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Sample records for 6061-t6 aluminum matrix

  1. Shock-loading response of 6061-T6 aluminum metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchio, K.S.; Gray, G.T. III

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to systematically study the influence of peak-shock pressure and second-phase reinforcement on the structure/property response of shock-loaded 6061-T6 Al, used as a baseline for comparison, showed no increased shock hardening compared to the unshocked material deformed to an equivalent strain. The reload stress-strain response of the shock-loaded 6061-T6 Al-alumina composites exhibit a lower reload yield strength than the flow stress of the starting composites. The degrees of strength loss was found to increase with increasing shock pressure. Wavespeed measurements of shock-prestrained specimens showed no degradation compared to unshocked specimens, indicating that particle cracking had not occurred under shock. This result was supported by optical metallography, which did not reveal cracked particles or particle decohesion in the shock-prestrained samples. The reload stress-strain response of the shock-prestrained composites, after resolutionizing and T6 reaging, showed that the composites recovered their full as-received preshock stress-strain responses. This result supports the finding that degradation in reload strength was attributable to matrix microstructural changes resulting from the shock. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination of the shock-loaded microstructures revealed that the matrix regions adjacent to the particle/matrix interface had undergone significant recovery and partial recrystallization resulting from the shock. This type of near-interface substructure is in stark contrast to the heavily dislocated near-interface dislocation substructure of the as-received composites. The loss of dislocation density (i.e., strain hardening) in the near-interface matrix region, resulting from the shock, highlights the importance of the thermally introduced dislocation substructure changes in establishing the strength of metal-matrix composites (MMCs).

  2. Fatigue design curves for 6061-T6 aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Yahr, G.T.

    1993-06-01

    A request has been made to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Committee that 6061-T6 aluminum be approved for use in the construction of Class 1 welded nuclear vessels so it can be used for the pressure vessel of the Advanced Neutron Source research reactor. Fatigue design curves with and without mean stress effects have been proposed. A knock-down factor of two is applied to the design curve for evaluation of welds. The basis of the curves is explained. The fatigue design curves are compared to fatigue data from base metal and weldments.

  3. Fatigue design curves for 6061-T6 aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Yahr, G.T.

    1993-01-01

    A request has been made to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Committee that 6061-T6 aluminum be approved for use in the construction of Class 1 welded nuclear vessels so it can be used for the pressure vessel of the Advanced Neutron Source research reactor. Fatigue design curves with and without mean stress effects have been proposed. A knock-down factor of two is applied to the design curve for evaluation of welds. The basis of the curves is explained. The fatigue design curves are compared to fatigue data from base metal and weldments.

  4. The effect of strain rate on the tensile properties of an Al[sub 2]O[sub 3p]/6061-T6 aluminum metal-matrix composite at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Chia Chaw Perng; Jiun Ren Hwang; Ji Liang Doong )

    1993-08-01

    Alumina (Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites have recently become candidates for structural materials because of their good specific modulus and strength, and are considered to be valuable materials for aerospace and automobile industry applications. In view of such application, they might be processed or applied in high strain rate loading conditions, such as explosive forming, blast loading and metalworking, etc. Knowledge of the mechanical behavior of the metal matrix composites under high strain rate loading is a prerequisite. However, not much work related to this topic has been done. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the strain rate on the tensile properties of the Al[sub 2]O[sub 3p]/6061-T6 composite at low temperatures.

  5. Corrosion of type 6061-T6 aluminum in mercury and mercury vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawel, S. J.; Manneschmidt, E. T.

    2003-05-01

    To examine potential corrosion of aluminum maintenance equipment in environments periodically containing mercury vapor and droplets of liquid mercury, c-rings of 6061-T6 aluminum have been exposed to a series of screening tests. The tests included vapor phase exposures as well as immersion of stressed and unstressed c-rings in the as-received condition and with chemical treatments to modify the passive film. Test conditions included the temperature range 0-160 °C, times of 3-30 days and, in addition to liquid Hg, various Hg vapor environments including residual air, residual helium and condensing conditions. The results indicate 6061-T6 is quite susceptible to pitting and cracking when immersed in Hg for even a brief time, but at least one chemical treatment was shown to improve corrosion resistance under immersion conditions. Type 6061-T6 was found to be essentially immune to vapor phase corrosion for the conditions examined, with only very minor development of pits or pit precursors.

  6. Prevention of non-ductile fracture in 6061-T6 aluminum nuclear pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Yahr, G.T.

    1995-06-01

    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Committee has approved rules for the use of 6061-T6 and 6061-T651 aluminum for the construction of Class 1 welded nuclear pressure vessels for temperatures not exceeding 149 C (300 F). Nuclear Code Case N-519 allows the use of this aluminum in the construction of low temperature research reactors such as the Advanced Neutron Source. The rules for protection against non-ductile fracture are discussed. The basis for a value of 25.3 MPa {radical}m (23 ksi {radical}in.) for the critical or reference stress intensity factor for use in the fracture analysis is presented. Requirements for consideration of the effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness are discussed.

  7. The corrosion protection of 6061-T6 aluminum by a polyurethane-sealed anodized coat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion protection of 6061-T6 anodized aluminum afforded by a newly patented polyurethane seal was studied using the ac impedance technique. Values of the average corrosion rates over a 27-day exposure period in 3.5 percent NaCl solutions at pH 5.2 and pH 9.5 compared very favorably for Lockheed-prepared polyurethane-sealed and dichromate-sealed coats of the same thickness. Average corrosion rates for both specimens over the first 7 days of exposure compared well with those for a hard anodized, dichromate-sealed coat, but rose well above those for the hard anodized coat over the entire 27-day period. This is attributed both to the greater thickness of the hard anodized coat, and possibly to its inherently better corrosion protective capability.

  8. Cavitation pitting and erosion of aluminum 6061-T6 in mineral oil water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Cavitation erosion studies of aluminum 6061-T6 in mineral oil and in ordinary tap water are presented. The maximum erosion rate (MDPR, or mean depth of penetration rate) in mineral oil was about four times that in water. The MDPR in mineral oil decreased continuously with time, but the MDPR in water remained approximately constant. The cavitation pits in mineral oil were of smaller diameter and depth than the pits in water. Treating the pits as spherical segments, we computed the radius r of the sphere. The logarithm of h/a, where h is the pit depth and 2a is the top width of the pit, was linear when plotted against the logarithm of 2r/h - 1.

  9. Vertical Compensation Friction Stir Welding of 6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shude; Meng, Xiangchen; Xing, Jingwei; Ma, Lin; Gao, Shuangsheng

    2016-09-01

    Vertical compensation friction stir welding (VCFSW) was proposed in order to solve the adverse effect caused by a big gap at the interface between two welded workpieces. VCFSW was successfully applied to weld 6061-T6 aluminum alloy with the thickness of 4 mm, while 2024-T4 aluminum alloy was selected as a rational compensation material. The results show that VCFSW is difficult to get a sound joint when the width of strip is no less than 1.5 mm. Decreasing the welding speed is beneficial to break compensation strip into pieces and then get higher quality joint. When the width of strip is 1 mm, the tensile strength and elongation of joint at the welding speed of 50 mm/min and rotational velocity of 1,800 rpm reach the maximum values of 203 MPa and 5.2%, respectively. Moreover, the addition of 2024-T4 alloy plays a strengthening effect on weld zone (WZ) of VCFSW joint. The fracture surface morphology of joint consisting of amounts of dimples exhibits ductile fracture.

  10. CO2 laser beam welding of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy thin plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Akio; Kobayashi, Kojiro F.; Todaka, Hirotaka

    1997-12-01

    Laser beam welding is an attractive welding process for age-hardened aluminum alloys, because its low heat input minimizes the width of weld fusion and heat-affected zones (HAZs). In the present work, 1-mm-thick age-hardened Al-Mg-Si alloy, 6061-T6, plates were welded with full penetration using a 2.5-kW CO2 laser. Fractions of porosity in the fusion zones were less than 0.05 pct in bead-on-plate welding and less than 0.2 pct in butt welding with polishing the groove surface before welding. The width of a softened region in the-laser beam welds was less than 1/4 times that of a tungsten inert gas (TIG) weld. The softened region is caused by reversion of strengthening β″ (Mg2Si) precipitates due to weld heat input. The hardness values of the softened region in the laser beam welds were almost fully recovered to that of the base metal after an artificial aging treatment at 448 K for 28.8 ks without solution annealing, whereas those in the TIG weld were not recovered in a partly reverted region. Both the bead-on-plate weld and the butt weld after the postweld artificial aging treatment had almost equivalent tensile strengths to that of the base plate.

  11. Erosion of aluminum 6061-T6 under cavitation attack in mineral oil and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    Studies of the erosion of aluminum 6061-T6 under cavitation attack in distilled water, ordinary tap water and a viscous mineral oil are presented. The mean depth of penetration for the mineral oil was about 40 percent of that for water at the end of a 40 min test. The mean depth of penetration and its rate did not differ significantly for distilled and tap water. The mean depth of penetration rate for both distilled and tap water increased to a maximum and then decreased with test duration, while that for mineral oil had a maximum during the initial period. The ratio h/2a of the pit depth h to the pit diameter 2a varied from 0.04 to 0.13 in water and from 0.06 to 0.20 in mineral oil. Scanning electron microscopy indicates that the pits are initially formed over the grain boundaries and precipitates while the surface grains are deformed under cavitation attack.

  12. Thermal-mechanical modeling and experimental validation of weld solidification cracking in 6061-T6 aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Dike, J.J.; Brooks, J.A.; Bammann, D.J.; Li, M.

    1997-12-31

    Finite element simulation using an internal state variable constitutive model coupled with a void growth and damage model are used to study weld solidification cracking of 6061-T6 aluminum. Calculated results are compared with data from an experimental program determining the locations of failure as a function of weld process parameters and specimen geometry. Two types of weld solidification cracking specimen were studied. One specimen, in which cracking did not occur, was used to evaluate finite element simulations of the thermal response and calculations of average strain across the weld. The other specimen type was used to determine the location of crack initiation as a function of weld process parameters. This information was used to evaluate the finite element simulations of weld solidification cracking. A solidification model which includes dendrite tip and eutectic undercooling was used in both thermal and mechanical finite element analyses. A strain rate and temperature history dependent constitutive model is coupled with a ductile void growth damage model in the mechanical analyses. Stresses near the weld pool are examined to explain results obtained in the finite element analyses and correlated with experimental observations. Good agreement is obtained between simulation and experiment for locations of crack initiation and extent of cracking. Some effects of uncertainties in material parameters are discussed.

  13. Recovery of Mechanical Properties of a 6061-T6 Aluminum Weld by Heat Treatment After Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Javier Serrano; Ambriz, Ricardo Rafael; López, Francisco Fernando Curiel; Vigueras, David Jaramillo

    2016-07-01

    The dilution effects in welds of a 6061-T6 (Al-Si-Mg) alloy obtained by the modified indirect electric arc (MIEA), using an ER4043 filler metal (Al-Si), and postweld heat treatment (PWHT) were analyzed. The soft zone (55 to 70 HV0.1) formed by the microstructural transformation in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) was eliminated. The hardness measurements were presented on a traditional microhardness profile and mapping representation. A hardening effect of the fusion zone was observed; the hardness values were above 120 HV0.1 and tended to be uniform. This behavior could be attributed to the chemical composition of the filler metal, the Mg migration from the base to the weld metal, and the reversible process of the PWHT, which promotes precipitation hardening. Improvement for yield (260 MPa) and tensile strength (310 MPa) of the MIEA joints was observed; these values were similar to those obtained for the base metal. However, the presence of porosity in the fusion zone limits the ductility of the joints (4.3 pct). Even though the yield and tensile strengths of the base metal and welded joints were similar, the stress concentration due to porosity in the weld metal generated data dispersion in fatigue life. As a consequence, the high-cycle fatigue life decreases with respect to the base metal. In contrast, when the crack propagates under elastic conditions, the crack-tip singularity is affected by the porosity in the weld metal (stress liberator). This aspect, in conjunction with the hardening effect in joints subjected to PWHT, improves the fatigue crack growth rate when compared to the as-welded condition.

  14. Effect of laser peening with different energies on fatigue fracture evolution of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, J.; Huang, S.; Zhou, J. Z.; Lu, J. Z.; Xu, S. Q.; Zhang, H. F.

    2016-03-01

    To deeply understand the effect of laser peening (LP) with different laser pulse energies on 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, the fatigue fracture morphologies evolution process at various fatigue crack growth (FCG) stages and the corresponding strengthen mechanism were investigated. At the initial stage of FCG, more fatigue micro-cliffs were found after LP, while the fatigue striation spacing simultaneously reduced. A "stop-continue" phenomenon of crack propagation was discovered for laser peened samples. The fatigue striation spacing at the middle stage of FCG increased significantly while compared with that at the initial stage, in addition, the fatigue striation spacing decreased with an increase in laser pulse energy. Fracture morphologies in transition region of laser peened samples exhibit a mixing fracture characteristic of striations and dimples. The laser peened sample with laser pulse energy of 7 J presents more circuitous growing paths. Due to the complex stress state induced by LP, dimples with different sizes appeared in the final fracture region.

  15. Mechanical Characteristics of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy 6061 T6 Formed by Arc and Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astarita, A.; Squillace, A.; Nele, L.

    2016-01-01

    Butt welds formed by arc welding in inert gas with nonconsumable electrode (tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding) and by friction stir welding (FSW) from aluminum alloy AA6061 T6 are studied. Comparative analysis of the structures and mechanical properties of the welded joints is performed using the results of optical and electron microscopy, tensile tests, tests for residual bending ductility, and measurements of microhardness. The changes in the microstructure in different zones and the degrees of degradation of the mechanical properties after the welding are determined. It is shown that the size of the tool for the friction stir welding affects the properties of the welds. Quantitative results showing the relation between the microscopic behavior of the alloy and the welding-induced changes in the microstructure are obtained. Friction stir welding is shown to provide higher properties of the welds.

  16. Effect of Welding Speeds on Mechanical Properties of Level Compensation Friction Stir Welded 6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Quan; Yue, Yumei; Ji, Shude; Li, Zhengwei; Gao, Shuangsheng

    2016-04-01

    In order to eliminate the flash, arc corrugation and concave in weld zone, level compensation friction stir welding (LCFSW) was put forward and successfully applied to weld 6061-T6 aluminum alloy with varied welding speed at a constant tool rotational speed of 1,800 rpm in the present study. The glossy joint with equal thickness of base material can be attained, and the shoulder affected zone (SAZ) was obviously reduced. The results of transverse tensile test indicate that the tensile strength and elongation reach the maximum values of 248 MPa and 7.1% when the welding speed is 600 mm/min. The microhardness of weld nugget (WN) is lower than that of base material. The tensile fracture position locates at the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the advancing side (AS), where the microhardness is the minimum. The fracture surface morphology represents the typical ductile fracture.

  17. The mechanical response of a 6061-T6 Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} metal matrix composite at high rates of deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, S.; Chichili, D.R.; Ramesh, K.T.

    1995-12-01

    The mechanical properties of a 6061-T6 aluminum alloy reinforced with a 20 vol% fraction of alumina particles and of an unreinforced 6061-T6 alloy are studied over a range of strain rates (10{sup {minus}4} to 6 {times} 10{sup 5} s{sup {minus}1}) using quasistatic compression, compression and torsion Kolsky Bars, and high strain rate pressure-shear plate impact. At a given strain rate the composite displays increased strength but essentially the same strain hardening as the matrix. However, the composite displays a stronger rate-sensitivity than does the unreinforced alloy at high rates of deformation (> 10{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1}). The rate-sensitivity of the unreinforced alloy is shown to be largely the result of the imposed strain rate rather than of the rate history. For quasistatic deformations, a model proposed by Bao et al. (1991) describes the behavior of the composite fairly accurately given the behavior of the unreinforced alloy. This paper presents an extension of the model that is able to predict the dynamic behavior of the composite given the dynamic response of the monolithic alloy.

  18. Full Field Measurement of The Dynamic Response of AA6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy under High Strain Rate Compression and Torsion Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odoh, Daniel Oghenekewhe Oluwatobi

    The dynamic response of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy under high strain rate loading in compression and torsion loading conditions was studied using the split Hopkinson pressure bar, the Kolsky torsion bar, and the high speed digital image correlation system. AA6061-T6 alloy, the most widely used in the AA6000 series, is a multi-purpose Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy containing about 0.4 % wt. of Cu and other alloying additives. The properties of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy including medium to high strength, good fracture toughness, and high corrosion resistance make it to find application in high performance structures such as the automotive parts, panels, and armored carriers. In this work, the effect of strain rate during dynamic test on formation of adiabatic shear bands in AA6061-T6 alloy was investigated. A post deformation analysis of the tested specimen was performed in order to determine the damage evolution and strain localization along the narrow adiabatic shear bands within the specimen. The formation of an adiabatic shear band in the aluminum alloy tested was found to depend on the strain rate at which the test was conducted. Stress, strain, and strain rate data obtained from the elastic waves in the compression and torsion bar tests were also compared with those obtained using the high speed digital cameras. Results show good agreement between both measurement techniques with the 3D digital image correlation technique giving a slightly lower result. Scanning and electron microscopy results show that both deformed and transformed bands can be formed in AA6061-T6 alloy during dynamic loading. The type of adiabatic shear band formed depends on the strain rate at which test was performed.

  19. Quench sensitivity of hot extruded 6061-T6 and 6069-T6 aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bergsma, S C; Kassner, M E; Li, X; Rosen, R S

    2000-08-08

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the quench sensitivity of mechanical properties of hot extruded 6061 and 6069 aluminum alloys. The relationship between mechanical properties and quench delzty time at various temperatures between 200-500 C was determined. It was concluded that the 6069-T6 was somewhat more quench sensitive than 6061, which may be consistent with the composition difference.

  20. Angular distortion and through-thickness residual stress distribution in the friction-stir processed 6061-T6 aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Choo, Hahn; Brown, D. W.; Feng, Zhili; Liaw, Peter K; Hubbard, Camden R

    2006-01-01

    Residual stresses were measured through the thickness of friction-stir processed (FSP) 6061-T6 aluminum-alloy plates using neutron diffraction. Two different specimens were prepared to study the relationship between residual stress distributions through the thickness of the plate and angular distortion: (Case 1) a plate processed with both stirring pin and tool shoulder, i.e., a typical FSP plate subjected to both plastic deformation and frictional heat, and (Case 2) a plate processed only with the tool shoulder, i.e., subjected mainly to the frictional heating. The measured residual stress profiles show relatively small through-thickness residual stress variations in Case 1, while there is a significant through-thickness residual stress variations in Case 2. The main cause of the geometric angular distortion could be related to the non-uniform distribution of the frictional heat generated by the tool shoulder leading to the asymmetric distributions of the residual stress through the thickness of the FSP plate.

  1. Ultrasonic Fatigue Endurance of Aluminum Alloy AISI 6061-T6 on Pre-corroded and Non-corroded Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez Almaraz, Gonzalo M.; Dueñas Aburto, Antonio; Correa Gómez, Erasmo

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonic fatigue tests are carried out on aluminum alloy 6061-T6 in order to analyze the fatigue endurance behavior under artificial pre-corrosion attack by hydrochloric acid for the pH concentrations of 0.47 and 0.80. The pre-corrosion attack is used to simulate the long-time environmental effect and the corresponding decay of fatigue life in regard to non-corroded specimens. Experimental results show that ultrasonic fatigue endurance under these two degrees of pre-corrosion attack decreases dramatically. Furthermore, it is observed that crack initiation is frequently associated with one or several pre-corrosion pitting holes at the specimen surface. Pitting holes are assumed to be semi-hemispherical and the stress concentration factors are evaluated taking into account the size and proximity of two crack initiation pitting holes. The crack growth rates are obtained for the pre-corroded specimens and compared to the non-corroded specimen. Finally, conclusions are listed concerning ultrasonic fatigue endurance of testing specimens, together with the fracture surfaces, crack paths, and crack growth rates.

  2. Effect of laser shot peening on precipitation hardened aluminum alloy 6061-T6 using low energy laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyajith, S.; Kalainathan, S.

    2012-03-01

    Mechanical properties of engineering material can be improved by introducing compressive residual stress on the material surface and refinement of their microstructure. Variety of mechanical process such as shot peening, water jet peening, ultrasonic peening, laser shot peening were developed in the last decades on this contrast. Among these, lasers shot peening emerged as a novel industrial treatment to improve the crack resistance of turbine blades and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenic stainless steel in power plants. In this study we successfully performed laser shot peening on precipitation hardened aluminum alloy 6061-T6 with low energy (300 mJ, 1064 nm) Nd:YAG laser using different pulse densities of 22 pulses/mm 2 and 32 pulses/mm 2. Residual stress evaluation based on X-ray diffraction sin 2 ψ method indicates a maximum of 190% percentage increase on surface compressive stress. Depth profile of micro-hardness shows the impact of laser generated shock wave up to 1.2 mm from the surface. Apart from that, the crystalline size and micro-strain on the laser shot peened surfaces have been investigated and compared with the unpeened surface using X-ray diffraction in conjunction with line broadening analysis through the Williamson-Hall plot.

  3. Characterization of mechanical shock waves in aluminum 6061-T6 using a high power laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Romero, J. R.; García-Torales, G.; Gómez Rosas, G.; Ocaña, J. L.; Flores, Jorge L.

    2016-09-01

    Strengthening techniques allows enhance metal physical properties. Laser shock peening (LSP) technique consist in a surface treatment which a high power laser pulse induces a compressive residual stress field through mechanical shock waves, increasing hardness, corrosion resistance, fatigue resistance. In comparison with the shot peening technique, LSP is a method that allows precision controlling the laser incidence on the surface under treatment increasing the surface quality in the surface under treatment. In this work, mechanical shock waves are induced in aluminum and measure using two different experimental approaches. First, using a PVDZ sensors and secondly, strain gauges are used. Experimental results are presented.

  4. Experimental measurement of the principal isentrope for aluminum 6061-T6 to 240 GPa.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jean-Paul

    2005-02-01

    Using a magnetic pressure drive, an absolute measurement of stress and density along the principal compression isentrope is obtained for solid aluminum to 240 GPa. Reduction of the free-surface velocity data relies on a backward integration technique, with approximate accounting for unknown systematic errors in experimental timing. Maximum experimental uncertainties are {+-}4.7% in stress and {+-}1.4% in density, small enough to distinguish between different equation-of-state (EOS) models. The result agrees well with a tabular EOS that uses an empirical universal zero-temperature isotherm.

