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Sample records for 60-hz fields estradiol

  1. Effects of 60-Hz fields, estradiol and xenoestrogens on human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, C.; Travis, C.; Garrett, S.; Henley, D.

    1996-10-01

    If exposure to xenoestrogens or electromagnetic fields (EMFs) such as 60 Hz contributes to the etiology of breast cancer, it is likely that they must stimulate the growth of breast cells, damage genetic material or enhance the effects of other mitogenic or mutagenic agents (co-promotion). Therefore, the ability of xenoestrogens or exposure to 60-Hz fields to stimulate the entry of growth-arrested human breast cancer cells into the cell cycle was determined using cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, synthesis of cyclin D1 and cdc2 activity. Exposure of estrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 or T-47D cells to estrogen and xenoestrogens (DDT and Red No.3) increased Cdk2 and cyclin B1-cdc2 activity and cyclin D1 synthesis. Exposure of breast cancer cells to 12 mG or 1 or 9 G electromagnetic fields at 60 Hz failed to stimulate Cdk2 or cyclin B1-cdc2 activity or cyclin D1 synthesis. Simultaneous co-exposure of cells to 60-Hz fields and chemical promoters did not enhance Cdk2 activation above the levels produced by the chemical promoter alone. Estrogen and xenoestrogens also stimulated binding of the estrogen receptor to the estrogen receptor element but the EMF did not. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) induced phosphorylation of p53 and pRb105 in MCF-7 cells, but EMF exposure had no effect. DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agents and Red Dye No. 3 were found to increase p53 site-specific DNA binding in breast cancer cells, but EMF exposure did not. These studies suggest that estrogen and xenoestrogens stimulate growth-arrested breast cancer cells to enter the growth cycle, but EMF exposure does not. Site-specific p53-DNA binding was increased in MCF-7 cells treated with DNA-damaging agents, but not by EMF exposure. EMF exposure does not appear to act as a promoter or DNA-damaging agent for human breast cancer cells in vitro. 34 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Endocrinological effects of strong 60-Hz electric fields on rats

    SciTech Connect

    Free, M.J.; Kaune, W.T.; Phillips, R.D.; Cheng, H.C.

    1981-01-01

    Adult male rats were exposed or sham-exposed to 60-Hz electric fields without spark discharges, ozone, or significant levels or other secondary variables. No effects were discharges, ozone, or significant levels of other secondary variables. No effects were observed on body weights or plasma hormone levels after 30 days of exposure at an effective field strength of 68 kV/m. After 120 days of exposure (effective field strength = 64 kV/m), effects were inconsistent, with signficant reductions in body weight and plasma levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and corticosterone occurring in one replicate experiment but not in the other. Plasma testosterone levels were significantly reduced after 120 days of exposure in one experiment, with a similar but not statistically significant reduction in a replicate experiment. Weanling rats, exposed or sham-exposed in electric fields with an effective field strength of 80 kV/m from 20 to 56 days of age, exhibited identical or closely similar growth trends in body and organ weights. Hormone levels in exposed and sham-exposed groups were also similar. However, there was an apparent phase shift between the two groups in the cyclic variations of concentrations of hormones at different stages of development, particularly with respect to follicle-stimulating hormone and corticosterone. We concluded that 60-Hz electric fields may bring about subtle changes in the endocrine system of rats, and that these changes may be related to alterations in episodic rhythms.

  3. Influence of 60-Hz magnetic fields on sea urchin development

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, S.; Zimmerman, A.M.; Winters, W.D.; Cameron, I.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Continuous exposure of sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) embryos at 18 degrees C to a cyclic 60-Hz magnetic field at 0.1 mT rms beginning 4 min after insemination caused a significant developmental delay during the subsequent 23 hours. No delay in development was recorded for periods up to 18 hours after fertilization. At 18 h, most embryos were in the mesenchyme blastula stage. At 23 h, most control embryos were in mid-gastrula whereas most magnetic-field-exposed embryos were in the early gastrula stage. Thus an estimated 1-h delay occurred between these developmental stages. The results are discussed in terms of possible magnetic-field modification of transcription as well as interference with cell migration during gastrulation. The present study extends and supports the growing body of information about potential effects of exposures to extremely-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields on developing organisms.

  4. Detection thresholds for 60 Hz electric fields by nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.; Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    Because responses of animals to detection of the presence of an electric field (EF) are a possible mechanism for production of biological effects, it is important to know what EF intensities are detectable. Operant methods were used to train six baboons (Papio cynocephalus) to perform a psychophysical task involving detection of EF presence. During the response phase of a trial, a subject responded on one push button to report the presence of the EF and on a different push button to report the absence of the EF. Correct reports of EF presence or absence produced delivery of food rewards. The subjects became proficient at performing this psychophysical detection task; during 35 days of testing, false alarm rates averaged 9%. The average EF detection threshold was 12 kV/m; the range of means among subjects was 5--15 kV/m. Two special test procedures confirmed that the subjects were responding directly to EF presence or absence and not to artifacts that might be associated with EF generation. The EF detection threshold of nonhuman primates is similar to thresholds reported for rats and humans.

  5. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Lucas, J.H.; Moore, G.T.; Orr, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    An overall description of this research program is presented. The objectives are to investigate using nonhuman primates, possible behavioral effects associated with exposure to high-intensity, 60 Hz, electric fields. 6 tabs.

  6. Brown-colored deposits on hair of female rats chronically exposed to 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, F.C.; Rommereim, D.N.; Miller, R.A.; Anderson, L.E. )

    1990-01-01

    An increased incidence and severity of a brownish coloration of hair has been observed around the nose and on the ears of female rats that were chronically exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Microscopic examination of the colored areas revealed a red-brown globular deposit on hair shafts in affected areas without signs of physical injury.

  7. Development toxicology study in rats exposed to 60-Hz horizontal magnetic fields. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1997-09-01

    A replicate study using large numbers of animals was conducted to determine if 60 Hz magnetic fields would produce developmental toxicity in rats. Systems used previously for electric field exposures were retrofitted to provide magnetic field exposures to small laboratory animals. Large coils, separated from the rat cages, were energized by computer-controlled function generators providing a relatively pure, 1,000--{micro}T (10 G), 60-Hz, horizontal magnetic field for the high exposure group. Leakage fields to a second system provided a second exposure group with average exposures of 0.61 {micro}T (6.1 mG). Ambient fields within a third (control) system were 0.09 {micro}T (0.9 mG). Replicate experiments were conducted in which female rats were mated, and sperm-positive females were randomly distributed among the three exposure groups: (0.09, 0.61, and 1,000 {micro}T). Pregnant animals were exposed to 60 Hz horizontal magnetic fields for 20 hr/day from mating until very near term, 20 days later.

  8. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Lucas, J.H.; Moore, G.T.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.; Taylor, L.L.; Tuttle, M.L.

    1987-10-24

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, possible behavioral effects associated with exposure to high intensity 60 Hz electric fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, will be used by the Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric fields associated with power transmission over high voltage lines. This research program consists of four major research projects, all of which have been successfully completed. The first project evaluated the potentially aversive character of exposure to 60 Hz electric fields by determining the threshold intensity that produces escape or avoidance responses. The second project estimated the threshold intensity for detection threshold was 12 kV/m; the range of means was 6 to 16 kV/m. The third project assessed, in separate experiments conducted at 30 and 60 kV/m, effects of chronic exposure to electric fields on the performance of two operant conditioning tasks, fixed ratio (FR), and differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL). In the same two experiments, the fourth project investigated, using the systematic quantitative observational sampling methods of primatology, the possible stress-inducing effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the behavior of baboons living in small social groups. 131 refs., 87 figs., 123 tabs.

  9. Effects of 60-Hz electric fields on specific humoral and cellular components of the immune system

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.E.; Phillips, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    Humoral and cellular functions of the immune system of Swiss-Webster mice were evaluated after exposure to 60-Hz electric fields at 100 kV/m. No significant differences were observed in primary antibody response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (precipitating antibody levels) between exposed (30 or 60 days) and control mice, nor were there significant changes in mitogen-stimulation response of spleen cells from mice similarly exposed for 90 or 150 days when compared to sham-exposed animals.

  10. 60-Hz electric-field effects on pineal melatonin rhythms: time course for onset and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.W.; Chess, E.K.; Anderson, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    Rats exposed for 3 weeks to uniform 60-Hz electric fields of 39 kV/m (effective field strength) failed to show normal pineal gland circadian rhythms in serotonin N-acetyl transferase activity and melatonin concentrations. The time required for recovery of the melatonin rhythm after cessation of field exposure was determined to be less than 3 days. The rapid recovery suggests that the overall metabolic competence of the pineal is not permanently compromised by electric-field exposure, and that the circadian rhythm effect may be neuronally mediated.

  11. Cytohistological analysis of roots whose growth is affected by a 60-Hz electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Brulfert, A.; Miller, M.W.; Robertson, D.; Dooley, D.A.; Economou, P.

    1985-01-01

    Roots of Pisum sativum were exposed for 48 h to 60-Hz electric fields of 430 V/m in an aqueous inorganic growth medium. The growth in length of the exposed roots was 44% of that for control roots. Root tips were analyzed for mitotic index and cell cycle duration. Mature, differentiated root sections from tissue produced after electrode energization were analyzed for cell lengths and number of files. The major reason for the observation that exposed roots are shorter than control roots is that cell elongation in the former is greatly diminished relative to controls. 15 references, 1 figures, 4 tables.

  12. Diurnal patterns in brain biogenic amines of rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, B.J.; Anderson, L.E.; Lowery, C.I.; Adey, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    Levels of brain neurotransmitters and their metabolites, as well as concentrations of enzymes associated with their synthesis and metabolism, fluctuate during the day in patterns defined as circadian. The present study examined these rhythms in albino rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Thirty-six animals were exposed to a 39 kV/m field for 4 weeks, 20 h/day, in a parallel-plate electrode system. A group of 36 sham animals was similarly handled and housed in a nonenergized exposure system. On the sampling day, animals were sacrificed at 4-h intervals throughout the 24-h day. Brains were removed, dissected, and kept frozen until chemically analyzed. The levels of biogenic amines and their acidic metabolites in the striatum, hypothalamus, and hippocampus were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) methods. Repeated exposure to 60-Hz electric fields produced significant alterations in the diurnal rhythms of several biogenic amines: dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC, the primary metabolite of dopamine in the rat) in the striatum, and norepinephrine, dopamine, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA; serotonin metabolite) in the hypothalamus. Levels of serotonin in the striatum and hypothalamus showed clear circadian patterns that was not affected by the field. No diurnal or field-related changes were observed in the hippocampal amines.

  13. Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia in rats exposed to intermittent 60 Hz magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L E; Morris, J E; Miller, D L; Rafferty, C N; Ebi, K L; Sasser, L B

    2001-04-01

    An animal model for large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia in male Fischer 344 rats was utilized to determine whether magnetic field exposure can be shown to influence the progression of leukemia. We previously reported that exposure to continuous 60 Hz, 1 mT magnetic fields did not significantly alter the clinical progression of LGL leukemia in young male rats following injection of spleen cells from donor leukemic rats. Results presented here extend those studies with the following objectives: (a) to replicate the previous study of continuous 60 Hz magnetic field exposures, but using fewer LGL cells in the inoculum, and (b) to determine if intermittent 60 Hz magnetic fields can alter the clinical progression of leukemia. Rats were randomly assigned to four treatment groups (18/group) as follows: (1) 1 mT (10 G) continuous field, (2) 1 mT intermittent field (off/on at 3 min intervals), (3) ambient controls ( < 0.1 microT), and (4) positive control (5 Gy whole body irradiation from cobalt-60 four days prior to initiation of exposure). All rats were injected intraperitoneally with 2.2 x 10(6) fresh, viable LGL leukemic spleen cells at the beginning of the study. The fields were activated for 20 h per day, 7 days per week, and all exposure conditions were superimposed over the natural ambient magnetic field. The rats were weighed and palpated for splenomegaly weekly. Splenomegaly developed 9-11 weeks after transplantation of the leukemia cells. Hematological evaluations were performed at 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 weeks of exposure. Peripheral blood hemoglobin concentration, red blood cells, and packed cell volume declined, and total white blood cells and LGL cells increased dramatically in all treatment groups after onset of leukemia. Although the positive control group showed different body weight curves and developed signs of leukemia earlier than other groups, differences were not detected between exposure groups and ambient controls. Furthermore, there were no

  14. Effects of a 60 Hz magnetic field on central cholinergic systems of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1993-03-15

    The authors studied the effects of an acute exposure to a 60 Hz magnetic field on sodium-dependent, high-affinity choline uptake in the brain of the rat. Decreases in uptake were observed in the frontal cortex and hippocampus after the animals were exposed to a magnetic field at flux densities [>=] 0.75 mT. These effects of the magnetic field were blocked by pretreating the animals with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone, but not by the peripheral opioid antagonist, naloxone methiodide. These data indicate that the magnetic-field-induced decreases in high-affinity choline uptake in the rat brain were mediated by endogenous opioids in the central nervous systems.

  15. Chronic exposure to a 60-Hz electric field: effects on neuromuscular function in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, R.A.; Laszewski, B.L.; Carr, D.B.

    1981-01-01

    Neuromuscular function in adult male rats was studied following 30 days of exposure to a 60-Hz electric field at 100 kV/m (unperturbed field strength). Isometric force transducters were attached to the tendons of the plantaris (predominantly fast twitch), and soleus (predominantly slow twitch) muscles in the urethan-anesthetized rat. Square-wave stimuli were delivered to the distal stump of the transected sciatic nerve. Several measurements were used to characterize neuromuscular function, including twitch characteristics, chronaxie, tetanic and posttetanic potentiation, and fatigue and recovery. The results from three independent series of experiments are reported. Only recovery from fatigue in slow-twitch muscles was consistently and significantly affected (enhanced) by electric-field exposure. This effect does not appear to be mediated by field-induced changes in either neuromuscular transmission, or in the contractile mechanism itself. It is suggested that the effect may be mediated secondary to an effect on mechanisms regulating muscle blood flow or metabolism.

  16. Chronic exposure to a 60-Hz electric field: effects on neuromuscular function in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, R A; Laszewski, B L; Carr, D B

    1981-01-01

    Neuromuscular function in adult male rats was studied following 30 days of exposure to a 60-Hz electric field at 100 kV/m (unperturbed field strength). Isometric force transducers were attached to the tendons of the plantaris (predominantly fast twitch), and soleus (predominantly slow twitch) muscles in the urethan-anesthetized rat. Square-wave stimuli were delivered to the distal stump of the transected sciatic nerve. Several measurements were used to characterized neuromuscular function, including twitch characteristics, chronaxie, tetanic and posttetanic potentiation, and fatigue and recovery. The results from three independent series of experiments are reported. Only recovery from fatigue in slow-twitch muscles was consistently and significantly affected (enhanced) by electric-field exposure. This effect does not appear to be mediated by field-induced changes in either neuromuscular transmission, or in the contractile mechanism itself. It is suggested that the effect may be mediated secondary to an effect on mechanisms regulating muscle blood flow or metabolism.

  17. Effect of chronic 60-Hz electric field exposure on mammary tumorigenesis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.; Leung, F.C.; Rommereim, D.N.; Buschbom, R.L.; Wilson, B.W.; Stevens, R.G.

    1989-07-01

    Female rats were administered a single dosage of 7 or 10 mg of DMBA intragastrically between 50 and 55 days of age and palpated weekly for mammary tumors in two experiments. Rats were either exposed to a 40 kV/m 60-Hz electric field or sham-exposed in utero through 18 or 23 weeks of age. There was no difference between electric field exposed and sham-exposed in incidence of first tumor. When the results of the two experiments were combined, the electric field exposed groups had significantly more tumors per tumor-bearing animal than the sham-groups. These results may have implications for the role of electric power use in the etiology and promotion of breast cancer. 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. A 0.5 G, 60 Hz magnetic field suppresses melatonin production in pinealocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosen, L A; Barber, I; Lyle, D B

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a model for testing various hypotheses concerning possible mechanisms whereby electromagnetic fields might induce suppression of nighttime melatonin production in rodents. A published method for digesting freshly obtained pineal glands to the single cell level was modified, yielding better than 95% viability. An in vitro exposure facility developed for the Food and Drug Administration was used for 12-h overnight exposures of primary pinealocyte cultures to 0.05 mT, 60 Hz, vertical AC and 0.06 microT, DC fields. After exposure, cells were separated from the supernatant by centrifugation. Supernatant melatonin was measured by ELISA assays. Data from 10 experiments demonstrated an average 46% reduction in norepinephrine-induced production of melatonin in the pinealocytes. The results support the hypothesis that EM exposure can produce pineal gland melatonin suppression by affecting individual cells.

  19. Effects of 60 Hz electrical fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates: Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Orr, J.L.

    1988-04-06

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, behavioral effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric fields associated with power transmission over high voltage lines. This program is being conducted at Southwest Research Institute as part of an international collaborative information exchange and scientific research effort involving the United State Department of Energy, Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry, and Japan's Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry. Since August of 1984, four major research projects were successfully completed. 48 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Chronic exposure to 60-Hz electric fields: effects on pineal function in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.W.; Anderson, L.E.; Hilton, D.I.; Philips, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    As a component of studies to search for effects of 60-Hz electric field exposure on mammalian endocrine function, concentrations of melatonin, 5-methoxytryptophol, and serotonin-N-acetyl transferase activity were measured in the pineal glands of rats exposed or sham-exposed at 65 kV/m for 30 days.In two replicate experiments there were statistically significant differences between exposed and control rats in that the normal nocturnal increase in pineal melatonin content was depressed in the exposed animals. Concentrations of 5-methoxytryptophol were increased in the pineal glands of the exposed groups when compared to sham-exposed controls. An alteration was also observed in serotonin-N-acetyl transferase activity, with lower levels measured in pineal glands from exposed animals.

  1. Biological effects of 60-Hz electric fields on small and large laboratory animals

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    Rats and mice were exposed to 60-Hz electric fields up to 330 kV/m for durations as long as four months. No significant effects were found in the following major areas: metabolic status and growth; organ and tissue morphology; brain morphology; cardiovascular function; serum chemistry; reproduction; prenatal growth and development; teratology; bone growth; peripheral nerve function; humoral and cell-mediated immunity; susceptibility to viral infection; cell and membrane function; illness/malaise; and cytogenetics. Statistically significant effects of electric field exposures were observed in the following areas: bone fracture repair; neonatal development; neuromuscular function; endocrinology; hematology; neurochemistry; urine volume and chemistry; sympathetic nervous system; behavior. It is likely that many of the effects observed are secondary to chronic stimulation of the animal by the field. Our research efforts have shifted to an in-depth investigation of nervous system functions, with emphasis in behavior, neurochemistry, neurophysiology, and dosimetry. Current and future research in these areas will focus on: relationship of effects to field strength and duration of exposure; recovery from observed effects; fundamental understanding of observed effects; fundamental understanding of interaction of field with animal (dosimetry); and biological significance of observed effects. (ERB)

  2. Biological studies of swine exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Volume 2: Behavior. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    The behavioral responses in three generations of miniature swine chronically exposed to a 30-kV/m, 60-Hz electric field have been assessed in a series of screening experiments. Tests were conducted on mature swine as well as on very young swine and weanlings and included measures of: (1) preference for exposure to or shielding from the electric field; (2) early neuromuscular development; (3) exploratory behavior; (4) simple learning and memory function; and (5) short-term memory. Repeated evaluations of behavioral parameters show few statistically significant effects. In the parental (F/sub 0/) generation, exposed sows showed a preference to remain out of the field, particularly during the dark period. Adult first-generation (F/sub 1/) sows, however, failed to demonstrate such a preference to stay out of the field. In other behavioral assessments, the singular significant effect in F/sub 1/ swine was the increased number of vocalizations in both male and female swine during the exploratory behavior test. This result, also inconsistent across generations, was not repeated in the second-generation (F/sub 2/) exploratory tests, where exposed female swine made significantly fewer vocalizations than their sham-exposed counterparts. The study provides no other evidence of an overall behavioral effect in swine of prenatal exposure to electric fields. 13 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.

  3. Effects of 60-Hz electric fields on serotonin metabolism in the rat pineal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.; Hilton, D.I.; Phillips, R.D.; Wilson, B.W.; Chess, E.K.

    1982-06-01

    Serotonin and two of its metabolites, melatonin and 5-methoxytryptophol, exhibit circadian rhythmicity in the pineal gland. We recently reported a marked reduction in the normal night-time increase in melatonin concentration in the pineal glands of rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Concomitant with the apparent abolition of melatonin rhythmicity, serotonin-N-acetyl transferase (SNAT) activity was suppressed. We have now conducted studies to determine if abolition of the rhythm in melatonin production in electric-field-exposed rats arises solely from interference in SNAT activity, or if the availability of pineal serotonin is a factor that is affected by exposure. Pineal serotonin concentrations were compared in rats that were either exposed or sham exposed to 65 kV/m for 30 days. Sham-exposed animals exhibited normal diurnal rhythmicity for pineal concentrations of both melatonin and serotonin; melatonin levels increased markedly during the dark phase with a concurrent decrease in serotonin levels. In the exposed animals, however, normal serotonin rhythmicity was abolished; serotonin levels in these animals did not increase during the light period. The conclusion that electric field exposure results in a biochemical alteration in SNAT enzyme activity can be inferred from the loss of both serotonin and melatonin rhythmicity, as well as by direct measurement of SNAT activity itself. 35 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  4. Nonhuman primates will not respond to turn off strong 60 Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    Using a set of six baboons (Papio cynocephalus), the authors conducted a series of seven experiments designed to evaluate the potentially aversive character of a 60 Hz electric field (EF). Initially, the subjects were trained, using food rewards as the reinforcer, to respond only when a cue light was illuminated. Next, an EF was presented along with the cue light; responses produced delivery of a food pellet and turned off both the cue light and the EF. Then, stimulus and reward conditions were varied. The authors determined that (1) presence of a strong EF does not affect operant responding for food rewards, (2) subjects will not respond at normal rates when the only reinforcer is termination of a strong EF, (3) presence of a strong EF can serve as a discriminative stimulus, (4) presence of a strong EF does not affect extinction of an appetite-motivated task, and (5) presentation of an EF can become a secondary reinforcer. The pattern of results was consistent across all experiments, suggesting that an EF of as much as 65 kV/m is not aversive to nonhuman primates. Separately, the authors demonstrated that the average EF detection threshold for baboons is 12 kV/m. Thus, EF exposure at intensities well above the detection threshold and at species-scaled EF strengths greater than those found environmentally does not appear to be aversive.

  5. Studies on prenatal and postnatal development in rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Sikov, M.R.; Montgomery, L.D.; Smith, L.G.; Phillips, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    A series of three experiments was performed to determine the effects of 30-day exposures to uniform 60-Hz electric fields (100 kV/m) on reproduction and on growth and development in the fetuses and offspring of rats. In the first experiment, exposure of females for 6 days prior to and during the mating period did not affect their reproductive performance, and continued exposure through 20 days of gestation (dg) did not affect the viability, size, or morphology of their fetuses. In the second experiment, exposure of the pregnant rat was begun on 0 dg and continued until the resulting offspring reached 8 days of age. In the third experiment, exposure began at 17 dg and continued through 25 days of postnatal life. In the second and third experiments, no statistically significant differences suggesting impairment of the growth or survival of exposed offspring were detected. In the second experiment, a significantly greater percentage of the exposed offspring showed movement, standing, and grooming at 14 days of age than among-sham-exposed offspring. There was a significant decrease at 14 days in the percentage of exposed offspring displaying the righting reflex in the second experiment and negative geotropism in the third experiment. These differences were all transient and were not found when the animals were tested again at 21 days of age. Evaluation of the reproductive integrity of the offspring of the second experiment did not disclose any deficits.

  6. Immune function and host defense in rodents exposed to 60-Hz magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    House, R V; Ratajczak, H V; Gauger, J R; Johnson, T R; Thomas, P T; Mccormick, D L

    1996-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the influence of subchronic exposure to pure, linearly polarized 60-Hz magnetic fields (MF) on the host immune response in mice. The experimental design was as follows: three groups were exposed continuously (18.5 hr/day) to MF at field strengths of 0.02, 2, or 10 gauss (G), one group was exposed intermittently (1 hr on/1 hr off) to MF at a field strength of 10 G, and one group served as a sham control. Experimental endpoints included spleen and thymus weights and cellularity, antibody-forming cell (AFC) response, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response, splenic lymphocyte subset analysis, susceptibility to infection with Listeria monocytogenes, and natural killer (NK) cell activity. No differences in body weight, lymphoid organ weight, or lymphoid organ cellularity were observed in any MF-exposed group in comparison to sham controls. Likewise, no statistically significant differences were found in comparisons of AFC responses. Isolated statistically significant differences from control were observed in MF-exposed mice in the DTH assay, although no clear dose-related pattern of altered activity was seen. Splenic lymphocyte subset parameters examined were within normal limits in all groups, and no differences between control and MF-exposed mice were found. Host resistance to bacterial infection was not altered at any MF exposure examined in this study. Finally, although apparently dose-related, statistically significant alterations were observed in an initial study of NK cell function, repeat studies failed to demonstrate a consistent pattern of alteration.

  7. Constraints of thermal noise on the effects of weak 60-Hz magnetic fields acting on biological magnetite.

    PubMed Central

    Adair, R K

    1994-01-01

    Previous calculations of limits imposed by thermal noise on the effects of weak 60-Hz magnetic fields on biological magnetite are generalized and extended to consider multiple signals, the possibility of anomalously large magnetosome structures, and the possibility of anomalously small cytoplasm viscosities. The results indicate that the energies transmitted to the magnetite elements by fields less than 5 microT, characteristic of the electric power distribution system, will be much less than thermal noise energies. Hence, the effects of such weak fields will be masked by that noise and cannot be expected to affect biology or, therefore, the health of populations. PMID:8159681

  8. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behavior of nonhuman primates. Quarterly technical progress report No. 20, September 28-December 20, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.

    1986-01-03

    This research program will evaluate the aversive character of exposure to 60 Hz electric fields by determining the threshold intensity which produces avoidance or escape responses, will estimate the threshold intensity for detection of 60 Hz electric fields, will assess effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the performance of two operant conditioning tasks, fixed ratio and differential reinforcement of low rate responding, will investigate, using the systematic quantitative observational sampling methods of primatology, the possible stress-inducing effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the behavior of baboons living in small social groups. In all experiments, the electric fields will be described, characterized, and controlled to account for recognized artifacts associated with high intensity 60 Hz electric fields and the health of all subjects will be described using the methods of primate veterinary medicine.

  9. Chronic exposure to a 60-Hz electric field: effects on synaptic transmission and peripheral nerve function in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, R A; Laszewski, B L; Carr, D B; Phillips, R D

    1980-01-01

    Several reports have suggested that the nervous system can be affected by exposure to electric fields and that these effects may have detrimental health consequences for the exposed organism. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic (30-day) exposure of rats to a 60Hz, 100-kV/m electric field on synaptic transmission and peripheral-nerve function. One hundred forty-four rats, housed in individual polycarbonate cages were exposed to uniform, vertical, 60-Hz electric fields in a system free of corona discharge and ozone formation and in which the animals did not receive spark discharges or other shocks during exposure. Following 30 days of exposure to the electric field, superior cervical sympathetic ganglia, vagus and sciatic nerves were removed from rats anesthetized with urethan, placed in a temperature-controlled chamber, and superfused with a modified mammalian Ringer's solution equilibrated with 95% O2 and 5% CO2. Several measures and tests were used to characterize synaptic transmission and peripheral-nerve function. These included amplitude, area, and configuration of the postsynaptic or whole-nerve compound-action potential; conduction velocity; accommodation; refractory period; strength-duration curves; conditioning-test (C-T) response, frequency response; post-tetanic response; and high-frequency-induced fatigue. The results of a series of neurophysiologic tests and measurements indicate that only synaptic transmission is significantly and consistently affected by chronic (30-day) exposure to a 60-Hz, 100-kV/m electric field. Specifically, and increase in synaptic excitability was detected in replicated measurements of the C-T response ratio. In addition, there are trends in other data that can be interpreted to suggest a generalized increase in neuronal excitability in exposed animals.

  10. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates. Project technical status report, November 23, 1985-January 17, 1986. [Papio cynocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-24

    The objective was to investigate, using baboons (superspecies Papio cynocephalus) as surrogates, possible behavioral effects associated with exposure to high intensity 60 Hz electric fields. This program consists of four major projects. The first will evaluate the potential aversive character of exposure to 60 Hz electric fields by determining the threshold intensity which produces avoidance or escape responses. The second project will estimate the threshold intensity for detection of 60 Hz electric fields. The third will assess effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the performance of two operant conditioning tasks, fixed ratio (FR) and differential reinforcement of low rate responding (DRL). The fourth will investigate the possible stress-inducing effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the behavior of baboons living in small social groups.

  11. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates: Projects 3 and 4

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.; Taylor, L.L.; Tuttle, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, possible hehavioral effects associated with exposure to high intensity 60 Hz electric fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, will be used by the Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric fields associated with power transmission over high voltage lines. This research program consists of four major research projects, all of which have been successfully completed. The third project assessed, in separate experiments conducted at 30 and 60 kV/m, effects of chronic exposure to electric fields on the performance of two operant conditioning tasks, fixed ratio (FR), and differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL). In the same two experiments, the fourth project investigated, using the systematic quantitative observational sampling methods of primatology, the possible stress-inducing effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the behavior of baboons living in small social groups. This volume contains only appendices for projects 3 and 4. 81 figs., 67 tabs.

  12. Effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Coelho, A.M.; Easley, S.P.; Orr, J.L.; Reiter, R.J.; Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-09-24

    A series of pioneering electric and magnetic field experiments were completed using nonhuman primates and a unique, well-engineered, and reliable exposure facility. Effects of operant behavior, social behavior, and serum melatonin concentration were examined using 60 Hz field combinations of other 6 W/m and 0.6 G or 30 W/m and 1.0 G. Observations noted in the course of this study include: Combines electric and magnetic field exposure does not have any important effect on short-term memory; the transitory increases in social behavior observed in previous electric fields did not occur; combined electric and magnetic field exposure might lead to reduced behavioral frequency in baboon social groups; three experiments clearly establish that one set of exposure conditions does not produce molatonin suppression in nonhuman primates; and a small pilot experiment suggests that a different exposure protocol might result in melatonin suppression.

  13. Case-control study of childhood cancer and exposure to 60-Hz magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Savitz, D.A.; Wachtel, H.; Barnes, F.A.; John, E.M.; Tvrdik, J.G.

    1988-07-01

    Concern with health effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields has been raised by epidemiologic studies of childhood cancer in relation to proximity to electric power distribution lines. This case-control study was designed to assess the relation between residential exposure to magnetic fields and the development of childhood cancer. Eligible cases consisted of all 356 residents of the five-county 1970 Denver, Colorado Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area aged 0-14 years who were diagnosed with any form of cancer between 1976 and 1983. Controls were selected by random digit dialing to approximate the case distribution by age, sex, and telephone exchange area. Exposure was characterized through in-home electric and magnetic field measurements under low and high power use conditions and wire configuration codes, a surrogate measure of long-term magnetic field levels. Measured magnetic fields under low power use conditions had a modest association with cancer incidence; a cutoff score of 2.0 milligauss resulted in an odds ratio of 1.4 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.6-2.9) for total cancers and somewhat larger odds ratios (ORs) for leukemias (OR = 1.9), lymphomas (OR = 2.2), and soft tissue sarcomas (OR = 3.3). Neither magnetic fields (OR = 1.0) nor electric fields (OR = 0.9) under high power use conditions were related to total cancers. Wire codes associated with higher magnetic fields were more common among case than control homes. The odds ratio to contrast very high and high to very low, low, and buried wire codes was 1.5 (95% CI = 1.0-2.3) for total cases, with consistency across cancer subgroups except for brain cancer (OR = 2.0) and lymphomas (OR = 0.8). Contrasts of very high to buried wire code homes produced larger, less precise odds ratios of 2.3 for total cases, 2.9 for leukemias, and 3.3 for lymphomas.

  14. Origins of electromagnetic hypersensitivity to 60 Hz magnetic fields: A provocation study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok Won; Choi, Jae Lim; Nam, Ki Chang; Yang, Dong In; Kwon, Min Kyung

    2012-05-01

    With increasing electrical device usage, social concerns about the possible effects of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on human health have increased. The number of people with self-attributed electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) who complain of various subjective symptoms such as headache and insomnia has also increased. However, it is unclear whether EHS results from physiological or other origins. In this double-blinded study, we simultaneously investigated physiological changes (heart rate, respiration rate, and heart rate variability), subjective symptoms, and perception of the magnetic field to assess origins of the subjective symptoms. Two volunteer groups of 15 self-reported EHS and 16 non-EHS individuals were tested with exposure to sham and real (60 Hz, 12.5 µT) magnetic fields for 30 min. Magnetic field exposure did not have any effects on physiological parameters or eight subjective symptoms in either group. There was also no evidence that the EHS group perceived the magnetic field better than the non-EHS group. In conclusion, the subjective symptoms did not result from the 60 Hz, 12.5 µT magnetic field exposures but from other non-physiological factors.

  15. Growth rate and mitotic index analysis of Vicia faba L. roots exposed to 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, M.; Miller, M.W.; Cox, C.; Carstesen, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    Growth, mitotic index, and growth rate recovery were determined for Vicia faba L. roots exposed to 60-Hz electric fields of 200, 290, and 360 V/m in an aqueous inorganic nutrient medium (conductivity 0.07-0.09 S/m). Root growth rate decreased in proportion to the increasing strength; the electric field threshold for a growth rate effect was about 230 V/m. The induced transmembrane potential at the threshold exposure was about 4-7 mV. The mitotic index was not affected by an electric field exposure sufficient to reduce root growth rate to about 35% of control. Root growth rate recovery from 31-96% of control occurred in 4 days after cessation of the 360 V/m exposure. The results support the postulate that the site of action of the applied electric fields is the cell membrane. 10 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  16. Effects of exposure to a 60-kV/m, 60-Hz electric field on the social behavior of baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Easley, S.P.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Rogers, W.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors found in a previously reported study that exposure to a 30-kV/m, 60-Hz electric field had significant effects on the social behavior of baboons. However, it was not established whether or not the effects were related specifically to the 30-kV/m intensity of the field. A new experiment was conducted to determine whether or not exposure to a 60-Hz electric field at 60 kV/m would produce like changes in the baboons' social behavior. They exposed one group of eight male baboons to an electric field 12 hours a day, 7 days a week, for 6 weeks. A second group of eight animals was maintained under sham-exposure (control) conditions. Rates of performing on each of six categories of social behavior and on four categories of nonsocial behavior were used as criteria for comparing exposed with unexposed subjects and for within-group comparisons during three six-week experimental periods: Pre-Exposure, Exposure, and Post-Exposure. The results indicate that (1) during the exposure period, exposed animals exhibited statistically significant differences from controls in means of performance rates based on several behavioral categories; (2) across all three periods, within-group comparisons revealed that behaviors of exposed baboons were significantly affected by exposure to the electric field; (3) changes in performance levels probably reflect a stress response to the electric field; and (4) the means of response rates of animals exposed at 60 kV/m were higher, but not double, those of animals exposed at 30 kV/m. As in the 30-kV/m experiment, animals exposed at 60 kV/m exhibited significant differences in performances of Passive Affinity, Tension, and Stereotypy. Mean rates of performing these categories were 122% (Passive Affinity), 48% (Tension), and 40% (Stereotypy) higher in the exposed group than in the control group during exposure to the 60-kV/m field.

  17. Immunological and biochemical effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.; Cohen, H.D.

    1988-01-08

    Public concern has been expressed about possible health risks arising from exposure to powerline electric and magnetic fields. This project is addressing this concern through a research program designed to evaluate the effects of exposure to known field conditions on multiple measures of human function. The present phase of project activities began in October 1985, and will end in September 1988. Two of the three tasks to be accomplished in this phase have now been completed. During the present reporting period, project staff designed and began preparations for Task 3. These plans were reviewed at the two project review meetings held in the present reporting period, and data collection on the Task 3 study is scheduled to begin in the next reporting period. Project goals during this reporting period were to: complete analysis of intermittent exposure study; attend the annual DOE/EPRI contractors review meeting; participate in project review meetings; and design and prepare for Task 3. Data collection for this study ended in the previous reporting period. The following activities were performed to complete the required statistical analyses: electrophysiological data were screened for artifacts, scored, and entered into the compute data base; urine samples were assayed for cortisol, dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine; performance data were verified and entered into the data base; subjective data were verified and entered into the data base; and multivariate and univariate statistical tests were performed to evaluate the effects of the exposure conditions on the above measures.

  18. BIGEL analysis of gene expression in HL60 cells exposed to X rays or 60 Hz magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E. K.; Zhang, X. F.; Han, L. H.; Harrison, G. H.; Davis, C. C.; Zhou, X. J.; Ioffe, V.; McCready, W. A.; Abraham, J. M.; Meltzer, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    We screened a panel of 1,920 randomly selected cDNAs to discover genes that are differentially expressed in HL60 cells exposed to 60 Hz magnetic fields (2 mT) or X rays (5 Gy) compared to unexposed cells. Identification of these clones was accomplished using our two-gel cDNA library screening method (BIGEL). Eighteen cDNAs differentially expressed in X-irradiated compared to control HL60 cells were recovered from a panel of 1,920 clones. Differential expression in experimental compared to control cells was confirmed independently by Northern blotting of paired total RNA samples hybridized to each of the 18 clone-specific cDNA probes. DNA sequencing revealed that 15 of the 18 cDNA clones produced matches with the database for genes related to cell growth, protein synthesis, energy metabolism, oxidative stress or apoptosis (including MYC, neuroleukin, copper zinc-dependent superoxide dismutase, TC4 RAS-like protein, peptide elongation factor 1alpha, BNIP3, GATA3, NF45, cytochrome c oxidase II and triosephosphate isomerase mRNAs). In contrast, BIGEL analysis of the same 1,920 cDNAs revealed no differences greater than 1.5-fold in expression levels in magnetic-field compared to sham-exposed cells. Magnetic-field-exposed and control samples were analyzed further for the presence of mRNA encoding X-ray-responsive genes by hybridization of the 18 specific cDNA probes to RNA from exposed and control HL60 cells. Our results suggest that differential gene expression is induced in approximately 1% of a random pool of cDNAs by ionizing radiation but not by 60 Hz magnetic fields under the present experimental conditions.

  19. BIGEL analysis of gene expression in HL60 cells exposed to X rays or 60 Hz magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E K; Zhang, X F; Han, L H; Harrison, G H; Davis, C C; Zhou, X J; Ioffe, V; McCready, W A; Abraham, J M; Meltzer, S J

    1998-12-01

    We screened a panel of 1,920 randomly selected cDNAs to discover genes that are differentially expressed in HL60 cells exposed to 60 Hz magnetic fields (2 mT) or X rays (5 Gy) compared to unexposed cells. Identification of these clones was accomplished using our two-gel cDNA library screening method (BIGEL). Eighteen cDNAs differentially expressed in X-irradiated compared to control HL60 cells were recovered from a panel of 1,920 clones. Differential expression in experimental compared to control cells was confirmed independently by Northern blotting of paired total RNA samples hybridized to each of the 18 clone-specific cDNA probes. DNA sequencing revealed that 15 of the 18 cDNA clones produced matches with the database for genes related to cell growth, protein synthesis, energy metabolism, oxidative stress or apoptosis (including MYC, neuroleukin, copper zinc-dependent superoxide dismutase, TC4 RAS-like protein, peptide elongation factor 1alpha, BNIP3, GATA3, NF45, cytochrome c oxidase II and triosephosphate isomerase mRNAs). In contrast, BIGEL analysis of the same 1,920 cDNAs revealed no differences greater than 1.5-fold in expression levels in magnetic-field compared to sham-exposed cells. Magnetic-field-exposed and control samples were analyzed further for the presence of mRNA encoding X-ray-responsive genes by hybridization of the 18 specific cDNA probes to RNA from exposed and control HL60 cells. Our results suggest that differential gene expression is induced in approximately 1% of a random pool of cDNAs by ionizing radiation but not by 60 Hz magnetic fields under the present experimental conditions.

  20. Effect of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on the activity of hsp70 promoter: an in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-De la Fuente, Abraham O.; Alcocer-González, Juan M.; Heredia-Rojas, J. Antonio; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Rodríguez-Flores, Laura E.; Santoyo-Stephano, Martha A.; Castañeda-Garza, Esperanza; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes S.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to EMFs (electromagnetic fields) results in a number of important biological changes, including modification of genetic expression. We have investigated the effect of 60 Hz sinusoidal EMFs at a magnetic flux density of 80 μT on the expression of the luciferase gene contained in a plasmid labelled as pEMF (EMF plasmid). This gene construct contains the specific sequences for the induction of hsp70 (heat-shock protein 70) expression by EMFs, as well as the reporter for the luciferase gene. The pEMF vector was electrotransferred into quadriceps muscles of BALB/c mice that were later exposed to EMFs. Increased luciferase expression was observed in mice exposed to EMFs 2 h daily for 7 days compared with controls (P<0.05). These data along with other reports in the literature suggest that EMFs can have far-reaching effects on the genome. PMID:23124775

  1. Study of the behavioral and biological effects of high strength 60 HZ electric fields. Quarterly technical progress report No. 15, 12 May 1984-3 August 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-08-15

    Progress is reported in the construction of a test facility for studying the effects of high intensity, 60 Hz electric fields on baboons. Effects to be studied include operant out social behaviors. (ACR)

  2. Cancer promotion in a mouse-skin model by a 60-Hz magnetic field: II. Tumor development and immune response.

    PubMed

    McLean, J R; Stuchly, M A; Mitchel, R E; Wilkinson, D; Yang, H; Goddard, M; Lecuyer, D W; Schunk, M; Callary, E; Morrison, D

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary findings on the influence of 60-Hz (2-mT) magnetic fields on tumor promotion and co-promotion in the skins of mice. The effect of magnetic fields on natural killer (NK) cell activity in spleen and blood was also examined. Groups of 32 juvenile female mice were exposed to the magnetic field as described in part I. The dorsal skin of all animals was treated with a subthreshold dose of the carcinogen 7,12-dimethyl-benz(a)anthracene (DMBA). One week after the treatment, two groups were sham exposed (group A) or field exposed at 2 mT (group B) 6 h/day for 21 weeks, to test whether the field would act as a tumor promoter. No tumors developed in these two groups of mice. To test whether the magnetic field would modify tumor development by directly affecting tumor growth or by suppressing immune surveillance, two additional groups of mice were treated weekly with the tumor promoter 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and then either sham exposed (group C) or field exposed (group D). The time to appearance of tumors was shorter (but not statistically so) in the group exposed to magnetic fields and TPA. Some differences in NK cell activity and spleen size were observed between the sham- and field-exposed groups.

  3. No effect of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on MYC or {beta}-actin expression in human leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy-Hulbert, A.; Wilkins, R.C.; Hesketh, T.R.

    1995-10-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown weak correlations between exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF EMFs) and the incidence of several cancers, particularly childhood leukemias, although negative studies have also been reported. These observations have prompted a broad range of in vitro cellular studies in which effects of ELF EMFs have been observed. However, no reported response has been replicated widely in independent laboratories. One potentially important response is the rapid activation of proto-oncogenes and other genes in human leukemic (HL60) cells and a wide variety of other eukaryotic cells, because of the role of these genes in cell proliferation. We describe quantitative Northern analysis of MYC and {beta}actin mRNAs from HL60 cells exposed to fields under conditions very similar to those reported previously to activate these genes, namely 60 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields of 0.57, 5.7 or 57 {mu}T for 20 min. In addition we have used a new design of field-exposure system and introduced a number of other modifications to the protocol to optimize any response. We have also developed a novel method providing enhanced accuracy for the quantitative measurement of mRNA. No significant effect of ELF EMFs on gene expression was observed using any of these systems and analytical methods. 70 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Biological studies of swine exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Volume 1. Overview and summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    Over a three-year period, three generations of female miniature swine and their offspring were exposed to a 30-kV/m, 60-Hz electric field. Such a field approximates the 12-kV/m field that a human would experience under a 765-kV line. After swine exposures varying from 6 to 36 months, project personnel analyzed a wide range of biological parameters including growth, blood cell and serum biochemistry, blood immunoglobulin levels, behavior, peripheral nerve function, cell-mediated immunity, cytogenetics, and reproduction and development. There were no significant differences in health effects between the exposed and sham-exposed swine, except in the area of fetal development. The first breeding produced no significant difference between exposed and control offspring. When those offspring were bred after 18 months of exposure, the fetuses of exposed sows had an increased incidence of morphological malformations and lower body weight than fetuses from control sows. The live-born had lower body weights and increased birth defects. Several factors suggest that electric fields per se may not have caused these reproductive changes. For example, similar types of malformations occurred in control pigs. Also, in second-generation sows, the incidence of fetal malformations was similar for both exposed and control groups. It is possible that other factors such as housing, inbreeding, disease, or treatment of disease may have produced the observed effects. 64 refs., 13 figs., 25 tabs.

  5. Effects of exposure to 30 kV/m, 60-Hz electric fields on the social behavior of baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Rogers, W.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that exposure to a 30-kV/m, 60-Hz electric field produces significant change (stress) in the social behavior of adult male baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis). One group of eight baboons was exposed to an electric field (12 hours per day, 7 days per week for 6 weeks) while a second group of eight baboons was maintained in a sham-exposure (control) condition. Exposed subjects and control subjects were compared over three, six-week experimental periods (pre-exposure, exposure, and post-exposure). Performance rates of six categories of social behaviors (passive affinity, active affinity, approach, tension, threat, and attack) and four categories of nonsocial behaviors (forage, manipulate, posture, and stereotypy) were used to compare the two groups. The results of our study indicate that (1) there were no significant differences between the two groups during the pre-exposure or post-exposure periods; (2) during the exposure period, experimental and control groups exhibited statistically significant differences in the mean performance rates of three behavior categories; (3) within-group comparisons across periods indicate that the experimentally exposed group exhibited statistically significant changes in passive affinity, tension, and stereotypy; and (4) changes in behavior performance among the exposed subjects reflect a stress response to the electric field.

  6. A 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure facility for nonhuman primates: Design and operational data during experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Lucas, J.H.; Cory, W.E.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    A unique exposure facility was designed and constructed to generate large-scale vertical electric fields (EF) of up to 65 kV/m and horizontal magnetic fields (MF) of up to 100 {micro}T (1G), so that the behavioral and neuroendocrine effects of 60 Hz EF or combined electric and magnetic field (E/MF) exposure could be examined using nonhuman primates as subjects. Facility design and operational problems and their solutions are presented, and representative operational data from four sets of experiments are provided. A specially designed, optically isolated, 4 cm spherical-dipole EF probe and a commercially available MF probe were used to map the EF and MF within the fiberglass animal cages. In addition, amplifiers, signal conditioners, and A/D converters provided EF, MF, and transformer signals to a microcomputer at 15 min intervals. The apparatus produced homogeneous, stable E/MF at the desired intensities, and the fiberglass cages did not produce appreciable distortion or attenuation. Levels of recognized EF artifacts such as corona and ozone were negligible. The facility worked as intended, providing a well-characterized and artifact-controlled environment for experiments with baboons (Papio cynocephalus).

  7. Effect of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on the activity of hsp70 promoter: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de la Fuente, Abraham O; Alcocer-González, Juan M; Antonio Heredia-Rojas, J; Balderas-Candanosa, Isaías; Rodríguez-Flores, Laura E; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes S

    2009-03-01

    We have evaluated the effect of 60 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields (MF) at 8 and 8 microT on expression of the luciferase gene contained in a gene construct labelled as Electromagnetic Field-plasmid (pEMF). The vector included the hsp70 promotor containing the 3 nCTCTn sequences previously described for the induction of hsp70 expression by magnetic fields, as well as the reporter of the luciferase gene. We also replicated the study of Lin et al. [Lin H, Blank M, Rossol-Haseroth K, Goodman R. Regulating genes with electromagnetic response elements. J Cell Biochem 2001;81(1):143-48]. The pEMF plasmid was transfected into HeLa and BMK16 cell lines that were later exposed to either MF or thermal shock (TS). An increased luciferase expression was found in both the cells exposed to MF and TS compared with their control groups (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the combined effect of MF and TS was also analyzed. A synergistic effect between two factors was observed for this co-exposure condition in terms of luciferase gene expression.

  8. Study of the behavioral and biological effects of high-strength 60-Hz electric fields. Quarterly technical progress report number 10, 18 December 1982-18 March 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-20

    The objective of this contract is to use the baboon as a surrogate for the human in studies of the possible deleterious effects of exposure to high strength, 60 Hz electric fields. The specific aims of this contract are to (1) design and construct an exposure facility in which baboons can be exposed to an electric field up to 60 kV/m in intensity for experiments and (2) to develop computer models relating the fields and currents produced in both baboons and humans by exposure to high strength, 60 Hz electric fields.

  9. Study of the behavioral and biological effects of high-strength 60-Hz electric fields. Quarterly progress report, 11 October 1981-10 January 1982. [Research plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    The primary objective of this research is to study the effects of high intensity, 60 Hz electric fields on baboon behavior to obtain information which will assist in the determination of the degree of risk of deleterious consequences for humans exposed to such fields. The generalization of results obtained with the baboon to predictions concerning humans will be aided by the development of computer models relating the surface electric field intensities and internal current densities produced in baboons and humans by exposure to high intensity, 60 Hz electric fields. Research plans are described.

  10. Biological studies of swine exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Volume 4: growth, reproduction, and development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    Swine were exposed to uniform, vertical, 60-Hz, 30-kV/m electric fields for 20 hours/day, 7 days/week. The parental generation (F/sub 0/ gilts) was bred after 4 months on study; some were killed for teratologic study at 100 days of gestation (dg), and the others produced a first-generation (F/sub 1/) of offspring. The pooled incidence of terata in these litters was similar in the exposed and sham-exposed groups. The F/sub 0/ females, which produced the F/sub 1/ generation, were rebred after 18 months of exposure and were killed at 100 dg: malformation incidence in exposed litters (75%) was significantly greater than in sham-exposed litters (29%). Types of malformations were not dissimilar between the two groups. The F/sub 1/ gilts were bred at 18 months of age; there were indications of impaired copulatory behavior and decreased fertility in the exposed animals. Defective offspring were found in significantly more of the exposed litters (71%) than in sham-exposed litters (33%). The F/sub 1/ sows were bred again 10 months later, and teratologic evaluations were performed on their second litters at 100 dg. The percentage of litters with malformed fetuses was essentially identical in the exposed and sham-exposed groups (70 and 73%, respectively). The change in malformation incidences between generations and between the first and second breedings makes it difficult to unequivocally conclude that chronic exposure to a strong electric field caused developmental effects in swine, although it appears there may be an association. It is also possible that other factors, such as housing, inbreeding, disease or its treatment may have contributed to the results. 22 refs., 9 figs., 28 tabs.

  11. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-09-24

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF), using the baboon (Papio cynocephalus) as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences of human exposure to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. This report covers a series of three experiments (Experiments III, IV, and IVA) on the effect of combined 60-Hz E/MF on operant behavior. These experiments were a continuation of previous investigations of 60-Hz electric field exposure on baboons.

  12. Effects of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on early growth in three plant species and a replication of previous results

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.S.

    1996-05-01

    In an attempt to replicate the findings of Smith et al., seeds of Raphanus sativus L. (radish), Sinapsis alba L. (mustard), and Hordeum vulgare L. (barley) were grown for between 9 and 21 days in continuous electromagnetic fields (EMFs) at ion-cyclotron resonance conditions for stimulation of Ca{sup 2+} (B{sub H} = 78.3 {micro}T, B{sub HAC} = 40 {micro}T peak-peak at 60 Hz, B{sub v} = 0). On harvesting, radish showed results similar to those of Smith et al. Dry stem weight and plant height were both significantly greater (Mann-Whitney tests, Ps < 0.05) in EMF-exposed plants than in control plants in each EMF experiment. Wet root weight was significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in two out of three experiments, as were dry leaf weight, dry whole weight, and stem diameter. Dry root weight, wet leaf weight, and wet whole weight were significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in one of three experiments. All significant differences indicated an increase in weight or size in the EMF-exposed plants. In each of the sham experiments, no differences between exposed and control plants were evident. Mustard plants failed to respond to the EMFs in any of the plant parameters measured. In one experiment, barley similarly failed to respond; but in another showed significantly greater wet root weight and significantly smaller stem diameter and dry seed weight at the end of the experiment in exposed plants compared to control plants. Although these results give no clue about the underlying bioelectromagnetic mechanism, they demonstrate that, at least for one EMF-sensitive biosystem, results can be independently replicated in another laboratory. Such replication is crucial in establishing the validity of bioelectromagnetic science.

  13. Effects of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on early growth in three plant species and a replication of previous results.

    PubMed

    Davies, M S

    1996-01-01

    In an attempt to replicate the findings of Smith et al., seeds of Raphanus sativus L. (radish), Sinapsis alba L. (mustard), and Hordeum vulgare L. (barley) were grown for between 9 and 21 days in continuous electromagnetic fields (EMFs) at "ion-cyclotron resonance" conditions for stimulation of Ca(2+) (B(H) = 78.3 mu T, B(HAC) = 40 mu T peak-peak at 60 Hz, B(V) = 0). On harvesting, radish showed results similar to those of Smith et al. Dry stem weight and plant height were both significantly greater (Mann-Whitney tests, Ps < 0.05) in EMF-exposed plants than in control plants in each EMF experiment. Wet root weight was significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in two out of three experiments, as were dry leaf weight, dry whole weight, and stem diameter. Dry root weight, wet leaf weight, and wet whole weight were significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in one of three experiments. All significant differences indicated an increase in weight or size in the EMF-exposed plants. In each of the sham experiments, no differences between exposed and control plants were evident. Mustard plants failed to respond to the EMFs in any of the plant parameters measured. In one experiment, barley similarly failed to respond; but in another showed significantly greater wet root weight and significantly smaller stem diameter and dry seed weight at the end of the experiment in exposed plants compared to control plants. Although these results give no clue about the underlying bioelectromagnetic mechanism, they demonstrate that, at least for one EMF-sensitive biosystem, results can be independently replicated in another laboratory. Such replication is crucial in establishing the validity of bioelectromagnetic science.

  14. Effects of 60 Hz Magnetic Field Exposure on the Pineal and Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in the Siberian Hamster (Phodopus Sungorus)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Bary W. ); Matt, Kathleen S.; Morris, James E. ); Sasser, Lyle B. ); Miller, Douglas L. ); Anderson, Larry E. )

    1999-11-15

    Experiments using the dwarf Siberian hamster Phodopus sungorus were carried out to determine possible neuroendocrine consequences of one-time and repeated exposures to 60 Hz magnetic fields (MF). Animals were maintained in either a short-light (SL, 8 h light:16 h dar) or long-light (LL, 16 h light:8h dark) photoperiod.

  15. Effects of a 30 kV/m, 60 Hz electric field on the social behavior of baboons: A crossover experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Easley, S.P.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Rogers, W.R. )

    1992-01-01

    Using a crossover experimental design, we evaluated our earlier findings that exposure to a 30 kV/m, 60 Hz electric field for 12 hours per day, 7 days per week for 6 weeks produced significant changes in the performance rates of social behaviors among young adult male baboons. In the crossover experiment, the former control group was exposed to a 30 kV/m, 60 Hz electric field for 3 weeks. Only an extremely small, incidental magnetic field was generated by the exposure apparatus. We found that electric-field exposure again produced increases in the performance rates that index Passive Affinity, Tension, and Stereotypy. These findings, combined with results from our other electric-field experiments, indicate that exposure to strong electric fields, in the absence of associated magnetic fields, consistently produces effects that are expressed as increases in rates of performance of social behaviors in young adult male baboons.

  16. Intracellular Ca2+ Mobilization and Beta-hexosaminidase Release Are Not Influenced by 60 Hz-electromagnetic Fields (EMF) in RBL 2H3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yeon Hee; Song, Ho Sun; Kim, Hee Rae; Ko, Myoung Soo; Jeong, Jae Min; Kim, Yong Ho; Ryu, Jeong Soo; Sohn, Uy Dong; Gimm, Yoon-Myoung; Myung, Sung Ho

    2011-01-01

    The effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) on intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and cellular function in RBL 2H3 cells were investigated. Exposure to EMF (60 Hz, 0.1 or 1 mT) for 4 or 16 h did not produce any cytotoxic effects in RBL 2H3 cells. Melittin, ionomycin and thapsigargin each dose-dependently increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. The increase of intracellular Ca2+ induced by these three agents was not affected by exposure to EMF (60 Hz, 1 mT) for 4 or 16 h in RBL 2H3 cells. To investigate the effect of EMF on exocytosis, we measured beta-hexosaminidase release in RBL 2H3 cells. Basal release of beta-hexosaminidase was 12.3±2.3% in RBL 2H3 cells. Exposure to EMF (60 Hz, 0.1 or 1 mT) for 4 or 16 h did not affect the basal or 1 µM melittin-induced beta-hexosaminidase release in RBL 2H3 cells. This study suggests that exposure to EMF (60 Hz, 0.1 or 1 mT), which is the limit of occupational exposure, has no influence on intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and cellular function in RBL 2H3 cells. PMID:22128265

  17. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.

    1990-04-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. Activities this quarter extended those of the first project year: the modification of the facility to include 60-Hz magnetic fields, and development of the capability for studies of neuroendocrine parameters by obtaining blood samples from baboons during electric and magnetic field exposure. 18 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine systems of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. Activities this quarter extended those of the first project year which focused on two technical areas: the modification of the facility to include 60-Hz magnetic fields, and development of the capability for studies of neuroendocrine parameters by obtaining blood samples from baboons during electric and magnetic field exposure. 25 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.

    1993-01-22

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF), using the baboon (Papio cynocephalus) as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences of human exposure to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission.

  20. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Annual report, FY1992

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D

    1993-01-22

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF), using the baboon (Papio cynocephalus) as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences of human exposure to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission.

  1. Effects of 3 Hz and 60 Hz Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields on Anxiety-Like Behaviors, Memory Retention of Passive Avoidance and Electrophysiological Properties of Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Amin; Shahani, Minoo; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Semnanian, Saeed; Rahmati Roudsari, Mohammad; Rezaei Tavirani, Mostafa; Hasanzadeh, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The effects of electromagnetic fields on biological organisms have been a controversial and also interesting debate over the past few decades, despite the wide range of investigations, many aspects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF/EMFs) effects including mechanism of their interaction with live organisms and also their possible biological applications still remain ambiguous. In the present study, we investigated whether the exposures of ELF/EMF with frequencies of 3 Hz and 60 Hz can affect the memory, anxiety like behaviors, electrophysiological properties and brain’s proteome in rats. Methods: Male rats were exposed to 3 Hz and 60 Hz ELF/EMFs in a protocol consisting of 2 cycles of 2 h/day exposure for 4 days separated with a 2-day interval. Short term memory and anxiety like behaviors were assessed immediately, 1 and 2 weeks after the exposures. Effects of short term exposure were also assessed using electrophysiological approach immediately after 2 hours exposure. Results: Behavioral test revealed that immediately after the end of exposures, locomotor activity of both 3 Hz and 60 Hz exposed groups significantly decreased compared to sham group. This exposure protocol had no effect on anxiety like behavior during the 2 weeks after the treatment and also on short term memory. A significant reduction in firing rate of locus coeruleus (LC) was found after 2 hours of both 3 Hz and 60 Hz exposures. Proteome analysis also revealed global changes in whole brain proteome after treatment. Conclusion: Here, some evidence regarding the fact that such exposures can alter locomotor activity and neurons firing rate in male rats were presented. PMID:27330708

  2. Regularly scheduled, day-time, slow-onset 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure does not depress serum melatonin concentration in nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.; Orr, J.L.; Reiter, R.J.; Barlow-Walden, L.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments conducted with laboratory rodents indicate that exposure to 60 Hz electric fields or magnetic fields can suppress nocturnal melatonin concentrations in pineal gland and blood. In three experiments employing three field-exposed and three sham-exposed nonhuman primates, each implanted with an indwelling venous cannula to allow repeated blood sampling, the authors studied the effects of either 6 kV/m and 50 {micro}T (0.5 G) or 30 kV/m and 100 {micro}T (1.0 G) on serum melatonin patterns. The fields were ramped on and off slowly, so that no transients occurred. Extensive quality control for the melatonin assay, computerized control and monitoring of field intensities, and consistent exposure protocols were used. No changes in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration resulted from 6 weeks of day-time exposure with slow field onset/offset and a highly regular exposure protocol. These results indicate that, under the conditions tested, day-time exposure to 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields in combination does not result in melatonin suppression in primates.

  3. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-07-14

    This volume contains detailed experimental data to accompany quarterly report, dated July 14, 1992, by this group entitled Investigation of Effects of 60-Hz Electric Fields on Operant and Social Behavior and on the Neuroendocrine System of Nonhuman Primates.'' This volume is a collection of Appendices which are entitled: Appendix A- Field Mapping Data Forms, Appendix B- Exposure Area (East Side) Electric Field Data, Appendix C- Exposure Area (East Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix D- Sham Area (West Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix E- Memoranda Concerning Field Onset During Experiment IV and the Crossover Experiment, Appendix F- Exposure Area (East Side) Electric Field Data, Appendix G- Exposure Area (East Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix H- Sham Area (west Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix I- Compiled Data and Anovas for Experiment III Social Data, Appendix J -Written Comments Provided by Statistician Dr. Robert Mason, and Appendix K- Reference Text Provided by Dr. Coelho.

  4. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-09-01

    A cohort of sixteen male baboons were assigned to electric and magnetic field (E/MF) exposure and sham-exposure. The social behavior subjects were simultaneously exposed to 60 Hz E/MF. Ten behavioral categories were measured. Each behavioral category was comprised of multiple molecular behaviors that could be objectively identified and counted. Six of the behavior categories were social'', in that interactions between subjected were involved. The remaining four were non-social'' and pertained to individual behaviors such as movements or postural stances.

  5. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.

    1989-10-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields. Results from this program could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. This program is being conducted at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) as part of an international collaborative information exchange and scientific research effort. This annual report marks the completion of the first year of the four year research program. This project year has focused on two technical areas: the modification of the facility to include 60-Hz magnetic fields, and development of the capability for studies of neuroendocrine parameters by obtaining blood samples from baboons during electric and magnetic field exposure. Activities in the social behavior, operant behavior, and laboratory animal sciences during this project year have been in preparation for the start of Experiment 3. 7 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Effects of the electromagnetic field, 60 Hz, 3 microT, on the hormonal and metabolic regulation of undernourished pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, C W S F; Pereira, P B; Catanho, M T J A; Medeiros, M C

    2009-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have implicated maternal protein-calorie deficiency as an important public health problem in developing countries. Over the last decades, a remarkable diffusion of electricity and an increased level of the electromagnetic field (EMF) in the environment have characterized modern societies. Therefore, researchers are concerned with the biological effects of 50-60 Hz, EMF. The aim of this paper is to show the effects of EMF of 60 Hz, 3 muT, exposure for two hours per day in the regulation of the hormonal and metabolic concentrations in pregnant rats, which were fed by Regional Basic Diet (RBD) during their pregnancy as compared with pregnant rats fed a standard diet. Pregnant rats exposed to EMF of 60 Hz, 3 muT, over the pregnancy and fed with RBD presented an increase in glucose release when compared with the Group subjected only to the RBD ration. Rats fed RBD presented a decrease in their insulin and cortisol serum levels when compared with the Group fed with casein. The T3 and T4 concentrations presented the greatest variation among the Groups. The relation T4:T3 was much exaggerated in the Group subjected to RDB and exposed to EMF when compared to the others. In conclusion, the group subjected to the association of EMF and undernutrition suffered a decrease in its serum concentration of T4 and T3 when compared to the well-nourished group and the relationship T4:T3 in the former group was almost eighteen-fold the later one.

  7. Exposure of baboons to combined 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields does not produce work stoppage or affect operant performance on a match-to-sample task

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.; Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    The authors examined the effects of combined 60 Hz electric and magnetic field (EMF) exposure on performance of delayed match-to-sample (MTS) procedure involving the flash rate of a light as the stimulus. Six baboons (Papio cynocephalus) fully acquired the task; four others functioned accurately only when cued. All ten subjects were assigned to EMF-exposed or sham-exposed groups of five and were used to test for a work-stoppage effect that was previously observed with initial exposure to electric fields (EF) of 30 or 60 kV/m. Here, the authors report the results of two experiments, each consisting of 6 week preexposure, exposure, and postexposure periods. They found no evidence of work stoppage with fields of 6 kV/m and 50 {micro}T (0.5 G) or with 30 kV/m and 100 {micro}T (1.0 G). In neither experiment was there evidence of an adverse effect of 60 Hz EMF exposure on MTS performance.

  8. Rapid-onset/offset, variably scheduled 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure reduces nocturnal serum melatonin concentration in nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.; Reiter, R.J.; Barlow-Walden, L.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments with rodents indicate that power-frequency electric field (EF) or magnetic field (MF) exposure can suppress the normal nocturnal increase in melatonin concentration in pineal gland and blood. In a separate set of three experiments conducted with nonhuman primates, the authors did not observe melatonin suppression as a result of 6 weeks of day-time exposure to combined 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF) with regularly schedule ``slow`` E/MF onsets/offsets. The study described here used a different exposure paradigm in which two baboons were exposed to E/MF with ``rapid`` E/MF onsets/offsets accompanied by EF transients not found with slowly ramped E/MF onset/offset; profound reductions in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration were observed in this experiment. If replicated in a more extensive experiment, the observation of melatonin suppression only in the presence of E/MF transients would suggest that very specific exposure parameters determine the effects of 60 Hz E/MF on melatonin.

  9. 60 Hz electric field changes the membrane potential during burst phase in pancreatic β-cells: in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Neves, Gesilda F; Silva, José R F; Moraes, Renato B; Fernandes, Thiago S; Tenorio, Bruno M; Nogueira, Romildo A

    2014-06-01

    The production, distribution and use of electricity can generate low frequency electric and magnetic fields (50-60 Hz). Considering that some studies showed adverse effects on pancreatic β-cells exposed to these fields; the present study aimed to analyze the effects of 60 Hz electric fields on membrane potential during the silent and burst phases in pancreatic β-cells using a mathematical model. Sinusoidal 60 Hz electric fields with amplitude ranging from 0.5 to 4 mV were applied on pancreatic β-cells model. The sinusoidal electric field changed burst duration, inter-burst intervals (silent phase) and spike sizes. The parameters above presented dose-dependent response with the voltage amplitude applied. In conclusion, theoretical analyses showed that a 60 Hz electric field with low amplitudes changes the membrane potential in pancreatic β-cells.

  10. Effect of 60 Hz magnetic fields on the activation of hsp70 promoter in cultured INER-37 and RMA E7 cells.

    PubMed

    Heredia-Rojas, J Antonio; Rodríguez de la Fuente, Abraham Octavio; Alcocer González, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez-Flores, Laura E; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Santoyo-Stephano, Martha A; Castañeda-Garza, Esperanza; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes S

    2010-10-01

    It has been reported that 50-60 Hz magnetic fields (MF) with flux densities ranging from microtesla to millitesla are able to induce heat shock factor or heat shock proteins in various cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of 60 Hz sinusoidal MF at 8 and 80 μT on the expression of the luciferase gene contained in a plasmid labeled as electromagnetic field-plasmid (pEMF). This gene construct contains the specific sequences previously described for the induction of hsp70 expression by MF, as well as the reporter for the luciferase gene. The pEMF vector was transfected into INER-37 and RMA E7 cell lines that were later exposed to either MF or thermal shock (TS). Cells that received the MF or TS treatments and their controls were processed according to the luciferase assay system for evaluate luciferase activity. An increased luciferase gene expression was observed in INER-37 cells exposed to MF and TS compared with controls (p < 0.05), but MF exposure had no effect on the RMA E7 cell line.

  11. Absence of DNA damage after 60-Hz electromagnetic field exposure combined with ionizing radiation, hydrogen peroxide, or c-Myc overexpression.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yeung Bae; Choi, Seo-Hyun; Lee, Jae Seon; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Lee, Ju-Woon; Hong, Seung-Cheol; Myung, Sung Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2014-03-01

    The principal objective of this study was to assess the DNA damage in a normal cell line system after exposure to 60 Hz of extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF) and particularly in combination with various external factors, via comet assays. NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells, WI-38 human lung fibroblast cells, L132 human lung epithelial cells, and MCF10A human mammary gland epithelial cells were exposed for 4 or 16 h to a 60-Hz, 1 mT uniform magnetic field in the presence or absence of ionizing radiation (IR, 1 Gy), H(2)O(2) (50 μM), or c-Myc oncogenic activation. The results obtained showed no significant differences between the cells exposed to ELF-MF alone and the unexposed cells. Moreover, no synergistic or additive effects were observed after 4 or 16 h of pre-exposure to 1 mT ELF-MF or simultaneous exposure to ELF-MF combined with IR, H(2)O(2), or c-Myc activation.

  12. (Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates)

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.

