-131 could lead to major DSB damage than 6 MV X-ray at the same dose due to its cross fire effect and spatial distribution of energy in different angels. This

  11. Dependence of current rise time on laser-triggered discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Soowon; Kamohara, Takashi; Hosseini, S. Hamid R.; Katsuki, Sunao

    2016-07-01

    A powerful, stable extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source is the most important component for EUV lithography and EUV mask inspection. Here, we investigate the characteristics of laser-triggered discharge plasma at three different current rise times, fast, middle and slow. A height-adjustable coaxial birdcage was used to change circuit inductance. The rise time was varied between 30 ns-55 ns with peak current of 10 kA. The time-integrated EUV (at 13.5 nm in 2% bandwidth) intensity for the fast rise time was found to be 55% stronger than that of the slow rise time despite its lower energy. A high-speed Mach-Zehnder interferogram and visible imaging of the pinch plasma were employed to discuss plasma compression processes qualitatively and quantitatively. Also discharge produced debris was investigated using a silicon-crystal witness plate. The fast rise current was found to have advantages such as lower debris, higher EUV intensity, and possibility of suppressing instability in comparison with the slow rise time. As expected, total debris amounts lessened proportionally to the primary charged energy, as found from a comparison of fast and slow rise currents.

  12. Electron contamination modeling and skin dose in 6 MV longitudinal field MRIgRT: Impact of the MRI and MRI fringe field

    SciTech Connect

    Oborn, B. M.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Butson, M. J.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Keall, P. J.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: In recent times, longitudinal field MRI-linac systems have been proposed for 6 MV MRI-guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT). The magnetic field is parallel with the beam axis and so will alter the transport properties of any electron contamination particles. The purpose of this work is to provide a first investigation into the potential effects of the MR and fringe magnetic fields on the electron contamination as it is transported toward a phantom, in turn, providing an estimate of the expected patient skin dose changes in such a modality. Methods: Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations of a water phantom exposed to a 6 MV x-ray beam were performed. Longitudinal magnetic fields of strengths between 0 and 3 T were applied to a 30 x 30 x 20 cm{sup 3} phantom. Surrounding the phantom there is a region where the magnetic field is at full MRI strength, consistent with clinical MRI systems. Beyond this the fringe magnetic field entering the collimation system is also modeled. The MRI-coil thickness, fringe field properties, and isocentric distance are varied and investigated. Beam field sizes of 5 x 5, 10 x 10, 15 x 15 and 20 x 20 cm{sup 2} were simulated. Central axis dose, 2D virtual entry skin dose films, and 70 {mu}m skin depth doses were calculated using high resolution scoring voxels. Results: In the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field, electron contamination from the linear accelerator is encouraged to travel almost directly toward the patient surface with minimal lateral spread. This results in a concentration of electron contamination within the x-ray beam outline. This concentration is particularly encouraged if the fringe field encompasses the collimation system. Skin dose increases of up to 1000% were observed for certain configurations and increases above Dmax were common. In nonmagnetically shielded cases, electron contamination generated from the jaw faces and air column is trapped and propagated almost directly to the phantom entry region, giving rise to

  13. SU-E-T-175: Evaluation of the Relative Output Ratio for Collimator Jaw and MLC Defined Small Static 6MV Photon Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, G; Thwaites, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate relative output ratio of collimator jaw and MLC defined small photon fields. Methods: Relative output ratios were measured using Gafchromic EBT3 film for a 6 MV photon beam on a Novalis Tx with HD120 MLC. Beam collimation was achieved by the jaws for 1.0 cm and 3.0 cm and MLC defined square field sizes between 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm with varying jaw settings between 2.0 and 4.0 cm. Film pieces were exposed to 4 Gy. Experiments were repeated with each session consisting of five consecutive exposures for the given MLC and/or jaw collimation and with the MLC and the jaws reset for each exposure. Films were scanned using EPSON 10000XL flatbed scanner approximately 24 hours after exposure in 48 bit RGB format at 150 dpi. Film calibration data were corrected for daily linac output variations. Doses were evaluated using the green channel with square ROI sizes of 0.1 – 0.6 cm. Converted doses were normalised for output ratio calculation using the 3.0 cm field as a machine specific reference field size. Mean output ratio and coefficient of variation (CV) were calculated for each experimental session. Results: For the Novalis 6 MV photon beam the output ratios between 0.719 and 0.872 have been measured for the jaw/MLC combinations tested. For a jaw setting of 4.0 cm field, the mean CV of the output ratios increased from 0.77% to 1.48% with decreasing MLC field size from 1.0 cm to 0.5 cm. For a nominal MLC 1.0 cm field, the CV increased to 1.00% from 0.77% with reducing jaw field size from 4.0 cm to 2.0 cm. Conclusion: The relative output ratio and the associated CV were dependent on the collimator jaw and MLC settings. The field size dependent CV showed similar trends to those reported in the literature.

  14. SU-E-T-53: Benchmarking a Monte Carlo Model for Patient Plane Leakage Calculations of Low Energy 6MV Unique Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Constantin, M; Sawkey, D; Johnsen, S; Hsu, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To validate the physics parameters of a Monte Carlo model for patient plane leakage calculations on the 6MV Unique linac by comparing the simulations against IEC patient plane leakage measurements. The benchmarked model can further be used for shielding design optimization, to predict leakage in the proximity of intended treatment fields, reduce the system weight and cost, and improve components reliability. Methods: The treatment head geometry of the Unique linac was simulated in Geant4 (v9.4.p02 with “Opt3” standard electromagnetic physics list) based on CAD drawings of all collimation and shielding components projected from the target to the area within 2m from isocenter. A 4×4m2 scorer was inserted 1m from the target in the patient plane and multiple phase space files were recorded by performing a 40-node computing cluster simulation on the EC2 cloud. The photon energy fluence was calculated relative to the value at isocenter for a 10×10cm2 field using 10×10mm2 bins. Tungsten blocks were parked accordingly to represent MLC120. The secondary particle contamination to patient plane was eliminated by “killing” those particles prior to the primary collimator entrance using a “kill-plane”, which represented the upper head shielding components not being modeled. Both IEC patient-plane leakage and X/Y-jaws transmission were simulated. Results: The contribution of photons to energy fluence was 0.064% on average, in excellent agreement with the experimental data available at 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5m from isocenter, characterized by an average leakage of 0.045% and a maximum leakage of 0.085%. X- and Y-jaws transmissions of 0.43% and 0.44% were found in good agreement with measurements of 0.48% and 0.43%, respectively. Conclusion: A Geant4 model based on energy fluence calculations for the 6MV Unique linac was created and validated using IEC patient plane leakage measurements. The “kill-plane” has effectively eliminated electron contamination to

  15. Superiority of Low Energy 160 KV X-Rays Compared to High Energy 6 MV X-Rays in Heavy Element Radiosensitization for Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sara N.; Pradhan, Anil K.; Nahar, Sultana N.; Barth, Rolf F.; Yang, Weilian; Nakkula, Robin J.; Palmer, Alycia; Turro, Claudia

    2013-06-01

    High energy X-rays in the MeV range are generally employed in conventional radiation therapy from linear accelerators (LINAC) to ensure sufficient penetration depths. However, lower energy X-rays in the keV range may be more effective when coupled with heavy element (high-Z or HZ) radiosensitizers. Numerical simulations of X-ray energy deposition for tumor phantoms sensitized with HZ radiosensitizers were performed using the Monte Carlo code Geant4. The results showed enhancement in energy deposition to radiosensitized phantoms relative to unsensitized phantoms for low energy X-rays in the keV range. In contrast, minimal enhancement was seen using high energy X-rays in the MeV range. Dose enhancement factors (DEFs) were computed and showed radiosensitization only in the low energy range < 200 keV, far lower than the energy of the majority of photons in the LINAC energy range. In vitro studies were carried to demonstrate the tumoricidal effects of HZ sensitized F98 rat glioma cells following irradiation with both low energy 160 kV and high energy 6 MV X-ray sources. The platinum compound, pyridine terpyridine Pt(II) nitrate, was initially used because it was 7x less toxic that an equivalent amount of carboplatin in vitro studies. This would allow us to separate the radiotoxic and the chemotoxic effects of HZ sensitizers. Results from this study showed a 10-fold dose dependent reduction in surviving fractions (SF) of radiosensitized cells treated with low energy 160 kV X-rays compared to those treated with 6 MV X-rays. This is in agreement with our simulations that show an increase in dose deposition in radiosensitized tumors for low energy X-rays. Due to unforeen in vivo toxicity, however, another in vitro study was performed using the commonly used, Pt-based chemotherapeutic drug carboplatin which confirmed earlier results. This lays the ground work for a planned in vivo study using F98 glioma bearing rats. This study demonstrates that while high energy X-rays are

  16. Dosimetric Comparison of 6 MV and 15 MV Single Arc Rapidarc to Helical TomoTherapy for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Jing; Yue Jinbo; McLawhorn, Robert; Yang Wensha; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Dunlap, Neal E.; Sheng Ke; Yin Fangfang; Benedict, Stanley H.

    2011-10-01

    We conducted a planning study to compare Varian's RapidArc (RA) and helical TomoTherapy (HT) for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Three intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were generated for 8 patients with pancreatic cancer: one using HT with 6-MV beam (Plan{sub HT6}), one using single-arc RA with 6-MV beam (Plan{sub RA6}), and one using single-arc RA with 15-MV beam (Plan{sub RA15}). Dosimetric indices including high/low conformality index (CI{sub 100%}/CI{sub 50%}), heterogeneity index (HI), monitor units (MUs), and doses to organs at risk (OARs) were compared. The mean CI{sub 100%} was statistically equivalent with respect to the 2 treatment techniques, as well as beam energy (0.99, 1.01, and 1.02 for Plan{sub HT6}, Plan{sub RA6}, and Plan{sub RA156,} respectively). The CI{sub 50%} and HI were improved in both RA plans over the HT plan. The RA plans significantly reduced MU (MU{sub RA6} = 697, MU{sub RA15} = 548) compared with HT (MU{sub HT6} = 6177, p = 0.008 in both cases). The mean maximum cord dose was decreased from 29.6 Gy in Plan{sub HT6} to 21.6 Gy (p = 0.05) in Plan{sub RA6} and 21.7 Gy (p = 0.04) in Plan{sub RA15}. The mean bowel dose decreased from 17.2 Gy in Plan{sub HT6} to 15.2 Gy (p = 0.03) in Plan{sub RA6} and 15.0 Gy (p = 0.03) Plan{sub RA15}. The mean liver dose decreased from 8.4 Gy in Plan{sub HT6} to 6.3 Gy (p = 0.04) in Plan{sub RA6} and 6.2 Gy in Plan{sub RA15}. Variations of the mean dose to the duodenum, kidneys, and stomach were statistically insignificant. RA and HT can both deliver conformal dose distributions to target volumes while limiting the dose to surrounding OARs in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Dosimetric advantages might be gained by using RA over HT by reducing the dose to OARs and total MUs used for treatment.

  17. High resolution entry and exit Monte Carlo dose calculations from a linear accelerator 6 MV beam under the influence of transverse magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Oborn, B M; Metcalfe, P E; Butson, M J; Rosenfeld, A B

    2009-08-01

    A current concern with 6 MV transverse field MRI-linac hybrid systems is the predicted increases in skin dose (both the entry and exit sides) caused by the effects of the magnetic field on secondary electrons. In this work high resolution GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations have been performed at the beam central axis in the entry and exit regions of a water phantom to predict surface (0 microm depth) and skin (70 microm depth) doses when placed in such a hybrid system. A 30 x 30 x 20 cm3 water phantom with 10 microm thick voxels has been simulated by being irradiated perpendicularly with a 6 MV photon beam (Varian 2100C) of sizes of 5 x 5, 10 x 10, 15 x 15, and 20 x 20 cm2. Uniform transverse magnetic fields of 0.2, 0.75, 1.5, and 3 T with varying thickness above the phantom have been investigated. Simulations with and without lepton contamination have been performed. In the entry region the high resolution scoring has yielded unexpected surface and skin doses. There is a small amount of nonpurged air-generated lepton contamination that originates immediately above the phantom surface and delivers its dose over very short longitudinal distances in the entry region. At 0.2 T the surface and skin doses are not accurately predicted using lepton-contamination-free simulations and extrapolated lower resolution scoring. Lepton-free simulations are up to 7% of Dmax lower than simulations with leptons. However, compared to 0 T, entry skin dose is reduced at 0.2 and 0.75 T but increases to 28%-31% of Dmax at 3 T. For skin doses at the central axis in the exit region, high resolution scoring shows relative increases of 38%-106%, depending on the magnetic field strength and field size. These values are also up to 20% higher than lower resolution results. The shape of the exit dose profiles varies unpredictably and so extrapolation of low resolution data is insufficient. In order to achieve accurate Monte Carlo skin dosimetry in a transverse field MRI-linac system, the authors

  18. Reference photon dosimetry data and reference phase space data for the 6 MV photon beam from Varian Clinac 2100 series linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Sang Hyun; Vassiliev, Oleg N.; Lee, Seungsoo; Liu, H. Helen; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Mohan, Radhe

    2005-01-01

    The current study presents the reference photon dosimetry data (RPDD) and reference phase space data (RPSD) for the 6 MV photon beam from Varian 2100 series linear accelerators. The RPDD provide the basic photon dosimetry data, typically collected during the initial commissioning of a new linear accelerator, including output factors, depth dose data, and beam profile data in air and in water. The RPSD provide the full phase space information, such as position, direction, and energy for each particle generated inside the head of any particular linear accelerator in question. The dosimetric characteristics of the 6 MV photon beam from the majority of the aforementioned accelerators, which are unaltered from the manufacturer's original specifications, can be fully described with these two data sets within a clinically acceptable uncertainty ({approx}{+-}2%). The current study also presents a detailed procedure to establish the RPDD and RPSD using measured data and Monte Carlo calculations. The RPDD were constructed by compiling our own measured data and the average data based on the analysis of more than 50 sets of measured data from the Radiological Physics Center (RPC) and 10 sets of clinical dosimetry data obtained from 10 different institutions participating in the RPC's quality assurance monitoring program. All the measured data from the RPC and the RPC-monitored institutions were found to be within a statistically tight range (i.e., 1{sigma}{approx_equal}1% or less) for each dosimetric quantity. The manufacturer's standard data, except for in-air off-axis factors that are available only from the current study, were compared with the RPDD, showing that the manufacturer's standard data could also be used as the RPDD for the photon beam studied in this study. The RPSD were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations using the BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc code system with 6.2 MeV (a spread of 3% full width at half maximum) and 1.0 mm full width at half maximum as the values of the

  19. An evaluation of NCRP report 151--radiation shielding design for radiotherapy facilities, and a feasibility study for 6 MV open-door treatments in an existing high-energy radiation therapy bunker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kildea, John

    This thesis describes a study of shielding design techniques used for radiation therapy facilities that employ megavoltage linear accelerators. Specifically, an evaluation of the shielding design formalism described in NCRP report 151 was undertaken and a feasibility study for open-door 6 MV radiation therapy treatments in existing 6 MV, 18 MV treatment rooms at the Montreal General Hospital (MGH) was conducted. To evaluate the shielding design formalism of NCRP 151, barrier-attenuated equivalent doses were measured for several of the treatment rooms at the MGH and compared with expectations from NCRP 151 calculations. It was found that, while the insight and recommendations of NCRP 151 are very valuable, its dose predictions are not always correct. As such, the NCRP 151 methodology is best used in conjunction with physical measurements. The feasibility study for 6 MV open-door treatments made use of the NCRP 151 formalism, together with physical measurements for realistic 6 MV workloads. The results suggest that, dosimetrically, 6 MV open door treatments are feasible. A conservative estimate for the increased dose at the door arising from such treatments is 0.1 mSv, with a 1/8 occupancy factor, as recommended in NCRP 151, included.

  20. Improved operation of a microwave pulse compressor with a laser-triggered high-pressure gas plasma switch

    SciTech Connect

    Shlapakovski, A.; Gorev, S.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2016-08-15

    The influence of laser beam parameters on the output pulses of a resonant microwave compressor with a laser-triggered plasma switch was investigated. The S-band compressor, consisting of a rectangular waveguide-based cavity and H-plane waveguide tee with a shorted side arm, was filled with pressurized dry air and pumped by 1.8-μs-long microwave pulses of up to 450 kW power. A Nd:YAG laser was used to ignite the gas discharge in the tee side arm for output pulse extraction. The laser beam (at 213 nm or 532 nm) was directed along the RF electric field lines. It was found that the compressor operated most effectively when the laser beam was focused at the center of the switch waveguide cross-section. In this case, the power extraction efficiency reached ∼47% at an output power of ∼14 MW, while when the laser beam was not focused the maximal extraction efficiency was only ∼20% at ∼6 MW output power. Focusing the laser beam resulted also in a dramatic decrease (down to <1 ns) in the delay of the output pulses' appearance with respect to the time of the beam's entrance into the switch, and the jitter of the output pulses' appearance was minimized. In addition, the quality of the output pulses' waveform was significantly improved.

  1. Improved operation of a microwave pulse compressor with a laser-triggered high-pressure gas plasma switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlapakovski, A.; Gorev, S.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of laser beam parameters on the output pulses of a resonant microwave compressor with a laser-triggered plasma switch was investigated. The S-band compressor, consisting of a rectangular waveguide-based cavity and H-plane waveguide tee with a shorted side arm, was filled with pressurized dry air and pumped by 1.8-μs-long microwave pulses of up to 450 kW power. A Nd:YAG laser was used to ignite the gas discharge in the tee side arm for output pulse extraction. The laser beam (at 213 nm or 532 nm) was directed along the RF electric field lines. It was found that the compressor operated most effectively when the laser beam was focused at the center of the switch waveguide cross-section. In this case, the power extraction efficiency reached ˜47% at an output power of ˜14 MW, while when the laser beam was not focused the maximal extraction efficiency was only ˜20% at ˜6 MW output power. Focusing the laser beam resulted also in a dramatic decrease (down to <1 ns) in the delay of the output pulses' appearance with respect to the time of the beam's entrance into the switch, and the jitter of the output pulses' appearance was minimized. In addition, the quality of the output pulses' waveform was significantly improved.

  2. Comparison of build-up region doses in oblique tangential 6 MV photon beams calculated by AAA and CCC algorithms in breast Rando phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunun, P.; Tangboonduangjit, P.; Dumrongkijudom, N.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the build-up region doses on breast Rando phantom surface with the bolus covered, the doses in breast Rando phantom and also the doses in a lung that is the heterogeneous region by two algorithms. The AAA in Eclipse TPS and the collapsed cone convolution algorithm in Pinnacle treatment planning system were used to plan in tangential field technique with 6 MV photon beam at 200 cGy total doses in Breast Rando phantom with bolus covered (5 mm and 10 mm). TLDs were calibrated with Cobalt-60 and used to measure the doses in irradiation process. The results in treatment planning show that the doses in build-up region and the doses in breast phantom were closely matched in both algorithms which are less than 2% differences. However, overestimate of doses in a lung (L2) were found in AAA with 13.78% and 6.06% differences at 5 mm and 10 mm bolus thickness, respectively when compared with CCC algorithm. The TLD measurements show the underestimate in buildup region and in breast phantom but the doses in a lung (L2) were overestimated when compared with the doses in the two plannings at both thicknesses of the bolus.

  3. Comparison of second cancer risk due to out-of-field doses from 6-MV IMRT and proton therapy based on 6 pediatric patient treatment plans

    PubMed Central

    Athar, Basit S.; Paganetti, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study compared 6-MV IMRT and proton therapy in terms of organ specific second cancer lifetime attributable risks (LARs) caused by scattered and secondary out-of-field radiation. Material and Methods Based on simulated organ doses, excess relative and excess absolute risk models were applied to assess organ-specific LARs. Two treatment sites (cranium and central spine) were considered involving 6 treatment volumes and 6 patient ages (9-month, 4-year, 8-year, 11-year, 14-year, and adult). Results The LARs for thyroid cancer from a 6 cm diameter field treating a brain lesion in a 4-year old patient were estimated to be 1.1% and 0.3% in passive proton therapy and IMRT, respectively. However, estimated LARs for bladder cancer, more than 25 cm from the field edge for the same patient and treatment field, were estimated to be 0.2% and 0.02% from IMRT and proton therapy, respectively. Risks for proton beam scanning was found to be an order of magnitude smaller compared to passive proton therapy. Conclusion In terms of out-of-field risks, IMRT offers advantage close to the primary field and an increasing advantage for passive proton therapy is noticed with increasing distance to the field. Scanning proton beam therapy shows the lowest risks. PMID:21159398

  4. Monte Carlo correction factors for a Farmer 0.6 cm3 ion chamber dose measurement in the build-up region of the 6 MV clinical beam.

    PubMed

    Pena, J; Sánchez-Doblado, F; Capote, R; Terrón, J A; Gómez, F

    2006-03-21

    Reference dosimetry of photon fields is a well-established subject and currently available protocols (such as the IAEA TRS-398 and AAPM TG-51) provide methods for converting the ionization chamber (IC) reading into dose to water, provided reference conditions of charged particle equilibrium (CPE) are fulfilled. But these protocols cannot deal with the build-up region, where the lack of CPE limits the applicability of the cavity theorems and so the chamber correction factors become depth dependent. By explicitly including the IC geometry in the Monte Carlo simulations, depth-dependent dose correction factors are calculated for a PTW 30001 0.6 cm(3) ion chamber in the build-up region of the 6 MV photon beam. The corrected percentage depth dose (PDD) agrees within 2% with that measured using the NACP 02 plane-parallel ion chamber in the build-up region at depths greater than 0.4 cm, where the Farmer chamber wall reaches the phantom surface.

  5. Validation of Monte Carlo simulation of 6 MV photon beam produced by Varian Clinac 2100 linear accelerator using BEAMnrc code and DOSXYZnrc code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencheikh, Mohamed; Maghnouj, Abdelmajid; Tajmouati, Jaouad; Didi, Abdessamad; Ezzati, Ahad Olah

    2017-09-01

    The Monte Carlo model for the photon-beam output from the Varian Clinac 2100 linear accelerator was validated to compare the calculated to measured PDD and beam dose profiles The Monte Carlo calculation method is considered to be the most accurate method for dose calculation in radiotherapy. The objective of this study is to build a Monte Carlo geometry of Varian Clinac 2100 linear accelerator as realistically as possible. The Monte Carlo codes used in this work were the BEAMnrc code to simulate the photons beam and the DOSXYZnrc code to examinate the absorbed dose in the water phantom. We have calculated percentage depth dose (PDD) and beam profiles of the 6 MV photon beam for the 6 × 6 cm2, 10 × 10 cm2 and 15 × 15 cm2 field sizes. We have used the gamma index technique for the quantitative evaluation to compare the measured and calculated distributions. Good agreement was found between calculated PDD and beam profile compared to measured data. The comparison was evaluated using the gamma index method and the criterions were 3% for dose difference and 3 mm for distance to agreement. The gamma index acceptance rate was more than 97% of both distribution comparisons PDDs and dose profiles and our results were more developed and accurate. The Varian Clinac 2100 linear accelerator was accurately modeled using Monte Carlo codes: BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc codes package.

  6. Comparison of Flattening Filter (FF) and Flattening-Filter-Free (FFF) 6 MV photon beam characteristics for small field dosimetry using EGSnrc Monte Carlo code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangeetha, S.; Sureka, C. S.

    2017-06-01

    The present study is focused to compare the characteristics of Varian Clinac 600 C/D flattened and unflattened 6 MV photon beams for small field dosimetry using EGSnrc Monte Carlo Simulation since the small field dosimetry is considered to be the most crucial and provoking task in the field of radiation dosimetry. A 6 MV photon beam of a Varian Clinac 600 C/D medical linear accelerator operates with Flattening Filter (FF) and Flattening-Filter-Free (FFF) mode for small field dosimetry were performed using EGSnrc Monte Carlo user codes (BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc) in order to calculate the beam characteristics using Educated-trial and error method. These includes: Percentage depth dose, lateral beam profile, dose rate delivery, photon energy spectra, photon beam uniformity, out-of-field dose, surface dose, penumbral dose and output factor for small field dosimetry (0.5×0.5 cm2 to 4×4 cm2) and are compared with magna-field sizes (5×5 cm2 to 40×40 cm2) at various depths. The results obtained showed that the optimized beam energy and Full-width-half maximum value for small field dosimetry and magna-field dosimetry was found to be 5.7 MeV and 0.13 cm for both FF and FFF beams. The depth of dose maxima for small field size deviates minimally for both FF and FFF beams similar to magna-fields. The depths greater than dmax depicts a steeper dose fall off in the exponential region for FFF beams comparing FF beams where its deviations gets increased with the increase in field size. The shape of the lateral beam profiles of FF and FFF beams varies remains similar for the small field sizes less than 4×4 cm2 whereas it varies in the case of magna-fields. Dose rate delivery for FFF beams shows an eminent increase with a two-fold factor for both small field dosimetry and magna-field sizes. The surface dose measurements of FFF beams for small field size were found to be higher whereas it gets lower for magna-fields than FF beam. The amount of out-of-field dose reduction gets

  7. Dose-volume histogram comparison between static 5-field IMRT with 18-MV X-rays and helical tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Akihiro; Shibamoto, Yuta; Hattori, Yukiko; Tamura, Takeshi; Iwabuchi, Michio; Otsuka, Shinya; Sugie, Chikao; Yanagi, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    We treated prostate cancer patients with static 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using linac 18-MV X-rays or tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays. As X-ray energies differ, we hypothesized that 18-MV photon IMRT may be better for large patients and tomotherapy may be more suitable for small patients. Thus, we compared dose-volume parameters for the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) in 59 patients with T1-3 N0M0 prostate cancer who had been treated using 5-field IMRT. For these same patients, tomotherapy plans were also prepared for comparison. In addition, plans of 18 patients who were actually treated with tomotherapy were analyzed. The evaluated parameters were homogeneity indicies and a conformity index for the PTVs, and D2 (dose received by 2% of the PTV in Gy), D98, Dmean and V10-70 Gy (%) for OARs. To evaluate differences by body size, patients with a known body mass index were grouped by that index ( <21; 21-25; and >25 kg/m(2)). For the PTV, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans compared with the 5-field IMRT plans. For the rectum, V10 Gy and V60 Gy were higher, whereas V20 Gy and V30 Gy were lower in the tomotherapy plans. For the bladder, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans. However, both plans were considered clinically acceptable. Similar trends were observed in 18 patients treated with tomotherapy. Obvious trends were not observed for body size. Tomotherapy provides equivalent dose distributions for PTVs and OARs compared with 18-MV 5-field IMRT. Tomotherapy could be used as a substitute for high-energy photon IMRT for prostate cancer regardless of body size.

  8. An investigation of the depth dose in the build-up region, and surface dose for a 6-MV therapeutic photon beam: Monte Carlo simulation and measurements

    PubMed Central

    Apipunyasopon, Lukkana; Srisatit, Somyot; Phaisangittisakul, Nakorn

    2013-01-01

    The percentage depth dose in the build-up region and the surface dose for the 6-MV photon beam from a Varian Clinac 23EX medical linear accelerator was investigated for square field sizes of 5 × 5, 10 × 10, 15 × 15 and 20 × 20 cm2using the EGS4nrc Monte Carlo (MC) simulation package. The depth dose was found to change rapidly in the build-up region, and the percentage surface dose increased proportionally with the field size from approximately 10% to 30%. The measurements were also taken using four common detectors: TLD chips, PFD dosimeter, parallel-plate and cylindrical ionization chamber, and compared with MC simulated data, which served as the gold standard in our study. The surface doses obtained from each detector were derived from the extrapolation of the measured depth doses near the surface and were all found to be higher than that of the MC simulation. The lowest and highest over-responses in the surface dose measurement were found with the TLD chip and the CC13 cylindrical ionization chamber, respectively. Increasing the field size increased the percentage surface dose almost linearly in the various dosimeters and also in the MC simulation. Interestingly, the use of the CC13 ionization chamber eliminates the high gradient feature of the depth dose near the surface. The correction factors for the measured surface dose from each dosimeter for square field sizes of between 5 × 5 and 20 × 20 cm2are introduced. PMID:23104898

  9. MO-A-213AB-02: Redesign of a 6 MV Linear Accelerator Waveguide to Produce Energies Up to 10 MV.

    PubMed

    Baillie, D; St Aubin, J; Fallone, B; Steciw, S

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the feasibility of producing a short, high-energy linear accelerator for use in a proposed hybrid linear accelerator magnetic resonance imager (linac-MRI). A short 6MV waveguide was previously simulated in COMSOL and benchmarked against experiment. The simulated input power is increased from 2.5 to 7.5 MW to reflect replacing the magnetron power source with a commercially available klystron, and the RF fields within the waveguide are calculated. The RF solution is used as an input into PARMELA, an electron-tracking software, to calculate the electron energy and spatial distribution exiting the waveguide. The electric fields within the waveguide are compared with experimental thresholds for electric breakdown within the waveguide to determine the possibility of operation at increased input power. The energy spectrum of the electron beam incident on the target is analyzed for suitability for radiotherapy. Finally, some potential modifications to the simulated cavity dimensions and positioning are discussed, and a preliminary estimate of the effects on the electron distributions are analyzed. When the input power is increased, peak surface electric fields within the waveguide of 215 MV/m are calculated, below the threshold determined by experiment of 240 - 300 MV/m for similar resonant structures. The FWHM of the electron focal spot is shown to be 1.5 times larger than the focal spot from the unmodified waveguide. The maximum electron energy increases from 6.1 to 10.6 MeV and the spread of electron energies is 5 times larger than the original. The modifications to the first cavity are shown to reduce the focal spot and energy spread to be comparable to the unmodified waveguide. It is feasible to produce a high-energy waveguide that is short enough for use in our linac-MRI. Slight modifications to the existing waveguide design will be required to optimize beam parameters for treatment. ACF Graduate Studentship. © 2012 American Association of Physicists

  10. Comparison of pencil-beam, collapsed-cone and Monte-Carlo algorithms in radiotherapy treatment planning for 6-MV photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Jin; Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Dong Ho

    2015-07-01

    Treatment planning system calculations in inhomogeneous regions may present significant inaccuracies due to loss of electronic equilibrium. In this study, three different dose calculation algorithms, pencil beam (PB), collapsed cone (CC), and Monte-Carlo (MC), provided by our planning system were compared to assess their impact on the three-dimensional planning of lung and breast cases. A total of five breast and five lung cases were calculated by using the PB, CC, and MC algorithms. Planning treatment volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) delineations were performed according to our institution's protocols on the Oncentra MasterPlan image registration module, on 0.3-0.5 cm computed tomography (CT) slices taken under normal respiration conditions. Intensitymodulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were calculated for the three algorithm for each patient. The plans were conducted on the Oncentra MasterPlan (PB and CC) and CMS Monaco (MC) treatment planning systems for 6 MV. The plans were compared in terms of the dose distribution in target, the OAR volumes, and the monitor units (MUs). Furthermore, absolute dosimetry was measured using a three-dimensional diode array detector (ArcCHECK) to evaluate the dose differences in a homogeneous phantom. Comparing the dose distributions planned by using the PB, CC, and MC algorithms, the PB algorithm provided adequate coverage of the PTV. The MUs calculated using the PB algorithm were less than those calculated by using. The MC algorithm showed the highest accuracy in terms of the absolute dosimetry. Differences were found when comparing the calculation algorithms. The PB algorithm estimated higher doses for the target than the CC and the MC algorithms. The PB algorithm actually overestimated the dose compared with those calculated by using the CC and the MC algorithms. The MC algorithm showed better accuracy than the other algorithms.

  11. A feasibility study to calculate unshielded fetal doses to pregnant patients in 6-MV photon treatments using Monte Carlo methods and anatomically realistic phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarz, Bryan; Xu, X. George

    2008-07-15

    A Monte Carlo-based procedure to assess fetal doses from 6-MV external photon beam radiation treatments has been developed to improve upon existing techniques that are based on AAPM Task Group Report 36 published in 1995 [M. Stovall et al., Med. Phys. 22, 63-82 (1995)]. Anatomically realistic models of the pregnant patient representing 3-, 6-, and 9-month gestational stages were implemented into the MCNPX code together with a detailed accelerator model that is capable of simulating scattered and leakage radiation from the accelerator head. Absorbed doses to the fetus were calculated for six different treatment plans for sites above the fetus and one treatment plan for fibrosarcoma in the knee. For treatment plans above the fetus, the fetal doses tended to increase with increasing stage of gestation. This was due to the decrease in distance between the fetal body and field edge with increasing stage of gestation. For the treatment field below the fetus, the absorbed doses tended to decrease with increasing gestational stage of the pregnant patient, due to the increasing size of the fetus and relative constant distance between the field edge and fetal body for each stage. The absorbed doses to the fetus for all treatment plans ranged from a maximum of 30.9 cGy to the 9-month fetus to 1.53 cGy to the 3-month fetus. The study demonstrates the feasibility to accurately determine the absorbed organ doses in the mother and fetus as part of the treatment planning and eventually in risk management.

  12. Using electric pulse and laser to trigger a sharp and nonvolatile change of lateral photovoltage in nano-carbon film

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Zhikai; Zhou, Peiqi; Huang, Xu; Mei, Chunlian; Zhang, Ke; Wang, Hui

    2016-03-28

    A greatly enhanced lateral photovoltage (LPV) triggered by electric pulse has been observed in nano-carbon oxide semiconductor (COS) structures. The original maximal output signal of lateral photovoltage achieved in these structures is 9.8 mV. However, by combining the application of a 60 V voltage pulse with laser illumination, the LPV can reach a very high value of 183 mV and the change ratio after 60 V pulse is nearly 1800%. In addition, the states of these light and electric-pulse triggered COSs are permanently changed, showing a non-volatile characteristic. We attribute this phenomenon to the trapping effect of stimulated electrons in COSs. The work suggests an approach for tailoring LPV-based devices by electric pulse and will be useful for the development of electric pulse modulated photodetectors.

  13. SU-E-T-313: Dosimetric Deviation of Misaligned Beams for a 6 MV Photon Linear Accelerator Using Monte Carlo Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric variations of misaligned beams for a linear accelerator by using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Method and Materials: Misaligned beams of a Varian 21EX Clinac were simulated to estimate the dosimetric effects. All the linac head components for a 6 MV photon beam were implemented in BEAMnrc/EGSnrc system. For incident electron beam parameters, 6 MeV with 0.1 cm full-width-half-max Gaussian beam was used. A phase space file was obtained below the jaw per each misalignment condition of the incident electron beam: (1) The incident electron beams were tilted by 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 degrees on the x-axis from the central axis. (2) The center of the incident electron beam was off-axially moved toward +x-axis by 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 cm away from the central axis. Lateral profiles for each misaligned beam condition were acquired at dmax = 1.5 cm and 10 cm depth in a rectangular water phantom. Beam flatness and symmetry were calculated by using the lateral profile data. Results: The lateral profiles were found to be skewed opposite to the angle of the incident beam for the tilted beams. For the displaced beams, similar skewed lateral profiles were obtained with small shifts of penumbra on the +x-axis. The variations of beam flatness were 3.89–11.18% and 4.12–42.57% for the tilted beam and the translated beam, respectively. The beam symmetry was separately found to be 2.95 −9.93% and 2.55–38.06% separately. It was found that the percent increase of the flatness and the symmetry values are approximated 2 to 3% per 0.5 degree tilt or per 1 mm displacement. Conclusion: This study quantified the dosimetric effects of misaligned beams using MC simulations. The results would be useful to understand the magnitude of the dosimetric deviations for the misaligned beams.

  14. The effect of voxel size on dose distribution in Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yani, Sitti; Dirgayussa, I Gde E.; Haryanto, Freddy; Arif, Idam; Rhani, Moh. Fadhillah

    2015-09-30

    Recently, Monte Carlo (MC) calculation method has reported as the most accurate method of predicting dose distributions in radiotherapy. The MC code system (especially DOSXYZnrc) has been used to investigate the different voxel (volume elements) sizes effect on the accuracy of dose distributions. To investigate this effect on dosimetry parameters, calculations were made with three different voxel sizes. The effects were investigated with dose distribution calculations for seven voxel sizes: 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 × 1 × 0.5 cm{sup 3}, and 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm{sup 3}. The 1 × 10{sup 9} histories were simulated in order to get statistical uncertainties of 2%. This simulation takes about 9-10 hours to complete. Measurements are made with field sizes 10 × 10 cm2 for the 6 MV photon beams with Gaussian intensity distribution FWHM 0.1 cm and SSD 100.1 cm. MC simulated and measured dose distributions in a water phantom. The output of this simulation i.e. the percent depth dose and dose profile in d{sub max} from the three sets of calculations are presented and comparisons are made with the experiment data from TTSH (Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore) in 0-5 cm depth. Dose that scored in voxels is a volume averaged estimate of the dose at the center of a voxel. The results in this study show that the difference between Monte Carlo simulation and experiment data depend on the voxel size both for percent depth dose (PDD) and profile dose. PDD scan on Z axis (depth) of water phantom, the big difference obtain in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm{sup 3} about 17%. In this study, the profile dose focused on high gradient dose area. Profile dose scan on Y axis and the big difference get in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm{sup 3} about 12%. This study demonstrated that the arrange voxel in Monte Carlo simulation becomes important.

  15. Monte Carlo modeling and simulations of the High Definition (HD120) micro MLC and validation against measurements for a 6 MV beam

    SciTech Connect

    Borges, C.; Zarza-Moreno, M.; Heath, E.; Teixeira, N.; Vaz, P.

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: The most recent Varian micro multileaf collimator (MLC), the High Definition (HD120) MLC, was modeled using the BEAMNRC Monte Carlo code. This model was incorporated into a Varian medical linear accelerator, for a 6 MV beam, in static and dynamic mode. The model was validated by comparing simulated profiles with measurements. Methods: The Varian Trilogy (2300C/D) accelerator model was accurately implemented using the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo simulation program BEAMNRC and validated against off-axis and depth dose profiles measured using ionization chambers, by adjusting the energy and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the initial electron beam. The HD120 MLC was modeled by developing a new BEAMNRC component module (CM), designated HDMLC, adapting the available DYNVMLC CM and incorporating the specific characteristics of this new micro MLC. The leaf dimensions were provided by the manufacturer. The geometry was visualized by tracing particles through the CM and recording their position when a leaf boundary is crossed. The leaf material density and abutting air gap between leaves were adjusted in order to obtain a good agreement between the simulated leakage profiles and EBT2 film measurements performed in a solid water phantom. To validate the HDMLC implementation, additional MLC static patterns were also simulated and compared to additional measurements. Furthermore, the ability to simulate dynamic MLC fields was implemented in the HDMLC CM. The simulation results of these fields were compared with EBT2 film measurements performed in a solid water phantom. Results: Overall, the discrepancies, with and without MLC, between the opened field simulations and the measurements using ionization chambers in a water phantom, for the off-axis profiles are below 2% and in depth-dose profiles are below 2% after the maximum dose depth and below 4% in the build-up region. On the conditions of these simulations, this tungsten-based MLC has a density of 18.7 g

  16. Accuracy of dose measurements and calculations within and beyond heterogeneous tissues for 6 MV photon fields smaller than 4 cm produced by Cyberknife

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Ellen E.; Daskalov, George M.