  5. Experimental measurement of the principal isentrope for aluminum 6061-T6 to 240 GPa.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jean-Paul

    2006-02-01

    Using a magnetic pressure drive, an absolute measurement of stress and density along the principal compression isentrope is obtained for solid aluminum to 240 GPa. Reduction of the free-surface velocity data relies on a backward integration technique, with approximate accounting for unknown systematic errors in experimental timing. Maximum experimental uncertainties are +/-4.7% in stress and +/-1.4% in density, small enough to distinguish between different equation-of-state (EOS) models. The result agrees well with a tabular EOS that uses an empirical universal zero-temperature isotherm.

  6. A Micro-Electrochemical Study of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum 6061-T6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul E.; Calle, Luz M.

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of friction stir welded Aluminum alloy 606 1-T6 was studied using a micro-electrochemical cell. The micro-electrochemical cell has a measurement area of about 0.25 square mm which allows for measurement of corrosion properties at a very small scale. The corrosion and breakdown potentials were measured at many points inside and outside the weld along lines perpendicular to the weld. The breakdown potential is approximately equal inside and outside the weld; however, it is lower in the narrow border between the weld and base material. The results of electrochemical measurements were correlated to micro-structural analysis. The corrosion behavior of the friction stir welded samples was compared to tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded samples of the same material.

  7. Effects of Applied Load on 6061-T6 Aluminum Joined Employing a Novel Friction Bonding Process

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas E. Burkes; Neil P. Hallinan; Karen L. Shropshire; Peter B. Wells

    2008-12-01

    Friction bonding is under consideration for use in mass production of plate-type nuclear fuels for research reactors. This article discusses the effects of applied load (the most important process parameter for fabrication of these fuels) on temperature distribution, microstructure, and mechanical properties. Friction bonding experiments showed that tool geometry caused temperature gradients across the tool surface. Temperatures at the joint interface suggested the advancing side of the tool produced a majority of the frictional heat, while the retreating side of the tool mainly forged the plasticized material while bonding increased with applied load. The microstructure across the tool surface was also altered and, as a function of applied load, affected the mechanical properties. The 6061 aluminum alloy had mechanical properties close to a T4 temper after processing. Results documented in this article will aid in continual enhancement of friction bonding for nuclear fuel plate fabrication, and will hopefully contribute to continued advancement of friction stir welding (FSW) state of the art.

  8. Galvanic coupling between D6AC steel, 6061-T6 aluminum, Inconel 718 and graphite-epoxy composite material: Corrosion occurrence and prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Higgins, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of galvanic coupling between D6AC steel, 6061-T6 aluminum, Inconel 718, and graphite-epoxy composite material (G/E) in 3.5% NaCl were studied. Measurements of corrosion potentials, galvanic currents and corrosion rates of the bare metals using weight-loss methods served to establish the need for corrosion protection in cases where D6AC steel and 6061-T6 aluminum are galvanically coupled to G/E in salt water while Inconel 718 was shown to be compatible with G/E. Six tests were made to study corrosion protective methods for eliminating galvanic corrosion in the cases of D6AC steel and 6061-T6 aluminum coupled to G/E. These results indicate that, when the G/E is completely coated with paint or a paint/polyurethane resin combination, satisfactory protection of the D6AC steel is achieved with either a coat of zinc-rich primer or a primer/topcoat combination. Likewise, satisfactory corrosion protection of the aluminum is achieved by coating it with an epoxy coating system.

  9. Examination of irradiated 304L stainless steel to 6061-T6 aluminum inertia welded transition joints after irradiation in a spallation neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.A.

    2000-04-28

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) designed and fabricated tritium target/blanket assemblies which were irradiated for six months at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Cooling water was supplied to the assemblies through 1 inch diameter 304L Stainless Steel (SS) tubing. To attach the 304L SS tubing to the modules a 304L SS to 6061-T6 Aluminum (Al) inertia welded transition joint was used. These SS/Al inertia weld transition joints simulate expected transition joints in the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Target/Blanket where as many as a thousand SS/Al weld transition joints will be used. Materials compatibility between the 304L SS and the 6061-T6 Al in the spallation neutron environment is a major concern as well as the corrosion associated with the cooling water flowing through the piping. The irradiated inertia weld examination will be discussed.

  10. In-situ neutron diffraction measurements of temperature and stresses during friction stir welding of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Feng, Zhili; Wang, Xun-Li; Brown, D. W.; Clausen, B; An, Ke; Choo, Hahn; Hubbard, Camden R; David, Stan A

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of temperature and thermal stresses during friction stir welding of Al6061-T6 was investigated by means of in-situ, time-resolved neutron diffraction technique. A method is developed to deconvolute the temperature and stress from the lattice spacing changes measured by neutron diffraction. The deep penetration capability of neutrons made it possible for the first time to obtain the temperature and thermal stresses inside a friction stir weld.

  11. In-situ neutron diffraction measurements of temperature and stresses during friction stir welding of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhili; Wang, Xun-Li; David, Stan A; Choo, Hahn; Hubbard, Camden R; Woo, Wan Chuck; Brown, D. W.; Clausen, B; An, Ke

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of temperature and thermal stresses during friction stir welding of Al6061-T6 was investigated by means of in situ, time resolved neutron diffraction technique. A method was developed to deconvolute the temperature and stress from the lattice spacing changes measured by neutron diffraction. The deep penetration capability of neutrons made it possible for the first time to obtain the temperature and thermal stresses inside a friction stir weld.

  12. Prediction of hardness minimum locations during natural aging in an aluminum alloy 6061-T6 friction stir weld

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Choo, Hahn; Feng, Zhili; Withers, Prof Philip

    2009-01-01

    This study describes a simple model that can predict the evolution of hardness distribution as a function of natural aging time in a heat-treatable 6061-T6 Al alloy plate subjected to friction stir welding (FSW). First, two dimensional thermal distributions were simulated as a function of time in the FSW plate by finite element modeling. Second, the hardness changes during natural aging were measured as a function of aging time for a number of Al specimens that had been previously isothermally heat-treated to different hold temperatures in order to determine the natural aging kinetics. Finally, the simulated temperature profiles and the natural aging kinetics were correlated to predict the hardness profiles in the FSW plate. The predicted hardness variations are consistent with measured hardness profiles in that the location of minimum hardness moves away from the centerline as the aging time and/or heat input increases. The hardness variation was also related to the location of failure in cross-weld tensile samples.

  13. Modeling of Residual Stresses and Property Distributions in Friction Stir Welds of Aluminum Alloy 6061-T6

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A; Wang, Xun-Li; Sklad, Philip S

    2007-01-01

    An integrated thermal-metallurgical-mechanical model is used to analyze and provide insights into the formation of the residual stress and the changes in microstructure and property of Al6061-T6 friction stir welds. The simulations were conducted by means of a three-dimensional finite element model that accounts for the phenomena of frictional heating, weld microstructure and strength changes due to dissolution and reprecipitation of the hardening precipitate particles, and the mechanical workpiece/tool contact during the friction stir welding (FSW) process. The model predictions were confirmed by experimental measurement data from previous studies. For the friction stir welds investigated, it was found that the residual stress distribution is strongly dependent on the welding process parameters and the degree of material softening caused by welding. The recovery of material strength from natural aging does not increase the residual stress in the weld. The failure of friction stir weld under tensile load is controlled by the combination of the reduction in strength and the residual stresses in the heat affected zone (HAZ).

  14. Microstructure and mechanical properties of twin-wire arc sprayed Ni-Al composite coatings on 6061-T6 aluminum alloy sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji-xiao; Liu, Jing-shun; Zhang, Lun-yong; Sun, Jian-fei; Wang, Zhi-ping

    2014-05-01

    We have systematically studied the microstructure and mechanical properties of Ni-5wt%Al and Ni-20wt%Al composite coatings fabricated on 6061-T6 aluminum alloy sheet by twin-wire arc spraying under different experimental conditions. The abrasive wear behavior and interface diffusion behavior of the composite coatings were evaluated by dry/wet rubber wheel abrasive wear tests and heat treatment, respectively. Experimental results indicate that the composite coatings exhibit features of adhesive wear. Besides, the Vickers microhardness of NiAl and Ni3Al intermetallic compounds is relatively larger than that of the substrate, which is beneficial for enhancing the wear resistance. With the increase of annealing temperature and time, the interface diffusion area between the Ni-Al coating and the substrate gradually expands with the formation of NiAl3 and Ni2Al3 phases, and is controlled by diffusion of aluminum atoms. The grain growth exponent n of diffusion kinetics of the Ni-Al coating, calculated via a high-temperature diffusion model at 400, 480, and 550°C, is between 0.28 and 0.38. This satisfies the cubic law, which is consistent with the general theoretical relationship of high-temperature diffusion.

  15. In-situ Time-Resolved Neutron Diffraction Measurements of Microstructure Variations during Friction Stir Welding in a 6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Wang, Xun-Li; Ungar, Prof Tomas; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A; Clausen, B; Hubbard, Camden R

    2008-01-01

    The microstructure change is one of the most important research areas in the friction stir welding (FSW). However, direct observation of microstructure changes during FSW has been extremely challenging because many measurement techniques are inapplicable. Recently developed in-situ time-resolved neutron diffraction methodology, which drastically improves the temporal resolution of neutron diffraction, enables to observe the transient microstructure changes during FSW. We installed a portable FSW system in the Spectrometer for MAterials Research at Temperature and Stress (SMARTS) at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and the FSW was made on 6.35mm-thickness 6061-T6 Al alloy plate. At the same time, the neutron beam was centered on the mid-plane of the Al plate at 8 mm from the tool center (underneath the tool shoulder) and the diffraction peak was continuously measured during welding. The peak broadening analysis has been performed using the Williamson-Hall Method. The result shows that the dislocation density of about 3.2 x 10^15 m-2 duing FSW, which is the significant increse compared to the before (4.5 x 10^14 m-2) and after (4.0 x 10^14 m-2) the FSW. The quantitatively analysis of the grain structure can provide an insight to understand the transient variation of the microstructure during FSW.

  16. Microstructure Characterization of Magnetic-Pulse-Welded AA 6061-T6 by Electron Backscattered Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuan; Babu, Suresh; Zhang, P; Kenik, Edward A; Daehn, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    The grain boundary crystallographic misorientations of magnetic-pulse-welded (MPW) aluminum alloy (AA) 6061-T6 in linear and tubular configurations were examined using the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. A refined structure of heavily deformed grains with higher grain boundary angles was observed in linear welds. Significant spalling was observed away from the joints, in the interior of tubular welds. The results show the complex interaction of shock waves with the materials during this impact welding process.

  17. Electron beam welding of 6061-T6 covers to A356-T6 machined cast housings: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.P.

    1988-03-01

    An electron beam welding process was developed to replace the manual gas tungsten arc welding process for welding 6061-T6 aluminum covers to the A356-T6 cast aluminum machined housing for a Filter Pack Assembly. Design change recommendations must be incorporated prior to implementation of the electron beam welding process. 3 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Evaluation of Johnson-Cook model constants for aluminum based particulate metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilfi, H.; Brar, N. S.

    1996-05-01

    High strain rate and high temperature response of three types of aluminum based particulate metal matrix ceramic composites is investigated by performing split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) experiments. The composites are: NGP-2014 (15% SiC), NGT-6061 (15% SiC), and NGU-6061 (15% Al2O3), in which all the reinforcement materials are percentage by volume. Johnson-Cook constitutive model constants are evaluated from the high strain rate/high temperature data and implemented in a two dimensional finite element computer code (EPIC-2D) to simulate the penetration of an ogive nose tungsten projectile (23 grams) at a velocity 1.17 km/sec into the base 6061-T6 aluminum alloy and the composite NGU-6061. The simulated penetrations in the composite and in 6061-T6 aluminum agree with in 2%, in both materials, with the measured values.

  19. Corrosion behaviors of Al-Si-Cu-based filler metals and 6061-T6 brazements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, T. L.; Wang, S. S.; Tsao, L. C.; Chang, S. Y.; Chuang, T. H.; Yeh, M. S.

    2002-04-01

    The corrosion behaviors of a series of Al-Si-Cu-based filler metals and the 6061-T6 butt joints brazed with these filler metals are evaluated by polarization tests and immersion tests in a 3.5% NaCl aqueous solution. For comparison, a traditional Al-12Si filler metal is also employed. The results indicate that the Al-Si-Cu-based filler metals before brazing possess much higher corrosion current densities and pitting tendencies than the Al-12Si filler metal. However, brazing of the 6061-T6 alloy with an Al-12Si filler metal produces a wider butt joint, which, in this case, creates a more extensive corrosion region. Severe galvanic corrosion occurs at the 6061-T6 joints when brazed with Al-Si-Cu-based filler metals. However, in the case of the 6061-T6/Al-12Si brazements, selective corrosion of the Al-12Si eutectic phase can be observed. The bonding strengths of the 6061-T6 butt joints brazed with various filler metals are also measured before and after the immersion tests.

  20. High strength and high ductility behavior of 6061-T6 alloy after laser shock processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencalp Irizalp, Simge; Saklakoglu, Nursen

    2016-02-01

    The plastic deformation behavior of 6061-T6 alloy which was subjected to severe plastic deformation (SPD) at high strain rates during laser shock processing (LSP) was researched. In LSP-treated materials, the near surface microstructural change was examined by TEM and fracture surfaces after tensile testing were examined by SEM. An increase in strength of metallic materials brings about the decrease in ductility. In this study, the results showed that LSP-treated 6061-T6 alloy exhibited both high strength and high ductility. TEM observation showed that stacking fault (SF) ribbon enlarged, deformation twins formed and twin boundary increased in LSP-treated 6061-T6 alloy. This observation was an indication of stacking fault energy (SFE) decrease. Work hardening capability was recovered after LSP impacts.

  1. Galvanic corrosion of aluminum-matrix composites. Technical report No. 2, 1 Mar-31 Dec 90

    SciTech Connect

    Hihara, L.H.; Latanision, R.M.

    1991-02-01

    Galvanic-corrosion rates of Al-matrix composites were high in aerated chloride-containing solutions. Oxygen reduction was found to be the primary cathodic reaction. Aluminum corroded by pitting. The type of noble constituent (i.e., graphite, SiC, or TiB{sub 2}) also affected galvanic-corrosion rates. For example, results indicated that the galvanic-corrosion rate of Al should be about 30 times greater when coupled to graphite than when coupled to SiC or TiB{sub 2}. In dearated solutions, galvanic corrosion was negligible even if chlorides were present. The galvanic-corrosion rates were determined using the zero-resistance ammeter technique and from potentiodynamic polarization diagrams of ultrapure Al, 6061-T6 Al, graphite fiber, SiC, TiB2, and a commercial graphite fiber/6061-T6 Al metal-matrix composite.

  2. Cavitation pitting and erosion of Al 6061-T6 in mineral oil and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    The authors are currently carrying out a study of the cavitation erosion of different bearing metals and alloys in mineral oils were studied. The variations of weight loss, the pit diameter and depth due to cavitation erosion on Al 6061-T6 in mineral oil and water are presented.

  3. Quasi-steady state principle and in-situ real-time investigation of transient strains in 6061-T6 Al alloy using neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Brown, D. W.; Choo, Hahn; Clausen, B; David, Stan A; Feng, Zhili; Hubbard, Camden R; Wang, Xun-Li

    2007-01-01

    Neutron diffraction research has been limited to the "static" behavior of materials since the number of collected neutrons is insufficient to reach the adequate neutron counts in rapid changes of material state. In order to achieve the desired precision for the study of the transient material behavior, we propose an in-situ neutron-diffraction measurement method based on the quasi-steady state (QSS) phenomenon. The QSS principle was applied for the measurement of transient lattice spacing changes in a 6061-T6 aluminum alloy plate during thermo-mechanical processing.

  4. Experimental Investigation of Turning Parameters on AA 6061-T6 Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthiban, A.; Pugazhenthi, R.; Ravikumar, R.; Vivek, P.

    2017-03-01

    Turning is a broadly used material removal process to manufacture cylindrical products. The effects of various process parameters on turning like spindle speed, feed rate and depth of cut have been investigated to Impact on Material Removal Rate (MRR) and surface roughness (Ra) by using Response Surface Methodology. Experimental plan is performed by a Box-behenken design. The main purpose of this work is to study the effect of process parameters on Aluminium alloy AA6061-T6 surface, and to develop the mathematical model for Material removal rate and surface roughness on milling process. The quadratic model is best agreement with experimental data; finally the numerical optimization technique has been used to find out best optimum milling parameters. The optimal set of process parameters has also been predicted to maximize the MRR and minimize the surface roughness.

  5. Effect of Laser Shock Peening on surface properties and residual stress of Al6061-T6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimianrizi, A.; Foroozmehr, E.; Badrossamay, M.; Farrokhpour, H.

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of Laser Shock Peening (LSP) on Al 6061-T6. The confined LSP regime using Nd: YAG laser with 1200 mJ of energy per pulse and 8 ns of pulse width were applied. The treated specimens were evaluated by means of surface integrity with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope, microhardness, surface roughness and induced residual stress using an X-ray diffraction method. Results showed that by the use of LSP, compressive residual stress could effectively be induced on the surface of treated material. It was also revealed that the hardened depth of the material, up to a maximum depth of 1875 μm, could be achieved due to work hardening and grain refinement. In addition, surface roughness measurements showed that the LSP could deteriorate surface quality depending on the LSP parameters. The influences of beam overlap rates, number of laser shots and scanning pattern on microhardness as well as surface roughness are discussed.

  6. Structural-phase changes in Al6061-T6 alloy during high-dose N-2(+) implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukieh, M.

    2004-02-01

    N 2 + nitrogen ions with an energy of 50 keV were implanted into Al6061-T6 alloy with high dose (10(16) - 2 x 10(17) ions/cm(2)) at room temperature in order to form thin aluminium nitride (AlN) layers. The structural-phase changes in implanted Al 6061-T6 alloy were investigated using Rutherford back-scattering and transmission electron microscopic techniques. The results indicate that nitrogen implantation led to the formation of nitride phases (AlN, Al7N C-3(3)) which improved the surface hardness by 80% and increased the electrical resistance up to 1800% at maximum dose (2 x 10(17) ions/cm(2)).

  7. Parametric studies on tensile strength in joining AA6061- T6 and AA7075-T6 by gas metal arc welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishak, M.; Noordin, N. F. M.; Shah, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Proper selection of the welding parameters can result in better joining. In this study, the effects of various welding parameters on tensile strength in joining dissimilar aluminum alloys AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 were investigated. 2 mm thick samples of both base metals were welded by semi-automatic gas metal arc welding (GMAW) using filler wire ER5356. The welding current, arc voltage and welding speed were chosen as variables parameters. The strength of each specimen after the welding operations were tested and the effects of these parameters on tensile strength were identified by using Taguchi method. The range of parameter for welding current were chosen from 100 to 115 A, arc voltage from 17 to 20 V and welding speed from 2 to 5 mm/s. L16 orthogonal array was used to obtained 16 runs of experiments. It was found that the highest tensile strength (194.34 MPa) was obtained with the combination of a welding current of 115 A, welding voltage of 18 V and welding speed of 4 mm/s. Through analysis of variance (ANOVA), the welding voltage was the most effected parameter on tensile strength with percentage of contribution at 41.30%.

  8. A study on ultra-precision machining technique for Al6061-T6 to fabricate space infrared optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Geun-man; Lee, Gil-jae; Hyun, Sang-won; Sung, Ha-yeong; Chung, Euisik; Kim, Geon-hee

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, analysis of variance on designed experiments with full factorial design was applied to determine the optimized machining parameters for ultra-precision fabrication of the secondary aspheric mirror, which is one of the key elements of the space cryogenic infrared optics. A single point diamond turning machine (SPDTM, Nanotech 4μpL Moore) was adopted to fabricate the material, AL6061-T6, and the three machining parameters of cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut were selected. With several randomly assigned experimental conditions, surface roughness of each condition was measured by a non-contact optical profiler (NT2000; Vecco). As a result of analysis using Minitab, the optimum cutting condition was determined as following; cutting speed: 122 m/min, feed rate: 3 mm/min and depth of cut: 1 μm. Finally, a 120 mm diameter aspheric secondary mirror was attached to a particularly designed jig by using mixture of paraffin and wax and successfully fabricated under the optimum machining parameters. The profile of machined surface was measured by a high-accuracy 3-D profilometer(UA3P; Panasonic) and we obtained the geometrical errors of 30.6 nm(RMS) and 262.4 nm(PV), which satisfy the requirements of the space cryogenic infrared optics.

  9. The Young's Modulus of 1018 Steel and 6061-T6 Aluminium Measured from Quasi-Static to Elastic Precursor Strain-Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, Philip J.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Lovato, Manuel L.

    2009-12-01

    The assumption that Young's modulus is strain-rate invariant is tested for 6061-T6 aluminium alloy and 1018 steel over 10 decades of strain-rate. For the same billets of material, 3 quasi-static strain-rates are investigated with foil strain gauges at room temperature. The ultrasonic sound speeds are measured and used to calculate the moduli at approximately 104 s-1. Finally, 1D plate impact is used to generate an elastic pre-cursor in the alloys at a strain-rate of approximately 106 s1 from which the longitudinal sound speed may be obtained. It is found that indeed the Young's modulus is strain-rate independent within the experimental accuracy.

  10. Effects of aging treatment and heat input on the microstructures and mechanical properties of TIG-welded 6061-T6 alloy joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dong; Shen, Jun; Tang, Qin; Wu, Cui-ping; Zhou, Yan-bing

    2013-03-01

    Aging treatment and various heat input conditions were adopted to investigate the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of TIG welded 6061-T6 alloy joints by microstructural observations, microhardness tests, and tensile tests. With an increase in heat input, the width of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) increases and grains in the fusion zone (FZ) coarsen. Moreover, the hardness of the HAZ decreases, whereas that of the FZ decreases initially and then increases with an increase in heat input. Low heat input results in the low ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints due to the presence of partial penetrations and pores in the welded joints. After a simple artificial aging treatment at 175°C for 8 h, the microstructure of the welded joints changes slightly. The mechanical properties of the welded joints enhance significantly after the aging process as few precipitates distribute in the welded seam.

  11. Ultrasonic measurement of anisotropy and temperature dependence of elastic parameters by a dry coupling method applied to a 6061-T6 alloy.

