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Sample records for 600k wls fibers

  1. Final results from the SDC dopant search for new green wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Pla-Dalmau, A.; Foster, G.W.; Zhang, G.

    1993-12-01

    A scintillating tile/fiber design had been selected for the SDC calorimeter. It consisted of scintillator plates embedded with a wavelength shifting (WLS) fiber which was spliced to a clear fiber. Based on the results from previous radiation damage studies on different scintillating materials, SCSN38 had been chosen for the scintillating tile and BCF91 or Y7 for the WLS fiber. SCSN38 is a blue-emitting scintillator and both WLS fibers use K-27, a green-emitting compound, as dopant. K-27 has a decay time of approximately 12 ns which is long in comparison to that of most blue-emitting materials. Of all the factors that affect the speed of the scintillator tile/fiber calorimeter, the lifetime of the green-emitting dopant is the dominant component. To increase the speed of the calorimeter, it would be desirable that the green WLS fibers utilized had lifetimes between 3 and 5 ns. However, currently available green WLS fibers exhibit decay times between 7 and 12 ns. Development of new green-emitting WLS fibers with short decay times must be investigated. The goal of this project was to search for commercially available fluorescent compounds with {lambda}{sub abs} = 400--450 nm, {lambda}{sub em} = 450--550 nm, {tau} = 3--7 ns, and quantum efficiency of minimum 0.7 (current K-27 baseline). Large Stokes shift and low self-absorption were not important requirements since the optical pathlength for the shifted light was small. Characterization of the spectroscopic properties of these compounds after styrene polymerization is important since this is an essential part of the manufacturing of WLS fibers. This summary presents the transmittance and fluorescence data for each dopant tested. However, many fluorescence measurements using different excitation wavelengths and orientations were recorded. Volume 1 presents a plot for each dopant combining transmittance and the most representative fluorescence measurement.

  2. Detection of the Light Produced in Scintillating Tiles by Means of a Wls Fiber and AN Avalanche Photodiode Working in the Geiger Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akindinov, A.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Martemiyanov, A.; Smirnitsky, A.; Voloshin, K.; Grigoriev, E.; Golovin, V.; Bondarenko, G.

    2004-07-01

    Plates of an organic scintillator BC408, 50 × 50 × 5 mm3, with a wavelength-shifting (WLS) fiber Kuraray Y11, embedded in circular grooves inside the plastic, were used in combination with 1 mm2 avalanche photodiodes working in the Geiger mode (APDg or MRS-APD). Beam tests with minimum ionizing particles (MIP), performed at the ITEP synchrotron, have shown high detection efficiencies (about 13 photo-electrons).

  3. Digital signal processing for a thermal neutron detector using ZnS(Ag):6LiF scintillating layers read out with WLS fibers and SiPMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosset, J.-B.; Stoykov, A.; Greuter, U.; Hildebrandt, M.; Schlumpf, N.

    2016-07-01

    We present a digital signal processing system based on a photon counting approach which we developed for a thermal neutron detector consisting of ZnS(Ag):6LiF scintillating layers read out with WLS fibers and SiPMs. Three digital filters have been evaluated: a moving sum, a moving sum after differentiation and a digital CR-RC4 filter. The performances of the detector with these filters are presented. A full analog signal processing using a CR-RC4 filter has been emulated digitally. The detector performance obtained with this analog approach is compared with the one obtained with the best performing digital approach.

  4. Detection of thermal neutrons using ZnS(Ag):6LiF neutron scintillator read out with WLS fibers and SiPMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, M.; Stoykov, A.; Mosset, J.-B.; Greuter, U.; Schlumpf, N.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present the development of a one-dimensional multi-channel thermal neutron detection system for the application in neutron scattering instrumentation, e.g. strain-scanning diffractometers. The detection system is based on ZnS(Ag):6LiF neutron scintillator with embedded WLS fibers which are read out with a SiPM. A dedicated signal processing system allows us to suppress the SiPM dark counts and to extract the signals from the neutron absorption events. For a single-channel detection unit which represents the elementary building block of this detection system we achieved a neutron detection efficiency of ~65% at 1.2 Å, a background count rate <10-3 Hz and a gamma-sensitivity <10-6 (measured with a 60Co source), while the dead time is ~20 μs and the multi-count ratio is < 1 %. This performance was achieved even for SiPM dark count rates of up to ~2 MHz.

  5. Development of a 600 kJ HTS SMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, K. C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, S. H.; Sim, K. D.; Sohn, M. H.; Lee, E. Y.; Park, S. J.; Hahn, S. Y.; Park, M. W.

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes an overview of development on a 600 kJ high-temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage (HTS SMES). Our final goal will be the commercialization of MJ class HTS SMES system for the increase of power quality within 5 years. Hence, for this purpose, we have developed the research and development in 3 years. The purpose of this research is to develop a pilot system, which can protect the sensitivity loads from a momentary power interruption or a voltage sag.

  6. 76 FR 38197 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Form N-600K, Revision of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities; Form N-600K... information collection under review: form N- 600K, application for citizenship and issuance of certificate... sponsoring the collection: Form N-600K, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. (4) Affected public...

  7. 75 FR 18871 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-600K, Revision of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-600K... Information Collection under Review: Form N- 600K, Application for Citizenship and Issuance of Certificate...: Form N-600K, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. (4) Affected public who will be asked...

  8. Development of 600 kV triple resonance pulse transformer.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjia; Zhang, Faqiang; Liang, Chuan; Xu, Zhou

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a triple-resonance pulse transformer based on an air-core transformer is introduced. The voltage across the high-voltage winding of the air-core transformer is significantly less than the output voltage; instead, the full output voltage appears across the tuning inductor. The maximum ratio of peak load voltage to peak transformer voltage is 2.77 in theory. By analyzing pulse transformer's lossless circuit, the analytical expression for the output voltage and the characteristic equation of the triple-resonance circuit are presented. Design method for the triple-resonance pulse transformer (iterated simulation method) is presented, and a triple-resonance pulse transformer is developed based on the existing air-core transformer. The experimental results indicate that the maximum ratio of peak voltage across the load to peak voltage across the high-voltage winding of the air-core transformer is approximately 2.0 and the peak output voltage of the triple-resonance pulse transformer is approximately 600 kV.

  9. 76 FR 58029 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-600K, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... collection was previously published in the Federal Register on June 29, 2011, at 76 FR 38197, allowing for a... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-600K... Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 600K; Application for Citizenship and Issuance of...

  10. 600 kV modulator design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, K.; de Lamare, J.; Nesterov, V.; Cassel, R.

    1992-07-01

    Preliminary design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) requires a pulse power source to produce a 600 kV, 600 A, 1.4 {mu}s, 0.1% flat top pulse with rise and fall times of approximately 100 ns to power an X-Band klystron with a microperveance of 1.25 at {approx} 100 MW peak RF power. The design goals for the modulator, including those previously listed, are peak modulator pulse power of 340 MW operating at 120 Hz. A three-stage darlington pulse-forming network, which produces a >100 kV, 1.4 {mu}s pulse, is coupled to the klystron load through a 6:1 pulse transformer. Careful consideration of the transformer leakage inductance, klystron capacitance, system layout, and component choice is necessary to produce the very fast rise and fall times at 600 kV operating continuously at 120 Hz.

  11. Analysis of eddy current losses during discharging period in a 600 kJ SMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, M. J.; Kwak, S. Y.; Lee, S. Y.; Kim, W. S.; Lee, J. K.; Park, C.; Choi, K.; Bae, J. H.; Kim, S. H.; Sim, K. D.; Seong, K. C.; Jung, H. K.; Hahn, S.

    2008-09-01

    The operation of the SMES system can be divided into three modes such as charging, operating and discharging. During the charging and the discharging modes, a magnetic field variation due to the current increase and decrease generate eddy current losses in the SMES system. The eddy current loss in discharging mode is the major factor to be considered because the operating time in the mode is fixed, whereas the charging mode has the arbitrary operating time which is not fixed. In this paper, we present the analysis results of the eddy current losses which are generated in the 600 kJ class HTS SMES system during the discharging mode.

  12. Measurement and control of single spins in diamond above 600 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyli, David M.

    2013-03-01

    The nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond stands out among spin qubit systems in large part because its spin can be controlled under ambient conditions whereas most other solid state qubits operate only at cryogenic temperatures. However, despite the intense interest in the NV center's room temperature properties for nanoscale sensing and quantum information applications, the ultimate thermal limits to its measurement and control have been largely unknown. We demonstrate that the NV center's spin can be optically addressed and coherently controlled at temperatures exceeding 600 K and show that its addressability is eventually limited by thermal quenching of the optical spin readout. These measurements, in combination with computational studies, provide important information about the electronic states that facilitate the optical spin measurement and, moreover, suggest that the coherence of the NV center's spin states could be utilized for thermometry. We infer that single spins in diamond offer temperature sensitivities better than 100 mK/√{ Hz} up to 600 K using conventional sensing techniques and show that advanced measurement schemes provide a pathway to reach 10 mK/√{ Hz} sensitivities. Together with diamond's ideal thermal and mechanical properties, these results suggest that NV center thermometers could be applied in cellular thermometry and scanning thermal microscopy. This work was funded by AFOSR, ARO, and DARPA.

  13. The 600K T9 dwarfs: analysis of the spectral energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Saumon, Didier; Leggett, Sandy K; Burningham, Ben; Cushing, Michael C; Marley, Mark S; Pinfield, David J; Smart, Richard L; Warren, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    We present 8--15 {mu}m spectra of ULAS J003402.77-005206.7, and extremely late-type T dwarf. We fit synthetic spectra to the near- through mid-infrared energy distribution of this dwarf, as well as to the near-infrared spectra of two similar dwarfs, ULAS J133553.45+113005.2 and CFBDS J005910.82-011401.3. The fit to ULAS J133553.45+113005.2 is constrained using mid-infrared photometry. We derive effective temperatures of 550--600 K for all three of these T9 dwarfs; ULAS J003402.77-005206.7 appears to be the least massive (5--30 M{sub Jup}), and CFBDS J005910.82-011401.3 the most massive (30--50 M{sub Jup}).

  14. Noise radiation characteristics of the Westinghouse WWG-0600 (600kW) wind turbine generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Hubbard, Harvey H.

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic data are presented from five different WWG-0600 machines for the wind speed range 6.7 to 13.4 m/s, for a power output range of 51 to 600 kW and for upwind, downwind and crosswind locations. Both broadband and narrowband data are presented and are compared with calculations and with similar data from other machines. Predicted broadband spectra are in good agreement with measurements at high power and underestimate them at low power. Discrete frequency rotational noise components are present in all measurements and are believed due to terrain induced wind gradients. Predictions are in general agreement with measurements upwind and downwind but underestimate them in the crosswind direction.

  15. Design and test results of a 600-kW tetrode amplifier for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, D.E.; Brittain, D.L.; Grippe, J.M.; Marrufo, O.

    1993-05-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of a pulsed 600-kW tetrode amplifier that will be used to drive a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). Three stages of amplification provide a nominal gain of 77 dB and peak output power of 600 kW. The amplifier is operated at a pulse width of 100 {mu}s and a repetition frequency of 10 Hz. This paper presents the rf design and calculated operating conditions for the amplifier. Details of the electrical design are presented, along with test results.

  16. Design and test results of a 600-kW tetrode amplifier for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, D.E.; Brittain, D.L. ); Grippe, J.M.; Marrufo, O. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of a pulsed 600-kW tetrode amplifier that will be used to drive a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). Three stages of amplification provide a nominal gain of 77 dB and peak output power of 600 kW. The amplifier is operated at a pulse width of 100 [mu]s and a repetition frequency of 10 Hz. This paper presents the rf design and calculated operating conditions for the amplifier. Details of the electrical design are presented, along with test results.

  17. A 600-kV double-pulser for the PHERMEX electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.L.; Kang, M.; Melton, J.G.; Seitz, G.J.; Trujillo, L.T.

    1997-09-01

    The PHERMEX (Pulsed High Energy Radiographic Machine Emitting X-rays) Radiographic Facility is a 50-MHz, 3-Cavity, RF-Linac driven by a pulsed, thermionic electron-gun Injector. The PHERMEX is used to take flash radiographs using x-rays at a single time in an explosively driven event. To investigate the time evolution of these events requires two things: (1) a multiple-pulser to drive the electron-gun Injector and (2) a large-format, gamma-ray, camera system to record a scintillator at the different times. The authors report the recent success of developing a reliable double-pulser that consists of two Marx generators that independently charge two PFLs that are switched out at about 1.4 MV. The PFLs are connected in series by large diaphragm switches that are independently laser triggered by two quadrupled-YAG lasers. Recent tests of the system into a dummy load, produced two high quality 600 kV pulses separated by 1.0 {micro}s. Each pulse has a FWHM of 90 ns, a 50 ns flat-top {+-} 3%, and a risetime of 25 ns and a falltime of 35 ns. The interpulse time is variable up to about 275 {micro}s; the first switch is kept closed by a keep alive inductor. The system has produced a 50 shot sequence of two pulses with a 1-sigma jitter < 1 ns. The system has been modeled using TOSCA-3D, FLUX-2D, and a transmission line model run with the circuits code Micro-CAP.

  18. Women's Liberation Scale (WLS): A Measure of Attitudes Toward Positions Advocated by Women's Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Carlos

    The Women's Liberation Scale (WLS) is a 14-item, Likert-type scale designed to measure attitudes toward positions advocated by women's groups. The WLS and its four-alternative response schema is presented, along with descriptive statistics of scores based on male and female college samples. Reliability and validity measures are reported, and the…

  19. Comparison of calculated and experimental thermal attachment rate constants for SF6 in the temperature range 200-600 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orient, O. J.; Chutjian, A.

    1986-01-01

    Electron-attachment cross sections are calcualted for the process e(-) + SF6 yields SF6(-) in the energy range 1-200 meV. An electron scattering approximation is used in which diatomiclike potential energy curves near the equilibrium SF6 ground state are constructed from recent spectroscopic data. Excellent agreement is found over the entire energy range with experimental attachment cross sections at a temperature of 300 K for s-wave (l = 0) scattering. The same calculation, with appropriate adjustment of the thermal populations, is used to calculate attachment rate constants in the range 50-600 K for both s- and p-wave scattering.

  20. Study of the corrosion behaviors of 304 austenite stainless steel specimens exposed to static liquid lithium at 600 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiancai; Zuo, Guizhong; Ren, Jun; Xu, Wei; Sun, Zhen; Huang, Ming; Hu, Wangyu; Hu, Jiansheng; Deng, Huiqiu

    2016-11-01

    Investigation of corrosion behavior of stainless steel served as one kind of structure materials exposed to liquid lithium (Li) is one of the keys to apply liquid Li as potential plasma facing materials (PFM) or blanket coolant in the fusion device. Corrosion experiments of 304 austenite stainless steel (304 SS) were carried out in static liquid Li at 600 K and up to1584 h at high vacuum with pressure less than 4 × 10-4 Pa. After exposure to liquid Li, it was found that the weight of 304 SS slightly decreased with weight loss rate of 5.7 × 10-4 g/m2/h and surface hardness increased by about 50 HV. Lots of spinel-like grains and holes were observed on the surface of specimens measured by SEM. By further EDS, XRD and metallographic analyzing, it was confirmed that the main compositions of spinel-like grains were M23C6 carbides, and 304 SS produced a non-uniform corrosion behavior by preferential grain boundary attack, possibly due to the easy formation of M23C6 carbides and/or formation of Li compound at grain boundaries.

  1. Simultaneous measurement of all thermoelectric properties of bulk materials in the temperature range 300-600 K.

    PubMed

    Kolb, H; Dasgupta, T; Zabrocki, K; Mueller, E; de Boor, J

    2015-07-01

    Thermoelectric materials can directly convert heat into electrical energy. The characterization of different materials is an important part in thermoelectric materials research to improve their properties. Usually, different methods and setups are combined for the temperature dependent determination of all thermoelectric key quantities - Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity. Here, we present a measurement system for the simultaneous determination of all of these quantities plus the direct determination of the figure of merit by means of the Harman method (zT)H in a temperature range from room temperature up to 600 K. A simultaneous measurement saves time and reduces the measurement error, and the change of all material properties can be monitored even for unstable materials. Thermal conductivity measurements are inherently affected by undesired thermal losses, in particular, through radiation at higher temperatures. We show a simple experimental approach to measure radiation losses and correct for those. Comparative measurements on traditional systems show good agreement for all measured quantities. PMID:26233393

  2. Iterative methods for the WLS state estimation on RISC, vector, and parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Nieplocha, J.; Carroll, C.C.

    1993-10-01

    We investigate the suitability and effectiveness of iterative methods for solving the weighted-least-square (WLS) state estimation problem on RISC, vector, and parallel processors. Several of the most popular iterative methods are tested and evaluated. The best performing preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) is very well suited for vector and parallel processing as is demonstrated for the WLS state estimation of the IEEE standard test systems. A new sparse matrix format for the gain matrix improves vector performance of the PCG algorithm and makes it competitive to the direct solver. Internal parallelism in RISC processors, used in current multiprocessor systems, can be taken advantage of in an implementation of this algorithm.

  3. Tests of Scintillator+WLS Strips for Muon System at Future Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, Dmitri; Evdokimov, Valery; Lukić, Strahinja

    2015-10-11

    Prototype scintilator+WLS strips with SiPM readout for muon system at future colliders were tested for light yield, time resolution and position resolution. Depending on the configuration, light yield of up to 36 photoelectrons per muon per SiPM has been achieved, as well as time resolution of 0.5 ns and position resolution of ~ 7 cm.

  4. Bayesian WLS/GLS regression for regional skewness analysis for regions with large crest stage gage networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Veilleux, Andrea G.; Stedinger, Jery R.; Eash, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes methodological advances in regional log-space skewness analyses that support flood-frequency analysis with the log Pearson Type III (LP3) distribution. A Bayesian Weighted Least Squares/Generalized Least Squares (B-WLS/B-GLS) methodology that relates observed skewness coefficient estimators to basin characteristics in conjunction with diagnostic statistics represents an extension of the previously developed B-GLS methodology. B-WLS/B-GLS has been shown to be effective in two California studies. B-WLS/B-GLS uses B-WLS to generate stable estimators of model parameters and B-GLS to estimate the precision of those B-WLS regression parameters, as well as the precision of the model. The study described here employs this methodology to develop a regional skewness model for the State of Iowa. To provide cost effective peak-flow data for smaller drainage basins in Iowa, the U.S. Geological Survey operates a large network of crest stage gages (CSGs) that only record flow values above an identified recording threshold (thus producing a censored data record). CSGs are different from continuous-record gages, which record almost all flow values and have been used in previous B-GLS and B-WLS/B-GLS regional skewness studies. The complexity of analyzing a large CSG network is addressed by using the B-WLS/B-GLS framework along with the Expected Moments Algorithm (EMA). Because EMA allows for the censoring of low outliers, as well as the use of estimated interval discharges for missing, censored, and historic data, it complicates the calculations of effective record length (and effective concurrent record length) used to describe the precision of sample estimators because the peak discharges are no longer solely represented by single values. Thus new record length calculations were developed. The regional skewness analysis for the State of Iowa illustrates the value of the new B-WLS/BGLS methodology with these new extensions.

  5. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... it can help with weight control. Fiber aids digestion and helps prevent constipation . It is sometimes used ... fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in ...

  6. Field Testing of LIDAR-Assisted Feedforward Control Algorithms for Improved Speed Control and Fatigue Load Reduction on a 600-kW Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Avishek A.; Bossanyi, Ervin A.; Scholbrock, Andrew K.; Fleming, Paul; Boquet, Mathieu; Krishnamurthy, Raghu

    2015-12-14

    A severe challenge in controlling wind turbines is ensuring controller performance in the presence of a stochastic and unknown wind field, relying on the response of the turbine to generate control actions. Recent technologies such as LIDAR, allow sensing of the wind field before it reaches the rotor. In this work a field-testing campaign to test LIDAR Assisted Control (LAC) has been undertaken on a 600-kW turbine using a fixed, five-beam LIDAR system. The campaign compared the performance of a baseline controller to four LACs with progressively lower levels of feedback using 35 hours of collected data.

  7. Analysis of wntless (WLS) expression in gastric, ovarian, and breast cancers reveals a strong association with HER2 overexpression.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Jonathan; James, Jacqueline; McCluggage, Glenn W; McQuaid, Stephen; Arthur, Kenneth; Boyle, David; Mullan, Paul; McArt, Darragh; Yan, Benedict; Irwin, Gareth; Harkin, D Paul; Zhengdeng, Lei; Ong, Chee-Wee; Yu, Jia; Virshup, David M; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2015-03-01

    The oncogenic role of WNT is well characterized. Wntless (WLS) (also known as GPR177, or Evi), a key modulator of WNT protein secretion, was recently found to be highly overexpressed in malignant astrocytomas. We hypothesized that this molecule may be aberrantly expressed in other cancers known to possess aberrant WNT signaling such as ovarian, gastric, and breast cancers. Immunohistochemical analysis using a TMA platform revealed WLS overexpression in a subset of ovarian, gastric, and breast tumors; this overexpression was associated with poorer clinical outcomes in gastric cancer (P=0.025). In addition, a strong correlation was observed between WLS expression and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression. Indeed, 100% of HER2-positive intestinal gastric carcinomas, 100% of HER2-positive serous ovarian carcinomas, and 64% of HER2-positive breast carcinomas coexpressed WLS protein. Although HER2 protein expression or gene amplification is an established predictive biomarker for trastuzumab response in breast and gastric cancers, a significant proportion of HER2-positive tumors display resistance to trastuzumab, which may be in part explainable by a possible mechanistic link between WLS and HER2.

  8. Raman scattering of 2H-MoS2 at simultaneous high temperature and high pressure (up to 600 K and 18.5 GPa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, JianJun; Li, HePing; Dai, LiDong; Hu, HaiYing; Zhao, ChaoShuai

    2016-03-01

    The Raman spectroscopy of natural molybdenite powder was investigated at simultaneous conditions of high temperature and high pressure in a heatable diamond anvil cell (DAC), to obtain the temperature and pressure dependence of the main Raman vibrational modes (E1g, E2 g 1 ,A1g, and 2LA(M)). Over our experimental temperature and pressure range (300-600 K and 1 atm-18.5 GPa), the Raman modes follow a systematic blue shift with increasing pressure, and red shift with increasing temperature. The results were calculated by three-variable linear fitting. The mutual correlation index of temperature and pressure indicates that the pressure may reduce the temperature dependence of Raman modes. New Raman bands due to structural changes emerged at about 3-4 GPa lower than seen in previous studies; this may be caused by differences in the pressure hydrostaticity and shear stress in the sample cell that promote the interlayer sliding.

  9. WLS-ENO: Weighted-least-squares based essentially non-oscillatory schemes for finite volume methods on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongxu; Jiao, Xiangmin

    2016-06-01

    ENO (Essentially Non-Oscillatory) and WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory) schemes are widely used high-order schemes for solving partial differential equations (PDEs), especially hyperbolic conservation laws with piecewise smooth solutions. For structured meshes, these techniques can achieve high order accuracy for smooth functions while being non-oscillatory near discontinuities. For unstructured meshes, which are needed for complex geometries, similar schemes are required but they are much more challenging. We propose a new family of non-oscillatory schemes, called WLS-ENO, in the context of solving hyperbolic conservation laws using finite-volume methods over unstructured meshes. WLS-ENO is derived based on Taylor series expansion and solved using a weighted least squares formulation. Unlike other non-oscillatory schemes, the WLS-ENO does not require constructing sub-stencils, and hence it provides a more flexible framework and is less sensitive to mesh quality. We present rigorous analysis of the accuracy and stability of WLS-ENO, and present numerical results in 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D for a number of benchmark problems, and also report some comparisons against WENO.

  10. A Scintillator tile-fiber preshower detector for the CDF Central Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    S. Lami

    2004-08-12

    The front face of the CDF central calorimeter is being equipped with a new Preshower detector, based on scintillator tiles read out by WLS fibers. A light yield of about 40 pe/MIP at the tile exit was obtained, exceeding the design requirements.

  11. Elimination of ghosting artifacts from wavelength-shifting fiber neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C. L.; Diawara, Y.; Hannan, B. W.; Hodges, J. P.; Clonts, L. G.

    2013-01-15

    Misassignment of neutron position (ghosting) produces artifacts which have been observed in wavelength-shifting (WLS) fiber detectors developed for time-of-flight (TOF) neutron powder diffraction. In position-sensitive detectors (PSDs) with WLS fiber encoding, thermal and cold neutrons interact with a monolithic {sup 6}LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillator screen, and scintillation photons are generated and transported through the crossed fibers to photomultipliers (PMTs). The neutron position is determined by photon counts in the PMTs within a preset time window. Ghosting occurs when neutrons hit the group boundaries of two neighboring PMTs for x-position multiplexing, which is modeled as resulting from a long travel length (about 3-5 mm) of a small number of scintillation photons. This model is supported by the change observed in aperture images when the threshold number for photon-pulses was adjusted for neutron event determination. When the threshold number of photon-pulses was set above 10 for each PMT, the ghost peaks in the aperture images and TOF spectra of powder diffraction were strongly suppressed or completely eliminated, and the intrinsic background levels of the WLS detectors were significantly reduced. Our result indicates that WLS fiber detector is a promising alternative for {sup 3}He PSDs for neutron scattering.

  12. Elimination of ghosting artifacts from wavelength-shifting fiber neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G.; Diawara, Yacouba; Hannan, Bruce W.; Hodges, Jason P.; Wang, Cai-Lin

    2013-01-31

    Misassignment of neutron position (ghosting) produces artifacts, which have been observed in wavelength-shifting (WLS) fiber detectors developed for time-of-flight (TOF) neutron powder diffraction. In position-sensitive detectors (PSDs) with WLS fiber encoding, thermal and cold neutrons interact with a monolithic 6LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillator screen, and scintillation photons are generated and transported through the crossed fibers to photomultipliers (PMTs). The neutron position is determined by photon counts in PMTs within a preset time window. Ghosting occurs when neutrons hit the group boundaries of two neighboring PMTs for x-position multiplexing, which is modeled as resulting from a long travel length (about 3-5 mm) of a small number of scintillation photons. This model is supported by the change observed in aperture images when the threshold number for photon-pulses was adjusted for a neutron event determination. When the threshold number of photon-pulses was set above 10 for each PMT, the ghost peaks in the aperture images and TOF spectra of powder diffraction were strongly suppressed or completely eliminated, and the intrinsic background levels of the WLS detectors were significantly reduced. Our result indicates that WLS fiber detector is a promising alternative for 3He PSDs for neutron scattering.

  13. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... broccoli, spinach, and artichokes legumes (split peas, soy, lentils, etc.) almonds Look for the fiber content of ... salsa, taco sauce, and cheese for dinner. Add lentils or whole-grain barley to your favorite soups. ...

  14. Genome-wide detection of CNVs in Chinese indigenous sheep with different types of tails using ovine high-density 600K SNP arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Caiye; Fan, Hongying; Yuan, Zehu; Hu, Shijin; Ma, Xiaomeng; Xuan, Junli; Wang, Hongwei; Zhang, Li; Wei, Caihong; Zhang, Qin; Zhao, Fuping; Du, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Chinese indigenous sheep can be classified into three types based on tail morphology: fat-tailed, fat-rumped, and thin-tailed sheep, of which the typical breeds are large-tailed Han sheep, Altay sheep, and Tibetan sheep, respectively. To unravel the genetic mechanisms underlying the phenotypic differences among Chinese indigenous sheep with tails of three different types, we used ovine high-density 600K SNP arrays to detect genome-wide copy number variation (CNV). In large-tailed Han sheep, Altay sheep, and Tibetan sheep, 371, 301, and 66 CNV regions (CNVRs) with lengths of 71.35 Mb, 51.65 Mb, and 10.56 Mb, respectively, were identified on autosomal chromosomes. Ten CNVRs were randomly chosen for confirmation, of which eight were successfully validated. The detected CNVRs harboured 3130 genes, including genes associated with fat deposition, such as PPARA, RXRA, KLF11, ADD1, FASN, PPP1CA, PDGFA, and PEX6. Moreover, multilevel bioinformatics analyses of the detected candidate genes were significantly enriched for involvement in fat deposition, GTPase regulator, and peptide receptor activities. This is the first high-resolution sheep CNV map for Chinese indigenous sheep breeds with three types of tails. Our results provide valuable information that will support investigations of genomic structural variation underlying traits of interest in sheep. PMID:27282145

  15. Use of a 600-kHz Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler to measure estuarine bottom type, relative abundance of submerged aquatic vegetation, and eelgrass canopy height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Joseph D.; Peterson, Bradley J.

    2007-03-01

    The acoustic backscatter intensity signal from a high-frequency (600 kHz) Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) was used to categorize four different types of bottom habitat (sand, mud, sparse and dense vegetation) in a shallow-water estuary (Shinnecock Bay, NY, USA). A diver survey of the bay measured sediment and bottom vegetation characteristics at 85 sites within the bay. These data were used to groundtruth the acoustic data. Acoustic data were collected at four sites with known bottom types and used to develop an algorithm that could categorize the bottom type. The slope of the echo intensity profile close to the bottom was used to determine the bottom type and the relative numerical density (sparse or dense) of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV). In areas where eelgrass ( Zostera marina) was the dominant SAV species, the intensity profile data were analyzed to measure the height of the vegetation canopy. An acoustic survey which categorized the bottom type of the bay was conducted from a small vessel. The percentage of sampled sites categorized as each bottom habitat type from the acoustic survey was similar to those obtained by the diver survey. These methods may provide a means to rapidly survey estuarine habitats and measure spatial and temporal variations in SAV populations, as well as changes in the height of the eelgrass canopy.

  16. Genome-wide detection of CNVs in Chinese indigenous sheep with different types of tails using ovine high-density 600K SNP arrays

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Caiye; Fan, Hongying; Yuan, Zehu; Hu, Shijin; Ma, Xiaomeng; Xuan, Junli; Wang, Hongwei; Zhang, Li; Wei, Caihong; Zhang, Qin; Zhao, Fuping; Du, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Chinese indigenous sheep can be classified into three types based on tail morphology: fat-tailed, fat-rumped, and thin-tailed sheep, of which the typical breeds are large-tailed Han sheep, Altay sheep, and Tibetan sheep, respectively. To unravel the genetic mechanisms underlying the phenotypic differences among Chinese indigenous sheep with tails of three different types, we used ovine high-density 600K SNP arrays to detect genome-wide copy number variation (CNV). In large-tailed Han sheep, Altay sheep, and Tibetan sheep, 371, 301, and 66 CNV regions (CNVRs) with lengths of 71.35 Mb, 51.65 Mb, and 10.56 Mb, respectively, were identified on autosomal chromosomes. Ten CNVRs were randomly chosen for confirmation, of which eight were successfully validated. The detected CNVRs harboured 3130 genes, including genes associated with fat deposition, such as PPARA, RXRA, KLF11, ADD1, FASN, PPP1CA, PDGFA, and PEX6. Moreover, multilevel bioinformatics analyses of the detected candidate genes were significantly enriched for involvement in fat deposition, GTPase regulator, and peptide receptor activities. This is the first high-resolution sheep CNV map for Chinese indigenous sheep breeds with three types of tails. Our results provide valuable information that will support investigations of genomic structural variation underlying traits of interest in sheep. PMID:27282145

  17. Histologic and Phenotypic Factors and MC1R Status Associated with BRAF(V600E), BRAF(V600K), and NRAS Mutations in a Community-Based Sample of 414 Cutaneous Melanomas.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Elke; Olsen, Catherine M; Kvaskoff, Marina; Pandeya, Nirmala; Yeo, Abrey; Green, Adèle C; Williamson, Richard M; Triscott, Joe; Wood, Dominic; Mortimore, Rohan; Hayward, Nicholas K; Whiteman, David C

    2016-04-01

    Cutaneous melanomas arise through causal pathways involving interplay between exposure to UV radiation and host factors, resulting in characteristic patterns of driver mutations in BRAF, NRAS, and other genes. To gain clearer insights into the factors contributing to somatic mutation genotypes in melanoma, we collected clinical and epidemiologic data, performed skin examinations, and collected saliva and tumor samples from a community-based series of 414 patients aged 18 to 79, newly diagnosed with cutaneous melanoma. We assessed constitutional DNA for nine common polymorphisms in melanocortin-1 receptor gene (MC1R). Tumor DNA was assessed for somatic mutations in 25 different genes. We observed mutually exclusive mutations in BRAF(V600E) (26%), BRAF(V600K) (8%), BRAF(other) (5%), and NRAS (9%). Compared to patients with BRAF wild-type melanomas, those with BRAF(V600E) mutants were significantly younger, had more nevi but fewer actinic keratoses, were more likely to report a family history of melanoma, and had tumors that were more likely to harbor neval remnants. BRAF(V600K) mutations were also associated with high nevus counts. Both BRAF(V600K) and NRAS mutants were associated with older age but not with high sun exposure. We also found no association between MC1R status and any somatic mutations in this community sample of cutaneous melanomas, contrary to earlier reports.

  18. Time-dependent statistical failure of fiber networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Amanda; Uesaka, Tetsu

    2015-10-01

    Numerical simulations of time-dependent stochastic failure of fiber network have been performed by using a central-force, triangular lattice model. This two-dimensional (2D) network can be seen as the next level of structural hierarchy to fiber bundles, which have been investigated for many years both theoretically and numerically. Unlike fiber bundle models, the load sharing of the fiber network is determined by the network mechanics rather than a preassigned rule, and its failure is defined as the point of avalanche rather than the total fiber failure. We have assumed that the fiber in the network follows Coleman's probabilistic failure law [B. D. Coleman, J. Appl. Phys. 29, 968 (1958), 10.1063/1.1723343] with the Weibull shape parameter β =1 (memory less fiber). Our interests are how the fiber-level probabilistic failure law is transformed into the one for the network and how the failure characteristics and disorders on the fiber level influence the network failure response. The simulation results showed that, with increasing the size of the network (N ), weakest-link scaling (WLS) appeared and each lifetime distribution at a given size approximately followed Weibull distribution. However, the scaling behavior of the mean and the Weibull shape parameter clearly deviate from what we can predict from the WLS of Weibull distribution. We have found that a characteristic distribution function has, in fact, a double exponential form, not Weibull form. Accordingly, for the 2D network system, Coleman's probabilistic failure law holds but only approximately. Comparing the fiber and network failure properties, we found that the network structure induces an increase of the load sensitivity factor ρ (more brittle than fiber) and Weibull shape parameter β (less uncertainty of lifetime). Superimposed disorders on the fiber level reduce all these properties for the network.

  19. Time-dependent statistical failure of fiber networks.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Amanda; Uesaka, Tetsu

    2015-10-01

    Numerical simulations of time-dependent stochastic failure of fiber network have been performed by using a central-force, triangular lattice model. This two-dimensional (2D) network can be seen as the next level of structural hierarchy to fiber bundles, which have been investigated for many years both theoretically and numerically. Unlike fiber bundle models, the load sharing of the fiber network is determined by the network mechanics rather than a preassigned rule, and its failure is defined as the point of avalanche rather than the total fiber failure. We have assumed that the fiber in the network follows Coleman's probabilistic failure law [B. D. Coleman, J. Appl. Phys. 29, 968 (1958)] with the Weibull shape parameter β=1 (memory less fiber). Our interests are how the fiber-level probabilistic failure law is transformed into the one for the network and how the failure characteristics and disorders on the fiber level influence the network failure response. The simulation results showed that, with increasing the size of the network (N), weakest-link scaling (WLS) appeared and each lifetime distribution at a given size approximately followed Weibull distribution. However, the scaling behavior of the mean and the Weibull shape parameter clearly deviate from what we can predict from the WLS of Weibull distribution. We have found that a characteristic distribution function has, in fact, a double exponential form, not Weibull form. Accordingly, for the 2D network system, Coleman's probabilistic failure law holds but only approximately. Comparing the fiber and network failure properties, we found that the network structure induces an increase of the load sensitivity factor ρ (more brittle than fiber) and Weibull shape parameter β (less uncertainty of lifetime). Superimposed disorders on the fiber level reduce all these properties for the network. PMID:26565219

  20. Monte Carlo code G3sim for simulation of plastic scintillator detectors with wavelength shifter fiber readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, P. K.; Dugad, S. R.; Gupta, S. K.

    2012-04-01

    A detailed description of a compact Monte Carlo simulation code "G3sim" for studying the performance of a plastic scintillator detector with wavelength shifter (WLS) fiber readout is presented. G3sim was developed for optimizing the design of new scintillator detectors used in the GRAPES-3 extensive air shower experiment. Propagation of the blue photons produced by the passage of relativistic charged particles in the scintillator is treated by incorporating the absorption, total internal, and diffuse reflections. Capture of blue photons by the WLS fibers and subsequent re-emission of longer wavelength green photons is appropriately treated. The trapping and propagation of green photons inside the WLS fiber is treated using the laws of optics for meridional and skew rays. Propagation time of each photon is taken into account for the generation of the electrical signal at the photomultiplier. A comparison of the results from G3sim with the performance of a prototype scintillator detector showed an excellent agreement between the simulated and measured properties. The simulation results can be parametrized in terms of exponential functions providing a deeper insight into the functioning of these versatile detectors. G3sim can be used to aid the design and optimize the performance of scintillator detectors prior to actual fabrication that may result in a considerable saving of time, labor, and money spent.

  1. Utilization of wavelength-shifting fibers coupled to ZnS(Ag) and plastic scintillator for simultaneous detection of alpha/beta particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifergan, Y.; Dadon, S.; Israelashvili, I.; Osovizky, A.; Gonen, E.; Yehuda-Zada, Y.; Smadja, D.; Knafo, Y.; Ginzburg, D.; Kadmon, Y.; Cohen, Y.; Mazor, T.

    2015-06-01

    Low level radioactive surface contamination measurements require lightweight, large area and high efficiency detector. In most existing scintillation detectors there is a tradeoff between effective area and scintillation light collection. By using wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers the scintillation light may be collected efficiently also in a large area detector. In this study, WLS fibers were coupled to a beta sensitive plastic scintillator layer and to a alpha sensitive silver-activated zinc sulfide ZnS(Ag) layer for detecting both alpha and beta particles. The WLS fibers collect the scintillation light from the whole detector and transfer it to a single PMT. This first prototype unique configuration enables monitoring radioactive contaminated surfaces by both sides of the detector and provides high gamma rejection. In this paper, the detector structure, as well as the detector's measured linear response, will be described. The measured detection efficiency of 238Pu alpha particles (5.5 MeV) is ~63%. The measured detection efficiency for beta particles is ~89% for 90Sr-90Y (average energy of 195.8 keV, 934.8 keV), ~50% for 36Cl (average energy of 251.3 keV), and 35% for 137Cs (average energy of 156.8 keV).

  2. A Multi-Anode Photomultiplier Tube Based Wavelength-Shifting-Fiber Detector for neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Kevin D; Clonts, Lloyd G; Crow, Lowell; Diawara, Yacouba; Funk, Loren L; Hannan, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Riedel, Richard A; Wang, Cai-Lin

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength-shifting (WLS) fiber scintillator neutron detectors were developed for two time-of-flight (TOF) neutron powder diffractometers (POWGEN, VULCAN) at Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). In a recent module (v3.0), however, there are 32 1-inch-diameter photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) which are bulky and expensive. We built a new detector module (v3.1) based on four multi-anode (MA) PMTs, and tested its performance including detection efficiency, count rate capability, spatial resolution, ghosting properties, and gamma-ray sensitivity. The v3.1 module was compared with two prior v3.0 modules, and 3He tube detectors.

  3. Fiber biology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber cells arising from seed epidermis is the most important agricultural textile commodity in the world. To produce fully mature fibers, approximately two months of fiber developmental process are required. The timing of four distinctive fiber development stages consisting of initiation, ...

  4. Two Fiber Optical Fiber Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Mathew R.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Breeding, Shawn P.

    2000-01-01

    An optical fiber thermometer consists of an optical fiber whose sensing tip is given a metallic coating. The sensing tip of the fiber is essentially an isothermal cavity, so the emission from this cavity will be approximately equal to the emission from a blackbody. Temperature readings are obtained by measuring the spectral radiative heat flux at the end of the fiber at two wavelengths. The ratio of these measurements and Planck's Law are used to infer the temperature at the sensing tip. Optical fiber thermometers have high accuracy, excellent long-term stability and are immune to electromagnetic interference. In addition, they can be operated for extended periods without requiring re-calibration. For these reasons. it is desirable to use optical fiber thermometers in environments such as the International Space Station. However, it has recently been shown that temperature readings are corrupted by emission from the fiber when extended portions of the probe are exposed to elevated temperatures. This paper will describe several ways in which the reading from a second fiber can be used to correct the corrupted temperature measurements. The accuracy and sensitivity to measurement uncertainty will be presented for each method.

  5. Optical Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatak, Ajoy; Thyagarajan, K.

    With the development of extremely low-loss optical fibers and their application to communication systems, a revolution has taken fiber glass place during the last 40 years. In 2001, using glass fibers as the transmission medium and lightwaves as carrier wave waves, information was transmitted at a rate more than 1 Tbit/s (which is roughly equivalent to transmission of about 15 million simultaneous telephone conversations) through one hair thin optical fiber. Experimental demonstration of transmission at the rate of 14 Tbit/s over a 160 km long single fiber was demonstrated in 2006, which is equivalent to sending 140 digital high definition movies in 1 s. Very recently record transmission of more than 100 Tbit/s over 165 km single mode fiber has been reported. These can be considered as extremely important technological achievements. In this chapter we will discuss the propagation characteristics of optical fibers with special applications to optical communication systems and also present some of the noncommunication applications such as sensing.