    2008-06-15

    For the small radiation field sizes used in stereotactic radiosurgery, lateral electronic disequilibrium and steep dose gradients exist in a large portion of these fields, requiring the use of high-resolution measurement techniques. These relatively large areas of electronic disequilibrium make accurate dosimetry as well as dose calculation more difficult, and this is exacerbated in regions of tissue heterogeneity. Tissue heterogeneity was considered insignificant in the brain where stereotactic radiosurgery was first used. However, as this technique is expanded to the head and neck and other body sites, dose calculations need to account for dose perturbations in and beyond air cavities, lung, and bone. In a previous study we have evaluated EBT Gafchromic film (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ) for dosimetry and characterization of the Cyberknife radiation beams and found that it was comparable to other common detectors used for small photon beams in solid water equivalent phantoms. In the present work EBT film is used to measure dose in heterogeneous slab phantoms containing lung and bone equivalent materials for the 6 MV radiation beams of diameter 7.5 to 40 mm produced by the Cyberknife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA). These measurements are compared to calculations done with both the clinically utilized Raytrace algorithm as well as the newly developed Monte Carlo based algorithm available on the Cyberknife treatment planning system. Within the low density material both the measurements and Monte Carlo calculations correctly model the decrease in dose produced by a loss of electronic equilibrium, whereas the Raytrace algorithm incorrectly predicts an enhancement of dose in this region. Beyond the low density material an enhancement of dose is correctly calculated by both algorithms. Within the high density bone heterogeneity the EBT film measurements represent dose to unit density tissue in bone and agree with the Monte Carlo results when corrected to dose

  17. Comparison of out-of-field photon doses in 6 MV IMRT and neutron doses in proton therapy for adult and pediatric patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athar, Basit S.; Bednarz, Bryan; Seco, Joao; Hancox, Cindy; Paganetti, Harald

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess lateral out-of-field doses in 6 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) and compare them with secondary neutron equivalent dose contributions in proton therapy. We simulated out-of-field photon doses to various organs as a function of distance, patient's age, gender and treatment volumes based on 3, 6, 9 cm field diameters in the head and neck and spine region. The out-of-field photon doses to organs near the field edge were found to be in the range of 2, 5 and 10 mSv Gy-1 for 3 cm, 6 cm and 9 cm diameter IMRT fields, respectively, within 5 cm of the field edge. Statistical uncertainties calculated in organ doses vary from 0.2% to 40% depending on the organ location and the organ volume. Next, a comparison was made with previously calculated neutron equivalent doses from proton therapy using identical field arrangements. For example, out-of-field doses for IMRT to lung and uterus (organs close to the 3 cm diameter spinal field) were computed to be 0.63 and 0.62 mSv Gy-1, respectively. These numbers are found to be a factor of 2 smaller than the corresponding out-of-field doses for proton therapy, which were estimated to be 1.6 and 1.7 mSv Gy-1 (RBE), respectively. However, as the distance to the field edge increases beyond approximately 25 cm the neutron equivalent dose from proton therapy was found to be a factor of 2-3 smaller than the out-of-field photon dose from IMRT. We have also analyzed the neutron equivalent doses from an ideal scanned proton therapy (assuming not significant amount of absorbers in the treatment head). Out-of-field doses were found to be an order of magnitude smaller compared to out-of-field doses in IMRT or passive scattered proton therapy. In conclusion, there seem to be three geometrical areas when comparing the out-of-target dose from IMRT and (passive scattered) proton treatments. Close to the target (in-field, not analyzed here) protons offer a distinct advantage due to the lower

  18. Radial current high power dummy load for characterizing the high power laser triggered transformer-type accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yi; Zhong, Hui-Huang; Liu, Jin-Liang; Ren, He-Ming; Yang, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Hong, Zhi-qiang

    2010-09-01

    A radial-current aqueous resistive solution load was applied to characterize a laser triggered transformer-type accelerator. The current direction in the dummy load is radial and is different from the traditional load in the axial. Therefore, this type of dummy load has smaller inductance and fast response characteristic. The load was designed to accommodate both the resistance requirement of accelerator and to allow optical access for the laser. Theoretical and numerical calculations of the load's inductance and capacitance are given. The equivalent circuit of the dummy load is calculated in theory and analyzed with a PSPICE code. The simulation results agree well with the theoretical analysis. At last, experiments of the dummy load applied to the high power spiral pulse forming line were performed; a quasisquare pulse voltage is obtained at the dummy load.

  19. New random trigger-feature for ultrashort-pulsed laser increases throughput, accuracy and quality in micromachining applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehler, Andreas; Ammann, Hubert; Benetti, Marco; Wassermann, Dominique; Jaeggi, Beat; Remund, Stefan; Neuenschwander, Beat

    2017-02-01

    For most micromachining applications, the laser focus has to be moved across the workpiece, either by steering the beam or by moving the workpiece. To maximize throughput, this movement should be as fast as possible. However, the required positioning accuracy often limits the obtainable speed. Especially the machining of small and complex features with high precision is constrained by the motion-system's maximum acceleration, limiting the obtainable moving spot velocity to very low values. In general, processing speed can vary widely within the same processing job. To obtain optimum quality at maximum throughput, ideally the pulse energy and the pulse-to-pulse pitch on the workpiece are kept constant. This is only possible if laser-pulses can be randomly triggered, synchronized to the current spot velocity. For ultrafast lasers this is not easily possible, as by design they are usually operated at a fixed pulse repetition rate. The pulse frequency can only be changed by dividing down with integer numbers which leads to a rather coarse frequency grid, especially when applied close to the maximum used operating frequency. This work reports on a new technique allowing random triggering of an ultrafast laser. The resulting timing uncertainty is less than ±25ns, which is negligible for real-world applications, energy stability is <2% rms. The technique allows using acceleration-ramps of the implemented motion system instead of applying additional override moves or skywriting techniques. This can reduce the processing time by up to 40%. Results of applying this technique to different processing geometries and strategies will be presented.

  20. Development of Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation Source using Laser Triggered Vacuum Spark Discharge Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Masato; Yamada, Junzaburo; Zhu Qiushi; Hotta, Eiki

    2009-01-21

    A laser triggerd discharge produced Sn plasma light source has been developed. Experimental parameters such as electrode separation and laser irradiation power are varied to optimize EUV emission power. It is clear that the maximum EUV radiation was occurred in the position where the pinch was observed.

  1. Magnetic shielding investigation for a 6 MV in-line linac within the parallel configuration of a linac-MR system.

    PubMed

    Santos, D M; St Aubin, J; Fallone, B G; Steciw, S

    2012-02-01

    In our current linac-magnetic resonance (MR) design, a 6 MV in-line linac is placed along the central axis of the MR's magnet where the MR's fringe magnetic fields are parallel to the overall electron trajectories in the linac waveguide. Our previous study of this configuration comprising a linac-MR SAD of 100 cm and a 0.5 T superconducting (open, split) MR imager. It showed the presence of longitudinal magnetic fields of 0.011 T at the electron gun, which caused a reduction in target current to 84% of nominal. In this study, passive and active magnetic shielding was investigated to recover the linac output losses caused by magnetic deflections of electron trajectories in the linac within a parallel linac-MR configuration. Magnetic materials and complex shield structures were used in a 3D finite element method (FEM) magnetic field model, which emulated the fringe magnetic fields of the MR imagers. The effects of passive magnetic shielding was studied by surrounding the electron gun and its casing with a series of capped steel cylinders of various inner lengths (26.5-306.5 mm) and thicknesses (0.75-15 mm) in the presence of the fringe magnetic fields from a commercial MR imager. In addition, the effects of a shield of fixed length (146.5 mm) with varying thicknesses were studied against a series of larger homogeneous magnetic fields (0-0.2 T). The effects of active magnetic shielding were studied by adding current loops around the electron gun and its casing. The loop currents, separation, and location were optimized to minimize the 0.011 T longitudinal magnetic fields in the electron gun. The magnetic field solutions from the FEM model were added to a validated linac simulation, consisting of a 3D electron gun (using OPERA-3d/scala) and 3D waveguide (using comsol Multiphysics and PARMELA) simulations. PARMELA's target current and output phase-space were analyzed to study the linac's output performance within the magnetic shields. The FEM model above agreed within 1

  2. Characterization of the cellular response triggered by gold nanoparticle-mediated laser manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalies, Stefan; Keil, Sebastian; Sender, Sina; Hammer, Susanne C.; Antonopoulos, Georgios C.; Schomaker, Markus; Ripken, Tammo; Escobar, Hugo Murua; Meyer, Heiko; Heinemann, Dag

    2015-11-01

    Laser-based transfection techniques have proven high applicability in several cell biologic applications. The delivery of different molecules using these techniques has been extensively investigated. In particular, new high-throughput approaches such as gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection allow efficient delivery of antisense molecules or proteins into cells preserving high cell viabilities. However, the cellular response to the perforation procedure is not well understood. We herein analyzed the perforation kinetics of single cells during resonant gold nanoparticle-mediated laser manipulation with an 850-ps laser system at a wavelength of 532 nm. Inflow velocity of propidium iodide into manipulated cells reached a maximum within a few seconds. Experiments based on the inflow of FM4-64 indicated that the membrane remains permeable for a few minutes for small molecules. To further characterize the cellular response postmanipulation, we analyzed levels of oxidative heat or general stress. Although we observed an increased formation of reactive oxygen species by an increase of dichlorofluorescein fluorescence, heat shock protein 70 was not upregulated in laser-treated cells. Additionally, no evidence of stress granule formation was visible by immunofluorescence staining. The data provided in this study help to identify the cellular reactions to gold nanoparticle-mediated laser manipulation.

  3. Gene Silencing by Gold Nanoshell-Mediated Delivery and Laser-Triggered Release of Antisense Oligonucleotide and siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Huschka, Ryan; Barhoumi, Aoune; Liu, Qing; Roth, Jack A.; Ji, Lin; Halas, Naomi J.

    2013-01-01

    The approach of RNA interference (RNAi)- using antisense DNA or RNA oligonucleotides to silence activity of a specific pathogenic gene transcript and reduce expression of the encoded protein- is very useful in dissecting genetic function and holds significant promise as a molecular therapeutic. A major obstacle in achieving gene silencing with RNAi technology is the systemic delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. Here we demonstrate an engineered gold nanoshell (NS)-based therapeutic oligonucleotide delivery vehicle, designed to release its cargo on demand upon illumination with a near-infrared (NIR) laser. A poly(L)lysine peptide (PLL) epilayer covalently attached to the NS surface (NS-PLL) is used to capture intact, single-stranded antisense DNA oligonucleotides, or alternatively, double-stranded short-interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules. Controlled release of the captured therapeutic oligonucleotides in each case is accomplished by continuous wave NIR laser irradiation at 800 nm, near the resonance wavelength of the nanoshell. Fluorescently tagged oligonucleotides were used to monitor the time-dependent release process and light-triggered endosomal release. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing human lung cancer H1299 cell line was used to determine cellular uptake and gene silencing mediated by the NS-PLL carrying GFP gene-specific single-stranded DNA antisense oligonucleotide (AON-GFP), or a double-stranded siRNA (siRNA-GFP), in vitro. Light-triggered delivery resulted in ∼ 47% and ∼49% downregulation of the targeted GFP expression by AON-GFP and siRNA-GFP, respectively. Cytotoxicity induced by both the NS-PLL delivery vector and by laser irradiation is minimal, as demonstrated by a XTT cell proliferation assay. PMID:22862291

  4. Optical diagnostics of vascular reactions triggered by weak allergens using laser speckle-contrast imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Yu L; Kalchenko, V V; Astaf'eva, N G; Meglinski, I V

    2014-08-31

    The capability of using the laser speckle contrast imaging technique with a long exposure time for visualisation of primary acute skin vascular reactions caused by a topical application of a weak contact allergen is considered. The method is shown to provide efficient and accurate detection of irritant-induced primary acute vascular reactions of skin. The presented technique possesses a high potential in everyday diagnostic practice, preclinical studies, as well as in the prognosis of skin reactions to the interaction with potentially allergenic materials. (laser biophotonics)

  5. Prolongation of the lifetime of guided discharges triggered in atmospheric air by femtosecond laser filaments up to 130 μs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arantchouk, L.; Honnorat, B.; Thouin, E.; Point, G.; Mysyrowicz, A.; Houard, A.

    2016-04-01

    The triggering and guiding of electric discharges produced in atmospheric air by a compact 100 kV Marx generator is realized in laboratory using an intense femtosecond laser pulse undergoing filamentation. We describe here an approach allowing extending the lifetime of the discharges by injecting a current with an additional circuit. Laser guiding discharges with a length of 8.5 cm and duration of 130 μs were obtained.

  6. Constituent Components of Out-of-Field Scatter Dose for 18-MV Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy: A Comparison With 6-MV and Implications for Carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben, Jeremy D.; Smith, Ryan; Lancaster, Craig M.; Haynes, Matthew; Jones, Phillip; Panettieri, Vanessa

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To characterize and compare the components of out-of-field dose for 18-MV intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and their 6-MV counterparts and consider implications for second cancer induction. Methods and Materials: Comparable plans for each technique/energy were delivered to a water phantom with a sloping wall; under full scatter conditions; with field edge abutting but outside the bath to prevent internal/phantom scatter; and with shielding below the linear accelerator head to attenuate head leakage. Neutron measurements were obtained from published studies. Results: Eighteen-megavolt IMRT produces 1.7 times more out-of-field scatter than 18-MV 3D-CRT. In absolute terms, however, differences are just approximately 0.1% of central axis dose. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT reduces internal/patient scatter by 13%, but collimator scatter (C) is 2.6 times greater than 18-MV 3D-CRT. Head leakage (L) is minimal. Increased out-of-field photon scatter from 18-MV IMRT carries out-of-field second cancer risks of approximately 0.2% over and above the 0.4% from 18-MV 3D-CRT. Greater photoneutron dose from 18-MV IMRT may result in further maximal, absolute increased risk to peripheral tissue of approximately 1.2% over 18-MV 3D-CRT. Out-of-field photon scatter remains comparable for the same modality irrespective of beam energy. Machine scatter (C+L) from 18 versus 6 MV is 1.2 times higher for IMRT and 1.8 times for 3D-CRT. It is 4 times higher for 6-MV IMRT versus 3D-CRT. Reduction in internal scatter with 18 MV versus 6 MV is 27% for 3D-CRT and 29% for IMRT. Compared with 6-MV 3D-CRT, 18-MV IMRT increases out-of-field second cancer risk by 0.2% from photons and adds 0.28-2.2% from neutrons. Conclusions: Out-of-field photon dose seems to be independent of beam energy for both techniques. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT increases out-of-field scatter 1.7-fold over 3D-CRT because of greater collimator scatter despite

  7. Constituent components of out-of-field scatter dose for 18-MV intensity modulated radiation therapy versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy: a comparison with 6-MV and implications for carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ruben, Jeremy D; Smith, Ryan; Lancaster, Craig M; Haynes, Matthew; Jones, Phillip; Panettieri, Vanessa

    2014-11-01

    To characterize and compare the components of out-of-field dose for 18-MV intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and their 6-MV counterparts and consider implications for second cancer induction. Comparable plans for each technique/energy were delivered to a water phantom with a sloping wall; under full scatter conditions; with field edge abutting but outside the bath to prevent internal/phantom scatter; and with shielding below the linear accelerator head to attenuate head leakage. Neutron measurements were obtained from published studies. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT produces 1.7 times more out-of-field scatter than 18-MV 3D-CRT. In absolute terms, however, differences are just approximately 0.1% of central axis dose. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT reduces internal/patient scatter by 13%, but collimator scatter (C) is 2.6 times greater than 18-MV 3D-CRT. Head leakage (L) is minimal. Increased out-of-field photon scatter from 18-MV IMRT carries out-of-field second cancer risks of approximately 0.2% over and above the 0.4% from 18-MV 3D-CRT. Greater photoneutron dose from 18-MV IMRT may result in further maximal, absolute increased risk to peripheral tissue of approximately 1.2% over 18-MV 3D-CRT. Out-of-field photon scatter remains comparable for the same modality irrespective of beam energy. Machine scatter (C+L) from 18 versus 6 MV is 1.2 times higher for IMRT and 1.8 times for 3D-CRT. It is 4 times higher for 6-MV IMRT versus 3D-CRT. Reduction in internal scatter with 18 MV versus 6 MV is 27% for 3D-CRT and 29% for IMRT. Compared with 6-MV 3D-CRT, 18-MV IMRT increases out-of-field second cancer risk by 0.2% from photons and adds 0.28-2.2% from neutrons. Out-of-field photon dose seems to be independent of beam energy for both techniques. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT increases out-of-field scatter 1.7-fold over 3D-CRT because of greater collimator scatter despite reducing internal/patient scatter. Out

  8. ECG-triggering of the laser Doppler signal: an approach for perfusion imaging on the beating calf heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardell, Karin; Karlsson, Daniel M.; Loenn, Urban; Traff, Stefan; Casimir-Ahn, Henrik

    2001-06-01

    Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) has successfully been used to map the myocardial perfusion on patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery on the arrested heart. The need for intra-operative evaluation of graft function is obvious in routine surgery but even more imperative when adapting new surgical techniques where the procedure is performed on the beating heart. When using LDPI on the beating heart, artifacts originating from the movement of the heart are superimposed on the Doppler signal. We have investigated a method to reduce these artifacts by controlling the sampling sequence with ECG-triggering. The method has been assessed in an animal model on the beating calf heart. After sternotomy, an area covering 1 cm2 was imaged at the anterior wall of the left ventricle. In this area, six perfusion images were captured each of them recorded at fixed, but different time intervals in the cardiac cycle. In addition continuous measurements at one spot was done during 1 - 2 minutes. The signal recorded during pumping action was high compared to measurements performed in the same muscle area during infusion of blood with a syringe pump. Repeated measurements captured at a fixed delay time from the R-peak in the same areas at the same heart frequency showed reproducibility. ECG-triggering of the laser Doppler signal is the first step in our attempts to adapt LDPI to enabling assessment of myocardial perfusion on the beating heart. Further technical achievements and in-vivo investigations are, however, needed and will be performed by our research team in future studies.

  9. Laser-triggered proton acceleration from hydrogenated low-density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantov, A. V.; Obraztsova, E. A.; Chuvilin, A. L.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2017-06-01

    Synchronized proton acceleration by ultraintense slow light (SASL) in low-density targets has been studied in application to fabricated carbon nanotube films. Proton acceleration from low-density plasma films irradiated by a linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulse of ultrarelativistic intensity was considered as result of both target surface natural contamination by hydrocarbons and artificial volumetric doping of low-density carbon nanotube films. The 3D particle-in-cell simulations confirm the SASL concept [A. V. Brantov et al., Synchronized Ion Acceleration by Ultraintense Slow Light, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 085004 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.085004] for proton acceleration by a femtosecond petawatt-class laser pulse from realistic low-density targets with a hydrogen impurity, quantify the characteristics of the accelerated protons, and demonstrate a significant increase of their energy compared with the proton energy generated from contaminated ultrathin solid dense foils.

  10. Optical diagnostics of vascular reactions triggered by weak allergens using laser speckle-contrast imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Yu L.; Kalchenko, V. V.; Astaf'eva, N. G.; Meglinski, I. V.

    2014-08-01

    The capability of using the laser speckle contrast imaging technique with a long exposure time for visualisation of primary acute skin vascular reactions caused by a topical application of a weak contact allergen is considered. The method is shown to provide efficient and accurate detection of irritant-induced primary acute vascular reactions of skin. The presented technique possesses a high potential in everyday diagnostic practice, preclinical studies, as well as in the prognosis of skin reactions to the interaction with potentially allergenic materials.

  11. Silver nanoparticle synthesis: novel route for laser triggering of polyelectrolyte capsules.

    PubMed

    Anandhakumar, S; Vijayalakshmi, S P; Jagadeesh, G; Raichur, Ashok M

    2011-09-01

    We have demonstrated the synthesis of light-sensitive polyelectrolyte capsules (PECs) by utilizing a novel polyol reduction method and investigated its applicability as photosensitive drug delivery vehicle. The nanostructured capsules were prepared via layer by layer (LbL) assembly of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and dextran sulfate (DS) on silica particles followed by in-situ synthesis of silver nanoparticles (NPs). Capsules without silver NPs were permeable to low molecular weight (M(w), 479 g/mol) rhodamine but impermeable to higher molecular weight fluorescence labeled dextran (FITC-dextran). However, capsules synthesized with silver NPs showed porous morphology and were permeable to higher molecular weight (M(w) 70 kDa) FITC-dextran also. These capsules were loaded with FITC-dextran using thermal encapsulation method by exploiting temperature induced shrinking of the capsules. During heat treatment the porous morphology of the capsules transformed into smooth pore free structure which prevents the movement of dextran into bulk during the loading process. When these loaded capsules are exposed to laser pulses, the capsule wall ruptured, resulting in the release of the loaded drug/dye. The rupture of the capsules was dependent on particle size, laser pulse energy and exposure time. The release was linear with time when pulse energy of 400 μJ was used and burst release was observed when pulse energy increased to 600 μJ.

  12. Polyelectrolyte/carbon nanotube composite microcapsules and drug release triggered by laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Haruyuki; Kato, Noritaka

    2016-03-01

    The fabrication of stimuli-responsive capsules is one of the hot topics in the research field of drug delivery systems. Near-infrared (NIR) light is one of the promising stimuli, because of its high transparency to biological tissues, and NIR-responsive capsules have been fabricated using various NIR-adsorbing materials. Here, we employed single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the NIR-adsorbing material, and microcapsules containing SWCNTs were fabricated by a combination of the layer-by-layer and template-assisted methods. The anti-cancer drug was loaded into the capsules, and the release rates in the dark and under NIR laser irradiation were compared. Distinct release was confirmed in the latter case, whereas almost no release was detected in the former case, indicating that the SWCNT molecule is a suitable light absorber for use with optically addressable drug carriers.

  13. Nanoscale Electron Bunching in Laser-Triggered Ionization Injection in Plasma Accelerators.

    PubMed

    Xu, X L; Pai, C-H; Zhang, C J; Li, F; Wan, Y; Wu, Y P; Hua, J F; Lu, W; An, W; Yu, P; Joshi, C; Mori, W B

    2016-07-15

    Ionization injection is attractive as a controllable injection scheme for generating high quality electron beams using plasma-based wakefield acceleration. Because of the phase-dependent tunneling ionization rate and the trapping dynamics within a nonlinear wake, the discrete injection of electrons within the wake is nonlinearly mapped to a discrete final phase space structure of the beam at the location where the electrons are trapped. This phenomenon is theoretically analyzed and examined by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations which show that three-dimensional effects limit the wave number of the modulation to between >2k_{0} and about 5k_{0}, where k_{0} is the wave number of the injection laser. Such a nanoscale bunched beam can be diagnosed by and used to generate coherent transition radiation and may find use in generating high-power ultraviolet radiation upon passage through a resonant undulator.

  14. SU-E-T-46: A Monte Carlo Investigation of Radiation Interactions with Gold Nanoparticles in Water for 6 MV, 85 KeV and 40 KeV Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, D B; O’Brien, D J; McFadden, C H; Wolfe, T; Krishnan, S; Sawakuchi, G O; Hallacy, T M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the effect of gold-nanoparticles (AuNPs) on energy deposition in water for different irradiation conditions. Methods: TOPAS version B12 Monte Carlo code was used to simulate energy deposition in water from monoenergetic 40 keV and 85 keV photon beams and a 6 MV Varian Clinac photon beam (IAEA phase space file, 10x10 cm{sup 2}, SSD 100 cm). For the 40 and 85 keV beams, monoenergetic 2x2 mm{sup 2} parallel beams were used to irradiate a 30x30x10 µm {sup 3} water mini-phantom located at 1.5 cm depth in a 30x30x50 cm{sup 3} water phantom. 5000 AuNPs of 50 nm diameter were randomly distributed inside the mini-phantom. Energy deposition was scored in the mini-phantom with the AuNPs’ material set to gold and then water. For the 6 MV beam, we created another phase space (PHSP) file on the surface of a 2 mm diameter sphere located at 1.5 cm depth in the water phantom. The PHSP file consisted of all particles entering the sphere including backscattered particles. Simulations were then performed using the new PHSP as the source with the mini-phantom centered in a 2 mm diameter water sphere in vacuum. The g4em-livermore reference list was used with “EMRangeMin/EMRangeMax = 100 eV/7 MeV” and “SetProductionCutLowerEdge = 990 eV” to create the new PHSP, and “SetProductionCutLowerEdge = 100 eV” for the mini-phantom simulations. All other parameters were set as defaults (“finalRange = 100 µm”). Results: The addition of AuNPs resulted in an increase in the mini-phantom energy deposition of (7.5 ± 8.7)%, (1.6 ± 8.2)%, and (−0.6 ± 1.1)% for 40 keV, 85 keV and 6 MV beams respectively. Conclusion: Enhanced energy deposition was seen at low photon energies, but decreased with increasing energy. No enhancement was observed for the 6 MV beam. Future work is required to decrease the statistical uncertainties in the simulations. This research is partially supported from institutional funds from the Center for Radiation Oncology Research, The

  15. Peak-detector-hold based circuit for trigger synchronization of the electron beam and wiggler in a free-electron laser experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi Kumar, A. V.; Mohandas, K. K.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Jain, K. K.

    1999-02-01

    A simple circuit based on the principle of peak detect and hold has been designed, tested, and used for efficient and reliable synchronization of the triggering of the relativistic electron beam and the electromagnet wiggler that are used in a pulsed, millimeter wave free-electron laser experiment. This circuit is found to be reliable in operation and has a jitter of less than 2% for a fixed wiggler current.

  16. Design and Operation of a Two-Color Interferometer to Measure Plasma and Neutral Gas Densities in a Laser-Triggered Spark Gap Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, J. F.; Ruden, E. L.; Domonkos, M. T.; Schmitt-Sody, A.; Lucero, A.

    2014-10-01

    A Mach-Zehnder imaging interferometer, operating with 1064-nm and 532-nm wavelength beams from a short-pulse laser and a frequency-doubled branch, respectively, has been designed and built to simultaneously measure plasma free electron and neutral gas densities profiles within a laser-triggered spark gap switch with a 5-mm gap. The switch will be triggered by focusing a separate 532-nm or 1064-nm laser pulse along the gap's axis to trigger low-jitter breakdown. Illuminating the gap transverse to this axis, the diagnostic will generate interferograms for each wavelength, which will then be numerically converted to phase-shift maps. These will be used to calculate independent line-integrated free electron and neutral density profiles by exploiting their different frequency dispersion curves. The density profiles themselves, then, will be calculated by Abel inversion. Details of the interferometer's design will be presented along with density data obtained using a variety of fill gasses at various pressures. Other switch parameters will be varied as well in order to characterize more fully the performance of the switch.

  17. Developing a pulse trigger generator for a three-electrode spark-gap switch in a transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyuan; Guo, Lihong; Zhang, Xingliang

    2016-04-01

    To improve the probability and stability of breakdown discharge in a three-electrode spark-gap switch for a high-power transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser and to improve the efficiency of its trigger system, we developed a high-voltage pulse trigger generator based on a two-transistor forward converter topology and a multiple-narrow-pulse trigger method. Our design uses a narrow high-voltage pulse (10 μs) to break down the hyperbaric gas between electrodes of the spark-gap switch; a dry high-voltage transformer is used as a booster; and a sampling and feedback control circuit (mainly consisting of a SG3525 and a CD4098) is designed to monitor the spark-gap switch and control the frequency and the number of output pulses. Our experimental results show that this pulse trigger generator could output high-voltage pulses (number is adjusted) with an amplitude of >38 kV and a width of 10 μs. Compared to a conventional trigger system, our design had a breakdown probability increased by 2.7%, an input power reduced by 1.5 kW, an efficiency increased by 0.12, and a loss reduced by 1.512 kW.

  18. Developing a pulse trigger generator for a three-electrode spark-gap switch in a transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingyuan; Guo, Lihong; Zhang, Xingliang

    2016-04-01

    To improve the probability and stability of breakdown discharge in a three-electrode spark-gap switch for a high-power transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser and to improve the efficiency of its trigger system, we developed a high-voltage pulse trigger generator based on a two-transistor forward converter topology and a multiple-narrow-pulse trigger method. Our design uses a narrow high-voltage pulse (10 μs) to break down the hyperbaric gas between electrodes of the spark-gap switch; a dry high-voltage transformer is used as a booster; and a sampling and feedback control circuit (mainly consisting of a SG3525 and a CD4098) is designed to monitor the spark-gap switch and control the frequency and the number of output pulses. Our experimental results show that this pulse trigger generator could output high-voltage pulses (number is adjusted) with an amplitude of >38 kV and a width of 10 μs. Compared to a conventional trigger system, our design had a breakdown probability increased by 2.7%, an input power reduced by 1.5 kW, an efficiency increased by 0.12, and a loss reduced by 1.512 kW.

  19. SU-E-T-800: Verification of Acurose XB Dose Calculation Algorithm at Air Cavity-Tissue Interface Using Film Measurement for Small Fields of 6-MV Flattening Filter-Free Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S; Suh, T; Chung, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To verify the dose accuracy of Acuros XB (AXB) dose calculation algorithm at air-tissue interface using inhomogeneous phantom for 6-MV flattening filter-free (FFF) beams. Methods: An inhomogeneous phantom included air cavity was manufactured for verifying dose accuracy at the air-tissue interface. The phantom was composed with 1 and 3 cm thickness of air cavity. To evaluate the central axis doses (CAD) and dose profiles of the interface, the dose calculations were performed for 3 × 3 and 4 × 4 cm{sup 2} fields of 6 MV FFF beams with AAA and AXB in Eclipse treatment plainning system. Measurements in this region were performed with Gafchromic film. The root mean square errors (RMSE) were analyzed with calculated and measured dose profile. Dose profiles were divided into inner-dose profile (>80%) and penumbra (20% to 80%) region for evaluating RMSE. To quantify the distribution difference, gamma evaluation was used and determined the agreement with 3%/3mm criteria. Results: The percentage differences (%Diffs) between measured and calculated CAD in the interface, AXB shows more agreement than AAA. The %Diffs were increased with increasing the thickness of air cavity size and it is similar for both algorithms. In RMSEs of inner-profile, AXB was more accurate than AAA. The difference was up to 6 times due to overestimation by AAA. RMSEs of penumbra appeared to high difference for increasing the measurement depth. Gamma agreement also presented that the passing rates decreased in penumbra. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the dose calculation with AXB shows more accurate than with AAA for the air-tissue interface. The 2D dose distributions with AXB for both inner-profile and penumbra showed better agreement than with AAA relative to variation of the measurement depths and air cavity sizes.

  20. SU-E-T-499: Comparison of Measured Tissue Phantom Ratios (TPR) Against Calculated From Percent Depth Doses (PDD) with and Without Peak Scatter Factor (PSF) in 6MV Open Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanasamy, G; Cruz, W; Gutierrez, Alonso; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S; Breton, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To examine the accuracy of measured tissue phantom ratios (TPR) values with TPR calculated from percentage depth dose (PDD) with and without peak scatter fraction (PSF) correction. Methods: For 6MV open beam, TPR and PDD values were measured using PTW Semiflex (31010) ionization field and reference chambers (0.125cc volume) in a PTW MP3-M water tank. PDD curves were measured at SSD of 100cm for 7 square fields from 3cm to 30cm. The TPR values were measured up to 22cm depth for the same fields by continuous water draining method with ionization chamber static at 100cm from source. A comparison study was performed between the (a) measured TPR, (b) TPR calculated from PDD without PSF, (c) TPR calculated from PDD with PSF and (d) clinical TPR from RadCalc (ver 6.2, Sun Nuclear Corp). Results: There is a field size, depth dependence on TPR values. For 10cmx10cm, the differences in surface dose (DDs), dose at 10cm depth (DD10) <0.5%; differences in dmax (Ddmax) <2mm for the 4 methods. The corresponding values for 30cmx30cm are DDs, DD10 <0.2% and Ddmax<3mm. Even though for 3cmx3cm field, DDs and DD10 <1% and Ddmax<1mm, the calculated TPR values with and without PSF correction differed by 2% at >20cm depth. In all field sizes at depths>28cm, (d) clinical TPR values are larger than that from (b) and (c) by >3%. Conclusion: Measured TPR in method (a) differ from calculated TPR in methods (b) and (c) to within 1% for depths < 28cm in all 7 fields in open 6MV beam. The dmax values are within 3mm of each other. The largest deviation of >3% was observed in clinical TPR values in method (d) for all fields at depths < 28cm.

  1. Validation of GEANT4 simulations for percentage depth dose calculations in heterogeneous media by using small photon beams from the 6-MV Cyberknife: Comparison with photon beam dosimetry with EBT2 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung Il; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Shin, Jae Won; Hong, Seung-Woo; Suh, Tae Suk; Min, Kyung Joo; Lee, Sang Deok; Chung, Su Mi; Jung, Jae-Yong

    2015-04-01

    Percentage depth dose (PDD) distributions in heterogeneous phantoms with lung and soft bone equivalent media are studied by using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. For lung equivalent media, Balsa wood is used, and for soft bone equivalent media, a compound material with epoxy resin, hardener and calcium carbonate is used. Polystyrene slabs put together with these materials are used as a heterogeneous phantom. Dose measurements are performed with Gafchromic EBT2 film by using photon beams from the 6-MV CyberKnife at the Seoul Uridul Hospital. The cone sizes of the photon beams are varied from 5 to 10 to 30 mm. When the Balsa wood is inserted in the phantom, the dose measured with EBT2 film is found to be significantly different from the dose without the EBT2 film in and the dose beyond the Balsa wood region, particularly for small field sizes. On the other hand, when the soft bone equivalent material is inserted in the phantom, the discrepancy between the dose measured with EBT2 film and the dose without EBT2 film can be seen only in the region of the soft bone equivalent material. GEANT4 simulations are done with and without the EBT2 film to compare the simulation results with measurements. The GEANT4 simulations including EBT2 film are found to agree well with the measurements for all the cases within an error of 2.2%. The results of the present study show that GEANT4 gives reasonable results for the PDD calculations in heterogeneous media when using photon beams produced by the 6-MV CyberKnife

  2. Radiosurgery with unflattened 6-MV photon beams.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, P F; Gillies, B A; Schwartz, M; Young, C; Davey, P

    1991-01-01

    One of the major drawbacks to doing stereotactic radiosurgery with a linear accelerator is the long time required to deliver the target dose. Single fractions of 25 Gy delivered at the isocenter and at depth in the skull may require beam times in excess of 15 min for a typical linear accelerator with a maximum dose rate of 250 cGy/min in tissue. In an effort to decrease the treatment time for this technique, the flattening filter has been removed from an AECL Therac-6 linear accelerator and the characteristics of the resulting beam have been measured. Flatness is acceptable for the field sizes used with this technique and the dose rate is increased by a factor of 2.75.

  3. Examination of laser-triggered discharge using a virtual gas model and the similarity of its Paschen curve with those of inert gases

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshi, Y.; Yoshida, H.

    2009-09-15

    We examined laser-triggered discharge (LTD) under asymmetric electric fields in air. Upon introducing a virtual gas with npd (n=2.8-3) instead of pd in Paschen's law [Ann. Phys. Chem. 37, 69 (1889)], the results of LTD in air coincided with the Paschen curve. A Paschen curve similar to those of inert gases, i.e., Ne and He, can be obtained even in air. This implies that in LTD, the number of gas molecules between electrodes appears to be n times higher than that in air. In LTD in air, the gamma effect is presumed to be significant, similar to in inert gases.

  4. Amplification of ps-pulses from freely triggerable gain-switched laser diodes at 1062 nm and second harmonic generation in periodically poled lithium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönau, Thomas; Riecke, Sina M.; Lauritsen, Kristian; Erdmann, Rainer

    2011-03-01

    We present a compact frequency-doubled laser source with fundamental wavelength operation at 1062 nm. A freely triggerable seed diode laser delivers sub-100 ps pulses in the picojoule range at variable repetition rates up to 80 MHz. After amplification in a Ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier, the average power exceeds 380mW at 40 MHz, which corresponds to 9.5 nJ pulses and about 75W of peak power. The output beam is then focussed into periodically poled lithium niobate for second harmonic generation (SHG). In this way, green picosecond pulses with an energy of up to 2 nJ at 40MHz are generated. The pulse energy and pulse shape of the second harmonic pulses are systematically studied for various repetition rates, allowing conclusions on the amplifier performance under different operating conditions.

  5. Fluence-dependent effects of low-level laser therapy in myofascial trigger spots on modulation of biochemicals associated with pain in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yueh-Ling; Hong, Chang-Zern; Chou, Li-Wei; Yang, Shun-An; Yang, Chen-Chia

    2015-01-01

    Evidence strongly supports that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is an effective physical modality for the treatment of pain associated with myofascial trigger points (MTrP). However, the effect of laser fluence (energy intensity in J/cm(2)) on biochemical regulation related to pain is unclear. To better understand the biochemical mechanisms modulated by high- and low-fluence LLLT at myofascial trigger spots (MTrSs; similar to human MTrPs) in skeletal muscles of rabbits, the levels of β-endorphin (β-ep), substance P (SP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were investigated in this study. New Zealand rabbits (2.5-3.0 kg in weight) were used in this study. High-fluence LLLT (27 J/cm(2)), low-fluence LLLT (4.5 J/cm(2)), or sham operations were applied on MTrSs of biceps femoris of rabbits for five sessions (one session per day). Effects of LLLT at two different fluences on biceps femoris, dorsal root ganglion (DRG), and serum were determined by β-ep, SP, TNF-α, and COX-2 immunoassays. LLLT irradiation with fluences of 4.5 and 27 J/cm(2) at MTrSs can significantly reduce SP level in DRG. LLLT with lower fluence of 4.5 J/cm(2) exerted lower levels of TNF-α and COX-2 expression in laser-treated muscle, but LLLT with higher fluence of 27 J/cm(2) elevated the levels of β-ep in serum, DRG, and muscle. This study demonstrated fluence-dependent biochemical effects of LLLT in an animal model on management of myofascial pain. The findings can contribute to the development of dosage guideline for LLLT for treating MTrP-induced pain.

  6. A STUDY OF THE SHIELDING USED TO REDUCE LEAKAGE AND SCATTERED RADIATION TO THE FETUS IN A PREGNANT PATIENT TREATED WITH A 6-MV EXTERNAL X-RAY BEAM

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bin; Bednarz, Bryan; Xu, X. George

    2012-01-01

    A Monte Carlo-based procedure has been developed to assess the shielded fetal doses from 6 MV external photon beam radiation treatments and improve upon existing techniques that are based on AAPM Task Group Report 36 (TG-36). Anatomically realistic models of the pregnant patient representing 3- and 6-mo gestational stages were implemented into the MCNPX code together with a detailed accelerator model that is capable of simulating scattered and leakage radiation from the accelerator head. The phantom was shielded using suggested lead and Cerrobend in different locations and with different thicknesses. Absorbed doses to the fetus both with and without shielding were calculated considering typical mantle, head and neck, and brain treatment plans. The unshielded fetal doses tended to increase with decreasing distance from the field edge to the nearest fetal point and increasing of the field size. The unshielded absorbed doses to the fetus for all treatment plans ranged from a maximum of 4.08 μGy/MU (monitor unit) to a minimum 0.09 μGy/MU. The use of lead or Cerrobend shielding reduced the fetal doses by factors of up to 4. For an optimal shield half-value layer, the dose reduction between lead and Cerrobend was statistically insignificant. The maximum permitted MUs for the mantle treatments with shielding were calculated based on 5 cGy dose limits suggested by TG-36. The study demonstrates an accurate assessing tool that can be used to determine the absorbed dose to the fetus and to design the shielding as part of the treatment planning and risk management. PMID:19901592

  7. A study of the shielding used to reduce leakage and scattered radiation to the fetus in a pregnant patient treated with a 6-MV external X-ray beam.

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Bednarz, Bryan; Xu, X George

    2009-12-01

    A Monte Carlo-based procedure has been developed to assess the shielded fetal doses from 6 MV external photon beam radiation treatments and improve upon existing techniques that are based on AAPM Task Group Report 36 (TG-36). Anatomically realistic models of the pregnant patient representing 3- and 6-mo gestational stages were implemented into the MCNPX code together with a detailed accelerator model that is capable of simulating scattered and leakage radiation from the accelerator head. The phantom was shielded using suggested lead and Cerrobend in different locations and with different thicknesses. Absorbed doses to the fetus both with and without shielding were calculated considering typical mantle, head and neck, and brain treatment plans. The unshielded fetal doses tended to increase with decreasing distance from the field edge to the nearest fetal point and increasing of the field size. The unshielded absorbed doses to the fetus for all treatment plans ranged from a maximum of 4.08 microGy/MU (monitor unit) to a minimum 0.09 microGy/MU. The use of lead or Cerrobend shielding reduced the fetal doses by factors of up to 4. For an optimal shield half-value layer, the dose reduction between lead and Cerrobend was statistically insignificant. The maximum permitted MUs for the mantle treatments with shielding were calculated based on 5 cGy dose limits suggested by TG-36. The study demonstrates an accurate assessing tool that can be used to determine the absorbed dose to the fetus and to design the shielding as part of the treatment planning and risk management.