    1989-03-24

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. The test facility is being modified to include combined electric and magnetic field capability. This will be accomplished by the installation of a magnetic field exposure system and modification of the electric field exposure equipment. The purpose of this document is to provide information on the design. 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Reduction of the nocturnal rise in pineal melatonin levels in rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields in utero and for 23 days after birth

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, R.J.; Anderson, L.E.; Buschbom, R.I.; Wilson, B.W.

    1988-02-01

    Rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields of either 10, 65, or 130 kV/m from conception to 23 days of age exhibited reduced peak nighttime pineal melatonin contents compared to unexposed controls. As a group, the exposed rats also exhibited a phase delay, estimated at approximately 1.4 hours, in the occurrence of the nocturnal melatonin peak. No clear dose-response relationship was noticed over the range of electric field strengths used as treatments in these experiments. These are the first studies concerned with the effects of electric field exposure on the pineal melatonin rhythm in immature rats and the findings are generally consistent with those obtained using adult rats, where electric field exposure has been shown to abolish the nighttime rhythm in pineal melatonin concentrations. 15 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Reduction of the nocturnal rise in pineal melatonin levels in rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields in utero and for 23 days after birth

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, R.J.; Anderson, L.E.; Buschbom, R.L.; Wilson, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    Rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields of either 10, 65, or 130 kV/m from conception to 23 days of age exhibited reduced peak nighttime pineal melatonin contents compared to unexposed controls. As a group, the exposed rats also exhibited a phase delay, estimated at approximately 1.4 hours, in the occurrence of the nocturnal melatonin peak. No clear dose-response relationship was noticed over the range of electric field strengths used as treatments in these experiments. These are the first studies concerned with the effects of electric field exposure on the pineal melatonin rhythm in immature rats. The findings are generally consistent with those obtained using adult rats, where electric field exposure has been shown to abolish the nighttime rhythm in pineal melatonin concentrations.

  15. Effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on nueroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.

    1993-01-22

    This series of experiments, using a well-characterized exposure facility and employing a variety of control procedures to study behavior and the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates, does not provide any evidence that exposure to power-frequency electric fields, or electric and magnetic fields in combination, for 12 hours per day for six weeks produces any deleterious effects in young-adult males. The primate experiments summarized here confirm the general conclusion indicated by experiments with rodents; although biological and behavioral changes can occur, there are no clear results establishing the occurrence of adverse effects in experiments involving relatively short-term exposure to environmentally-relevant electric or magnetic fields. Given the general agreement of the primate and rodent results, conclusions from the laboratory animal studies therefore presumably generalize well to humans.

  16. Effects of concurrent exposure to 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields on the social behavior of baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Rogers, W.R. |

    1995-12-31

    Previous research has demonstrated that 30 or 60 kV/m electric fields (EF) reliably produce temporary increases in the performance of three categories of baboon social behavior: Passive Affinity, Tension, and Stereotypy. The experimental design included 6 week preexposure, exposure, and postexposure periods with experimental and control groups, each with eight subjects. Here, the authors report two experiments that evaluated the effects of combined EF and magnetic fields (MF) on baboon social behavior. One experiment demonstrated that exposure to 6 kV/m EF and 50 {micro}T (0.5 G) MF produced Period {times} Group interactions for Stereotypy and Attack, but the previously observed increases in Passive Affinity, Tension, and Stereotypy did not occur. A second experiment demonstrated that exposure to 30 kV/m EF and 100 {micro}T 1.0 G MF did not produce the same magnitude of increases in Passive Affinity, Tension, and Stereotypy observed previously with 30 kV/m EF alone. The exposed group exhibited decreased performance rates for several behavior categories during exposure with further declines during postexposure. The control group showed fewer downward trends across periods.

  17. (Study of the behavioral and biological effects of high intensity 60 Hz electric fields): Quarterly technical progress report No. 29

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.

    1989-07-14

    Activities this quarter involved all phases of the project plus a meeting of the Joint Committee in Tokyo. Detailed mapping of the exposure facility is scheduled to be completed during the week of August 14, 1989. Both electric and magnetic fields should be available for tests of the components of the tether and blood sampling system for the neuroendocrine pilot study in September 1989. The groups for the social behavior study are stabilizing appropriately. Details on the formation of the groups and their status has been provided. Dr. Coelho has included information related to aspects of the social experiment ranging from age estimation in baboons through the cardiovascular consequences of psychosocial stress. In addition, a draft manuscript is included on the data from the previous experiments which describes the effects of 30 and 60 kV/m electric fields on the social behavior of baboons. Tests of the blood handling procedures and analysis methods have been completed. With the exception of the catecholamine analyses, the handling procedures and variability in replicate measurements are satisfactory. Logistic and practical considerations now weigh strongly against including the analysis of the blood samples for catecholamines. Preliminary tests indicate that a sampling procedure which will work for the other compounds is probably not satisfactory for the catecholamines.

  18. Protein kinase C activity is altered in HL60 cells exposed to 60 Hz AC electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Holian, O.; Reyes, H.M.; Attar, B.M.; Walter, R.J.; Astumian, R.D.; Lee, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    The authors examined the effects of electric fields (EFs) on the activity and subcellular distribution of protein kinase C (PKC) of living HL60 cells. Sixty Hertz AC sinusoidal EFs (1.5--1,000 mV/cm p-p) were applied for 1 h to cells (10{sup 7}/ml) in Teflon chambers at 37 C in the presence or absence of 2 {micro}M phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). PMA stimulation alone evoked intracellular translocation of PKC from the cytosolic to particulate fractions. In cells that were exposed to EFs (100--1,000 mV/cm) without PMA, a loss of PKC activity from the cytosol, but no concomitant rise in particulate PKC activity, was observed. In the presence of PMA, EFs (33--330 mV/cm) also accentuated the expected loss of PKC activity from the cytosol and augmented the rise in PKC activity in the particulate fraction. These data show that EFs alone or combined with PMA promote down-regulation of cytosolic PKC activity similar to that evoked by mitogens and tumor promoters but that it does not elicit the concomitant rise in particulate activity seen with those agents.

  19. Are the stray 60-Hz electromagnetic fields associated with the distribution and use of electric power a significant cause of cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J D

    1992-01-01

    The putative causal relation between ambient low-frequency (50 or 60 Hz) electromagnetic fields (necessarily present in living and working environments because of our ever increasing use of electrical devices) and cancer, especially leukemia, can be tested on the large scale by examining historical data on the growth of the generation and consumption of electric power since 1900 and corresponding data on cancer death and incidence rates. The United States per capita generation and residential consumption of electric power have grown roughly exponentially since 1900; total per capita generation has increased by a factor of 10 since 1940, and per capita residential consumption has increased by a factor of 20 in the same period. The ubiquitous stray fields from power distribution lines and internal and external wiring in buildings have grown in the same proportions. In contrast to the explosive increase in the generation and use of electricity, the age-adjusted cancer death rate for the population as a whole shows only a slight rise since 1900. When respiratory cancers (largely caused by tobacco use) are subtracted, the remaining death rate has actually fallen since 1940. That the death rate may have fallen because of better diagnosis and treatment, despite a rising incidence rate, is not substantiated, especially for leukemia, including childhood leukemia, where the incidence rate has been constant or declining slightly for the past 25 yr. The absence of any appreciable change in the national cancer incidence rates during a period in which residential use of electric power has increased dramatically shows that the associated stray 50- or 60-Hz electromagnetic fields pose no significant hazard to the average individual. PMID:1565645

  20. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.

    1992-11-02

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF), using the baboon surrogate for the human. Baboon social groups were scanned and electronically monitored during Experiments IV and IVA. The social scan, form that the technicians used to identify baboon locations and proximity to other baboons: was used to gain a simple snapshot of the position of the baboons in their cage. The scans were taken hourly every morning and evening for a total of eight scans per side per day. This report covers in detail the scan and activity data-gathering process. A set of appendices is attached which include printouts of the data sets and adjunct material pertinent to interpreting the data. The supporting material is comprised of calendars and listings of major events that occurred during the scan and activity data collection.

  1. Electric field of the power terrestrial sources observed by microsatellite Chibis-M in the Earth's ionosphere in frequency range 1-60 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkin, Fedir; Korepanov, Valery; Dudkin, Denis; Pilipenko, Vyacheslav; Pronenko, Vira; Klimov, Stanislav

    2015-07-01

    The power line emission (PLE) 50/60 Hz and the Schumann resonance (SR) harmonics were detected by the use of a compact electrical field sensor of length 0.42 m during microsatellite Chibis-M mission in years 2012-2014. The initial orbit of Chibis-M has altitude 500 km and inclination 52°. We present the space distribution of PLE and its connections with the possible overhead power lines. PLE has been recorded both in the shade and sunlit parts of the orbits as opposed to SR which have been recorded only in the nightside of the Earth. The cases of an extra long distance of PLE propagation in the Earth's ionosphere and increased value of SR Q factor have been also observed. These results should stimulate the ionosphere model refinement for ultralow frequency and extremely low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation as well as a study on new possibility of the ionosphere diagnostics.

  2. Experimental evidence for 60 Hz magnetic fields operating through the signal transduction cascade. Effects on calcium influx and c-MYC mRNA induction.

    PubMed

    Liburdy, R P; Callahan, D E; Harland, J; Dunham, E; Sloma, T R; Yaswen, P

    1993-11-22

    We tested the hypothesis that early alterations in calcium influx induced by an imposed 60 Hz magnetic field are propagated down the signal transduction (ST) cascade to alter c-MYC mRNa induction. To test this we measured both ST parameters in the same cells following 60 Hz magnetic field exposures in a specialized annular ring device (220 G (22 mT), 1.7 mV/cm maximal E(induced), 37 degrees C, 60 min). Ca2+ influx is a very early ST marker that precedes the specific induction of mRNA transcripts for the proto-oncogene c-MYC, an immediate early response gene. In three experiments influx of 45Ca2+ in the absence of mitogen was similar to that in cells treated with suboptimal levels of Con-A (1 micrograms/ml). However, calcium influx was elevated 1.5-fold when lymphocytes were exposed to Con-A plus magnetic fields; this co-stimulatory effect is consistent with previous reports from our laboratory [FEBS Lett. 301 (1992) 53-59; FEBS Lett. 271 (1990) 157-160; Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 649 (1992) 74-95]. The level of c-MYC mRNA transcript copies in non-activated cells and in suboptimally-activated cells was also similar, which is consistent with the above calcium influx findings. Significantly, lymphocytes exposed to the combination of magnetic fields plus suboptimal Con-A responded with an approximate 3.0-fold increase in band intensity of c-MYC mRNA transcripts. Importantly, transcripts for the housekeeping gene GAPDH were not influenced by mitogen or magnetic fields. We also observed that lymphocytes that failed to exhibit increased calcium influx in response to magnetic fields plus Con-A, also failed to exhibit an increase in total copies of c-MYC mRNA. Thus, calcium influx and c-MYC mRNA expression, which are sequentially linked via the signal transduction cascade in contrast to GAPDH, were both increased by magnetic fields. These findings support the above ST hypothesis and provide experimental evidence for a general biological framework for understanding magnetic field

  3. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-07-14

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields, using the baboon (Papio cynocephalus). Results from this program are used to estimate consequences of human exposure to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. Electric and magnetic field measurements for Experiment IIIA (Confirmatory), Experiment IV and Social Behavior portion of Experiment III are presented. The systems for the production and monitoring of the fields performed satisfactorily during Experiment IIIA and during all but the last part of Experiment IV. In Experiment III, two-way repeated analyses of variance revealed statistically significant Group (Exposed and Sham Exposed) and Period (Baseline. Exposure, and Post-Exposure) main effects. Two significant Period by Group interactions were also found. Seven of the ten behavioral categories showed a main effect of Period. Two-sample t-test comparisons of the two groups for each period indicated that performance rates in two behavioral categories (Stereotypy and Posture) were significantly lower in the Exposure Group. In general, the Exposed subjects exhibited a trend of progressively lower performance rates across the three periods. Specific accomplishments reported in this document were: measurement of electric and magnetic fields for Experiments IIIA and IV, completed analysis of the Social Behavioral data from Experiment III, and a detailed discussion of statistical methods employed on the Social Behavioral portion of Experiment III, and hematology data were collected and recorded for Operant and Social Behavioral subjects for Experiment IV.

  4. Evaluation of the possible copromoting effect of a 60 Hz magnetic field during chemically induced carcinogenesis in skin of SENCAR mice. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    DiGiovanni, J.; Walborg, E.F.; Anderson, L.E.; Sasser, L.B.; Morris, J.E.; Miller, D.L. |

    1997-11-01

    It has been hypothesized that exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields can enhance tumorigenesis through a copromotional mechanism. Equivocal support for this hypothesis was provided by experiments performed by Stuchly et al. using a mouse skin model; i.e. the induction of skin tumors in SENCAR mice exposed to a single subcarcinogenic dose of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and promotion by repetitive doses of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). The mice were exposed to a 2 mT (60 Hz) magnetic field during the entire promotion phase of the experiment. The Stuchly study, which utilized single weekly doses of TPA, demonstrated a statistically significant increase in skin tumors after 16--18 weeks of promotion; however, by 23 weeks of promotion, the difference was not statistically significant. The study was designed to provide definitive evidence to confirm or refute a copromotional role of ELF magnetic field exposure on DMBA/TPA-induced skin carcinogenesis in SENCAR mice. This study was modeled after the study of Stuchly et al., (1992), including the animal model and exposure conditions. However, three different promoting doses of TPA, within the linear dose response range for induction of skin tumors, were utilized.

  5. Chronically indwelling venous cannula and automatic blood sampling system for use with nonhuman primates exposed to 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Lucas, J.H.; Smith, H.D.; Orr, J.L.; Mikiten, B.C.

    1995-12-31

    An automated blood sampling system was developed for use with tethered baboons (Papio cynocephalus) during concurrent exposure to 60 Hz 30 kV/m electric fields and 0.1 mT (1.0 G) magnetic fields. The system was controlled by a FORTH-based microcomputer, which operated a pump, a fraction collector, and two pinch valves. A swivel mechanism at the end of the tether allowed the baboons to move freely in their cages. The hardware and software were designed for fail-safe operation. Heparinized saline was infused at a rate of 0.5 ml/min until a sample cycle was initiated. Then, blood was drawn from the animal into a storage tube at a rate of 12.5 ml/min, a sample of undiluted blood was taken from the end of the storage tube near the baboon, and the blood remaining in the storage tube was then flushed back into the animal. Use of the storage tube prevented the peristaltic pump rollers from pressing on tubing containing blood, and return of the blood diluted with saline limited the blood wasted per sample to less than 0.5 ml. The system functioned reliably in three experiments, collecting samples as scheduled 97% of the time. Although it was initially designed for and used successfully with primates in an electric and magnetic field environment, this type of system could be employed in many areas of biomedical research or medical treatment.

  6. Initial studies on the effects of combined 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure on the immune system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, K.K.; Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    In a pilot immunology experiment, peripheral blood samples from six baboons (Papio cynocephalus) housed as a social group were collected during week 5 of preexposure, exposure, and postexposure periods that were each 6 weeks in duration. The subjects were exposed to vertical 6 kV/m and horizontal 50 {micro}T (0.5 G) fields for 12 h per day. Lymphocytes collected during the exposure period displayed statistically significant (P < .05) reductions in CD3{sup +} and CD4{sup +} counts, interleukin 2 receptor expression, and proliferative response to pokeweed mitogen. A second experiment was conducted using samples from seven subjects exposed to 30 kV/m and 100 {micro}T (1.0 G) and eight sham-exposed subjects. Statistically significant Period {times} Group interactions occurred for total white blood cell count and CD4{sup +} to CD8{sup +} ratio, but the pattern of results was not suggestive of an exposure-related effect. Although components of the nonhuman primate immune system appear to be affected by 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure in one of two experiments, additional experiments are required to evaluate this possibility.

  7. The effect of extremely low-frequency magnetic field (50–60 Hz) exposure on spontaneous apoptosis: The results of a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mansourian, Mahsa; Marateb, Hamid Reza; Vaseghi, Golnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: This paper is a meta-analysis of the published data from in vitro studies to evaluate whether spontaneous apoptosis might be influenced by extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MFs). Materials and Methods: A comprehensive scientific literature search in electronic databases was conducted and studies covering the period 2000–2010 were selected. Then, published studies involving the desired topic were retrieved. The inclusion criteria were percentage of apoptosis in the cells exposed to 50–60 Hz ELF-MFs. The statistical analysis was performed by comprehensive meta-analysis version 2. Results: The summary measure of association (95% confidence interval) for all 18 effect estimated from 8 studies was 1.18 (1.15, 1.20). Heterogeneity among studies was found. There was no evidence of publication bias for the association between exposure to MF and apoptosis risk. Conclusion: Our meta-analysis provided conclusive data that ELF-MFs can increase apoptosis in cancer and normal cells. Furthermore, there is a possibly individual intensity and time range with maximum created effect according to window effect. PMID:27656610

  8. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Quarterly report 40, Operant behavior: Experiments 3, 4, and 4A

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-09-24

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF), using the baboon (Papio cynocephalus) as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences of human exposure to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. This report covers a series of three experiments (Experiments III, IV, and IVA) on the effect of combined 60-Hz E/MF on operant behavior. These experiments were a continuation of previous investigations of 60-Hz electric field exposure on baboons.

  9. Initial exposure to 30 kV/m or 60 kV/m 60 Hz electric fields produces temporary cessation of operant behavior of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    In two separate experiments, the authors examined the effects of a 60 Hz electric field (EF) on performance of an operant schedule consisting of two signaled components: fixed-ratio (FR30) and differential reinforcement of low-rate (DRL20). In each experiment, 12 naive baboons (Papio cynocephalus) were assigned randomly to either an EF-exposed experimental group or a sham-exposed control group. A homogeneous vertical EF of 30 kV/m was used in one experiment; 60 kV/m was used in the other. The experimental design for both experiments included 6 week preexposure, exposure, and postexposure periods. The planned analyses indicated no evidence of statistically significant (P < .05) effects of EF exposure. However, exploratory analyses comparing performance during the last week of preexposure and the first week of exposure revealed statistically significant acute effects (work stoppage): The mean response rates of the EF-exposed groups were greatly reduced on day 1 of exposure but were normal by the end of day 2 of EF exposure. The authors hypothesize that introduction of a highly unusual stimulus, the EF, temporarily interfered with normal operant behavior to produce a primary work stoppage. Supplementary cross-over experiments added at the end of each main experiment indicated that work stoppage occurred again when formerly EF-exposed subjects served as sham-exposed controls, while other subjects received their first EF exposure. Presumably, reoccurrence of other stimuli correlated with initial exposure to the EF became sufficient to subsequently cause secondary work stoppage in the absence of direct EF exposure. The primary and secondary work-stoppage effects were reproducible.

  10. Ntp technical report on toxicity, reproductive, and developmental studies of 60-Hz magnetic fields, administered by whole body exposure to F344/N rats, Sprague-Dawley rats, and B6C3F1 mice. Toxicity report series

    SciTech Connect

    Boorman, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    Electric and magnetic fields are associated with the production, transmission, and use of electricity; thus the potential for human exposure is high. These electric and magnetic fields are predominantly of low frequency (60 Hz) and generally of low intensity. The prevailing view among physicists is that exposure to these low-frequency, low-intensity fields does not pose a health hazard. However, this view has been challenged by reports linking magnetic field exposure to the development of leukemia and other cancers. Because multiple epidemiologic studies suggested a potential for increased cancer rates with increasing exposure, and because of public concern, the effects of 60-Hz magnetic field exposure were examined in F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice in 8-week full-body-exposure studies. Animals were evaluated for hematology and clinical chemistry (rats only) parameters, pineal gland hormone concentrations, and histopathology. Additional studies were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats to examine teratologic and reproductive effects of magnetic field exposure.

  11. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Quarterly report 37 - Part 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-07-14

    This volume contains detailed experimental data to accompany quarterly report, dated July 14, 1992, by this group entitled ``Investigation of Effects of 60-Hz Electric Fields on Operant and Social Behavior and on the Neuroendocrine System of Nonhuman Primates.`` This volume is a collection of Appendices which are entitled: Appendix A- Field Mapping Data Forms, Appendix B- Exposure Area (East Side) Electric Field Data, Appendix C- Exposure Area (East Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix D- Sham Area (West Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix E- Memoranda Concerning Field Onset During Experiment IV and the Crossover Experiment, Appendix F- Exposure Area (East Side) Electric Field Data, Appendix G- Exposure Area (East Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix H- Sham Area (west Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix I- Compiled Data and Anovas for Experiment III Social Data, Appendix J -Written Comments Provided by Statistician Dr. Robert Mason, and Appendix K- Reference Text Provided by Dr. Coelho.

  12. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Social behavior portions of Experiments III and IV: Quarterly report No. 39

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-09-01

    A cohort of sixteen male baboons were assigned to electric and magnetic field (E/MF) exposure and sham-exposure. The social behavior subjects were simultaneously exposed to 60 Hz E/MF. Ten behavioral categories were measured. Each behavioral category was comprised of multiple molecular behaviors that could be objectively identified and counted. Six of the behavior categories were ``social``, in that interactions between subjected were involved. The remaining four were ``non-social`` and pertained to individual behaviors such as movements or postural stances.

  13. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates. Annual report, August 5, 1984-October 25, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Lucas, J.H.; Moore, G.T.; Orr, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Operant behavioral methods have been used to assess the aversiveness of intense electric fields. One aspect of the aversiveness of a stimulus is the ability to act as a negative reinforcer. A negative reinforcer is a stimulus whose response contingent termination maintains behavior. Baboons were trained to perform an operant task to obtain food rewards, determined that the addition of an intense electric field did not disrupt performance, measured the background level of responding in the absence of any primary reinforcers, assessed the ability of electric field termination to maintain operant responding, and verified that the electric field could serve as a discriminative stimulus.

  14. Effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Draft final report, October 1, 1988--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Coelho, A.M.; Easley, S.P.; Orr, J.L.; Reiter, R.J.; Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-09-24

    A series of pioneering electric and magnetic field experiments were completed using nonhuman primates and a unique, well-engineered, and reliable exposure facility. Effects of operant behavior, social behavior, and serum melatonin concentration were examined using 60 Hz field combinations of other 6 W/m and 0.6 G or 30 W/m and 1.0 G. Observations noted in the course of this study include: Combines electric and magnetic field exposure does not have any important effect on short-term memory; the transitory increases in social behavior observed in previous electric fields did not occur; combined electric and magnetic field exposure might lead to reduced behavioral frequency in baboon social groups; three experiments clearly establish that one set of exposure conditions does not produce molatonin suppression in nonhuman primates; and a small pilot experiment suggests that a different exposure protocol might result in melatonin suppression.

  15. Long-term effects of 60-Hz electric vs. magnetic fields on IL-1 and other immune parameters in sheep: Phase 4 study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hefeneider, S.H.; McCoy, S.L.; Hausman, F.A.

    1998-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the effect of exposure to long-term low-frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMF) from an environmental 500-kV transmission line on immune function in sheep. The primary hypothesis tested was that the reduction in IL-1 activity observed in two previous short-term studies (9 months) was due to exposure to EMF from this transmission line. The secondary hypothesis was that long-term exposure (27 months) would impact immune function and animal health. To characterize the components of the EMF environment responsible for the previously observed reduction in IL-1 activity, the experiment was designed not only to examine the effect of exposure to electric and magnetic fields, but also to examine the magnetic field component alone. This was done by constructing a third pen (MF) which was shielded with wire to effectively eliminate the electric field while not significantly affecting the magnitude of the magnetic field.

  16. Long-term effects of 60-Hz electric vs. magnetic fields on IL-1 and other immune parameters in sheep: Phase 5 study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hefeneider, S.H.; McCoy, S.L.; Hausman, F.A.

    1998-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the effect of exposure to long-term low-frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMF) from a 500-kV transmission line on immune function in sheep. The primary hypothesis was that the reduction in IL-1 activity observed in two previous short-term studies (9 months) was due to EMF exposure from this transmission line. The secondary hypothesis was that long-term exposure (27 months) would impact immune function and animal health. To characterize the components of EMF responsible for the previously observed reduction in IL-1 activity, the experiment was designed not only to examine the effect of exposure to electric and magnetic fields, but also to examine the magnetic field component alone.

  17. Effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on nueroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Final report, October 1, 1988--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.

    1993-01-22

    This series of experiments, using a well-characterized exposure facility and employing a variety of control procedures to study behavior and the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates, does not provide any evidence that exposure to power-frequency electric fields, or electric and magnetic fields in combination, for 12 hours per day for six weeks produces any deleterious effects in young-adult males. The primate experiments summarized here confirm the general conclusion indicated by experiments with rodents; although biological and behavioral changes can occur, there are no clear results establishing the occurrence of adverse effects in experiments involving relatively short-term exposure to environmentally-relevant electric or magnetic fields. Given the general agreement of the primate and rodent results, conclusions from the laboratory animal studies therefore presumably generalize well to humans.

  18. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates. Technical status report, June 8-August 2, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-02

    Progress made at calibrating the electric field distribution within and around cages used for behavorial testing of baboons is described. It is concluded that all of the parts of the ''system'' are rather constant in their readings. The only component which seems to show appreciable variability is the 4 cm probe. Although the optically coupled 4 cm spherical dipole probe usually performs well, it is becoming apparent that sometimes it can produce misleading results. Although we do not yet understand the situation completely, it appears as though there are at least two variables affecting the probe, battery voltage and humidity. 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates: Neuroendocrine portion of Experiment IV

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    This quarterly report covers the neuroendocrine Portion of Experiment IV. Serum melatonin concentration was measured in individual baboons, each implanted with a chronically indwelling venous cannula. As in Experiment III the system of six automatic blood samplers was used to achieve undisturbed, 24 hr per day, simultaneous blood sampling from six individual subjects. The objective of the neuroendocrine portion of Experiment IV was to determine if 30 kV/m electric and 1.0 G magnetic field (E/MF) exposure produced a 50% decline in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration. Other groups of subjects were tested concurrently during Experiment IV to assess E/MF effects on group social and individual operant behavior. The results of these experiments will be covered respectively in the next two quarterly reports. The results of Experiment IV, as was the case with the result of Experiments III and IIIA, provide little or no evidence that E/MF exposure, under the conditions of these experiments, affects nocturnal serum melatonin concentrations of nonhuman primates. Together the negative results of Experiments III, IIA and IV indicate that day-time exposure of primates to slow-onset/offset, regularly-scheduled E/MF does not produce melatonin suppression, strongly suggesting that such exposure would not affect human melatonin either. However, before concluding that E/MF exposure in general has no effect on primate melatonin, nightime exposure needs to be examined, and the possibility, suggested by the Pilot Experiment, that fast onset/offset, irregularly-scheduled E/MF can completely suppress melatonin needs to be investigated.

  20. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Quarterly report 37 - Part 1, Text

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-07-14

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields, using the baboon (Papio cynocephalus). Results from this program are used to estimate consequences of human exposure to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. Electric and magnetic field measurements for Experiment IIIA (Confirmatory), Experiment IV and Social Behavior portion of Experiment III are presented. The systems for the production and monitoring of the fields performed satisfactorily during Experiment IIIA and during all but the last part of Experiment IV. In Experiment III, two-way repeated analyses of variance revealed statistically significant Group (Exposed and Sham Exposed) and Period (Baseline. Exposure, and Post-Exposure) main effects. Two significant Period by Group interactions were also found. Seven of the ten behavioral categories showed a main effect of Period. Two-sample t-test comparisons of the two groups for each period indicated that performance rates in two behavioral categories (Stereotypy and Posture) were significantly lower in the Exposure Group. In general, the Exposed subjects exhibited a trend of progressively lower performance rates across the three periods. Specific accomplishments reported in this document were: measurement of electric and magnetic fields for Experiments IIIA and IV, completed analysis of the Social Behavioral data from Experiment III, and a detailed discussion of statistical methods employed on the Social Behavioral portion of Experiment III, and hematology data were collected and recorded for Operant and Social Behavioral subjects for Experiment IV.

  1. Involvement of protein kinase C in the modulation of morphine-induced analgesia and the inhibitory effects of exposure to 60-hz magnetic fields in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis

    SciTech Connect

    Kavaliers, M.; Ossenkopp, K.P. )

    1990-02-26

    One of the more consistent and dramatic effects of exposure to magnetic fields is the attenuation of morphine-induced analgesia. Results of previous studies have implicated alterations in calcium channel functioning and Ca{sup ++} flux in the mediation of these effects. It is generally accepted that Ca{sup ++}-activated-phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (Protein kinase C; PKC) plays an important role in relaying trans-membrane signaling in diverse Ca{sup ++} dependent cellular processes. In experiment 1 we observed that morphine-induced analgesia in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis, as measured by the latency of an avoidance behavior to a warmed surface, was reduced by the PKC activator, SC-9, and was enhanced by the PKC inhibitors, H-7 and H-9. In contrast, HA-10004, a potent inhibitor of other protein kinases, but only a very weak inhibitor of PKC, had no effect on morphine-induced analgesia. In experiment 2 exposure of snails for 30 minutes to a 1.0 gauss (rms) 60-Hz magnetic field reduced morphine-induced analgesia. This inhibitory effect of the magnetic field was reduced by the PKC inhibitors, H-7 and H-9, and was augmented by the PKC activator SC-9. These results suggest that: (i) PKC is involved in the modulation of morphine-induced analgesia and, (ii) the inhibitory effects of magnetic fields involve PKC.

  2. Effects on g2/m phase cell cycle distribution and aneuploidy formation of exposure to a 60 Hz electromagnetic field in combination with ionizing radiation or hydrogen peroxide in l132 nontumorigenic human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hee; Yoon, Hye Eun; Lee, Jae-Seon; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Myung, Sung Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess whether exposure to the combination of an extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF; 60 Hz, 1 mT or 2 mT) with a stress factor, such as ionizing radiation (IR) or H2O2, results in genomic instability in non-tumorigenic human lung epithelial L132 cells. To this end, the percentages of G2/M-arrested cells and aneuploid cells were examined. Exposure to 0.5 Gy IR or 0.05 mM H2O2 for 9 h resulted in the highest levels of aneuploidy; however, no cells were observed in the subG1 phase, which indicated the absence of apoptotic cell death. Exposure to an ELF-MF alone (1 mT or 2 mT) did not affect the percentages of G2/M-arrested cells, aneuploid cells, or the populations of cells in the subG1 phase. Moreover, when cells were exposed to a 1 mT or 2 mT ELF-MF in combination with IR (0.5 Gy) or H2O2 (0.05 mM), the ELF-MF did not further increase the percentages of G2/M-arrested cells or aneuploid cells. These results suggest that ELF-MFs alone do not induce either G2/M arrest or aneuploidy, even when administered in combination with different stressors.

  3. Biomedical effects associated with energy-transmission systems: effects of 60-Hz electric fields on circadian and ultradian physiological and behavioral functions in small rodents. Period covered: January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Ehret, C.F.; Rosenberg, R.S.; Sacher, G.A.; Duffy, P.H.; Groh, K.R.; Russell, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of extremely low frequency (ELF) electric fields on transient patterns of circadian rhythms of physiological and behavioral end points are being investigated. This project is developing a data base to determine the exposure conditions that disturb the highly characteristic waveforms of ultradian, circadian, and infradian rhythms. The project has taken the following approach: (1) small rodents are exposed to well-defined ELF horizontal or vertical electric fields at nominal field strengths as high as 100 kV/m in individual residential facilities; (2) exposures follow a variety of schedules ranging from brief (one minute) to continuous, and including variations of circadian periodicities; (3) end points such as metabolism, activity, core body temperature, operant performance, and weight gain are continuously recorded for long intervals by microprocessor-controlled data acquisition systems; (4) the characteristic waveforms are analyzed by several statistical procedures for deviations from their unperturbed ultradian and circadian patterns; and (5) when and if exposures induce distrubances of the patterns, a search for concomitant neurochemical changes will begin. The following conclusions were reached: under a variety of exposure conditions the circadian regulatory system of the rat remained intact; brief ELF exposures at field strengths above 35 kV/m, presented during the inactive phase of the circadian cycle, produced a transient arousal in mice, characterized by increases in motor activity, carbon dioxide production, and oxygen consumption; the transient arousal habituated rapidly; no significant effects were seen in the second, third, or fourth exposure of mice using a one hour on, one hour off protocol; and there were no circadian aftereffects of the intermittent ELF stimulus in mice, based on measuresof rhythms of activity and gas metabolism.

  4. Effect of electric and magnetic fields (60 Hz) on production, and levels of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1, in lactating, pregnant cows subjected to short days.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M; Petitclerc, D; Nguyen, D H; Block, E; Burchard, J F

    2002-11-01

    Electric and magnetic fields (EMF) are generated by the transmission of electricity through high tension lines traversing rural areas. Previous studies showed increased dry matter intake (DMI) and fat corrected milk in dairy cows exposed to EMF. Because EMF exposure has been shown to suppress pineal release of melatonin in some species, it was hypothesized that EMF effects resemble those of exposure to long days. Previous studies have shown that DMI and milk production increase in dairy cattle in response to long day photoperiods, and this has been observed in association with increased circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), but not growth hormone (GH). The hypothesis that EMF act by modifying the response to photoperiod was tested by subjecting dairy cows to controlled EMF exposure while keeping them under short-day conditions. Sixteen lactating, pregnant Holstein cows were exposed to a vertical electric field of 10 kV/m and a horizontal magnetic field of 30 microT in a crossover design with treatment switchback. Two groups of eight cows each were exposed to EMF for 16 h/d in either oftwo sequences. Each sequence consisted of three consecutive 28-d periods. All animals were maintained under short day conditions (8 h light, 16 h dark) during the trial. DMI and plasma IGF-1 were increased (P < 0.01) during EMF exposure (17.03 vs.16.04 kg/d, SE = 0.4; 137 +/- 6 ng/ml vs 126 +/- 6, respectively). The mean GH concentration was not affected, but a treatment x hour interaction was detected, with GH lower for the EMF exposed animals during the first 16 h of the sampling period, and higher for the last 8 h. Overall, the yield of milk or its components was not affected by EMF exposure, but milk yield was significantly higher for the exposed animals during wk 4 of treatment.

  5. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates: Neuroendocrine portion of Experiment IV. Quarterly report No. 38

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    This quarterly report covers the neuroendocrine Portion of Experiment IV. Serum melatonin concentration was measured in individual baboons, each implanted with a chronically indwelling venous cannula. As in Experiment III the system of six automatic blood samplers was used to achieve undisturbed, 24 hr per day, simultaneous blood sampling from six individual subjects. The objective of the neuroendocrine portion of Experiment IV was to determine if 30 kV/m electric and 1.0 G magnetic field (E/MF) exposure produced a 50% decline in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration. Other groups of subjects were tested concurrently during Experiment IV to assess E/MF effects on group social and individual operant behavior. The results of these experiments will be covered respectively in the next two quarterly reports. The results of Experiment IV, as was the case with the result of Experiments III and IIIA, provide little or no evidence that E/MF exposure, under the conditions of these experiments, affects nocturnal serum melatonin concentrations of nonhuman primates. Together the negative results of Experiments III, IIA and IV indicate that day-time exposure of primates to slow-onset/offset, regularly-scheduled E/MF does not produce melatonin suppression, strongly suggesting that such exposure would not affect human melatonin either. However, before concluding that E/MF exposure in general has no effect on primate melatonin, nightime exposure needs to be examined, and the possibility, suggested by the Pilot Experiment, that fast onset/offset, irregularly-scheduled E/MF can completely suppress melatonin needs to be investigated.

  6. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Quarterly report, Scan and activity data for experiments 4 and 4A, [July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.

    1992-11-02

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF), using the baboon surrogate for the human. Baboon social groups were scanned and electronically monitored during Experiments IV and IVA. The social scan, form that the technicians used to identify baboon locations and proximity to other baboons: was used to gain a simple snapshot of the position of the baboons in their cage. The scans were taken hourly every morning and evening for a total of eight scans per side per day. This report covers in detail the scan and activity data-gathering process. A set of appendices is attached which include printouts of the data sets and adjunct material pertinent to interpreting the data. The supporting material is comprised of calendars and listings of major events that occurred during the scan and activity data collection.

  7. Improvement of both dystonia and tics with 60 Hz pallidal deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hwynn, Nelson; Tagliati, Michele; Alterman, Ron L; Limotai, Natlada; Zeilman, Pamela; Malaty, Irene A; Foote, Kelly D; Morishita, Takashi; Okun, Michael S

    2012-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation has been utilized in both dystonia and in medication refractory Tourette syndrome. We present an interesting case of a patient with a mixture of disabling dystonia and Tourette syndrome whose coexistent dystonia and tics were successfully treated with 60 Hz-stimulation of the globus pallidus region.

  8. Investigation of Potential Behavioral Effects of Exposure to 60 Hz Electromagnetic Fields.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    chlorpromazine was not altered by exposure to microwaves. A lhough, the above current literature indicates that under many con- ditions the effects of various...Oct 20-23, 1975, Vol. 1, DHEW Publ. ( FDA )77-8010, pp. 311-322, Washington, D.C.: U. S. Government Printing Office, 1975. % % 6. deLorge, J. Operant...In: Symposium on Biological Effects and Measurement of Radio Frequency/Microwaves, D. G. Hazzard (Ed.), pp. 62-68, HEW Publ ( FDA )77-8026, Washington

  9. Deficits in high- (>60 Hz) gamma-band oscillations during visual processing in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Grützner, Christine; Wibral, Michael; Sun, Limin; Rivolta, Davide; Singer, Wolf; Maurer, Konrad; Uhlhaas, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Current theories of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia have focused on abnormal temporal coordination of neural activity. Oscillations in the gamma-band range (>25 Hz) are of particular interest as they establish synchronization with great precision in local cortical networks. However, the contribution of high gamma (>60 Hz) oscillations toward the pathophysiology is less established. To address this issue, we recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data from 16 medicated patients with chronic schizophrenia and 16 controls during the perception of Mooney faces. MEG data were analysed in the 25–150 Hz frequency range. Patients showed elevated reaction times and reduced detection rates during the perception of upright Mooney faces while responses to inverted stimuli were intact. Impaired processing of Mooney faces in schizophrenia patients was accompanied by a pronounced reduction in spectral power between 60–120 Hz (effect size: d = 1.26) which was correlated with disorganized symptoms (r = −0.72). Our findings demonstrate that deficits in high gamma-band oscillations as measured by MEG are a sensitive marker for aberrant cortical functioning in schizophrenia, suggesting an important aspect of the pathophysiology of the disorder. PMID:23532620

  10. Power line emission 50/60 Hz and Schumann resonances observed by microsatellite Chibis-M in the Earth's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkin, Denys; Pilipenko, Vyacheslav; Dudkin, Fedir; Pronenko, Vira; Klimov, Stanislav

    2015-04-01

    The overhead power lines are the sources of intense wideband electromagnetic (EM) emission, especially in ELF-VLF range, because of significant length (up to a few thousand kilometers) and strong 50/60 Hz currents with noticeable distortion. The radiation efficiency of the power line emission (PLE) increases with the harmonic order, so they are well observed by ground-based EM sensors. However their observations by low orbiting satellites (LEO) are very rare, particularly at basic harmonic 50/60 Hz, because of the ionospheric plasma opacity in ELF band. The Schumann resonance (SR) is the narrow-band EM noise that occurs due to the global thunderstorm activity in the Earth-ionosphere cavity. The first five eigenmodes of the SR are 7.8, 14.3, 20.8, 27.3 and 33.8 Hz and, thus, SR harmonics are also strongly absorbed by the Earth ionosphere. The published numerical simulations show that the penetration depth of such an ELF emission into the Earth's ionosphere is limited to 50-70 km for electric field and 120-240 km for magnetic field. From this follows, that PLE and SR can hardly ever be detected by LEO satellites, i.e. above the F-layer of ionosphere. In spite of this fact, these emissions were recently observed with use of the electric field antennas placed on the satellites C/NOFS (USA) and Chibis-M (Russia). Microsatellite Chibis-M was launched on January 24, 2012, at 23:18:30 UTC from the cargo ship "Progress M-13M" to circular orbit with altitude ~500 km and inclination ~52° . Chibis-M mass is about 40 kg where one third is a scientific instrumentation. The dimensions of the microsatellite case are 0.26x0.26x0.54 m with the outside mounted solar panels, service and scientific instrumentation. The main scientific objective of Chibis-M is the theoretical model verification for the atmospheric gamma-ray bursts. It requires the study of the accompanying EM processes such as the plasma waves produced by the lightning discharges in the VLF band. Chibis-M decayed on 15

  11. Effects of field-manure applications on stratified 17B-estradiol concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The estrogenic hormone, 17'-estradiol (E2), is a potent endocrine disrupting compound found in animal manures. The objective of this study was to assess the occurrence of manure-borne E2 stratified through soil in fields that receive swine (Sus scrofa domestica) manure slurry as fertilizer. Soil cor...

  12. 17-β-Estradiol Counteracts the Effects of High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields on Trophoblastic Connexins and Integrins

    PubMed Central

    Cervellati, Franco; Lunghi, Laura; Fabbri, Elena; Valbonesi, Paola; Marci, Roberto; Biondi, Carla; Vesce, Fortunato

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of high-frequency electromagnetic fields (HF-EMFs) and 17-β-estradiol on connexins (Cxs), integrins (Ints), and estrogen receptor (ER) expression, as well as on ultrastructure of trophoblast-derived HTR-8/SVneo cells. HF-EMF, 17-β-estradiol, and their combination induced an increase of Cx40 and Cx43 mRNA expression. HF-EMF decreased Int alpha1 and β1 mRNA levels but enhanced Int alpha5 mRNA expression. All the Ints mRNA expressions were increased by 17-β-estradiol and exposure to both stimuli. ER-β mRNA was reduced by HF-EMF but augmented by 17-β-estradiol alone or with HF-EMF. ER-β immunofluorescence showed a cytoplasmic localization in sham and HF-EMF exposed cells which became nuclear after treatment with hormone or both stimuli. Electron microscopy evidenced a loss of cellular contact in exposed cells which appeared counteracted by 17-β-estradiol. We demonstrate that 17-β-estradiol modulates Cxs and Ints as well as ER-β expression induced by HF-EMF, suggesting an influence of both stimuli on trophoblast differentiation and migration. PMID:23819010

  13. Transport of 17beta-estradiol and testosterone in a field lysimeter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    17ß-estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) are present in sources such as waste treatment effluent and manures, and can potentially disrupt aquatic organisms at low concentrations. Laboratory studies consistently indicate limited mobility and rapid attenuation of E2 and T in soils; however, these hormo...

  14. Transport of 17ß-Estradiol and Testosterone in a Field Lysimeter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    17ß-estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) are naturally present in manures and have the potential to disrupt aquatic organisms at low concentrations. Laboratory studies have indicated that E2 and T would have limited mobility and would attenuate rapidly in soils; however, these hormones are consistent...

  15. 17beta-Estradiol potentiates field excitatory postsynaptic potentials within each subfield of the hippocampus with greatest potentiation of the associational/commissural afferents of CA3.

    PubMed

    Kim, M T; Soussou, W; Gholmieh, G; Ahuja, A; Tanguay, A; Berger, T W; Brinton, R D

    2006-08-11

    We sought to determine the impact of 17beta-estradiol throughout the hippocampal trisynaptic pathway and to investigate the afferent fiber systems within CA1 and CA3 in detail. To achieve this objective, we utilized multielectrode arrays to simultaneously record the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials from the CA1, dentate gyrus, and CA3 of rat hippocampal slices in the presence or absence of 100 pM 17beta-estradiol. We confirmed our earlier findings in CA1, where 17beta-estradiol significantly increased field excitatory postsynaptic potentials amplitude (20%+/-3%) and slope (22%+/-7%). 17beta-Estradiol significantly potentiated the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials in dentate gyrus, amplitude (15%+/-4%) and slope (17%+/-5), and in CA3, amplitude (15%+/-4%) and slope (19%+/-5%). Using a high-density multielectrode array, we sought to determine the source of potentiation in CA1 and CA3 by determining the impact of 17beta-estradiol on the apical afferents and the basal afferents within CA1 and on the mossy fibers and the associational/commissural fibers within CA3. In CA1, 17beta-estradiol induced a modest increase in the amplitude (7%+/-2%) and slope (9%+/-3%) following apical stimulation with similar magnitude of increase following basal stimulation amplitude (10%+/-2%) and slope (12%+/-3%). In CA3, 17beta-estradiol augmented the mossy fiber amplitude (15%+/-3%) and slope (18%+/-6%) and the associational/commissural fiber amplitude (31%+/-13%) and slope (40%+/-15%). These results indicate that 17beta-estradiol potentiated synaptic transmission in each subfield of the hippocampal slice, with the greatest magnitude of potentiation at the associational/commissural fibers in CA3. 17beta-Estradiol regulation of CA3 responses provides a novel site of 17beta-estradiol action that corresponds to the density of estrogen receptors within the hippocampus. The implications of 17beta-estradiol potentiation of the field potential in each of the hippocampal subfields

  16. Further studies of 60-Hz exposure effects on human function. Final report summary, July 3, 1989--September 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.; Cohen, H.D.

    1994-03-29

    The objective of the exploratory study was to determine whether the electric or magnetic field, presented separately in an intermittent fashion, would produce the same pattern of heart rate increases and decreases seen in the original intermittent exposure study. In addition, time of day and baseline heart rate were explored in an attempt to clarify design issues that arose from previous studies. Twenty-four healthy young men 21 to 35 years of age participated in the study. Half were exposed to a 9-kV/m electric field, and half to a 200-mG magnetic field. Within each of these groups, half were exposed in the morning and half in the afternoon.

  17. Estradiol Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Estradiol topical gel and emulsion (lotion type mixture) are used to treat and prevent hot flushes (hot flashes; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) in women who are experiencing menopause ( ...

  18. Increased voluntary drive is associated with changes in common oscillations from 13 to 60 Hz of interference but not rectified electromyography.

    PubMed

    Neto, Osmar P; Baweja, Harsimran S; Christou, Evangelos A

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the capability of interference and rectified electromyography (EMG) to detect changes in the beta (13-30-HZ) and Piper (30-60-HZ) bands when voluntary force is increased. Twenty adults exerted a constant force abduction of the index finger at 15% and 50% of maximum. The common oscillations at various frequency bands (0-500 HZ) were estimated from the first dorsal interosseous muscle using cross wavelets of interference and rectified EMG. For the interference EMG signals, normalized power significantly (P < 0.01) increased with force in the beta (9.0 +/- 0.9 vs. 15.5 +/- 2.1%) and Piper (13.6 +/- 0.9 vs. 21 +/- 1.7%) bands. For rectified EMG signals, however, the beta and Piper bands remained unchanged (P > 0.4). Although rectified EMG is used in many clinical studies to identify changes in the oscillatory drive to the muscle, our findings suggest that only interference EMG can accurately capture the increase in oscillatory drive from 13 to 60 HZ with voluntary force.

  19. Very Broadband Rayleigh-Wave Dispersion (0.06 - 60 Hz) and Shear-Wave Velocity Structure Under Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, K. A.; Bilek, S. L.; Patton, H. J.; Abbott, R. E.; Stead, R.; Pancha, A.; White, R.

    2009-12-01

    Earth structure plays an important role in the generation of seismic waves for all sources. Nowhere is this more evident than at near-surface depths where man-made sources, such as explosions, are conducted. For example, short-period Rayleigh waves (Rg) are excited and propagate in the upper 2 km of Earth's crust. The importance of Rg in the generation of S waves from explosion sources through near-source scattering depends greatly on the shear-wave velocity structure at very shallow depths. Using three distinct datasets, we present a very broadband Rayleigh-wave phase velocity dispersion curve for the Yucca Flat (YF) region of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The first dataset consists of waveforms of historic NTS explosions recorded on regional seismic networks and will provide information for the lowest frequencies (0.06-0.3 Hz). The second dataset is comprised of waveforms from a non-nuclear explosion on YF recorded at near-local distances and will be used for mid-range frequencies (0.2-1.5 Hz). The third dataset contains high-frequency waveforms recorded from refraction microtremor surveys on YF. This dataset provides information between 1.5 and 60 Hz. Initial results from the high frequency dataset indicate velocities range from 0.45-0.9 km/s at 1.5 Hz and 0.25-0.45 km/s at 60 Hz. The broadband nature of the dispersion curve will allow us to invert for the shear-wave velocity structure to 10 km depth, with focus on shallow depths where nuclear tests were conducted in the YF region. The velocity model will be used by researchers as a tool to aid the development of new explosion source models that incorporate shear wave generation. The new model can also be used to help improve regional distance yield estimation and source discrimination for small events.

  20. c-Fos induction by a 14T magnetic field in visceral and vestibular relays of the female rat brainstem is modulated by estradiol

    PubMed Central

    Cason, Angie M.; Kwon, Bumsup; Smith, James C.; Houpt, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that high magnetic fields interact with the vestibular system of humans and rodents. In rats, exposure to high magnetic fields of 7T or above induces locomotor circling and leads to a conditioned taste aversion if paired with a novel taste. Sex differences in the behavioral responses to magnetic field exposure have been found, such that female rats show more locomotor circling and enhanced conditioned taste aversion compared to male rats. To determine if estrogen modulates the neural response to high magnetic fields, c-Fos expression after 14T magnetic field exposure was compared in ovariectomized rats and ovariectomized rats with estradiol replacement. Compared to sham exposure, magnetic field exposure induced significantly more c-Fos positive cells in the nucleus of the solitary tract and the parabrachial, medial vestibular, prepositus, and supragenualis nuclei. Furthermore, there was a significant asymmetry in c-Fos induction between sides of the brainstem in several regions. In ovariectomized rats, there was more c-Fos expressed in the right side compared to left side in the locus coeruleus and parabrachial, superior vestibular, and supragenualis nuclei; less expression in the right compared to left side of the medial vestibular; and no asymmetry in the prepositus nucleus and the nucleus of the solitary tract. Chronic estradiol treatment modulated the neural response in some regions: less c-Fos was induced in the superior vestibular nucleus and locus coeruleus after estradiol replacement; estradiol treatment eliminated the asymmetry of c-Fos expression in the locus coeruleus and supragenualis nucleus, created an asymmetry in the prepositus nucleus and reversed the asymmetry in the parabrachial nucleus. These results suggest that ovarian steroids may mediate sex differences in the behavioral responses to magnetic field exposure at the level of visceral and vestibular nuclei of the brainstem. PMID:20553875

  1. [Interhemispheric relations of the EEG power of cortical potentials in the band of 1-60 Hz during formation and testing of cognitive set to facial expression].

    PubMed

    Dumenko, V N; Kozlov, M K; Kurova, N S; Cheremushkin, E A

    2009-01-01

    Interhemispheric relations of the EEG power in the 1-60 frequency band were studied at the stages of formation and testing of the cognitive set to facial expression. Different topographic asymmetry patterns were revealed in subjects with different set plasticity. In subjects without behavioral actualization (n = 11) of the set at the stage of set formation, EEG power in the gamma band (21-40 and 41-60 Hz) prevailed in the frontal areas of the right hemisphere, whereas the power of electrical oscillations in the bands of 2-7 and 8-13 Hz was higher also in the frontal areas but of the left hemisphere. At the stage of set testing, this basic topographical asymmetry pattern persisted. Formation of the set in subjects with pronounced actualization (n = 18) was characterized by another topographical asymmetry pattern: a significant excess of the power of gamma oscillations was observed in the posterotemporal and occipital areas of the left hemisphere, whereas the power of oscillations in the bands 2-7, 8-13, and 14-20 Hz was higher also in the posterior areas but of the right hemisphere. No asymmetry in the EEG power was observed in these subjects at the stage of set testing.

  2. Blood Test: Estradiol

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2-Year-Old Blood Test: Estradiol KidsHealth ... measures the level of the hormone estradiol in the bloodstream. Estradiol plays an important role in sexual development: It's the most important form of the hormone ...

  3. A simple dye-sensitized solar cell sealing technique using a CO 2 laser beam excited by 60 Hz AC discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Gil; Hong, Ji-Tae; Xu, Guo-Cheng; Kim, Ho-Sung; Lee, Kyoung-Jun; Park, Sung-Joon; Kim, Whi-Young; Kim, Hee-Je

    2010-09-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) use two glass substrates (photo electrode and counter electrode) coated with fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) to harvest light into the cell and to collect electrons. The space between the photo electrode and the counter electrode are filled with a liquid type electrolyte for electron transfer into the cell. Therefore, an appropriate sealing method is required to prevent the liquid electrolyte leaking out. In this paper, a simple CO 2 laser beam with TEM 00 mode excited by a 60 Hz AC discharge was used to seal two glass substrates coated with FTO for the fabrication of DSSCs. The sealing technique improved the durability and stability of the DSSCs. The optimal conditions for the sealing of the DSSCs are related to the pin-hole diameter, the discharge current and the moving velocity of the target. Especially, the CO 2 laser beam is used as a heat source that is precisely controlled by the pin-hole, which plays an important role in adjusting its spot size. From these results, the maximum laser power was found to be 40 W at 18 Torr and 35 mA. In order to achieve the best sealing quality, the following parameters are required: a pin-hole diameter of 4 mm, input voltage of 10.73 kV, discharge current of 9.31 mA, moving velocity of 1 mm/s and distance from the target surface of 26.5 cm. Scanning electron microscope images show that the sealing quality obtained using the CO 2 laser beam is superior to that obtained using a hot press or soldering iron.

  4. [Polish regulations on maximum admissible intensities for electric and magnetic frequencies of 60 Hz and the European Union recommendations for electrical power engineering].

    PubMed

    Groszko, Marian

    2003-01-01

    Electric and magnetic fields of 50 Hz from electric power devices affect not only workers, but also the general population, as these devices are also located in populated areas, hence the duality of regulations on maximum admissible intensities. This paper presents these regulations and discusses in detail the changes of 2001. Based on the Polish regulations, hygienic evaluation of electric power devices has been attempted. The Polish regulations on the 50 Hz electromagnetic fields were compared with relevant international regulations of CENELEC and the European Union recommendations. Our maximum admissible intensities have been found to conform with the international standards.

  5. Estradiol Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... periods). Transdermal estradiol is also used to prevent osteoporosis (a condition in which the bones become thin ... Women who only need a medication to prevent osteoporosis may benefit more from a different medication that ...

  6. Estradiol and the Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Margaret M.

    2009-01-01

    Estradiol is the most potent and ubiquitous member of a class of steroid hormones called estrogens. Fetuses and newborns are exposed to estradiol derived from their mother, their own gonads, and synthesized locally in their brains. Receptors for estradiol are nuclear transcription factors that regulate gene expression but also have actions at the membrane, including activation of signal transduction pathways. The developing brain expresses high levels of receptors for estradiol. The actions of estradiol on developing brain are generally permanent and range from establishment of sex differences to pervasive trophic and neuroprotective effects. Cellular end points mediated by estradiol include the following: 1) apoptosis, with estradiol preventing it in some regions but promoting it in others; 2) synaptogenesis, again estradiol promotes in some regions and inhibits in others; and 3) morphometry of neurons and astrocytes. Estradiol also impacts cellular physiology by modulating calcium handling, immediate-early-gene expression, and kinase activity. The specific mechanisms of estradiol action permanently impacting the brain are regionally specific and often involve neuronal/glial cross-talk. The introduction of endocrine disrupting compounds into the environment that mimic or alter the actions of estradiol has generated considerable concern, and the developing brain is a particularly sensitive target. Prostaglandins, glutamate, GABA, granulin, and focal adhesion kinase are among the signaling molecules co-opted by estradiol to differentiate male from female brains, but much remains to be learned. Only by understanding completely the mechanisms and impact of estradiol action on the developing brain can we also understand when these processes go awry. PMID:18195084

  7. Estradiol and neurodegenerative oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Jon

    2008-10-01

    Estradiol is a potent preventative against neurodegenerative disease, in part, by activating antioxidant defense systems scavenging reactive oxygen species, limiting mitochondrial protein damage, improving electron transport chain activity and reducing mitochondrial DNA damage. Estradiol also increases the activity of complex IV of the electron transport chain, improving mitochondrial respiration and ATP production under normal and stressful conditions. However, the high oxidative cellular environment present during neurodegeneration makes estradiol a poor agent for treatment of existing disease. Oxidative stress stimulates the production of the hydroperoxide-dependent hydroxylation of estradiol to the catecholestrogen metabolites, which can undergo reactive oxygen species producing redox cycling, setting up a self-generating toxic cascade offsetting any antioxidant/antiapoptotic effects generated by the parent estradiol. Additional disease-induced factors can further perpetuate this cycle. For example dysregulation of the catecholamine system could alter catechol-O-methyltransferase-catalyzed methylation, preventing removal of redox cycling catecholestrogens from the system enhancing pro-oxidant effects of estradiol.

  8. delta 9-THC and 17-beta-estradiol in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Foy, M R; Teyler, T J; Vardaris, R M

    1982-04-01

    Electrophysiological field potentials recorded from in vitro hippocampal slice preparations show dose-dependent differences in response to 17-beta-estradiol (E2) and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) added to the incubation medium. Using a wide range of doses (1 pM-10 nM), it was found that mid-range concentrations of estradiol (100 pM) and THC (10 pM) tended to increase field potentials in CA1 of rodents. Higher dose levels of each agent were found to depress neuronal activity. In the context of prior findings, these results suggest that the two compounds share a common mechanism of action in the hippocampus.

  9. 77 FR 31722 - New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Estradiol; Estradiol Benzoate and Testosterone Propionate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-30

    ... and testosterone propionate) with TYLAN (tylosin tartrate). 200-221 COMPONENT TE-IS 522.2477 (trenbolone acetate and estradiol). COMPONENT TE-S (trenbolone acetate and estradiol). COMPONENT TE-G (trenbolone acetate and estradiol). COMPONENT TE-IS (trenbolone acetate and estradiol) with TYLAN...

  10. Effects of 17 b-estradiol and extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on social recognition memory in female rats: a possible interaction?

    PubMed

    Reyes-Guerrero, Gloria; Vázquez-García, Mario; Elias-Viñas, David; Donatti-Albarrán, Olga A; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda

    2006-06-20

    We have investigated a potential memory-enhancing effect of exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF EMF) in female rats and its dependence on estrogen, using a social recognition task. A juvenile social recognition paradigm was used and memory retention tested at 30 and 300 min after an adult was exposed to a juvenile during two 4-min trials. Results showed that an intact social recognition memory was present at 30 min in both gonadally intact and ovariectomized rats with, or without, ELF-EMF. However, whereas gonadally intact control females failed to show retention of the recognition memory at 300 min, those additionally exposed to ELF EMF did. This shows that the enhanced duration effect of ELF EMF on social recognition memory occurs in gonadally intact females as well as in males. In addition, results showed that the ELF EMF facilitation of memory retention was prevented by ovariectomy but restored by exogenous treatment with estrogen. This suggests that this ELF EMF effect on social recognition memory is estrogen-dependent.

  11. [Oral combined contraception: is there any difference between ethinyl-estradiol and estradiol?].

    PubMed

    Trémollieres, F

    2012-02-01

    Estradiol 17-β, which is the natural estrogen in women, offers an alternative to ethinyl-estradiol to be used in combined oral contraceptives. Thanks to its biochemical structure, estradiol has a far lesser impact on the synthesis of hepatic proteins than ethinyl-estradiol, which is likely to result in a better metabolic and vascular profile. However and until lately, the different clinical trials that had investigated estradiol-containing oral contraceptives were limited by bleeding disturbances, with breakthrough and irregular bleeding and higher rates of discontinuation. Development of anti-gonadotropic progestins with a potent endometrial activity is likely to make possible their combination with estradiol in oral contraceptives. The objective of this current review is to provide an overview of the development of combined oral contraceptives containing natural estrogen from the respective biochemical and pharmacological characteristics of ethinyl-estradiol and estradiol.

  12. Environmental magnetic fields: Influences on early embryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, I.L.; Hardman, W.E.; Winters, W.D.; Zimmerman, S.; Zimmerman, A.M. )

    1993-04-01

    A 10-mG, 50 to 60-Hz magnetic field is in the intensity and frequency range that people worldwide are often exposed to in homes and in the workplace. Studies about the effects of 50- to 100-Hz electromagnetic fields on various species of animal embryos (fish, chick, fly, sea urchin, rat, and mouse) indicate that early stages of embryonic development are responsive to fluctuating magnetic fields. Chick, sea urchin, and mouse embryos are responsive to magnetic field intensities of 10-100 mG. Results from studies on sea urchin embryos indicate that exposure to conditions of rotating 60-Hz magnetic fields, e.g., similar to those in our environment, interferes with cell proliferation at the morula stage in a manner dependent on field intensity. The cleavage stages, prior to the 64-cell stage, were not delayed by this rotating 60-Hz magnetic field suggesting that the ionic surges, DNA replication, and translational events essential for early cleavage stages were not significantly altered. Studies of histone synthesis in early sea urchin embryos indicated that the rotating 60-Hz magnetic field decreased zygotic expression of early histone genes at the morula stage and suggests that this decrease in early histone production was limiting to cell proliferation. Whether these comparative observations from animal development studies will be paralleled by results from studies of human embryogenesis, as suggested by some epidemiology studies, has yet to be established. 38 refs.

  13. 21 CFR 522.840 - Estradiol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Estradiol. 522.840 Section 522.840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.840 Estradiol....

  14. 21 CFR 522.840 - Estradiol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Estradiol. 522.840 Section 522.840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.840 Estradiol....

  15. 21 CFR 522.840 - Estradiol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Estradiol. 522.840 Section 522.840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.840 Estradiol....

  16. 21 CFR 522.840 - Estradiol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Estradiol. 522.840 Section 522.840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.840 Estradiol....

  17. 21 CFR 522.840 - Estradiol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Estradiol. 522.840 Section 522.840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.840 Estradiol....

  18. 21 CFR 556.240 - Estradiol and related esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Estradiol and related esters. 556.240 Section 556... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.240 Estradiol and related esters. No residues of estradiol, resulting from the use of estradiol or any of the related esters, are permitted in excess of the...

  19. 21 CFR 556.240 - Estradiol and related esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Estradiol and related esters. 556.240 Section 556... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.240 Estradiol and related esters. No residues of estradiol, resulting from the use of estradiol or any of the related esters, are permitted in excess of the...

  20. 21 CFR 556.240 - Estradiol and related esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Estradiol and related esters. 556.240 Section 556... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.240 Estradiol and related esters. No residues of estradiol, resulting from the use of estradiol or any of the related esters, are permitted in excess of the...

  1. 21 CFR 556.240 - Estradiol and related esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Estradiol and related esters. 556.240 Section 556... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.240 Estradiol and related esters. No residues of estradiol, resulting from the use of estradiol or any of the related esters, are permitted in excess of the...

  2. 21 CFR 556.240 - Estradiol and related esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Estradiol and related esters. 556.240 Section 556... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.240 Estradiol and related esters. No residues of estradiol, resulting from the use of estradiol or any of the related esters, are permitted in excess of the...

  3. Ethinyl Estradiol and Etonogestrel Vaginal Ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... a class of medications called combination hormonal contraceptives (birth control medications). Etonogestrel is a progestin and ethinyl estradiol ... contraceptive ring is a very effective method of birth control but does not prevent the spread of human ...

  4. Estradiol: a rhythmic, inhibitory, indirect control of meal size.

    PubMed

    Eckel, Lisa A

    2004-08-01

    The classic analyses of the inhibitory effects of cholecystokinin (CCK) on meal size, conducted by Professor Gerard P. Smith and his colleagues at the Bourne Laboratory, inspired my initial interest in this field. My current research, which investigates the role of estradiol in the control of meal size, continues to be guided by Gerry's thoughtful, scientific approach to the study of ingestive behavior. In 1996, the year I arrived as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Bourne Laboratory, Gerry published a new theory of the controls of meal size. In this important paper, Gerry proposed that the controls of meal size can be either direct or indirect. He argued that direct controls of meal size interact with peripheral, preabsorptive receptors that are sensitive to the chemical, mechanical, and colligative properties of ingested food and that indirect controls of meal size function to modulate the activity of direct controls. The purpose of this review is to illustrate how Gerry's theory has guided much of what is known about the mechanism by which estradiol inhibits food intake in female rats. I will provide evidence, primarily from behavioral studies of gonadally intact and ovariectomized rats, that estradiol exerts phasic and tonic inhibitory effects on food intake by acting as a rhythmic, inhibitory, indirect control of meal size.

  5. Analysis of magnetic field levels at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, Christos G.

    1994-01-01

    The scope of this work is to evaluate the magnetic field levels of distribution systems and other equipment at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Magnetic fields levels in several operational areas and various facilities are investigated. Three dimensional mappings and contour are provided along with the measured data. Furthermore, the portion of magnetic fields generated by the 60 Hz fundamental frequency and the portion generated by harmonics are examined. Finally, possible mitigation techniques for attenuating fields from electric panels are discussed.

  6. Calcium signaling in lymphocytes and ELF fields. Evidence for an electric field metric and a site of interaction involving the calcium ion channel.

    PubMed

    Liburdy, R P

    1992-04-13

    Calcium influx increased during mitogen-activated signal transduction in thymic lymphocytes exposed to a 22 mT, 60 Hz magnetic field (E induced = 1.7 mV/cm, 37 degrees C, 60 min). To distinguish between an electric or a magnetic field dependence a special multi-ring annular cell culture plate based on Faraday's Law of Induction was employed. Studies show a dependence on the strength of the induced electric field at constant magnetic flux density. Moreover, exposure to a pure 60 Hz electric field or to a magnetically-induced electric field of identical strength resulted in similar changes in calcium transport. The first real-time monitoring of [Ca2+]i during application of a 60 Hz electric field revealed an increase in [Ca2+]i observed 100 s after mitogen stimulation; this suggests that the plateau phase rather than the early phase of calcium signaling was influenced. The hypothesis was tested by separating, in time, the early release of calcium from intracellular stores from the influx of extracellular calcium. In calcium-free buffer, 60 Hz field exerted little influence on the early release of calcium from intracellular stores. In contrast, addition of extracellular calcium during exposure enhanced calcium influx through the plasma membrane. Alteration of the plateau phase of calcium signaling implicates the calcium channel as a site of field interaction. In addition, an electric field exposure metric is mechanistically consistent with a cell-surface interaction site.

  7. Copper and endogenous mediators of estradiol action.

    PubMed

    Fishman, J H; Fishman, J

    1988-04-29

    Divalent copper increases by severalfold specific estradiol binding in rat uterine cytosol at 37 degrees C. Two endogenous substances have now been isolated from the cytosol one of which sharply inhibits the copper effect while the other sharply promotes it. The inhibitor is thermostable, it is adsorbed by dextran coated charcoal and elutes from Sephadex columns with water. The promoter is thermolabile at 60 degrees C, it is not readily adsorbed by the charcoal and elutes from Sephadex columns with KCl. The two substances are thought to be mediators of estradiol action.

  8. Estradiol and raloxifene modulate hippocampal gamma oscillations during a spatial memory task.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Anna; Hudson, Matthew; Du, Xin; Wu, Yee Wen Candace; Nakamura, Jay; van den Buuse, Maarten; Jones, Nigel C; Hill, Rachel A

    2017-04-01

    Previous work suggests that estradiol regulates the expression of hippocampal parvalbumin as well as hippocampus-dependent spatial memory in mice. Parvalbumin interneurons generate neuronal oscillatory activity in the gamma frequency range (30-80Hz) and gamma oscillations are closely linked with higher cognitive functions. Raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, shows beneficial effects on human cognitive performance, and has few peripheral side effects unlike estradiol, but the biological mechanisms which underpin these benefits are not clear. This study aimed to investigate whether estradiol and raloxifene modulate hippocampal gamma-band oscillations during spatial memory performance. Prepubescent female mice were ovariectomized (OVX) and implanted with a subcutaneous pellet of either estradiol (E2), raloxifene or placebo. During adulthood, local field potentials were recorded from the dorsal hippocampus while mice were performing the Y-maze hippocampus-dependent spatial memory task. Ovariectomy caused deficits in spatial memory, accompanied by a significant reduction in hippocampal gamma oscillations, specifically during decision making. Estradiol as well as raloxifene rescued both behavioural and electrophysiological deficits. These data have significant implications for disorders of cognitive impairment where altered gamma oscillations are apparent, such as schizophrenia.

  9. EFFECTS OF 17B ESTRADIOL AND ETHINYL ESTRADIOL ON REPRODUCTIVE INDICATORS IN LABORATORY-EXPOSED CUNNER, TAUTOGOLABRUS ADPERSUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus) are being studied in our laboratory to evaluate how 17 - estradiol and ethinyl estradiol affect their reproductive success. Cunner was selected because this species spawns daily, is common in estuarine areas, is easily obtainable, and is amenable ...

  10. 21 CFR 522.1940 - Progesterone and estradiol benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Progesterone and estradiol benzoate. 522.1940... § 522.1940 Progesterone and estradiol benzoate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in § 510.600(c) of this...: (1) Suckling beef calves—(i) Amount—(A) 100 milligrams (mg) progesterone and 10 mg estradiol...

  11. 21 CFR 522.1940 - Progesterone and estradiol benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Progesterone and estradiol benzoate. 522.1940... § 522.1940 Progesterone and estradiol benzoate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in § 510.600(c) of this...: (1) Suckling beef calves—(i) Amount—(A) 100 milligrams (mg) progesterone and 10 mg estradiol...