  6. Fireblocking Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    PBI was originally developed for space suits. In 1980, the need for an alternative to asbestos and stricter government anti-pollution standards led to commercialization of the fire blocking fiber. PBI is used for auto racing driver suits and aircraft seat covers. The fiber does not burn in air, is durable and easily maintained. It has been specified by a number of airliners and is manufactured by Hoechst-Celanese Corporation.

  7. Photovoltaic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudiana, Russell; Eckert, Robert; Cardone, John; Ryan, James; Montello, Alan

    2006-08-01

    It was realized early in the history of Konarka that the ability to produce fibers that generate power from solar energy could be applied to a wide variety of applications where fabrics are utilized currently. These applications include personal items such as jackets, shirts and hats, to architectural uses such as awnings, tents, large covers for cars, trucks and even doomed stadiums, to indoor furnishings such as window blinds, shades and drapes. They may also be used as small fabric patches or fiber bundles for powering or recharging batteries in small sensors. Power generating fabrics for clothing is of particular interest to the military where they would be used in uniforms and body armor where portable power is vital to field operations. In strong sunlight these power generating fabrics could be used as a primary source of energy, or they can be used in either direct sunlight or low light conditions to recharge batteries. Early in 2002, Konarka performed a series of proof-of-concept experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of building a photovoltaic cell using dye-sensitized titania and electrolyte on a metal wire core. The approach taken was based on the sequential coating processes used in making fiber optics, namely, a fiber core, e.g., a metal wire serving as the primary electrode, is passed through a series of vertically aligned coating cups. Each of the cups contains a coating fluid that has a specific function in the photocell. A second wire, used as the counter electrode, is brought into the process prior to entering the final coating cup. The latter contains a photopolymerizable, transparent cladding which hardens when passed through a UV chamber. Upon exiting the UV chamber, the finished PV fiber is spooled. Two hundred of foot lengths of PV fiber have been made using this process. When the fiber is exposed to visible radiation, it generates electrical power. The best efficiency exhibited by these fibers is 6% with an average value in the 4

  8. Low-fiber diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... restricted diet; Crohn disease - low fiber diet; Ulcerative colitis - low fiber diet; Surgery - low fiber diet ... of: Irritable bowel syndrome Diverticulitis Crohn disease Ulcerative colitis Sometimes people are put on this diet after ...

  9. Fiber distributed feedback laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Evans, G. A.; Yeh, C. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Utilizing round optical fibers as communication channels in optical communication networks presents the problem of obtaining a high efficiency coupling between the optical fiber and the laser. A laser is made an integral part of the optical fiber channel by either diffusing active material into the optical fiber or surrounding the optical fiber with the active material. Oscillation within the active medium to produce lasing action is established by grating the optical fiber so that distributed feedback occurs.

  10. Strong fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Che-Yu.

    1991-03-01

    This program was directed to a new and generic approach to the development of new materials with novel and interesting properties, and to the precision fabrication of these materials in one and two-dimensional forms. Advanced deposition processes and microfabrication technology were used to produce fibers and grids of metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and mixtures of controlled composition and structure, and with new and interesting mechanical and physical properties. Deposition processes included electron beam evaporation, co-deposition of mixtures by dual electron beam evaporation, thermal evaporation, sputtering of a single element or compound, sputtering of a single element in a gaseous atmosphere to produce compounds, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD), and selective tungsten chemical vapor deposition (W-CVD). The approach was to use the deposition processes in coordination with patterns generated by optical lithography to produce fibers with transverse dimensions in the micron range, and lengths from less than a millimeter to several centimeters. The approach is also applicable to the production of two-dimensional grids and particulates of controlled sizes and geometries.

  11. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor); Mattes, Brenton L. (Inventor); Charnetski, Clark J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  12. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  13. Coatings for graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galasso, F. S.; Scola, D. A.; Veltri, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Graphite fibers released from composites during burning or an explosion caused shorting of electrical and electronic equipment. Silicon carbide, silica, silicon nitride and boron nitride were coated on graphite fibers to increase their electrical resistances. Resistances as high as three orders of magnitude higher than uncoated fiber were attained without any significant degradation of the substrate fiber. An organo-silicone approach to produce coated fibers with high electrical resistance was also used. Celion 6000 graphite fibers were coated with an organo-silicone compound, followed by hydrolysis and pyrolysis of the coating to a silica-like material. The shear and flexural strengths of composites made from high electrically resistant fibers were considerably lower than the shear and flexural strengths of composites made from the lower electrically resistant fibers. The lower shear strengths of the composites indicated that the coatings on these fibers were weaker than the coating on the fibers which were pyrolyzed at higher temperature.

  14. Alumina fiber strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, R. T.; Nelson, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effective fiber strength of alumina fibers in an aluminum composite was increased to 173,000 psi. A high temperature heat treatment, combined with a glassy carbon surface coating, was used to prevent degradation and improve fiber tensile strength. Attempts to achieve chemical strengthening of the alumina fiber by chromium oxide and boron oxide coatings proved unsuccessful. A major problem encountered on the program was the low and inconsistent strength of the Dupont Fiber FP used for the investigation.

  15. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, James K.

    1993-01-01

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  16. Specialty optical fibers: revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2011-10-01

    The paper contains description of chosen aspects of analysis and design of tailored optical fibers. By specialty optical fibers we understand here the fibers which have complex construction and which serve for the functional processing of optical signal rather than long distance transmission. Thus, they are called also instrumentation optical fibers. The following issues are considered: transmission properties, transformation of optical signal, fiber characteristics, fiber susceptibility to external reactions. The technology of tailored optical fibers offers a wider choice of the design tools for the fiber itself, and then various devices made from these fiber, than classical technology of communication optical fibers. The consequence is different fiber properties, nonstandard dimensions and different metrological problems. The price to be paid for wider design possibilities are bigger optical losses of these fibers and weaker mechanical properties, and worse chemical stability. These fibers find their applications outside the field of telecommunications. The applications of instrumentation optical fibers combine other techniques apart from the photonics ones like: electronic, chemical and mechatronic.

  17. Composite Random Fiber Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picu, Catalin; Shahsavari, Ali

    2013-03-01

    Systems made from fibers are common in the biological and engineering worlds. In many instances, as for example in skin, where elastin and collagen fibers are present, the fiber network is composite, in the sense that it contains fibers of very different properties. The relationship between microstructural parameters and the elastic moduli of random fiber networks containing a single type of fiber is understood. In this work we address a similar target for the composite networks. We show that linear superposition of the contributions to stiffness of individual sub-networks does not apply and interesting non-linear effects are observed. A physical basis of these effects is proposed.

  18. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    DOEpatents

    Stinton, David P.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Lowden, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  19. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  20. Fiber Optics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, William E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses various applications of fiber optics technology: information systems, industrial robots, medicine, television, transportation, and training. Types of jobs that will be available with fiber optics training (such as electricians and telephone cable installers and splicers) are examined. (CT)

  1. Soluble vs. insoluble fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... soluble and insoluble. Both are important for health, digestion, and preventing diseases. Soluble fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in ...

  2. Omnidirectional fiber optic tiltmeter

    DOEpatents

    Benjamin, B.C.; Miller, H.M.

    1983-06-30

    A tiltmeter is provided which is useful in detecting very small movements such as earth tides. The device comprises a single optical fiber, and an associated weight affixed thereto, suspended from a support to form a pendulum. A light source, e.g., a light emitting diode, mounted on the support transmits light through the optical fiber to a group of further optical fibers located adjacent to but spaced from the free end of the single optical fiber so that displacement of the single optical fiber with respect to the group will result in a change in the amount of light received by the individual optical fibers of the group. Photodetectors individually connectd to the fibers produce corresponding electrical outputs which are differentially compared and processed to produce a resultant continuous analog output representative of the amount and direction of displacement of the single optical fiber.

  3. Fiber pulling apparatus modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Guy A.; Workman, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    A reduced gravity fiber pulling apparatus (FPA) was constructed in order to study the effects of gravity on glass fiber formation. The apparatus was specifically designed and built for use on NASA's KC-135 aircraft. Four flights have been completed to date during which E-glass fiber was successfully produced in simulated zero, high, and lunar gravity environments. In addition simulated lunar soil samples were tested for their fiber producing properties using the FPA.

  4. Helical Fiber Amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.; Kliner, Dahy; Goldberg, Lew

    2002-12-17

    A multi-mode gain fiber is provided which affords substantial improvements in the maximum pulse energy, peak power handling capabilities, average output power, and/or pumping efficiency of fiber amplifier and laser sources while maintaining good beam quality (comparable to that of a conventional single-mode fiber source). These benefits are realized by coiling the multimode gain fiber to induce significant bend loss for all but the lowest-order mode(s).

  5. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, Kevin J.

    2001-01-01

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  6. The Fiber Optic Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the fiber optics programs at the Career and Technical Center in Berlin, Pennsylvania and the Charles S. Monroe Technology Center in Loudoun County, Virginia. Discusses the involvement of the Fiber Optic Association with education, research and development, manufacturing, sales, distribution, installation, and maintenance of fiber optic…

  7. Oxynitride glass fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Parimal J.; Messier, Donald R.; Rich, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Research at the Army Materials Technology Laboratory (AMTL) and elsewhere has shown that many glass properties including elastic modulus, hardness, and corrosion resistance are improved markedly by the substitution of nitrogen for oxygen in the glass structure. Oxynitride glasses, therefore, offer exciting opportunities for making high modulus, high strength fibers. Processes for making oxynitride glasses and fibers of glass compositions similar to commercial oxide glasses, but with considerable enhanced properties, are discussed. We have made glasses with elastic moduli as high as 140 GPa and fibers with moduli of 120 GPa and tensile strengths up to 2900 MPa. AMTL holds a U.S. patent on oxynitride glass fibers, and this presentation discusses a unique process for drawing small diameter oxynitride glass fibers at high drawing rates. Fibers are drawn through a nozzle from molten glass in a molybdenum crucible at 1550 C. The crucible is situated in a furnace chamber in flowing nitrogen, and the fiber is wound in air outside of the chamber, making the process straightforward and commercially feasible. Strengths were considerably improved by improving glass quality to minimize internal defects. Though the fiber strengths were comparable with oxide fibers, work is currently in progress to further improve the elastic modulus and strength of fibers. The high elastic modulus of oxynitride glasses indicate their potential for making fibers with tensile strengths surpassing any oxide glass fibers, and we hope to realize that potential in the near future.

  8. Mineral Fiber Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical and physical properties of different forms of mineral fibers impact biopersistence and pathology in the lung. Fiber chemistry, length, aspect ratio, surface area and dose are critical factors determining mineral fiber-associated health effects including cancer and as...

  9. Linearly polarized fiber amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Kliner, Dahv A.; Koplow, Jeffery P.

    2004-11-30

    Optically pumped rare-earth-doped polarizing fibers exhibit significantly higher gain for one linear polarization state than for the orthogonal state. Such a fiber can be used to construct a single-polarization fiber laser, amplifier, or amplified-spontaneous-emission (ASE) source without the need for additional optical components to obtain stable, linearly polarized operation.

  10. Advanced Engineering Fibers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edie, Dan D.; Dunham, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Clemson University's Advanced Engineered Fibers Laboratory, which was established to provide national leadership and expertise in developing the processing equipment and advance fibers necessary for the chemical, fiber, and textile industries to enter the composite materials market. Discusses some of the laboratory's activities in…

  11. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  12. Multimaterial Acoustic Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chocat, Noemie

    The emergence of multimaterial fibers that combine a multiplicity of solid materials with disparate electrical, optical, and mechanical properties into a single fiber presents new opportunities for extending fiber applications well beyond optical transmission. Fiber reflectors, thermal detectors, photodetectors, chemical sensors, surface-emitting fiber lasers, fiber diodes, and other functional fiber devices have been demonstrated with this approach. Yet, throughout this development and indeed the development of fibers in general, a key premise has remained unchanged : that fibers are essentially static devices incapable of controllably changing their properties at high frequencies. Unique opportunities would arise if a rapid, electrically-driven mechanism for changing fiber properties existed. A wide spectrum of hitherto passive fiber devices could at once become active with applications spanning electronics, mechanics, acoustics, and optics, with the benefits of large surface-area, structural robustness, and mechanical flexibility. This thesis addresses the challenges and opportunities associated with the realization of electromechanical transduction in fibers through the integration of internal piezoelectric and electrostrictive domains. The fundamental challenges related to the fabrication of piezoelectric devices in fiber form are analyzed from a materials perspective, and candidate materials and geometries are selected that are compatible with the thermal drawing process. The first realization of a thermally drawn piezoelectric fiber device is reported and its piezoelectric response is established over a wide range of frequencies. The acoustic properties of piezoelectric fiber devices are characterized and related to their mechanical and geometric properties. Collective effects in multi-fiber constructs are discussed and demonstrated by the realization of a linear phased array of piezoelectric fibers capable of acoustic beam steering. High strain actuation

  13. Hybrid matrix fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.

    2003-07-15

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites include two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  14. Fiber coating method

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot

    2003-04-15

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

  15. Fiber coating method

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot

    2001-01-01

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

  16. Fiber optic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, J.; Sohler, W.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of the developments in the field of fiber optics sensor technology is presented along with a discussion of the advantages of optical measuring instruments as compared with electronic sensors. The two primary types of fiber optics sensors, specifically those with multiwave fibers and those with monowave fibers, are described. Examples of each major sensor type are presented and discussed. Multiwave detectors include external and internal fiber optics sensors. Among the monowave detectors are Mach-Zender interferometers, Michelson interferometers, Sagnac interferometers (optical gyroscopes), waveguide resonators, and polarimeter sensors. Integrated optical sensors and their application in spectroscopy are briefly discussed.

  17. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, J.K.

    1993-10-05

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information. 4 figures.

  18. Digestion of kiwifruit fiber.

    PubMed

    Henare, Sharon J; Rutherfurd, Shane M

    2013-01-01

    Dietary fiber affects the digestion and absorption of nutrients in the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, it is generally believed that fiber largely escapes digestion in the human small intestine and is therefore mainly a substrate for microbial fermentation in the hindgut. Kiwifruit is a food naturally high in dietary fiber, yet the impact of dietary kiwifruit on nutrient availability has not been reported. The digestion of kiwifruit has been investigated but only in in vitro digestion studies. With its naturally high nonstarch polysaccharide content, it would be expected that kiwifruit would possess the characteristics of a good source of fiber for nutrition and health. Kiwifruit contains soluble and nonsoluble fiber components, both of which would be expected to affect the physical attributes of digesta as it transits the gastrointestinal tract. This chapter summarizes fiber digestion in general and current knowledge of kiwifruit fiber digestion in the gastrointestinal tract.

  19. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  20. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  1. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  2. Solvation of halogen ions in aqueous solutions at 500 K-600 K under 100 atm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hao; Hao, Ting; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2015-12-01

    Structural properties of the pure water and halogen solutions at high temperatures and pressures are studied by using the molecular dynamics simulations and quantum molecular simulations. The related characters are calculated as functions of temperature and pressure. The results show that the hydrogen bonded networks become looser as temperature increases, with the collapse of the traditional tetrahedral structure. It is similar to the concentration-dependent collapse in the NaCl solutions. However, adding other halogen elements has no further effects on the already weakly bonded water molecules. At the phase changing points, the process of hydration is evident for the bigger ions, so that the bigger the ion is, the smaller a cluster is formed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grand Nos. 11025524 and 11161130520), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2010CB832903), and the European Commission’s 7th Framework Programme (FP7-PEOPLE-2010-IRSES) (Grant No. 269131).

  3. Coatings for Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galasso, F. S.; Scola, D. A.; Veltri, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Several approaches for applying high resistance coatings continuously to graphite yarn were investigated. Two of the most promising approaches involved (1) chemically vapor depositing (CVD) SiC coatings on the surface of the fiber followed by oxidation, and (2) drawing the graphite yarn through an organo-silicone solution followed by heat treatments. In both methods, coated fibers were obtained which exhibited increased electrical resistances over untreated fibers and which were not degraded. This work was conducted in a previous program. In this program, the continuous CVD SiC coating process used on HTS fiber was extended to the coating of HMS, Celion 6000, Celion 12000 and T-300 graphite fiber. Electrical resistances three order of magnitude greater than the uncoated fiber were measured with no significant degradation of the fiber strength. Graphite fibers coated with CVD Si3N4 and BN had resistances greater than 10(exp 6) ohm/cm. Lower pyrolysis temperatures were used in preparing the silica-like coatings also resulting in resistances as high as three orders of magnitude higher than the uncoated fiber. The epoxy matrix composites prepared using these coated fibers had low shear strengths indicating that the coatings were weak.

  4. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey, W. W.; Glenn, W. H.; Snitzer, E.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature sensor has been developed that utilizes the temperature dependent absorption of a rare earth doped optical fiber. The temperature measurement is localized at a remote position by splicing a short section of the rare earth fiber into a loop of commercial data communication fiber that sends and returns an optical probe signal to the temperature sensitive section of fiber. The optical probe signal is generated from two different wavelength filtered LED sources. A four port fiber optic coupler combines the two separate wavelength signals into the fiber sensing loop. Time multiplexing is used so that each signal wavelength is present at a different time. A reference signal level measurement is also made from the LED sources and a ratio taken with the sensor signal to produce a transmission measurement of the fiber loop. The transmission is affected differently at each wavelength by the rare earth temperature sensitive fiber. The temperature is determined from a ratio of the two transmission measurements. This method eliminates any ambiguity with respect to changes in signal level in the fiber loop such as mating and unmating optical connectors. The temperature range of the sensor is limited to about 800 C by the temperature limit fo the feed fibers.

  5. Capillary stretching of fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duprat, C.; Protiere, S.

    2015-09-01

    We study the interaction of a finite volume of liquid with two parallel thin flexible fibers. A tension along the fibers is imposed and may be varied. We report two morphologies, i.e. two types of wet adhesion: a weak capillary adhesion, where a liquid drop bridges the fibers, and a strong elastocapillary adhesion where the liquid is spread between two collapsed fibers. We show that geometry, capillarity and stretching are the key parameters at play. We describe the collapse and detachment of the fibers as a function of two nondimensional parameters, arising from the geometry of the system and a balance between capillary and stretching energies. In addition, we show that the morphology, thus the capillary adhesion, can be controlled by changing the tension within the fibers.

  6. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  7. Fiber composite flywheel rim

    DOEpatents

    Davis, D.E.; Ingham, K.T.

    1987-04-28

    A flywheel comprising a hub having at least one radially projecting disc, an annular rim secured to said disc and providing a surface circumferential to said hub, a first plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim congruent to said surface, and a shell enclosing said first plurality of fibers and formed by a second plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim tangentially to said surface. 2 figs.

  8. Fiber composite flywheel rim

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Donald E.; Ingham, Kenneth T.

    1987-01-01

    A flywheel 2 comprising a hub 4 having at least one radially projecting disc 6, an annular rim 14 secured to said disc and providing a surface circumferential to said hub, a first plurality of resin-impregnated fibers 22 wound about said rim congruent to said surface, and a shell 26 enclosing said first plurality of fibers and formed by a second plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim tangentially to said surface.

  9. Fiber optic micro accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Swierkowski, Steve P.

    2005-07-26

    An accelerometer includes a wafer, a proof mass integrated into the wafer, at least one spring member connected to the proof mass, and an optical fiber. A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially reflective surface on the proof mass and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. The two partially reflective surfaces are used to detect movement of the proof mass through the optical fiber, using an optical detection system.

  10. Soluble and insoluble fiber (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... stool. There are two types of dietary fiber, soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber retains water and turns to gel during ... and nutrient absorption from the stomach and intestine. Soluble fiber is found in foods such as oat ...

  11. Method of carbonizing polyacrylonitrile fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagliostro, D. E.; Lerner, N. R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of carbonizing polyacrylonitrile fibers by exposing the fibers at an elevated temperature to an oxidizing atmosphere; then exposing the oxidized fibers to an atmosphere of an inert gas such as nitrogen containing a carbonaceous material such as acetylene. The fibers are preferably treated with an organic compound, for example benzoic acid, before the exposure to an oxidizing atmosphere. The invention also relates to the resulting fibers. The treated fibers have enhanced tensile strength.

  12. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  13. Low dielectric polyimide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorogy, William E., Jr. (Inventor); St.clair, Anne K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature resistant polyimide fiber that has a dielectric constant of less than 3 is presented. The fiber was prepared by first reacting 2,2-bis (4-(4aminophenoxy)phenyl) hexafluoropropane with 2,2-bis (3,4-dicarboxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane dianhydride in an aprotic solvent to form a polyamic acid resin solution. The polyamic acid resin solution is then extruded into a coagulation medium to form polyamic acid fibers. The fibers are thermally cured to their polyimide form. Alternatively, 2,2-bis(4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl) hexafluoropropane is reacted with 2,2-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane dianhydride to form a polyamic acid, and the polyamic acid is chemically converted to its polyimide form. The polyimide is then dissolved in a solvent to form a polyimide resin solution, and the polyimide resin is extruded into a coagulation medium to form a polyimide wet gel filament. In order to obtain polyimide fibers of increased tensile properties, the polyimide wet gel filaments are stretched at elevated temperatures. The tensile properties of the fibers were measured and found to be in the range of standard textile fibers. Polyimide fibers obtained by either method will have a dielectric constant similar to that of the corresponding polymer, viz., less than 3 at 10 GHz.

  14. Multimode optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Bigot-Astruc, Marianne; Molin, Denis; Sillard, Pierre

    2014-11-04

    A depressed graded-index multimode optical fiber includes a central core, an inner depressed cladding, a depressed trench, an outer depressed cladding, and an outer cladding. The central core has an alpha-index profile. The depressed claddings limit the impact of leaky modes on optical-fiber performance characteristics (e.g., bandwidth, core size, and/or numerical aperture).

  15. Super capacitor with fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Joseph Collin; Kaschmitter, James

    2015-02-17

    An electrical cell apparatus includes a first current collector made of a multiplicity of fibers, a second current collector spaced from the first current collector; and a separator disposed between the first current collector and the second current collector. The fibers are contained in a foam.

  16. ROLE OF FIBER MODIFICATION IN NATURAL FIBER COMPOSITE PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Gutowska, Anna; Simmons, Kevin L.; Holbery, Jim

    2005-11-03

    The prediction and characterization of the adhesion between fiber, surface treatment, and polymer is critical to the success of large-scale natural fiber based polymer composites in automotive semi-structural application. The two primary factors limiting the use of natural fiber in polymer composites are fiber moisture uptake and fiber degradation during high-temperature processing. In this study, we have developed several fiber surface modification techniques and analyzed the fiber-polymer adhesion of modified fibers to more clearly understand the critical parameters controlling moisture uptake, swelling, and fiber degradation due to interfacial structure. We will present a overview of surface modification techniques we have applied to date for hemp fiber sources, and illustrate a path to characterize surface modification effects on natural fiber adhesion in thermoplastic composites.

  17. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Yen, S. P. S.; Klein, E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, crosslinked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  18. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  19. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  20. Python fiber optic seal

    SciTech Connect

    Ystesund, K.; Bartberger, J.; Brusseau, C.; Fleming, P.; Insch, K.; Tolk, K.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a high security fiber optic seal that incorporates tamper resistance features that are not available in commercial fiber optic seals. The Python Seal is a passive fiber optic loop seal designed to give indication of unauthorized entry. The seal includes a fingerprint feature that provides seal identity information in addition to the unique fiber optic pattern created when the seal is installed. The fiber optic cable used for the seal loop is produced with tamper resistant features that increase the difficulty of attacking that component of a seal. A Seal Reader has been developed that will record the seal signature and the fingerprint feature of the seal. A Correlator software program then compares seal images to establish a match or mismatch. SNL is also developing a Polaroid reader to permit hard copies of the seal patterns to be obtained directly from the seal.

  1. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-10-04

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  2. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  3. Fiber optic attenuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzetti, Mike F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fiber optic attenuator of the invention is a mandrel structure through which a bundle of optical fibers is wrapped around in a complete circle. The mandrel structure includes a flexible cylindrical sheath through which the bundle passes. A set screw on the mandrel structure impacts one side of the sheath against two posts on the opposite side of the sheath. By rotating the screw, the sheath is deformed to extend partially between the two posts, bending the fiber optic bundle to a small radius controlled by rotating the set screw. Bending the fiber optic bundle to a small radius causes light in each optical fiber to be lost in the cladding, the amount depending upon the radius about which the bundle is bent.

  4. Fiber optic hydrophone

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmenko, Paul J.; Davis, Donald T.

    1994-01-01

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optic fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends.

  5. Fiber optic hydrophone

    DOEpatents

    Kuzmenko, P.J.; Davis, D.T.

    1994-05-10

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is disclosed. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optical fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends. 2 figures.

  6. Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, and carbon fibers made thereby

    DOEpatents

    Naskar, Amit Kumar; Hunt, Marcus Andrew; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-08-04

    Methods for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, wherein the polyolefin fiber precursor is partially sulfonated and then carbonized to produce carbon fiber. Methods for producing hollow carbon fibers, wherein the hollow core is circular- or complex-shaped, are also described. Methods for producing carbon fibers possessing a circular- or complex-shaped outer surface, which may be solid or hollow, are also described.

  7. Fiber Pulling Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.; OBrien, Sue; Adcock, Leonard

    1998-01-01

    The fiber optics industry has grown into a multi-billion marketplace that will continue to grow into the 21st century. Optical fiber communications is currently dominated by silica glass technology. Successful efforts to improve upon the low loss transmission characteristics of silica fibers have propelled the technology into the forefront of the communications industry. However, reaching the theoretical transmission capability of silica fiber through improved processing has still left a few application areas in which other fiber systems can provide an influential role due to specific characteristics of high theoretical transmission in the 2 - 3 micron wavelength region. One of the other major materials used for optical fibers is the systems based upon Heavy Metal Fluoride Glass (HMFG). Commercial interest is driven primarily by the potential for low loss repeaterless infrared fibers. An example of the major communications marketplace which would benefit from the long distance repeaterless capability of infrared fibers is the submarine cables which link the continents. When considering commercial interests, optical fiber systems provide a healthy industrial position which continues to expand. Major investments in the systems used for optical fiber communications have continued to increase each year and are predicted to continue well into the next century. Estimates of 8.5% compounded annually are predicted through 1999 for the North American market and 1 1 % worldwide. The growth for the optical fiber cable itself is expected to continue between 44 and 50 per cent of the optical fiber communications budget through 1999. The total budget in 1999 world-wide is expected to be in the neighborhood of $9 billion. Another survey predicts that long haul telecommunications represents 15% of a world-wide fiber optics market in 1998. The actual amount allotted to cable was not specified. However, another market research had predicted that the cable costs alone represents more

  8. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

  9. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, Bruce R.; Prather, William S.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer.

  10. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1992-10-06

    An apparatus and method are described for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer. 4 figs.

  11. Fiber Optic Microphone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.; George, Thomas; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Research into advanced pressure sensors using fiber-optic technology is aimed at developing compact size microphones. Fiber optic sensors are inherently immune to electromagnetic noise, and are very sensitive, light weight, and highly flexible. In FY 98, NASA researchers successfully designed and assembled a prototype fiber-optic microphone. The sensing technique employed was fiber optic Fabry-Perot interferometry. The sensing head is composed of an optical fiber terminated in a miniature ferrule with a thin, silicon-microfabricated diaphragm mounted on it. The optical fiber is a single mode fiber with a core diameter of 8 micron, with the cleaved end positioned 50 micron from the diaphragm surface. The diaphragm is made up of a 0.2 micron thick silicon nitride membrane whose inner surface is metallized with layers of 30 nm titanium, 30 nm platinum, and 0.2 micron gold for efficient reflection. The active sensing area is approximately 1.5 mm in diameter. The measured differential pressure tolerance of this diaphragm is more than 1 bar, yielding a dynamic range of more than 100 dB.

  12. Automated fiber pigtailing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, O. T.; Lowry, M. E.; Lu, S. Y.; Nelson, D. C.; Nikkel, D. J.; Pocha, M. D.; Young, K. D.

    1994-02-01

    The high cost of optoelectronic (OE) devices is due mainly to the labor-intensive packaging process. Manually pigtailing such devices as single-mode laser diodes and modulators is very time consuming with poor quality control. The Photonics Program and the Engineering Research Division at LLNL are addressing several issues associated with automatically packaging OE devices. A furry automated system must include high-precision fiber alignment, fiber attachment techniques, in-situ quality control, and parts handling and feeding. This paper will present on-going work at LLNL in the areas of automated fiber alignment and fiber attachment. For the fiber alignment, we are building an automated fiber pigtailing machine (AFPM) which combines computer vision and object recognition algorithms with active feedback to perform sub-micron alignments of single-mode fibers to modulators and laser diodes. We expect to perform sub-micron alignments in less than five minutes with this technology. For fiber attachment, we are building various geometries of silicon microbenches which include on-board heaters to solder metal-coated fibers and other components in place; these designs are completely compatible with an automated process of OE packaging. We have manually attached a laser diode, a thermistor, and a thermo-electric heater to one of our microbenches in less than 15 minutes using the on-board heaters for solder reflow; an automated process could perform this same exercise in only a few minutes. Automated packaging techniques such as these will help lower the costs of OE devices.

  13. Nanotube composite carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, R.; Jacques, D.; Rao, A. M.; Rantell, T.; Derbyshire, F.; Chen, Y.; Chen, J.; Haddon, R. C.

    1999-08-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were dispersed in isotropic petroleum pitch matrices to form nanotube composite carbon fibers with enhanced mechanical and electrical properties. We find that the tensile strength, modulus, and electrical conductivity of a pitch composite fiber with 5 wt % loading of purified SWNTs are enhanced by ˜90%, ˜150%, and 340% respectively, as compared to the corresponding values in unmodified isotropic pitch fibers. These results serve to highlight the potential that exits for developing a spectrum of material properties through the selection of the matrix, nanotube dispersion, alignment, and interfacial bonding.

  14. Photochromic glass optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvi, Bilal A.; Israr, Amber; Asif, Muhammad; Aamir, Muhammad; Rehan, Muhammad

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the fabrication and analysis of novel twin cored fiber which contains a transparent and silver halide doped photochromic core in same cladding. The Photochromic core fibers were fabricated in twin cored structure by rode and tube method. The diameter of photochromic core and transparent core is around 15 m. The distance between two cores is 1.5m. The transparent core was used to guide the probe beam and photochromic core was excited by UV source. The interaction of the probe beam with the excited photochromic core showed the photochromic behavior of the fiber.

  15. Fiber optic communication links

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    Fiber optics is a new, emerging technology which offers relief from many of the problems which limited past communications links. Its inherent noise immunity and high bandwidth open the door for new designs with greater capabilities. Being a new technology, certain problems can be encountered in specifying and installing a fiber optic link. A general fiber optic system is discussed with emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages. It is not intended to be technical in nature, but a general discussion. Finally, a general purpose prototype Sandia communications link is presented.

  16. QUARTZ FIBER ELECTROSCOPES

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, R.P.

    1957-09-17

    An instrument carried unobtrusively about the person such as in a finger ring to indicate when that person has been exposed to an unusual radiation hazard is described. A metallized quartz fiber is electrically charged to indicate a full scale reading on an etched glass background. The quartz fiber and the scale may be viewed through a magnifying lens for ease of reading. Incident radiation will ionize gaseous particles in the sealed structure thereby allowing the charge to leak off the quartz fiber with its resulting movement across the scale proportionally indicating the radiation exposure.

  17. Carbon Fiber Risk Analysis. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The scope and status of the effort to assess the risks associated with the accidental release of carbon/graphite fibers from civil aircraft is presented. Vulnerability of electrical and electronic equipment to carbon fibers, dispersal of carbon fibers, effectiveness of filtering systems, impact of fiber induced failures, and risk methodology are among the topics covered.

  18. Muscle Fiber Types and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Jason R.

    2001-01-01

    The specific types of fibers that make up individual muscles greatly influence how people will adapt to their training programs. This paper explains the complexities of skeletal muscles, focusing on types of muscle fibers (slow-twitch and fast-twitch), recruitment of muscle fibers to perform a motor task, and determining fiber type. Implications…

  19. Robust fiber clustering of cerebral fiber bundles in white matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xufeng; Wang, Yongxiong; Zhuang, Songlin

    2014-11-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging fiber tracking (DTI-FT) has been widely accepted in the diagnosis and treatment of brain diseases. During the rendering pipeline of specific fiber tracts, the image noise and low resolution of DTI would lead to false propagations. In this paper, we propose a robust fiber clustering (FC) approach to diminish false fibers from one fiber tract. Our algorithm consists of three steps. Firstly, the optimized fiber assignment continuous tracking (FACT) is implemented to reconstruct one fiber tract; and then each curved fiber in the fiber tract is mapped to a point by kernel principal component analysis (KPCA); finally, the point clouds of fiber tract are clustered by hierarchical clustering which could distinguish false fibers from true fibers in one tract. In our experiment, the corticospinal tract (CST) in one case of human data in vivo was used to validate our method. Our method showed reliable capability in decreasing the false fibers in one tract. In conclusion, our method could effectively optimize the visualization of fiber bundles and would help a lot in the field of fiber evaluation.

  20. Fiber optics: A research paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drone, Melinda M.

    1987-01-01

    Some basic aspects concerning fiber optics are examined. Some history leading up to the development of optical fibers which are now used in the transmission of data in many areas of the world is discussed. Basic theory of the operation of fiber optics is discussed along with methods for improving performance of the optical fiber through much research and design. Splices and connectors are compared and short haul and long haul fiber optic networks are discussed. Fiber optics plays many roles in the commercial world. The use of fiber optics for communication applications is emphasized.

  1. Simulating Optical Fibers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, Dale

    1988-01-01

    Described is a demonstration of Snell's law using a laser beam and an optical fiber. Provided are the set-up method of the demonstration apparatus and some practical suggestions including "index matching" technique using vaseline. (YP)

  2. Tapered GRIN fiber microsensor.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Mejía, Felipe; Biazoli, Claudecir R; Cordeiro, Cristiano M B

    2014-12-15

    The sensitivity of an optical fiber microsensor based on inter-modal interference can be considerably improved by tapering a short extension of the multimode fiber. In the case of Graded Index fibers with a parabolic refractive index profile, a meridional ray exhibits a sinusoidal path. When these fibers are tapered, the period of the propagated beam decrease down-taper and increase up-taper. We take advantage of this modulation -along with the enhanced overlap between the evanescent field and the external medium- to substantially increase the sensitivity of these devices by tuning the sensor's maximum sensitivity wavelength. Moreover, the extension of this device is reduced by one order of magnitude, making it more propitious for reduced space applications. Numerical and experimental results demonstrate the success and feasibility of this approach. PMID:25606989

  3. Fiber based optofluidic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lismont, M.; Vandewalle, N.; Joris, B.; Dreesen, L.

    2014-09-01

    Medicinal diagnosis requires the development of innovative devices allowing the detection of small amounts of biological species. Among the large variety of available biosensors, the ones based on fluorescence phenomenon are really promising. Here, we show a prototype of the basic unit of a multi-sensing biosensor combining optics and microfluidics benefits. This unit makes use of two crossed optical fibers: the first fiber is used to carry small probe molecules droplets and excite fluorescence, while the second one is devoted to target molecules droplets transport and fluorescence detection. Within this scheme, the interaction takes place in each fiber node. The main benefits of this detection setup are the absence of fibers functionalization, the use of microliter volumes of target and probe species, their separation before interaction, and a better detection limit compared to cuvettes setups.

  4. Fiber and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... pears green peas legumes (dried beans, split peas, lentils, etc.) artichokes almonds A high-fiber food has ... salsa, taco sauce, and cheese for dinner. Add lentils or whole-grain barley to soups. Create mini- ...

  5. Fiber Optics: No Illusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A campus computer center at Hofstra University (New York) that holds 70 terminals for student use was first a gymnasium, then a language laboratory. Strands of fiber optics are used for the necessary wiring. (MLF)

  6. Fiber-Scanned Microdisplays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossman-Bosworth, Janet; Seibel, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Helmet- and head-mounted display systems, denoted fiber-scanned microdisplays, have been proposed to provide information in an "augmented reality" format (meaning that the information would be optically overlaid on the user's field of view).

  7. Optical fiber magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarzello, John F.; Finkel, Jack

    1991-08-01

    An optical fiber magnetometer having omnidirectional capability is disclosed herein for measuring a total magnetic field independent of its physical orientation or the direction of the field or fields. A relatively long optical fiber defining a sensing arm for exposure to a magnetic field is wound in the form of a spheroid (like rubber bands on a golf ball or yarn threads on a baseball) to provide optical lengths of substantially the same total length in every direction through the spheroid winding. The plane of polarization of light transmitted through the optical fiber winding is caused to rotate (Faraday effect) when the fiber or components thereof is exposed parallel to a magnetic field. The extent of plane rotation is determined, inter alia, by the total magnetic field passing through the spheroid winding.

  8. Fiber optic gas sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Peng (Inventor); Buric, Michael P. (Inventor); Swinehart, Philip R. (Inventor); Maklad, Mokhtar S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gas sensor includes an in-fiber resonant wavelength device provided in a fiber core at a first location. The fiber propagates a sensing light and a power light. A layer of a material is attached to the fiber at the first location. The material is able to absorb the gas at a temperature dependent gas absorption rate. The power light is used to heat the material and increases the gas absorption rate, thereby increasing sensor performance, especially at low temperatures. Further, a method is described of flash heating the gas sensor to absorb more of the gas, allowing the sensor to cool, thereby locking in the gas content of the sensor material, and taking the difference between the starting and ending resonant wavelengths as an indication of the concentration of the gas in the ambient atmosphere.

  9. Ways to Boost Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Reproduction Top Articles dad holding baby at apple orchard - Kidney Disease: High- and Moderate-Potassium Foods ... lower its fiber content. For example, one medium apple with the peel contains 4.4 grams of ...

  10. Fiber-optic gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Herve C.; Arditty, Herve J.

    1992-05-01

    This paper reviews the technological evolution of the interferometric fiber gyroscope over the last fifteen years. Today a psychological barrier has been passed, and it is now accepted that this new technology will find many applications during the 90's.

  11. High-fiber foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... potatoes with skin Broccoli, artichokes, squashes, and string beans Vegetable smoothies You can also get more fiber by eating: Legumes, such as lentils, black beans, split peas, kidney beans, lima beans, and chickpeas ...

  12. Hollow-Fiber Clinostat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H.; Miller, Teresa Y.; Snyder, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    Hollow-fiber clinostat, is bioreactor used to study growth and other behavior of cells in simulated microgravity. Cells under study contained in porous hollow fiber immersed in culture medium inside vessel. Bores in hollow fiber allow exchange of gases, nutrients, and metabolic waste products between living cells and external culture media. Hollow fiber lies on axis of vessel, rotated by motor equipped with torque and speed controls. Desired temperature maintained by operating clinostat in standard tissue-culture incubator. Axis of rotation made horizontal or vertical. Designed for use with conventional methods of sterilization and sanitation to prevent contamination of specimen. Also designed for asepsis in assembly, injection of specimen, and exchange of medium.

  13. Fiber alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, S.H.; Warren, M.E.; Snipes, M.B. Jr.; Armendariz, M.G.; Word, J.C. V

    1997-08-19

    A fiber alignment apparatus includes a micro-machined nickel spring that captures and locks arrays of single mode fibers into position. The design consists of a movable nickel leaf shaped spring and a fixed pocket where fibers are held. The fiber is slid between the spring and a fixed block, which tensions the spring. When the fiber reaches the pocket, it automatically falls into the pocket and is held by the pressure of the leaf spring. 8 figs.

  14. Fiber alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Warren, Mial Evans; Snipes, Jr., Morris Burton; Armendariz, Marcelino Guadalupe; Word, V., James Cole

    1997-01-01

    A fiber alignment apparatus includes a micro-machined nickel spring that captures and locks arrays of single mode fibers into position. The design consists of a movable nickel leaf shaped spring and a fixed pocket where fibers are held. The fiber is slid between the spring and a fixed block, which tensions the spring. When the fiber reaches the pocket, it automatically falls into the pocket and is held by the pressure of the leaf spring.

  15. [Carbohydrates and fiber].

    PubMed

    Lajolo, F M; de Menezes, E W; Filisetti-Cozzi, T M

    1988-09-01

    Dietary carbohydrates comprise two fractions that may be classified as digestible, and which are useful as energy sources (simple and complex carbohydrates) and fiber, which is presumed to be of no use to the human body. There are insufficient epidemiologic data on the metabolic effects of simple carbohydrates and it is not advisable to make quantitative recommendations of intake. It is questionable to recommend in developing countries that a fixed proportion of dietary energy be derived from simple sugars, due to the high prevalence of deficient energy intake, cultural habits, and regional differences in food intake and physical activity. In relation to recommendations of complex carbohydrates, it should be considered that their absorption is influenced by many factors inherent to the individual and to the foods. Fiber is defined as a series of different substances derived from tissue structures, cellular residues and undigested chemical substances that may be partially utilized after intestinal bacteria have acted on them. There is not a clear definition of the chemical composition of fiber, but it consists mainly of polysaccharides (such as cellulose, hemicellulose and pectins), lignin and end products of the interactions of various food components. The effects of fiber, such as control of food intake, regulation of gastrointestinal transit, post-prandial blood concentrations of cholesterol, glucose and insulin, flatulence and alterations in nutrient bioavailability are due to various physical properties inherent to its chemical components. Impairment of nutrient absorption may be harmful, mainly among populations whose food intake is lower than their energy needs, and with a high fiber content. This may be particularly important in pregnant women, growing children and the elderly, and should be considered when making nutrient recommendations. A precise knowledge of fiber is also important to calculate the real energy value of foods, mainly for two reasons: 1

  16. Fiber optics welder

    DOEpatents

    Higgins, R.W.; Robichaud, R.E.