  8. Correlated electronic decay in expanding clusters triggered by intense XUV pulses from a Free-Electron-Laser

    PubMed Central

    Oelze, Tim; Schütte, Bernd; Müller, Maria; Müller, Jan P.; Wieland, Marek; Frühling, Ulrike; Drescher, Markus; Al-Shemmary, Alaa; Golz, Torsten; Stojanovic, Nikola; Krikunova, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Irradiation of nanoscale clusters and large molecules with intense laser pulses transforms them into highly-excited non- equilibrium states. The dynamics of intense laser-cluster interaction is encoded in electron kinetic energy spectra, which contain signatures of direct photoelectron emission as well as emission of thermalized nanoplasma electrons. In this work we report on a so far not observed spectrally narrow bound state signature in the electron kinetic energy spectra from mixed Xe core - Ar shell clusters ionized by intense extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) pulses from a free-electron-laser. This signature is attributed to the correlated electronic decay (CED) process, in which an excited atom relaxes and the excess energy is used to ionize the same or another excited atom or a nanoplasma electron. By applying the terahertz field streaking principle we demonstrate that CED-electrons are emitted at least a few picoseconds after the ionizing XUV pulse has ended. Following the recent finding of CED in clusters ionized by intense near-infrared laser pulses, our observation of CED in the XUV range suggests that this process is of general relevance for the relaxation dynamics in laser produced nanoplasmas. PMID:28098175

  9. Correlated electronic decay in expanding clusters triggered by intense XUV pulses from a Free-Electron-Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelze, Tim; Schütte, Bernd; Müller, Maria; Müller, Jan P.; Wieland, Marek; Frühling, Ulrike; Drescher, Markus; Al-Shemmary, Alaa; Golz, Torsten; Stojanovic, Nikola; Krikunova, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Irradiation of nanoscale clusters and large molecules with intense laser pulses transforms them into highly-excited non- equilibrium states. The dynamics of intense laser-cluster interaction is encoded in electron kinetic energy spectra, which contain signatures of direct photoelectron emission as well as emission of thermalized nanoplasma electrons. In this work we report on a so far not observed spectrally narrow bound state signature in the electron kinetic energy spectra from mixed Xe core - Ar shell clusters ionized by intense extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) pulses from a free-electron-laser. This signature is attributed to the correlated electronic decay (CED) process, in which an excited atom relaxes and the excess energy is used to ionize the same or another excited atom or a nanoplasma electron. By applying the terahertz field streaking principle we demonstrate that CED-electrons are emitted at least a few picoseconds after the ionizing XUV pulse has ended. Following the recent finding of CED in clusters ionized by intense near-infrared laser pulses, our observation of CED in the XUV range suggests that this process is of general relevance for the relaxation dynamics in laser produced nanoplasmas.

  10. Single Continuous Near-Infrared Laser-Triggered Photodynamic and Photothermal Ablation of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Using Effective Targeted Copper Sulfide Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaomei; Zhao, Yu; Yu, Yunjian; Chen, Xuelei; Wei, Xiaosong; Zhang, Xinge; Li, Chaoxing

    2017-09-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains has made conventional antibiotic therapies less efficient. The development of a novel nanoantibiotic approach for efficiently ablating such bacterial infections is becoming crucial. Herein, a collection of poly(5-(2-ethyl acrylate)-4-methylthiazole-g-butyl)/copper sulfide nanoclusters (PATA-C4@CuS) was synthesized for efficient capture and effective ablation of levofloxacin-resistant Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria upon tissue-penetrable near-infrared (NIR) laser irradiation. In this work, we took advantage of the excellent photothermal and photodynamic properties of copper sulfide nanoparticles (CuSNPs) upon NIR laser irradiation and thiazole derivative as a membrane-targeting cationic ligand toward bacteria. The conjugated nanoclusters could anchor the bacteria to trigger the bacterial aggregation quickly and efficiently kill them. These conjugated nanoclusters could significantly inhibit levofloxacin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens at 5.5 μg/mL under NIR laser irradiation (980 nm, 1.5 W cm(-2), 5 min), which suggested that the heat and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated from the irradiated CuSNPs attached to bacteria were effective in eliminating and preventing the regrowth of the bacteria. Importantly, the conjugated nanoclusters could promote healing in bacteria-infected rat wounds without nonspecific damage to normal tissue. These findings highlight the promise of the highly versatile multifunctional nanoantibiotics in bacterial infection.

  11. Dynamic triggering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, David P.; Prejean, Stephanie; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic stresses propagating as seismic waves from large earthquakes trigger a spectrum of responses at global distances. In addition to locally triggered earthquakes in a variety of tectonic environments, dynamic stresses trigger tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor in the brittle–plastic transition zone along major plate-boundary faults, activity changes in hydrothermal and volcanic systems, and, in hydrologic domains, changes in spring discharge, water well levels, soil liquefaction, and the eruption of mud volcanoes. Surface waves with periods of 15–200 s are the most effective triggering agents; body-wave trigger is less frequent. Triggering dynamic stresses can be < 1 kPa.

  12. The use of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the treatment of trigger points that are associated with rotator cuff tendonitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shenqiti, A.; Oldham, J.

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of LLLT in the treatment of trigger points (TrPs) that are associated with rotator cuff tendonitis. A double-blind randomized controlled trail was conducted. Sixty patients were randomly allocated to one of two groups: sham or laser therapy. The laser (Excel, Omega Universal Technologies Ltd, London, UK) parameters used were a wavelength of 820 nm, a power output of 100 mW, a frequency of 5000 Hz (modulated) and energy density of 32 J/cm2. The two groups received a course of 12 treatment sessions for four weeks (3 sessions per week). Pain, functional activities (as measured using the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, SPADI), pressure pain threshold (PPT) and range of motion (ROM) were assessed pre and post treatment, with a three month follow-up assessment. Significant improvements in pain (p < 0.001) were observed for the laser group (6 cm median improvement on a 10 cm VAS) compared to the sham group (2 cm median improvement) immediately post treatment. The improvements in the laser group continued post treatment with a 7 cm median improvement observed at three month follow-up. Similar between group differences were observed for ROM (p < 0.01), functional activities (p <= 0.001) and PPT (p <= 0.05). The findings of the current study suggested that LLLT is effective in treating patients with TrPs associated with rotator cuff tendonitis, when using the parameters described. However, the mechanism of its action is not yet clear, and will require further investigation.

  13. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  14. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  15. Communication: XFAIMS—eXternal Field Ab Initio Multiple Spawning for electron-nuclear dynamics triggered by short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mignolet, Benoit; Curchod, Basile F. E.; Martinez, Todd J.

    2016-11-17

    Attoscience is an emerging field where attosecond pulses or few cycle IR pulses are used to pump and probe the correlated electron-nuclear motion of molecules. We present the trajectory-guided eXternal Field Ab Initio Multiple Spawning (XFAIMS) method that models such experiments “on-the-fly,” from laser pulse excitation to fragmentation or nonadiabatic relaxation to the ground electronic state. For the photoexcitation of the LiH molecule, we show that XFAIMS gives results in close agreement with numerically exact quantum dynamics simulations, both for atto- and femtosecond laser pulses. As a result, we then show the ability of XFAIMS to model the dynamics in polyatomic molecules by studying the effect of nuclear motion on the photoexcitation of a sulfine (H2CSO).

  16. Communication: XFAIMS—eXternal Field Ab Initio Multiple Spawning for electron-nuclear dynamics triggered by short laser pulses

    DOE PAGES

    Mignolet, Benoit; Curchod, Basile F. E.; Martinez, Todd J.

    2016-11-17

    Attoscience is an emerging field where attosecond pulses or few cycle IR pulses are used to pump and probe the correlated electron-nuclear motion of molecules. We present the trajectory-guided eXternal Field Ab Initio Multiple Spawning (XFAIMS) method that models such experiments “on-the-fly,” from laser pulse excitation to fragmentation or nonadiabatic relaxation to the ground electronic state. For the photoexcitation of the LiH molecule, we show that XFAIMS gives results in close agreement with numerically exact quantum dynamics simulations, both for atto- and femtosecond laser pulses. As a result, we then show the ability of XFAIMS to model the dynamics inmore » polyatomic molecules by studying the effect of nuclear motion on the photoexcitation of a sulfine (H2CSO).« less

  17. New double constant-fraction trigger circuit for locking on laser pulse trains up to 100 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Cova, S.; Ripamonti, G.; Lacaita, A. )

    1990-03-01

    We describe a new technique for picosecond synchronization on a 80-MHz mode-locked laser. An implementation of such technique is described, and experimental results are presented. Better than 30-ps FWHM synchronization jitter is demonstrated, with an optical pulse amplitude fluctuation of a decade. Such results confirm that single-photon-timing experiments with picosecond resolution are possible by using high-repetition-rate light pulses (i.e., without any cavity dumper).

  18. Custom-designed Laser-based Heating Apparatus for Triggered Release of Cisplatin from Thermosensitive Liposomes with Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yannan N; Weersink, Robert A; Foltz, Warren D; Zheng, Jinzi; Chaudary, Naz; Jaffray, David A; Allen, Christine

    2015-12-13

    Liposomes have been employed as drug delivery systems to target solid tumors through exploitation of the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect resulting in significant reductions in systemic toxicity. Nonetheless, insufficient release of encapsulated drug from liposomes has limited their clinical efficacy. Temperature-sensitive liposomes have been engineered to provide site-specific release of drug in order to overcome the problem of limited tumor drug bioavailability. Our lab has designed and developed a heat-activated thermosensitive liposome formulation of cisplatin (CDDP), known as HTLC, to provide triggered release of CDDP at solid tumors. Heat-activated delivery in vivo was achieved in murine models using a custom-built laser-based heating apparatus that provides a conformal heating pattern at the tumor site as confirmed by MR thermometry (MRT). A fiber optic temperature monitoring device was used to measure the temperature in real-time during the entire heating period with online adjustment of heat delivery by alternating the laser power. Drug delivery was optimized under magnetic resonance (MR) image guidance by co-encapsulation of an MR contrast agent (i.e., gadoteridol) along with CDDP into the thermosensitive liposomes as a means to validate the heating protocol and to assess tumor accumulation. The heating protocol consisted of a preheating period of 5 min prior to administration of HTLC and 20 min heating post-injection. This heating protocol resulted in effective release of the encapsulated agents with the highest MR signal change observed in the heated tumor in comparison to the unheated tumor and muscle. This study demonstrated the successful application of the laser-based heating apparatus for preclinical thermosensitive liposome development and the importance of MR-guided validation of the heating protocol for optimization of drug delivery.

  19. The effect of different bleaching wavelengths on the sensitivity of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C optically stimulated luminescence detectors (OSLDs) exposed to 6 MV photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Omotayo, Azeez A.; Cygler, Joanna E.; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O.

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To determine the effect of different bleaching wavelengths on the response of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C optically stimulated luminescence detectors (OSLDs) exposed to accumulated doses of 6 MV photon beams. Methods: In this study the authors used nanoDot OSLDs readout with a MicroStar reader. The authors first characterized the dose-response, fading, and OSL signal loss of OSLDs exposed to doses from 0.5 to 10 Gy. To determine the effect of different bleaching wavelengths on the OSLDs' response, the authors optically treated the OSLDs with 26 W fluorescent lamps in two modes: (i) directly under the lamps for 10, 120, and 600 min and (ii) with a long-pass filter for 55, 600, and 2000 min. Changes in the OSLDs' sensitivity were determined for an irradiation-readout-bleaching-readout cycle after irradiations with 1 and 10 Gy dose fractions. Results: The OSLDs presented supralinearity for doses of 2 Gy and above. The signal loss rates for sequential readouts were (0.287 {+-} 0.007)% per readout in the reader's strong-stimulation mode, and (0.019 {+-} 0.002)% and (0.035 {+-} 0.007)% per readout for doses of 0.2 and 10 Gy, respectively, in the reader's weak-stimulation mode. Fading half-life values ranged from (0.98 {+-} 0.14) min to (1.77 {+-} 0.24) min and fading showed dose dependence for the first 10-min interval. For 10 and 55 min bleaching using modes (i) and (ii), the OSL signal increased 14% for an accumulated dose of 7 Gy (1 Gy fractions). For OSLDs exposed to 10 Gy fractions, the OSL signal increased 30% and 25% for bleaching modes (i) and (ii) and accumulated dose of 70 Gy, respectively. For 120 and 600 min bleaching using modes (i) and (ii), the OSL signal increased 2.7% and 1.5% for an accumulated dose of 7 Gy (1 Gy fractions), respectively. For 10 Gy fractions, the signal increased 14% for bleaching mode (i) (120 min bleaching) and decreased 1.3% for bleaching mode (ii) (600 min bleaching) for an accumulated dose of 70 Gy. For 600 and 2000 min bleaching

  20. Effect of a short weak prepulse on laser-triggered front-surface heavy-ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Bochkarev, S. G.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Golovin, G. V.; Uryupina, D. S.; Shulyapov, S. A.; Savel'ev, A. B.; Andriyash, A. V.

    2012-10-15

    A suppression of light-ion acceleration (from surface water contaminants) was observed when a moderate-intensity subpicosecond laser pulse was focused on a thick metal target. Simultaneously, an effective generation of high-energy multicharge ions of the target material (Fe) was experimentally observed. A numerical simulation based on the Boltzmann-Vlasov-Poisson model revealed that this is due to the very specific regime of cleaning contaminants from the target surface by the short weak prepulse preceding the main pulse by more than 10 ns and having an intensity below the surface breakdown threshold. Because this prepulse causes the contaminant layer to boil explosively, a low-density gap forms above the target surface. These conditions are consequently favorable for boosting the energy of heavy ions.

  1. Low-visibility light-intensity laser-triggered release of entrapped calcein from 1,2-bis (tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes is mediated through a type I photoactivation pathway.

    PubMed

    Yavlovich, Amichai; Viard, Mathias; Gupta, Kshitij; Sine, Jessica; Vu, Mylinh; Blumenthal, Robert; Tata, Darrell B; Puri, Anu

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported on the physical characteristics of photo-triggerable liposomes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and 1,2-bis (tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC(8,9)PC) carrying a photo agent as their payload. When exposed to a low-intensity 514 nm wavelength (continuous-wave) laser light, these liposomes were observed to release entrapped calcein green (Cal-G; Ex/Em 490/517 nm) but not calcein blue (Cal-B; Ex/Em 360/460 nm). In this study, we have investigated the mechanism for the 514 nm laser-triggered release of the Cal-G payload using several scavengers that are known specifically to inhibit either type I or type II photoreaction pathways. Liposomes containing DPPC:DC(8,9)PC: distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE)-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-2000 (86:10:04 mole ratio) were loaded either with fluorescent (calcein) or nonfluorescent ((3)H-inulin) aqueous markers. In addition, a non-photo-triggerable formulation (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine [POPC]:DC(8,9)PC:DSPE-PEG2000) was also studied with the same payloads. The 514 nm wavelength laser exposure on photo-triggerable liposomes resulted in the release of Cal-G but not that of Cal-B or (3)H-inulin, suggesting an involvement of a photoactivated state of Cal-G due to the 514 nm laser exposure. Upon 514 nm laser exposures, substantial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, ≈100 μM) levels were detected from only the Cal-G loaded photo-triggerable liposomes but not from Cal-B-loaded liposomes (≤10 μM H2O2). The Cal-G release from photo-triggerable liposomes was found to be significantly inhibited by ascorbic acid (AA), resulting in a 70%-80% reduction in Cal-G release. The extent of AA-mediated inhibition of Cal-G release from the liposomes also correlated with the consumption of AA. No AA consumption was detected in the 514 nm laser-exposed Cal B-loaded liposomes, thus confirming a role of photoactivation of Cal-G in liposome destabilization. Inclusion of 100 mM K3Fe

  2. Trigger finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... Redness in your cut or hand Swelling or warmth in your cut or hand Yellow or green drainage from the cut Hand pain or discomfort Fever If your trigger finger returns, call your surgeon. You may need another surgery.

  3. Low-visibility light-intensity laser-triggered release of entrapped calcein from 1,2-bis (tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes is mediated through a type I photoactivation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yavlovich, Amichai; Viard, Mathias; Gupta, Kshitij; Sine, Jessica; Vu, Mylinh; Blumenthal, Robert; Tata, Darrell B; Puri, Anu

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported on the physical characteristics of photo-triggerable liposomes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and 1,2-bis (tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9PC) carrying a photo agent as their payload. When exposed to a low-intensity 514 nm wavelength (continuous-wave) laser light, these liposomes were observed to release entrapped calcein green (Cal-G; Ex/Em 490/517 nm) but not calcein blue (Cal-B; Ex/Em 360/460 nm). In this study, we have investigated the mechanism for the 514 nm laser-triggered release of the Cal-G payload using several scavengers that are known specifically to inhibit either type I or type II photoreaction pathways. Liposomes containing DPPC:DC8,9PC: distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE)-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-2000 (86:10:04 mole ratio) were loaded either with fluorescent (calcein) or nonfluorescent (3H-inulin) aqueous markers. In addition, a non-photo-triggerable formulation (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine [POPC]:DC8,9PC:DSPE-PEG2000) was also studied with the same payloads. The 514 nm wavelength laser exposure on photo-triggerable liposomes resulted in the release of Cal-G but not that of Cal-B or 3H-inulin, suggesting an involvement of a photoactivated state of Cal-G due to the 514 nm laser exposure. Upon 514 nm laser exposures, substantial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, ≈100 μM) levels were detected from only the Cal-G loaded photo-triggerable liposomes but not from Cal-B-loaded liposomes (≤10 μM H2O2). The Cal-G release from photo-triggerable liposomes was found to be significantly inhibited by ascorbic acid (AA), resulting in a 70%–80% reduction in Cal-G release. The extent of AA-mediated inhibition of Cal-G release from the liposomes also correlated with the consumption of AA. No AA consumption was detected in the 514 nm laserexposed Cal B-loaded liposomes, thus confirming a role of photoactivation of Cal-G in liposome destabilization. Inclusion of 100 mM K3Fe(CN)6 (a

  4. Triggering Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Kelton D.; /Purdue U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    To determine if klystrons will perform to the specifications of the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) project, a new digital trigger controller is needed for the Klystron/Microwave Department Test Laboratory. The controller needed to be programmed and Windows based user interface software needed to be written to interface with the device over a USB (Universal Serial Bus). Programming the device consisted of writing logic in VHDL (VHSIC (Very High Speed Integrated Circuits) hardware description language), and the Windows interface software was written in C++. Xilinx ISE (Integrated Software Environment) was used to compile the VHDL code and program the device, and Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 was used to compile the C++ based Windows software. The device was programmed in such a way as to easily allow read/write operations to it using a simple addressing model, and Windows software was developed to interface with the device over a USB connection. A method of setting configuration registers in the trigger device is absolutely necessary to the development of a new triggering system, and the method developed will fulfill this need adequately. More work is needed before the new trigger system is ready for use. The configuration registers in the device need to be fully integrated with the logic that will generate the RF signals, and this system will need to be tested extensively to determine if it meets the requirements for low noise trigger outputs.

  5. Microwave-triggered laser switch

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, M.S.

    1982-05-19

    A high-repetition rate switch is described for delivering short duration, high-powered electrical pulses from a pulsed-charged dc power supply. The present invention utilizes a microwave-generating device such as a magnetron that is capable of producing high-power pulses at high-pulse repetition rates and fast-pulse risetimes for long periods with high reliability. The rail-gap electrodes provide a large surface area that reduces induction effects and minimizes electrode erosion. Additionally, breakdown is initiated in a continuous geometric fashion that also increases operating lifetime of the device.

  6. Microwave-triggered laser switch

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.

    1984-01-01

    A high-repetition rate switch for delivering short duration, high-power electrical pulses from a pulsed-charged dc power supply. The present invention utilizes a microwave-generating device such as a magnetron that is capable of producing high-power pulses at high-pulse repetition rates and fast-pulse risetimes for long periods with high reliability. The rail-gap electrodes provide a large surface area that reduces induction effects and minimizes electrode erosion. Additionally, breakdown is initiated in a continuous geometric fashion that also increases operating lifetime of the device.

  7. Direct numerical simulation of the initial stage of a thermally induced microcavitation in a water-rich biotissue triggered by a nanosecond pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Sy-Bor; Ly, Kevin; Bhaskar, Arun; Schmidt, Morgan S.; Thomas, Robert J.

    2017-05-01

    A numerical analysis capable of describing the early stage of a thermal microcavitation process in a water-rich biotissue without avalanche breakdown was developed. The analysis successfully reproduced the laser-induced heating, vapor bubble formation, bubble expansion, and shockwave propagation inside a water-rich biotissue during a thermal microcavitation process. Based on the analysis, it was determined that the evolution of the temperature, pressure, and laser-induced shockwave is dependent on the incident laser energy and laser pulse width. On the other hand, the early stage dynamics of the microcavitation process showed little dependence on the elastic modulus of the biotissue for the laser and tissue conditions studied.

  8. Radiosensitization of high-Z compounds by medium-energy 160 kV vs. high-energy 6 MV X-rays for radiation therapy: Theoretical, in vitro and in vivo studies of platinum compounds activating glioma F98 cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S.; Pradhan, A.; Nahar, S.; Montenegro, M.; Barth, R.; Nakkula, R.; Turro, C.

    2013-03-01

    Energy dependence of X-ray irradiation of high-Z compounds for enhanced radiosensitization is explored thoeretically and via in vitro and in vivo experiments. The cell killing ability of medium-energy X-rays from 160 kV source are found to be more effective than 6 MV X-rays in activating high-Z contrast agents. Results are presented for a newly synthesized Pt compound, Pyridine Terpyridine Pt(II) Nitrate ([Pt(typ)(py)]) and carboplatin in treating F98 rat glioma. In-vitro results show considerable reduction in cell viability for radiosensitized cells irradiated with a 160 kV irradiator. Cells treated with 6 MV LINAC radiation find little variation with radiation dose. Maximum dose enhancement factors (DEFs) and minimum cancer cell survival fractions correspond to 50-200 keV range, and fall rapidly at higher energies. Theoretical calculations of photoelectric absorption vis-a-vis total scattering demonstrates this energy dependence. However, in vivo studies of rats treated with [Pt(tpy)(py)] had a severe negative neurotoxic response, confirmed by histopathological analysis. But subsequent in vivo studies using carboplatin showed very positive results in the treatment of F98 glioma bearing rats and potential clinical radiation therapy.

  9. Rational design of a comprehensive cancer therapy platform using temperature-sensitive polymer grafted hollow gold nanospheres: simultaneous chemo/photothermal/photodynamic therapy triggered by a 650 nm laser with enhanced anti-tumor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiaoran; Chen, Yinyin; Cheng, Ziyong; Deng, Kerong; Ma, Ping'an; Hou, Zhiyao; Liu, Bei; Huang, Shanshan; Jin, Dayong; Lin, Jun

    2016-03-28

    Combining multi-model treatments within one single system has attracted great interest for the purpose of synergistic therapy. In this paper, hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNs) coated with a temperature-sensitive polymer, poly(oligo(ethylene oxide) methacrylate-co-2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate) (p(OEGMA-co-MEMA)), co-loaded with DOX and a photosensitizer Chlorin e6 (Ce6) were successfully synthesized. As high as 58% DOX and 6% Ce6 by weight could be loaded onto the HAuNs-p(OEGMA-co-MEMA) nanocomposites. The grafting polymer brushes outside the HAuNs play the role of "gate molecules" for controlled drug release by 650 nm laser radiation owing to the temperature-sensitive property of the polymer and the photothermal effect of HAuNs. The HAuNs-p(OEGMA-co-MEMA)-Ce6-DOX nanocomposites with 650 nm laser radiation show effective inhibition of cancer cells in vitro and enhanced anti-tumor efficacy in vivo. In contrast, control groups without laser radiation show little cytotoxicity. The nanocomposite demonstrates a way of "killing three birds with one stone", that is, chemotherapy, photothermal and photodynamic therapy are triggered simultaneously by the 650 nm laser stimulation. Therefore, the nanocomposites show the great advantages of multi-modal synergistic effects for cancer therapy by a remote-controlled laser stimulus.

  10. Photon-triggered nanowire transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungkil; Lee, Hoo-Cheol; Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Hwang, Min-Soo; Park, Jin-Sung; Lee, Jung Min; So, Jae-Pil; Choi, Jae-Hyuck; Kwon, Soon-Hong; Barrelet, Carl J; Park, Hong-Gyu

    2017-10-01

    Photon-triggered electronic circuits have been a long-standing goal of photonics. Recent demonstrations include either all-optical transistors in which photons control other photons or phototransistors with the gate response tuned or enhanced by photons. However, only a few studies report on devices in which electronic currents are optically switched and amplified without an electrical gate. Here we show photon-triggered nanowire (NW) transistors, photon-triggered NW logic gates and a single NW photodetection system. NWs are synthesized with long crystalline silicon (CSi) segments connected by short porous silicon (PSi) segments. In a fabricated device, the electrical contacts on both ends of the NW are connected to a single PSi segment in the middle. Exposing the PSi segment to light triggers a current in the NW with a high on/off ratio of >8 × 10(6). A device that contains two PSi segments along the NW can be triggered using two independent optical input signals. Using localized pump lasers, we demonstrate photon-triggered logic gates including AND, OR and NAND gates. A photon-triggered NW transistor of diameter 25 nm with a single 100 nm PSi segment requires less than 300 pW of power. Furthermore, we take advantage of the high photosensitivity and fabricate a submicrometre-resolution photodetection system. Photon-triggered transistors offer a new venue towards multifunctional device applications such as programmable logic elements and ultrasensitive photodetectors.

  11. Firearm trigger assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2010-02-16

    A firearm trigger assembly for use with a firearm includes a trigger mounted to a forestock of the firearm so that the trigger is movable between a rest position and a triggering position by a forwardly placed support hand of a user. An elongated trigger member operatively associated with the trigger operates a sear assembly of the firearm when the trigger is moved to the triggering position. An action release assembly operatively associated with the firearm trigger assembly and a movable assembly of the firearm prevents the trigger from being moved to the triggering position when the movable assembly is not in the locked position.

  12. Rational design of a comprehensive cancer therapy platform using temperature-sensitive polymer grafted hollow gold nanospheres: simultaneous chemo/photothermal/photodynamic therapy triggered by a 650 nm laser with enhanced anti-tumor efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiaoran; Chen, Yinyin; Cheng, Ziyong; Deng, Kerong; Ma, Ping'an; Hou, Zhiyao; Liu, Bei; Huang, Shanshan; Jin, Dayong; Lin, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Combining multi-model treatments within one single system has attracted great interest for the purpose of synergistic therapy. In this paper, hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNs) coated with a temperature-sensitive polymer, poly(oligo(ethylene oxide) methacrylate-co-2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate) (p(OEGMA-co-MEMA)), co-loaded with DOX and a photosensitizer Chlorin e6 (Ce6) were successfully synthesized. As high as 58% DOX and 6% Ce6 by weight could be loaded onto the HAuNs-p(OEGMA-co-MEMA) nanocomposites. The grafting polymer brushes outside the HAuNs play the role of ``gate molecules'' for controlled drug release by 650 nm laser radiation owing to the temperature-sensitive property of the polymer and the photothermal effect of HAuNs. The HAuNs-p(OEGMA-co-MEMA)-Ce6-DOX nanocomposites with 650 nm laser radiation show effective inhibition of cancer cells in vitro and enhanced anti-tumor efficacy in vivo. In contrast, control groups without laser radiation show little cytotoxicity. The nanocomposite demonstrates a way of ``killing three birds with one stone'', that is, chemotherapy, photothermal and photodynamic therapy are triggered simultaneously by the 650 nm laser stimulation. Therefore, the nanocomposites show the great advantages of multi-modal synergistic effects for cancer therapy by a remote-controlled laser stimulus.Combining multi-model treatments within one single system has attracted great interest for the purpose of synergistic therapy. In this paper, hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNs) coated with a temperature-sensitive polymer, poly(oligo(ethylene oxide) methacrylate-co-2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate) (p(OEGMA-co-MEMA)), co-loaded with DOX and a photosensitizer Chlorin e6 (Ce6) were successfully synthesized. As high as 58% DOX and 6% Ce6 by weight could be loaded onto the HAuNs-p(OEGMA-co-MEMA) nanocomposites. The grafting polymer brushes outside the HAuNs play the role of ``gate molecules'' for controlled drug release by 650 nm laser radiation

  13. [Lasers].

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  14. Lasers.

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  15. Single-photon emission at a rate of 143 MHz from a deterministic quantum-dot microlens triggered by a mode-locked vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schlehahn, A.; Gschrey, M.; Schnauber, P.; Schulze, J.-H.; Rodt, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Heindel, T. Reitzenstein, S.; Gaafar, M.; Vaupel, M.; Stolz, W.; Rahimi-Iman, A.; Koch, M.

    2015-07-27

    We report on the realization of a quantum dot (QD) based single-photon source with a record-high single-photon emission rate. The quantum light source consists of an InGaAs QD which is deterministically integrated within a monolithic microlens with a distributed Bragg reflector as back-side mirror, which is triggered using the frequency-doubled emission of a mode-locked vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (ML-VECSEL). The utilized compact and stable laser system allows us to excite the single-QD microlens at a wavelength of 508 nm with a pulse repetition rate close to 500 MHz at a pulse width of 4.2 ps. Probing the photon statistics of the emission from a single QD state at saturation, we demonstrate single-photon emission of the QD-microlens chip with g{sup (2)}(0) < 0.03 at a record-high single-photon flux of (143 ± 16) MHz collected by the first lens of the detection system. Our approach is fully compatible with resonant excitation schemes using wavelength tunable ML-VECSELs, which will optimize the quantum optical properties of the single-photon emission in terms of photon indistinguishability.

  16. Single-photon emission at a rate of 143 MHz from a deterministic quantum-dot microlens triggered by a mode-locked vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlehahn, A.; Gaafar, M.; Vaupel, M.; Gschrey, M.; Schnauber, P.; Schulze, J.-H.; Rodt, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Stolz, W.; Rahimi-Iman, A.; Heindel, T.; Koch, M.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-07-01

    We report on the realization of a quantum dot (QD) based single-photon source with a record-high single-photon emission rate. The quantum light source consists of an InGaAs QD which is deterministically integrated within a monolithic microlens with a distributed Bragg reflector as back-side mirror, which is triggered using the frequency-doubled emission of a mode-locked vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (ML-VECSEL). The utilized compact and stable laser system allows us to excite the single-QD microlens at a wavelength of 508 nm with a pulse repetition rate close to 500 MHz at a pulse width of 4.2 ps. Probing the photon statistics of the emission from a single QD state at saturation, we demonstrate single-photon emission of the QD-microlens chip with g(2)(0) < 0.03 at a record-high single-photon flux of (143 ± 16) MHz collected by the first lens of the detection system. Our approach is fully compatible with resonant excitation schemes using wavelength tunable ML-VECSELs, which will optimize the quantum optical properties of the single-photon emission in terms of photon indistinguishability.

  17. Laser Physics and Laser Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    is probably better than will ever be needed. Publications that have appeared, or are in the final stages of preparation, covering the FHT algorithm...and the understanding of the energy storage and laser trigger requirements make pursuit of a two photon laser a much more probable success now than...of energy migration for the amlec- 1) In the haigh comipressibility eginic produced by the laser tilar excited states, obtained by studying the decay

  18. Fabrication of Plasmonic Nanorod-Embedded Dipeptide Microspheres via the Freeze-Quenching Method for Near-Infrared Laser-Triggered Drug-Delivery Applications.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Hakan; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Babur, Esra; Duman, Memed; Aydin, Halil M; Demirel, Gokhan

    2016-05-09

    Control of drug release by an external stimulus may provide remote controllability, low toxicity, and reduced side effects. In this context, varying physical external stimuli, including magnetic and electric fields, ultrasound, light, and pharmacological stimuli, have been employed to control the release rate of drug molecules in a diseased region. However, the design and development of alternative on-demand drug-delivery systems that permit control of the dosage of drug released via an external stimulus are still required. Here, we developed near-infrared laser-activatable microspheres based on Fmoc-diphenylalanine (Phe-Phe) dipeptides and plasmonic gold nanorods (AuNRs) via a simple freeze-quenching approach. These plasmonic nanoparticle-embedded microspheres were then employed as a smart drug-delivery platform for native, continuous, and pulsatile doxorubicin (DOX) release. Remarkable sustained, burst, and on-demand DOX release from the fabricated microspheres were achieved by manipulating the laser exposure time. Our results demonstrate that AuNR-embedded dipeptide microspheres have great potential for controlled drug-delivery systems.

  19. Myofascial trigger point pain.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Bernadette

    2013-01-01

    Myofascial trigger point pain is an extremely prevalent cause of persistent pain disorders in all parts of the body, not just the head, neck, and face. Features include deep aching pain in any structure, referred from focally tender points in taut bands of skeletal muscle (the trigger points). Diagnosis depends on accurate palpation with 2-4 kg/cm2 of pressure for 10 to 20 seconds over the suspected trigger point to allow the referred pain pattern to develop. In the head and neck region, cervical muscle trigger points (key trigger points) often incite and perpetuate trigger points (satellite trigger points) and referred pain from masticatory muscles. Management requires identification and control of as many perpetuating factors as possible (posture, body mechanics, psychological stress or depression, poor sleep or nutrition). Trigger point therapies such as spray and stretch or trigger point injections are best used as adjunctive therapy.

  20. Dealing with Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Dealing With Asthma Triggers KidsHealth > For Kids > Dealing With Asthma Triggers ... or the flu weather conditions exercise continue Managing Asthma Asthma can't be cured but it can ...

  1. Asthma triggers (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes. ... asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes.

  2. THE STAR LEVEL-3 TRIGGER SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    LANGE, J.S.; ADLER, C.; BERGER, J.; DEMELLO, M.; FLIERL, D.; ET AL

    1999-11-15

    The STAR level-3 trigger is a MYRINET interconnected ALPHA processor farm, performing online tracking of N{sub track} {ge} 8000 particles (N{sub point} {le} 45 per track) with a design input rate of R=100 Hz. A large scale prototype system was tested in 12/99 with laser and cosmic particle events.

  3. A brief history of laser guided lightning discharge models and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozma, Matthew A.

    1994-07-01

    Laser guided lightning discharge uses lasers instead of rockets to trigger lightning. Artificially triggered lightning has several important applications including aerospace vehicle launch protection and electrical power line transmission protection, among others. A brief history of the theoretical models used to predict triggered lightning, the experimentation completed with rocket triggered lightning, and the work completed on laser guided lightning discharge is presented. A bibliography of work related to lightning modeling, rocket-triggered lightning, and laser-triggered lightning is also included.

  4. Triggering trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, Giulia; Maarbjerg, Stine; Nurmikko, Turo; Truini, Andrea; Cruccu, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Although it is widely accepted that facial pain paroxysms triggered by innocuous stimuli constitute a hallmark sign of trigeminal neuralgia, very few studies to date have systematically investigated the role of the triggers involved. In the recently published diagnostic classification, triggered pain is an essential criterion for the diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia but no study to date has been designed to address this issue directly. In this study, we set out to determine, in patients with trigeminal neuralgia, how frequently triggers are present, which manoeuvres activate them and where cutaneous and mucosal trigger zones are located. Methods Clinical characteristics focusing on trigger factors were collected from 140 patients with trigeminal neuralgia, in a cross-sectional study design. Results Provocation of paroxysmal pain by various trigger manoeuvres was reported by 136 of the 140 patients. The most frequent manoeuvres were gentle touching of the face (79%) and talking (54%). Trigger zones were predominantly reported in the perioral and nasal region. Conclusion This study confirms that in trigeminal neuralgia, paroxysmal pain is associated with triggers in virtually all patients and supports the use of triggers as an essential diagnostic feature of trigeminal neuralgia.

  5. Stay away from asthma triggers

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma triggers - stay away from; Asthma triggers - avoiding; Reactive airway disease - triggers; Bronchial asthma - triggers ... to them. Have someone who does not have asthma cut the grass, or wear a facemask if ...

  6. Lessons from (triggered) tremor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, Joan

    2010-01-01

    I test a “clock-advance” model that implies triggered tremor is ambient tremor that occurs at a sped-up rate as a result of loading from passing seismic waves. This proposed model predicts that triggering probability is proportional to the product of the ambient tremor rate and a function describing the efficacy of the triggering wave to initiate a tremor event. Using data mostly from Cascadia, I have compared qualitatively a suite of teleseismic waves that did and did not trigger tremor with ambient tremor rates. Many of the observations are consistent with the model if the efficacy of the triggering wave depends on wave amplitude. One triggered tremor observation clearly violates the clock-advance model. The model prediction that larger triggering waves result in larger triggered tremor signals also appears inconsistent with the measurements. I conclude that the tremor source process is a more complex system than that described by the clock-advance model predictions tested. Results of this and previous studies also demonstrate that (1) conditions suitable for tremor generation exist in many tectonic environments, but, within each, only occur at particular spots whose locations change with time; (2) any fluid flow must be restricted to less than a meter; (3) the degree to which delayed failure and secondary triggering occurs is likely insignificant; and 4) both shear and dilatational deformations may trigger tremor. Triggered and ambient tremor rates correlate more strongly with stress than stressing rate, suggesting tremor sources result from time-dependent weakening processes rather than simple Coulomb failure.

  7. Schmitt trigger multivibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zrubek, W. E.

    1969-01-01

    Schmitt trigger multivibrator circuit, capable of astable, monostable or bistable operation, incorporates an input circuit in conjunction with a Schmitt trigger circuit. The circuits form two output signal levels, are useful in switching circuit applications, initiates oscillations, and forms highly unsymmetrical wave forms.

  8. Causality and headache triggers

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Dana P.; Smitherman, Todd A.; Martin, Vincent T.; Penzien, Donald B.; Houle, Timothy T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the conditions necessary to assign causal status to headache triggers. Background The term “headache trigger” is commonly used to label any stimulus that is assumed to cause headaches. However, the assumptions required for determining if a given stimulus in fact has a causal-type relationship in eliciting headaches have not been explicated. Methods A synthesis and application of Rubin’s Causal Model is applied to the context of headache causes. From this application the conditions necessary to infer that one event (trigger) causes another (headache) are outlined using basic assumptions and examples from relevant literature. Results Although many conditions must be satisfied for a causal attribution, three basic assumptions are identified for determining causality in headache triggers: 1) constancy of the sufferer; 2) constancy of the trigger effect; and 3) constancy of the trigger presentation. A valid evaluation of a potential trigger’s effect can only be undertaken once these three basic assumptions are satisfied during formal or informal studies of headache triggers. Conclusions Evaluating these assumptions is extremely difficult or infeasible in clinical practice, and satisfying them during natural experimentation is unlikely. Researchers, practitioners, and headache sufferers are encouraged to avoid natural experimentation to determine the causal effects of headache triggers. Instead, formal experimental designs or retrospective diary studies using advanced statistical modeling techniques provide the best approaches to satisfy the required assumptions and inform causal statements about headache triggers. PMID:23534872

  9. AMY trigger system

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Yoshihide

    1989-04-01

    A trigger system of the AMY detector at TRISTAN e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is described briefly. The system uses simple track segment and shower cluster counting scheme to classify events to be triggered. It has been operating successfully since 1987.

  10. Laser fusion pulse shape controller

    DOEpatents

    Siebert, Larry D.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for controlling the pulse shape, i.e., the pulse duration and intensity pattern, of a pulsed laser system, and which is particularly well adapted for controlling the pellet ignition pulse in a laser-driven fusion reaction system. The apparatus comprises a laser generator for providing an optical control pulse of the shape desired, a pulsed laser triggered by the control pulse, and a plurality of optical Kerr-effect gates serially disposed at the output of the pulsed laser and selectively triggered by the control pulse to pass only a portion of the pulsed laser output generally corresponding in shape to the control pulse.

  11. LHCb Topological Trigger Reoptimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Ilten, Philip; Khairullin, Egor; Rogozhnikov, Alex; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Williams, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so- called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger, which utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected a nearly 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%; its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and neural networks. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all ’interesting” decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. Methods studied include cascading, ensembling and blending techniques. Furthermore, novel boosting techniques have been implemented that will help reduce systematic uncertainties in Run 2 measurements. We demonstrate that the reoptimized topological trigger is expected to significantly improve on the Run 1 performance for a wide range of b-hadron decays.