  12. 21 CFR 522.1940 - Progesterone and estradiol benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Progesterone and estradiol benzoate. 522.1940... § 522.1940 Progesterone and estradiol benzoate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in § 510.600(c) of this...: (1) Suckling beef calves—(i) Amount—(A) 100 milligrams (mg) progesterone and 10 mg estradiol...

  13. Inhibition of Estradiol Synthesis Impairs Fear Extinction in Male Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Bronwyn M.; Milad, Mohammed R.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging research has demonstrated that the sex hormone estradiol regulates fear extinction in female rodents and women. Estradiol may also regulate fear extinction in males, given its role in synaptic plasticity in both sexes. Here we report that inhibition of estradiol synthesis during extinction training, via the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole,…

  14. 21 CFR 522.2477 - Trenbolone acetate and estradiol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... milligrams (mg) trenbolone acetate and 24 mg estradiol (one implant consisting of 6 pellets, each pellet containing 20 mg trenbolone acetate and 4 mg estradiol) per implant dose. (B) 120 mg trenbolone acetate and 24 mg estradiol (one implant consisting of 7 pellets, each of 6 pellets containing 20 mg...

  15. 21 CFR 522.1940 - Progesterone and estradiol benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...: (1) Suckling beef calves—(i) Amount—(A) 100 milligrams (mg) progesterone and 10 mg estradiol benzoate (one implant consisting of 4 pellets, each pellet containing 25 mg progesterone and 2.5 mg estradiol benzoate) per implant dose. (B) 100 mg progesterone and 10 mg estradiol benzoate (one implant consisting...

  16. 21 CFR 522.2477 - Trenbolone acetate and estradiol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... milligrams (mg) trenbolone acetate and 24 mg estradiol (one implant consisting of 6 pellets, each pellet containing 20 mg trenbolone acetate and 4 mg estradiol) per implant dose. (B) 120 mg trenbolone acetate and 24 mg estradiol (one implant consisting of 7 pellets, each of 6 pellets containing 20 mg...

  17. Sorption and degradation of 17ß-estradiol-17sulfate in agricultural soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    17ß-estradiol (E2) can induce endocrine disruptions at low concentrations. Laboratory studies have indicated low potential for persistence and mobility of E2 in the environment, and yet field studies measure estrogens at concentrations of concern. Humans and animals eliminate E2 primarily as a conju...

  18. Modeling sorption and degradation of 17B-estradiol-17-sulfate in agricultural soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The natural steroid hormone, 17B-estradiol (E2), can be an endocrine disruptor at part-per trillion levels. Laboratory studies indicate a low potential for E2 persistence and mobility in the environment; however, field studies consistently indicate the presence of E2 and its primary metabolite, estr...

  19. ELEVATION OF SERUM 17-B-ESTRADIOL IN CHANNEL CATFISH FOLLOWING INJECTION OF 17-B-ESTRADIOL, ETHYNYL ESTRADIOL, ESTRONE, ESTRIOL, AND ESTRADIOL-17B- GLUCURONIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    17-b-Estradiol is naturally converted in numerous organisms to various derivatives/metabolites, which may be excreted from the organism into its immediate external environment. There is a paucity of data regarding the biological effects of the derivatives/metabolites on aquatic o...

  20. THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN.
    Harland and Liburdy (1) reported that 1.2-uT, 60-Hz magnetic fields could significantly block the inhibitory action of pharmacological levels of tamoxifen (10-7 M) on the growth of MCF-7 human br...

  1. Circulating Estradiol Regulates Brain-Derived Estradiol via Actions at GnRH Receptors to Impact Memory in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Black, Katelyn L.; Daniel, Jill M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Systemic estradiol treatment enhances hippocampus-dependent memory in ovariectomized rats. Although these enhancements are traditionally thought to be due to circulating estradiol, recent data suggest these changes are brought on by hippocampus-derived estradiol, the synthesis of which depends on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) activity. The goal of the current work is to test the hypothesis that peripheral estradiol affects hippocampus-dependent memory through brain-derived estradiol regulated via hippocampal GnRH receptor activity. In the first experiment, intracerebroventricular infusion of letrozole, which prevents the synthesis of estradiol, blocked the ability of peripheral estradiol administration in ovariectomized rats to enhance hippocampus-dependent memory in a radial-maze task. In the second experiment, hippocampal infusion of antide, a long-lasting GnRH receptor antagonist, blocked the ability of peripheral estradiol administration in ovariectomized rats to enhance hippocampus-dependent memory. In the third experiment, hippocampal infusion of GnRH enhanced hippocampus-dependent memory, the effects of which were blocked by letrozole infusion. Results indicate that peripheral estradiol-induced enhancement of cognition is mediated by brain-derived estradiol via hippocampal GnRH receptor activity. PMID:28032117

  2. Sex differences in episodic memory: minimal influence of estradiol.

    PubMed

    Yonker, Julie E; Eriksson, Elias; Nilsson, Lars Göran; Herlitz, Agneta

    2003-07-01

    Sex differences exist for several cognitive tasks and estrogen has been suggested to influence these differences. Eighteen men and 18 women were matched on age and estradiol level. Potential sex differences were assessed in episodic memory, semantic memory, verbal fluency, problem solving, and visuospatial ability. Significant sex differences, favoring women, were found for tasks assessing episodic memory. Correlations between estradiol level and cognitive performance were significant for face recognition in females. Since sex differences remained in verbal episodic memory tasks and face recognition despite matched levels of estradiol, circulating estradiol does not appear to be of paramount consequence for observed sex differences in episodic memory.

  3. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  4. Final report on key comparison CCQM-K55.a (estradiol): An international comparison of mass fraction purity assignment of estradiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westwood, Steven; Josephs, Ralf; Daireaux, Adeline; Wielgosz, Robert; Davies, Stephen; Wang, Hongjie; Rodrigues, Jainana; Wollinger, Wagner; Windust, Anthony; Kang, Ma; Fuhai, Su; Philipp, Rosemarie; Kuhlich, Paul; Wong, Siu-kay; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Pérez, Melina; Avila, Marco; Fernandes-Whaley, Maria; Prevoo, D.; de Vos, J.; Visser, R.; Archer, M.; LeGoff, Thierry; Wood, Steve; Bearden, Dan; Bedner, Mary; Boroujerdi, Arezue; Duewer, David; Hancock, Diane; Lang, Brian; Porter, Barbara; Schantz, Michele; Sieber, John; White, Edward; Wise, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    purity. The relative expanded uncertainties reported by laboratories having results consistent with the KCRV ranged from 0.2% to 0.8%. The review of results that were biased from the KCRV showed that two major analytical challenges are posed by the material: the measurement of its water content and controlling for related substance artefact formation during the analysis process. The results displaying a positive bias relative to the KCRV (overestimation of estradiol content) were due to underestimation of the water content of the material, while those with a negative bias (underestimation of estradiol) overestimated the total related substance impurities through a failure to detect and control for artefact formation arising from in situ oxidative dimerization of estradiol in neutral solution prior to analysis. There was however good agreement between all participants in the identification and the quantification of the individual related structure impurities actually present in the sample. The comparison also demonstrated the utility of high-field 1H NMR for both quantitative and qualitative analysis of high purity compounds. It is noted that all the participants who used qNMR as a major or contributing technique and included it as part of, combined it or confirmed it with a conventional 'mass balance' data estimate, obtained results consistent with the KCRV. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  5. The Binding Constant of Estradiol to Bovine Serum Albumin: An Upper-Level Experiment Utilizing Tritium-Labeled Estradiol and Liquid Scintillation Counting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peihong Liang; Adhyaru, Bhavin; Pearson, Wright L.; Williams, Kathryn R.

    2006-01-01

    The experiment used [to the third power]H-labeled estradiol to determine the binding constant of estradiol to bovine serum albumin. Estradiol must complex with serum proteins for the transport in the blood stream because of its low solubility in aqueous systems and estradiol-protein binding constant, where K[subscript B] is important to understand…

  6. Effect of endogenous androgens on 17beta-estradiol-mediated protection after spinal cord injury in male rats.

    PubMed

    Kachadroka, Supatra; Hall, Alicia M; Niedzielko, Tracy L; Chongthammakun, Sukumal; Floyd, Candace L

    2010-03-01

    Several groups have recently shown that 17beta-estradiol is protective in spinal cord injury (SCI). Testosterone can be aromatized to 17beta-estradiol and may increase estrogen-mediated protection. Alternatively, testosterone has been shown to increase excitotoxicity in models of central nervous system (CNS) injury. These experiments test the hypothesis that endogenous testosterone in male rats alters 17beta-estradiol-mediated protection by evaluating a delayed administration over a clinically relevant dose range and manipulating testicular-derived testosterone. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were either gonadectomized or left gonad-intact prior to SCI. SCI was produced by a midthoracic crush injury. At 30 min post SCI, animals received a subcutaneous pellet of 0.0, 0.05, 0.5, or 5.0 mg of 17beta-estradiol, released over 21 days. Hindlimb locomotion was analyzed weekly in the open field. Spinal cords were collected and analyzed for cell death, expression of Bcl-family proteins, and white-matter sparing. Post-SCI administration of the 0.5- or 5.0-mg pellet improved hindlimb locomotion, reduced urinary bladder size, increased neuronal survival, reduced apoptosis, improved the Bax/Bcl-xL protein ratio, and increased white-matter sparing. In the absence of endogenous testicular-derived androgens, SCI induced greater apoptosis, yet 17beta-estradiol administration reduced apoptosis to the same extent in gonadectomized and gonad-intact male rats. These data suggest that delayed post-SCI administration of a clinically relevant dose of 17beta-estradiol is protective in male rats, and endogenous androgens do not alter estrogen-mediated protection. These data suggest that 17beta-estradiol is an effective therapeutic intervention for reducing secondary damage after SCI in males, which could be readily translated to clinical trials.

  7. Estradiol-induced promotion of hepatocarcinogenesis in medaka: Relationship of foci of cellular alteration to neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, J.B.; Hinton, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    In some laboratory and field studies, female fish have higher prevalences of liver tumors than do males. The authors hypothesize gender and site-specific differences in prevalence are due to variable exposures of previously initiated fish to tumor modulating compounds. Estradiol, a growth promoter, increases incidences of hepatic tumors in carcinogen-treated rainbow trout and medaka (Oryzias latipes). Estradiol also increases incidences of hepatic foci of cellular alteration (FCA) in medaka. FCA are found in subadults of tumor-bearing feral populations. Lack of knowledge about the relationship of various phenotypes of FCA to eventual tumors, however, has prevented use of FCA as a biomarker. The authors examined fate and growth of liver FCA using a 2-step, initiation-promotion protocol. Three week old medaka were exposed to 200 ppm diethylnitrosamine (DEN) for 24 hr. and then fed 0.1 ppm 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) continuously through sampling at weeks 4--26. Percent volume of FCA and morphometric characteristics of normal and focal hepatocytes, including numerical density and average hepatocyte volume were quantified using computer-assisted stereology. E2 increased percentage of liver occupied by DEN-initiated amphophilic, basophilic and eosinophilic FCA in both sexes. Focal parameters of young, DEN-initiated and estradiol-treated medaka were not reached until much later in fish given only DEN. Non-focal hepatocytes in estradiol-treated medaka were smaller and more numerous than in DEN-only counterparts. Morphometric analysis is quantitatively tracking the fate of specific phenotypes of FCA to determine their role in progression to cancer.

  8. Dissipation of 17B-estradiol in composted poultry litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of heated composting and ambient temperature poultry waste decomposition on the fate of 17ß-estradiol and testosterone were determined in separate experiments. A mixture of poultry litter, wood chips and straw was amended with [14C]17ß-estradiol or [14C]testosterone and allowed to under...

  9. Estradiol release kinetics determine tissue response in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Otto, Christiane; Kantner, Ingrid; Nubbemeyer, Reinhard; Schkoldow, Jenny; Fuchs, Iris; Krahl, Elisabeth; Vonk, Richardus; Schüler, Christiane; Fritzemeier, Karl-Heinrich; Erben, Reinhold G

    2012-04-01

    Estrogen replacement is an effective therapy of postmenopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, bone loss, and vaginal dryness. Undesired estrogen effects are the stimulation of uterine and mammary gland epithelial cell proliferation as well as hepatic estrogenicity. In this study, we examined the influence of different estradiol release kinetics on tissue responsivity in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Pulsed release kinetics was achieved by ip or sc administration of estradiol dissolved in physiological saline containing 10% ethanol (EtOH/NaCl) whereas continuous release kinetics was achieved by sc injection of estradiol dissolved in benzylbenzoate/ricinus oil (1+4, vol/vol). Initial 3-d experiments in OVX rats showed that pulsed ip estradiol administration had profoundly reduced stimulatory effects on the uterus and the liver compared with continuous release kinetics. On the other hand, both administration forms prevented severe vaginal atrophy. Based on these results, we compared the effects of pulsed (sc in EtOH/NaCl) vs. continuous (sc in benzylbenzoate/ricinus oil) estradiol release kinetics on bone, uterus, mammary gland, and liver in a 4-month study in OVX rats. Ovariectomy-induced bone loss was prevented by both administration regimes. However, pulsed estradiol resulted in lower uterine weight, reduced induction of hepatic gene expression, and reduced mammary epithelial hyperplasia relative to continuous estradiol exposure. We conclude that organ responsivity is influenced by different hormone release kinetics, a fact that might be exploited to reduce undesired estradiol effects in postmenopausal women.

  10. 21 CFR 522.2478 - Trenbolone acetate and estradiol benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... consists of: (1) 8 pellets, each pellet containing 25 milligrams (mg) trenbolone acetate and 3.5 mg estradiol benzoate. (2) 4 pellets, each pellet containing 25 mg trenbolone acetate and 3.5 mg estradiol...) For an implant as described in paragraph (a)(1) of this section: (A) Amount. 200 mg trenbolone...

  11. 21 CFR 522.2478 - Trenbolone acetate and estradiol benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... consists of: (1) 8 pellets, each pellet containing 25 milligrams (mg) trenbolone acetate and 3.5 mg estradiol benzoate. (2) 4 pellets, each pellet containing 25 mg trenbolone acetate and 3.5 mg estradiol...) For an implant as described in paragraph (a)(1) of this section: (A) Amount. 200 mg trenbolone...

  12. DIBROMOACETIC ACID-INDUCED ELEVATIONS OF ESTRADIOL IN THE CYCLING AND OVARIECTOMOZED/ESTRADIOL-IMPLANTED FEMALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Goldman, JM and Murr, AS. Dibromoacetic Acid-induced Elevations of Estradiol in Both Cycling and Ovariectomized / Estradiol-implanted Female Rats

    ABSTRACT
    Haloacetic acids are one of the principal classes of disinfection by-products generated by the chlorination of mun...

  13. Ethinyl estradiol and 17β-estradiol in combined oral contraceptives: pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Stanczyk, Frank Z; Archer, David F; Bhavnani, Bhagu R

    2013-06-01

    The need to seek improved combined oral contraceptive (COC) efficacy, with fewer health risks and better acceptability, has been ongoing since the introduction of COCs more than 50 years ago. New progestin formulations combined with lower doses of ethinyl estradiol (EE), the predominant estrogenic component of COCs, have reduced the incidence of venous thromboembolism and other negative outcomes of COC treatment. Previous attempts to use endogenous 17β-estradiol (E₂) instead of EE were limited primarily by poor cycle control. The recent introduction of E₂-based formulations has renewed interest to determine if there are potential benefits of using E₂ in COCs. These formulations have been shown to have similar efficacy and cycle control as EE-based COCs. This review provides a brief summary of the pharmacology of EE and E₂, including metabolism, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, as well as adverse effects of these estrogens.

  14. Response of dairy cattle to transient voltages and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Reinemann, D.J.; Laughlin, N.K.; Stetson, L.E.

    1995-07-01

    Stray voltages in dairy facilities have been studied since the 1970`s. Previous research using steady-state ac and dc voltages has defined cow-contact voltage levels which may cause behavior and associated production problems. This research was designed to address concerns over possible effects of transient voltages and magnetic fields on dairy cows. Dairy cows response to transient voltages and magnetic fields was measured. The waveforms of the transient voltages applied were: 5 cycles of 60-Hz ac with a total pulse time of 83 ms, 1 cycle of 60-Hz ac with a total pulse time of 16 ms, and 1 cycle of an ac square wave (spiking positive and negative) of 2-ms duration. Alternating magnetic fields were produced by passing 60-Hz ac fundamental frequency with 2nd and 3rd harmonic and random noise components in metal structures around the cows. The maximum magnetic field associated with this current flow was in excess of 4 G. A wide range of sensitivity to transient voltages was observed among cows. Response levels from 24 cows to each transient exposure were normally distributed. No responses to magnetic fields were observed.

  15. The hyperventilation of cirrhosis: progesterone and estradiol effects.

    PubMed

    Lustik, S J; Chhibber, A K; Kolano, J W; Hilmi, I A; Henson, L C; Morris, M C; Bronsther, O

    1997-01-01

    Progesterone and estradiol are metabolized in the liver and are elevated in patients with cirrhosis. Progesterone stimulates ventilation by activating progesterone receptors in the central nervous system; estradiol may facilitate progesterone's actions by increasing progesterone receptors. This study evaluated whether progesterone and estradiol contribute to the respiratory alkalosis common in cirrhotic patients. Arterial blood gases and progesterone and estradiol levels were obtained in 50 patients with cirrhosis. Multiple linear regression revealed a statistically significant correlation between PaCO2 and progesterone and estradiol (r = .54, P < .05). Patients with severe hyperventilation (PaCO2 < or = 30 mm Hg) had statistically higher levels of progesterone and estradiol than did patients with mild hyperventilation (30 < PaCO2 < or = 35) or normal ventilation (PaCO2 > 35) (P < .05). Although the progesterone levels were two orders of magnitude lower than those associated with hyperventilation in pregnant patients, the increased ventilatory effect may be because of the altered blood-brain barrier (BBB) present in cirrhotic patients. Progesterone and estradiol appear to contribute to the hyperventilation in cirrhotic patients.

  16. Feasibility of using near-infrared spectroscopy for rapid quantification of 17β-estradiol sorption coefficients in soil.

    PubMed

    Singh, Baljeet; Malley, Diane F; Farenhorst, Annemieke; Williams, Phil

    2012-10-10

    Livestock manure contains natural steroid hormones, with the most potent being 17β-estradiol. The transport of steroid hormones from agricultural fields to adjacent water bodies can result in 17β-estradiol environmental contamination impacting aquatic organisms. Sorption coefficients are useful input into models that estimate risk of water contamination. The feasibility of applying near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for determining sorption coefficients of 17β-estradiol in soil was investigated for two irregular undulating to hummocky terrain landscapes in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, Canada. A total of 609 soil samples in 140 soil profiles were collected from several horizons to a depth of 1 m. Air-dried and sieved (2 mm) soil samples were analyzed for soil organic carbon (SOC), soil pH, and soil texture. Sorption coefficients of 17β-estradiol were determined by a batch equilibrium process. Spectral data were collected from soil samples (25 g) using two instruments, the 45VISNIR Zeiss Corona (wavelength range 700-1690 nm) and the Foss NIRSystems 6500 (wavelength range 1100-2500 nm). Regardless of the site and instrument, the predictive models were excellent for both SOC and 17β-estradiol sorption coefficients. The data thus generated can be used as input parameters in fate models for efficient risk assessments and decision-making programs for environmental safety where soils are at risk of receiving inputs of 17β-estradiol. Calibration results for soil pH were also adequate with Corona outperforming the Foss instrument. Soil texture predictions were relatively unsuccessful regardless of the instrument and site.

  17. 3D model of amphioxus steroid receptor complexed with estradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Michael E.; Chang, David J.

    2009-08-28

    The origins of signaling by vertebrate steroids are not fully understood. An important advance was the report that an estrogen-binding steroid receptor [SR] is present in amphioxus, a basal chordate with a similar body plan as vertebrates. To investigate the evolution of estrogen-binding to steroid receptors, we constructed a 3D model of amphioxus SR complexed with estradiol. This 3D model indicates that although the SR is activated by estradiol, some interactions between estradiol and human ER{alpha} are not conserved in the SR, which can explain the low affinity of estradiol for the SR. These differences between the SR and ER{alpha} in the steroid-binding domain are sufficient to suggest that another steroid is the physiological regulator of the SR. The 3D model predicts that mutation of Glu-346 to Gln will increase the affinity of testosterone for amphioxus SR and elucidate the evolution of steroid-binding to nuclear receptors.

  18. Association Between Preovulatory Concentrations of Estradiol and Expression of Uterine Milk Protein Precursor, Inhibin Beta A, Period 1, Proenkephalin, and Receptors for Oxytocin, Progesterone, and Estradiol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eliminating the preovulatory surge of estradiol decreased uterine weight, uterine protein, RNA to DNA ratio, rate of protein synthesis, and embryo survival following embryo transfer in sheep. Furthermore, cows that did not exhibit standing estrus (decreased preovulatory concentrations of estradiol) ...

  19. ESTRADIOL RAPIDLY MODULATES ODOR RESPONSES IN MOUSE VOMERONASAL SENSORY NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    CHERIAN, S.; LAM, Y. WAI; MCDANIELS, I.; STRUZIAK, M.; DELAY, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    In rodents, many social behaviors are driven by the sense of smell. The vomeronasal organ (VNO), part of the accessory olfactory system mediates many of these chemically driven behaviors. The VNO is heavily vascularized, and is readily accessible to circulating peptide or steroid hormones. Potentially, this allows circulating hormones to alter behavior through modulating the output of the primary sensory neurons in the VNO, the vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs). Based on this, we hypothesized that steroid hormones, in particular 17β-estradiol, would modulate activity of VSNs. In this paper, we show that the estrogen receptors, GPR30 and ERα, were present in VSNs and that estradiol may be synthesized locally in the VNO. Our results also showed that 17β-estradiol decreased responses of isolated VSNs to dilute urine, a potent natural stimulus, with respect to current amplitudes and depolarization. Further, 17β-estradiol increased the latency of the first action potential (AP) and the AP amplitude. Additionally, calcium responses to sulfated steroids (present in the low molecular weight fraction of urine) that act as ligands for apical vomeronasal receptors were decreased by 17β-estradiol. In conclusion, we show that estradiol modulates odorant responses mediated by VSNs and hence paves the way for future studies to better understand the mechanisms by which odorant mediated behavior is altered by endocrine status of the animal. PMID:24680884

  20. Social regulation of plasma estradiol concentration in a female anuran.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Kathleen S; Wilczynski, Walter

    2006-06-01

    The behavior of an individual within a social aggregation profoundly influences behavior and physiology of other animals within the aggregation in such a way that these social interactions can enhance reproductive success, survival and fitness. This phenomenon is particularly important during the breeding season when males and female must synchronize their reproductive efforts. We examined whether exposure to conspecific social cues can elevate sex steroid levels, specifically estradiol and androgens, in female túngara frogs (Physalaemus pustulosus). We compared plasma estradiol and androgen concentrations in wild-caught females before and after exposure to either natural mate choruses or random tones. After exposure to mate choruses for 10 consecutive nights, estradiol concentrations were significantly elevated whereas there was no significant elevation in estradiol concentrations in the group of females exposed to random tones for 10 nights. Plasma androgen concentrations were not significantly changed after exposure to either natural mate choruses or random tones for 10 consecutive nights. Social modulation of estradiol concentrations may be important in maintaining a female's reproductive state while males are chorusing. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate social regulation of estradiol concentration in female anurans.

  1. Conversion of estrone to estradiol in male fathead minnows ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Estrogens are frequently observed in aquatic environments associated with anthropogenic influence, such as agricultural runoff and wastewater treatment effluent. While 17â-estradiol (E2) is the most potent naturally-occurring estrogen, estrone (E1) is often found at higher environmental concentrations. However, exogenous sources of E1 could potentially be converted to the more potent E2 through the action of endogenous 17â-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity, specifically, the 17â-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 isoform (HSD17B1). Observation of increased plasma E2 concentrations without measureable changes in aromatase (cytochrome P45019a) expression in male fish caged in ambient waters containing elevated concentrations of E1, but low or non-detectable concentrations of E2, suggested this may be occurring in the field. If so, exogenous E1 may have a greater impact on reproductive function in aquatic vertebrates than previously assumed. The present study was conducted to evaluate this hypothesis. Male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to aqueous concentrations of 16.7, 50, and 150 ng E1/L in the laboratory exhibit significantly (p<0.05) elevated plasma E2 concentrations relative to control. Plasma testosterone (T) was elevated at a low E1 exposure concentration (1.8 ng E1/L) and depressed at the highest level of exposure (150 ng E1/L). Additionally, vitellogenin (VTG) mRNA expression was significantly elevated at concentrations of 50 and 10

  2. Biological effects of ELF (extremely-low-frequency) electric and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1989-10-01

    Studies have been conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to examine extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields for possible biological effects in animals. Two areas of investigation are reported here: (1) studies on the nervous system, including behavior and neuroendocrine function, and (2) experiments on cancer development in animals. In behavioral experiments, preliminary data suggest that short term memory may be affected in albino rats exposed to combined ELF and static magnetic fields. Neuroendocrine studies were conducted to demonstrate an apparent stress-related response in rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Finally, using a chemically-induced mammary tumor model, experiments were conducted in which rats, chronically exposed to 60-Hz electric fields, showed an enhancement in the number of tumors per tumor bearing animal.

  3. Hypothesis: The risk of childhood leukemia is related to combinations of power-frequency and static magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J.D. |; Thomas, D.C.; London, S.J.; Peters, J.M.

    1995-05-01

    The authors present a hypothesis that the risk of childhood leukemia is related to exposure to specific combinations of static and extremely-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields. Laboratory data from calcium efflux and diatom mobility experiments were used with the gyromagnetic equation to predict combinations of 60 Hz and static magnetic fields hypothesized to enhance leukemia risk. The laboratory data predicted 19 bands of the static field magnitude with a bandwidth of 9.1 {mu}T that, together with 60 Hz magnetic fields, are expected to have biological activity. The authors then assessed the association between this exposure metric and childhood leukemia using data from a case-control study in Los Angeles County. ELF and static magnetic fields were measured in the bedrooms of 124 cases determined from a tumor registry and 99 controls drawn from friends and random digit dialing. Although no association was found for childhood leukemia in relation to measured ELF or static magnetic fields alone, an increasing trend of leukemia risk with measured ELF fields was found for subjects within these static field bands. When the 60 Hz magnetic fields were assessed according to the Wertheimer-Leeper code for wiring configurations, leukemia risks were again greater with the hypothesized exposure conditions. Although the risk estimates are based on limited magnetic field measurements for a small number of subjects, these findings suggest that the risk of childhood leukemia may be related to the combined effects of the static and ELF magnetic fields.

  4. The effects of inverter magnetic fields on early seed germination of mung beans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsin-Hsiung; Wang, Show-Ran

    2008-12-01

    The biological effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF MFs) on living organisms have been explored in many studies. Most of them demonstrate the biological effects caused by 50/60 Hz magnetic fields or pulsed magnetic fields. However, as the development of power electronics flourishes, the magnetic fields induced are usually in other different waveforms. This study aims to assess the effects of magnetic fields generated by inverter systems on the early growth of plants using mung beans as an example. In the experiment, an inverter which can produce sinusoidal pulsed width modulation (SPWM) voltages was used to drive 3 specially made circular coils and an AC motor. Six SPWM voltages with different fundamental frequencies (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 Hz) set on the inverter drive the circuit to produce the specific kinds of MFs. The results indicate that the magnetic field induced by a 20 or 60 Hz SPWM voltage has an enhancing effect on the early growth of mung beans, but the magnetic fields induced by SPWM voltages of other frequencies (30, 40, and 50 Hz) have an inhibitory effect, especially at 50 Hz.

  5. ELF Communications System Ecological Monitoring Program: Electromagnetic Field Measurements and Engineering Support--1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    1985. It also allowed measurements to be taken with the NRTF-Clam Lake operating both at its secondary frequency of 44 Hz and at its primary frequency...EM fields affect vertebrate metabolism , nor which aspects of 3 exposure (i.e., intensity, duration, or both) could be important. The unmitigated 60 Hz...nominally on the same order of magnitude as the 76 Hz field values at the treatment sites during 150 ampere operation. Prior to 1990 metabolic studies

  6. Neural response dynamics of spiking and local field potential activity depend on CRT monitor refresh rate in the tree shrew primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Veit, Julia; Bhattacharyya, Anwesha; Kretz, Robert; Rainer, Gregor

    2011-11-01

    Entrainment of neural activity to luminance impulses during the refresh of cathode ray tube monitor displays has been observed in the primary visual cortex (V1) of humans and macaque monkeys. This entrainment is of interest because it tends to temporally align and thus synchronize neural responses at the millisecond timescale. Here we show that, in tree shrew V1, both spiking and local field potential activity are also entrained at cathode ray tube refresh rates of 120, 90, and 60 Hz, with weakest but still significant entrainment even at 120 Hz, and strongest entrainment occurring in cortical input layer IV. For both luminance increments ("white" stimuli) and decrements ("black" stimuli), refresh rate had a strong impact on the temporal dynamics of the neural response for subsequent luminance impulses. Whereas there was rapid, strong attenuation of spikes and local field potential to prolonged visual stimuli composed of luminance impulses presented at 120 Hz, attenuation was nearly absent at 60-Hz refresh rate. In addition, neural onset latencies were shortest at 120 Hz and substantially increased, by ∼15 ms, at 60 Hz. In terms of neural response amplitude, black responses dominated white responses at all three refresh rates. However, black/white differences were much larger at 60 Hz than at higher refresh rates, suggesting a mechanism that is sensitive to stimulus timing. Taken together, our findings reveal many similarities between V1 of macaque and tree shrew, while underscoring a greater temporal sensitivity of the tree shrew visual system.

  7. Enhanced osteoblast proliferation and collagen gene expression by estradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest, M.; Schmid, Ch.; Froesch, E.R. )

    1988-04-01

    Estrogens play a crucial role in the development of postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, the mechanism by which estrogens exert their effects on bone is unknown. To examine possible direct effects of 17{beta}-estradiol on bone-forming cells, the authors used pure rat osteoblast-like cells in vitro as a model. Osteoblast-like cells prepared from calvaria of newborn rats were cultured serum-free in methylcellulose-containing medium for 21 days. Osteoblast-like cells proliferate selectively into clonally derived cell clusters of spherical morphorlogy. 17{beta}-Estradiol at concentrations of 0.1 nM and 1 nM enhanced osteoblast-like cell proliferation by 41% and 68% above vehicle-treated controls. The biologically inactive stereoisomer 17{alpha}-estradiol (same concentrations) had no effect. Moreover, the antiestrogen tamoxifen abolished the stimulation of osteoblast-like cell proliferation by 17{beta}-estradiol. After 21 days of culture, RNA was prepared and analyzed in a dot-hybridization assay for the abundance of pro{alpha}1(I) collagen mRNA. Steady-state mRNA levels were increased in cultures treated with 17{beta}-estradiol in a dose-dependent manner with maximal stimulation at 1 nM and 10 nM. At the same concentrations, the percentage of synthesized protein (labeled by ({sup 3}H)proline pulse) that was digestible by collagenase was increased, indicating that 17{beta}-estradiol acts as pretranslational levels to enhance synthesis of bone collagen. These data show that the osteoblast is a direct target for 17{beta}-estradiol.

  8. 17β-Estradiol enhances sulforaphane cardioprotection against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Angeloni, Cristina; Teti, Gabriella; Barbalace, Maria Cristina; Malaguti, Marco; Falconi, Mirella; Hrelia, Silvana

    2017-01-12

    The lower incidence of ischemic heart disease in female with respect to male gender suggests the possibility that female sex hormones could have specific effects in cardiovascular protection. 17β-Estradiol is the predominant premenopausal circulating form of estrogen and has a protective role on the cardiovascular system. Recent evidences suggest that gender can influence the response to cardiovascular medications; therefore, we hypothesized that sex hormones could also modulate the cardioprotective effects of nutraceutical compounds, such as the isothiocyanate sulforaphane, present in Brassica vegetables. This study was designed to explore the protective effects of sulforaphane in the presence of 17β-estradiol against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in primary cultures of rat cardiomyocytes. Interestingly, 17β-estradiol enhanced sulforaphane protective activity against H2O2-induced cell death with respect to sulforaphane or 17β-estradiol alone as measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays. Moreover, 17β-estradiol boosted sulforaphane ability to counteract oxidative stress, reducing intracellular reactive oxygen species and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine levels and increasing the expression of phase II enzymes. Using specific antagonists of estrogen receptor α and β, we observed that these effects are not mediated by estrogen receptors. Otherwise, ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways seem to be involved, as the presence of specific inhibitors of these kinases reduced the protective effect of sulforaphane in the presence of 17β-estradiol. Sulforaphane and 17β-estradiol co-treatment counteracted cell morphology alterations induced by H2O2 as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy. Our results demonstrated, for the first time, that estrogens could enhance sulforaphane protective effects, suggesting that nutraceutical efficacy might be modulated by sex hormones.

  9. Analysis of the 60-Hz power system at KSC: The Orsino substation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalu, Alex O.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of the Orsino Substation, a component (50 percent) of the 60-Hertz electric power system at the Kennedy Space Center, is presented. Presented here are separate single-line diagrams of the sixteen feeder circuits to permit easy access to information on the individual feeders for future planning. The load condition of each feeder and load break switch are presented and a heuristic reliability analysis of the system is performed. Information is given about the system fashion useful for decision making purposes. The beauty of it is in the simplified manner by which information about the system can be obtained.

  10. Possible role of resveratrol targeting estradiol and neprilysin pathways in lipopolysaccharide model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Nesrine S; Bayan, Yasmeen

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible, progressive neurodegenerative brain disease that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills. It is the most common cause of dementia among older people. One of the most important hallmarks of AD is the presence of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide in the brain that suggests that it is the primary trigger for neuronal loss. Herbal extracts have been studied over the years for their potential therapeutic effect in AD. Resveratrol (RSV), one of the most important phytoestrogens, is considered to be useful as estrogen plays an important role in AD. One of the most important amyloid degrading enzymes is neprilysin (NEP), which plays a major role in degrading Aβ, and mainly affected by estrogen. So, the aim of the present study is investigating the possible role of resveratrol in lipopolysaccharide model of AD and the implication of its possible role in regulating the estradiol and neprilysin pathways. Mice were divided into four groups: Control group (0.9 % saline), LPS group (0.8 mg/kg i.p once), Treatment group with RSV (mice were once injected with LPS then after 30 min given a dose of {4 mg/kg} RSV for 7 days), and RSV group only (mice received 4 mg/kg i.p for 7 days only). After 7 days mice were subjected to different behavioral tests using Y-maze, object recognition test, and open field tests. Estradiol and NEP level were measured using ELISA kit. Results showed RSV was able to reverse the decline in different types of memory (working, nonspatial, and locomotor functions) caused by LPS induction in mice. Moreover RSV was able to significantly increase both the estradiol level and NEP level and that may have a great role to decrease Aβ deposition as it has been confirmed that there is a link between NEP and estradiol level; by upregulation of estradiol level this consequently leads to increase in the level of NEP level, and by increasing the NEP level in brain, this lead to decrease in Aβ deposition and enhancing its

  11. Cellular mechanisms of estradiol-mediated masculinization of the brain.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Jaclyn M; McCarthy, Margaret M

    2008-04-01

    The sexual differentiation of reproductive physiology and behavior in the rodent brain is largely determined by estradiol aromatized from testicular androgens. The cellular mechanisms by which estradiol masculinizes the brain are beginning to emerge and revealing novel features of brain development that are highly region-specific. In the preoptic area, the major site controlling male sexual behavior, estradiol increases the level of the COX-2 enzyme and its product, prostaglandin E2 which promotes dendritic spine synaptogenesis. In the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, the major site controlling female reproductive behavior, estradiol promotes glutamate release from synaptic terminals, activating NMDA receptors and the MAP kinase pathway. In the arcuate nucleus, a major regulator of anterior pituitary function, estradiol increases GABA synthesis, altering the morphology of neighboring astrocytes and reducing formation of dendritic spines synapses. Glutamate, GABA and the importance of neuronal-astrocytic cross-talk are emerging as common aspects of masculinization. Advances are also being made in the mechanistic basis of female brain development, although the challenges are far greater.

  12. The role of estradiol in male reproductive function

    PubMed Central

    Schulster, Michael; Bernie, Aaron M; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, testosterone and estrogen have been considered to be male and female sex hormones, respectively. However, estradiol, the predominant form of estrogen, also plays a critical role in male sexual function. Estradiol in men is essential for modulating libido, erectile function, and spermatogenesis. Estrogen receptors, as well as aromatase, the enzyme that converts testosterone to estrogen, are abundant in brain, penis, and testis, organs important for sexual function. In the brain, estradiol synthesis is increased in areas related to sexual arousal. In addition, in the penis, estrogen receptors are found throughout the corpus cavernosum with high concentration around neurovascular bundles. Low testosterone and elevated estrogen increase the incidence of erectile dysfunction independently of one another. In the testes, spermatogenesis is modulated at every level by estrogen, starting with the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis, followed by the Leydig, Sertoli, and germ cells, and finishing with the ductal epithelium, epididymis, and mature sperm. Regulation of testicular cells by estradiol shows both an inhibitory and a stimulatory influence, indicating an intricate symphony of dose-dependent and temporally sensitive modulation. Our goal in this review is to elucidate the overall contribution of estradiol to male sexual function by looking at the hormone's effects on erectile function, spermatogenesis, and libido. PMID:26908066

  13. The role of estradiol in male reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Schulster, Michael; Bernie, Aaron M; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, testosterone and estrogen have been considered to be male and female sex hormones, respectively. However, estradiol, the predominant form of estrogen, also plays a critical role in male sexual function. Estradiol in men is essential for modulating libido, erectile function, and spermatogenesis. Estrogen receptors, as well as aromatase, the enzyme that converts testosterone to estrogen, are abundant in brain, penis, and testis, organs important for sexual function. In the brain, estradiol synthesis is increased in areas related to sexual arousal. In addition, in the penis, estrogen receptors are found throughout the corpus cavernosum with high concentration around neurovascular bundles. Low testosterone and elevated estrogen increase the incidence of erectile dysfunction independently of one another. In the testes, spermatogenesis is modulated at every level by estrogen, starting with the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis, followed by the Leydig, Sertoli, and germ cells, and finishing with the ductal epithelium, epididymis, and mature sperm. Regulation of testicular cells by estradiol shows both an inhibitory and a stimulatory influence, indicating an intricate symphony of dose-dependent and temporally sensitive modulation. Our goal in this review is to elucidate the overall contribution of estradiol to male sexual function by looking at the hormone's effects on erectile function, spermatogenesis, and libido.

  14. Testosterone, estradiol, ACTH and musical, spatial and verbal performance.

    PubMed

    Hassler, M; Gupta, D; Wollmann, H

    1992-01-01

    Testosterone, estradiol, and ACTH were determined in blood serum of 26 healthy males aged 19.16 and of 25 healthy females aged 18.77 years on average, and results were correlated with test scores of three spatial tests, a verbal fluency measure, and a test measuring general musical ability. In addition, hemispheric lateralization for verbal material and handedness was assessed. While testosterone and estradiol alone were not significantly related to any of the cognitive or musical tests, testosterone/estradiol ratio was significantly negatively correlated with spatial tests, and ACTH was significantly positively correlated with spatial and musical tests. Correlations were stronger in females than in males. The laterality index was significantly negatively correlated with testosterone in males indicating that right hemisphere involvement in verbal processing was associated with high testosterone levels.

  15. Sympathetic regulation of estradiol secretion from the ovary.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Sae

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that hormone secretion from endocrine glands is regulated by hierarchical feedback mechanisms. However, although Cannon revealed in the 1920s that sympathoadrenal medullary function increased during emergency situations, no studies on the autonomic nervous regulation of hormone secretion have been undertaken for many years. In the past 40 years, the autonomic nervous regulation of insulin secretion from the pancreas, gastrin secretion from the stomach, glucocorticoid secretion from the adrenal cortex, etc., has been demonstrated. Estradiol secretion from the ovary is strongly controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, and its possible regulation by autonomic nerves has been largely unnoticed. Some histological studies have revealed rich adrenergic sympathetic innervation in the ovary. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the activation of the sympathetic nerves to the ovary directly reduces estradiol secretion from the ovary. This article reviews physiological and morphological studies, primarily in rats, on the sympathetic regulation of estradiol secretion from the ovary.

  16. Electric and magnetic fields and tumor progression. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Keng, P.C.; Grota, L.J.; Michaelson, S.; Lu, S.T.

    1994-12-01

    This laboratory study has rigorously investigated two previously reported biological effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields. The first effect involves nighttime suppression of melatonin synthesis in the pineal glands of rats exposed to high electric fields. The second concerns the increase in colony forming ability of human colon cancer cells exposed to 1.4-G magnetic fields. Neither effect was detected in the present study. A series of published laboratory studies on rats reported that 60-Hz electric fields at various field levels up to 130 kV/m suppress the nighttime synthesis of melatonin, a hormone produced by the pineal gland. Since melatonin is known to modulate the immune system and may inhibit cancer cell activity, changes in physiological levels of melatonin may have significant health consequences. In the repeat experiments, field exposure did not alter nighttime levels of melatonin or enzyme activities in the pineal gland. A small but statistically significant reduction of about 20% in serum melatonin was seen in exposed animals. Pineal melatonin was also unaffected by the presence of red light as a cofactor with field exposure or by time-shifting the daily field exposure period. Another study reported that 60-Hz magnetic fields can affect the colony forming ability of human cancer cells after exposure in a culture medium. In the repeat experiments, field exposure did not alter the colony forming ability of human Colo 205 cells in two different cell concentrations at plating or in two different incubation conditions. Field exposure also did not affect cell cycling in any of the four cell lines tested.

  17. Estradiol modulates effort-based decision making in female rats.

    PubMed

    Uban, Kristina A; Rummel, Julia; Floresco, Stan B; Galea, Liisa A M

    2012-01-01

    Disorders of the dopamine system, such as schizophrenia or stimulant addiction, are associated with impairments in different forms of cost/benefit decision making. The neural circuitry (ie amygdala, prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens) underlying these functions receives dopamine input, which is thought to have a central role in mediating cost/benefit decisions. Estradiol modulates dopamine activity, and estrogen receptors (ERs) are found within this neurocircuitry, suggesting that decision making may be influenced by estradiol. The present study examined the contribution of estradiol and selective ERα and β agonists on cost/benefit decision making in adult female Long-Evans rats. An effort-discounting task was utilized, where rats could either emit a single response on a low-reward lever to receive two pellets, or make 2, 5, 10, or 20 responses on a high-reward lever to obtain four pellets. Ovariectomy increased the choice on the high-reward lever, whereas replacement with high (10 μg), but not low (0.3 μg), levels of estradiol benzoate reduced the choice on the high-reward lever. Interestingly, both an ERα agonist (propyl-pyrazole triol (PPT)) and an ERβ agonist (diarylpropionitrile (DPN)) increased choice on the high-reward lever when administered independently, but when these two agonists were combined, a decrease in choice for the high-reward lever was observed. The effects of estradiol, PPT, and DPN were more pronounced 24 h post-administration, suggesting that these effects may be genomic in nature. Together, these results demonstrate that estradiol modulates cost/benefit decision making in females, whereby concomitant activation of ERα and β receptors shifts the decision criteria and reduces preference for larger, yet more costly rewards.

  18. Estradiol Membrane-Initiated Signaling and Female Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Micevych, Paul E; Wong, Angela May; Mittelman-Smith, Melinda Anne

    2015-07-01

    The discoveries of rapid, membrane-initiated steroid actions and central nervous system steroidogenesis have changed our understanding of the neuroendocrinology of reproduction. Classical nuclear actions of estradiol and progesterone steroids affecting transcription are essential. However, with the discoveries of membrane-associated steroid receptors, it is becoming clear that estradiol and progesterone have neurotransmitter-like actions activating intracellular events. Ultimately, membrane-initiated actions can influence transcription. Estradiol membrane-initiated signaling (EMS) modulates female sexual receptivity and estrogen feedback regulating the luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. In the arcuate nucleus, EMS activates a lordosis-regulating circuit that extends to the medial preoptic nucleus and subsequently to the ventromedial nucleus (VMH)--the output from the limbic and hypothalamic regions. Here, we discuss how EMS leads to an active inhibition of lordosis behavior. To stimulate ovulation, EMS facilitates astrocyte synthesis of progesterone (neuroP) in the hypothalamus. Regulation of GnRH release driving the LH surge is dependent on estradiol-sensitive kisspeptin (Kiss1) expression in the rostral periventricular nucleus of the third ventricle (RP3V). NeuroP activation of the LH surge depends on Kiss1, but the specifics of signaling have not been well elucidated. RP3V Kiss1 neurons appear to integrate estradiol and progesterone information which feeds back onto GnRH neurons to stimulate the LH surge. In a second population of Kiss1 neurons, estradiol suppresses the surge but maintains tonic LH release, another critical component of the estrous cycle. Together, evidence suggests that regulation of reproduction involves membrane action of steroids, some of which are synthesized in the brain.

  19. Estradiol Membrane-Initiated Signaling and Female Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Micevych, Paul E; Wong, Angela May; Mittelman-Smith, Melinda Anne

    2016-01-01

    The discoveries of rapid, membrane-initiated steroid actions and central nervous system steroidogenesis have changed our understanding of the neuroendocrinology of reproduction. Classical nuclear actions of estradiol and progesterone steroids affecting transcription are essential. However, with the discoveries of membrane-associated steroid receptors, it is becoming clear that estradiol and progesterone have neurotransmitter-like actions activating intracellular events. Ultimately, membrane-initiated actions can influence transcription. Estradiol membrane-initiated signaling (EMS) modulates female sexual receptivity and estrogen feedback regulating the luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. In the arcuate nucleus, EMS activates a lordosis-regulating circuit that extends to the medial preoptic nucleus and subsequently to the ventromedial nucleus (VMH)—the output from the limbic and hypothalamic regions. Here, we discuss how EMS leads to an active inhibition of lordosis behavior. To stimulate ovulation, EMS facilitates astrocyte synthesis of progesterone (neuroP) in the hypothalamus. Regulation of GnRH release driving the LH surge is dependent on estradiol-sensitive kisspeptin (Kiss1) expression in the rostral periventricular nucleus of the third ventricle (RP3V). NeuroP activation of the LH surge depends on Kiss1, but the specifics of signaling have not been well elucidated. RP3V Kiss1 neurons appear to integrate estradiol and progesterone information which feeds back onto GnRH neurons to stimulate the LH surge. In a second population of Kiss1 neurons, estradiol suppresses the surge but maintains tonic LH release, another critical component of the estrous cycle. Together, evidence suggests that regulation of reproduction involves membrane action of steroids, some of which are synthesized in the brain. PMID:26140715

  20. Estradiol and osmolality: Behavioral responses and central pathways.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Kathleen S

    2015-12-01

    Regulation of appropriate osmolality of body fluid is critical for survival, yet there are sex differences in compensatory responses to osmotic challenges. Few studies have focused on the role of sex hormones such as estradiol in behavioral responses to increases or decreases in systemic osmolality, and even fewer studies have investigated whether central actions of estrogens contribute to these responses. This overview integrates findings from a series of ongoing and completed experiments conducted in my laboratory to assess estradiol effects on water and NaCl intake in response to osmotic challenges, and on activity in central pathways that mediate such responses.

  1. The Role of Hippocampal Estradiol Receptor-α in a Perimenopausal Affective Disorders-Like Rat Model and Attenuating of Anxiety by Electroacupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yongheng; Ma, Shulan

    2016-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapy is the principal treatment for perimenopausal affective disorders which can cause severe side effects. The present study compared the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) and estradiol treatment on perimenopausal affective disorders at the behavioral and cellular levels. In this randomized experimental in vivo study, adult female rats were divided into intact, ovariectomy, chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), and ovariectomy and CUS combination groups. After week 6, all groups were subdivided to three subgroups of control, EA, and estradiol treatment. The behavioral parameters in the open field and the elevated plus maze tests were assessed before and after treatments. Alterations of serum steroid hormones and changes of estradiol receptor-α (ER-α) immunofluorescence neurons in the hippocampus sections were evaluated. EA treatment caused more antianxiety effects than estradiol treatment in CUS group (P < 0.05). Notably, estradiol and EA treatments had better significant behavioral effects when the models were not estrogen-deficient. Importantly, within each group, compared to the control group, the numbers of ER-α-positive neurons were significantly larger in EA subgroups. Therefore, EA had antianxiety effects on perimenopausal affective disorders caused by CUS but not by estrogen deficiency and upregulation of hippocampus ER-α neurons may contribute to its mechanism of action. PMID:28044085

  2. Endometriosis Under Estradiol Stimulation Imaged Using 18F-FDG and Its Control After Estradiol Cessation and Progesterone Hormonal Replacement.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Frédéric; Turcotte, Éric

    2016-03-01

    Endometriosis is a frequent and benign cause of disabling abdominal pain, for which a diagnosis suspicion is clinically raised, but its confirmation necessitates a surgical exploration by laparoscopy. Foci of endometriosis proliferate under estrogen stimulation, like normal endometrium. We present a patient under estradiol stimulation for a history of endometrial cancer who underwent a PET/CT scan to assess an abdominal lesion showing a high F-FDG uptake, which normalized under progesterone hormonal replacement and cessation of estradiol. Two consecutive biopsies confirmed endometriosis. F-FDG evaluation of endometriosis under estrogen stimulation could be a promising approach to refractory endometriosis assessment.

  3. 9(10 leads to 19)abeo steriods. Total synthesis of abeo-estradiol, abeo-estradiol 3-methyl ether, and 17 alpha-ethynyl abeo-estradiol 3-methyl ether.

    PubMed

    Abushanab, E; Lee, D Y; Meresak, W A; Duax, W L

    1976-04-30

    Total synthesis of abeo-estradiol, abeo-estradiol 3-methyl ether, and 17alpha-ethynyl abeo-estradiol 3-methyl ether is described. Stereochemical assignments in 9(10 through 19) abeo-estradiol and its 3-methyl ether were made by X-ray analysis of the 17-keytone. Single crystals were grown by evaporation of a petroleum ether-ethanol solution and the intensities of 2619 diffraction spectra were measured, of which 1036 had intensity greater than twice the background. The structure was refined by full-matrix least-squares techniques and all hydrogen atoms were located in the Fourier difference syntheses.

  4. Fate of estradiol and testosterone in anaerobic lagoon digestors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory-scale lagoon digestors were constructed, and the fate of 14C-labelled 17ß-estradiol (E2) and testosterone (Test) were monitored for 42 d anaerobically under biological and sterile conditions. Hormone levels decreased in the liquid layer and increased in the sludge with time. At 42 d, 16-2...

  5. Fate of 17B-estradiol in anaerobic lagoon digesters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fate of [14C]17B-estradiol ([14C]E2) was monitored for 42 d in triplicate 10 L anaerobic digesters. Total radioactive residues (TRR) decreased rapidly in the liquid layer of the digesters and reached a steady-state value of 19-24% of the initial dose after 4 days. LC/MS/MS analyses of the liqu...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1260 - Estradiol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Estradiol test system. 862.1260 Section 862.1260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1260 - Estradiol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Estradiol test system. 862.1260 Section 862.1260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1260 - Estradiol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Estradiol test system. 862.1260 Section 862.1260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1260 - Estradiol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Estradiol test system. 862.1260 Section 862.1260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  10. Fate of glucuronide conjugated estradiol in the environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fate and transport of conjugated reproductive hormones, which are polar compared to parent hormones, are little understood. Laboratory bench-scale soil (Hamar; Sandy, mixed, frigid typic Endoaquolls) sorption studies were conducted using [14C] 17ß-estradiol-3-glucuronide for a range of concentra...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1260 - Estradiol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Estradiol test system. 862.1260 Section 862.1260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  12. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. 522.842 Section 522.842 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM...

  13. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. 522.842 Section 522.842 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM...

  14. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. 522.842 Section 522.842 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM...

  15. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. 522.842 Section 522.842 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM...

  16. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. 522.842 Section 522.842 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM...

  17. Neurotensin enhances estradiol induced DNA synthesis in immature rat uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, A.; Vijayan, E.

    1985-05-27

    Systemic administration of Neurotensin, a tridecapeptide, in immature rats treated with estradiol benzoate significantly enhances uterine DNA synthesis as reflected by the incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine. The peptide may have a direct action on the uterus. Substance P, a related peptide, had no effect on uterine DNA synthesis. 18 references, 4 tables.

  18. Pregnancy-induced gingivitis and OMICS in dentistry: in silico modeling and in vivo prospective validation of estradiol-modulated inflammatory biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Gürsoy, Mervi; Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Könönen, Eija; Moreira, José C F; Liukkonen, Joonas; Sorsa, Timo; Gürsoy, Ulvi K

    2014-09-01

    Pregnancy-associated gingivitis is a bacterial-induced inflammatory disease with a remarkably high prevalence ranging from 35% to 100% across studies. Yet little is known about the attendant mechanisms or diagnostic biomarkers that can help predict individual susceptibility for rational personalized medicine. We aimed to define inflammatory proteins in saliva, induced or inhibited by estradiol, as early diagnostic biomarkers or target proteins in relation to pregnancy-associated gingivitis. An in silico gene/protein interaction network model was developed by using the STITCH 3.1 with "experiments" and "databases" as input options and a confidence score of 0.700 (high confidence). Salivary estradiol, interleukin (IL)-1β and -8, myeloperoxidase (MPO), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, -8, and -9, and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 levels from 30 women were measured prospectively three times during pregnancy and twice during postpartum. In silico analysis revealed that estradiol interacts with IL-1β and -8 by an activation link when the "actions view" was consulted. In saliva, estradiol concentrations associated positively with TIMP-1 and negatively with MPO and MMP-8 concentrations. When the gingival bleeding on probing percentage (BOP%) was included in the model as an effect modifier, the only association, a negative one, was found between estradiol and MMP-8. Throughout gestation, estradiol modulates the inflammatory response by inhibiting neutrophilic enzymes, such as MMP-8. The interactions between salivary degradative enzymes and proinflammatory cytokines during pregnancy suggest promising ways to identify candidate biomarkers for pregnancy-associated gingivitis, and for personalized medicine in the field of dentistry. Finally, we call for greater investments in, and action for biomarker research in periodontology and dentistry that have surprisingly lagged behind in personalized medicine compared to other fields, such as cancer research.

  19. Effect of moderate electric field frequency on growth kinetics and metabolic activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    PubMed

    Loghavi, Laleh; Sastry, Sudhir K; Yousef, Ahmed E

    2008-01-01

    Moderate electric fields (MEF) have been previously shown to alter the metabolic activity of microbial cells; thus, the effect of frequency and electric field would be of considerable interest. We investigated herein the effects of MEF frequency on microbial growth kinetics and bacteriocin (Lacidin A) production of Lactobacillus acidophilus OSU 133 during fermentation. The following fermentation treatments were compared: conventional (for 40 h), MEF (1 V cm(-1), for 40 h), combination of MEF (1 V cm(-1), for the first 5 h) and conventional (for 35 h) at various frequency levels (45, 60, and 90 Hz) all at 30 degrees C, and control (conventional) fermentation at 37 degrees C. MEF treatments with purely sinusoidal waveforms at all frequencies at 30 degrees C produced a shorter lag phase than conventional fermentation. However, no lag phase reduction was found for a 60 Hz waveform that contained high-frequency harmonics. There was, however, a significant increase in the bacteriocin production under early MEF treatment at 60 Hz with high-frequency harmonics. On the basis of these observations, the fermentation process is accelerated by applying pure sinusoidal MEF at the early stage of growth while a significant increase in the bacteriocin production occurs when sinusoidal field at 60 Hz with harmonics is applied at the early stage of the growth.

  20. Oral contraceptives and cognition: A role for ethinyl estradiol.

    PubMed

    Beltz, Adriene M; Hampson, Elizabeth; Berenbaum, Sheri A

    2015-08-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Estradiol and cognition". Estrogens have been seen to play a role in human cognitive abilities, but questions remain about the cognitive impact of ethinyl estradiol, which is contained in many oral contraceptives (OCs). Inconsistencies in past studies likely reflect small samples and heterogeneous groups of OC users. The aims of the present work were to examine OC effects on sex-typed spatial and verbal abilities by (a) comparing mental rotations and expressional fluency in normally-cycling (NC) women and men to OC users considered as a heterogeneous group and then to homogeneous groups of OC users created by classifying pills according to their active constituents, and (b) determining the relation between synthetic hormone doses in OCs and mental rotations and expressional fluency. Participants were 136 men, 93 NC women, and 148 OC users, including homogeneous monophasic (n = 55) and triphasic (n = 43) OC groups, aged 18 to 30 years. Significant effects of OC use were seen in homogeneous group comparisons but not when OC users were considered as a heterogeneous group. On mental rotations, men outperformed women, and monophasic OC users outperformed NC women. The latter difference may be attributable to estradiol, as ethinyl estradiol was inversely related to spatial ability among OC users and was lower in monophasic than in triphasic users. On expressional fluency, NC women and monophasic OC users outperformed men, and monophasic users outperformed triphasic users. Thus, results show the importance of ethinyl estradiol and of considering pill constituents when studying the cognitive effects of OCs.

  1. The Stimulation of HSD17B7 Expression by Estradiol Provides a Powerful Feed-Forward Mechanism for Estradiol Biosynthesis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shehu, Aurora; Albarracin, Constance; Devi, Y. Sangeeta; Luther, Kristin; Halperin, Julia; Le, Jamie; Mao, Jifang; Duan, Rachel W.; Frasor, Jonna

    2011-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously cloned and purified an ovarian protein found to be a novel 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 7 enzyme (HSD17B7) (formerly prolactin receptor-associated protein) that converts the weak estrogen, estrone, to the highly potent estradiol. The regulation of this enzyme has not yet been explored. In this report, we show high expression of HSD17B7 in human ductal carcinoma and breast cancer cell lines and present evidence for a strong up-regulation of this enzyme by estradiol at the level of mRNA, protein expression, and promoter activity in MCF-7 cells. The effect of estradiol is mediated by estrogen receptor (ER)α, whereas ERβ prevents this stimulation. ER antagonists, ICI 182,780 and 4-hydroxytamoxifen, prevent estradiol-induced stimulation of the endogenously expressed HSD17B7, suggesting that these inhibitors not only block estradiol action but also its production. We have identified a −185-bp region of the hsd17b7 promoter that is highly conserved among rat, mouse, and human and confers regulation by estradiol in MCF-7 cells. This region is devoid of a classical estradiol-response element but contains a nuclear factor 1 (NF1) site that is essential for estradiol action. We found that estradiol stimulates the recruitment and DNA binding of NF1 to this region of the hsd17b7 promoter. Furthermore, knockdown of NF1 family members, NF1B, NF1A, and NF1X, completely prevents induction of this gene by estradiol. In summary, our findings demonstrate that estradiol stimulates HSD17B7 transcriptional activity in breast cancer cells through a novel mechanism requiring NF1 and strongly suggest a positive feedback mechanism to increase local estradiol synthesis causing growth of estrogen-dependent breast cancers. PMID:21372145

  2. ESTRADIOL AND THE ESTRADIOL METABOLITE, 2-HYDROXYESTRADIOL, ACTIVATE AMP-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE IN C2C12 MYOTUBES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systemic loss of estradiol (E2) during menopause is associated with increased adiposity which can be prevented with E2 replacement. Rodent studies suggest that E2, or lack of, is a key mediator in menopause-related metabolic changes. We have previously demonstrated that E2 treatment produces a rap...

  3. Estradiol reduces dendritic spine density in the ventral striatum of female Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Staffend, Nancy A; Loftus, Caroline M; Meisel, Robert L

    2011-01-01

    Estradiol affects a variety of brain regions by modulating physiological and cellular functions as well as neuronal morphology. Within the striatum, estradiol is known to induce physiological and molecular changes, yet estradiol's effects on striatal dendritic morphology have not yet been evaluated. Using ballistic delivery of the lipophilic dye DiI to tissue sections, we were able to evaluate estradiol's effects on striatal morphology in female Syrian hamsters. We found that estradiol significantly decreased spine density within the nucleus accumbens core, with no effect in the nucleus accumbens shell or caudate. Interestingly, estradiol treatment caused a significant deconstruction of spines from more to less mature spine subtypes in both the nucleus accumbens core and shell regardless of changes in spine density. These results are significant in that they offer a novel mechanism for estradiol actions on a wide variety of nucleus accumbens functions such as motivation or reward as well as their pathological consequences (e.g. drug addiction).

  4. Relationship between ovarian reserve and preovulatory estradiol during a fixed-time AI protocol in beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estradiol production is essential for reproductive efficiency. This study compared numbers of follicles in beef cows that did or did not have elevated preovulatory estradiol during a fixed-time AI (FTAI) protocol. In experiment 1, 5 low estradiol (LowE2) and 5 high estradiol (HighE2) cows were slaug...

  5. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of 17beta-estradiol and 17beta-estradiol-3-acetate solubilities and diffusion coefficents in silicone elastromeric intravaginal rings.

    PubMed

    Russell, J A; Malcolm, R K; Campbell, K; Woolfson, A D

    2000-07-07

    A rapid, sensitive reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method has been developed for the determination of in vitro release of 17beta-estradiol and its ester prodrug, 17beta-estradiol-3-acetate, from silicone intravaginal rings. Partial hydrolysis of the acetate under the aqueous conditions provided by the 1% benzalkonium chloride release medium necessitates its conversion to 17beta-estradiol prior to HPLC analysis. Both steroid peaks have been fully resolved from the benzalkonium chloride peaks by the reported chromatographic method, which employs a C18 bonded reversed-phase column, an acetonitrile-water (50:50, v/v) mobile phase and a UV detection wavelength of 281 nm. The peak area versus 17beta-estradiol concentration was found to be linear over the range of 0.0137-1347 microkg ml(-1). The HPLC method has also been used to determine the silicone solubilities and diffusion coefficients of the two related steroids. The almost 100-fold increase in 17beta-estradiol-3-acetate release from the silicone core-type intravaginal rings compared to 17beta-estradiol is shown to be due to a 60-fold increase in silicone solubility and a one and a half-fold increase in diffusitivity. The results demonstrate that an effective estrogen replacement therapy dose of 17beta-estradiol may be administered from a silicone intravaginal reservoir device containing the labile 17beta-estradiol-3-acetate prodrug.

  6. Estradiol Upregulates c-FLIPlong Expression in Anterior Pituitary Cells.

    PubMed

    Jaita, G; Zárate, S; Ferraris, J; Gottardo, M F; Eijo, G; Magri, M L; Pisera, D; Seilicovich, A

    2016-04-01

    Anterior pituitary cell turnover depends on a tight balance between proliferation and apoptosis. We have previously shown that estrogens sensitize anterior pituitary cells to pro-apoptotic stimuli. c-FLIP (cellular-FLICE-inhibitory-protein) isoforms are regulatory proteins of apoptosis triggered by death receptors. c-FLIPshort isoform competes with procaspase-8 inhibiting its activation. However, c-FLIPlong isoform may have a pro- or anti-apoptotic function depending on its expression level. In the present study, we explored whether estrogens modulate c-FLIP expression in anterior pituitary cells from ovariectomized (OVX) rats and in GH3 cells, a somatolactotrope cell line. Acute administration of 17β-estradiol to OVX rats increased c-FLIPlong expression in the anterior pituitary gland without changing c-FLIPshort expression as assessed by Western blot. Estradiol in vitro also increased c-FLIPlong expression in anterior pituitary cells but not in GH3 cells. As determined by flow cytometry, the percentage of anterior pituitary cells expressing c-FLIP was higher than in GH3 cells. However, c-FLIP fluorescence intensity in GH3 cells was higher than in anterior pituitary cells. FasL increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive GH3 cells incubated either with or without estradiol suggesting that the pro-apoptotic action of Fas activation is estrogen-independent. Our results show that unlike what happens in nontumoral pituitary cells, estrogens do not modulate either c-FLIPlong expression or FasL-induced apoptosis in GH3 cells. The stimulatory effect of estradiol on c-FLIPlong expression could be involved in the sensitizing effect of this steroid to apoptosis in anterior pituitary cells. The absence of this estrogenic action in tumor pituitary cells could be involved in their tumor-like behavior.

  7. Estradiol modulates Kiss1 neuronal response to ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Frazao, Renata; Lemko, Heather M. Dungan; da Silva, Regina P.; Ratra, Dhirender V.; Lee, Charlotte E.; Williams, Kevin W.; Zigman, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin is a metabolic signal regulating energy homeostasis. Circulating ghrelin levels rise during starvation and fall after a meal, and therefore, ghrelin may function as a signal of negative energy balance. Ghrelin may also act as a modulator of reproductive physiology, as acute ghrelin administration suppresses gonadotropin secretion and inhibits the neuroendocrine reproductive axis. Interestingly, ghrelin's effect in female metabolism varies according to the estrogen milieu predicting an interaction between ghrelin and estrogens, likely at the hypothalamic level. Here, we show that ghrelin receptor (GHSR) and estrogen receptor-α (ERα) are coexpressed in several hypothalamic sites. Higher levels of circulating estradiol increased the expression of GHSR mRNA and the co-xpression of GHSR mRNA and ERα selectively in the arcuate nucleus (ARC). Subsets of preoptic and ARC Kiss1 neurons coexpressed GHSR. Increased colocalization was observed in ARC Kiss1 neurons of ovariectomized estradiol-treated (OVX + E2; 80%) compared with ovariectomized oil-treated (OVX; 25%) mice. Acute actions of ghrelin on ARC Kiss1 neurons were also modulated by estradiol; 75 and 22% of Kiss1 neurons of OVX + E2 and OVX mice, respectively, depolarized in response to ghrelin. Our findings indicate that ghrelin and estradiol may interact in several hypothalamic sites. In the ARC, high levels of E2 increase GHSR mRNA expression, modifying the colocalization rate with ERα and Kiss1 and the proportion of Kiss1 neurons acutely responding to ghrelin. Our findings indicate that E2 alters the responsiveness of kisspeptin neurons to metabolic signals, potentially acting as a critical player in the metabolic control of the reproductive physiology. PMID:24473434

  8. Actions and interactions of estradiol and glucocorticoids in cognition and the brain: Implications for aging women.

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Alexandra Ycaza; Mather, Mara

    2015-01-01

    Menopause involves dramatic declines in estradiol production and levels. Importantly, estradiol and the class of stress hormones known as glucocorticoids exert countervailing effects throughout the body, with estradiol exerting positive effects on the brain and cognition, glucocorticoids exerting negative effects on the brain and cognition, and estradiol able to mitigate negative effects of glucocorticoids. Although the effects of these hormones in isolation have been extensively studied, the effects of estradiol on the stress response and the neuroprotection offered against glucocorticoid exposure in humans are less well known. Here we review evidence suggesting that estradiol-related protection against glucocorticoids mitigates stress-induced interference with cognitive processes. Animal and human research indicates that estradiol-related mitigation of glucocorticoid damage and interference is one benefit of estradiol supplementation during peri-menopause or soon after menopause. The evidence for estradiol-related protection against glucocorticoids suggests that maintaining estradiol levels in post-menopausal women could protect them from stress-induced declines in neural and cognitive integrity. PMID:25929443

  9. The effects of 17beta estradiol, 17alpha estradiol and progesterone on oxidative stress biomarkers in ovariectomized female rat brain subjected to global cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ozacmak, V H; Sayan, H

    2009-01-01

    Neuroprotective effects of estrogens and progesterone have been widely studied in various experimental models. The present study was designed to compare possible neuroprotective effects of 17alpha-estradiol, 17beta-estradiol, and progesterone on oxidative stress in rats subjected to global cerebral ischemia. Global cerebral ischemia was induced in ovariectomized female rats by four vessel occlusion for 10 min. Following 72 h of reperfusion, levels of malondialdehyde (MDA, oxidative stress marker), and reduced glutathione (GSH, major endogenous antioxidant) were assessed in hippocampus, striatum and cortex of rats treated with either 17alpha-estradiol, 17beta-estradiol, progesterone or estradiol + progesterone beforehand. Steroid administration ameliorated ischemia-induced decrease in GSH and increase in MDA levels. Our data offers additional evidence that estrogens and progesterone or combination of two exert a remarkable neuroprotective effect reducing oxidative stress.

  10. Actions of estradiol on discrete attributes of the luteinizing hormone pulse signal in man. Studies in postmenopausal women treated with pure estradiol.