    A system is described for welding fiber optic waveguides together. The ends of the two fibers to be joined together are accurately, collinearly aligned in a vertical orientation and subjected to a controlled, diffuse arc to effect welding and thermal conditioning. A front-surfaced mirror mounted at a 45/sup 0/ angle to the optical axis of a stereomicroscope mounted for viewing the junction of the ends provides two orthogonal views of the interface during the alignment operation.

  17. Fiber optic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, Judy K.; Ward, Thomas E.; Grey, Alan E.

    1990-04-01

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  18. Fiber optic detector

    SciTech Connect

    Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  19. Production of mullite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S. (Inventor); Sparks, J. Scott (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed here is a process for making mullite fibers wherein a hydrolizable silicon compound and an aluminum compound in the form of a difunctional aluminum chelate are hydrolized to form sols using water and an alcohol with a catalytic amount of hydrochloric acid. The sols are mixed in a molar ratio of aluminum to silicon of 3 to 1 and, under polycondensation conditions, a fibrous gel is formed. From this gel the mullite fibers can be produced.

  20. Infrared fiber optic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    The development of IR fiber optics for use in astronomical and other space applications is summarized. Candidate materials were sought for use in the 1 to 200 micron and the 200 to 1000 micron wavelength range. Synthesis and optical characterization were carried out on several of these materials in bulk form. And the fabrication of a few materials in single crystal fiber optic form were studied.

  1. Wetting fibers with liposomes.

    PubMed

    Borghi, N; Alias, K; de Gennes, P-G; Brochard-Wyart, F

    2005-05-01

    Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are deposited on glass microfibers. The vesicles adopt the classical "onduloidal" shape of liquid droplets on fibers. They spread by two simultaneous mechanisms: envelopment and emission of a precursor film. This film spreads faster than on a uniform plane surface and eventually stops, signaling the presence of defects on the rod. This fast spreading tenses the vesicles; transient pores open on the GUVs and the internal liquid leaks out. This process leads to a new technique for fiber coating.

  2. Glass fiber insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, E.J.; Ngo, T.M.

    1993-06-29

    A composition for a glass fiber insulation is described comprising a loose mat of glass fibers having at least a portion of the surface coated with a water insoluble, non-hygroscopic, amorphous aluminum phosphate polymer having a molar ratio of Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] to P[sub 2]O[sub 5] of less than 1 and providing a substantial thermal resistance.

  3. Enzymatic modification of flaxseed fibers.

    PubMed

    Maijala, Pekka; Mäkinen, Marliina; Galkin, Sari; Fagerstedt, Kurt; Härkäsalmi, Tiina; Viikari, Liisa

    2012-11-01

    Flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) fibers were modified by oxidoreductive and cellulolytic enzymes. The lignin amount and intrinsic plant peroxidase activity was evaluated by histochemical and spectrophotometric assays. Peroxidase activity was not found from bast fibers. The flaxseed fibers were further separated and treated with laccase to conjugate the model compounds, that is, the hydrophobic gallate molecules on fiber surfaces. Laccase was able to slowly oxidize fiber-conjugated phenolics, but no fundamental changes in fiber cell surface structure or notable coupling of the applied hydrophobic gallate molecules onto the fibers occurred, as revealed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The reactivity of the mature fibers was further investigated using cellulolytic enzymes. Cellobiohydrolase (CBH) and endoglucanase (EG)-rich enzyme preparations were applied to reach a hydrolysis degree of 1-6% (of the fiber dry matter) using a standard enzyme dosage. The CBH mixture altered the fiber surface morphology distinctly, and SEM images illustrated fibers in which the cellulose fibrils seemed to be loosened and partially hydrolyzed. In contrast, the effect of the EG-rich preparation without CBH activity was notable on the fiber surface, polishing the surfaces. The cellulolytic treatments were potentially interesting for specific enzymatic modifications of flax fiber surfaces, whereas the approach to use oxidoreductive enzyme treatments on mature linseed fibers offered little potential, obviously due to the low lignin content of the fibers.

  4. Electrospun amplified fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Morello, Giovanni; Camposeo, Andrea; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-03-11

    All-optical signal processing is the focus of much research aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods involving high-temperature processes performed in a highly pure environment slow the fabrication process and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, high-throughput, room temperature production. Here, we report on near-infrared polymer fiber amplifiers working over a band of ∼20 nm. The fibers are cheap, spun with a process entirely carried out at room temperature, and shown to have amplified spontaneous emission with good gain coefficients and low levels of optical losses (a few cm(-1)). The amplification process is favored by high fiber quality and low self-absorption. The found performance metrics appear to be suitable for short-distance operations, and the large variety of commercially available doping dyes might allow for effective multiwavelength operations by electrospun amplified fiber optics.

  5. Electrospun Amplified Fiber Optics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    All-optical signal processing is the focus of much research aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods involving high-temperature processes performed in a highly pure environment slow the fabrication process and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, high-throughput, room temperature production. Here, we report on near-infrared polymer fiber amplifiers working over a band of ∼20 nm. The fibers are cheap, spun with a process entirely carried out at room temperature, and shown to have amplified spontaneous emission with good gain coefficients and low levels of optical losses (a few cm–1). The amplification process is favored by high fiber quality and low self-absorption. The found performance metrics appear to be suitable for short-distance operations, and the large variety of commercially available doping dyes might allow for effective multiwavelength operations by electrospun amplified fiber optics. PMID:25710188

  6. Fiber optics for controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1987-11-01

    The challenge of those involved in control-system hardware development is to accommodate an ever-increasing complexity in aircraft control, while limiting the size and weight of the components and improving system reliability. A technology that displays promise towards this end is the area of fiber optics for controls. The primary advantages of employing optical fibers, passive optical sensors, and optically controlled actuators are weight and volume reduction, immunity from electromagnetic effects, superior bandwidth capabilities, and freedom from short circuits and sparking contacts. Since 1975, NASA Lewis has performed in-house, contract, and grant research in fiber optic sensors, high-temperature electro-optic switches, and fly-by-light control-system architecture. Passive optical sensor development is an essential yet challenging area of work and has therefore received much attention during this period. A major effort to develop fly-by-light control-system technology, known as the Fiber-Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program, was initiated in 1985 as a cooperative effort between NASA and DOD. Phase 1 of FOCSI, completed in 1986, was aimed at the design of a fiber-optic integrated propulsion/flight control system. Phase 2, yet to be initiated, will provide subcomponent and system development, and a system engine test. In addition to a summary of the benefits of fiber optics, the FOCSI program, sensor advances, and future directions in the NASA Lewis program will be discussed.

  7. Fiber optic current probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyntjes, G.; Fox, R.

    1984-02-01

    This report documents the results of Phase 1 research into a new type of Fiber Optic Current probe, suitable for high voltage, high current applications. The probe uses a stabilized two frequency HeNe laser to read the magnitude and sign of magnetic field induced circular birefringence in an optical fiber wound around a conductor. Measurements of both alternating and direct currents were demonstrated with a breadboard system. The system was tested at low voltages with currents of up to 4500 amperes peak and with up to 28 turns of optical fiber around the conductor. The response was found to increase linearly with the number of fiber turns. Experimental determinations of the system's frequency response and dynamic range were not possible due to our inability to generate large, fast current transients. The predicted frequency response is 100 kHz with an ability to read transient amplitudes of 300 times the nominal line current. Several single-mode fibers were used to form transducers, and the optimum fiber for further development was identified. The 2-frequency interrogation technique described worked entirely as predicted, and should be applicable to magnetic field measurements in general (i.e., charged particle beams, Tokamaks, antenna patterns, EMP testing, etc.).

  8. Emergence of fiber supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dingshan; Qian, Qihui; Wei, Li; Jiang, Wenchao; Goh, Kunli; Wei, Jun; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Yuan

    2015-02-01

    Supercapacitors (SCs) are energy storage devices which have high power density and long cycle life. Conventional SCs have two-dimensional planar structures. As a new family of SCs, fiber SCs utilize one-dimensional cylindrically shaped fibers as electrodes. They have attracted significant interest since 2011 and have shown great application potential either as micro-scale devices to complement or even replace micro-batteries in miniaturized electronics and microelectromechanical systems or as macro-scale devices for wearable electronics or smart textiles. This tutorial review provides an essential introduction to this new field. We first introduce the basics of performance evaluation for fiber SCs as a foundation to understand different research approaches and the diverse performance metrics reported in the literature. Next, we summarize the current state-of-the-art progress in structure design and electrode fabrication of fiber SCs. This is followed by a discussion on the integration of multiple fiber SCs and the combination with other energy harvesting or storage devices. Last, we present our perspectives on the future development of fiber SCs and highlight key technical challenges with the hope of stimulating further research progress. PMID:25420877

  9. Fiber optics for controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1987-01-01

    The challenge of those involved in control-system hardware development is to accommodate an ever-increasing complexity in aircraft control, while limiting the size and weight of the components and improving system reliability. A technology that displays promise towards this end is the area of fiber optics for controls. The primary advantages of employing optical fibers, passive optical sensors, and optically controlled actuators are weight and volume reduction, immunity from electromagnetic effects, superior bandwidth capabilities, and freedom from short circuits and sparking contacts. Since 1975, NASA Lewis has performed in-house, contract, and grant research in fiber optic sensors, high-temperature electro-optic switches, and fly-by-light control-system architecture. Passive optical sensor development is an essential yet challenging area of work and has therefore received much attention during this period. A major effort to develop fly-by-light control-system technology, known as the Fiber-Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program, was initiated in 1985 as a cooperative effort between NASA and DOD. Phase 1 of FOCSI, completed in 1986, was aimed at the design of a fiber-optic integrated propulsion/flight control system. Phase 2, yet to be initiated, will provide subcomponent and system development, and a system engine test. In addition to a summary of the benefits of fiber optics, the FOCSI program, sensor advances, and future directions in the NASA Lewis program will be discussed.

  10. Study on basalt fiber parameters affecting fiber-reinforced mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. A.; Chernykh, T. N.; Sashina, A. V.; Bogusevich, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the effect of different dosages and diameters of basalt fibers on tensile strength increase during bending of fiberboard-reinforced mortar samples. The optimal dosages of fiber, providing maximum strength in bending are revealed. The durability of basalt fiber in an environment of cement, by means of microscopic analysis of samples of fibers and fiberboard-reinforced mortar long-term tests is examined. The article also compares the behavior of basalt fiber in the cement stone environment to a glass one and reveals that the basalt fiber is not subject to destruction.

  11. The optimal fiber volume fraction and fiber-matrix property compatibility in fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Ning

    1992-01-01

    Although the question of minimum or critical fiber volume fraction beyond which a composite can then be strengthened due to addition of fibers has been dealt with by several investigators for both continuous and short fiber composites, a study of maximum or optimal fiber volume fraction at which the composite reaches its highest strength has not been reported yet. The present analysis has investigated this issue for short fiber case based on the well-known shear lag (the elastic stress transfer) theory as the first step. Using the relationships obtained, the minimum spacing between fibers is determined upon which the maximum fiber volume fraction can be calculated, depending on the fiber packing forms within the composites. The effects on the value of this maximum fiber volume fraction due to such factors as fiber and matrix properties, fiber aspect ratio and fiber packing forms are discussed. Furthermore, combined with the previous analysis on the minimum fiber volume fraction, this maximum fiber volume fraction can be used to examine the property compatibility of fiber and matrix in forming a composite. This is deemed to be useful for composite design. Finally some examples are provided to illustrate the results.

  12. Optical fiber stripper positioning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Fyfe, Richard W.; Sanchez, Jr., Amadeo

    1990-01-01

    An optical fiber positioning apparatus for an optical fiber stripping device is disclosed which is capable of providing precise axial alignment between an optical fiber to be stripped of its outer jacket and the cutting blades of a stripping device. The apparatus includes a first bore having a width approximately equal to the diameter of an unstripped optical fiber and a counter bore axially aligned with the first bore and dimensioned to precisely receive a portion of the stripping device in axial alignment with notched cutting blades within the stripping device to thereby axially align the notched cutting blades of the stripping device with the axis of the optical fiber to permit the notched cutting blades to sever the jacket on the optical fiber without damaging the cladding on the optical fiber. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus further includes a fiber stop which permits determination of the length of jacket to be removed from the optical fiber.

  13. Pyrolysis Pathways of Sulfonated Polyethylene, an Alternative Carbon Fiber Precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Younker, Jarod M; Saito, Tomonori; Hunt, Marcus A; Beste, Ariana; Naskar, Amit K

    2013-01-01

    Sulfonated polyethylene is an emerging precursor for the production of carbon fibers. Pyrolysis of sulfonated polyethylene was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). n-heptane-4-sulfonic acid (H4S) was selected as a model compound for the study of sulfonated polyethylene. Density functional theory and conventional transition state theory were used to determine the rate constants of pyrolysis for H4S from 300-1000 K. Multiple reaction channels from two different mechanisms were explored: 1) internal five-centered elimination (Ei 5) and 2) radical chain reaction. The pyrolysis of H4S was simulated with kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) to obtain TGA plots that compared favorably to experiment. We observed that at tem- peratures < 550 K, the radical mechanism was dominant and yielded the trans-alkene, whereas cis-alkene was formed at higher temperatures from the internal elimination. The maximum rates of % mass loss became independent of initial OH radical concentration at 440-480 K. Experimentally, the maximum % mass loss occurred from 440-460 K (heating rate dependent). Activation energies derived from the kMC-simulated TGAs of H4S (26-29 kcal/mol) agreed with experiment for sulfonated polyethylene ( 31 kcal/mol). The simulations revealed that in this region, decomposition of radical HOSO2 became competitive to H abstraction by HOSO2, making OH the carrying radical for the reaction chain. The maximum rate of % mass loss for internal elimination was observed at temperatures > 600 K. Low-scale carbonization utilizes temperatures < 620 K; thus, internal elimination will not be competitive. Ei5 elimination has been studied for sulfoxides and sulfones, but this represents the first study of internal elimination in sulfonic acids. Nonlinear Arrhenius plots were found for all bimolecular reactions. The most significant nonlinear behavior was observed for reactions where the barrier was small. For reactions with low activation barriers, nonlinearity was traced to

  14. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, Peter B.; Looney, Larry D.

    1993-01-01

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

  15. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

    1993-11-30

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resistance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation. 4 figures.

  16. ZBLAN Fiber Phase B Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    1997-01-01

    A Phase B feasibility study will be performed for the study of the effects of microgravity on the preform processing and fiber pulling of ZBLAN optical glass. Continuing from the positive results achieved in the fiber annealing experiments in 20 second intervals at 0.001 g on the KC-135 and the 5 minute experiments on the SPAR rocket, experiments will continue to work towards design of a fiber sting to initiate fiber pulling operations in space. Anticipated results include less homogeneous nucleation than ground-based annealed fibers. Infrared Fiber Systems and Galileo are the participating industrial investigators.

  17. Natural Fiber Composites: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Westman, Matthew P.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Laddha, Sachin; Kafentzis, Tyler A.

    2010-03-07

    The need for renewable fiber reinforced composites has never been as prevalent as it currently is. Natural fibers offer both cost savings and a reduction in density when compared to glass fibers. Though the strength of natural fibers is not as great as glass, the specific properties are comparable. Currently natural fiber composites have two issues that need to be addressed: resin compatibility and water absorption. The following preliminary research has investigated the use of Kenaf, Hibiscus cannabinus, as a possible glass replacement in fiber reinforced composites.

  18. Optical fiber interferometric spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Li, Baosheng; Liu, Yan; Zhai, Yufeng; Wang, An

    2006-02-01

    We design an optical fiber spectrometer based on optical fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer. In optical fiber Fourier transform spectrometer spectra information is obtained by Fourier transform of interferogram, which recording intensity change vs. optical path difference. Optical path difference is generated by stretching one fiber arm which wound around fiber stretch drive by high power supply. Information from detector is linear with time rather than with optical path difference. In order to obtain high accuracy wavenumber, reference beam is used to control the optical path difference. Optical path difference is measured by reference laser interference fringe. Interferogram vs. optical path difference is resampled by Brault algorithm with information from reference beam and test beam. In the same condition, one-sided interferogram has higher resolution than that of two-sided interferogram. For one-sided interferogram, zero path difference position must be determined as accurately as possible, small shift will result in phase error. For practical experiment in laboratory, position shift is inevitable, so phase error correction must be considered. Zero order fringe is determined by curve fitting. Spectrum of light source is obtained from one-sided interferogram by Fourier cosine transform. A spectral resolution of about ~3.1 cm -1 is achieved. In practice, higher resolution is needed. This compact equipment will be used in emission spectra and absorption spectra, especially in infrared region.

  19. Continuous fiber thermoplastic prepreg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Maywood L. (Inventor); Johnson, Gary S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A pultrusion machine employing a corrugated impregnator vessel to immerse multiple, continuous strand, fiber tow in an impregnating material, and an adjustable metered exit orifice for the impregnator vessel to control the quantity of impregnating material retained by the impregnated fibers, is provided. An adjustable height insert retains transverse rod elements within each depression of the corrugated vessel to maintain the individual fiber tows spread and in contact with the vessel bottom. A series of elongated heating dies, transversely disposed on the pultrusion machine and having flat heating surfaces with radiused edges, ensure adequate temperature exposed dwell time and exert adequate pressure on the impregnated fiber tows, to provide the desired thickness and fiber/resin ratio in the prepreg formed. The prepreg passing through the pulling mechanism is wound on a suitable take-up spool for subsequent use. A formula is derived for determining the cross sectional area opening of the metering device. A modification in the heating die system employs a heated nip roller in lieu of one of the pressure applying flat dies.

  20. Tapered fiber bundle couplers for high-power fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliwinska, Dorota; Kaczmarek, Pawel; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we would like to demonstrate our results on performing (6+1)x1 tapered fiber bundle combiners using a trielectrode fiber splicing system. In our combiners we have used 9/80 μm (core/clad) diameter fibers as single-mode signal input ports. Using this fiber, instead of a conventional 9/125 μm single-mode fiber allowed us to reduce the taper ratio and therefore significantly increase the signal transmission. We have also performed power combiner which is based on the LMA fibers: input signal fiber 20/125μm and passive double clad fiber 25/300 μm at the output.

  1. Polydimethylsiloxane fibers for optical fiber sensor of displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martincek, Ivan; Pudis, Dusan; Gaso, Peter

    2013-09-01

    The paper describes the preparation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber integrated on the conventional optical fibers and their use for optical fiber displacement sensor. PDMS fiber was made of silicone elastomer Sylgard 184 (Dow Corning) by drawing from partially cured silicone. Optical fiber displacement sensor using PDMS fiber is based on the measurement of the local minimum of optical signal in visible spectral range generated by intermodal interference of circularly symmetric modes. Position of the local minimum in spectral range varies by stretching the PDMS fiber of 230 μm in the wavelength range from 688 to 477 nm. In the stretched PDMS fiber is possible to determine the longitudinal displacement with an accuracy of approximately 1 micrometer.

  2. Carbon Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    HyComp(R), Inc. development a line of high temperature carbon fiber composite products to solve wear problems in the harsh environment of steel and aluminum mills. WearComp(R), self-lubricating composite wear liners and bushings, combines carbon graphite fibers with a polyimide binder. The binder, in conjunction with the fibers, provides the slippery surface, one that demands no lubrication, yet wears at a very slow rate. WearComp(R) typically lasts six to ten times longer than aluminum bronze. Unlike bronze, WearComp polishes the same surface and imparts a self-lube film for years of service. It is designed for continuous operation at temperatures of 550 degrees Fahrenheit and can operate under high compressive loads.

  3. Probabilistic Fiber Composite Micromechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    Probabilistic composite micromechanics methods are developed that simulate expected uncertainties in unidirectional fiber composite properties. These methods are in the form of computational procedures using Monte Carlo simulation. The variables in which uncertainties are accounted for include constituent and void volume ratios, constituent elastic properties and strengths, and fiber misalignment. A graphite/epoxy unidirectional composite (ply) is studied to demonstrate fiber composite material property variations induced by random changes expected at the material micro level. Regression results are presented to show the relative correlation between predictor and response variables in the study. These computational procedures make possible a formal description of anticipated random processes at the intra-ply level, and the related effects of these on composite properties.

  4. Containerless glass fiber processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, E. C.; Naumann, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    An acoustic levitation furnace system is described that was developed for testing the feasibility of containerless fiber pulling experiments. It is possible to levitate very dense materials such as platinum at room temperature. Levitation at elevated temperatures is much more difficult. Samples of dense heavy metal fluoride glass were levitated at 300 C. It is therefore possible that containerless fiber pulling experiments could be performed. Fiber pulling from the melt at 650 C is not possible at unit gravity but could be possible at reduced gravities. The Acoustic Levitation Furnace is described, including engineering parameters and processing information. It is illustrated that a shaped reflector greatly increases the levitation force aiding the levitation of more dense materials.

  5. Fiber optic calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Rudy, C.; Bayliss, S.; Bracken, D.; Bush, J.; Davis, P.

    1998-01-01

    A twin-bridge calorimeter using optical fiber as the sensor element was constructed and tested. This system demonstrates the principle and capability of using fiber for heat-flow measurements of special nuclear material. This calorimeter uses piezoelectric-generated phase-carrier modulation with subsequent electronic signal processing to allow phase shifts as small as 1 microradian ({mu}rad) to be measured. The sensing element consists of 21-m lengths of single-mode optical fiber wrapped around sample and reference chambers. The sensitivity of the calorimeter was determined to be 74 radians (rad) of phase shift per milliwatt of thermal power. One milliwatt of thermal power is equivalent to 400 mg of plutonium (6% {sup 240}Pu). The system noise base was about 0.2 rad, equivalent to about 1 mg of plutonium.

  6. Fiber Optic Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Rudy, C.; Bayliss, S.; Bracken, D.; Bush, J.; Davis, P.

    1997-12-12

    A twin-bridge calorimeter using optical fiber as the sensor element was constructed and tested. This system demonstrates the principle and capability of using optical fibers for heat-flow measurements of special nuclear material. This calorimeter uses piezoelectric-generated phase-carrier modulation with subsequent electronic signal processes to allow phase shifts as small as 1 microradian ({micro}rad) to be measured. The sensing element consists of 21-m lengths of single-mode optical fiber wrapped around sample and reference chambers. The sensitivity of the calorimeter was determined to be 74 radians (rad) of phase shift per milliwatt of thermal power. One milliwatt of thermal power is equivalent to 400 mg of plutonium (6% {sup 240}Pu). The system noise base was about 0.2 rad, equivalent to about 1 mg of plutonium.

  7. Carbon Fibers Conductivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. Y.; Butkus, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the process of electrical conduction in polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers, calculations were carried out on cluster models of the fiber consisting of carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen atoms using the modified intermediate neglect of differential overlap (MINDO) molecular orbital (MO) method. The models were developed based on the assumption that PAN carbon fibers obtained with heat treatment temperatures (HTT) below 1000 C retain nitrogen in a graphite-like lattice. For clusters modeling an edge nitrogen site, analysis of the occupied MO's indicated an electron distribution similar to that of graphite. A similar analysis for the somewhat less stable interior nitrogen site revealed a partially localized II electron distribution around the nitrogen atom. The differences in bonding trends and structural stability between edge and interior nitrogen clusters led to a two-step process proposed for nitrogen evolution with increasing HTT.

  8. Femtosecond Fiber Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Katherine J.

    This thesis focuses on research I have done on ytterbium-doped femtosecond fiber lasers. These lasers operate in the near infrared region, lasing at 1030 nm. This wavelength is particularly important in biomedical applications, which includes but is not limited to confocal microscopy and ablation for surgical incisions. Furthermore, fiber lasers are advantageous compared to solid state lasers in terms of their cost, form factor, and ease of use. Solid state lasers still dominate the market due to their comparatively high energy pulses. High energy pulse generation in fiber lasers is hindered by either optical wave breaking or by multipulsing. One of the main challenges for fiber lasers is to overcome these limitations to achieve high energy pulses. The motivation for the work done in this thesis is increasing the output pulse peak power and energy. The main idea of the work is that decreasing the nonlinearity that acts on the pulse inside the cavity will prevent optical wave breaking, and thus will generate higher energy pulses. By increasing the output energy, ytterbium-doped femtosecond fiber lasers can be competitive with solid state lasers which are used commonly in research. Although fiber lasers tend to lack the wavelength tuning ability of solid state lasers, many biomedical applications take advantage of the 1030 microm central wavelength of ytterbium-doped fiber lasers, so the major limiting factor of fiber lasers in this field is simply the output power. By increasing the output energy without resorting to external amplification, the cavity is optimized and cost can remain low and economical. During verification of the main idea, the cavity was examined for possible back-reflections and for components with narrow spectral bandwidths which may have contributed to the presence of multipulsing. Distinct cases of multipulsing, bound pulse and harmonic mode-locking, were observed and recorded as they may be of more interest in the future. The third

  9. The crucial fiber components and gain fiber for high power ytterbium-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Lei; Liu, Peng; Xing, Ying-Bin; Wang, Yi-Bo; Dai, Neng-Li; Li, Jin-Yan; He, Bing; Zhou, Jun

    2015-08-01

    We have demonstrated a kW continuous-wave ytterbium-doped all-fiber laser oscillator with 7×1 fused fiber bundle combiner, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and double-clad gain fiber fabricated by corresponding technologies. The results of experiment that the oscillator had operated at 1079.48nm with 80.94% slope efficiency without the influence of temperature and non-linear effects indicate that fiber components and gain fiber were suitable to high power environment. No evidence of the signal power roll-over showed that this oscillator possess the capacity to highest output with available pump power.

  10. Automated fiber pigtailing machine

    DOEpatents

    Strand, O.T.; Lowry, M.E.

    1999-01-05

    The Automated Fiber Pigtailing Machine (AFPM) aligns and attaches optical fibers to optoelectronic (OE) devices such as laser diodes, photodiodes, and waveguide devices without operator intervention. The so-called pigtailing process is completed with sub-micron accuracies in less than 3 minutes. The AFPM operates unattended for one hour, is modular in design and is compatible with a mass production manufacturing environment. This machine can be used to build components which are used in military aircraft navigation systems, computer systems, communications systems and in the construction of diagnostics and experimental systems. 26 figs.

  11. Automated fiber pigtailing machine

    DOEpatents

    Strand, Oliver T.; Lowry, Mark E.

    1999-01-01

    The Automated Fiber Pigtailing Machine (AFPM) aligns and attaches optical fibers to optoelectonic (OE) devices such as laser diodes, photodiodes, and waveguide devices without operator intervention. The so-called pigtailing process is completed with sub-micron accuracies in less than 3 minutes. The AFPM operates unattended for one hour, is modular in design and is compatible with a mass production manufacturing environment. This machine can be used to build components which are used in military aircraft navigation systems, computer systems, communications systems and in the construction of diagnostics and experimental systems.

  12. Silicon fiber optic sensors

    DOEpatents

    Pocha, Michael D.; Swierkowski, Steve P.; Wood, Billy E.

    2007-10-02

    A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially or wholly reflective surface on the free end of an integrated elongate channel or an integrated bounding wall of a chip of a wafer and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. Such a constructed device can be utilized to detect one or more physical parameters, such as, for example, strain, through the optical fiber using an optical detection system to provide measuring accuracies of less than aboutb0.1%.

  13. Fiber bundle endocytoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Michael; Chang, Tou Pin; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Endocytoscopy is an optical biopsy technique which uses a miniaturized camera to capture white light microscopy images through an endoscope. We have developed an alternative design that instead relays images to an external camera via a coherent fiber bundle. In this paper we characterize the device and demonstrate microscopy of porcine tissue ex vivo. One advantage of our approach is the ease with which other bundle-compatible imaging modalities can be deployed simultaneously. We show this by acquiring quasi-simultaneous endocytoscopy and fluorescence confocal endomicroscopy images through a single fiber bundle. This opens up possibilities for multi-modal endomicroscopy, combining white light and fluorescence imaging. PMID:24409380

  14. QUARTZ FIBER ELECTROSCOPES

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, R.P.

    1956-04-17

    This patent pertains to quartz fiber electroscopes of small size for use by personnel to monitor nuclear radiation. The invention resides tn a novel way of charging the electroscope whereby the charging of the electroscope whereby the charging of the electroscope is carried out without obtaining contact with the fiber system or its support and the electroscope can therefore be constructed without a protective cap to prevent wrongful discharge. The electroscope is charged by placing a voltage between an electrode located in close proximity to the element to be charged and the electroscope me metallic case. ABSTRACTS

  15. Fiber-Optic Sensing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Milnes, M.; Baylor, L.C.; Bave, S.

    1996-10-24

    This article offers a basic review of fiber-optic sensing technology, or more specifically, fiber-optic sensing technology as applied to the qualitative or quantitative identification of a chemical sample, and how it works,

  16. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    DOEpatents

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  17. High-Speed Fiber Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulis, Walter; Tarasenko, Oleksandr; Yu, Zhangwei; Fonjallaz, Pierre-Yves; Knape, Harald

    2008-10-01

    All-fiber optical switches based on fiber with electrodes exhibit transition times <10 ns. The devices are monolithic and robust, they are simple and could potentially be manufactured at low cost. The insertion loss is extremely low and the devices are compatible with single mode fiber technology. Two types of switches are discussed, one based on polarization rotation, the other one relying on the wavelength shift of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG).

  18. Compound fiber ring resonator: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Lit, J.W.Y.

    1994-06-01

    A compound fiber ring resonator is made with a Fabry-Perot etalon built inside a fiber ring that is fed through a 2 x 2 directional single-mode fiber coupler. It is theoretically analyzed by an unfolded equivalent model and a transfer-matrix method. The output intensities are presented, and four cases are discussed. The results may be useful in applications such as fiber spectrum analyzers, sensors, and lasers. 25 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOEpatents

    Halpin, J.M.

    1996-03-26

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 {micro}m. 30 figs.

  20. Buying Fiber-Optic Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Describes consortia formed by college and university administrators to buy, manage, and maintain their own fiber-optic networks with the goals of cutting costs of leasing fiber-optic cable and planning for the future. Growth capacity is the real advantage of owning fiber-optic systems. (SLD)

  1. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Sprehn, Gregory A.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Poco, John F.; Sandler, Pamela H.

    1997-01-01

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency.

  2. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Sprehn, G.A.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.; Sandler, P.H.

    1997-11-04

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency. 4 figs.

  3. Fiber Optics and Library Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Michael

    1984-01-01

    This article examines fiber optic technology, explains some of the key terminology, and speculates about the way fiber optics will change our world. Applications of fiber optics to library systems in three major areas--linkage of a number of mainframe computers, local area networks, and main trunk communications--are highlighted. (EJS)

  4. Shedding Light on Fiber Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunch, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    Explains the principles of fiber optics as a medium for light-wave communication. Current uses of fiber systems on college campuses include voice, video, and local area network applications. A group of seven school districts in Minnesota are linked via fiber-optic cables. Other uses are discussed. (MLF)

  5. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOEpatents

    Halpin, John M.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 .mu.m.

  6. Direct spinning of fiber supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tong; Ding, Xiaoteng; Liang, Yuan; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Nan; Qu, Liangti

    2016-06-16

    A direct wet spinning approach is demonstrated for facile and continuous fabrication of a whole fiber supercapacitor using a microfluidic spinneret. The resulting fiber supercapacitor shows good electrochemical properties and possesses high flexibility and mechanical stability. This strategy paves the way for large-scale continuous production of fiber supercapacitors for weavable electronics.

  7. Fabrication of Optical Fiber Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, Miguel V.

    In this paper we present the main research activities of the Laboratorio de Fibras Opticas del Instituto de Ciencia de los Materiales de la Universidad de Valencia. We show some of the main results obtained for devices based on tapered fibers, fiber Bragg gratings, acousto-optic effects and photonic crystal fibers.

  8. Refractory ceramic fibers

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Refractory ceramic fibers ; CASRN Not found Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcino

  9. Whole Grains and Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... fiber. Some examples of refined grains are wheat flour, enriched bread and white rice. Most refined grains are enriched , which means that ... grains. Some examples of enriched grains are wheat flour, enriched bread and white rice. Eating whole grains provides important health benefits: Many ...

  10. Electrodes with fiber structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benczur-Uermoessy, G.; Berger, G.; Haschka, F.

    1986-01-01

    An electrode framework with a fiber structure, universally applicable in alkaline storage battery systems, was developed and readied for production. Storage batteries with these electrodes present higher energy and power densities and are economical to produce. The design is applicable to all rechargable storage batteries and might replace the previous variety of designs.

  11. Optical Fiber Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report of work done on NASA Grant NAG-1-443. The work covers the period from July 1, 1992 to December 1, 1998. During this period several distinct but related research studies and work tasks were undertaken. These different subjects are enumerated below with a description of the work done on each of them. The focus of the research was the development of optical fibers for use as distributed temperature and stress sensors. The initial concept was to utilize the utilize the temperature and stress dependence of emission from rare earth and transition metal ions substitutionally doped into crystalline or glass fibers. During the course of investigating this it became clear that fiber Bragg gratings provided a alternative for making the desired measurements and there was a shift of research focus on to include the photo-refractive properties of germano-silicate glasses used for most gratings and to the possibility of developing fiber laser sources for an integrated optical sensor in the research effort. During the course of this work several students from Christopher Newport University and other universities participated in this effort. Their names are listed below. Their participation was an important part of their education.

  12. Drying of fiber webs

    DOEpatents

    Warren, David W.

    1997-01-01

    A process and an apparatus for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquified eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciately stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers.

  13. Drying of fiber webs

    DOEpatents

    Warren, D.W.

    1997-04-15

    A process and an apparatus are disclosed for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquefied eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciatively stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers. 6 figs.

  14. Carbon fiber study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A coordinated Federal Government action plan for dealing with the potential problems arising from the increasing use of graphite fiber reinforced composite materials in both military and civilian applications is presented. The required dissemination of declassified information and an outline of government actions to minimize the social and economic consequences of proliferated composite materials applications were included.

  15. Infrared Fiber Optic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Successive years of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Langley Research Center to Sensiv Inc., a joint venture between Foster-Miller Inc. and Isorad, Ltd., assisted in the creation of remote fiber optic sensing systems. NASA's SBIR interest in infrared, fiber optic sensor technology was geared to monitoring the curing cycles of advanced composite materials. These funds helped in the fabrication of an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. Foster-Miller ingenuity allowed infrared transmitting optical fibers to combine with Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy to enable remote sensing. Sensiv probes operate in the mid-infrared range of the spectrum, although modifications to the instrument also permits its use in the near-infrared region. The Sensiv needle-probe is built to be placed in a liquid or powder and analyze the chemicals in the mixture. Other applications of the probe system include food processing control; combustion control in furnaces; and maintenance problem solving.

  16. Optical Fiber Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    F&S Inc. developed and commercialized fiber optic and microelectromechanical systems- (MEMS) based instrumentation for harsh environments encountered in the aerospace industry. The NASA SBIR programs have provided F&S the funds and the technology to develop ruggedized coatings and coating techniques that are applied during the optical fiber draw process. The F&S optical fiber fabrication facility and developed coating methods enable F&S to manufacture specialty optical fiber with custom designed refractive index profiles and protective or active coatings. F&S has demonstrated sputtered coatings using metals and ceramics and combinations of each, and has also developed techniques to apply thin coatings of specialized polyimides formulated at NASA Langley Research Center. With these capabilities, F&S has produced cost-effective, reliable instrumentation and sensors capable of withstanding temperatures up to 800? C and continues building commercial sales with corporate partners and private funding. More recently, F&S has adapted the same sensing platforms to provide the rapid detection and identification of chemical and biological agents

  17. Bluebonnet Fiber Collages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Joan

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a lesson that uses stitching and applique techniques to create a fiber collage in which every child is successful with high-quality work. This lesson was inspired by Tomie dePaola's "The Legend of the Bluebonnet." The back cover had a lovely illustration of the bluebonnet flower the author thought would translate easily to a…

  18. Fiber optics for controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1990-01-01

    The design, development, and testing of a fiber optic integrated propulsion/flight control system for an advanced supersonic dash aircraft (flies at supersonic speeds for short periods of time) is the goal of the joint NASA/DOD Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program. Phase 1 provided a comparison of electronic and optical control systems, identified the status of current optical sensor technology, defined the aircraft sensor/actuator environment, proposed architectures for fully optical control systems, and provided schedules for development. Overall, it was determined that there are sufficient continued efforts to develop such a system. It was also determined that it is feasible to build a fiber optic control system for the development of a data base for this technology, but that further work is necessary in sensors, actuators, and components to develop an optimum design, fully fiber optic integrated control system compatible with advanced aircraft environments. Phase 2 is to design, construct, and ground test a fly by light control system. Its first task is to provide a detailed design of the electro-optic architecture.

  19. Multiwavelength fiber laser for the fiber link monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Peng-Chun; Lee, Wei-Yun; Wu, Shin-Shian; Hu, Hsuan-Lun

    2013-10-01

    This work proposes a novel fiber link monitoring system that uses a multiwavelength fiber laser for wavelength-division-multiplexed (WDM) passive optical network (PON). The multiwavelength fiber laser is based on an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) and a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). Experimental results show the feasibility using the system to monitor a fiber link with a high and stable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of over 26 dB. The link quality of downstream signals as well as the fiber link on WDM channels can be monitored in real time. Favorable carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR), composite second-order (CSO), and composite triple beat (CTB) performance metrics were obtained for cable television (CATV) signals that were transported through 25 km of standard single-mode fiber (SMF).

  20. Cryogenic Fiber Optic Sensors Based on Fiber Bragg Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinehart, P. R.; Maklad, M.; Courts, S. S.

    2008-03-01

    Fiber optic sensing has many favorable characteristics—a single fiber can be used to multiplex multiple sensors along the length of the fiber, fiber optic sensing is immune to electromagnetic noise and is inherently safe for combustible liquids and atmospheres. Previously, fiber optic sensors based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) have been demonstrated for cryogenic use for both temperature and strain sensing, but often little data is supplied as to the reproducibility or unit-to-unit uniformity of these sensors. Lake Shore Cryotronics has manufactured fiber optic cryogenic temperature sensors based on Bragg gratings using novel packaging techniques. The temperature response and reproducibility is reported from 80K to 480K for glass-packaged sensors, and a calibration for a high sensitivity, wide range zinc-packaged sensor is reported.

  1. Polymer-Derived Ceramic Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    SiC-based ceramic fibers are derived from polycarbosilane or polymetallocarbosilane precursors and are classified into three groups according to their chemical composition, oxygen content, and C/Si atomic ratio. The first-generation fibers are Si-C-O (Nicalon) fibers and Si-Ti-C-O (Tyranno Lox M) fibers. Both fibers contain more than 10-wt% oxygen owing to oxidation during curing and lead to degradation in strength at temperatures exceeding 1,300°C. The maximum use temperature is 1,100°C. The second-generation fibers are SiC (Hi-Nicalon) fibers and Si-Zr-C-O (Tyranno ZMI) fibers. The oxygen content of these fibers is reduced to less than 1 wt% by electron beam irradiation curing in He. The thermal stability of these fibers is improved (they are stable up to 1,500°C), but their creep resistance is limited to a maximum of 1,150°C because their C/Si atomic ratio results in excess carbon. The third-generation fibers are stoichiometric SiC fibers, i.e., Hi-Nicalon Type S (hereafter Type S), Tyranno SA, and Sylramic™ fibers. They exhibit improved thermal stability and creep resistance up to 1,400°C. Stoichiometric SiC fibers meet many of the requirements for the use of ceramic matrix composites for high-temperature structural application. SiBN3C fibers derived from polyborosilazane also show promise for structural applications, remain in the amorphous state up to 1,800°C, and have good high-temperature creep resistance.

  2. Modal interference fiber optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrat, Marcin; Szustakowski, Mieczyslaw; Gorka, Andrzej; Palka, Norbert; Zyczkowski, Marek; Niznik, Sylwester

    2004-11-01

    Modal Interference Fiber Optic Sensor (MIFOS) for permanent monitoring of the network is presented. A mechanical disturbance of a fiber cable influences on intensity distribution at the end-face of a multimode fiber. Variations in interfering images are analysed by means of a digital processing unit that determines the alarm in case of unauthorized access along the whole length of the fiber. A contrast of an interference pattern and a procedure of fiber optic selection for the sensor are shown. A simple criterion that bases on changes of local maximums positions of the interference patterns is applied. A laboratory arrangement of the sensor and its experimental research are shown.

  3. Optical-Fiber Leak Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kosten, Susan E.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed optical-fiber sensor detects small changes in pressure in elastomeric O-ring or similar pressure seal, which may indicate deterioration of seal and interpreted as indications of incipient failure. According to concept, length of optical fiber embedded in seal. Light-emitting diode illuminates one end of fiber; photodetector measures intensity of light emerging from other end. Pressure-induced changes in seal bend fiber slightly, altering microbending-induced loss of light from fiber and alter intensity of light at photodetector. Change in intensity approximately proportional to change in pressure.