  12. Calorimetry Triggering in ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Igonkina, O.; Achenbach, R.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Alexandre, G.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.; Aracena, I.; Backlund, S.; Baines, J.; Barnett, B.M.; Bauss, B.; Bee, C.; Behera, P.; Bell, P.; Bendel, M.; Benslama, K.; Berry, T.; Bogaerts, A.; Bohm, C.; Bold, T.; /UC, Irvine /AGH-UST, Cracow /Birmingham U. /Barcelona, IFAE /CERN /Birmingham U. /Rutherford /Montreal U. /Santa Maria U., Valparaiso /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Barcelona, IFAE /CERN /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Lisbon, LIFEP /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Birmingham U. /Copenhagen U. /Copenhagen U. /Brookhaven /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Pennsylvania U. /Montreal U. /SLAC /CERN /Michigan State U. /Chile U., Catolica /City Coll., N.Y. /Oxford U. /La Plata U. /McGill U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /CERN /Rutherford /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /Birmingham U. /Montreal U. /CERN /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Liverpool U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Pennsylvania U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Geneva U. /Birmingham U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /AGH-UST, Cracow /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Michigan State U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U. /Birmingham U. /CERN /Montreal U. /Stockholm U. /Arizona U. /Regina U. /Regina U. /Rutherford /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /City Coll., N.Y. /University Coll. London /Humboldt U., Berlin /Queen Mary, U. of London /Argonne /LPSC, Grenoble /Arizona U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Antonio Narino U. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Chile U., Catolica /Indiana U. /Manchester U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Rutherford /City Coll., N.Y. /Stockholm U. /La Plata U. /Antonio Narino U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Antonio Narino U. /Pavia U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Pennsylvania U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Chile U., Catolica /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Rutherford /Barcelona, IFAE /Nevis Labs, Columbia U. /CERN /Antonio Narino U. /McGill U. /Rutherford /Santa Maria U., Valparaiso /Rutherford /Chile U., Catolica /Brookhaven /Oregon U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /McGill U. /Antonio Narino U. /Antonio Narino U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Sydney U. /Rutherford /McGill U. /McGill U. /Pavia U. /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Moscow State U. /Stockholm U. /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Birmingham U. /Geneva U. /Oregon U. /Barcelona, IFAE /University Coll. London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Birmingham U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Birmingham U. /Oregon U. /La Plata U. /Geneva U. /Chile U., Catolica /McGill U. /Pavia U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Regina U. /Birmingham U. /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Oxford U. /CERN /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /UC, Irvine /UC, Irvine /Wisconsin U., Madison /Rutherford /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /CERN /Geneva U. /Copenhagen U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Stockholm U. /University Coll. London

    2011-12-08

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for data taking at 14 TeV collision energy. A rich discovery physics program is being prepared in addition to the detailed study of Standard Model processes which will be produced in abundance. The ATLAS multi-level trigger system is designed to accept one event in 2/10{sup 5} to enable the selection of rare and unusual physics events. The ATLAS calorimeter system is a precise instrument, which includes liquid Argon electro-magnetic and hadronic components as well as a scintillator-tile hadronic calorimeter. All these components are used in the various levels of the trigger system. A wide physics coverage is ensured by inclusively selecting events with candidate electrons, photons, taus, jets or those with large missing transverse energy. The commissioning of the trigger system is being performed with cosmic ray events and by replaying simulated Monte Carlo events through the trigger and data acquisition system.

  13. ELECTRONIC TRIGGER CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Russell, J.A.G.

    1958-01-01

    An electronic trigger circuit is described of the type where an output pulse is obtained only after an input voltage has cqualed or exceeded a selected reference voltage. In general, the invention comprises a source of direct current reference voltage in series with an impedance and a diode rectifying element. An input pulse of preselected amplitude causes the diode to conduct and develop a signal across the impedance. The signal is delivered to an amplifier where an output pulse is produced and part of the output is fed back in a positive manner to the diode so that the amplifier produces a steep wave front trigger pulsc at the output. The trigger point of the described circuit is not subject to variation due to the aging, etc., of multi-electrode tabes, since the diode circuit essentially determines the trigger point.

  14. Dealing with Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... smell given off by paint or gas, and air pollution. If you notice that an irritant triggers your ... or other tobacco products around you. If outdoor air pollution is a problem, running the air conditioner or ...

  15. Laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, W.A.; Boskma, P.

    1980-12-01

    Unrestricted laser fusion offers nations an opportunity to circumvent arms control agreements and develop thermonuclear weapons. Early laser weapons research sought a clean radiation-free bomb to replace the fission bomb, but this was deceptive because a fission bomb was needed to trigger the fusion reaction and additional radioactivity was induced by generating fast neutrons. As laser-implosion experiments focused on weapons physics, simulating weapons effects, and applications for new weapons, the military interest shifted from developing a laser-ignited hydrogen bomb to more sophisticated weapons and civilian applications for power generation. Civilian and military research now overlap, making it possible for several countries to continue weapons activities and permitting proliferation of nuclear weapons. These countries are reluctant to include inertial confinement fusion research in the Non-Proliferation Treaty. 16 references. (DCK)

  16. Triggered Earthquakes Following Parkfield?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hough, S. E.

    2004-12-01

    When the M5.0 Arvin earthquake struck approximately 30 hours after the 28 September 2004 M6.0 Parkfield earthquake, it seemed likely if not obvious that the latter had triggered the former. The odds of a M5.0 or greater event occurring by random chance in a given 2-day window is low, on the order of 2%. However, previously published results suggest that remotely triggered earthquakes are observed only following much larger mainshocks, typically M7 or above. Moreover, using a standard beta-statistic approach, one finds no pervasive regional increase of seismicity in the weeks following the Parkfield mainshock. (Neither were any moderate events observed at regional distances following the 1934 and 1966 Parkfield earthquakes.) Was Arvin a remotely triggered earthquake? To address this issue further I compare the seismicity rate changes following the Parkfield mainshock with those following 14 previous M5.3-7.1 earthquakes in central and southern California. I show that, on average, seismicity increased to a distance of at least 120 km following these events. For all but the M7.1 Hector Mine mainshock, this is well beyond the radius of what would be considered a traditional aftershock zone. Average seismicity rates also increase, albeit more weakly, to a distance of about 220 km. These results suggest that even moderate mainshocks in central and southern California do trigger seismicity at distances up to 220 km, supporting the inference that Arvin was indeed a remotely triggered earthquake. In general, only weak triggering is expected following moderate (M5.5-6.5) mainshocks. However, as illustrated by Arvin and, in retrospect, the 1986 M5.5 Oceanside earthquake, which struck just 5 days after the M5.9 North Palm Springs earthquake, triggered events can sometimes be large enough to generate public interest, and anxiety.

  17. The CMS trigger system

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2017-01-24

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, tau lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during datamore » taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.« less

  18. Cygnus Trigger System

    SciTech Connect

    G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, C. Mitton

    2008-02-01

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two radiographic sources (Cygnus 1, Cygnus 2) each with a dose rating of 4 rads at 1 m, and a 1-mm diameter spot size. The electrical specifications are: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This facility is located in an underground environment at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These sources were developed as a primary diagnostic for subcritical tests, which are single-shot, high-value events. In such an application there is an emphasis on reliability and reproducibility. A robust, low-jitter trigger system is a key element for meeting these goals. The trigger system was developed with both commercial and project-specific equipment. In addition to the traditional functions of a trigger system there are novel features added to protect the investment of a high-value shot. Details of the trigger system, including elements designed specifically for a subcritical test application, will be presented. The individual electronic components have their nominal throughput, and when assembled have a system throughput with a measured range of jitter. The shot-to-shot jitter will be assessed both individually and in combination. Trigger reliability and reproducibility results will be presented for a substantial number of shots executed at the NTS.

  19. The CMS trigger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Damiao, D. De Jesus; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; El Sawy, M.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Chowdhury, S. Roy; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kothekar, K.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Najafabadi, M. Mohammadi; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pegoraro, M.; Pozzobon, N.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Ventura, S.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Ali, M. A. B. Md; Mohamad Idris, F.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Yusli, M. N.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. 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W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, τ lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during data taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.

  20. Trigger mechanism for engines

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, L.R.

    1989-02-28

    A trigger mechanism is described for a blower-vacuum apparatus having a trigger mounted within a handle and a small engine comprising: a throttle; a ''L'' shaped lever having first and second legs mounted for rotation about an intermediate pivot within the handle when the trigger is depressed, interconnecting the trigger and the throttle, the second leg having first teeth defined therein, the lever further having idle, full throttle and stop positions; a normally raised latch means adapted to be rotated and axially depressed, the latch means having second teeth situated on a cam to engage the first teeth for holding the lever in an intermediate position between the idle and full throttle positions when the latch means is rotated. The latch means further are cam teeth into potential engagement with the lever teeth when the trigger is depressed, lever is biased to the stop position; and idle adjusting means means for intercepting the second leg for preventing the second leg from reaching the stop position when the latch means is raised.

  1. CDF - Secondary vertex trigger

    SciTech Connect

    D. Lucchesi

    2002-10-25

    At the beginning of 2002 a new data taking with an upgraded trigger system started for the CDF collaboration. One of the major improvements is the track trigger. A fast processor reconstructs tracks in the central drift chamber and the Silicon Vertex Tracker combines these tracks with the silicon vertex detector information to have track parameters with a precision as good as the offine reconstruction. This system allows CDF to trigger on tracks significantly displaced from the primary vertex with high efficiency for signal events like charm and beauty and to keep low background rates. The performances, in terms of resolution and efficiency, of both the processors are illustrated and the firsts physics results are discussed.

  2. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Schare, Joshua M.; Bunch, Kyle

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  3. Video Event Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L.; Lichter, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    Video event trigger (VET) processes video image data to generate trigger signal when image shows significant change like motion or appearance, disappearance, change in color, change in brightness, or dilation of object. System aids in efficient utilization of image-data-storage and image-data-processing equipment in applications in which many video frames show no changes and are wasteful to record and analyze all frames when only relatively few frames show changes of interest. Applications include video recording of automobile crash tests, automated video monitoring of entrances, exits, parking lots, and secure areas.

  4. Triggered Nanoparticles as Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang Soo; Duncan, Bradley; Creran, Brian; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Drug delivery systems (DDSs) face several challenges including site-specific delivery, stability, and the programmed release of drugs. Engineered nanoparticle (NP) surfaces with responsive moieties can enhance the efficacy of DDSs for in vitro and in vivo systems. This triggering process can be achieved through both endogenous (biologically controlled release) and exogenous (external stimuli controlled release) activation. In this review, we will highlight recent examples of the use of triggered release strategies of engineered nanomaterials for in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:24159362

  5. Trigger Circuit for Marx Generators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-02-08

    A trigger circuit is provided for a trigger system for a Marx generator column. The column includes a plurality of metal electrode pairs wherein the...electrode (trigatron) spark gap switch forming the first spark gap of the Marx generator column. The triggering circuit includes a trigger

  6. Disambiguating Syntactic Triggers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakas, William Gregory; Fodor, Janet Dean

    2012-01-01

    We present data from an artificial language domain that suggest new contributions to the theory of syntactic triggers. Whether a learning algorithm is capable of matching the achievements of child learners depends in part on how much parametric ambiguity there is in the input. For practical reasons this cannot be established for the domain of all…

  7. Common Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... your bedroom. Wash your bedding on the hottest water setting. Outdoor Air Pollution Outdoor air pollution can trigger an asthma attack. ... newspaper to plan your activities for when air pollution levels will be ... home by removing as many water and food sources as you can. Cockroaches are ...

  8. AIDS radio triggers.

    PubMed

    Elias, A M

    1991-07-01

    In April 1991, the Ethnic Communities' Council of NSW was granted funding under the Community AIDS Prevention and Education Program through the Department of Community Services and Health, to produce a series of 6x50 second AIDS radio triggers with a 10-second tag line for further information. The triggers are designed to disseminate culturally-sensitive information about HIV/AIDS in English, Italian, Greek, Spanish, Khmer, Turkish, Macedonian, Serbo-Croatian, Arabic, Cantonese, and Vietnamese, with the goal of increasing awareness and decreasing the degree of misinformation about HIV/AIDS among people of non-English-speaking backgrounds through radio and sound. The 6 triggers cover the denial that AIDS exists in the community, beliefs that words and feelings do not protect one from catching HIV, encouraging friends to be compassionate, compassion within the family, AIDS information for a young audience, and the provision of accurate and honest information on HIV/AIDS. The triggers are slated to be completed by the end of July 1991 and will be broadcast on all possible community, ethnic, and commercial radio networks across Australia. They will be available upon request in composite form with an information kit for use by health care professionals and community workers.

  9. Triggered plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.

    1988-01-01

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  10. Optically triggered infrared photodetector.

    PubMed

    Ramiro, Íñigo; Martí, Antonio; Antolín, Elisa; López, Esther; Datas, Alejandro; Luque, Antonio; Ripalda, José M; González, Yolanda

    2015-01-14

    We demonstrate a new class of semiconductor device: the optically triggered infrared photodetector (OTIP). This photodetector is based on a new physical principle that allows the detection of infrared light to be switched ON and OFF by means of an external light. Our experimental device, fabricated using InAs/AlGaAs quantum-dot technology, demonstrates normal incidence infrared detection in the 2-6 μm range. The detection is optically triggered by a 590 nm light-emitting diode. Furthermore, the detection gain is achieved in our device without an increase of the noise level. The novel characteristics of OTIPs open up new possibilities for third generation infrared imaging systems ( Rogalski, A.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L. J. Appl. Phys. 2009, 105 (9), 091101).

  11. Trigger developments for ARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ming-Yuan

    2013-04-01

    The Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) is a planned large-scale neutrino detector at the South Pole aiming at observing ultra-high-energy cosmogenic neutrinos via detecting radio Cherenkov radiation from neutrinos' interaction with Antarctic ice. By the end of the austral summer of 2012/13 three detector stations have been deployed at depths of up to 200 m. A prototype detector station has been taking data for two years. The final array is planned to consist of 37 stations with a 200 km^2 coverage, and provide high sensitivity in the range of 10 PeV to 10 EeV. In order to increase the discover potential of the stations, advanced triggering schemes are in development which take into account the topology of signal events. Here a brief status and the triggering schemes in development will be presented, and based on simulations their improvements to ARA neutrino sensitivity will be discussed.

  12. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  13. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  14. Neural networks for triggering

    SciTech Connect

    Denby, B. ); Campbell, M. ); Bedeschi, F. ); Chriss, N.; Bowers, C. ); Nesti, F. )

    1990-01-01

    Two types of neural network beauty trigger architectures, based on identification of electrons in jets and recognition of secondary vertices, have been simulated in the environment of the Fermilab CDF experiment. The efficiencies for B's and rejection of background obtained are encouraging. If hardware tests are successful, the electron identification architecture will be tested in the 1991 run of CDF. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Band, D.; Kippen, M.

    2004-09-28

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  16. Dopamine triggers Heterosynaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masago; Otaka, Mami; Huang, Yanhua; Neumann, Peter A.; Winters, Bradley D.; Grace, Anthony A.; Schlüter, Oliver M.; Dong, Yan

    2013-01-01

    As a classic neuromodulator, dopamine has long been thought to modulate, rather than trigger, synaptic plasticity. In contrast, our present results demonstrate that within the parallel projections of dopaminergic and GABAergic terminals from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to nucleus accumbens core (NAcCo), action potential-activated release of dopamine heterosynaptically triggers LTD at GABAergic synapses, which is likely mediated by activating presynaptically-located dopamine D1 class receptors and expressed by inhibiting presynaptic release of GABA. Moreover, this dopamine-mediated heterosynaptic LTD is abolished after withdrawal from cocaine exposure. These results suggest that action potential-dependent dopamine release triggers very different cellular consequences from those induced by volume release or pharmacological manipulation. Activation of the VTA-to-NAcCo projections is essential for emotional and motivational responses. This dopamine-mediated LTD allows a flexible output of NAcCo neurons, whereas disruption of this LTD may contribute to the rigid emotional and motivational state observed in addicts during cocaine withdrawal. PMID:23595734

  17. Subnanosecond trigger system for ETA

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, E.G.; Lauer, E.J.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers D.; Schmidt, J.A.

    1980-05-30

    A high-voltage trigger system capable of triggering 30, 250 kV spark gaps; each with less than +- 1 ns jitter has been constructed. In addition to low jitter rates, the trigger system must be capable of delivering the high voltage pulses to the spark gaps either simultaneously or sequentially as determined by other system requirements. The trigger system consists of several stages of pulse amplification culminating in 160 kV pulses having 30 ns risetime. The trigger system is described and test data provided.

  18. Pediatric Trigger Digits.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Andrea S; Bae, Donald S

    2015-11-01

    Pediatric trigger thumb presents not at birth but early in childhood. Most evidence suggests that it is caused by a developmental size mismatch between the flexor pollicis longus tendon and its sheath. Patients generally present with the thumb interphalangeal joint locked in flexion. Surgical reviews report near universally excellent outcomes after open release of the A1 pulley. However, recent reports indicate that there may be a role for nonsurgical treatment for families that are willing to wait several years for possible spontaneous resolution of the deformity. Triggering in digits other than the thumb in children is generally associated with an underlying diagnosis including anatomic abnormalities of the tendons, and metabolic, inflammatory, and infectious etiologies. Although some have advocated nonsurgical treatment, surgery is often necessary to address the underlying anatomic etiology. More extensive surgery beyond simple A1 pulley release is often required, including release of the A3 pulley and resection of a slip of the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Protons Trigger Mitochondrial Flashes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianhua; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Zhanglong; Wu, Di; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Rufeng; Yin, Rongkang; Hou, Tingting; Jian, Chongshu; Xu, Jiejia; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yanru; Gao, Feng; Cheng, Heping

    2016-07-26

    Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes) are highly conserved elemental mitochondrial signaling events. However, which signal controls their ignition and how they are integrated with other mitochondrial signals and functions remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to further delineate the signal components of the mitoflash and determine the mitoflash trigger mechanism. Using multiple biosensors and chemical probes as well as label-free autofluorescence, we found that the mitoflash reflects chemical and electrical excitation at the single-organelle level, comprising bursting superoxide production, oxidative redox shift, and matrix alkalinization as well as transient membrane depolarization. Both electroneutral H(+)/K(+) or H(+)/Na(+) antiport and matrix proton uncaging elicited immediate and robust mitoflash responses over a broad dynamic range in cardiomyocytes and HeLa cells. However, charge-uncompensated proton transport, which depolarizes mitochondria, caused the opposite effect, and steady matrix acidification mildly inhibited mitoflashes. Based on a numerical simulation, we estimated a mean proton lifetime of 1.42 ns and diffusion distance of 2.06 nm in the matrix. We conclude that nanodomain protons act as a novel, to our knowledge, trigger of mitoflashes in energized mitochondria. This finding suggests that mitoflash genesis is functionally and mechanistically integrated with mitochondrial energy metabolism.

  20. Laser acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, T.; Nakajima, K.; Mourou, G.

    2017-02-01

    The fundamental idea of Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) is reviewed. An ultrafast intense laser pulse drives coherent wakefield with a relativistic amplitude robustly supported by the plasma. While the large amplitude of wakefields involves collective resonant oscillations of the eigenmode of the entire plasma electrons, the wake phase velocity ˜ c and ultrafastness of the laser pulse introduce the wake stability and rigidity. A large number of worldwide experiments show a rapid progress of this concept realization toward both the high-energy accelerator prospect and broad applications. The strong interest in this has been spurring and stimulating novel laser technologies, including the Chirped Pulse Amplification, the Thin Film Compression, the Coherent Amplification Network, and the Relativistic Mirror Compression. These in turn have created a conglomerate of novel science and technology with LWFA to form a new genre of high field science with many parameters of merit in this field increasing exponentially lately. This science has triggered a number of worldwide research centers and initiatives. Associated physics of ion acceleration, X-ray generation, and astrophysical processes of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are reviewed. Applications such as X-ray free electron laser, cancer therapy, and radioisotope production etc. are considered. A new avenue of LWFA using nanomaterials is also emerging.

  1. Final report on LDRD project : advanced optical trigger systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Roose, Lars D.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Mar, Alan; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Bauer, Thomas M.; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Montano, Victoria A.

    2008-09-01

    Advanced optically-activated solid-state electrical switch development at Sandia has demonstrated multi-kA/kV switching and the path for scalability to even higher current/power. Realization of this potential requires development of new optical sources/switches based on key Sandia photonic device technologies: vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices. The key to increasing the switching capacity of PCSS devices to 5kV/5kA and higher is to distribute the current in multiple parallel line filaments triggered by an array of high-brightness line-shaped illuminators. Commercial mechanically-stacked edge-emitting lasers have been used to trigger multiple filaments, but they are difficult to scale and manufacture with the required uniformity. In VCSEL arrays, adjacent lasers utilize identical semiconductor material and are lithographically patterned to the required dimensions. We have demonstrated multiple-line filament triggering using VCSEL arrays to approximate line generation. These arrays of uncoupled circular-aperture VCSELs have fill factors ranging from 2% to 30%. Using these arrays, we have developed a better understanding of the illumination requirements for stable triggering of multiple-filament PCSS devices. Photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices offer advantages of high voltage operation (multi-kV), optical isolation, triggering with laser pulses that cannot occur accidentally in nature, low cost, high speed, small size, and radiation hardness. PCSS devices are candidates for an assortment of potential applications that require multi-kA switching of current. The key to increasing the switching capacity of PCSS devices to 5kV/5kA and higher is to distribute the current in multiple parallel line filaments triggered by an array of high-brightness line-shaped illuminators. Commercial mechanically-stacked edge-emitting lasers have been demonstrated to trigger multiple filaments, but they

  2. Nostalgia: content, triggers, functions.

    PubMed

    Wildschut, Tim; Sedikides, Constantine; Arndt, Jamie; Routledge, Clay

    2006-11-01

    Seven methodologically diverse studies addressed 3 fundamental questions about nostalgia. Studies 1 and 2 examined the content of nostalgic experiences. Descriptions of nostalgic experiences typically featured the self as a protagonist in interactions with close others (e.g., friends) or in momentous events (e.g., weddings). Also, the descriptions contained more expressions of positive than negative affect and often depicted the redemption of negative life scenes by subsequent triumphs. Studies 3 and 4 examined triggers of nostalgia and revealed that nostalgia occurs in response to negative mood and the discrete affective state of loneliness. Studies 5, 6, and 7 investigated the functional utility of nostalgia and established that nostalgia bolsters social bonds, increases positive self-regard, and generates positive affect. These findings demarcate key landmarks in the hitherto uncharted research domain of nostalgia.

  3. Gravity triggered neutrino condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela

    2010-11-01

    In this work we use the Schwinger-Dyson equations to study the possibility that an enhanced gravitational attraction triggers the formation of a right-handed neutrino condensate, inducing dynamical symmetry breaking and generating a Majorana mass for the right-handed neutrino at a scale appropriate for the seesaw mechanism. The composite field formed by the condensate phase could drive an early epoch of inflation. We find that to the lowest order, the theory does not allow dynamical symmetry breaking. Nevertheless, thanks to the large number of matter fields in the model, the suppression by additional powers in G of higher order terms can be compensated, boosting them up to their lowest order counterparts. This way chiral symmetry can be broken dynamically and the infrared mass generated turns out to be in the expected range for a successful seesaw scenario.

  4. The CMS High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trocino, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High-Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running with the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. We present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simple single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We discuss the optimisation of the trigger and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  5. Mechanism for Triggered Waves in Atrial Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Shiferaw, Yohannes; Aistrup, Gary L; Wasserstrom, J Andrew

    2017-08-08

    Excitation-contraction coupling in atrial cells is mediated by calcium (Ca) signaling between L-type Ca channels and Ryanodine receptors that occurs mainly at the cell boundary. This unique architecture dictates essential aspects of Ca signaling under both normal and diseased conditions. In this study we apply laser scanning confocal microscopy, along with an experimentally based computational model, to understand the Ca cycling dynamics of an atrial cell subjected to rapid pacing. Our main finding is that when an atrial cell is paced under Ca overload conditions, Ca waves can then nucleate on the cell boundary and propagate to the cell interior. These propagating Ca waves are referred to as "triggered waves" because they are initiated by L-type Ca channel openings during the action potential. These excitations are distinct from spontaneous Ca waves originating from random fluctuations of Ryanodine receptor channels, and which occur after much longer waiting times. Furthermore, we argue that the onset of these triggered waves is a highly nonlinear function of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca load. This strong nonlinearity leads to aperiodic response of Ca at rapid pacing rates that is caused by the complex interplay between paced Ca release and triggered waves. We argue further that this feature of atrial cells leads to dynamic instabilities that may underlie atrial arrhythmias. These studies will serve as a starting point to explore the nonlinear dynamics of atrial cells and will yield insights into the trigger and maintenance of atrial fibrillation. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Myofascial Trigger Point Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Gerwin, Robert D

    2016-10-01

    Myofascial pain syndromes caused by trigger points (TrPs) in muscle are a common cause of local and generalized pain. Trigger points are hyperirritable zones in contracted bands of muscle, thought to be caused by muscle overload or stress. Stress TrPs have characteristic electromyographic features, and can be visualized with ultrasound and magnetic resonance elastography. Trigger point needling or injection can be effective in inactivating TrP, but correcting triggers is also critical. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. The PHENIX Muon Trigger Upgrade Level-1 Trigger System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajoie, John; Kempel, Todd

    2010-02-01

    The PHENIX Muon Trigger Upgrade adds a set of Level-1 trigger detectors to the existing muon spectrometers and will enhance the ability of the experiment to pursue a rich program of spin physics in polarized proton collisions. The upgrade will allow the experiment to select high momentum muons from the decay of W bosons and reject both beam-associated and low-momentum collision background, enabling the study of quark and antiquark polarization in the proton. The Muon Trigger Upgrade will add momentum and timing information to the present muon Level-1 trigger, which only makes use of tracking in the PHENIX muon identifier (MuID) panels. Signals from new Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) and re-instrumented planes in the existing muon tracking (MuTr) chambers will provide momentum and timing information for the new Level-1 trigger. An RPC timing resolution of ˜2 ns will permit rejection of beam related backgrounds while tracking information from the RPCs and MuTr station will be used by the trigger to select events with high momentum muon candidates. The RPC and MuTr hit information will be sent by optical fibers to a set of Level-1 trigger processors that will make use of cutting edge FPGA technology to provide very high data densities in a compact form factor. The layout of the upgrade, details of the Level-1 electronics and trigger algorithm development will be presented. )

  8. The NA62 trigger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivda, M.; NA62 Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    The main aim of the NA62 experiment (NA62 Technical Design Report, [1]) is to study ultra-rare Kaon decays. In order to select rare events over the overwhelming background, central systems with high-performance, high bandwidth, flexibility and configurability are necessary, that minimize dead time while maximizing data collection reliability. The NA62 experiment consists of 12 sub-detector systems and several trigger and control systems, for a total channel count of less than 100,000. The GigaTracKer (GTK) has the largest number of channels (54,000), and the Liquid Krypton (LKr) calorimeter shares with it the largest raw data rate (19 GB/s). The NA62 trigger system works with 3 trigger levels. The first trigger level is based on a hardware central trigger unit, so-called L0 Trigger Processor (L0TP), and Local Trigger Units (LTU), which are all located in the experimental cavern. Other two trigger levels are based on software, and done with a computer farm located on surface. The L0TP receives information from triggering sub-detectors asynchronously via Ethernet; it processes the information, and then transmits a final trigger decision synchronously to each sub-detector through the Trigger and Timing Control (TTC) system. The interface between L0TP and the TTC system, which is used for trigger and clock distribution, is provided by the Local Trigger Unit board (LTU). The LTU can work in two modes: global and stand-alone. In the global mode, the LTU provides an interface between L0TP and TTC system. In the stand-alone mode, the LTU can fully emulate L0TP and so provides an independent way for each sub-detector for testing or calibration purposes. In addition to the emulation functionality, a further functionality is implemented that allows to synchronize the clock of the LTU with the L0TP and the TTC system. For testing and debugging purposes, a Snap Shot Memory (SSM) interface is implemented, that can work

  9. An enhanced multiwavelength ultraviolet biological trigger lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achey, Alexander; Bufton, Jack; Dawson, Jeffrey; Huang, Wen; Lee, Sangmin; Mehta, Nikhil; Prasad, Coorg R.

    2004-12-01

    A compact Ultraviolet Biological Trigger Lidar (UBTL) instrument for detection and discrimination of bio-warfare-agent (BWA) simulant aerosol clouds was developed by us [Prasad, et al, 2004] using a 5mW, 375nm semiconductor UV optical source (SUVOS) laser diode. It underwent successful field tests at Dugway Proving Ground and demonstrated measurement ranges of over 300m for elastic scattering and >100m for fluorescence. The UBTL was modified during mid-2004 to enhance its detection and discrimination performance with increased range of operation and sensitivity. The major optical modifications were: 1. increase in telescope collection aperture to 200 mm diameter: 2. addition of 266nm and 977nm laser transmitters: 3. addition of three detection channels for 266nm and 977nm elastic backscatter and fluorescence centered at 330nm. Also the commercial electronics of the original UBTL were replaced with a multi-channel field programmable gate array (FPGA) chip for laser diode modulation and data acquisition that allowed simultaneous and continuous operation of the UBTL sensor on all of its transmitter and receiver wavelengths. A notebook computer was added for data display and storage. Field tests were performed during July 2004 at the Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center in Maryland to establish the enhanced performance of UBTL subsystems. Results of these tests are presented and discussed.

  10. The TOTEM modular trigger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagliesi, M. G.; Berretti, M.; Cecchi, R.; Greco, V.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Oliveri, E.; Pedreschi, E.; Scribano, A.; Spinella, F.; Turini, N.

    2010-05-01

    The TOTEM experiment will measure the total cross-section with the luminosity independent method and study elastic and diffractive scattering at the LHC. We are developing a modular trigger system, based on programmable logic, that will select meaningful events within 2.5 μs. The trigger algorithm is based on a tree structure in order to obtain information compression. The trigger primitive is generated directly on the readout chip, VFAT, that has a specific fast output that gives low resolution hits information. In two of the TOTEM detectors, Roman Pots and T2, a coincidence chip will perform track recognition directly on the detector readout boards, while for T1 the hits are transferred from the VFATs to the trigger hardware. Starting from more than 2000 bits delivered by the detector electronics, we extract, in a first step, six trigger patterns of 32 LVDS signals each; we build, then, on a dedicated board, a 1-bit (L1) trigger signal for the TOTEM experiment and 16 trigger bits to the CMS experiment global trigger system for future common data taking.

  11. Fermi GBM Early Trigger Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Paciesas, Bill; Meegan, Charles

    2009-05-25

    Since the launch of the Fermi observatory on June 11 2008, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has seen approximately 250 triggers of which about 150 were cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). GBM operates dozens of trigger algorithms covering various energy bands and timescales and is therefore sensitive to a wide variety of phenomena, both astrophysical and not.

  12. Triggering requirements for SSC physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gilchriese, M.G.D.

    1989-04-01

    Some aspects of triggering requirements for high P{sub T} physics processes at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) are described. A very wide range of trigger types will be required to enable detection of the large number of potential physics signatures possible at the SSC. Although in many cases trigger rates are not now well understood, it is possible to conclude that the ability to trigger on transverse energy, number and energy of jets, number and energy of leptons (electrons and muons), missing energy and combinations of these will be required. An SSC trigger system must be both highly flexible and redundant to ensure reliable detection of many new physics processes at the SSC.

  13. Relative biological damage and electron fluence in and out of a 6 MV photon field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syme, A.; Kirkby, C.; Mirzayans, R.; Mac Kenzie, M.; Field, C.; Fallone, B. G.

    2009-11-01

    Scattered radiation in the penumbra of a megavoltage radiation therapy beam can deposit a non-negligible dose in the healthy tissue around a target volume. The lower energy of the radiation in this region suggests that its biological effectiveness might not be the same as that of the open beam. In this work, we determined the relative biological damage in normal human fibroblasts after megavoltage irradiation in two geometries. The first was an open-beam irradiation and the second was a blocked configuration in which only scattered radiation could reach the target cells. The biological damage was evaluated by the γ-H2AX immunofluorescence assay, which is capable of detecting DNA double-strand breaks in individual cells. We report that the scattered radiation is more effective at producing biological damage than the open beam radiation. We found a 27% enhancement in the net mean nuclear γ-H2AX fluorescence intensity at 2 Gy and a 48% enhancement at 4 Gy. These findings are of interest due to the increased doses of penumbral radiation close to target volumes both in dose escalation studies and in IMRT treatment deliveries where high dose gradients exist for the purpose of conformal avoidance of healthy tissues.

  14. The COMET: A 6-MV, 400-kJ, magnetically-switched pulse-power module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neau, E. L.

    The Inertial Confinement Fusion program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is based on the use of large, economical, multi-module, multimegavolt accelerators to drive ion beam generating diodes or imploding plasma loads. This type of accelerator uses several stages of pulse time compression to raise the peak power to the multi-terrawatt level. Pulsed power accelerators have traditionally relied on the ionization of a gaseous, liquid, or solid material, through one or several channels, to connect one pulse compression stage to a succeeding stage. The large change in inductance of a region enclosing a saturable ferri or ferromagnetic material can, with proper design, be substituted for the more conventional switching techniques in certain applications. The use of amorphous METGLAS 2606SC saturable cores, based on earlier system studies, as a possible low-loss repetitive substitute for the self-closing water switches used in the final stages of one class of the pulse power accelerators was investigated.

  15. A dose-response curve for biodosimetry from a 6 MV electron linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Lemos-Pinto, M M P; Cadena, M; Santos, N; Fernandes, T S; Borges, E; Amaral, A

    2015-05-26

    Biological dosimetry (biodosimetry) is based on the investigation of radiation-induced biological effects (biomarkers), mainly dicentric chromosomes, in order to correlate them with radiation dose. To interpret the dicentric score in terms of absorbed dose, a calibration curve is needed. Each curve should be constructed with respect to basic physical parameters, such as the type of ionizing radiation characterized by low or high linear energy transfer (LET) and dose rate. This study was designed to obtain dose calibration curves by scoring of dicentric chromosomes in peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with a 6 MV electron linear accelerator (Mevatron M, Siemens, USA). Two software programs, CABAS (Chromosomal Aberration Calculation Software) and Dose Estimate, were used to generate the curve. The two software programs are discussed; the results obtained were compared with each other and with other published low LET radiation curves. Both software programs resulted in identical linear and quadratic terms for the curve presented here, which was in good agreement with published curves for similar radiation quality and dose rates.

  16. A 0.2 ns beam pulse for the 6 MV Van de Graaff accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurray, W. R.; Kritzinger, J. J.; Wikner, V. C.; Swart, T.; Schmitt, H.

    1984-01-01

    The 1.5 ns pulsed beam of the SUNI Van de Graaff accelerator has been used for neutron time-of-flight studies. To provide sufficient resolution for neutron scattering measurements at 22 MeV, a post-acceleration bunching system has been installed. Bunching of 2-6 MeV p, d and 3He beams is achieved in a simple quarter-wave coaxial resonator chamber designed for high Q and low power. The bunched pulse has a fwhm of less than 0.2 ns. The design and testing of the bunching system are outlined. Optimum power requirements are tabulated together with the induced beam energy spreads.

  17. Waveguide detuning caused by transverse magnetic fields on a simulated in-line 6 MV linac.

    PubMed

    St Aubin, J; Steciw, S; Fallone, B G

    2010-09-01

    Due to the close proximity of the linear accelerator (linac) to the magnetic resonance (MR) imager in linac-MR systems, it will be subjected to magnet fringe fields larger than the Earth's magnetic field of 5 x 10(-5) T. Even with passive or active shielding designed to reduce these fields, some magnitude of the magnetic field is still expected to intersect the linac, causing electron deflection and beam loss. This beam loss, resulting from magnetic fields that cannot be eliminated with shielding, can cause a detuning of the waveguide due to excessive heating. The detuning, if significant, could lead to an even further decrease in output above what would be expected strictly from electron deflections caused by an external magnetic field. Thus an investigation of detuning was performed through various simulations. According to the Lorentz force, the electrons will be deflected away from their straight course to the target, depositing energy as they impact the linac copper waveguide. The deposited energy would lead to a heating and deformation of the copper structure resulting in resonant frequency changes. PARMELA was used to determine the mean energy and fraction of total beam lost in each linac cavity. The energy deposited into the copper waveguide from the beam losses caused by transverse magnetic fields was calculated using the Monte Carlo program DOSRZnrc. From the total energy deposited, the rise in temperature and ultimately the deformation of the structure was estimated. The deformed structure was modeled using the finite element method program COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS to determine the change in cavity resonant frequency. The largest changes in resonant frequency were found in the first two accelerating cavities for each field strength investigated. This was caused by a high electron fluence impacting the waveguide inner structures coupled with their low kinetic energies. At each field strength investigated, the total change in accelerator frequency was less than a manufacturing tolerance of 10 kHz and is thus not expected to have a noticeable effect on accelerator performance. The amount of beam loss caused by magnetic fringe fields for a linac in a linac-MR system depends on the effectiveness of its magnetic shielding. Despite the best efforts to shield the linac from the magnetic fringe fields, some persistent magnetic field is expected which would result in electron beam loss. This investigation showed that the detuning of the waveguide caused by additional electron beam loss in persistent magnetic fields is not a concern.

  18. Monte Carlo modeling of a Novalis Tx Varian 6 MV with HD-120 multileaf collimator.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Quino, Luis Alberto; Massingill, Brian; Shi, Chengyu; Gutierrez, Alonso; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Stathakis, Sotirios

    2012-09-06

    A Monte Carlo model of the Novalis Tx linear accelerator equipped with high-definition multileaf collimator (HD-120 HD-MLC) was commissioned using ionization chamber measurements in water. All measurements in water were performed using a liquid filled ionization chamber. Film measurements were made using EDR2 film in solid water. Open rectangular fields defined by the jaws or the HD-MLC were used for comparison against measurements. Furthermore, inter- and intraleaf leakage calculated by the Monte Carlo model was compared against film measurements. The statistical uncertainty of the Monte Carlo calculations was less than 1% for all simulations. Results for all regular field sizes show an excellent agreement with commissioning data (percent depth-dose curves and profiles), well within 1% of difference in the relative dose and 1 mm distance to agreement. The computed leakage through HD-MLCs shows good agreement with film measurements. The Monte Carlo model developed in this study accurately represents the new Novalis Tx Varian linac with HD-MLC and can be used for reliable patient dose calculations.

  19. Seismology: dynamic triggering of earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Gomberg, Joan; Johnson, Paul

    2005-10-06

    After an earthquake, numerous smaller shocks are triggered over distances comparable to the dimensions of the mainshock fault rupture, although they are rare at larger distances. Here we analyse the scaling of dynamic deformations (the stresses and strains associated with seismic waves) with distance from, and magnitude of, their triggering earthquake, and show that they can cause further earthquakes at any distance if their amplitude exceeds several microstrain, regardless of their frequency content. These triggering requirements are remarkably similar to those measured in the laboratory for inducing dynamic elastic nonlinear behaviour, which suggests that the underlying physics is similar.

  20. Pulsed thyristor trigger control circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A trigger control circuit is provided for producing firing pulses for the thyristor of a thyristor control system such as a power factor controller. The control circuit overcomes thyristor triggering problems involved with the current lag associated with controlling inductive loads and utilizes a phase difference signal, already present in the power factor controller, in deriving a signal for inhibiting generation of a firing pulse until no load current is flowing from the preceding half cycle and thereby ensuring that the thyristor is triggered on during each half cycle.

  1. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P.; Odom, Susan A.; Sottos, Nancy R.; White, Scott R.; Moore, Jeffrey S.

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  2. Can Weather Changes Trigger Migraines?

    MedlinePlus

    ... uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 27, 2015. Triggers: Environmental and physical factors. National Headache Foundation. http://www.headaches.org/education/Tools_for_Sufferers/Headache_-_Frequently_Asked_Questions/Environmental_ ...

  3. Timing of the triggering action of shooting in relation to the cardiac cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Helin, P; Sihvonen, T; Hänninen, O

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the timing of triggering in relation to the cardiac cycle in shooting. The test subjects were six Finnish rifle and pistol champions as well as three beginners at shooting. The electrical activity of the trigger finger muscle (m. flexor digitorum superficialis; surface electrodes) and the heart cycle were fed into a two-channel x-t recorder. The movements of the gun were recorded using a laser technique and, at the same time, cardiac cycles were also monitored. Results showed that the champion shooters triggered during diastole whereas the beginners triggered both during diastole and systole. The results of those beginners triggering during diastole were better than those triggering during systole. PMID:3580727

  4. Synchronization of Thomson scattering measurements on MAST using an FPGA based ``Smart'' trigger unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, G.