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, J D; Evans, W S; Rogol, A D; Thorner, M O; Stumpf, P

    1987-01-01

    We assessed the time-dependent impact of estradiol on properties of the luteinizing hormone (LH) pulse signal in 12 hypoestrogenemic postmenopausal volunteers studied basally and after 1, 5, 10, and 30 d of estradiol delivery via an intravaginal Silastic ring. Computerized analysis of the plasma LH time series revealed a significant decrease in LH pulse frequency within 24 h of estrogen treatment, followed by a secondary increase (days 5 and 10), and then a sustained decline (day 30) in LH pulsatility. Estradiol also significantly suppressed incremental and maximal (but not fractional) LH pulse amplitudes in a biphasic manner. In contrast, LH peak duration was invariant until day 30 of estradiol replacement. These observations indicate that the well recognized biphasic actions of estradiol on mean serum LH concentrations can be modeled in relation to specific and time-dependent alterations in LH pulse frequency and amplitude. PMID:3818948

  11. Estradiol increases consumption of a chocolate cake mix in female rats.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Karen J; Reid, Larry D; Caffalette, Christopher A; Stitt, Karen T; Klein, Lucas A; Lacroix, Aubrie M; Reid, Meta L

    2006-05-01

    Female Sprague-Dawley rats were given an opportunity to eat chocolate cake mix (CCM) using a common brand of cake mix, while standard laboratory food was also available. They took large amounts of the CCM, often taking more than 20 g in 24 h. Some animals were given a single injection of 1 of 6 doses of estradiol valerate (ranging from 0.09 to 10.0 mg/kg) and others were given vehicle. Estradiol valerate provides for sustained release of estradiol. Those receiving estradiol ate more than those receiving vehicle at doses larger than 0.09 mg/kg. Further, with a dose of 10 mg/kg, greater intake among estradiol-treated females was apparent 2 months post-injection. Methodological issues of neophobia and conditioned avoidance were addressed in the study's design and may explain why increased intakes were observed here in contrast to the consensus that estradiol reduces food intake.

  12. Central expression and anorectic effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor are regulated by circulating estradiol levels.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zheng; Liu, Xian; Senthil Kumar, Shiva Priya Dharshan; Zhang, Jing; Shi, Haifei

    2013-03-01

    Estrogens potently suppress food intake. Compelling evidence suggests that estradiol, the primary form of estrogens, reduces food intake by facilitating other anorectic signals. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), like estradiol, appears to suppress food intake by affecting meal size. We hypothesized that estradiol modulates Bdnf expression and the anorectic effect of BDNF. The first goal was to determine whether Bdnf expression was regulated by endogenous estradiol of cycling rats and by cyclic estradiol treatment using ovariectomized rats. Bdnf expression within the ventromedial nucleus of hypothalamus (VMH) was temporally elevated at estrus following the estradiol peak, which coincided with the decline in feeding at this phase of the ovarian cycle. Additionally, food intake and body weight were increased following ovariectomy with a parallel decrease in Bdnf expression in the VMH. All of these alterations were reversed by cyclic estradiol treatment, suggesting that Bdnf expression within the VMH was regulated in an estradiol-dependent manner. The second goal was to determine whether estradiol modulates the anorectic effect of BDNF. Sham-operated estrous rats and ovariectomized rats cyclically treated with estradiol responded to a lower dose of central administration of BDNF to decrease food intake than male rats and oil-treated ovariectomized rats, implying that endogenous estradiol or cyclic estradiol replacement increased the sensitivity to anorectic effect of BDNF. These data indicate that Bdnf expression within the VMH and the anorectic effect of BDNF varied depending on plasma estradiol levels, suggesting that estradiol may regulate BDNF signaling to regulate feeding.

  13. Reflex modulation of ovarian estradiol secretion by noxious mechanical stimulation of a hindpaw in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Sae; Kagitani, Fusako; Hotta, Harumi

    2012-11-02

    Previously, we demonstrated that electrical stimulation of the superior ovarian nerve in rats reduces the ovarian estradiol secretion rate. In the present study, we examined the effect of noxious mechanical afferent stimulation (pinching) of a hindpaw on the ovarian estradiol secretion rate in rats. The rats were anesthetized on the day of estrus, and the ovarian venous blood was collected intermittently. The secretion rate of estradiol from the ovary was calculated from differences in the estradiol concentration between ovarian venous plasma and systemic arterial blood plasma, and from the flow rate of ovarian venous plasma. Pinching stimulation of a hindpaw for 5 min decreased the estradiol secretion rate from the ovary. A significant reduction of the estradiol secretion rate began at 5 min after the end of the stimulation and lasted for 20 min. The minimum decrease in estradiol secretion rate was 71.1 ± 14.0% of the prestimulus basal values at 15 min after the stimulation ended. The decrease responses of the ovarian estradiol secretion rate were abolished by bilateral severance of the superior ovarian nerves. The efferent activity of the superior ovarian nerves was increased following hindpaw pinching. After spinal transection at the second cervical level, the increased response of the superior ovarian nerve activity by hindpaw pinching was abolished. These results indicate that noxious mechanical stimulation of a hindpaw decreases the estradiol secretion rate from the ovary, and that the response is due to reflex activation of ovarian sympathetic nerves, mediated by supraspinal structures.

  14. Estradiol and Progesterone have Opposing Roles in the Regulation of Fear Extinction in Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Graham, Bronwyn M; Daher, Melissa

    2016-02-01

    Fear extinction, the laboratory basis of exposure therapy for anxiety disorders, fluctuates across the female rat estrous cycle, where extinction is enhanced during proestrus (high estradiol and progesterone), and impaired during metestrus (low estradiol and progesterone). During the estrous cycle increasing levels of estradiol precede and then overlap with increased levels of progesterone. We sought to isolate the impact of these hormonal changes on fear extinction by systematically treating ovariectomized female rats with estradiol alone, or in combination with progesterone. We found that estradiol alone facilitated extinction recall, whereas the effects of progesterone on estradiol-treated rats were biphasic and dependent on the time interval between progesterone administration and extinction training. Progesterone potentiated estradiol's facilitation of extinction recall when extinction training occurred 6 h after progesterone administration. However, progesterone abolished estradiol's facilitation of extinction recall when extinction training occurred 24 h after progesterone administration. Furthermore, in naturally cycling rats, blocking progesterone receptor activation during proestrus (when progesterone levels peak) prevented the impairment in extinction recall in rats extinguished during metestrus. These results suggest that in naturally cycling females whereas cyclical increases in estradiol facilitate fear extinction, cyclical increases in progesterone may lead to fear extinction impairments. As extinction training took place after the hormonal treatments had been metabolized, we propose that genomic mechanisms may at least partly mediate the impact of cyclic fluctuations in sex hormones on fear extinction.

  15. Estradiol and Progesterone have Opposing Roles in the Regulation of Fear Extinction in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Bronwyn M; Daher, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Fear extinction, the laboratory basis of exposure therapy for anxiety disorders, fluctuates across the female rat estrous cycle, where extinction is enhanced during proestrus (high estradiol and progesterone), and impaired during metestrus (low estradiol and progesterone). During the estrous cycle increasing levels of estradiol precede and then overlap with increased levels of progesterone. We sought to isolate the impact of these hormonal changes on fear extinction by systematically treating ovariectomized female rats with estradiol alone, or in combination with progesterone. We found that estradiol alone facilitated extinction recall, whereas the effects of progesterone on estradiol-treated rats were biphasic and dependent on the time interval between progesterone administration and extinction training. Progesterone potentiated estradiol's facilitation of extinction recall when extinction training occurred 6 h after progesterone administration. However, progesterone abolished estradiol's facilitation of extinction recall when extinction training occurred 24 h after progesterone administration. Furthermore, in naturally cycling rats, blocking progesterone receptor activation during proestrus (when progesterone levels peak) prevented the impairment in extinction recall in rats extinguished during metestrus. These results suggest that in naturally cycling females whereas cyclical increases in estradiol facilitate fear extinction, cyclical increases in progesterone may lead to fear extinction impairments. As extinction training took place after the hormonal treatments had been metabolized, we propose that genomic mechanisms may at least partly mediate the impact of cyclic fluctuations in sex hormones on fear extinction. PMID:26156559

  16. [Oxidative destruction of estradiol after treatment with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase and methemoglobin].

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Iu M; Matiushin, A I; Titov, V Iu

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that estradiol in the presence of horse radish peroxidase interacts with hydrogen peroxide, which is evidenced by an increase in its optical density at 280 nm. The photometering of samples containing estradiol and horse radish peroxidase upon their titration with hydrogen peroxide indicated that the increase in optical density stops after introducing hydrogen peroxide equimolar in concentration to estradiol. The stoichiometric ratio of estradiol consumed during oxidative destruction to hydrogen peroxide was 1:1. In the presence of ascorbate, the oxidative destruction of estradiol by the action of hydrogen peroxide, catalyzed by horse radish peroxidase, was observed only after a latent period and showed the same regularities as in the absence of ascorbate. It was found by calorimetry that, during the latent period, estradiol catalyzes the degradation of hydrogen peroxide and ascorbate without undergoing oxidative destruction. The substrates of the peroxidase reaction benzidine, 1-naphthol, and phenol interact with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of ascorbate and horse radish peroxidase in a similar way. Presumably, upon interaction with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of horse radish peroxidase, estradiol, like other substrates of this reaction, undergoes oxidative destruction by the mechanism of peroxidase reaction. It is shown that oxidative destruction of estradiol by the action of hydrogen peroxide can also be catalyzed by methemoglobin by the same mechanism. These data are important for understanding the role of estradiol in the organism and the pathways of its metabolic conversions.

  17. A Comparison of the Effects of Transdermal Estradiol and Estradiol Valerate on Endometrial Receptivity in Frozen-thawed Embryo Transfer Cycles: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Davar, Robab; Janati, Sima; Mohseni, Fereshteh; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi; Asgari, Soheila

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal endometrial preparation protocol by comparing the clinical outcome of two methods of endometrial preparation in frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET) cycles, including that is, oral estradiol and 17ß-estradiol transdermal patch. Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, women underwent either conventional IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) who had at least two top-quality embryos appropriate for cryopreservation and frozen embryos from previous cycles. In the study group (n=45), 17-B estradiol transdermal patches 100 μg were applied from the second day of the cycle and continued every other day. Then, each patch was removed after four days. In the control group (n=45), oral estradiol valerate 6 mg was started at the same time and continued daily. Results: There was a significant difference in estradiol level on the day of progesterone administration and the day of embryo transfer between the two groups (p= 0.001 in both), but no significant difference was observed between them in biochemical and clinical pregnancy rates (32.6% vs. 33.3%, p=1.000 and 30.2% vs. 33.3%, p=0.810, respectively). Conclusion: It is suggested that estradiol transdermal patches be used instead of oral estradiol in FET cycles. Due to the reduced costs, drug dose, and emotional stress as well as the simplicity of the protocol for patients. PMID:27141464

  18. Low Doses of 17α-Estradiol and 17β-Estradiol Facilitate, Whereas Higher Doses of Estrone and 17α- and 17β-Estradiol Impair, Contextual Fear Conditioning in Adult Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Barha, Cindy K; Dalton, Gemma L; Galea, Liisa AM

    2010-01-01

    Estrogens are known to exert significant structural and functional effects in the hippocampus of adult rodents. In particular, 17β-estradiol can improve, impair, or have no effect on hippocampus-dependent learning and memory depending on dose and time of administration. The effects of other forms of estrogen, such as estrone and 17α-estradiol, on hippocampus-dependent learning have not been as thoroughly investigated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 17β-estradiol, estrone, and 17α-estradiol at three different doses on two different tasks: hippocampus-dependent contextual fear conditioning and hippocampus-independent cued fear conditioning. Adult ovariectomized female rats were injected with one of the estrogens at one of the three doses 30 mins before conditioning to assess the rapid effects of these estrogens on acquisition. Twenty-four hours later memory for the context was examined and 1 h later memory for the cue (tone) was assessed. Levels of synaptophysin were examined in the dorsal hippocampus of rats to identify a potential synaptic correlate of hormonal effects on contextual fear conditioning. Low 17β-estradiol and 17α-estradiol enhanced, whereas high 17β-estradiol and 17α-estradiol impaired, contextual fear conditioning. Only the middle dose of estrone severely impaired contextual fear conditioning. Estrogens did not alter performance in the hippocampus-independent cued task. Synaptophysin expression was increased by estrone (at a middle and high dose) and 17β-estradiol (at a middle dose) in the CA3 region of the hippocampus and was not correlated with cognition. The results of this study indicate that estradiol can positively or negatively influence hippocampus-dependent learning and memory, whereas estrone impairs hippocampus-dependent learning and memory in a dose-dependent manner. These results have important therapeutic implications, as estrone, a main component of a widely used hormone replacement

  19. Energy metabolism and hindbrain AMPK: regulation by estradiol.

    PubMed

    Briski, Karen P; Ibrahim, Baher A; Tamrakar, Pratistha

    2014-03-01

    Nerve cell energy status is screened within multiple classically defined hypothalamic and hindbrain components of the energy balance control network, including the hindbrain dorsal vagal complex (DVC). Signals of caudal DVC origin have a physiological role in glucostasis, e.g., maintenance of optimal supply of the critical substrate fuel, glucose, through control of motor functions such as fuel consumption and gluco-counterregulatory hormone secretion. A2 noradrenergic neurons are a likely source of these signals as combinatory laser microdissection/high-sensitivity Western blotting reveals expression of multiple biomarkers for metabolic sensing, including adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Hypoglycemia elicits estradiol-dependent sex differences in A2 AMPK activation as phospho-AMPK (pAMPK) expression is augmented in male and ovariectomized (OVX) female, but not estrogen-replaced, OVX rats. This dichotomy may reflect, in part, estradiol-mediated up-regulation of glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme expression during hypoglycemia. Our new model for short-term feeding abstinence has physiological relevance to planned (dieting) or unplanned (meal delay) interruption of consumption in modern life, which is negatively correlated with appetite control and obesity, and is useful for investigating how estrogen may mitigate the effects of disrupted fuel acquisition on energy balance via actions within the DVC. Estradiol reduces DVC AMPK activity after local delivery of the AMP mimic, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-riboside, or cessation of feeding for 12 h but elevates pAMPK expression when these treatments are combined. These data suggest that estrogen maintains cellular energy stability over periods of suspended fuel acquisition and yet optimizes, by DVC AMPK-dependent mechanisms, counter-regulatory responses to metabolic challenges that occur during short-span feeding abstinence.

  20. Trapping of Rb Atoms by ac Electric Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Schlunk, Sophie; Marian, Adela; Geng, Peter; Meijer, Gerard; Schoellkopf, Wieland; Mosk, Allard P.

    2007-06-01

    We demonstrate trapping of an ultracold gas of neutral atoms in a macroscopic ac electric trap. Three-dimensional confinement is obtained by switching between two saddle-point configurations of the electric field. Stable trapping is observed in a narrow range of switching frequencies around 60 Hz. The dynamic confinement of the atoms is directly visualized at different phases of the ac switching cycle. We observe about 10{sup 5} Rb atoms in the 1 mm{sup 3} large and several microkelvins deep trap with a lifetime of approximately 5 s.

  1. 2-Hydroxy-4-glutathion-S-yl-17beta-estradiol and 2-hydroxy-1-glutathion-S-yl-17beta-estradiol produce oxidative stress and renal toxicity in an animal model of 17beta-estradiol-mediated nephrocarcinogenicity.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, M; Lau, S S; Monks, T J

    1998-01-01

    Chronic exposure of male Syrian hamsters to a variety of estrogens has been linked with a high incidence of renal carcinoma. The basis of this species and tissue specificity remains to be resolved. We have recently shown that (i) 17beta-estradiol is nephrotoxic in the hamster in a manner dependent upon the activity of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and (ii) 17beta-estradiol is metabolized to a variety of catechol estrogen glutathione conjugates (Butterworth et al., Carcinogenesis, 18, 561-567, 1997). We report that the catechol estrogen glutathione conjugates exhibit redox properties similar to those of the catechol estrogens, and maintain the ability to generate superoxide radicals. Administration of 2-hydroxy-4-glutathion-S-yl-17beta-estradiol or 2-hydroxy-1-glutathion-S-yl-17beta-estradiol (0.27-5.0 micromol/kg) to Syrian hamsters, produces mild nephrotoxicity. Repeated daily administration of 2-hydroxy-4-glutathion-S-yl-17beta-estradiol causes a sustained elevation in urinary markers of renal damage and in the concentration of renal protein carbonyls and lipid hydroperoxides. Catechol estrogen oxidation and conjugation of glutathione in the liver, followed by the selective uptake of the redox active conjugates in tissues rich in gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase may contribute to 17beta-estradiol-induced renal tumors in the hamster.

  2. Minireview: Animal studies on the role of 50/60-Hertz magnetic fields in carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Loescher, W.; Mevissen, M. )

    1994-01-01

    A number of epidemiological studies have suggested that exposure to 50/60-Hz magnetic fields (MF) from power lines and electrical equipment may be associated with a modestly increased incidence of various type of cancer. Laboratory studies have indicated that nonionizing radiation has no mutagenic effect, i.e. does not initiate cancer. Thus, if 50/60-Hz MF are truly associated with an increased risk of cancer, then these fields must act as a promoter or co-promoter of cancer in cells that have already been initiated. This paper reviews the evidence produced by animal studies. As shown in this review, the available animal data on 50/60-Hz MF exposures seem to indicate that intermediate MF exposure exerts co-promoting effects in different tumor models, particularly cocarcinogenesis models of breast cancer while chronic (up to life-time) exposure may exert promoting effects on [open quotes]spontaneous[close quotes] development of certain tumors. The tumor promoting or co-promoting effects of 50/60-Hz MF exposure found in several animal studies could relate to actions of MF on gene expression, immune surveillance, and Ca[sup 2+] homeostasis as demonstrated by in vitro experiments in cell cultures. However, the most plausible evidence of an in vivo effect of MF exposure which could be related to tumor promotion is reduction of circulating levels of melatonin, i.e. a hormone which is inhibitory to the growth of a wide range of cancers, particularly breast cancer. Animal studies have shown that 50-Hz MF exposure at fluxes as low as 0.3-1 [mu]Tesla significantly reduces nocturnal melatonin levels in plasma. While decrease of melatonin levels alone could explain tumor promoting or copromoting effects of MF exposure, recent data indicate that MF exposure also impairs the effects of melatonin at the cellular level. The oncostatic effect of melatonin on proliferation of a human breast cancer cell line was antagonized by 60-Hz MF exposure at a flux density of 1 [mu]Tesla.

  3. The Estradiol-Dihydrotestosterone model of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, A Edward

    2005-01-01

    Background The exact relationship between hormonal activity and prostate cancer(PCa) has not yet been clearly defined. One of the key hormones associated with PCa is testosterone(T). However, both in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that under some conditions T is capable of either promoting PCa growth or death. This article proposes a theory which resolves this apparent paradox. Model The Estradiol-Dihydrotestosterone(E-D) model introduced in this paper proposes that 17β-estradiol(E2) is essential for initiating the growth of PCa cells through the formation of telomeres. It also proposes that T is responsible for increasing the expression of proteins which cause apoptosis, or programmed cell death, and that 5α-dihydrotestosterone(DHT) is essential for preventing this. In addition, it is known that some T is converted to both E2 and DHT, which means that depending on the conditions, T is capable of either promoting the growth of or the killing of PCa. PMID:15777479

  4. THE PATHOBIOLOGY OF 17B-ESTRADIOL IN SUMMER FLOUNDER, PARALICHTYS DENTATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estradiol has been shown to cause increased vitellogenin (VtG) concentrations in male fish. The intent of this study was to evaluate the pathobiology associated with exposure to 17 -estradiol (E2) on liver, gonad, and kidney tissues of summer flounder, Paralichthys dentatus. Juve...

  5. 17β-Estradiol administration promotes delayed cutaneous wound healing in 40-week ovariectomised female mice.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Kanae; Nakajima, Yukari; Urai, Tamae; Komatsu, Emi; Nasruddin; Sugama, Junko; Nakatani, Toshio

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of 17β-estradiol on wound healing in 40-week ovariectomised female mice. Thirty-six-week-old female mice were divided into three groups: medication with 17β-estradiol after ovariectomy (OVX + 17β-estradiol), ovariectomy (OVX) and sham (SHAM). The mice received two full-thickness wounds, and the OVX + 17β-estradiol group was administered 17β-estradiol at 0·01 g/day until healing. In the OVX + 17β-estradiol group, the ratio of wound area was significantly smaller than those of the OVX and SHAM groups on days 1-3, 5, 6, 8-12 and 9-12, respectively, the numbers of neutrophils and macrophages were significantly smaller than those on days 3 and 7, the ratio of re-epithelialisation was significantly higher than those on days 3 and 11, the ratio of myofibroblasts was significantly higher than those on day 11 and smaller on day 14, and the ratio of collagen fibres was significantly larger than that of the OVX group on days 7-14. We found that 17β-estradiol administration promotes cutaneous wound healing in 40-week female mice by reducing wound area, shortening inflammatory response, and promoting re-epithelialisation, collagen deposition and wound contraction. Our results suggest that cutaneous wound healing that is delayed because of ageing is promoted by exogenous and continuous 17β-estradiol administration.

  6. Evaluating the role of astrocytes on β-estradiol effect on seizures of Pilocarpine epileptic model.

    PubMed

    Sarfi, Masoumeh; Elahdadi Salmani, Mahmoud; Goudarzi, Iran; Lashkar Boluki, Taghi; Abrari, Kataneh

    2017-02-15

    Epilepsy with periodic and unpredictable seizures is associated with hippocampal glutamate toxicity and tissue reorganization. Astrocytes play an important role in mediating the neuroprotective effects of estradiol and reducing seizure severity. Accordingly, the protective effects of low and high doses of estradiol on behavioral, astrocytic involvement and neuronal survival aspects of Pilocarpine-induced epilepsy were investigated. Lithium- Pilocarpine (30mg/kg) model was used to provoke epilepsy. Βeta-estradiol (2,40μg/µl) was injected subcutaneously from 48 before to 48h after seizure induction. Behavioral convulsions were then monitored and recorded on the day of induction. Four weeks later, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and the astrocyte transporter GLT-1 expression of the hippocampus were measured. Moreover, hippocampal glutamate and GABA were evaluated to study excitability changes. Finally, neuronal counting in the hippocampus was also performed using Nissl staining. The latency for generalized clonic (GC) convulsions significantly increased while the rate of GC and death significantly reduced due to β-estradiol treatment. GS activity and GLT-1 expression increased in the groups receiving the high dose of β-estradiol and Pilocarpine. Furthermore, the amount of both GABA and glutamate content decreased due to high dose of estradiol, while only GABA increased in Pilocarpine treated rats. Finally, administration of β-estradiol with low and high doses increased and improved the density of nerve cells. It is concluded that chronic administration β-estradiol has anticonvulsant and neuroprotective properties which are plausibly linked to astrocytic activity.

  7. Exogenous estradiol alters gonadal growth and timing of temperature sex determination in gonads of sea turtle.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; Marmolejo-Valencia, Alejandro; Merchant-Larios, Horacio

    2015-12-01

    Temperature sex determining species offer a model for investigating how environmental cues become integrated to the regulation of patterning genes and growth, among bipotential gonads. Manipulation of steroid hormones has revealed the important role of aromatase in the regulation of the estrogen levels involved in temperature-dependent sex determination. Estradiol treatment counteracts the effect of male-promoting temperature, but the resulting ovarian developmental pattern differs from that manifested with the female-promoting temperature. Hypoplastic gonads have been reported among estradiol-treated turtles; however the estradiol effect on gonadal size has not been examined. Here we focused on the sea turtle Lepidochelys olivacea, which develops hypoplastic gonads with estradiol treatment. We studied the effect of estradiol on cell proliferation and on candidate genes involved in ovarian pattern. We found this effect is organ specific, causing a dramatic reduction in gonadal cell proliferation during the temperature-sensitive period. Although the incipient gonads resembled tiny ovaries, remodeling of the medullary cords and down-regulation of testicular factor Sox9 were considerably delayed. Contrastingly, with ovarian promoting temperature as a cue, exogenous estradiol induced the up-regulation of the ovary factor FoxL2, prior to the expression of aromatase. The strong expression of estrogen receptor alpha at the time of treatment suggests that it mediates estradiol effects. Overall results indicate that estradiol levels required for gonadal growth and to establish the female genetic network are delicately regulated by temperature.

  8. Estradiol alleviates the ischemic brain injury-induced decrease of neuronal calcium sensor protein hippocalcin.

    PubMed

    Koh, Phil-Ok

    2014-10-17

    Estradiol has protective and reparative effects in neurodegenerative diseases. Hippocalcin is a neuronal calcium-sensor protein that acts as a calcium buffer to regulate the intracellular concentration of Ca(2+). This study was investigated to elucidate whether estradiol regulates hippocalcin expression in a focal cerebral ischemia model and glutamate-treated neuronal cells. An ovariectomy was performed in adult female rats, and vehicle or estradiol was administered before middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Cerebral cortex tissues were collected at 24h after MCAO. A proteomic approach revealed that hippocalcin expression decreased in vehicle-treated animals with combined MCAO, while estradiol treatment attenuated this decrease. Reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analyses also showed that estradiol administration prevented the MCAO injury-induced decrease in hippocalcin expression. In cultured hippocampal cells, glutamate exposure increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, which was rescued by the presence of estradiol. Moreover, glutamate toxicity decreased hippocalcin expression, whereas estradiol attenuated this decrease. Together, these findings suggest that estradiol has a neuroprotective function by regulating hippocalcin expression and intracellular Ca(2+) levels in ischemic brain injury.

  9. Effects of preovulatory estradiol concentration on embryo survival and pregnancy establishment in beef cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of estradiol during the preovulatory period on embryo survival and pregnancy establishment has not been characterized in beef cows. We hypothesized that preovulatory estradiol is important for embryo survival and pregnancy establishment in beef cows. In order to establish the importance o...

  10. Application of fly ash as an adsorbent for Estradiol in animal waste.

    PubMed

    Norris, Pauline; Hagan, Stephanie; Cohron, Martin; Zhao, Houying; Pan, Wei-Ping; Li, Kawang

    2015-09-15

    The contamination of agricultural ground with estrogen compounds through application of animal wastes is a present concern. At the same time, current uses for waste fly ash having high carbon content are limited. To help mitigate these problems, we examine using waste fly ash as a useful adsorbent for Estradiol in pig waste digests. In this study, Estradiol was added to vials containing water and fly ash from several different power plants. After an extraction process, the amount of Estradiol in the water was measured. Commercial activated carbon was also used for comparison purposes. Vials containing varying concentrations of Estradiol and no trapping material were used as a control. The results from this study indicate that fly ash can be used as a trapping material for Estradiol in water, but that commercially available activated carbon can trap about an order of magnitude more Estradiol than the fly ash and that the effects of the fly ash matrix can both inhibit and promote the solvation of Estradiol into water depending possibly upon pH and cation concentration effects. In addition, preliminary extraction studies using pig waste digest indicate that fly ash can be used as adsorbent for Estradiol present in pig waste.

  11. Dissipation and transformation of 17B-estradiol-17-sulfate in soil-water systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogen conjugates are known to be precursors of endocrine-disrupting free estrogens, e.g. 17B-estradiol (E2) and estrone (E1), in the environment. This study investigated the fate of a sulfate conjugated estrogen, 17B-estradiol-17-sulfate (E2-17S), in agricultural soils using laboratory batch stu...

  12. Luteinizing hormone secretion as influenced by age and estradiol in the prepubertal gilt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to determine if there is an age related reduction in the sensitivity of the negative feedback action of estradiol on luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in the prepubertal gilt. Ovariectomized gilts at 90 (n = 12), 150 (n = 11) or 210 (n = 12) days of age received estradiol ...

  13. Influence of pulsating magnetic field on softening behavior of cold rolled AISI 4340 steel at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, S.N.; Singh, P.N.; Singh, V.

    1996-06-15

    The mechanical behavior of a ferromagnetic material is influenced by presence of magnetic field. The rate of stress relaxation in nickel increases by a.c. magnetic field of 11 Oersted (Oe) and 60 Hz. The application of 800 Oe steady magnetic field accelerates the process of creeping in high purity iron. The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the influence of pulsating magnetic field of 942 Oe, produced by a.c. current (50Hz), on the softening behavior of AISI 4340 steel, cold rolled to 20, 60, and 80%.

  14. Human Endometrial Adenocarcinoma Transplanted into Nude Mice: Growth Regulation by Estradiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyaswaroop, P. G.; Zaino, R. J.; Mortel, R.

    1983-01-01

    A model for studying the growth of primary tumors of human endometrium and its regulation by 17β -estradiol has been developed in which ovariectomized nude mice are used as recipients. The receptors for sex steroids are maintained during serial transplantation of the tumor in this system. Although the rate of growth of receptor-negative endometrial tumors transplanted into ovariectomized nude mice is unaffected by the sustained presence or absence of estradiol, the growth of receptor-positive tumors is significantly increased by estradiol. Receptor-positive tumors treated with estradiol produced elevated concentrations of progesterone receptor. That the progesterone receptor is functional in this tumor is evident from the induction of estradiol 17β -dehydrogenase activity upon progestin administration. These findings are consistent with receptor-mediated regulation of growth of endometrial carcinoma.

  15. The Effect of Estradiol on the Growth Plate Chondrocytes of Limb and Spine from Postnatal Mice in vitro: The Role of Estrogen-Receptor and Estradiol Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Sheng; Zheng, Shuang; Li, Xin-Feng; Liu, Zu-De

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Skeletal development is a complex process. Little is known about the different response of limb or spine growth plate chondrocytes (LGP or SGP) to the estrogen level and the role of estrogen receptor (ER) during postnatal stage. Methods: LGP and SGP chondrocytes were isolated from 50 one-week mice and treated with different concentrations of 17β-estradiol. Cell viability was measured by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8). The expression of collagen II and X were evaluated by real-time PCR and Western blotting. Then, the response of LGP or SGP chondrocyte after with or without estradiol and specific ER antagonists to block the effect of ERs were also measured by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Results: Estradiol promoted the chondrogensis of the chondrocytes in vitro and achieved the maximal expression of type II collagen at the dose of 10-7 M. Additionally, the regulatory effect of estradiol on the chondrogenesis can be mainly relied on ERα. The LGP chondrocytes were more sensitive to the estradiol treatment than SGP in the expression of type II collagen. Conclusions: Estrogen at a pharmacological concentration (10-7 M) could stimulate the maximal production of type II collagen in the growth plate chondrocytes in vitro, which exerts its activity mainly through ERα in the chondrogenesis. Furthermore, the LGP chondrocytes were more sensitive to the estradiol treatment than SGP in the chondrogenesis. PMID:28123350

  16. Use of a biotinyl-estradiol derivative to demonstrate estradiol-membrane binding sites on adherent human breast cancer MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Germain, P S; Metezeau, P; Tiefenauer, L X; Kiefer, H; Ratinaud, M H; Habrioux, G

    1993-01-01

    A biotinyl-derivative of 17 beta-estradiol has been used to demonstrate a site of recognition and binding of estradiol located on the plasma membrane of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells by using the biotin/avidin-FITC system. The specificity of this binding has been shown by a displacement of the fluorescent label by 17 beta-estradiol. No displacement was observed when testosterone was added. Quantification of this phenomenon has been shown by laser scanning cytometry while preserving the cells adhesiveness to their growth support as well as their membrane integrity. An analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy suggested that the fluorescence distribution on MCF-7 cells treated with estradiol-biotin was on the cell periphery. The results obtained are in favour of the recognition and binding site of 17 beta-estradiol located on the plasma membrane of MCF-7 cells and they would indicate that the biological activity of estradiol, among others, could be initiated by an interaction with the membrane.

  17. Human melatonin during continuous magnetic field exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.; Cook, M.R.; Riffle, D.W.

    1997-05-01

    This report describes the third in a series of double-blind, laboratory-based studies that were aimed at determining the effects of nocturnal exposure to power frequency magnetic fields on blood levels of melatonin in human volunteers. The two earlier studies evaluated effects on melatonin of intermittent exposure to 60 Hz circularly polarized magnetic fields at 10 and 200 mG. No overall effects on melatonin levels were found. In the present study, men were exposed continuously rather than intermittently through the night to the same 200 mG magnetic field condition that was used previously; again, no overall effects on melatonin levels were found. The authors conclude that the intermittent and continuous exposure conditions used in the laboratory to date are not effective in altering nocturnal blood levels of melatonin in human volunteers.

  18. Estradiol regulates human QT-interval: acceleration of cardiac repolarization by enhanced KCNH2 membrane trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Anneken, Lars; Baumann, Stefan; Vigneault, Patrick; Biliczki, Peter; Friedrich, Corinna; Xiao, Ling; Girmatsion, Zenawit; Takac, Ina; Brandes, Ralf P.; Kissler, Stefan; Wiegratz, Inka; Zumhagen, Sven; Stallmeyer, Birgit; Hohnloser, Stefan H.; Klingenheben, Thomas; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Nattel, Stanley; Ehrlich, Joachim R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Modulation of cardiac repolarization by sexual hormones is controversial and hormonal effects on ion channels remain largely unknown. In the present translational study, we therefore assessed the relationship between QTc duration and gonadal hormones and studied underlying mechanisms. Methods and results We measured hormone levels and QTc intervals in women during clomiphene stimulation for infertility and women before, during, and after pregnancy. Three heterozygous LQT-2 patients (KCNH2-p.Arg752Pro missense mutation) and two unaffected family members additionally were studied during their menstrual cycles. A comprehensive cellular and molecular analysis was done to identify the mechanisms of hormonal QT-interval regulation. High estradiol levels, but neither progesterone nor estradiol/progesterone ratio, inversely correlated with QTc. Consistent with clinical data, in vitro estradiol stimulation (60 pmol/L, 48 h) enhanced IKCNH2. This increase was mediated by estradiol receptor-α-dependent promotion of KCNH2-channel trafficking to the cell membrane. To study the underlying mechanism, we focused on heat-shock proteins. The heat-shock protein-90 (Hsp90) inhibitor geldanamycin abolished estradiol-induced increase in IKCNH2. Geldanamycin had no effect on KCNH2 transcription or translation; nor did it affect expression of estradiol receptors and chaperones. Estradiol enhanced the physical interaction of KCNH2-channel subunits with heat-shock proteins and augmented ion-channel trafficking to the membrane. Conclusion Elevated estradiol levels were associated with shorter QTc intervals in healthy women and female LQT-2 patients. Estradiol acts on KCNH2 channels via enhanced estradiol-receptor-α-mediated Hsp90 interaction, augments membrane trafficking and thereby increases repolarizing current. These results provide mechanistic insights into hormonal control of human ventricular repolarization and open novel therapeutic avenues. PMID:26271031

  19. Estradiol Attenuates Multiple Tetrodotoxin-Sensitive Sodium Currents in Isolated Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Garro, Mona; Kuehl-Kovarik, M. Cathleen

    2010-01-01

    Secretion from gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons is necessary for the production of gametes and hormones from the gonads. Subsequently, GnRH release is regulated by steroid feedback. However, the mechanisms by which steroids, specifically estradiol, modulate GnRH secretion are poorly understood. We have previously shown that estradiol administered to the female mouse decreases inward currents in fluorescently-labeled GnRH neurons. The purpose of this study was to examine the contribution of sodium currents in the negative feedback action of estradiol. Electrophysiology was performed on GnRH neurons dissociated from young, middle-aged, or old female mice. All mice were ovariectomized; half were estradiol replaced. The amplitude of the sodium current underlying the action potential was significantly decreased in GnRH neurons from young estradiol-treated animals. In addition, in vivo estradiol significantly decreased the transient sodium current amplitude, but prolonged the sodium current inactivation time constant. Estradiol decreased the persistent sodium current amplitude, and induced a significant negative shift in peak current potential. In contrast to results obtained from cells from young reproductive animals, estradiol did not significantly attenuate the sodium current underlying the action potential in cells isolated from middle-aged or old mice. Sodium channels can modulate cell threshold, latency of firing, and action potential characteristics. The reduction of sodium current amplitude by estradiol suggests a negative feedback on GnRH neurons, which could lead to a downregulation of cell excitability and hormone release. The attenuation of estradiol regulation in peripostreproductive and postreproductive animals could lead to dysregulated hormone release with advancing age. PMID:20580637

  20. Degradation of endocrine disrupting chemicals bisphenol A, ethinyl estradiol, and estradiol during UV photolysis and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeldt, Erik J; Linden, Karl G

    2004-10-15

    The degradation of three endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), bisphenol A, ethinyl estradiol, and estradiol, was investigated via ultraviolet (UV) radiation photolysis and the UV/hydrogen peroxide advanced oxidation process (AOP). These EDCs have been detected at low levels in wastewaters and surface waters in both the United States and European countries, can cause adverse effects on humans and wildlife via interactions with the endocrine system, and thus must be treated before entering the public drinking water supply. Because many EDCs can only be partially removed with conventional water treatment systems, there is a need to evaluate alternative treatment processes. For each EDC tested, direct UV photolysis quantum yields were derived for use with both monochromatic low-pressure (LP) UV lamps and polychromatic medium-pressure (MP) UV lamps and second-order hydroxyl radical rate constants were developed. These parameters were utilized to successfully model UV treatment of the EDCs in laboratory and natural waters. The polychromatic MP UV radiation source was more effective for direct photolysis degradation as compared to conventional LP UV lamps emitting monochromatic UV 254 nm radiation. However, in all cases the EDCs were more effectively degraded utilizing UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation as compared to direct UV photolysis treatment.

  1. 76 FR 75886 - Determination That DEMULEN 1/50-28 (Ethinyl Estradiol; Ethynodiol Diacetate) Tablet and Four...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... estradiol; 4901 Searle ethynodiol diacetate) Pkwy., Skokie, Tablet, 0.05 mg; 1 mg. IL 60077. NDA 018160 DEMULEN 1/35-28 Do. (ethinyl estradiol; ethynodiol diacetate) Tablet, 0.035 mg; 1 mg. ] NDA 018168 DEMULEN 1/35-21 Do. (ethinyl estradiol; ethynodiol diacetate) Tablet, 0.035 mg; 1 mg. NDA 019190...

  2. Detection of estradiol-17β during a mass coral spawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, S.; Atkinson, M. J.

    1992-04-01

    The steroid estradiol-17β (E2) is associated with female gametogenesis in all vertebrates and many invertebrates. This is the first report of estrogens in scleractinian corals. Seawater and egg slicks were collected during a mass coral spawn at Ningaloo reef, Western Australia for the measurement of total phosphate (TP) and E2. Total P in the water column increased 600 times, from 0.5μM to 300μM. Concentrations of E2 increased nearly 8 fold during the spawn, from 55 to 420 pg/100 ml seawater. Coral eggs collected from egg slicks contained 368±40 pg E2/g dry wt of eggs. Estrogen may be a key hormone in a simple endocrine system of scleractinian corals that synchronizes growth and development of coral oocytes. Its potential role in triggering spawning via chemical messengers in the water column warrants further research.

  3. Relationship between Carotenoids, Retinol, and Estradiol Levels in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Marcello; de Vita, Francesca; Lauretani, Fulvio; Bandinelli, Stefania; Semba, Richard D.; Bartali, Benedetta; Cherubini, Antonio; Cappola, Anne R.; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Background. In vitro evidence suggests anti-estrogenic properties for retinol and carotenoids, supporting a chemo-preventive role of these phytochemicals in estrogen-dependent cancers. During aging there are significant reductions in retinol and carotenoid concentrations, whereas estradiol levels decline during menopause and progressively increase from the age of 65. We aimed to investigate the hypothesis of a potential relationship between circulating levels of retinol, carotenoids, and estradiol (E2) in a cohort of late post-menopausal women. Methods. We examined 512 women ≥ 65 years from the InCHIANTI study. Retinol, α-caroten, β-caroten, β-criptoxantin, lutein, zeaxanthin, and lycopene levels were assayed at enrollment (1998–2000) by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography. Estradiol and testosterone (T) levels were assessed by Radioimmunometry (RIA) and testosterone-to-estradiol ratio (T/E2), as a proxy of aromatase activity, was also calculated. General linear models adjusted for age (Model 1) and further adjusted for other confounders including Body Mass Index (BMI) BMI, smoking, intake of energy, lipids, and vitamin A; C-Reactive Protein, insulin, total cholesterol, liver function, and testosterone (Model 2) were used to investigate the relationship between retinol, carotenoids, and E2 levels. To address the independent relationship between carotenoids and E2 levels, factors significantly associated with E2 in Model 2 were also included in a fully adjusted Model 3. Results. After adjustment for age, α-carotene (β ± SE = −0.01 ± 0.004, p = 0.02) and β-carotene (β ± SE = −0.07 ± 0.02, p = 0.0007) were significantly and inversely associated with E2 levels. α-Carotene was also significantly and positively associated with T/E2 ratio (β ± SE = 0.07 ± 0.03, p = 0.01). After adjustment for other confounders (Model 2), the inverse relationship between α-carotene (β ± SE = −1.59 ± 0.61, p = 0.01), β-carotene (β ± SE = −0.29 ± 0.08, p

  4. Estradiol Regulates Brown Adipose Tissue Thermogenesis via Hypothalamic AMPK

    PubMed Central

    Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B.; González-García, Ismael; Martins, Luís; Lage, Ricardo; Fernández-Mallo, Diana; Martínez-Sánchez, Noelia; Ruíz-Pino, Francisco; Liu, Ji; Morgan, Donald A.; Pinilla, Leonor; Gallego, Rosalía; Saha, Asish K.; Kalsbeek, Andries; Fliers, Eric; Bisschop, Peter H.; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén; Rahmouni, Kamal; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; López, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Estrogens play a major role in the modulation of energy balance through central and peripheral actions. Here, we demonstrate that central action of estradiol (E2) inhibits AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) through estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) selectively in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH), leading to activation of thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT) through the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in a feeding-independent manner. Genetic activation of AMPK in the VMH prevented E2-induced increase in BAT-mediated thermogenesis and weight loss. Notably, fluctuations in E2 levels during estrous cycle also modulate this integrated physiological network. Together, these findings demonstrate that E2 regulation of the VMH AMPK-SNS-BAT axis is an important determinant of energy balance and suggest that dysregulation in this axis may account for the common changes in energy homeostasis and obesity linked to dysfunction of the female gonadal axis. PMID:24856932

  5. Seizure facilitating activity of the oral contraceptive ethinyl estradiol.

    PubMed

    Younus, Iyan; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2016-03-01

    Contraceptive management is critical in women with epilepsy. Although oral contraceptives (OCs) are widely used by many women with epilepsy, little is known about their impact on epileptic seizures and epileptogenesis. Ethinyl estradiol (EE) is the primary component of OC pills. In this study, we investigated the pharmacological effect of EE on epileptogenesis and kindled seizures in female mice using the hippocampus kindling model. Animals were stimulated daily with or without EE until generalized stage 5 seizures were elicited. EE treatment significantly accelerated the rate of epileptogenesis. In acute studies, EE caused a significant decrease in the afterdischarge threshold and increased the incidence and severity of seizures in fully-kindled mice. In chronic studies, EE treatment caused a greater susceptibility to kindled seizures. Collectively, these results are consistent with moderate proconvulsant-like activity of EE. Such excitatory effects may affect seizure risk in women with epilepsy taking OC pills.

  6. Estradiol decreases cortical reactive astrogliosis after brain injury by a mechanism involving cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    López Rodríguez, Ana Belén; Mateos Vicente, Beatriz; Romero-Zerbo, Silvana Y; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Noé; Bellini, María José; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Bermudez-Silva, Francisco Javier; Azcoitia, Iñigo; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Viveros, María-Paz

    2011-09-01

    The neuroactive steroid estradiol reduces reactive astroglia after brain injury by mechanisms similar to those involved in the regulation of reactive gliosis by endocannabinoids. In this study, we have explored whether cannabinoid receptors are involved in the effects of estradiol on reactive astroglia. To test this hypothesis, the effects of estradiol, the cannabinoid CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist AM251, and the cannabinoid CB2 antagonist/inverse agonist AM630 were assessed in the cerebral cortex of male rats after a stab wound brain injury. Estradiol reduced the number of vimentin immunoreactive astrocytes and the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactive astrocytes in the proximity of the wound. The effect of estradiol was significantly inhibited by the administration of either CB1 or CB2 receptor antagonists. The effect of estradiol may be in part mediated by alterations in endocannabinoid signaling because the hormone increased in the injured cerebral cortex the messenger RNA levels of CB2 receptors and of some of the enzymes involved in the synthesis and metabolism of endocannabinoids. These findings suggest that estradiol may decrease reactive astroglia in the injured brain by regulating the activity of the endocannabinoid system.

  7. Effects of estradiol on the thermoneutral zone and core temperature in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Dacks, Penny A; Rance, Naomi E

    2010-03-01

    Hot flushes represent a disorder of central thermoregulation characterized by the episodic activation of heat loss mechanisms. Although flushes are associated with estrogen withdrawal, there is little understanding of the effects of estrogen on thermoregulation in any species. It has been proposed that hormone withdrawal increases the sensitivity of hypothalamic neural pathways that control heat dissipation effectors. If so, we predicted that ovariectomized rats without estradiol treatment would activate tail skin vasodilatation (a major heat loss effector) at lower ambient temperatures and thereby lower the thermoneutral zone. The thermoneutral zone, defined as the range of ambient temperatures in which thermoregulation is achieved only by sensible (dry) heat loss, was evaluated based on properties of skin vasomotion. Core and tail skin temperatures were recorded in ovariectomized rats (with and without estradiol-17beta) exposed to ambient temperatures from 13 to 34 C in an environmental chamber. Rats without estradiol exhibited increased skin vasodilatation and a shift in the thermoneutral zone to lower ambient temperatures. Moreover, the ambient temperature threshold for skin vasodilatation was significantly lower in rats without estradiol treatment. At most ambient temperatures, average core temperature was unaffected by estradiol. However, at ambient temperatures of 32.5 C and above, untreated ovariectomized rats exhibited higher core temperatures compared with estradiol-treated rats. Thus, estradiol-17beta treatment enhanced the maintenance of core temperature during heat exposure. These findings support the hypothesis that estrogen withdrawal increases the sensitivity of thermoregulatory neural pathways and modifies the activation of heat loss mechanisms.

  8. Influence of agricultural antibiotics and 17beta-estradiol on the microbial community of soil.

    PubMed

    Chun, Soul; Lee, Jaehoon; Radosevich, Mark; White, David C; Geyer, Roland

    2006-01-01

    Agricultural pharmaceuticals are a major environmental concern because of their hazardous effects on human and wildlife. This study analyzed phospholipid ester-linked fatty acids (PLFAs) and quinones to investigate the effects of a steroid (17beta-estradiol) and agricultural antibiotics (chlortetracycline and tylosin) on soil microbes in the laboratory. Two different types of soil were used: Sequatchie loam (0.8% organic matter) and LaDelle silt loam (9.2% organic matter). The soils were spiked with 17beta-estradiol and antibiotics, alone or in combination. In Sequatchie loam, 17beta-estradiol significantly increased the microbial biomass, especially the biomarkers for beta proteobacteria (16:1omega7c, 18:1omega7c, Cy17:0, and UQ-8). The coexistence of antibiotics decreased the stimulatory effect of 17beta-estradiol on the microbial community. In LaDelle silt loam, there were no significant differences in total microbial biomass and their microbial community structure among the treatments. Overall, 17beta-estradiol changed the microbial community of soil and the presence of antibiotics nullified the effect of 17beta-estradiol. However, the effects of 17beta-estradiol and antibiotics on soil microbes were sensitive to the soil properties, as seen in the LaDelle silt loam.

  9. Context-specific effects of estradiol on spatial learning and memory in the zebra finch.

    PubMed

    Rensel, M A; Salwiczek, L; Roth, J; Schlinger, B A

    2013-02-01

    Estradiol is known to impact cognitive function including spatial learning and memory, with studies focused largely on rodent models. Estrogens can be produced peripherally or centrally as neuroestrogens, and the specific role for neuroestrogens in memory processes remains unresolved. Many songbirds possess remarkable spatial memory capabilities and also express the estrogen synthetic enzyme aromatase abundantly in the hippocampus, suggesting that locally-produced estrogens may promote the acquisition or retrieval of spatial memories in these birds. We examined the effect of estradiol on spatial memory in three contexts in the zebra finch: retrieval after discrimination training, retrieval after familiarization but without discrimination training, and memory acquisition, using a combination of estradiol implants and oral dosing with the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole (FAD). Retrieval of spatial memory in both contexts was impaired when estradiol production was blocked. However, spatial memory acquisition was enhanced when estradiol production was inhibited whereas estradiol replacement impaired acquisition. These results provide evidence for a context-specific role of estradiol in songbird spatial memory, results that find accord with some mammalian studies but have not yet been observed in birds.

  10. Serum testosterone and estradiol 17-beta concentrations in 15 dogs with perineal hernia.

    PubMed

    Mann, F A; Boothe, H W; Amoss, M S; Tangner, C H; Puglisi, T A; Hobson, H P

    1989-06-01

    Serum testosterone and estradiol 17-beta concentrations, and serum testosterone-to-estradiol ratio were evaluated in 15 dogs (greater than or equal to 5 years old) with perineal hernia (9 sexually intact males and 6 castrated males) and in 9 clinically normal sexually intact male dogs greater than or equal to 5 years old. There was no significant difference in serum testosterone-to-estradiol ratio between sexually intact male dogs with perineal hernia and clinically normal sexually intact male dogs. In castrated dogs with perineal hernia, serum testosterone concentration and testosterone-to-estradiol ratio were significantly (P less than 0.05) lower, compared with those values in sexually intact dogs with perineal hernia and in clinically normal sexually intact male dogs. There was no significant difference in serum estradiol 17-beta concentration among sexually intact male dogs with perineal hernia, castrated dogs with perineal hernia, and clinically normal sexually intact male dogs. Serum testosterone and estradiol 17-beta concentrations in dogs with perineal hernia did not differ from those values in clinically normal male dogs of the same age. Castration cannot be recommended for the treatment of perineal hernia unless a castration-responsive contributing factor such as prostatomegaly is identified, unless the pelvic diaphragm of dogs with perineal hernia has high sensitivity to normal or low serum testosterone and estradiol 17-beta concentrations, or unless there is documentation that other androgens and/or estrogens are involved.

  11. Role of estradiol in cortisol-induced reduction of luteinizing hormone pulse frequency.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Amy E; Breen, Kellie M; Tilbrook, Alan J; Wagenmaker, Elizabeth R; Karsch, Fred J

    2009-06-01

    Precise control of pulsatile GnRH and LH release is imperative to ovarian cyclicity but is vulnerable to environmental perturbations, like stress. In sheep, a sustained (29 h) increase in plasma cortisol to a level observed during stress profoundly reduces GnRH pulse frequency in ovariectomized ewes treated with ovarian steroids, whereas shorter infusion (6 h) is ineffective in the absence of ovarian hormones. This study first determined whether the ovarian steroid milieu or duration of exposure is the relevant factor in determining whether cortisol reduces LH pulse frequency. Prolonged (29 h) cortisol infusion did not lower LH pulse frequency in ovariectomized ewes deprived of ovarian hormones, but it did so in ovariectomized ewes treated with estradiol and progesterone to create an artificial estrous cycle, implicating ovarian steroids as the critical factor. Importantly, this effect of cortisol was more pronounced after the simulated preovulatory estradiol rise of the artificial follicular phase. The second experiment examined which component of the ovarian steroid milieu enables cortisol to reduce LH pulse frequency in the artificial follicular phase: prior exposure to progesterone in the luteal phase, low early follicular phase estradiol levels, or the preovulatory estradiol rise. Basal estradiol enabled cortisol to decrease LH pulse frequency, but the response was potentiated by the estradiol rise. These findings lead to the conclusion that ovarian steroids, particularly estradiol, enable cortisol to inhibit LH pulse frequency. Moreover, the results provide new insight into the means by which gonadal steroids, and possibly reproductive status, modulate neuroendocrine responses to stress.

  12. Estradiol enhances the acquisition of lithium chloride-induced conditioned taste aversion in castrated male rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Fan; Tsai, Yuan-Feen; Tai, Mei-Yun; Yeh, Kuei-Ying

    2015-10-01

    The present study examined the effects of short-term treatment with ovarian hormones on the acquisition of conditioned taste aversion (CTA). Adult male rats were castrated and randomly divided into LiCl- and saline-treated groups. Nineteen days after castration, all of the animals were subjected to 23.5-h daily water deprivation for seven successive days (day 1 to day 7). On the conditioning day (day 8), the rats received either a 4 ml/kg of 0.15 M LiCl or the same dose of saline injection immediately after administration of a 2 % sucrose solution during the 30-min water session. Starting from day 6, rats in both groups received one of the following treatments: daily subcutaneous injection of (1) estradiol alone (30 μg/kg; estradiol benzoate (E) group), (2) estradiol plus progesterone (500 μg; E + progesterone (P) group), or (3) olive oil. From day 9 to day 11, all of the rats were given daily two-bottle preference tests during the 30-min fluid session. The estradiol and estradiol plus progesterone treatments in the LiCl groups resulted in significantly lower preference scores for the sucrose solution compared with the olive oil treatment groups, but no difference in preference score was seen between these two groups. These results indicate that both the estradiol and estradiol plus progesterone treatments in the LiCl groups enhanced the acquisition of CTA learning and suggest that estradiol affects the acquisition of CTA mediated by an activational effect in male rats, whereas progesterone treatment does not influence the effects of estradiol on the acquisition of CTA.

  13. Membrane-Initiated Estradiol Signaling Induces Spinogenesis Required for Female Sexual Receptivity

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Amy; Dewing, Phoebe

    2011-01-01

    Estrogens have profound actions on the structure of the nervous system during development and in adulthood. One of the signature actions of estradiol is to alter the morphology of neural processes. In the hippocampus, estradiol modulates spines and cellular excitability that affect cognitive behaviors. In the hypothalamus, estradiol increases spine density in mediobasal hypothalamic nuclei that regulate reproduction. The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARH), an important site for modulation of female sexual receptivity, has a sexual dimorphism in dendritic spine density that favors females. In the present study, we used both β-actin immunostaining and Golgi staining to visualize estradiol-induced changes in spine density in Long–Evans rats. Golgi impregnation was used to visualize spine shape, and then β-actin immunoreactivity was used as a semiquantitative measure of spine plasticity since actin forms the core of dendritic spines. At 4 h after estradiol treatment, both β-actin immunofluorescence and filopodial spines were increased (from 70.57 ± 1.09% to 78.01 ± 1.05%, p < 0.05). Disruption of estradiol-induced β-actin polymerization with cytochalasin D attenuated lordosis behavior, indicating the importance of estradiol-mediated spinogenesis for female sexual receptivity (81.43 ± 7.05 to 35.00 ± 11.76, p < 0.05). Deactivation of cofilin, an actin depolymerizing factor is required for spinogenesis. Membrane-initiated estradiol signaling involving the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a was responsible for the phosphorylation and thereby deactivation of cofilin. These data demonstrate that estradiol-induced spinogenesis in the ARH is an important cellular mechanism for the regulation of female sexual behavior. PMID:22131419

  14. Low-dosage micronized 17 beta-estradiol prevents bone loss in postmenopausal women

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ettinger, B.; Genant, H. K.; Steiger, P.; Madvig, P.

    1992-01-01

    With the use of a double-blind, randomized, dose-ranging design, we tested during an 18-month period the degree of protection against postmenopausal bone loss afforded by micronized 17 beta-estradiol in dosages of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg. All subjects received supplementation to ensure a minimum of 1500 mg calcium daily. Fifty-one subjects completed at least 1 year of follow-up bone density measurements by quantitative computed tomography and by single- and dual-photon absorptiometry. In the placebo group spinal trabecular bone density decreased 4.9% annually (p less than 0.001), whereas in those taking micronized 17 beta-estradiol bone density tended to increase (annual increases of 0.3% in the 0.5 mg micronized 17 beta-estradiol group, 1.8% in the 1.0 mg micronized 17 beta-estradiol group, and 2.5% in the 2.0 mg micronized 17 beta-estradiol group). After completing the double-blind phase, 41 subjects completed an additional 18 months of follow-up while taking 1.0 mg micronized 17 beta-estradiol. During this time one third of the subjects were randomly assigned to discontinue calcium supplements. Among those who previously received placebo, trabecular bone density increased 4.3% annually, whereas among those who had used micronized 17 beta-estradiol, trabecular bone density response was inversely related to the dosage previously used. Additionally and independently, the level of calcium intake showed a statistically significant correlation with the change in spinal trabecular bone density (r = 0.37, p = 0.02). We conclude that micronized 17 beta-estradiol has a continuous skeletal dose-response effect in the range of 0.5 to 2.0 mg and that calcium intake positively modifies the skeletal response to 1.0 mg micronized 17 beta-estradiol.

  15. Estradiol enhances the acquisition of lithium chloride-induced conditioned taste aversion in castrated male rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shih-Fan; Tsai, Yuan-Feen; Tai, Mei-Yun; Yeh, Kuei-Ying

    2015-10-01

    The present study examined the effects of short-term treatment with ovarian hormones on the acquisition of conditioned taste aversion (CTA). Adult male rats were castrated and randomly divided into LiCl- and saline-treated groups. Nineteen days after castration, all of the animals were subjected to 23.5-h daily water deprivation for seven successive days (day 1 to day 7). On the conditioning day (day 8), the rats received either a 4 ml/kg of 0.15 M LiCl or the same dose of saline injection immediately after administration of a 2 % sucrose solution during the 30-min water session. Starting from day 6, rats in both groups received one of the following treatments: daily subcutaneous injection of (1) estradiol alone (30 μg/kg; estradiol benzoate (E) group), (2) estradiol plus progesterone (500 μg; E + progesterone (P) group), or (3) olive oil. From day 9 to day 11, all of the rats were given daily two-bottle preference tests during the 30-min fluid session. The estradiol and estradiol plus progesterone treatments in the LiCl groups resulted in significantly lower preference scores for the sucrose solution compared with the olive oil treatment groups, but no difference in preference score was seen between these two groups. These results indicate that both the estradiol and estradiol plus progesterone treatments in the LiCl groups enhanced the acquisition of CTA learning and suggest that estradiol affects the acquisition of CTA mediated by an activational effect in male rats, whereas progesterone treatment does not influence the effects of estradiol on the acquisition of CTA.

  16. Low doses of estradiol partly inhibit release of GH in sheep without affecting basal levels.

    PubMed

    Hudmon, A; Davenport, G; Coleman, E S; Sartin, J L

    2009-10-01

    Estradiol increases basal growth hormone (GH) concentrations in sheep and cattle. This study sought to determine the effects of estradiol on GH-releasing hormone (GRH)-stimulated GH release in sheep. Growth hormone secretory characteristics, the GH response to GRH, and steady-state GH mRNA concentrations were determined in castrated male lambs treated with 2 different doses of estradiol 17-beta for a 28-d experimental period. Although no differences between treatments in mean GH, basal GH, or GH pulse number were observed after 28 d of estradiol treatment, GH pulse amplitude was greater (P < 0.05) in the 2.00-cm implant-treated animals than in the control and 0.75-cm implant group. The effect of estradiol treatment on GRH-stimulated GH release revealed differences between the control and estradiol-treated animals (P < 0.05). The 15-min GH responses to 0.075 microg/kg hGRH in the control, 0.75-cm, and 2.00-cm implant groups, respectively, were 76 +/- 10, 22.6 +/- 2.1, and 43.6 +/- 15.0 ng/mL. Growth hormone mRNA content was determined for pituitary glands from the different treatment groups, and no differences in steady-state GH mRNA levels were observed. There were no differences in the mean plasma concentrations of IGF-I, cortisol, T(3), or T(4) from weekly samples. Growth hormone release from cultured ovine pituitary cells from control sheep was not affected by estradiol after 72 h or in a subsequent 3-h incubation with estradiol combined with GRH. These data suggest that estradiol has differing actions on basal and GRH-stimulated GH concentrations in plasma, but the increase in pulse amplitude does not represent an increased pituitary sensitivity to GRH.

  17. Estrogenic potencies of resorcylic acid lactones and 17 beta-estradiol in female rats.

    PubMed

    Everett, D J; Perry, C J; Scott, K A; Martin, B W; Terry, M K

    1987-01-01

    Uterotrophic response in sexually immature female rats has been used to rank the relative estrogenic potencies of six resorcylic acid lactones (RALs) and to compare their activities with that of 17 beta-estradiol. On oral administration, the estrogenic potency relative to 17 beta-estradiol is as follows: 7 alpha-zearalenol, 10 times less; zeranol, 150 times less; taleranol, 350 times less; zearalanone, 400 times less; zearalenone, 650 times less; 7 beta-zearalenol, 3500 times less. On subcutaneous administration, zeranol is 500 times less estrogenic than 17 beta-estradiol.

  18. Mechanism of the Rapid Effect of 17β -Estradiol on Medial Amygdala Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabekura, Junichi; Oomura, Yutaka; Minami, Taketsugu; Mizuno, Yuji; Fukuda, Atsuo

    1986-07-01

    The mechanism by which sex steroids rapidly modulate the excitability of neurons was investigated by intracellular recording of neurons in rat medial amygdala brain slices. Brief hyperpolarization and increased potassium conductance were produced by 17β - estradiol. This effect persisted after elimination of synaptic input and after suppression of protein synthesis. Thus, 17β -estradiol directly changes the ionic conductance of the postsynaptic membrane of medial amygdala neurons. In addition, a greater proportion of the neurons from females than from males responded to 17β -estradiol.

  19. Environmental magnetic fields inhibit the antiproliferative action of tamoxifen and melatonin in a human breast cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Harland, J D; Liburdy, R P

    1997-01-01

    We have previously reported that environmental-level magnetic fields (1.2 microT [12 milligauss], 60 Hz) block the growth inhibition of the hormone melatonin (10(-9) M) on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in vitro. We now report that the same 1.2 microT, 60 Hz magnetic fields significantly block the growth inhibitory action of pharmacological levels of tamoxifen (10(-7) M). In biophysical studies we have taken advantage of Faraday's Law of Current Induction and tested whether the 1.2 microT magnetic field or the associated induced electric field is responsible for this field effect on melatonin and tamoxifen. We observe that the magnetic field component is associated with the field blocking effect on melatonin and tamoxifen function. To our knowledge the tamoxifen studies represent the first experimental evidence for an environmental-level magnetic field modification of drug interaction with human breast cancer cells. Together, these findings provide support to the theory that environmental-level magnetic fields can act to modify the action of a drug or hormone on regulation of cell proliferation. Melatonin and tamoxifen may act through different biological pathways to down-regulate cell growth, and further studies are required to identify a specific biological site of interaction for the 1.2 microT magnetic field.

  20. Biological Detection of Low-Level Electric Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Frank S.

    1996-03-01

    This paper will review sources of noise in biological systems including thermal noise, shot noise, 1/f noise, signals generated by the biological system, and the background environment. These noise signals will be examined for a model nerve cell and compared with estimates for the electrical and magnetic signals which are typically generated by our power distribution systems at 60 Hz. A number of mechanisms by which biological systems may be able to extract signals from noise will be described. All of these mechanism require biological system nonlinearities and repetitive signals. The results of computer simulation show that computer models of a neural network can be trained to identify a 60-Hz signal with 97% accuracy at signal-to-noise ratios from 1 to 0.001 using a back propagation algorithm. The number of training runs increases with decreasing signal-to-noise ratio. These results will be discussed in terms of biological results which show that sharks can detect electrical signal levels approaching 10-7 V/m and bees can detect changes in magnetic field levels of 10-9 T. Some recent results from our lab on the effects of ELF magnetic fields on the growth rate of pre T cells will also be presented.

  1. Electromagnetic Fields Associated with Commercial Solar Photovoltaic Electric Power Generating Facilities.

    PubMed

    Tell, R A; Hooper, H C; Sias, G G; Mezei, G; Hung, P; Kavet, R

    2015-01-01

    The southwest region of the United States is expected to experience an expansion of commercial solar photovoltaic generation facilities over the next 25 years. A solar facility converts direct current generated by the solar panels to three-phase 60-Hz power that is fed to the grid. This conversion involves sequential processing of the direct current through an inverter that produces low-voltage three-phase power, which is stepped up to distribution voltage (∼12 kV) through a transformer. This study characterized magnetic and electric fields between the frequencies of 0 Hz and 3 GHz at two facilities operated by the Southern California Edison Company in Porterville, CA and San Bernardino, CA. Static magnetic fields were very small compared to exposure limits established by IEEE and ICNIRP. The highest 60-Hz magnetic fields were measured adjacent to transformers and inverters, and radiofrequency fields from 5-100 kHz were associated with the inverters. The fields measured complied in every case with IEEE controlled and ICNIRP occupational exposure limits. In all cases, electric fields were negligible compared to IEEE and ICNIRP limits across the spectrum measured and when compared to the FCC limits (≥0.3 MHz).

  2. [Chronic administration of estradiol to ovariectomized female Wistar rats causes development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Iu O; Artem'eva, M M; Medvedev, O S; Medvedeva, N A

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the role of female sex hormone estradiol in the development of hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Previously, it was shown that the development of pulmonary hypertension in Wistar female rats is accompanied by a twofold increase in the estradiol level. Ovariectomy reduces the degree of pulmonary hypertension in these animals. In this work, the effect of various chronic doses of exogenous estradiol (5 and 15 microg/kg per day) on the development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in Wistar female rats has been studied. Pulmonary hypertension was induced by exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (10 h a day for 2 weeks) at simulated altitude of 5000 m (O2 concentration reduced to 10%). The administration of estradiol in different doses (5 and 15 microg/kg per day) for 21 day initiated the development of pulmonary hypertension in ovariectomized Wistar female rats.

  3. Neuroprotective Actions of Estradiol and Novel Estrogen Analogs in Ischemia: Translational Implications

    PubMed Central

    Etgen, Anne M.; Jover-Mengual, Teresa; Suzanne Zukin, R.

    2011-01-01

    This review highlights our investigations into the neuroprotective efficacy of estradiol and other estrogenic agents in a clinically relevant animal model of transient global ischemia, which causes selective, delayed death of hippocampal CA1 neurons and associated cognitive deficits. We find that estradiol rescues a significant number of CA1 pyramidal neurons that would otherwise die in response to global ischemia, and this is true when hormone is provided as a long-term pretreatment at physiological doses or as an acute treatment at the time of reperfusion. In addition to enhancing neuronal survival, both forms of estradiol treatment induce measurable cognitive benefit in young animals. Moreover, estradiol and estrogen analogs that do not bind classical nuclear estrogen receptors retain their neuroprotective efficacy in middle-aged females deprived of ovarian hormones for a prolonged duration (8 weeks). Thus, non-feminizing estrogens may represent a new therapeutic approach for treating the neuronal damage associated with global ischemia. PMID:21163293

  4. Variation of lead-induced lethality in estradiol-treated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, G.R.

    1982-03-01

    Studies were undertaken to test the female sex hormone ..beta..-estradiol for its ability to modify lethality in young adult female and male mice exposed to lead acetate. Mice were injected with ..beta..-estradiol on day -1 and 0, and immediately after the second injection lead acetate was administered at four subgroup dosages ranging from 75 to 600 mg/kg body weight. Control mice were injected with only lead acetate. On day 4, 6, and 8 after Pb, the median lethal dosages (LD/sub 50/s) were calculated from the observed mortality ratios by a method for moving averages. LD/sub 50/ values were considerably lower for the Pb- and ..beta..-estradiol-injected groups than for the controls. Data from these experiments indicate that the ..beta..-estradiol treatments render both female and male mice more vulnerable to the lethal effects of lead acetate.

  5. Determination of estradiol valerate in pharmaceutical preparations and human serum by flow injection chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenwen; Xie, Liangxiao; Liu, Hongshuang; Xu, Shichao; Hu, Bingcheng; Cao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for the detection of trace estradiol valerate (EV) in pharmaceutical preparations and human serum was developed by inhibition of luminol chemiluminescence (CL) by estradiol valerate on the zinc deuteroporphyrin (ZnDP)-enhanced luminol-K3 Fe(CN)6 chemiluminescence system. Under optimized experimental conditions, CL intensity and concentration of estradiol valerate had a good linear relationship in the ranges of 8.0 × 10(-8) to 1.0 × 10(-5) g/mL. Detection limit (3σ) was estimated to be 3.5 × 10(-8) g/mL. The proposed method was applied successfully for the determination of estradiol valerate in pharmaceutical preparations and human serum and recoveries were 97.0-105.0% and 95.5-106.0%, respectively. The possible mechanism of the CL system is discussed.

  6. OOCYTE ENVELOPE PROTEINS AND VITELLOGENIN IN MALE SHEEPHEAD MINNOW EXPOSED TO ESTRADIOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oocyte Envelope Proteins and Vitellogenin Expression in Male Sheepshead Minnows Exposed to Estradiol (Abstract). To be presented at the 22nd Annual Meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry: Changing Environmental Awareness: Societal Concerns and Scientifi...

  7. COULD ETHINYL ESTRADIOL AFFECT THE POPULATION BIOLOGY OF CUNNER, TAUTOGOLABRUS ADSPERSUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals in the environment may disturb the population dynamics of wildlife by affecting reproductive output and embryonic development of organisms. This study used a population model to evaluate whether ethinyl estradiol (EE2 could affect cunner Tautogolabr...

  8. Estradiol increases growth hormone secretion in rats exposed to swimming stress or reserpine treatment.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, E; Jansson, J O

    1985-09-30

    The secretory pattern of growth hormone (GH) in female rats differs from that in males with respect to e.g. the inter-peak baseline levels being higher in females. In the present study the influence of sex steroids on plasma GH levels was investigated in male rats under various conditions. Administration of estradiol, but not testosterone, was found to increase GH release in rats with suppressed levels induced by exposure to swimming stress or by treatment with the monoamine depleting agent reserpine. In line with previous studies, administration of estradiol was found to increase also inter-peak GH levels in adult male rats; i.e. to cause a feminization of the secretory pattern. In stressed and in reserpinized animals as well as in normal male rats, the effect of estradiol is similar to that earlier demonstrated for somatostatin antiserum, and hence it is suggested that estradiol may act antagonistic to the GH inhibiting factor.