  4. Fiber gyroscope with birefringence modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, S. L. A.; Kim, B. Y.; Shaw, H. J.

    1987-03-01

    A theoretical analysis of the nonreciprocal phase error in a highly-birefringent fiber gyroscope is presented, characterizing the different types of errors and their sources in a general form. These error terms are due to polarization cross coupling in the fiber and in the fiber components and can be reduced by modulating the magnitude of the fiber birefringence at appropriate locations in the optical circuit and by balancing the optical power between the two polarization eigenmodes of the fiber at the input of the interferometer. Experimental results demonstrating these techniques show a 20 dB relief on the performance requirements of the polarizer usually employed for drift reduction.

  5. Multimetallic Electrodeposition on Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger-Hiller, F.; Kleiber, J.; Böttger, T.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    Efficient lightweight design requires intelligent materials that meet versatile functions. One approach is to extend the range of properties of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) by plating the fiber component. Electroplating leads to metalized layers on carbon fibers. Herein only cyanide-free electrolytes where used. Until now dendrite-free layers were only obtained using current densities below 1.0 A dm-2. In this work, dendrite-free tin and copper coatings were achieved by pre-metalizing the carbon fiber substrates. Furthermore, applying a combination of two metals with different sized thermal expansion coefficient lead to a bimetallic coating on carbon fiber rovings, which show an actuatory effect.

  6. Improved Optical Fiber Chemical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio O.; Rogowski, Robert S.

    1994-01-01

    Calculations, based on exact theory of optical fiber, have shown how to increase optical efficiency sensitivity of active-core, step-index-profile optical-fiber fluorosensor. Calculations result of efforts to improve efficiency of optical-fiber chemical sensor of previous concept described in "Making Optical-Fiber Chemical Sensors More Sensitive" (LAR-14525). Optical fiber chemical detector of enhanced sensitivity made in several configurations. Portion of fluorescence or chemiluminescence generated in core, and launched directly into bound electromagnetic modes that propagate along core to photodetector.

  7. Gasifiable carbon-graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, Marshall F. (Inventor); Ramohalli, Kumar N. R. (Inventor); Dowler, Warren L. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Fine, carbon-graphite fibers do not combust during the combustion of a composite and are expelled into the air as fine conductive particles. Coating of the fibers with a salt of a metal having a work function below 4.2 eV such as an alkaline earth metal salt, e.g., calcium acetate, catalytically enhances combustion of the fibers at temperatures below 1000.degree. C. such that the fibers self-support combustion and burn to produce a non-conductive ash. Fire-polishing the fibers before application of the coating is desirable to remove sizing to expose the carbon surface to the catalyst.

  8. Silica optical fibers: technology update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krohn, David A.; McCann, Brian P.

    1995-05-01

    Silica-core optical fibers have long been the standard delivery medium for medical laser delivery systems. Their high strength, excellent flexibility, and low cost continue to make them the fiber of choice for systems operating from 300 to 2200 nm. An overview of the current fiber constructions available to the industry is reviewed. Silicone-clad fibers, hard- fluoropolymer clad fibers and silica-clad fibers are briefly compared in terms of mechanical and optical properties. The variety of fiber coatings available is also discussed. A significant product development of silica fiber delivery systems has been in side-firing laser delivery systems for Urology. These devices utilize silica-core fibers to project the laser energy at a substantial lateral angle to the conventional delivery system, typically 40 to 100 degrees off axis. Many unique distal tips have been designed to meet the needs of this potentially enormous application. There are three primary technologies employed in side-firing laser delivery systems: reflection off of an attached medium; reflection within an angle-polished fiber through total internal reflection; and reflection from both an angle-polished fiber and an outside medium. Each technology is presented and compared on the basis of operation modality, transmission efficiency, and power-handling performance.

  9. Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy using small spherical distal fiber tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Kennedy, Joshua D.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    This study tests a 100-μm-core fiber with 300-μm-diameter ball tip during Thulium fiber laser (TFL) lithotripsy. The TFL was operated at 1908 nm wavelength with 35-mJ pulse energy, 500-μs pulse duration, and 300-Hz pulse rate. Calcium oxalate/phosphate stone samples were weighed, laser procedure times measured, and ablation rates calculated for ball tip fibers, with comparison to bare tip fibers. Photographs of ball tips were taken before and after each procedure to observe ball tip degradation and determine number of procedures completed before need to replace fiber. Saline irrigation rates and ureteroscope deflection were measured with and without TFL fiber present. There was no statistical difference (P > 0.05) between stone ablation rates for single-use ball tip fiber (1.3 +/- 0.4 mg/s) (n=10), multiple-use ball tip fiber (1.3 +/- 0.5 mg/s) (n=44), and conventional single-use bare tip fibers (1.3 +/- 0.2 mg/s) (n=10). Ball tip durability varied widely, but fibers averaged > 4 stone procedures before decline in stone ablation rates due to mechanical damage at front surface of ball tip. The small fiber diameter did not impact ureteroscope deflection or saline flow rates. The miniature ball tip fiber may provide a cost-effective design for safe fiber insertion through the ureteroscope working channel and the ureter without risk of scope damage or tissue perforation, and without compromising stone ablation efficiency during TFL ablation of kidney stones.

  10. Single mode fiber and twin-core fiber connection technique for in-fiber integrated interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Tingting; Zhang, Xiaotong; Guan, Chunying; Yang, Xinghua; Yuan, Libo

    2015-09-01

    A novel twin-core fiber connector has been made by two side-polished fibers. By using side polishing technique, we present a connector based on the twin-core fiber (TCF) and two D-shaped single-core fibers. After simple alignment and splicing, all fiber miniaturizing connector can be obtained. Two cores can operate independently and are non-interfering. The coupling loss of this connector is low and the fabrication technologies are mature. The connector device could be used for sensors or particle trapping.

  11. Fiberized fluorescent dye microtubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladev, Veselin; Eftimov, Tinko

    2013-03-01

    In the present work we study the effect of the length of fluorescent dye-filled micro-capillaries on the fluorescence spectra. Two types of micro-capillaries have been studied: a 100 μm inner diameter fused silica capillary with a transparent coating and one of the holes of a fiber optic glass ferrule with 125 μm inner diameter. The tubes were filled with solutions of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol and then in glycerin. Experimental data show that the maximum fluorescence and the largest spectral widths are observed for a sample length of about 0.25 mm for the used concentration. This results show that miniature tunable fiberized dye lasers can be developed using available standard micro-and fibre-optic components.

  12. Fiber optic TV direct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassak, John E.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the operational television (OTV) technology was to develop a multiple camera system (up to 256 cameras) for NASA Kennedy installations where camera video, synchronization, control, and status data are transmitted bidirectionally via a single fiber cable at distances in excess of five miles. It is shown that the benefits (such as improved video performance, immunity from electromagnetic interference and radio frequency interference, elimination of repeater stations, and more system configuration flexibility) can be realized if application of the proven fiber optic transmission concept is used. The control system will marry the lens, pan and tilt, and camera control functions into a modular based Local Area Network (LAN) control network. Such a system does not exist commercially at present since the Television Broadcast Industry's current practice is to divorce the positional controls from the camera control system. The application software developed for this system will have direct applicability to similar systems in industry using LAN based control systems.

  13. Optical fiber smartphone spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Arafat; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2016-05-15

    An optical fiber-based smartphone spectrometer incorporating an endoscopic fiber bundle is demonstrated. The endoscope allows transmission of the smartphone camera LED light to a sample, removing complications from varying background illumination. The reflected spectra collected from a surface or interface is dispersed onto the camera CMOS using a reflecting diffraction grating. A spectral resolution as low as δλ∼2.0  nm over a bandwidth of Δλ∼250  nm is obtained using a slit width, ωslit=0.7  mm. The instrument has vast potential in a number of industrial applications including agricultural produce analysis. Spectral analysis of apples shows straightforward measurement of the pigments anthocyanins, carotenoid, and chlorophyll, all of which decrease with increasing storage time. PMID:27176971

  14. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  15. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element (11, 11a to 11j) having a cladding or coating of a material (23, 23a to 23j) which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector (24, 24a to 24j) may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses.

  16. Fiber optic TV direct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassak, John E.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of the operational television (OTV) technology was to develop a multiple camera system (up to 256 cameras) for NASA Kennedy installations where camera video, synchronization, control, and status data are transmitted bidirectionally via a single fiber cable at distances in excess of five miles. It is shown that the benefits (such as improved video performance, immunity from electromagnetic interference and radio frequency interference, elimination of repeater stations, and more system configuration flexibility) can be realized if application of the proven fiber optic transmission concept is used. The control system will marry the lens, pan and tilt, and camera control functions into a modular based Local Area Network (LAN) control network. Such a system does not exist commercially at present since the Television Broadcast Industry's current practice is to divorce the positional controls from the camera control system. The application software developed for this system will have direct applicability to similar systems in industry using LAN based control systems.

  17. Fiber Optic Velocity Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Neyer, Barry T.

    1988-04-01

    This paper explores the use of a new velocity measurement technique that has several advantages over existing techniques. It uses an optical fiber to carry coherent light to and from a moving target. A Fabry-Perot interferometer, formed by a gradient index lens and the moving target, produces fringes with a frequency proportional to the target velocity. This technique can measure velocities up to 10 km/s, is accurate, portable, and completely noninvasive.

  18. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Homuth, Emil F.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  19. Hydrogen loading to the optic fibers for fiber grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chun; Zhang, Wen-yu; Zhu, Yuan; Pan, Zhi-yong

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, fibers with different depths of hermetically coated carbon are hydrogen loaded and radiated, and it's found that too thick of carbon layer around fiber can't bring best radiation-resistant properties, because the thick carbon layer would make the entering of hydrogen difficult although it can help to stop the hydrogen escaping. We also research the duration of saturated hydrogen loading under the temperature of 60°C and 100°C respectively, and it's found that after 120h and 48h, the fibers' photo sensitivities tend to be flat. We also reload hydrogen into the fibers which have been loaded once, and these fibers are etched then, this help us to deep understand the mechanism of hydrogen loading for the fiber gratings.

  20. Piezoelectric ceramic fibers for active fiber composites: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornmann, Xavier; Huber, Christian; Elsener, Hans-Rudolf

    2003-08-01

    The morphology and the free strain performances of three different piezoelectric ceramic fibers used for the manufacture of active fiber composites (AFCs) have been investigated. The morphology of the fibers has a direct influence on the manufacture of the AFCs. Fibers with non-uniform diameters are more difficult to contact with the interdigitated electrodes and can be the cause of irreparable damages in AFCs. An indirect method requiring the use of a simple analytical model is proposed to evaluate the free strain of active fiber composites. This indirect method presents a relatively good agreement with direct free strain measurements performed with strain gages glued on both sides of an AFC. The results show a systematic difference of ca. 20 % between the indirect and the direct methods. However, the indirect method did not permit to see differences of piezoelectric performance between the types of fibers.

  1. Homogenization of long fiber reinforced composites including fiber bending effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian F.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a homogenization method, which accounts for intrinsic size effects related to the fiber diameter in long fiber reinforced composite materials with two independent constitutive models for the matrix and fiber materials. A new choice of internal kinematic variables allows to maintain the kinematics of the two material phases independent from the assumed constitutive models, so that stress-deformation relationships, can be expressed in the framework of hyper-elasticity and hyper-elastoplasticity for the fiber and the matrix materials respectively. The bending stiffness of the reinforcing fibers is captured by higher order strain terms, resulting in an accurate representation of the micro-mechanical behavior of the composite. Numerical examples show that the accuracy of the proposed model is very close to a non-homogenized finite-element model with an explicit discretization of the matrix and the fibers.

  2. Nematic droplets on fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, V. M. O.; Silvestre, N. M.; Telo da Gama, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of new techniques for the fabrication of nematic droplets with nontrivial topology provides new routes for the assembly of responsive devices. Here we explore some of the properties of nematic droplets on fibers, which constitute the basic units of a type of device that is able to respond to external stimuli, including the detection of gases. We perform a numerical study of spherical nematic droplets on fibers. We analyze the equilibrium textures for homogeneous and hybrid boundary conditions and find that in some cases the nematic avoids the nucleation of topological defects, which would provide a different optical response. We consider in detail a homeotropic nematic droplet wrapped around a fiber with planar anchoring. We investigate the effect of an electric field on the texture of this droplet. In the presence of a dc field, the system undergoes an orientational transition above a given threshold Ec, for which a ring defect is transformed into a figure-eight defect. We also consider ac fields, at high and low frequencies, and find that the textures are similar to those observed for static fields, in contrast with recently reported experiments.

  3. Comparisons of methods measuring fiber maturity and fineness of Upland cotton fibers containing different degree of fiber cell wall development.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fiber maturity and fineness are important physical properties of cotton fibers affecting qualities of fibers and yarns. A number of direct and indirect methods are used for measuring fiber maturity and fineness from mature fibers that are thick secondary cell walls composed of almost pure cellulose....

  4. Critical reviews of fiber-optic communication technology Optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapron, F. P.

    The review begins with brief highlights of the history of fiber optics, followed by a discussion of the attributes of shortwave and longwave transmission. This leads to an investigation of various fiber types, short-haul considerations, and then single-mode aspects. Specialty fiber is briefly covered, followed by a survey of several research trends today that will lead to new systems capabilities in the future. No references are given, since hundreds would be necessary to make the list even partially complete.

  5. FIBER ORIENTATION IN INJECTION MOLDED LONG CARBON FIBER THERMOPLASTIC COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jin; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Mathur, Raj N.; Sharma, Bhisham; Sangid, Michael D.; Costa, Franco; Jin, Xiaoshi; Tucker III, Charles L.; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2015-03-23

    A set of edge-gated and center-gated plaques were injection molded with long carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites, and the fiber orientation was measured at different locations of the plaques. Autodesk Simulation Moldflow Insight (ASMI) software was used to simulate the injection molding of these plaques and to predict the fiber orientation, using the anisotropic rotary diffusion and the reduced strain closure models. The phenomenological parameters of the orientation models were carefully identified by fitting to the measured orientation data. The fiber orientation predictions show very good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Optical Fiber Networks for Remote Fiber Optic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Vallejo, Montserrat; Lopez-Amo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of optical fiber sensor networks for remote sensing. Firstly, the state of the art of remote fiber sensor systems has been considered. We have summarized the great evolution of these systems in recent years; this progress confirms that fiber-optic remote sensing is a promising technology with a wide field of practical applications. Afterwards, the most representative remote fiber-optic sensor systems are briefly explained, discussing their schemes, challenges, pros and cons. Finally, a synopsis of the main factors to take into consideration in the design of a remote sensor system is gathered. PMID:22666011

  7. Optical fiber networks for remote fiber optic sensors.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Vallejo, Montserrat; Lopez-Amo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of optical fiber sensor networks for remote sensing. Firstly, the state of the art of remote fiber sensor systems has been considered. We have summarized the great evolution of these systems in recent years; this progress confirms that fiber-optic remote sensing is a promising technology with a wide field of practical applications. Afterwards, the most representative remote fiber-optic sensor systems are briefly explained, discussing their schemes, challenges, pros and cons. Finally, a synopsis of the main factors to take into consideration in the design of a remote sensor system is gathered. PMID:22666011

  8. Direct spinning of fiber supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tong; Ding, Xiaoteng; Liang, Yuan; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Nan; Qu, Liangti

    2016-06-01

    A direct wet spinning approach is demonstrated for facile and continuous fabrication of a whole fiber supercapacitor using a microfluidic spinneret. The resulting fiber supercapacitor shows good electrochemical properties and possesses high flexibility and mechanical stability. This strategy paves the way for large-scale continuous production of fiber supercapacitors for weavable electronics.A direct wet spinning approach is demonstrated for facile and continuous fabrication of a whole fiber supercapacitor using a microfluidic spinneret. The resulting fiber supercapacitor shows good electrochemical properties and possesses high flexibility and mechanical stability. This strategy paves the way for large-scale continuous production of fiber supercapacitors for weavable electronics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Design of the microfluidic spinneret and operation of the spinneret (movie). See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03116a

  9. Multichannel laser-fiber vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudzik, Grzegorz; Waz, Adam; Kaczmarek, Pawel; Antonczak, Arkadiusz; Sotor, Jaroslaw; Krzempek, Karol; Sobon, Grzegorz; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2013-01-01

    For the last few years we were elaborating the laser-fiber vibrometer working at 1550 nm. Our main stress was directed towards different aspects of research: analysis of scattered light, efficient photodetection, optimization of the fiber-free space interfaces and signal processing. As a consequence we proposed the idea of a multichannel fiber vibrometer based on well developed telecommunication technique - Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM). One of the most important parts of a fiber-laser vibrometer is demodulation electronic section. The distortion, nonlinearity, offset and added noise of measured signal come from electronic circuits and they have direct influence on finale measuring results. We present the results of finished project "Developing novel laser-fiber monitoring technologies to prevent environmental hazards from vibrating objects" where we have constructed a 4-channel WDM laser-fiber vibrometer.

  10. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, G. W.; Qian, Q. Peng, K. L.; Wen, X.; Zhou, G. X.; Sun, M.; Chen, X. D.; Yang, Z. M.

    2015-02-15

    Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se) semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array.

  11. Drop impact on a fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Gil; Kim, Wonjung

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of drop impact on a thin fiber. Using high-speed videography, we analyze the dynamics of droplet collision with a fiber. Based on the systematic experiments, we identify three outcomes of collision: capturing, single drop falling, and splitting. The outcomes are presented in a regime map, where the regime boundaries are explained through a scale analysis of forces. We also measure the liquid retention on the fiber after the droplet impact. By considering a liquid film on the fiber, we develop a mechanical model that predicts the residual water mass. Our model reveals that the residual mass depends critically on the fiber thickness and less on the impact speed. Our study can be extended to predicting the remaining droplet, critical problems in air filtration, water collection, and fiber coating.

  12. Comparison of fiber polishing techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlet, P.; Marcus, M.; Lindenmeyer, C.

    1999-03-30

    Many D0 Run II detectors currently in production rely on scintillating tile and fiber technology. In general, light from active scintillating elements or calibration signals is transported to the photodetection system along optical fiber pathways. Building a tile/fiber detector requires very conscientious technical support and a high degree of quality control; polishing fibers is one of the most delicate of tasks involved. This note compares three methods used to polish Hewlett Packard HFBR-RUS500 fiber. This type of fiber is expected to be used in both the Muon Scintillator Counters (MSC) and the InterCryostat Detector (ICD) calibration systems to transport light from the LED distribution block to the photomultiplier tubes.

  13. Fiber Laser Development for LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Chen, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a linearly-polarized Ytterbium-doped fiber ring laser with single longitudinal-mode output at 1064nm for LISA and other space applications. Single longitudinal-mode selection was achieved by using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and a fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP). The FFP also serves as a frequency-reference within our ring laser. Our laser exhibits comparable low frequency and intensity noise to Non-Planar Ring Oscillator (NPRO). By using a fiber-coupled phase modulator as a frequency actuator, the laser frequency can be electro-optically tuned at a rate of 100kHz. It appears that our fiber ring laser is promising for space applications where robustness of fiber optics is desirable.

  14. Fiber laser development for LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numata, Kenji; Chen, Jeffrey R.; Camp, Jordan

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a linearly-polarized Ytterbium-doped fiber ring laser with single longitudinal-mode output at 1064 nm for LISA and other space applications. Single longitudinal-mode selection was achieved by using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and a fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP). The FFP also serves as a frequency-reference within our ring laser. Our laser exhibits comparable low frequency and intensity noise to Non-Planar Ring Oscillator (NPRO). By using a fiber-coupled phase modulator as a frequency actuator, the laser frequency can be electro-optically tuned at a rate of 100 kHz. It appears that our fiber ring laser is promising for space applications where robustness of fiber optics is desirable.

  15. Communicating On The Moon Via Fiber Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutes, George F.

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses feasibility of communicating over long distances on Moon via fiber optics. Compares fiber-optic and microwave technologies, concluding fiber optics offer less consumption of power, less weight, less bulk, and lower cost. Present commercial fiber-optic technology appears usable on Moon with minor modifications. Includes tutorial chapter on fiber-optic-communication technology and chapter on efforts to improve technology.

  16. Fiber optic sensor and method for making

    DOEpatents

    Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

    2010-05-18

    A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

  17. Producing Silicon Carbide/Silicon Nitride Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Manufacturing process makes CxSiyNz fibers. Precursor fibers spun from extruding machine charged with polycarbosilazane resin. When pyrolyzed, resin converted to cross-linked mixture of silicon carbide and silicon nitride, still in fiber form. CxSiyNz fibers promising substitutes for carbon fibers in high-strength, low-weight composites where high electrical conductivity unwanted.

  18. Dissemination, redissemination and fiber life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiber, W.

    1979-01-01

    The technical background of dissemination of carbon fibers as well as the possibility of redissemination and fiber life are outlined. Plume spread and weather, measures of pollution and of damage potential, and parameters controlling dissemination patterns are among the topics discussed. It is shown that the redissemination rate off hard surfaces decreases with time and that fiber length decreases with time. Redissemination from vegetated land is shown to be insignificant.

  19. Actuating Fibers: Design and Applications.

    PubMed

    Stoychev, Georgi V; Ionov, Leonid

    2016-09-21

    Actuators are devices capable of moving or controlling objects and systems by applying mechanical force on them. Among all kinds of actuators with different shapes, fibrous ones deserve particular attention. In spite of their apparent simplicity, actuating fibers allow for very complex actuation behavior. This review discusses different approaches for the design of actuating fibers, and their advantages and disadvantages. We also discuss the prospects for the design of fibers with advanced architectures and complex actuation behavior. PMID:27571481

  20. Fiber Sagnac interferometer temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Starodumov, A.N.; Zenteno, L.A.; Monzon, D.; De La Rosa, E.

    1997-01-01

    A modified Sagnac interferometer-based fiber temperature sensor is proposed. Polarization independent operation and high temperature sensitivity of this class of sensors make them cost effective instruments for temperature measurements. A comparison of the proposed sensor with Bragg grating and long-period grating fiber sensors is derived. A temperature-induced spectral displacement of 0.99 nm/K is demonstrated for an internal stress birefringent fiber-based Sagnac interferometer. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Electrochromic fiber-shaped supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuli; Lin, Huijuan; Deng, Jue; Zhang, Ye; Sun, Xuemei; Chen, Peining; Fang, Xin; Zhang, Zhitao; Guan, Guozhen; Peng, Huisheng

    2014-12-23

    An electrochromic fiber-shaped super-capacitor is developed by winding aligned carbon nanotube/polyaniline composite sheets on an elastic fiber. The fiber-shaped supercapacitors demonstrate rapid and reversible chromatic transitions under different working states, which can be directly observed by the naked eye. They are also stretchable and flexible, and are woven into textiles to display designed signals in addition to storing energy.

  2. Source of released carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, V. L.

    1979-01-01

    The potential for the release of carbon fibers from aircraft crashes/fires is addressed. Simulation of the conditions of aircraft crash fires in order to predict the quantities and forms of fibrous materials which might be released from civilian aircraft crashes/fires is considered. Figures are presented which describe some typical fiber release test activities together with some very preliminary results of those activities. The state of the art of carbon fiber release is summarized as well as some of the uncertainties concerning accidental fiber release.

  3. Photonic crystal fibers in biophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchin, Valery V.; Skibina, Julia S.; Malinin, Anton V.

    2011-12-01

    We observed recent experimental results in area of photonic crystal fibers appliance. Possibility of creation of fiberbased broadband light sources for high resolution optical coherence tomography is discussed. Using of femtosecond pulse laser allows for generation of optical radiation with large spectral width in highly nonlinear solid core photonic crystal fibers. Concept of exploitation of hollow core photonic crystal fibers in optical sensing is demonstrated. The use of photonic crystal fibers as "smart cuvette" gives rise to efficiency of modern optical biomedical analysis methods.

  4. Annealing of silicon optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, N.; McMillen, C.; Singh, R.; Podila, R.; Rao, A. M.; Hawkins, T.; Foy, P.; Morris, S.; Rice, R.; Poole, K. F.; Zhu, L.; Ballato, J.

    2011-11-01

    The recent realization of silicon core optical fibers has the potential for novel low insertion loss rack-to-rack optical interconnects and a number of other uses in sensing and biomedical applications. To the best of our knowledge, incoherent light source based rapid photothermal processing (RPP) was used for the first time to anneal glass-clad silicon core optical fibers. X-ray diffraction examination of the silicon core showed a considerable enhancement in the length and amount of single crystallinity post-annealing. Further, shifts in the Raman frequency of the silicon in the optical fiber core that were present in the as-drawn fibers were removed following the RPP treatment. Such results indicate that the RPP treatment increases the local crystallinity and therefore assists in the reduction of the local stresses in the core, leading to more homogenous fibers. The dark current-voltage characteristics of annealed silicon optical fiber diodes showed lower leakage current than the diodes based on as-drawn fibers. Photons in UV and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) regions play a very important role in improving the bulk and carrier transport properties of RPP-treated silicon optical fibers, and the resultant annealing permits a path forward to in situ enhancement of the structure and properties of these new crystalline core optical fibers.

  5. Density of intercalated graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Slabe, Melissa E.

    1990-01-01

    The density of Amoco P-55, P-75, P-100, and P-120 pitch-based graphite fibers and their intercalation compounds with bromine, iodine monochloride, and copper (II) chloride have been measured using a density gradient column. The distribution of densities within a fiber type is found to be a sensitive indicator of the quality of the intercalation reaction. In all cases the density was found to increase, indicating that the mass added to the graphite is dominant over fiber expansion. Density increases are small (less than 10 percent) giving credence to a model of the intercalated graphite fibers which have regions which are intercalated and regions which are not.

  6. Density of intercalated graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Slabe, Melissa E.

    1989-01-01

    The density of Amoco P-55, P-75, P-100, and P-120 pitch-based graphite fibers and their intercalation compounds with bromine, iodine monochloride, and copper (II) chloride have been measured using a density gradient column. The distribution of densities within a fiber type is found to be a sensitive indicator of the quality of the intercalation reaction. In all cases the density was found to increase, indicating that the mass added to the graphite is dominant over fiber expansion. Density increases are small (less than 10 percent) giving credence to a model of the intercalated graphite fibers which have regions which are intercalated and regions which are not.

  7. Health benefits of prebiotic fibers.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Diederick

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the various compounds that can act as prebiotic fibers: their structure, occurrence, production, and physiological effects (health effects) will be presented. The basis for the description is the latest definitions for dietary fibers and for prebiotics. Using as much as possible data from human studies, both the fiber and the prebiotic properties will be described of a variety of compounds. Based on the presented data the latest developments in the area of prebiotics, fibers and gut and immune health will be discussed in more detail as they show best what the potential impact of prebiotics on health of the human host might be. PMID:25624035

  8. Preparation of silicon carbide fibers

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    1983-10-12

    Silicon carbide fibers suitable for use in the fabrication of dense, high-strength, high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments are fabricated by a new, simplified method wherein a mixture of short-length rayon fibers and colloidal silica is homogenized in a water slurry. Water is removed from the mixture by drying in air at 120/sup 0/C and the fibers are carbonized by (pyrolysis) heating the mixture to 800 to 1000/sup 0/C in argon. The mixture is subsequently reacted at 1550 to 1900/sup 0/C in argon to yield pure ..beta..-SiC fibers.

  9. Wear of metal fiber brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Lloyd Perryman, Jr.

    The goal of this dissertation was determining the wear mechanism of metal fiber brushes on commutators and slip rings with the goal of achieving the lowest possible wear rate. To this end, metal fiber brushes were operated, while conducting direct current, on gold-plated copper rotors with and without unfilled gaps to simulate slip rings and commutators, respectively. Wear rates on unfilled-groove commutators were found to be only modestly higher than on slip ring style rotors. Three possible causes for enhanced metal fiber brush wear on commutators were considered: (i) accelerated "adhesive" wear controlled by contact spots, (ii) fatigue induced wear and (iii) "fiber chopping". Similarly, SEM analysis of fiber tips and wear particles produced scant, if any, evidence of fiber chopping, which would occur as, again, fiber tips extend elastically into the commutator grooves and small slices of them would be "chopped" off by oncoming edges of commutator bars. Finally considered was "modified chopping", wherein fiber tips would be dragged over groove edges, resulting in tensile fracture and chopping. Only a single fiber fragment showed damage that might be compatible with that mechanism. Moreover, the fact that it was exemplified by a single tenuous case, rules it out as significant. The same conclusion also follows from comparing commutator wear rates with that on slip rings. These show good correlation in terms of effective brush pressure, which on commutators is increased because only bars conduct current and gaps do not support load. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  10. Optical fiber dispersion characterization study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geeslin, A.; Arriad, A.; Riad, S. M.; Padgett, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    The theory, design, and results of optical fiber pulse dispersion measurements are considered. Both the hardware and software required to perform this type of measurement are described. Hardware includes a thermoelectrically cooled injection laser diode source, an 800 GHz gain bandwidth produce avalanche photodiode and an input mode scrambler. Software for a HP 9825 computer includes fast Fourier transform, inverse Fourier transform, and optimal compensation deconvolution. Test set construction details are also included. Test results include data collected on a 1 Km fiber, a 4 Km fiber, a fused spliced, eight 600 meter length fibers concatenated to form 4.8 Km, and up to nine optical connectors.

  11. BN Bonded BN fiber article from boric oxide fiber

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, Robert S.

    1978-12-19

    A boron nitride bonded boron nitride fiber article and the method for its manufacture which comprises forming a shaped article with a composition comprising boron oxide fibers and boric acid, heating the composition in an anhydrous gas to a temperature above the melting point of the boric acid and nitriding the resulting article in ammonia gas.

  12. Fiber reinforced superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, Donald W.; Signorelli, Robert A.; Caulfield, Thomas; Tien, John K.

    1987-01-01

    Improved performance of heat engines is largely dependent upon maximum cycle temperatures. Tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys (TFRS) are the first of a family of high temperature composites that offer the potential for significantly raising hot component operating temperatures and thus leading to improved heat engine performance. This status review of TFRS research emphasizes the promising property data developed to date, the status of TFRS composite airfoil fabrication technology, and the areas requiring more attention to assure their applicability to hot section components of aircraft gas turbine engines.

  13. Fiber optic sensing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic interferometer utilizes a low coherence light emitting diode (LED) laser as a light source which is filtered and driven at two RF frequencies, high and low, that are specific to the initial length of the resonator chamber. A displacement of a reflecting mirror changes the length traveled by the nonreferencing signal. The low frequency light undergoes destructive interference which reduces the average intensity of the wave while the high frequency light undergoes constructive interference which increases the average intensity of the wave. The ratio of these two intensity measurements is proportional to the displacement incurred.

  14. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  15. Fiber optic systems for mobile platforms II

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, N.E.; Moore, E.L.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at the symposium of International Society for Optical Engineering. Topics covered/include: Fiber optic pressure sensor for internal combustion engine; Automotive fiber optic technology: application issues; and Fiber optic guided missile.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: small fiber neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions small fiber neuropathy small fiber neuropathy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Small fiber neuropathy is a condition characterized by severe pain attacks ...

  17. Stronger Carbon Fibers for Reinforced Plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagliostro, D. E.; Lerner, N. R.

    1983-01-01

    Process makes fibers 70 percent stronger at lower carbonization temperature. Stronger carbon fibers result from benzoic acid pretreatment and addition of acetylene to nitrogen carbonizing atmosphere. New process also makes carbon fibers of higher electrical resistance -- an important safety consideration.

  18. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA) to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p < 10−8) and 0.8 mm at 41.6% vs. 19.5% (p < 10−4), respectively. The review focuses on carbon fiber properties that increased PBA for enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration. PMID:26966555

  19. Coating Carbon Fibers With Platinum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, Michael R.; Duncan, Peter; Coupland, Duncan; Rigali, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    A process for coating carbon fibers with platinum has been developed. The process may also be adaptable to coating carbon fibers with other noble and refractory metals, including rhenium and iridium. The coated carbon fibers would be used as ingredients of matrix/fiber composite materials that would resist oxidation at high temperatures. The metal coats would contribute to oxidation resistance by keeping atmospheric oxygen away from fibers when cracks form in the matrices. Other processes that have been used to coat carbon fibers with metals have significant disadvantages: Metal-vapor deposition processes yield coats that are nonuniform along both the lengths and the circumferences of the fibers. The electrical resistivities of carbon fibers are too high to be compatible with electrolytic processes. Metal/organic vapor deposition entails the use of expensive starting materials, it may be necessary to use a furnace, and the starting materials and/or materials generated in the process may be hazardous. The present process does not have these disadvantages. It yields uniform, nonporous coats and is relatively inexpensive. The process can be summarized as one of pretreatment followed by electroless deposition. The process consists of the following steps: The surfaces of the fiber are activated by deposition of palladium crystallites from a solution. The surface-activated fibers are immersed in a solution that contains platinum. A reducing agent is used to supply electrons to effect a chemical reduction in situ. The chemical reduction displaces the platinum from the solution. The displaced platinum becomes deposited on the fibers. Each platinum atom that has been deposited acts as a catalytic site for the deposition of another platinum atom. Hence, the deposition process can also be characterized as autocatalytic. The thickness of the deposited metal can be tailored via the duration of immersion and the chemical activity of the solution.

  20. Monolithic fiber end cap collimator for high-power free-space fiber-fiber coupling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuanfeng; Chen, Zilun; Wang, Zefeng; Hou, Jing

    2016-05-20

    In this paper, we present the design, construction, and testing of a monolithic fiber end cap collimator for high-power free-space fiber-fiber coupling applications. The collimator is based on a large-sized fiber end cap and a spherical lens design on the output facet. Values of the spot size and working distance are theoretically analyzed based on Gaussian approximation and ABCD transmission matrix. The free-space fiber-fiber coupling process is also analyzed for different lens curvature radii and coupling distances. In the experiment, a collimated laser beam is obtained with Rayleigh length of about 400 mm. A high-power laser with 1.1 kW output is tested on the end cap collimator, which only heats up by 7°C at the output facet without active cooling. Free-space fiber-fiber coupling between two 20/400 μm fibers is achieved based on these collimators, with measured coupling loss lower than 0.3 dB. PMID:27411125

  1. Fiber breakage phenomena in long fiber reinforced plastic preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao-Tsai; Tseng, Huan-Chang; Vlcek, Jiri; Chang, Rong-Yeu

    2015-07-01

    Due to the high demand of smart green, the lightweight technologies have become the driving force for the development of automotives and other industries in recent years. Among those technologies, using short and long fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP) to replace some metal components can reduce the weight of an automotive significantly. However, the microstructures of fibers inside plastic matrix are too complicated to manage and control during the injection molding through the screw, the runner, the gate, and then into the cavity. This study focuses on the fiber breakage phenomena during the screw plastification. Results show that fiber breakage is strongly dependent on screw design and operation. When the screw geometry changes, the fiber breakage could be larger even with lower compression ratio.

  2. Mode-locked fiber lasers based on doped fiber arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Song, Yanrong

    2014-05-10

    We designed a new kind of mode-locked fiber laser based on fiber arrays, where the central core is doped. A theoretical model is given for an all-fiber self-starting mode-locked laser based on this kind of doped fiber array. Two different kinds of fiber lasers with negative dispersion and positive dispersion are simulated and discussed. The stable mode-locked pulses are generated from initial noise conditions by the realistic parameters. The process of self-starting mode-locking multipulse transition and the relationship between the energy of the central core and the propagation distance of the pulses are discussed. Finally, we analyze the difference between the averaged mode-locked laser and the discrete mode-locked laser.

  3. Graphite fiber intercalation: Basic properties of copper chloride intercalated fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Miller, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    In situ resistance measurements were used to follow the intercalation of copper chloride in pitch-based fibers. Subsequent single fiber resistivity measurements reveal a large range of resistivities, from 13 to 160 micro-ohms cm. Additional density measurements reveal a bimodal distribution of mass densities. The dense fibers have lower resistivities and correspond to the stage III compound identified by X-ray diffraction. Neither resistivity nor density correlate with diameter. Both energy dispersive spectroscopy and mass density data suggest that excess chlorine resides in the intercalated fiber, resulting in a stoichiometry of C4.9n CuCl2.5 (where n is the stage number) for the denser fibers. Finally, thermogravimetric analysis shows a 33 percent loss in mass upon heating to 700C. This loss in mass is attributed to loss of both chlorine and carbon.

  4. Continuous method of producing silicon carbide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor); Rabe, James Alan (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    This invention pertains to a method for production of polycrystalline ceramic fibers from silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) ceramic fibers wherein the method comprises heating an amorphous ceramic fiber containing silicon and carbon in an inert environment comprising a boron oxide and carbon monoxide at a temperature sufficient to convert the amorphous ceramic fiber to a polycrystalline ceramic fiber. By having carbon monoxide present during the heating of the ceramic fiber, it is possible to achieve higher production rates on a continuous process.

  5. Fiber optic light sensor.

    PubMed

    Chudyk, Wayne; Flynn, Kyle F

    2015-06-01

    We describe a low-cost fiber optic sensor for measuring photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in turbulent flow. Existing technology was combined in a novel way for probe development addressing the need for a small but durable instrument for use in flowing water. Optical components including fiber optics and a wide-spectrum light detector were used to separate light collection from electronic detection so that measurements could be completed in either the field or laboratory, in air or underwater. Connection of the detector to Arduino open-source electronics and a portable personal computer (PC) enabled signal processing and allowed data to be stored in a spreadsheet for ease of analysis. Calibration to a commercial cosine-corrected instrument showed suitable agreement with the added benefit that the small sensor face allowed measurements in tight spaces such as close to the streambed or within leafy or filamentous plant growth. Subsequently, we applied the probe in a separate study where over 35 experiments were successfully completed to characterize downward light attenuation in filamentous algae in turbulent flow. PMID:26009160

  6. Strong fibers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Che-Yu

    1991-03-01

    This program was directed to a new and generic approach to the development of new materials with novel and interesting properties, and to the precision fabrication of these materials in one and two-dimensional forms. Advanced deposition processes and microfabrication technology were used to produce fibers and grids of metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and mixtures of controlled composition and structure, and with new and interesting mechanical and physical properties. Deposition processes included electron beam evaporation, co-deposition of mixtures by dual electron beam evaporation, thermal evaporation, sputtering of a single element or compound, sputtering of a single element in a gaseous atmosphere to produce compounds, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD), and selective tungsten chemical vapor deposition (W-CVD). The approach was to use the deposition processes in coordination with patterns generated by optical lithography to produce fibers with transverse dimensions in the micron range, and lengths from less than a millimeter to several centimeters. The approach is also applicable to the production of two-dimensional grids and particulates of controlled sizes and geometries.

  7. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  8. Fiber optic light sensor.

    PubMed

    Chudyk, Wayne; Flynn, Kyle F

    2015-06-01

    We describe a low-cost fiber optic sensor for measuring photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in turbulent flow. Existing technology was combined in a novel way for probe development addressing the need for a small but durable instrument for use in flowing water. Optical components including fiber optics and a wide-spectrum light detector were used to separate light collection from electronic detection so that measurements could be completed in either the field or laboratory, in air or underwater. Connection of the detector to Arduino open-source electronics and a portable personal computer (PC) enabled signal processing and allowed data to be stored in a spreadsheet for ease of analysis. Calibration to a commercial cosine-corrected instrument showed suitable agreement with the added benefit that the small sensor face allowed measurements in tight spaces such as close to the streambed or within leafy or filamentous plant growth. Subsequently, we applied the probe in a separate study where over 35 experiments were successfully completed to characterize downward light attenuation in filamentous algae in turbulent flow.

  9. Quantum cryptography using optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Franson, J D; Lives, H

    1994-05-10

    Quantum cryptography permits the transmission of secret information whose security is guaranteed by the uncertainty principle. An experimental system for quantum crytography is implemented based on the linear polarization of single photons transmitted by an optical fiber. Polarization-preserving optical fiber and a feedback loop are employed to maintain the state of polarization. Error rates of less than 0.5% are obtained.

  10. Fiber optic-based biosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1991-01-01

    The NRL fiber optic biosensor is a device which measures the formation of a fluorescent complex at the surface of an optical fiber. Antibodies and DNA binding proteins provide the mechanism for recognizing an analyze and immobilizing a fluorescent complex on the fiber surface. The fiber optic biosensor is fast, sensitive, and permits analysis of hazardous materials remote from the instrumentation. The fiber optic biosensor is described in terms of the device configuration, chemistry for protein immobilization, and assay development. A lab version is being used for assay development and performance characterization while a portable device is under development. Antibodies coated on the fiber are stable for up to two years of storage prior to use. The fiber optic biosensor was used to measure concentration of toxins in the parts per billion (ng/ml) range in under a minute. Immunoassays for small molecules and whole bacteria are under development. Assays using DNA probes as the detection element can also be used with the fiber optic sensor, which is currently being developed to detect biological warfare agents, explosives, pathogens, and toxic materials which pollute the environment.