    PubMed

    Augereau, F; Laux, D; Allais, L; Mottot, M; Caes, C

    2007-03-01

    A pulse-echo ultrasonic method is presented to measure elastic parameter variations during thermal loading with high accuracy. Using a dry coupling configuration dedicated to high temperature investigation, this technique has been applied on 6061-T6 aluminium samples up to 220 degrees C. Experimental settings are described to assess the measurement reproducibility estimated at a value of 0.2%. Consequently, the anisotropy of this aluminium between the rolling direction and two orthogonal axes has been clearly detected and also measured versus temperature. As regards the temperature dependence of these elastic parameters, these results are compared with the estimations of the Young's modulus obtained during mechanical tests in conditions of low cycle fatigue (LCF). The same linear variation versus temperature is found but with a shift of 7GPa. This difference has been classically attributed to systematic experimental error sources and to the distinction existing between dynamic and static elastic modulus.

  12. The effects of maintaining temperature in annealing heat treatment for an FSWed 6061-T6 Al alloy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Jun; Han, Min-Su; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2013-08-01

    The technological development of all kinds of lightweight transportation devices including vehicles, aircraft, ships, etc. has progressed markedly with the demand for energy saving and environmental protection. Aluminum alloy is in the spotlight as it is a suitable environmentally friendly material. However, deformation is a major problem during the welding process because aluminum alloy has a large thermal expansion coefficient. In addition, it is known that its corrosion resistance is excellent; nevertheless, in practice, considerable corrosion is generated and this is a major problem. To solve this problem, the friction stir welding (FSW) technology is applied extensively at various industrial fields as a new welding technique. This method involves a process in which materials are joined by frictional heat and physical force. Therefore, we evaluated improvements in mechanical properties and corrosion resistance through annealing heat treatment after FSW. The electrochemical experiment did not show a significant difference. However, the microstructure observation showed defectless, fine crystal particles, indicating excellent properties at 200-225°C.

  13. Recycling of aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Yoshinori; Izawa, Norihisa; Kuramasu, Yukio

    1999-03-01

    Separation of matrix metals in composites was tried on alumina short fiber-reinforced aluminum and 6061 alloy composites and SiC whisker-reinforced 6061 alloy composite for recycling. It is possible to separate molten matrix metals from fibers in the composites using fluxes that are used for melt treatment to remove inclusions. About 50 vol pct of the matrix metals was separated from the alumina short fiber-reinforced composites. The separation ratio of the matrix from the SiC whisker-reinforced 6061 alloy composite was low and about 20 vol pct. The separation mechanism was discussed thermodynamically using interface free energies. Since the flux/fiber interface energy is smaller than the aluminum/fiber interface energy, the replacement of aluminum with fluxes in composites takes place easily. Gases released by the decomposition of fluxes act an important role in pushing out the molten matrix metal from the composite. The role was confirmed by the great amount cavity formed in the composite after the matrix metal flowed out.

  14. Corrosive wear of SiC whisker- and particulate-reinforced 6061 aluminum alloy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.Y.; Ishii, H.; Chuang, T.H.

    1996-09-01

    Wear tests on SiC whisker- and SiC particulate-reinforced 6061-T6 aluminum matrix composites (SiCw/Al and SiCp/Al), fabricated using a high pressure infiltration method, were performed in laboratory air, ion-exchanged water and a 3 pct NaCl aqueous solution using a block-on-ring type apparatus. The effects of environment, applied load, and rotational (sliding) speed on the wear properties against a sintered alumina block were evaluated. Electrochemical measurements in ion-exchanged water and a 3 pct NaCl aqueous solution were also made under the same conditions as the wear tests. A comparison was made with the properties of the matrix aluminum alloy 6061-T6. The SiC-reinforced composites exhibited better wear resistance compared with the monolithic 6061 Al alloy even in a 3 pct NaCl aqueous solution. Increase in the wear resistance depended on the shape, size, and volume fraction of the SiC reinforcement. Good correlation was obtained between corrosion resistance and corrosion wear. The ratios of wear volume due to the corrosive effect to noncorrosive wear were 23 to 83 pct, depending on the wear conditions.

  15. Part I. Corrosion studies of continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites. Part II. Galvanic corrosion between continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites and 4340 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun

    Part I. The corrosion performance of continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites (CF-AMCs) was investigated in both the laboratory and field environments by comparing them with their respective monolithic matrix alloys, i.e., pure Al, A1-2wt%Cu T6, and Al 6061 T6. The corrosion initiation sites were identified by monitoring the changes in the surface morphology. Corrosion current densities and pH profiles at localized corrosion sites were measured using the scanning-vibrating electrode technique and the scanning ion-selective electrode technique, respectively. The corrosion damage of the materials immersed in various electrolytes, as well as those exposed in a humidity chamber and outdoor environments, was evaluated. Potentiodynamic polarization behavior was also studied. The corrosion initiation for the composites in 3.15 wt% NaCl occurred primarily around the Fe-rich intermetallic particles, which preferentially existed around the fiber/matrix interface on the composites. The corrosion initiation sites were also caused by physical damage (e.g., localized deformation) to the composite surface. At localized corrosion sites, the buildup of acidity was enhanced by the formation of micro-crevices resulting from fibers left in relief as the matrix corroded. The composites that were tested in exposure experiments exhibited higher corrosion rates than their monolithic alloys. The composites and their monolithic alloys were subjected to pitting corrosion when anodically polarized in the 3.15 wt% NaCl, while they passivated when anodically polarized in 0.5 M Na2SO4. The experimental results indicated that the composites exhibited inferior corrosion resistance compared to their monolithic matrix alloys. Part II. Galvanic corrosion studies were conducted on CF-AMCs coupled to 4340 steel since CF-AMCs have low density and excellent mechanical properties and are being considered as potential jacketing materials for reinforcing steel gun barrels. Coupled and

  16. Corrosion characterization of aluminum alloys treated with a new sealing process -- Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, G.; Miller, A.E.; Vasanth, K.L.

    1999-07-01

    Continuing an earlier investigation a new sealing solution that contains catalytic amount of chromium (1--10{micro}g) was developed. Aluminum alloys 2024-T6 and 6061-T6 coupons were anodized and sealed with the new sealing formulation. Passivation characteristics of these samples were evaluated using potentiodynamic anodic polarization tests. Al 6061-T6 coupons were further subjected to prohesion tests. In this paper, the results obtained from these tests are compared to those obtained by aluminum alloy treated with standard chromate conversion coating.

  17. Tests Of Polyurethane And Dichromate Coats On Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments to determine relative effectiveness of new polyurethane and more-conventional dichromate coat in helping to retard corrosion of anodized 6061-T6 aluminum. Concludes by suggesting greater protection against corrosion achieved by combining polyurethane-sealing method with hard-anodizing method and by increasing thickness of coat.

  18. Structure/property relations of aluminum under varying rates and stress states

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Matthew T; Horstemeyer, Mark F; Whittington, Wilburn R; Solanki, Kiran N

    2010-11-19

    In this work we analyze the plasticity, damage, and fracture characteristics of three different processed aluminum alloys (rolled 5083-H13, cast A356-T6, and extruded 6061-T6) under varying stress states (tension, compression, and torsion) and strain rates (0.001/, 1/s., and 1000/s). The stress state difference had more of a flow stress effect than the applied strain rates for those given in this study (0.001/sec up to 1000/sec). The stress state and strain rate also had a profound effect on the damage evolution of each aluminum alloy. Tension and torsional straining gave much greater damage nucleation rates than compression. Although the damage of all three alloys was found to be void nucleation dominated, the A356-T6 and 5083-H131 aluminum alloys incurred void damage via micron scale particles where the 6061-T6 aluminum alloy incurred void damage from two scales, micron-scale particles and nanoscale precipitates. Having two length scales of particles that participated in the damage evolution made the 6061-T6 incur a strain rate sensitive damage rate that was different than the other two aluminum alloys. Under tension, as the strain rate increased, the 6061-T6 aluminum alloy's void nucleation rate decreased, but the A356-T6 and 5083-H131 aluminum alloys void nucleation rate increased.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Ballistic Impact of Layered Aluminum Nitride Ceramic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    tile(s) Aluminum nitride (AlN) 163 a Polymer layers Polyurethane foam 18 b Backing metal Aluminum 6061-T6 (Al) 23 c Projectile Tungsten heavy alloy ... alloys . Composites B: Engineering. 2009;40:443–450. 9. Clayton JD. Two-scale modeling of effects of microstructure and thermomechanical properties on...the dynamic performance of an aluminum alloy . International Journal of Materials and Structural Integrity. 2010;4:116– 140. 10. Clayton JD. A

  20. The corrosion protection of several aluminum alloys by chromic acid and sulfuric acid anodizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion protection afforded 7075-T6, 7075-T3, 6061-T6, and 2024-T3 aluminum alloys by chromic acid and sulfuric acid anodizing was examined using electrochemical techniques. From these studies, it is concluded that sulfuric acid anodizing provides superior corrosion protection compared to chromic acid anodizing.

  1. 49 CFR 178.46 - Specification 3AL seamless aluminum cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... change in cylinder wall thickness, service pressure, or diameter; a 30 percent or greater change in water...) Size and service pressure. A DOT 3AL cylinder is a seamless aluminum cylinder with a maximum water... specimen 6061-T6 38,000 35,000 214 1 “D” represents specimen diameters. When the cylinder wall is...

  2. Aluminum-Alloy-Matrix/Alumina-Reinforcement Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashalikar, Uday; Rozenoyer, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Isotropic composites of aluminum-alloy matrices reinforced with particulate alumina have been developed as lightweight, high-specific-strength, less-expensive alternatives to nickel-base and ferrous superalloys. These composites feature a specific gravity of about 3.45 grams per cubic centimeter and specific strengths of about 200 MPa/(grams per cubic centimeter). The room-temperature tensile strength is 100 ksi (689 MPa) and stiffness is 30 Msi (206 GPa). At 500 F (260 C), these composites have shown 80 percent retention in strength and 95 percent retention in stiffness. These materials also have excellent fatigue tolerance and tribological properties. They can be fabricated in net (or nearly net) sizes and shapes to make housings, pistons, valves, and ducts in turbomachinery, and to make structural components of such diverse systems as diesel engines, automotive brake systems, and power-generation, mining, and oil-drilling equipment. Separately, incorporation of these metal matrix composites within aluminum gravity castings for localized reinforcement has been demonstrated. A composite part of this type can be fabricated in a pressure infiltration casting process. The process begins with the placement of a mold with alumina particulate preform of net or nearly net size and shape in a crucible in a vacuum furnace. A charge of the alloy is placed in the crucible with the preform. The interior of the furnace is evacuated, then the furnace heaters are turned on to heat the alloy above its liquidus temperature. Next, the interior of the furnace is filled with argon gas at a pressure about 900 psi (approximately equal to 6.2 MPa) to force the molten alloy to infiltrate the preform. Once infiltrated, the entire contents of the crucible can be allowed to cool in place, and the composite part recovered from the mold.

  3. Aluminum/Silicon Carbide Matrix Material for Targeting System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-21

    most common MMC is cast aluminum reinforced with various amounts of silicon carbide . LMMFC is currently machining very high precision components for...targeting systems from cast aluminum/ silicon carbide (AISiC) matrix material (with a very high SiC content) and are experiencing difficulty achieving the

  4. Aluminum / Silicon Carbide Matrix Material Machining for Targeting Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-21

    most common (MMC) is cast aluminum reinforced with various amounts of silicon carbide . (LMMFC) is currently machining very high precision components for...targeting systems made from cast aluminum/ silicon carbide (AISiC) matrix material (with a very high SiC content) and is experiencing difficulty

  5. Precipitation hardening of a novel aluminum matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez, Oscar Marcelo

    2002-09-15

    Deterioration of properties in cast aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) due to matrix/reinforcement chemical reactions is absent when AlB{sub 2} particles are used as reinforcements. This communication reports the fabrication of a heat-treatable AMC reinforced with borides. Final hardness values can be adjusted by solution and precipitation, which harden the composite. Evolution of the microstructure is concisely presented as observed by secondary electron microscopy. Precipitation hardening of the aluminum matrix, observed by microhardness measurements, has been corroborated by differential thermal analysis.

  6. Aluminum alloy welding and stress-corrosion testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, W.G.; Jimenez, E.

    1981-04-01

    The weldability, strength, and corrosion resistance of four 5XXX aluminum alloys electron beam welded to 6061-T6 aluminum alloy without a filler metal were evaluated. Adding filler metal raises weld energy requirements and makes the process more difficult to control. In this study, instead of using a filler metal, a high-magnesium 5XXX alloy was welded to the 6061 alloy. The four 5XXX alloys used (5456-H321, 5052-H34, 5086-H323, and 5083-H32) were selected for their high magnesium content which reduces weld crack sensitivity.

  7. Corrosion protection of aluminum metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, H.J.; Mansfeld, F.

    1997-12-01

    Corrosion protection of aluminum metal-matrix composites (MMC) by anodizing treatments was investigated. Electrochemical behavior of MMC without protection also was investigated. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements were used to characterize the properties of protective surface layers. Materials studied were Al 6061/SiC, alloy A356/SiC, Al 2009/SiC, Al 2014/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al 6061/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with various reinforcement concentrations. The MMC had similar corrosion (E{sub corr}) and pitting (E{sub pit}) potentials as the matrix alloy. The cathodic current density for oxygen reduction in 0.5% N sodium chloride increased for Al 6061/SiC MMC with reinforcement concentration, which was attributed to electrochemically active interfaces between the matrix and the reinforcement particles. Anodizing and hot-water sealing were less effective for MMC than for the matrix aluminum alloys. The reinforcement particles produced a more porous structure of the anodized layer for MMC. Improved results were noted for dichromate sealing, where chromium (Cr{sup 6+}) in the pores of the outer oxide acted as an inhibitor. The effectiveness of corrosion protection methods decreased with increasing reinforcement concentration and was a function of the matrix alloy but not of the reinforcement material. The observed reduction in corrosion protection was believed to result from corrosion-susceptible interfaces formed between the reinforcement particles and the matrix.

  8. Light weight and high strength materials made of recycled steel and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nounezi, Thomas

    Recycling has proven not only to address today's economical, environmental and social issues, but also to be imperative for the sustainability of human technology. The current thesis has investigated the feasibility of a new philosophy for Recycling (Alloying-Recycling) using steel 1020 and aluminum 6061T6. The study was limited to the metallurgical aspects only and has highlighted the potential of recycled alloys made of recycled aluminum and steel to exhibit substantially increased wear resistance and strength-to-weight ratio as compared to initial primary materials. Three alloy-mixtures are considered: TN3 (5wt% 1020 +95wt% 6061T6); TN5 (0.7wt% 1020 + 99.3wt% 6061T6); and TN4 (10wt% 6061T6 + 90wt% 1020). A Tucker induction power supply system (3kW; 135-400 kHz) is used to melt the alloy mixtures for casting in graphite crucibles. Heat treatment of the cast samples is done using a radiation box furnace. Microscopy, Vickers hardness and pin-on-disc abrasive wear tests are performed. Casting destroyed the initial microstructures of the alloys leading to a hardness reduction in the as-cast and solution heat-treated aluminum rich samples to 60 Hv from 140 Hv. Ageing slightly increased the hardness of the cast samples and provided a wear resistance two times higher than that of the initial 6061T6 material. On the steel rich side, the hardness of the as-cast TN4 was 480 Hv, which is more than twice as high as the initial hardness of steel 1020 of 202 Hv; this hints to strong internal and residual stress, probably martensite formation during fast cooling following casting. Solution heat treatment lowered the hardness to the original value of steel 1020, but provided about ten (10) times higher wear resistance; this suggests higher ductility and toughness of normalised TN4 as compared to 1020. In addition, TN4 exhibits about 25% weight reduction as compared to 1020. The actual recycling process and the effect of non-metallic impurities shall be investigated in future

  9. Fracture toughness of SiC/Al metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Parker, B. H.; Chu, H. P.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to evaluate fracture toughness of SiC/Al metal matrix composite (MMC). The material was a 12.7 mm thick extrusion of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy with 40 v/o SiC particulates. Specimen configuration and test procedure conformed to ASTM E399 Standard for compact specimens. It was found that special procedures were necessary to obtain fatigue cracks of controlled lengths in the preparation of precracked specimens for the MMC material. Fatigue loading with both minimum and maximum loads in compression was used to start the precrack. The initial precracking would stop by self-arrest. Afterwards, the precrack could be safely extended to the desired length by additional cyclic tensile loading. Test results met practically all the E399 criteria for the calculation of plane strain fracture toughness of the material. A valid K sub IC value of the SiC/Al composite was established as K sub IC = 8.9 MPa square root of m. The threshold stress intensity under which crack would cease to grow in the material was estimated as delta K sub th = 2MPa square root of m for R = 0.09 using the fatigue precracking data. Fractographic examinations show that failure occurred by the micromechanism involved with plastic deformation although the specimens broke by brittle fracture. The effect of precracking by cyclic loading in compression on fracture toughness is included in the discussion.

  10. Fracture toughness of SiC/Al metal matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Flom, Y.; Parker, B.H.; Chu, H.P.

    1989-08-01

    An experimental study was conducted to evaluate fracture toughness of SiC/Al metal matrix composite (MMC). The material was a 12.7 mm thick extrusion of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy with 40 v/o SiC particulates. Specimen configuration and test procedure conformed to ASTM E399 Standard for compact specimens. It was found that special procedures were necessary to obtain fatigue cracks of controlled lengths in the preparation of precracked specimens for the MMC material. Fatigue loading with both minimum and maximum loads in compression was used to start the precrack. The initial precracking would stop by self-arrest. Afterwards, the precrack could be safely extended to the desired length by additional cyclic tensile loading. Test results met practically all the E399 criteria for the calculation of plane strain fracture toughness of the material. A valid K{sub IC} value of the SiC/Al composite was established as K{sub IC} = 8.9 MPa square root of m. The threshold stress intensity under which crack would cease to grow in the material was estimated as delta K sub th = 2MPa square root of m for R = 0.09 using the fatigue precracking data. Fractographic examinations show that failure occurred by the micromechanism involved with plastic deformation although the specimens broke by brittle fracture. The effect of precracking by cyclic loading in compression on fracture toughness is included in the discussion.

  11. Development of a Precipitation-Strengthened Matrix for Non-quenchable Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Nhon Q.; Sorensen, Jim; Klier, Eric M.; Sanaty-Zadeh, Amirreza; Bayansan, Davaadorj; Seidman, David N.; Dunand, David C.

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in metal matrix composite-encapsulated ceramic armor show promise in lightweight armor technology. The system contains ceramic tiles, such as alumina, sandwiched between unreinforced aluminum or aluminum metal matrix composite (Al-MMC), which has a better toughness compared to the ceramic tiles. The sandwich structures should not be quenched during the fabrication, as the large mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion between the ceramic tiles and the unreinforced aluminum or Al-MMC creates internal stresses high enough to fracture the ceramic tiles. However, slow cooling of most commercial alloys creates large precipitates making solute unavailable for the formation of fine precipitates during aging. Here, we develop a non-quenched, high-strength metal matrix utilizing dilute Al-Sc-Zr alloys. We demonstrate that the dilute Al-0.09 Sc-0.045 Zr at.% alloy and the same alloy containing 0-4 vol.% alumina short fibers do not result in precipitation upon slow cooling from a high temperature, and can thereafter be aged to increase their strength. They exhibit a moderate strength, but improved ductility and toughness as compared to common armor aluminum alloys, such as AA5083-H131, making them attractive as armor materials and hybrid armor systems.

  12. Structure and thermophysical properties of aluminum-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, N. B.; Michurov, N. S.; Senaeva, E. I.; Bykova, T. M.

    2016-11-01

    The microstructure and thermophysical properties of aluminum-matrix composites have been studied, in which a granulated Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy has been used as the matrix, and SiC particles taken in the amounts of 10, 20, and 30 vol % have bee used as the filler. It has been shown that, with an increase in the amount of the filler, the temperatures of the solidus and liquidus of the composites and the values of the thermal expansion coefficient and density increase, whereas the heat capacity, thermal conductivity, and thermal diffusivity decrease. The heat capacity of the composite depends on the amount of the filler: upon heating from 25 to 500°C, the heat capacity of the composite with 10 vol % SiC increases by only 16%, while that of the composite with 20 vol % SiC increases by 19%; and, at 39 vol % SiC, it increases by 36%.

  13. Micro-finish hard anodized coatings on aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.

    1992-03-01

    The production of thin hard anodized coatings on Single Point Diamond Turned (SPDT) 6061-T6 aluminum has been studied. The investigation centered on producing a surface finish of less than 10 microinch after anodizing. By starting with a 2 microinch (AA) surface finish and controlling time, temperature, current density and solution chemistry, coatings with surface finishes of 8 microinch and a thickness of .0003 inch, are obtained. Surface roughness from several anodizing solutions is compared. The operational life of a PTFE sliding seal against a coated cylinder bore is used as verification of finish quality.

  14. Chromate-free corrosion resistant conversion coatings for aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G. ); Stoner, G.E. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a method for generating chromate-free corrosion resistant coatings on aluminum alloys using a process procedurally similar to standard chromate conversion. These coatings provide good corrosion resistance on 6061-T6 and 1100 A1 under salt spray testing conditions. The resistance of the new coating is comparable to that of chromate conversion coatings in four point probe tests, but higher when a mercury probe technique is used. Initial tests of paint adhesion, and under paint corrosion resistance are promising. Primary advantage of this new process is that no hazardous chemicals are used or produced during the coating operation.

  15. Chromate-free corrosion resistant conversion coatings for aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.; Stoner, G.E.

    1993-03-01

    We have developed a method for generating chromate-free corrosion resistant coatings on aluminum alloys using a process procedurally similar to standard chromate conversion. These coatings provide good corrosion resistance on 6061-T6 and 1100 A1 under salt spray testing conditions. The resistance of the new coating is comparable to that of chromate conversion coatings in four point probe tests, but higher when a mercury probe technique is used. Initial tests of paint adhesion, and under paint corrosion resistance are promising. Primary advantage of this new process is that no hazardous chemicals are used or produced during the coating operation.