  9. Estradiol reduces anxiety- and depression-like behavior of aged female mice.

    PubMed

    Walf, Alicia A; Frye, Cheryl A

    2010-02-09

    Beneficial effects of the ovarian steroid, 17beta-estradiol (E(2)), for affective behavior have been reported in young individuals, but less is known about the effects of E(2) among older individuals, and the capacity of older individuals to respond to E(2) following its decline. In the present study, the effects of acute E(2) administration to aged mice for anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors were investigated. Intact female C57BL/6 mice (N=18) that were approximately 24 months old were administered vehicle (sesame oil, n=9) or E(2) (10 microg, n=9) subcutaneously 1h prior to behavioral testing. Mice were tested for anxiety-like behavior (open field, elevated plus maze, mirror chamber, light-dark transition task, Vogel conflict task) and depression-like behavior (forced swim task). To assess the role of general motor behavior and coordination in these aged mice, performance in an activity monitor and rotarod task, and total entries made in tasks (open field, elevated plus maze, light-dark transition task) were determined. Mice administered E(2), compared to vehicle, demonstrated anti-anxiety behavior in the open field, mirror chamber, and light-dark transition task, and anti-depressive-like behavior in the forced swim task. E(2) also tended to have anti-anxiety effects in the elevated plus maze and Vogel task compared to vehicle administration, but these effects did not reach statistical significance. E(2) did not alter motor behavior and/or coordination in the activity monitor, open field, or rotarod tasks. Thus, an acute E(2) regimen produced specific anti-anxiety and anti-depressant effects, independent of effects on motor behavior, when administered to aged female C57BL/6 mice.

  10. Estradiol reduces anxiety- and depression-like behavior of aged female mice

    PubMed Central

    Walf, Alicia A.; Frye, Cheryl A.

    2013-01-01

    Beneficial effects of the ovarian steroid, 17β-estradiol (E2), for affective behavior have been reported in young individuals, but less is known about the effects of E2 among older individuals, and the capacity of older individuals to respond to E2 following its decline. In the present study, the effects of acute E2 administration to aged mice for anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors were investigated. Intact female C57BL/6 mice (N=18) that were approximately 24 months old were administered vehicle (sesame oil, n=9) or E2 (10 μg, n=9) subcutaneously 1h prior to behavioral testing. Mice were tested for anxiety-like behavior (open field, elevated plus maze, mirror chamber, light–dark transition task, Vogel conflict task) and depression-like behavior (forced swim task). To assess the role of general motor behavior and coordination in these aged mice, performance in an activity monitor and rotarod task, and total entries made in tasks (open field, elevated plus maze, light–dark transition task) were determined. Mice administered E2, compared to vehicle, demonstrated anti-anxiety behavior in the open field, mirror chamber, and light–dark transition task, and anti-depressive-like behavior in the forced swim task. E2 also tended to have anti-anxiety effects in the elevated plus maze and Vogel task compared to vehicle administration, but these effects did not reach statistical significance. E2 did not alter motor behavior and/or coordination in the activity monitor, open field, or rotarod tasks. Thus, an acute E2 regimen produced specific anti-anxiety and anti-depressant effects, independent of effects on motor behavior, when administered to aged female C57BL/6 mice. PMID:19804793

  11. Estradiol influences the mechanical properties of human fetal osteoblasts through cytoskeletal changes

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, Padmalosini; Lim, Chwee Teck; Lee, Taeyong

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estradiol induced stiffness changes of osteoblasts were quantified using AFM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estradiol causes significant decrease in the stiffness of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased stiffness was caused by decreased density of f-actin network. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stiffness changes were not associated with mineralized matrix of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estradiol increases inherent alkaline phosphatase activity of osteoblasts. -- Abstract: Estrogen is known to have a direct effect on bone forming osteoblasts and bone resorbing osteoclasts. The cellular and molecular effects of estrogen on osteoblasts and osteoblasts-like cells have been extensively studied. However, the effect of estrogen on the mechanical property of osteoblasts has not been studied yet. It is important since mechanical property of the mechanosensory osteoblasts could be pivotal to its functionality in bone remodeling. This is the first study aimed to assess the direct effect of estradiol on the apparent elastic modulus (E{sup Asterisk-Operator }) and corresponding cytoskeletal changes of human fetal osteoblasts (hFOB 1.19). The cells were cultured in either medium alone or medium supplemented with {beta}-estradiol and then subjected to Atomic Force Microscopy indentation (AFM) to determine E{sup Asterisk-Operator }. The underlying changes in cytoskeleton were studied by staining the cells with TRITC-Phalloidin. Following estradiol treatment, the cells were also tested for proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization. With estradiol treatment, E{sup Asterisk-Operator} of osteoblasts significantly decreased by 43-46%. The confocal images showed that the changes in f-actin network observed in estradiol treated cells can give rise to the changes in the stiffness of the cells. Estradiol also increases the inherent alkaline phosphatase activity of the cells. Estradiol induced stiffness

  12. Estrus synchronization in cattle using estradiol, melengestrol acetate and PGF.

    PubMed

    Kastelic, J P; McCartney, D H; Olson, W O; Barth, A D; Garcia, A; Mapletoft, R J

    1996-11-01

    In Experiment 1, all cattle were fed MGA (0.5 mg/head/d) for 7 d (designated Days 0 to 6) and given PGF on Day 6. One-half were administered estradiol valerate (EV; 5 mg, im) on Day 0. At Location 1, a higher proportion (P < 0.005) of EV-treated heifers were detected in estrus and bred by AI between Days 7 and 13 than control heifers not receiving EV (27 of 33 versus 15 of 32), but the number of pregnancies (12 vs 10) was not significantly different. Eighty-three of 104 EV-treated and 89 of 106 control cows were inseminated, resulting in 50 and 45 pregnancies, respectively (not significant). At Location 2, cattle were similarly treated and exposed to bulls on Days 7 to 49. Fall pregnancy rate was higher (P < 0.015) for EV-treated than control heifers (44 of 48 vs 33 of 46), but was not significantly different for cows (22 of 26 vs 19 of 23). In Experiment 2, estradiol 17beta (E17beta; 5 mg, im) and progesterone (100 mg, im) were administered on Day 0 (instead of EV). In a third group (designated the PGF group), cattle were bred on Days 0 to 6, and PGF was administered on Day 6 to those not yet bred. For 213 cows, the percentage pregnant to a synchronized estrus was greater in the PGF group (72%) than in either the control group treated with MGA (49%; P = 0.005) or the group receiving MGA and E17beta (54%; P < 0.025). Fall pregnancy rates were 91, 89, and 96% for the 213 cows (not significant) and 89, 93, and 98% for 131 heifers (not significant) in the PGF, MGA and E17beta groups, respectively. In cattle without a functional CL, the average diameter of the largest follicle at Day 6 was 1 to 2 mm smaller in the E17beta + MGA group than in the MGA group (difference significant only in cows at Location 1). Combined for both locations, the synchronized pregnancy rate in heifers without a functional CL on Day 6 was higher (P < 0.05) in the E17beta + MGA group than in the MGA group (11 of 21, 52% versus 4 of 20, 20%). Estrogen treatment caused regression of ovarian

  13. 17β-estradiol enhances memory duration in the main olfactory bulb in CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Dillon, T Samuel; Fox, Laura C; Han, Crystal; Linster, Christiane

    2013-12-01

    Rodents rely heavily on odor detection, discrimination, and memory to locate food, find mates, care for pups, and avoid predators. Estrogens have been shown to increase memory retention in rodents performing spatial memory and object placement tasks. Here we evaluate the extent to which 17β-estradiol modulates memory formation and duration in the olfactory system. Adult CD-1 mice were gonadectomized and given either systemic 17β-estradiol replacement, local 17β-estradiol in the main olfactory bulb, or no replacement. Before performing the behavioral task the mice were given saline or PHTPP (an estrogen receptor β [ER-β] antagonist) via bilateral infusion into the main olfactory bulb. As the beta-type estrogen receptor (ER-β) is more abundant than the alpha-type estrogen receptor in the murine main olfactory bulb, the current study focuses on 17β-estradiol and its interactions with ERβ. Habituation, a simple, nonassociative learning task in which an animal is exposed to the same odor over successive presentations, was used to evaluate the animals' ability to detect odors and form an olfactory memory. To evaluate memory duration, we added a final trial of intertrial interval time (30 or 60 min) in which we presented the habituated odor. Neither surgical nor drug manipulation affected the ability of mice to detect or habituate to an odor. After habituation, gonadectomized 17β-estradiol-treated mice retained memory of an odor for 30 min, whereas non-estradiol-treated, 17β-estradiol+ERβ antagonist (PHTPP), and untreated male mice did not remember an odor 30 min after habituation. The results show that both systemic and local bulbar infusions of 17β-estradiol enhance odor memory duration in mice.

  14. Methods for long-term 17β-estradiol administration to mice.

    PubMed

    Ingberg, E; Theodorsson, A; Theodorsson, E; Strom, J O

    2012-01-01

    Rodent models constitute a cornerstone in the elucidation of the effects and biological mechanisms of 17β-estradiol. However, a thorough assessment of the methods for long-term administration of 17β-estradiol to mice is lacking. The fact that 17β-estradiol has been demonstrated to exert different effects depending on dose emphasizes the need for validated administration regimens. Therefore, 169 female C57BL/6 mice were ovariectomized and administered 17β-estradiol using one of the two commonly used subcutaneous methods; slow-release pellets (0.18 mg, 60-day release pellets; 0.72 mg, 90-day release pellets) and silastic capsules (with/without convalescence period, silastic laboratory tubing, inner/outer diameter: 1.575/3.175 mm, filled with a 14 mm column of 36 μg 17β-estradiol/mL sesame oil), or a novel peroral method (56 μg 17β-estradiol/day/kg body weight in the hazelnut cream Nutella). Forty animals were used as ovariectomized and intact controls. Serum samples were obtained weekly for five weeks and 17β-estradiol concentrations were measured using radioimmunoassay. The peroral method resulted in steady concentrations within--except on one occasion--the physiological range and the silastic capsules produced predominantly physiological concentrations, although exceeding the range by maximum a factor three during the first three weeks. The 0.18 mg pellet yielded initial concentrations an order of magnitude higher than the physiological range, which then decreased drastically, and the 0.72 mg pellet produced between 18 and 40 times higher concentrations than the physiological range during the entire experiment. The peroral method and silastic capsules described in this article constitute reliable modes of administration of 17β-estradiol, superior to the widely used commercial pellets.

  15. Estradiol shows anti-skin cancer activities through decreasing MDM2 expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Feng, Jianguo; Chen, Ying; Li, Shun; Ou, Mengting; Sun, Weichao; Tang, Liling

    2017-01-31

    Estradiol plays important roles in many biological responses inducing tumor genesis and cancer treatment. However, the effects of estradiol on tumors were inconsistent among a lot of researches and the mechanism is not fully understood. Our previous study indicated that splicing factor hnRNPA1 could bind to the human homologue of mouse double minute (MDM2), an oncogene which has been observed to be over-expressed in numerous types of cancers. In this research, we investigated whether and how estradiol correlate to cancer cell behaviors through heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNPA1) and MDM2. Results showed that 10×10-13Mestradiol elevated the expression of hnRNPA1 regardless ER expression in cells, and then down-regulated the expression of MDM2. At the same time, estradiol inhibited cell proliferation, migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition progression of A375 and GLL19 cells. While, knocking down hnRNPA1 through the transfection of hnRNPA1 siRNA led to the increase of MDM2 at both protein level and gene level In vivo experiment, subcutaneous injection with estradiol every two days near the tumor at doses of 2.5mg/kg/d suppressed tumor growth and reduced MDM2 expression. In a word, via increasing hnRNPA1 level and then reducing the expression of MDM2, estradiol prevented carcinogenesis in melanomas. We confirmed therapeutic effect of estradiol, as well as a new way for estradiol to resist skin cancer.

  16. 17β-estradiol in runoff as affected by various poultry litter application strategies.

    PubMed

    Delaune, P B; Moore, P A

    2013-02-01

    Steroidal hormones, which are excreted by all mammalian species, have received increasing attention in recent years due to potential environmental implications. The objective of this study was to evaluate 17β-estradiol concentrations in runoff water from plots receiving poultry litter applications using various management strategies. Treatments included the effects of 1) aluminum sulfate (alum) application rates to poultry litter; 2) time until the first runoff event occurs after poultry litter application; 3) poultry litter application rate; 4) fertilizer type; and 5) litter from birds fed modified diets. Rainfall simulators were used to cause continuous runoff from fertilized plots. Runoff samples were collected and analyzed for 17β-estradiol concentrations. Results showed that increasing alum additions to poultry litter decreased 17β-estradiol concentrations in runoff water. A significant exponential decline in 17β-estradiol runoff was also observed with increasing time until the first runoff event after litter application. Concentrations of 17β-estradiol in runoff water increased with increasing litter application rate and remained above background concentrations after three runoff events at higher application rates. Management practices such as diet modification and selection of fertilizer type were also shown to affect 17β-estradiol concentrations in runoff water. Although results from these experiments typically represented a worst case scenario since runoff events generally occurred immediately after litter application, the contaminant loss from pastures fertilized with poultry litter can be expected to be much lower than continual estradiol loadings observed from waste water treatment plants. Management practices such as alum amendment and application timing can significantly reduce the risk of 17β-estradiol losses in the environment.

  17. Voluntary Exercise Impairs Initial Delayed Spatial Alternation Performance in Estradiol Treated Ovariectomized Middle-Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Neese, Steven L.; Korol, Donna L.; Schantz, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Estrogens differentially modulate behavior in the adult female rodent. Voluntary exercise can also impact behavior, often reversing age associated decrements in memory processes. Our research group has published a series of papers reporting a deficit in the acquisition of an operant working memory task, delayed spatial alternation (DSA), following 17β-estradiol treatment to middle-aged ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The current study examined if voluntary exercise could attenuate the 17β-estradiol induced deficits on DSA performance. OVX 12-month old Long- Evans rats were implanted with a Silastic capsule containing 17β-estradiol (10% in cholesterol: low physiological range) or with a blank capsule. A subset of the 17β-estradiol and OVX untreated rats were given free access to a running wheel in their home cage. All rats were tested for 40 sessions on the DSA task. Surprisingly, we found running wheel access to impair initial acquisition of the DSA task in 17β-estradiol treated rats, an effect not seen in OVX untreated rats given running wheel access. This deficit was driven by an increase in perseverative responding on a lever no longer associated with reinforcement. We also report for the first time a 17β-estradiol induced impairment on the DSA task following a long intertrial delay (18-sec), an effect revealed following more extended testing than in our previous studies (15 additional sessions). Overall, running wheel access increased initial error rate on the DSA task in 17β-estradiol treated middle-aged OVX rats, and failed to prevent the 17β-estradiol induced deficits in performance of the operant DSA task in later testing sessions. PMID:24013039

  18. Synchronization of estrus in beef cattle with norgestomet and estradiol valerate.

    PubMed Central

    Kastelic, J P; Olson, W O; Martinez, M; Cook, R B; Mapletoft, R J

    1999-01-01

    Fifty-six cows received a norgestomet implant and an injection of norgestomet and estradiol valerate; half (n = 28) received 500 IU equine chorionic gonadotrophin (eCG) at implant removal, 9 d later. A third group (n = 25) received 2 doses of cloprostenol (500 micrograms) 11 d apart. Estrous rate was higher (P < 0.05) for cows given norgestomet and estradiol plus 500 IU eCG (75.0%) than for those receiving cloprostenol (44.0%); for those receiving norgestomet and estradiol alone, it was intermediate (67.8%). Pregnancy rates to artificial insemination (after estrus or timed) were higher (P < 0.05) for cows given norgestomet and estradiol than for those given cloprostenol (23 of 28, 82.1% vs 13 of 25, 52.0%), and intermediate (67.8%) for those given norgestomet and estradiol plus eCG. In a second experiment, for heifers treated with norgestomet and estradiol plus eCG (n = 15) or with 2 doses of cloprostenol (n = 16), estrous rates were 66.7% vs 56.2% (P > 0.5), ovulation rates were 100.0% vs 81.2% (P = 0.08), intervals from implant removal or cloprostenol treatment to estrus were 48.0 +/- 4.4 hours vs 61.3 +/- 7.0 hours (P = 0.12) and to ovulation were 70.4 +/- 4.4 hours vs 93.2 +/- 7.5 hours (P < 0.01), respectively; pregnancy rates were 41.7 and 35.7%, respectively (P > 0.5). Norgestomet and estradiol were as good as (heifers) or superior to (cows) a 2-dose cloprostenol regimen. In cows given norgestomet and estradiol, injecting eCG at implant removal did not significantly improve estrous or pregnancy rates. PMID:10086217

  19. Aromatase inhibitors in obese breast cancer patients are not associated with increased plasma estradiol levels.

    PubMed

    Diorio, Caroline; Lemieux, Julie; Provencher, Louise; Hogue, Jean-Charles; Vachon, Eric

    2012-11-01

    Obesity, in postmenopausal women, has been associated to a higher breast cancer incidence and worst prognosis. Some studies suggested a decrease in aromatase inhibitors (AI) efficacy in obese postmenopausal breast cancer patients, although estradiol levels were not measured. The purpose of the present study was to verify if estradiol levels are measurable in postmenopausal women under AI. If achievable, the goal is to compare the estradiol levels in lean versus obese postmenopausal women under AI treatment for non-metastatic breast cancer. Postmenopausal women were recruited in accordance to one of these four groups: lean [body mass index (BMI) of 18-25 kg/m(2)] under AI (n = 30), obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) under AI (n = 30), lean AI-naïve (n = 10), and obese AI-naïve (n = 10). Lean and obese women were matched according to their age. Estradiol levels were measured in plasma using an ELISA. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to assess the significance of the differences between the groups. Estradiol levels in postmenopausal women under AI varied from 0 to 94.65 pg/ml with a median value of 0.98 pg/ml. Obese AI-naïve women had higher estradiol levels than lean AI-naïve women (p = 0.03). There was no difference in estradiol levels between lean and obese women under AI (p = 0.76). Despite very low plasma levels, it is possible to measure the estradiol levels in postmenopausal women under AI treatment. Our results suggest that the known impact of obesity on recurrence risk in women under AI treatment may not be due to incomplete aromatase inhibition. Further works are needed to examine closely the aromatase-independent pathways that are linking obesity to breast cancer risk and recurrence.

  20. Acute treatment with 17beta-estradiol attenuates astrocyte-astrocyte and astrocyte-neuron communication.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shilpa P; Sikdar, Sujit Kumar

    2007-12-01

    Astrocytes are now recognized as dynamic signaling elements in the brain. Bidirectional communication between neurons and astrocytes involves integration of neuronal inputs by astrocytes and release of gliotransmitters that modulate neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission. The ovarian steroid hormone, 17beta-estradiol, in addition to its rapid actions on neuronal electrical activity can rapidly alter astrocyte intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) through a membrane-associated estrogen receptor. Using calcium imaging and electrophysiological techniques, we investigated the functional consequences of acute treatment with estradiol on astrocyte-astrocyte and astrocyte-neuron communication in mixed hippocampal cultures. Mechanical stimulation of an astrocyte evoked a [Ca2+]i rise in the stimulated astrocyte, which propagated to the surrounding astrocytes as a [Ca2+]i wave. Following acute treatment with estradiol, the amplitude of the [Ca2+]i elevation in astrocytes around the stimulated astrocyte was attenuated. Further, estradiol inhibited the [Ca2+]i rise in individual astrocytes in response to the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, trans-(+/-)-1-amino-1,3-cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid. Mechanical stimulation of astrocytes induced [Ca2+]i elevations and electrophysiological responses in adjacent neurons. Estradiol rapidly attenuated the astrocyte-evoked glutamate-mediated [Ca2+]i rise and slow inward current in neurons. Also, the incidence of astrocyte-induced increase in spontaneous postsynaptic current frequency was reduced in the presence of estradiol. The effects of estradiol were stereo-specific and reversible following washout. These findings may indicate that the regulation of neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission by astrocytes is sensitive to rapid estradiol-mediated hormonal control.

  1. Effects of estradiol on uterine perfusion in anesthetized cyclic mares affected with uterine vascular elastosis.

    PubMed

    Esteller-Vico, A; Liu, I K M; Vaughan, B; Steffey, E P; Brosnan, R J

    2016-01-01

    Uterine vascular elastosis in mares is characterized by degeneration of uterine vasculature through thickening of the elastin layers. Factors commonly associated with this degeneration include age, parity, and chronic uterine endometritis. Affected mares have also been shown to exhibit decreases in uterine blood flow and perfusion of the uterus. Due to the increased thickness of the elastin layers, we hypothesize that vasodilatation of the uterine vasculature is also impaired. To test the functionality of these vessels, we evaluated the vasodilatory effects of estradiol on the uterine vascular bed in mares with normal vasculature and mares with severe elastosis. Both groups were tested in estrus and diestrus. Fluorescent microspheres were used to determine basal blood perfusion, followed by the intravenous administration of 1.0 μg/kg of 17β-estradiol. After 90 min, perfusion was measured once again to determine the vascular response to estradiol. Control mares in estrus displayed a significant increase in total uterine blood flow after the administration of estradiol when compared to baseline levels. No other group had a significant increase in total blood flow and perfusion after estradiol administration. The administration of estradiol in control mares induced regional increases in perfusion in the uterine horns and uterine body during estrus and only in the uterine horns during diestrus. Mares affected by elastosis exhibited no regional differences in perfusion levels post-estradiol administration. The difference in the vasodilatory response induced by estradiol between reproductively healthy mares and mares affected with elastosis indicates that the functionality of the affected vessels is compromised.

  2. Estradiol Stimulates Vasodilatory and Metabolic Pathways in Cultured Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino, Agua; Mata, Manuel; Laguna-Fernandez, Andrés; Novella, Susana; Oviedo, Pilar J.; García-Pérez, Miguel Angel; Tarín, Juan J.; Cano, Antonio; Hermenegildo, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Vascular effects of estradiol are being investigated because there are controversies among clinical and experimental studies. DNA microarrays were used to investigate global gene expression patterns in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) exposed to 1 nmol/L estradiol for 24 hours. When compared to control, 187 genes were identified as differentially expressed with 1.9-fold change threshold. Supervised principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis revealed the differences between control and estradiol-treated samples. Physiological concentrations of estradiol are sufficient to elicit significant changes in HUVEC gene expression. Notch signaling, actin cytoskeleton signaling, pentose phosphate pathway, axonal guidance signaling and integrin signaling were the top-five canonical pathways significantly regulated by estrogen. A total of 26 regulatory networks were identified as estrogen responsive. Microarray data were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR in cardiovascular meaning genes; cyclooxigenase (COX)1, dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH)2, phospholipase A2 group IV (PLA2G4) B, and 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase were up-regulated by estradiol in a dose-dependent and estrogen receptor-dependent way, whereas COX2, DDAH1 and PLA2G4A remained unaltered. Moreover, estradiol-induced COX1 gene expression resulted in increased COX1 protein content and enhanced prostacyclin production. DDAH2 protein content was also increased, which in turn decreased asymmetric dimethylarginine concentration and increased NO release. All stimulated effects of estradiol on gene and protein expression were estrogen receptor-dependent, since were abolished in the presence of the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780. This study identifies new vascular mechanisms of action by which estradiol may contribute to a wide range of biological processes. PMID:20011585

  3. Catechol-O-methyltransferase is dispensable for vascular protection by estradiol in mouse models of atherosclerosis and neointima formation.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmson, Anna S; Bourghardt-Fagman, Johan; Gogos, Joseph A; Fogelstrand, Per; Tivesten, Asa

    2011-12-01

    Estradiol is converted to the biologically active metabolite 2-methoxyestradiol via the activity of the enzyme catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT). Exogenous administration of both estradiol and 2-methoxyestradiol reduces experimental atherosclerosis and neointima formation, and COMT-dependent formation of 2-methoxyestradiol likely mediates the antimitogenic effect of estradiol on smooth muscle cells in vitro. This study evaluated whether 2-methoxyestradiol mediates the vasculoprotective actions of estradiol in vivo. Wild-type (WT) and COMT knockout (COMTKO) mice on an apolipoprotein E-deficient background were gonadectomized and treated with estradiol or placebo. Exogenous estradiol reduced atherosclerotic lesion formation in both females (WT, -78%; COMTKO, -82%) and males (WT, -48%; COMTKO, -53%) and was equally effective in both genotypes. We further evaluated how exogenous estradiol affected neointima formation after ligation of the carotid artery in ovariectomized female mice; estradiol reduced intimal hyperplasia to a similar extent in both WT (-80%) and COMTKO (-77%) mice. In ovarian-intact female COMTKO mice, atherosclerosis was decreased (-25%) compared with WT controls. In conclusion, the COMT enzyme is dispensable for vascular protection by exogenous estradiol in experimental atherosclerosis and neointima formation in vivo. Instead, COMT deficiency in virgin female mice with intact endogenous production of estradiol results in relative protection against atherosclerosis.

  4. Characterization of a 7 day 17 beta-estradiol transdermal delivery system: pharmacokinetics in healthy postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R A; Zegarac, E A; Eldon, M A; Sedman, A J; Forgue, S T

    1996-08-01

    To assess the delivery characteristics of a new 7 day 17 beta-estradiol transdermal delivery system (TDS), estradiol and estrone pharmacokinetics were evaluated following a single 7 d application of one TDS or two TDSs in 24 healthy, postmenopausal women in a nonblind, randomized, two-period crossover study. Serial blood samples and total urine output were collected before (baseline measurement of endogenous hormone) and during TDS application, and for 24 h (urine) or 72 h (blood) following TDS removal. Serum was assayed for estradiol and estrone by a validated radioimmunoassay (RIA) method. The combined amounts of estradiol and its conjugates, and estrone and its conjugates in urine were determined by validated RIA methods. Overall, one or two estradiol TDSs were well tolerated by healthy, postmenopausal female volunteers. Estradiol absorption from the TDS was characterized by a zero-order process and was dose proportional, resulting in average steady-state serum estradiol concentrations of 16 and 33 pg mL-1 above baseline during the 7 d application of one and two TDSs, respectively. Parallel but smaller increases in serum estrone concentrations were observed, resulting in an increase in the serum estradiol/estrone concentration ratio from approximately 0.2 at baseline to median values of 0.64 and 0.88 during application of one and two TDSs, respectively. The 7 day 17 beta-estradiol TDS delivered a nominal estradiol dose of 0.02 mg/24 h during the intended wear period.

  5. Estradiol levels in girls with Turner's syndrome compared to normal prepubertal girls as determined by an ultrasensitive assay.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Courtnay A; Heinrichs, Claudine; Larmore, Kimberly A; Craen, Marguerita; Brown-Dawson, Jacquelyn; Shaywitz, Sally; Ross, Judith; Klein, Karen Oerter

    2003-01-01

    Based on growing evidence that estradiol is produced in small amounts even in the prepubertal ovary, we hypothesized that estradiol levels in girls with Turner's syndrome (TS) are lower than in normal prepubertal girls secondary to the lack of normally functioning ovaries. Estradiol levels in untreated girls with TS have not been previously well defined because of the lack of adequate sensitivity of previously available estradiol assays. We utilized an ultrasensitive assay to study estradiol levels in 34 girls with TS and 34 normal age-matched prepubertal girls between the ages of 5 and 12 years. The average estradiol level in the girls with TS (6.4 +/- 4.9 pmol/l estradiol equivalents) was significantly lower than in the normal prepubertal girls (12.7 +/- 10.8 pmol/l estradiol equivalents; p < 0.01). Girls with TS were significantly shorter, and weighed less than the normal prepubertal girls, as expected. The estradiol level was not significantly correlated with height, bone age, or degree of bone age delay. In conclusion, girls with TS have significantly lower estradiol levels than normal age-matched prepubertal girls. This report is consistent with the hypothesis that the lack of normal ovarian function in girls with TS is evident even before puberty.

  6. Metabolism of estradiol in greyhounds and German shepherd dogs. An investigation with special reference to hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Beling, C G; Gustafsson, P O; Kasström, H

    1975-01-01

    Metabolism of estradiol was investigated in 5 dogs, 3 female Greyhounds with radiographically perfect hip joints and 2 female German Shepherd dogs with hip dysplasia (one pregnant and the other non-pregnant). One of the Greyhounds was studied both when pregnant and non-pregnant. The non-pregnant dogs were injected with C14-labelled estradiol-17beta i.v. and 5 mg estradiol-17beta benzoate i.m. The pregnant dogs were given only radiolabelled estradiol-17beta. Twenty-four-hour-specimens of urine were collected from the dogs for 6--8 days. Determination of urinary estrone, estradiol-17beta, and estriol was made. It was found that most of the injected estradiol was excreted unmetabolized in all dogs. A significant amount of the injected estradiol was converted to estrone and a small amount to estriol. There was no significant difference in the excretion patterns of estrone, estradiol, and estriol between the Greyhounds with perfect hip joints and the German Shepherds with hip dysplasia, regardless whether the dogs were pregnant or not. The conclusion was drawn that the capacity of dogs with hip dysplasia to metabolize estradiol and to eliminate estradiol and metabolites is not impaired.

  7. Promotion of human adipocyte precursor replication by 17beta-estradiol in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Roncari, D A; Van, R L

    1978-01-01

    The influence of 17beta-estradiol and 17alpha-estradiol on adult human omental adipocyte precursors grown in a propagating culture system was studied. Cells were grown in subculture in the presence or absence of hormone. 17beta-estradiol resulted in significant promotion of adipocyte precursor replication, as determined by cell counting and incorporation of radioactive thymidine into DNA. The hormone stimulated cell multiplication in the concentration range 0.5--500 ng/ml growth medium. The highest level tested was 500 ng/ml. The maximal effects were obtained at 50 ng/ml (P less than 0.001 by paired t test, 48 h after hormone addition). All 10 cell strains (five were derived from men and five from women) that were tested responded similarly to the hormone. 17beta-estradiol did not affect cell size. 17alpha-estradiol did not promote the replication of adipocyte precursors, nor did it influence cell size. Thus, 17beta-estradiol, which is the active isomer in known target tissues, stimulates the multiplication of human adipocyte precursors in culture. Images PMID:690182

  8. Sex, estradiol, and spatial memory in a food-caching corvid.

    PubMed

    Rensel, Michelle A; Ellis, Jesse M S; Harvey, Brigit; Schlinger, Barney A

    2015-09-01

    Estrogens significantly impact spatial memory function in mammalian species. Songbirds express the estrogen synthetic enzyme aromatase at relatively high levels in the hippocampus and there is evidence from zebra finches that estrogens facilitate performance on spatial learning and/or memory tasks. It is unknown, however, whether estrogens influence hippocampal function in songbirds that naturally exhibit memory-intensive behaviors, such as cache recovery observed in many corvid species. To address this question, we examined the impact of estradiol on spatial memory in non-breeding Western scrub-jays, a species that routinely participates in food caching and retrieval in nature and in captivity. We also asked if there were sex differences in performance or responses to estradiol. Utilizing a combination of an aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, with estradiol implants, we found that while overall cache recovery rates were unaffected by estradiol, several other indices of spatial memory, including searching efficiency and efficiency to retrieve the first item, were impaired in the presence of estradiol. In addition, males and females differed in some performance measures, although these differences appeared to be a consequence of the nature of the task as neither sex consistently out-performed the other. Overall, our data suggest that a sustained estradiol elevation in a food-caching bird impairs some, but not all, aspects of spatial memory on an innate behavioral task, at times in a sex-specific manner.

  9. Consequences of nongenomic actions of estradiol on pathogenic genital tract response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Estradiol is a steroid hormone that regulates the structure and function of the female reproductive system. In addition to its genomic effects, which are mediated by activated nuclear receptors, estradiol elicits a variety of rapid signaling events independently of transcriptional or genomic regulation. These nongenomic actions influence the milieu of the genital tract, which changes the ability of pathogens to infect the genital tract. This review discusses our current knowledge regarding the mechanisms and relevance of nongenomic estradiol signaling in the genital tract that could change the ability of pathogens to invade epithelial cells. PubMed was searched through January 1980 for papers related to estradiol actions in the ovary, fallopian tube, uterus and cervix. The mechanisms conveying these rapid effects consist of a multitude of signaling molecules and include cross-talk with slower transcriptional actions. The nongenomic actions of estradiol that influence the infectious abilities of pathogens occur either directly on the genital tract cells or indirectly by modulating the local and systemic immune systems. Additional in-depth characterization of the response is required before the normal and pathological reproductive functions of the nongenomic estradiol pathway can be targeted for pharmacological intervention. PMID:23351368

  10. Modulatory Effects of Sex Steroids Progesterone and Estradiol on Odorant Evoked Responses in Olfactory Receptor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Paul; Mohrhardt, Julia; Gisselmann, Günter; Hatt, Hanns

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the sex steroid hormones progesterone and estradiol on physiology and behavior during menstrual cycles and pregnancy is well known. Several studies indicate that olfactory performance changes with cyclically fluctuating steroid hormone levels in females. Knowledge of the exact mechanisms behind how female sex steroids modulate olfactory signaling is limited. A number of different known genomic and non-genomic actions that are mediated by progesterone and estradiol via interactions with different receptors may be responsible for this modulation. Next generation sequencing-based RNA-Seq transcriptome data from the murine olfactory epithelium (OE) and olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) revealed the expression of several membrane progestin receptors and the estradiol receptor Gpr30. These receptors are known to mediate rapid non-genomic effects through interactions with G proteins. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining results provide evidence for progestin and estradiol receptors in the ORNs. These data support the hypothesis that steroid hormones are capable of modulating the odorant-evoked activity of ORNs. Here, we validated this hypothesis through the investigation of steroid hormone effects by submerged electro-olfactogram and whole cell patch-clamp recordings of ORNs. For the first time, we demonstrate that the sex steroid hormones progesterone and estradiol decrease odorant-evoked signals in the OE and ORNs of mice at low nanomolar concentrations. Thus, both of these sex steroids can rapidly modulate the odor responsiveness of ORNs through membrane progestin receptors and the estradiol receptor Gpr30. PMID:27494699

  11. Hernia fibroblasts lack β-estradiol induced alterations of collagen gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Background Estrogens are reported to increase type I and type III collagen deposition and to regulate Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) expression. These proteins are reported to be dysregulated in incisional hernia formation resulting in a significantly decreased type I to III ratio. We aimed to evaluate the β-estradiol mediated regulation of type I and type III collagen genes as well as MMP-2 gene expression in fibroblasts derived from patients with or without history of recurrent incisional hernia disease. We compared primary fibroblast cultures from male/female subjects without/without incisional hernia disease. Results Incisional hernia fibroblasts (IHFs) revealed a decreased type I/III collagen mRNA ratio. Whereas fibroblasts from healthy female donors responded to β-estradiol, type I and type III gene transcription is not affected in fibroblasts from males or affected females. Furthermore β-estradiol had no influence on the impaired type I to III collagen ratio in fibroblasts from recurrent hernia patients. Conclusion Our results suggest that β-estradiol does not restore the imbaired balance of type I/III collagen in incisional hernia fibroblasts. Furthermore, the individual was identified as an independent factor for the β-estradiol induced alterations of collagen gene expression. The observation of gender specific β-estradiol-dependent changes of collagen gene expression in vitro is of significance for future studies of cellular response. PMID:17010202

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor mediates estradiol-induced dendritic spine formation in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Murphy, D D; Cole, N B; Segal, M

    1998-09-15

    Dendritic spines are of major importance in information processing and memory formation in central neurons. Estradiol has been shown to induce an increase of dendritic spine density on hippocampal neurons in vivo and in vitro. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) recently has been implicated in neuronal maturation, plasticity, and regulation of GABAergic interneurons. We now demonstrate that estradiol down-regulates BDNF in cultured hippocampal neurons to 40% of control values within 24 hr of exposure. This, in turn, decreases inhibition and increases excitatory tone in pyramidal neurons, leading to a 2-fold increase in dendritic spine density. Exogenous BDNF blocks the effects of estradiol on spine formation, and BDNF depletion with a selective antisense oligonucleotide mimics the effects of estradiol. Addition of BDNF antibodies also increases spine density, and diazepam, which facilitates GABAergic neurotransmission, blocks estradiol-induced spine formation. These observations demonstrate a functional link between estradiol, BDNF as a potent regulator of GABAergic interneurons, and activity-dependent formation of dendritic spines in hippocampal neurons.

  13. Altered functional brain asymmetry for mental rotation: effect of estradiol changes across the menstrual cycle

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xun; Kelly, Thomas H.; Curry, Thomas E.; Lal, Chitra; Joseph, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    Mental rotation is a visuo-spatial task associated with pronounced sex differences. Performance is also affected by gonadal hormones such as testosterone and estradiol. To better understand hormonal modulation of the neural substrates of mental rotation, the present study examined the influence of estradiol using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Ten pre-menopausal women were tested on a 3D mental rotation task during the early follicular (EF) and late follicular (LF) phases of the menstrual cycle. Change in estradiol between the two phases was confirmed by hormone assays. Brain activation patterns were similar across the two phases, but the change in estradiol had different associations with the two hemispheres. Better performance in the LF than the EF phase was associated with a pattern of reduced recruitment of the right hemisphere and increased recruitment of the left hemisphere. The increased recruitment of the left hemisphere was directly associated with greater changes in estradiol. Given that the right hemisphere is the dominant hemisphere in visuo-spatial processing, our results suggest that estradiol is associated with reduced functional asymmetry, consistent with recent accounts of hormonal modulation of neurocognitive function. PMID:26222958

  14. Altered functional brain asymmetry for mental rotation: effect of estradiol changes across the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xun; Kelly, Thomas H; Curry, Thomas E; Lal, Chitra; Joseph, Jane E

    2015-09-30

    Mental rotation is a visuospatial task associated with pronounced sex differences. Performance is also affected by gonadal hormones such as testosterone and estradiol. To better understand hormonal modulation of the neural substrates of mental rotation, the present study examined the influence of estradiol using functional MRI. Ten premenopausal women were tested on a 3D mental rotation task during the early follicular and late follicular phases of the menstrual cycle. Change in estradiol between the two phases was confirmed by hormone assays. Brain activation patterns were similar across the two phases, but the change in estradiol had different associations with the two hemispheres. Better performance in the late follicular than the early follicular phase was associated with a pattern of reduced recruitment of the right hemisphere and increased recruitment of the left hemisphere. The increased recruitment of the left hemisphere was directly associated with greater changes in estradiol. Given that the right hemisphere is the dominant hemisphere in visuospatial processing, our results suggest that estradiol is associated with reduced functional asymmetry, consistent with recent accounts of hormonal modulation of neurocognitive function.

  15. Histologic study of the internal organs of rats chronically exposed to a high-intensity electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, Y.J.; Majeau-Chargois, D.; Lymangrover, J.R.; Dunlap, W.P.; Hsieh, S.T.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of 120-day exposure to a high-intensity (80 kV/m), 60-Hz electric field on histology of selected internal organs of Sprague-Dawley rats was investigated. The organs examined were the pituitary, thymus, heart, lungs, liver, spleen, right and left adrenals, right and left kidneys, and right and left testes. Histological examination of 10-micron tissue sections from randomly selected animals revealed no specific evidence of histopathologic differences between field-exposed and sham-exposed animals at the light microscopic level.

  16. 17β-Estradiol attenuates the activity of the glutamate transporter type 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Na, Hyo-Seok; Park, Hee-Pyeong; Kim, Chong-Sung; Do, Sang-Hwan; Zuo, Zhiyi; Kim, Chong-Soo

    2012-02-15

    Estrogen, a neuroactive sex hormone in the brain, enhances neuronal excitability and increases seizures. Glutamate transporters help in limiting the excitatory neurotransmission by uptaking glutamate from the synapses. We investigated the effects of 17β-estradiol on the activity of a glutamate transporter, excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3), in Xenopus oocytes. EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injection of rat EAAT3 mRNA. l-Glutamate (30 μM)-induced membrane currents mediated by EAAT3 were measured using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. 17β-Estradiol reduced EAAT3 activity in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. 17β-Estradiol (10nM for 72h) significantly decreased V(max) but had no effect on K(m) of EAAT3 for glutamate. When 17β-estradiol treated oocytes were incubated with phorbol-12-myrisate-13-acetate, a protein kinase C (PKC) activator, 17β-estradiol-induced decrease in EAAT3 activity was abolished. Furthermore, in pretreatment of oocytes with chelerythrine or staurosporine, two PKC inhibitors, EAAT3 activity was significantly decreased. However, there was no statistical difference among the 17β-estradiol, PKC inhibitor, or 17β-estradiol plus PKC inhibitor groups. Likewise, wortmannin, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, significantly reduced basal EAAT3 activity, but the activity did not differ among the 17β-estradiol, wortmannin, or 17β-estradiol plus wortmannin groups. Estradiol receptor inhibitor, fulvestrant, did not change the reduced EAAT3 activity by 17β-estradiol. Our results suggest that 17β-estradiol decreases EAAT3 activity. PKC and PI3K seem to be involved in this effect, possibly not via estradiol receptors.

  17. Modeling Sorption and Degradation of 17β-Estradiol-17-Sulfate in Agricultural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, X.; Casey, F. X.; Hakk, H.; Shrestha, S. L.; DeSutter, T.; Khan, E.; Oduor, P. G.

    2011-12-01

    The natural steroid hormone, 17β-estradiol (E2), can be an endocrine disruptor at part-per trillion levels. Laboratory studies indicate a low potential for E2 persistence and mobility in the environment; however, field studies consistently indicate the presence of E2 and its primary metabolite, estrone, at levels sufficiently high to impact water quality. To facilitate urine excretion, animals may release E2 as a sulfated conjugate, which would have a higher aqueous solubility than the parent compound. We hypothesize that E2 conjugates contribute to the detection of free estrogens in the environment. The objective of this study was to determine the sorption, degradation, and mobility of a model conjugate, 17β-estradiol-17-sulfate (E2-17S), in agricultural soils. Radiolabeled E2-17S ([14C]E2-17S) was chemically synthesized in a three-step process, and then batch experiments were conducted in natural and sterile soils. Additionally, soil organic carbon (OC) was varied (1.29 and 0.26%) to investigate its effect on the fate of [14C]E2-17S. Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) was used in concert with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to detect and quantitate parent compound and metabolites of E2-17S in the aqueous and bound phases. Residual soil was combusted to determine non-extractable levels of 14C. The E2-17S was relatively stable in the aqueous phase for natural and sterile soils. Mono- and di- hydroxyl E2-17S were detected as metabolites of E2-17S in the aqueous phase above both sterile and natural soil. Deconjugation to form E2 was not observed in aqueous phase; however, E2 and estrone were extracted from both natural and sterile soils. A conceptual model was developed to simulate and identify the fate and transport processes of E2-17S. Organic carbon was found to be an important factor affecting the sorption and degradation of E2-17S in soils.

  18. Transdermal 17-beta estradiol replacement therapy reduces megakaryocyte GPVI expression.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hongquan; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Wei; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Bray, Paul F; Leng, Xinghong

    2008-01-01

    The platelet-collagen interaction is a critical early event in arterial thrombus formation, and platelet GPVI is the major activating receptor for collagen. We have previously used a mouse model to demonstrate that the estrogen effects on platelets depend upon the agonist, estrogen formulation and route of administration. In the current study we used a model of transdermal estradiol (E2) administration to ovariectomized mice to address the potential inhibitory effects of E2 on platelet GPVI. Platelet GPVI expression was reduced after transdermal E2 replacement therapy (p

  19. Estradiol protective role in atherogenesis through LDL structure modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papi, Massimiliano; Brunelli, Roberto; Ciasca, Gabriele; Maiorana, Alessandro; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Palmieri, Valentina; Parasassi, Tiziana; De Spirito, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Relevant physiological functions are exerted by circulating low density lipoprotein (LDL) as well as eventual pathological processes triggering atherogenesis. Modulation of these functions can well be founded on modifications of LDL structure. Given its large dimension, multicomponent organization and strong interactions between the protein apoB-100 and lipids, determining LDL 3D structure remains a challenge. We propose a novel quantitative physical approach to this complex biological problem. We introduce a three-component model, fitted to small angle x-ray scattering data on LDL maintained in physiological conditions, able to achieve a consistent 3D structure. Unexpected features include three distinct protein domains protruding out of a sphere, quite rough in its surface, where several core lipid areas are exposed. All LDL components are affected by 17-β-estradiol (E2) binding to apoB-100. Mostly one of the three protruding protein domains, dramatically reducing its presence on the surface and with a consequent increase of core lipids’ exposure. This result suggests a structural basis for some E2 protecting roles and LDL physiological modifications.

  20. Progesterone and estradiol plasma levels in neonatally irradiated cycling rats

    SciTech Connect

    Freud, A.; Sod-Moriah, U.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Female rats which were exposed to a single low dose of gamma irradiation (6R or 15R) at the age of 8 days produce smaller litters when mature than untreated controls. The possibility that the impaired fertility resulted from altered ovarian activity as reflected by changes in plasma levels of progesterone or estardiol was investigated. Plasma levels of both steroids were determined throughout the day of proestrus. Progesterone level was also determined in 6R animals on the day of weaning. The maturity of such irradiated rats was assessed by observing the time of vaginal opening. The results indicated that the preovulatory peak of progesterone was delayed in the 6R rats whereas in the 15R group its levels were significantly lower. On the other hand no differences in estradiol plasma levels were noticed between the groups. The higher level of progesterone in the 6R animals was not evident on the day of weaning and was even in both groups, but vaginal opening in the irradiated rats was significantly delayed. The elevated level of progesterone might be responsible, among other endocrine changes, for the lower fertility of neonatally irradiated mature female rats.

  1. Fecal estradiol-17β and testosterone in prepubertal domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Faya, M; Carranza, A; Miotti, R; Ponchón, T; Furlan, P; Gobello, C

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this article was to describe the time course of prepubertal sexual steroids in domestic cats. Fourteen newborn kittens were followed up until puberty (physical, behavioral, and hormonal changes). Fecal testosterone [T; males] and E estradiol 17-β [E2; females] concentrations were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA and two consecutive time windows (TWs) were used to compare changes in both male (postnatal weeks 1-4 vs. 5-14) and females (postnatal weeks 1-5 vs. 6-13). Puberty was achieved 14.3 ± 0.3 and 13.3 ± 0.4 weeks after birth in male and female cats, respectively. In both genders, during TW-1 fecal steroids concentrations were similar (males) or even higher (females) to that previously described for mature cats. Fecal T (P < 0.01) and E2 (P < 0.01) varied throughout the weeks. Differences were found when hormonal concentrations of TW-1 were compared with those of TW-2 both for male (61.4 ± 7.9 vs. 16.9 ± 2.2 ng/g; P < 0.01) and female (78.2 ± 12.5 vs. 11.2 ± 4.0 ng/g; P < 0.01) cats. It is concluded that in domestic cats there is a sexual steroid surge during the first 4 and 5 postnatal weeks in male and female animals, respectively.

  2. Distinct epidermal keratinocytes respond to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields differently.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao-Ying; Chuang, Chun-Yu; Shu, Wun-Yi; Chang, Cheng-Wei; Chen, Chaang-Ray; Fan, Tai-Ching; Hsu, Ian C

    2014-01-01

    Following an increase in the use of electric appliances that can generate 50 or 60 Hz electromagnetic fields, concerns have intensified regarding the biological effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) on human health. Previous epidemiological studies have suggested the carcinogenic potential of environmental exposure to ELF-EMFs, specifically at 50 or 60 Hz. However, the biological mechanism facilitating the effects of ELF-EMFs remains unclear. Cellular studies have yielded inconsistent results regarding the biological effects of ELF-EMFs. The inconsistent results might have been due to diverse cell types. In our previous study, we indicated that 1.5 mT, 60 Hz ELF-EMFs will cause G1 arrest through the activation of the ATM-Chk2-p21 pathway in human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether ELF-EMFs cause similar effects in a distinct epidermal keratinocyte, primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK), by using the same ELF-EMF exposure system and experimental design. We observed that ELF-EMFs exerted no effects on cell growth, cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution, and the activation of ATM signaling pathway in NHEK cells. We demonstrated that the 2 epidermal keratinocytes responded to ELF-EMFs differently. To further validate this finding, we simultaneously exposed the NHEK and HaCaT cells to ELF-EMFs in the same incubator for 168 h and observed the cell growths. The simultaneous exposure of the two cell types results showed that the NHEK and HaCaT cells exhibited distinct responses to ELF-EMFs. Thus, we confirmed that the biological effects of ELF-EMFs in epidermal keratinocytes are cell type specific. Our findings may partially explain the inconsistent results of previous studies when comparing results across various experimental models.

  3. Applied AC and DC magnetic fields cause alterations in the mitotic cycle of early sea urchin embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, M.; Ernst, S.G.

    1995-09-01

    This study demonstrates that exposure to 60 Hz magnetic fields (3.4--8.8 mt) and magnetic fields over the range DC-600 kHz (2.5--6.5 mT) can alter the early embryonic development of sea urchin embryos by inducing alterations in the timing of the cell cycle. Batches of fertilized eggs were exposed to the fields produced by a coil system. Samples of the continuous cultures were taken and scored for cell division. The times of both the first and second cell divisions were advanced by ELF AC fields and by static fields. The magnitude of the 60 Hz effect appears proportional to the field strength over the range tested. the relationship to field frequency was nonlinear and complex. For certain frequencies above the ELF range, the exposure resulted in a delay of the onset of mitosis. The advance of mitosis was also dependent on the duration of exposure and on the timing of exposure relative to fertilization.

  4. Effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) on the chemiluminescence (CL) of murine peritoneal exudate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Caren, L.D. )

    1992-02-26

    Stimulated PEC generate microbicidal free oxygen radicals which are potentially mutagenic and possibly carcinogenic. The effects of combined alternating electric and magnetic fields on oxygen radical production were measured in this study. A Helmholtz coil and parallel plate electrodes were utilized to provide uniform field characteristics. Effects were studied at combined field frequencies of 60, 600, and 6,000 Hz. Thioglycollate-elicited PEC were exposed to EMF or placed in a far corner of the lab (controls). Following the addition of zymosan, luminol-enhanced CL was measured. No differences in CL were found for exposures to 60 Hz for 18 hr; 600 Hz for 10 hr; or 6,000 Hz for 0.75 hr. PEC exposed to 6,000 Hz for 11 hr showed a 25% increase in CL over control PEC. At 600 and 6,000 Hz, the temperature of the air and a dish of saline in the EMF apparatus was 26C, vs. 25C where the controls were kept. At 60 Hz, there was no temperature difference. These preliminary experiments indicate that under these conditions, EMF fields do not have a significant effect on this immune function.

  5. Estradiol-potentiated cadherin-11 in synovial membrane involves in temporomandibular joint inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kou, Xiao-Xing; Wang, Xue-Dong; Li, Chen-Shuang; Bi, Rui-Yun; Meng, Zhen; Li, Bei; Zhou, Yan-Heng; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2014-09-01

    Estrogen is involved in inflammation/pain of temporomandibular joint (TMJ), but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Cadherin-11 plays an essential role in synovial inflammation. This study examined whether estrogen could potentiate cadherin-11 in synoviocytes and contribute to TMJ inflammatory pain. Female rats were ovariectomized, treated with increasing doses of 17β-estradiol for 10 days, and injected intra-articularly with complete Freund's adjuvant to induce TMJ inflammation. The expression of cadherin-11 in synovial membrane was evaluated. TMJ pain was blocked with intra-articular injection of anti-cadherin-11 antibody and evaluated by head withdrawal threshold. Primary TMJ synoviocytes were treated with estradiol and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α or blocked with anti-cadherin-11 antibody to assess the expression of cadherin-11, interleukin (IL)-6, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). We observed that estradiol potentiated the inflammation-induced expression of cadherin-11 in the synoviocytes of synovial membrane from inflamed TMJ. Estradiol induced cadherin-11 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in primary synoviocytes and further potentiated the induction of cadherin-11 by TNF-α in synoviocytes. Furthermore, an estrogen receptor antagonist or a NF-κB inhibitor partially blocked the effects of estradiol on cadherin-11 induction in the synovial membrane. Blocking cadherin-11 partially reversed the TMJ inflammatory pain and estradiol-potentiated proliferation of synovial lining cells accompanied with iNOS expression. In addition, blocking cadherin-11 reversed TNF-α-induced and estradiol-potentiated transcription of IL-6, COX-2, and iNOS in primary synoviocytes. These results suggest that estrogen aggravated TMJ inflammatory pain partially through cadherin-11-mediated release of proinflammatory cytokines and enzymes in the synoviocytes.

  6. Detection of estradiol at an electrochemical immunosensor with a Cu UPD|DTBP-Protein G scaffold.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Xinhai; Zhang, Jiamei; Feng, Heqing; Liu, Xiuhua; Wong, Danny K Y

    2012-05-15

    A copper monolayer was formed on a gold electrode surface via underpotential deposition (UPD) method to construct a Cu UPD|DTBP-Protein G immunosensor for the sensitive detection of 17β-estradiol. Copper UPD monolayer can minimize the non-specific adsorption of biological molecules on the immunosensor surface and enhance the binding efficiency between immunosensor surface and thiolated Protein G. The crosslinker DTBP (Dimethyl 3,3'-dithiobispropionimidate · 2HCl) has strong ability to immobilize Protein G molecules on the electrode surface and the immobilized Protein G provides an orientation-controlled binding of antibodies. A monolayer of propanethiol was firstly self-assembled on the gold electrode surface, and a copper monolayer was deposited via UPD on the propanethiol modified electrode. Propanethiol monolayer helps to stabilize the copper monolayer by pushing the formation and stripping potentials of the copper UPD monolayer outside the potential range in which copper monolayer can be damaged easily by oxygen in air. A droplet DTBP-Protein G was then applied on the modified electrode surface followed by the immobilization of estradiol antibody. Finally, a competitive immunoassay was conducted between estradiol-BSA (bovine serum albumin) conjugate and free estradiol for the limited binding sites of estradiol antibody. Square wave voltammetry (SWV) was employed to monitor the electrochemical reduction current of ferrocenemethanol and the SWV current decreased with the increase of estradiol-BSA conjugate concentration at the immunosensor surface. Calibration of immunosensors in waste water samples spiked with 17β-estradiol yielded a linear response up to ≈ 2200 pg mL(-1), a sensitivity of 3.20 μA/pg mL(-1) and a detection limit of 12 pg mL(-1). The favorable characteristics of the immunosensors such as high selectivity, sensitivity and low detection limit can be attributed to the Cu UPD|DTBP-Protein G scaffold.

  7. Peripheral microvascular vasodilatory response to estradiol and genistein in women with insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wenner, Megan M.; Taylor, Hugh S.; Stachenfeld, Nina S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Estradiol enhances vasodilation in healthy women, but vascular effects of the phytoestrogen genistein are still under investigation. Insulin resistance (IR) compromises microvascular function. We therefore examined the interaction of estradiol, genistein, and IR on microvascular vasodilatory responsiveness. Methods We hypothesized that estradiol and genistein increase microvascular vasodilation in healthy women (control, n=8, 23±2 yr, BMI 25.9±2.9 kg/m2) but not in women with IR (n=7, 20±1 yr, BMI 27.3±3.0 kg/m2). We used the cutaneous circulation as a model of microvascular vasodilatory function. We determined cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) with laser Doppler flowmetry and beat-to-beat blood pressure during local cutaneous heating (42°C) with estradiol or genistein microdialysis perfusions. Because heat induced vasodilation is primarily an NO mediated response, we examined microvascular vasodilation with and without L-NMMA. Results In control women, estradiol enhanced CVC (94.4±2.6 % vs. saline 81.6±4.2 % CVCmax, P<0.05), which was reversed with L-NMMA (80.9±7.8 % CVCmax, P<0.05), but genistein did not affect vasodilation. Neither estradiol nor genistein altered CVC in IR, although L-NMMA attenuated CVC during genistein. Conclusions Our study does not support improved microvascular responsiveness during genistein exposure in healthy young women, and demonstrates that neither estradiol nor genistein improve microvascular vasodilatory responsiveness in women with IR. PMID:25996650

  8. Regulation of prolactin synthesis in vitro by estrogenic and antiestrogenic derivatives of estradiol and estrone.

    PubMed

    Jordan, V C; Koch, R

    1989-04-01

    The estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities of derivatives of estradiol and estrone were determined in vitro using the ability of primary cultures of immature rat pituitary cells to synthesize PRL. Estradiol derivatives were the most potent estrogens in the assay. Large ethinyl substitutions in the 17 alpha position generally caused a decrease in estrogenic potency (up to 1000-fold). The 3 phenolic hydroxyl was important, but not essential, for the estrogenic activity of the estradiol molecule. Estratriene was approximately 1000 times less potent than estradiol. However, significant estrogenic activity was observed with the compound anordin (EC50, 8 x 10(-9) M), which could potentially be converted to a dihydroxylated derivative but without an aromatic A ring. Similarly, the steroid androst-5-ene-3,17-diol was weakly estrogenic (EC50, 3 x 10(-8) M). Steriods with a ketone in the A and D rings were generally inactive as estrogens and antiestrogens. Estradiol derivatives with 17 beta amines were only weak estrogens. Estrone derivatives were less active than the corresponding estradiol derivatives. 4-Nitromethoxyestrone exhibited weak antiestrogenic properties; however, 4-nitroestrone and methoxyestrone were both estrogens. The reason for the antiestrogenic properties of 4-nitromethoxyestrone is obscure, as the compound does not have structural features similar to those of known nonsteroidal antiestrogens. Minor alterations to the estradiol molecule at the 11 beta (OH) or 6 (ketone) position had little effect on estrogenic potency; however, large substitutions at the 11 beta (RU 39,411) or 7 alpha (ICI 164384) position produced antiestrogenic compounds. RU 39,411 was approximately 10 times more active as an antiestrogen than 4-hydroxytamoxifen, whereas ICI 164,384 was approximately 10 times less active than 4-hydroxytamoxifen. A series of hypothetical models is proposed that could explain the antiestrogenic properties of RU 39,411 and ICI 164,384 by an interaction

  9. 17β-estradiol upregulates oxytocin and the oxytocin receptor in C2C12 myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Berio, Enrica; Starvaggi Cucuzza, Laura; Biolatti, Bartolomeo; Cannizzo, Francesca Tiziana

    2017-01-01

    Background The endocrinology of skeletal muscle is highly complex and many issues about hormone action in skeletal muscle are still unresolved. Aim of the work is to improve our knowledge on the relationship between skeletal muscle and 17β-estradiol. Methods The skeletal muscle cell line C2C12 was treated with 17β-estradiol, the oxytocin peptide and a combination of the two hormones. The mRNA levels of myogenic regulatory factors, myosin heavy chain, oxytocin, oxytocin receptor and adipogenic factors were analysed in C2C12 myotubes. Results It was demonstrated that C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes express oxytocin and its receptor, in particular the receptor levels physiologically increase in differentiated myotubes. Myotubes treated with 17β-estradiol overexpressed oxytocin and oxytocin receptor genes by approximately 3- and 29-fold, respectively. A decrease in the expression of fatty acid binding protein 4 (0.62-fold), a fat metabolism-associated gene, was observed in oxytocin-treated myotubes. On the contrary, fatty acid binding protein 4 was upregulated (2.66-fold) after the administration of the combination of 17β-estradiol and oxytocin. 17β-estradiol regulates oxytocin and its receptor in skeletal muscle cells and they act in a synergic way on fatty acid metabolism. Discussion Oxytocin and its receptor are physiologically regulated along differentiation. 17β-estradiol regulates oxytocin and its receptor in skeletal muscle cells. 17β-estradiol and oxytocin act in a synergic way on fatty acid metabolism. A better understanding of the regulation of skeletal muscle homeostasis by estrogens and oxytocin peptide could contribute to increase our knowledge of muscle and its metabolism. PMID:28382233

  10. Comparison of Two Methods of Estradiol Replacement: their Physiological and Behavioral Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mosquera, Laurivette; Shepherd, Luz; Torrado, Aranza I; Torres-Diaz, Yvonne M; Miranda, Jorge D; Segarra, Annabell C

    2016-01-01

    Fluctuating sex steroids during the estrous or menstrual cycle of mammalian females make it difficult to determine their role on behaviors and physiology. To avoid this, many investigators ovariectomize their animals and administer progesterone, estradiol or a combination of both. Several different strategies are used to administer estradiol, which confounds interpretation of results. This study compared two methods of estradiol replacement implants: Silastic tubes filled with crystalline estradiol benzoate (E2) and commercially available estradiol benzoate pellets. Implants were placed subcutaneously in adult ovariectomized (OVX) rats and blood samples obtained weekly. Control OVX rats received empty Silastic tubes or placebo pellets. Our data shows that E2 plasma levels from rats with Silastic implants peaked after one week and decreased slowly thereafter. In contrast, plasma E2 from commercial pellets peaked after two weeks, increasing and decreasing over time. To validate hormone release, body weight was monitored. All E2 treated animals maintained a similar body weight over the four weeks period whereas an increase in body weight over time was observed in the OVX group that received empty implants, confirming E2 release and supporting the role of E2 in the regulation of body weight. Furthermore, the effects of E2 on basal locomotor activity were assessed using animal activity cages. Results showed no difference between E2 and control group in several locomotor activities. These results indicate that Silastic implants achieve more stable plasma estradiol levels than pellets and thus are a better alternative for studies of estradiol on brain function and behavior. PMID:26962471

  11. Estradiol inhibits Ca2+ and K+ channels in smooth muscle cells from pregnant rat myometrium.

    PubMed

    Okabe, K; Inoue, Y; Soeda, H

    1999-07-02

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the actions of 17beta-estradiol on the electrical activity of pregnant rat myometrium. The longitudinal layer of the myometrium was dissected from pregnant rats (17 to 19 days of gestation), and single cells were isolated by enzymatic digestion. Calcium currents and potassium currents were recorded by the whole-cell voltage-clamp method, and the single calcium-dependent potassium current was recorded by the outside-out patch-clamp method. The effects of 17beta-estradiol on these currents were investigated. When a myometrial cell was held at -50 mV, depolarization to a potential more positive than -30 mV produced an inward current followed by a slowly developing outward current. Application of tetraethylammonium inhibited the outward current while the inward current was completely abolished in a calcium-free solution. Estradiol at high concentrations (> 3 microM) inhibited both inward and outward currents in a voltage-dependent manner. Removal of estradiol restored the amplitude of the outward but not of the inward current. Estradiol (30 microM) also inhibited the activity of single calcium-dependent potassium channels without changing single channel conductance. In conclusion, estradiol at high concentrations inhibited: (1) voltage-dependent calcium, (2) calcium-dependent potassium and (3) voltage-dependent potassium currents. These actions of estradiol would prevent action potential generation and after-hyperpolarizations. Suppression of the after-hyperpolarization might further prevent spike generation due to slowing of the calcium channel's recovery from the inactivated state.

  12. Progesterone resistance in endometriosis: link to failure to metabolize estradiol.

    PubMed

    Bulun, Serdar E; Cheng, You-Hong; Yin, Ping; Imir, Gonca; Utsunomiya, Hiroki; Attar, Erkut; Innes, Joy; Julie Kim, J

    2006-03-27

    Endometriosis is the most common cause of pelvic pain and affects an estimated 5 million women in the US. The biologically active estrogen estradiol (E2) is the best-defined mitogen for the growth and inflammation processes in the ectopic endometriotic tissue that commonly resides on the pelvic organs. Progesterone and progestins may relieve pain by limiting growth and inflammation in endometriosis but a portion of patients with endometriosis and pelvic pain do not respond to treatment with progestins. Moreover, progesterone-induced molecular changes in the eutopic (intrauterine) endometrial tissue of women with endometriosis are either blunted or undetectable. These in vivo observations are indicative of resistance to progesterone action in endometriosis. The molecular basis of progesterone resistance in endometriosis may be related to an overall reduction in the levels of progesterone receptors (PRs) and the lack of the PR isoform named progesterone receptor B (PR-B). In normal endometrium, progesterone acts on stromal cells to induce secretion of paracrine factor(s). These unknown factor(s) act on neighboring epithelial cells to induce the expression of the enzyme 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (17beta-HSD-2), which metabolizes the biologically active estrogen E2 to estrone (E1). In endometriotic tissue, progesterone does not induce epithelial 17beta-HSD-2 expression due to a defect in stromal cells. The inability of endometriotic stromal cells to produce progesterone-induced paracrine factors that stimulate 17beta-HSD-2 may be due to the lack of PR-B and very low levels of progesterone receptor A (PR-A) observed in vivo in endometriotic tissue. The end result is deficient metabolism of E2 in endometriosis giving rise to high local concentrations of this local mitogen. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying progesterone resistance and failure to metabolize E2 in endometriosis are reviewed.

  13. Estradiol-progesterone interaction during the preparation of vaginal rings.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Saleh I; Khidr, Sayed H; Ahmed, Sayed M; Jackanicz, Theodore M; Nash, Harold A

    2003-02-01

    An unexpected enhanced release, in vitro, of estradiol (E2) was observed on the preparation of vaginal rings containing E2 and progesterone (P) in a silicone elastomer. The present work deals with exploring the reason(s) behind this enhanced E2 release. The effect of the ring design (i.e., putting P and E2 in the same compartment or in adjacent or separate compartments) was studied. The effects of the curing temperature as well as the curing time were also investigated. The possible interaction(s) between P and E2 on simple heating of their mixtures was investigated using infrared (IR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Also, the dissolution behavior of P, E2, and their mixture before and after heating was studied. The ring design, with respect to the position of the steroid layer(s), affected the release of P and E2 from the vaginal rings. Curing the rings at higher temperatures (>/=140 degrees C) for >/=30 min resulted in an enhanced release of the steroids, especially E2. The IR, DSC, phase diagram, and NMR results indicate that an interaction between P and E2, leading to the formation of a molecular complex, took place. It was concluded that putting P and E2 in the same compartment and curing by heating at a high temperature and for an extended time promoted this kind of interaction. The greater hydrophobicity of the interaction product, relative to that of E2, was considered the main reason behind the enhanced in vitro release of E2 from the vaginal rings.

  14. Transdermal Estradiol Treatment for Postpartum Depression: A Pilot Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wisner, Katherine L.; Sit, Dorothy K.Y.; Moses-Kolko, Eydie L.; Driscoll, Kara E.; Prairie, Beth; Stika, Catherine S.; Eng, Heather F.; Dills, John L; Luther, James F.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Postpartum depression occurs in 14.5% of women in the first three months after birth. This study was an 8 week acute phase randomized trial with three cells (transdermal estradiol (E2), sertraline, and placebo) for the treatment of postpartum major depressive disorder. However, the study was stopped after batch analysis revealed that the E2 serum concentrations were lower than pre-study projections. This paper explores our experiences that will inform future investigations of therapeutic E2 use. Explanations for the low E2 concentrations were: 1) Study patch non-adhesion, which did not explain the low concentrations across the entire sample. 2) Ineffective transdermal patch preparations, although two different patch preparations were used and no significant main effect of patch type on E2 concentrations was found. 3) Obesity, at study entry, E2-treated women had mean ± SD BMI=32.9 ±7.4. No pharmacokinetic data comparing E2 concentrations from transdermal patches in obese women vs. normal weight controls are available. 4) Induction of Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) 3A4 and other E2 elimination pathways in pregnancy. CYP4503A4 is induced in pregnancy and is a pathway for the metabolism of E2. Conversion to estrone and Phase II metabolism via glucuronidation and sulfation, which also increase in pregnancy, are routes of E2 elimination. The time required for these pathways to normalize after delivery has not been elucidated. The observation that transdermal E2 doses greater than 100 mcg/day did not increase serum concentrations was unexpected. Another hypothesis consistent with this observation is suppression of endogenous E2 secretion with increasing exogenous E2 dosing. PMID:26061609

  15. Estradiol-induced gene expression in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowman, C.J.; Kroll, K.J.; Gross, T.G.; Denslow, N.D.

    2002-01-01

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) and estrogen receptor (ER) gene expression levels were measured in largemouth bass to evaluate the activation of the ER-mediated pathway by estradiol (E2). Single injections of E2 ranging from 0.0005 to 5 mg/kg up-regulated plasma Vtg in a dose-dependent manner. Vtg and ER mRNAs were measured using partial cDNA sequences corresponding to the C-terminal domain for Vtg and the ligand-binding domain of ER?? sequences. After acute E2-exposures (2 mg/kg), Vtg and ER mRNAs and plasma Vtg levels peaked after 2 days. The rate of ER mRNA accumulation peaked 36-42 h earlier than Vtg mRNA. The expression window for ER defines the primary response to E2 in largemouth bass and that for Vtg a delayed primary response. The specific effect of E2 on other estrogen-regulated genes was tested during these same time windows using differential display RT-PCR. Specific up-regulated genes that are expressed in the same time window as Vtg were ERp72 (a membrane-bound disulfide isomerase) and a gene with homology to an expressed gene identified in zebrafish. Genes that were expressed in a pattern that mimics the ER include the gene for zona radiata protein ZP2, and a gene with homology to an expressed gene found in winter flounder. One gene for fibrinogen ?? was down-regulated and an unidentified gene was transiently up-regulated after 12 h of exposure and returned to basal levels by 48 h. Taken together these studies indicate that the acute molecular response to E2 involves a complex network of responses over time. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Specific estradiol biosynthetic pathway in choriocarcinoma (JEG-3) cell line.