  11. The Future of Modified Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J. V.; Goheen, Steven C.; Buschle-Diller, Gisela

    2006-06-30

    The future of fiber technology for medical and specialty applications depends largely on the future needs of our civilization. It has been said that unmet needs drive the funding that sparks ideas. In this regard recent emphasis on United States homeland security has encouraged new bio-fiber research, resulting in the development of anti-bacterial fibers for producing clothing and filters to eliminate pathogens and enzyme-linked fibers to facilitate decontamination of nerve toxins from human skin [1]. Magnetic fibers may also have future security applications including fiber-based detectors for individual and material recognition. Interest in smart and interactive textiles is increasing with a projected average annual growth rate of 36% by 2009 [2]. More specific markets including medical textiles and enzymes will grow even more rapidly. Among the medical textiles are interactive wound dressings, implantable grafts, smart hygienic materials, and dialysis tubing. Some of the medical and specialty fibers inclusive of these types of product areas are discussed in this book. A recent review of the surface modification of fibers as therapeutic and diagnostic systems relevant to some of these new product areas has been published by Gupta [3]. In his review he examined current technology for medical textile structures [3] with a focus on woven medical textile materials.

  12. Supercontinuum Generation in Optical Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, J. M.; Taylor, J. R.

    2010-04-01

    1. Introduction and history J. R. Taylor; 2. Supercontinuum generation in microstructure fiber - an historical note J. K. Ranka; 3. Nonlinear fiber optics overview J. C. Travers, M. H. Frosz and J. M. Dudley; 4. Fiber supercontinuum generation overview J. M. Dudley; 5. Silica fibers for supercontinuum generation J. C. Knight and W. Wadsworth; 6. Supercontinuum generation and nonlinearity in soft glass fibers J. H. V. Price and D. J. Richardson; 7. Increasing the blue-shift of a picosecond pumped supercontinuum M. H. Frosz, P. M. Moselund, P. D. Rasmussen, C. L. Thomsen and O. Bang; 8. Continuous wave supercontinuum generation J. C. Travers; 9. Theory of supercontinuum and interactions of solitons with dispersive waves D. V. Skryabin and A. V. Gorbach; 10. Interaction of four-wave mixing and stimulated Raman scattering in optical fibers S. Coen, S. G. Murdoch and F. Vanholsbeeck; 11. Nonlinear optics in emerging waveguides: revised fundamentals and implications S. V. Afshar, M. Turner and T. M. Monro; 12. Supercontinuum generation in dispersion varying fibers G. Genty; 13. Supercontinuum generation in chalcogenide glass waveguides Dong-Il Yeom, M. R. E. Lamont, B. Luther Davies and B. J. Eggleton; 14. Supercontinuum generation for carrier-envelope phase stabilization of mode-locked lasers S. T. Cundiff; 15. Biophotonics applications of supercontinuum generation C. Dunsby and P. M. W. French; 16. Fiber sources of tailored supercontinuum in nonlinear microspectroscopy and imaging A. M. Zheltikov; Index.

  13. System for testing optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Davies, Terence J.; Franks, Larry A.; Nelson, Melvin A.

    1981-01-01

    A system for nondestructively determining the attenuation coefficient, .alpha.(.lambda.), of low-loss optical fiber wave guides. Cerenkov light pulses are generated at a plurality of locations in the fiber by a beam of charged particles. The transit times of selected spectral components and their intensities are utilized to unfold the .alpha.(.lambda.) values over the measured spectrum.

  14. Fiber optic refractive index monitor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan David

    2002-01-01

    A sensor for measuring the change in refractive index of a liquid uses the lowest critical angle of a normal fiber optic to achieve sensitivity when the index of the liquid is significantly less than the index of the fiber core. Another embodiment uses a liquid filled core to ensure that its index is approximately the same as the liquid being measured.

  15. Thermoplastic coating of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, D. D.; Lickfield, G. C.; Allen, L. E.; Mccollum, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    A continuous powder coating system was developed for coating carbon fiber with LaRC-TPI (Langley Research Center-Thermoplastic Polyimide), a high-temperature thermoplastic polymide invented by NASA-Langley. The coating line developed used a pneumatic fiber spreader to separate the individual fibers. The polymer was applied within a recirculating powder coating chamber then melted using a combination of direct electrical resistance and convective heating to make it adhere to the fiber tow. The tension and speed of the line were controlled with a dancer arm and an electrically driven fiber wind-up and wind-off. The effects of heating during the coating process on the flexibility of the prepreg produced were investigated. The uniformity with which the fiber tow could be coated with polymer also was examined. Composite specimens were fabricated from the prepreg and tested to determine optimum process conditions. The study showed that a very uniform and flexible prepeg with up to 50 percent by volume polymer could be produced with this powder coating system. The coating line minimized powder loss and produced prepeg in lengths of up to 300 m. The fiber spreading was found to have a major effect on the coating uniformity and flexibility. Though test results showed low composite tensile strengths, analysis of fracture surfaces under scanning electron microscope indicated that fiber/matrix adhesion was adequate.

  16. Safety Precautions in Fiber Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Marcia

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses the potential hazards of working with fibers, dyes, and wax in textile art projects: bacteria, dust, poisons, allergies, and fumes. Safety precautions for working with dyes are listed. This article is one of seven in this issue on fiber arts. (SJL)

  17. Plasma vitrification of asbestos fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    Asbestos is a mineral in the form of long, thread-like fibers. Asbestos fibers have been among the best insulators of pipes, boilers, ducts, tanks, etc., in buildings, ships, and industrial furnaces. Over 150,000 metric tons of asbestos were consumed in the United States in 1984. The Environmental Protection Agency has declared asbestos fibers a known human carcinogen. And today, asbestos insulators are being replaced by manmade non-hazardous fibers. Millions of tons of replaced asbestos fiber insulators are in storage, awaiting the demonstration of effective alternative disposal technologies. Plasma vitrification has been demonstrated during May, June and July 1995 as a viable, cost-effective, safe technology for asbestos fiber disposal. A low-mass plasma arc heater is submerged under the waste asbestos insulating materials, and the intense heat of the plasma flame heats and melts the fibers. The by-product is dark, non-hazardous glass pellets. The vitrification process renders the asbestos waste safe for use as road construction aggregates or other fill materials. This paper will describe the results of start-up of a 1 ton-per-hour Plasma Mobile Asbestos Vitrification (MAV) Plant at a DOD Site in Port Clinton, Ohio. The Plasma MAV Plant is being demonstrated for the on-site disposal of 1.5 million pounds of Amosite asbestos fibers.

  18. Development of novel fibers for telecoms application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukasa, Kazunori; Imamura, Katsunori; Takahashi, Masanori; Yagi, Takeshi

    2010-12-01

    This paper reviews the current situations of optical fibers used for terrestrial and submarine transmission systems as well as up-to-date R&D on these fibers. The current fibers include standard single mode fibers (SMFs), non-zero dispersion shifted fibers (NZ-DSFs), and dispersion managed lines (DMLs). Even though these fibers show quite high and matured properties, the internet traffic is continuously growing, and around 2015-2020, it is expected that the current transmission fibers would become inadequate. To prepare for the future ultra high-capacity transmission, there are three important R&D directions for transmission fibers. (1) Reducing non-linearity by means of enlarging Aeff and/or reducing attenuation loss. It is very important in the case of transmission systems using new multi-level signal formats. (2) Expanding the transmission band more than the current C- and/or L-Band by utilizing new transmission fibers. For example, holey fibers (HFs), which have an endlessly single mode (ESM) property, are one of the interesting candidates of the new transmission fibers. (3) Using Space Division Multiplexing (SDM) by using multi-core fibers. The multi-core fiber literally multiples the core number within a fiber dimension, which enables multiple transmission capacity per one fiber. In addition to the developments of transmission fibers, component fibers have also been studied and developed. Examples of R&D on these component fibers will be also discussed in the latter part of this paper.

  19. The Melting Curve and High-Pressure Chemistry of Formic Acid to 8 GPa and 600 K

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, W; Zaug, J M; Howard, W M; Goncharov, A F; Crowhurst, J C; Jeanloz, R

    2005-04-13

    We have determined the melting temperature of formic acid (HCOOH) to 8.5 GPa using infrared absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and visual observation of samples in a resistively heated diamond-anvil cell. The experimentally determined melting curve compares favorably with a two-phase thermodynamic model. Decomposition reactions were observed above the melting temperature up to a pressure of 6.5 GPa, where principal products were CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and CO. At pressures above 6.5 GPa, decomposition led to solid-like reaction products. Infrared and Raman spectra of these recovered products indicate that pressure affects the nature of carbon-carbon bonding.

  20. Surface-emitting fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapira, Ofer; Kuriki, Ken; Orf, Nicholas D.; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Benoit, Gilles; Viens, Jean F.; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Ibanescu, Mihai; Joannopoulos, John D.; Fink, Yoel; Brewster, Megan M.

    2006-05-01

    All fiber lasers to date emit radiation only along the fiber axis. Here a fiber that exhibits laser emission that is radially directed from its circumferential surface is demonstrated. A unique and controlled azimuthally anisotropic optical wave front results from the interplay between a cylindrical photonic bandgap fiber resonator, anisotropic organic dye gain, and a linearly polarized axial pump. Low threshold (86nJ) lasing at nine different wavelengths is demonstrated throughout the visible and near-infrared spectra. We also report the experimental realization of unprecedented layer thicknesses of 29.5 nm maintained throughout meter-long fibers. Such a device may have interesting medical applications ranging from photodynamic therapy to in vivo molecular imaging, as well as textile fabric displays.

  1. Fiber Grating Environmental Sensing System

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Whitten L.; Udd, Eric

    2003-07-29

    Fiber grating environmental measurement systems are comprised of sensors that are configured to respond to changes in moisture or chemical content of the surrounding medium through the action of coatings and plates inducing strain that is measured. These sensors can also be used to monitor the interior of bonds for degradation due to aging, cracking, or chemical attack. Means to multiplex these sensors at high speed and with high sensitivity can be accomplished by using spectral filters placed to correspond to each fiber grating environmental sensor. By forming networks of spectral elements and using wavelength division multiplexing arrays of fiber grating sensors may be processed in a single fiber line allowing distributed high sensitivity, high bandwidth fiber optic grating environmental sensor systems to be realized.

  2. Coherent fiber supercontinuum for biophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Haohua; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Biophotonics and nonlinear fiber optics have traditionally been two independent fields. Since the discovery of fiber-based supercontinuum generation in 1999, biophotonics applications employing incoherent light have experienced a large impact from nonlinear fiber optics, primarily because of the access to a wide range of wavelengths and a uniform spatial profile afforded by fiber supercontinuum. However, biophotonics applications employing coherent light have not benefited from the most well-known techniques of supercontinuum generation for reasons such as poor coherence (or high noise), insufficient controllability, and inadequate portability. Fortunately, a few key techniques involving nonlinear fiber optics and femtosecond laser development have emerged to overcome these critical limitations. Despite their relative independence, these techniques are the focus of this review, because they can be integrated into a low-cost portable biophotonics source platform. This platform can be shared across many different areas of research in biophotonics, enabling new applications such as point-of-care coherent optical biomedical imaging. PMID:24358056

  3. Compressive strength of carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Prandy, J.M. ); Hahn, H.T. )

    1991-01-01

    Most composites are weaker in compression than in tension, which is due to the poor compressive strength of the load bearing fibers. The present paper discusses the compressive strengths and failure modes of 11 different carbon fibers: PAN-AS1, AS4, IM6, IM7, T700, T300, GY-30, pitch-75, ultra high modulus (UHM), high modulus (HM), and high strength (HS). The compressive strength was determined by embedding a fiber bundle in a transparent epoxy matrix and testing in compression. The resin allows for the containment and observation of failure during and after testing while also providing lateral support to the fibers. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to determine the global failure modes of the fibers.

  4. Glass fiber manufacturing and fiber safety: the producer's perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, J R; Hadley, J G

    1994-01-01

    Historically, the potential health effects of airborne fibers have been associated with the dose, dimension, and durability. Increasing focus is being placed on the latter category. Concern about airborne fiber safety could be reduced by manufacturing fibers that are not respirable; however, due to performance and manufacturing constraints on glasswool insulations, this is not possible today. These products are an important part of today's economy and as a major manufacturer, Owens-Corning is committed to producing and marketing materials that are both safe and effective in their intended use. To this end, manufacturing technology seeks to produce materials that generate low concentrations of airborne fibers, thus minimizing exposure and irritation. The range of fiber diameters is controlled to assure effective product performance and, as far as possible, to minimize respirability. Glass compositions are designed to allow effective fiber forming and ultimate product function. Fiber dissolution is primarily a function of composition; this too, can be controlled within certain constraints. Coupled with these broad parameters is an extensive product stewardship program to assure the safety of these materials. This article will discuss the factors that influence glasswool insulation production, use, and safety. PMID:7882953

  5. Genomic landscape of fiber genes in fibered and non-fibered cottons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber is the largest single cell in the plant kingdom. It is the best model to study cell function, differentiation, maturation, and cell death. Cotton fiber transcriptome can be clustered into two types of regions: conservative areas and recombination hotspots. This study was to investig...

  6. Autotract: automatic cleaning and tracking of fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Juan C.; Yang, Jean Y.; Budin, François; Styner, Martin

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new tool named Autotract to automate fiber tracking in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Autotract uses prior knowledge from a source DTI and a set of corresponding fiber bundles to extract new fibers for a target DTI. Autotract starts by aligning both DTIs and uses the source fibers as seed points to initialize a tractography algorithm. We enforce similarity between the propagated source fibers and automatically traced fibers by computing metrics such as fiber length and fiber distance between the bundles. By analyzing these metrics, individual fiber tracts can be pruned. As a result, we show that both bundles have similar characteristics. Additionally, we compare the automatically traced fibers against bundles previously generated and validated in the target DTI by an expert. This work is motivated by medical applications in which known bundles of fiber tracts in the human brain need to be analyzed for multiple datasets.

  7. Autotract: Automatic cleaning and tracking of fibers

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Juan C.; Yang, Jean Y.; Budin, François; Styner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new tool named Autotract to automate fiber tracking in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Autotract uses prior knowledge from a source DTI and a set of corresponding fiber bundles to extract new fibers for a target DTI. Autotract starts by aligning both DTIs and uses the source fibers as seed points to initialize a tractography algorithm. We enforce similarity between the propagated source fibers and automatically traced fibers by computing metrics such as fiber length and fiber distance between the bundles. By analyzing these metrics, individual fiber tracts can be pruned. As a result, we show that both bundles have similar characteristics. Additionally, we compare the automatically traced fibers against bundles previously generated and validated in the target DTI by an expert. This work is motivated by medical applications in which known bundles of fiber tracts in the human brain need to be analyzed for multiple datasets. PMID:27065227

  8. All-fiber optical isolator based on Faraday rotation in highly terbium-doped fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L.; Jiang, S.; Zuegel, J. D.; Marciante, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    An all-fiber isolator with 17 dB optical isolation is demonstrated. The fiber Faraday rotator uses 56 wt. % terbium (Tb)-doped silicate fiber, and the fiber polarizers are Corning SP1060 single-polarization fiber. Finally, the effective Verdet constant of the Tb-doped fiber is measured to be -24.5±1.0 rad/(Tm) at 1053 nm, which is 20 times larger than silica fiber and 22% larger than previously reported results.

  9. FIBER LENGTH DISTRIBUTION MEASUREMENT FOR LONG GLASS AND CARBON FIBER REINFORCED INJECTION MOLDED THERMOPLASTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunc, Vlastimil; Frame, Barbara J; Nguyen, Ba N.; TuckerIII, Charles L.; Velez-Garcia, Gregorio

    2007-01-01

    Procedures for fiber length distribution (FLD) measurement of long fiber reinforced injection molded thermoplastics were refined for glass and carbon fibers. Techniques for sample selection, fiber separation, digitization and length measurement for both fiber types are described in detail. Quantitative FLD results are provided for glass and carbon reinforced polypropylene samples molded with a nominal original fiber length of 12.7 mm (1/2 in.) using equipment optimized for molding short fiber reinforced thermoplastics.

  10. Discrete bisoliton fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X. M.; Han, X. X.; Yao, X. K.

    2016-01-01

    Dissipative solitons, which result from the intricate balance between dispersion and nonlinearity as well as gain and loss, are of the fundamental scientific interest and numerous important applications. Here, we report a fiber laser that generates bisoliton – two consecutive dissipative solitons that preserve a fixed separation between them. Deviations from this separation result in its restoration. It is also found that these bisolitons have multiple discrete equilibrium distances with the quantized separations, as is confirmed by the theoretical analysis and the experimental observations. The main feature of our laser is the anomalous dispersion that is increased by an order of magnitude in comparison to previous studies. Then the spectral filtering effect plays a significant role in pulse-shaping. The proposed laser has the potential applications in optical communications and high-resolution optics for coding and transmission of information in higher-level modulation formats. PMID:27767075

  11. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.A.; Sanchez, R.; Dulleck, G.R.

    1996-05-01

    This report covers the development of fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensors for monitoring dissolved hydrogen gas in transformer oil. The concentration of hydrogen gas is a measure of the corona and spark discharge within the transformer and reflects the state of health of the transformer. Key features of the instrument include use of palladium alloys to enhance hydrogen sensitivity, a microprocessor controlled instrument with RS-232, liquid crystal readout, and 4-20 ma. current loop interfaces. Calibration data for both sensors can be down loaded to the instrument through the RS-232 interface. This project was supported by the Technology Transfer Initiative in collaboration with J. W. Harley, Inc. through the mechanism of a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA).

  12. Optical fiber synaptic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarchik, A. N.; Jaimes-Reátegui, R.; Sevilla-Escoboza, R.; García-Lopez, J. H.; Kazantsev, V. B.

    2011-06-01

    Understanding neuron connections is a great challenge, which is needed to solve many important problems in neurobiology and neuroengineering for recreation of brain functions and efficient biorobotics. In particular, a design of an optical synapse capable to communicate with neuron spike sequences would be crucial to improve the functionality of neuromimmetic networks. In this work we propose an optical synaptic sensor based on an erbium-doped fiber laser driven by a FitzHung-Nagumo electronic neuron, to connect with another electronic neuron. Two possible optical synaptic configurations are analyzed for optoelectronic coupling between neurons: laser cavity loss modulation and pump laser modulation. The control parameters of the proposed optical synapse provide additional degrees of flexibility to the neuron connection traditionally controlled only by coupling strengths in artificial networks.

  13. Ceramic fiber filter technology

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    Fibrous filters have been used for centuries to protect individuals from dust, disease, smoke, and other gases or particulates. In the 1970s and 1980s ceramic filters were developed for filtration of hot exhaust gases from diesel engines. Tubular, or candle, filters have been made to remove particles from gases in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification-combined-cycle power plants. Very efficient filtration is necessary in power plants to protect the turbine blades. The limited lifespan of ceramic candle filters has been a major obstacle in their development. The present work is focused on forming fibrous ceramic filters using a papermaking technique. These filters are highly porous and therefore very lightweight. The papermaking process consists of filtering a slurry of ceramic fibers through a steel screen to form paper. Papermaking and the selection of materials will be discussed, as well as preliminary results describing the geometry of papers and relative strengths.

  14. Optical fiber-based photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cǎsǎndruc, Albert; Bücker, Robert; Kassier, Günther; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2016-08-01

    We present the design of a back-illuminated photocathode for electron diffraction experiments based on an optical fiber, and experimental characterization of emitted electron bunches. Excitation light is guided through the fiber into the experimental vacuum chamber, eliminating typical alignment difficulties between the emitter metal and the optical trigger and position instabilities, as well as providing reliable control of the laser spot size and profile. The in-vacuum fiber end is polished and coated with a 30 nm gold (Au) layer on top of 3 nm of chromium (Cr), which emits electrons by means of single-photon photoemission when femtosecond pulses in the near ultraviolet (257 nm) are fed into the fiber on the air side. The emission area can be adjusted to any value between a few nanometers (using tapered fibers) and the size of a multi-mode fiber core (100 μm or larger). In this proof-of-principle experiment, two different types of fibers were tested, with emission spot diameters of 50 μm and 100 μm, respectively. The normalized thermal electron beam emittance (TE) was measured by means of the aperture scan technique, and a TE of 4.0 π nm was measured for the smaller spot diameter. Straightforward enhancements to the concept allowed to demonstrate operation in an electric field environment of up to 7 MV/m.

  15. Dimensional stability of natural fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, Mark S.

    2013-04-19

    One of the main problems associated with the use of natural fibers as reinforcing agents in composites is their uptake of moisture. Many natural fibers are lignocellulosic, which causes them to swell and shrink as the amount of available moisture changes. Swelling and shrinking can cause composites to prematurely fail. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study that considers the use of two different low molecular weight monomers, hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA), polymerized by electron beam ionizing radiation, to dimensionally stabilize natural fibers. Eight different treatments consisting of varying amounts of monomer, encapsulating agent, and cross-linkers, were evaluated for their ability to dimensionally stabilize sisal fiber. Results indicate that both polymerized HEA and HEMA can reduce the swelling of sisal fiber. The effectiveness of HEA and HEMA can be further enhanced with the use of a cross-linker (SR 454). The use of hydroxylated monomers to dimensionally stabilize natural fibers may play an important role in reducing delamination and improving fiber-resin adhesion in composites.

  16. Dimensional stability of natural fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Mark S.; Smith, Jennifer L.; Woods, Sean; Tiss, Kenneth J.; Larsen, L. Scott

    2013-04-01

    One of the main problems associated with the use of natural fibers as reinforcing agents in composites is their uptake of moisture. Many natural fibers are lignocellulosic, which causes them to swell and shrink as the amount of available moisture changes. Swelling and shrinking can cause composites to prematurely fail. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study that considers the use of two different low molecular weight monomers, hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA), polymerized by electron beam ionizing radiation, to dimensionally stabilize natural fibers. Eight different treatments consisting of varying amounts of monomer, encapsulating agent, and cross-linkers, were evaluated for their ability to dimensionally stabilize sisal fiber. Results indicate that both polymerized HEA and HEMA can reduce the swelling of sisal fiber. The effectiveness of HEA and HEMA can be further enhanced with the use of a cross-linker (SR 454). The use of hydroxylated monomers to dimensionally stabilize natural fibers may play an important role in reducing delamination and improving fiber-resin adhesion in composites.

  17. Multiplexed displacement fiber sensor using thin core fiber exciter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen; Hefferman, Gerald; Wei, Tao

    2015-06-01

    This letter reports a multiplexed optical displacement sensor using a thin core fiber (TCF) exciter. The TCF exciter is followed by a stripped single mode optical fiber. A small section of buffer is used as the movable component along the single mode fiber. Ultra-weak cladding mode reflection (< - 75 dB) was employed to probe the refractive index discontinuity between the air and buffer coating boundary. The position change of the movable buffer segment results in a delay change of the cladding mode reflection. Thus, it is a measure of the displacement of the buffer segment with respect to the glass fiber. The insertion loss of one sensor was measured to be less than 3 dB. A linear relationship was evaluated between the measurement position and absolute position of the moving actuator. Multiplexed capability was demonstrated and no cross talk was found between the sensors.

  18. Fiber composite materials: A survey of fiber matrix interface mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Report is described which discusses mechanism of load transfer from matrix to fiber through interface and effects of interface on composite structural integrity. Theoretical considerations are supplemented with experimental data. General trends and significant points are illustrated graphically.

  19. Optical-fiber interferometric strain sensor using a single fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Narendran, N.; Shukla, A.; Letcher, S. Rhode Island Univ., Kingston )

    1992-12-01

    A single fiber (SF) interferometric strain sensor based on Fresnel reflections is described. A beam from the He-Ne laser which is coupled with an optical fiber via a microscope objective passes through the interaction region and part of it (beam-a) exits the fiber while the other is Fresnel reflected toward the proximal end where it is once again Fresnel reflected toward the distant end. The beam-b exits the fiber and interferes with the first beam. The combined signal is focused onto an avalanche photodiode connected to a digital storage oscilliscope and an IBM PC. The sensor is characterized by higher sensitivity than a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. 19 refs.

  20. Fiber optic control system integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppel, G. L.; Glasheen, W. M.; Russell, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    A total fiber optic, integrated propulsion/flight control system concept for advanced fighter aircraft is presented. Fiber optic technology pertaining to this system is identified and evaluated for application readiness. A fiber optic sensor vendor survey was completed, and the results are reported. The advantages of centralized/direct architecture are reviewed, and the concept of the protocol branch is explained. Preliminary protocol branch selections are made based on the F-18/F404 application. Concepts for new optical tools are described. Development plans for the optical technology and the described system are included.

  1. Nozzle for superconducting fiber production

    DOEpatents

    Righi, Jamal

    1992-11-17

    A nozzle apparatus for producing flexible fibers of superconducting material receives melted material from a crucible for containing a charge of the superconducting material. The material is melted in the crucible and falls in a stream through a bottom hole in the crucible. The stream falls through a protecting collar which maintains the stream at high temperatures. The stream is then supplied through the downwardly directed nozzle where it is subjected to a high velocity air flow which breaks the melted superconducting material into ligaments which solidify into the flexible fibers. The fibers are collected by blowing them against a porous cloth.

  2. Interfacial adhesion of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.

    1987-01-01

    Relative adhesion strengths between AS4, AS1, and XAS carbon fibers and thermoplastic polymers were determined using the embedded single filament test. Polymers studied included polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide, polyetherimide, polysulfone, polyphenylene oxide blends with polystyrene, and polycarbonate blends with a polycarbonate polysiloxane block copolymer. Fiber surface treatments and sizings improved adhesion somewhat, but adhesion remained well below levels obtained with epoxy matrices. An explanation for the differences between the Hercules and Grafil fibers was sought using X ray photon spectroscopy, wetting, scanning electron microscopy and thermal desorption analysis.

  3. Apparatus and method for combining light from two or more fibers into a single fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Klingsporn, Paul Edward

    2007-02-20

    An apparatus and method for combining light signals carried on a plurality of input fibers onto a single receiving fiber with a high degree of efficiency. The apparatus broadly comprises the receiving fiber and a plurality of input fiber-lens assemblies, with each fiber lens assembly including an input fiber; a collimating lens interposed between the input fiber and the receiving fiber and adapted to collimate the light signal; and a focusing lens interposed between the collimating lens and the receiving fiber and adapted to focus the collimated light signal onto the face of the receiving fiber. The components of each fiber-lens assembly are oriented along an optic axis that is inclined relative to the receiving fiber, with the inclination angle depending at least in part on the input fiber's numerical aperture and the focal lengths and diameters of the collimating and focusing lenses.

  4. Apparatus and method for combining light from two or more fibers into a single fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Klingsporn, Paul Edward

    2006-03-14

    An apparatus and method for combining light signals carried on a plurality of input fibers onto a single receiving fiber with a high degree of efficiency. The apparatus broadly comprises the receiving fiber and a plurality of input fiber-lens assemblies, with each fiber lens assembly including an input fiber; a collimating lens interposed between the input fiber and the receiving fiber and adapted to collimate the light signal; and a focusing lens interposed between the collimating lens and the receiving fiber and adapted to focus the collimated light signal onto the face of the receiving fiber. The components of each fiber-lens assembly are oriented along an optic axis that is inclined relative to the receiving fiber, with the inclination angle depending at least in part on the input fiber's numerical aperture and the focal lengths and diameters of the collimating and focusing lenses.

  5. Erbium Doped Fiber Sources and Amplifiers for Optical Fiber Sensors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagener, Jefferson L.

    1996-08-01

    This thesis explores the use of erbium-doped fiber in lasers, amplified spontaneous emission sources, and amplifiers with particular attention to applications involving fiber sensor technology. Erbium-doped fiber laser output power is shown to be strongly dependent on the erbium dopant concentration in a fiber. Using multiple fibers with various erbium ion concentrations, laser output powers are found to decrease as erbium concentration is increased. Upconversion in paired ions is successfully used to model the lasers, resulting in a better understanding of the loss mechanism involved. Further investigation shows that co-doping an erbium-doped fiber with aluminum helps eliminate upconversion in paired ions, and an optimum ratio of 20 aluminum ions for every erbium ion is established. Upconversion due to paired ions is also used to predict the behavior of erbium-doped fiber amplifiers as a function of the erbium ion concentration. With this knowledge of concentration dependence, a low doped, high output power fiber is chosen for use as an amplified spontaneous emission source in a fiber optic gyroscope. Used as a single pass broadband source in one propagation direction and as a signal amplifier in the other direction, this source is tested experimentally in a high quality fiber gyroscope. Experimental results reveal an unexpected dependence on the polarization states of the optical pump and the gyroscope output signal. A theory of polarization anisotropy in the erbium ions is developed in full and accurately models the experimental observations. Using this model to optimize the source, a fiber gyroscope output stability of 4 parts per million is obtained experimentally, approaching the requirements of inertial navigation. This model is also used to explore novel single polarization amplified spontaneous emission sources. Large scale amplified sensor arrays are examined theoretically to determine component and amplification requirements. For balanced gain and loss

  6. Developments in Hollow Graphite Fiber Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Michael; Brantley, Lott W., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Hollow graphite fibers will be lighter than standard solid graphite fibers and, thus, will save weight in optical components. This program will optimize the processing and properties of hollow carbon fibers developed by MER and to scale-up the processing to produce sufficient fiber for fabricating a large ultra-lightweight mirror for delivery to NASA.

  7. Wedged Fibers Suppress Feedback of Laser Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.

    1986-01-01

    When injected laser is coupled into optical fiber, emission instabilities arise because of optical feedback losses from fiber into laser. Coupling efficiencies as high as 80 percent, however, obtained by shaping end of multimode fiber into obtuse-angled wedge. Because slanted sides eliminate back reflection, such wedged fiber achieves high coupling efficiency.

  8. Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2015-12-01

    Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a boron oxide gas within a temperature range of from approximately 1400.degree. C. to approximately 2200.degree. C. Continuous boron carbide fibers, continuous fibers comprising boron carbide, and articles including at least a boron carbide coating are also disclosed.

  9. Influence of fiber quality on draftometer measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fiber-to-fiber and fiber-to-machine friction play an important role in determining textile processing efficiency and end-product quality. A process, known as drafting, is used to control the attenuation of the fiber mass being processed in carding, drawing and spinning. The amount of attenuation t...

  10. Use of optical fibers in spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Lawrence W.

    1988-01-01

    The use of single or small numbers of fiber optic fibers in astronomical spectroscopy with the goal of greater spectrophotometric and radial velocity accuracy is discussed. The properties of multimode step index fibers which are most important for this application are outlined, as are laboratory tests of currently available fibers.

  11. All-Fiber Optical Faraday Mirror Using 56-wt%-Terbium-Doped Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L.; Jiang, S.; Marciante, J.R.

    2010-06-22

    An all-fiber optical Faraday mirror that consists of a fiber Faraday rotator and a fiber Bragg grating is demonstrated. The fiber Faraday rotator uses a 21-cm-long section of 56-wt%-terbium-doped silicate fiber. The polarization state of the reflected light is rotated 89 degrees +/- 2 degrees with a 16-dB polarization extinction ratio.

  12. Fiber Amplifier Report for NEPP 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomes, Joe; Ott, Melanie; LaRocca, Frank; Chuska, Rick; Switzer, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Ongoing qualification activities of LiNbO3 modulators. Passive (unpumped) radiation testing of Er-, Yb-, and Er/Yb-doped fibers: a) Yb-doped fibers exhibit higher radiation resistance than Er-doped fibers; b) Er/Yb co-doped fibers exhibit largest radiation resistance. Active (pumped) radiation testing of Yb-doped fibers conducted at NASA GSFC: a) Typical decay behavior observed; b) No comparison could be made to other fibers due to problems with test setup. Development of new high power fiber terminations.

  13. IR fiber sources for scene projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, L. B.; Sanghera, J. S.; Aggarwal, I. D.

    2007-04-01

    Naval Research Laboratory has developed IR transmitting fiber and IR fiber sources which can be used for HWIL testing. IR transmitting fiber is capable of broad transmission from near IR to LWIR and can be formed into bundles for imaging. IR fiber sources are based on rare earth doped glass or nonlinear processes in the glass and are cable of high brightness IR emission. Recently, NRL developed a four emitter MWIR fiber source which is capable of high temperature simulation, high dynamic range, and fast response. New broadband fiber sources based upon IR supercontinuum generation in IR fibers are also being developed. In this paper, we will report on these technologies.

  14. Coated fiber tips for optical instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, John B.; Chanda, Sheetal; Locknar, Sarah A.; Carver, Gary E.

    2016-03-01

    Compact optical systems can be fabricated by integrating coatings on fiber tips. Examples include fiber lasers, fiber interferometers, fiber Raman probes, fiber based spectrometers, and anti-reflected endoscopes. These interference filters are applied to exposed tips - either connectorized or cleaved. Coatings can also be immersed within glass by depositing on one tip and connecting to another uncoated tip. This paper addresses a fiber spectrometer for multispectral imaging - useful in several fields including biomedical scanning, flow cytometry, and remote sensing. Our spectrometer integrates serial arrays of reflecting fiber tips, delay lines between these elements, and a single element detector.

  15. Soft capacitor fibers for electronic textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jian Feng; Gorgutsa, Stephan; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2010-09-01

    A highly flexible, conductive polymer-based fiber with high electric capacitance is reported. The fiber is fabricated using fiber drawing method, where a multimaterial macroscopic preform is drawn into a submillimeter capacitor microstructured fiber. A typical measured capacitance per unit length of our fibers is 60-100 nF/m which is about 3 orders magnitude higher than that of a coaxial cable of a comparable diameter. The fiber has a transverse resistivity of 5 kΩ m. Softness, lightweight, absence of liquid electrolyte, and ease of scalability to large production volumes make the fibers interesting for various smart textile applications.

  16. Apparatus For Chemically Treating Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanfield, Clarence E.

    1991-01-01

    New apparatus for chemical treatment of graphite-fiber tow developed. Applies chemical solutions to commercially purchased unsized fibers or in-house-made fibers, to improve following: handling of fibers, interface bonding of fiber to resin matrix during prepreg fabrication, and interface bonding in laminates during molding process. Designed for research and development, with predrying and post-drying in inert environments. Easily adaptable to different chemical solutions and well suited for small-scale, prototype, tailor-made fiber systems. Used to develop fiber/resin composites for aerospace, automotive, marine, and other applications.

  17. Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber

    DOEpatents

    Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle E.; Binder, Thomas P.; Rammelsberg, Anne M.

    2010-11-16

    The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

  18. Thermoplastic-carbon fiber hybrid yarn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketterer, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Efforts were directed to develop processing methods to make carbon fiber/thermoplastic fiber preforms that are easy to handle and drapeable, and to consolidate them into low void content laminates. The objectives were attained with the development of the hybrid yarn concept; whereby, thermoplastic fiber can be intimately intermixed with carbon fiber into a hybrid yarn. This was demonstrated with the intermixing of Celion 3000 with a Celanese liquid crystal polymer fiber, polybutylene terepthalate fiber, or polyetheretherketone fiber. The intermixing of the thermoplastic matrix fiber and the reinforcing carbon fiber gives a preform that can be easily fabricated into laminates with low void content. Mechanical properties of the laminates were not optimized; however, initial results indicated properties typical of a thermoplastic/carbon fiber composites prepared by more conventional methods.

  19. [Classification and the composition of food fibers].

    PubMed

    Bezhanidze, I Z; Alasaniia, N Sh; Kontselidze, L A; Kharazi, N A; Bezhanidze, N V

    2009-06-01

    Fiber promotes the contractions that keep food moving through the intestine. Also, high-fiber foods expand the inside walls of the colon and eases the passage of waste. The food and fiber research was conducted. In the article, the classification and the composition of food fibers are presented. Multifunctional properties of food fiber in the process of digestion are discussed. The physiological value of food fibers for the human organism is stressed. Diets high in fiber during the entire life are recommended. If a person can't consume enough fiber in diet alone, certain stool softening and bulking agents are recommended. They can be very useful in preventing and treating digestive tract disorders. The analysis of high fiber food sources and world production and consumption of food fiber is also presented. PMID:19578217

  20. Direct writing of fiber optic components in photonic crystal fibers and other specialty fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Luis Andre; Sezerman, Omur; Best, Garland; Ng, Mi Li; Kane, Saidou

    2016-04-01

    Femtosecond direct laser writing has recently shown great potential for the fabrication of complex integrated devices in the cladding of optical fibers. Such devices have the advantage of requiring no bulk optical components and no breaks in the fiber path, thus reducing the need for complicated alignment, eliminating contamination, and increasing stability. This technology has already found applications using combinations of Bragg gratings, interferometers, and couplers for the fabrication of optical filters, sensors, and power monitors. The femtosecond laser writing method produces a local modification of refractive index through non-linear absorption of the ultrafast laser pulses inside the dielectric material of both the core and cladding of the fiber. However, fiber geometries that incorporate air or hollow structures, such as photonic crystal fibers (PCFs), still present a challenge since the index modification regions created by the writing process cannot be generated in the hollow regions of the fiber. In this work, the femtosecond laser method is used together with a pre-modification method that consists of partially collapsing the hollow holes using an electrical arc discharge. The partial collapse of the photonic band gap structure provides a path for femtosecond laser written waveguides to couple light from the core to the edge of the fiber for in-line power monitoring. This novel approach is expected to have applications in other specialty fibers such as suspended core fibers and can open the way for the integration of complex devices and facilitate miniaturization of optical circuits to take advantage of the particular characteristics of the PCFs.

  1. Flame resistant elastic elastomeric fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Massucco, A. A.

    1972-01-01

    Development of materials to improve flame resistance of elastic elastomeric fibers is discussed. Two approaches, synthesis of polyether based urethanes and modification of synthesized urethanes with flame ratardant additives, are described. Specific applications of both techniques are presented.

  2. Fiber Optics: A Bright Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, James, Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an overview of the impact of fiber optics on telecommunications and its application to information processing and library services, including information retrieval, news services, remote transmission of library services, and library networking. (RAA)

  3. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, Tom; Spector, Garry B.

    1994-01-01

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected.

  4. Application of Fiber Optic Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, William Lance; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony; Chan, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic sensing technology has emerged in recent years offering tremendous advantages over conventional aircraft instrumentation systems. The advantages of fiber optic sensors over their conventional counterparts are well established; they are lighter, smaller, and can provide enormous numbers of measurements at a fraction of the total sensor weight. After a brief overview of conventional and fiber-optic sensing technology, this paper presents an overview of the research that has been conducted at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in recent years to advance this promising new technology. Research and development areas include system and algorithm development, sensor characterization and attachment, and real-time experimentally-derived parameter monitoring for ground- and flight-based applications. The vision of fiber optic smart structure technology is presented and its potential benefits to aerospace vehicles throughout the lifecycle, from preliminary design to final retirement, are presented.

  5. Carbon Fiber Risk Analysis: Conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    It was concluded that preliminary estimates indicate that the public risk due to accidental release of carbon fiber from air transport aircraft is small. It was also concluded that further work is required to increase confidence in these estimates.

  6. Mobile fiber optic emission spectrograph

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, W.A.; Coleman, C.J.; McCarty, J.E.; Beck, R.S.

    1997-05-01

    Technical Assistance Request HLW/DWPF-TAR-970064 asked SRTC to evaluate the use of a fiber optic coupled emission spectrometer. The spectrometer would provide additional ICP analyses in the DWPF laboratory.

  7. Strain sensing using optical fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, Richard; Hiles, Steven

    1994-01-01

    The main source of attenuation which will be studied is the optical fiber's sensitivity to bending at radii that are much larger than the radius of the fiber. This type of environmental attenuation causes losses that are a function of the severity of the bend. The average attenuation caused by bending varies exponentially with the bend radius. There are many different fibers, sources, and testing equipment available. This thesis describes tests that were performed to evaluate the variables that effect bending related attenuation and will discuss the consistency of the results. Descriptions and comparisons will be made between single mode and multimode fibers as well as instrumentation comparisons between detection equipment. Detailed analysis of the effects of the whispering gallery mode will be performed along with theorized methods for characterization of these modes.

  8. Fiber optic synthetic aperture interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hercher, Michael

    1990-08-01

    This report describes a Fiber Optic Stellar Interferometer built by Optra, Inc. for the purposes of (1) measuring stellar diameters using a pair of small portable telescopes (rather than a large observatory telescope), and (2) measuring atmospheric turbulence. The key element of this concept is the use of singlemode optical fibers to link the separate small telescopes with the interferometer module. We have shown that the proposed turbulence measurements are entirely feasible using a distant light source (preferably a laser). The demonstration of the ability to obtain white light fringes through the fibers was not successful. We believe that this is due to a mismatch in the lengths of the fibers, and we have proposed a simple and flexible solution to this problem.

  9. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, T.; Spector, G.B.

    1994-03-29

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected is described. 11 figures.

  10. Nanomechanics of electrospun phospholipid fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, Ana C. E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk; Chronakis, Ioannis S. E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk; Nikogeorgos, Nikolaos; Lee, Seunghwan

    2015-06-01

    Electrospun asolectin phospholipid fibers were prepared using isooctane as a solvent and had an average diameter of 6.1 ± 2.7 μm. Their mechanical properties were evaluated by nanoindentation using Atomic Force Microscopy, and their elastic modulus was found to be approximately 17.2 ± 1 MPa. At a cycle of piezo expansion-retraction (loading-unloading) of a silicon tip on a fiber, relatively high adhesion was observed during unloading. It is proposed that this was primarily due to molecular rearrangements at the utmost layers of the fiber caused by the indentation of the hydrophilic tip. The phospholipid fibers were shown to be stable in ambient conditions, preserving the modulus of elasticity up to 24 h.