    2010-10-01

    The MAST Thomson scattering diagnostic has recently been upgraded to make electron density and temperature measurements at 130 points across the 1.5 m diameter of the plasma. The new system is able to take 240 measurements per second using eight Nd:YAG lasers, each running at 30 Hz. The exact firing time of these lasers is adjusted with 100 ns precision using a field programmable gate array based trigger unit. Trigger pulses are produced to fire the lamps of all lasers and the Q switches with the appropriate delay depending on the warm-up status. The lasers may be fired in rapid bursts so as to achieve a high temporal resolution over eight points separated down to the microsecond level. This trigger unit receives optical trigger events and signals from external sources, allowing the trigger sequences to be resynchronized to the start of the plasma pulse and further events during the shot such as the entry of a fuelling pellet or randomly occurring plasma events. This resynchronization of the laser firing sequence allows accurate and reproducible measurements of fast plasma phenomena.

  5. The H1 Trigger with Emphasis on Tracking Triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedlberger, J.

    1995-11-01

    Since the commissioning of the electron proton collider HERA in 1992 at DESY the H1 experiment collected data with stable performance. The collision frequency of 10.4 MHz necessitates a pipelined design of the data acquisition and the trigger. A multilevel trigger is used to provide the required selectivity on physics processes and to allow for fast rejection of background events. Subdetector-based, deadtime-free triggers are combined to produce a first level trigger. The dcr φ trigger described herein, extracts its data from the central driftchamber. The drifttime of the signals is measured online and logical functions are applied on the digitized time measurements. To account for different performance parameters of the driftchamber the hardware demands a high flexibility, thus leading to a design with Programmable Gate Arrays (XILINX). Track-finding is achieved by means of ten thousand look-up tables, each with typically 20 inputs. Although the signals for one event will arrive within 1.1 μs, it is possible to determine the timing of the event online within one bunchcrossing (0.096 μs).

  6. Optical laser scanning of a leucodye micelle gel: preliminary results of a 3D dose verification of an IMRT treatment for a brain tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, J.; De Deene, Y.

    2013-06-01

    In the present study an in-house developed leucodye micelle gel was used in combination with an in-house developed optical laser scanner for the 3D dose verification of an IMRT treatment of a pituitary adenoma. In an initial prospective study, a gel measured depth dose distribution of a square 6 MV photon beam was compared with an ion chamber measurement. In a second experiment, the gel and scanner were used to verify a clinical dose distribution on a recently installed linear accelerator. The calibration procedure is identified as the major source of dose deviations.

  7. External triggering and triggered targeting strategies for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanfei; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2017-06-01

    Drug delivery systems that are externally triggered to release drugs and/or target tissues hold considerable promise for improving the treatment of many diseases by minimizing nonspecific toxicity and enhancing the efficacy of therapy. These drug delivery systems are constructed from materials that are sensitive to a wide range of external stimuli, including light, ultrasound, electrical and magnetic fields, and specific molecules. The responsiveness conferred by these materials allows the release of therapeutics to be triggered on demand and remotely by a physician or patient. In this Review, we describe the rationales for such systems and the types of stimuli that can be deployed, and provide an outlook for the field.

  8. Anthropogenic Triggering of Large Earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The physical mechanism of the anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes on active faults is studied on the basis of experimental phenomenology, i.e., that earthquakes occur on active tectonic faults, that crustal stress values are those measured in situ and, on active faults, comply to the values of the stress drop measured for real earthquakes, that the static friction coefficients are those inferred on faults, and that the effective triggering stresses are those inferred for real earthquakes. Deriving the conditions for earthquake nucleation as a time-dependent solution of the Tresca-Von Mises criterion applied in the framework of poroelasticity yields that active faults can be triggered by fluid overpressures < 0.1 MPa. Comparing this with the deviatoric stresses at the depth of crustal hypocenters, which are of the order of 1–10 MPa, we find that injecting in the subsoil fluids at the pressures typical of oil and gas production and storage may trigger destructive earthquakes on active faults at a few tens of kilometers. Fluid pressure propagates as slow stress waves along geometric paths operating in a drained condition and can advance the natural occurrence of earthquakes by a substantial amount of time. Furthermore, it is illusory to control earthquake triggering by close monitoring of minor “foreshocks”, since the induction may occur with a delay up to several years. PMID:25156190

  9. Anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2014-08-26

    The physical mechanism of the anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes on active faults is studied on the basis of experimental phenomenology, i.e., that earthquakes occur on active tectonic faults, that crustal stress values are those measured in situ and, on active faults, comply to the values of the stress drop measured for real earthquakes, that the static friction coefficients are those inferred on faults, and that the effective triggering stresses are those inferred for real earthquakes. Deriving the conditions for earthquake nucleation as a time-dependent solution of the Tresca-Von Mises criterion applied in the framework of poroelasticity yields that active faults can be triggered by fluid overpressures < 0.1 MPa. Comparing this with the deviatoric stresses at the depth of crustal hypocenters, which are of the order of 1-10 MPa, we find that injecting in the subsoil fluids at the pressures typical of oil and gas production and storage may trigger destructive earthquakes on active faults at a few tens of kilometers. Fluid pressure propagates as slow stress waves along geometric paths operating in a drained condition and can advance the natural occurrence of earthquakes by a substantial amount of time. Furthermore, it is illusory to control earthquake triggering by close monitoring of minor "foreshocks", since the induction may occur with a delay up to several years.

  10. Industrial accidents triggered by lightning.

    PubMed

    Renni, Elisabetta; Krausmann, Elisabeth; Cozzani, Valerio

    2010-12-15

    Natural disasters can cause major accidents in chemical facilities where they can lead to the release of hazardous materials which in turn can result in fires, explosions or toxic dispersion. Lightning strikes are the most frequent cause of major accidents triggered by natural events. In order to contribute towards the development of a quantitative approach for assessing lightning risk at industrial facilities, lightning-triggered accident case histories were retrieved from the major industrial accident databases and analysed to extract information on types of vulnerable equipment, failure dynamics and damage states, as well as on the final consequences of the event. The most vulnerable category of equipment is storage tanks. Lightning damage is incurred by immediate ignition, electrical and electronic systems failure or structural damage with subsequent release. Toxic releases and tank fires tend to be the most common scenarios associated with lightning strikes. Oil, diesel and gasoline are the substances most frequently released during lightning-triggered Natech accidents.

  11. Microchip Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-31

    physics that underlies their performance, typical operating parameters for the devices, and several of their applications . Keywords Composite-cavity...laser, Diode -pumped laser, Laser, Microchip laser, Miniature laser, Monolithic laser, Passively Q-switched laser, Q-switched laser, Saturable...cavity mirrors are deposited directly on the gain medium and the laser is pumped with a diode laser, either directly, as shown in Fig. 1, or via an

  12. Detector array control and triggering

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, S.; Anzalone, A.; Bartolucci, M. |

    1998-08-01

    A commercial DSP-based board installed in a host-PC was employed for the fast, on-line and real-time computation of special algorithms, in order to perform event selection and operate as a 2nd level trigger. Moreover an ad hoc build interface, realized using PLDs with a view to connecting the DSP-board to the ADCs and to the data acquisition system, has been tested in order to evaluate the performances of these programmable devices used as a look-up-table and as a decisional part of a 1st level trigger.

  13. Know Your Smoking Triggers | Smokefree.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Triggers are the things that make you want to smoke. Different people have different triggers, like a stressful situation, sipping coffee, going to a party, or smelling cigarette smoke. Most triggers fall into one of these four categories: Emotional Pattern Social Withdrawal Knowing your triggers and understanding the best way to deal with them is your first line of defense.

  14. A new look at trigger point injections.

    PubMed

    Wong, Clara S M; Wong, Steven H S

    2012-01-01

    Trigger point injections are commonly practised pain interventional techniques. However, there is still lack of objective diagnostic criteria for trigger points. The mechanisms of action of trigger point injection remain obscure and its efficacy remains heterogeneous. The advent of ultrasound technology in the noninvasive real-time imaging of soft tissues sheds new light on visualization of trigger points, explaining the effect of trigger point injection by blockade of peripheral nerves, and minimizing the complications of blind injection.

  15. A New Look at Trigger Point Injections

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Clara S. M.; Wong, Steven H. S.

    2012-01-01

    Trigger point injections are commonly practised pain interventional techniques. However, there is still lack of objective diagnostic criteria for trigger points. The mechanisms of action of trigger point injection remain obscure and its efficacy remains heterogeneous. The advent of ultrasound technology in the noninvasive real-time imaging of soft tissues sheds new light on visualization of trigger points, explaining the effect of trigger point injection by blockade of peripheral nerves, and minimizing the complications of blind injection. PMID:21969825

  16. Suicide Triggers Described by Herodotus

    PubMed Central

    Auchincloss, Stephane; Ahmadi, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to better understand the triggers of suicide, particularly among the ancient Greek and Persian soldiers and commanders. Method: ‘Herodotus:TheHistories’ is a history of the rulers and soldiery who participated in the Greco-Persian wars (492-449 BCE). A new translation (2013) of this manuscript was studied. Accounts of suicide were collected and collated, with descriptions of circumstances, methods, and probable triggers. Results: Nine accounts of suicide were identified. Eight of these were named individuals (4 Greeks and 4 Persians); of whom, seven were male. Only one (not the female) appeared to act in response to a mental disorder. Other triggers of suicide included guilt, avoidance of dishonour/punishment and altruism. Cutting/ stabbing was the most common method; others included hanging, jumping, poison, and burning (the single female). Conclusion: While soldiers at a time of war do not reflect the general community, they are nevertheless members of their society. Thus, this evidence demonstrates that suicide triggered by burdensome circumstances (in addition to mental disorder) was known to the Greek and Persian people more than two millennia ago. PMID:27437010

  17. Triggering Reform at Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    An intriguing experiment is afoot in some of the nation's struggling public schools. New "Parent Trigger" laws passed in California and on the agenda in New York, Ohio, Colorado, and Chicago, allow parents of chronically failing schools to unseat the schools' leadership and staff. But the initiative has pitfalls. It's easy to mobilize…

  18. The use of optically triggered, high gain GaAs switches for UWB pulse generation

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Zutavern, F.J.; O`Malley, M.W.; Gallegos, R.R.; Helgeson, W.D.

    1994-04-01

    A high peak power impulse pulser that is controlled with high gain, optically triggered GaAs Photoconductive Semiconductor Switches (PCSS) has been constructed and tested. The system has a short 50 {Omega} line that is charged to 100 kV and discharged through the switch when the switch is triggered with as little as 90 nJ of laser energy. The laser that is used is a small laser diode array whose output is delivered through a fiber to the switch. The current in the system ranges from 1 kA (with one laser) to 1.3 kA (with two) and the pulse widths are 1.9 and 1.4 ns, respectively. The peak power and the energy delivered to the load are 50 MW to 84 MW and 95 NJ to 120 mJ for one or two lasers. The small trigger energy and switch jitter are due to a high gain switching mechanism in GaAs. This experiment also shows a relationship between the rise time of the voltage across the switch and the required trigger energy and switch jitter.

  19. Prospect of triggering the 178m2Hf isomer and the role of resonance conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpeshin, F. F.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.; Zhang, J.

    2009-03-01

    A mechanism of triggering the 12.7keV E3 transition, based on the new decay mode of the 31y isomer via resonance internal conversion and emission of a 1.4keV X-ray quantum, is considered. Actually, this decay mode was observed previously in the decay of 45- and 46-fold ions of 125Te . For the purpose of triggering, the atomic radiative vertex has to be induced by resonance radiation. This mechanism makes triggering by an order of magnitude more efficient than triggering a bare nucleus, and is achieved at a lower combination frequency. An experiment is proposed for the direct observation of the new decay mode. This also offers a new way of resonance scattering of these X-rays. Triggering through higher-lying 2573 and 2805keV states is also considered. The results are extended to the general problem of triggering. The main obstacle for enhancing the efficiency is a high internal conversion rate. For this reason, shape isomers with low multipole order -- E1 , M1 , and with a high enough energy of triggering transition are of interest for triggering. The partial ionization of the outer electrons will also help. The same recommendations hold for triggering isomers in laser-produced plasma.

  20. Laser Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauger, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes lasers and indicates that learning about laser technology and creating laser technology activities are among the teacher enhancement processes needed to strengthen technology education. (JOW)

  1. Laser Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauger, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes lasers and indicates that learning about laser technology and creating laser technology activities are among the teacher enhancement processes needed to strengthen technology education. (JOW)

  2. Laser apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepf, G. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A laser apparatus having a pump laser device for producing pump laser energy upon being excited is disclosed. The pump laser device has a resonating cavity for oscillating and amplifying the pump laser energy. A source laser device is used for producing source laser energy upon being excited by the pump laser energy. The source laser device has a resonating cavity for oscillating and amplifying the source laser energy. The source laser's resonating cavity is coupled within a portion of the pump laser's resonating cavity.

  3. Remote electrical arc suppression by laser filamentation.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Elise; Mongin, Denis; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2015-11-02

    We investigate the interaction of narrow plasma channels formed in the filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses, with a DC high voltage. The laser filaments prevent electrical arcs by triggering corona that neutralize the high-voltage electrodes. This phenomenon, that relies on the electric field modulation and free electron release around the filament, opens new prospects to lightning and over-voltage mitigation.

  4. Improved quality of intrafraction kilovoltage images by triggered readout of unexposed frames

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Jonassen, Johnny; Jensen, Carsten; Schmidt, Mai Lykkegaard

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The gantry-mounted kilovoltage (kV) imager of modern linear accelerators can be used for real-time tumor localization during radiation treatment delivery. However, the kV image quality often suffers from cross-scatter from the megavoltage (MV) treatment beam. This study investigates readout of unexposed kV frames as a means to improve the kV image quality in a series of experiments and a theoretical model of the observed image quality improvements. Methods: A series of fluoroscopic images were acquired of a solid water phantom with an embedded gold marker and an air cavity with and without simultaneous radiation of the phantom with a 6 MV beam delivered perpendicular to the kV beam with 300 and 600 monitor units per minute (MU/min). An in-house built device triggered readout of zero, one, or multiple unexposed frames between the kV exposures. The unexposed frames contained part of the MV scatter, consequently reducing the amount of MV scatter accumulated in the exposed frames. The image quality with and without unexposed frame readout was quantified as the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the gold marker and air cavity for a range of imaging frequencies from 1 to 15 Hz. To gain more insight into the observed CNR changes, the image lag of the kV imager was measured and used as input in a simple model that describes the CNR with unexposed frame readout in terms of the contrast, kV noise, and MV noise measured without readout of unexposed frames. Results: Without readout of unexposed kV frames, the quality of intratreatment kV images decreased dramatically with reduced kV frequencies due to MV scatter. The gold marker was only visible for imaging frequencies ≥3 Hz at 300 MU/min and ≥5 Hz for 600 MU/min. Visibility of the air cavity required even higher imaging frequencies. Readout of multiple unexposed frames ensured visibility of both structures at all imaging frequencies and a CNR that was independent of the kV frame rate. The image lag was 12.2%, 2

  5. Method for triggering an action

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Bartholomew, David B.; Johnson, Monte L.; Moon, Justin; Koehler, Roger O.

    2006-10-17

    A method for triggering an action of at least one downhole device on a downhole network integrated into a downhole tool string synchronized to an event comprises determining latency, sending a latency adjusted signal, and performing the action. The latency is determined between a control device and the at least one downhole device. The latency adjusted signal for triggering an action is sent to the downhole device. The action is performed downhole synchronized to the event. A preferred method for determining latency comprises the steps: a control device sends a first signal to the downhole device; after receiving the signal, the downhole device sends a response signal to the control device; and the control device analyzes the time from sending the signal to receiving the response signal.

  6. The CDF silicon vertex trigger

    SciTech Connect

    B. Ashmanskas; A. Barchiesi; A. Bardi

    2003-06-23

    The CDF experiment's Silicon Vertex Trigger is a system of 150 custom 9U VME boards that reconstructs axial tracks in the CDF silicon strip detector in a 15 {mu}sec pipeline. SVT's 35 {mu}m impact parameter resolution enables CDF's Level 2 trigger to distinguish primary and secondary particles, and hence to collect large samples of hadronic bottom and charm decays. We review some of SVT's key design features. Speed is achieved with custom VLSI pattern recognition, linearized track fitting, pipelining, and parallel processing. Testing and reliability are aided by built-in logic state analysis and test-data sourcing at each board's input and output, a common inter-board data link, and a universal ''Merger'' board for data fan-in/fan-out. Speed and adaptability are enhanced by use of modern FPGAs.

  7. Triggered optical coherence tomography for capturing rapid periodic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ernest W.; Kobler, James B.; Yun, Seok H.

    2011-07-01

    Quantitative cross-sectional imaging of vocal folds during phonation is potentially useful for diagnosis and treatments of laryngeal disorders. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful technique, but its relatively low frame rates makes it challenging to visualize rapidly vibrating tissues. Here, we demonstrate a novel method based on triggered laser scanning to capture 4-dimensional (4D) images of samples in motu at audio frequencies over 100 Hz. As proof-of-concept experiments, we applied this technique to imaging the oscillations of biopolymer gels on acoustic vibrators and aerodynamically driven vibrations of the vocal fold in an ex vivo calf larynx model. Our results suggest that triggered 4D OCT may be useful in understanding and assessing the function of vocal folds and developing novel treatments in research and clinical settings.

  8. The ALICE high level trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt, T.; Grastveit, G.; Helstrup, H.; Lindenstruth, V.; Loizides, C.; Röhrich, D.; Skaali, B.; Steinbeck, T.; Stock, R.; Tilsner, H.; Ullaland, K.; Vestbø, A.; Vik, T.; Wiebalck, A.; the ALICE Collaboration

    2004-08-01

    The ALICE experiment at LHC will implement a high-level trigger system for online event selection and/or data compression. The largest computing challenge is posed by the TPC detector, which requires real-time pattern recognition. The system entails a very large processing farm that is designed for an anticipated input data stream of 25 GB s-1. In this paper, we present the architecture of the system and the current state of the tracking methods and data compression applications.

  9. The Shootdown of Trigger 4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    this interview to be highly credible. Although young , Cadillac 2A had flown 100 combat missions prior to 29 July, 50 of which were in search of MiGs...north of Phuc Yen. Between Phuc Yen and Thud Ridge. 13:13:15 Trigger 1 White (I) Whoa! What the fuck is that? I hope that was a Thud! 29 13:13:31

  10. Development of autonomous triggering instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Steve E.; Swift, Theresa M.; Fonda, James W.

    2008-03-01

    Triggering instrumentation for autonomous monitoring of load-induced strain is described for economical, fast bridge inspection. The development addresses one aspect for the management of transportation infrastructure - bridge monitoring and inspection. The objectives are to provide quantitative performance information from a load test, to minimize the setup time at the bridge, and to minimize the closure time to traffic. Multiple or networked measurements can be made for a prescribed loading sequence. The proposed smart system consists of in-situ strain sensors, an embedded data acquisition module, and a measurement triggering system. A companion control unit is mounted on the truck serving as the load. As the truck moves to the proper position, the desired measurement is automatically relayed back to the control unit. In this work, the testing protocol is developed and the performance parameters for the triggering and data acquisition are measured. The test system uses a dedicated wireless sensor mote and an infrared positioning system. The electronic procedure offers improvements in available information and economics.

  11. Stimulus conflict triggers behavioral avoidance.

    PubMed

    Dignath, David; Eder, Andreas B

    2015-12-01

    According to a recent extension of the conflict-monitoring theory, conflict between two competing response tendencies is registered as an aversive event and triggers a motivation to avoid the source of conflict. In the present study, we tested this assumption. Over five experiments, we examined whether conflict is associated with an avoidance motivation and whether stimulus conflict or response conflict triggers an avoidance tendency. Participants first performed a color Stroop task. In a subsequent motivation test, participants responded to Stroop stimuli with approach- and avoidance-related lever movements. These results showed that Stroop-conflict stimuli increased the frequency of avoidance responses in a free-choice motivation test, and also increased the speed of avoidance relative to approach responses in a forced-choice test. High and low proportions of response conflict in the Stroop task had no effect on avoidance in the motivation test. Avoidance of conflict was, however, obtained even with new conflict stimuli that had not been presented before in a Stroop task, and when the Stroop task was replaced with an unrelated filler task. Taken together, these results suggest that stimulus conflict is sufficient to trigger avoidance.

  12. Optical Spectra of Triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. D.; Biagi, C. J.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.; Christian, H. J., Jr.

    2009-12-01

    In August 2009, the first optical spectra of triggered lightning flashes were acquired. Data from two triggered lightning flashes were obtained at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in north-central Florida. The spectrometer that was used has an average dispersion of 260 Å/mm resulting in an average resolution of 5 Å when mated to a Photron (SA1.1) high-speed camera. The spectra captured with this system had a free spectral range of 3800-8000 Å. The spectra were captured at 300,000 frames per second. The spectrometer's vertical field of view was 3 m at an altitude 50 m above the launch tower, intended to view the middle of the triggering wire. Preliminary results show that the copper spectrum dominated the earliest part of the flash and copper lines persisted during the total lifetime of the detectable spectrum. Animations over the lifetime of the stroke from the initial wire illumination to multiple return strokes show the evolution of the spectrum. In addition, coordinated high speed channel base current, electric field and imagery measurements of the exploding wire, downward leaders, and return strokes were recorded. Quantitative analysis of the spectral evolution will be discussed in the context of the overall flash development.

  13. CHRONICLE: International forum on advanced high-power lasers and applications (AHPLA '99)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanas'ev, Yurii V.; Zavestovskaya, I. N.; Zvorykin, V. D.; Ionin, Andrei A.; Senatsky, Yu V.; Starodub, Aleksandr N.

    2000-05-01

    A review of reports made on the International Forum on Advanced High-Power Lasers and Applications, which was held at the beginning of November 1999 in Osaka (Japan), is presented. Five conferences were held during the forum on High-Power Laser Ablation, High-Power Lasers in Energy Engineering, High-Power Lasers in Civil Engineering and Architecture, High-Power Lasers in Manufacturing, and Advanced High-Power Lasers. The following trends in the field of high-power lasers and their applications were presented: laser fusion, laser applications in space, laser-triggered lightning, laser ablation of materials by short and ultrashort pulses, application of high-power lasers in manufacturing, application of high-power lasers in mining, laser decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear reactors, high-power solid-state and gas lasers, x-ray and free-electron lasers. One can find complete information on the forum in SPIE, vols. 3885-3889.

  14. Transient immunoreactivity after laser tattoo removal: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Izikson, Leonid; Avram, Mathew; Anderson, R Rox

    2008-04-01

    Laser tattoo removal is one of most commonly used indications for medical lasers. Professional tattoos contain a multitude of potentially immunogenic chemicals that are released or modified by laser treatment. We studied potential immunologic reactions following laser tattoo removal. Case report of two patients with immunologic reactions after laser tattoo removal. Two patients developed transient immunoreactivity that presented as regional lymphadenopathy after laser tattoo removal of professional black and blue-green tattoos. These reactions resolved without any complications. Tattoo pigments released or modified by laser therapy may trigger transient immunoreactivity in susceptible individuals.

  15. Method and system for communicating with a laser power driver

    DOEpatents

    Telford, Steven

    2017-07-18

    A system for controlling a plurality of laser diodes includes an optical transmitter coupled to the laser diode driver for each laser diode. An optical signal including bi-phase encoded data is provided to each laser diode driver. The optical signal includes current level and pulse duration information at which each of the diodes is to be driven. Upon receiving a trigger signal, the laser diode drivers operate the laser diodes using the current level and pulse duration information to output a laser beam.

  16. Guidance system for laser targets

    DOEpatents

    Porter, Gary D.; Bogdanoff, Anatoly

    1978-01-01

    A system for guiding charged laser targets to a predetermined focal spot of a laser along generally arbitrary, and especially horizontal, directions which comprises a series of electrostatic sensors which provide inputs to a computer for real time calculation of position, velocity, and direction of the target along an initial injection trajectory, and a set of electrostatic deflection means, energized according to a calculated output of said computer, to change the target trajectory to intercept the focal spot of the laser which is triggered so as to illuminate the target of the focal spot.

  17. Laser Safety Evaluation of the MILES and Mini MILES Laser Emitting Components

    SciTech Connect

    AUGUSTONI, ARNOLD L.

    2002-02-02

    Laser safety evaluation and output emission measurements were performed (during October and November 2001) on SNL MILES and Mini MILES laser emitting components. The purpose, to verify that these components, not only meet the Class 1 (eye safe) laser hazard criteria of the CDRH Compliance Guide for Laser Products and 21 CFR 1040 Laser Product Performance Standard; but also meet the more stringent ANSI Std. z136.1-2000 Safe Use of Lasers conditions for Class 1 lasers that govern SNL laser operations. The results of these measurements confirmed that all of the Small Arms Laser Transmitters, as currently set (''as is''), meet the Class 1 criteria. Several of the Mini MILES Small Arms Transmitters did not. These were modified and re-tested and now meet the Class 1 laser hazard criteria. All but one System Controllers (hand held and rifle stock) met class 1 criteria for single trigger pulls and all presented Class 3a laser hazard levels if the trigger is held (continuous emission) for more than 5 seconds on a single point target. All units were Class 3a for ''aided'' viewing. These units were modified and re-tested and now meet the Class 1 hazard criteria for both ''aided'' as well as ''unaided'' viewing. All the Claymore Mine laser emitters tested are laser hazard Class 1 for both ''aided'' as well as ''unaided'' viewing.

  18. Efficient Distribution of Triggered Synchronous Block Diagrams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-21

    called a trigger. At a given synchronous step, if the trigger is true , the block fires normally; otherwise, the block stutters , that is, keeps its...trigger is false, no updates are made and the values written at the outputs are the same as in the previous step (i.e., the process “ stutters ”). All

  19. Psychological triggers and hyperventilation symptoms in asthma.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Thomas; Kullowatz, Antje; Bobb, Carol; Dahme, Bernhard; Magnussen, Helgo; Kanniess, Frank; Steptoe, Andrew

    2008-05-01

    Anecdotal accounts have identified hyperventilation as one route through which psychological factors can trigger bronchoconstriction. However, little is known about the empirical association between psychological and other trigger factors and hyperventilation in asthma exacerbations. To study the cross-sectional association between perceived triggers and hyperventilation symptoms in 1 British and 1 German sample of patients with asthma who were recruited from the community and from primary care clinics. Patients completed relevant language versions of the Asthma Trigger Inventory and the Asthma Symptom Checklist. After controlling for demographics and asthma severity, perceived asthma triggers measured by subscales of the Asthma Trigger Inventory explained 12.5% to 37.3% of the variance in Asthma Symptom Checklist hyperventilation-hypocapnia symptoms. Psychological triggers accounted for 10.6% to 26.7% of the variance alone and 4.3% to 11.0% of the variance over and above other trigger factors. In contrast, perceived animal and pollen allergen triggers did not contribute unique variance to the hyperventilation symptom report. Psychological triggers did not explain variance in classic airway obstruction symptoms, thus arguing against a general bias toward inflated symptom reports in patients with psychologically induced asthma. Differences in perceived asthma triggers are substantially associated with hyperventilation symptoms, and patients with more frequent psychological triggers also tend to report that they experience more hyperventilation symptoms during their asthma symptom episodes.

  20. Externally triggered imaging technique for microbolometer-type terahertz imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Naoki; Sudou, Takayuki; Ishi, Tsutomu; Okubo, Syuichi; Isoyama, Goro; Irizawa, Akinori; Kawase, Keigo; Kato, Ryukou

    2016-04-01

    The authors developed terahertz (THz) imager which incorporates 320x240 focal plane array (FPA) with enhanced sensitivity in sub-THz region (ca. 0.5 THz). The imager includes functions such as external-trigger imaging, lock-in imaging, beam profiling and so on. The function of the external-trigger imaging is mainly described in this paper, which was verified in combination of the THz imager with the pulsed THz free electron laser (THz-FEL) developed by Osaka University. The THz-FEL emits THz radiation in a wavelength range of 25 - 150 μm at repetition rates of 2.5, 3.3, 5.0 and 10 pulses per second. The external trigger pulse for the THz imager was generated with a pulse generator, using brightening pulse for THz-FEL. A series of pulses emitted by the THz-FEL at 86 μm were introduced to the THz imager and Joule meter via beam splitter, so that the output signal of THz imager was normalized with the output of the Joule meter and the stability of the THz radiation from FEL was also monitored. The normalized output signals of THz imager (digits/μJ) obtained at the repetition rates mentioned above were found consistent with one another. The timing-relation of the external trigger pulse to the brightening pulse was varied and the influence of the timing-relation on beam pattern is presented. These experimental results verify that the external trigger imaging function operates correctly.

  1. Infrasonic Observations from Triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arechiga, R. O.; Johnson, J. B.; Edens, H. E.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.; Eack, K.; Eastvedt, E. M.

    2009-12-01

    We measured acoustic signals during both triggered and natural lightning. A comparative analysis of simultaneous data from the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), acoustic measurements and digital high-speed photography operating in the same area was made. Acoustic emissions, providing quantitative estimates of acoustic power and spectral content, will complement coincident investigations, such as X-ray emissions. Most cloud-to-ground lightning flashes lower negative charge to ground, but flashes that lower positive charge to ground are often unusually destructive and are less understood. The New Mexico Tech Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) locates the sources of impulsive RF radiation produced by lightning flashes in three spatial dimensions and time, operating in the 60 - 66 MHz television band. However, positive breakdown is rarely detected by the LMA and positive leader channels are outlined only by recoil events. Positive cloud-to-ground (CG) channels are usually not mapped (or partially mapped because they may have recoil events). Acoustic and electric field instruments are a good complement to the LMA, since they can detect both negative and positive leaders. An array of five stations was deployed during the Summer of 2009 (July 20 to August 13) in the Magdalena mountains of New Mexico, to monitor infrasound (below 20 Hz) and audio range sources due to natural and triggered lightning. The stations were located at close (57 m), medium (303 and 537 m) and far (1403 and 2556 m) distances surrounding the triggering site. Each station consisted of five sensors, one infrasonic and one in the audio range at the center, and three infrasonic in a triangular configuration. This research will provide a more complete picture, and provide further insight into the nature of lightning.

  2. Holin triggering in real time.

    PubMed

    White, Rebecca; Chiba, Shinobu; Pang, Ting; Dewey, Jill S; Savva, Christos G; Holzenburg, Andreas; Pogliano, Kit; Young, Ry

    2011-01-11

    During λ infections, the holin S105 accumulates harmlessly in the membrane until, at an allele-specific time, suddenly triggering to form irregular holes of unprecedented size (>300 nm), releasing the endolysin from the cytoplasm, resulting in lysis within seconds. Here we used a functional S105-GFP chimera and real-time deconvolution fluorescence microscopy to show that the S105-GFP fusion accumulated in a uniformly distributed fashion, until suddenly, within 1 min, it formed aggregates, or rafts, at the time of lethal triggering. Moreover, the isogenic fusion to a nonlethal S105 mutant remained uniformly distributed, whereas a fusion to an early-lysing mutant showed early triggering and early raft formation. Protein accumulation rates of the WT, early, and nonlethal alleles were identical. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) revealed that the nonlethal mutant and untriggered WT hybrids were highly mobile in the membrane, whereas the WT raft was essentially immobile. Finally, an antiholin allele, S105(ΔTMD1)-mcherryfp, in the product of which the S105 sequence deleted for the first transmembrane domain was fused to mCherryFP. This hybrid retained full antiholin activity, in that it blocked lethal hole formation by the S105-GFP fusion, accumulated uniformly throughout the host membrane and prevented the S105-GFP protein from forming rafts. These findings suggest that phage lysis occurs when the holin reaches a critical concentration and nucleates to form rafts, analogous to the initiation of purple membrane formation after the induction of bacteriorhodopsin in halobacteria. This model for holin function may be relevant for processes in mammalian cells, including the release of nonenveloped viruses and apoptosis.

  3. Holin triggering in real time

    PubMed Central

    White, Rebecca; Chiba, Shinobu; Pang, Ting; Dewey, Jill S.; Savva, Christos G.; Holzenburg, Andreas; Pogliano, Kit; Young, Ry

    2011-01-01

    During λ infections, the holin S105 accumulates harmlessly in the membrane until, at an allele-specific time, suddenly triggering to form irregular holes of unprecedented size (>300 nm), releasing the endolysin from the cytoplasm, resulting in lysis within seconds. Here we used a functional S105–GFP chimera and real-time deconvolution fluorescence microscopy to show that the S105–GFP fusion accumulated in a uniformly distributed fashion, until suddenly, within 1 min, it formed aggregates, or rafts, at the time of lethal triggering. Moreover, the isogenic fusion to a nonlethal S105 mutant remained uniformly distributed, whereas a fusion to an early-lysing mutant showed early triggering and early raft formation. Protein accumulation rates of the WT, early, and nonlethal alleles were identical. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) revealed that the nonlethal mutant and untriggered WT hybrids were highly mobile in the membrane, whereas the WT raft was essentially immobile. Finally, an antiholin allele, S105ΔTMD1–mcherryfp, in the product of which the S105 sequence deleted for the first transmembrane domain was fused to mCherryFP. This hybrid retained full antiholin activity, in that it blocked lethal hole formation by the S105–GFP fusion, accumulated uniformly throughout the host membrane and prevented the S105–GFP protein from forming rafts. These findings suggest that phage lysis occurs when the holin reaches a critical concentration and nucleates to form rafts, analogous to the initiation of purple membrane formation after the induction of bacteriorhodopsin in halobacteria. This model for holin function may be relevant for processes in mammalian cells, including the release of nonenveloped viruses and apoptosis. PMID:21187415

  4. Dynamic Triggering of Microseismic Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H.; Van der Baan, M.

    2015-12-01

    Microseismic events are commonly recorded during hydraulic fracturing experiments. In microseismic interpretations, each event is often regarded as independent and uncorrelated to neighboring ones. In reality, both the rock deformation (static stresses) and transient wave motion (dynamic stresses) associated with microseismic events add to the stress field together with the external loading (fluid injection). We believe the resulting static and dynamic stress perturbations will influence both the timing and spatial evolution of the microseismic cloud. We study the dynamic triggering of microseismicity using numerical simulations of a biaxial deformation test by means of a bonded particle method (Potyondy and Cundall, 2004), where crack development can be tracked and analyzed independently. Our methodology is to compare the stress changes due to one specific event with the occurrence of the next few events in the numerical simulations. In addition, we compute the dynamic stress perturbations for recorded large events analytically given their (non-double couple) failure mechanisms. Our results show that cracks following a major event tend to form in zones affected by the dynamic stresses by promoting new failure in areas that are critically stressed. This confirms that dynamic triggering during hydraulic fracturing operations but also larger scale seismicity is likely. It also demonstrates the often complex interplay between the dynamic and static stress changes and their effect on the temporal and spatial evolution of rock deformation at all scales.

  5. Luminous pulses during triggered lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, W. P.; Eastvedt, E. M.; Trueblood, J. J.; Eack, K. B.; Edens, H. E.; Aulich, G. D.; Hunyady, S. J.; Murray, W. C.

    2012-05-01

    A triggered lightning flash that transferred negative charge to ground in central New Mexico produced more than three levels of branching above the main channel to ground in a 1 km vertical field of view. A high-speed video recording shows that the main channel had about 50 brief luminous pulses, many of which were superimposed on a slowly changing persistent luminosity. In contrast, superposition was rare in the uppermost visible branches because luminous pulses first appeared on preexisting dark channels before merging into a luminous channel. This observation suggests that luminous pulses in triggered and natural lightning originate only on dark branches and that the complexity of the main channel to ground is the result of multiple mergers of dark branches with pulses into luminous branches without pulses. This suggestion is contrary to an earlier conclusion that there are two kinds of luminous pulses. We also observe behavior characteristic of electromagnetic waves on transmission lines: when a downward propagating luminous pulse reaches a junction with another initially dark branch, it travels both upward and downward along that branch. Upon reaching the ground the downward propagating wave produces a bright reflection which also splits at the junctions, producing luminosity for a short distance upward in one direction while propagating much farther upward along the path charged by the downward propagating wave. However, when a downward moving luminous pulse reaches a junction with an initially luminous branch, splitting is not evident, probably due to the greater conductivity of the luminous channel.

  6. High-Power Thyratron-Type Switch For Laser Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkman, George F.; Hartmann, Werner; Hsu, Tseng-Yang; Liou, Rong L.; Gundersen, Martin A.; Ingwersen, Pete; Merz, Spencer S.

    1989-04-01

    A review of recent progress in the development of the low-pressure (~27 Pa H2) glow discharge pulsed high-power (10~30kV) switch, the Back-Lighted Thyratron (BLT), is to be presented. The BLT operates with a glow discharge and utilizes a simple device geometry. New data on peak current capability, current rise rate, current reversal ability, life, repetition rate operation, and trigger efficiency and comparisons of delay and jitter with different trigger methods (flash-triggered, laser-triggered and electrically-triggered) are reported.

  7. Inertial confinement fusion based on the ion-bubble trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Jafari, S. Nilkar, M.; Ghasemizad, A.; Mehdian, H.

    2014-10-15

    Triggering the ion-bubble in an inertial confinement fusion, we have developed a novel scheme for the fast ignition. This scheme relies on the plasma cavitation by the wake of an intense laser pulse to generate an ion-bubble. The bubble acts both as an intense electron accelerator and as an electron wiggler. Consequently, the accelerated electrons trapped in the bubble can emit an intense tunable laser light. This light can be absorbed by an ablation layer on the outside surface of the ignition capsule, which subsequently drills it and thereby produces a guide channel in the pellet. Finally, the relativistic electron beam created in the bubble is guided through the channel to the high density core igniting the fusion fuel. The normalized beam intensity and beam energy required for triggering the ignition have been calculated when core is heated by the e-beam. In addition, through solving the momentum transfer, continuity and wave equations, a dispersion relation for the electromagnetic and space-charge waves has been analytically derived. The variations of growth rate with the ion-bubble density and electron beam energy have been illustrated. It is found that the growth rates of instability are significantly controlled by the ions concentration and the e-beam energy in the bubble.

  8. Remotely Triggered Scaffolds for Controlled Release of Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Paul; McGarvey, David J.; Lees, Martin R.; Hoskins, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Fe3O4-Au hybrid nanoparticles (HNPs) have shown increasing potential for biomedical applications such as image guided stimuli responsive drug delivery. Incorporation of the unique properties of HNPs into thermally responsive scaffolds holds great potential for future biomedical applications. Here we successfully fabricated smart scaffolds based on thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNiPAM). Nanoparticles providing localized trigger of heating when irradiated with a short laser burst were found to give rise to remote control of bulk polymer shrinkage. Gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized using wet chemical precipitation methods followed by electrochemical coating. After subsequent functionalization of particles with allyl methyl sulfide, mercaptodecane, cysteamine and poly(ethylene glycol) thiol to enhance stability, detailed biological safety was determined using live/dead staining and cell membrane integrity studies through lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) quantification. The PEG coated HNPs did not show significant cytotoxic effect or adverse cellular response on exposure to 7F2 cells (p < 0.05) and were carried forward for scaffold incorporation. The pNiPAM-HNP composite scaffolds were investigated for their potential as thermally triggered systems using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. These studies show that incorporation of HNPs resulted in scaffold deformation after very short irradiation times (seconds) due to internal structural heating. Our data highlights the potential of these hybrid-scaffold constructs for exploitation in drug delivery, using methylene blue as a model drug being released during remote structural change of the scaffold. PMID:23603890

  9. Laser-based ion sources for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Brantov, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    Interaction of relativistic short laser pulses with thin foils is studied by using 3D PIC simulations in the context of ICAN's "dream laser". It is shown that such a laser will make it possible to accelerate protons and deuterons to multi-MeV energies with a current density of 100 A/cm2. The laser-triggered hadron beams may trigger nuclear reactions of interest for nuclear medicine and pharmacy. As an example, the yields C-11 for PET, of Tc-99m for SPECT, and neutrons for therapy have been analyzed.

  10. The solid state detector technology for picosecond laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prochazka, Ivan

    1993-01-01

    We developed an all solid state laser ranging detector technology, which makes the goal of millimeter accuracy achievable. Our design and construction philosophy is to combine the techniques of single photon ranging, ultrashort laser pulses, and fast fixed threshold discrimination while avoiding any analog signal processing within the laser ranging chain. The all solid state laser ranging detector package consists of the START detector and the STOP solid state photon counting module. Both the detectors are working in an optically triggered avalanche switching regime. The optical signal is triggering an avalanche current buildup which results in the generation of a uniform, fast risetime output pulse.