  16. Corrosion control of cement-matrix and aluminum-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jiangyuan

    Corrosion control of composite materials, particularly aluminum-matrix and cement-matrix composites, was addressed by surface treatment, composite formulation and cathodic protection. Surface treatment methods studied include anodization in the case of aluminum-matrix composites and oxidation treatment (using water) in the case of steel rebar for reinforcing concrete. The effects of reinforcement species (aluminum nitride (AIN) versus silicon carbide (SiC) particles) in the aluminum-matrix composites and of admixtures (carbon fibers, silica fume, latex and methylcellulose) in concrete on the corrosion resistance of composites were addressed. Moreover, the effect of admixtures in concrete and of admixtures in mortar overlay (as anode on concrete) on the efficiency of cathodic protection of steel reinforced concrete was studied. For SiC particle filled aluminum, anodization was performed successfully in an acid electrolyte, as for most aluminum alloys. However, for AlN particle filled aluminum, anodization needs to be performed in an alkaline (0.7 N NaOH) electrolyte instead. The concentration of NaOH in the electrolyte was critical. It was found that both silica fume and latex improved the corrosion resistance of rebar in concrete in both Ca(OH)sb2 and NaCl solutions, mainly because these admixtures decreased the water absorptivity. Silica fume was more effective than latex. Methylcellulose improved the corrosion resistance of rebar in concrete a little in Ca(OH)sb2 solution. Carbon fibers decreased the corrosion resistance of rebar in concrete, but this effect could be made up for by either silica fume or latex, such that silica fume was more effective than latex. Surface treatment in the form of water immersion for two days was found to improve the corrosion resistance of rebar in concrete. This treatment resulted in a thin uniform layer of black iron oxide (containing Fesp{2+}) on the entire rebar surface except on the cross-sectional surface. Prior to the

  17. Microstructural Characterization of 6061 Aluminum to 304L Stainless Steel Inertia Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.A.

    1999-09-29

    'Microstructural characterization of 6061-T6 aluminum-to-Type 304L stainless steel inertia welds provided a technical basis to conclude that transition joints fabricated from such welds should satisfactorily contain helium/hydrogen gas mixtures. This conclusion is based on the lack of semi-continuous alignments of particles and/or inclusions at, or near, the aluminum-to-stainless steel interface. These dissimilar metal transition joints play a key role in the operation of an accelerator driven, spallation neutron source designed for the production of tritium. The Accelerator Production of Tritium system will produce tritium through neutron interactions with 3He gas contained in water-cooled, 6061-T6 aluminum pressure tubes. Current design concepts include thousands of thin-walled pressure tubes distributed throughout a number of aluminum-clad, lead-filled, blanket modules. The aluminum pressure tubes are connected to a tritium extraction and purification system through a stainless steel manifold. The transition from aluminum to stainless steel is made via transition joints machined from the aluminum-to-stainless steel inertia welds. The paper describes the baseline microstructural characterization of the welds, including optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and uses that characterization to evaluate potential gas leakage across the weld.'

  18. Ultrasonic Assessment of Impact-Induced Damage and Microcracking in Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Benjamin; Villars, Esther; Delmont, Frantz; Bowles, Kenneth J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The main objective of this NASA FAR project is to conduct ultrasonic assessment of impact-induced damage and microcracking in polymer matrix composites at various temperatures. It is believed that the proposed study of impact damage assessment on polymer matrix composites will benefit several NASA missions and current interests, such as ballistic impact testing of composite fan containment and high strain rate deformation modeling of polymer matrix composites. Impact-induced damage mechanisms in GLARE and ARALL fiber-metal laminates subject to instrumented drop-weight impacts at various temperatures were studied. GLARE and ARALL are hybrid composites made of alternating layers of aluminum and glass (for GLARE) and aramid- (for ARALL) fiber-reinforced epoxy. Damage in pure aluminum panels impacted by foreign objects was mainly characterized by large plastic deformation surrounding a deep penetration dent. On the other hand, plastic deformation in fiber-metal laminates was often not as severe although the penetration dent was still produced. The more stiff fiber-reinforced epoxy layers provided better bending rigidity; thus, enhancing impact damage tolerance. Severe cracking, however, occurred due to the use of these more brittle fiber-reinforced epoxy layers. Fracture patterns, e.g., crack length and delamination size, were greatly affected by the lay-up configuration rather than by the number of layers, which implies that thickness effect was not significant for the panels tested in this study. Immersion ultrasound techniques were then used to assess damages generated by instrumented drop-weight impacts onto these fiber-metal laminate panels as well as 6061-T6 aluminum/cast acrylic sandwich plates adhered by epoxy. Depending on several parameters, such as impact velocity, mass, temperature, laminate configuration, sandwich construction, etc., various types of impact damage were observed, including plastic deformation, radiating cracks emanating from the impact site

  19. Characterization of tribological behaviour of graphitic aluminum matrix composites, grey cast iron, and aluminum silicon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, Ahmad Reza

    In recent years a number of aluminum-silicon alloys and some graphitic aluminum matrix composites have been fabricated for potential tribological applications in the automotive industry, in particular for lightweight high efficiency internal combustion engines to replace conventional uses of cast iron. This study provides a systematic investigation for wear mechanisms in dry sliding of the graphitic aluminum-matrix composites (A356 Al-10%SiC-4%Gr and A356 Al-5%Al2O3-3%Gr) developed for cylinder liner applications. Two eutectic Al-Si alloys (modified with rare earth elements) developed for wear resistant engine blocks were also studied. The tribological behavior of grey cast iron (ASTM A30), which is a traditional material for engine components, was also investigated as reference. For graphitic aluminum matrix composites, a wear mapping approach has been adopted. Three main regimes: ultra mild, mild and severe wear regions were determined in the maps; additionally, a scuffing region was observed. In the ultra mild wear regime the wear resistance was primarily due to the hard particles supporting the load. It was shown that the onset of severe wear in graphitic composites occurred at considerably higher loads compared to A356 aluminum alloy and A356 Al-20% SiC composite. At the onset of severe wear, the surface temperatures and coefficient of friction of the graphitic composites was lower than that of A356 Al-20% SiC. At all testing conditions in the mild wear regime, a protective tribo-layer was formed, which by increasing the speed and load became more continuous, more compact, smoother, and harder. The tribo-layers were removed at the onset of severe wear. An experimental wear map of grey cast iron was constructed; it consisted of three wear regimes: ultra mild, mild and severe wear. In the ultra mild regime a compacted fine iron oxide powder formed on the contact. The onset of severe wear was started with local material transfer to the steel counterface, and

  20. Degradation Mechanisms in Aluminum Matrix Composites: Alumina/Aluminum and Boron/Aluminum. Ph.D. Thesis - North Carolina State Univ. at Raleigh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of fabrication and long term thermal exposure (up to 10,000 hours at 590 K) on two types of aluminum matrix composites were examined. An alumina/aluminum composite, was made of continuous alpha Al2O3 fibers in a matrix of commercially pure aluminum alloyed with 2.8% lithium. The mechanical properties of the material, the effect of isothermal exposure, cyclic thermal exposure, and fatigue are presented. Two degradation mechanisms are identified. One was caused by formation of a nonstoichiometric alumina during fabrication, the other by a loss of lithium to a surface reaction during long term thermal exposure. The other composite, boron/aluminum, made of boron fibers in an aluminum matrix, was investigated using five different aluminum alloys for the matrices. The mechanical properties of each material and the effect of isothermal and cyclic thermal exposure are presented. The effects of each alloy constituent on the degradation mechanisms are discussed. The effects of several reactions between alloy constituents and boron fibers on the composite properties are discussed.

  1. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Erin E.; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2016-06-01

    This work focuses on the microstructural characterization of aluminum to steel friction stir welded joints. Lap weld configuration coupled with scribe technology used for the weld tool have produced joints of adequate quality, despite the significant differences in hardness and melting temperatures of the alloys. Common to friction stir processes, especially those of dissimilar alloys, are microstructural gradients including grain size, crystallographic texture, and precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Because of the significant influence that intermetallic compound formation has on mechanical and ballistic behavior, the characterization of the specific intermetallic phases and the degree to which they are formed in the weld microstructure is critical to predicting weld performance. This study used electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Vickers micro-hardness indentation to explore and characterize the microstructures of lap friction stir welds between an applique 6061-T6 aluminum armor plate alloy and a RHA homogeneous armor plate steel alloy. Macroscopic defects such as micro-cracks were observed in the cross-sectional samples, and binary intermetallic compound layers were found to exist at the aluminum-steel interfaces of the steel particles stirred into the aluminum weld matrix and across the interfaces of the weld joints. Energy dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis identified the intermetallic layer as monoclinic Al3Fe. Dramatic decreases in grain size in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and weld zones that evidenced grain refinement through plastic deformation and recrystallization. Crystallographic grain orientation and texture were examined using electron backscatter diffraction. Striated regions in the orientations of the aluminum alloy were determined to be the result of the severe deformation induced by the complex weld tool geometry. Many of the textures observed in the weld

  2. Severe plastic deformation processing and high strain rate superplasticity in an aluminum matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, R.S.; McFadden, S.X.; Mukherjee, A.K.; Valiev, R.Z.; Islamgaliev, R.K.

    1999-04-23

    Metal matrix composites possess an attractive set of properties for structural applications. For example, reinforcement of conventional aluminum alloys with second phase ceramic particulates increases the stiffness, high temperature strength, etc. A drawback of ceramic phase reinforcement is that it makes machining of components difficult. Superplastic forming is quite attractive for hard-to-machine materials like composites. A number of aluminum matrix composites exhibit superplasticity. The most attractive feature of superplasticity in aluminum matrix composite is the high strain rate (10{sup {minus}2}--10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1}) for optimum ductility. This is significantly higher than the optimum superplastic strain rates of 10{sup {minus}4}--10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1} in conventional fine grained alloys. The optimum superplasticity in aluminum matrix composites is influenced by the thermo-mechanical processing. In the last five years or so, a number of aluminum alloys have been processes by severe plastic deformation (SePD). Severe plastic deformation processing leads to ultrafine grained aluminum alloys with attractive superplastic properties. In this short paper the authors report on successful processing of an ultrafine grained aluminum matrix composite by severe plastic deformation technique. The SePD processes 2009 Al-SiC{sub 2} composite exhibits high strain rate superplasticity.

  3. Aluminum-matrix composite materials with shungite rock fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikov, I. E.; Kovalevski, V. V.; Chernyshova, T. A.; Bolotova, L. K.

    2010-11-01

    A method is proposed for the introduction of shungite rocks into aluminum melts by mechanical mixing with carriers, namely, aluminum granules and reactive titanium powders taking part in exothermic in situ reactions. The structures of composite materials with shungite rock additions are studied, and a stabilizing effect of these additions on dry sliding friction is revealed.

  4. The mechanical properties measurement of multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manjula Pal, Hemant; Sharma, Vimal

    2015-05-15

    Nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite containing carbon nanotubes were fabricated using physical mixing method followed by cold pressing. The microstructure of the composite has been investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy techniques. These studies revealed that the carbon nanotubes were homogeneously dispersed throughout the metal matrix. The consolidated samples were pressureless sintered in inert atmosphere to further actuate a strong interface between carbon nanotubes and aluminum matrix. The nanoindentation tests carried out on considered samples showed that with the addition of 0.5 wt% carbon nanotubes, the hardness and elastic modulus of the aluminum matrix increased by 21.2 % and 2 % repectively. The scratch tests revealed a decrease in the friction coefficient of the carbon nanotubes reinforced composite due to the presence of lubricating interfacial layer. The prepared composites were promising entities to be used in the field of sporting goods, construction materials and automobile industries.

  5. Alkaline oxide conversion coatings for aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.

    1996-02-01

    Three related conversion coating methods are described that are based on film formation which occurs when aluminum alloys are exposed to alkaline Li salt solutions. Representative examples of the processing methods, resulting coating structure, composition and morphology are presented. The corrosion resistance of these coatings to aerated 0.5 M NaCl solution has been evaluated as a function of total processing time using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). This evaluation shows that excellent corrosion resistance can be uniformly achieved using no more than 20 minutes of process time for 6061-T6. Using current methods a minimum of 80 minutes of process time is required to get marginally acceptable corrosion resistance for 2024-T3. Longer processing times are required to achieve uniformly good corrosion resistance.

  6. Comparison of dislocation damping in aluminum-based metal-matrix composites with that in pure aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfenden, A.; Cook, L. S.

    The piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique was used at frequencies near 80 kHz and at temperatures in the range 300-1150 K to make measurements of mechanical damping, dynamic Young's modulus and strain amplitude on small specimens of pure aluminum and several metal matrix composites. The results permitted an elucidation of the dependence of damping level on strain amplitude and temperature. The study also permitted an examination of some aspects of the damping mechanisms, in particular dislocation damping.

  7. Pressureless infiltration of aluminum metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kajikawa, Y.; Nukami, T.; Flemings, M.C.

    1995-08-01

    Pressureless infiltration of ceramic preforms by molten aluminum is described. The preforms are SiC with varying amounts of particulate Al, Ti, and Ni. Infiltrants employed are pure Al and Al-12.5 wt pct Si. It is shown that a pressure differential within the preform is required for infiltration, and measurements are made of pressure changes in the preforms during infiltration. Results indicate that atmospheric pressure is essential for infiltration but that capillarity may play a role as well.

  8. In Situ Synthesis Aluminum Borate Whiskers Reinforced TiB2 Matrix Composites for Application in Aluminum Reduction Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gang; Yang, Jianhong

    2013-11-01

    The TiB2 matrix ceramics reinforced by aluminum borate whiskers (Al18B4O33 w) had been prepared by the pressureless sintering method. The mechanical properties and densification behavior of the TiB2 matrix ceramics were investigated. The results showed that Al18B4O33 w was in situ synthesized by the reaction of boehmite (AlOOH) and TiB2 powders during the sintering process. Increasing the sintering temperature had benefited for densification of the TiB2 matrix ceramics. Al18B4O33 w could increase the flexural strength and Vicker's hardness. It is obtained that the maximum value Vicker's hardness with 1.81 GPa and flexural strength with 82 MPa for samples sintered at 1600°C.

  9. Fabrication of carbon nanofiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composites assisted by aluminum coating formed on nanofiber surface by in situ chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Fumio; Masuda, Chitoshi

    2015-01-01

    The van der Waals agglomeration of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and the weight difference and poor wettability between CNFs and aluminum hinder the fabrication of dense CNF-reinforced aluminum matrix composites with superior properties. In this study, to improve this situation, CNFs were coated with aluminum by a simple and low-cost in situ chemical vapor deposition (in situ CVD). Iodine was used to accelerate the transport of aluminum atoms. The coating layer formed by the in situ CVD was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results confirmed that the CNFs were successfully coated with aluminum. The composites were fabricated to investigate the effect of the aluminum coating formed on the CNFs. The dispersion of CNFs, density, Vickers micro-hardness and thermal conductivity of the composites fabricated by powder metallurgy were improved. Pressure-less infiltration experiments were conducted to fabricate composites by casting. The results demonstrated that the wettability and infiltration were dramatically improved by the aluminum coating layer on CNFs. The aluminum coating formed by the in situ CVD technique was proved to be effective for the fabrication of CNF-reinforced aluminum matrix composites.

  10. Pathways to a family of low-cost, high-performance, metal matrix composites based on aluminum diboride in aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Aaron Christopher

    The continued development of a new family of metal matrix composites based on the in-situ formation of AlB2 flakes in liquid aluminum is described. First, a new synthesis technique for the preparation of high aspect ratio AlB2 is demonstrated. Borax and B2O 3 were reacted with molten aluminum to prepare high aspect ratio AlB 2. The focus then shifts to further understanding the Al-B alloy system. Work on the Al-B alloy system concentrated on the Al(L) + AlB 2 → Al(L) + AlB12 peritectic transformation and the growth of AlB2 in aluminum. The equilibrium peritectic transformation temperature was redetermined and found to be 950 +/- 5°C. The kinetics of the peritectic transformation were measured and reported for the first time. Cu, Fe, and Si additions were made to the alloy, and their effect on the peritectic reaction was investigated. All three elements shorten the time required for the peritectic reaction to occur. The effect of these three elements on flake growth was also investigated. They each caused a reduction in the size of growing AlB2 flakes. Finally two samples containing more than 30v% AlB2 in aluminum were prepared. Their properties were measured. The sample containing 40v% AlB2 exhibited a flexural strength of 200 MPa. The 35v% sample exhibited a flexural strength of 150 MPa. When the 35v% sample was tested in compression, it exhibited an ultimate strength close to 200 MPa. Its modulus varied from 200--300 GPa depending on the orientation of the loading axis with respect to the flake reinforcement.

  11. Ductile and strong aluminum-matrix titanium aluminide composite formed in-situ from aluminum, titanium dioxide and sodium hexafluoroaluminate

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Chung, D.D.L.

    1994-12-31

    An aluminum-matrix TiAl{sub 3}-particle (1--2 {mu}m) composite exhibiting high tensile ductility (22%), high tensile strength (235 MPa) and a grain size of 50 {mu}m was made by a new in-situ method involving reactions among Al, TiO{sub 2} and Na{sub 3}AlF{sub 6}, which were subjected to stir casting at 900 C. The strength and ductility were higher than those of an aluminum-matrix TiAl{sub 3}-particle Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-particle composite made in-situ by reacting Al with TiO{sub 2}, (without Na{sub 3}AlF{sub 6}). This is due to the ability of Na{sub 3}AlF{sub 6} to enhance the reduction of TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, thus resulting in more TiAl{sub 3} and a smaller grain size.

  12. Strengthening behavior of chopped multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, S.E.; Bae, D.H.

    2013-09-15

    Strengthening behavior of the aluminum composites reinforced with chopped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or aluminum carbide formed during annealing at 500 °C has been investigated. The composites were fabricated by hot-rolling the powders which were ball-milled under various conditions. During the early annealing process, aluminum atoms can cluster inside the tube due to the diffusional flow of aluminum atoms into the tube, providing an increase of the strength of the composite. Further annealing induces the formation of the aluminum carbide phase, leading to an overall drop in the strength of the composites. While the strength of the composites can be evaluated according to the rule of mixture, a particle spacing effect can be additionally imparted on the strength of the composites reinforced with the chopped MWCNTs or the corresponding carbides since the reinforcing agents are smaller than the submicron matrix grains. - Highlights: • Strengthening behavior of chopped CNT reinforced Al-based composites is investigated. • Chopped CNTs have influenced the strength and microstructures of the composites. • Chopped CNTs are created under Ar- 3% H2 atmosphere during mechanical milling. • Strength can be evaluated by the rule of the mixture and a particle spacing effect.

  13. Vacuum brazing of high volume fraction SiC particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Dongfeng; Niu, Jitai; Gao, Zeng; Wang, Peng

    2015-03-01

    This experiment chooses A356 aluminum matrix composites containing 55% SiC particle reinforcing phase as the parent metal and Al-Si-Cu-Zn-Ni alloy metal as the filler metal. The brazing process is carried out in vacuum brazing furnace at the temperature of 550°C and 560°C for 3 min, respectively. The interfacial microstructures and fracture surfaces are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy spectrum analysis (EDS). The result shows that adequacy of element diffusion are superior when brazing at 560°C, because of higher activity and liquidity. Dislocations and twins are observed at the interface between filler and composite due to the different expansion coefficient of the aluminum alloy matrix and SiC particles. The fracture analysis shows that the brittle fracture mainly located at interface of filler and composites.

  14. Effect of microstructure and notch root radius on fracture toughness of an aluminum metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent results on the effects of matrix aging condition (matrix temper) and notch root radius on the measured fracture toughness of a SiC particulate reinforced aluminum alloy are reviewed. Stress intensity factors at catastrophic fracture were obtained for both underaged and overaged composites reveal. The linear relation found between apparent fracture toughness and the square root of the notch root radius implies a linear dependence of the crack opening displacement on the notch root radius. The results suggest a strain controlled fracture process, and indicate that there are differences in the fracture micromechanisms of the two aging conditions.

  15. Extreme ultraviolet reflection efficiencies of diamond-turned aluminum, polished nickel, and evaporated gold surfaces. [for telescope mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malina, R. F.; Cash, W.

    1978-01-01

    Measured reflection efficiencies are presented for flat samples of diamond-turned aluminum, nickel, and evaporated gold surfaces fabricated by techniques suited for EUV telescopes. The aluminum samples were 6.2-cm-diameter disks of 6061-T6, the electroless nickel samples were formed by plating beryllium disks with 7.5-microns of Kanigen. Gold samples were produced by coating the aluminum and nickel samples with 5 strips of evaporated gold. Reflection efficiencies are given for grazing angles in the 5-75 degree range. The results indicate that for wavelengths over about 100 A, the gold-coated nickel samples yield highest efficiencies. For shorter wavelengths, the nickel samples yield better efficiencies. 500 A is found to be the optimal gold thickness.

  16. Interfacial characteristics for brazing of aluminum matrix composites with Al-12Si filler metals

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.P.; Chuang, T.H.

    1997-12-01

    Discussions concerning the interfacial reactions and characterizations in brazing aluminum matrix composites are documented in this study. Joints of alumina particulate reinforced 6061 aluminum matrix composites were made using an Al-12 (wt pct) Si filler metal by vacuum brazing. The resulted maximum bonding strengths were 75.4, 81.5, and 71.8 MPa for 10, 15, and 20 vol pct alumina reinforcement, respectively. The microstructural examinations revealed that the bonding strength was strictly related to the reinforced alumina particles and the reaction products presented at the joint interfaces. During brazing, Mg segregated at the joining interface and alumina/6061 Al interface. Further, reactions between alumina and 6061 Al matrix resulted in the formation of Mg-rich phases, such as MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and MgO, near the joining interface and the alumina reinforcement. The Si in the filler material penetrated into the metal matrix composites (MMCs) matrix and segregated at the alumina/6061 Al interfaces. This phenomenon can be confirmed by a joint between two alumina bulk specimens.

  17. Recycling of aluminum and caustic soda solution from waste effluents generated during the cleaning of the extruder matrixes of the aluminum industry.