  11. Optical fiber feedback SQUID magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Naito, S.; Sampei, Y.; Takahashi, T. )

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes an optical fiber feedback superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer which was developed to improve electromagnetic interference characteristics. The SQUID consists of an RF SQUID probe, an RF amplifier, two multimode fibers, and a SQUID control unit. Phase-locked pulse width modulation (PWM) was used to construct a flux locked loop (FLL) circuit in the SQUID control unit. The operation of the optical fiber feedback SQUID is stable when a common mode voltage of ac 100 V/50 Hz is applied. It has an energy resolution of 1 x 10/sup -28/ J/Hz. This paper also describes the measurement of an auditory evoked field from the human brain in a magnetically shielded room using the fiber feedback SQUID with a gradiometer type pickup coil.

  12. Assessment of Carbon Fiber Electrical Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The risks associated with the use of carbon fiber composites in civil aircraft are discussed along with the need for protection of civil aircraft equipment from fire-released carbon fibers. The size and number of carbon fibers released in civil aircraft crash fires, the downwind dissemination of the fibers, their penetration into buildings and equipment, and the vulnerability of electrical/electronic equipment to damage by the fibers are assessed.

  13. High temperature, flexible, fiber-preform seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor); Strocky, Paul J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A seal is mounted in a rectangular groove in a movable structural panel. The seal comprises a fiber preform constructed of multiple layers of fiber having a uniaxial core. Helical fibers are wound over the core. The fibers are of materials capable of withstanding high temperatures and are both left-hand and right-hand wound. An outer layer wrapped over said helical fibers prevents abrasion damage.

  14. Novel fiber lasers and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenteno, Luis A.; Walton, Donnell T.

    2003-07-01

    Glass fiber lasers were invented in the 60's by Elias Snitzer at Americal Optical, soon after the invention of the first solid-state glass laser. However, it was not until the 80's when these waveguide devices were deployed in industrial applications, driven largely by the technological success of the semiconductor laser diode, which provided practical and efficient pumps, and by the advent of low loss rare-earth-doped optical fiber.

  15. Mechanochromic Fibers with Structural Color.

    PubMed

    Li, Houpu; Sun, Xuemei; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-12-21

    Responsive photonic crystals have been widely developed to realize tunable structural colors by manipulating the flow of light. Among them, mechanochromic photonic crystals attract increasing attention due to the easy operation, high safety and broad applications. Recently, mechanochromic photonic crystal fibers were proposed to satisfy the booming wearable smart textile market. In this Concept, the fundamental mechanism, fabrication, and recent progress on mechanochromic photonic crystals, especially in fiber shape, are summarized to represent a new direction in sensing and displaying. PMID:26420744

  16. Light diffusing fiber optic chamber

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan J.

    2002-01-01

    A light diffusion system for transmitting light to a target area. The light is transmitted in a direction from a proximal end to a distal end by an optical fiber. A diffusing chamber is operatively connected to the optical fiber for transmitting the light from the proximal end to the distal end and transmitting said light to said target area. A plug is operatively connected to the diffusing chamber for increasing the light that is transmitted to the target area.

  17. Fiber optics: a communications revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keck, Donald B.

    1992-05-01

    Optical fiber and photonics technology have dramatically impacted the way in which the world handles information. The ability to effectively manage and transport ever-increasing amounts of information, over broadband networks, will directly affect the economic vitality of nations and corporations. This paper profiles the development of commercially viable optical fiber and discusses some of the aspects of becoming a world-class competitor in optical telecommunications.

  18. Small Business Innovations (Fiber Optics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Foster-Miller, Inc. Waltham, MA developed the In-Situ Fiber Optic Polymer Reaction Monitor which could lead to higher yields and lower costs in complex composite manufacturing. The monitor, developed under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with Langley Research Center, uses an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. It is the first analytical system capable of directly measuring the chemistry of advanced composite materials.

  19. Water tests on optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volotinen, Tarja T.

    1999-12-01

    It is a general assumption that water itself, rather than impurities of water solutions, is dangerous for standard optical fibers. In this review paper, a summary of the results on water test conditions, made by COST 246 Action, is given, and the factors affecting the test results of strength and fatigue tests, are discussed. A fiber may have very different strength degradation in water depending on the chemical conditions, such as, ion concentration of the water, test vessel material, temperature etc.

  20. Fiber coupler end face wavefront surface metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compertore, David C.; Ignatovich, Filipp V.; Marcus, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Despite significant technological advances in the field of fiber optic communications, one area remains surprisingly `low-tech': fiber termination. In many instances it involves manual labor and subjective visual inspection. At the same time, high quality fiber connections are one of the most critical parameters in constructing an efficient communication link. The shape and finish of the fiber end faces determines the efficiency of a connection comprised of coupled fiber end faces. The importance of fiber end face quality becomes even more critical for fiber connection arrays and for in the field applications. In this article we propose and demonstrate a quantitative inspection method for the fiber connectors using reflected wavefront technology. The manufactured and polished fiber tip is illuminated by a collimated light from a microscope objective. The reflected light is collected by the objective and is directed to a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. A set of lenses is used to create the image of the fiber tip on the surface of the sensor. The wavefront is analyzed by the sensor, and the measured parameters are used to obtain surface properties of the fiber tip, and estimate connection loss. For example, defocus components in the reflected light indicate the presence of bow in the fiber end face. This inspection method provides a contact-free approach for quantitative inspection of fiber end faces and for estimating the connection loss, and can potentially be integrated into a feedback system for automated inspection and polishing of fiber tips and fiber tip arrays.

  1. Impurities in Kevlar 49 fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Pruneda, C.O.; Morgan, R.J.; Lim, R.; Gregory, L.J.; Fischer, J.W.

    1984-12-11

    The impurities in Kevlar 49 fibers (poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide)PPTA) are reported and discussed in terms of the fiber fabrication processes. These impurities were monitored by inductively coupled plasma emission and optical emission spectroscopy. The principal impurities Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and total S were analyzed chemically. From these chemical analyses together with C, N, H elemental analyses we show that there are 1.5 wt % impurities present in Kevlar 49 fibers of which approx. 50% are in the form of Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and the remainder probably in the form of benzene sulfonic -SO/sub 3/H PPTA side groups. There are 3 of these acid groups per each PPTA macromolecule. Organic impurities, such as terephthalic acid are discussed in the light of degradation studies of PPTA-H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ spinning dopes. Electron microprobe x-ray spectroscopy and laser-induced damage studies were utilized to investigate the distribution of impurities through the fiber cross-section. The distribution of impurities throughout the fiber are determined by the fiber fabrication processes and are discussed at the microscopic and molecular level. The defects caused by these impurities and their effect on the deformation and failure modes are also considered. 22 references, 3 tables.

  2. Coiled Fiber Pulsed Laser Simulator

    2009-01-29

    This suite of codes simulates the transient output pulse from an optically-pumped coiled fiber amplifier. The input pulse is assumed to have a Gaussian time dependence and a spatial dependence that may be Gaussian or an eigenmode of the straight of bent fiber computed using bend10 or bend20. Only one field component is used (semivectorial approximation). The fully-spatially-dependent fiber gain profile is specified is subroutines "inversion" and "interp_inversion" and is presently read from a datamore » file, although other means of specifying fiber gain could be reallized through modification of these subroutines. The input pulse is propagated through the fiber, including the following physical effects: spatial and temporal gain saturation, self-focusing, bend losses, and confinement from a user-defined fiber index profile. The user can follow the propagation progress with 3D graphics that show an intensity profile via user-modifiable cutting planes through the time space axes. A restart capability is also included. Approximate solutions in the frequency domain may be obtained much faster using the auxilliary codes bendbpm10 (full vector), bendbpm20 (semivectoral), and bendbpm21 (semivectoral with gain sheet spproximation for gain and self-focusing). These codes all include bend loss and spatial (but not temporal) gain saturation.« less

  3. Fiber Optic Flexural Disk Microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David A.; Hofler, T.; Garrett, S. L.

    1989-02-01

    A microphone consisting of a hollow cylinder whose flexible, circular endplates are bonded to pairs of flat spiral wound coils of optical fiber is described. When the endplate/disk is deformed due to a pressure difference, the outer and inner fiber coils experience opposite strains resulting in a "push-pull" optical path length difference which is detected in an all-fiber Michelson interferometer. The close proximity of the interferometric fiber coils, separated by the thin thermally conducting end plate, rejects thermal gradient induced signals. The addition of a second identical endplate and fiber coil pair at the opposite end of the cylinder doubles the acoustic sensitivity while canceling acceleration induced signals. The calculated and measured optical strain of a single plate, single coil sensor using static pressure, acoustic pressure, and acceleration are in good agreement and yield a sensitivity of 21 milliradians per Pascal per meter of optical fiber for an 8.0 cm diameter, 3.0 mm thick plate below its resonance frequency of 3 KHz.

  4. Cells on foam and fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Clyde, R.

    1996-12-31

    Cells grow on high area foam and, when a screen is put around the foam, it is made heavier so it can be fluidized. When foam is rotated in a half full RBC (rotary biological contactor), drops are formed and mass transfer of oxygen to drops is much faster. Most fungi and some mammalian cells need oxygen. Corrugated fibers with holes in the valleys also produce drops. White rot fungus needs oxygen and it degrades many chlorine compounds, azo dyes, PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and TNT. Old cardboard boxes are readily available and when buried in soil, oxygen is entrapped. In a lake, the boxes expose high area. Celite entrapped in fibers provides even more area. Fibers have high surface area for immobilizing cells and, when the fibers are rotated, fast reactions occur, converting one chemical to another. Sugar has been fermented to alcohol in 10--15 minutes. Ethanol has high octane and does not need lead. Old cars and trucks still use lead, and high levels have been found in the drinking water of several large cities. Bacteria on fibers can remove lead in a few seconds. When an RBC of plain fiber discs is rotated and a light shone in the tope, the light hits a thin moving film to degrade chlorine compounds and sterilize water. Titania can be fused to the fiberglass discs. Microbes and light remove sulfur from oil. Calcium magnesium acetate is a non-corrosive road deicer. Salt on roads causes millions of dollars damage to bridges and cars.

  5. Fiber optic frequency transfer link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primas, Lori E. (Inventor); Sydnor, Richard L. (Inventor); Lutes, George F. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A reference frequency distribution system is disclosed for transmitting a reference frequency from a reference unit to a remote unit while keeping the reference frequency at the reference unit and the remote unit in phase. A fiber optic cable connects the reference unit to the remote unit. A frequency source at the reference unit produces a reference frequency having an adjustable phase. A fiber optic transmitter at the reference unit modulates a light beam with the reference frequency and transmits the light beam into the fiber optic cable. A 50/50 reflector at the remote unit reflects a first portion of the light beam from the reference unit back into the fiber optic cable to the reference unit. A first fiber optic receiver disposed at the remote unit receives a second portion of the light beam and demodulates the reference frequency to be used at the remote unit. A second fiber optic receiver disposed at the reference unit receives the first portion of the light beam and demodulates a reference frequency component. A phase conjugator is connected to the frequency source for comparing the phase of the reference frequency component to the phase of the reference frequency modulating the light beam being transmitted from the reference unit to maintain a conjugate (anti-symmetric) relationship between the reference frequency component and the reference frequency modulating the light beam where virtually no phase difference exists between the phase of the reference frequency component and the phase of the reference frequency modulating the light beam.

  6. 40 CFR 414.30 - Applicability; description of the other fibers subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (*). *Acrylic Fibers (85% Polyacrylonitrile) *Cellulose Acetate Fibers *Fluorocarbon (Teflon) Fibers *Modacrylic... (Quiana) *Polyaramid (Kevlar) Resin-Fibers *Polyaramid (Nomex) Resin-Fibers *Polyester...

  7. 40 CFR 414.30 - Applicability; description of the other fibers subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... those fibers and fiber groups listed below. Product groups are indicated with an asterisk (*). *Acrylic...) *Polyaramid (Kevlar) Resin-Fibers *Polyaramid (Nomex) Resin-Fibers *Polyester Fibers *Polyethylene...

  8. 40 CFR 414.30 - Applicability; description of the other fibers subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... those fibers and fiber groups listed below. Product groups are indicated with an asterisk (*). *Acrylic...) *Polyaramid (Kevlar) Resin-Fibers *Polyaramid (Nomex) Resin-Fibers *Polyester Fibers *Polyethylene...

  9. 40 CFR 414.30 - Applicability; description of the other fibers subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... those fibers and fiber groups listed below. Product groups are indicated with an asterisk (*). *Acrylic...) *Polyaramid (Kevlar) Resin-Fibers *Polyaramid (Nomex) Resin-Fibers *Polyester Fibers *Polyethylene...

  10. Hydrogen Optical Fiber Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, Robert A.; Beshay, Manal; Cordero, Steven R.

    2008-07-28

    Optically-based hydrogen sensors promise to deliver an added level of safety as hydrogen and fuel cell technologies enter the mainstream. More importantly, they offer reduced power consumption and lower cost, which are desirable for mass production applications such as automobiles and consumer appliances. This program addressed two of the major challenges previously identified in porous optrode-based optical hydrogen sensors: sensitivity to moisture (ambient humidity), and interference from the oxygen in air. Polymer coatings to inhibit moisture and oxygen were developed in conjunction with newer and novel hydrogen sensing chemistries. The results showed that it is possible to achieve sensitive hydrogen detection and rapid response with minimal interference from oxygen and humidity. As a result of this work, a new and more exciting avenue of investigation was developed: the elimination of the porous optrode and deposition of the sensor chemistry directly into the polymer film. Initial results have been promising, and open up a wider range of potential applications from extended optical fiber sensing networks, to simple plastic "stickers" for use around the home and office.

  11. Optical fiber inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Moore, F.W.

    1985-04-05

    A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected. 10 figs.

  12. Optical fiber inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Francis W.

    1987-01-01

    A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected.

  13. Human Muscle Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The stimulus of gravity affects RNA production, which helps maintain the strength of human muscles on Earth (top), as seen in this section of muscle fiber taken from an astronaut before spaceflight. Astronauts in orbit and patients on Earth fighting muscle-wasting diseases need countermeasures to prevent muscle atrophy, indicated here with white lipid droplets (bottom) in the muscle sample taken from the same astronaut after spaceflight. Kerneth Baldwin of the University of California, Irvine, is conducting research on how reducing the stimulus of gravity affects production of the RNA that the body uses as a blueprint for making muscle proteins. Muscle proteins are what give muscles their strength, so when the RNA blueprints aren't available for producing new proteins to replace old ones -- a situation that occurs in microgravity -- the muscles atrophy. When the skeletal muscle system is exposed to microgravity during spaceflight, the muscles undergo a reduced mass that translates to a reduction in strength. When this happens, muscle endurance decreases and the muscles are more prone to injury, so individuals could have problems in performing extravehicular activity [space walks] or emergency egress because their bodies are functionally compromised.

  14. Optical fiber sensor having a sol-gel fiber core and a method of making

    DOEpatents

    Tao, Shiquan; Jindal, Rajeev; Winstead, Christopher; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2006-06-06

    A simple, economic wet chemical procedure is described for making sol-gel fibers. The sol-gel fibers made from this process are transparent to ultraviolet, visible and near infrared light. Light can be guided in these fibers by using an organic polymer as a fiber cladding. Alternatively, air can be used as a low refractive index medium. The sol-gel fibers have a micro pore structure which allows molecules to diffuse into the fiber core from the surrounding environment. Chemical and biochemical reagents can be doped into the fiber core. The sol-gel fiber can be used as a transducer for constructing an optical fiber sensor. The optical fiber sensor having an active sol-gel fiber core is more sensitive than conventional evanescent wave absorption based optical fiber sensors.

  15. Passive and Active Fiber Optic Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digonnet, Michel Jean-Francois

    This thesis is concerned with the development and characterization of both passive and active fiber-optic components for applications in single-mode fiber systems, in particular in the new technology of fiber sensors and signal processors. These components include single-mode fiber directional couplers, vital to many optical fiber systems, all-fiber wavelength multiplexers, with potential applications in communication systems and active fiber devices, and single-crystal fiber lasers and amplifiers as miniature light sources and signal regenerators. The fiber directional couplers involved in this work, fabricated by a polishing process, are described in detail. Experimental characterization of their coupling, loss and unique tuning properties, and their respective dependence on the coupler geometrical parameters, are reported. A theoretical model of fiber-to-fiber coupling is also developed and shown to be a very useful and accurate tool in the design and study of this type of fiber couplers. The dependence of the coupling properties of fiber couplers on the signal wavelength is studied both theoretically and experimentally for applications in wavelength division multiplexing. All-fiber multiplexers exhibiting a good wavelength selectivity and unique tunability are described and shown to operate according to the coupler model. Work on active fiber devices explores the potential of the new technology of single-crystal fibers grown by the laser-heated floating-zone technique. The status of crystal fiber growth is reported, together with the basic physical and optical characteristics of these fibers. A theoretical model of the effects of fiber model structure on the gain and laser operation of active fibers is also developed to predict the performance of lasers and amplifiers in a fiber form. Several conceptual pumping schemes are described which offer solutions to the difficult problem of optically pumping small diameter fiber amplifiers. The experimental

  16. Fiber reinforced hybrid phenolic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Amit

    Hybrid composites in recent times have been developed by using more than one type of fiber reinforcement to bestow synergistic properties of the chosen filler and matrix and also facilitating the design of materials with specific properties matched to end use. However, the studies for hybrid foams have been very limited because of problems related to fiber dispersion in matrix, non uniform mixing due to presence of more than one filler and partially cured foams. An effective approach to synthesize hybrid phenolic foam has been proposed and investigated here. Hybrid composite phenolic foams were reinforced with chopped glass and aramid fibers in varied proportions. On assessing mechanical properties in compression and shear several interesting facts surfaced but overall hybrid phenolic foams exhibited a more graceful failure, greater resistance to cracking and were significantly stiffer and stronger than foams with only glass and aramid fibers. The optimum fiber ratio for the reinforced hybrid phenolic foam system was found to be 1:1 ratio of glass to aramid fibers. Also, the properties of hybrid foam were found to deviate from rule of mixture (ROM) and thus the existing theories of fiber reinforcement fell short in explaining their complex behavior. In an attempt to describe and predict mechanical behavior of hybrid foams a statistical design tool using analysis of variance technique was employed. The utilization of a statistical model for predicting foam properties was found to be an appropriate tool that affords a global perspective of the influence of process variables such as fiber weight fraction, fiber length etc. on foam properties (elastic modulus and strength). Similar approach could be extended to study other fiber composite foam systems such as polyurethane, epoxy etc. and doing so will reduce the number of experimental iterations needed to optimize foam properties and identify critical process variables. Diffusivity, accelerated aging and flammability

  17. Graphite fiber surface treatment to improve char retention and increase fiber clumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, J. T., Jr.; Weldy, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    Composites containing carbon and graphite fibers can release fibers into the atmosphere during a fire. This release can potentially cause failure in some types of electrical equipment. Reduced fiber dispersion during and after combustion will reduce risks. Epoxidized char forming systems were synthesized which will react with commercially available surface treated carbon fiber. Fibers modified with these char formers retained adhesion in a specific epoxy matrix resin. Small scale combustion testing indicates that using these char former modified fibers in laminates will help to reduce the dispersement of fibers resulting from exposure to fire without sacrificing resin to fiber adhesion.

  18. Development of Manila Hemp Fiber Epoxy Composite with High Tensile Properties Through Handpicking Fiber Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ke; Takagi, Hitoshi; Yang, Zhimao

    Manila hemp fibers are separated to several sequent fragments from single fiber. The tensile strength of each fiber fragments and their epoxy composite are measured, followed by scanning electronic microscopic (SEM) analysis. The results show that the tensile strength of fiber fragments is almost constant along fiber. For composite, the tensile strength first increases and then decreases at the position near to root. The Young's modulus presents increasing with location from root to top for fiber and composite. Microstructure analysis indicates that the difference of tensile properties between fiber fragments derive from the difference of fiber diameter.

  19. Theoretical analysis of novel fiber grating pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liao; Jia, Hongzhi; Fang, Liang; You, Bei

    2016-06-01

    A novel fiber grating pair that consists of a conventional long-period fiber grating and a fiber Bragg cladding grating (FBCG) is proposed. The FBCG is a new type of fiber grating in which refractive index modulation is formed in the cladding. Through the coupled-mode theory, we accurately calculate the coupling coefficients between modes supported in the fibers. And some other mode coupling features in the fiber cladding gratings are analyzed in detail. The calculation of the modes involved in this paper is based on a model of three-layer step-index fiber geometry. Then, we have investigated the sensitivity characteristics for variation of the modulation strengths of the fiber Bragg cladding gratings' resonance peaks and the long-period cladding gratings' (LPCGs) dual resonant peaks. Finally, the modulation strength sensitivity of the grating pair's three resonant peaks is demonstrated, and the results indicate that these grating pairs may find potential applications in optical fiber sensing.

  20. Optical fiber sensor having an active core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An optical fiber is provided. The fiber is comprised of an active fiber core which produces waves of light upon excitation. A factor ka is identified and increased until a desired improvement in power efficiency is obtained. The variable a is the radius of the active fiber core and k is defined as 2 pi/lambda wherein lambda is the wavelength of the light produced by the active fiber core. In one embodiment, the factor ka is increased until the power efficiency stabilizes. In addition to a bare fiber core embodiment, a two-stage fluorescent fiber is provided wherein an active cladding surrounds a portion of the active fiber core having an improved ka factor. The power efficiency of the embodiment is further improved by increasing a difference between the respective indices of refraction of the active cladding and the active fiber core.

  1. Measuring shear modulus of individual fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behlow, Herbert; Saini, Deepika; Oliviera, Luciana; Skove, Malcolm; Rao, Apparao

    2014-03-01

    Fiber technology has advanced to new heights enabling tailored mechanical properties. For reliable fiber applications their mechanical properties must be well characterized at the individual fiber level. Unlike the tensile modulus, which can be well studied in a single fiber, the present indirect and dynamic methods of measuring the shear properties of fibers suffer from various disadvantages such as the interaction between fibers and the influence of damping. In this talk, we introduce a quasi-static method to directly measure the shear modulus of a single micron-sized fiber. Our simple and inexpensive setup yields a shear modulus of 16 and 2 GPa for a single IM7 carbon fiber and a Kevlar fiber, respectively. Furthermore, our setup is also capable of measuring the creep, hysteresis and the torsion coefficient, and examples of these will be presented.

  2. All fiber passively Q-switched laser

    DOEpatents

    Soh, Daniel B. S.; Bisson, Scott E

    2015-05-12

    Embodiments relate to an all fiber passively Q-switched laser. The laser includes a large core doped gain fiber having a first end. The large core doped gain fiber has a first core diameter. The laser includes a doped single mode fiber (saturable absorber) having a second core diameter that is smaller than the first core diameter. The laser includes a mode transformer positioned between a second end of the large core doped gain fiber and a first end of the single mode fiber. The mode transformer has a core diameter that transitions from the first core diameter to the second core diameter and filters out light modes not supported by the doped single mode fiber. The laser includes a laser cavity formed between a first reflector positioned adjacent the large core doped gain fiber and a second reflector positioned adjacent the doped single mode fiber.

  3. Harnessing the fiber fuse for sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guei-Ru; Baiad, Mohamad Diaa; Gagne, Mathieu; Liu, Wen-Fung; Kashyap, Raman

    2014-04-21

    A simple refractive index sensor based on a small section of fiber damaged by the fiber fuse is proposed and demonstrated with a sensitivity of 350.58 nm/refractive index unit (RIU). For comparison, a hetero-core structure fiber sensor composed of a short no-core fiber (NCF) sandwiched between two pieces of single-mode fibers is demonstrated with a sensitivity of 157.29 nm/RIU. The fiber fuse technique can allow mass production of sensors by incorporating small sections of the damaged fiber of any type into each device. We believe this is the first application of the periodic damage tracks in optical fibers formed by the fiber fuse.

  4. 4MOST fiber feed concept design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, D. M.; Winkler, R.; Saviauk, Allar; Haynes, R.; Barden, S.; Bellido-Tirado, O.; Bauer, S.; de Jong, Roelof S.; Depagne, E.; Dionies, F.; Ehrlich, K.; Kelz, Andreas; Saunders, W.; Woche, M.

    2014-08-01

    4MOST, the 4m Multi-Object Spectroscopic Telescope, features a 2.5 degree diameter field-of-view with ~2400 fibers in the focal plane that are configured by a fiber positioner based on the tilting spine principle (Echidna/FMOS) arranged in a hexagonal pattern. The fibers feed two types of spectrographs; ~1600 fibers go to two spectrographs with resolution R>5000 and ~800 fibers to a spectrograph with R>18,000. Part of the ongoing optimization of the fiber feed subsystem design includes early prototyping and testing of key components such as fiber connectors and fiber cable management. Performance data from this testing will be used in the 4MOST instrument simulator (TOAD) and 4MOST system design optimization. In this paper we give an overview of the current fiber feed subsystem design, simulations and prototyping plans.

  5. Enhancing Textile Fiber Identification with Detergent Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Mujumdar, Nirvani; Heider, Emily C; Campiglia, Andres D

    2015-12-01

    Discovering common origins of trace evidential textile fibers can be a challenging task when fiber structure or dye composition does not provide exclusive identifying information. Introduction of new chemical species after mass production and distribution of a textile may be exploited to trace its history and identify the origin of its fibers. In this article, fluorescence microscopy is used to examine the alteration in the fluorescence spectral fingerprint of single fibers resulting from exposure to commonly used detergents that contain fluorescent whitening agents. Dyed acrylic, cotton, and nylon fibers were laundered and the spectral contribution of the detergent on single fibers was quantified and shown to reach a maximum after five sequential washes; some detergents showed statistically meaningful differences to fiber spectra after only a single wash. Principal component cluster analysis was used to determine that the spectra of laundered fibers are distinct from the spectra of dyed, unwashed cotton or nylon, but not acrylic, fibers. PMID:26647148

  6. Optical fiber coupling method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goss, W. C.; Nelson, M. D.; Mclauchlan, J. M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Systems are described for coupling a pair of optical fibers to pass light between them, which enables a coupler to be easily made, and with simple equipment, while closely controlling the characteristics of the coupler. One method includes mounting a pair of optical fibers on a block having a large hole therein, so the fibers extend across the hole while lying adjacent and parallel to one another. The fibers are immersed in an etchant to reduce the thickness of cladding around the fiber core. The fibers are joined together by applying a liquid polymer so the polymer-air interface moves along the length of the fibers to bring the fibers together in a zipper-like manner, and to progressively lay a thin coating of the polymer on the fibers.

  7. Influence of fiber packing structure on permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Zhong; Berdichevsky, Alexander L.

    1993-01-01

    The study on the permeability of an aligned fiber bundle is the key building block in modeling the permeability of advanced woven and braided preforms. Available results on the permeability of fiber bundles in the literature show that a substantial difference exists between numerical and analytical calculations on idealized fiber packing structures, such as square and hexagonal packing, and experimental measurements on practical fiber bundles. The present study focuses on the variation of the permeability of a fiber bundle under practical process conditions. Fiber bundles are considered as containing openings and fiber clusters within the bundle. Numerical simulations on the influence of various openings on the permeability were conducted. Idealized packing structures are used, but with introduced openings distributed in different patterns. Both longitudinal and transverse flow are considered. The results show that openings within the fiber bundle have substantial effect on the permeability. In the longitudinal flow case, the openings become the dominant flow path. In the transverse flow case, the fiber clusters reduce the gap sizes among fibers. Therefore the permeability is greatly influenced by these openings and clusters, respectively. In addition to the porosity or fiber volume fraction, which is commonly used in the permeability expression, another fiber bundle status parameter, the ultimate fiber volume fraction, is introduced to capture the disturbance within a fiber bundle.

  8. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  9. Hollow fibers for compact infrared gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrecht, A.; Hartwig, S.; Herbst, J.; Wöllenstein, J.

    2008-02-01

    Hollow fibers can be used for compact infrared gas sensors. The guided light is absorbed by the gas introduced into the hollow core. High sensitivity and a very small sampling volume can be achieved depending on fiber parameters i.e. attenuation, flexibility, and gas exchange rates. Different types of infrared hollow fibers including photonic bandgap fibers were characterized using quantum cascade lasers and thermal radiation sources. Obtained data are compared with available product specifications. Measurements with a compact fiber based ethanol sensor are compared with a system simulation. First results on the detection of trace amounts of the explosive material TATP using hollow fibers and QCL will be shown.

  10. Carbon fiber behavior in an enclosed volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, M. C.

    1979-01-01

    Tests were performed to evaluate the behavior of single carbon fibers existing in an enclosed space such as a room of a building. Three general phenomena were explored: the concentration decay rate of a fiber-charged room, the degree of uniform mixing of fibers within a room, and the effects of fibers being redisseminated off deposition surfaces within a room. The results were required in understanding the ratio of total indoor fiber exposure to total outdoor fiber exposure, a quantity essential to risk analysis. Results indicate that decay rate is predictable within acceptable limits and that homogeneous mixing can always be assumed. Some factors of redissemination are identified and effects discussed.

  11. Polyacrylonitrile fibers containing graphene oxide nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Chien, An-Ting; Liu, H Clive; Newcomb, Bradley A; Xiang, Changsheng; Tour, James M; Kumar, Satish

    2015-03-11

    Graphene oxide nanoribbon (GONR) made by the oxidative unzipping of multiwalled carbon nanotube was dispersed in dimethylformamide and mixed with polyacrylonitrile (PAN) to fabricate continuous PAN/GONR composite fibers by gel spinning. Subsequently, PAN/GONR composite fibers were stabilized and carbonized in a batch process to fabricate composite carbon fibers. Structure, processing, and properties of the composite precursor and carbon fibers have been studied. This study shows that GONR can be used to make porous precursor and carbon fibers. In addition, GONR also shows the potential to make higher mechanical property carbon fibers than that achieved from PAN precursor only. PMID:25671488

  12. System Grows Single-Crystal Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westfall, Leonard; Sayir, Ali; Penn, Wayne

    1994-01-01

    Award-winning Melt Modulation(TM) system produces single or multiple fibers of any variety of single-crystal materials in continuous or discrete lengths. Developed specifically to produce research quantities of fibers for strong, lightweight composite materials that withstand high temperatures in aerospace applications. Also used to grow such single-crystal materials as high-temperature superconductors and fiber-optic materials. Modifications enable system to apply conformal coats to fibers as they are being grown, producing fibers for greater number of composites in which coatings provide thermal and chemical compatibility between fiber and matrix materials.

  13. Heat-resistant fiber and/or fire retardant synthetic fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurada, I.; Kaji, K.; Okada, T.

    1984-08-21

    A heat resistant and/or fire retardant synthetic fiber is obtained by a process comprising immersing a polyethylene fiber into a solution of acrylic acid or impregnating a polyethylene fiber with a solution of acrylic acid and irradiating the polyethylene fiber with an ionizing radiation to graft polymerize the polyethylene fiber with at least 15%, based on the weight of the polyethylene fiber, of acrylic acid, or a process comprising irradiating a polyethylene fiber with an ionizing radiation and then immersing the polyethylene fiber into a solution of acrylic acid or impregnating the polyethylene fiber with a solution of acrylic acid to graft polymerize the polyethylene fiber with at least 15%, based on the weight of the polyethylene fiber, of acrylic acid.

  14. Oxide fiber targets at ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, U.; Bergmann, U. C.; Carminati, D.; Catherall, R.; Cederkäll, J.; Correia, J. G.; Crepieux, B.; Dietrich, M.; Elder, K.; Fedoseyev, V. N.; Fraile, L.; Franchoo, S.; Fynbo, H.; Georg, U.; Giles, T.; Joinet, A.; Jonsson, O. C.; Kirchner, R.; Lau, Ch.; Lettry, J.; Maier, H. J.; Mishin, V. I.; Oinonen, M.; Peräjärvi, K.; Ravn, H. L.; Rinaldi, T.; Santana-Leitner, M.; Wahl, U.; Weissman, L.; Isolde Collaboration

    2003-05-01

    Many elements are rapidly released from oxide matrices. Some oxide powder targets show a fast sintering, thus losing their favorable release characteristics. Loosely packed oxide fiber targets are less critical since they may maintain their open structure even when starting to fuse together at some contact points. The experience with various oxide fiber targets (titania, zirconia, ceria and thoria) used in the last years at ISOLDE is reviewed. For short-lived isotopes of Cu, Ga and Xe the zirconia and ceria targets respectively provided significantly higher yields than any other target (metal foils, oxide powders, etc.) tested before. Titania fibers, which were not commercially available, were produced in a relic process by impregnation of a rayon felt in a titanium chloride solution and subsequent calcination by heating the dried felt in air. Thoria fibers were obtained either by the same process or by burning commercial gas lantern mantle cloth. In the future a beryllia fiber target could be used to produce very intense 6He beams (order of 10 13 ions per second) via the 9Be(n,α) reaction using spallation neutrons.

  15. Fiber optic evanescent wave biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duveneck, Gert L.; Ehrat, Markus; Widmer, H. M.

    1991-09-01

    The role of modern analytical chemistry is not restricted to quality control and environmental surveillance, but has been extended to process control using on-line analytical techniques. Besides industrial applications, highly specific, ultra-sensitive biochemical analysis becomes increasingly important as a diagnostic tool, both in central clinical laboratories and in the doctor's office. Fiber optic sensor technology can fulfill many of the requirements for both types of applications. As an example, the experimental arrangement of a fiber optic sensor for biochemical affinity assays is presented. The evanescent electromagnetic field, associated with a light ray guided in an optical fiber, is used for the excitation of luminescence labels attached to the biomolecules in solution to be analyzed. Due to the small penetration depth of the evanescent field into the medium, the generation of luminescence is restricted to the close proximity of the fiber, where, e.g., the luminescent analyte molecules combine with their affinity partners, which are immobilized on the fiber. Both cw- and pulsed light excitation can be used in evanescent wave sensor technology, enabling the on-line observation of an affinity assay on a macroscopic time scale (seconds and minutes), as well as on a microscopic, molecular time scale (nanoseconds or microseconds).

  16. Quasar target selection fiber efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, H.; Yanny, B.

    1996-05-01

    We present estimates of the efficiency for finding QSOs as a function of limiting magnitude and galactic latitude. From these estimates, we have formulated a target selection strategy that should net 80,000 QSOs in the north galactic cap with an average of 70 fibers per plate, not including fibers reserved for high-redshift quasars. With this plan, we expect 54% of the targets to be QSOs. The North Galactic Cap is divided into two zones of high and low stellar density. We use about five times as many fibers for QSO candidates in the half of the survey with the lower stellar density as we use in the half with higher stellar density. The current plan assigns 15% of the fibers to FIRST radio sources; if these are not available, those fibers would be allocated to lower probability QSO sources, dropping the total number of QSOs by a small factor (5%). We will find about 17,000 additional quasars in the southern strips, and maybe a few more at very high redshift. Use was made of two data sets: the star and quasar simulated test data generated by Don Schneider, and the data from UJFN plate surveys by Koo (1986) and Kron (1980). This data was compared to results from the Palomar-Green Survey and a recent survey by Pat Osmer and collaborators.

  17. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC)

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Wagner

    2002-12-18

    This report summarizes work to develop CFCC's for various applications in the Industries of the Future (IOF) and power generation areas. Performance requirements range from relatively modest for hot gas filters to severe for turbine combustor liners and infrared burners. The McDermott Technology Inc. (MTI) CFCC program focused on oxide/oxide composite systems because they are known to be stable in the application environments of interest. The work is broadly focused on dense and porous composite systems depending on the specific application. Dense composites were targeted at corrosion resistant components, molten aluminum handling components and gas turbine combustor liners. The development work on dense composites led to significant advances in fiber coatings for oxide fibers and matrix densification. Additionally, a one-step fabrication process was developed to produce low cost composite components. The program also supported key developments in advanced oxide fibers that resulted in an improved version of Nextel 610 fiber (commercially available as Nextel 650) and significant progress in the development of a YAG/alumina fiber. Porous composite development focused on the vacuum winding process used to produce hot gas filters and infrared burner components.

  18. Identifying practical solutions to meet America's fiber needs: proceedings from the Food & Fiber Summit.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Amy R; Jones, Julie Miller; Rodriguez, Judith; Slavin, Joanne; Zelman, Kathleen M

    2014-07-08

    Fiber continues to be singled out as a nutrient of public health concern. Adequate intakes of fiber are associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, certain gastrointestinal disorders and obesity. Despite ongoing efforts to promote adequate fiber through increased vegetable, fruit and whole-grain intakes, average fiber consumption has remained flat at approximately half of the recommended daily amounts. Research indicates that consumers report increasingly attempting to add fiber-containing foods, but there is confusion around fiber in whole grains. The persistent and alarmingly low intakes of fiber prompted the "Food & Fiber Summit," which assembled nutrition researchers, educators and communicators to explore fiber's role in public health, current fiber consumption trends and consumer awareness data with the objective of generating opportunities and solutions to help close the fiber gap. The summit outcomes highlight the need to address consumer confusion and improve the understanding of sources of fiber, to recognize the benefits of various types of fibers and to influence future dietary guidance to provide prominence and clarity around meeting daily fiber recommendations through a variety of foods and fiber types. Potential opportunities to increase fiber intake were identified, with emphasis on meal occasions and food categories that offer practical solutions for closing the fiber gap.

  19. Carbon fiber internal pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Internal pressure vessels were designed; the filament was wound of carbon fibers and epoxy resin and tested to burst. The fibers used were Thornel 400, Thornel 75, and Hercules HTS. Additional vessels with type A fiber were made. Polymeric linears were used, and all burst testing was done at room temperature. The objective was to produce vessels with the highest attainable PbV/W efficiencies. The type A vessels showed the highest average efficiency: 2.56 x 10 to the 6th power cm. Next highest efficiency was with Thornel 400 vessels: 2.21 x 10 to the 6th power cm. These values compare favorably with efficiency values from good quality S-glass vessels, but strains averaged 0.97% or less, which is less than 1/3 the strain of S-glass vessels.

  20. Fiber Ring Optical Gyroscope (FROG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design, construction, and testing of a one meter diameter fiber ring optical gyro, using 1.57 kilometers of single mode fiber, are described. The various noise components: electronic, thermal, mechanical, and optical, were evaluated. Both dc and ac methods were used. An attempt was made to measure the Earth rotation rate; however, the results were questionable because of the optical and electronic noise present. It was concluded that fiber ring optical gyroscopes using all discrete components have many serious problems that can only be overcome by discarding the discrete approach and adapting an all integrated optic technique that has the laser source, modulator, detector, beamsplitters, and bias element on a single chip.

  1. Intercalated hybrid graphite fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The invention is directed to a highly conductive lightweight hybrid material and methods of producing the same. The hybrid composite is obtained by weaving strands of a high strength carbon or graphite fiber into a fabric-like structure, depositing a layer of carbon onto the structure, heat treating the structure to graphitize the carbon layer, and intercalating the graphitic carbon layer structure. A laminate composite material useful for protection against lightning strikes comprises at least one layer of the hybrid material over at least one layer of high strength carbon or graphite fibers. The composite material of the present invention is compatible with matrix compounds, has a coefficient of thermal expansion which is the same as underlying fiber layers, and is resistant to galvanic corrosion in addition to being highly conductive. These materials are useful in the aerospace industry, in particular as lightning strike protection for airplanes.

  2. Optical fiber meta-tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Principe, Maria; Micco, Alberto; Crescitelli, Alessio; Castaldi, Giuseppe; Consales, Marco; Esposito, Emanuela; La Ferrara, Vera; Galdi, Vincenzo; Cusano, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    We report on the first example of a "meta-tip" configuration that integrates a metasurface on the tip of an optical fiber. Our proposed design is based on an inverted-Babinet plasmonic metasurface obtained by patterning (via focused ion beam) a thin gold film deposited on the tip of an optical fiber, so as to realize an array of rectangular aperture nanoantennas with spatially modulated sizes. By properly tuning the resonances of the aperture nanoantennas, abrupt variations can be impressed in the field wavefront and polarization. We fabricated and characterized several proof-of-principle prototypes operating an near-infrared wavelengths, and implementing the beam-steering (with various angles) of the cross-polarized component, as well as the excitation of surface waves. Our results pave the way to the integration of the exceptional field-manipulation capabilities enabled by metasurfaces with the versatility and ubiquity of fiber-optics technological platforms.

  3. Methods for characterizing plant fibers.

    PubMed

    Cruthers, Natasha; Carr, Debra; Niven, Brian; Girvan, Elizabeth; Laing, Raechel

    2005-08-01

    The effectiveness of different microscopy techniques for measuring the dimensions of ultimate fibers from harakeke (Phormium tenax, New Zealand flax) was investigated using a factorial experimental design. Constant variables were geographical location, location of specimens along the leaf, season (winter), individual plant, a fourth leaf from a north-facing fan, age of plant, and cultivars (two). Experimental variables were microscopy techniques and measurement axis. Measurements of width and length of harakeke ultimate fibers depended on the microscopic preparation/technique used as well as the cultivar examined. The best methods were (i) transverse sections of leaf specimens 4 microm thick, embedded in Paraplast and observed using light microscopy, and (ii) nonfixed ultimate fibers observed using scanning electron microscopy.