  11. Earthquake Simulator Finds Tremor Triggers

    ScienceCinema

    Johnson, Paul

    2016-07-12

    Using a novel device that simulates earthquakes in a laboratory setting, a Los Alamos researcher has found that seismic waves-the sounds radiated from earthquakes-can induce earthquake aftershocks, often long after a quake has subsided. The research provides insight into how earthquakes may be triggered and how they recur. Los Alamos researcher Paul Johnson and colleague Chris Marone at Penn State have discovered how wave energy can be stored in certain types of granular materials-like the type found along certain fault lines across the globe-and how this stored energy can suddenly be released as an earthquake when hit by relatively small seismic waves far beyond the traditional “aftershock zone” of a main quake. Perhaps most surprising, researchers have found that the release of energy can occur minutes, hours, or even days after the sound waves pass; the cause of the delay remains a tantalizing mystery.

  12. Earthquake Simulator Finds Tremor Triggers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Paul

    2015-03-27

    Using a novel device that simulates earthquakes in a laboratory setting, a Los Alamos researcher has found that seismic waves-the sounds radiated from earthquakes-can induce earthquake aftershocks, often long after a quake has subsided. The research provides insight into how earthquakes may be triggered and how they recur. Los Alamos researcher Paul Johnson and colleague Chris Marone at Penn State have discovered how wave energy can be stored in certain types of granular materials-like the type found along certain fault lines across the globe-and how this stored energy can suddenly be released as an earthquake when hit by relatively small seismic waves far beyond the traditional “aftershock zone” of a main quake. Perhaps most surprising, researchers have found that the release of energy can occur minutes, hours, or even days after the sound waves pass; the cause of the delay remains a tantalizing mystery.

  13. Starburst Triggering and Environmental Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, F.

    Introduction Stability of a two-fluid medium Mechanisms to trigger starbursts Dynamical mechanisms: non-axisymmetry and torques Angular momentum transfer for the stellar component Angular momentum transfer for the gas component feedback and self-regulation Fueling activity by bars The inner Lindblad resonance Nuclear disks and nuclear bars Bar destruction through mass concentration Gas-dominated central disk Environmental effects Numerical codes and gas modelling Star-formation processes Formation of large complexes Lessons from mergers Gas morphology in mergers Tidal tails and dark matter Ring galaxies Groups and clusters Rich clusters Galaxy evolution Evolution along the hubble sequence Fragility of disks Evolution at high redshift Gas and dark matter Hot gas in rich clusters Self-gravity and fractal structure of the ISM Conclusion

  14. CDF level 2 trigger upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Anikeev, K.; Bogdan, M.; DeMaat, R.; Fedorko, W.; Frisch, H.; Hahn, K.; Hakala, M.; Keener, P.; Kim, Y.; Kroll, J.; Kwang, S.; Lewis, J.; Lin, C.; Liu, T.; Marjamaa, F.; Mansikkala, T.; Neu, C.; Pitkanen, S.; Reisert, B.; Rusu, V.; Sanders, H.; /Fermilab /Chicago U. /Pennsylvania U.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the new CDF Level 2 Trigger, which was commissioned during Spring 2005. The upgrade was necessitated by several factors that included increased bandwidth requirements, in view of the growing instantaneous luminosity of the Tevatron, and the need for a more robust system, since the older system was reaching the limits of maintainability. The challenges in designing the new system were interfacing with many different upstream detector subsystems, processing larger volumes of data at higher speed, and minimizing the impact on running the CDF experiment during the system commissioning phase. To meet these challenges, the new system was designed around a general purpose motherboard, the PULSAR, which is instrumented with powerful FPGAs and modern SRAMs, and which uses mezzanine cards to interface with upstream detector components and an industry standard data link (S-LINK) within the system.

  15. Documentation of myofascial trigger points.

    PubMed

    Fischer, A A

    1988-04-01

    Two basic diagnostic features of myofascial trigger points (TPs), namely, local tenderness and alteration of tissue consistency (such as in taut bands, muscle spasm), can be documented quantitatively by simple hand-held instruments. A pressure threshold meter (algometer) assists in location of TPs and their relative sensitivity. A side-to-side difference exceeding 2kg in comparison with normal values indicates pathologic tenderness. The effect of treatment can be quantified. Pressure tolerance, measured over normal muscles and shin bones, expresses pain sensitivity. Myopathy is suspected if muscle tolerance drops below bone tolerance. Tissue compliance measurement documents objectively and quantitatively alteration in soft tissue consistency. Muscle spasm, tension, spasticity, taut bands, scar tissues, or fibrositic nodules can be documented. The universal clinical dynamometer is used as part of a physical examination to quantify weakness. Thermography (heat imaging) demonstrates discoid shaped hot spots over TPs. Muscle activity, spasm, or contraction is visualized as increased heat emission in the shape of the active muscle.

  16. Landslide triggering by rain infiltration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2000-01-01

    Landsliding in response to rainfall involves physical processes that operate on disparate timescales. Relationships between these timescales guide development of a mathematical model that uses reduced forms of Richards equation to evaluate effects of rainfall infiltration on landslide occurrence, timing, depth, and acceleration in diverse situations. The longest pertinent timescale is A/D0, where D0 is the maximum hydraulic diffusivity of the soil and A is the catchment area that potentially affects groundwater pressures at a prospective landslide slip surface location with areal coordinates x, y and depth H. Times greater than A/D0 are necessary for establishment of steady background water pressures that develop at (x, y, H) in response to rainfall averaged over periods that commonly range from days to many decades. These steady groundwater pressures influence the propensity for landsliding at (x, y, H), but they do not trigger slope failure. Failure results from rainfall over a typically shorter timescale H2/D0 associated with transient pore pressure transmission during and following storms. Commonly, this timescale ranges from minutes to months. The shortest timescale affecting landslide responses to rainfall is √(H/g), where g is the magnitude of gravitational acceleration. Postfailure landslide motion occurs on this timescale, which indicates that the thinnest landslides accelerate most quickly if all other factors are constant. Effects of hydrologic processes on landslide processes across these diverse timescales are encapsulated by a response function, R(t*) = √(t*/π) exp (-1/t*) - erfc (1/√t*), which depends only on normalized time, t*. Use of R(t*) in conjunction with topographic data, rainfall intensity and duration information, an infinite-slope failure criterion, and Newton's second law predicts the timing, depth, and acceleration of rainfall-triggered landslides. Data from contrasting landslides that exhibit rapid, shallow motion and slow, deep

  17. Diet and Dermatitis: Food Triggers

    PubMed Central

    Schlichte, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Given increasing awareness of the link between diet and health, many patients are concerned that dietary factors may trigger dermatitis. Research has found that dietary factors can indeed exacerbate atopic dermatitis or cause dermatitis due to systemic contact dermatitis. In atopic dermatitis, dietary factors are more likely to cause an exacerbation among infants or children with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis relative to other populations. Foods may trigger rapid, immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity reactions or may lead to late eczematous reactions. While immediate reactions occur within minutes to hours of food exposure, late eczematous reactions may occur anywhere from hours to two days later. Screening methods, such as food allergen-specific serum immunoglobulin E tests or skin prick tests, can identify sensitization to specific foods, but a diagnosis of food allergy requires specific signs and symptoms that occur reproducibly upon food exposure. Many patients who are sensitized will not develop clinical findings upon food exposure; therefore, these tests may result in false-positive tests for food allergy. This is why the gold standard for diagnosis remains the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge. In another condition, systemic contact dermatitis, ingestion of a specific food can actually cause dermatitis. Systemic contact dermatitis is a distinct T-cell mediated immunological reaction in which dietary exposure to specific allergens results in dermatitis. Balsam of Peru and nickel are well-known causes of systemic contact dermatitis, and reports have implicated multiple other allergens. This review seeks to increase awareness of important food allergens, elucidate their relationship with atopic dermatitis and systemic contact dermatitis, and review available diagnostic and treatment strategies. PMID:24688624

  18. Disaster triggers disaster: Earthquake triggering by tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowinski, S.; Tsukanov, I.

    2011-12-01

    Three recent devastating earthquakes, the 1999 M=7.6 Chi-Chi (Taiwan), 2010 M=7.0 Leogane (Haiti), 2010 M=6.4 Kaohsiung (Taiwan), and additional three moderate size earthquakes (66 earthquake that occurred in the central mountainous area of Taiwan within three years after the typhoon. The 2009 Morakot typhoon was followed by 2009 M=6.2 Nantou and 2010 M=6.4 Kaohsiung earthquakes; the 1969 Flossie typhoon was followed by an M=6.3 earthquake in 1972; and the 1996 Herb typhoon by the 1998 M=6.2 Rueyli and 1999 M=7.6 Chi-Chi earthquakes. The earthquake catalog of Taiwan lists only two other M>6 main-shocks that occurred in Taiwan's central mountainous belt, one of them was in 1964 only four months after the wet Typhoon Gloria poured heavy rain in the same area. We suggest that the close proximity in time and space between wet tropical cyclones and earthquakes reflects a physical link between the two hazard types in which these earthquakes were triggered by rapid erosion induced by tropical cyclone's heavy rain. Based on remote sensing observations, meshfree finite element modeling, and Coulomb failure stress analysis, we show that the

  19. Triggers of oral lichen planus flares and the potential role of trigger avoidance in disease management.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hannah X; Blasiak, Rachel; Kim, Edwin; Padilla, Ricardo; Culton, Donna A

    2017-09-01

    Many patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) report triggers of flares, some of which overlap with triggers of other oral diseases, including oral allergy syndrome and oral contact dermatitis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of commonly reported triggers of OLP flares, their overlap with triggers of other oral diseases, and the potential role of trigger avoidance as a management strategy. Questionnaire-based survey of 51 patients with biopsy-proven lichen planus with oral involvement seen in an academic dermatology specialty clinic and/or oral pathology clinic between June 2014 and June 2015. Of the participants, 94% identified at least one trigger of their OLP flares. Approximately half of the participants (51%) reported at least one trigger that overlapped with known triggers of oral allergy syndrome, and 63% identified at least one trigger that overlapped with known triggers of oral contact dermatitis. Emotional stress was the most commonly reported trigger (77%). Regarding avoidance, 79% of the study participants reported avoiding their known triggers in daily life. Of those who actively avoided triggers, 89% reported an improvement in symptoms and 70% reported a decrease in the frequency of flares. Trigger identification and avoidance can play a potentially effective role in the management of OLP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Smart trigger logic for focal plane arrays

    DOEpatents

    Levy, James E; Campbell, David V; Holmes, Michael L; Lovejoy, Robert; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kay, Randolph R; Cavanaugh, William S; Gurrieri, Thomas M

    2014-03-25

    An electronic device includes a memory configured to receive data representing light intensity values from pixels in a focal plane array and a processor that analyzes the received data to determine which light values correspond to triggered pixels, where the triggered pixels are those pixels that meet a predefined set of criteria, and determines, for each triggered pixel, a set of neighbor pixels for which light intensity values are to be stored. The electronic device also includes a buffer that temporarily stores light intensity values for at least one previously processed row of pixels, so that when a triggered pixel is identified in a current row, light intensity values for the neighbor pixels in the previously processed row and for the triggered pixel are persistently stored, as well as a data transmitter that transmits the persistently stored light intensity values for the triggered and neighbor pixels to a data receiver.

  1. The LHCb trigger: Algorithms and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Hugo; LHCb Collaboration

    2010-11-01

    This article describes the hardware architecture of the LHCb trigger system, as well as the algorithms that it executes in order to identify the relevant B meson decays. The expected performance on simulated data and the trigger commissioning status and plans are also presented. The LHCb trigger consists of two phases: the Level 0 and the High Level Trigger. The former is synchronous and implemented in custom electronics, and it reduces the rate to 1 MHz. The High Level Trigger is a C++ algorithm running in a farm of about 1000 16-core computing nodes and further reducing the rate to 2 kHz. The Level 0 efficiency computed on B meson events that would be offline-selected range between 90% for decays containing muons and 50% for purely hadronic decays, the later suffering from higher light quark backgrounds. Overall High Level Trigger efficiencies range between 60% and 80%.

  2. Long Pulse Narrowband XeCl Laser Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-15

    longest pulse width obtained with an e-beam pumped excimer laser . The kinetics processes of the long pulse narrowband were investigated by measurements...electrically triggered switch driven by a small Marx bank which produces the high voltage trigger required. This allows a high standoff voltage and...Phys. Lett 45, p. 507 (1984). 13 M. W. Taylor, J. Goldhar, and J. R. Murray, "Dylux: an instant image photographic material suitable for UV laser beam

  3. System for rapidly tuning a low pressure pulsed laser

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.A.; Ahl, J.L.

    1989-09-19

    This patent describes a system for rapidly tuning a low pressure pulsed laser over multiple wavelengths. The system comprising: a low pressure one electrode pair discharge region in a laser cavity having a laser trigger means connected to the electrode pair for initiating low pressure discharge within the discharge region; a quarterwave plate and a Q-switch in optical alignment with the one electrode pair discharge region along the laser optical axis; a fixed laser output coupler at the discharge region end of the laser cavity; and a rotatable grating means for wavelength switching the at least two high gain Q-switched pulses.

  4. The BTeV trigger: Recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Kasper, Penelope; /Fermilab

    2003-12-01

    BTeV is a collider experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron dedicated to precision measurements of CP violation, mixing and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. The detector is a forward spectrometer with a pixel vertex detector inside a dipole magnet. A unique feature of BTeV is the trigger, which reconstructs tracks and vertices in every beam crossing. They present here an overview of the BTeV trigger and a description of recent improvements in trigger timing.

  5. Internal Triggering Marx Generator Using Hydrogen Thyratrons.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    Operation of a Marx generator using hydrogen thyratrons as switches, with the switches in the upper stages of the Marx being triggered by a signal...derived from the lower stages (internal triggering) was investigated. The Marx was in a negative output configuration and utilized pulse forming...PFN’s. Timing requirements and erection diagnostics were determined using a two-stage Marx , with both stages triggered from separate external sources

  6. Possible triggers for phase transformation in zirconia hip balls.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sharon S; Green, Douglas D; Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Donaldson, Thomas K; Clarke, Ian C

    2008-05-01

    The clinical history of yttria-stabilized, zirconia (Zr) ceramic has been controversial. In the patient, combinations of hydrothermal and mechanical shocks may trigger detrimental changes in Zr balls that have inferior metastability. Transformations from tetragonal to monoclinic phase may be influenced by impingement, dislocation, and disassociation in certain patients. Hydrothermal stability was measured in Zr balls from four vendors by autoclave and mechanical models that included "cup-impingement," "abrasive" wear, and "3rd-body" wear. Standard simulator tests for polyethylene (PE) wear studies combined pristine and previously transformed Zr and were also used to test lubricant effects (Zr/Zr-serum, Zr/Zr-water, Zr/PE-water). For in-vivo comparisons we studied retrieved Zr balls at 1-15 years follow-up by laser interferometry, SEM, EDS, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. We found that severe mechanical shock triggered local surface destruction but little transformation. In contrast, hydrothermal processes revealed 5-13% monoclinic by 7 h, increasing at a rate of 0.56%/h for 22-mm balls and 0.81%/h for 26-mm balls. The all-ceramic Zr/Zr bearings were very sensitive to lubrication mode, showing early catastrophic failure when run in water but surviving 20 million cycles when run with serum lubrication. Wear with Zr/PE combination did not trigger phase changes in water or serum but decreased the monoclinic content measured on previously transformed surfaces. Most retrieved Zr balls showed high transformation (30-85% monoclinic) but some showed no transformation. The ball areas with major monoclinic changes corresponded to PE contact, suggesting that tribological conditions under the cup were the trigger. This indicated that we understand little of the hydrothermal conditions operating under Zr/PE hip joints in-vivo. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The Run-2 ATLAS Trigger System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Martínez, A.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The ATLAS trigger successfully collected collision data during the first run of the LHC between 2009-2013 at different centre-of-mass energies between 900 GeV and 8TeV. The trigger system consists of a hardware Level-1 and a software-based high level trigger (HLT) that reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of a few hundred Hz. In Run-2, the LHC will operate at centre-of-mass energies of 13 and 14 TeV and higher luminosity, resulting in up to five times higher rates of processes of interest. A brief review of the ATLAS trigger system upgrades that were implemented between Run-1 and Run-2, allowing to cope with the increased trigger rates while maintaining or even improving the efficiency to select physics processes of interest, will be given. This includes changes to the Level-1 calorimeter and muon trigger systems, the introduction of a new Level-1 topological trigger module and the merging of the previously two-level HLT system into a single event processing farm. A few examples will be shown, such as the impressive performance improvements in the HLT trigger algorithms used to identify leptons, hadrons and global event quantities like missing transverse energy. Finally, the status of the commissioning of the trigger system and its performance during the 2015 run will be presented.

  8. Migraine Trigger Site Surgery is All Placebo.

    PubMed

    McGeeney, Brian E

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade surgical treatments for migraine involving proposed trigger sites have been described and popularized by plastic surgeons in particular. Various related techniques aim to free up "trigger sites" by removal of small facial muscles or "decompressing" small facial nerves. The basis for migraine trigger site surgery is without merit. There is one positive placebo controlled study with many limitations. Natural history and placebo mechanisms explain the outcomes from migraine surgery. The American Headache Society recommends that the migraine surgery not be performed outside of a clinical trial. Migraine trigger site surgery should not be performed. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  9. Ischemic compression after trigger point injection affect the treatment of myofascial trigger points.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo A; Oh, Ki Young; Choi, Won Hyuck; Kim, In Kyum

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the effects of trigger point injection with or without ischemic compression in treatment of myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle. SIXTY PATIENTS WITH ACTIVE MYOFASCIAL TRIGGER POINTS IN UPPER TRAPEZIUS MUSCLE WERE RANDOMLY DIVIDED INTO THREE GROUPS: group 1 (n=20) received only trigger point injections, group 2 (n=20) received trigger point injections with 30 seconds of ischemic compression, and group 3 (n=20) received trigger point injections with 60 seconds of ischemic compression. The visual analogue scale, pressure pain threshold, and range of motion of the neck were assessed before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 1 week after treatment. Korean Neck Disability Indexes were assessed before treatment and 1 week after treatment. We found a significant improvement in all assessment parameters (p<0.05) in all groups. But, receiving trigger point injections with ischemic compression group showed significant improvement as compared with the receiving only trigger point injections group. And no significant differences between receiving 30 seconds of ischemic compression group and 60 seconds of ischemic compression group. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of ischemic compression for myofascial trigger point. Trigger point injections combined with ischemic compression shows better effects on treatment of myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle than the only trigger point injections therapy. But the duration of ischemic compression did not affect treatment of myofascial trigger point.

  10. Laser principles.

    PubMed

    Bogdan Allemann, Inja; Kaufman, Joely

    2011-01-01

    Since the construction of the first laser in the 1960s, the role that lasers play in various medical specialities, including dermatology, has steadily increased. However, within the last 2 decades, the technological advances and the use of lasers in the field of dermatology have virtually exploded. Many treatments have only become possible with the use of lasers. Especially in aesthetic medicine, lasers are an essential tool in the treatment armamentarium. Due to better research and understanding of the physics of light and skin, there is now a wide and increasing array of different lasers and devices to choose from. The proper laser selection for each indication and treatment requires a profound understanding of laser physics and the basic laser principles. Understanding these principles will allow the laser operator to obtain better results and help avoid complications. This chapter will give an in-depth overview of the physical principles relevant in cutaneous laser surgery. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Prompt trigger primitives for a self-seeded track trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressanandt, N.; Halgeri, A.; Kamat, M.; Koppal, V.; Newcomer, M.

    2012-10-01

    A viable self-seeded track trigger for a high rate collider detector environment must have excellent angular precision, response times commensurate with beam crossing rate and low mass. We have designed a fast clustering block servicing 128 contiguous strips to be included in an LHC upgrade silicon strip front end ASIC (ABC130) with these objectives in mind. The block is based on the presence of an analog front end with binary (threshold determined) strip readout latched at each beam crossing. Combinatorial logic tests for the presence of one or two adjacent strips over threshold, a qualifying cluster, at each beam crossing and transmits up to two, eight bits clusters descriptors, specifying address and cluster width via a high speed LVDS output. It is envisioned that a correlator chip, presently in conception, receives this data and via look-up tables checks for coincident hits between silicon strip layers. Since the clustering output will report the presence of one or two hit strips, a half strip pitch ( ~ 40 um for the ATLAS detector) resolution may be possible for each cluster. Our timing results show that the combinatorial clustering logic will settle within 6 ns. Assuming a beam crossing rate of 40 MHz, 16 bits of serialized data can be shifted out at 640MHz each crossing. This will allow a beam synchronous update rate providing data for up to two clusters for each bank of 128 strips. The data latency into the correlator chip will be only two crossings. Present power estimates suggest that the fast cluster block with LVDS driver will consume less than 12 mW.

  12. Nonlinear dynamical triggering of slow slip

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Paul A; Knuth, Matthew W; Kaproth, Bryan M; Carpenter, Brett; Guyer, Robert A; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves; Daub, Eric G; Marone, Chris

    2010-12-10

    Among the most fascinating, recent discoveries in seismology have been the phenomena of triggered slip, including triggered earthquakes and triggered-tremor, as well as triggered slow, silent-slip during which no seismic energy is radiated. Because fault nucleation depths cannot be probed directly, the physical regimes in which these phenomena occur are poorly understood. Thus determining physical properties that control diverse types of triggered fault sliding and what frictional constitutive laws govern triggered faulting variability is challenging. We are characterizing the physical controls of triggered faulting with the goal of developing constitutive relations by conducting laboratory and numerical modeling experiments in sheared granular media at varying load conditions. In order to simulate granular fault zone gouge in the laboratory, glass beads are sheared in a double-direct configuration under constant normal stress, while subject to transient perturbation by acoustic waves. We find that triggered, slow, silent-slip occurs at very small confining loads ({approx}1-3 MPa) that are smaller than those where dynamic earthquake triggering takes place (4-7 MPa), and that triggered slow-slip is associated with bursts of LFE-like acoustic emission. Experimental evidence suggests that the nonlinear dynamical response of the gouge material induced by dynamic waves may be responsible for the triggered slip behavior: the slip-duration, stress-drop and along-strike slip displacement are proportional to the triggering wave amplitude. Further, we observe a shear-modulus decrease corresponding to dynamic-wave triggering relative to the shear modulus of stick-slips. Modulus decrease in response to dynamical wave amplitudes of roughly a microstrain and above is a hallmark of elastic nonlinear behavior. We believe that the dynamical waves increase the material non-affine elastic deformation during shearing, simultaneously leading to instability and slow-slip. The inferred

  13. Nonlinear Dynamical Triggering of Slow-Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P. A.; Knuth, M. W.; Kaproth, B. M.; Carpenter, B. M.; Guyer, R. A.; Le Bas, P.; Daub, E. G.; Marone, C.

    2010-12-01

    Among the most fascinating, recent discoveries in seismology have been the phenomena of triggered slip, including triggered earthquakes and triggered-tremor, as well as triggered slow, silent-slip during which no seismic energy is radiated. Because fault nucleation depths cannot be probed directly, the physical regimes in which these phenomena occur are poorly understood. Thus determining physical properties that control diverse types of triggered fault sliding and what frictional constitutive laws govern triggered faulting variability is challenging. We are characterizing the physical controls of triggered faulting with the goal of developing constitutive relations by conducting laboratory and numerical modeling experiments in sheared granular media at varying load conditions. In order to simulate granular fault zone gouge in the laboratory, glass beads are sheared in a double-direct configuration under constant normal stress, while subject to transient perturbation by acoustic waves. We find that triggered, slow, silent-slip occurs at very small confining loads (~1-3 MPa) that are smaller than those where dynamic earthquake triggering takes place (4-7 MPa), and that triggered slow-slip is associated with bursts of LFE-like acoustic emission. Experimental evidence suggests that the nonlinear dynamical response of the gouge material induced by dynamic waves may be responsible for the triggered slip behavior: the slip-duration, stress-drop and along-strike slip displacement are proportional to the triggering wave amplitude. Further, we observe a shear-modulus decrease corresponding to dynamic-wave triggering relative to the shear modulus of stick-slips. Modulus decrease in response to dynamical wave amplitudes of roughly a microstrain and above is a hallmark of elastic nonlinear behavior. We believe that the dynamical waves increase the material non-affine elastic deformation during shearing, simultaneously leading to instability and slow-slip. The inferred

  14. Ionization and Triggered Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritschneder, M.; Lin, D. N. C.; Murray, S. D.; Burkert, A.

    2011-12-01

    We perform a set of high resolution simulations on the impact of the UV-radiation of massive stars on the turbulent interstellar medium with the tree-SPH code iVINE. This parameter study includes different levels and driving scales of the turbulence, different ionizing flux as well as different temperatures and densities of the cold gas. We find a clear correlation between the initial state of the turbulent cloud and the final morphology and physical properties of the structures adjacent to the HII region. From the simulations we are able to derive a criterion for the formation of pillar-like structures and thus the formation of cores and stars. Gravitational collapse occurs regularly on the tips of the structures. We also derive column densities and velocity profiles of our simulations and find these to be in very good agreement with the observations of trunks and cores. In addition, we investigate the further evolution of the pillars once the massive star explodes. This leads to a supernova triggered scenario for the formation of our Solar System.

  15. Fluid pressure waves trigger earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Fluids-essentially meteoric water-are present everywhere in the Earth's crust, occasionally also with pressures higher than hydrostatic due to the tectonic strain imposed on impermeable undrained layers, to the impoundment of artificial lakes or to the forced injections required by oil and gas exploration and production. Experimental evidence suggests that such fluids flow along preferred paths of high diffusivity, provided by rock joints and faults. Studying the coupled poroelastic problem, we find that such flow is ruled by a nonlinear partial differential equation amenable to a Barenblatt-type solution, implying that it takes place in form of solitary pressure waves propagating at a velocity which decreases with time as v ∝ t [1/(n - 1) - 1] with n ≳ 7. According to Tresca-Von Mises criterion, these waves appear to play a major role in earthquake triggering, being also capable to account for aftershock delay without any further assumption. The measure of stress and fluid pressure inside active faults may therefore provide direct information about fault potential instability.

  16. Trigger Points: An Anatomical Substratum

    PubMed Central

    Akamatsu, Flávia Emi; Ayres, Bernardo Rodrigues; Saleh, Samir Omar; Hojaij, Flávio; Andrade, Mauro; Hsing, Wu Tu; Jacomo, Alfredo Luiz

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to bring the trapezius muscle knowledge of the locations where the accessory nerve branches enter the muscle belly to reach the motor endplates and find myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). Although anatomoclinical correlations represent a major feature of MTrP, no previous reports describing the distribution of the accessory nerve branches and their anatomical relationship with MTrP are found in the literature. Both trapezius muscles from twelve adult cadavers were carefully dissected by the authors (anatomy professors and medical graduate students) to observe the exact point where the branches of the spinal accessory nerve entered the muscle belly. Dissection was performed through stratigraphic layers to preserve the motor innervation of the trapezius muscle, which is located deep in the muscle. Seven points are described, four of which are motor points: in all cases, these locations corresponded to clinically described MTrPs. The four points were common in these twelve cadavers. This type of clinical correlation between spinal accessory nerve branching and MTrP is useful to achieve a better understanding of the anatomical correlation of MTrP and the physiopathology of these disorders and may provide a scientific basis for their treatment, rendering useful additional information to therapists to achieve better diagnoses and improve therapeutic approaches. PMID:25811029

  17. The trigger supervisor: Managing triggering conditions in a high energy physics experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, B.; Lanza, R.; LeVine, M.J.; Scheetz, R.A.; Videbaek, F.

    1987-01-01

    A trigger supervisor, implemented in VME-bus hardware, is described, which enables the host computer to dynamically control and monitor the trigger configuration for acquiring data from multiple detector partitions in a complex experiment.

  18. Magnesium-based photocathodes for triggering back-lighted thyratrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozer, Esin B.

    This dissertation presents experimental studies of application of magnesium-based photocathodes to optically triggered pseudospark switches, called back-lighted thyratrons (BLTs). Magnesium was chosen as a low work function metal photocathode for its potential to increase triggering performance of the switch with a higher photoemission performance than traditional BLT cathodes. Improvement in triggering performance of plasma switches is of interest for device development of compact pulsed power systems where the size of switching units can limit the overall size and the mobility of the system. Experiments were conducted on photoemission performance of photocathode candidates under BLT-relevant conditions; and delay and jitter performance of a BLT with photocathode candidates with changing helium pressure and switch voltages. A review of photocathode literature showed that Mg and Cu are the most promising candidates for increasing the photoemission during the triggering of BLTs. As a commonly used BLT cathode in the switch literature, Mo was chosen together with Mg and Cu to be tested under BLT-relevant pressure and field conditions. Quantum efficiency measurements of high-purity foils of Mg, Cu and Mo showed a superior performance of Mg and Cu over Mo. Mg had the highest quantum efficiency of 1.5 x 10-5 among all three materials. After photoemission measurements in a test bed were concluded, testing of these cathodes for their switching performance was done in two stages. First, an unfocused UV laser beam (8.5 x 106 W/cm 2) with a wavelength of 266 nm was used for delay measurements of a BLT with Mg, Cu and Mo-based cathodes. Mg-based cathodes showed at least a thirty-fold reduction in delay and jitter compared to Cu-based and at least an eighty-fold reduction in delay and jitter compared to Mo-based cathodes at any given helium pressure and switch voltage pair. Subsequently, a partial focusing of the same light source was utilized (7.4 x 107W/cm 2) for delay

  19. Triggering soft bombs at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapen, Simon; Griso, Simone Pagan; Papucci, Michele; Robinson, Dean J.

    2017-08-01

    Very high multiplicity, spherically-symmetric distributions of soft particles, with p T ˜ few×100 MeV, may be a signature of strongly-coupled hidden valleys that exhibit long, efficient showering windows. With traditional triggers, such `soft bomb' events closely resemble pile-up and are therefore only recorded with minimum bias triggers at a very low efficiency. We demonstrate a proof-of-concept for a high-level triggering strategy that efficiently separates soft bombs from pile-up by searching for a `belt of fire': a high density band of hits on the innermost layer of the tracker. Seeding our proposed high-level trigger with existing jet, missing transverse energy or lepton hardware-level triggers, we show that net trigger efficiencies of order 10% are possible for bombs of mass several × 100 GeV. We also consider the special case that soft bombs are the result of an exotic decay of the 125 GeV Higgs. The fiducial rate for `Higgs bombs' triggered in this manner is marginally higher than the rate achievable by triggering directly on a hard muon from associated Higgs production.

  20. The H1 neural network trigger project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiesling, C.; Denby, B.; Fent, J.; Fröchtenicht, W.; Garda, P.; Granado, B.; Grindhammer, G.; Haberer, W.; Janauschek, L.; Kobler, T.; Koblitz, B.; Nellen, G.; Prevotet, J.-C.; Schmidt, S.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.

    2001-08-01

    We present a short overview of neuromorphic hardware and some of the physics projects making use of such devices. As a concrete example we describe an innovative project within the H1-Experiment at the electron-proton collider HERA, instrumenting hardwired neural networks as pattern recognition machines to discriminate between wanted physics and uninteresting background at the trigger level. The decision time of the system is less than 20 microseconds, typical for a modern second level trigger. The neural trigger has been successfully running for the past four years and has turned out new physics results from H1 unobtainable so far with other triggering schemes. We describe the concepts and the technical realization of the neural network trigger system, present the most important physics results, and motivate an upgrade of the system for the future high luminosity running at HERA. The upgrade concentrates on "intelligent preprocessing" of the neural inputs which help to strongly improve the networks' discrimination power.

  1. Methods for automatic trigger threshold adjustment

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Benjamin J; Partridge, Michael E

    2014-03-18

    Methods are presented for adjusting trigger threshold values to compensate for drift in the quiescent level of a signal monitored for initiating a data recording event, thereby avoiding false triggering conditions. Initial threshold values are periodically adjusted by re-measuring the quiescent signal level, and adjusting the threshold values by an offset computation based upon the measured quiescent signal level drift. Re-computation of the trigger threshold values can be implemented on time based or counter based criteria. Additionally, a qualification width counter can be utilized to implement a requirement that a trigger threshold criterion be met a given number of times prior to initiating a data recording event, further reducing the possibility of a false triggering situation.

  2. The LHCb trigger and its upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziurda, A.

    2016-07-01

    The current LHCb trigger system consists of a hardware level, which reduces the LHC inelastic collision rate of 30 MHz, at which the entire detector is read out. In a second level, implemented in a farm of 20 k parallel-processing CPUs, the event rate is reduced to about 5 kHz. We review the performance of the LHCb trigger system during Run I of the LHC. Special attention is given to the use of multivariate analyses in the High Level Trigger. The major bottleneck for hadronic decays is the hardware trigger. LHCb plans a major upgrade of the detector and DAQ system in the LHC shutdown of 2018, enabling a purely software based trigger to process the full 30 MHz of inelastic collisions delivered by the LHC. We demonstrate that the planned architecture will be able to meet this challenge.

  3. Laser clock

    SciTech Connect

    Facklam, R.L.

    1983-05-26

    A laser clock includes a linear laser in one embodiment of the clock and a ring laser gyro in the other embodiment. The linear laser is frequency stabilized and utilizes a single active medium in the form of a low pressure gas, such as He-Ne, with a Doppler broadened gain curve. The ring laser gyro is a four frequency laser with a Faraday rotor. Detector and electronic circuitry associated with the laser of each embodiment detects a beat frequency and convert it to a clock signal.

  4. Photo-Thermally Induced Current Switching in Vanadium-Dioxide-Based Devices Using CO2 Laser Pumping.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihoon; Jo, Songhyun; Park, Kyongsoo; Kim, Bong-Jun; Lee, Yong Wook

    2015-11-01

    By utilizing a CO2 laser as an illumination light source for triggering, we demonstrated bidirectional laser triggering in a two-terminal planar device based on a highly resistive vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin film. Bidirectional laser triggering between 0 and 10 mA was realized by switching the CO2 laser whose focused beam illuminated the VO2 film, and transient responses of laser-triggered devices were investigated when periodical laser pulses excited the VO2-based device at a variety of pulse widths and repetition rates. A switching contrast between off- and on-state currents was evaluated as -3333, and the rising and falling times were measured as -39 and -21 ms in the transient responses obtained by using periodic laser pulses with a pulse width of 100 ms, respectively.

  5. JASMONATE-TRIGGERED PLANT IMMUNITY

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Marcelo L.; Kang, Jin-Ho; Howe, Gregg A.

    2014-01-01

    The plant hormone jasmonate (JA) exerts direct control over the production of chemical defense compounds that confer resistance to a remarkable spectrum of plant-associated organisms, ranging from microbial pathogens to vertebrate herbivores. The underlying mechanism of JA-triggered immunity (JATI) can be conceptualized as a multi-stage signal transduction cascade involving: i) pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that couple the perception of danger signals to rapid synthesis of bioactive JA; ii) an evolutionarily conserved JA signaling module that links fluctuating JA levels to changes in the abundance of transcriptional repressor proteins; and iii) activation (de-repression) of transcription factors that orchestrate the expression of myriad chemical and morphological defense traits. Multiple negative feedback loops act in concert to restrain the duration and amplitude of defense responses, presumably to mitigate potential fitness costs of JATI. The convergence of diverse plant- and non-plant-derived signals on the core JA module indicates that JATI is a general response to perceived danger. However, the modular structure of JATI may accommodate attacker-specific defense responses through evolutionary innovation of PRRs (inputs) and defense traits (outputs). The efficacy of JATI as a defense strategy is highlighted by its capacity to shape natural populations of plant attackers, as well as the propensity of plant-associated organisms to subvert or otherwise manipulate JA signaling. As both a cellular hub for integrating informational cues from the environment and a common target of pathogen effectors, the core JA module provides a focal point for understanding immune system networks and the evolution of chemical diversity in the plant kingdom. PMID:24973116

  6. Dark matter triggers of supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Peter W.; Rajendran, Surjeet; Varela, Jaime

    2015-09-01

    The transit of primordial black holes through a white dwarf causes localized heating around the trajectory of the black hole through dynamical friction. For sufficiently massive black holes, this heat can initiate runaway thermonuclear fusion causing the white dwarf to explode as a supernova. The shape of the observed distribution of white dwarfs with masses up to 1.25 M⊙ rules out primordial black holes with masses ˜1019- 1020 gm as a dominant constituent of the local dark matter density. Black holes with masses as large as 1024 gm will be excluded if recent observations by the NuStar Collaboration of a population of white dwarfs near the galactic center are confirmed. Black holes in the mass range 1020- 1022 gm are also constrained by the observed supernova rate, though these bounds are subject to astrophysical uncertainties. These bounds can be further strengthened through measurements of white dwarf binaries in gravitational wave observatories. The mechanism proposed in this paper can constrain a variety of other dark matter scenarios such as Q balls, annihilation/collision of large composite states of dark matter and models of dark matter where the accretion of dark matter leads to the formation of compact cores within the star. White dwarfs, with their astronomical lifetimes and sizes, can thus act as large spacetime volume detectors enabling a unique probe of the properties of dark matter, especially of dark matter candidates that have low number density. This mechanism also raises the intriguing possibility that a class of supernova may be triggered through rare events induced by dark matter rather than the conventional mechanism of accreting white dwarfs that explode upon reaching the Chandrasekhar mass.

  7. Development of on-line laser power monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chien-Fang; Lee, Meng-Shiou; Li, Kuan-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Since the laser was invented, laser has been applied in many fields such as material processing, communication, measurement, biomedical engineering, defense industries and etc. Laser power is an important parameter in laser material processing, i.e. laser cutting, and laser drilling. However, the laser power is easily affected by the environment temperature, we tend to monitor the laser power status, ensuring there is an effective material processing. Besides, the response time of current laser power meters is too long, they cannot measure laser power accurately in a short time. To be more precisely, we can know the status of laser power and help us to achieve an effective material processing at the same time. To monitor the laser power, this study utilize a CMOS (Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) camera to develop an on-line laser power monitoring system. The CMOS camera captures images of incident laser beam after it is split and attenuated by beam splitter and neutral density filter. By comparing the average brightness of the beam spots and measurement results from laser power meter, laser power can be estimated. Under continuous measuring mode, the average measuring error is about 3%, and the response time is at least 3.6 second shorter than thermopile power meters; under trigger measuring mode which enables the CMOS camera to synchronize with intermittent laser output, the average measuring error is less than 3%, and the shortest response time is 20 millisecond.

  8. Blue Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    HOLLOW CATHODE LASER FABRICATION 13 4. EXPERIENCE WITH THE BLUE LASER 18 4.1 Operational and Processing Experience 18 4.2 Performance Testing 20 5...34 -. - . •. SECTION 3 BLUE HOLLOW CATHODE LASER FABRICATION This section presents an overview of the steps taken in creating a HCL. There is...to the laser assembly. These steps can actually be considered as the final steps in laser fabrication because some of them involve adding various

  9. Radio Follow-up of Gravitational-wave Triggers during Advanced LIGO O1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palliyaguru, N. T.; Corsi, A.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cenko, S. B.; Frail, D. A.; Perley, D. A.; Mishra, N.; Singer, L. P.; Gal-Yam, A.; Nugent, P. E.; Surace, J. A.

    2016-10-01

    We present radio follow-up observations carried out with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array during the first observing run (O1) of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). A total of three gravitational-wave triggers were followed-up during the ≈ 4 months of O1, from 2015 September to 2016 January. Two of these triggers, GW150914 and GW151226, are binary black hole (BH) merger events of high significance. A third trigger, G194575, was subsequently declared as an event of no interest (i.e., a false alarm). Our observations targeted selected optical transients identified by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory in the Advanced LIGO error regions of the three triggers, and a limited region of the gravitational-wave localization area of G194575 not accessible to optical telescopes due to Sun constraints, where a possible high-energy transient was identified. No plausible radio counterparts to GW150914 and GW151226 were found, in agreement with expectations for binary BH mergers. We show that combining optical and radio observations is key to identifying contaminating radio sources that may be found in the follow-up of gravitational-wave triggers, such as emission associated with star formation and active galactic nuclei. We discuss our results in the context of the theoretical predictions for radio counterparts to gravitational-wave transients, and describe our future plans for the radio follow-up of Advanced LIGO (and Virgo) triggers.