    PubMed

    Tansens, Pieter; Rodal, Alberto T; Machado, Carina M M; Soares, Helena M V M

    2011-03-15

    Anodising industries use a concentrated caustic soda solution to remove aluminum from extruder matrixes. This procedure produces very alkaline effluents containing high amounts of aluminum. The work reported here was focussed on recycling aluminum, as aluminum hydroxide, from these effluents and regenerating an alkaline sodium hydroxide solution. Briefly, the method comprises a dilution step (necessary for reducing the viscosity of the effluent and allowing the subsequent filtration) followed by a filtration to eliminate a substantial amount of the insoluble iron. Then, sulphuric acid was added to neutralize the waste solution down to pH 12 and induce aluminum precipitation. The purity of the aluminum salt was improved after washing the precipitate with deionised water. The characterization of the solid recovered, performed by thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, indicated characteristics typical of bayerite. The proposal method allowed recovering 82% of the aluminum present in the wastewater with high purity (99.5%). Additionally, a sufficiently concentrated caustic soda solution was also recovered, which can be reused in the anodising industries. This procedure can be easily implemented and ensures economy by recycling reagents (concentrated caustic soda solution) and by recovering commercial by-products (aluminum hydroxide), while avoiding environmental pollution.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composite Reinforced by Carbothermally Reduced of Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Jamasri; Wildan, M. W.; Sulardjaka; Kusnanto

    2011-01-17

    The addition of fly ash into aluminum as reinforcement can potentially reduce the production cost and density of aluminum. However, mechanical properties of aluminum matrix composite reinforced by fly ash (MMC ALFA) have some limitations due to the characteristic of fly ash. In this study, a carbothermal reduction process of fly ash and activated carbon powder with particle size <32 {mu}m was performed prior to produce MMC ALFA.The process was carried out in a furnace at 1300 deg. C in vacuum condition under argon flow. Synthesis product was analyzed by XRD with Cu-K{sub {alpha}} radiation. From XRD analysis, it shows that the synthesis process can produce SiC powder. The synthesis product was subsequently used as reinforcement particle. Aluminum powder was mixed with 5, 10 and 15% of the synthesized powder, and then uni-axially compacted at pressure of 300 MPa. The compacted product was sintered for 2 hours in argon atmosphere at temperature variation of 550 and 600 deg. C. Flexural strength, hardness and density of MMC ALFA's product were respectively evaluated using a four point bending test method based on ASTM C1161 standard, Brinell hardness scale and Archimedes method. The result of this study shows that the increase of weight of reinforcement can significantly increase the hardness and flexural strength of MMCs. The highest hardness and flexural strength of the MMC product are 300 kg/mm{sup 2} and 107.5 MPa, respectively.

  19. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composite Reinforced by Carbothermally Reduced of Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamasri, Wildan, M. W.; Sulardjaka, Kusnanto

    2011-01-01

    The addition of fly ash into aluminum as reinforcement can potentially reduce the production cost and density of aluminum. However, mechanical properties of aluminum matrix composite reinforced by fly ash (MMC ALFA) have some limitations due to the characteristic of fly ash. In this study, a carbothermal reduction process of fly ash and activated carbon powder with particle size <32 μm was performed prior to produce MMC ALFA. The process was carried out in a furnace at 1300° C in vacuum condition under argon flow. Synthesis product was analyzed by XRD with Cu-Kα radiation. From XRD analysis, it shows that the synthesis process can produce SiC powder. The synthesis product was subsequently used as reinforcement particle. Aluminum powder was mixed with 5, 10 and 15% of the synthesized powder, and then uni-axially compacted at pressure of 300 MPa. The compacted product was sintered for 2 hours in argon atmosphere at temperature variation of 550 and 600° C. Flexural strength, hardness and density of MMC ALFA's product were respectively evaluated using a four point bending test method based on ASTM C1161 standard, Brinell hardness scale and Archimedes method. The result of this study shows that the increase of weight of reinforcement can significantly increase the hardness and flexural strength of MMCs. The highest hardness and flexural strength of the MMC product are 300 kg/mm2 and 107.5 MPa, respectively.

  20. Aluminum Matrix Composites Strengthened with CuZrAgAl Amorphous Atomized Powder Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, Jan; Rogal, Łukasz; Wajda, Wojciech; Kukuła-Kurzyniec, Agata; Coddet, Christian; Dembinski, Lucas

    2015-06-01

    The Al-matrix composites were prepared by hot pressing in vacuum of an aluminum powder with 20 and 40 wt.% addition of the amorphous Cu43Zr43Ag7Al7 alloy (numbers indicate at.%) obtained using gas atomization method. The amorphous structure of the powder was confirmed using x-ray diffraction, DSC, and TEM. The average size of mostly spherical particles was 100 μm, so the powder was sieved to obtain maximum size of 60 μm. The composites were prepared using uniaxial cold pressing in vacuum and at a temperature of 400 °C. The composites of hardness from 43 to 53 HV were obtained for both additions of the amorphous phase. They reached compression strength of 150 MPa for 20% of amorphous phase and 250 MPa for the higher content. The modest hardening effect was caused by crack initiation at Al/amorphous interfaces. The amorphous phase was only partially crystallized in the hot-pressed composites, what did not cause hardness decrease. The application of nanocrystalline aluminum powders obtained by high-energy ball milling for the matrix of composites allowed obtaining nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composites of size near 150 nm, strengthened with the amorphous powders, whose compression strength was near 550 MPa for the composite containing 40% of the amorphous phase and slightly lower for the composite containing 20% of the phase. They showed much higher ductility of 23% in comparison with 7% for the composite containing 40% amorphous phase. The distribution of the strengthening phase in the nanocrystalline matrix was not homogeneous; the amorphous particles formed bands, where majority of cracks nucleated during compression test.

  1. Aluminum-matrix composites with embedded Ni-Ti wires by ultrasonic consolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahnlen, Ryan; Dapino, Marcelo J.; Short, Matt; Graff, Karl

    2009-03-01

    [Smart Vehicle Workshop] This paper presents the development of active aluminum-matrix composites manufactured by Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing (UAM), an emerging rapid prototyping process based on ultrasonic metal welding. Composites created through UAM experience process temperatures as low as 20°C, in contrast to current metal-matrix fabrication processes which require fusion of materials and hence reach temperatures of 500°C and above. UAM thus creates unprecedented opportunities to develop adaptive structures with seamlessly embedded smart materials and electronic components without degrading the properties that make embedding these materials and components attractive. This research focuses on three aspects of developing UAM Ni-Ti/Al composites which have not been accomplished before: (i) Characterization of the mechanical properties of the composite matrix; (ii) Investigation of Ni-Ti/Al composites as tunable stiffness materials and as strain sensors based on the shape memory effect; and (iii) Development of constitutive models for UAM Ni-Ti/Al composites. The mechanical characterization shows an increase in tensile strength of aluminum UAM builds over the parent material (Al 3003-H18), likely due to grain refinement caused by the UAM process. We demonstrate the ability to embed Ni-Ti wires up to 203 μm in diameter in an aluminum matrix, compared with only 100 μm in previous studies. The resulting Ni-Ti/Al UAM composites have cross sectional area ratios of up to 13.4% Ni-Ti. These composites exhibit a change in stiffness of 6% and a resistivity change of -3% when the Ni- Ti wires undergo martensite to austenite transformation. The Ni-Ti area ratios and associated strength of the shape memory effect are expected to increase as the UAM process becomes better understood and is perfected. The Brinson constitutive model for shape memory transformations is used to describe the stiffness and the strain sensing of Ni-Ti/Al composites in response to

  2. Friction Stir Welding of SiC/Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    1999-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a new solid state process for joining metals by plasticizing and consolidating materials around the bond line using thermal energy producing from frictional forces. A feasibility study for FSW of Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) was investigated using aluminum 6092 alloy reinforced with 17% SiC particulates. FSW process consists of a special rotating pin tool that is positioned to plunge into the MMC surface at the bond line. As the tool rotates and move forward along the bond line, the material at the bond line is heated up and forced to flow around the rotating tip to consolidate on the tip's backside to form a solid state joint. FSW has the potential for producing sound welds with MMC because the processing temperature occurs well below the melting point of the metal matrix; thereby eliminating the reinforcement-to-matrix solidification defects, reducing the undesirable chemical reactions and porosity problems.

  3. On Poisson's ratio for metal matrix composite laminates. [aluminum boron composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Shuart, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The definition of Poisson's ratio for nonlinear behavior of metal matrix composite laminates is discussed and experimental results for tensile and compressive loading of five different boron-aluminum laminates are presented. It is shown that there may be considerable difference in the value of Poisson's ratio as defined by a total strain or an incremental strain definition. It is argued that the incremental definition is more appropriate for nonlinear material behavior. Results from a (0) laminate indicate that the incremental definition provides a precursor to failure which is not evident if the total strain definition is used.

  4. Spray-forming monolithic aluminum alloy and metal matrix composite strip

    SciTech Connect

    McHugh, K.M.

    1995-10-01

    Spray forming with de Laval nozzles is an advanced materials processing technology that converts a bulk liquid metal to a near-net-shape solid by depositing atomized droplets onto a suitably shaped substrate. Using this approach, aluminum alloys have been spray formed as strip, with technoeconomic advantages over conventional hot mill processing and continuous casting. The spray-formed strip had a flat profile, minimal porosity, high yield, and refined microstructure. In an adaptation to the technique, 6061 Al/SiC particulate-reinforced metal matrix composite strip was produced by codeposition of the phases.

  5. Corrosion behavior of a particulate metal-matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolini, L.; Brunella, M.F.; Candiani, S.

    1999-04-01

    The corrosion behavior of a particulate-reinforced metal-matrix composite (MMC) with an Al 6061-T6 (UNS A96061, Al-Mg-Si) matrix and 10 vol% alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) particles was studied. The material was tested in different extrusion and forging conditions. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out in aerated and deaerated sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions with concentrations from 0.06 N up to saturation to study pitting corrosion initiation. Three-month immersion tests were performed in aerated solutions. Results showed pitting corrosion initiated in aerated solutions, even for the lower chloride concentration. No significant influence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles on corrosion susceptibility of the matrix was observed. However, corrosion attacks occurred preferentially in the vicinity of the reinforcing particles. Extrusion or forging treatment did not affect corrosion behavior of the composite material significantly.

  6. Jet Electrochemical Machining of Particle Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites with Different Neutral Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackert-Oschätzchen, M.; Lehnert, N.; Martin, A.; Schubert, A.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional mechanical machining of particle reinforced aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) is challenging because the hard ceramic particles in the soft aluminum matrix lead to an increased tool wear. Furthermore, the mechanical and thermal impact during conventional machining affects the microstructure of the AMCs. Electrochemical machining (ECM) is an alternative method to machine AMCs. Based on anodic dissolution, ECM has a slight influence on the work piece material structure and is independent of material strength and hardness. So the microstructure of the work piece remains unaffected. One method of ECM is electrochemical machining with continuous electrolytic free jet (Jet-ECM). Hereby the electrochemical removal is localized by the geometry of the electrolyte jet. By moving the electrolyte jet micro-structures and microgeometries can be generated quickly and flexibly in metallic parts [1]. Another advantage of Jet-ECM is the low consumption of electrolyte which allows an easy and inexpensive change of electrolyte for investigations with different types of electrolyte. In this study AMCs reinforced with different amounts of SiC-particles are machined with two pH-neutral electrolytes using Jet-ECM. The results provide information about the suitability of the selected electrolytes for the machining of AMCs. In addition, the influence of the particle content on the electrochemical removal result will be evaluated.

  7. The influence of reinforcement size on the microstructure and mechanical behavior of a nanostructured aluminum-based metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, Nathan Adam

    With increased availability and growing commercial applications, aluminum-based metal matrix composites show promise as high specific strength structural materials. Before they can be implemented however, they require thorough characterization and testing. A novel nanostructured aluminum-based metal matrix composite (MMC) was characterized through a combination of microstructural analysis and mechanical testing. Two composites were studied, an aluminum MMC reinforced with 50 nm boron carbide, (B4C) and an aluminum MMC reinforced with 500 nm boron carbide. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed an ultra-fine grained matrix with grains on the order of 100--300 nm. The quasi-static and dynamic response of the composites was compared with the behavior of the unreinforced aluminum alloy, and it was found that the reinforcement resulted in a 30% improvement in strength. The decrease in the reinforcement size from 500 to 50 nm activated an additional strengthening mechanism, which further improved the strength of the MMC reinforced with the 50 nm B4C. Dynamic compression tests were performed at elevated temperatures up 400°C on the composites, and it was found that they exhibited impressive strengths considering the thermal softening prevalent in aluminum. The reinforcement size was found to play an important role in the strain softening exhibited at elevated temperature, fracture mechanism, and composite strength. Models to describe the composite behavior are presented.

  8. High Strain Rate Mechanical Properties of Epoxy and Epoxy-Based Particulate Composites (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    stainless steel or 6061 -T6 aluminum. The striker is 305 mm long and made of the same material as the other bars. The samples, which were nominally 8 mm...Property Correlation in Discontinuously-Reinforced Aluminium Matrix Composites as a Function of Relative Particle Size Ratio. Mat. Sci. Eng., 2002. A337: p

  9. High Strain Rate Mechanical Properties of Epoxy and Epoxy-Based Particulate Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    steel or 6061 -T6 aluminum. The striker is 305 mm long and made of the same material as the other bars. The samples, which were nominally 8 mm...Correlation in Discontinuously-Reinforced Aluminium Matrix Composites as a Function of Relative Particle Size Ratio. Mat. Sci. Eng., 2002. A337: p

  10. Cavitation Erosion of Copper, Brass, Aluminum and Titanium Alloys in Mineral Oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    The variations of the mean depth of penetration, the mean depth rate of penetration, MDRP, the pit diameter 2a and depth h due to cavitation attack on Al 6061-T6, Cu, brass of composition Cu-35Zn-3Pb and Ti-5A1-2.5Sn are presented. The experiments are conducted in a mineral oil of viscosity 110 CS using a magnetostrictive oscillator of 20 kHz frequency. Based on MDRP on the materials, it is found that Ti-5Al-2.5Sn exhibits cavitation erosion resistance which is two orders of magnitude higher than the other three materials. The values of h/a are the largest for copper and decreased with brass, titanium, and aluminum. Scanning electron microscope studies show that extensive slip and cross slip occurred on the surface prior to pitting and erosion. Twinning is also observed on copper and brass.

  11. Pulsed ion beam surface treatment for preparing rapidly solidified corrosion resistant steel and aluminum surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.; Maestas, L.M.; McIntyre, D.C.; Stinnett, R.W.; Greenly, J.B.

    1995-03-01

    Intense, pulsed ion beams were used to melt and rapidly resolidify Types 316F, 316L and sensitized 304 stainless steel surfaces to eliminate the negative effects of microstructural heterogeneity on localized corrosion resistance. Anodic polarization curves determined for 316F and 316L showed that passive current densities were reduced and pitting potentials were increased due to ion beam treatment. Type 304 samples sensitized at 600 C for 100 h showed no evidence of grain boundary attack when surfaces were ion beam treated. Equivalent ion beam treatments were conducted with a 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. Electrochemical impedance experiments conducted with this alloy exposed to an aerated chloride solution showed that the onset of pitting was delayed compared to untreated control samples.

  12. The influence of microstructure on the tensile behavior of an aluminum metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birt, Michael J.; Johnson, W. Steven

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between tensile properties and microstructure of a powder metallurgy aluminum alloy, 2009 was examined. The alloy was investigated both unreinforced and reinforced with 15 v/o SiC whiskers or 15 v/o SiC particulate to form a discontinuous metal matrix composite (MMC). The materials were investigated in the as-fabricated condition and in three different hot-rolled sheet thicknesses of 6.35, 3.18, and 1.8 mm. Image analysis was used to characterize the morphology of the reinforcements and their distributions within the matrix alloy. Fractographic examinations revealed that failure was associated with the presence of microstructural inhomogeneities which were related to both the matrix alloy and to the reinforcement. The results from these observations together with the matrix tensile data were used to predict the strengths and moduli of the MMC's using relatively simple models. The whisker MMC could be modeled as a short fiber composite and an attempt was made to model the particulate MMC as a dispersion/dislocation hardened alloy.

  13. Low cycle fatigue behavior of a SiCp reinforced aluminum matrix composite at ambient and elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Han, N.L.; Wang, Z.G.; Sun, L.Z.

    1995-06-01

    Based on an investigation of low cycle fatigue life and cyclic stress response characteristics of SiC particulates reinforced pure aluminum and unreinforced matrix aluminum at 298 K and 441 K, the following observations were made. (1) Cyclic stress response of the unreinforced matrix aluminum, in the as-extruded condition, revealed initial cyclic hardening, cyclic stability and second hardening at ambient temperature. With a contrast, the unreinforced aluminum at elevated temperature showed progressively cyclic softening behavior without initial hardening. (2) The cyclic stress response characteristics of the composite were different from that of its unreinforced matrix at room temperature. In spite of the initial hardening, the composite showed progressive softening in most of the fatigue life. At elevated temperature the composite also displayed continuous cyclic softening behavior. The reason for the softening behavior probably was that the dislocation tangles in the composite specimen with a likely work-hardened status was not stable and could be changed under a cyclic loading. (3) The SiCp/Al composite and the unreinforced matrix followed the Coffin-Manson law. The low cycle fatigue resistance of the composite at room temperature was lower than that of the unreinforced matrix. A decrease in the fatigue endurance due to a rise in test temperature was observed for the composite and the unreinforced matrix especially at low cyclic plastic strain ranges. The induction of fatigue life of the unreinforced aluminum was faster than that of the composite, so the fatigue resistance of the composite was stronger than that of the unreinforced aluminum under lower cyclic strain ranges at elevated temperature.

  14. Mechanical properties of laser welded aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, D.M.; Mazumder, J.

    1996-12-31

    The demand for lighter weight vehicles has prompted accelerated development in processing aluminum alloys for automobile structural applications. One of the current research initiatives centers on laser beam welding of aluminum alloys. Autogenous butt welds have been performed on Al 3003, 5754, 6111, and 6061-T6 plates with a 6 kW CO2 laser. For 6061, tensile data indicate about 60% of the base metal strength was attained in the as-welded condition, with a brittle fracture occurring through the weld. A post-weld heat treatment to the T6 condition resulted in a recovery of original ultimate tensile strengths, although these also failed in the weld. Hardness measurements of the post-weld T6 reveal a uniform hardness across the HAZ and fusion zone that is comparable to the original hardness. All 3003 welds fractured in the parent material in a ductile fashion. A high quality bead was consistently achieved with the 3003 alloy, whereas the other alloys demonstrated bead irregularities. SEM photographs reveal large, spherical pores, suggesting that they were formed by gas entrapment rather than by shrinkage.

  15. Carbide coated fibers in graphites-aluminum composites. [(fabrication of metal matrix composites)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imprescia, R. J.; Levinson, L. S.; Reiswig, R. D.; Wallace, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities are described for a NASA-supported program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to develop graphite fiber-aluminum matrix composites. A chemical vapor deposition apparatus was constructed for continuously coating graphite fibers with TiC. As much as 150 meters of continuously coated fibers were produced. Deposition temperatures were varied from 1365 K to about 1750 K, and deposition time from 6 to 150 seconds. The 6 sec deposition time corresponded to a fiber feed rate of 2.54 m/min through the coater. Thin, uniform, adherent TiC coats, with thicknesses up to approximately 0.1 micrometer were produced on the individual fibers of Thornel 50 graphite yarns without affecting fiber strength. Although coat properties were fairly uniform throughout a given batch, more work is needed to improve the batch-to-batch reproducibility. Samples of TiC-coated Thornel 50 fibers were infiltrated with an aluminum alloy and hot-pressed in vacuum to produce small composite bars for flexure testing. Strengths as high as 90% of the rule-of-mixtures strength were achieved. Results of the examination of the fracture surfaces indicate that the bonding between the aluminum and the TiC-coated fibers is better than that achieved in a similar, commercially infiltrated material made with fibers having no observable surface coats. Several samples of Al-infiltrated, TiC-coated Thornel 50 graphite yarns, together with samples of the commercially infiltrated, uncoated fibers, were heated for 100 hours at temperatures near the alloy solidus. The TiC-coated samples appear to undergo less reaction than do the uncoated samples. Photomicrographs are shown.

  16. Mechanical behavior of a continuous fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composite subjected to transverse and thermal loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, F. A.

    1991-01-01

    The transverse properties of an aluminum alloy metal matrix composite reinforced by continuous alumina fibers were investigated. The composite is subjected to both mechanical and cyclic thermal loading. The results of an experimental program indicate that the shakedown concept of structural mechanics provides a means of describing the material behavior. When the loading conditions are within the shakedown region, the material finally responds in an elastic manner after initial plastic response, and for loading conditions outside the shakedown region, the material exhibits a rapid incremental plastic strain accumulation. The failure strain varies by an order of magnitude according to the operating conditions. Hence, for high mechanical and low thermal loading, the failure strains is small; for low mechanical and high thermal loading, the failure strain is large.

  17. Grain structure and dislocation density measurements in a friction stir welded aluminum alloy using x-ray peak profile analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Balogh, Levente; Ungar, Prof Tomas; Choo, Hahn; Feng, Zhili

    2008-01-01

    The dislocation density and grain structure of a friction stir welded 6061-T6 aluminum alloy was determined as a function of distance from the weld centerline using high-resolution micro-beam x-ray diffraction. The results of the x-ray peak profile analysis show that the dislocation density is about 1.2 x 10^14 m-2 inside and 4.8 x 10^14 m-2 outside of the weld region. The average subgrain size is about 180 nm in both regions. Compared to the base material, the dislocation density was significantly decreased in the dynamic recrystallized zone of the friction stir welds, which is a good correlation with the TEM observations. The influence of the dislocation density on the strain hardening behavior during tensile deformation is also discussed.

  18. Analysis of stress-strain, fracture and ductility behavior of aluminum matrix composites containing discontinuous silicon carbide reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdanels, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical properties and stress-strain behavior for several types of commercially fabricated aluminum matrix composites, containing up to 40 vol % discontinuous SiC whisker, nodule, or particulate reinforcement were evaluated. It was found that the elastic modulus of the composites was isotropic, to be independent of type of reinforcement, and to be controlled solely by the volume percentage of SiC reinforcement present. The yield/tensile strengths and ductility were controlled primarily by the matrix alloy and temper condition. Ductility decreased with increasing reinforcement content, however, the fracture strains observed were higher than those reported in the literature for this type of composite. This increase in fracture strain is attributed to cleaner matrix powder and increased mechanical working during fabrication. Conventional aluminum and titanium structural alloys were compared and have shown that the properties of these low cost, lightweight composites have good potential for application to aerospace structures.