  4. Building polymer fiber optic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienias, P.; Bereś-Pawlik, E.

    2015-09-01

    The paper describes an investigation of transmission in LAN with using polymer optical fiber (POF). There were used two kinds of POF, step index plastic optical fiber (SI-POF) and graded index plastic optical fiber (GI-POF). Furthermore, the paper include a comparison between SI-POF and GI-POF and possibilities of using them. For the project's needs, new type of couplers has been designed and built, optimization has been performed to obtain the best parameters for designed couplers. Additionally, the coupler has been built from the same material, which GI-POF - PMMA is made of. Moreover, CWDM (Coarse Wavelength Division Multiplexing) transmissions is investigated to improve the network capacity.

  5. Graphitized-carbon fiber/carbon char fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, John F.

    2007-08-28

    A method for recovery of intact graphitic fibers from fiber/polymer composites is described. The method comprises first pyrolyzing the graphite fiber/polymer composite mixture and then separating the graphite fibers by molten salt electrochemical oxidation.

  6. Surface Properties of Vitreous Fibers.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani; Tomatis; Fubini

    2000-04-01

    The surface properties of various vitreous fibers, suspected to be toxic to humans and animals, were investigated by means of paramagnetic labels covalently linked to the surface. Computer-aided analysis of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra provided structural and dynamic information on the label and its environment. Calorimetric measurements provided information on the hydration mechanism. The results were analyzed in terms of (a) different polarity and interaction abilities of surface regions, (b) presence of ions at the surface, (c) silica contents, (d) vicinity of the interacting sites, (e) fiber dimension and morphology of the surfaces, and (f) water hydration. The mobility of the labels decreased due to interaction of the fibers with ions or ionic and polar groups at the surface. Close interacting sites were identified on the basis of spin-spin effects and were distinguished and quantified in strongly and weakly interacting sites. The spin-labeling technique indicated decreased ability of the surface to interact with decreased silicon concentration and in the presence of contaminants at the surface. The interaction with water revealed in all cases a substantial heterogeneity in hydrophilicity of surface sites. The labels were not easily hydrated. Vitreous fibers of various compositions adsorbed much more water than crystalline or amorphous silica; water coordinated to surface cations played a major role in the overall adsorption. The surface reaction mechanisms were the same on fibers of different compositions, but the surface composition affected the extent of adsorption. Glass wool exhibited a much higher adsorption capacity than rock wool under the same experimental conditions. In conclusion, the combination of EPR and calorimetric measurements provided insight into the surface properties of silica-based fibers. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  7. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1991-01-01

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate.

  8. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1991-05-21

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate. 4 figures.

  9. Birefringent-fiber polarization coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngquist, R. C.; Brooks, J. L.; Shaw, H. J.

    1983-12-01

    Periodically stressing a birefringent fiber once per beat length can cause coherent coupling to occur between polarization modes. Such a birefringent-fiber polarization coupler is described here. More than 30 dB of power transfer between polarizations has been achieved. The device has been used as the output coupler of an in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and better than 25-dB on/off extinction has been measured. The device is wavelength selective and can be used as a multiplexer or as a notch filter. A notch of 9-nm full width at half-maximum has been achieved with a 60-period comb structure.

  10. Fiber reinforced composite resin systems.

    PubMed

    Giordano, R

    2000-01-01

    The Targis/Vectris and Sculpture/FibreKor systems were devised to create a translucent maximally reinforced resin framework for fabrication of crowns, bridges, inlays, and onlays. These materials are esthetic, have translucency similar to castable glass-ceramics such as OPC and Empress, and have fits that are reported to be acceptable in clinical and laboratory trials. These restorations rely on proper bonding to the remaining tooth structure; therefore, careful attention to detail must be paid to this part of the procedure. Cementation procedures should involve silane treatment of the cleaned abraded internal restoration surface, application of bonding agent to the restoration as well as the etched/primed tooth, and finally use of a composite resin. Each manufacturer has a recommended system which has been tested for success with its resin system. These fiber reinforced resins are somewhat different than classical composites, so not all cementation systems will necessarily work with them. Polishing of the restoration can be accomplished using diamond or alumina impregnated rubber wheels followed by diamond paste. The glass fibers can pose a health risk. They are small enough to be inhaled and deposited in the lungs, resulting in a silicosis-type problem. Therefore, if fibers are exposed and ground on, it is extremely important to wear a mask. Also, the fibers can be a skin irritant, so gloves also should be worn. If the fibers become exposed intraorally, they can cause gingival inflammation and may attract plaque. The fibers should be covered with additional composite resin. If this cannot be accomplished, the restoration should be replaced. The bulk of these restorations are formed using a particulate filled resin, similar in structure to conventional composite resins. Therefore, concerns as to wear resistance, color stability, excessive expansion/contraction, and sensitivity remain until these materials are proven in long-term clinical trials. They do hold the

  11. Fiber Optic Particle Concentration Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiarski, Anthony A.

    1986-01-01

    A particle concentration sensor would be useful in many industrial process monitoring applications where in situ measurements are required. These applications include determination of butterfat content of milk, percent insolubles in engine oil, and cell concentration in a bioreactor. A fiber optic probe was designed to measure particle concentration by monitoring the scattered light from the particle-light interaction at the end of a fiber-optic-based probe tip. Linear output was obtained from the sensor over a large range of particle loading for a suspension of 1.7 μm polystyrene microspheres in water and E. coli bacteria in a fermenter.

  12. Development of porous glass fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedo, P. B.; Barkatt, A.; Feng, X.; Finger, S. M.; Hojaji, H.

    1989-06-01

    Porous glass fiber optic sensors in which the porous sensor tip is an integral part of the fiber optic, have been developed and found to be rugged and reliable, due to their monolithic structure and large interior surface area for attachment of active species. The sensor portion of the fiber is made porous by selective leaching of a specially formulated borosilicate glass fiber, resulting in a strong, monolithic structure where the sensor portion of the fiber remains integrally attached to the rest of the fiber, essentially eliminating losses at the sensor-light pipe interface. The process for constructing porous glass fiber optic sensors involves fiber pulling, phase separation, selective leaching, attachment of the active reagent, and integration with other optical elements. A broad range of sensors based on this technology could be developed by using different active species, such as enzymes and other biochemicals, which could be bonded to the interior surface of the porous glass sensor.

  13. Breakthrough: Better Fiber for Better Products

    ScienceCinema

    Griffith, George; Garnier, John

    2016-07-12

    Researchers at Idaho National Laboratory have developed a cost-effective method for the continuous production of alpha silicon carbide fiber. The exceptionally strong, lightweight fiber could enable significant performance improvements in many everyday products.

  14. Some properties of an advanced boron fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    An advanced coreless boron fiber has exhibited tensile strengths which are more than twice that of the normal CVD B/W fibers. The coreless fiber is made by the chemical removal of the tungsten boride core exposed by splitting the as-grown fiber. The easily splittable fiber is made by the chemical vapor deposition of boron on a larger than usual tungsten substrate. It is expected that the ease of splitting is related to residual stresses in these fibers. Measurements of the axial residual stresses in both the normal and the splittable fibers are presented and the results compared. Differences in these stresses are discussed in connection with the ease of splitting in the splittable fibers.

  15. Erbium doped tellurite photonic crystal optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, Sergio P.; Fernandez, Enver; Rodriguez, Eugenio; Cesar, Carlos L.; Barbosa, Luiz C.

    2005-04-01

    In this work we present the fabrication of tellurite glass photonic crystal fiber doped with a very large erbium concentration. Tellurite glasses are important hosts for rare earth ions due to its very high solubility, which allows up to 10,000 ppm Er3+ concentrations. The photonic crystal optical fibers and tellurite glasses can be, therefore, combined in an efficient way to produce doped fibers for large bandwidth optical amplifiers. The preform was made of a 10 mm external diameter tellurite tube filled with an array of non-periodic tellurite capillaries and an erbium-doped telluride rod that constitute the fiber core. The preform was drawn in a Heathway Drawing Tower, producing fibers with diameters between 120 - 140 μm. We show optical microscope photography of the fiber"s transverse section. The ASE spectra obtained with a spectra analyzer show a red shift as the length of the optical fiber increases.

  16. Determining resin/fiber content of laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, G. G.; Houston, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Article discusses procedure where hydrazine is used to extract graphite fibers from cured polyimide resin. Method does not attack graphite fibers and is faster than hot-concentrated-acid digestion process.

  17. Quality of chemically modified hemp fibers.

    PubMed

    Kostic, Mirjana; Pejic, Biljana; Skundric, Petar

    2008-01-01

    Hemp fibers are very interesting natural material for textile and technical applications now. Applying hemp fibers to the apparel sector requires improved quality fibers. In this paper, hemp fibers were modified with sodium hydroxide solutions (5% and 18% w/v), at room and boiling temperature, for different periods of time, and both under tension and slack, in order to partially extract noncellulosic substances, and separate the fiber bundles. The quality of hemp fibers was characterised by determining their chemical composition, fineness, mechanical and sorption properties. The modified hemp fibers were finer, with lower content of lignin, increased flexibility, and in some cases tensile properties were improved. An original method for evaluation of tensile properties of hemp fibers was developed.

  18. Breakthrough: Better Fiber for Better Products

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, George; Garnier, John

    2012-01-01

    Researchers at Idaho National Laboratory have developed a cost-effective method for the continuous production of alpha silicon carbide fiber. The exceptionally strong, lightweight fiber could enable significant performance improvements in many everyday products.

  19. Optical-fiber pyrometer positioning accuracy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapetado, A.; García, E.; Díaz-Álvarez, J.; Miguélez, M. H.; Vazquez, C.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of the distance between the fiber end and the machined surface on temperature measurements in a two-color fiber-optic pyrometer is analyzed. The propose fiber-optic pyrometer is capable of measuring highly localized temperatures, while avoiding the use of lenses or fiber bundles, by using a standard graded index glass fiber OM1 with 62.5/125 core and cladding diameters. The fiber is placed very close to the target and below the tool insert. The output optical power at both wavelength bands is theoretically and experimentally analyzed for a temperature of 650°C at different fiber positions in a range of 2mm. The results show that there is no influence of the fiber position on the measured optical power and therefore, on the measured temperature.

  20. 16 CFR 303.23 - Textile fiber products containing superimposed or added fibers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Textile fiber products containing... UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.23 Textile fiber products containing superimposed or added fibers. Where a textile...

  1. 16 CFR 303.23 - Textile fiber products containing superimposed or added fibers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Textile fiber products containing... UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.23 Textile fiber products containing superimposed or added fibers. Where a textile...

  2. 16 CFR 303.23 - Textile fiber products containing superimposed or added fibers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Textile fiber products containing... UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.23 Textile fiber products containing superimposed or added fibers. Where a textile...

  3. 16 CFR 303.23 - Textile fiber products containing superimposed or added fibers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Textile fiber products containing... UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.23 Textile fiber products containing superimposed or added fibers. Where a textile...

  4. 16 CFR 303.23 - Textile fiber products containing superimposed or added fibers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Textile fiber products containing... UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.23 Textile fiber products containing superimposed or added fibers. Where a textile...

  5. Simultaneous demodulation of polarization mode coupling and fiber Bragg grating within a polarization maintaining fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanshuang; Liu, Yanlei; Zhang, Jianzhong; Yang, Jun; Canning, John; Peng, G. D.; Chen, Yujin; Yuan, Libo

    2015-09-01

    We propose a simultaneous demodulation scheme of polarization mode coupling and fiber Bragg grating in a polarization maintaining fiber based on a white light interferometer. A polarization maintaining fiber with two inscribed fiber Bragg gratings is used to demonstrate the feasibility.

  6. Mechanical Properties of Palm Fiber Mattress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Qian; Wu, Jia-Yu; Gu, Hao-Wei; Chen, Zong-Yong; Shi, Xiao-Bing; Liao, Ting-Mao; An, Cheng; Yuan, Hong; Liu, Ren-Huai

    2016-05-01

    Palm fiber mattress is increasingly accepted by many families. This study aims at evaluating the mechanical properties of palm fiber mattress. Two experiments were conduct to investigate the Young's modulus of palm fiber mattress in three directions. In addition, finite element models were established to characterize palm fiber mattress under uniform distributed pressure. Finally, results from finite element analysis are presented to illustrate that the thick mattress will stick with human body curve perfectly, which can support vertebral column effectively.

  7. Reflection losses from imperfectly broken fiber ends.

    PubMed

    Marcuse, D

    1975-12-01

    This paper presents an approximate theory for determining the reflection losses in multimode fibers that terminate in end surfaces that are not strictly perpendicular to the fiber axis. This theory is also applicable to tilts and covers step index as well as parabolic index fibers. The cross section of the step index fiber is assumed to have square geometry. This assumption simplifies the theory and is not expected to influ-ence the obtained results.

  8. Multiwatts narrow linewidth fiber Raman amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Taylor, Luke; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico

    2008-07-21

    Up to 4.8 W, approximately 10 MHz, 1178 nm laser is obtained by Raman amplification of a distributed feedback diode laser in standard single mode fibers pumped by an 1120 nm Yb fiber laser. More than 10% efficiency and 27 dB amplification is achieved, limited by onset of stimulated Brillouin scattering. The ratio of Raman to Brillouin gain coefficient of a fiber is identified as a figure of merit for building a narrow linewidth fiber Raman amplifier.

  9. Applications of fiber optics in physical protection

    SciTech Connect

    Buckle, T.H.

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to provide technical information useful for the development of fiber-optic communications and intrusion detection subsystems relevant to physical protection. There are major sections on fiber-optic technology and applications. Other topics include fiber-optic system components and systems engineering. This document also contains a glossary, a list of standards and specifications, and a list of fiber-optic equipment vendors.

  10. Sealed fiber-optic bundle feedthrough

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Carol E.

    2002-01-01

    A sealed fiber-optic bundle feedthrough by which a multitude of fiber-optic elements may be passed through an opening or port in a wall or structure separating two environments at different pressures or temperatures while maintaining the desired pressure or temperature in each environment. The feedthrough comprises a rigid sleeve of suitable material, a bundle of individual optical fibers, and a resin-based sealing material that bonds the individual optical fibers to each other and to the rigid sleeve.

  11. Microstructural analysis of lignocellulosic fiber networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, T.; Terzic, K.; Donath, T.; Meine, H.; Beckmann, F.; Thoemen, H.

    2006-08-01

    The structure of wood based medium density fiberboard (MDF) has been studied using synchrotron radiation-based x-ray microtomography (SRμCT.) Fully automated 3D segmentation and analysis routines have been developed in order to gain information about individual fibers, the distribution of the fiber material, fiber orientation, fiber surfaces and size and location of contact areas. Representative samples of the analyzed volume data are presented to demonstrate the results of the implemented methods using the VIGRA image processing library.

  12. High voltage spark carbon fiber detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.

    1980-01-01

    The pulse discharge technique was used to determine the length and density of carbon fibers released from fiber composite materials during a fire or aircraft accident. Specifications are given for the system which uses the ability of a carbon fiber to initiate spark discharge across a high voltage biased grid to achieve accurate counting and sizing of fibers. The design of the system was optimized, and prototype hardware proved satisfactory in laboratory and field tests.

  13. Development of China's fiber optic technology discussed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Q.

    1986-04-01

    Fiber optic technology is a new transmission technology having the outstanding advantages of low loss, high capacity, no magnetic interference, all-dielectric transmission, small size, and light weight. Research into fiber optic technology began in the mid-1970's in China. The scope of applications for fiber optic communications systems is divided into three categories: junction lines, trunk lines, and subscriber lines. Each of the categories are briefly discussed. The advantages and economic suitability of fiber optics are discussed.

  14. Crystal fibers for high power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Florea, C.; Gibson, D.; Peele, J.; Askins, C.; Shaw, B.; Bowman, S.; O'Connor, S.; Bayya, S.; Aggarwal, I.; Sanghera, J. S.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we present our recent progress in developing single crystal fibers for high power single frequency fiber lasers. The optical, spectral and morphological properties as well as the loss and gain measured from these crystal fibers drawn by Laser Heated Pedestal Growth (LHPG) system are also discussed. Results on application of various cladding materials on the crystal core and the methods of fiber end-face polishing are also presented.

  15. High pressure fiber optic sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

    2013-11-26

    The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

  16. Multiwatts narrow linewidth fiber Raman amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Taylor, Luke; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico

    2008-07-21

    Up to 4.8 W, approximately 10 MHz, 1178 nm laser is obtained by Raman amplification of a distributed feedback diode laser in standard single mode fibers pumped by an 1120 nm Yb fiber laser. More than 10% efficiency and 27 dB amplification is achieved, limited by onset of stimulated Brillouin scattering. The ratio of Raman to Brillouin gain coefficient of a fiber is identified as a figure of merit for building a narrow linewidth fiber Raman amplifier. PMID:18648406

  17. Athermal continuous-wave fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemova, Galina; Kashyap, Raman

    2009-07-01

    We present a new theoretical scheme for Yb 3+-doped athermal (radiation-balanced) continuous-wave fiber amplifier. This approach allows amplification with optical pumping of the fiber amplifier without detrimental heating of the fiber. Athermal amplification is realized by laser cooling in which waste heat is disposed of in the form of spontaneous fluorescence by balancing the radiated and absorbed power. The radiation-balanced fiber amplification can be realized using a specially designed distributed pumping scheme.

  18. A fiber inclinometer using a fiber microtaper with an air-gap microcavity fiber interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhongyao; Gang, Tingting; Hu, Manli; Qiao, Xueguang; Liu, Nan; Rong, Qiangzhou

    2016-04-01

    A micro-inclinometer is proposed and demonstrated experimentally; the device consists of a micro-fiber taper followed by an air-gap microcavity. A part of the core mode can couple to cladding modes via the taper. These cladding modes and residual core modes transmitted to downstream of the Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer. A fraction of these modes are reflected back to the SMF by two surfaces of the FP cavity and eventually recoupled to the leading-in SMF, resulting in a well-defined interference spectrum. The fringe contrast of the interferometer is highly sensitive to fiber bending with direction-independence and thus is capable of measuring tilt angles in high resolution. In addition, the interference wavelength always remains unchanged during the fiber bending.

  19. 16 CFR 303.43 - Fiber content tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.43 Fiber content tolerances. (a) A textile fiber product which contains more than one fiber shall not be deemed to be misbranded... fibers contained in a textile fiber product deviates or varies from the percentage stated on the label...

  20. Preparation of magnetic nickel hollow fibers with a trilobe structure using cellulose acetate fibers as templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Changfeng; Li, Ping; Zhang, Lixiong

    2013-02-01

    Nickel hollow fibers with trilobe shape in cross section and monolithic nickel structures composed of trilobe shaped nickel hollow fibrous networks were prepared by using cellulose acetate fibers from cigarette filters as the template. Magnetic ZSM-5/Ni hollow fibers were then fabricated by using the nickel-based hollow fibers as the support. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, and X-ray diffraction. The results indicate that nickel hollow fibers and ZSM-5/Ni hollow fibers retain the morphology of the cellulose acetate fibers, and the monolithic nickel structures can be prepared by pre-shaping the cellulose acetate fibers. The thickness of the nickel layer can be regulated by controlling the electroless plating times. The saturation magnetization and coercivity of the trilobe shaped nickel hollow fibers and ZSM-5/Ni hollow fibers are 27.78 and 21.59 emu/g and 78 and 61 Oe, respectively.

  1. Dietary fiber type reflects physiological functionality: comparison of grain fiber, inulin, and polydextrose.

    PubMed

    Raninen, Kaisa; Lappi, Jenni; Mykkänen, Hannu; Poutanen, Kaisa

    2011-01-01

    Dietary fiber is a nutritional concept based not on physiological functions but on defined chemical and physical properties. Recent definitions of dietary fiber differentiate inherent plant cell wall-associated fiber from isolated or synthetic fiber. For the latter to be defined as fiber, beneficial physiological effects should be demonstrated, such as laxative effects, fermentability, attenuation of blood cholesterol levels, or postprandial glucose response. Grain fibers are a major natural source of dietary fiber worldwide, while inulin, a soluble indigestible fructose polymer isolated from chicory, and polydextrose, a synthetic indigestible glucose polymer, have more simple structures. Inulin and polydextrose show many of the same functionalities of grain fiber in the large intestine, in that they are fermentable, bifidogenic, and laxative. The reported effects on postprandial blood glucose and fasting cholesterol levels have been modest, but grain fibers also show variable effects. New biomarkers are needed to link the physiological functions of specific fibers with long-term health benefits.

  2. Career Directions--Fiber Optic Installer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Fiber-optic communication is a method of transmitting information from one place to another by sending pulses of light through an optical fiber that is roughly the diameter of a human hair. The light forms an electromagnetic carrier wave that is modulated to carry information. Each optical fiber is capable of carrying an enormous amount of…

  3. A reduced gravity fiber pulling apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    A reduced gravity fiber pulling apparatus (FPA) was constructed in order to study the effects of gravity on glass fiber formation. The apparatus was specifically designed and built for use on NASA's KC-135 aircraft. To date, four flights have been completed during which E-glass fiber was successfully produced in simulated lunar gravity.

  4. New definitions for cotton fiber maturity ratio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber maturity affects fiber physical, mechanical, and chemical properties, as well as the processability and qualities of yarn and fabrics. New definitions of cotton fiber maturity ratio are introduced. The influences of sampling, sample preparation, measurement method, and correlations am...

  5. High strength high modulus ceramic fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetterolf, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    Low cost method was developed for producing high strength, high modulus, continuous ceramic oxide fibers. Process transforms inexpensive metallic salts into syrup-like liquids that can be fiberized at room temperatures. Resulting salt fibers are then converted to oxides by calcination at relatively low temperatures.

  6. Ephaptic coupling of myelinated nerve fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binczak, S.; Eilbeck, J. C.; Scott, A. C.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical predictions of a simple myelinated nerve fiber model are compared with theoretical results in the continuum and discrete limits, clarifying the nature of the conduction process on an isolated nerve axon. Since myelinated nerve fibers are often arranged in bundles, this model is used to study ephaptic (nonsynaptic) interactions between impulses on parallel fibers, which may play a functional role in neural processing.

  7. Effects of heat treatment on carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. Kyle; Phillips, Wayne M.

    1990-01-01

    Commercially produced carbon fibers were heat treated to graphitization temperatures. The fibers were characterized for mechanical and physical properties, including density, D0002 spacing, strength, and modulus in both the 'as received' and heat treated conditions. Mechanical property changes were correlated with the physical property changes in the fibers.

  8. Overview of Fiber-Optical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depaula, Ramon P.; Moore, Emery L.

    1987-01-01

    Design, development, and sensitivity of sensors using fiber optics reviewed. State-of-the-art and probable future developments of sensors using fiber optics described in report including references to work in field. Serves to update previously published surveys. Systems incorporating fiber-optic sensors used in medical diagnosis, navigation, robotics, sonar, power industry, and industrial controls.

  9. Analytical design of soliton molecules in fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moubissi, A.-B.; Nse Biyoghe, S.; Mback, C. B. L.; Ekogo, T. B.; Ben-Bolie, G. H.; Kofane, T. C.; Tchofo Dinda, P.

    2016-09-01

    We present an analytical method for designing fiber systems for a highly stable propagation of soliton molecules. This analytical design uses the variational equations of the soliton molecule to determine the parameters of the most suitable fiber system for any desired soliton, thus reducing dramatically the cost of the whole procedure of design, for both the appropriate fiber system and the desired soliton molecule.

  10. Using a Fiber Loop and Fiber Bragg Grating as a Fiber Optic Sensor to Simultaneously Measure Temperature and Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yao-Tang; Yen, Chih-Ta; Wu, Yue-Shiun; Cheng, Hsu-Chih

    2013-01-01

    This study integrated a fiber loop manufactured by using commercial fiber (SMF-28, Corning) and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) to form a fiber optic sensor that could simultaneously measure displacement and temperature. The fiber loop was placed in a thermoelectric cooling module with FBG affixed to the module, and, consequently, the center wavelength displacement of FBG was limited by only the effects of temperature change. Displacement and temperature were determined by measuring changes in the transmission of optical power and shifts in Bragg wavelength. This study provides a simple and economical method to measure displacement and temperature simultaneously. PMID:23681094

  11. Optical turbulence in fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Wabnitz, Stefan

    2014-03-15

    We analyze the nonlinear stage of modulation instability in passively mode-locked fiber lasers leading to chaotic or noise-like emission. We present the phase-transition diagram among different regimes of chaotic emission in terms of the key cavity parameters: amplitude or phase turbulence, and spatio-temporal intermittency. PMID:24690788

  12. Fiber Optics: Deregulate and Deploy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suwinski, Jan H.

    1993-01-01

    Describes fiber optic technology, explains its use in education and commercial settings, and recommends regulations and legislation that will speed its use to create broadband information networks. Topics discussed include distance learning; interactive video; costs; and the roles of policy makers, lawmakers, public advocacy groups, and consumers.…

  13. Monolithic fiber optic sensor assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Scott

    2015-02-10

    A remote sensor element for spectrographic measurements employs a monolithic assembly of one or two fiber optics to two optical elements separated by a supporting structure to allow the flow of gases or particulates therebetween. In a preferred embodiment, the sensor element components are fused ceramic to resist high temperatures and failure from large temperature changes.

  14. Fiber reinforced PMR polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Winters, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    Commercially obtained PMR-15 polyimide prepregs with S-glass and graphite fiber reinforcements were evaluated along with in-house prepared glass and graphite cloth PMR 2 materials. A novel autoclave approach was conceived and used to demonstrate that both the PMR systems respond to 1.4 MPa (200 psi) autoclave pressures to produce void free composites equivalent to die molded laminates. Isothermal gravimetric analysis and subsequent mechanical property tests indicated that the PMR 2 system was significantly superior in thermo-oxidative stability, and that S-glass reinforcements may contribute to the accelerated degradation of composites at 316 C (600 F) when compared to graphite fiber reinforced composites. Fully reversed bending fatigue experiments were conducted with a type of fixture unused for organic matrix composites. These studies indicated that the graphite fiber composites were clearly superior in fatigue resistance to the glass fiber reinforced material and that PMR matrix composite systems yield performance of the same order as composite materials employing other families of matrices.

  15. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  16. Piezoelectric fibers for conformal acoustics.

    PubMed

    Chocat, Noémie; Lestoquoy, Guillaume; Wang, Zheng; Rodgers, Daniel M; Joannopoulos, John D; Fink, Yoel

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound transducers have many important applications in medical, industrial, and environmental settings. Large-active-area piezoelectric fibers are presented here, which can be woven into extended and flexible ultrasound transducing fabrics. This work opens significant opportunities for large-area, flexible and adjustable acoustic emission and sensing for a variety of emerging applications.

  17. Cylindrical Piezoelectric Fiber Composite Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of piezoelectric devices has become widespread since Pierre and Jacques Curie discovered the piezoelectric effect in 1880. Examples of current applications of piezoelectric devices include ultrasonic transducers, micro-positioning devices, buzzers, strain sensors, and clocks. The invention of such lightweight, relatively inexpensive piezoceramic-fiber-composite actuators as macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators has made it possible to obtain strains and displacements greater than those that could be generated by prior actuators based on monolithic piezoceramic sheet materials. MFC actuators are flat, flexible actuators designed for bonding to structures to apply or detect strains. Bonding multiple layers of MFC actuators together could increase force capability, but not strain or displacement capability. Cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite (CPFC) actuators have been invented as alternatives to MFC actuators for applications in which greater forces and/or strains or displacements may be required. In essence, a CPFC actuator is an MFC or other piezoceramic fiber composite actuator fabricated in a cylindrical instead of its conventional flat shape. Cylindrical is used here in the general sense, encompassing shapes that can have circular, elliptical, rectangular or other cross-sectional shapes in the planes perpendicular to their longitudinal axes.

  18. Box graphs and singular fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Hirotaka; Lawrie, Craig; Morrison, David R.; Schafer-Nameki, Sakura

    2014-05-01

    We determine the higher codimension fibers of elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau fourfolds with section by studying the three-dimensional = 2 supersymmetric gauge theory with matter which describes the low energy effective theory of M-theory compactified on the associated Weierstrass model, a singular model of the fourfold. Each phase of the Coulomb branch of this theory corresponds to a particular resolution of the Weierstrass model, and we show that these have a concise description in terms of decorated box graphs based on the representation graph of the matter multiplets, or alternatively by a class of convex paths on said graph. Transitions between phases have a simple interpretation as "flopping" of the path, and in the geometry correspond to actual flop transitions. This description of the phases enables us to enumerate and determine the entire network between them, with various matter representations for all reductive Lie groups. Furthermore, we observe that each network of phases carries the structure of a (quasi-)minuscule representation of a specific Lie algebra. Interpreted from a geometric point of view, this analysis determines the generators of the cone of effective curves as well as the network of flop transitions between crepant resolutions of singular elliptic Calabi-Yau fourfolds. From the box graphs we determine all fiber types in codimensions two and three, and we find new, non-Kodaira, fiber types for E 6, E7 and E 8.

  19. Hadron calorimeter with reradiating fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Kostritskii, A.V.; Baliev, L.O.; Buzultskov, A.F.

    1995-03-01

    A hadron calorimeter in which scintillators are aligned in parallel with the particle beam and the light is output from the scintillators via optical fibers doped with a reradiating is described. The active element has been tested and the calorimeter`s operation simulated. The structure of a calorimeter unit is illustrated.

  20. 469nm Fiber Laser Source

    SciTech Connect

    Drobshoff, A; Dawson, J W; Pennington, D M; Payne, S A; Beach, R

    2005-01-20

    We have demonstrated 466mW of 469nm light from a frequency doubled continuous wave fiber laser. The system consisted of a 938nm single frequency laser diode master oscillator, which was amplified in two stages to 5 Watts using cladding pumped Nd{sup 3+} fiber amplifiers and then frequency doubled in a single pass through periodically poled KTP. The 3cm long PPKTP crystal was made by Raicol Crystals Ltd. with a period of 5.9 {micro}m and had a phase match temperature of 47 degrees Centigrade. The beam was focused to a 1/e{sup 2} diameter in the crystal of 29 {micro}m. Overall conversion efficiency was 11% and the results agreed well with standard models. Our 938nm fiber amplifier design minimizes amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm by employing an optimized core to cladding size ratio. This design allows the 3-level transition to operate at high inversion, thus making it competitive with the 1088nm 4-level transition. We have also carefully chosen the fiber coil diameter to help suppress propagation of wavelengths longer than 938 nm. At 2 Watts, the 938nm laser had an M{sup 2} of 1.1 and good polarization (correctable with a quarter and half wave plate to >10:1).

  1. Fiber Volume Fraction Influence on Fiber Compaction in Tapered Resin Injection Pultrusion Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuram, N. B.; Roux, J. A.; Jeswani, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    Liquid resin is injected into the tapered injection chamber through the injection slots to completely wetout the fiber reinforcements in a resin injection pultrusion process. As the resin penetrates through the fibers, the resin also pushes the fibers away from the wall towards the centerline causing compaction of the fiber reinforcements. The fibers are squeezed together due to compaction, making resin penetration more difficult; thus higher resin injection pressures are required to effectively penetrate through the fibers and achieve complete wetout. Fiber volume fraction in the final pultruded composite is a key to decide the mechanical and/or chemical properties of the composite. If the fiber volume fraction is too high, more fibers are squeezed together creating a fiber lean region near the wall and fiber rich region away from the wall. Also, the design of the injection chamber significantly affects the minimum injection pressure required to completely wet the fibers. A tapered injection chamber is considered such that wetout occurs at lower injection pressures due to the taper angle of the injection chamber. In this study, the effect of fiber volume fraction on the fiber reinforcement compaction and complete fiber wetout for a tapered injection chamber is investigated.

  2. Toughness of fiber reinforced shotcrete

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, D.R.; Chen, L.; Beaupre, D.

    1995-12-31

    Fibers are added to shotcrete to improve energy absorption and impact resistance, to provide crack resistance and crack control, and to provide apparent ductility, i.e., an ability to continue to carry load after the shotcrete matrix has cracked. In order to be able to quantify the benefits of fiber addition, a variety of different toughness measuring systems have been developed in different countries. Most commonly used are flexural toughness systems which determine load vs. deflection responses and relate the area under the curve to some absolute or dimensionless index energy parameter. In North America the ASTM C1018 test method is most commonly used. In Japan the JSCE-SF4 test procedure is used. A variety of procedures have been used in Europe, but the template approach of the Norwegian Guidelines NBP No. 7, seems to be finding favor. This paper briefly assesses the relative advantages and disadvantages of the various methods of characterizing toughness. It then provides recommendations for a new procedure which uses the ASTM C1018 test method for generating the flexural load vs. deflection curve, but analyzes the data using a modified version of the Norwegian template approach. The load vs. deflection curve is directly compared against four residual strength curves and the fiber reinforced shotcrete assigned one of four toughness performance levels. It is believed that this new procedure should provide suitable within and between laboratory reproducibility and be more suitable for purposes of differentiating between different fiber types and addition rates and specifying toughness for fiber reinforced shotcrete products than any of the existing methods.

  3. Cells on foam and fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Clyde, R.

    1995-11-01

    Cells growing on high area foam and when a screen is put around the foam, it is made heavier so it can be fluidized. When foam is rotated in a half full RBC, drops are formed and mass transfer of oxygen to drops in much faster. Most fungi and some mammalian cells need oxygen. Corrugated fibers with holes in the valleys also produce drops. White rot fungus needs oxygen and it degrades many chlorine compounds, azo dyes, and TNT. Old cardboard boxes are readily available and when buried in soil, oxygen is entrapped. In a lake, the boxes expose high area. Fibers have high surface area for immobilizing cells and when the fibers are rotated, fast reactions occur, converting one chemical to another. Sugar has been fermented to alcohol in 10-15 minutes. Ethanol has high octane and does not need lead. Old cars and trucks still use lead and high levels have been found in the drinking water of several large cities. Bacteria on fibers can remove lead in a few seconds. When an RBC of plain fiber discs is rotated and a light shone in the top the light hits a thin moving film to degrade chlorine compounds. Microbes and light remove sulfur from oil. Calcium magnesium acetate is a non corrosive road deicer. Salt on roads causes millions of dollars damage to bridges and cars. An inexpensive reactor has been made for organization studies of mammalian and plant cells. A magnet is near the bottom but not touching and oxygen is put on the top where there is no seal that can leak.

  4. Potato fiber as a dietary fiber source in dog foods.

    PubMed

    Panasevich, M R; Rossoni Serao, M C; de Godoy, M R C; Swanson, K S; Guérin-Deremaux, L; Lynch, G L; Wils, D; Fahey, G C; Dilger, R N

    2013-11-01

    Potato fiber (PF), a coproduct of potato starch manufacture, was evaluated as a potential novel fiber source in dog food. Potato fiber contained 55% total dietary fiber, 29% starch, 4% crude protein, and 2% acid-hydrolyzed fat. The PF substrate was evaluated for chemical composition, in vitro digestion and fermentation characteristics, and in vivo responses. For the in vitro hydrolytic-enzymatic digestion and fermentation experiment, raw and cooked PF substrates were first subjected to hydrolytic-enzymatic digestion to determine OM disappearance and then fermented using dog fecal inoculum. Fermentation characteristics were then measured at 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 h. For the in vivo experiment, 10 female mixed-breed dogs (6.13±0.17 yr; 22±2.1 kg) were provided 5 diets with graded concentrations (0%, 1.5%, 3%, 4.5%, or 6%) of PF in a replicated 5×5 Latin square design. Dogs were acclimated to the test diet for 10 d, followed by 4 d of total fecal collection. Fresh fecal samples were collected to measure fecal pH and fermentation end products. In vitro digestion revealed that raw and cooked PF were 32.3% and 27.9% digested enzymatically, whereas in vitro fermentation showed that PF was fermentable through 9 h. Raw PF had greater (P<0.05) acetate, propionate, and total short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations at the 12-h time point compared with cooked PF. The in vivo experiment showed no differences in apparent total tract DM, OM, CP, acid-hydrolyzed fat, or energy digestibility of diets containing graded concentrations of PF. However, total dietary fiber digestibility exhibited a linear increase (P<0.01) with increasing PF concentrations in the diet. Overall, linear increases (P<0.01) were observed for all individual and total SCFA, with a concomitant linear decrease (P<0.01) in fecal pH with increasing dietary PF. Fecal protein catabolite concentrations were low or undetectable, with the exception of spermidine, which exhibited a linear increase with increasing

  5. Properties of textile grade ceramic fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pudnos, Eric

    1992-01-01

    The availability of textile grade ceramic fibers has sparked great interest for applications in composite reinforcement and high temperature insulation. This paper summarizes the properties of various small diameter textile grade ceramic fibers currently available. Room temperature mechanical and electrical properties of the fibers are discussed for three cases: ambient conditions, after heat aging in argon, and after heat aging in wet air. Dow Corning (R) HPZ Ceramic Fiber, a silicon nitride type fiber, is shown to have improved retention of mechanical and electrical properties above 1200 C.

  6. Fiber optic extensometer for concrete deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Libo; Zhou, Li-min; Lau, K. T.; Jin, Wei; Demokan, M. S.

    2002-06-01

    A fiber optic extensometer based on a scanning white light Michelson interferometer is presented. The instrument employs a light emitting diode as the light source and a single mode fiber with predetermined gauge length as the extensometer sensor head. Light to and from the sensor head is transmitted through a single mode lead (i.e., in/out) fiber. The sensor performance is insensitive to the in/out fiber extensions. The fiber optic extensometer was applied to measure the compression and tension of concrete specimens. The measurement results compare well with that from a conventional extensometer.

  7. Fiber waveguide sensors for intelligent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flax, A. R.; Claus, R. O.

    1988-01-01

    This report, an addendum to the six month report submitted to NASA Langley Research Center in December 1987, covers research performed by the Fiber and Electro-Optics Research Center (FEORC) at Virginia Tech for the NASA Langley Research Center, Grant NAG1-780, for the period from December 1987 to June 1988. This final report discusses the research performed in the following four areas as described in the proposal: Fabrication of Sensor Fibers Optimized for Embedding in Advanced Composites; Fabrication of Sensor Fiber with In-Line Splices and Evaluation via OTR methods; Modal Domain Optical Fiber Sensor Analysis; and Acoustic Fiber Waveguide Implementation.

  8. Fiber optic interconnects: physical design for reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhir, E.

    2010-02-01

    The paper deals with the application of methods and approaches of the engineering mechanics to fiber optics systems. The emphasis is on fiber optics interconnects. We address traditional problems of the mechanical behavior of optical fiber interconnects subjected to mechanical and/or thermally induced loading, as well as the application of nanotechnology in optical fiber engineering. Particularly, we elaborate on the application of a newly developed advanced nano-particle material (NPM) as an attractive substitute for the existing optical fiber coatings and perhaps even claddings. The solutions to the majority of the examined problems were obtained using analytical ("mathematical") modeling, i.e., methods of classical structural analysis.

  9. Great prospects for fiber optics sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, T. E.

    1983-10-01

    Fiber optic sensors provide noise immunity and galvanic insulation at the measurement point. Interest in such sensors is increasing for these reasons. In the United States sales are expected to increase from 12 million dollars in 1981 to 180 million in 1991. Interferometric sensors based on single modus fibers deliver extremely high sensitivity, while sensors based on multi-modus fibers are more easily manufactured. The fiber optic sensors which are available today are based on point measurements. Development of fiber optic sensors in Norway is being carried out at the Central institute and has resulted in the development of medical manometers which are now undergoing clinical testing.

  10. The road to kilowatt fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Adrian; Samson, Bryce N.; Tankala, Kanishka; Machewirth, David P.; Manyam, Upendra H.; Abramczyk, Jaroslaw; Farroni, Julia; Guertin, Douglas P.; Jacobson, Nils

    2004-06-01

    Although fiber amplifiers have been employed in communications systems for many years, until very recently the fiber laser was little more than a scientific curiosity. However the fiber laser format has a number of intrinsic advantages over lamp and diode pumped YAG lasers including size, reliability, wavelength selectivity, heat dissipation, wallplug efficiency and operational cost; and with kiloWatt output powers now possible fiber lasers are beginning to replace lamp and diode pumped YAG lasers in many industrial applications. In this paper we review the recent and ongoing advances in fiber design that have facilitated this revolution.

  11. Methods for producing silicon carbide fibers

    DOEpatents

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2016-03-01

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  12. High performance pitch-based carbon fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Tadokoro, Hiroyuki; Tsuji, Nobuyuki; Shibata, Hirotaka; Furuyama, Masatoshi

    1996-12-31

    The high performance pitch-based carbon fiber with smaller diameter, six micro in developed by Nippon Graphite Fiber Corporation. This fiber possesses high tensile modulus, high tensile strength, excellent yarn handle ability, low thermal expansion coefficient, and high thermal conductivity which make it an ideal material for space applications such as artificial satellites. Performance of this fiber as a reinforcement of composites was sufficient. With these characteristics, this pitch-based carbon fiber is expected to find wide variety of possible applications in space structures, industrial field, sporting goods and civil infrastructures.

  13. Recent development of WDM fiber vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waz, A. T.; Dudzik, G.; Kaczmarek, P. R.; Antonczak, A. J.; Sotor, J. Z.; Krzempek, K.; Sobon, G. J.; Abramski, K. M.

    2012-06-01

    For the last few years we were elaborating the laser-fiber vibrometer working at 1550 nm. Our main stress was directed towards different aspects of research: analysis of scattered light, efficient photodetection, optimisation of the fiber-free space interfaces and signal processing. As a consequence we proposed the idea of a multichannel fiber vibrometer based on well developed telecommunication technique - Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM). We present the results of a just finished project "Developing novel laser-fiber monitoring technologies to prevent environmental hazards from vibrating objects" where we have constructed a 4-channel WDM laser-fiber vibrometer.