    PubMed

    Samson, Mélanie; Labrie, Fernand; Luu-The, Van

    2009-09-01

    Estradiol (E2) plays a crucial role in all reproduction processes. In the placenta, it is well recognized that E2 is synthesized from fetal dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS). However, there is some controversy about the biosynthetic pathway involved, some authors suggest that E2 is produced by aromatization of testosterone (T), while others suggest that E2 is produced by the conversion of estrone (E1) into E2 by type 1 17beta-HSD, subsequent to the aromatization of 4-androstenedione (4-dione) into E1. In the present report, using the precursor [(14)C]DHEA, inhibitors of steroidogenic enzymes (chemical inhibitors and siRNA) and a choriocarcinoma (JEG-3) cell line that expresses all the enzymes necessary to transform DHEA into E2, we could determine the sequential steps and the specific steroidogenic enzymes involved in the transformation of DHEA into E2. Quantification of mRNA expression levels using real-time PCR, strongly suggests that type 1 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD1), aromatase and type 1 17beta-HSD (17beta-HSD1) that are highly expressed in JEG-3 cells are the enzymes responsible for the transformation of DHEA into E2. Analysis of the intermediates produced in the absence and presence of 3beta-HSD, aromatase and 17beta-HSD1 inhibitors permits to determine the following sequential steps: DHEA is transformed into 4-dione by 3beta-HSD1, then 4-dione is aromatized into E1 by aromatase and E1 is finally transformed into E2 by 17beta-HSD1. Our data are clearly in favor of the pathway in which the step of aromatization precedes the step of reduction by 17beta-HSD.

  17. Estradiol rapidly inhibits soluble guanylyl cyclase expression in rat uterus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krumenacker, J. S.; Hyder, S. M.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Previous reports that investigated the regulation of the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway by estrogenic compounds have focused primarily on the levels of NO, NO-producing enzymes, and cGMP in various tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that 17beta-estradiol (E2) regulates the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the NO receptor, sGC, at the mRNA and protein levels in rat uterus. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we found that within 1 h of in vivo E2 administration to rats, sGC mRNA levels begin to diminish. After 3 h, there is a maximal diminution of sGC mRNA expression (sGC alpha(1) 10% and sGC beta(1) 33% of untreated). This effect was blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, indicating that estrogen receptor is required. The effect of E2 also was observed in vitro with incubations of uterine tissue, indicating that the response does not depend on the secondary release of other hormones or factors from other tissues. Puromycin did not block the effect, suggesting the effects occur because of preexisting factors in uterine tissues and do not require new protein synthesis. Using immunoblot analysis, we found that sGC protein levels also were reduced by E2 over a similar time course as the sGC mRNA. We conclude that sGC plays a vital role in the NO/sGC/cGMP regulatory pathway during conditions of elevated estrogen levels in the rat uterus as a result of the reduction of sGC expression.

  18. Estradiol rapidly inhibits soluble guanylyl cyclase expression in rat uterus

    PubMed Central

    Krumenacker, Joshua S.; Hyder, Salman M.; Murad, Ferid

    2001-01-01

    Previous reports that investigated the regulation of the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway by estrogenic compounds have focused primarily on the levels of NO, NO-producing enzymes, and cGMP in various tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that 17β-estradiol (E2) regulates the α1 and β1 subunits of the NO receptor, sGC, at the mRNA and protein levels in rat uterus. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we found that within 1 h of in vivo E2 administration to rats, sGC mRNA levels begin to diminish. After 3 h, there is a maximal diminution of sGC mRNA expression (sGC α1 10% and sGC β1 33% of untreated). This effect was blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, indicating that estrogen receptor is required. The effect of E2 also was observed in vitro with incubations of uterine tissue, indicating that the response does not depend on the secondary release of other hormones or factors from other tissues. Puromycin did not block the effect, suggesting the effects occur because of preexisting factors in uterine tissues and do not require new protein synthesis. Using immunoblot analysis, we found that sGC protein levels also were reduced by E2 over a similar time course as the sGC mRNA. We conclude that sGC plays a vital role in the NO/sGC/cGMP regulatory pathway during conditions of elevated estrogen levels in the rat uterus as a result of the reduction of sGC expression. PMID:11209068

  19. Modeling the photocatalytic mineralization in water of commercial formulation of estrogens 17-β estradiol (E2) and nomegestrol acetate in contraceptive pills in a solar powered compound parabolic collector.

    PubMed

    Colina-Márquez, José; Machuca-Martínez, Fiderman; Li Puma, Gianluca

    2015-07-22

    Endocrine disruptors in water are contaminants of emerging concern due to the potential risks they pose to the environment and to the aquatic ecosystems. In this study, a solar photocatalytic treatment process in a pilot-scale compound parabolic collector (CPC) was used to remove commercial estradiol formulations (17-β estradiol and nomegestrol acetate) from water. Photolysis alone degraded up to 50% of estradiol and removed 11% of the total organic carbon (TOC). In contrast, solar photocatalysis degraded up to 57% of estrogens and the TOC removal was 31%, with 0.6 g/L of catalyst load (TiO2 Aeroxide P-25) and 213.6 ppm of TOC as initial concentration of the commercial estradiols formulation. The adsorption of estrogens over the catalyst was insignificant and was modeled by the Langmuir isotherm. The TOC removal via photocatalysis in the photoreactor was modeled considering the reactor fluid-dynamics, the radiation field, the estrogens mass balance, and a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate law, that was expressed in terms of the rate of photon adsorption. The optimum removal of the estrogens and TOC was achieved at a catalyst concentration of 0.4 g/L in 29 mm diameter tubular CPC reactors which approached the optimum catalyst concentration and optical thickness determined from the modeling of the absorption of solar radiation in the CPC, by the six-flux absorption-scattering model (SFM).

  20. Mechanism of Estradiol-Induced Block of Voltage-Gated K+ Currents in Rat Medial Preoptic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Druzin, Michael; Malinina, Evgenya; Grimsholm, Ola; Johansson, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to characterize possible rapid effects of 17-β-estradiol on voltage-gated K+ channels in preoptic neurons and, in particular, to identify the mechanisms by which 17-β-estradiol affects the K+ channels. Whole-cell currents from dissociated rat preoptic neurons were studied by perforated-patch recording. 17-β-estradiol rapidly (within seconds) and reversibly reduced the K+ currents, showing an EC50 value of 9.7 µM. The effect was slightly voltage dependent, but independent of external Ca2+, and not sensitive to an estrogen-receptor blocker. Although 17-α-estradiol also significantly reduced the K+ currents, membrane-impermeant forms of estradiol did not reduce the K+ currents and other estrogens, testosterone and cholesterol were considerably less effective. The reduction induced by estradiol was overlapping with that of the KV-2-channel blocker r-stromatoxin-1. The time course of K+ current in 17-β-estradiol, with a time-dependent inhibition and a slight dependence on external K+, suggested an open-channel block mechanism. The properties of block were predicted from a computational model where 17-β-estradiol binds to open K+ channels. It was concluded that 17-β-estradiol rapidly reduces voltage-gated K+ currents in a way consistent with an open-channel block mechanism. This suggests a new mechanism for steroid action on ion channels. PMID:21625454

  1. Mechanism of estradiol-induced block of voltage-gated K+ currents in rat medial preoptic neurons.

    PubMed

    Druzin, Michael; Malinina, Evgenya; Grimsholm, Ola; Johansson, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to characterize possible rapid effects of 17-β-estradiol on voltage-gated K(+) channels in preoptic neurons and, in particular, to identify the mechanisms by which 17-β-estradiol affects the K(+) channels. Whole-cell currents from dissociated rat preoptic neurons were studied by perforated-patch recording. 17-β-Estradiol rapidly (within seconds) and reversibly reduced the K(+) currents, showing an EC(50) value of 9.7 µM. The effect was slightly voltage dependent, but independent of external Ca(2+), and not sensitive to an estrogen-receptor blocker. Although 17-α-estradiol also significantly reduced the K(+) currents, membrane-impermeant forms of estradiol did not reduce the K(+) currents and other estrogens, testosterone and cholesterol were considerably less effective. The reduction induced by estradiol was overlapping with that of the K(V)-2-channel blocker r-stromatoxin-1. The time course of K(+) current in 17-β-estradiol, with a time-dependent inhibition and a slight dependence on external K(+), suggested an open-channel block mechanism. The properties of block were predicted from a computational model where 17-β-estradiol binds to open K(+) channels. It was concluded that 17-β-estradiol rapidly reduces voltage-gated K(+) currents in a way consistent with an open-channel block mechanism. This suggests a new mechanism for steroid action on ion channels.

  2. Estradiol-induced antinociceptive responses on formalin-induced nociception are independent of COX and HPA activation.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Deirtra A; Barr, Gordon A; Amador, Nicole; Shivers, Kai-Yvonne; Kemen, Lynne; Kreiter, Christopher M; Jenab, Shirzad; Inturrisi, Charles E; Quinones-Jenab, Vanya

    2011-07-01

    Estrogen modulates pain perception but how it does so is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to determine if estradiol reduces nociceptive responses in part via hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1/COX-2 activity. The first study examined the effects of estradiol (20%) or vehicle with concurrent injection nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on formalin-induced nociceptive responding (flinching) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The drugs were ibuprofen (COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitor), SC560 (COX-1 inhibitor), or NS398 (COX-2 inhibitor). In a second study, estradiol's effects on formalin-induced nociception were tested in adrenalectomized (ADX), OVX, and ADX+OVX rats. Serum levels of prostaglandins (PG) PGE(2) and corticosterone were measured. Estradiol significantly decreased nociceptive responses in OVX rats with effects during both the first and the second phase of the formalin test. The nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) did not alter nociception at the doses used here. Adrenalectomy neither altered flinching responses in female rats nor reversed estradiol-induced antinociceptive responses. Estradiol alone had no effect on corticosterone (CORT) or prostaglandin levels after the formalin test, dissociating the effects of estradiol on behavior and these serum markers. Ibuprofen and NS398 significantly reduced PGE2 levels. CORT was not decreased by OVX surgery or by estradiol below that of ADX. Only IBU significantly increased corticosterone levels. Taken together, our results suggest that estradiol-induced antinociception in female rats is independent of COX activity and HPA axis activation.

  3. Delineation of electric and magnetic field effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation on transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.J.; Skowronski, W.J.; Mullins, J.M.; Nardone, R.M.; Penafiel, M.; Meister, R. )

    1991-01-31

    The relative effects of the electric and magnetic field components of extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation (ELF) on transcription were examined in human leukemia HL-60 cells. Delineation of the individual field contributions was achieved by irradiating cells in separate concentric compartments of a culture dish within a solenoid chamber. This exposure system produced a homogeneous magnetic field with a coincident electric field whose strength varied directly with distance from the center of the culture dish. Irradiation of HL-60 cells with sine wave ELF at 60 Hz and a field strength of 10 Gauss produced a transient increase in the transcriptional rates which reached a maximum of 50-60% enhancement at 30-120 minutes of irradiation and declined to near basal levels by 18 hours. Comparison of transcription responses to ELF of cells in different concentric compartments revealed that the transcriptional effects were primarily the result of the electric field component with little or no contribution from the magnetic field.

  4. Ovariectomy and 17β-estradiol Replacement in Rats and Mice: A Visual Demonstration

    PubMed Central

    Ström, Jakob O.; Theodorsson, Annette; Ingberg, Edvin; Isaksson, Ida-Maria; Theodorsson, Elvar

    2012-01-01

    Estrogens are a family of female sexual hormones with an exceptionally wide spectrum of effects. When rats and mice are used in estrogen research they are commonly ovariectomized in order to ablate the rapidly cycling hormone production, replacing the 17β-estradiol exogenously. There is, however, lack of consensus regarding how the hormone should be administered to obtain physiological serum concentrations. This is crucial since the 17β-estradiol level/administration method profoundly influences the experimental results1-3. We have in a series of studies characterized the different modes of 17β-estradiol administration, finding that subcutaneous silastic capsules and per-oral nut-cream Nutella are superior to commercially available slow-release pellets (produced by the company Innovative Research of America) and daily injections in terms of producing physiological serum concentrations of 17β-estradiol4-6. Amongst the advantages of the nut-cream method, that previously has been used for buprenorphine administration7, is that when used for estrogen administration it resembles peroral hormone replacement therapy and is non-invasive. The subcutaneous silastic capsules are convenient and produce the most stable serum concentrations. This video article contains step-by-step demonstrations of ovariectomy and 17β-estradiol hormone replacement by silastic capsules and peroral Nutella in rats and mice, followed by a discussion of important aspects of the administration procedures. PMID:22710371

  5. Ovariectomy and 17β-estradiol replacement in rats and mice: a visual demonstration.

    PubMed

    Ström, Jakob O; Theodorsson, Annette; Ingberg, Edvin; Isaksson, Ida-Maria; Theodorsson, Elvar

    2012-06-07

    Estrogens are a family of female sexual hormones with an exceptionally wide spectrum of effects. When rats and mice are used in estrogen research they are commonly ovariectomized in order to ablate the rapidly cycling hormone production, replacing the 17β-estradiol exogenously. There is, however, lack of consensus regarding how the hormone should be administered to obtain physiological serum concentrations. This is crucial since the 17β-estradiol level/administration method profoundly influences the experimental results. We have in a series of studies characterized the different modes of 17β-estradiol administration, finding that subcutaneous silastic capsules and per-oral nut-cream Nutella are superior to commercially available slow-release pellets (produced by the company Innovative Research of America) and daily injections in terms of producing physiological serum concentrations of 17β-estradiol. Amongst the advantages of the nut-cream method, that previously has been used for buprenorphine administration, is that when used for estrogen administration it resembles peroral hormone replacement therapy and is non-invasive. The subcutaneous silastic capsules are convenient and produce the most stable serum concentrations. This video article contains step-by-step demonstrations of ovariectomy and 17β-estradiol hormone replacement by silastic capsules and peroral Nutella in rats and mice, followed by a discussion of important aspects of the administration procedures.

  6. Testosterone reduces cumulative burying in female Wistar rats with minimal participation of estradiol.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-García, Ana G; Contreras, Carlos M; Vásquez-Hernández, Diana I; Molina-Jiménez, Tania; Jacome-Jacome, Emma

    2009-10-01

    Testosterone exerts anxiolytic effects, but the participation of its aromatase metabolic product estradiol is controversial. Therefore, we used the defensive burying paradigm in female Wistar rats to explore testosterone's (1.0 mg/rat, s.c.) interactions with picrotoxin (a noncompetitive gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor [GABA(A)] antagonist; 1.0 mg/kg, i.p.), formestane (an aromatase inhibitor; 3.0 mg/rat, s.c.), and tamoxifen (an estrogen receptor-beta antagonist; 1.0 mg/kg, s.c.). Serum levels of testosterone, estradiol, and progesterone were determined in the same rats. Burying latency and locomotion did not significantly change. Systemic testosterone administration enhanced serum testosterone and estradiol levels and reduced defensive burying. This reduction in total burying was blocked by pretreatment with picrotoxin and tamoxifen, but not formestane. We conclude that testosterone produced anxiolytic-like effects in female rats that were mediated by actions at the GABA(A) receptor, with participation of the estradiol receptor-beta, rather than estradiol aromatization.

  7. Effects of Elevated β-Estradiol Levels on the Functional Morphology of the Testis - New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Leavy, Myles; Trottmann, Matthias; Liedl, Bernhard; Reese, Sven; Stief, Christian; Freitag, Benjamin; Baugh, John; Spagnoli, Giulio; Kölle, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Elevated estradiol levels are correlated with male infertility. Causes of hyperestrogenism include diseases of the adrenal cortex, testis or medications affecting the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis. The aim of our study was to elucidate the effects of estradiol treatment on testicular cellular morphology and function, with reference to the treatment regimen received. Testes samples (n = 9) were obtained post-orchiectomy from male-to-female transsexuals within the age range of 26–52 years. Each patient had a minimum of 1–6 years estradiol treatment. For comparison, additional samples were obtained from microscopically unaltered testicular tissue surrounding tumors (n = 7). The tissues obtained were investigated by stereomicroscopy, histochemistry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and immunohistochemistry. Our studies revealed that estradiol treatment significantly decreased the diameter of the seminiferous tubules (p < 0.05) and induced fatty degeneration in the surrounding connective tissue. An increase in collagen fiber synthesis in the extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding the seminiferous tubules was also induced. Spermatogenesis was impaired resulting in mainly spermatogonia being present. Sertoli cells revealed diminished expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Both Sertoli and Leydig cells showed morphological alterations and glycoprotein accumulations. These results demonstrate that increased estradiol levels drastically impact the human testis. PMID:28045098

  8. Gene expression profile regulated by the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein and estradiol in cervical tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Malagón, Enoc M.; Bonilla-Delgado, José; Díaz-Chávez, José; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Romero-Cordoba, Sandra; Üren, Aykut; Çelik, Haydar; McCormick, Matthew; Munguía-Moreno, José A.; Ibarra-Sierra, Eloisa; Escobar-Herrera, Jaime; Lambert, Paul F.; Mendoza-Villanueva, Daniel; Bermudez-Cruz, Rosa M.; Gariglio, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    The HPV16 E7 oncoprotein and 17β-estradiol are important factors for the induction of premalignant lesions and cervical cancer. The study of these factors is crucial for a better understanding of cervical tumorigenesis. Here, we assessed the global gene expression profiles induced by the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein and/or 17β-estradiol in cervical tissue of FvB and K14E7 transgenic mice. We found that the most dramatic changes in gene expression occurred in K14E7 and FvB groups treated with 17β-estradiol. A large number of differentially expressed genes involved in the immune response were observed in 17β-estradiol treated groups. The E7 oncoprotein mainly affected the expression of genes involved in cellular metabolism. Our microarray data also identified differentially expressed genes that have not previously been reported in cervical cancer. The identification of genes regulated by E7 and 17β-estradiol, provides the basis for further studies on their role in cervical carcinogenesis. PMID:24210110

  9. Effects of estradiol on the development of the bursa of Fabricius in Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Michael James; McKernan, Moira; Lavoie, Emma T; Ottinger, Mary Ann

    2009-02-01

    Effects of androgens on the development of the bursa of Fabricius are better understood than those of estradiol, despite the known sensitivity of the bursa to estradiol early in embryogenesis. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of one-time yolk injections of estradiol at day 4 of incubation on the development of the bursa and spleen as indices of treatment effects on the immune system. Follicle size and numbers in hatchling bursas were significantly reduced at 50 and 500 microg/egg, respectively. Additionally, distorted plicae and thicker epithelial layers surrounding the plicae were observed in day-old chicks at the same treatment levels. Adult bursas from birds embryonically exposed to estrogen were significantly larger than controls, suggesting an inhibition of natural bursal regression. Although estradiol altered the development of the bursa, the spleen appeared to be unaffected. The observed effects of estradiol on the development of the bursa indicate that this lymphoid organ may be a target for developmental disruption by estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals, though long-term consequences of embryonic exposure on immune function remain unknown.

  10. Tissue responsiveness to estradiol and genistein in the sea bass liver and scale.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Patrícia I S; Estêvão, M Dulce; Andrade, André; Santos, Soraia; Power, Deborah M

    2016-04-01

    As in mammals, estrogens in fish are essential for reproduction but also important regulators of mineral homeostasis. Fish scales are a non-conventional target tissue responsive to estradiol and constitute a good model to study mineralized tissues effects and mechanisms of action of estrogenic compounds, including phytoestrogens. The responsiveness to estradiol and the phytoestrogen genistein, was compared between the scales and the liver, a classical estrogenic target, in sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Injection with estradiol and genistein significantly increased circulating vitellogenin (for both compounds) and mineral levels (estradiol only) and genistein also significantly increased scale enzymatic activities suggesting it increased mineral turnover. The repertoire, abundance and estrogenic regulation of nuclear estrogen receptors (ESR1, 2a and 2b) and membrane G-protein receptors (GPER and GPER-like) were different between liver and scales, which presumably explains the tissue-specific changes detected in estrogen-responsive gene expression. In scales changes in gene expression mainly consisted of small rapid increases, while in liver strong, sustained increases/decreases in gene expression occurred. Similar but not overlapping gene expression changes were observed in response to both estradiol and genistein. This study demonstrates for the first time the expression of membrane estrogen receptors in scales and that estrogens and phytoestrogens, to which fish may be exposed in the wild or in aquaculture, both affect liver and mineralized tissues in a tissue-specific manner.

  11. Estradiol in the Preoptic Area Regulates the Dopaminergic Response to Cocaine in the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Tobiansky, Daniel J; Will, Ryan G; Lominac, Kevin D; Turner, Jonathan M; Hattori, Tomoko; Krishnan, Krittika; Martz, Julia R; Nutsch, Victoria L; Dominguez, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    The sex-steroid hormone estradiol (E2) enhances the psychoactive effects of cocaine, as evidenced by clinical and preclinical studies. The medial preoptic area (mPOA), a region in the hypothalamus, is a primary neural locus for neuroendocrine integration, containing one of the richest concentrations of estrogen receptors in the CNS and also has a key role in the regulation of naturally rewarding behaviors. However, whether estradiol enhances the neurochemical response to cocaine by acting in the mPOA is still unclear. Using neurotoxic lesions and microdialysis, we examined whether the mPOA modulates cocaine-induced neurochemical activity in the nucleus accumbens. Tract tracing and immunohistochemical staining were used to determine whether projections from the mPOA to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are sensitive to estrogen signaling. Finally, estradiol microinjections followed by microdialysis were used to determine whether estrogenic signaling in the mPOA modulates cocaine-induced changes of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens. Results showed that lesions of the mPOA or microinjections of estradiol directly into the mPOA increased cocaine-induced release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the mPOA modulates cocaine responsiveness via projections to both dopaminergic and GABAergic neurons in the VTA, and that these projections are sensitive to estrogenic stimulation. Taken together, these findings point to a novel estradiol-dependent pathway that modulates cocaine-induced neurochemical activity in the mesolimbic system. PMID:26647972

  12. Growth performance in heavy lambs experimentally treated with 17 ß-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Loria, Guido Ruggero; Puleio, Roberto; Schiavo, Maria Rita; Giambruno, Paolo; Bozzetta, Elena; Todaro, Massimo

    2012-10-01

    European and Italian legislation have banned use of growth promoters in livestock since 1988, but epidemiological data show that anabolic drugs are still being used illegally. Recent surveys carried out on the cattle farms in Northern Italy have confirmed the presence of growth-promoting hormones. Authors report data on growth performances in 80 Valle del Belice × Comisana weaned lambs experimentally treated with 17 beta-estradiol with 0.5 ml solution of oil Depot Estradiol ® (containing 5 mg of 17β-estradiol valerate) by intramuscular injection into the thigh. The experiment was founded by the National Ministry of Health, to validate histological test for surveillance and control of growth-promoting hormones in sheep. This study confirmed the strong correlation between clinical and anatomopathological features and growth performances of treated animals. Otherwise, no significant differences were found on in vivo performance of the lambs. Estradiol treatment showed heavier shoulders and necks on treated lambs, while the loins were significantly lighter. Moreover, lamb-estradiol-treated groups showed lower separable and inseparable fat percentage than lamb-control groups.

  13. Estradiol and raloxifene protect cultured SN4741 neurons against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Biewenga, Eric; Cabell, Leigh; Audesirk, Teresa

    2005-01-20

    A large body of research has documented neuroprotective effects of estrogen against oxidative stress. Some neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease, in which oxidative stress has been implicated as a contributing factor, affect more males than females, suggesting a possible protective effect of estrogen. We used the clonal substantia nigra cell line SN4741 to compare the neuroprotective properties of estrogen and raloxifene against oxidative stress, and to determine whether raloxifene acted as an estrogen agonist or antagonist in this system. We pretreated SN4741 cultures with alpha-estradiol, beta-estradiol, and raloxifene, and exposed them to hydrogen peroxide. Low nanomolar levels of raloxifene, beta-estradiol, and alpha-estradiol all significantly reduced cell death caused by oxidative stress. The estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182,780 failed to reverse the neuroprotection by beta-estradiol, suggesting that the effect is not mediated by a classical ER. Western blotting using an antibody to the C-terminus region of ER-alpha revealed two bands, one at approximately 67 kDa (corresponding to ER-alpha) and a more prominent band at approximately 55-56 kDa. These results suggest that, in this cell line, both raloxifene and estrogen may be acting via a non-classical estrogen receptor.

  14. Effects of various doses of estradiol on chlamydial genital infection in ovariectomized guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Pasley, J N; Rank, R G; Hough, A J; Cohen, C; Barron, A L

    1985-01-01

    The effect of various doses of estradiol on genital tract infection by the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) was investigated in ovariectomized guinea pigs. Prolongation of infection, as determined by chlamydial inclusion counts of cells in Giemsa-stained smears of vaginal scrapings, was observed in animals receiving daily doses of 1.0, 10.0, 100.0, or 1000 micrograms of estradiol. In contrast to controls, ascending infection resulting in endometritis was found in animals receiving doses of greater than or equal to 1.0 microgram of estradiol per day. Response to estradiol treatment was reflected in an increase in cervical-uterine wet weight and uterine wall thickness. No differences were observed in time of appearance of antibody titers to GPIC in serum, but a delay in appearance of IgA antibody to GPIC in genital secretions was found in estradiol-treated animals receiving doses of greater than or equal to 1.0 microgram per day.

  15. Mechanism of action of estradiol on sodium pump in sarcolemma from the myocardium.

    PubMed

    Ziegelhöffer, A; Dzurba, A; Vrbjar, N; Styk, J; Slezák, J

    1990-12-01

    Today it is accepted that estrogens mitigate the consequences of ischemic heart disease. Preliminary experiments revealed an increase in heart sarcolemmal (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity after application of estradiol in vivo. It is also well known the key role of latter enzyme for heart function. The facts mentioned above indicate that estradiol may act on the heart just via modulation of the (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity. In present paper it is confirmed that 17-beta-estradiol stimulates the activity of sarcolemmal (Na+ + K+)-ATPase by allosteric manner, particularly by increasing positive cooperativity between the K(+)-binding sites of the enzyme. This effect is manifested by enhancement in functional capacity of the sodium pump in sarcolemma. Stimulatory effect of estradiol is bound to integrated myocytes: neither is it manifested in isolated sarcolemma in vitro nor exhibits any influence on the affinity of binding sites for cardiac glycosides or on total capacity of the sarcolemma to bind ouabain. Basing on the data obtained it was assumed that estradiol acts on the (Na+ + K+)-ATPase not directly but by means of a mediator released within the myocyte.

  16. Metal ions-based immunosensor for simultaneous determination of estradiol and diethylstilbestrol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sen; Du, Bin; Li, He; Xin, Xiaodong; Ma, Hongmin; Wu, Dan; Yan, Liangguo; Wei, Qin

    2014-02-15

    Environmental estrogens (EEs) can cause various endocrine diseases. Herein, we designed an ultrasensitive electrochemical immunosensor for simultaneous detection of two typical EEs, estradiol and diethylstilbestrol. These two analytes were immobilized on graphene sheet (GS) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Amino-group functionalized mesoporous Fe3O4 (Fe3O4-NH2) was loaded with Pb(2+) or Cd(2+), and then incubated with estradiol and diethylstilbestrol antibodies, respectively. Using an electrochemical analysis technique, two well-separated peaks were generated by the redox reaction of Pb(2+) or Cd(2+), making the simultaneous detection of two analytes on the electrode possible. Subsequently, square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to investigate the electrochemical behaviors of the immunosensor. Under optimized conditions, the SWASV peak currents were proportional to the concentrations of estradiol and diethylstilbestrol in the range from 0.050 pg mL(-1) to 100 ng mL(-1) and 1.0 pg mL(-1) to 100 ng mL(-1), respectively. The immunosensor exhibited highly sensitive response to estradiol with a detection limit of 0.015 pg mL(-1) and diethylstilbestrol with a detection limit of 0.38 pg mL(-1). Furthermore, the immunosensor was satisfactorily employed to detect estradiol and diethylstilbestrol simultaneously in water samples.

  17. Estradiol worsens the syndrome of ischemia-reperfusion injury in an experimental lung transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Santana-Rodríguez, Norberto; Clavo, Bernardino; Llontop, Pedro; López, Ana; García-Castellano, José Manuel; Machín, Rubén P; Ponce, Miguel A; Fiuza, María D; García-Herrera, Ricardo; Brito, Yanira; Yordi, Nagib Atallah; Chirino, Ricardo

    2011-06-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a common complication after lung transplantation. There is evidence that reactive oxygen species are involved in its pathogenesis. We designed an experimental study to evaluate whether the administration of antioxidants to lung transplantation recipients protects against IRI and early acute rejection (AR). Twenty-five rats received left lung transplants after 6 h of ischemia. Fifty minutes before the reperfusion, groups of five rats received a single dose of desferrioxamine (20 mg/kg), estradiol (25 mg/kg), or melatonin (10 mg/kg). The animals were killed 48 h after surgery and the postoperative outcome, IRI, and AR were evaluated. The frequency of severe injury and of moderate-to-severe edema was higher in animals treated with estradiol than in the control group (P = 0.022 and P = 0.026, respectively). No significant changes in the degree of IRI or AR were observed in the groups treated with desferrioxamine or melatonin. In our study, treatment with the antioxidants melatonin or desferrioxamine before reperfusion had no effects on IRI damage or on AR frequency or severity. However, treatment with estradiol resulted in a worse postoperative outcome and in severe edema. Therefore, despite the antioxidant capacity of estradiol, it is recommended that an evaluation of these adverse effects of estradiol in human lung transplant recipients be performed.

  18. Tyrosine kinase/p21ras/MAP-kinase pathway activation by estradiol-receptor complex in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, A; Di Domenico, M; Castoria, G; de Falco, A; Bontempo, P; Nola, E; Auricchio, F

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism by which estradiol acts on cell multiplication is still unclear. Under conditions of estradiol-dependent growth, estradiol treatment of human mammary cancer MCF-7 cells triggers rapid and transient activation of the mitogen-activated (MAP) kinases, erk-1 and erk-2, increases the active form of p21ras, tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc and p190 protein and induces association of p190 to p21ras-GAP. Both Shc and p190 are substrates of activated src and once phosphorylated, they interact with other proteins and upregulate p21ras. Estradiol activates the tyrosine kinase/p21ras/MAP-kinase pathway in MCF-7 cells with kinetics which are similar to those of peptide mitogens. It is only after introduction of the human wild-type 67 kDa estradiol receptor cDNA that Cos cells become estradiol-responsive in terms of erk-2 activity. This finding, together with the inhibition by the pure anti-estrogen ICI 182 780 of the stimulatory effect of estradiol on each step of the pathway in MCF-7 cells proves that the classic estradiol receptor is responsible for the transduction pathway activation. Transfection experiments of Cos cells with the estradiol receptor cDNA and in vitro experiments with c-src show that the estradiol receptor activates c-src and this activation requires occupancy of the receptor by hormone. Our experiments suggest that c-src is an initial and integral part of the signaling events mediated by the estradiol receptor. Images PMID:8635462

  19. Regulation of energy expenditure by estradiol in premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Edward L; Gavin, Kathleen M; Shea, Karen L; Wolfe, Pamela; Wierman, Margaret E; Schwartz, Robert S; Kohrt, Wendy M

    2015-11-01

    Suppressing sex hormones in women for 1 wk reduces resting energy expenditure (REE). The effects of more chronic suppression on REE and other components of total energy expenditure (TEE), and whether the reduction in REE is specifically due to loss of estradiol (E2), are not known. We compared the effects of 5 mo of sex hormone suppression (gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist therapy, GnRHAG) with placebo (PL) or E2 add-back therapy on REE and the components of TEE. Premenopausal women received GnRHAG (leuprolide acetate 3.75 mg/mo) and were randomized to receive transdermal therapy that was either E2 (0.075 mg/d; n = 24; means ± SD, aged = 37 ± 8 yr, BMI = 27.3 ± 6.2 kg/m(2)) or placebo (n = 21; aged = 34 ± 9 yr, BMI = 26.8 ± 6.2 kg/m(2)). REE was measured by using a metabolic cart, and TEE, sleep EE (SEE), exercise EE (ExEE, 2 × 30 min bench stepping), non-Ex EE (NExEE), and the thermic effect of feeding (TEF) were measured by using whole room indirect calorimetry. REE decreased in GnRHAG+PL [mean (95% CI), -54 (-98, -15) kcal/d], but not GnRHAG+E2 [+6 (-33, +45) kcal/d] (difference in between-group changes, P < 0.05). TEE decreased in GnRHAG+PL [-128 (-214, -41) kcal/d] and GnRHAG+E2 [-96 (-159, -32) kcal/d], with no significant difference in between-group changes (P = 0.55). SEE decreased similarly in both GnRHAG+PL [-0.07 (-0.12, -0.03) kcal/min] and GnRHAG+E2 [-0.07 (-0.12, -0.02) kcal/min]. ExEE decreased in GnRHAG+PL [-0.46 (-0.79, -0.13) kcal/min], but not GnRHAG+E2 [-0.30 (-0.65, +0.06) kcal/min]. There were no changes in TEF or NExEE in either group. In summary, chronic pharmacologic suppression of sex hormones reduced REE and this was prevented by E2 therapy.

  20. Regulation of energy expenditure by estradiol in premenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Gavin, Kathleen M.; Shea, Karen L.; Wolfe, Pamela; Wierman, Margaret E.; Schwartz, Robert S.; Kohrt, Wendy M.

    2015-01-01

    Suppressing sex hormones in women for 1 wk reduces resting energy expenditure (REE). The effects of more chronic suppression on REE and other components of total energy expenditure (TEE), and whether the reduction in REE is specifically due to loss of estradiol (E2), are not known. We compared the effects of 5 mo of sex hormone suppression (gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist therapy, GnRHAG) with placebo (PL) or E2 add-back therapy on REE and the components of TEE. Premenopausal women received GnRHAG (leuprolide acetate 3.75 mg/mo) and were randomized to receive transdermal therapy that was either E2 (0.075 mg/d; n = 24; means ± SD, aged = 37 ± 8 yr, BMI = 27.3 ± 6.2 kg/m2) or placebo (n = 21; aged = 34 ± 9 yr, BMI = 26.8 ± 6.2 kg/m2). REE was measured by using a metabolic cart, and TEE, sleep EE (SEE), exercise EE (ExEE, 2 × 30 min bench stepping), non-Ex EE (NExEE), and the thermic effect of feeding (TEF) were measured by using whole room indirect calorimetry. REE decreased in GnRHAG+PL [mean (95% CI), −54 (−98, −15) kcal/d], but not GnRHAG+E2 [+6 (−33, +45) kcal/d] (difference in between-group changes, P < 0.05). TEE decreased in GnRHAG+PL [−128 (−214, −41) kcal/d] and GnRHAG+E2 [−96 (−159, −32) kcal/d], with no significant difference in between-group changes (P = 0.55). SEE decreased similarly in both GnRHAG+PL [−0.07 (−0.12, −0.03) kcal/min] and GnRHAG+E2 [−0.07 (−0.12, −0.02) kcal/min]. ExEE decreased in GnRHAG+PL [−0.46 (−0.79, −0.13) kcal/min], but not GnRHAG+E2 [−0.30 (−0.65, +0.06) kcal/min]. There were no changes in TEF or NExEE in either group. In summary, chronic pharmacologic suppression of sex hormones reduced REE and this was prevented by E2 therapy. PMID:26338457

  1. Exposure scheme separates effects of electric shock and electric field for honey bees, Apis mellifera L

    SciTech Connect

    Bindokas, V.P.; Gauger, J.R.; Greenberg, B.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms to explain disturbance of honey bee colonies under a 765-kV, 60-Hz transmission line (electric (E) field = 7 kV/m) fall into two categories: direct bee perception of enhanced in-hive E fields, and perception of shock from induced currents. The same adverse biological effects previously observed in honey bee colonies exposed under a 765-kV transmission line can be reproduced by exposing worker bees to shock or E field within elongated hive entranceways (= tunnels). Exposure to intense E field caused disturbance only if bees were in contact with a conductive substrate. E-field and shock exposure can be separated and precisely defined within tunnels, eliminating dosimetric vagaries that occur when entire hives are exposed to E field.

  2. Neuroendocrine mediated effects of electromagnetic-field exposure: Possible role of the pineal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.B.; Stevens, R.G.; Anderson, L.E. )

    1989-01-01

    Reports from recent epidemiological studies have suggested a possible association between extremely low frequently (ELF; including 50- or 60-Hz) electric- and magnetic-field exposure, and increased risk of certain cancers, depression, and miscarriage. ELF field-induced pineal gland dysfunction is a possible etiological factor in these effects. Work in our laboratory and elsewhere has shown that ELF electromagnetic-field exposure can alter the normal circadian rhythm of melatonin synthesis and release in the pineal gland. Consequences of reduced or inappropriately timed melatonin release on the endocrine, neuronal, and immune systems are discussed. Laboratory data linking ELF field exposure to changes in pineal circadian rhythms in both animal and humans are reviewed. The authors suggest that the pineal gland, in addition to being a convenient locus for measuring dyschronogenic effects of ELF field exposure, may play a central role in biological response to these fields via alterations in the melatonin signal.

  3. 17beta-Estradiol reduces excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) amplitude in rat basolateral amygdala neurons.

    PubMed

    Womble, Mark D; Andrew, James A; Crook, Joseph J

    2002-10-11

    We examined the actions of estrogen on excitatory synaptic transmission in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), a brain region involved in learning, emotions, and the effects of stress. Intracellular recordings of monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) were obtained from BLA neurons in a slice preparation. Bath application of 17beta-estradiol (2 micro M) reduced EPSP amplitude by an average of 77%. This reduction was readily reversed by washing with control saline and was not mimicked by the inactive isomer 17 alpha-estradiol. Other passive and active properties of BLA neurons were unaffected by 17beta-estradiol. The observed EPSP reduction is in sharp contrast to the potentiation of EPSPs by estrogen observed in other brain regions.

  4. A new estradiol-dienogest oral contraceptive marks "The Pill's" 50th anniversary.

    PubMed

    Keder, Lisa M

    2011-01-01

    Oral contraceptive pills were first approved by the Food and Drug Administration 50 years ago. Discovery of the physiology of reproduction and demonstration of the ability to inhibit ovulation with ovarian extracts laid the early groundwork for the development of contraceptives. Later, characterization of the hormones controlling ovulation and synthesis of progestins allowed production of oral contraceptives. Modern estrogen and progestin pills have undergone significant changes since their initial introduction. New formulations have been developed, doses have been lowered, and extended use introduced. The Food and Drug Administration has recently approved a new oral contraceptive containing estradiol valerate and dienogest. This pill contains an orally active estradiol in combination with a progestin with strong endometrial activity. The decreasing estrogen dose combined with an increasing progestin dose decreases the risk of break through bleeding when compared to previous estradiol valerate formulations. The contraceptive efficacy and a tolerability of this new pill are similar to currently marketed low dose combined estrogen-progestin oral contraceptives.

  5. Effects of 17β-estradiol on emissions of greenhouse gases in simulative natural water body.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Aidong; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Chenxiao; Zong, Fengjiao; Yu, Zhongbo

    2015-05-01

    Environmental estrogens are widely spread across the world and are increasingly thought of as serious contaminators. The present study looks at the influence of different concentrations of 17β-estradiol on greenhouse gas emissions (CO2 , CH4 , and N2 O) in simulated systems to explore the relationship between environmental estrogen-pollution and greenhouse gas emissions in natural water bodies. The present study finds that 17β-estradiol pollution in simulated systems has significant promoting effects on the emissions of CH4 and CO2 , although no significant effects on N2 O emissions. The present study indicates that 17β-estradiol has different effects on the different elements cycles; the mechanism of microbial ecology is under review.

  6. Guanine nucleotide regulation of dopamine receptor agonist affinity states in rat estradiol-induced pituitary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Di Paolo, T.; Falardeau, P.

    1987-08-31

    The authors have investigated dopamine (DA) receptor agonist high- and low-affinity states in female rate estradiol-induced prolactin (PRL)-secreting pituitary tumors and intact pituitary tissue. Estradiol treatment increased the anterior pituitary weight 9-fold and plasma prolactin levels 74-fold and these measures are correlated (R = 0.745, n = 73, p < 0.001). Competition for (/sup 3/H)-spiperone binding to the DA receptor by apomorphine was compared in normal and adenomatous pituitary tissue. The inhibition constants (Ki) and the proportions of the two apomorphine sites are unchanged in tumors compared to intact pituitary tissue. Guanosine 5'-(..beta..-..gamma..-imino)triphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) causes complete conversion of the high into low affinity dopaminergic agonist site in normal pituitary and in tumors. These results suggest that rats with primary estradiol-induced pituitary tumors have normal and functional DA receptors. 9 references, 2 tables.

  7. Survey of residential magnetic field sources. Volume 2, Protocol, data analysis, and management: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zallanella, L.E.

    1993-09-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute has conducted a nationwide survey to collect engineering data on the sources and the levels of power frequency magnetic fields that exist inside residences. Approximately 1000 residences were randomly selected for the survey. The goals of this program were: (1) to identify all significant sources of 60 Hz magnetic field in residences, (2) to estimate for each source the percentage of residences where magnetic fields exceed specified levels, (3) to determine the relationship between magnetic field and source parameters, and (4) to characterize the field variations in space and time. The survey was not intended to measure exposure of people to magnetic fields and cannot be interpreted as such. To a great degree, exposure of people is dependent on their activity throughout a period of time. The intent of the program was to identity magnetic field sources. This was accomplished by hiking measurements at specific locations. To quantify personal exposure would have required the knowledge of the position of people with respect to magnetic field sources. The following sources of residential 60 Hz magnetic fields were idenfified: electrical appliances, grounding system of residences, overhead and underground power distribution lines, overhead power transmission lines, ground connections at electrical subpanels, and special wiring situations. Magnetic field from electrical appliances were measured separately while in the residences. The fields from other source were measured intentionally away from the influence of appliance fields, which is limited to areas close to appliances. Special techniques were used to determine how the field varied within the living space of the house and over a 24-hour period. Volume 1 describes program objectives and reports results and conclusions; Volume 2 describes study design, measurement protocol, data analysis, and data management.

  8. Kalirin-7, an important component of excitatory synapses, is regulated by estradiol in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin-Ming; Huang, Jian-Ping; Kim, Eun-Ji; Zhu, Qing; Kuchel, George A; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A

    2011-06-01

    Estradiol enhances the formation of dendritic spines and excitatory synapses in hippocampal neurons in vitro and in vivo, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Kalirin-7 (Kal7), the major isoform of Kalirin in the adult hippocampus, is a Rho GDP/GTP exchange factor localized to postsynaptic densities. In the hippocampus, both Kal7 and estrogen receptor α (ERα) are highly expressed in a subset of interneurons. Over-expression of Kal7 caused an increase in spine density and size in hippocampal neurons. To determine whether Kalirin might play a role in the effects of estradiol on spine formation, Kal7 expression was examined in the hippocampus of ovariectomized rats. Estradiol replacement increased Kal7 staining in both CA1 pyramidal neurons and interneurons in ovariectomized rats. Estradiol treatment of cultured hippocampal neurons increased Kal7 levels at the postsynaptic side of excitatory synapses and increased the number of excitatory synapses along the dendrites of pyramidal neurons. These increases were mediated via ERα because a selective ERα agonist, but not a selective ERβ agonist, caused a similar increase in both Kal7 levels and excitatory synapse number in cultured hippocampal neurons. When Kal7 expression was reduced using a Kal7-specific shRNA, the density of excitatory synapses was reduced and estradiol was no longer able to increase synapse formation. Expression of exogenous Kal7 in hippocampal interneurons resulted in decreased levels of GAD65 staining. Inhibition of GABAergic transmission with bicuculline produced a robust increase in Kal7 expression. These studies suggest Kal7 plays a key role in the mechanisms of estradiol-mediated synaptic plasticity.

  9. Effect of chronic estradiol administration on the acute pressor response to aortic coarctation in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Salgado, M C; Castania, J A; Ballejo, G; Salgado, H C

    1995-08-01

    We investigated the effect of chronic estradiol administration on the pressor response elicited by acute (45 min) partial aortic constriction in conscious Wistar rats and on vascular reactivity to angiotensin II and vasopressin in vitro. Estradiol (10 micrograms kg-1 day-1, sc) or vehicle was administered for 7 days to young castrated male and female rats and to female rats that had stopped cycling (14-16 months of age). In the acute experiment of aortic coarctation in conscious rats, carotid pressure was monitored continuously before and for 45 min after partial abdominal aortic coarctation. In ovariectomized females the mean carotid pressure and heart rate before aortic coarctation were significantly lower in estradiol-treated animals (107 +/- 3 vs 119 +/- 3 mmHg and 360 +/- 31 vs 494 +/- 12 bpm). Estradiol did not affect the pressor response (145-150 mmHg) to aortic coarctation of castrated male rats or ovariectomized female rats but blunted the reflex bradycardia of ovariectomized rats. The onset of the pressor response to aortic coarctation was delayed in aged female rats as compared to the other groups. While estradiol treatment significantly accelerated the onset of hypertension in aged rats, it did not affect the pressor response of castrated animals. Full dose-response curves to angiotensin II and vasopressin were constructed in vitro in the isolated mesenteric arterial bed obtained from similarly treated groups. Estradiol did not affect the vasopressin sensitivity or responsiveness of any group, but caused a significant increase in angiotensin II sensitivity in ovariectomized rats only.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Estradiol selectively reduces central neural activation induced by hypertonic NaCl infusion in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alexis B; Bass, Eryn E; Fan, Liming; Curtis, Kathleen S

    2012-09-10

    We recently reported that the latency to begin drinking water during slow, intravenous infusion of a concentrated NaCl solution was shorter in estradiol-treated ovariectomized rats compared to oil vehicle-treated rats, despite comparably elevated plasma osmolality. To test the hypothesis that the decreased latency to begin drinking is attributable to enhanced detection of increased plasma osmolality by osmoreceptors located in the CNS, the present study used immunocytochemical methods to label fos, a marker of neural activation. Increased plasma osmolality did not activate the subfornical organ (SFO), organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT), or the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in either oil vehicle-treated rats or estradiol-treated rats. In contrast, hyperosmolality increased fos labeling in the area postrema (AP), the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in both groups; however, the increase was blunted in estradiol-treated rats. These results suggest that estradiol has selective effects on the sensitivity of a population of osmo-/Na(+)-receptors located in the AP, which, in turn, alters activity in other central areas associated with responses to increased osmolality. In conjunction with previous reports that hyperosmolality increases blood pressure and that elevated blood pressure inhibits drinking, the current findings of reduced activation in AP, PVN, and RVLM-areas involved in sympathetic nerve activity-raise the possibility that estradiol blunts HS-induced blood pressure changes. Thus, estradiol may eliminate or reduce the initial inhibition of water intake that occurs during increased osmolality, and facilitate a more rapid behavioral response, as we observed in our recent study.

  11. Effects of estradiol on ischemic factor-induced astrocyte swelling and AQP4 protein abundance.

    PubMed

    Rutkowsky, Jennifer M; Wallace, Breanna K; Wise, Phyllis M; O'Donnell, Martha E

    2011-07-01

    In the early hours of ischemic stroke, cerebral edema forms as Na, Cl, and water are secreted across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and astrocytes swell. We have shown previously that ischemic factors, including hypoxia, aglycemia, and arginine vasopressin (AVP), stimulate BBB Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC) and Na/H exchanger (NHE) activities and that inhibiting NKCC and/or NHE by intravenous bumetanide and/or HOE-642 reduces edema and infarct in a rat model of ischemic stroke. Estradiol also reduces edema and infarct in this model and abolishes ischemic factor stimulation of BBB NKCC and NHE. There is evidence that NKCC and NHE also participate in ischemia-induced swelling of astrocytes. However, little is known about estradiol effects on astrocyte cell volume. In this study, we evaluated the effects of AVP (100 nM), hypoxia (7.5% O(2)), aglycemia, hypoxia (2%)/aglycemia [oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)], and estradiol (1-100 nM) on astrocyte cell volume using 3-O-methyl-d-[(3)H]glucose equilibration methods. We found that AVP, hypoxia, aglycemia, and OGD (30 min to 5 h) each significantly increased astrocyte cell volume, and that estradiol (30-180 min) abolished swelling induced by AVP or hypoxia, but not by aglycemia or OGD. Bumetanide and/or HOE-642 also abolished swelling induced by AVP but not aglycemia. Abundance of aquaporin-4, known to participate in ischemia-induced astrocyte swelling, was significantly reduced following 7-day but not 2- or 3-h estradiol exposures. Our findings suggest that hypoxia, aglycemia, and AVP each contribute to ischemia-induced astrocyte swelling, and that the edema-attenuating effects of estradiol include reduction of hypoxia- and AVP-induced astrocyte swelling and also reduction of aquaporin-4 abundance.

  12. Effects of raloxifene and estradiol on bone turnover parameters in intact and ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Canpolat, S; Tug, N; Seyran, A D; Kumru, S; Yilmaz, B

    2010-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate effects of raloxifene (RLX) and estradiol on bone formation and resorption in intact and ovariectomized (ovx) rat models. In the intact model, a total of 24 adult female rats were divided into three groups: Controls subcutaneously received saline alone. RLX (2 mg/kg) and estradiol (30 microg/kg) were injected to two groups of animals for a period of 6 weeks at two daily intervals. In the second model, rats (n = 24) were ovx and allowed to recover for a period of at least 3 weeks. Control group received vehicle alone. Remaining rats were divided into two groups and injected with RLX (2 mg/kg) and estradiol (30 microg/kg) for 6 weeks. Urine samples were collected from all animals 24 h after the last drug administration. Urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPD) was measured by ELISA. Serum parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcitonin, and osteocalcin levels were measured by immunoradiometric method. Serum concentrations of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Ca, and inorganic phosphate were determined by enzymatic-colorimetric method. Lumbar vertebrae (L2) of all animals were dissected out and processed for histopathological evaluation. Removal of ovaries significantly elevated urinary DPD levels (p < 0.01) compared with intact controls. Treatment of both intact and ovx rats with estradiol resulted in significant decreases (p < 0.01) in DPD values. RLX administration had no significant effect in the intact rats, but it remarkably reduced bone turnover in the ovx animals (p < 0.001). Both estradiol and RLX produced conflicting effects on serum ALP, osteocalcin, and PTH levels in both animal models. These findings suggest that RLX exerts its protective effects by reducing bone resorption, similar to that of estradiol, in ovx rats.

  13. Effect of estradiol on planktonic growth, coaggregation, and biofilm formation of the Prevotella intermedia group bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fteita, Dareen; Könönen, Eija; Söderling, Eva; Gürsoy, Ulvi Kahraman

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in the quantity and quality of biofilms at gingival margin are considered to play a role in the initiation and development of pregnancy-related gingivitis. Prevotella intermedia sensu lato is able to consume estradiol, the major sex hormone secreted during pregnancy, in the absence of vitamin K. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of estradiol on the planktonic growth, coaggregation, polysaccharide production, and biofilm formation of the P. intermedia group bacteria, namely P. intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, and Prevotella pallens. In all experiments, the type strain (ATCC) and a clinical strain (AHN) of P. intermedia, P. nigrescens, and P. pallens were incubated with the concentrations of 0, 30, 90, and 120 nmol/L of estradiol. Planktonic growth was assessed by means of the colony forming unit method, while coaggregation and biofilm formation were assessed by spectrophotometric methods. In the determination of protein and polysaccharide levels, the Bradford and phenol-sulfuric acid methods were used, respectively. P. pallens AHN 9283 and P. nigrescens ATCC 33563 increased their numbers at planktonic stage with increasing estradiol concentrations. In 48-h biofilm tests, elevated protein levels were found for both strains of P. intermedia, and the strains P. nigrescens ATCC 33563 and P. pallens AHN 9283 in the presence of estradiol. The P. intermedia strains also increased the levels of polysaccharide formation in the biofilm. Coaggregation of the P. intermedia group organisms with Fusobacterium nucleatum was enhanced only in P. intermedia AHN 8290. In conclusion, our in vitro experiments indicate that estradiol regulates planktonic growth, coaggregation, polysaccharide production, and biofilm formation characteristics of P. intermedia, P. nigrescens, and P. pallens differently. These results may, at least partly, explain the differences seen in their contribution to the pathogenesis of pregnancy-related gingivitis.

  14. Estradiol Variability, Stressful Life Events and the Emergence of Depressive Symptomatology during the Menopause Transition

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Jennifer L.; Rubinow, David R.; Eisenlohr-Moul, Tory A; Leserman, Jane; Girdler, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the role of estradiol fluctuation in triggering depressive symptoms in the menopause transition and assess the role of recent very stressful life events (VSLEs) as a moderating factor in this relationship. Methods 52 euthymic women in the menopause transition or early postmenopause (age 45–60) who were assigned to the placebo arm of a randomized controlled trial of hormone therapy provided the data for this report. At enrollment, women’s experience of recent VSLEs, depressive symptoms, serum estradiol and progesterone were assessed. At months 1, 8 and 14, depressive symptoms and hormones were re-assessed and participants underwent a stressor battery involving a speech and a mental arithmetic task. Participants rated their feelings of anxiety, fear, anger and rejection. The standard deviation of estradiol provided an index of hormone variability over the entire 14 months. Results Greater estradiol variability across the 14 months predicted greater depressive symptoms at month 14, though only in women reporting a higher number of VSLEs at baseline (39% of women reported ≤1 recent event). Greater estradiol variability also predicted greater feelings of rejection to the laboratory stressor at months 8 and 14. Furthermore, among women reporting higher VSLEs at baseline, feelings of rejection in response to the laboratory stressor at month 8 predicted depressive symptoms at month 14. Conclusion These data suggest estradiol variability may enhance emotional sensitivity to psychosocial stress, particularly sensitivity to social rejection. Combined with VSLEs proximate to the menopause transition, this increased sensitivity may contribute to the development of depressed mood. PMID:26529616

  15. Estradiol implants in the arcuate nucleus induce lactogenesis in virgin rats. Role of progesterone.

    PubMed

    Carón, R W; Deis, R P

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the centrally administered estradiol, and the effects of the consequent hypersecretion of prolactin (PRL) and progesterone, on lactogenesis as evaluated by mammary accumulation of casein and lactose. Bilateral cannulae containing 17beta-estradiol or cholesterol were implanted in the arcuate nucleus of virgin rats on the day of estrus (Day 0). In the first experiment different groups of rats were killed on Days 6, 9, 15, 17, or 19. Trunk blood was collected and abdominal mammary glands were taken. In the second experiment, estradiol-implanted rats received the progesterone antagonist mifepristone or vehicle at 14.00 h on Day 8 or 16 post-implant, and were killed 28 or 48 h later. Serum PRL and progesterone and mammary casein were measured by RIA and lactose was determined by an enzymatic assay. Estradiol-implanted rats showed a significant increase in both milk components at all time points after implant compared to controls. On Day 9 after estradiol implant, mifepristone had no effect on mammary content of casein or lactose. By contrast, on Day 16, mifepristone markedly increased both casein and lactose contents without modifying serum PRL and progesterone concentrations. In conclusion, 17beta-estradiol implants in the arcuate nucleus of virgin rats results in hyperprolactinaemia and stimulates mammary accumulation of casein and lactose in the absence of feto-placental units. Despite the prolonged luteal activation, the sustained high levels of circulating progesterone become inhibitory to lactogenesis after a relatively long period after implant.

  16. Chronic estradiol treatment decreases brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression and monoamine levels in the amygdala--implications for behavioral disorders.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Priya; Subramanian, Madhan; Nunez, Joseph L; Mohankumar, Sheba M J; Mohankumar, P S

    2014-03-15

    Changes in serum estradiol levels are associated with mood disorders in women. However, the underlying mechanisms are not clear. Because alterations in Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and monoamine levels in the hippocampus and amygdala have been associated with anxiety disorders, we hypothesized that chronic treatment with a low dose of estradiol would cause anxiety-like disorder by altering BDNF and monoamine levels in these regions. To test this hypothesis, female rats were sham-implanted (Controls) or implanted with pellets that release estradiol-17β (E2) for 90-days at the rate of 20 ng/day. Animals underwent behavioral tests such as the open field test and elevated plus maze test at the end of treatment. Brains from these animals were frozen, sectioned and the hippocampus, central amygdala and caudate putamen were microdissected and analyzed for monoamine levels using HPLC. BDNF protein levels in these areas were measured using ELISA and BDNF mRNA levels were analyzed using RT-PCR. In the open field test, animals chronically treated with E2 displayed anxiety-like behavior that was marked by a decrease in the number of inner zone crossings and increase in the rate of defecation compared to controls. However, no behavioral changes were observed in the elevated plus maze test. Chronic E2 treatment also decreased BDNF protein and mRNA levels in the central amygdala that was accompanied by a reduction in dopamine levels. No changes were observed in the hippocampus and caudate putamen. These results suggest that BDNF and dopamine in the central amygdala might possibly mediate chronic E2-induced behavioral alterations.

  17. Estradiol accelerates the effects of fluoxetine on serotonin 1A receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Sullivan, Nicole R; McAllister, Carrie E; Van de Kar, Louis D; Muma, Nancy A

    2013-07-01

    A major problem with current anti-depressant therapy is that it takes on average 6-7 weeks for remission. Since desensitization of serotonin (5-HT)1A receptor signaling contributes to the anti-depressive response, acceleration of the desensitization may reduce this delay in response to antidepressants. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that estradiol accelerates fluoxetine-induced desensitization of 5-HT1A receptor signaling in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) of rats, via alterations in components of the 5-HT1A receptor signaling pathway. Ovariectomized rats were injected with estradiol and/or fluoxetine, then adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and oxytocin responses to a 5-HT1A receptor agonist (+)-8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin (8-OH-DPAT) were examined to assess the function of 5-HT1A receptors in the PVN. Treatment with estradiol for either 2 or 7 days or fluoxetine for 2 days produced at most a partial desensitization of 5-HT1A receptor signaling, whereas 7 days of fluoxetine produced full desensitization. Combined treatment with estradiol and fluoxetine for 2 days produced nearly a full desensitization, demonstrating an accelerated response compared to either treatment alone. With two days of combined treatments, estradiol prevented the fluoxetine-induced increase in 5-HT1A receptor protein, which could contribute to the more rapid desensitization. Furthermore, EB treatment for 2 days decreased the abundance of the 35 kD Gαz protein which could contribute to the desensitization response. We found two isoforms of Gαz proteins with molecular mass of 35 and 33 kD, which differentially distributed in the detergent resistant microdomain (DRM) and in Triton X-100 soluble membrane region, respectively. The 35 kD Gαz proteins in the DRM can be sumoylated by SUMO1. Stimulation of 5-HT1A receptors with 8-OH-DPAT increases the sumoylation of Gαz proteins and reduces the 33 kD Gαz proteins, suggesting that these

  18. Estradiol suppresses tissue androgens and prostate cancer growth in castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Estrogens suppress tumor growth in prostate cancer which progresses despite anorchid serum androgen levels, termed castration resistant prostate cancers (CRPC), although the mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that estrogen inhibits CRPC in anorchid animals by suppressing tumoral androgens, an effect independent of the estrogen receptor. Methods The human CRPC xenograft LuCaP 35V was implanted into orchiectomized male SCID mice and established tumors were treated with placebo, 17β-estradiol or 17β-estradiol and estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780. Effects of 17β-estradiol on tumor growth were evaluated and tissue testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) evaluated by mass spectrometry. Results Treatment of LuCaP 35V with 17β-estradiol slowed tumor growth compared to controls (tumor volume at day 21: 785 ± 81 mm3 vs. 1195 ± 84 mm3, p = 0.002). Survival was also significantly improved in animals treated with 17β-estradiol (p = 0.03). The addition of the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 did not significantly change survival or growth. 17β-estradiol in the presence and absence of ICI 182,780 suppressed tumor testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) as assayed by mass spectrometry. Tissue androgens in placebo treated LuCaP 35V xenografts were; T = 0.71 ± 0.28 pg/mg and DHT = 1.73 ± 0.36 pg/mg. In 17β-estradiol treated LuCaP35V xenografts the tissue androgens were, T = 0.20 ± 0.10 pg/mg and DHT = 0.15 ± 0.15 pg/mg, (p < 0.001 vs. controls). Levels of T and DHT in control liver tissue were < 0.2 pg/mg. Conclusions CRPC in anorchid animals maintains tumoral androgen levels despite castration. 17β-estradiol significantly suppressed tumor T and DHT and inhibits growth of CRPC in an estrogen receptor independent manner. The ability to manipulate tumoral androgens will be critical in the development and testing of agents targeting CRPC through tissue steroidogenesis. PMID:20509933

  19. Effects of Estradiol and Venlafaxine on Insomnia Symptoms and Sleep Quality in Women with Hot Flashes

    PubMed Central

    Ensrud, Kristine E.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Hohensee, Chancellor; Caan, Bette; Carpenter, Janet S.; Freeman, Ellen W.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Landis, Carol A.; Manson, JoAnn; Newton, Katherine M.; Otte, Julie; Reed, Susan D.; Shifren, Jan L.; Sternfeld, Barbara; Woods, Nancy F.; Joffe, Hadine

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Determine effects of low-dose estradiol and low-dose venlafaxine on self-reported sleep measures in menopausal women with hot flashes. Design: 3-arm double-blind randomized trial. Participants assigned in a 2:2:3 ratio to 17β estradiol 0.5 mg/day (n = 97), venlafaxine XR 75 mg/day (n = 96), or placebo (n = 146) for 8 weeks. Setting: Academic research centers. Participants: 339 community-dwelling perimenopausal and postmenopausal women with ≥ 2 bothersome hot flashes per day. Measurements and Results: Insomnia symptoms (Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]) and sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]) at baseline, week 4 and 8; 325 women (96%) provided ISI data and 312 women (92%) provided PSQI data at baseline and follow-up. At baseline, mean (SD) hot flash frequency was 8.1/day (5.3), mean ISI was 11.1 (6.0), and mean PSQI was 7.5 (3.4). Mean (95% CI) change from baseline in ISI at week 8 was −4.1 points (−5.3 to −3.0) with estradiol, −5.0 points (−6.1 to −3.9) with venlafaxine, and −3.0 points (−3.8 to −2.3) with placebo (P overall treatment effect vs. placebo 0.09 for estradiol and 0.007 for venlafaxine). Mean (95% CI) change from baseline in PSQI at week 8 was −2.2 points (−2.8 to −1.6) with estradiol, −2.3 points (−2.9 to −1.6) with venlafaxine, and −1.2 points (−1.7 to −0.8) with placebo (P overall treatment effect vs. placebo 0.04 for estradiol and 0.06 for venlafaxine). Conclusions: Among perimenopausal and postmenopausal women with hot flashes, both low dose oral estradiol and low-dose venlafaxine compared with placebo modestly reduced insomnia symptoms and improved subjective sleep quality. Clinical Trial Registration: NCT01418209 at www.clinicaltrials.gov Citation: Ensrud KE, Guthrie KA, Hohensee C, Caan B, Carpenter JS, Freeman EW, LaCroix AZ, Landis CA, Manson J, Newton KM, Otte J, Reed SD, Shifren JL, Sternfeld B, Woods NF, Joffe H. Effects of estradiol and venlafaxine on insomnia symptoms

  20. Bisphenol A and estradiol are equipotent in antagonizing cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    LaPensee, Elizabeth W; LaPensee, Christopher R; Fox, Sejal; Schwemberger, Sandy; Afton, Scott; Ben-Jonathan, Nira

    2010-04-28

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a major problem facing breast cancer patients. Cisplatin, a highly effective DNA-damaging drug, has shown only little success in breast cancer treatment. We are reporting that low nanomolar doses of bisphenol A (BPA) or estradiol antagonize cisplatin cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells, with their effects not mediated via classical estrogen receptors. Although both compounds increase the expression of Bcl-2, a Bcl-2 inhibitor completely blocked the protective effects of BPA while only partially affecting those of estradiol. Blockade of BPA and E2 actions should sensitize ER-negative breast tumors to anti-cancer drugs and allow for the inclusion of cisplatin in treatment regimens.

  1. Estradiol inhibits osteoblast apoptosis via promotion of autophagy through the ER-ERK-mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yue-Hua; Chen, Ke; Li, Bo; Chen, Jiang-Wei; Zheng, Xin-Feng; Wang, Yu-Ren; Jiang, Sheng-Dan; Jiang, Lei-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Estradiol could protect osteoblast against apoptosis, and apoptosis and autophagy were extensively and intimately connected. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that autophagy was present in osteoblasts under serum deprivation and estrogen protected against osteoblast apoptosis via promotion of autophagy. MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells were cultured in a serum-free and phenol red-free minimal essential medium (α-MEM). Ultrastructural analysis, lysosomal activity assessment and monodansycadaverine (MDC) staining were employed to determine the presence of autophagy, and real time PCR was used to evaluate the expression of autophagic markers. Meanwhile, the osteoblasts were transferred in a serum-free and phenol red-free α-MEM containing either vehicle or estradiol. Apoptosis and autophagy was assessed by using the techniques of real-time PCR, Western blot, immunofluorescence assay, and flow cytometry. The possible pathway through which estrogen promoted autophagy in the serum-deprived osteoblasts was also investigated. Real-time PCR demonstrated the expression of LC3, beclin1 and ULK1 genes in osteoblasts under serum deprivation, and immunofluorescence assay verified high expression of proteins of these three autophagic bio-markers. Lysosomes and autolysosomes accumulated in the cytoplasm of osteoblasts were also detected under transmission electron microscopy, MDC staining and lysosomal activity assessment. Meanwhile, estradiol significantly decreased the expression of proteins of the bio-markers of apoptosis, and at the same time increased the expression of proteins of the bio-markers of autophagy in the serum-deprived osteoblasts. Furthermore, the estradiol-promoted autophagy in serum-deprived osteoblasts could be blocked by estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist (ICI 182780), and estradiol failed to rescue the cells pretreated with an inhibitor of vacuolar ATPase (bafilomycin A) from apoptosis. Serum deprivation resulted in apoptosis through

  2. Fate and Transport of 17β-Estradiol beneath Animal Waste Holding Ponds.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Lori A; Tyner, John S; Buchanan, John R; Hawkins, Shawn A; Lee, Jaehoon

    2015-05-01

    Concentrated animal feeding operations typically store livestock waste in clay-lined ponds. Although these ponds are regulated to include a liner with a small hydraulic conductivity to limit leaching, previous studies have traced surface and groundwater contamination from such regulated animal waste ponds. This research examined the transport of 17β-estradiol (E2) and its primary metabolite, estrone (E1), through soil liners using field- and laboratory-based studies. Additionally, a potential engineering solution to limit hormone transport-applying biochar to new pond liners to act as a retardant-was studied. Soil cores 80 cm in length were collected beneath a mature dairy waste pond and analyzed for moisture content and hormone concentrations. Unsaturated conditions and E2 concentrations of 4 to 250 ng g were detected beneath the waste pond. In the laboratory portion of the study, hand-packed columns of sand or clay were subjected to infiltration by a 2.3-m head of dairy waste. A subset of the hand-packed sand columns was amended with powdered biochar to test its ability to retard E2 and E1. For 3 mo, column leachate was analyzed for hormone concentrations, and at the conclusion of the study E2 and E1 concentrations in the soil were measured. In the 44 d after sealing, the clay, sand, sand with a thin layer of biochar, and sand mixed with a biochar amendment leached a total of 0.54, 1.3, 0.09, and 0.45 μg of E2, respectively. The biochar amendments to the hand-packed columns considerably minimized E2 in the leachate.

  3. Association of circulating concentrations of estradiol during the preovulatory period and expression of steroidogenic enzymes in beef cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cows with greater circulating concentrations of estradiol during the preovulatory period (HighE2) have increased pregnancy success following a fixed-time AI protocol. Furthermore, these animals have an enhanced ability to produce estradiol as indicated by increased expression of CYP19A1 and LHR wit...

  4. Estradiol attenuates down-regulation of PEA-15 and its two phosphorylated forms in ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Estradiol exerts a neuroprotective effect against focal cerebral ischemic injury through the inhibition of apoptotic signals. Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes 15 (PEA-15) is mainly expressed in brain that perform anti-apoptotic functions. This study investigated whether estradiol modulates the expression of PEA-15 and two phosphorylated forms of PEA-15 (Ser 104 and Ser 116) in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced injury and glutamate exposure-induced neuronal cell death. Adult female rats were ovariectomized to remove endogenous estradiol and treated with vehicle or estradiol prior to MCAO. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by MCAO and cerebral cortices were collected 24 h after MCAO. Western blot analysis indicated that estradiol prevents the MCAO-induced decrease in PEA-15, phospho-PEA-15 (Ser 104), phospho-PEA-15 (Ser 116). Glutamate exposure induced a reduction in PEA-15, phospho-PEA-15 (Ser 104), phospho-PEA-15 (Ser 116) in cultured neurons, whereas estradiol treatment attenuated the glutamate toxicity-induced decrease in the expression of these proteins. It has been known that phosphorylation of PEA-15 is an important step in carrying out its anti-apoptotic function. Thus, these findings suggest that the regulation of PEA-15 phosphorylation by estradiol contributes to the neuroprotective function of estradiol in ischemic brain injury. PMID:25806082

  5. Changes in ovarian function associated with circulating concentrations of estradiol before a GnRH-induced ovulation in beef cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    These studies were conducted to evaluate causes for differences in circulating concentrations of estradiol prior to a GnRH-induced ovulation and to determine if exogenous GnRH administration could alter LH secretion and subsequent follicular estradiol production. Beef cows (Experiment 1; n = 32, Ex...