  19. Mechanical characterization of copper coated carbon nanotubes reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Maqbool, Adnan; Hussain, M. Asif; Khalid, F. Ahmad; Bakhsh, Nabi; Hussain, Ali; Kim, Myong Ho

    2013-12-15

    In this investigation, carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum composites were prepared by the molecular-level mixing process using copper coated CNTs. The mixing of CNTs was accomplished by ultrasonic mixing and ball milling. Electroless Cu-coated CNTs were used to enhance the interfacial bonding between CNTs and aluminum. Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed the homogenous dispersion of Cu-coated CNTs in the composite samples compared with the uncoated CNTs. The samples were pressureless sintered under vacuum followed by hot rolling to promote the uniform microstructure and dispersion of CNTs. In 1.0 wt.% uncoated and Cu-coated CNT/Al composites, compared to pure Al, the microhardness increased by 44% and 103%, respectively. As compared to the pure Al, for 1.0 wt.% uncoated CNT/Al composite, increase in yield strength and ultimate tensile strength was estimated about 58% and 62%, respectively. However, in case of 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, yield strength and ultimate tensile strength were increased significantly about 121% and 107%, respectively. - Graphical Abstract: Copper coated CNTs were synthesized by the electroless plating process. Optimizing the plating bath to (1:1) by wt CNTs with Cu, thickness of Cu-coated CNTs has been reduced to 100 nm. Cu-coated CNTs developed the stronger interfacial bonding with the Al matrix which resulted in the efficient transfer of load. Highlights: • Copper coated CNTs were synthesized by the electroless plating process. • Thickness of Cu-coated CNTs has been reduced to 100 nm by optimized plating bath. • In 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, microhardness increased by 103%. • Cu-coated CNTs transfer load efficiently with stronger interfacial bonding. • In 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, Y.S and UTS increased by 126% and 105%.

  20. Non-chromate talc conversion coatings for aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.; Drewien, C.A.; Finch, J.L.; Stoner, G.E.

    1994-01-01

    A method was developed for applying an inorganic conversion coating on that is procedurally similar to chromate conversion coating methods; this method, however does not use or involve hazardous/toxic chemicals. The coating forms by precipitation involving Al{sup 3+} Li{sup +}, OH{sup {minus}}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2}{minus}, and possibly other anions. This polycrystalline coating is continuous, conformal and persistent in aggressive environments. Coating thicknesses range from several tenths to ten micrometers. Although the outer portions of the coating are porous, the pores do not penetrate to the substrate interface. These coatings do not match the levels of performance offered by commercially available chromate conversion coatings, but are capable of meeting many of the corrosion resistance, electrical resistivity, and paint adhesion requirements established in MIL-C-5541E ``Chemical Conversion Coatings on Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys.`` In this paper, methods for producing the talc coating on aluminum alloys 1100 and 6061-T6 are described and compared to traditional chromate conversion coating methods. Resulting coating structure and composition are described. Performance data for the talc coatings in MIL-C-5541E required tests are presented along with data commercial chromate-based coatings.

  1. Evaluation of the Technical-Economic Potential of Particle- Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites and Electrochemical Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, A.; Götze, U.; Hackert-Oschätzchen, M.; Lehnert, N.; Herold, F.; Meichsner, G.; Schmidt, A.

    2016-03-01

    Compared to conventional cutting, the processing of materials by electrochemical machining offers some technical advantages like high surface quality, no thermal or mechanical impact on the work piece and preservation of the microstructure of the work piece material. From the economic point of view, the possibility of process parallelization and the absence of any process-related tool wear are mentionable advantages of electrochemical machining. In this study, based on experimental results, it will be evaluated to what extent the electrochemical machining is technically and economically suitable for the finish-machining of particle- reinforced aluminum matrix composites (AMCs). Initial studies showed that electrochemical machining - in contrast to other machining processes - has the potential to fulfil demanding requirements regarding precision and surface quality of products or components especially when applied to AMCs. In addition, the investigations show that processing of AMCs by electrochemical machining requires less energy than the electrochemical machining of stainless steel. Therefore, an evaluation of electrochemically machined AMCs - compared to stainless steel - from a technical and an economic perspective will be presented in this paper. The results show the potential of electro-chemically machined AMCs and contribute to the enhancement of instruments for technical-economic evaluations as well as a comprehensive innovation control.

  2. Fracture behavior of reinforced aluminum alloy matrix composites using thermal imaging tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdelidis, N. P.; Exarchos, D.; Vazquez, P.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Sfarra, S.; Maldague, X. P. V.; Matikas, T. E.

    2016-05-01

    In this work the influence of the microstructure at the vicinity of the interface on the fracture behavior of particulate-reinforced aluminum alloy matrix composites (Al/SiCp composites) is studied by using thermographic tools. In particular, infrared thermography was used to monitor the plane crack propagation behavior of the materials. The deformation of solid materials is almost always accompanied by heat release. When the material becomes deformed or is damaged and fractured, a part of the energy necessary to initiate and propagate the damage is transformed in an irreversible way into heat. The thermal camera detects the heat wave, generated by the thermo-mechanical coupling and the intrinsic dissipated energy during mechanical loading of the sample. By using an adapted detector, thermography records the two dimensional "temperature" field as it results from the infrared radiation emitted by the object. The principal advantage of infrared thermography is its noncontact, non-destructive character. This methodology is being applied to characterise the fracture behavior of the particulate composites. Infrared thermography is being used to monitor the plane crack propagation behavior of such materials. Furthermore, an innovative approach to use microscopic measurements using IR microscopic lenses was attempted, in order to enable smaller features (in the micro scale) to be imaged with accuracy and assurance.

  3. Measurement of mercury in flue gas based on an aluminum matrix sorbent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Xu, Wei; Wang, Xiaohao; Wang, Wenhua

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of total mercury in flue gas based on an economical aluminum matrix sorbent was developed in this paper. A sorbent trap consisted of three tubes was employed to capture Hg from flue gas. Hg trapped on sorbent was transferred into solution by acid leaching and then detected by CVAAS. Hg adsorbed on sorbent was recovered completely by leaching process. The 87.7% recovery of Hg in flue gas by tube 1 and tube 2 was obtained on the equipment of coal combustion and sampling in lab. In order to evaluate the ability to recover and accurately quantify Hg(0) on the sorbent media, the analytical bias test on tube 3 spiked with Hg(0) was also performed and got the average recovery of 97.1%. Mercury measurements based on this method were conducted for three coal-fired power plants in China. The mercury in coal is distributed into bottom ash, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) ash, wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) reactant, and flue gas, and the relative distribution varied depending on factors such as the coal type and the operation conditions of plants. The mercury mass balances of three plants were also calculated which were 91.6%, 77.1%, and 118%, respectively. The reliability of this method was verified by the Ontario Hydro (OH) method either in lab or in field.

  4. Laser direct marking applied to rasterizing miniature Data Matrix Code on aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xia-Shuang; He, Wei-Ping; Lei, Lei; Wang, Jian; Guo, Gai-Fang; Zhang, Teng-Yun; Yue, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Precise miniaturization of 2D Data Matrix (DM) Codes on Aluminum alloy formed by raster mode laser direct part marking is demonstrated. The characteristic edge over-burn effects, which render vector mode laser direct part marking inadequate for producing precise and readable miniature codes, are minimized with raster mode laser marking. To obtain the control mechanism for the contrast and print growth of miniature DM code by raster laser marking process, the temperature field model of long pulse laser interaction with material is established. From the experimental results, laser average power and Q frequency have an important effect on the contrast and print growth of miniature DM code, and the threshold of laser average power and Q frequency for an identifiable miniature DM code are respectively 3.6 W and 110 kHz, which matches the model well within normal operating conditions. In addition, the empirical model of correlation occurring between laser marking parameters and module size is also obtained, and the optimal processing parameter values for an identifiable miniature DM code of different but certain data size are given. It is also found that an increase of the repeat scanning number effectively improves the surface finish of bore, the appearance consistency of modules, which has benefit to reading. The reading quality of miniature DM code is greatly improved using ultrasonic cleaning in water by avoiding the interference of color speckles surrounding modules.

  5. Measurement of Mercury in Flue Gas Based on an Aluminum Matrix Sorbent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Xu, Wei; Wang, Xiaohao; Wang, Wenhua

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of total mercury in flue gas based on an economical aluminum matrix sorbent was developed in this paper. A sorbent trap consisted of three tubes was employed to capture Hg from flue gas. Hg trapped on sorbent was transferred into solution by acid leaching and then detected by CVAAS. Hg adsorbed on sorbent was recovered completely by leaching process. The 87.7% recovery of Hg in flue gas by tube 1 and tube 2 was obtained on the equipment of coal combustion and sampling in lab. In order to evaluate the ability to recover and accurately quantify Hg0 on the sorbent media, the analytical bias test on tube 3 spiked with Hg0 was also performed and got the average recovery of 97.1%. Mercury measurements based on this method were conducted for three coal-fired power plants in China. The mercury in coal is distributed into bottom ash, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) ash, wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) reactant, and flue gas, and the relative distribution varied depending on factors such as the coal type and the operation conditions of plants. The mercury mass balances of three plants were also calculated which were 91.6%, 77.1%, and 118%, respectively. The reliability of this method was verified by the Ontario Hydro (OH) method either in lab or in field. PMID:22235178

  6. Internal Friction at Elevated Temperatures and Microplasticity of Aluminum Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiro; Utsumi, Shigenori; Nakamura, Takanobu; Nishiyama, Hironori

    Aluminum matrix composites (70vol%SiC/Al, 55vol%SiC/Al, 60vol%Al2O3/Al, 70vol%AlN/Al, and 30vol%SiC/Al) were prepared by the infiltration and the casting methods. The internal friction and the microplasticity of these composites were measured with a Föppel-Pertz torsion pendulum apparatus over the temperature range of 303 to 853 K and the strain range of 3×10-5 to 3×10-3. The internal friction of these composites increases with increasing temperature and increases rapidly over 600 to 800 K, while their shear modulus gradually decrease and rapidly decrease over 600 to 800 K. The internal friction of the composites at elevated temperatures is caused by relaxations due to the interfacial diffusion between a reinforcement phase and Al and due to the plastic flow at grain boundaries. The activation energy of the interfacial diffusion is 40.7-56.7 kJ/mol for SiC/Al, 62.1 kJ/mol for Al2O3/Al, and 27.7 kJ/mol for AlN/Al, respectively. The activation energy of the plastic flow is 42.3-119 kJ/mol. The internal friction of the infiltration composites remarkably depends on strain amplitude rather than that of the casting composites. The Granato-Lücke plots of the composites show a linear relationship, indicating that the increase in internal friction with increasing shear strain is caused by the vibration energy loss due to the dislocation damping mechanism. The dislocation mobility of the infiltration composites is larger than that of the casting composites. The specific damping capacity and Young's modulus of 70vol%SiC are higher than those of 70vol%AlN.

  7. Corrosion and wear resistance of titanium- and aluminum-based metal matrix composites fabricated by direct metal laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldera, Benjamin L.

    Titanium- and Aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC) have shown favorable properties for aerospace applications such as airframes, reinforcement materials and joining elements. In this research, such coatings were developed by direct metal laser deposition with a powder-fed fiber coupled diode laser. The MMC formulations consisted of pure titanium and aluminum matrices with reinforcing powder blends of chromium carbide and tungsten carbide nickel alloy. Two powder formulations were investigated for each matrix material (Ti1, Ti2, Al1 and Al2). Titanium based composites were deposited onto a Ti6Al4V plate while aluminum composites were deposited onto AA 7075 and AA 5083 for Al1 and Al2, respectively. Microstructures of the MMCs were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The hardness and reduced Young's modulus (Er) were assessed through depth-sensing instrumented nanoindentation. microhardness (Vickers) was also analyzed for each composite. The corrosion resistance of the MMCs were compared by monitoring open circuit potential (OCP), polarization resistance (Rp) and potentiodynamic polarization in 0.5 M NaCl to simulate exposure to seawater. The Ti-MMCs demonstrated improvements in hardness between 205% and 350% over Ti6Al4V. Al-MMCs showed improvements between 47% and 79% over AA 7075 and AA 5083. The MMCs showed an increase in anodic current density indicating the formation of a less protective surface oxide than the base metals.

  8. A method for studying weld fusion boundary microstructure evolution in aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kostrivas, A.; Lippold, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Aluminum alloys may exhibit a variety of microstructures within the fusion zone adjacent to the fusion boundary. Under conventional weld solidification conditions, epitaxial nucleation occurs off grains in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and solidification proceeds along preferred growth directions. In some aluminum alloys, such as those containing Li and Zr, a nondendritic equiaxed grain zone (EQZ) has been observed along the fusion boundary that does not nucleate epitaxially from the HAZ substrate. The EQZ has been the subject of considerable study because of its susceptibility to cracking during initial fabrication and repair. The motivation of this investigation was to develop a technique that would allow the nature and evolution of the fusion boundary to be studied under controlled thermal conditions. A melting technique was developed to simulate the fusion boundary of aluminum alloys using the Gleeble{reg{underscore}sign} thermal simulator. Using a steel sleeve to contain the aluminum, samples wee heated to incremental temperatures above the solidus temperature of a number of alloys. In Alloy 2195, a 4Cu-1Li alloy, an EQZ could be formed by heating in the temperature range approximately from 630--640 C. At temperatures above 640 C, solidification occurred by the normal epitaxial nucleation and growth mechanism. Fusion boundary behavior was also studied in Alloys 5454-H34, 6061-T6 and 2219-T8. Nucleation in these alloys was observed to be epitaxial. Details of the technique and its effectiveness for performing controlled melting experiments at incremental temperatures above the solidus are described.

  9. Avoidance of stress corrosion susceptibility in high strength aluminum alloys by control of grain boundary and matrix microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, P.; Deiasi, R.

    1974-01-01

    The relation of microstructure to the mechanical strength and stress corrosion resistance of highest strength and overaged tempers of BAR and 7050 aluminum alloys was investigated. Comparison is made with previously studied 7075 aluminum alloy. Optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry were used to characterize the grain morphology, matrix microstructure, and grain boundary microstructure of these tempers. Grain boundary interparticle spacing was significant to stress corrosion crack propagation for all three alloys; increasing interparticle spacing led to increased resistance to crack propagation. In addition, the fire grain size in Bar and 7050 appears to enhance crack propagation. The highest strength temper of 7050 has a comparatively high resistance to crack initiation. Overall stress corrosion behavior is dependent on environment pH, and evaluation over a range of pH is recommended.

  10. Microstructure of arc brazed and diffusion bonded joints of stainless steel and SiC reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elßner, M.; Weis, S.; Grund, T.; Wagner, G.; Habisch, S.; Mayr, P.

    2016-03-01

    Joint interfaces of aluminum and stainless steel often exhibit intermetallics of Al-Fe, which limit the joint strength. In order to reduce these brittle phases in joints of aluminum matrix composites (AMC) and stainless steel, diffusion bonding and arc brazing are used. Due to the absence of a liquid phase, diffusion welding can reduce the formation of these critical in- termetallics. For this joining technique, the influence of surface treatments and adjusted time- temperature-surface-pressure-regimes is investigated. On the other hand, arc brazing offers the advantage to combine a localized heat input with the application of a low melting filler and was conducted using the system Al-Ag-Cu. Results of the joining tests using both approaches are described and discussed with regard to the microstructure of the joints and the interfaces.

  11. Corrosion of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (CF-AMCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Shruti

    The first objective of this research is to study the atmospheric corrosion behavior of continuous reinforced aluminum matrix composites (CF-AMCs). The materials used for this research were alumina (Al2O3) and nickel (Ni) coated carbon (C) fibers reinforced AMCs. The major focus is to identify the correlation between atmospheric parameters and the corrosion rates of CF-AMCs in the multitude of microclimates and environments in Hawai'i. The micro-structures of CF-AMCs were obtained to correlate the microstructures with their corrosion performances. Also electrochemical polarization experiments were conducted in the laboratory to explain the corrosion mechanism of CF-AMCs. In addition, CF-AMCs were exposed to seven different test sites for three exposure periods. The various climatic conditions like temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), rainfall (RF), time of wetness (TOW), chloride (Cl- ) and sulfate (SO42-) deposition rate, and pH were monitored for three exposure period. Likewise, mass losses of CF-AMCs at each test site for three exposure periods were determined. The microstructure of the CF-AMCS showed that Al/C/50f MMCs contained a Ni-rich phase in the matrix, indicating that the Ni coating on the C fiber dissolved in the matrix. The intermetallic phases obtained in Al-2wt% Cu/Al 2O3/50f-T6 MMC and Al-2wt%-T6 monolith were rich in Cu and Fe. The intermetallic phases obtained in Al 7075/Al2O3/50f-T6 MMC and Al 7075-T6 monolith also contained traces of Mg, Zn, Ni, and Si. Electrochemical polarization experiment indicated that the Al/Al 2O3/50f Al-2wt% Cu/Al2O3/50f-T6 and Al 7075/Al2O3/50f-T6 MMC showed similar corrosion trends as their respective monoliths pure Al, Al-2wt%-T6 and Al 7075-T6 in both aerated and deaerated condition. Al2O3 fiber, being an insulator, did not have a great effect on the polarization behavior of the composites. Al/C/50f MMCs corroded at a much faster rate as compared to pure Al monolith due to the galvanic effect between C and Al

  12. Stir mixing and pressureless infiltration synthesis of aluminum alloy metal matrix nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Benjamin Franklin

    2009-12-01

    Pressureless liquid metal infiltration of suitably packed compacts of spherical shaped 47 nm size 70:30 Delta:Gamma Al2O3 mixed with a 7/2 ratio of elemental Al and Mg powders was used to study (i) the kinetics of pressureless infiltration processing of Al2O 3 nanoparticle-A206 alloy composites, (ii) the optimal processing variables to maximize material property responses, (iii) the development of multimodal microstructures in terms of feature size. The major experimental variables included: infiltration temperature (850 to 950°C), infiltration time (1--5 hours), and powder composition (0--50 wt% Al2O 3). All experiments were conducted under UHP nitrogen atmosphere. Under the conditions studied, compacts with a maximum of 20 wt% nanoparticles were successfully infiltrated with A206 alloy aluminum, and the degree of infiltration measured by the percentage of residual porosity depended on infiltration time, temperature and nanoparticle content. By examining responses including percent porosity, and macrohardness, empirical models for correlating processing conditions with material properties and microstructure were developed. The addition of increasing weight percentage of Al2O3 nanoparticles resulted in a decrease in the coefficient of thermal expansion greater than that predicted by the rule of mixtures due to the mechanical constraint of the nanoparticles on the matrix. Likewise, the damping capacity of the 10 wt% and 20 wt% reinforced nanocomposites increased with increasing weight percentage up to 280% greater than the base alloy. The key microstructural observations in the pressureless infiltrated composites include: (1) a bimodal structure of micro-scale grains, exhibiting Al-Cu-Mg precipitates dispersed within the grains; (2) amorphous and crystalline interfaces between the Al-alloy grains and the nanocomposite regions; (3) infiltrated nanoparticle agglomerates having nanoscale channels forming a nanoscale substructure; (4) mixed nanoscale reinforcements of

  13. Applicability of ultrasonic testing for the determination of volume fraction of particulates in alumina-reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, C.K.; Fang, R.L.; Weng, W.P.; Chuang, T.H.

    1999-10-01

    An ultrasonic testing technique was employed to determine the volume fraction of alumina particulate reinforcement in 6061 aluminum matrix composites. this study was performed on various composites with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nominal volume fractions of 10, 15, and 20%. For comparison, other techniques were employed as well, including the Archimedes method, metallographic image analysis, X-ray diffraction, and acid dissolution. Observations indicated that ultrasonic testing and acid dissolution methods are more reliable than the other techniques, while ultrasonic testing is faster than the acid dissolution method.

  14. Aluminum ammonium sulfate dodecahydrate purified from traditional Chinese medicinal herb Korean monkshood root is a potent matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yehua; Liu, Sen; Jin, Fenghai; Mu, Tianyang; Li, Cong; Jiang, Kun; Tian, Weihua; Yu, Dahai; Zhang, Yingqi; Fang, Xuexun

    2012-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc-dependent endopeptidases and key regulators for many physiological and pathological functions. The MMP inhibitors have been shown to modulate diseases such as cancer, inflammation, and cardiovascular diseases. In this paper we tracked the MMP inhibitory activities of the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Korean Monkshood Root. The purified active ingredient was identified by the elemental analysis, infrared spectrum (IR) and X-ray diffraction as aluminum ammonium sulfate dodecahydrate. This inorganic compound showed inhibitory activities toward a number of MMP family members. In particular, it has a strong inhibitory effect toward MMP-2 and MMP-9, with IC50 values of 0.54 and 0.50 μM, respectively. Further analysis suggested that the MMP inhibitory activity is mainly due to Al(3+). Cell viability assays using human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells showed aluminum ammonium sulfate had minimal cyto-toxicity with a concentration up to 500 μM. However, within 50 μM, it exhibited significant inhibition of cell invasion. To our knowledge, there has been no previous report of inorganic form of the MMP inhibitor with strong inhibitory activity. Our results for the first time showed that aluminum ammonium sulfate is an inorganic form of MMP inhibitor with high potency, and can be used to interfere with MMP related cellular processes.

  15. Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (MMC's) (Center Director's Discretionary Fund, Project No. 98-09)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. A.; Carter, R. W.; Ding, J.

    1999-01-01

    This technical memorandum describes an investigation of using friction stir welding (FSW) process for joining a variety of aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC's) reinforced with discontinuous silicon-carbide (SiC) particulate and functional gradient materials. Preliminary results show that FSW is feasible to weld aluminum MMC to MMC or to aluminum-lithium 2195 if the SiC reinforcement is <25 percent by volume fraction. However, a softening in the heat-affected zone was observed and is known to be one of the major limiting factors for joint strength. The pin tool's material is made from a low-cost steel tool H-13 material, and the pin tool's wear was excessive such that the pin tool length has to be manually adjusted for every 5 ft of weldment. Initially, boron-carbide coating was developed for pin tools, but it did not show a significant improvement in wear resistance. Basically, FSW is applicable mainly for butt joining of flat plates. Therefore, FSW of cylindrical articles such as a flange to a duct with practical diameters ranging from 2-5 in. must be fully demonstrated and compared with other proven MMC joining techniques for cylindrical articles.

  16. In-situ deformation studies of an aluminum metal-matrix composite in a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Tensile specimens made of a metal-matrix composite (cast and extruded aluminum alloy-based matrix reinforced with Al2O3 particulate) were tested in situ in a scanning electron microscope equipped with a deformation stage, to directly monitor the crack propagation phenomenon. The in situ SEM observations revealed the presence of microcracks both ahead of and near the crack-tip region. The microcracks were primarily associated with cracks in the alumina particles. The results suggest that a region of intense deformation exists ahead of the crack and corresponds to the region of microcracking. As the crack progresses, a region of plastically deformed material and associated microcracks remains in the wake of the crack.