  10. Radio Follow-Up of Gravitational-Wave Triggers during Advanced LIGO 01

    SciTech Connect

    Palliyaguru, N. T.; Corsi, Alessandra; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cenko, S. B.; Frail, D. A.; Perley, D. A.; Mishra, N.; Singer, L. P.; Gal-Yam, A.; Nugent, P. E.; Surace, J. A.

    2016-09-28

    We present radio follow-up observations carried out with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array during the first observing run (O1) of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). A total of three gravitational-wave triggers were followed-up during the ≈4 months of O1, from 2015 September to 2016 January. Two of these triggers, GW150914 and GW151226, are binary black hole (BH) merger events of high significance. A third trigger, G194575, was subsequently declared as an event of no interest (i.e., a false alarm). Our observations targeted selected optical transients identified by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory in the Advanced LIGO error regions of the three triggers, and a limited region of the gravitational-wave localization area of G194575 not accessible to optical telescopes due to Sun constraints, where a possible high-energy transient was identified. No plausible radio counterparts to GW150914 and GW151226 were found, in agreement with expectations for binary BH mergers. We show that combining optical and radio observations is key to identifying contaminating radio sources that may be found in the follow-up of gravitational-wave triggers, such as emission associated with star formation and active galactic nuclei. We discuss our results in the context of the theoretical predictions for radio counterparts to gravitational-wave transients, and describe our future plans for the radio follow-up of Advanced LIGO (and Virgo) triggers.

  11. Tremors Triggered along the Queen Charlotte Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiken, C.; Peng, Z.; Chao, K.

    2012-12-01

    In the past decade, deep tectonic tremors have been observed in numerous tectonic environments surrounding the Pacific and Caribbean plates. In these regions, tremors triggered by both regional and distant earthquakes have also been observed. Despite the ubiquitous observations of triggered tremors, tremors triggered in differing strike-slip environments are less understood. Here, we conduct a preliminary search of tremors triggered by teleseismic earthquakes along the transpressive Queen Charlotte Fault (QCF) located between the Cascadia subduction zone and Alaska. Tectonic tremors have not been previously reported along the QCF. We select teleseismic earthquakes during the 1990-2012 period as having magnitude M ≥ 6.5 and occurring at least 1,000 km away from the region. We reduce the number of mainshocks by selecting those that generate greater than 1 kPa dynamic stress estimated from surface-wave magnitude equations [e.g. van der Elst and Brodsky, 2010]. Our mainshock waveforms are retrieved from the Canadian National Seismograph Network (CNSN), processed, and filtered for triggered tremor observations. We characterize triggered tremors as high-frequency signals visible among several stations and coincident with broadband surface wave peaks. So far, we have found tremors triggered along the QCF by surface waves of five great earthquakes - the 2002/11/03 Mw7.9 Denali Fault, 2004/12/26 Mw9.0 Sumatra, 2010/02/27 Mw8.8 Chile, 2011/03/11 Mw9.0 Japan, and 2012/04/11 Mw8.6 Sumatra earthquakes. We compare our results to tremors triggered by teleseismic earthquakes on strike-slip faults in central and southern California, as well as Cuba [Peng et al., 2012]. Among strike-slip faults in these regions, we also compare triggered tremor amplitudes to peak ground velocities from the mainshocks and compute dynamic stresses to determine a triggering threshold for the QCF. We find that in most cases tremors in the QCF are triggered primarily by the Love waves, and additional

  12. Slow Earthquakes Triggered by Typhoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Linde, A. T.; Sacks, I. S.

    2006-12-01

    possible to determine whether these slow events are accompanied by non-volcanic tremor, as has been reported for the Nankai subduction and Cascadia slow events. We hypothesize that the slow earthquakes are triggered by the typhoon activity due to the resultant low air pressure over land reducing the locking force on the fault zone. Such repeated slow events may explain why this area of high deformation does not experience very large earthquakes.

  13. Climatic triggers for peatland initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Paul J.; Swindles, Graeme T.; Valdes, Paul J.; Ivanovic, Ruza F.; Gregoire, Lauren J.; Smith, Mark W.; Tarasov, Lev; Haywood, Alan M.; Bacon, Karen L.

    2017-04-01

    Peatlands are carbon-dense wetlands characterised by waterlogged, organic-rich soils. Modern-day peatlands have formed mainly since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), and despite covering only 3 % of the Earth's land surface are thought to store more than a third of all global soil carbon in the form of poorly decomposed plant detritus. Concern exists that this globally important carbon store may be vulnerable to near-future warming and changes in precipitation patterns, although the links between peatland development and climate are contested. The climatic and other environmental conditions that facilitate the initiation of peat are particularly poorly understood. We present the results of a novel, global study into the climate space of peat initiation since the LGM. We compiled a catalogue of radiocarbon dates of peat initiation from 942 sites that span a range of latitudes and biomes. We used the locations and ages of these peatlands to interrogate downscaled climate hindcasts at 500-yr intervals from a coupled atmosphere-ocean-vegetation general circulation model, HadCM3. This powerful combination of modelling and observational data provides a globally-consistent, temporally-extensive estimate of the climate spaces of peat initiation. In particular, it allows us to identify local and regional climatic changes that may have acted as triggers for peat formation. Peatlands in mid- and high-latitudes of both hemispheres, particularly in maritime locations, developed shortly after local increases in the time integral of growing season temperatures, and were seemingly not influenced by rainfall regime. Peat initiation at such sites appears to have been stimulated by temperature-driven increases in plant productivity in cold, postglacial landscapes, and was not water limited. The exception is the large peatland complex of the Western Siberian Lowlands, which was not glaciated during the last glacial period, and which appears to have been prompted instead by a strong

  14. Triggered tremor sweet spots in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, Joan; Prejean, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    To better understand what controls fault slip along plate boundaries, we have exploited the abundance of seismic and geodetic data available from the richly varied tectonic environments composing Alaska. A search for tremor triggered by 11 large earthquakes throughout all of seismically monitored Alaska reveals two tremor “sweet spots”—regions where large-amplitude seismic waves repeatedly triggered tremor between 2006 and 2012. The two sweet spots locate in very different tectonic environments—one just trenchward and between the Aleutian islands of Unalaska and Akutan and the other in central mainland Alaska. The Unalaska/Akutan spot corroborates previous evidence that the region is ripe for tremor, perhaps because it is located where plate-interface frictional properties transition between stick-slip and stably sliding in both the dip direction and laterally. The mainland sweet spot coincides with a region of complex and uncertain plate interactions, and where no slow slip events or major crustal faults have been noted previously. Analyses showed that larger triggering wave amplitudes, and perhaps lower frequencies (<~0.03 Hz), may enhance the probability of triggering tremor. However, neither the maximum amplitude in the time domain or in a particular frequency band, nor the geometric relationship of the wavefield to the tremor source faults alone ensures a high probability of triggering. Triggered tremor at the two sweet spots also does not occur during slow slip events visually detectable in GPS data, although slow slip below the detection threshold may have facilitated tremor triggering.

  15. The D0 run II trigger system

    SciTech Connect

    Schwienhorst, Reinhard; /Michigan State U.

    2004-11-01

    The D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron was upgraded for Run II. This upgrade included improvements to the trigger system in order to be able to handle the increased Tevatron luminosity and higher bunch crossing rates compared to Run I. The D0 Run II trigger is a highly exible system to select events to be written to tape from an initial interaction rate of about 2.5 MHz. This is done in a three-tier pipelined, buffered system. The first tier (level 1) processes fast detector pick-off signals in a hardware/firmware based system to reduce the event rate to about 1. 5kHz. The second tier (level 2) uses information from level 1 and forms simple Physics objects to reduce the rate to about 850 Hz. The third tier (level 3) uses full detector readout and event reconstruction on a filter farm to reduce the rate to 20-30 Hz. The D0 trigger menu contains a wide variety of triggers. While the emphasis is on triggering on generic lepton and jet final states, there are also trigger terms for specific final state signatures. In this document we describe the D0 trigger system as it was implemented and is currently operating in Run II.

  16. Triggering at a high luminosity hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Price, L.E.; Wagner, R.G.; Abolins, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    The extreme interaction rate occurring at the SSC as described in the Reference Design Report poses the principal new challenge for the triggering system compared with detectors at previous accelerators. At SSC we must plan for about 10/sup 8/ interactions per second. If bunch crossings occur each 33 ns, there will be an average of 3 interactions in each bunch crossing. Potential problems for triggering are presented both by the high total rate and by the multiple interactions per bunch crossing, so that triggering events must be selected in the presence of other interactions independent of the inherent speed of either detector elements or triggering electronics. Three principal topics are considered in this report: (1) Practical selections to be made in a first-level trigger to reduce the rate by a factor of 1000. (2) Electronics expected to implement this first-level trigger, and (3) the ultimate trigger selections that must be used to select the approximately 1 Hz that can practically be recorded for detailed analysis. 11 references, 6 figures.

  17. The Uses of Dynamic Earthquake Triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Emily E.; van der Elst, Nicholas J.

    2014-05-01

    Dynamic triggering of earthquakes by seismic waves is a robustly observed phenomenon with well-documented examples from over 30 major earthquakes. We are now in a position to use dynamic triggering as a natural experiment to probe the reaction of faults to the known stresses from seismic waves. We show here that dynamic triggering can be used to investigate the distribution of stresses required for failure on faults. In some regions, faults appear to be uniformly distributed over their loading cycles with equal numbers at all possible stresses from failure. Regions under tectonic extension, at the interface between locked and creeping faults, or subject to anthropogenic forcing are most prone to triggered failure. Predictions of future seismicity rates based on seismic wave amplitudes are theoretically possible and may provide similar results to purely stochastic prediction schemes. The underlying mechanisms of dynamic triggering are still unknown. The prolonged triggered sequences require a multistage process such as shear failure from rate-state friction coupled to aseismic creep or continued triggering through a secondary cascade. Permeability enhancement leading to drainage or pore pressure redistribution on faults is an alternative possibility.

  18. Intraplate triggered earthquakes: Observations and interpretation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hough, S.E.; Seeber, L.; Armbruster, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    We present evidence that at least two of the three 1811-1812 New Madrid, central United States, mainshocks and the 1886 Charleston, South Carolina, earthquake triggered earthquakes at regional distances. In addition to previously published evidence for triggered earthquakes in the northern Kentucky/southern Ohio region in 1812, we present evidence suggesting that triggered events might have occurred in the Wabash Valley, to the south of the New Madrid Seismic Zone, and near Charleston, South Carolina. We also discuss evidence that earthquakes might have been triggered in northern Kentucky within seconds of the passage of surface waves from the 23 January 1812 New Madrid mainshock. After the 1886 Charleston earthquake, accounts suggest that triggered events occurred near Moodus, Connecticut, and in southern Indiana. Notwithstanding the uncertainty associated with analysis of historical accounts, there is evidence that at least three out of the four known Mw 7 earthquakes in the central and eastern United States seem to have triggered earthquakes at distances beyond the typically assumed aftershock zone of 1-2 mainshock fault lengths. We explore the possibility that remotely triggered earthquakes might be common in low-strain-rate regions. We suggest that in a low-strain-rate environment, permanent, nonelastic deformation might play a more important role in stress accumulation than it does in interplate crust. Using a simple model incorporating elastic and anelastic strain release, we show that, for realistic parameter values, faults in intraplate crust remain close to their failure stress for a longer part of the earthquake cycle than do faults in high-strain-rate regions. Our results further suggest that remotely triggered earthquakes occur preferentially in regions of recent and/or future seismic activity, which suggests that faults are at a critical stress state in only some areas. Remotely triggered earthquakes may thus serve as beacons that identify regions of

  19. A novel in situ trigger combination method

    DOE PAGES

    Buzatu, Adrian; Warburton, Andreas; Krumnack, Nils; ...

    2013-01-30

    Searches for rare physics processes using particle detectors in high-luminosity colliding hadronic beam environments require the use of multi-level trigger systems to reject colossal background rates in real time. In analyses like the search for the Higgs boson, there is a need to maximize the signal acceptance by combining multiple different trigger chains when forming the offline data sample. In such statistically limited searches, datasets are often amassed over periods of several years, during which the trigger characteristics evolve and system performance can vary significantly. Reliable production cross-section measurements and upper limits must take into account a detailed understanding ofmore » the effective trigger inefficiency for every selected candidate event. We present as an example the complex situation of three trigger chains, based on missing energy and jet energy, that were combined in the context of the search for the Higgs (H) boson produced in association with a $W$ boson at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We briefly review the existing techniques for combining triggers, namely the inclusion, division, and exclusion methods. We introduce and describe a novel fourth in situ method whereby, for each candidate event, only the trigger chain with the highest a priori probability of selecting the event is considered. We compare the inclusion and novel in situ methods for signal event yields in the CDF $WH$ search. This new combination method, by virtue of its scalability to large numbers of differing trigger chains and insensitivity to correlations between triggers, will benefit future long-running collider experiments, including those currently operating on the Large Hadron Collider.« less

  20. Remotely triggered earthquakes following moderate main shocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hough, S.E.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1992, remotely triggered earthquakes have been identified following large (M > 7) earthquakes in California as well as in other regions. These events, which occur at much greater distances than classic aftershocks, occur predominantly in active geothermal or volcanic regions, leading to theories that the earthquakes are triggered when passing seismic waves cause disruptions in magmatic or other fluid systems. In this paper, I focus on observations of remotely triggered earthquakes following moderate main shocks in diverse tectonic settings. I summarize evidence that remotely triggered earthquakes occur commonly in mid-continent and collisional zones. This evidence is derived from analysis of both historic earthquake sequences and from instrumentally recorded M5-6 earthquakes in eastern Canada. The latter analysis suggests that, while remotely triggered earthquakes do not occur pervasively following moderate earthquakes in eastern North America, a low level of triggering often does occur at distances beyond conventional aftershock zones. The inferred triggered events occur at the distances at which SmS waves are known to significantly increase ground motions. A similar result was found for 28 recent M5.3-7.1 earthquakes in California. In California, seismicity is found to increase on average to a distance of at least 200 km following moderate main shocks. This supports the conclusion that, even at distances of ???100 km, dynamic stress changes control the occurrence of triggered events. There are two explanations that can account for the occurrence of remotely triggered earthquakes in intraplate settings: (1) they occur at local zones of weakness, or (2) they occur in zones of local stress concentration. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  1. Nanosecond electric pulses trigger actin responses in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Berghoefer, Thomas; Eing, Christian; Flickinger, Bianca; Hohenberger, Petra; Wegner, Lars H.; Frey, Wolfgang; Nick, Peter

    2009-09-25

    We have analyzed the cellular effects of nanosecond pulsed electrical fields on plant cells using fluorescently tagged marker lines in the tobacco cell line BY-2 and confocal laser scanning microscopy. We observe a disintegration of the cytoskeleton in the cell cortex, followed by contraction of actin filaments towards the nucleus, and disintegration of the nuclear envelope. These responses are accompanied by irreversible permeabilization of the plasma membrane manifest as uptake of Trypan Blue. By pretreatment with the actin-stabilizing drug phalloidin, the detachment of transvacuolar actin from the cell periphery can be suppressed, and this treatment can also suppress the irreversible perforation of the plasma membrane. We discuss these findings in terms of a model, where nanosecond pulsed electric fields trigger actin responses that are key events in the plant-specific form of programmed cell death.

  2. Nanosecond electric pulses trigger actin responses in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Berghöfer, Thomas; Eing, Christian; Flickinger, Bianca; Hohenberger, Petra; Wegner, Lars H; Frey, Wolfgang; Nick, Peter

    2009-09-25

    We have analyzed the cellular effects of nanosecond pulsed electrical fields on plant cells using fluorescently tagged marker lines in the tobacco cell line BY-2 and confocal laser scanning microscopy. We observe a disintegration of the cytoskeleton in the cell cortex, followed by contraction of actin filaments towards the nucleus, and disintegration of the nuclear envelope. These responses are accompanied by irreversible permeabilization of the plasma membrane manifest as uptake of Trypan Blue. By pretreatment with the actin-stabilizing drug phalloidin, the detachment of transvacuolar actin from the cell periphery can be suppressed, and this treatment can also suppress the irreversible perforation of the plasma membrane. We discuss these findings in terms of a model, where nanosecond pulsed electric fields trigger actin responses that are key events in the plant-specific form of programmed cell death.

  3. Very low pressure high power impulse triggered magnetron sputtering

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; Andersson, Joakim

    2013-10-29

    A method and apparatus are described for very low pressure high powered magnetron sputtering of a coating onto a substrate. By the method of this invention, both substrate and coating target material are placed into an evacuable chamber, and the chamber pumped to vacuum. Thereafter a series of high impulse voltage pulses are applied to the target. Nearly simultaneously with each pulse, in one embodiment, a small cathodic arc source of the same material as the target is pulsed, triggering a plasma plume proximate to the surface of the target to thereby initiate the magnetron sputtering process. In another embodiment the plasma plume is generated using a pulsed laser aimed to strike an ablation target material positioned near the magnetron target surface.

  4. [Thermal lasers and skin cicatrization].

    PubMed

    Mordon, Serge; Capon, Alexandre; Fournier, Nathalie; Iarmarcovai, Gwen

    2010-01-01

    Any cutaneous damage triggers a cascade of biological effects in the skin responsible for re-establishing skin integrity. Wound healing is a complex biological process inducing dermal remodelling leading at least to a visible scar, and sometimes to hypertrophic or keloid scars. Recent studies suggest that using a laser generates a precisely defined thermal effect in the skin, improving the wound healing process and potentially opening the door to scarless healing.

  5. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.

    1996-01-01

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film.

  6. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-01-09

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film. 3 figs.

  7. Global Search for Deep Triggered Tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, K.; Peng, Z.; Enescu, B.; Wu, C.; Fry, B.

    2011-12-01

    Deep "non-volcanic" tremor has been observed at many major plate-boundary faults, which provides new information about fault slip behaviors below the seismogenic zone. Most 'regular' or 'ambient' tremor occurs spontaneously or accompanies slow-slip events, while some tremor can be 'triggered' by large distant earthquakes. Recent studies have shown that triggered tremor occurs on the same fault patches as ambient tremor and can be used as a proxy to estimate background tremor activity. However, it is still not clear why tremor can only be observed in certain tectonic regions, and what the necessary conditions are for tremor generation. Here we conduct a global search for tremor triggered by teleseismic earthquakes with Mw ≥ 7.5 between 2001 and 2011 following our previous studies. We focus on regions in southwest Japan and the North Island of New Zealand. In southwest Japan, we found a total of 16 teleseismic earthquakes associated with clear triggered tremor during the passing surface waves. Using standard envelope cross-correlation techniques, we found that the triggered tremor is located close to the regions where ambient tremor is identified previously. Thus far, in New Zealand, we have only identified 4 events associated with triggered tremor in the North Island. Next, we calculate the dynamic stress loading and compare the stress threshold of triggering with the following regions: the Parkfield-Cholame section of the San Andreas Fault in central California, the Calaveras Fault in northern California, the San Jacinto Fault in southern California, the southern and northern Central Range in Taiwan, and the Vancouver Island in Cascadia. The apparent triggering threshold in southwest Japan is around 3-4 KPa, close to the triggering threshold at Parkfield (2-3 KPa) and southern Central Range in Taiwan (7-8 KPa). Our next steps are to explore the triggering potentials at these regions with amplitude, frequency, incident angle and types of incoming waves, and

  8. Introduction to myofascial trigger points in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wall, Rick

    2014-06-01

    In dogs, muscles make up 44%-57% of total body weight and can serve as source of both pain and dysfunction when myofascial trigger points are present. However, rarely is muscle mentioned as a generator of pain in dogs, and even less mentioned is muscle dysfunction. The veterinary practitioner with interest in pain management, rehabilitation, orthopedics, and sports medicine must be familiar with the characteristics, etiology, and precipitating factors of myofascial trigger points. Additionally, the development of examination and treatment skill is needed to effectively manage myofascial trigger points in dogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The upgrade of the CMS Global Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, J.; Arnold, B.; Bergauer, H.; Jeitler, M.; Matsushita, T.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Wulz, C.-E.

    2016-02-01

    The Global Trigger is the final step of the CMS Level-1 Trigger. Previously implemented in VME, it has been redesigned and completely rebuilt in MicroTCA technology, using the Virtex-7 FPGA chip family. It will allow to implement trigger algorithms close to the final physics selection. The new system is presented, together with performance tests undertaken in parallel operation with the legacy system during the initial months of Run II of the LHC at a beam energy of 13 TeV.

  10. Revisiting Pneumatic Nail Gun Trigger Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Albers, James; Lowe, Brian; Lipscomb, Hester; Hudock, Stephen; Dement, John; Evanoff, Bradley; Fullen, Mark; Gillen, Matt; Kaskutas, Vicki; Nolan, James; Patterson, Dennis; Platner, James; Pompeii, Lisa; Schoenfisch, Ashley

    2015-03-01

    Use of a pneumatic nail gun with a sequential actuation trigger (SAT) significantly diminishes the risk for acute traumatic injury compared to use of a contact actuation trigger (CAT) nail gun. A theoretically-based increased risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders from use of a SAT nail gun, relative to CAT, appears unlikely and remains unproven. Based on current knowledge, the use of CAT nail guns cannot be justified as a safe alternative to SAT nail guns. This letter provides a perspective of ergonomists and occupational safety researchers recommending the use of the sequential actuation trigger for all nail gun tasks in the construction industry.

  11. Revisiting Pneumatic Nail Gun Trigger Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Albers, James; Lipscomb, Hester; Hudock, Stephen; Dement, John; Evanoff, Bradley; Fullen, Mark; Gillen, Matt; Kaskutas, Vicki; Nolan, James; Patterson, Dennis; Platner, James; Pompeii, Lisa; Schoenfisch, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Summary Use of a pneumatic nail gun with a sequential actuation trigger (SAT) significantly diminishes the risk for acute traumatic injury compared to use of a contact actuation trigger (CAT) nail gun. A theoretically-based increased risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders from use of a SAT nail gun, relative to CAT, appears unlikely and remains unproven. Based on current knowledge, the use of CAT nail guns cannot be justified as a safe alternative to SAT nail guns. This letter provides a perspective of ergonomists and occupational safety researchers recommending the use of the sequential actuation trigger for all nail gun tasks in the construction industry. PMID:26366020

  12. Electronic trigger for the ASP experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.J.

    1985-11-01

    The Anomalous Single Photon (ASP) electronic trigger is described. The experiments is based on an electromagnetic calorimeter composed of arrays of lead glass blocks, read out with photo-multiplier tubes, surrounding the interaction point at the PEP storage ring. The primary requirement of the trigger system is to be sensitive to low energy (approx. =0.5 GeV and above) photons whilst discriminating against high backgrounds at PEP. Analogue summing of the PMT signals and a sequence of programmable digital look-up tables produces a ''dead-timeless'' trigger for the beam collision rate of 408 kHz. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Diffuse hair loss: its triggers and management.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Shannon; Bergfeld, Wilma

    2009-06-01

    Diffuse hair loss can affect both sexes at any age. Anything that interrupts the normal hair cycle can trigger diffuse hair loss. Triggers include a wide variety of physiologic or emotional stresses, nutritional deficiencies, and endocrine imbalances. Loss of telogen-phase hairs is the most common. Hair loss during the anagen phase is usually caused by chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Finding the cause, or trigger, of the hair loss requires a thorough history and examination and will enable appropriate treatment. Patient education is key in the management of diffuse hair loss.

  14. Impact of Multileaf Collimator Configuration Parameters on the Dosimetric Accuracy of 6-MV Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Nick; Perrin, David; Newhauser, Wayne; Zhang, Rui

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of selected configuration parameters that govern multileaf collimator (MLC) transmission and rounded leaf offset in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) (Pinnacle(3), Philips Medical Systems, Andover, MA, USA) on the accuracy of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose calculation. The MLC leaf transmission factor was modified based on measurements made with ionization chambers. The table of parameters containing rounded-leaf-end offset values was modified by measuring the radiation field edge as a function of leaf bank position with an ionization chamber in a scanning water-tank dosimetry system and comparing the locations to those predicted by the TPS. The modified parameter values were validated by performing IMRT quality assurance (QA) measurements on 19 gantry-static IMRT plans. Planar dose measurements were performed with radiographic film and a diode array (MapCHECK2) and compared to TPS calculated dose distributions using default and modified configuration parameters. Based on measurements, the leaf transmission factor was changed from a default value of 0.001 to 0.005. Surprisingly, this modification resulted in a small but statistically significant worsening of IMRT QA gamma-index passing rate, which revealed that the overall dosimetric accuracy of the TPS depends on multiple configuration parameters in a manner that is coupled and not intuitive because of the commissioning protocol used in our clinic. The rounded leaf offset table had little room for improvement, with the average difference between the default and modified offset values being -0.2 ± 0.7 mm. While our results depend on the current clinical protocols, treatment unit and TPS used, the methodology used in this study is generally applicable. Different clinics could potentially obtain different results and improve their dosimetric accuracy using our approach.

  15. Dose evaluation of Grid Therapy using a 6 MV flattening filter-free (FFF) photon beam: A Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rovira, Immaculada; Puxeu-Vaqué, Josep; Prezado, Yolanda

    2017-07-24

    Spatially fractionated radiotherapy is a strategy to overcome the main limitation of radiotherapy, i.e., the restrained normal tissue tolerances. A well-known example is Grid Therapy, which is currently performed at some hospitals using megavoltage photon beams delivered by Linacs. Grid Therapy has been successfully used in the management of bulky abdominal tumors with low toxicity. The aim of this work was to evaluate whether an improvement in therapeutic index in Grid Therapy can be obtained by implementing it in a flattening filter-free (FFF) Linac. The rationale behind is that the removal of the flattening filter shifts the beam energy spectrum towards lower energies and increase the photon fluence. Lower energies result in a reduction of lateral scattering and thus, to higher peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDR) in normal tissues. In addition, the gain in fluence might allow using smaller beams leading a more efficient exploitation of dose-volume effects, and consequently, a better normal tissue sparing. Monte Carlo simulations were used to evaluate realistic dose distributions considering a 6 MV FFF photon beam from a standard medical Linac and a cerrobend mechanical collimator in different configurations: grid sizes of 0.3 × 0.3 cm(2) , 0.5 × 0.5 cm(2) , and 1 × 1 cm(2) and a corresponding center-to-center (ctc) distance of 0.6, 1, and 2 cm, respectively (total field size of 10 × 10 cm(2) ). As figure of merit, peak doses in depth, PVDR, output factors (OF), and penumbra values were assessed. Dose at the entrance is slightly higher than in conventional Grid Therapy. However, it is compensated by the large PVDR obtained at the entrance, reaching a maximum of 35 for a grid size of 1 × 1 cm(2) . Indeed, this grid size leads to very high PVDR values at all depths (≥ 10), which are much higher than in standard Grid Therapy. This may be beneficial for normal tissues but detrimental for tumor control, where a lower PVDR might be requested. In that case, higher valley doses in the tumor could be achieved by using an interlaced approach and/or adapting the ctc distance. The smallest grid size (0.3 × 0.3 cm(2) ) leads to low PVDR at all depths, comparable to standard Grid Therapy. However, the use of very thin beams might increase the normal tissue tolerances with respect to the grid size commonly used (1 × 1 cm(2) ). The gain in fluence provided by FFF implies that the important OF reduction (0.6) will not increase treatment time. Finally, the intermediate configuration (0.5 × 0.5 cm(2) ) provides high PVDR in the first 5 cm, and comparable PVDR to previous Grid Therapy works at depth. Therefore, this configuration might allow increasing the normal tissue tolerances with respect to Grid Therapy thanks to the higher PVDR and thinner beams, while a similar tumor control could be expected. The implementation of Grid Therapy in an FFF photon beam from medical Linac might lead to an improvement of the therapeutic index. Among the cases evaluated, a grid size of 0.5 × 0.5 cm(2) (1-cm-ctc) is the most advantageous configuration from the physics point of view. Radiobiological experiments are needed to fully explore this new avenue and to confirm our results. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. Optimization of a multiple-scattering Compton camera as a photon-tracking imager for 6-MV photon therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taewoong; Yoon, Changyeon; Lee, Wonho

    2014-06-01

    During radiation therapy, the irradiated position and the energy deposited in a patient must be monitored. In general, calculations before photon exposure or 2D measurements of the transmitted photons have been widely used for making dose estimates. In this paper, we propose a real-time 3D dose measurement using Compton imaging technology. On the basis of the Monte-Carlo method, we designed a multiple-scattering Compton camera system (MSCC) with semiconductor and scintillation detectors. The MSCC was constructed with two semiconductor detectors as scattering detectors and a cadmium-tungstate (CWO) scintillator detector as an absorber detector. The two planar semiconductor arrays, and the CWO array consisted of 40 × 40 pixels, each with a size of 1 × 1 × ɛ mm3, where ɛ is the variable thickness of the detectors. The design parameters, such as the types of semiconductors, detector thicknesses and distances between detectors, were optimized on the basis of the detection efficiency and angular resolution of reconstructed images for a point source. Under the optimized conditions, uncertainty factors in geometry and energy were estimated for various inter-detector distances. We used a source corresponding to photons scattered from a water phantom exposed to 6-MeV peak X-rays. According to our simulation results, the figure of merit, reached its maximum value when the inter-detector distance was 3 cm. In order to achieve a high FOM, we chose 1 cm as the optimum thickness for the scattering and absorbed detectors. A cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detector showed the best performance among the simulated semiconductors. The position uncertainty caused by the pixelization effect was the major factor in degrading the angular resolution of the reconstructed images, and the degradation caused by energy broadening was less than expected. The angular uncertainties caused by Doppler broadening and incorrect sequencing were minimal compared with that of pixelization. Our simulation showed the feasibility of using the semiconductor-based Compton camera to monitor the exposed dose in 3D radiation therapy.

  17. Laser Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Dopant level analysis is important to the laser system designer because it allows him to model the laser's performance. It also allows the end user to determine what went wrong when a laser fails to perform as expected. Under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, Scientific Materials Corporation has developed a process for producing uniform laser rods in which the amount of water trapped in the crystal during growth is reduced. This research led to the formation of a subsidiary company, Montana Analytical Services, which conducts analysis of laser rods for dopant ion concentrations. This is a significant advance in laser technology.

  18. Visualizing light-triggered release of molecules inside living cells.

    PubMed

    Huschka, Ryan; Neumann, Oara; Barhoumi, Aoune; Halas, Naomi J

    2010-10-13

    The light-triggered release of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from gold nanoparticle-based, plasmon resonant vectors, such as nanoshells, shows great promise for gene delivery in living cells. Here we show that intracellular light-triggered release can be performed on molecules that associate with the DNA in a DNA host-guest complex bound to nanoshells. DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole), a bright blue fluorescent molecule that binds reversibly to double-stranded DNA, was chosen to visualize this intracellular light-induced release process. Illumination of nanoshell-dsDNA-DAPI complexes at their plasmon resonance wavelength dehybridizes the DNA, releasing the DAPI molecules within living cells, where they diffuse to the nucleus and associate with the cell's endogenous DNA. The low laser power and irradiation times required for molecular release do not compromise cell viability. This highly controlled co-release of nonbiological molecules accompanying the oligonucleotides could have broad applications in the study of cellular processes and in the development of intracellular targeted therapies.

  19. Triggerable electro-optic amplitude modulator bias stabilizer for integrated optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Conder, Alan D.; Haigh, Ronald E.; Hugenberg, Keith F.

    1995-01-01

    An improved Mach-Zehnder integrated optical electro-optic modulator is achieved by application and incorporation of a DC bias box containing a laser synchronized trigger circuit, a DC ramp and hold circuit, a modulator transfer function negative peak detector circuit, and an adjustable delay circuit. The DC bias box ramps the DC bias along the transfer function curve to any desired phase or point of operation at which point the RF modulation takes place.

  20. Triggerable electro-optic amplitude modulator bias stabilizer for integrated optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Conder, A.D.; Haigh, R.E.; Hugenberg, K.F.

    1995-09-26

    An improved Mach-Zehnder integrated optical electro-optic modulator is achieved by application and incorporation of a DC bias box containing a laser synchronized trigger circuit, a DC ramp and hold circuit, a modulator transfer function negative peak detector circuit, and an adjustable delay circuit. The DC bias box ramps the DC bias along the transfer function curve to any desired phase or point of operation at which point the RF modulation takes place. 7 figs.

  1. The asthma trigger inventory: validation of a questionnaire for perceived triggers of asthma.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Thomas; Steptoe, Andrew; Bobb, Carol; Harris, Alexander H S; Edwards, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Asthma patients' perceptions of triggers have been explored in a largely unstructured fashion in the past. We therefore developed and validated a questionnaire of commonly perceived asthma triggers. Two hundred forty-seven primary care patients with asthma filled in an asthma trigger survey together with questionnaires on demographics, asthma-relevant information, perceived control of asthma, and general health status. Factor structure of the item pool and psychometric properties of trigger subscales were evaluated. We also investigated the relationship between allergen or psychological trigger reports and allergy skin test response or respiratory impedance during emotional film viewing, respectively. Principal component analysis yielded six factors that were thematically associated with psychology, animal allergens, pollen allergens, physical activity, infection, and air pollution/irritants. Subscales showed good internal consistencies and low to moderately positive intercorrelations. Psychological triggers were consistently associated with less favorable health status, a reduced perception of asthma control, and greater medical treatment utilization. Animal allergen scores correlated positively with skin test responses to animal allergens. Respiratory impedance increases during emotional film clips were positively correlated with the psychological trigger subscale. The questionnaire is a reliable measure of commonly perceived asthma triggers. Aspects of patients' trigger reports reflect actual reactivity to specific trigger factors.

  2. Triggered creep as a possible mechanism for delayed dynamic triggering of tremor and earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelly, D.R.; Peng, Z.; Hill, D.P.; Aiken, C.

    2011-01-01

    The passage of radiating seismic waves generates transient stresses in the Earth's crust that can trigger slip on faults far away from the original earthquake source. The triggered fault slip is detectable in the form of earthquakes and seismic tremor. However, the significance of these triggered events remains controversial, in part because they often occur with some delay, long after the triggering stress has passed. Here we scrutinize the location and timing of tremor on the San Andreas fault between 2001 and 2010 in relation to distant earthquakes. We observe tremor on the San Andreas fault that is initiated by passing seismic waves, yet migrates along the fault at a much slower velocity than the radiating seismic waves. We suggest that the migrating tremor records triggered slow slip of the San Andreas fault as a propagating creep event. We find that the triggered tremor and fault creep can be initiated by distant earthquakes as small as magnitude 5.4 and can persist for several days after the seismic waves have passed. Our observations of prolonged tremor activity provide a clear example of the delayed dynamic triggering of seismic events. Fault creep has been shown to trigger earthquakes, and we therefore suggest that the dynamic triggering of prolonged fault creep could provide a mechanism for the delayed triggering of earthquakes. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  3. Lasers of All Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcou, Philippe; Forget, Sébastien Robert-Philip, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    * Introduction * The Laser in All Its Forms * Gas lasers * Dye lasers * Solid-state lasers * Lasers for Every Taste * The rise of lasers * Lasers of all sizes * The colors of the rainbow... and beyond * Shorter and shorter lasers * Increasingly powerful lasers * Lasers: A Universal Tool? * Cutting, welding, and cleaning * Communicating * Treating illnesses * Measuring * Supplying energy? * Entertaining * Understanding * Conclusion

  4. Software for implementing trigger algorithms on the upgraded CMS Global Trigger System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Takashi; Arnold, Bernhard

    2015-12-01

    The Global Trigger is the final step of the CMS Level-1 Trigger and implements a trigger menu, a set of selection requirements applied to the final list of trigger objects. The conditions for trigger object selection, with possible topological requirements on multiobject triggers, are combined by simple combinatorial logic to form the algorithms. The LHC has resumed its operation in 2015, the collision-energy will be increased to 13 TeV with the luminosity expected to go up to 2x1034 cm-2s-1. The CMS Level-1 trigger system will be upgraded to improve its performance for selecting interesting physics events and to operate within the predefined data-acquisition rate in the challenging environment expected at LHC Run 2. The Global Trigger will be re-implemented on modern FPGAs on an Advanced Mezzanine Card in MicroTCA crate. The upgraded system will benefit from the ability to process complex algorithms with DSP slices and increased processing resources with optical links running at 10 Gbit/s, enabling more algorithms at a time than previously possible and allowing CMS to be more flexible in how it handles the trigger bandwidth. In order to handle the increased complexity of the trigger menu implemented on the upgraded Global Trigger, a set of new software has been developed. The software allows a physicist to define a menu with analysis-like triggers using intuitive user interface. The menu is then realised on FPGAs with further software processing, instantiating predefined firmware blocks. The design and implementation of the software for preparing a menu for the upgraded CMS Global Trigger system are presented.

  5. The dangers of being trigger-happy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, J. E.; Haworth, T. J.; Bressert, E.

    2015-06-01

    We examine the evidence offered for triggered star formation against the backdrop provided by recent numerical simulations of feedback from massive stars at or below giant molecular cloud sizescales. We compile a catalogue of 67 observational papers, mostly published over the last decade, and examine the signposts most commonly used to infer the presence of triggered star formation. We then determine how well these signposts perform in a recent suite of hydrodynamic simulations of star formation including feedback from O-type stars performed by Dale et al. We find that none of the observational markers improve the chances of correctly identifying a given star as triggered by more than factors of 2 at most. This limits the fidelity of these techniques in interpreting star formation histories. We therefore urge caution in interpreting observations of star formation near feedback-driven structures in terms of triggering.

  6. A hypothesis for delayed dynamic earthquake triggering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.

    2005-01-01

    It's uncertain whether more near-field earthquakes are triggered by static or dynamic stress changes. This ratio matters because static earthquake interactions are increasingly incorporated into probabilistic forecasts. Recent studies were unable to demonstrate all predictions from the static-stress-change hypothesis, particularly seismicity rate reductions. However, current dynamic stress change hypotheses do not explain delayed earthquake triggering and Omori's law. Here I show numerically that if seismic waves can alter some frictional contacts in neighboring fault zones, then dynamic triggering might cause delayed triggering and an Omori-law response. The hypothesis depends on faults following a rate/state friction law, and on seismic waves changing the mean critical slip distance (Dc) at nucleation zones.

  7. Graphics Processing Units for HEP trigger systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammendola, R.; Bauce, M.; Biagioni, A.; Chiozzi, S.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Fantechi, R.; Fiorini, M.; Giagu, S.; Gianoli, A.; Lamanna, G.; Lonardo, A.; Messina, A.; Neri, I.; Paolucci, P. S.; Piandani, R.; Pontisso, L.; Rescigno, M.; Simula, F.; Sozzi, M.; Vicini, P.

    2016-07-01

    General-purpose computing on GPUs (Graphics Processing Units) is emerging as a new paradigm in several fields of science, although so far applications have been tailored to the specific strengths of such devices as accelerator in offline computation. With the steady reduction of GPU latencies, and the increase in link and memory throughput, the use of such devices for real-time applications in high-energy physics data acquisition and trigger systems is becoming ripe. We will discuss the use of online parallel computing on GPU for synchronous low level trigger, focusing on CERN NA62 experiment trigger system. The use of GPU in higher level trigger system is also briefly considered.

  8. New Fast Interaction Trigger for ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk

    2017-02-01

    The LHC heavy-ion luminosity and collision rate from 2021 onwards will considerably exceed the design parameters of the present ALICE forward trigger detectors and the introduction of the Muon Forward Tracker (MFT) will significantly reduce the space available for the new trigger detectors. To comply with these conditions a new Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT) will be built. FIT will be the main forward trigger, luminometer, and interaction-time detector. It will also determine multiplicity, centrality, and reaction plane of heavy-ion collisions. FIT will consist of two arrays of Cherenkov quartz radiators with MCP-PMT sensors and of a plastic scintillator ring. By increasing the overall acceptance of FIT, the scintillator will improve centrality and event plane resolution. It will also add sensitivity for the detection of beam-gas events and provide some degree of redundancy. FIT is currently undergoing an intense R&D and prototyping period. It is scheduled for installation in ALICE during 2020.

  9. Spark gaps synchronization using electrical trigger pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Ritu; Saroj, P.C.; Sharma, Archana; Roy, Vikas; Mittal, K.C.