  14. Silicon carbide fibers and articles including same

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, John E; Griffith, George W

    2015-01-27

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  15. Fiber-type dosimeter with improved illuminator

    DOEpatents

    Fox, R.J.

    1985-12-23

    A single-piece, molded plastic, Cassigrainian-type condenser arrangement is incorporated in a tubular-shaped personal pocket dosimeter of the type which combines an ionization chamber with an optically-read fiber electrometer to provide improved illumination of the electrometer fiber. The condenser routes incoming light from one end of the dosimeter tubular housing around a central axis charging pin assembly and focuses the light at low angles to the axis so that it falls within the acceptance angle of the electrometer fiber objective lens viewed through an eyepiece lens disposed in the opposite end of the dosimeter. This results in improved fiber illumination and fiber image contrast.

  16. Great prospects for fiber optics sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, T. E.

    1983-01-01

    Fiber optic sensors provide noise immunity and galvanic insulation at the measurement point. Interest in such sensors is increasing for these reasons. In the United States sales are expected to increase from 12 million dollars in 1981 to 180 million in 1991. Interferometric sensors based on single modus fibers deliver extremely high sensitivity, while sensors based on multi-modus fibers are more easily manufactured. The fiber optic sensors which are available today are based on point measurements. Development of fiber optic sensors in Norway is being carried out at the Central institute and has resulted in the development of medical manometers which are now undergoing clinical testing.

  17. Anisotropic fiber alignment in composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Graham, A.L.; Mondy, L.A.; Guell, D.C.

    1993-11-16

    High strength material composite structures are formed with oriented fibers to provide controlled anisotropic fibers. Fibers suspended in non-dilute concentrations (e.g., up to 20 volume percent for fibers having an aspect ratio of 20) in a selected medium are oriented by moving an axially spaced array of elements in the direction of desired fiber alignment. The array elements are generally perpendicular to the desired orientation. The suspension medium may also include sphere-like particles where the resulting material is a ceramic. 5 figures.

  18. Anisotropic fiber alignment in composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Graham, Alan L.; Mondy, Lisa A.; Guell, David C.

    1993-01-01

    High strength material composite structures are formed with oriented fibers to provide controlled anisotropic fibers. Fibers suspended in non-dilute concentrations (e.g., up to 20 volume percent for fibers having an aspect ratio of 20) in a selected medium are oriented by moving an axially spaced array of elements in the direction of desired fiber alignment. The array elements are generally perpendicular to the desired orientation. The suspension medium may also include sphere-like particles where the resulting material is a ceramic.

  19. Development program to produce mullite fiber insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, W. G.

    1975-01-01

    Processing methods were utilized to form a mullite fiber-Kaowool felt. The formation of a blended felt using the Rotoformer wet-laying method was successful. Felt products were evaluated for tensile strength, thermal stability, thermal conductivity and structural integrity at 1259 C and 1371 C. Textile processing methods failed in an attempt to form a yarn from staple and multifilament mullite fiber due to fiber damage through mechanical handling. The refractoriness of pure Kaowool ceramic fiber is improved with additions of 30% or greater mullite fiber.

  20. High electrical resistivity carbon/graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, F. L.; Forsman, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon/graphite fibers were chemically oxidized in the liquid phase to fibers of graphite oxide. Resistivity increases as high as 10,000 times were obtained, the oxidized fiber decomposed on exposure to atmosphere. A factor of 1,000 remained as a stable increment. The largest change observed was 1,000,000 times. Best results were obtained on the most highly graphitized fibers. Electrochemical oxidation yielded a lower increase--about 10 times, but provided a controllable method of synthesis and insight to the mechanism of reaction. Tensile tests indicated that the strength of the fiber on oxidation was decreased by no more than 25 percent.

  1. Fiber-type dosimeter with improved illuminator

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    A single-piece, molded plastic, Cassigrainian-type condenser arrangement is incorporated in a tubular-shaped personal pocket dosimeter of the type which combines an ionization chamber with an optically-read fiber electrometer to provide improved illumination of the electrometer fiber. The condenser routes incoming light from one end of the dosimeter tubular housing around a central axis charging pin assembly and focuses the light at low angles to the axis so that it falls within the acceptance angle of the electrometer fiber objective lens viewed through an eyepiece lens disposed in the opposite end of the dosimeter. This results in improved fiber illumination and fiber image contrast.

  2. Anomalous bending effect in photonic crystal fibers

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Haohua; Jiang, Zhi; Marks, Daniel. L.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    An unexpected transmission loss up to 50% occurs to intense femtosecond pulses propagating along an endlessly single-mode photonic crystal fiber over a length of 1 m. A specific leaky-fiber mode gains amplification along the fiber at the expense of the fundamental fiber mode through stimulated four-wave mixing and Raman scattering, leading to this transmission loss. Bending near the fiber entrance dissipates the propagating seed of this leaky mode, preventing the leaky mode amplification and therefore enhancing the transmission of these pulses. PMID:18542666

  3. Storing Fluorine In Graphitelike Carbon Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    1995-01-01

    Fluorine stored in graphite or graphitelike carbon fibers for later release and/or use in chemical reactions. Storage in carbon fibers eliminates difficulty and risk of using high-pressure tanks and pipes to hold corrosive gas. Storage in carbon fibers makes fluorine more readily accessible than does storage as constituent of metal fluoride. Carbon fibers heated to release stored fluorine, which draws away to vessel where reacts with material to be fluorinated, possibly at temperature other than release temperature. Alternatively, material to be fluorinated mixed or otherwise placed in contact with fibers and entire mass heated to or beyond release temperature.

  4. Fabrication of miniature fiber-optic temperature sensors

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yizheng; Wang, Anbo

    2010-07-27

    A method of coupling a silica fiber and a sapphire fiber includes providing a silica fiber having a doped core and a cladding layer, with the doped core having a prescribed diameter, providing a sapphire fiber having a diameter less than the doped core, placing an end of the sapphire fiber in close proximity to an end of the silica fiber, applying a heat source to the end of silica fiber and introducing the end of sapphire fiber into the heated doped core of the silica fiber to produce a coupling between the silica and sapphire fibers.

  5. Compensated vibrating optical fiber pressure measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.; Goff, David R.

    1987-01-01

    A microbending optical fiber is attached under tension to a diaphragm to se a differential pressure applied across the diaphragm which it causes it to deflect. The fiber is attached to the diaphragm so that one portion of the fiber, attached to a central portion of the diaphragm, undergoes a change in tension; proportional to the differential pressure applied to the diaphragm while a second portion attached at the periphery of the diaphragm remains at a reference tension. Both portions of the fiber are caused to vibrate at their natural frequencies. Light transmitted through the fiber is attenuated by both portions of the tensioned sections of the fiber by an amount which increases with the curvature of fiber bending so that the light signal is modulated by both portions of the fiber at separate frequencies. The modulated light signal is transduced into a electrical signal. The separate modulation signals are detected to generate separate signals having frequencies corresponding to the reference and measuring vibrating sections of the continuous fiber, respectively. A signal proportional to the difference between these signals is generated which is indicative of the measured pressure differential across the diaphragm. The reference portion of the fiber is used to compensate the pressure signal for zero and span changes resulting from ambient temperature and humidity effects upon the fiber and the transducer fixture.

  6. Architectures of fiber optic network in telecommunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, Irina B.; Vasile, Alexandru; Filip, Luminita E.

    2005-08-01

    The operators of telecommunications have targeted their efforts towards realizing applications using broad band fiber optics systems in the access network. Thus, a new concept related to the implementation of fiber optic transmission systems, named FITL (Fiber In The Loop) has appeared. The fiber optic transmission systems have been extensively used for realizing the transport and intercommunication of the public telecommunication network, as well as for assuring the access to the telecommunication systems of the great corporations. Still, the segment of the residential users and small corporations did not benefit on large scale of this technology implementation. For the purpose of defining fiber optic applications, more types of architectures were conceived, like: bus, ring, star, tree. In the case of tree-like networks passive splitters (that"s where the name of PON comes from - Passive Optical Network-), which reduce significantly the costs of the fiber optic access, by separating the costs of the optical electronic components. That's why the passive fiber optics architectures (PON represent a viable solution for realizing the access at the user's loop. The main types of fiber optics architectures included in this work are: FTTC (Fiber To The Curb); FTTB (Fiber To The Building); FTTH (Fiber To The Home).

  7. [Dietary fiber: concept, classification and current indications].

    PubMed

    García Peris, P; Camblor Alvarez, M

    1999-05-01

    Fiber is a concept that refers to or encompasses several carbohydrates and lignine that resist hydrolysis by human digestive enzymes and that are fermented by the microflora of the colon. From a practical point of view, fibers can be divided into soluble and insoluble. There is general acceptance of the concepts soluble fiber, fermentable, viscous and insoluble fiber, and non-viscous and barely fermentable fiber. The physiological effects and therefore the clinical applications of both fibers are different. In general, the insoluble fiber is barely fermentable and has a marked laxative and intestinal regulatory effect. Soluble fiber is fermented to a high degree, showing a powerful trophic effect at the colon level. Soluble fiber is also attributed a positive role in the carbohydrate and lipid metabolism due to the effects that this has at the intestinal and the systemic level on the glucose and the cholesterol metabolism. The goal of this article is to review the current concept of fiber based on the existing bibliography (it is thought that perhaps the current classification should be changed and that fiber should be talked about depending on its degree of polymerization), its physiologic effects and the possible indications that this may have from a clinical point of view, be this at the level of oral or enteral nutrition.

  8. Nanosecond laser damage of optical multimode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Guido; Krüger, Jörg

    2016-07-01

    For pulse laser materials processing often optical step index and gradient index multimode fibers with core diameters ranging from 100 to 600 μm are used. The design of a high power fiber transmission system must take into account limitations resulting from both surface and volume damage effects. Especially, breakdown at the fiber end faces and selffocusing in the fiber volume critically influence the fiber performance. At least operation charts are desirable to select the appropriate fiber type for given laser parameters. In industry-relevant studies the influence of fiber core diameter and end face preparation on laser-induced (surface) damage thresholds (LIDT) was investigated for frequently used all-silica fiber types (manufacturer LEONI). Experiments on preform material (initial fiber material) and compact specimens (models of the cladding and coating material) accompanied the tests performed in accordance with the relevant LIDT standards ISO 21254-1 and ISO 21254-2 for 1-on-1 and S-on-1 irradiation conditions, respectively. The relation beam diameter vs. LIDT was investigated for fused silica fibers. Additionally, laser-induced (bulk) damage thresholds of fused silica preform material F300 (manufacturer Heraeus) in dependence on external mechanical stress simulating fiber bending were measured. All experiments were performed with 10-ns laser pulses at 1064 and 532 nm wavelength with a Gaussian beam profile.

  9. Interfacial Studies of Sized Carbon Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Shahrul, S. N.; Hartini, M. N.; Hilmi, E. A.; Nizam, A.

    2010-03-11

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of sizing treatment on carbon fiber in respect of interfacial adhesion in composite materials, Epolam registered 2025. Fortafil unsized carbon fiber was used to performed the experiment. The fiber was commercially surface treated and it was a polyacrylonitrile based carbon fiber with 3000 filament per strand. Epicure registered 3370 was used as basic sizing chemical and dissolved in two types of solvent, ethanol and acetone for the comparison purpose. The single pull out test has been used to determine the influence of sizing on carbon fiber. The morphology of carbon fiber was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The apparent interfacial strength IFSS values determined by pull out test for the Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sized carbon fiber pointed to a good interfacial behaviour compared to the Epicure registered 3370/acetone sized carbon fiber. The Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sizing agent was found to be effective in promoting adhesion because of the chemical reactions between the sizing and Epolam registered 2025 during the curing process. From this work, it showed that sized carbon fiber using Epicure registered 3370 with addition of ethanol give higher mechanical properties of carbon fiber in terms of shear strength and also provided a good adhesion between fiber and matrix compared to the sizing chemical that contain acetone as a solvent.

  10. Interfacial Studies of Sized Carbon Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrul, S. N.; Hartini, M. N.; Hilmi, E. A.; Nizam, A.

    2010-03-01

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of sizing treatment on carbon fiber in respect of interfacial adhesion in composite materials, Epolam® 2025. Fortafil unsized carbon fiber was used to performed the experiment. The fiber was commercially surface treated and it was a polyacrylonitrile based carbon fiber with 3000 filament per strand. Epicure® 3370 was used as basic sizing chemical and dissolved in two types of solvent, ethanol and acetone for the comparison purpose. The single pull out test has been used to determine the influence of sizing on carbon fiber. The morphology of carbon fiber was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The apparent interfacial strength IFSS values determined by pull out test for the Epicure® 3370/ethanol sized carbon fiber pointed to a good interfacial behaviour compared to the Epicure® 3370/acetone sized carbon fiber. The Epicure® 3370/ethanol sizing agent was found to be effective in promoting adhesion because of the chemical reactions between the sizing and Epolam® 2025 during the curing process. From this work, it showed that sized carbon fiber using Epicure® 3370 with addition of ethanol give higher mechanical properties of carbon fiber in terms of shear strength and also provided a good adhesion between fiber and matrix compared to the sizing chemical that contain acetone as a solvent.

  11. Measuring forces between protein fibers by microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher W; Wang, J C; Briehl, R W; Turner, M S

    2005-04-01

    We propose a general scheme for measuring the attraction between mechanically frustrated semiflexible fibers by measuring their thermal fluctuations and shape. We apply this analysis to a system of sickle hemoglobin (HbS) fibers that laterally attract one another. These fibers appear to "zip" together before reaching mechanical equilibrium due to the existence of cross-links into a dilute fiber network. We are also able to estimate the rigidities of the fibers. These rigidities are found to be consistent with sickle hemoglobin "single" fibers 20 nm in diameter, despite recent experiments indicating that fiber bundling sometimes occurs. Our estimate of the magnitude of the interfiber attraction for HbS fibers is in the range 8 +/- 7 kBT/microm, or 4 +/- 3 k(B)T/microm if the fibers are assumed, a priori to be single fibers (such an assumption is fully consistent with the data). This value is sufficient to bind the fibers, overcoming entropic effects, although extremely chemically weak. Our results are compared to models for the interfiber attraction that include depletion and van der Waals forces. This technique should also facilitate a similar analysis of other filamentous protein assembles in the future, including beta-amyloid, actin, and tubulin.

  12. Side-emitting fiber optic position sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2008-02-12

    A side-emitting fiber optic position sensor and method of determining an unknown position of an object by using the sensor. In one embodiment, a concentrated beam of light source illuminates the side of a side-emitting fiber optic at an unknown axial position along the fiber's length. Some of this side-illuminated light is in-scattered into the fiber and captured. As the captured light is guided down the fiber, its intensity decreases due to loss from side-emission away from the fiber and from bulk absorption within the fiber. By measuring the intensity of light emitted from one (or both) ends of the fiber with a photodetector(s), the axial position of the light source is determined by comparing the photodetector's signal to a calibrated response curve, look-up table, or by using a mathematical model. Alternatively, the side-emitting fiber is illuminated at one end, while a photodetector measures the intensity of light emitted from the side of the fiber, at an unknown position. As the photodetector moves further away from the illuminated end, the detector's signal strength decreases due to loss from side-emission and/or bulk absorption. As before, the detector's signal is correlated to a unique position along the fiber.

  13. Wetting morphologies on randomly oriented fibers.

    PubMed

    Sauret, Alban; Boulogne, François; Soh, Beatrice; Dressaire, Emilie; Stone, Howard A

    2015-06-01

    We characterize the different morphologies adopted by a drop of liquid placed on two randomly oriented fibers, which is a first step toward understanding the wetting of fibrous networks. The present work reviews previous modeling for parallel and touching crossed fibers and extends it to an arbitrary orientation of the fibers characterized by the tilting angle and the minimum spacing distance. Depending on the volume of liquid, the spacing distance between fibers and the angle between the fibers, we highlight that the liquid can adopt three different equilibrium morphologies: 1) a column morphology in which the liquid spreads between the fibers, 2) a mixed morphology where a drop grows at one end of the column or 3) a single drop located at the node. We capture the different morphologies observed using an analytical model that predicts the equilibrium configuration of the liquid based on the geometry of the fibers and the volume of liquid. PMID:26123768

  14. Scintillating-glass-fiber neutron sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, K. H.; Arthur, R. J.; Bliss, M.; Brite, D. W.; Brodzinski, R. L.; Craig, R. A.; Geelhood, B. D.; Goldman, D. S.; Griffin, J. W.; Perkins, R. W.; Reeder, P. L.; Richey, W. R.; Stahl, K. A.; Sunberg, D. S.; Warner, R. A.; Wogman, N. A.; Weber, M. J.

    1994-12-01

    Cerium-doped lithium-silicate glass fibers have been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for use as thermal neutron detectors. By using highly-enriched 6Li, these fibers efficiently capture thermal neutrons and produce scintillation light that can be detected at the ends of the fibers. Advantages of scintillating fibers over 3He or BF 3 proportional tubes include flexibility in geometric configuration, ruggedness in high-vibration environments, and less detector weight for the same neutron sensitivity. This paper describes the performance of these scintillating fibers with regard to count rates, pulse height spectra, absolute efficiencies, and neutron/gamma discrimination. Fibers with light transmission lengths ( {1}/{e}) of greater than 2 m have been produced at PNL. Neutron sensors in fiber form allow development of a variety of neutron detectors packaged in previously unavailable configurations. Brief descriptions of some of the devices already produced are included to illustrate these possibilities.

  15. Prebiotics, Fermentable Dietary Fiber, and Health Claims.

    PubMed

    Delcour, Jan A; Aman, Per; Courtin, Christophe M; Hamaker, Bruce R; Verbeke, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1970s, the positive effects of dietary fiber on health have increasingly been recognized. The collective term "dietary fiber" groups structures that have different physiologic effects. Since 1995, some dietary fibers have been denoted as prebiotics, implying a beneficial physiologic effect related to increasing numbers or activity of the gastrointestinal microbiota. Given the complex composition of the microbiota, the demonstration of such beneficial effects is difficult. In contrast, an exploration of the metabolites of dietary fiber formed as a result of its fermentation in the colon offers better perspectives for providing mechanistic links between fiber intake and health benefits. Positive outcomes of such studies hold the promise that claims describing specific health benefits can be granted. This would help bridge the "fiber gap"-that is, the considerable difference between recommended and actual fiber intakes by the average consumer.

  16. Tensile creep behavior of polycrystalline alumina fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Tensile creep studies were conducted on polycrystalline Nextel 610 and Fiber FP alumina fibers with grain sizes of 100 and 300 nm, respectively. Test conditions were temperatures from 800 to 1050 C and stresses from 60 to 1000 MPa. For both fibers, only a small primary creep portion occurred followed by steady-state creep. The stress exponents for steady-state creep of Nextel 610 and Fiber FP were found to be about 3 and 1, respectively. At lower temperatures, below 1000 C, the finer grained Nextel 610 had a much higher 0.2 percent creep strength for 100 hr than the Fiber FP; while at higher temperatures, Nextel 610 had a comparable creep strength to the Fiber FP. The stress and grain size dependencies suggest Nextel 610 and Fiber FP creep rates are due to grain boundary sliding controlled by interface reaction and Nabarro-Herring mechanisms, respectively.

  17. Preferred Orientation in Polymer Fiber Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, C.; Hsiao , B; Chu, B

    2010-01-01

    Fiber symmetry is one of the most important sample geometries encountered in both wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) of polymers, applicable both to natural polymers like collagen or cellulose and to many synthetic polymers that come in fiber form or otherwise exhibit cylindrical rotational symmetry. The structural information to be determined in scattering experiments from such fiber systems includes both the structure of the individual structural unit and qualitative and quantitative information about the preferred orientation state of the ensemble. Existing approaches and new developments to analyze fiber scattering patterns are rigorously reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on the calculation of complete SAXS and WAXS fiber scattering patterns, and various practical examples including collagen and cellulose fibers as well as fibers based on copolymers of polyethylene and polypropylene are discussed.

  18. Dietary sources of fiber intake in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sardinha, Aline Nascimento; Canella, Daniela Silva; Martins, Ana Paula Bortoletto; Claro, Rafael Moreira; Levy, Renata Bertazzi

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the household availability of fibers in Brazil and to identify the dietary sources of this nutrient. Data from the 2008-2009 Household Budget Survey were used to estimate national household availability and density of fibers and also according to stratifications defined by income level, five regions and area (rural or urban). The contribution of the different food groups, classified by the nature, extent and purpose of processing, to total fibers available in Brazilian households was also determined. The mean density of per capita fibers was 7.6 g/1000 kcal. Higher availability and density of fibers was observed in households situated in rural areas and among low-income families. The main dietary sources of fiber were beans, bread, rice, fruit, vegetables and manioc flour. Fiber intake was found to be insufficient. Therefore, actions promoting a healthy diet are needed to improve the dietary quality of the Brazilian population.

  19. Trilobal Polyimide Fiber Insulation for Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, M.; Wachtel, J.; Hemberger, F.; Schultz, T.; Vidi, S.; Ebert, H.-P.

    2008-08-01

    Recent measurements have shown a record-breaking low thermal conductivity λtotal of less than 0.25 × 10-3 W·m-1·K-1 at temperatures of 120 K for an evacuated sample consisting of polyimide fibers with a trilobal fiber cross section. Existing models for the heat transport in fiber insulations cannot sufficiently describe fiber insulations consisting of fibers with non-cylindrical cross sections. In this article, a modification for the model for cylindrical fibers will be presented. The modifications for the trilobal cross section of the fiber will be explained and compared to the original cylindrical model. The results of the theoretical calculations will be discussed in comparison to experimental results of measurements performed with a guarded hot-plate apparatus at temperatures in the range from 120 K to 420 K.

  20. Optical fiber sensors for harsh environments

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Juncheng; Wang, Anbo

    2007-02-06

    A diaphragm optic sensor comprises a ferrule including a bore having an optical fiber disposed therein and a diaphragm attached to the ferrule, the diaphragm being spaced apart from the ferrule to form a Fabry-Perot cavity. The cavity is formed by creating a pit in the ferrule or in the diaphragm. The components of the sensor are preferably welded together, preferably by laser welding. In some embodiments, the entire ferrule is bonded to the fiber along the entire length of the fiber within the ferrule; in other embodiments, only a portion of the ferrule is welded to the fiber. A partial vacuum is preferably formed in the pit. A small piece of optical fiber with a coefficient of thermal expansion chosen to compensate for mismatches between the main fiber and ferrule may be spliced to the end of the fiber.

  1. High temperature structural fibers: Status and needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The key to high temperature structural composites is the selection and incorporation of continuous fiber reinforcement with optimum mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. Critical fiber property needs are high strength, high stiffness, and retention of these properties during composite fabrication and use. However, unlike polymeric composites where all three requirements are easily achieved with a variety of commercially available carbon-based fibers, structural fibers with sufficient stiffness and strength retention for high temperature metal, intermetallic, and ceramic composites are not available. The objective here is to discuss in a general manner the thermomechanical stability problem for current high performance fibers which are based on silicon and alumina compositions. This is accomplished by presenting relevant fiber property data with a brief discussion of potential underlying mechanisms. From this general overview, some possible materials engineering approaches are suggested which may lead to minimization and/or elimination of this critical stability problem for current high temperature fibers.

  2. Anelastic deformation of boron fibers. [vapor deposited fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    The flexural deformation behavior of vapor-deposited boron fibers was examined from 100 to 1100 K by stress-relaxation and internal friction techniques. Only strong thermally-activated anelasticity was observed with no evidence of plasticity up to surface strains of 0.006. The parameters governing the relaxation processes within the anelastic spectra of as-received and annealed fibers were determined. These parameters were correlated with X-ray structure studies to develop preliminary models for the sources of boron's anelasticity. The large relaxation strengths of the dominant Ia processes coupled with their relaxation times and energies suggest a sliding mechanism between certain basic structural subunits common to both the beta-rhombohedral and vapor-deposited boron structures.

  3. LiNbO3 Cylinder Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornreich, Philip

    2004-01-01

    We have successfully fabricate optical fiber with a thin layer of LiNbO3 at the boundary of the glass core and clear glass cladding. The construction of this fiber is based on our successful Semiconductor Cylinder Fibers (SCF). A schematic representation of a LiN bo, Cylinder Fiber. These fibers can be used as light modulators, sonar detectors and in other applications. The core diameter of the fiber is sufficiently small compared to the light wavelength and the indices of refraction of the core and cladding glasses are sufficiently close in value so that there is sufficient light at the core cladding boundary to interact with the LiNbO3 layer. This fiber functions best when just a single light mode propagates through the fiber. The idea for a LiNbO3 Cylinder Fiber came from Dr. Tracee Jamison of NASA. The optical properties of LiNbO3 can be changed with strain or the application of an electric field. Thus these fibers can be used as acoustic sensors as for example in a sonar. They can also be used as electric field operated light modulators. However, for this application the fibers would be made with a cross section in the form of a "D". The core with its surrounding LiNbO, layer would be close to the flat portion of the "D" shaped fiber. Two metal contacts would be deposited on the flat portion of the fiber on either side of the core. A voltage applied across these contacts will result in an electric field in the core region that can be used for modulating the optical properties of the LiNbO3 layer. To our knowledge this is the first ever LiNbO3 Cylinder Fiber made.

  4. LiNbO3 Cylinder Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    We have successfully fabricate optical fiber with a thin layer of LiNbO3 at the boundary of the glass core and dear glass cladding. The construction of this fiber is based on our successful Semiconductor Cylinder Fibers (SCF). A schematic representation of a LiNbO3 Cylinder Fiber is shown. These fibers can be used as light modulators, sonar detectors and in other applications. The core diameter of the fiber is sufficiently small compared to the light wavelength and the indices of refraction of the core and cladding glasses are sufficiently close in value so that there is sufficient light at the core cladding boundary to interact with the LiNbO3 layer. This fiber functions best when just a single light mode propagates through the fiber. The idea for a LiNbO3 Cylinder Fiber came from Dr. Tracee Jamison of NASA. The optical properties of LiNbO3 can be changed with strain or the application of an electric field. Thus these fibers can be used as acoustic sensors as for example in a sonar. They can also be used as electric field operated light modulators. However, for this application the fibers would be made with a cross section in the form of a 'D'. The core with its surrounding LiNbO, layer would be close to the flat portion of the 'D' shaped fiber. Two metal contacts would be deposited on the flat portion of the fiber on either side of the core. A voltage applied across these contacts will result in an electric field in the core region that can be used for modulating the optical properties of the LiNbO, layer. To our knowledge this is the first ever LiNbO, Cylinder Fiber made.

  5. Structural carbohydrates in a plant biomass: correlations between the detergent fiber and dietary fiber methods.

    PubMed

    Godin, Bruno; Agneessens, Richard; Gerin, Patrick; Delcarte, Jérôme

    2014-06-18

    We compared the detergent fiber and dietary fiber methods to analyze the cellulose and hemicellulose contents of commelinid and non-commelinid magnoliophyta biomass. A good linear correlation was found between both methods. Compared to the more accurate dietary fiber method, the detergent fiber method overestimates the content of cellulose, whereas the detergent fiber method, as compared to the dietary fiber method, overestimates and underestimates the hemicellulose content in commelinid and non-commelinid magnoliophyta biomass, respectively. Because of the good linear correlations, conversion factors were determined to predict the cellulose, hemicellulose, and xylan contents to be expected from the dietary fiber method, on the basis of analyses made by the faster, cheaper, and more commonly practiced detergent fiber method. Nevertheless, the dietary fiber method offers the advantage of providing the detailed composition of the hemicelluloses (xylan, arabinan, hemicellulosic glucan, galactan, and mannan), and that is of interest for biorefining purposes.

  6. Investigation of Polymer Resin/Fiber Compatibility in Natural Fiber Reinforced Composite Automotive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Huang, Cheng; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2010-01-01

    Natural fibers represent a lower density and potentially lower cost alternative to glass fibers for reinforcement of polymers in automotive composites. The high specific modulus and strength of bast fibers make them an attractive option to replace glass not only in non-structural automotive components, but also in semi-structural and structural components. Significant barriers to insertion of bast fibers in the fiber reinforced automotive composite market include the high moisture uptake of this lignocellulosic material relative to glass and the weak inherent interface between natural fibers and automotive resins. This work seeks to improve the moisture uptake and resin interfacing properties of natural fibers through improved fundamental understanding of fiber physiochemical architecture and development of tailored fiber surface modification strategies.

  7. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed

    Barker, R H

    1975-06-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  8. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, R H

    1975-01-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  9. Fiber tracking algorithm in combined PIV/PTV measurement of fiber suspension flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoseini, Afshin Abbasi; Zavareh, Zahra; Lundell, Fredrik; Anderson, Helge I.

    2013-10-01

    A new algorithm for fiber tracking in combined PIV/PTV measurement of fiber suspension flow is proposed based on SOM neural network and is examined by synthetic images of fibers showing 2D suspension flows. There is a new idea in the algorithm to take the orientation of fibers into account for matching as well as their position. In two-phase PIV measurements of fiber-laded suspension flows, fiber tracking has a key role together with PIV measurement of fluid phase. The essential parts of fiber tracking are to correctly identify and match fibers in successive images. The development of a method in order to determine the position and orientation of fibers using steerable filter with a reasonable accuracy have already been done, [3]. The present study is concentrated in the development of an algorithm for pairing fibers in consecutive images. The method used is based on the SOM neural network that finds most likely matching link in images on the basis of feature extraction and clustering. The fundamental concept is finding the corresponding fibers with the nearest characteristics, position and angle in images. It improves not only the robustness against loss-of-pair fibers between two image frames but also reliable matching at large numbers of dispersed fibers image using one more characteristics of fibers in image, namely their orientation, in addition to their coordinate vector.

  10. Numerical approach of the injection molding process of fiber-reinforced composite with considering fiber orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Thi, T. B.; Yokoyama, A.; Ota, K.; Kodama, K.; Yamashita, K.; Isogai, Y.; Furuichi, K.; Nonomura, C.

    2014-05-01

    One of the most important challenges in the injection molding process of the short-glass fiber/thermoplastic composite parts is being able to predict the fiber orientation, since it controls the mechanical and the physical properties of the final parts. Folgar and Tucker included into the Jeffery equation a diffusive type of term, which introduces a phenomenological coefficient for modeling the randomizing effect of the mechanical interactions between the fibers, to predict the fiber orientation in concentrated suspensions. Their experiments indicated that this coefficient depends on the fiber volume fraction and aspect ratio. However, a definition of the fiber interaction coefficient, which is very necessary in the fiber orientation simulations, hasn't still been proven yet. Consequently, this study proposed a developed fiber interaction model that has been introduced a fiber dynamics simulation in order to obtain a global fiber interaction coefficient. This supposed that the coefficient is a sum function of the fiber concentration, aspect ratio, and angular velocity. The proposed model was incorporated into a computer aided engineering simulation package C-Mold. Short-glass fiber/polyamide-6 composites were produced in the injection molding with the fiber weight concentration of 30 wt.%, 50 wt.%, and 70 wt.%. The physical properties of these composites were examined, and their fiber orientation distributions were measured by micro-computed-tomography equipment μ-CT. The simulation results showed a good agreement with experiment results.

  11. Numerical approach of the injection molding process of fiber-reinforced composite with considering fiber orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Thi, T. B. E-mail: yokoyama@kit.ac.jp; Yokoyama, A. E-mail: yokoyama@kit.ac.jp; Ota, K. E-mail: katsuhiro-kodama@toyobo.jp E-mail: yumiko-isogai@toyobo.jp E-mail: chisato-nonomura@toyobo.jp; Kodama, K. E-mail: katsuhiro-kodama@toyobo.jp E-mail: yumiko-isogai@toyobo.jp E-mail: chisato-nonomura@toyobo.jp; Yamashita, K. E-mail: katsuhiro-kodama@toyobo.jp E-mail: yumiko-isogai@toyobo.jp E-mail: chisato-nonomura@toyobo.jp; Isogai, Y. E-mail: katsuhiro-kodama@toyobo.jp E-mail: yumiko-isogai@toyobo.jp E-mail: chisato-nonomura@toyobo.jp; Furuichi, K. E-mail: katsuhiro-kodama@toyobo.jp E-mail: yumiko-isogai@toyobo.jp E-mail: chisato-nonomura@toyobo.jp; Nonomura, C. E-mail: katsuhiro-kodama@toyobo.jp E-mail: yumiko-isogai@toyobo.jp E-mail: chisato-nonomura@toyobo.jp

    2014-05-15

    One of the most important challenges in the injection molding process of the short-glass fiber/thermoplastic composite parts is being able to predict the fiber orientation, since it controls the mechanical and the physical properties of the final parts. Folgar and Tucker included into the Jeffery equation a diffusive type of term, which introduces a phenomenological coefficient for modeling the randomizing effect of the mechanical interactions between the fibers, to predict the fiber orientation in concentrated suspensions. Their experiments indicated that this coefficient depends on the fiber volume fraction and aspect ratio. However, a definition of the fiber interaction coefficient, which is very necessary in the fiber orientation simulations, hasn't still been proven yet. Consequently, this study proposed a developed fiber interaction model that has been introduced a fiber dynamics simulation in order to obtain a global fiber interaction coefficient. This supposed that the coefficient is a sum function of the fiber concentration, aspect ratio, and angular velocity. The proposed model was incorporated into a computer aided engineering simulation package C-Mold. Short-glass fiber/polyamide-6 composites were produced in the injection molding with the fiber weight concentration of 30 wt.%, 50 wt.%, and 70 wt.%. The physical properties of these composites were examined, and their fiber orientation distributions were measured by micro-computed-tomography equipment μ-CT. The simulation results showed a good agreement with experiment results.

  12. Monitoring Fiber Stress During Curing of Single Fiber Glass- and Graphite-Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madhukar, Madhu S.; Kosuri, Ranga P.; Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    The difference in thermal expansion characteristics of epoxy matrices and graphite fibers can produce significant residual stresses in the fibers during curing of composite materials. Tests on single fiber glass-epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite specimens were conducted in which the glass and graphite fibers were preloaded in tension, and the epoxy matrix was cast around the fibers. The fiber tension was monitored while the matrix was placed around the fiber and subjected to the temperature-time curing cycle. Two mechanisms responsible for producing stress in embedded fibers were identified as matrix thermal expansion and contraction and matrix cure shrinkage. A simple analysis based on the change in fiber tension during the curing cycle was conducted to estimate the produced stresses. Experimental results on single fiber glass- and graphite-epoxy composites show that the fiber was subjected to significant tensile stresses when the temperature was raised from the first to the second dwell period. When initial fiber pretension is about 60 percent of the fiber failure load, these curing-induced stresses can cause tensile fracture of the embedded fiber.

  13. Hollow steel tips for reducing distal fiber burn-back during thulium fiber laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Hutchens, Thomas C; Blackmon, Richard L; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2013-07-01

    The use of thulium fiber laser (TFL) as a potential alternative laser lithotripter to the clinical holmium:YAG laser is being studied. The TFL's Gaussian spatial beam profile provides efficient coupling of higher laser power into smaller core fibers without proximal fiber tip degradation. Smaller fiber diameters are more desirable, because they free up space in the single working channel of the ureteroscope for increased saline irrigation rates and allow maximum ureteroscope deflection. However, distal fiber tip degradation and "burn-back" increase as fiber diameter decreases due to both excessive temperatures and mechanical stress experienced during stone ablation. To eliminate fiber tip burn-back, the distal tip of a 150-μm core silica fiber was glued inside 1-cm-long steel tubing with fiber tip recessed 100, 250, 500, 1000, or 2000 μm inside the steel tubing to create the hollow-tip fiber. TFL pulse energy of 34 mJ with 500-μs pulse duration and 150-Hz pulse rate was delivered through the hollow-tip fibers in contact with human calcium oxalate monohydrate urinary stones during ex vivo studies. Significant fiber tip burn-back and degradation was observed for bare 150-μm core-diameter fibers. However, hollow steel tip fibers experienced minimal fiber burn-back without compromising stone ablation rates. A simple, robust, compact, and inexpensive hollow fiber tip design was characterized for minimizing distal fiber burn-back during the TFL lithotripsy. Although an increase in stone retropulsion was observed, potential integration of the hollow fiber tip into a stone basket may provide rapid stone vaporization, while minimizing retropulsion.

  14. High power fiber delivery for laser ignition applications.

    PubMed

    Yalin, Azer P

    2013-11-01

    The present contribution provides a concise review of high power fiber delivery research for laser ignition applications. The fiber delivery requirements are discussed in terms of exit energy, intensity, and beam quality. Past research using hollow core fibers, solid step-index fibers, and photonic crystal and bandgap fibers is summarized. Recent demonstrations of spark delivery using large clad step-index fibers and Kagome photonic bandgap fibers are highlighted.

  15. Sky subtraction with fiber spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissandrini, C.; Cristiani, S.; La Franca, F.

    1994-11-01

    The sky-subtraction performance of multifiber spectrographs is discussed, analyzing in detail the case of the OPTOPUS system at the 3.6-m European Space Observatory (ESO) telescope at La Silla. A standard technique, based on flat fields obtained with a uniformly illuminated screen on the dome, provides poor results. A new method has been developed, using the (O I) emission line at 5577 A as a calibrator of the fiber transmittance, taking into account the diffuse light and the influence of each fiber on the adjacent ones, and correcting for the effects of the image distortions on the sky sampling. In this way the accuracy of the sky subtraction improves from 2%-8% to 1.3%-1.6%.

  16. Transparent conductive graphene textile fibers.

    PubMed

    Neves, A I S; Bointon, T H; Melo, L V; Russo, S; de Schrijver, I; Craciun, M F; Alves, H

    2015-01-01

    Transparent and flexible electrodes are widely used on a variety of substrates such as plastics and glass. Yet, to date, transparent electrodes on a textile substrate have not been explored. The exceptional electrical, mechanical and optical properties of monolayer graphene make it highly attractive as a transparent electrode for applications in wearable electronics. Here, we report the transfer of monolayer graphene, grown by chemical vapor deposition on copper foil, to fibers commonly used by the textile industry. The graphene-coated fibers have a sheet resistance as low as ~1 kΩ per square, an equivalent value to the one obtained by the same transfer process onto a Si substrate, with a reduction of only 2.3 per cent in optical transparency while keeping high stability under mechanical stress. With this approach, we successfully achieved the first example of a textile electrode, flexible and truly embedded in a yarn. PMID:25952133

  17. Fiber based pathogen photoinactivating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Cesario, Thomas C.; Rentzepis, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    A new fiber based instrument described, which can be inserted through the nose, mouth, or other means into the body, has the potential to: (a) detect and image infected areas inside the body; (b) deliver drugs only onto the infected areas inside and outside the human body; (c) remove the excess drugs; (d) use the same fiber for both imaging and illumination with high intensity light of wavelengths varying from deep UV to IR to induce photoreactions of the drug with the pathogen of the infected area. This compact system utilizes much smaller quantities of drugs and radiation dose than conventional methods, eliminates the need for intravenous injection, and greatly decreases the toxic effects of drugs and irradiation to the human body including swelling, inflammation, nausea, fever, and sunlight sensitivity that lasts for about 30 days.

  18. Thermal lensing in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang

    2016-08-22

    Average powers from fiber lasers have reached the point that a quantitative understanding of thermal lensing and its impact on transverse mode instability is becoming critical. Although thermal lensing is well known qualitatively, there is a general lack of a simple method for quantitative analysis. In this work, we first conduct a study of thermal lensing in optical fibers based on a perturbation technique. The perturbation technique becomes increasingly inaccurate as thermal lensing gets stronger. It, however, provides a basis for determining a normalization factor to use in a more accurate numerical study. A simple thermal lensing threshold condition is developed. The impact of thermal lensing on transverse mode instability is also studied. PMID:27557260

  19. Transparent conductive graphene textile fibers

    PubMed Central

    Neves, A. I. S.; Bointon, T. H.; Melo, L. V.; Russo, S.; de Schrijver, I.; Craciun, M. F.; Alves, H.

    2015-01-01

    Transparent and flexible electrodes are widely used on a variety of substrates such as plastics and glass. Yet, to date, transparent electrodes on a textile substrate have not been explored. The exceptional electrical, mechanical and optical properties of monolayer graphene make it highly attractive as a transparent electrode for applications in wearable electronics. Here, we report the transfer of monolayer graphene, grown by chemical vapor deposition on copper foil, to fibers commonly used by the textile industry. The graphene-coated fibers have a sheet resistance as low as ~1 kΩ per square, an equivalent value to the one obtained by the same transfer process onto a Si substrate, with a reduction of only 2.3 per cent in optical transparency while keeping high stability under mechanical stress. With this approach, we successfully achieved the first example of a textile electrode, flexible and truly embedded in a yarn. PMID:25952133

  20. Hydrostatic pressure sensor based on fiber Bragg grating written in single-ring suspended fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Htein, Lin; Liu, Zhengyong; Tam, Hwa-Yaw

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel optical fiber consisting of a suspended-fiber with core and cladding diameter of ~ 5 and 30 μm and a supporting ring with thickness of ~ 9 μm. The outer diameter of the fiber was 125 μm and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with a length of 1-mm was inscribed on it. Hydrostatic pressure was measured by monitoring the Bragg wavelength shifts of 9-mm long single-ring suspended fiber. Pressure sensitivity was measured to be -18.92 pm/MPa, which is about five times higher than FBG on standard single-mode fiber.