  17. Tensile Properties of Nano AL2O3 Particulate-Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites by Mechanical Alloying and Hot Extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdinia, M.; Jenabali Jahromi, S. A.

    The powder of the micro Al and variant volume fractions of nano Al2O3 were milled by a high energy planetary ball-mill. By milling, a homogenous distribution of nano Al2O3 particles in the metal matrix were developed. Then the milled powder was cold compressed and sintered at 545°C for one hr. The mold and the sintered sample hold in a furnace until the temperature reached 545°C. Then the hot 27mm diameter sample was extruded to 6mm diameter. From the extruded specimens, tensile, hardness and microstructure of the prepared specimens were determined. By these tests the effect of milling time, the percent of nano-particles and the microstructure were evaluated. The hardness and tensile behaviors of aluminum matrix composites reinforced with nano Al2O3 particulate have been found to increase remarkably with the volume fraction of the reinforcement.

  18. Compressive strength, plastic flow properties, and surface frictional effects of 1100, 3003 and 6061 aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkerton, G.W.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this study is to find aluminum alloys that are effective for use as wire vacuum seals in the 800MeV particle accelerator located at the Louis Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) in Los Alamos, NM. Three alloys, Al 1100, Al 3003, and Al 6061, are investigated under uniaxial compression to determine stresses for a given height reduction from 0 to 70 percent, and to find plastic flow and surface interaction effects. Right-circular cylindrical specimens are compressed on-end (cylindrically) and radially (for modeling as compressed wire). Aluminum 1100 and 3003 alloys are compared for length to diameter ratios of 1 and 2 for both compression types, and are then compared to results of radial compression of annealed small diameter Al 1100 wire currently used at LAMPE. The specimens are also compressed between three different platen surfaces, polished steel, etched steel, and aluminum 6061-T6, to determine effects of friction. The Al 3003 alloy exhibits 20 to 25% lower stresses at all height reductions than Al 1100 for both cylindrical and radial compression.

  19. The corrosion protection of aluminum by various anodizing treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, Merlin D.

    1989-01-01

    Corrosion protection to 6061-T6 aluminum, afforded by both teflon-impregnated anodized coats (Polylube and Tufram) and hard-anodized coats (water sealed and dichromate sealed), was studied at both pH 5.5 and pH 9.5, with an exposure period of 28 days in 3.5 percent NaCl solution (25 C) for each specimen. In general, corrosion protection for all specimens was better at pH 9.5 than at pH 5.5. Protection by a Tufram coat proved superior to that afforded by Polylube at each pH, with corrosion protection by the hard-anodized, water-sealed coat at pH 9.5 providing the best protection. Electrochemical work in each case was corroborated by microscopic examination of the coats after exposure. Corrosion protection by Tufram at pH 9.5 was most comparable to that of the hard-anodized samples, although pitting and some cracking of the coat did occur.

  20. Comparing addition of ZrO II particles in micron and nano scale on microstructure and mechanical behavior of aluminum-matrix composites produced by vortex route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghchesara, M. A.; Karimi, M.; Abdizadeh, H.; Baharvandi, H. R.

    2007-07-01

    Aluminum matrix composites are important engineering materials in automotive, aerospace and other applications because of their low weight, high specific strength and better physical and mechanical properties compared to pure aluminum. ZrO II particles as reinforcement were selected to add aluminum with micron and nano size. Al/ZrO II composites were produced by direct incorporation (vortex method) in different temperatures and 5 volume percents of ZrO II particles. Microstructure of the samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical composition of the phases was studied by XRD. Hardness, and density of these composites were also measured. The microstructure and mechanical properties tests of composites and study the effect of particle size, resulted the better properties compared to matrix aluminum. Homogeneous dispersion of the reinforcement particles in the matrix aluminum was observed. The results show enhancing the composites properties for all samples compared to the monolithic alloy. However there are some differences in results because of particle size of ceramics and therefore differences between particles surface area. Maximum volume percent that can be added to A356 aluminum alloy is 5 vol.%, for nano ZrO II particles, but it seems that is more than 5 vol.% for micron particles. Increasing of viscosity, porosities and much more defects are caused by increasing volume percents and using smaller particles. The casting processing is difficult in these conditions. Furthermore, optimum temperatures of casting for micron and nano zirconia particles are not the same.

  1. Characterization of an Effective Cleaning Procedure for Aluminum Alloys: Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and Zeta Potential Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N J; Shen, T H; Esposito, A P; Tillotson, T M

    2004-06-02

    We have developed a cleaning procedure for aluminum alloys for effective minimization of surface-adsorbed sub-micron particles and non-volatile residue. The procedure consists of a phosphoric acid etch followed by an alkaline detergent wash. To better understand the mechanism whereby this procedure reduces surface contaminants, we characterized the aluminum surface as a function of cleaning step using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). SERS indicates that phosphoric acid etching re-establishes a surface oxide of different characteristics, including deposition of phosphate and increased hydration, while the subsequent alkaline detergent wash appears to remove the phosphate and modify the new surface oxide, possibly leading to a more compact surface oxide. We also studied the zeta potential of <5 micron pure aluminum and aluminum alloy 6061-T6 particles to determine how surface electrostatics may be affected during the cleaning process. The particles show a decrease in the magnitude of their zeta potential in the presence of detergent, and this effect is most pronounced for particles that have been etched with phosphoric acid. This reduction in magnitude of the surface attractive potential is in agreement with our observation that the phosphoric acid etch followed by detergent wash results in a decrease in surface-adsorbed sub-micron particulates.

  2. Characterization of an effective cleaning procedure for aluminum alloys: surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and zeta potential analysis.

    PubMed

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Shen, Tien H; Esposito, Anthony P; Tillotson, Thomas M

    2005-02-01

    We have developed a cleaning procedure for aluminum alloys for effective minimization of surface-adsorbed sub-micrometer particles and nonvolatile residue. The procedure consists of a phosphoric acid etch followed by an alkaline detergent wash. To better understand the mechanism whereby this procedure reduces surface contaminants, we characterized the aluminum surface as a function of cleaning step using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). SERS indicates that phosphoric acid etching re-establishes a surface oxide of different characteristics, including deposition of phosphate and increased hydration, while the subsequent alkaline detergent wash appears to remove the phosphate and modify the new surface oxide, possibly leading to a more compact surface oxide. We also studied the zeta potential of <5 microm pure aluminum and aluminum alloy 6061-T6 particles to determine how surface electrostatics may be affected during the cleaning process. The particles show a decrease in the magnitude of their zeta potential in the presence of detergent, and this effect is most pronounced for particles that have been etched with phosphoric acid.

  3. Effect of low-velocity or ballistic impact damage on the strength of thin composite and aluminum shear panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Impact tests were conducted on shear panels fabricated from 6061-T6 aluminum and from woven fabric prepreg of Du Pont Kevlara fiber/epoxy resin and graphite fiber/epoxy resin. The shear panels consisted of three different composite laminates and one aluminum material configuration. Three panel aspect ratios were evaluated for each material configuration. Composite panels were impacted with a 1.27-cm (0.05-in) diameter aluminum sphere at low velocities of 46 m/sec (150 ft/sec) and 67 m/sec (220 ft/sec). Ballistic impact conditions consisted of a tumbled 0.50-caliber projectile impacting loaded composite and aluminum shear panels. The results of these tests indicate that ballistic threshold load (the lowest load which will result in immediate failure upon penetration by the projectile) varied between 0.44 and 0.61 of the average failure load of undamaged panels. The residual strengths of the panels after ballistic impact varied between 0.55 and 0.75 of the average failure strength of the undamaged panels. The low velocity impacts at 67 m/sec (220 ft/sec) caused a 15 to 20 percent reduction in strength, whereas the impacts at 46 m/sec (150 ft/sec) resulted in negligible strength loss. Good agreement was obtained between the experimental failure strengths and the predicted strength with the point stress failure criterion.

  4. The Influence of ScF3 Nanoparticles on the Physical and Mechanical Properties of New Metal Matrix Composites Based on A356 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorozhtsov, S.; Zhukov, I.; Promakhov, V.; Naydenkin, E.; Khrustalyov, A.; Vorozhtsov, A.

    2016-12-01

    The development of the aerospace and automotive industries demands the development of aluminum alloys and composites reinforced with new nanoparticles. In this work, metal matrix composites (MMC) with an A356 aluminum alloy matrix reinforced with 0.2 wt.% and 1 wt.% of ScF3 nanoparticles were produced by ultrasonic dispersion of nanoparticles in the melt followed by casting in a metallic mold. Structure as well as physical and mechanical properties of the cast samples were examined using electron and optical microscopy, hardness and tensile testing. It is shown that nanoparticles clusters are formed during the solidification at grain boundaries and silicon inclusions. Increasing nanoparticles content significantly reduced the grain size in the MMC and increased the mechanical properties—ultimate tensile strength, elongation and hardness. The contribution of different strengthening mechanisms is discussed. It is suggested that the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the nanoparticles ScF3 and the aluminum matrix is a dominant strengthening mechanism.

  5. In Situ Liquid-Crystal-Polymer Fiber Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composite.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    Prepared for B U NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND (AIR-51412) Washington, DC 20361-0001 9182600991-08867 NOTICES REPORT NUMBERING SYSTEM - The numbering of...the twentieth Center report for the year 1988 and prepared by the Air Vehicle and Crew Systems Technology Department. The numerical codes are as...examined in this research were prepared from commercially pure aluminum and Vectra, a wholly aromatic, thermotropic, liquid-crystal copolyester (LCPE). The

  6. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Development of Elevated Temperature Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) Alloy and Its Processing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, David C.; Gegal, Gerald A.

    2014-04-15

    The objective of this project was to provide a production capable cast aluminum metal matrix composite (MMC) alloy with an operating temperature capability of 250-300°C. Important industrial sectors as well as the military now seek lightweight aluminum alloy castings that can operate in temperature ranges of 250-300°C. Current needs in this temperature range are being satisfied by the use of titanium alloy castings. These have the desired strength properties but the end components are heavier and significantly more costly. Also, the energy requirements for production of titanium alloy castings are significantly higher than those required for production of aluminum alloys and aluminum alloy castings.

  7. Calorimetric studies of 7000 series aluminum alloys. I - Matrix precipitate characterization of 7075. II - Comparison of 7075, 7050, and RX720 alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiasi, R.; Adler, P. N.

    1977-01-01

    Correlation between differential scanning calorimetry and high temperature transmission electron microscopy for the characterization of preexisting matrix precipitates in the highest-strength and overaged tempers of 7075 aluminum was demonstrated. The solid state reactions undergone by these tempers in the 20-500 C temperature range were elucidated and expressed in terms of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters. The dissolution parameters for each phase are distinguishable and serve as guidelines for a rapid characterization of the matrix microstructure of these alloys.

  8. Fabrication and Characterization of Squeezed Cast Aluminum Matrix Composites Containing Boride Reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaya-Luengas, L.; Estremera-Pérez, E.; Muñoz, L.; Suárez, O. M.

    2010-12-01

    Aluminum alloys containing 2 and 4 wt.% copper reinforced with aluminum dodecaborides were successfully fabricated by squeeze casting employing pressures up to 62 MPa. The distribution of reinforcements throughout the composites was quantified, whereas the effect of pressure on the composites density and hardness was determined. In addition, the reinforcement chemical stability was examined using high-temperature x-ray diffraction which permitted to confirm the formation of AlB2 phase a result of AlB12 decomposition. The pressure effect on the squeezed composites was investigated by optical microscopy, Vickers microhardness testing, superficial Rockwell hardness testing, and differential thermal analysis. At the highest applied pressures, the castings density increased when the shrinkage porosity was practically eliminated. The composite superficial hardness improved by increasing the applied squeeze. The indirect squeeze cast technique caused Al2Cu phase segregation to upper regions of the specimens, while conversely, the AlB12 reinforcements segregated preferentially at lower regions of the casting.

  9. Approach to In- Situ Producing Reinforcing Phase Within an Active-Transient Liquid Phase Bond Seam for Aluminum Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guifeng; Liao, Xianjin; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Linjie; Zhang, Jianxun

    2015-06-01

    To optimize the braze composition design route for aluminum matrix composite, the feasibility of in situ producing reinforcing phase within the transient liquid phase bond seam matrix, by adding active melting point increaser (MPI, e.g., Ti) together with general melting point depressant (MPD, e.g., Cu) into the interlayer, was demonstrated. For SiC p /A356 composite, by comparing the wettability, joint microstructure, joint shear strength, and fracture path for the developed Al-19Cu-1Ti, Al-19Cu, Al-33Cu-1Ti, Al-33Cu (wt pct), and commercial Cu foils as interlayer, the feasibility of in situ producing reinforcing phase within the bond seam by adding Ti was demonstrated. Especially for Al-19Cu-1Ti active braze, small and dispersed ternary aluminide of Al-Si-Ti phase was obtained within the bond seam as in situ reinforcement, leading to a favorable fracture path within SiC p /A356, not along the initial interface or within the bond seam. For the formation mechanism of the in situ reinforcing phase of MPI-containing intermetallic compound within the bond seam, a model of repeating concentration-precipitation-termination-engulfment during isothermal solidification is proposed.

  10. Carbon nanofiber reinforced aluminum matrix composite fabricated by combined process of spark plasma sintering and hot extrusion.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hansang; Kurita, Hiroki; Leparoux, Marc; Kawasaki, Akira

    2011-05-01

    Spark plasma sintering and hot extrusion processes have been employed for fabricating carbon nanofiber (CNF)-aluminum (Al) matrix bulk materials. The Al powder and the CNFs were mixed in a mixing medium of natural rubber. The CNFs were well dispersed onto the Al particles. After removal of the natural rubber, the Al-CNF mixture powders were highly densified. From the microstructural viewpoint, the composite materials were observed by optical, field-emission scanning electron, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopies. The CNFs were found to be located on every grain boundary and aligned with the extrusion direction of the Al-CNF bulk materials. Some Al carbides (Al4C3) were also observed at the surface of the CNFs. This carbide was created by a reaction between the Al and the disordered CNF. The CNFs and the formation of Al4C3 play an important role in the enhancement of the mechanical properties of the Al-CNF bulk material. The CNFs can also be used for engineering reinforcement of other matrix materials such as ceramics, polymers and more complex matrices.

  11. Effect of fiber diameter and matrix alloys on impact-resistant boron/aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdanels, D. L.; Signorelli, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Efforts to improve the impact resistance of B/Al are reviewed and analyzed. Nonstandard thin-sheet charpy and Izod impact tests and standard full-size Charpy impact tests were conducted on composites containing unidirectional 0.10mm, 0.14mm, and 0.20mm diameter boron fibers in 1100, 2024, 5052, and 6061 Al matrices. Impact failure modes of B/Al are proposed in an attempt to describe the mechanisms involved and to provide insight for maximizing impact resistance. The impact strength of B/Al was significantly increased by proper selection of materials and processing. The use of a ductile matrix and large diameter boron fibers gave the highest impact strengths. This combination resulted in improved energy absorption through matrix shear deformation and multiple fiber breakage.

  12. High concentration of residual aluminum oxide on titanium surface inhibits extracellular matrix mineralization.

    PubMed

    Canabarro, A; Diniz, M G; Paciornik, S; Carvalho, L; Sampaio, E M; Beloti, M M; Rosa, A L; Fischer, R G

    2008-12-01

    In the present study we characterized titanium (Ti) surfaces submitted to different treatments and evaluated the response of osteoblasts derived from human alveolar bone to these surfaces. Five different surfaces were evaluated: ground (G), ground and chemical etched (G1-HF for 60 s), sand blasted (SB-Al(2)O(3) particles 65 mum), sand blasted and chemical etched (SLA1-HF for 60 s and SLA2-HF for 13 s). Surface morphology was evaluated under SEM and roughness parameters by contact scanning instrument. The presence of Al(2)O(3) was detected by EDS and the amount calculated by digital analyses. Osteoblasts were cultured on these surfaces and it was evaluated: cell adhesion, proliferation, and viability, alkaline phosphatase activity, total protein content, and matrix mineralization formation. Physical and chemical treatments produced very different surface morphologies. Al(2)O(3) residues were detected on SB and SLA2 surfaces. Only matrix mineralization formation was affected by different surface treatments, being increased on rough surface (SLA1) and reduced on surface with high amount of Al(2)O(3) residues (SB). On the basis of these findings, it is possible to conclude that high concentration of residual Al(2)O(3) negatively interfere with the process of matrix mineralization formation in contact with Ti implant surfaces.

  13. High temperature dynamic modulus and damping of aluminum and titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.; Maisel, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Dynamic modulus and damping capacity property data were measured from 20 to over 500 C for unidirectional B/Al (1100), B/Al (6061), B/SiC/Al (6061), Al2O3/Al, SiC/Ti-6Al-4V, and SiC/Ti composites. The measurements were made under vacuum by the forced vibration of composite bars at free-free flexural resonance near 2000 Hz and at amplitudes below 0.000001. Whereas little variation was observed in the dynamic moduli of specimens with approximately the same fiber content (50 percent), the damping of B/Al composites was found at all temperatures to be significantly greater than the damping of the Al2O3/Al and SiC/Ti composites. For those few situations where slight deviations from theory were observed, the dynamic data were examined for information concerning microstructural changes induced by composite fabrication and thermal treatment. The 270 C damping peak observed in B/Al (6061) composites after heat treatment above 460 C appears to be the result of a change in the 6061 aluminum alloy microstructure induced by interaction with the boron fibers. The growth characteristics of the damping peak suggest its possible value for monitoring fiber strength degration caused by excess thermal treatment during B/Al (6061) fabrication and use.

  14. Surface-modified anodic aluminum oxide membrane with hydroxyethyl celluloses as a matrix for bilirubin removal.

    PubMed

    Xue, Maoqiang; Ling, Yisheng; Wu, Guisen; Liu, Xin; Ge, Dongtao; Shi, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Microporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes were modified by 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to produce terminal epoxy groups. These were used to covalently link hydroxyethyl celluloses (HEC) to amplify reactive groups of AAO membrane. The hydroxyl groups of HEC-AAO composite membrane were further modified with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether to link arginine as an affinity ligand. The contents of HEC and arginine of arginine-immobilized HEC-AAO membrane were 52.1 and 19.7mg/g membrane, respectively. As biomedical adsorbents, the arginine-immobilized HEC-AAO membranes were tested for bilirubin removal. The non-specific bilirubin adsorption on the unmodified HEC-AAO composite membranes was 0.8mg/g membrane. Higher bilirubin adsorption values, up to 52.6mg/g membrane, were obtained with the arginine-immobilized HEC-AAO membranes. Elution of bilirubin showed desorption ratio was up to 85% using 0.3M NaSCN solution as the desorption agent. Comparisons equilibrium and dynamic capacities showed that dynamic capacities were lower than the equilibrium capacities. In addition, the adsorption mechanism of bilirubin and the effects of temperature, initial concentration of bilirubin, albumin concentration and ionic strength on adsorption were also investigated.

  15. Effect of angleplying and matrix enhancement on impact-resistant boron/aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdanels, D. L.; Signorelli, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Efforts to improve the impact resistance of B/Al are reviewed and analyzed. Tensile and dynamic modulus tests, thin sheet Charpy and Izod impact tests, and standard full size Charpy impact tests were conducted on 0.20 mm (8 mil) diameter-B/1100 Al matrix composites. Angleplies ranged from unidirectional to + or - 30 deg. The best compromise between reduced longitudinal properties and increased transverse properties was obtained with + or - 15 deg angleply. The pendulum impact strengths of improved B/Al were higher than that of notched titanium and appear to be enough to warrant consideration of B/Cl for application to fan blades in aircraft gas turbine engines.

  16. In situ surface studies of conversion coatings for steel and aluminum. Final report, 15 April 1989-14 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    White, H.W.; Mansfeld, F.; Bryant, P.

    1992-11-10

    The primary goals of the work were to develop mechanisms of corrosion protection for cerium based surface layers on aluminum alloys and on polyacrylic acid (PAA) complexed zinc phosphate conversion coatings on steel. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) using tunnel current control was developed and applied to several problems. The cerium based coatings on AI 6061-T6 are shown to consist of two principle components--a poorly ordered monohydrated aluminum oxide, and an insoluble cerium oxide which forms at areas concentrated with impurities and alloying elements. Electrochemical action during the surface modification process fosters the precipitation of cerium compounds which inhibit further attack. The addition of high molecular weight PAA to the phosphating bath can significantly improve both resistance to corrosion and top-coat adherence of zinc phosphate conversion coatings on steel. Raman spectra showed the compositions of both unmodified and PAA modified films to be zinc phosphate dihydrate. Single crystallite surfaces were imaged using AFM. The morphologies of the unmodified and modified films were in general quite similar, but subtle differences were apparent. Several other projects involving surface layers and adsorbates were carried out and are described.

  17. Effect of Spark-Plasma-Sintering Conditions on Tensile Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composites Reinforced with Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Imai, H.; Umeda, J.; Takahashi, M.; Kondoh, K.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, aluminum (Al) matrix composites containing 2 wt.% multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were fabricated by powder metallurgy using high-energy ball milling (HEBM), spark plasma sintering (SPS), and subsequent hot extrusion. The effect of SPS conditions on the tensile properties of CNT/Al composites was investigated. The results showed that composites with well-dispersed CNTs and nearly full-density CNT/Al can be obtained. During HEBM, CNTs were shortened, inserted into welded Al powder particles, bonded to Al, and still stable without CNT-Al reaction. After consolidation, Al4C3 phases formed in composites under different sintering conditions. With the increase of sintering temperature and holding time, the strength decreased. Conversely, the ductility and toughness noticeably increased. As a result, a good balance between strength (367 MPa in ultimate tensile strength) and ductility (13% in elongation) was achieved in the as-extruded CNT/Al composite sintered at 630°C with a holding time of 300 min.