    2014-07-01

    In pulse power systems, it is required to have synchronized triggering of two or more high voltage spark gaps capable of switching large currents, using electrical trigger pulses. This paper intends to study the synchronization of spark gaps using electrical trigger. The trigger generator consists of dc supply, IGBT switch and driver circuit which generates 8kV, 400ns (FWHM) pulses. The experiment was carried out using two 0.15uF/50kV energy storage capacitors charged to 12kV and discharged through stainless steel spark gaps of diameter 9 mm across 10 ohm non inductive load. The initial experiment shows that synchronization has been achieved with jitter of 50 to 100ns. Further studies carried out to reduce the jitter time by varying various electrical parameters will be presented. (author)

  10. Trigger circuits for the PHENIX electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, S.S.; Britton, C.L. Jr.; Winterberg, A.L.; Young, G.R.

    1997-11-01

    Monolithic and discrete circuits have been developed to provide trigger signals for the PHENIX electromagnetic calorimeter detector. These trigger circuits are deadtimeless and create overlapping 4 by 4 energy sums, a cosmic muon trigger, and a 144 channel energy sum. The front end electronics of the PHENIX system sample the energy and timing channels at each bunch crossing (BC) but it is not known immediately if this data is of interest. The information from the trigger circuits is used to determine if the data collected is of interest and should be digitized and stored or discarded. This paper presents details of the design, issues affecting circuit performance, characterization of prototypes fabricated in 1.2 {micro}m Orbit CMOS, and integration of the circuits into the EMCal electronics system.

  11. Session summary: Electronics, triggering and data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Rescia, S.

    1991-12-01

    The session focused on the requirements for calorimetry at the SSC/LHC. Results on new readout techniques, calibration, radiation hard electronics and semiconductor devices, analog and digital front and electronics, and trigger strategies are presented.

  12. Remotely triggered nonvolcanic tremor in Sumbawa, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, F.; Lupi, M.; Miller, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    We present, for the first time, evidence for triggered tremor beneath the island of Sumbawa, Indonesia. We show triggered tremor in response to three teleseismic earthquakes: the Mw9.0 2011 Tohoku earthquake and two oceanic strike-slip earthquakes (Mw 8.6 and Mw8.2) offshore of Sumatra in 2012. We constrain an apparent triggering threshold of 1 mm/s ground velocity that corresponds to about 8 kPa dynamic stress. Peak tremor amplitudes of about 180 nm/s are observed, and scale with the ground velocity induced by the remote earthquakes. Triggered tremor responds to 45-65 s period surface waves and predominantly correlates with Rayleigh waves, even though the 2012 oceanic events have stronger Love wave amplitudes. We could not locate the tremor because of minimal station coverage, but data indicate several potential source volumes including the Flores Thrust, the Java subduction zone, or Tambora volcano.

  13. The occurrence of earthquake-triggered landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahramani, M.; Evans, S. G.; Natural Disaster Systems Research Group

    2011-12-01

    A database containing 136 landslide-triggering earthquakes worldwide, with magnitudes greater than the minimum observed threshold for causing landslides (M4.5), has been compiled for the period of 1998 -2009. Our data sources include a comprehensive review of the existing literature on earthquake-triggered landslides, and also a USGS-based earthquake catalog (PAGER-CAT) which contains information on earthquake-induced secondary events. Only 14 earthquakes out of 136 seismic events induced significant numbers of landslides (>250). We compared the number of landslide-triggering earthquakes with the total number of earthquakes with M ≥ 4.5 (n=68,734) during the same period of time. The result shows only 0.2 percent of earthquakes triggered landslides and only 4.5% of earthquakes of M > 6 resulted in the occurrence of earthquake-triggered landslides. In addition, we compiled a database of 37 large-scale landslides, involving initial failure volumes of greater than 20 Mm3 that occurred worldwide in the period of 1900 to 2010. The database contains large-scale earthquake-triggered (n=18) and non-earthquake-triggered landslides (n=19) (ETL and NETL respectively), i.e., ca. 50% of large-scale landslides were induced by seismic activity. Surprisingly, the volume-temporal frequency curves of ETL and NETL show almost identical slope and intercept. Thus for a given volume, the annual frequency of ETL is almost identical to NETL in the 110 year period. We found that, in contrast to previous studies, the volume of the largest landslide triggered by a given landslide-triggering earthquake is not found to be a function of earthquake magnitude. We calculated peak ground acceleration (PGA) for the 18 large-scale ETLs at the site of each occurrence. PGA values in the range of 0.02 g to 0.35 g were obtained. We show that PGA values are well-correlated with the volume of landslides below a threshold of ca. 100 Mm3. Above this threshold, the relationship between PGA and ETL volume

  14. Dynamic stresses, Coulomb failure, and remote triggering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, D.P.

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic stresses associated with crustal surface waves with 15-30-sec periods and peak amplitudes 5 km). The latter is consistent with the observation that extensional or transtensional tectonic regimes are more susceptible to remote triggering by Rayleigh-wave dynamic stresses than compressional or transpressional regimes. Locally elevated pore pressures may have a role in the observed prevalence of dynamic triggering in extensional regimes and geothermal/volcanic systems.

  15. Diclofenac: a new trigger of pemphigus vulgaris?

    PubMed

    Matz, H; Bialy-Golan, A; Brenner, S

    1997-01-01

    Many drugs have been shown to induce pemphigus, including thiol and nonthiol drugs. We present a case of pemphigus vulgaris where a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication, diclofenac in suppositories and topical gel preparations, is suspected of having triggered the disease. The temporal relationship between drug and outbreak of disease together with the positive migration inhibition factor test to diclofenac point to the possible involvement of this drug in triggering pemphigus vulgaris.

  16. A Gamma-Ray Burst Trigger Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The detection rate of a gamma-ray burst detector can be increased by using a count rate trigger with many accumulation times DELTAt and energy bands DELTAE Because a burst's peak flux varies when averaged over different DELTAt and DELTAE the nominal sensitivity (the numerical value of the peak flux) of a trigger system is less important than how much fainter a burst could be at the detection threshold as DELTAt and DELTAE are changed. The relative sensitivity of different triggers can be quantified by referencing the detection threshold back to the peak flux for a fiducial value of DELTAt and DELTA E. This mapping between peak flux values for different sets of DELTAt and DELTAE varies from burst to burst. Quantitative estimates of the burst detection rate for a given detector and trigger system can be based on the observed rate at a measured peak flux value in this fiducial trigger. Predictions of a proposed trigger's burst detection rate depend on the assumed burst population, and these predictions can be wildly in error for triggers that differ significantly from previous missions. I base the fiducial rate on the BATSE observations: 550 bursts per sky above a peak flux of 0.3 ph per square centimeter per second averaged over DELTAt=1.024 sec and DELTAE=50-300 keV. Using a sample of 100 burst lightcurves I find that triggering on any value of DELTAt that is a multiple of 0.064 sec decreases the average threshold peak flux on the 1.024 sec timescale by a factor of 0.6. Extending DELTAE to lower energies includes the large flux of the X-ray background, increasing the background count rate. Consequently a low energy DELTAE is advantageous only for very soft bursts. Whether a large fraction of the population of bright bursts is soft is disputed; the new population of X-ray Flashes is soft but relatively faint.

  17. Tremor, remote triggering and earthquake cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Deep tectonic tremor and episodic slow-slip events have been observed at major plate-boundary faults around the Pacific Rim. These events have much longer source durations than regular earthquakes, and are generally located near or below the seismogenic zone where regular earthquakes occur. Tremor and slow-slip events appear to be extremely stress sensitive, and could be instantaneously triggered by distant earthquakes and solid earth tides. However, many important questions remain open. For example, it is still not clear what are the necessary conditions for tremor generation, and how remote triggering could affect large earthquake cycle. Here I report a global search of tremor triggered by recent large teleseismic earthquakes. We mainly focus on major subduction zones around the Pacific Rim. These include the southwest and northeast Japan subduction zones, the Hikurangi subduction zone in New Zealand, the Cascadia subduction zone, and the major subduction zones in Central and South America. In addition, we examine major strike-slip faults around the Caribbean plate, the Queen Charlotte fault in northern Pacific Northwest Coast, and the San Andreas fault system in California. In each place, we first identify triggered tremor as a high-frequency non-impulsive signal that is in phase with the large-amplitude teleseismic waves. We also calculate the dynamic stress and check the triggering relationship with the Love and Rayleigh waves. Finally, we calculate the triggering potential with the local fault orientation and surface-wave incident angles. Our results suggest that tremor exists at many plate-boundary faults in different tectonic environments, and could be triggered by dynamic stress as low as a few kPas. In addition, we summarize recent observations of slow-slip events and earthquake swarms triggered by large distant earthquakes. Finally, we propose several mechanisms that could explain apparent clustering of large earthquakes around the world.

  18. Global Search of Triggered Tectonic Tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Z.; Aiken, C.; Chao, K.; Gonzalez-Huizar, H.; Wang, B.; Ojha, L.; Yang, H.

    2013-05-01

    Deep tectonic tremor has been observed at major plate-boundary faults around the Pacific Rim. While regular or ambient tremor occurs spontaneously or accompanies slow-slip events, tremor could be also triggered by large distant earthquakes and solid earth tides. Because triggered tremor occurs on the same fault patches as ambient tremor and is relatively easy to identify, a systematic global search of triggered tremor could help to identify the physical mechanisms and necessary conditions for tremor generation. Here we conduct a global search of tremor triggered by large teleseismic earthquakes. We mainly focus on major faults with significant strain accumulations where no tremor has been reported before. These includes subduction zones in Central and South America, strike-slip faults around the Caribbean plate, the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather fault system and the Denali fault in the western Canada and Alaska, the Sumatra-Java subduction zone, the Himalaya frontal thrust faults, as well as major strike-slip faults around Tibet. In each region, we first compute the predicted dynamic stresses σd from global earthquakes with magnitude>=5.0 in the past 20 years, and select events with σd > 1 kPa. Next, we download seismic data recorded by stations from local or global seismic networks, and identify triggered tremor as a high-frequency non-impulsive signal that is in phase with the large-amplitude teleseismic waves. In cases where station distributions are dense enough, we also locate tremor based on the standard envelope cross-correlation techniques. Finally, we calculate the triggering potential for the Love and Rayleigh waves with the local fault orientation and surface-wave incident angles. So far we have found several new places that are capable of generating triggered tremor. We will summarize these observations and discuss their implications on physical mechanisms of tremor and remote triggering.

  19. 10 Joule High Voltage Trigger Micro Marx

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    A low energy Marx generator makes a convenient trigger for various spark gaps. With an output around 200 kV and a rise time less than 2 ns, the micro... Marx can multichannel field distortion gaps or fire a number of gaps without much gap-to-gap isolation. This design features small size, low cost, and good triggering characteristics. The complete unit is shown in Fig. 1.

  20. Comment on "Tail reconnection triggering substorm onset".

    PubMed

    Lui, A T Y

    2009-06-12

    Angelopoulos et al. (Research Articles, 15 August 2008, p. 931) reported that magnetic reconnection in Earth's magnetotail triggered the onset of a magnetospheric substorm. We provide evidence that (i) near-Earth current disruption, occurring before the conventional tail reconnection signatures, triggered the onset; (ii) the observed auroral intensification and tail reconnection are not causally linked; and (iii) the onset they identified is a continuation of earlier substorm activities.

  1. Average Characteristics of Triggered and Nontriggered Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Tung-Shin; McPherron, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic field data from ground stations, geosynchronous orbit, and magnetotail are examined to study the response to substorm activity with and without apparent interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) perturbations. Global substorms are identified using a sudden, persistent decrease in the AL index. The onset of this global expansion is taken to be the time of the Pi2 burst nearest to the beginning of the AL decrease. IMF triggers were identified subjectively through visual scanning of the data. Both northward turnings of the IMF B, and decreases in the amplitude of the By component were considered as possible triggers. Two different solar wind monitors were used in the investigation: IMP 8 in a circular orbit with a distance between approx.12 and approx.35 R(sub E) from the Earth-Sun line and ISEE 2 in an elliptical orbit with a distance of only approx.5- 10 R(sub E) from the Earth-Sun line. The results of superposed epoch analysis show that the temporal response from ground stations, geosynchronous orbit, and magnetotail are nearly identical for triggered (with apparent IMF perturbation) and nontriggered (without apparent IMF perturbation) substorms. It is therefore concluded that the nontriggered substorms are not a different form of activity than triggered substorms. However, we demonstrate that the magnitude of the response is different for the two types of substo&. By every measure considered, triggered substorm are systematically larger than nontriggered substorms. We interpret the fact that nearly 40% of all substorms cannot be associated with an IMF trigger as evidence that substorms are caused by an internal instability. However, the fact that so many appear to be triggered suggests that this internal instability is susceptible to external perturbations by the IMF. The fact that triggered substorms are larger than nontriggered substorms is counterintuitive, and we have no explanation for the observation.

  2. Commissioning of the CMS High Level Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Agostino, Lorenzo; et al.

    2009-08-01

    The CMS experiment will collect data from the proton-proton collisions delivered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a centre-of-mass energy up to 14 TeV. The CMS trigger system is designed to cope with unprecedented luminosities and LHC bunch-crossing rates up to 40 MHz. The unique CMS trigger architecture only employs two trigger levels. The Level-1 trigger is implemented using custom electronics, while the High Level Trigger (HLT) is based on software algorithms running on a large cluster of commercial processors, the Event Filter Farm. We present the major functionalities of the CMS High Level Trigger system as of the starting of LHC beams operations in September 2008. The validation of the HLT system in the online environment with Monte Carlo simulated data and its commissioning during cosmic rays data taking campaigns are discussed in detail. We conclude with the description of the HLT operations with the first circulating LHC beams before the incident occurred the 19th September 2008.

  3. Upgrade of the trigger system of CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeitler, Manfred; CMS Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    Various parts of the CMS trigger and in particular the Level-1 hardware trigger will be upgraded to cope with increasing luminosity, using more selective trigger conditions at Level 1 and improving the reliability of the system. Many trigger subsystems use FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) in the electronics and will benefit from developments in this technology, allowing us to place much more logic into a single FPGA chip, thus reducing the number of chips, electronic boards and interconnections and in this way improving reliability. A number of subsystems plan to switch from the old VME bus to the new microTCA crate standard. Using similar approaches, identical modules and common software wherever possible will reduce costs and manpower requirements and improve the serviceability of the whole trigger system. The computer-farm based High-Level Trigger will not only be extended by using increasing numbers of more powerful PCs but there are also concepts for making it more robust and the software easier to maintain, which will result in better efficiency of the whole system.

  4. The ALICE electromagnetic calorimeter high level triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronchetti, F.; Blanco, F.; Figueredo, M.; Knospe, A. G.; Xaplanteris, L.

    2012-12-01

    The ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) detector yields a huge sample of data from different sub-detectors. On-line data processing is applied to select and reduce the volume of the stored data. ALICE applies a multi-level hardware trigger scheme where fast detectors are used to feed a three-level (L0, L1, and L2) deep chain. The High-Level Trigger (HLT) is a fourth filtering stage sitting logically between the L2 trigger and the data acquisition event building. The EMCal detector comprises a large area electromagnetic calorimeter that extends the momentum measurement of photons and neutral mesons up to pT = 250 GeV/c, which improves the ALICE capability to perform jet reconstruction with measurement of the neutral energy component of jets. An online reconstruction and trigger chain has been developed within the HLT framework to sharpen the EMCal hardware triggers, by combining the central barrel tracking information with the shower reconstruction (clusters) in the calorimeter. In the present report the status and the functionality of the software components developed for the EMCal HLT online reconstruction and trigger chain will be discussed, as well as preliminary results from their commissioning performed during the 2011 LHC running period.

  5. The Zeus calorimeter first level trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.J.

    1989-04-01

    The design of the Zeus Detector Calorimeter Level Trigger is presented. The Zeus detector is being built for operation at HERA, a new storage ring that will provide collisions between 820 GeV protons and 30 GeV electrons in 1990. The calorimeter is made of depleted uranium plates and plastic scintillator read out by wavelength shifter bars into 12,864 photomultiplier tubes. These signals are combined into 974 trigger towers with separate electromagnetic and hadronic sums. The calorimeter first level trigger is pipelined with a decision provided 5 {mu}sec after each beam crossing, occurring every 96 nsec. The trigger determines the total energy, the total transverse energy, the missing energy, and the energy and number of isolated electrons and muons. It also provides information on the number and energy of clusters. The trigger rate needs to be held to 1 kHz against a rate of proton-beam gas interactions of approximately 500 kHz. The summed trigger tower pulseheights are digitized by flash ADC`s. The digital values are linearized, stored and used for sums and pattern tests.

  6. Trigger finger, tendinosis, and intratendinous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lundin, A-C; Aspenberg, P; Eliasson, P

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis of trigger finger has generally been ascribed to primary changes in the first annular ligament. In contrast, we recently found histological changes in the tendons, similar to the findings in Achilles tendinosis or tendinopathy. We therefore hypothesized that trigger finger tendons would show differences in gene expression in comparison to normal tendons in a pattern similar to what is published for Achilles tendinosis. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on biopsies from finger flexor tendons, 13 trigger fingers and 13 apparently healthy control tendons, to assess the expression of 10 genes which have been described to be differently expressed in tendinosis (collagen type 1a1, collagen 3a1, MMP-2, MMP-3, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-3, aggrecan, biglycan, decorin, and versican). In trigger finger tendons, collagen types 1a1 and 3a1, aggrecan and biglycan were all up-regulated, and MMP-3and TIMP-3 were down-regulated. These changes were statistically significant and have been previously described for Achilles tendinosis. The remaining four genes were not significantly altered. The changes in gene expression support the hypothesis that trigger finger is a form of tendinosis. Because trigger finger is a common condition, often treated surgically, it could provide opportunities for clinical research on tendinosis. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Laser microphone

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2000-11-14

    A microphone for detecting sound pressure waves includes a laser resonator having a laser gain material aligned coaxially between a pair of first and second mirrors for producing a laser beam. A reference cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors for transmitting a reference portion of the laser beam between the mirrors. A sensing cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors, and is laterally displaced from the reference cell for transmitting a signal portion of the laser beam, with the sensing cell being open for receiving the sound waves. A photodetector is disposed in optical communication with the first mirror for receiving the laser beam, and produces an acoustic signal therefrom for the sound waves.

  8. Laser sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatenko, A. A.; Revina, E. I.

    2015-10-01

    The review is devoted to the major advances in laser sampling. The advantages and drawbacks of the technique are considered. Specific features of combinations of laser sampling with various instrumental analytical methods, primarily inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, are discussed. Examples of practical implementation of hybrid methods involving laser sampling as well as corresponding analytical characteristics are presented. The bibliography includes 78 references.

  9. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2004-01-13

    Sequenced pulses of light from an excitation laser with at least two resonator cavities with separate output couplers are directed through a light modulator and a first polarzing analyzer. A portion of the light not rejected by the first polarizing analyzer is transported through a first optical fiber into a first ignitor laser rod in an ignitor laser. Another portion of the light is rejected by the first polarizing analyzer and directed through a halfwave plate into a second polarization analyzer. A first portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer passes through the second polarization analyzer to a second, oscillator, laser rod in the ignitor laser. A second portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer is redirected by the second polarization analyzer to a second optical fiber which delays the beam before the beam is combined with output of the first ignitor laser rod. Output of the second laser rod in the ignitor laser is directed into the first ignitor laser rod which was energized by light passing through the first polarizing analyzer. Combined output of the first ignitor laser rod and output of the second optical fiber is focused into a combustible fuel where the first short duration, high peak power pulse from the ignitor laser ignites the fuel and the second long duration, low peak power pulse directly from the excitation laser sustains the combustion.

  10. The Topo-trigger: a new concept of stereo trigger system for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Coto, R.; Mazin, D.; Paoletti, R.; Blanch Bigas, O.; Cortina, J.

    2016-04-01

    Imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) such as the Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescopes endeavor to reach the lowest possible energy threshold. In doing so the trigger system is a key element. Reducing the trigger threshold is hampered by the rapid increase of accidental triggers generated by ambient light (the so-called Night Sky Background NSB). In this paper we present a topological trigger, dubbed Topo-trigger, which rejects events on the basis of their relative orientation in the telescope cameras. We have simulated and tested the trigger selection algorithm in the MAGIC telescopes. The algorithm was tested using MonteCarlo simulations and shows a rejection of 85% of the accidental stereo triggers while preserving 99% of the gamma rays. A full implementation of this trigger system would achieve an increase in collection area between 10 and 20% at the energy threshold. The analysis energy threshold of the instrument is expected to decrease by ~ 8%. The selection algorithm was tested on real MAGIC data taken with the current trigger configuration and no γ-like events were found to be lost.

  11. Perceived triggers of asthma: evaluation of a German version of the Asthma Trigger Inventory.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Thomas; Kullowatz, Antje; Kanniess, Frank; Dahme, Bernhard; Magnussen, Helgo

    2008-03-01

    Patients' perception of asthma triggers has been explored in a largely unstructured fashion in the past. Therefore, we developed the Asthma Trigger Inventory (ATI), a questionnaire that allows for a psychometrically valid measurement of patients' perceived asthma triggers. Here we evaluate a German language version of the ATI and studied the relationship of subscales with self-reported health status, health care use, psychopathology, and results of allergy skin testing. Data were obtained from 370 asthma patients recruited from the community, primary care, and in-patient asthma treatment and education. Analysis revealed a five-factor structure that largely confirmed results with the English original. Reliability was good to satisfactory (Cronbach's alpha=0.77-0.89) for allergy, exercise, air pollution/irritants, infection, and psychological trigger subscales. In hierarchical regression analysis adjusting for demographics and asthma severity, asthma patients with stronger non-allergic triggers showed less physical and mental well-being and more asthma-related health care use. Psychological triggers showed unique associations with anxious and depressed mood. Pollen and animal allergen scores of the ATI were significantly related to skin test results for relevant allergens. Non-allergic but not allergic triggers showed substantial associations with asthma control. The German version of the ATI reliably measures asthma patients' trigger perceptions. Non-specific asthma triggers exert a greater burden on patients' well-being and primary health care use.

  12. Transient triggering of near and distant earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Blanpied, M.L.; Beeler, N.M.

    1997-01-01

    We demonstrate qualitatively that frictional instability theory provides a context for understanding how earthquakes may be triggered by transient loads associated with seismic waves from near and distance earthquakes. We assume that earthquake triggering is a stick-slip process and test two hypotheses about the effect of transients on the timing of instabilities using a simple spring-slider model and a rate- and state-dependent friction constitutive law. A critical triggering threshold is implicit in such a model formulation. Our first hypothesis is that transient loads lead to clock advances; i.e., transients hasten the time of earthquakes that would have happened eventually due to constant background loading alone. Modeling results demonstrate that transient loads do lead to clock advances and that the triggered instabilities may occur after the transient has ceased (i.e., triggering may be delayed). These simple "clock-advance" models predict complex relationships between the triggering delay, the clock advance, and the transient characteristics. The triggering delay and the degree of clock advance both depend nonlinearly on when in the earthquake cycle the transient load is applied. This implies that the stress required to bring about failure does not depend linearly on loading time, even when the fault is loaded at a constant rate. The timing of instability also depends nonlinearly on the transient loading rate, faster rates more rapidly hastening instability. This implies that higher-frequency and/or longer-duration seismic waves should increase the amount of clock advance. These modeling results and simple calculations suggest that near (tens of kilometers) small/moderate earthquakes and remote (thousands of kilometers) earthquakes with magnitudes 2 to 3 units larger may be equally effective at triggering seismicity. Our second hypothesis is that some triggered seismicity represents earthquakes that would not have happened without the transient load (i

  13. CW laser pumped emerald laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.; Lai, S.T.

    1984-02-01

    A CW laser-pumped emerald laser is reported. A 34 percent output power slope efficiency is observed with longitudinal pumping by a krypton laser in a nearly concentric cavity. The laser has been tuned from 728.8 to 809.0 nm. Losses in emerald are larger than those of alexandrite determined in a similar cavity. The present data also indicate that the excited state absorption minimum is shifted from that of alexandrite. 13 references.

  14. Laser-induced crystallization and crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Teruki; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2011-11-04

    Recent streams of laser studies on crystallization and crystal growth are summarized and reviewed. Femtosecond multiphoton excitation of solutions leads to their ablation at the focal point, inducing local bubble formation, shockwave propagation, and convection flow. This phenomenon, called "laser micro tsunami" makes it possible to trigger crystallization of molecules and proteins from their supersaturated solutions. Femtosecond laser ablation of a urea crystal in solution triggers the additional growth of a single daughter crystal. Intense continuous wave (CW) near infrared laser irradiation at the air/solution interface of heavy-water amino acid solutions results in trapping of the clusters and evolves to crystallization. A single crystal is always prepared in a spatially and temporally controlled manner, and the crystal polymorph of glycine depends on laser power, polarization, and solution concentration. Upon irradiation at the glass/solution interface, a millimeter-sized droplet is formed, and a single crystal is formed by shifting the irradiation position to the surface. Directional and selective crystal growth is also possible with laser trapping. Finally, characteristics of laser-induced crystallization and crystal growth are summarized.

  15. Cutaneous lasers.

    PubMed

    Fedok, Fred G; Garritano, Frank; Portela, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    There has been a remarkable development and evolution of laser technology, leading to adaptation of lasers for medical use and the treatment of skin problems and disorders. Many treatments that required incisional surgery and other invasive methods are now preferentially treated with a laser. Although laser advances have resulted in the availability of some amazing tools, they require the clinical skill and judgment of the clinician for their optimal use. This article provides a clinically oriented overview of many of the lasers valuable in facial plastic surgery. Basic science, clinical adaptations, and patient management topics are covered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2004-11-23

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  17. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-07-10

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  18. Note: Optical trigger device with sub-picosecond timing jitter and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodet, Jan; Prochazka, Ivan

    2012-03-01

    We are presenting the design, construction, and overall performance of the optical trigger device. This device generates an electrical signal synchronously to the detected ultra-short optical pulse. The device was designed for application in satellite laser ranging and laser time transfer experiments, time correlated photon counting and similar experiments, where picosecond timing resolution and detection delay stability are required. It consists of the ultrafast optical detector, signal discriminator, output pulse forming circuit, and output driver circuits. It was constructed as a single compact device to optimize their matching and maintain stability. The detector consists of an avalanche photodiode--both silicon and germanium types may be used to cover the wavelength range of 350-1550 nm. The analogue signal of this photodiode is sensed by the ultrafast comparator with 8 GHz bandwidth. The ps clock distribution circuit is used to generate the fast rise/fall time output pulses of pre-set length. The trigger device timing performance is excellent: the random component of the timing jitter is typically 880 fs, the temperature dependence of the detection delay was measured to be 370 fs/K. The systematic error contribution depends on the laser used and its stability. The sub-ps values have been obtained for various laser sources.

  19. Note: Optical trigger device with sub-picosecond timing jitter and stability.

    PubMed

    Kodet, Jan; Prochazka, Ivan

    2012-03-01

    We are presenting the design, construction, and overall performance of the optical trigger device. This device generates an electrical signal synchronously to the detected ultra-short optical pulse. The device was designed for application in satellite laser ranging and laser time transfer experiments, time correlated photon counting and similar experiments, where picosecond timing resolution and detection delay stability are required. It consists of the ultrafast optical detector, signal discriminator, output pulse forming circuit, and output driver circuits. It was constructed as a single compact device to optimize their matching and maintain stability. The detector consists of an avalanche photodiode--both silicon and germanium types may be used to cover the wavelength range of 350-1550 nm. The analogue signal of this photodiode is sensed by the ultrafast comparator with 8 GHz bandwidth. The ps clock distribution circuit is used to generate the fast rise/fall time output pulses of pre-set length. The trigger device timing performance is excellent: the random component of the timing jitter is typically 880 fs, the temperature dependence of the detection delay was measured to be 370 fs/K. The systematic error contribution depends on the laser used and its stability. The sub-ps values have been obtained for various laser sources.

  20. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2003-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In a third embodiment, alternating short and long pulses of light from the excitation light source are directed into the ignitor laser. Each of the embodiments of the invention can be multiplexed so as to provide laser light energy sequentially to more than one ignitor laser.

  1. Graphical processors for HEP trigger systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammendola, R.; Biagioni, A.; Chiozzi, S.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Di Lorenzo, S.; Fantechi, R.; Fiorini, M.; Frezza, O.; Lamanna, G.; Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Martinelli, M.; Neri, I.; Paolucci, P. S.; Pastorelli, E.; Piandani, R.; Pontisso, L.; Rossetti, D.; Simula, F.; Sozzi, M.; Vicini, P.

    2017-02-01

    General-purpose computing on GPUs is emerging as a new paradigm in several fields of science, although so far applications have been tailored to employ GPUs as accelerators in offline computations. With the steady decrease of GPU latencies and the increase in link and memory throughputs, time is ripe for real-time applications using GPUs in high-energy physics data acquisition and trigger systems. We will discuss the use of online parallel computing on GPUs for synchronous low level trigger systems, focusing on tests performed on the trigger of the CERN NA62 experiment. Latencies of all components need analysing, networking being the most critical. To keep it under control, we envisioned NaNet, an FPGA-based PCIe Network Interface Card (NIC) enabling GPUDirect connection. Moreover, we discuss how specific trigger algorithms can be parallelised and thus benefit from a GPU implementation, in terms of increased execution speed. Such improvements are particularly relevant for the foreseen LHC luminosity upgrade where highly selective algorithms will be crucial to maintain sustainable trigger rates with very high pileup.

  2. The D/Ø Silicon Track Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrück, Georg

    2003-09-01

    We describe a trigger preprocessor to be used by the D Ø experiment for selecting events with tracks from the decay of long-lived particles. This Level 2 impact parameter trigger utilizes information from the Silicon Microstrip Tracker to reconstruct tracks with improved spatial and momentum resolutions compared to those obtained by the Level 1 tracking trigger. It is constructed of VME boards with much of the logic existing in programmable processors. A common motherboard provides the I/O infrastructure and three different daughter boards perform the tasks of identifying the roads from the tracking trigger data, finding the clusters in the roads in the silicon detector, and fitting tracks to the clusters. This approach provides flexibility for the design, testing and maintenance phases of the project. The track parameters are provided to the trigger framework in 25 μs. The effective impact parameter resolution for high-momentum tracks is 35 μm, dominated by the size of the Tevatron beam.

  3. Tau Trigger at the ATLAS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Benslama, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Belanger-Champange, C.; Brenner, R.; Bosman, M.; Casado, P.; Osuna, C.; Perez, E.; Vorwerk, V.; Czyczula, Z.; Dam, M.; Xella, S.; Demers, S.; Farrington, S.; Igonkina, O.; Kanaya, N.; Tsuno, S.; Ptacek, E.; Reinsch, A.; Strom, David M.; Torrence, E.; /Oregon U. /Sydney U. /Lancaster U. /Birmingham U.

    2011-11-09

    Many theoretical models, like the Standard Model or SUSY at large tan({beta}), predict Higgs bosons or new particles which decay more abundantly to final states including tau leptons than to other leptons. At the energy scale of the LHC, the identification of tau leptons, in particular in the hadronic decay mode, will be a challenging task due to an overwhelming QCD background which gives rise to jets of particles that can be hard to distinguish from hadronic tau decays. Equipped with excellent tracking and calorimetry, the ATLAS experiment has developed tau identification tools capable of working at the trigger level. This contribution presents tau trigger algorithms which exploit the main features of hadronic tau decays and describes the current tau trigger commissioning activities. Many of the SM processes being investigated at ATLAS, as well as numerous BSM searches, contain tau leptons in their final states. Being able to trigger effectively on the tau leptons in these events will contribute to the success of the ATLAS experiment. The tau trigger algorithms and monitoring infrastructure are ready for the first data, and are being tested with the data collected with cosmic muons. The development of efficiency measurements methods using QCD and Z {yields} {tau}{tau} events is well advanced.

  4. Trigger points – ultrasound and thermal findings

    PubMed Central

    Cojocaru, MC; Cojocaru, IM; Voiculescu, VM; Cojan-Carlea, NA; Dumitru, VL; Berteanu, M

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Muscle pain can be elicited by any irritation of the nociceptors in the muscle or central sensitization in the central nervous system. The most frequently described muscle pain syndromes are myofascial pain syndrome and fibromyalgia syndrome. Myofascial pain syndrome has a more localized manifestation, the trigger points. Objective: If there is a correlation between the clinical findings, the ultrasound examination and the thermal pattern of trigger points exist. Material and method: The presence of trigger points can be identified by using clinical criteria. An ultrasound examination was performed to evaluate the trigger point dimensions. The ultrasound showed an ellipsoidal hypoechogenic area in the muscle. A thermography of the low back region was performed in order to observe the thermal pattern of the area. Results: Trigger points are represented by a higher temperature area surrounded by a cooler area, probably caused by a deficit in the blood flow around those points. Discussion: Infrared thermography could be a great asset for the monitoring of neuromusculoskeletal disorders and their dynamics, as well as an important aid for the initial diagnosis of conditions associated with tissue temperature alterations. PMID:26351532

  5. Controllable mode multistability in microring lasers.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Guohui; Wang, Zhuoran

    2013-04-22

    We investigate mode multistability, i.e. coexistence of direction bistability and wavelength bi/multistability in microring lasers (MRLs) theoretically and numerically. We derive the expressions for conditions required for mode multistable operation in microring lasers based on a nonlinear multimode model with nonlinear effects stemming from carrier density pulsation, carrier heating and spectral hole burning included. We find theoretically that lasing mode can be selected from the multistable modes by external optical injection through gain saturation, and removal of the external optical injection will not affect the stability of the established lasing mode. Numerical results on all-optical multistate flip-flop function demonstrate that switching between multistable modes can be induced by trigger signals with each states self-sustained after the removal of the trigger signals in a 50µm-radius microring laser.

  6. The UA1 upgrade calorimeter trigger processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bains, N.; Baird, S. A.; Biddulph, P.; Campbell, D.; Cawthraw, M.; Charlton, D.; Coughlan, J.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellis, N.; Fensome, I. F.; Flynn, P.; Galagedera, S.; Garvey, J.; Grayer, G.; Gregory, J.; Halsall, R.; Jimack, M. P.; Jovanovic, P.; Kenyon, I. R.; Landon, M.; Oliver, J.; Robinson, D.; Shah, T. P.; Stephens, R.; Sumorok, K.

    1990-07-01

    The increased luminosity of the improved CERN Collider and the more subtle signals of second-generation collider physics demand increasingly sophisticated triggering. We have built a new first-levl trigger processor designed to use the excellent granularity of the UA1 upgrade calorimeter. This device is entirely digital and handles events in 1.5 μs, thus introducing no dead time. Its most novel feature is fast two-dimensional electromagnetic cluster-finding with the possibility of demanding an isolated shower of limited penetration. The processor allows multiple combinations of triggers on electromagnetic shower, hadronic jets and energy sums, including a total-energy veto of multiple interactions and a full vector sum of missing transverse energy. This hard-wired processor is about five times more powerful than its predecess or, and makes extensive use of pipelining techniques. It was used extensively in the 1988 and 1989 runs of the CERN Collider.

  7. Self-triggering superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Xing [Albany, NY; Tekletsadik, Kasegn [Rexford, NY

    2008-10-21

    A modular and scaleable Matrix Fault Current Limiter (MFCL) that functions as a "variable impedance" device in an electric power network, using components made of superconducting and non-superconducting electrically conductive materials. The matrix fault current limiter comprises a fault current limiter module that includes a superconductor which is electrically coupled in parallel with a trigger coil, wherein the trigger coil is magnetically coupled to the superconductor. The current surge doing a fault within the electrical power network will cause the superconductor to transition to its resistive state and also generate a uniform magnetic field in the trigger coil and simultaneously limit the voltage developed across the superconductor. This results in fast and uniform quenching of the superconductors, significantly reduces the burnout risk associated with non-uniformity often existing within the volume of superconductor materials. The fault current limiter modules may be electrically coupled together to form various "n" (rows).times."m" (columns) matrix configurations.

  8. Earthquake triggering by transient and static deformations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Beeler, N.M.; Blanpied, M.L.; Bodin, P.

    1998-01-01

    Observational evidence for both static and transient near-field and far-field triggered seismicity are explained in terms of a frictional instability model, based on a single degree of freedom spring-slider system and rate- and state-dependent frictional constitutive equations. In this study a triggered earthquake is one whose failure time has been advanced by ??t (clock advance) due to a stress perturbation. Triggering stress perturbations considered include square-wave transients and step functions, analogous to seismic waves and coseismic static stress changes, respectively. Perturbations are superimposed on a constant background stressing rate which represents the tectonic stressing rate. The normal stress is assumed to be constant. Approximate, closed-form solutions of the rate-and-state equations are derived for these triggering and background loads, building on the work of Dieterich [1992, 1994]. These solutions can be used to simulate the effects of static and transient stresses as a function of amplitude, onset time t0, and in the case of square waves, duration. The accuracies of the approximate closed-form solutions are also evaluated with respect to the full numerical solution and t0. The approximate solutions underpredict the full solutions, although the difference decreases as t0, approaches the end of the earthquake cycle. The relationship between ??t and t0 differs for transient and static loads: a static stress step imposed late in the cycle causes less clock advance than an equal step imposed earlier, whereas a later applied transient causes greater clock advance than an equal one imposed earlier. For equal ??t, transient amplitudes must be greater than static loads by factors of several tens to hundreds depending on t0. We show that the rate-and-state model requires that the total slip at failure is a constant, regardless of the loading history. Thus a static load applied early in the cycle, or a transient applied at any time, reduces the stress

  9. Use of GPUs in Trigger Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamanna, Gianluca

    In recent years the interest for using graphics processor (GPU) in general purpose high performance computing is constantly rising. In this paper we discuss the possible use of GPUs to construct a fast and effective real time trigger system, both in software and hardware levels. In particular, we study the integration of such a system in the NA62 trigger. The first application of GPUs for rings pattern recognition in the RICH will be presented. The results obtained show that there are not showstoppers in trigger systems with relatively low latency. Thanks to the use of off-the-shelf technology, in continous development for purposes related to video game and image processing market, the architecture described would be easily exported to other experiments, to build a versatile and fully customizable online selection.

  10. Triggering of volcanic eruptions by large earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Takeshi

    2017-08-01

    When a large earthquake occurs near an active volcano, there is often concern that volcanic eruptions may be triggered by the earthquake. In this study, recently accumulated, reliable data were analyzed to quantitatively evaluate the probability of the occurrence of new eruptions of volcanoes located near the epicenters of large earthquakes. For volcanoes located within 200 km of large earthquakes of magnitude 7.5 or greater, the eruption occurrence probability increases by approximately 50% for 5 years after the earthquake origin time. However, no significant increase in the occurrence probability of new eruptions was observed at distant volcanoes or for smaller earthquakes. The present results strongly suggest that new eruptions are likely triggered by static stress changes and/or strong ground motions caused by nearby large earthquakes. This is not similar to the previously presented evidence that volcanic earthquakes at distant volcanoes are remotely triggered by surface waves generated by large earthquakes.

  11. BTeV trigger/DAQ innovations

    SciTech Connect

    Votava, Margaret; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    BTeV was a proposed high-energy physics (HEP) collider experiment designed for the study of B-physics and CP Violation at the Tevatron at Fermilab. BTeV included a large-scale, high-speed trigger and data acquisition (DAQ) system, reading data from the detector at 500 Gbytes/sec and writing data to mass storage at a rate of 200 Mbytes/sec. The design of the trigger/DAQ system was innovative while remaining realistic in terms of technical feasibility, schedule and cost. This paper will give an overview of the BTeV trigger/DAQ architecture, highlight some of the technical challenges, and describe the approach that was used to solve these challenges.

  12. Newborn Observation Track and Trigger (NOTT) Chart.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mansoor; Phillips, Isabel; Karupaih, Ashok; Kamireddy, Haripriya; Manzoor, Azhar

    2016-03-01

    Use of early warning system scores and track-and-trigger charts is widespread in adult and paediatric hospitalized patients; but its use in neonatal group is not well recognized. The authors aimed to develop and implement neonatal observation track-and-trigger chart for use in babies on postnatal wards and to assess its efficacy in identifying neonates in need of urgent medical assessment and intervention. Core group developed Newborn Observation Track and Trigger (NOTT) chart for "At-Risk" and "At-High-Risk" Infants. A decision tree was devised based on 'low', 'medium' and 'high' scores. Sensitivity and specificity of