  6. Estradiol increases expression of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor after acute administration of ethanol in the neonatal rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Firozan, Bita; Goudarzi, Iran; Elahdadi Salmani, Mahmoud; Lashkarbolouki, Taghi; Rezaei, Arezou; Abrari, Kataneh

    2014-06-05

    Recently it has been shown that estradiol prevents the toxicity of ethanol in developing cerebellum. The neuroprotective effect of estradiol is not due to a single phenomenon but rather encompasses a spectrum of independent proccesses. According to the specific timing of Purkinje cell vulnerability to ethanol and several protective mechanisms of estradiol, we considered the neurotrophin system, as a regulator of differentiation, maturation and survival of neurons during CNS development. Interactions between estrogen and Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, an essential factor in neuronal survival) lead us to investigate involvement of BDNF pathway in neuroprotective effects of estrogen against ethanol toxicity. In this study, 17β-estradiol (300-900μg/kg) was injected subcutaneously in postnatal day (PD) 4, 30min prior to intraperitoneal injection of ethanol (6g/kg) in rat pups. Eight hours after injection of ethanol, BDNF mRNA and protein levels were assayed. Behavioral studies, including rotarod and locomotor activity tests were performed in PD 21-23 and histological study was performed after completion of behavioral tests in PD 23. Our results indicated that estradiol increased BDNF mRNA and protein levels in the presence of ethanol. We also observed that pretreatment with estradiol significantly attenuated ethanol-induced motoric impairment. Histological analysis also demonstrated that estradiol prevented Purkinje cell loss following ethanol treatment. These results provide evidence on the possible mechanisms of estradiol neuroprotection against ethanol toxicity.

  7. Changes in hippocampal function of ovariectomized rats after sequential low doses of estradiol to simulate the preovulatory estrogen surge

    PubMed Central

    Scharfman, Helen E.; Hintz, Tana M.; Gomez, Juan; Stormes, Kerry A.; Barouk, Sharon; Malthankar-Phatak, Gauri H.; McCloskey, Daniel P.; Luine, Victoria N.; MacLusky, Neil J.

    2008-01-01

    In adult female rats, robust hippocampal changes occur when estradiol rises on the morning of proestrus. Whether estradiol mediates these changes, however, remains unknown. To address this issue, we used sequential injections of estradiol to simulate two key components of the preovulatory surge: the rapid rise in estradiol on proestrous morning, and the slower rise during the preceding day, diestrus 2. Animals were examined mid-morning of simulated proestrus, and compared to vehicle-treated or intact rats. In both simulated and intact rats, CA1-evoked responses were potentiated in hippocampal slices, and presynaptic mechanisms appeared to contribute. In CA3, multiple population spikes were evoked in response to mossy fiber stimuli, and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor was increased. Simulation of proestrous morning also improved performance on object and place recognition tests, in comparison to vehicle treatment. Surprisingly, effects on CA1-evoked responses showed a dependence on estradiol during simulated diestrus 2, as well as a dependence on proestrous morning. Increasing estradiol above the physiological range on proestrous morning paradoxically decreased evoked responses in CA1. However, CA3 pyramidal cell activity increased further, and became synchronized. Together, the results confirm that physiological estradiol levels are sufficient to profoundly affect hippocampal function. In addition: (i) changes on proestrous morning appear to depend on slow increases in estradiol during the preceding day; (ii) effects are extremely sensitive to the peak serum level on proestrous morning; and (iii) there are striking subfield differences within the hippocampus. PMID:17970745

  8. Expression profile of early estradiol-responsive genes in cynomolgus macaque liver: implications for drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ise, Ryota; Kito, Go; Uno, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen plays important roles in estrogen-responsive tissues, such as mammary glands, ovaries, and the uterus. In the liver, the major drug metabolizing organ, estrogen is known to regulate expression of some drug-metabolizing enzymes. Due to the lack of information on the role of estrogen in hepatic gene expression in primate species, we previously investigated the late response of hepatic gene expression to estradiol in cynomolgus macaques. To understand the early response of hepatic gene expression to estradiol, in this study, microarray analysis was conducted using cynomolgus macaque liver samples collected at 1 h and 5 h after estradiol injection. Comparison of expression profiles in estradiol and solvent (control)-treated ovariectomized cynomolgus macaques revealed 27 differentially expressed genes (>2.0-fold), including 18 at 1 h and 9 at 5 h after estradiol injection. As indicated by Gene Ontology analysis, these genes were related to oxidoreductase activity and transferase activity, partly representing important aspects of drug-metabolizing enzymes. Further analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that estradiol down-regulated CYP2A24, CYP2C76, and CYP2E1 (>2.0-fold) at 1 h and up-regulated GSTM5 (>2.0-fold) at 5 h after estradiol injection. These results suggest that the short-term estradiol treatment influenced expression of hepatic genes, including drug-metabolizing enzyme genes, in cynomolgus macaque liver.

  9. Mammary gland morphology and gene expression signature of prepubertal male and female rats following exposure to exogenous estradiol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to characterize the actions of xenoestrogens, it is essential to possess a solid portrait of the physiological effects of exogenous estradiol. We assessed effects of three doses of exogenous estradiol (E2) (0.1, 1.0 and 10 micrograms/kg/day) on the mammary gland morphology and gene expressi...

  10. Molecular biology of beta-estradiol-estrogen receptor complex binding to estrogen response element and the effect on cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Heger, Zbynek; Zitka, Ondrej; Krizkova, Sona; Beklova, Miroslava; Kizek, Rene; Adam, Vojtech

    2013-01-01

    Group of estrogen pollutants, where the highest estrogen activity is reported at estradiol, is characterized by the fact that even at very low concentrations have potential to cause xenoestrogenic effects. During exposure of excessive amounts of estradiols may be produced undesirable effects resulting in the feminization of males of water organisms. The presence of estradiols in drinking water implies also a risk for the human population in the form of cancers of endocrine systems, abnormalities in reproduction or dysfunctions of neuronal and immune system. Currently, the research is focused mainly to uncover the relationship between the estrogen receptors binding affinity with an estrogen response element and estradiol. In this review we summarized facts about molecular biological principles of β estradiol-estrogen receptor complex binding with estrogen response element and its successive effect on cancer genes expression.

  11. Testosterone-derived estradiol production by male endothelium is robust and dependent on p450 aromatase via estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Villablanca, Amparo C; Tetali, Sarada; Altman, Robin; Ng, Kenneth F; Rutledge, John C

    2013-12-01

    Vascular endothelium expresses both the estrogen receptors (ERs) α and β, and ERα mediates development of early atherosclerosis in male mice. This process is thought to be testosterone-dependent. We hypothesized that male murine aortic endothelium produces robust levels of estradiol by aromatase conversion of testosterone, and that regulation of this process is mediated by the presence of ERs, primarily ERα. Aortic endothelium was isolated from ERα knockout (ERα -/-) and wild-type (ERα +/+) male mice and treated with testosterone or the 5α reduction product dihydrotestosterone (DHT), with or without the P450 aromatase inhibitor anastrazole, or a non-specific estrogen receptor antagonist. Aromatase gene expression and estradiol production were assayed. Treatment with testosterone, but not DHT, caused increased aromatase expression and estradiol production in ERα +/+ endothelium that was attenuated by disruption of ERα in the ERα -/- group. Anastrazole inhibition of aromatase reduced testosterone-induced aromatase expression and estradiol levels in both ERα -/- and ERα +/+ endothelium. Antagonism of both ERs decreased testosterone-induced aromatase expression in both wild-type and knockout groups. The effects of the receptor antagonist on estradiol production differed between the two groups, however, with a reduction in estradiol release from the ERα +/+ cells and complete abolition of estradiol release from the ERα -/- cells. Thus, estradiol production in vascular endothelium from male mice is robust, depends on the aromatic conversion of testosterone and requires functional ERα to achieve maximal levels of estradiol generation. Local vascular production of aromatase-mediated estradiol in response to circulating testosterone may affect ERα-dependent mechanisms to increase susceptibility to early atheroma formation in male mice. This pathway may have important therapeutic relevance for reducing the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in

  12. Interaction between estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone promotes in vitro survival and development of caprine preantral follicles.

    PubMed

    Lima-Verde, I B; Matos, M H T; Saraiva, M V A; Bruno, J B; Tenório, S B; Martins, F S; Rossetto, R; Cunha, L D; Name, K P O; Báo, S N; Campello, C C; Figueiredo, J R

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) on survival and growth of caprine preantral follicles. Pieces of ovarian tissue were cultured for 1 or 7 days in minimum essential medium (MEM) containing estradiol (1, 5, 10, 20 or 40 pg/ml), FSH (50 ng/ml), or a combination of the two hormones. Cultured and noncultured control ovarian tissues were processed for histological and ultrastructural studies. The results showed that after 7 days of culture, the treatments that yielded the highest percentage of normal follicles relative to MEM alone were those that combined FSH with estradiol at 1, 5 or 20 pg/ml. The addition of FSH to 1-day cultures containing 1 pg/ml estradiol or to 7-day cultures with 1 or 5 pg/ml estradiol increased the percentage of normal follicles compared to estradiol alone at the same concentrations. After 7 days of culture, all treatments generated higher percentages of developing follicles as compared to control and MEM alone. The addition of either FSH or 10 pg/ml of estradiol to the culture media or estradiol (1, 5, 10 or 20 pg/ml) and FSH in combination significantly increased follicular diameter as compared with MEM alone following 7 days of culture. Ultrastructural studies confirmed follicular integrity after 7 days of culture in the presence of 1 pg/ml estradiol plus FSH. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the interaction between estradiol and FSH maintains ultrastructural integrity and stimulates activation and further growth of cultured caprine preantral follicles.

  13. Weak extremely-low-frequency magnetic field-induced regeneration anomalies in the planarian, Dugesia tigrina

    SciTech Connect

    Jenrow, K.A.; Smith, C.H.; Liboff, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    The authors recently reported that cephalic regeneration in the planarian Dugesia tigrina was significantly delayed in populations exposed continuously to combined parallel DC and AC magnetic fields. This effect was consistent with hypotheses suggesting an underlying resonance phenomenon. The authors report here, in a parallel series of investigations on the same model system, that the incidence of regeneration anomalies presenting as tumor-like protuberances also increases significantly (P < .001) in association with exposure to weak 60 Hz magnetic fields, with peak intensities ranging between 1.0 and 80.0 {micro}T. These anomalies often culminate in the complete disaggregation of the organism. Similar to regeneration rate effects, the incidence of regeneration anomalies is specifically dependent upon the planaria possessing a fixed orientation with respect to the applied magnetic field vectors. However, unlike the regeneration rate effects, the AC magnetic field alone, in the absence of any measurable DC field, is capable of producing these anomalies. Moreover, the incidence of regeneration anomalies follows a clear dose-response relationship as a function of AC magnetic field intensity, with the threshold for induced electric field intensity estimated at 5 {micro} V/m. The addition of either 51.1 or 78.4 {micro}T DC magnetic fields, applied in parallel combination with the AC field, enhances the appearance of anomalies relative to the 60 Hz AC field alone, but only at certain AC field intensities. Thus, whereas the previous study of regeneration rate effects appeared to involve exclusively resonance interactions, the regeneration anomalies reported here appear to result primarily from Faraday induction coupling.

  14. Estradiol impairs response inhibition in young and middle-aged, but not old rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Victor C.; Neese, Steven L.; Korol, Donna L.; Schantz, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Estrogens have been shown to have a strong influence on such cognitive domains as spatial memory, response learning, and several tasks of executive function, including both working memory and attention. However, the effects of estrogens on inhibitory control and timing behavior, both important aspects of executive function, have received relatively little attention. We examined the effects of estradiol on inhibitory control and timing using a differential reinforcement of low rates of responding (DRL) task. Ovariectomized young (3 month), middle-aged (12 month), and old (18 month) Long-Evans rats received 5% or 10% 17β-estradiol in cholesterol vehicle or cholesterol vehicle alone via Silastic implants and were tested on a DRL task requiring them to wait 15 seconds between lever presses to receive a food reinforcer. The ratio of reinforced to non-reinforced lever presses did not differ across age in the cholesterol vehicle group. Conversely, 17β-estradiol impaired learning of the DRL task in young and middle-aged rats, but the learning of old rats was not impaired relative to vehicle controls following either 5% or 10% 17β-estradiol treatment. Overall, old rats also made fewer lever presses than both the young and middle-aged rats. These results provide new evidence that estrogens impair inhibitory control, an important aspect of self regulation, and add to existing evidence that estrogens differentially affect cognition at different ages. PMID:21281713

  15. Tributyltin impairs the coronary vasodilation induced by 17β-estradiol in isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Roger Lyrio; Podratz, Priscila Lang; Sena, Gabriela Cavati; Filho, Vicente Sathler Delgado; Lopes, Pedro Francisco Iguatemy; Gonçalves, Washington Luiz Silva; Alves, Leandro Miranda; Samoto, Vivian Yochiko; Takiya, Christina Maeda; de Castro Miguel, Emilio; Moysés, Margareth Ribeiro; Graceli, Jones Bernardes

    2012-01-01

    Triorganotins, such as tributyltin (TBT), are environmental contaminants that are commonly used as antifouling agents for boats. However, TBT is also known to alter mammalian reproductive functions. Although the female sex hormones are primarily involved in the regulation of reproductive functions, 17β-estradiol also protects against cardiovascular diseases, in that this hormone reduces the incidence of coronary artery disease via coronary vasodilation. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of 100 ng/kg TBT administered daily by oral gavage for 15 d on coronary functions in female Wistar rats. Findings were correlated with changes in sex steroids concentrations. Tributyltin significantly increased the baseline coronary perfusion pressure and impaired vasodilation induced by 17β-estradiol. In addition, TBT markedly decreased serum 17β-estradiol levels accompanied by a significant rise in serum progesterone levels. Tributyltin elevated collagen deposition in the heart interstitium and number of mast cells proximate to the cardiac vessels. There was a positive correlation between the increase in coronary perfusion pressure and incidence of cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, TBT induced endothelium denudation (scanning electron microscopy) and accumulation of platelets. Moreover, TBT impaired coronary vascular reactivity to estradiol (at least in part), resulting in endothelial denudation, enhanced collagen deposition and elevated number of mast cells. Taken together, the present results demonstrate that TBT exposure may be a potential risk factor for cardiovascular disorders in rats.

  16. The role of estradiol and progesterone in modulating the subjective effects of stimulants in humans.

    PubMed

    Evans, Suzette M

    2007-10-01

    Although stimulant abuse is a growing problem among women, few studies have focused on factors that may be implicated in potential sex differences. Numerous preclinical studies have indicated that female rodents are more sensitive than male rodents to the behavioral effects of stimulants and that the hormone estradiol is involved in these sex differences. In humans, the subjective response to stimulants is greater in the follicular phase (characterized by moderate estradiol levels and minimal progesterone levels) than in the luteal phase (characterized by elevated estradiol levels and elevated progesterone levels). Differences between men and women emerge only when men are compared with women in the luteal phase; the subjective response to stimulants is similar in men and women in the follicular phase. In contrast to rodents, there is minimal evidence that estradiol enhances the subjective response to stimulants in humans. Rather, the hormone progesterone has been shown to attenuate the subjective response to stimulants, particularly in women. Recent preclinical data confirm that progesterone reduces the behavioral response to stimulants. In summary, there is converging evidence from studies in humans that (a) men and women do differ in their subjective response to stimulants; (b) these sex differences are evident when women are in the luteal phase, when progesterone levels are elevated; and (c) progesterone administration attenuates the subjective response to stimulants. Therefore, the menstrual cycle should be addressed in mixed-gender studies. Moreover, the modulatory effects of progesterone on reducing the positive effects of cocaine may have some clinical utility in treating stimulant abusers.

  17. Micro-RNA378 (miR-378) regulates ovarian estradiol production by targeting aromatase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shengyu; Linher-Melville, Katja; Yang, Burton B; Wu, De; Li, Julang

    2011-10-01

    Estradiol is a steroid hormone that not only plays an important role in ovarian follicular development but also is associated with many reproductive disorders. Owing to the importance of aromatase in the production of estradiol, the regulation of aromatase gene expression at the transcriptional level has been an extensive area of study for over two decades. However, its regulation at the posttranscriptional level has remained unclear. Here, we show that micro-RNA378 (miR-378) is spatiotemporally expressed in porcine granulosa cells, the cells that generate estradiol in the ovary during follicular development, in an inverse manner compared with the expression of aromatase. In vitro overexpression and inhibition experiments revealed that aromatase expression, and therefore estradiol production, by granulosa cells, is posttranscriptionally down-regulated by miR-378. Furthermore, site-directed mutation studies identified two binding sites in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the aromatase coding sequence that are critical for the action of miR-378. Interestingly, overexpression of the aromatase 3'-UTR enhanced aromatase expression at the protein level in granulosa cells, possibly mediated by the binding of miR-378 within this region, thereby reducing the binding of this micro-RNA to the endogenous aromatase 3'-UTR.

  18. The ovarian hormone estradiol plays a crucial role in the control of food intake in females

    PubMed Central

    Eckel, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite a strong male bias in both basic and clinical research, it is becoming increasingly accepted that the ovarian hormone estradiol plays an important role in the control of food intake in females. Estradiol’s feeding inhibitory effect occurs in a variety of species, including women, but the underlying mechanism has been studied most extensively in rats and mice. Accordingly, much of the data reviewed here is derived from the rodent literature. Adult female rats display a robust decrease in food intake during estrus and ovariectomy promotes hyperphagia and weight gain, both of which can be prevented by a physiological regimen of estradiol treatment. Behavioral analyses have demonstrated that the feeding inhibitory effect of estradiol is mediated entirely by a decrease in meal size. In rats, estradiol appears to exert this action indirectly via interactions with peptide and neurotransmitter systems implicated in the direct control of meal size. Here, I summarize research examining the neurobiological mechanism underlying estradiol’s anorexigenic effect. Central estrogen receptors (ERs) have been implicated and activation of one ER subtype in particular, ERα, appears both sufficient and necessary for the estrogenic control of food intake. Future studies are necessary to identify the critical brain areas and intracellular signaling pathways responsible for estradiol’s anorexigenic effect. A clearer understanding of the estrogenic control of food intake is prerequisite to elucidating the biological factors that contribute to obesity and eating disorders, both of which are more prevalent in women, compared to men. PMID:21530561

  19. Toxicity of 17 {beta}-estradiol and dibutyl-n-phthalate to Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    SciTech Connect

    Patvna, P.J.; Cooper, K.R. |

    1995-12-31

    Phthalate esters are ubiquitous environmental contaminants that are hypothesized to cause developmental toxicity in aquatic organisms via an estrogenic mechanism. Japanese medaka embryos and larvae provide an excellent model for the study of toxicant effects on embryonic development. The following groups were examined (N = 10--20): a non-treatment control, a vehicle control, 17 {beta}-estradiol and Dibutyl-n-phthalate, in individual glass vials. The medaka embryos were treated beginning at the blastula stage, for ten days. At day 10, embryos were changed into fresh rearing solution. The embryos were observed daily, until three days post-hatching, for toxic developmental effects. Exposure to 17 {beta}-estradiol caused urinary bladder lesions at the lowest doses tested. At concentrations {le} 3 {micro}M/0.82 ppm, 17 {beta}-estradiol caused inhibition of swim bladder inflation, pericardial edema, and marked cachexia. Dibutyl-n-phthalate caused pronounced enlargement of the urinary bladder. No other gross lesions were observed. Both 17 {beta}-estradiol and Dibutyl-n-phthalate caused effects on the urinary tract which will be characterized at the light microscopic level. The lesions observed in the embryo medaka following Dibutyl-n-phthalate exposure were at or below water solubility and are in agreement with previously reported toxic levels.

  20. Relation between leptin and estradiol levels in Egyptian lactating Arab mares during foaling heat.

    PubMed

    El-Maaty, Amal M Abo; Gabr, Faten I

    2010-01-01

    Sixteen Arab lactating mares belonging to Al-Zahraa Arab Horse Stud underwent two ultrasound examinations at 3 weeks interval starting from the day of demonstration of foaling heat. In addition, daily blood samples were collected from parturition until after exhibiting first postpartum estrus (day 11) with daily observation of estrous signs. Both leptin and estradiol hormones were assayed. Mean day of foaling heat was 8.9+/-0.9 day. Most mares came in foaling heat during days 9 and 10 had high conception rate compared to those who came in estrus earlier or later. Estradiol levels were high after day of foaling then decrease after expression of foaling heat. But leptin levels increase from day 8 to day 10 compared to other days before and after the first ovulation. A significant positive correlation was found between estradiol and leptin (r=0.58, p<0.025). The positive correlation between leptin and estradiol led us to suggest that leptin hormone plays an important role in ovulation of the first postpartum estrus in mares.

  1. 17B-Estradiol in Runoff as Affected by Various Poultry Litter Application Strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Runoff of estrogen from land fertilized with poultry litter has recently received increased attention. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of various poultry litter application strategies on 17B-estradiol concentrations in runoff water. Treatments included the effects of 1) al...

  2. Interactions of androgens and estradiol on sex accessory ducts of larval tiger salamanders, Ambystoma tigrinum.

    PubMed

    Norris, D O; Carr, J A; Summers, C H; Featherston, R

    1997-06-01

    Immature tiger salamander larvae were treated with 12.5 or 25 micrograms of estradiol, testosterone, or dihydrotestosterone (DHT), or 12.5 micrograms of estradiol combined with 12.5 micrograms of either testosterone or DHT. Müllerian duct epithelium was more stimulated by combined steroid treatment than by any steroid alone. Estradiol antagonized the action of DHT in the Wolffian duct. Both of the androgens and estradiol when administered alone at the higher dose stimulated enlargement of connective tissue surrounding the ducts, but the combined 12.5 micrograms androgen/12.5 micrograms estrogen treatment was more effective even though the total steroid administered was the same. The effectiveness of DHT on müllerian cells of this species is evidence against a required aromatization of androgens to explain paradoxical steroid effects and suggests that fundamental differences may exist in steroid receptors of müllerian ducts, connective tissue, and Wolffian ducts. A possible role for the urodele duct system for assessing estrogenic activity of environmental contaminants is discussed.

  3. Changes in salivary estradiol predict changes in women's preferences for vocal masculinity.

    PubMed

    Pisanski, Katarzyna; Hahn, Amanda C; Fisher, Claire I; DeBruine, Lisa M; Feinberg, David R; Jones, Benedict C

    2014-08-01

    Although many studies have reported that women's preferences for masculine physical characteristics in men change systematically during the menstrual cycle, the hormonal mechanisms underpinning these changes are currently poorly understood. Previous studies investigating the relationships between measured hormone levels and women's masculinity preferences tested only judgments of men's facial attractiveness. Results of these studies suggested that preferences for masculine characteristics in men's faces were related to either women's estradiol or testosterone levels. To investigate the hormonal correlates of within-woman variation in masculinity preferences further, here we measured 62 women's salivary estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone levels and their preferences for masculine characteristics in men's voices in five weekly test sessions. Multilevel modeling of these data showed that changes in salivary estradiol were the best predictor of changes in women's preferences for vocal masculinity. These results complement other recent research implicating estradiol in women's mate preferences, attention to courtship signals, sexual motivation, and sexual strategies, and are the first to link women's voice preferences directly to measured hormone levels.

  4. Effect of Dietary Fiber Intake on Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels Independent of Estradiol in Healthy Premenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Mumford, Sunni L.; Schisterman, Enrique F.; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Gaskins, Audrey J.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; VanderWeele, Tyler J.

    2011-01-01

    High-fiber diets are associated with improved lipid profiles. However, pre- and postmenopausal women respond differently to fiber intake, suggesting that endogenous estradiol mediates the effect. The authors' objective was to determine the direct effect of fiber intake on lipoprotein cholesterol levels independent of estradiol among premenopausal women. The BioCycle Study, a prospective cohort study conducted at the State University of New York at Buffalo from 2005 to 2007, followed 259 healthy women for up to 2 complete menstrual cycles. Serum lipoprotein and hormone levels were measured at 16 visits timed using fertility monitors. Fiber intake was assessed by 8 24-hour recalls. Marginal structural models with inverse probability weights for both lipoprotein and estradiol levels were used to estimate controlled direct effects of the highest category of fiber intake (≥22 g/day vs. <22 g/day) while accounting for age, body mass index, total energy, vitamin E intake, physical activity, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and progesterone. Reductions were observed in total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol in women with higher fiber intakes. Direct effects were greater than total effects. These analyses suggested that estradiol mediates at least part of the association between fiber and cholesterol among premenopausal women. More research is needed to elucidate the biologic mechanisms driving these associations. PMID:21148240

  5. Pregnancy rates after ewes were treated with estradiol-17beta and oxytocin.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cervical dilation may improve transcervical sheep embryo-transfer procedures, if the cervical dilation method does not reduce pregnancy rates. This experiment was conducted to determine whether estradiol-17beta-oxytocin treatment, which dilates the cervix in luteal-phase ewes, affects pregnancy rat...

  6. An On-Farm Survey of Spatial and Temporal Stratifications of 17ß-Estradiol Concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    17ß-estradiol (E2), a natural estrogenic hormone, may cause endocrine disruption in sensitive organisms. It has been reported to dissipate rapidly in soil laboratory studies, but is frequently detected in the environment leading to question about possible sources and processes that explain the mobil...

  7. Effects of bromocriptine on (/sup 3/H)estradiol binding in cytosol of anterior pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    De Nicola, A.F.; Weisenberg, L.S.; Arakelian, M.C.; Libertun, C.

    1981-07-01

    The hypothalamus may control hormone receptors in the anterior pituitary either by a direct trophic effect or indirectly by regulation of serum pituitary hormone levels. Rats whose medial basal hypothalamus had been destroyed in order to suppress neural control of the gland showed a reduction in (/sup 3/H)estradiol binding in the anterior pituitary and high serum PRL levels; both changes were reversed by treatment of the lesioned rats with daily injections of bromocriptine, a dopamine agonist. In nonlesioned animals, the same treatment did not modify significantly those parameters. In another hyperprolactinemic model (rats with anterior pituitaries transplanted under the kidney capsule), (/sup 3/H)estradiol binding by the in situ pituitaries of the host rats was similar to that in the nongrafted controls. These results suggest that changes due to median eminence lesion are reversible and that bromocriptine is able to act as a substitutive therapy which restores binding of estradiol in glands whose receptors have been decreased by the effect of the lesion. High PRL levels due to pituitary transplant do not account for the observed changes in the pituitary estradiol binding.

  8. Estradiol regulates expression of miRNAs associated with myogenesis in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    17-Estradiol (E2) is a steroid hormone that negatively affects muscle growth in rainbow trout, but the mechanism associated with this response is not fully understood. To better characterize the effects of E2 on muscle, we identified differentially regulated microRNAs (miRNAs) and muscle atrophy-rel...

  9. 17ß-Estradiol Is Necessary for Extinction of Cocaine Seeking in Female Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twining, Robert C.; Tuscher, Jennifer J.; Doncheck, Elizabeth M.; Frick, Karyn M.; Mueller, Devin

    2013-01-01

    Human and preclinical models of addiction demonstrate that gonadal hormones modulate acquisition of drug seeking. Little is known, however, about the effects of these hormones on extinction of drug-seeking behavior. Here, we investigated how 17ß-estradiol (E[subscript 2]) affects expression and extinction of cocaine seeking in female rats. Using a…

  10. EFFECTS OF ETHINYL ESTRADIOL ON GONDAL DEVELOPMENT AND PATHOLOGY IN CUNNER, TAUTOGOLABRUS ADSPERSUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The intent of this study was to determine histopathologically the effect of ethinyl estradiol (EE2) on gonadal development, liver and kidney condition in reproductively active cunner, Tautogolabrus adspersus. Reproductively active cunner were treated by implanting EE2 in a slow r...

  11. Cortisol interferes with the estradiol-induced surge of luteinizing hormone in the ewe.

    PubMed

    Wagenmaker, Elizabeth R; Breen, Kellie M; Oakley, Amy E; Pierce, Bree N; Tilbrook, Alan J; Turner, Anne I; Karsch, Fred J

    2009-03-01

    Two experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that cortisol interferes with the positive feedback action of estradiol that induces the luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. Ovariectomized sheep were treated sequentially with progesterone and estradiol to create artificial estrous cycles. Cortisol or vehicle (saline) was infused from 2 h before the estradiol stimulus through the time of the anticipated LH surge in the artificial follicular phase of two successive cycles. The plasma cortisol increment produced by infusion was approximately 1.5 times greater than maximal concentrations seen during infusion of endotoxin, which is a model of immune/inflammatory stress. In experiment 1, half of the ewes received vehicle in the first cycle and cortisol in the second; the others were treated in reverse order. All ewes responded with an LH surge. Cortisol delayed the LH surge and reduced its amplitude, but both effects were observed only in the second cycle. Experiment 2 was modified to provide better control for a cycle effect. Four treatment sequences were tested (cycle 1-cycle 2): vehicle-vehicle, cortisol-cortisol, vehicle-cortisol, cortisol-vehicle. Again, cortisol delayed but did not block the LH surge, and this delay occurred in both cycles. Thus, an elevation in plasma cortisol can interfere with the positive feedback action of estradiol by delaying and attenuating the LH surge.

  12. Conversion of estrone to estradiol in male fathead minnows: Implications for assessing risk

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogens are frequently observed in aquatic environments associated with anthropogenic influence, such as agricultural runoff and wastewater treatment effluent. While 17â-estradiol (E2) is the most potent naturally-occurring estrogen, estrone (E1) is often found at higher ...

  13. Effect of estradiol on chlamydial genital infection of female guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Rank, R G; White, H J; Hough, A J; Pasley, J N; Barron, A L

    1982-11-01

    Female guinea pigs were treated daily with 1 mg of beta-estradiol-3-benzoate intramuscularly beginning 14 days before intravaginal inoculation with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis and continuing during the course of the infection. Treatment with estradiol was found to markedly influence the course of genital infection with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis, producing infections of greater intensity and longer duration than those in control animals. Moreover, pathogenesis was altered in that ascending infection was observed, resulting in endometritis, cystic salpingitis, and cystitis. Infection in the controls was limited to the cervix and vagina. Estradiol treatment increased the apparent number of infected cells in the cervix and vagina as detected by histopathology and immunofluorescent staining. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis were comparable in estradiol-treated and untreated animals. These data indicate that hormonal manipulation may have profound effects on the course of chlamydial genital infections.

  14. Isolation and Bioaugmentation of an Estradiol-Degrading Bacterium and Its Integration into a Mature Biofilm▿

    PubMed Central

    Iasur-Kruh, Lilach; Hadar, Yitzhak; Minz, Dror

    2011-01-01

    Bioaugmentation can alter the potential activity as well as the composition of the naturally occurring microbial biota during bioremediation of a contaminated site. The focus of the current study is the pollutant 17β-estradiol (E2), which can cause endocrine effects and is potentially harmful to aquatic biota and to public health. The community composition and function of biofilms, originating from a wetland system, as affected by augmentation of an estradiol-degrading bacterium (EDB-LI1) under different conditions, were investigated. EDB-LI1 inoculation into biofilm from two wetland ponds representing early and advanced water treatment stages, respectively, yielded three significant observations, as follows: (i) EDB-LI1, enriched from a biofilm of a constructed wetland wastewater treatment system, was detected (by quantitative PCR [qPCR] analysis) in this environment in the augmented biofilm only; (ii) the augmented biofilm acquired the ability to remove estradiol; and (iii) the bacterial community composition (analyzed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis [DGGE]) of the augmented biofilm differed from that of the control biofilm. Furthermore, EDB-LI1 bioaugmentation showed a higher level of removal of estradiol with biofilms that originated from the advanced-treatment-stage wetland pond than those from the early-treatment-stage pond. Hence, the bioaugmentation efficiency of EDB-LI1 depends on both the quality of the feed water and the microbial community composition in the pond. PMID:21478310

  15. Effects of liquid swine manure on sorption of 17ß-estradiol to soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogens are potent endocrine disrupting chemicals and can be found in the environment. Animal manure can contain estrogenic hormones, specifically 17'-estradiol (E2). A common manure management practice is to contain liquid manure in a manure storage ponds or lagoons, which is then applied on or i...

  16. Sorption and Degradation of 17ß-Estradiol-17Sulfate in Agricultural Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the environment, the natural estrogenic hormone, 17ß-estradiol (E2) can potentially induce endocrine disruptions at low concentrations, i.e. 1-10 ng/L. Laboratory based studies have found low potentials for the persistence and mobility of E2 in the environment due to its high degradation and/or s...

  17. Sexual Function in Women on Estradiol or Venlafaxine for Hot Flushes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Susan D.; Mitchell, Caroline M.; Joffe, Hadine; Cohen, Lee; Shifren, Jan L.; Newton, Katherine M.; Freeman, Ellen W.; Larson, Joseph C.; Manson, JoAnn E.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Guthrie, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate sexual function in midlife women taking low-dose oral estradiol or venlafaxine for hot flushes. Methods In an 8-week randomized controlled trial among women aged 40-62 years, sexual function was compared between oral estradiol 0.5 mg/day or venlafaxine 75 mg/day (both compared with placebo). Measures included composite and 6 domain scores from the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and sexually related personal distress. Results Participants were aged 54.6 (standard deviation [SD] 3.8) years, 59% Caucasian, with 8.1 (SD 5.3) daily hot flushes. Median composite baseline FSFI score was 16.3 (SD 11.9, n=256) for all women and 21.7 (SD 9.3, n=198) among sexually active women. Composite mean FSFI change from baseline to week-8 was 1.4 (95% Confidence Interval [CI] -0.4, 3.2) for estradiol, 1.1 (95% CI -0.5, 2.7) for venlafaxine and -0.3 (95% CI -1.6, 1.0) for placebo. Composite FSFI and sexually-related distress change from baseline did not differ between estradiol and placebo (p= 0.38, p=0.30) or venlafaxine and placebo (p=0.79, p=0.48). Among sexually active women, FSFI domain score change from baseline differences (active compared with placebo) in desire was 0.3 (95% CI 0.0, 0.6) for estradiol; -0.6 (95% CI -1.2, 0.0) in orgasm for venlafaxine, and 0.9 (95% CI 0.2, 1.6) in penetration pain for venlafaxine. No women reported adverse events related to sexual dysfunction. Conclusions Overall sexual function among nondepressed midlife women experiencing hot flushes did not change over 8-weeks with low-dose oral estradiol or venlafaxine (compared with placebo), although subtle increase in desire (estradiol), and decreases in orgasm and pain (venlafaxine) may exist. PMID:25004335

  18. Seasonal variation and estradiol-dependent elevation of Thames estuary eel Anguilla anguilla plasma vitellogenin levels and comparisons with other United Kingdom estuaries.

    PubMed

    Peters, L D; Doyotte, A; Mitchelmore, C L; McEvoy, J; Livingstone, D R

    2001-11-12

    Eel Anguilla anguilla plasma vitellogenin was investigated as a biomarker of exposure to environmental compounds with estrogenic activity, along the tidal course of the Thames Estuary, UK. A. anguilla was chosen as a sentinel species because of their wide distribution, robustness in field and laboratory studies and also because they have a characterised normal intersex' condition where the gonad contains both developing male and female gonadal cells termed a Syrski organ. Following laboratory exposure to 17beta-estradiol (intraperitoneal injection), a plasma protein (approx. 211 kDa apparent molecular weight) was detected by monoclonal antibodies to vitellogenin of striped bass (Morone saxatilis). Western and dot blot analyses were developed and vitellogenin was isolated from 17beta-estradiol-treated fish to calibrate the quantification of the blots by image analysis. The limits of sensitivity for the Western and dot blots were 100 and 10 ng vitellogenin/ml, respectively. Levels of vitellogenin in Thames estuary samples were below the detection limits of the Western but not the dot blot, and showed no statistically significant site-specific (10 sites) and seasonal-specific (May, August, November) differences. Values were observed to be low, between 11 and 165 ng/ml, compared with 17-50 mg/ml for 17beta-estradiol-treated eels. Similar low levels of plasma vitellogenin were determined in fish sampled along the Tyne, Wear, Tees or Humber estuaries, or the Weston canal Liverpool, with mean plasma vitellogenin levels varying between 44 and 82 ng/ml. These levels of vitellogenin in A. anguilla plasma were observed to be consistent with the known biology of the eel. Immature females, or fish with syrski organs, reported both lower levels and smaller variation of plasma vitellogenin concentrations whereas the highest plasma vitellogenin concentrations were determined in fish above 45 cm consistent with female fish. These results indicate inter-species variation between the

  19. Diethylstilbestrol can effectively accelerate estradiol-17-O-glucuronidation, while potently inhibiting estradiol-3-O-glucuronidation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Liangliang; Xiao, Ling; Xia, Yangliu; Zhou, Kun; Wang, Huili; Huang, Minyi; Ge, Guangbo; Wu, Yan; Wu, Ganlin; Yang, Ling

    2015-03-01

    This in vitro study investigates the effects of diethylstilbestrol (DES), a widely used toxic synthetic estrogen, on estradiol-3- and 17-O- (E2-3/17-O) glucuronidation, via culturing human liver microsomes (HLMs) or recombinant UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) with DES and E2. DES can potently inhibit E2-3-O-glucuronidation in HLM, a probe reaction for UGT1A1. Kinetic assays indicate that the inhibition follows a competitive inhibition mechanism, with the Ki value of 2.1 ± 0.3 μM, which is less than the possible in vivo level. In contrast to the inhibition on E2-3-O-glucuronidation, the acceleration is observed on E2-17-O-glucuronidation in HLM, in which cholestatic E2-17-O-glucuronide is generated. In the presence of DES (0–6.25 μM), K{sub m} values for E2-17-O-glucuronidation are located in the range of 7.2–7.4 μM, while V{sub max} values range from 0.38 to 1.54 nmol/min/mg. The mechanism behind the activation in HLM is further demonstrated by the fact that DES can efficiently elevate the activity of UGT1A4 in catalyzing E2-17-O-glucuronidation. The presence of DES (2 μM) can elevate V{sub max} from 0.016 to 0.81 nmol/min/mg, while lifting K{sub m} in a much lesser extent from 4.4 to 11 μM. Activation of E2-17-O-glucuronidation is well described by a two binding site model, with K{sub A}, α, and β values of 0.077 ± 0.18 μM, 3.3 ± 1.1 and 104 ± 56, respectively. However, diverse effects of DES towards E2-3/17-O-glucuronidation are not observed in liver microsomes from several common experimental animals. In summary, this study issues new potential toxic mechanisms for DES: potently inhibiting the activity of UGT1A1 and powerfully accelerating the formation of cholestatic E2-17-O-glucuronide by UGT1A4. - Highlights: • E2-3-O-glucuronidation in HLM is inhibited when co-incubated with DES. • E2-17-O-glucuronidation in HLM is stimulated when co-incubated with DES. • Acceleration of E2-17-O-glucuronidationin in HLM by DES is via activating the

  20. Naturally-occurring estradiol-17{beta}-fatty acid esters, but not estradiol-17{beta}, preferentially induce mammary tumorigenesis in female rats: Implications for an important role in human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Laura H.; Yu Jina; Xu Xiaomeng; Lee, Anthony J.; Zhu Baoting

    2008-06-15

    Because mammary glands are surrounded by adipose tissues, we hypothesize that the ultra-lipophilic endogenous estrogen-17{beta}-fatty acid esters may have preferential hormonal and carcinogenic effects in mammary tissues compared to other target organs (such as the uterus and pituitary). This hypothesis is tested in the present study. We found that all 46 rats implanted with an estradiol-17{beta} pellet developed large pituitary tumors (average weight = 251 {+-}103 mg) and had to be terminated early, but only 48% of them developed mammary tumors. In addition, approximately one-fourth of them developed a huge uterus. In the 26 animals implanted with a mixture containing estradiol-17{beta}-stearate and estradiol-17{beta}-palmitate (two representative estradiol-17{beta}-fatty acid esters) or in the 29 animals implanted with estradiol-17{beta}-stearate alone (in the same molar dose as estradiol-17{beta}), 73% and 79%, respectively, of them developed mammary tumors, whereas only 3 or 2 animals, respectively, had to be terminated early due to the presence of a large pituitary tumor. Both tumorous and normal mammary tissues contained much higher levels of estrogen esterase than other tissues, which catalyzes the releases of bioactive estrogens from their fatty acid esters. In conclusion, while estradiol-17{beta} is much stronger in inducing pituitary tumor (100% incidence) than mammary tumor, estradiol-17{beta}-fatty acid esters have a higher efficacy than estradiol-17{beta} in inducing mammary tumor and yet it only has little ability to induce uterine out-growth and pituitary tumorigenesis. This study establishes the endogenous estrogen-17{beta}-fatty acid esters as preferential inducers of mammary tumorigenesis.

  1. Analyzing the influence of BDNF heterozygosity on spatial memory response to 17β-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y W C; Du, X; van den Buuse, M; Hill, R A

    2015-01-20

    The recent use of estrogen-based therapies as adjunctive treatments for the cognitive impairments of schizophrenia has produced promising results; however the mechanism behind estrogen-based cognitive enhancement is relatively unknown. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates learning and memory and its expression is highly responsive to estradiol. We recently found that estradiol modulates the expression of hippocampal parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons, known to regulate neuronal synchrony and cognitive function. What is unknown is whether disruptions to the aforementioned estradiol-parvalbumin pathway alter learning and memory, and whether BDNF may mediate these events. Wild-type (WT) and BDNF heterozygous (+/-) mice were ovariectomized (OVX) at 5 weeks of age and simultaneously received empty, estradiol- or progesterone-filled implants for 7 weeks. At young adulthood, mice were tested for spatial and recognition memory in the Y-maze and novel-object recognition test, respectively. Hippocampal protein expression of BDNF and GABAergic interneuron markers, including parvalbumin, were assessed. WT OVX mice show impaired performance on Y-maze and novel-object recognition test. Estradiol replacement in OVX mice prevented the Y-maze impairment, a Behavioral abnormality of dorsal hippocampal origin. BDNF and parvalbumin protein expression in the dorsal hippocampus and parvalbumin-positive cell number in the dorsal CA1 were significantly reduced by OVX in WT mice, while E2 replacement prevented these deficits. In contrast, BDNF(+/-) mice showed either no response or an opposite response to hormone manipulation in both behavioral and molecular indices. Our data suggest that BDNF status is an important biomarker for predicting responsiveness to estrogenic compounds which have emerged as promising adjunctive therapeutics for schizophrenia patients.

  2. Transcriptome Profile of Rat Adrenal Evoked by Gonadectomy and Testosterone or Estradiol Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jopek, Karol; Celichowski, Piotr; Szyszka, Marta; Tyczewska, Marianna; Milecka, Paulina; Malendowicz, Ludwik K.; Rucinski, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    Sex differences in adrenal cortex structure and function are well known in different species. In the rat, they are manifested as larger adrenal cortex and higher corticosterone secretion by females compared with males. These sex differences depend, among others, on functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA). In this aspect, it is widely accepted that testosterone exerts an inhibitory and estradiol stimulatory effect on the said axis. The molecular bases of these sex-related differences are poorly understood. Therefore, we performed studies aimed to demonstrate the effect of testosterone and estradiol on the expression of differentially regulated genes in rat adrenal gland. The classical method applied in the study—gonadectomy and gonadal hormone replacement—allows obtaining results suggesting a physiological role of the tested hormone (testosterone or estradiol) in the regulation of the specific genes. Adult male and female rats were either gonadectomized or sham operated. Half of orchiectomized rats were replaced with testosterone while ovariectomized ones with estradiol. Transcriptome was identified by means of Affymetrix® Rat Gene 2.1 ST Array. Differentially expressed genes were analyzed by means of DAVID web-based bioinformatic tools and confirmed by means of Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. For selected genes, validation of the results was performed using QPCR. Performed experiments have provided unexpected results. Contrary to expectations, in orchiectomized rats, testosterone replacement stimulates expression of numerous genes, mainly those associated with lipids and cholesterol metabolism. However, in ovariectomized animals, estradiol replacement inhibits the expression of genes, mainly those involved in intracellular signaling pathways. The physiological relevance of these findings awaits further research. PMID:28261157

  3. 17β-Estradiol reduces nitric oxide production in the Guinea pig cochlea.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, U-R; Brieger, J; Striedter, C; Fischer, I; Schmidtmann, I; Li, H; Mann, W J; Helling, K

    2013-11-01

    Intense noise exposure and the application of ototoxic substances result in increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), such as nitric oxide (NO). In order to reduce the free NO concentration in the inner ear under pathological conditions, the use of natural cytoprotective substances such as 17β-estradiol is a promising therapeutic concept. In male guinea pigs the organ of Corti and the lateral wall were isolated from the cochlea and afterwards incubated for 6 h in cell-culture medium. 17β-Estradiol was adjusted in 2 concentrations to organ cultures of the right ears (12 animals per concentration). The left ears were used as controls. The NO production was quantified in the supernatant by chemiluminescence after incubation. Depending on the concentration, 17β-estradiol reduced NO in the organ of Corti by 43% (p=0.015) and 46% (p=0.026), respectively. In the lateral wall, the NO concentration was reduced by 24%, but without statistical significance (p=0.86). However, when analyzing the association between the 2 cochlear regions for each animal separately, the NO concentrations were lower in nearly all 17β-estradiol-treated ears compared to controls. In order to demonstrate the flexibility of the organ culture system, the NO donor DETA NONOate and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitors L-NAME and L-NMMA were applied. The electron microscopic analysis revealed a well-preserved cochlear cell morphology after incubation. The ability of 17β-estradiol to influence the NO production preferentially in the organ of Corti might offer new therapeutic perspectives for inner ear protection.

  4. Repeated Estradiol Treatment Attenuates Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion-Induced Neurodegeneration in Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Stanojlović, Miloš; Guševac, Ivana; Grković, Ivana; Mitrović, Nataša; Zlatković, Jelena; Horvat, Anica; Drakulić, Dunja

    2016-08-01

    Although a substantial number of pre-clinical and experimental studies have investigated effects of 17β-estradiol, its precise molecular mechanism of action in the early state of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion remains controversial. The present study attempted to verify whether post-ischemic estradiol treatment (33.3 μg/kg for seven consecutive days) affects previously reported number of hippocampal apoptotic cells and amount of DNA fragmentation characteristic for apoptosis as well as the expression of key elements within synaptosomal Akt and Erk signal transduction pathways (NF-κB, Bax, Bcl-2, cytochrome C, caspase 3, and PARP). Additionally, alterations of aforementioned molecules linked to protection in various neurodegenerative disorders were monitored in the cytosolic, mitochondrial, and nuclear fractions associating investigated kinases and NF-κB with gene expression of their downstream effectors-Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase 3. The results revealed that an initial increase in the number of apoptotic cells and amount of DNA fragmentation induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion was significantly reduced by 17β-estradiol. In synaptic regions, an altered profile with respect to the protein expression of Bcl-2 and phosphorylated Akt was detected, although the level of other examined proteins was not modified. In other investigated sub-cellular fractions, 17β-estradiol elicited phosphorylation and translocation of Akt and Erk along with modulation of the expression of their subsequent effectors. Our findings support the concept that repeated post-ischemic 17β-estradiol treatment attenuates neurodegeneration induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion in hippocampus through the activation of investigated kinases and regulation of their downstream molecules in sub-cellular manner indicating a time window and regime of its administration as a valid therapeutic intervention.

  5. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 4-(hydroxyalkyl)estradiols and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Lovely, C J; Bhat, A S; Coughenour, H D; Gilbert, N E; Brueggemeier, R W

    1997-11-07

    A series of synthetic estrogens containing hydroxyalkyl side chains at the C-4 position of the A ring were designed as metabolically stable analogs of 4-hydroxyestradiol, a catechol estrogen. These synthetic steroids would facilitate investigations on the potential biological role of catechol estrogens and also enable further examination of the structural and electronic constraints on the A ring in the interaction of estrogens with the estrogen receptor. Catechol estrogens are implicated as possible causative agents in estrogen-induced tumorigenesis. 4-Hydroxyestradiol has weaker affinity for the estrogen receptor and exhibits lower estrogenic activity in vivo; on the other hand, the catechol estrogens are prone to further oxidative metabolism and can form reactive intermediates. This report describes the synthesis and initial biochemical evaluation of 4-(hydroxyalkyl)estrogens and 4-(aminoalkyl)estradiols. The 4-(hydroxyalkyl)estrogens were prepared by oxidative hydroboration of 4-alkenylestradiols. The alkenylestradiols were obtained via a Stille cross-coupling between a MOM-protected 4-bromoestradiol and an alkenylstannane. The (4-aminoalkyl)estrogens were prepared from the hydroxyalkyl derivatives with phthalimide under Mitsunobu conditions. The substituted estradiols were evaluated for estrogen receptor binding activity in MCF-7 human mammary carcinoma cells, and 4-(hydroxymethyl)estradiol 1 exhibited the highest affinity with an apparent EC50 value of 364 nM. The relative activities for mRNA induction of the pS2 gene in MCF-7 cell cultures by the 4-(hydroxyalkyl)estrogens closely parallel the relative binding affinities. 4-(Hydroxymethyl)estradiol 1 did not stimulate the growth of MCF-7 cells at concentrations up to 1 microM. Thus, 4-(hydroxymethyl)estradiol 1 exhibited similar estrogen receptor affinity as the catechol estrogen, 4-hydroxyestradiol, and may prove useful in the examination of the biological effects of 4-hydroxyestrogens.

  6. DREAM/calsenilin/KChIP3 modulates strategy selection and estradiol-dependent learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Tunur, Tumay; Stelly, Claire E; Schrader, Laura Ann

    2013-11-18

    Downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM)/calsenilin(C)/K⁺ channel interacting protein 3 (KChIP3) is a multifunctional Ca²⁺-binding protein highly expressed in the hippocampus that inhibits hippocampus-sensitive memory and synaptic plasticity in male mice. Initial studies in our lab suggested opposing effects of DR/C/K3 expression in female mice. Fluctuating hormones that occur during the estrous cycle may affect these results. In this study, we hypothesized that DR/C/K3 interacts with 17β-estradiol, the primary estrogen produced by the ovaries, to play a role in hippocampus function. We investigated the role of estradiol and DR/C/K3 in learning strategy in ovariectomized (OVX) female mice. OVX WT and DR/C/K3 knockout (KO) mice were given three injections of vehicle (sesame oil) or 17β-estradiol benzoate (0.25 mg in 100 mL sesame oil) 48, 24, and 2 h before training and testing. DR/C/K3 and estradiol had a time-dependent effect on strategy use in the female mice. Male KO mice exhibited enhanced place strategy relative to WT 24 h after pre-exposure. Fear memory formation was significantly reduced in intact female KO mice relative to intact WT mice, and OVX reduced fear memory formation in the WT, but had no effect in the KO mice. Long-term potentiation in hippocampus slices from female mice was enhanced by circulating ovarian hormones in both WT and DR/C/K3 KO mice. Paired-pulse depression was not affected by ovarian hormones but was reduced in DR/C/K3 KO mice. These results provide the first evidence that DR/C/K3 plays a timing-dependent role in estradiol regulation of learning, memory, and plasticity.

  7. Estradiol Binds to Insulin and Insulin Receptor Decreasing Insulin Binding in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Podufaly, Abigail; Dillon, Patrick F.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Insulin (INS) resistance associated with hyperestrogenemias occurs in gestational diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovary syndrome, ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, estrogen therapies, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. The mechanism by which INS and estrogen interact is unknown. We hypothesize that estrogen binds directly to INS and the insulin receptor (IR) producing INS resistance. Objectives: To determine the binding constants of steroid hormones to INS, the IR, and INS-like peptides derived from the IR; and to investigate the effect of estrogens on the binding of INS to its receptor. Methods: Ultraviolet spectroscopy, capillary electrophoresis, and NMR demonstrated estrogen binding to INS and its receptor. Horse-radish peroxidase-linked INS was used in an ELISA-like procedure to measure the effect of estradiol on binding of INS to its receptor. Measurements: Binding constants for estrogens to INS and the IR were determined by concentration-dependent spectral shifts. The effect of estradiol on INS binding to its receptor was determined by shifts in the INS binding curve. Main Results: Estradiol bound to INS with a Kd of 12 × 10−9 M and to the IR with a Kd of 24 × 10−9 M, while other hormones had significantly less affinity. Twenty-two nanomolars of estradiol shifted the binding curve of INS to its receptor 0.8 log units to the right. Conclusion: Estradiol concentrations in hyperestrogenemic syndromes may interfere with INS binding to its receptor producing significant INS resistance. PMID:25101056

  8. Influence of dynorphin on estradiol- and cervical stimulation-induced prolactin surges in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, Andrea M; Helena, Cleyde V; Cristancho-Gordo, Ruth; Gonzalez-Iglesias, Arturo E; Bertram, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Prolactin is an anterior pituitary hormone necessary for fertility, pregnancy maintenance, lactation, and aspects of maternal behavior. In rodents, there is a surge of prolactin on the afternoon of proestrus, and a semi-circadian pattern of prolactin surges during early pregnancy, with a diurnal and nocturnal surge every day. Both of these patterns can be replicated in ovariectomized rats. A prior study demonstrated that central antagonism of κ-opioid receptors, the target of dynorphin, largely abolished the nocturnal prolactin surge in pregnant rats. We build on this to determine whether dynorphin, perhaps from the arcuate population that co-express kisspeptin, neurokinin B, and dynorphin (KNDy neurons), also contributes to the estradiol- or cervical stimulation-induced surges in ovariectomized rats. Ovariectomized rats were treated with either estradiol or cervical stimulation to induce prolactin surge(s). Blood samples were taken around the expected surge time to determine the effect of either acute κ-opioid receptor antagonism or previous chemical ablation of the KNDy population on prolactin levels. Dynorphin antagonism does significantly disrupt the nocturnal prolactin surge, but it does not contribute to the estradiol-induced surge. Chemical ablation of KNDy neurons had opposite effects; ablation of 40 % of the KNDy neurons had no impact on the nocturnal prolactin surge, while a somewhat larger ablation significantly reduced the size of the estradiol-induced surge. We conclude that dynorphin is likely a controlling factor for the nocturnal surge induced by cervical stimulation, and that other KNDy neuron products must play a role in the estradiol-induced surge.

  9. Reproductive effects on freshwater fish exposed to 17α-trenbolone and 17α-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Joseph A; Staveley, Jane P; Constantine, Lisa

    2017-03-01

    17α-Trenbolone and 17α-estradiol are principal metabolites in cattle excreta following the administration of Synovex(®) ONE, which contains trenbolone acetate and estradiol benzoate. As part of the environmental assessment of the use of Synovex(®) ONE, data were generated to characterize the effects of 17α-trenbolone and 17α-estradiol on the reproduction of freshwater fish. These substances are known endocrine disruptors, so the purpose of testing was not to clarify these properties but to identify concentrations representing population-relevant effects for use in risk characterization. The short-term reproduction assay was conducted with 17α-trenbolone using the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and the medaka (Oryzias latipes) and with 17α-estradiol using the fathead minnow. Adverse effects on the population-relevant endpoints of survival and fecundity were used to establish the no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) and the lowest-observed-effect concentration (LOEC) for each study. For 17α-trenbolone, adverse effects on fecundity of the fathead minnow occurred at 120 ng/L; this was the LOEC, and the NOEC was 35 ng/L. 17β-Trenbolone did not adversely affect survival and fecundity of medaka at the concentrations tested, resulting in a NOEC of 110 ng/L and a LOEC of >110 ng/L. 17α-Estradiol did not adversely impact survival and fecundity of the fathead minnow at the concentrations tested, resulting in a NOEC and LOEC of 250 ng/L and >250 ng/L, respectively. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:636-644. © 2016 SETAC.

  10. High endogenous estradiol is associated with enhanced cognitive emotion regulation of physiological conditioned fear responses in women.

    PubMed

    Graham, Bronwyn M; Ash, Catherine; Den, Miriam L

    2017-02-28

    The sex hormone estradiol has a modifying role in the underlying neurobiology of cognitive emotion regulation, although whether estradiol is associated with outcomes of techniques like cognitive restructuring is unknown. In the present study 34 women with regular menstrual cycles participated in a one-day differential fear conditioning procedure. Women then received cognitive restructuring training, involving the reappraisal of their initial thoughts about the conditioning procedure to reduce their emotional responses, before repeating the conditioning procedure. Endogenous estradiol levels (ascertained by a blood sample) were not associated with subjective or physiological indices of conditioned fear during the first conditioning session. Following cognitive restructuring, however, women with high estradiol exhibited significantly reduced physiological arousal in the presence of the conditioned stimulus, relative to women with low estradiol. No group differences were observed in subjective fear ratings obtained after the second conditioning procedure, although those obtained during the second habitation phase (taking place immediately following cognitive restructuring) were lower amongst high estradiol women. Progesterone was not associated with any outcomes measures. Together, these results suggest that the outcomes of cognitive emotion regulation may be enhanced during periods of naturally high estradiol.

  11. beta-estradiol influences differentiation of hippocampal neurons in vitro through an estrogen receptor-mediated process.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, T; Cabell, L; Kern, M; Audesirk, G

    2003-01-01

    We utilized morphometric analysis of 3 day cultures of hippocampal neurons to determine the effects of both estradiol and the synthetic estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene on several parameters of neuronal growth and differentiation. These measurements included survival, neurite production, dendrite number, and axon and dendrite length and branching. 17 beta-Estradiol (10 nM) selectively stimulated dendrite branching; this effect was neither mimicked by alpha-estradiol, nor blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780. The selective estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene (100 nM) neither mimicked nor reversed the effects of estradiol on dendritic branching. Western immunoblotting for the alpha and beta subtypes of estrogen receptor revealed the presence of alpha, but not beta, estrogen receptors in our hippocampal cultures. There is growing recognition of the effects of 17 beta-estradiol on neuronal development and physiology, with implications for brain sexual dimorphism, plasticity, cognition, and the maintenance of cognitive function during aging. The role of estradiol in hippocampal neuronal differentiation and function has particular implications for learning and memory. These data support the hypothesis that 17 beta-estradiol is acting via alpha estrogen receptors in influencing hippocampal development in vitro. Raloxifene, prescribed to combat osteoporosis in post-menopausal women, is a selective estrogen receptor modulator with tissue-specific agonist/antagonist properties. Because raloxifene had no effect on dendritic branching, we hypothesize that it does not interact with the alpha estrogen receptor in this experimental paradigm.

  12. Estradiol is associated with altered cognitive and physiological responses during fear conditioning and extinction in healthy and spider phobic women.

    PubMed

    Li, Stella; Graham, Bronwyn M

    2016-12-01

    The first-line psychological treatment for anxiety disorders is exposure therapy, which can be modeled in the laboratory using fear extinction. In healthy women, estradiol levels predict return of fear following extinction, whereas low levels are associated with greater return of fear. Investigating whether estradiol is similarly associated with extinction in clinically anxious women may provide insight to mechanisms underlying symptom relapse following exposure therapy. In the present study, women with spider phobia and healthy women participated in a 2-day fear conditioning and extinction procedure during a period of high or low estradiol levels. Skin conductance responses, shock expectancy, and valence ratings were measured throughout. Women exhibited comparable decreases in physiological arousal from conditioning to the end of extinction training on Day 1. However, compared to women with high estradiol, and irrespective of clinical status, women with low estradiol exhibited significant return of physiological arousal at extinction recall on Day 2, despite accurate ratings regarding the likelihood of shock. Low estradiol women also reported heightened threat expectancy and physiological responding during presentation of safety cues. These results may point to novel means of enhancing exposure therapy in women by timing treatment delivery during periods of higher estradiol levels. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Investigation of the effects of magnetic field exposure on human melatonin. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.; Cook, M.R.; Cohen, H.D.

    1994-08-01

    Several rodent studies have suggested that magnetic field exposure may alter the daily pattern of melatonin secretion. This study investigated melatonin levels in mean exposed overnight to magnetic fields of 10 mG and 200 mG. The study also assessed the potential effects of exposure on a number of performance and self-reported endpoints in the subjects. Investigation of this area is important, as altered diurnal melatonin cycles have been linked to a variety of endpoints, including reproductive outcome, neurobehavioral function, and carcinogenesis. The results of this investigation did not support the a priori hypothesis that exposure to 60-Hz magnetic fields of 10 mG and 200 mG alters nighttime melatonin levels in a population of adult males. However, the data suggested the possibility of differential sensitivity to magnetic fields based on an individual`s baseline melatonin level.

  14. Estradiol promotes pentose phosphate pathway addiction and cell survival via reactivation of Akt in mTORC1 hyperactive cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Gu, X; Zhang, E; Park, M-A; Pereira, A M; Wang, S; Morrison, T; Li, C; Blenis, J; Gerbaudo, V H; Henske, E P; Yu, J J

    2014-05-15

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a female-predominant interstitial lung disease that can lead to respiratory failure. LAM cells typically have inactivating TSC2 mutations, leading to mTORC1 activation. The gender specificity of LAM suggests that estradiol contributes to disease development, yet the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are not completely understood. Using metabolomic profiling, we identified an estradiol-enhanced pentose phosphate pathway signature in Tsc2-deficient cells. Estradiol increased levels of cellular NADPH, decreased levels of reactive oxygen species, and enhanced cell survival under oxidative stress. Mechanistically, estradiol reactivated Akt in TSC2-deficient cells in vitro and in vivo, induced membrane translocation of glucose transporters (GLUT1 or GLUT4), and increased glucose uptake in an Akt-dependent manner. (18)F-FDG-PET imaging demonstrated enhanced glucose uptake in xenograft tumors of Tsc2-deficient cells from estradiol-treated mice. Expression array study identified estradiol-enhanced transcript levels of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), the rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway. Consistent with this, G6PD was abundant in xenograft tumors and lung metastatic lesions of Tsc2-deficient cells from estradiol-treated mice. Molecular depletion of G6PD attenuated estradiol-enhanced survival in vitro, and treatment with 6-aminonicotinamide, a competitive inhibitor of G6PD, reduced lung colonization of Tsc2-deficient cells. Collectively, these data indicate that estradiol promotes glucose metabolism in mTORC1 hyperactive cells through the pentose phosphate pathway via Akt reactivation and G6PD upregulation, thereby enhancing cell survival under oxidative stress. Interestingly, a strong correlation between estrogen exposure and G6PD was also found in breast cancer cells. Targeting the pentose phosphate pathway may have therapeutic benefit for LAM and possibly other hormonally dependent neoplasms.

  15. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibit growth and reduce estradiol levels of antral follicles in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Rupesh K.; Singh, Jeffery M.; Leslie, Tracie C.; Meachum, Sharon; Flaws, Jodi A.; Yao, Humphrey H-C

    2010-01-15

    Any insult that affects survival of ovarian antral follicles can cause abnormal estradiol production and fertility problems. Phthalate esters (PEs) are plasticizers used in a wide range of consumer and industrial products. Exposure to these chemicals has been linked to reduced fertility in humans and animal models. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) decrease serum estradiol levels and aromatase (Arom) expression, prolong estrous cycles, and cause anovulation in animal and culture models. These observations suggest PEs directly target antral follicles. We therefore tested the hypothesis that DEHP (1-100 mug/ml) and MEHP (0.1-10 mug/ml) directly inhibit antral follicular growth and estradiol production. Antral follicles from adult mice were cultured with DEHP or MEHP, and/or estradiol for 96 h. During culture, follicle size was measured every 24 h as a measurement of follicle growth. After culture, media were collected for measurement of estradiol levels and follicles were subjected to measurement of cylin-D-2 (Ccnd2), cyclin-dependant-kinase-4 (Cdk4), and Arom. We found that DEHP and MEHP inhibited growth of follicles and decreased estradiol production compared to controls at the highest doses. DEHP and MEHP also decreased mRNA expression of Ccnd2, Cdk4, and Arom at the highest dose. Addition of estradiol to the culture medium prevented the follicles from DEHP- and MEHP-induced inhibition of growth, reduction in estradiol levels, and decreased Ccnd2 and Cdk4 expression. Collectively, our results indicate that DEHP and MEHP may directly inhibit antral follicle growth via a mechanism that partially includes reduction in levels of estradiol production and decreased expression of cell cycle regulators.

  16. Effects of electromagnetic field exposure on the heart: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Elmas, Onur

    2016-01-01

    The use of electrical devices has gradually increased throughout the last century, and scientists have suggested that electromagnetic fields (EMF) generated by such devices may have harmful effects on living creatures. This work represents a systematic review of collective scholarly literature examining the effects of EMFs on the heart. Although most works describing effects of EMF exposure have been carried out using city electric frequencies (50-60 Hz), a consensus has not been reached about whether long- or short-term exposure to 50-60 Hz EMF negatively affects the heart. Studies have indicated that EMFs produced at cell-phone frequencies cause no-effect on the heart. Differences between results of studies may be due to a compensatory response developed by the body over time. At greater EMF strengths or shorter exposures, the ability of the body to develop compensation mechanisms is reduced and the potential for heart-related effects increases. It is noteworthy that diseases of heart tissues such as myocardial ischemia can also be successfully treated using EMF. Despite the substantial volume of data that has been collected on heart-related effects of EMFs, additional studies are needed at the cellular and molecular level to fully clarify the subject. Until the effects of EMF on heart tissue are more fully explored, electronic devices generating EMFs should be approached with caution.

  17. Effects of CB1 receptor agonism and antagonism on behavioral fear and physiological stress responses in adult intact, ovariectomized, and estradiol-replaced female rats.

    PubMed

    Simone, J J; Malivoire, B L; McCormick, C M

    2015-10-15

    There is growing interest in the development of cannabis-based therapies for the treatment of fear and anxiety disorders. There are a few studies, but none in females, of the effects of the highly selective cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) agonist, arachidonyl 2'-chlorethylamide (ACEA), on behavioral fear. In experiment 1 involving gonadally-intact females, ACEA (either 0.1 or 0.01 mg/kg) was without effect in the elevated plus maze (EPM), and the lower dose decreased anxiety in the open field test (OFT). AM251 increased anxiety in the EPM and decreased locomotor activity in the OFT. Twenty-four hours after fear conditioning, neither ACEA nor AM251 affected generalized fear or conditioned fear recall. AM251 and 0.1 mg/kg ACEA impaired, and 0.01 mg/kg ACEA enhanced, within-session fear extinction. AM251 increased plasma corticosterone concentrations after the fear extinction session, whereas ACEA was without effect. Based on evidence that estradiol may moderate the effects of CB1 receptor signaling in females, experiment 2 involved ovariectomized (OVX) rats provided with 10-μg 17β-Estradiol and compared with OVX rats without hormone replacement (oil vehicle). Irrespective of hormone treatment, AM251 increased anxiety in the EPM, whereas ACEA (0.01 mg/kg) was without effect. Neither hormone nor drug altered anxiety in the OFT, but estradiol increased and AM251 decreased distance traveled. After fear conditioning, AM251 decreased generalized fear. Neither hormone nor drug had any effect on recall or extinction of conditioned fear, however, ACEA and AM251 increased fear-induced plasma corticosterone concentrations. Further, when results with intact rats were compared with those from OVX rats, gonadal status did not moderate the effects of either AM251 or ACEA, although OVX displayed greater anxiety and fear than did intact rats. Thus, the effects of CB1 receptor antagonism and agonism in adult female rats do not depend on ovarian estradiol.

  18. Hepatic expression of heme oxygenase-1 and antioxidant response element-mediated genes following administration of ethinyl estradiol to rats

    SciTech Connect

    Morio, Lisa A.; Leone, Angelique; Sawant, Sharmilee P.; Nie, Alex Y.; Brandon Parker, J.; Taggart, Peter; Barron, Alfred M.; McMillian, Michael K. . E-mail: mmcmilli@prdus.jnj.com; Lord, Peter

    2006-11-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is one of several enzymes induced by hepatotoxicants, and is thought to have an important protective role against cellular stress during liver inflammation and injury. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the role of HO-1 in estradiol-induced liver injury. A single dose of ethinyl estradiol (500 mg/kg, po) resulted in mild liver injury. Repeated administration of ethinyl estradiol (500 mg/kg/day for 4 days, po) resulted in no detectable liver injury or dysfunction. Using RT-PCR analysis, we demonstrate that HO-1 gene expression in whole liver tissue is elevated (> 20-fold) after the single dose of ethinyl estradiol. The number and intensity of HO-1 immunoreactive macrophages were increased after the single dose of ethinyl estradiol. HO-1 expression was undetectable in hepatic parenchymal cells from rats receiving Methocel control or a single dose of ethinyl estradiol, however cytosolic HO-1 immunoreactivity in these cells after repeated dosing of ethinyl estradiol was pronounced. The increases in HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 immunoreactivity following administration of a single dose of ethinyl estradiol suggested that this enzyme might be responsible for the observed protection of the liver during repeated dosing. To investigate the effect of HO-1 expression on ethinyl estradiol-induced hepatotoxicity, rats were pretreated with hemin (50 {mu}mol/kg, ip, a substrate and inducer of HO-1), with tin protoporphyrin IX (60 {mu}mol/kg, ip, an HO-1 inhibitor), or with gadolinium chloride (10 mg/kg, iv, an inhibitor/toxin of Kupffer cells) 24 h before ethinyl estradiol treatment. Pretreatment with modulators of HO-1 expression and activity had generally minimal effects on ethinyl estradiol-induced liver injury. These data suggest that HO-1 plays a limited role in antioxidant defense against ethinyl estradiol-induced oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity, and suggests that other coordinately induced enzymes are responsible for protection observed

  19. Chemical reactivity as a tool to study carcinogenicity: reaction between estradiol and estrone 3,4-quinones ultimate carcinogens and guanine.

    PubMed

    Huetz, Ph; Kamarulzaman, E E; Wahab, H A; Mavri, J

    2004-01-01

    In this article we study the chemical reactions between guanine and two ultimate carcinogens, the 3,4-quinone forms of the estrogens estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2). DNA was truncated to guanine, i.e. no deoxyribose moiety was included. Due to a complex reaction that involves proton transfer via water molecules we applied linear free energy relationships rather than computation of the transition state and activation energies. The minima corresponding to reactants and products were obtained on the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. The effects of hydration were considered using the solvent reaction field of Tomasi and co-workers and the Langevin dipoles model of Florian and Warshel. No significant difference in reaction free energy for the reaction involving estrone and estradiol metabolites was found, despite the fact that for the two substances different carcinogenic activities were reported. Differences in carcinogenicity may be therefore attributed to other types of interactions or reactions such as (i) specific interactions of the carbonyl or hydroxyl group with DNA giving rise to different activation free energies for the reactions, (ii) the reaction of depurination and subsequent effects on the DNA, (iii) enzymatic or nonenzymatic oxidation steps (P450, aromatase, peroxidases, O2) and detoxification reactions (catechol-O-methyl transferase, S-transferase), or (iv) binding of the hormone to its nuclear receptors.

  20. Neuropeptidase activity is down-regulated by estradiol in steroid-sensitive regions of the hypothalamus in female mice

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Lisa A.; Cyr, Nicole E.; Qiao, Jana W.; DeFries, Christa C.; Tetel, Marc J.; Wolfson, Adele J.

    2012-01-01

    Thimet oligopeptidase (TOP) and prolyl endopeptidase (PEP) are neuropeptidases involved in the hydrolysis of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, a key component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. GnRH is regulated in part by feedback from steroid hormones such as estradiol. Previously, we demonstrated that TOP levels are down-regulated by estradiol in reproductively-relevant regions of the female rodent brain. The present study supports these findings by showing that TOP enzyme activity, as well as protein levels, in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus of female mice are controlled estradiol. We further demonstrate that PEP levels in this same brain region are down-regulated by estradiol in parallel with those of TOP. These findings provide evidence that these neuropeptidases are part of the fine control of hormone levels in the HPG axis. PMID:22672888

  1. COMPARISON OF THE ESTROGENIC POTENCIES OF ESTRADIOL, ETHYNYLESTRADIOL, DIETHYLSTILBESTROL, NONYLPHENOL AND METHOXYCHLOR IN VIVO AND IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five natural, pharmaceutical, or xenobiotic chemicals (17b-estradiol, ethynylestradiol, diethystilbestrol, nonylphenol, methoxychlor) were tested in two in vitro (MCF-7 breast tumor cell proliferation [E-screen], yeast estrogen system [YES]), and one in vivo (male sheepshead min...

  2. Androgen and estradiol levels in plasma and amniotic fluid of late gestational male and female hamsters: uterine position effects.

    PubMed

    Vomachka, A J; Lisk, R D

    1986-06-01

    Using radioimmunoassay we have measured the plasma and amniotic fluid levels of androgen and estradiol in male and female hamster fetuses nearing parturition. On Days 14 and 15 of gestation (day of birth = Day 16), plasma levels of androgen are higher in males than females while estradiol levels are equal. Amniotic fluid levels of these hormones, while lower than plasma, reflect the difference in androgen and the similarity in estradiol between sexes. Uterine position analysis on Day 14 suggests that female siblings located caudally suppress amniotic fluid androgen and elevate estradiol levels of male siblings. Comparison of Day 18 gestation male and female rat amniotic fluid androgen to Day 14 hamsters reveals that male rats are bathed in high levels of androgen. Female rats have lower levels which are not different from those of male hamsters. Female hamsters are exposed to little androgen. Relevance to behavioral sexual differentiation and the display of adult behavior is discussed.

  3. Gene expression responses of European flounder (Platichthys flesus) to 17-beta estradiol.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tim D; Diab, Amer M; George, Stephen G; Sabine, Victoria; Chipman, James K

    2007-02-05

    Male European flounder (Platichthys flesus) were intraperitoneally injected with 10mg/kg 17-beta estradiol and tissues taken from individuals over a timecourse of 16 days. The GENIPOL P. flesus cDNA microarray was employed to detect hepatic gene expression differences between fish treated with estradiol and saline controls. Known biomarkers of estrogen exposure, choriogenin L and vitellogenins, showed sustained induction over the time-course. Among 175 identified clones showing sustained statistically significant induction or repression, those associated with the Gene Ontology terms mitochondria, amino acid synthesis, ubiquitination and apoptosis were included amongst those induced while those associated with immune function, electron transport, cell signalling and protein phosphorylation were repressed. Thus, we show the gene expression response of an environmentally relevant fish species to a high dose of an estrogenic endocrine disruptor and also report the sequencing of a further 2121 flounder ESTs.

  4. Progesterone After Estradiol Modulates Shuttle-Cage Escape by Facilitating Volition

    PubMed Central

    Mayeaux, Darryl J.; Tandle, Sarah M.; Cilano, Sean M.; Fitzharris, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    In animal models of depression, depression is defined as performance on a learning task. That task is typically escaping a mild electric shock in a shuttle cage by moving from one side of the cage to the other. Ovarian hormones influence learning in other kinds of tasks, and these hormones are associated with depressive symptoms in humans. The role of these hormones in shuttle-cage escape learning, however, is less clear. This study manipulated estradiol and progesterone in ovariectomized female rats to examine their performance in shuttle-cage escape learning without intentionally inducing a depressive-like state. Progesterone, not estradiol, within four hours of testing affected latencies to escape. The improvement produced by progesterone was in the decision to act, not in the speed of learning or speed of escaping. This parallels depression in humans in that depressed people are slower in volition, in their decisions to take action. PMID:26823653

  5. Increased egg estradiol concentration feminizes digit ratios of male pheasants (Phasianus colchicus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saino, N.; Rubolini, D.; Romano, M.; Boncoraglio, G.

    2007-03-01

    The length ratio between individual digits differs between males and females in humans, other mammals, lizards, and one bird species. Sexual dimorphism in digit ratios and variation among individuals of the same sex may depend on differential exposure to androgens and estrogens during embryonic life. Organizational effects of sex hormones could cause the observed correlations between digit ratios and diverse phenotypic traits in humans. However, no study has investigated experimentally the effect of prenatal estrogens on digit ratios. We analyzed the effect of estradiol injection in ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) eggs on digit ratios. Males from control eggs had higher ratios between the second or third and the fourth digit of the right foot compared to females. Estradiol-treated eggs produced males with lower (feminized) right foot second to fourth digit ratio. Thus, we provided the first experimental evidence that prenatal exposure to physiologically high estrogen levels affects bird digit ratios.

  6. Matching plasmon resonances to the C=C and C-H bonds in estradiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbomson, Ifeoma G.; McMeekin, Scott; De La Rue, Richard; Johnson, Nigel P.

    2015-03-01

    We tune nanoantennas to resonate within mid-infrared wavelengths to match the vibrational resonances of C=C and C-H of the hormone estradiol. Modelling and fabrication of the nanoantennas produce plasmon resonances between 2 μm to 7 μm. The hormone estradiol was dissolved in ethanol and evaporated, leaving thickness of a few hundreds of nanometres on top of gold asymmetric split H-like shaped on a fused silica substrate. The reflectance was measured and a red-shift is recorded from the resonators plasmonic peaks. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is use to observe enhanced spectra of the stretching modes for the analyte which belongs to alkenyl biochemical group.

  7. Abnormal ovarian cycles as diagnosed by ultrasound and serum estradiol levels.

    PubMed

    Polan, M L; Totora, M; Caldwell, B V; DeCherney, A H; Haseltine, F P; Kase, N

    1982-03-01

    A significant portion of human infertility is presumably due to defective ovulation, including patients who fail to conceive despite medical induction of ovulation, those who fail despite repeated timely donor inseminations, and those with "infertility of unknown etiology". All point out the inadequacy of standard criteria for normal ovulation. This investigation correlates preovulatory serum estradiol and gonadotropin concentrations with dominant follicle growth measured ultrasonographically and serum progesterone levels. The data indicate a 35% incidence of cycles with significantly abnormal serum estradiol levels, decreased dominant follicle size, and abnormal progesterone levels despite biphasic basal body temperature curves and normal cycle length. If these cycles represent inadequate or abnormal ovulation, they can be distinguished from adequate cycles prior to follicle rupture and may benefit the treatment of human infertility.

  8. Bisphenol A and Estradiol are Equipotent in Antagonizing Cisplatin-Induced Cytotoxicity in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    LaPensee, Elizabeth W.; LaPensee, Christopher R.; Fox, Sejal; Schwemberger, Sandy; Afton, Scott; Ben-Jonathan, Nira

    2010-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a major problem facing breast cancer patients. Cisplatin, a highly effective DNA-damaging drug, has shown only little success in breast cancer treatment. We are reporting that low nanomolar doses of bisphenol A (BPA) or estradiol antagonize cisplatin cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells, with their effects not mediated via classical estrogen receptors. Although both compounds increase the expression of Bcl-2, a Bcl-2 inhibitor completely blocked the protective effects of BPA while only partially affecting those of estradiol. Blockade of BPA and E2 actions should sensitize ER-negative breast tumors to anti-cancer drugs and allow for the inclusion of cisplatin in treatment regimens. PMID:19796866

  9. Modulatory role of 17β-estradiol in the tumor microenvironment of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Hima, Sithul; Sreeja, Sreeharshan

    2016-02-01

    Thyroid cancer (TC) is an endocrine related cancer and is well coupled with the female reproductive hormone, 17β-estradiol (estrogen). Plenty of articles have discussed the role of tumor microenvironment (TME) with different types of tumors in a broad-spectrum but the role of female reproductive hormone, that is, involvement of estrogen in TME of TC have not been reviewed elsewhere. The aim of this review is to analyze how 17β-estradiol affects the TME of TC and also that subsequently leads to progression of cancer. This review is given a new insight on: 1) the estrogen's involvement in TME of TC; 2) how it interferes with the complex cross talk of signaling pathways established between cancer cells, host cells, and their surrounding extracellular matrix; and 3) the important factors of microenvironment comprising inflammation, hypoxia, angiogenesis, metastasis, various growth factors and fibroblasts in stromal cells.

  10. Estradiol promotes M1-like macrophage activation through cadherin-11 to aggravate temporomandibular joint inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kou, Xiao-Xing; Li, Chen-Shuang; He, Dan-Qing; Wang, Xue-Dong; Hao, Ting; Meng, Zhen; Zhou, Yan-Heng; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-03-15

    Macrophages play a major role in joint inflammation. Estrogen is involved in rheumatoid arthritis and temporomandibular disorders. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. This study was done to verify and test how estrogen affects M1/M2-like macrophage polarization and then contributes to joint inflammation. Female rats were ovariectomized and treated with increasing doses of 17β-estradiol for 10 d and then intra-articularly injected with CFA to induce temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation. The polarization of macrophages and expression of cadherin-11 was evaluated at 24 h after the induction of TMJ inflammation and after blocking cadherin-11 or estrogen receptors. NR8383 macrophages were treated with estradiol and TNF-α, with or without blocking cadherin-11 or estrogen receptors, to evaluate the expression of the M1/M2-like macrophage-associated genes. We found that estradiol increased the infiltration of macrophages with a proinflammatory M1-like predominant profile in the synovium of inflamed TMJ. In addition, estradiol dose-dependently upregulated the expressions of the M1-associated proinflammatory factor inducible NO synthase (iNOS) but repressed the expressions of the M2-associated genes IL-10 and arginase in NR8383 macrophages. Furthermore, estradiol mainly promoted cadherin-11 expression in M1-like macrophages of inflamed TMJ. By contrast, blockage of cadherin-11 concurrently reversed estradiol-potentiated M1-like macrophage activation and TMJ inflammation, as well as reversed TNF-α-induced induction of inducible NO synthase and NO in NR8383 macrophages. The blocking of estrogen receptors reversed estradiol-potentiated M1-like macrophage activation and cadherin-11 expression. These results suggested that estradiol could promote M1-like macrophage activation through cadherin-11 to aggravate the acute inflammation of TMJs.

  11. Neuroprotection by estradiol: a role of aromatase against spine synapse loss after blockade of GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lepu; Lehan, Nadine; Wehrenberg, Uwe; Disteldorf, Erik; von Lossow, Richard; Mares, Ute; Jarry, Hubertus; Rune, Gabriele M

    2007-01-01

    Estrogen has been suggested to be pro-epileptic by reducing GABA synthesis, resulting in increased spine density and a decreased threshold for seizures in the hippocampus, which, once they occur, are characterized by a dramatic spine loss in the affected brain areas. As considerable amounts of estradiol are synthesized in the hippocampus, in this study we focused on aromatase, the rate-limiting enzyme in estrogen synthesis in order to examine the role of locally synthesized estrogens in epilepsy. To this end, we first examined the effects of letrozole, a potent aromatase inhibitor, on GABA metabolism in single interneurons of hippocampal dispersion cultures. Letrozole downregulated estradiol release into the medium, as well as glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) expression and GABA synthesis, and decreased the number of GAD positive cells in the cultures. Next, we counted spine synapses and measured estradiol release of hippocampal slice cultures, in which GABA(A) receptors had been blocked by bicuculline, in order to mimic epileptic activity. Treatment of slice cultures with bicuculline resulted in a dramatic decrease in the number of spine synapses and in a significant suppression of estrogen synthesis. The decrease in synapse number in response to bicuculline was restored by combined application of estradiol and bicuculline. Surprisingly, estradiol alone had no effect on either spine synapse number or on GAD expression and GABA synthesis. "Rescue" of synapse number in "epileptic slices" by estradiol and maintenance of GABA metabolism by hippocampus-derived estradiol points to a neuroprotective role of aromatase in epilepsy. Re-filling of estradiol stores after their depletion due to overexcitation may therefore add to therapeutical strategies in epilepsy.

  12. Estradiol Facilitation of Cocaine Self-Administration in Female Rats Requires Activation of mGluR5

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Luis A.; Gross, Kellie S.; Himmler, Brett T.; Emmitt, Nicole L.; Peterson, Brittni M.; Foster Olive, M.; Carroll, Marilyn E.; Meisel, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In comparison to men, women initiate drug use at earlier ages and progress from initial use to addiction more rapidly. This heightened intake and vulnerability to drugs of abuse is regulated in part by estradiol, although the signaling mechanisms by which this occurs are not well understood. Recent findings indicate that within the nucleus accumbens core, estradiol induces structural plasticity via membrane-localized estrogen receptor α, functionally coupled to metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5). Hence, we sought to determine whether mGluR5 activation was essential for estradiol-mediated enhancement of cocaine self-administration. Ovariectomized (OVX) female rats were allowed to freely self-administer cocaine under extended access conditions (6 h/d) for 10 consecutive days. The mGluR5 antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride (MPEP) or vehicle was administered before estradiol (or oil), on a 2 d on/2 d off schedule throughout the extended access period. MPEP treatment prevented the estradiol-dependent enhancement of cocaine self-administration in OVX females. In a separate experiment, potentiation of mGluR5 function with the positive allosteric modulator 3-cyano-N-(1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)benzamide (in the absence of estradiol treatment) failed to increase cocaine self-administration. These data suggest that mGluR5 activation is necessary for estradiol-mediated enhancement of responses to cocaine, but that direct mGluR5 activation is insufficient to mimic the female response to estradiol. Building on previous studies in male animals, these findings further highlight the therapeutic potential of mGluR5 antagonism in the treatment of addiction and suggest that there may be added therapeutic benefit in females. PMID:27822496

  13. Estradiol and GPER Activation Differentially Affect Cell Proliferation but Not GPER Expression in the Hippocampus of Adult Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Guterman, Paula; Lieblich, Stephanie E; Chow, Carmen; Galea, Liisa A M

    2015-01-01

    Estradiol increases cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the female rodent but it is not known whether the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), a membrane receptor, is involved in this process, nor whether there are regional differences in estradiol's effects on cell proliferation. Thus, we investigated whether estradiol exerts its effects on cell proliferation in the dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus through GPER, using the GPER agonist, G1, and antagonist, G15. Ovariectomized adult female rats received a single injection of either: 17β-estradiol (10 μg), G1 (0.1, 5, 10 μg), G15 (40 μg), G15 and estradiol, or vehicle (oil, DMSO, or oil+DMSO). After 30 min, animals received an injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and were perfused 24 h later. Acute treatment with estradiol increased, while the GPER agonist G1 (5 μg) decreased, the number of BrdU+ cells in the dentate gyrus relative to controls. The GPER antagonist, G15 increased the number of BrdU+ cells relative to control in the dorsal region and decreased the number of BrdU+ cells in the ventral region. However, G15 treatment in conjunction with estradiol partially eliminated the estradiol-induced increase in cell proliferation in the dorsal dentate gyrus. Furthermore, G1 decreased the expression of GPER in the dentate gyrus but not the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. In summary, we found that activation of GPER decreased cell proliferation and GPER expression in the dentate gyrus of young female rats, presenting a potential and novel estrogen-independent role for this receptor in the adult hippocampus.

  14. Pubertal immune challenge blocks the ability of estradiol to enhance performance on cognitive tasks in adult female mice.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Nafissa; Blaustein, Jeffrey D

    2013-07-01

    Puberty is a period characterized by brain reorganization that contributes to the development of neural and behavioral responses to gonadal steroids. Previously, we have shown that a single injection of the bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1.5mg/kg IP), during the pubertal period (around 6weeks old) in mice decreases sexual receptivity in response to estradiol and progesterone in adulthood. These findings suggest that pubertal immune challenge has an enduring effect of decreasing the behavioral responsiveness to gonadal steroid hormones. Since estradiol improves cognitive function in certain tasks in mice, we investigated the effect of pubertal immune challenge on the ability of estradiol to enhance cognitive function. We hypothesized that estradiol would be less effective at enhancing performance on particular cognitive tasks in female mice treated with LPS during puberty. Six-week old (pubertal) and 10-week old (adult) female CD1 mice were injected with either saline or LPS. Five weeks later, they were ovariectomized and implanted subcutaneously with either an estradiol- or oil-filled Silastic(©) capsule followed 1week later with testing for cognitive function. The duration of juvenile investigation during social discrimination and recognition tests was used as a measure of social memory, and the duration of object investigation during object recognition and placement tests was used as a measure of object memory. Chronic estradiol treatment enhanced social and object memory in saline-treated females and in females treated with LPS in adulthood. In contrast, in females treated with LPS at 6weeks old, estradiol failed to improve social and object memories. These results support the hypothesis that exposure to an immune challenge during puberty reduces at least some of the cognitive effects of estradiol. Moreover, these results support the idea that pubertal immune challenge compromises a wide variety of behavioral influences of ovarian hormones.

  15. Simultaneous Degradation of Estrone, 17β-Estradiol and 17α-Ethinyl Estradiol in an Aqueous UV/H₂O₂ System.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Chao; Deng, Jing; Song, Yali; Li, Qingsong; Guo, Yaping; Li, Cong

    2015-09-25

    UV/H₂O₂, which is an advanced treatment technology used to reduce multiple contaminants, is effective in potable water treatment. Simultaneous degradation effects and kinetics of three types of coexisting micropollutant estrogens (steroid estrogens, SEs), including estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2), in deionized water were studied. Experiments were carried out with ultraviolet-C (UVC) radiation, together with hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), in a cylinder photoreactor. The results demonstrated that the degradation processes of all of the estrogens strongly fit first-order kinetics. Single solutions of E1, E2 and EE2 showed higher degradation rates and removal efficiencies under the same reaction conditions compared with those under mixed conditions. Coexisting combinations of estrogens were put into the UV/H₂O₂ system to estimate their possible competitive influences on each other by examining their removal efficiencies and reaction rate constant, k, values. E1 is predominantly reduced rapidly during the competition, while the presence of other estrogens has negligible impacts on E1; however, the degradation of E2 and EE2 is affected by the competitive background, not in relation to the types but to the existing amounts. In the UV/H₂O₂ system, photocatalysis of the estrogens can stably produce an intermediate X, with the highest quantity coming from E1, while considerably lower quantities are obtained from E2 and EE2.

  16. HPLC-fluorescence detection and adsorption of bisphenol A, 17beta-estradiol, and 17alpha-ethynyl estradiol on powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yeomin; Westerhoff, Paul; Snyder, Shane A; Esparza, Mario

    2003-08-01

    The adsorption of three estrogenic compounds (bisphenol A (BPA), 17beta-estradiol (E2), and 17alpha-ethynyl estradiol (EE2)) on several powdered activated carbons (PAC) was investigated. Without preconcentration, method detection limits (MDL) using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection at an excitation wavelength of 280 nm and an emission wavelength of 310 nm were 0.88, 1.15, and 0.96 nM for BPA, E2, and EE2, respectively. Compound recoveries were >90% in raw drinking water matrices. PAC screening studies (six PAC brands) indicated all three compounds were removed by PAC, but the percentage removal ranged from 31% to >99% based upon PAC type/dosage and presence/absence of natural organic matter. The order of removal (E2>EE2>BPA) corresponded with logK(ow) values for the compounds (3.1-4.0, 3.7-3.9, 3.3, respectively). Kinetic and PAC dose-response experiments were conducted with the two best performing PACs. Increasing contact time and PAC dose improved compound removal. Freundlich isotherm parameters were fit to the experimental data. This study confirms that PAC treatment is feasible for >99% removal of three estrogenic compounds from raw drinking waters that may be at risk for containing such compounds, at least at initial concentration of 500 ng/l and higher.

  17. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of estradiol-linked genotoxicants as anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Sharma, U; Marquis, J C; Nicole Dinaut, A; Hillier, S M; Fedeles, B; Rye, P T; Essigmann, J M; Croy, R G

    2004-07-16

    A series of bifunctional compounds was prepared consisting of 17beta estradiol linked to a DNA damaging N,N-bis-(2-chloroethyl)aniline. The objective of our studies was to determine the characteristics of the linker that permitted both reaction with DNA and binding of the resultant covalent adducts to the estrogen receptor. Linker characteristics were pivotal determinants underlying the ability of the compounds to kill selectively breast cancer cells that express the estrogen receptor.

  18. Neonatal exposure to estradiol valerate increases dopamine content in nigrostriatal pathway during adulthood in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cruz, G; Riquelme, R; Espinosa, P; Jara, P; Dagnino-Subiabre, A; Renard, G M; Sotomayor-Zárate, R

    2014-05-01

    Research in programming has focused in the study of stimuli that affect sensitive periods of development such as prenatal and neonatal stage. We previously showed that exposure to estradiol valerate to female rats during the first 12 h of life increased catecholamine content in ventromedial-arcuatus hypothalamus of the adult rat. However, changes in others dopaminergic circuits have not been studied. The purpose of this work was to determine the neurotransmitters changes induced by neonatal estradiol valerate (0.1 mg/50 μl s. c. per rat) administration on nigrostriatal pathway of adult female rats. Sesame oil (50 μl s. c. per rat) was administered in a control parallel group. EV-1 adult rats presented effective markers of long-term estrogenization as decreased serum levels of progesterone and a reduction in the size of estrogen-sensitive organs. In the brain, neonatal estradiol valerate administration led to a significant increase in dopamine content in striatum, substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. With respect to the contents of dopamine metabolites, only 3-methoxytyramine content increased in substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. In addition, the content of noradrenaline increased only in striatum. Interestingly, estrogenized rats lacked locomotor activity induced by acute dose of amphetamine (1 mg/kg i. p.). Altogether, these results show that neonatal exposure to estradiol valerate permanently modified the content of monoamine neurotransmitters in nigrostriatal pathway and amphetamine-induced locomotor activity of adult female rats. This might imply that estrogenized rats could have changes in the expression of key proteins in dopaminergic regulation, as tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter.

  19. Lacking of estradiol reduces insulin exocytosis from pancreatic β-cells and increases hepatic insulin degradation.

    PubMed

    Santos, Roberta S; Batista, Thiago M; Camargo, Rafael L; Morato, Priscila N; Borck, Patrícia C; Leite, Nayara C; Kurauti, Mirian A; Wanschel, Amarylis C B A; Nadal, Ángel; Clegg, Deborah J; Carneiro, Everardo M

    2016-10-01

    Low levels of plasma estrogens are associated with weight-gain, android fat distribution, and a high prevalence of obesity-related comorbidities such as glucose intolerance and type II diabetes. The mechanisms underlying the association between low levels of estrogens and impaired glucose homeostasis are not completely understood. To begin to test this, we used three-month-old female C57BL/6J mice that either underwent ovariectomy (OVX) or received a sham surgery (Sham), and we characterized glucose homeostasis. In a subsequent series of experiments, OVX mice received estradiol treatment (OVX+E2) or vehicle (OVX) for 6 consecutive days. As has been previously reported, lack of ovarian hormones resulted in dysregulated glucose homeostasis. To begin to explore the mechanisms by which this occurs, we characterized the impact of estrogens on insulin secretion and degradation in these mice. Insulin secretion and plasma insulin levels were lower in OVX mice. OVX mice had lower levels of pancreatic Syntaxin 1-A (Synt-1A) protein, which is involved in insulin extrusion from the pancreas. In the liver, OVX mice had higher levels of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) and this was associated with higher insulin clearance. Estradiol treatment improved glucose intolerance in OVX mice and restored insulin secretion, as well as normalized the protein content of pancreatic Synt-1A. The addition of estrogens to OVX mice reduced IDE protein to that of Sham mice. Our data suggest loss of ovarian estradiol following OVX led to impaired glucose homeostasis due to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction in the exocytosis of insulin, and upregulation of hepatic IDE protein content resulting in lower insulinemia, which was normalized by estradiol replacement.

  20. Estradiol negatively modulates the pleiotropic actions of orphanin FQ/nociceptin at proopiomelanocortin synapses.

    PubMed

    Borgquist, Amanda; Kachani, Malika; Tavitian, Nadia; Sinchak, Kevin; Wagner, Edward J

    2013-01-01

    Orphanin FQ/nociceptin (OFQ/N) inhibits the activity of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons located in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARH) that regulate female sexual behavior and energy balance. We tested the hypothesis that estradiol modulates the ability of OFQ/N to pre- and postsynaptically decrease the excitability of these cells. To this end, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in hypothalamic slices prepared from ovariectomized rats, including some that were injected with the retrograde tracer Fluorogold in the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) to label the POMC neurons regulating sexual receptivity. OFQ/N (1 µM) evoked a robust outward current in ARH neurons from vehicle-treated animals that was blocked by the opioid receptor-like (ORL)1 receptor antagonist UFP-101 (100 nM) and the G protein-gated, inwardly rectifying K⁺ (GIRK-1) channel blocker tertiapin (10 nM). OFQ/N also produced a decrease in the frequency of glutamatergic, miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), which was also antagonized by UFP-101. Estradiol benzoate (2 µg) increased basal mEPSC frequency and markedly diminished both the OFQ/N-induced activation of postsynaptic GIRK-1 channel currents and the presynaptic inhibition of glutamatergic neurotransmission. These effects were observed in identified POMC neurons, including eight that projected to the MPN. Taken together, these data reveal that estradiol attenuates the pleiotropic inhibitory actions of OFQ/N on POMC neurons: presynaptically through reducing the OFQ/N inhibition of glutamate release and postsynaptically by reducing ORL1 signaling through GIRK channels. As such, they impart critical insight into a mechanism for estradiol to increase the activity of POMC neurons that inhibit sexual receptivity.

  1. Effects of human serum on transport of testosterone and estradiol into rat brain.

    PubMed

    Pardridge, W M; Mietus, L J; Frumar, A M; Davidson, B J; Judd, H L

    1980-07-01

    The effect in vivo of the plasma proteins in human serum on the transport of [3H]testosterone (T), [3H]-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and [3H]estradiol (E2) through the brain capillary wall, i.e., the blood-brain barrier, was studied in anesthetized rats using a tissue-sampling-single-injection technique, In the absence of plasma proteins, approximately 90% of plasma T, DHT, or E2 was transported into brain on a single pass after a bolus carotid injection of labeled hormone. Serum was obtained from 57 patients in seven different clinical conditions: pregnancy, oral contraceptive use, thin and obese postmenopausal, follicular phase female, hirsutism, and normal male; the level (mean +/- SD) of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) varied from 17 +/- 5 nM (hirsutism) to 323 +/- 83 nM (pregnancy). When the carotid injection solution was made 67% serum, the amount of T, DHT, or E2 transported into brain was inhibited in proportion to the concentration of SHBG. Among the patient groups, an overall linear inverse correlation between the mean SHBG level and the mean extraction of unidirectional influx of testosterone (r = 0.99) and estradiol (r = 0.98) was observed. These studies indicate that a) the undirectional clearance by brain of both testosterone and estradiol is inversely related to the SHBG level and b) the fraction of hormone transported into brain greatly exceeds the free (dialyzable) moiety and is essentially equal to the albumin-bound fraction of plasma testosterone or estradiol.

  2. Percutaneous 17 beta-estradiol replacement therapy in hypertensive postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Osório-Wender, M C; Vitola, D; Spritzer, P M

    1997-09-01

    The present study evaluated the short-term effects of percutaneous 17 beta-estradiol on blood pressure, metabolic profile and hormonal levels in postmenopausal women with systemic arterial hypertension. After a wash-out period of 15 days, 10 hypertensive patients were treated with guanabenz acetate to control blood pressure, followed by 17 beta-estradiol in the form of hydroalcoholic gel administered for 21 of 28 days of each cycle, for 3 cycles. Patients were evaluated before, during and 2 months after estrogen administration. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure or heart rate did not present any significant change in any patient when compared to those periods with the antihypertensive drug only (pretreatment period and 60 days after estrogen therapy was discontinued). Plasma biological markers of hepatic estrogenic action (plasma renin activity, antithrombin III, triglycerides, total cholesterol and lipoproteins) also remained unchanged during the study. Hormone treatment was effective, as indicated by the relief of menopausal symptoms, a decrease in FSH levels (73.48 +/- 27.21 to 35.09 +/- 20.44 IU/l, P < 0.05), and an increase in estradiol levels (15.06 +/- 8.76 to 78.7 +/- 44.6 pg/ml, P < 0.05). There was no effect on LH (18.0 +/- 9.5 to 14.05 +/- 8.28 IU/l). Hormone levels returned to previous values after estrogen treatment was discontinued. The data indicate that short-term percutaneous 17 beta-estradiol replacement therapy, at the dose used, seems to be a safe hormone therapy for hypertensive menopausal women. Nevertheless, a controlled, prospective, randomized clinical assay with a larger number of subjects is needed to definitely establish both the beneficial and harmful effects of hormone replacement therapy in hypertensive women.

  3. Anticancer Activity of Estradiol Derivatives: A Quantitative Structure--Activity Relationship Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muranaka, Ken

    2001-10-01

    Commercial packages to implement modern QSAR (quantitative structure-activity relationship) techniques are highly priced; however, the essence of QSAR can be taught without them. Microsoft Excel was used to analyze published data on anticancer activities of estradiol analogs by a QSAR approach. The resulting QSAR equations highly correlate the structural features and physicochemical properties of the analogs with the observed biological activities by multiple linear regression.

  4. Mitochondrial membrane potential changes in osteoblasts treated with parathyroid hormone and estradiol.

    PubMed

    Troyan, M B; Gilman, V R; Gay, C V

    1997-06-15

    This study assessed mitochondrial membrane potential changes in cultured osteoblasts treated with hormones known to regulate osteoblasts. A fluorescent carbocyanine dye, 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolocarbocyanine++ + iodide, also called JC-1, was used as a probe. JC-1 emits photons at 585 nm (orange-red) when the membrane potential in mitochondria is highly negative, but when the potential becomes reduced emission occurs at 527 nm (green). Osteoblasts were rinsed in serum-free medium for 5 min, then loaded with 1 x 10(-6) M JC-1 for 10 min. The distribution and intensity of JC-1 fluorescence were evaluated with a laser-scanning confocal microscope system. Hormone treatments included parathyroid hormone (PTH; 10(-8) M), 17beta-estradiol (10(-8) M), and thyroxine (T4; 10(-8) M). The potassium ionophore valinomycin (10(-6) M) was used as a control since it is known to disrupt the electrochemical gradient of mitochondria without interfering with the pH gradient. Valinomycin caused a profound, rapid increase (22.5% above untreated values) in the green/red ratio, which indicated a lowering of the mitochondrial membrane potential in all samples evaluated. PTH caused a less pronounced, but significant (7-14%), reduction in membrane potential in all cells examined. PTH is known to affect osteoblasts in a number of ways and is inhibitory to mitochondrial respiration; the results confirm this effect. For estradiol, half of the cells responded at a significant level, with a membrane potential reduction of 6 to 13% being recorded; the other half did not respond. Thyroxine did not alter mitochondrial membrane potential. Responses were detectable within 20 s for valinomycin, but occurred at a slower rate, over 200 to 300 s, following PTH and estradiol treatment. Responses to PTH and estradiol could be due to mitochondrial uptake of cytosolic Ca2+.

  5. Cognitive Functions, Concentration of Endogenous Estradiol, Estrogen Receptor α (ERα) Polymorphism in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Bojar, Iwona; Pinkas, Jarosław; Wierzbińska-Stępniak, Anna; Raczkiewicz, Dorota; Owoc, Alfred; Gujski, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between cognitive functions and the level of endogenous estradiol in postmenopausal women, according to which estrogen receptor α (ERα) polymorphism the woman carries. Material/Methods The study group consisted of 210 women. The inclusion criteria were: minimum 2 years after the last menstruation, FSH concentration 30 U/ml, and no dementia signs on Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). A computerized battery of Central Nervous System Vital Signs (CNS VS) test was used to diagnose cognitive functions. Genotyping of the ERα polymorphism was performed using a polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzymes (PCR-RFLP). Blood plasma was tested for FSH and estradiol (E2). Statistical analysis was performed using STATISTICA software. Results A relationship was confirmed between standard scores for 3 cognitive functions: general memory, verbal memory, and processing speed, and the XbaI polymorphism in the women in the study. In the group of women with genotype TT PvuII, significant positive relationships were observed between the concentration of E2 and the standard scores of 3 cognitive functions: general memory, verbal memory, and processing speed. In the group of women with genotype TC PvuII, significant negative correlations were found between the concentration of E2 and the standard scores of 4 cognitive functions: NCI, general memory, verbal memory, and processing speed. Conclusions ERα polymorphism exerted an effect on the interaction between the concentration of estradiol and the results for cognitive functions. The concentration of estradiol did not depend on Xba1 and PvuII polymorphisms. The results for cognitive functions depended on which Xba1 polymorphism the woman carried. PMID:27680398

  6. Association Between Serum Levels of Testosterone and Estradiol With Meibomian Gland Assessments in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Ablamowicz, Anna F.; Nichols, Jason J.; Nichols, Kelly K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this analysis were to determine if there is an association between serum levels of testosterone and estradiol with meibomian gland (MG) morphology and lipid layer thickness. Methods The data used for this analysis were collected from postmenopausal women with and without dry eye disease. Meibography was used to assess MG dropout on the central two-thirds of the eyelid and biomicroscopy was used for assessing MG expressibility and meibum quality. Venous blood samples were drawn for serum hormone level analysis. The Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman correlations were used for statistical analysis. Results One hundred ninety-eight postmenopausal women with an average age of 61.2 (±9.1) years were included in this analysis. Testosterone levels showed significant differences between MG dropout grades 1 and 4 (P = 0.002) and grades 2 and 4 (P = 0.01), whereas estradiol levels were different based on MG dropout (P = 0.53). No significant correlations were found between testosterone (r = 0.10, P = 0.17) or estradiol (r = 0.05, P = 0.45) and lipid layer thickness. Conclusions Testosterone levels were increased with MG dropout, which was significant between the mild and severe dropout groups, whereas no significant differences were found with estradiol and any MG assessment. Although the literature suggests an association of serum hormone levels and pathogenesis of dry eye disease in postmenopausal women, analysis of active sex steroid precursors and local tissue hormone levels may prove more useful. PMID:26830366

  7. Biodegradable estradiol microspheres do not affect uterine involution or characteristics of postpartum estrus in mares.

    PubMed

    Arrott, C; Macpherson, M; Blanchard, T; Varner, D; Thompson, J; Simpson, B; Bruemmer, J; Vogelsang, S; Fernandez, M; Fleet, T; Burns, P

    1994-08-01

    Quarterhorse mares were used to investigate effects of estradiol-17beta on uterine involution, duration of estrus, interval to ovulation, and fertility achieved by breeding on the first postpartum estrus. On the day of foaling, mares were injected with biodegradable poly (DL-lactide) microspheres containing either 100 mg estradiol-17beta (25 mares) or no drug (27 mares). The treatment period was considered to last for 12 to 15 d. Estrus was determined by teasing mares (n=16) with a stallion. Ovulation was detected by transrectal ultrasonographic examination of ovaries (n=48). On Days 6, 11 and 16 post partum, transrectal ultrasonography was used to measure cross-sectional diameters of the uterine body, uterine horns, and fluid within the uterine lumen (n=28). Uteri were swabbed for bacteriologic culture, and uterine biopsies were obtained from the previously gravid uterine horn on Days 11 and 16 post partum, for assessment of endometritis and morphometric analysis of endometrial histioarchitecture (n=19). Twenty-two mares were bred on foal-heat, and pregnancy was determined by transrectal ultrasonography on 14 to 16 and 30 to 35 d after breeding. With only one exception (diameter of previously gravid uterine horn on Day 11), mean values for all measures of uterine involution did not differ between treatment groups (P > 0.05). No differences were detected between treatment group means for length of estrus or interval to ovulation (P > 0.05). No differences were detected between treatment group liklihoods for recovery of potential bacterial pathogens, presence of endometritis, or presence of intrauterine fluid at 11 or 16 d post partum (P > 0.05). Pregnancy rate of mares treated with estradiol (5 11 ; 45%) was not different from that of control mares (9 11 ; 82%; P > 0.05). Estradiol treatment did not hasten uterine involution, increase duration of estrus, delay ovulation, or increase fertility in these postpartum mares.

  8. Estradiol enhances retention but not organization of hippocampus-dependent memory in intact male mice.

    PubMed

    Al Abed, Alice Shaam; Sellami, Azza; Brayda-Bruno, Laurent; Lamothe, Valérie; Noguès, Xavier; Potier, Mylène; Bennetau-Pelissero, Catherine; Marighetto, Aline

    2016-07-01

    Because estrogens have mostly been studied in gonadectomized females, effects of chronic exposure to environmental estrogens in the general population are underestimated. Estrogens can enhance hippocampus-dependent memory through the modulation of information storage. However, declarative memory, the hippocampus-dependent memory of facts and events, demands more than abilities to retain information. Specifically, memory of repetitive events of everyday life such as "where I parked" requires abilities to organize/update memories to prevent proactive interference from similar memories of previous "parking events". Whether such organizational processes are estrogen-sensitive is unknown. We here studied, in intact young and aged adult mice, drinking-water (1μM) estradiol effects on both retention and organizational components of hippocampus-dependent memory, using a radial-maze task of everyday-like memory. Demand on retention vs organization was manipulated by varying the time-interval separating repetitions of similar events. Estradiol increased performance in young and aged mice under minimized organizational demand, but failed to improve the age-associated memory impairment and diminished performance in young mice under high organizational demand. In fact, estradiol prolonged mnemonic retention of successive events without improving organization abilities, hence resulted in more proactive interference from irrelevant memories. c-Fos imaging of testing-induced brain activations showed that the deterioration of young memory was associated with dentate gyrus dysconnectivity, reminiscent of that seen in aged mice. Our findings support the view that estradiol is promnesic but also reveal that such property can paradoxically impair memory. These findings have important outcomes regarding health issues relative to the impact of environmental estrogens in the general population.

  9. Cognitive Functions, Concentration of Endogenous Estradiol, Estrogen Receptor α (ERα) Polymorphism in Postmenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Bojar, Iwona; Pinkas, Jarosław; Wierzbińska-Stępniak, Anna; Raczkiewicz, Dorota; Owoc, Alfred; Gujski, Mariusz

    2016-09-28

    BACKGROUND The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between cognitive functions and the level of endogenous estradiol in postmenopausal women, according to which estrogen receptor α (ERα) polymorphism the woman carries. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study group consisted of 210 women. The inclusion criteria were: minimum 2 years after the last menstruation, FSH concentration 30 U/ml, and no dementia signs on Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). A computerized battery of Central Nervous System Vital Signs (CNS VS) test was used to diagnose cognitive functions. Genotyping of the ERa polymorphism was performed using a polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzymes (PCR-RFLP). Blood plasma was tested for FSH and estradiol (E2). Statistical analysis was performed using STATISTICA software. RESULTS A relationship was confirmed between standard scores for 3 cognitive functions: general memory, verbal memory, and processing speed, and the XbaI polymorphism in the women in the study. In the group of women with genotype TT PvuII, significant positive relationships were observed between the concentration of E2 and the standard scores of 3 cognitive functions: general memory, verbal memory, and processing speed. In the group of women with genotype TC PvuII, significant negative correlations were found between the concentration of E2 and the standard scores of 4 cognitive functions: NCI, general memory, verbal memory, and processing speed. CONCLUSIONS ERα polymorphism exerted an effect on the interaction between the concentration of estradiol and the results for cognitive functions. The concentration of estradiol did not depend on Xba1 and PvuII polymorphisms. The results for cognitive functions depended on which Xba1 polymorphism the woman carried.

  10. 17β-estradiol effects on human coronaries and grafts employed in myocardial revascularization: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Polvani, Gianluca; Barili, Fabio; Rossoni, Giuseppe; Dainese, Luca; Ossola, Manuela Wally; Topkara, Veli K; Grillo, Francesco; Penza, Eleonora; Tremoli, Elena; Biglioli, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    Background This study was undertaken to compare the in vitro effects of 17β-estradiol on human epicardial coronary arteries, resistance coronary arteries and on arterial vessels usually employed as grafts in surgical myocardial revascularization. Methods Coronary artery rings (descending coronary artery, right coronary artery, circumflex coronary artery, first septal branch) and arterial graft rings (internal thoracic artery, gastro-epiploic artery) obtained from human heart donors with heart not suitable to cardiac transplantation were connected to force transducer for isometric force recording. Precontracted specimens with and without endothelium were exposed to increasing concentration of 17β-estradiol (3–30–300–3000 nmol/l) and to vehicle (0.1% v/v ethanol). We also evaluated the effects of 17β-estradiol on vessels before and 20 minutes after exposure to L-monomethyl-arginine and indomethacin. Results 17β-estradiol induced a significant relaxation in all precontracted vessels (mean maximum effect: 78,6% ± 8,5). This effect was not different among the different rings and was not related to the presence of endothelium. N-monomethyl-L-arginine and indomethacin did not modify 17β-estradiol relaxant effect. Conclusion The vasodilator action of the 17β-estradiol is similar on coronary arteries, resistance coronary arteries and arterial vessels usually employed as grafts in myocardial revascularization. PMID:17181858

  11. Castration reduces male testosterone, estradiol, and territorial aggression, but not paternal behavior in biparental dwarf hamsters (Phodopus campbelli).

    PubMed

    Hume, Johanna M; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine E

    2005-09-01

    Biparental male hamsters, Phodopus campbelli, act as midwives during the birth of their litter and are highly responsive to an experimentally displaced pup. They also have high peripheral concentrations of estradiol, a hormone with known roles in maternal behavior. Surgical castration during the gestation of their first litter was used to investigate the source of that estradiol and the functional role of testicular sex steroids in paternal responsiveness. In Experiment I, castration reduced both testosterone and estradiol concentrations, confirming that the testes were the primary source of estradiol. However, neither paternal responsiveness nor multiple measures of reproductive success were altered by the castration. Aggression directed towards an intruder, however, was reduced by castration. In Experiment II, removal of prior experience with birth or pups also failed to alter paternal responsiveness in castrated males. Although the present results do not preclude a role for local estradiol synthesis in the brain, results do not support an association between high circulating estradiol in males and their paternal behavior.

  12. Picogram-detection of estradiol at an electrochemical immunosensor with a gold nanoparticle|Protein G-(LC-SPDP)-scaffold.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqiang; Wong, Danny K Y

    2009-02-15

    Low picograms of the hormone 17beta-estradiol were detected at an electrochemical immunosensor. This immunosensor features a gold nanoparticle|Protein G-(LC-SPDP)(1)-scaffold, to which a monoclonal anti-estradiol capture antibody was immobilised to facilitate a competitive immunoassay between sample 17beta-estradiol and a horseradish peroxidase-labelled 17beta-estradiol conjugate. Upon constructing this molecular architecture on a disposable gold electrode in a flow cell, amperometry was conducted to monitor the reduction current of benzoquinone produced from a catalytic reaction of horseradish peroxidase. This current was then quantitatively related to 17beta-estradiol present in a sample. Calibration of immunosensors in blood serum samples spiked with 17beta-estradiol yielded a linear response up to approximately 1200 pg mL(-1), a sensitivity of 0.61microA/pg mL(-1) and a detection limit of 6 pg mL(-1). We attribute these favourable characteristics of the immunosensors to the gold nanoparticle|Protein G-(LC-SPDP) scaffold, where the gold nanoparticles provided a large electrochemically active surface area that permits immobilisation of an enhanced quantity of all components of the molecular architecture, while the Protein G-(LC-SPDP) component aided in not only reducing steric hindrance when Protein G binds to the capture antibody, but also providing an orientation-controlled immobilisation of the capture antibody. Coupled with amperometric detection in a flow system, the immunosensor exhibited excellent reproducibility.

  13. Hormone replacement with 17β-estradiol plus dihydrotestosterone restores male sexual behavior in rats treated neonatally with clomipramine.

    PubMed

    Limón-Morales, Ofelia; Soria-Fregozo, Cesar; Arteaga-Silva, Marcela; González, Marisela Hernández; Vázquez-Palacios, Gonzalo; Bonilla-Jaime, Herlinda

    2014-11-01

    Male sexual behavior (MSB) in rodents, in both its consummatory and motivational components, is regulated by hormones such as testosterone, 17β-estradiol and 5-α-dihydrotestosterone. In experiments, neonatal treatment with clomipramine (CMI; a serotonin reuptake inhibitor) reproduces some of the signs of depression in adult age, including reduced sexual behavior manifested in a lower percentage of subjects that mount, intromit and ejaculate, although their testosterone levels were not altered. However, the effect of this treatment on estrogen levels and the consequences of hormone substitution using 17β-estradiol and 5-α-dihydrotestosterone on the expression of male sexual behavior are still unknown. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to analyze the effect of neonatal treatment with CMI on plasma testosterone and 17β-estradiol levels, and the role of testosterone, 17β-estradiol and 5-α-dihydrotestosterone in altering the consummatory and motivational components of sexual behavior in male rats. To this end, it analyzed the copulatory parameters and sexual incentive motivation (SIM) of rats treated with CMI under two conditions: basal and post-hormone replacements. Neonatal treatment with CMI did not affect plasma testosterone or 17β-estradiol concentrations, but did decrease both the consummatory component and sexual motivation according to the results of the SIM test. These aspects were recovered after administering 17β-estradiol +5-α-dihydrotestosterone, but not testosterone.

  14. Does estradiol have an impact on the dipeptidyl peptidase IV enzyme activity of the Prevotella intermedia group bacteria?

    PubMed

    Fteita, Dareen; Könönen, Eija; Gürsoy, Mervi; Söderling, Eva; Gürsoy, Ulvi Kahraman

    2015-12-01

    Initiation and development of pregnancy-associated gingivitis is seemingly related to the microbial shift towards specific gram-negative anaerobes in subgingival biofilms. It is known that Prevotella intermedia sensu lato is able to use estradiol as an alternative source of growth instead of vitamin K. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of estradiol on the bacterial dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) enzyme activity in vitro as a virulent factor of the Prevotella intermedia group bacteria, namely P. intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, Prevotella pallens, and Prevotella aurantiaca. In all experiments, 2 strains of each Prevotella species were used. Bacteria were incubated with the concentrations of 0, 30, 90, and 120 nmol/L of estradiol and were allowed to build biofilms at an air-solid interface. DPPIV activities of biofilms were measured kinetically during 20 min using a fluorometric assay. The enzyme activity was later related to the amount of protein produced by the same biofilm, reflecting the biofilm mass. Estradiol significantly increased DPPIV activities of the 8 Prevotella strains in a strain- and dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our in vitro experiments indicate that estradiol regulates the DPPIV enzyme activity of P. intermedia, P. nigrescens, P. pallens, and P. aurantiaca strains differently. Our results may, at least partly, explain the role of estradiol to elicit a virulent state which contributes to the pathogenesis of pregnancy-related gingivitis.

  15. Effect of 17β-estradiol on the elasticity of MCF-7 cells by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuhua; Jiang, Ningcheng; Zheng, Liqin; Yang, Hongqin; Xie, Shusen

    2016-10-01

    Estrogen plays an important role in the development and progression of breast cancer, and it promotes proliferation, invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells. In this paper, we investigated the effect of estrogen on the elasticity of breast cancer cells. 17β-estradiol, one of the most active estrogens in the human body was applied to MCF-7 living cells and the elasticity of breast cancer cells was measured by atomic force microscopy. The force spectroscopy was performed on the center of the cell and the Hertz model was used to calculate the elasticity modulus. Furthermore, the confocal fluorescence imaging was taken to observe the effect of 17β-estradiol on the actin distribution in the cells. The results show that the elasticity of the cells decreases rapidly after the addition of 17β-estradiol, which indicates that the cells appear softer for 17β-estradiol's treatment. From the confocal imaging, it can be observed that the actin filament rearranged for 17β-estradiol's treatment, which may lead to the alteration of the cell elasticity. Our findings may deepen our understanding on the rapid effect of 17β-estradiol to MCF-7 cells.

  16. Estradiol induces endothelial cell migration and proliferation through estrogen receptor-enhanced RhoA/ROCK pathway.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, Pilar J; Sobrino, Agua; Laguna-Fernandez, Andrés; Novella, Susana; Tarín, Juan J; García-Pérez, Miguel-Angel; Sanchís, Juan; Cano, Antonio; Hermenegildo, Carlos

    2011-03-30

    Migration and proliferation of endothelial cells are involved in re-endothelialization and angiogenesis, two important cardiovascular processes that are increased in response to estrogens. RhoA, a small GTPase which controls multiple cellular processes, is involved in the control of cell migration and proliferation. Our aim was to study the role of RhoA on estradiol-induced migration and proliferation and its dependence on estrogen receptors activity. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were stimulated with estradiol, in the presence or absence of ICI 182780 (estrogen receptors antagonist) and Y-27632 (Rho kinase inhibitor). Estradiol increased Rho GEF-1 gene expression and RhoA (gene and protein expression and activity) in an estrogen receptor-dependent manner. Cell migration, stress fiber formation and cell proliferation were increased in response to estradiol and were also dependent on the estrogen receptors and RhoA activation. Estradiol decreased p27 levels, and significantly raised the expression of cyclins and CDK. These effects were counteracted by the use of either ICI 182780 or Y-27632. In conclusion, estradiol enhances the RhoA/ROCK pathway and increases cell cycle-related protein expression by acting through estrogen receptors. This results in an enhanced migration and proliferation of endothelial cells.

  17. Recent studies in the behavioral toxicology of ELF electric and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lovely, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Behavioral responses to ELF electric and magnetic fields are reviewed starting with the simple sensory awareness or detection by an animal and moving on through more-complicated behavioral responses such as behavior that averts exposure. The literature selected in this review is taken primarily from the area of behavioral toxicology. As such, it does not review work on specialized response systems to ELF fields. The most notable of these omitted specialized response systems are electroreception, which occurs in a number of fish species, and homing/navigation and communication of the location of food that occurs in several species of birds and in honeybees, respectively. The toxicologic orientation of most researches that evaluate the effects of exposure to ELF electric and magnetic fields has been influenced primarily by the missions of DOE and the power industry programs to determine the health effects of power frequency (50- and 60-Hz) electric and magnetic fields. Because of these large programmatic efforts, most of the recent research has in fact been done at 50 or 60 Hz. In the context of the above limitations, remarkably few robust behavioral effects have been reported. Those that have been reported probably relate to an animal's perception of the electric field, although there are some exceptions to this generalization. The apparent lack of deleterious effects in animals is consistent with recent studies on humans that have been conducted in the UK. With this in mind, it is tempting to conclude that exposure to an ELF field is a rather innocuous event and, other than possible mini-shocks, is without hazard. 43 references.

  18. Estradiol Reduces Connexin43 Gap Junctions in the Uterus during Adenomyosis in Cows.

    PubMed

    Korzekwa, A J; Łupicka, M; Socha, B M; Szczepańska, A A

    2016-09-01

    Adenomyosis is defined as the presence of glandular foci external to the endometrium of the uterus, either in the myometrium or/and perimetrium, depending on the progress of this dysfunction. To date, we showed that steroids secretion and prolactin expression and proliferative processes are disturbed during uterine adenomyosis in cows. During endometriosis in eutopic endometrium in women, gap junctions are down regulated. The transmembrane gap junction protein, connexin (Cx43) is necessary for endometrial morphological, biochemical and angiogenic functions. The aim of this study is recognition of adenomyosis etiology by determination of the role of Cx43 in this process. Immunolocalization and comparison of Cx43 mRNA and protein expression in healthy (N=9) and adenomyotic uterine tissue (N=9), and Cx43 mRNA expression (real time PCR) in uterine stromal - myometrium co-culture under 24-hour stimulation with 17-beta estradiol (10-7M) isolated from healthy (N=5) and adenomyotic (N=5) cows were determined. Cx43 was localized in healthy and adenomyotic uteri. mRNA and protein expression was down-regulated in uterine tissue in adenomyotic compared with healthy cows (p<0.05). Estradiol stimulated Cx43 mRNA expression in myometrial cell culture and co-culture of stromal and myometrial cells in adenomyotic compared with healthy cows (p<0.05). In summary, down-regulation of Cx43 expression in the junction zone might play an important role in pathogenesis of adenomyosis. Estradiol modulates gap junctions during adenomyosis.

  19. Localization of /sup 3/H-estradiol in the reproductive organs of male and female baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Weaker, F.J.; Sheridan, P.J.

    1982-05-01

    The uptake and retention of radiolabeled estradiol by both the male and female reproductive organs were examined in the baboon. Two male and two female baboons were injected intracardially with 1 microgram/kg body weight of /sup 3/H-estradiol and two animals, one male and one female, were injected with both labeled and 100 micrograms/kg body weight of unlabeled estradiol. One and a half hours after the injections, the animals were sacrificed and the uterus, cervix, vagina, oviduct, seminal vesicles, and prostate gland were removed and processed for autoradiography. The stratified squamous epithelia of the cervix and vagina demonstrated a light uptake of the label in the germinative, but not in the superficial cell layers. The columnar cells lining the oviduct and uterine glands were labeled, whereas the luminal epithelium of the uterus and the glandular epithelia of the seminal vesicles and prostate gland did not sequester the tritiated steroid. The interstitial cells of all the organs studied demonstrated a moderate to heavy uptake of the radioactivity, whereas the smooth muscle cells were lightly labeled except in the vagina, in which these cells displayed a moderate number of silver grains.

  20. Oral hormone replacement therapy: factors that influence the estradiol concentrations achieved in a multiracial study population.

    PubMed

    Gavaler, Judith S

    2002-02-01

    The assumption that estradiol (E2) concentrations are reliably increased to therapeutic levels in postmenopausal women receiving hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has not been explicitly tested. Nor have factors that may modulate the E2 levels achieved been evaluated. The author examined E2 concentrations in a multiracial study population of 309 postmenopausal women treated with oral HRT and observed that 51.1% had achieved estradiol levels of at least 45 pg/ml (achievers). The odds of being an achiever were significantly elevated among non-Caucasian women by a HRT dose greater than 0.625 mg, current moderate drinking, and increasing duration of HRT use. The odds were significantly decreased by having a high school education or less and increasing time since last HRT dose. White postmenopausal women had significantly reduced odds of being an achiever, and both a dose of less than 0.625 mg and a dose equal to 0.625 mg significantly reduced the odds of being an achiever. Increasing body mass index and menopause duration were both associated with lower odds. This report demonstrates not only that women treated with HRTdo not all achieve therapeutic levels of estradiol but also that factors can be identified that modulate the E2 concentration achieved in response to HRT administration.

  1. Lack of support for relation between woman's masculinity preference, estradiol level and mating context.

    PubMed

    Marcinkowska, Urszula M; Ellison, Peter T; Galbarczyk, Andrzej; Milkowska, Karolina; Pawlowski, Boguslaw; Thune, Inger; Jasienska, Grazyna

    2016-02-01

    It has been proposed that women's preferences for male facial sexual dimorphism are positively correlated with conception probability and differ between short- and long-term mating contexts. In this study, we tested this assumption by analyzing relationships between estradiol levels to the women's preferences of male faces that were manipulated to vary in masculinity. Estradiol was measured in daily saliva samples throughout the entire menstrual cycle collected by Polish women with regular menstrual cycles. In our analyses, we included the three most commonly used definitions of the fertile window in the literature. After computing the overall masculinity preference of each participant and measuring hormone levels, we found that i) the timing of ovulation varied greatly among women (between -11 and -17days from the onset of the next menses, counting backwards), ii) there was no relationship between daily, measured during the day of the test (N=83) or average for the cycle (N=115) estradiol levels and masculinity preferences, iii) there were no differences in masculinity preferences between women in low- and high-conception probability phases of the cycle, and iv) there were no differences in masculinity preferences between short- and long-term mating contexts. Our results do not support the idea that women's preferences for a potential sexual partner's facial masculinity fluctuate throughout the cycle.

  2. Local effect of bisphenol A on the estradiol synthesis of ovarian granulosa cells from PCOS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Zhu, Qinling; Dang, Xuan; He, Yaqiong; Li, Xiaoxue; Sun, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Close relationship between polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and bisphenol A (BPA) has drawn much attention in recent years, while the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In our study, we aim to detect BPA concentration in the follicular fluid and investigate its effect on estradiol synthesis in human granulosa cells from PCOS and non-PCOS patients. Follicular fluid and granulosa cells were collected from women who underwent controlled ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection. BPA concentration in the follicular fluid from PCOS patients (440.50 ± 63.70 pg/ml) was significantly higher than that from non-PCOS patients (338.00 ± 57.88 pg/ml). Expression of aromatase and estradiol synthesis in cultured granulosa cells was examined after treatment with BPA from 0.01 to 1 μM for 24 h. Expression of aromatase and estradiol synthesis was downregulated by BPA in a dose-dependent manner in PCOS, but no effect was observed in granulosa cells from non-PCOS patients. These findings provide evidence that increased BPA concentration in the follicular fluid of PCOS patients may play an important role in its pathogenesis by attenuating the expression of aromatase in granulosa cells.

  3. System for stable β-estradiol-inducible gene expression in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Minoru; Imai, Akihiro; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Ishikawa, Masaki; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Kurata, Tetsuya; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Reski, Ralf; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2013-01-01

    Inducible transgene expression provides a useful tool to analyze gene function. The moss Physcomitrellapatens is a model basal land plant with well-developed research tools, including a high efficiency of gene targeting and substantial genomics resources. However, current systems for controlled transgene expression remain limited. Here we report the development of an estrogen receptor mediated inducible gene expression system, based on the system used in flowering plants. After identifying the appropriate promoters to drive the chimeric transducer, we succeeded in inducing transcription over 1,000-fold after 24 h incubation with β-estradiol. The P. patens system was also effective for high-level long-term induction of gene expression; transcript levels of the activated gene were maintained for at least seven days on medium containing β-estradiol. We also established two potentially neutral targeting sites and a set of vectors for reproducible expression of two transgenes. This β-estradiol-dependent system will be useful to test genes individually or in combination, allowing stable, inducible transgenic expression in P. patens.

  4. Doxorubicin loaded 17β-estradiol based SWNT dispersions for target specific killing of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Moumita; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The present work reports the synthesis of a 17β-estradiol based amphiphiles comprising of polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety linked through succinic acid that non-covalently dispersed (76%) the single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water. The superior exfoliation of carbon nanotubes was characterized by microscopic and spectroscopic studies. Significant stability of these SWNT dispersions was observed in the presence of protein in cell culture media and the nanohybrids were highly biocompatible toward mammalian cells. Anticancer drug doxorubicin loaded on these nanohybrids was selectively delivered within estrogen receptor rich cancer cells, MCF7 (breast cancer cell) and A549 (lung cancer cell). Microscopic studies showed the localization of doxorubicin within the cancer cell nucleus whereas no such localization was observed in ER negative cells. Both these ER positive cancer cells were killed by ∼3 fold higher efficiency than that of ER negative MDA-MB-231 (advanced breast cancer cell) and HeLa cells that are deprived of estrogen receptors. Thus, judiciously designed estradiol based nanohybrids proved to be excellent tool for SWNT dispersion and also for selectively killing of ER positive cancer cells. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time non-covalently modified SWNTs by estradiol based amphiphilic dispersing agent have been used for selective killing of ER positive cancer cells by doxorubicin loaded on dispersed SWNTs. It holds immense promise to be exploited as a cancer therapeutic agent.

  5. Role of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript in estradiol-mediated neuroprotection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yun; Zhang, Wenri; Klaus, Judith; Young, Jennifer; Koerner, Ines; Sheldahl, Laird C.; Hurn, Patricia D.; Martínez-Murillo, Francisco; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2006-09-01

    Estrogen reduces brain injury after experimental cerebral ischemia in part through a genomic mechanism of action. Using DNA microarrays, we analyzed the genomic response of the brain to estradiol, and we identified a transcript, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), that is highly induced in the cerebral cortex by estradiol under ischemic conditions. Using in vitro and in vivo models of neural injury, we confirmed and characterized CART mRNA and protein up-regulation by estradiol in surviving neurons, and we demonstrated that i.v. administration of a rat CART peptide is protective against ischemic brain injury in vivo. We further demonstrated binding of cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein to a CART promoter CRE site in ischemic brain and rapid activation by CART of ERK in primary cultured cortical neurons. The findings suggest that CART is an important player in estrogen-mediated neuroprotection and a potential therapeutic agent for stroke and other neurodegenerative diseases. ischemia | stroke | estrogen

  6. Age-specific reference values for serum FSH and estradiol levels throughout the reproductive period.

    PubMed

    Grisendi, Valentina; Spada, Elena; Argento, Cindy; Plebani, Maddalena; Milani, Silvano; Seracchioli, Renato; Volpe, Annibale; La Marca, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    High serum day 3 FSH levels are associated with poor ovarian reserve and reduced fertility, but the interpretation of FSH values according to age is still not univocal. The purpose of this study was to determine age-dependent reference values in women with regular menstrual cycles and FSH as a guide for specialists. The study was performed at the Department of Mother-Infant of a University-based tertiary care centre. One-hundred ninety-two healthy normal menstruating women were recruited for the study. All patients attended the department on menstrual cycle day 3 for a blood sample for FSH and estradiol determination. A linear relationship between FSH or estradiol serum levels and age was observed. The FSH level increased by 0.11 IU for every year of age (1 IU for every 9 years of age). The values of FSH and estradiol corresponding to the 5th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 95th centiles for any specific age have been calculated. Serum FSH levels need to be interpreted according to age-dependent reference values. Serum FSH levels on 95th centile for any age may represent a warning sign for reduced ovarian reserve.

  7. Influence of exposure to electromagnetic field on the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Jeong, J H; Kim, J S; Lee, B C; Min, Y S; Kim, D S; Ryu, J S; Soh, K S; Seo, K M; Sohn, U D

    2005-01-01

    1 We examined whether extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) affect the basal level of cardiovascular parameters and influence of drugs acting on the sympathetic nervous system. 2 Male rats were exposed to sham control and EMF (60 Hz, 20 G) for 1 (MF-1) or 5 days (MF-5). We evaluated the alterations of blood pressure (BP), pulse pressure (PP), heart rate (HR), and the PR interval, QRS interval and QT interval on the electrocardiogram and dysrhythmic ratio in basal level and dysrhythmia induced by beta-adrenoceptor agonists. 3 In terms of the basal levels, there were no statistically significant differences among control, MF-1 and MF-5 in PR interval, QRS interval, mean BP, HR and PP. However, the QT interval, representing ventricular repolarization, was significantly reduced by MF-1 (P < 0.05). 4 (-)-Dobutamine (beta1-adrenoceptor-selective agonist)-induced tachycardia was significantly suppressed by ELF-EMF exposure in MF-1 for the increase in HR (DeltaHR), the decrease in QRS interval (DeltaQRS) and the decrease in QT (DeltaQT) interval. Adrenaline (nonselective beta-receptor agonist)-induced dysrhythmia was also significantly suppressed by ELF-EMF in MF-1 for the number of missing beats, the dysrhythmic ratio, and the increase in BP and PP. 5 These results indicated that 1-day exposure to ELF-EMF (60 Hz, 20 G) could suppress the increase in HR by affecting ventricular repolarization and may have a down-regulatory effect on responses of the cardiovascular system induced by sympathetic agonists.

  8. Overview of WHO (World Health Organization) environmental health Criteria 35 on extremely-low-frequency (elf) fields

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.D.

    1986-07-01

    The paper summarizes and reviews the document World Health Criteria 35. The purpose of the Criteria 35 is to provide information for health authorities and regulatory agencies on the possible effects of extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electric and magnetic fields on human health and to give guidance on the assessment of risks from occupational and general-population exposures. The Criteria Document includes a review of biological effects on human beings and animals exposed to ELF fields in the frequency range of 0-300 Hz with emphasis on power (50- and 60-Hz) electric fields. Subjects reviewed in the document include the physical characteristics of ELF fields, measurement techniques and dosimetry, levels of exposure from devices in common use, mechanisms of interaction, biological effects in animals and animal tissues, human studies, health risk evaluation, and guidance on the development of protective measures such as regulations and safe-use guidelines.

  9. Effects of controlled-frequency moderate electric fields on pectin methylesterase and polygalacturonase activities in tomato homogenate.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, Chaminda P; Sastry, Sudhir K

    2016-05-15

    The effect of controlled-frequency moderate electric field treatments on pectin methylesterase and polygalcturonase activities in tomato homogenate was investigated by subjecting identically treated control and electrically-treated samples to the same temperature history. Additionally, a model was developed for the motion of the enzyme molecules subjected to an electric field. Results show that the application of electric fields at a low field strength (0.4V/cm) constant temperature (65°C) has a statistically significant effect on pectin methylesterase activity, typically at or lower than 60 Hz. At higher frequencies, the effects are negligible. Molecular motion simulations suggest that the efficacy at low frequencies may be due to the amplitude of motion being of the order of the intermolecular distance for water. Higher frequencies result in small overall displacements due to rapid reversals in the direction of motion.

  10. Renewal of conditioned responding to food cues in rats: Sex differences and relevance of estradiol.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Lauren C; Petrovich, Gorica D

    2015-11-01

    Cues associated with food can stimulate food anticipation, procurement, and consumption, independently of hunger. These and other behaviors driven by learned cues are persistent and can reappear after extinction, because the original learned associations continue to exist. Renewal, or reinstatement, of extinguished conditioned behavior may explain the inability to change maladaptive eating habits driven by food cues, similar to the mechanisms of drug use relapse. Here, we investigated sex differences in context-induced renewal of responding to food cues, and the role of estradiol in females in a Pavlovian conditioning preparation. We compared adult male and female rats because there is evidence for sex differences in learning and memory and in the control of feeding. Context-induced renewal involves conditioning and extinction in different contexts and the renewal of conditioned behavior is induced by return to the conditioning context ("ABA renewal"; experimental groups). Control groups remain in the same context during conditioning, extinction, and test. In Experiment 1, male and female rats were trained to associate a tone with food pellets during acquisition, and after extinction with tone only presentations, were tested for renewal of responding to the tone. Learning was assessed through the expression of the conditioned response, which included approach and activity directed at food receptacle (food cup behavior). Males and females learned the acquisition and extinction of tone-food associations similarly, but there were sex differences during renewal of the conditioned responses to the food cue. Males showed robust renewal of responding, while renewal in intact females was inconsistent. Males in the experimental group had significantly higher food cup behavior compared to males in the control group, while females in both groups showed similar levels of food cup behavior during the tone. In Experiment 2, we examined a potential role of estradiol in renewal

  11. A simple and effective process for noise reduction of multichannel cortical field potential recordings in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Fu-Zen; Yen, Chen Tung; Chen, Ruei Feng

    2003-04-15

    Simple and useful steps, i.e. placing a grounded plate under the recording chamber as well as using multiple reference electrodes, are introduced here for obtaining reliable low-noise recordings of brain activity in freely moving rats. A general circuit model was built to analyze the electrical interference of both single-grounded and two-reference ground-free recording configurations. In both simulated and realistic conditions under two recording states, 60-Hz magnitude was in the microvolt range. Moreover, the noise was significantly reduced by shortening the distance between the subject and the grounded plate under the recording chamber. Furthermore, in chronically implanted rats, average 60-Hz interference of multichannel electroencephalograms of t