  18. Effects of filling material and laser power on the formation of intermetallic compounds during laser-assisted friction stir butt welding of steel and aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Xinjiang; Jin, Xiangzhong; Peng, Nanxiang; Ye, Ying; Wu, Sigen; Dai, Houfu

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, two kinds of materials, Ni and Zn, are selected as filling material during laser-assisted friction stir butt welding of Q235 steel and 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, and their influences on the formation of intermetallic compounds on the steel/aluminum interface of the joints were first studied. SEM was used to analyze the profile of the intermetallic compound layer and the fractography of tensile fracture surfaces. In addition, EDS was applied to investigate the types of the intermetallic compounds. The results indicate that a thin iron-abundant intermetallic compound layer forms and ductile fracture mode occurs when Ni is added, but a thick aluminum-abundant intermetallic compound layer generates and brittle fracture mode occurs when Zn is added. So the tensile strength of the welds with Ni as filling material is greater than that with Zn as filling material. Besides, the effect of laser power on the formation of intermetallic compound layer when Ni is added was investigated. The preheated temperature field produced by laser beam in the cross section of workpiece was calculated, and the tensile strength of the joints at different laser powers was tested. Results show that only when suitable laser power is adopted, can suitable preheating temperature of the steel reach, then can thin intermetallic compound layer form and high tensile strength of the joints reach. Either excessive or insufficient laser power will reduce the tensile strength of the joints.

  19. The Development of 6061-Aluminum Windows for the MICE LiquidAbsorber

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, W.; Yang, S.Q.; Green, M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Swanson, J.

    2005-08-24

    The thin windows for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) liquid Absorber will be fabricated from 6061-T6-aluminum. The absorber and vacuum vessel thin windows are 300-mm in diameter and are 180 mm thick at the center. The windows are designed for an internal burst pressure of 0.68 MPa (100 psig) when warm. The MICE experiment design calls for changeable windows on the absorber, so a bolted window design was adopted. Welded windows offer some potential advantages over bolted windows when they are on the absorber itself. This report describes the bolted window and its seal. This report also describes an alternate window that is welded directly to the absorber body. The welded window design presented permits the weld to be ground off and re-welded. This report presents a thermal FEA analysis of the window seal-weld, while the window is being welded. Finally, the results of a test of a welded-window are presented.

  20. Investigation of surface topography effects on metal flow under lubricated hot compression of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurk, Justin Irvin

    An investigation was conducted to study the effects of die surface topography, specifically surface roughness and lay, on metal flow and the friction factor under lubricated hot compression. 6061-T6 aluminum rings and square bar stock specimens were compressed on H-13 tool steel platens machined with a unidirectional lay pattern to six different roughnesses between a R 0 10 and 240 muin. A lab based hydraulic press mounted with an experimental die set was used for all testing. Repeated trials were conducted using high temperature vegetable oil and boron nitride lubricants. Metal flow was quantified as a function of surface roughness, lay orientation, and die temperature. Approximate plane strain cigar test specimens were compressed at platen temperatures of 300 °F and 400 °F and at orientations of 0°, 45°, and 90° between the longitudinal axis and unidirectional platen surface lay. The friction factor was assessed using the ring compression test under varying platen roughness conditions and die temperatures between 250 °F and 400 °F. Results indicate metal flow is optimized at low platen roughnesses and orientations parallel to the surface lay of the platen. Die temperature was not found to influence metal flow within the temperature range investigated. The friction factor was observed to be minimized at lower die temperatures and platen roughnesses.

  1. Numerical modelling of thermal phenomenon in friction stir welding of aluminum plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaira Vignesh, R.; Padmanaban, R.; Arivarasu, M.; Thirumalini, S.; Gokulachandran, J.; Sai Ram, Mutyala Sesha Satya

    2016-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process with potential to join materials that are non weldable by conventional fusion welding techniques. The study of heat transfer in FSW aids in the identification of defects like flash, inadequate heat input, poor material flow and mixing etc. In this paper, transient temperature distribution during FSW of aluminum alloy AA6061-T6 was simulated using finite element modelling. The model was used to predict the peak temperature and analyse the thermal history during FSW. The effect of process parameters namely tool rotation speed, tool traverse speed (welding speed), shoulder diameter and pin diameter of tool on the temperature distribution was investigated using two level factorial design. The model results were validated using the experimental results from the published literature. It was found that peak temperature was directly proportional to tool rotation speed and shoulder diameter and inversely proportional to tool traverse speed. The effect of pin diameter on peak temperature was found to be trivial.

  2. A chrome-free conversion coating and sealant for aluminum and its alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bibber, J.W.

    1999-07-01

    For over fifty years, chromates have been the standard against which other conversion coatings and/or sealants have been judged. Due to current environmental and safety concerns, they are being removed from use. This paper presents neutral salt-spray, filiform primer adhesion and electrical conductivity data on a commercial chromate-free, inorganic and non-toxic conversion coating used with a new and unique sealing emulsion. The seal is an organic water based emulsion which when dried on a permanganate based conversion coated aluminum surface will be polymerized, or cured, when heated to 250--300 F for 20 seconds or longer. The higher the temperature, or period of time, the greater the degree of polymerization. The polymerized film is as electrically conductive as chromate films and easily accepts and bonds to applied primers. For in-service repair a conventional heat-gun maybe used. For large surfaces, any other conventional heat source may be used. The 6061-T6, 7075-T6, and 2024-T3 series wrought alloys were tested and directly compared to current chromate based conversion coatings. The tests showed equivalent or superior results in all cases.

  3. Penetration experiments in aluminum 1100 targets using soda-lime glass projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horz, Friedrich; Cintala, Mark J.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Cardenas, Frank; Davidson, William E.; Haynes, Gerald; See, Thomas H.; Winkler, Jerry L.

    1995-01-01

    The cratering and penetration behavior of annealed aluminum 1100 targets, with thickness varied from several centimeters to ultra-thin foils less than 1 micrometer thick, were experimentally investigated using 3.2 mm diameter spherical soda-lime glass projectiles at velocities from 1 to 7 km/s. The objective was to establish quantitative, dimensional relationships between initial impact conditions (impact velocity, projectile diameter, and target thickness) and the diameter of the resulting crater or penetration hole. Such dimensional relationships and calibration experiments are needed to extract the diameters and fluxes of hypervelocity particles from space-exposed surfaces and to predict the performance of certain collisional shields. The cratering behavior of aluminum 1100 is fairly well predicted. However, crater depth is modestly deeper for our silicate impactors than the canonical value based on aluminum projectiles and aluminum 6061-T6 targets. The ballistic-limit thickness was also different. These differences attest to the great sensitivity of detailed crater geometry and penetration behavior on the physical properties of both the target and impactor. Each penetration experiment was equipped with a witness plate to monitor the nature of the debris plume emanating from the rear of the target. This plume consists of both projectile fragments and target debris. Both penetration hole and witness-plate spray patterns systematically evolve in response to projectile diameter/target thickness. The relative dimensions of the projectile and target totally dominate the experimental products documented in this report; impact velocity is an important contributor as well to the evolution of penetration holes, but is of subordinate significance for the witness-plate spray patterns.

  4. Development of a job-exposure matrix for exposure to total and fine particulate matter in the aluminum industry

    PubMed Central

    Noth, Elizabeth M.; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Liu, Sa; Cantley, Linda; Tessier-Sherman, Baylah; Eisen, Ellen A.; Cullen, Mark R.; Hammond, S. Katharine

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that exposure to particulate matter (PM) at environmental concentrations increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, particularly PM with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5μm (PM2.5). Despite this, the health impacts of higher occupational exposures to PM2.5 have rarely been evaluated. In part, this research gap derives from the absence of information on PM2.5 exposures in the workplace. To address this gap, we have developed a job-exposure matrix (JEM) to estimate exposure to two size fractions of PM in the aluminum industry. Measurements of total PM (TPM) and PM2.5 were used to develop exposure metrics for an epidemiologic study. TPM exposures for distinct exposure groups (DEGs) in the JEM were calculated using 8,385 personal TPM samples collected at 11 facilities (1980-2011). For 8 of these facilities, simultaneous PM2.5 and TPM personal monitoring was conducted from 2010-2011 to determine the percent of TPM that is composed of PM2.5 (%PM2.5) in each DEG. The mean TPM from the JEM was then multiplied by %PM2.5 to calculate PM2.5 exposure concentrations in each DEG. Exposures in the smelters were substantially higher than in fabrication units; mean TPM concentrations in smelters and fabrication facilities were 3.86 mg/m3 and 0.76 mg/m3, and the corresponding mean PM2.5 concentrations were 2.03 mg/m3 and 0.40 mg/m3. Observed occupational exposures in this study generally exceeded environmental PM2.5 concentrations by an order of magnitude. PMID:24022670

  5. Fusion boundary microstructure evolution in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrivas, Anastasios Dimitrios

    2000-10-01

    A melting technique was developed to simulate the fusion boundary of aluminum alloys using the GleebleRTM thermal simulator. Using a steel sleeve to contain the aluminum, samples were heated to incremental temperatures above the solidus temperature of a number of alloys. In alloy 2195, a 4wt%Cu-1wt%Li alloy, an equiaxed non-dendritic zone (EQZ) could be formed by heating in the temperature range from approximately 630 to 640°C. At temperatures above 640°C, solidification occurred by the normal epitaxial nucleation and growth mechanism. Fusion boundary behavior was also studied in alloys 5454-H34, 6061-T6, and 2219-T8. Additionally, experimental alloy compositions were produced by making bead on plate welds using an alloy 5454-H32 base metal and 5025 or 5087 filler metals. These filler metals contain zirconium and scandium additions, respectively, and were expected to influence nucleation and growth behavior. Both as-welded and welded/heat treated (540°C and 300°C) substrates were tested by melting simulation, resulting in dendritic and EQZ structures depending on composition and substrate condition. Orientation imaging microscopy (OIM(TM)) was employed to study the crystallographic character of the microstructures produced and to verify the mechanism responsible for EQZ formation. OIM(TM) proved that grains within the EQZ have random orientation. In all other cases, where the simulated microstructures were dendritic in nature, it was shown that epitaxy was the dominant mode of nucleation. The lack of any preferred crystallographic orientation relationship in the EQZ supports a theory proposed by Lippold et al that the EQZ is the result of heterogeneous nucleation within the weld unmixed zone. EDS analysis of the 2195 on STEM revealed particles with ternary composition consisted of Zr, Cu and Al and a tetragonal type crystallographic lattice. Microdiffraction line scans on EQZ grains in the alloy 2195 showed very good agreement between the measured Cu

  6. Impact Welding of Aluminum to Copper and Stainless Steel by Vaporizing Foil Actuator: Effect of Heat Treatment Cycles on Mechanical Properties and Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivek, Anupam; Hansen, Steven; Benzing, Jake; He, Mei; Daehn, Glenn

    2015-10-01

    This work studies the mechanical property effect of microstructure on impact welds of aluminum alloy AA6061 with both copper alloy Cu 110 and stainless steel AISI 304. AA6061-T6 and T4 temper aluminum sheets of 1 mm thickness were launched toward copper and stainless steel targets using the vaporizing foil actuator technique. Flyer plate velocities, measured via photonic Doppler velocimetry, were observed to be approximately 800 m/s. The welded aluminum-copper samples were subjected to instrumented peel testing, microhardness testing, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The welded joints exhibited cracks through their continuous intermetallic layers. The cracks were impeded upon encountering a ductile metallic wave. The welds created with T6 temper flyer sheets were found to have smaller intermetallic-free and wavy interface regions as compared to those created with T4 temper flyer sheets. Peel strength tests of the two weld combinations resulted in failure along the interface in the case of the T6 flyer welds, while the failure generally occurred in the parent aluminum for the T4 temper flyer welds. Half of the T4 flyer welds were subjected to aging for 18 h at 433 K (160 °C) to convert the aluminum sheet to the T6 condition. Although the aged flyer material did not attain the hardness of the as-received T6 material, it was found to be significantly stronger than the T4 material. These welds retained their strength after the aging process, and diffusion across the interface was minimal. The welded aluminum-stainless steel samples were analyzed on a more basic level than aluminum-copper samples, but were found to exhibit similar results.

  7. Conical shaped charge pressed powder, metal liner jet characterization and penetration in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.

    1997-05-01

    This work was conducted as part of a Near-wellbore Mechanics program at Sandia National Laboratories. An understanding of the interaction of the perforator jet from an explosive shaped charge with the fluid filled porous sandstone media is of basic importance to the completion of oil wells. Tests were conducted using the five-head Flash X-ray Test Site to measure the jet tip velocities and jet geometry for the OMNI and CAPSULE Conical Shaped Charge (CSC) oil well perforator jets fired into air. These tests were conducted to generate jet velocity and geometry information to be used in validating the CTH hydrocode modeling/simulation development of pressed powder, metal liner jets in air. Ten tests were conducted to determine the CSC jet penetration into 6061-T6 aluminum targets. Five tests were conducted with the OMNI CSC at 0.25, 6.0, and 19 inch standoffs from the target. Five tests were conducted with the CAPSULE CSC at 0.60, 5.0, 10.0, and 19 inch standoffs from the target. These tests were conducted to generate jet penetration into homogeneous target information for use in validating the CTH code modeling/simulation of pressed powder, metal liner jets penetrating aluminum targets. The Flash X-ray radiographs, jet velocities, jet diameters, and jet lengths data for jets fired into air are presented in this report. The jet penetration into aluminum and penetration hole profile data are also presented for the OMNI and CAPSULE perforators. Least Squares fits are presented for the measured jet velocity and jet penetration data.

  8. An experimental and modeling investigation of the external strain, internal stress and fiber phase transformation behavior of a NiTi actuated aluminum metal matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, W.D.; Lorentzen, T.; Broendsted, P.; Larsen, P.H.

    1998-06-12

    The present work reports macroscopic thermal mechanical and in-situ neutron diffraction measurements from 22.9 vol. %, 50.7 at. % Ni-Ti fiber actuated 6082-T6 aluminum matrix composite and 6082-T6 homogeneous aluminum control materials subjected to a room temperature 4% tensile elongation, a subsequent room temperature to 120 C unconstrained heating process, and a final 120 C tensile process. During the unconstrained room temperature to 120 C heating process, the composite exhibited a pronounced, non linear thermal contraction, while the homogeneous control exhibited the expected linear thermal expansion. The composite thermal contraction was clearly the result of a powerful shape memory response in the actuating NiTi fibers. The paper further presents a one-dimensional thermal strain, internal stress and fiber phase transformation composite model. Model parameters were identified from tests on extracted single fibers, calculations using these parameters quantitatively agree with experimental thermal mechanical and neutron diffraction measurements.

  9. X-ray and neutron diffraction measurements of dislocation density and subgrain size in a friction stir welded aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Claussen, Bjorn; Woo, Wanchuck; Zhili, Feng; Edward, Kenik; Ungar, Tamas

    2009-01-01

    The dislocation density and subgrain size were determined in the base material and friction-stir welds of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. High-resolution X-ray diffraction measurement was performed in the base material. The result of the line profile analysis of the X-ray diffraction peak shows that the dislocation density is about 4.5 x 10{sup 14} m{sup 02} and the subgrain size is about 200 nm. Meanwhile, neutron diffraction measurements have been performed to observe the diffraction peaks during friction-stir welding (FSW). The deep penetration capability of the neutron enables us to measure the peaks from the midplane of the Al plate underneath the tool shoulder of the friction-stir welds. The peak broadening analysis result using the Williamson-Hall method shows the dislocation density of about 3.2 x 10{sup 15} m{sup -2} and subgrain size of about 160 nm. The significant increase of the dislocation density is likely due to the severe plastic deformation during FSW. This study provides an insight into understanding the transient behavior of the microstructure under severe thermomechanical deformation.

  10. Salt Spray Test to Determine Galvanic Corrosion Levels of Electroless Nickel Connectors Mounted on an Aluminum Bracket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rolin, T. D.; Hodge, R. E.; Torres, P. D.; Jones, D. D.; Laird, K. R.

    2014-01-01

    During preliminary vehicle design reviews, requests were made to change flight termination systems from an electroless nickel (EN) connector coating to a zinc-nickel (ZN) plating. The reason for these changes was due to a new NASA-STD-6012 corrosion requirement where connectors must meet the performance requirement of 168 hr of exposure to salt spray. The specification for class F connectors, MIL-DTL-38999, certifies the EN coating will meet a 48-hr salt spray test, whereas the ZN is certified to meet a 168-hr salt spray test. The ZN finish is a concern because Marshall Space Flight Center has no flight experience with ZN-finished connectors, and MSFC-STD-3012 indicates that zinc and zinc alloys should not be used. The purpose of this test was to run a 168-hr salt spray test to verify the electrical and mechanical integrity of the EN connectors and officially document the results. The salt spray test was conducted per ASTM B117 on several MIL-DTL-38999 flight-like connectors mounted to an aluminum 6061-T6 bracket that was alodined. The configuration, mounting techniques, electrical checks, and materials used were typical of flight and ground support equipment.

  11. Matrix grain characterisation by electron backscattering diffraction of powder metallurgy aluminum matrix composites reinforced with MoSi{sub 2} intermetallic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Corrochano, J. Hidalgo, P.; Lieblich, M.; Ibanez, J.

    2010-11-15

    Research highlights: Six extruded PM AA6061/MoSi{sub 2}/15p were processed with and without ball milling {yields} EBSD was used to characterise matrix grain size and grain orientation. {yields} Ball milling decreases matrix grain size to submicrometric level. {yields} Ball milling produces a more equiaxed microstructure and larger misorientation. {yields} Increasing milling time produces matrix texture randomization.

  12. Tensile and Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of In-Situ Al3Zr + Al2O3-Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, G.; Ghose, A. K.; Chakrabarty, I.

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, aluminum-based in-situ intermetallic Al3Zr and Al2O3-reinforced metal matrix composites have been synthesized by direct melt reaction through stir casting of zirconium oxychloride (ZrOCl2·8H2O) powder in commercially pure aluminum. The in-situ reaction produces intermetallic Al3Zr needles that change to feathery morphology with increasing ZrOCl2·8H2O, while the Al2O3 is of fine globular shape. The tensile strengths of these composites increase with increasing volume percent reinforcements, attaining a peak value with 18 pct addition. The dry sliding wear behavior of the composites was evaluated with varying parameters, viz. sliding distance, normal load, and sliding velocities. The wear mechanisms are explained based on the microstructure, the topography of the worn surface, and the interfacial strength of the matrix and reinforcement. The tensile and wear properties are compared with widely used wear resistant hypereutectic Al-17 pct Si cast alloy.

  13. Spark Plasma Sintering of Aluminum-Magnesium-Matrix Composites with Boron Carbide and Tungsten Nano-powder Inclusions: Modeling and Experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvilis, E. S.; Khasanov, O. L.; Gulbin, V. N.; Petyukevich, M. S.; Khasanov, A. O.; Olevsky, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    Spark-plasma sintering (SPS) is used to fabricate fully-dense metal-matrix (Al/Mg) composites containing hard ceramic (boron carbide) and refractory metal (tungsten) inclusions. The study objectives include the modeling (and its experimental verification) of the process of the consolidation of the composites consisted of aluminum-magnesium alloy AMg6 (65 wt.%), B4C powder (15 wt.%), and W nano-powder (20 wt.%), as well as the optimization of the composite content and of the SPS conditions to achieve higher density. Discrete element modeling of the composite particles packing based on the particle size distribution functions of real powders is utilized for the determination of the powder compositions rendering maximum mixture packing densities. Two models: a power-law creep model of the high temperature deformation of powder materials, and an empirical logarithmic pressure-temperature-relative density relationship are successfully applied for the description of the densification of the aluminum-magnesium metal matrix powder composite subjected to spark-plasma sintering. The elastoplastic properties of the sintered composite samples are assessed by nanoindentation.

  14. Optimization of magnetically accelerated, ultra-high velocity aluminum flyer plates for use in plate impact, shock wave experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, Kyle Robert; Knudson, Marcus D.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Lemke, Raymond William; Davis, J. P.; Harjes, Henry Charles III; Giunta, Anthony Andrew; Bliss, David Emery

    2005-05-01

    The intense magnetic field produced by the 20 MA Z accelerator is used as an impulsive pressure source to accelerate metal flyer plates to high velocity for the purpose of performing plate impact, shock wave experiments. This capability has been significantly enhanced by the recently developed pulse shaping capability of Z, which enables tailoring the rise time to peak current for a specific material and drive pressure to avoid shock formation within the flyer plate during acceleration. Consequently, full advantage can be taken of the available current to achieve the maximum possible magnetic drive pressure. In this way, peak magnetic drive pressures up to 490 GPa have been produced, which shocklessly accelerated 850 {micro}m aluminum (6061-T6) flyer plates to peak velocities of 34 km/s. We discuss magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations that are used to optimize the magnetic pressure for a given flyer load and to determine the shape of the current rise time that precludes shock formation within the flyer during acceleration to peak velocity. In addition, we present results pertaining to plate impact, shock wave experiments in which the aluminum flyer plates were magnetically accelerated across a vacuum gap and impacted z-cut, {alpha}-quartz targets. Accurate measurements of resulting quartz shock velocities are presented and analyzed through high-fidelity MHD simulations enhanced using optimization techniques. Results show that a fraction of the flyer remains at solid density at impact, that the fraction of material at solid density decreases with increasing magnetic pressure, and that the observed abrupt decrease in the quartz shock velocity is well correlated with the melt transition in the aluminum flyer.

  15. X-Ray and Neutron Diffraction Measurements of Dislocation Density and Subgrain Size in a Friction-Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Ungar, Prof Tomas; Feng, Zhili; Kenik, Edward A; Clausen, B

    2009-01-01

    The dislocation density and subgrain size were determined in the base material and friction-stir welds of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. High-resolution X-ray diffraction measurement was performed in the base material. The result of the line profile analysis of the X-ray diffraction peak shows that the dislocation density is about 4.5 x 10{sup 14} m{sup -2} and the subgrain size is about 200 nm. Meanwhile, neutron diffraction measurements have been performed to observe the diffraction peaks during friction-stir welding (FSW). The deep penetration capability of the neutron enables us to measure the peaks from the midplane of the Al plate underneath the tool shoulder of the friction-stir welds. The peak broadening analysis result using the Williamson-Hall method shows the dislocation density of about 3.2 x 10{sup 15} m{sup -2} and subgrain size of about 160 nm. The significant increase of the dislocation density is likely due to the severe plastic deformation during FSW. This study provides an insight into understanding the transient behavior of the microstructure under severe thermomechanical deformation.

  16. Thermophysical and Electrical Properties of Metal Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    de if necessary and identify by block number) Aluminum matrix composiles, aluminum alloy matrix composites, copper matrix composites, electrical...the various com- posites of aluminum and aluminum alloy mar-tices, copper matrix, lead matrix, magnesium matrix, nickel and nickel alloy matrices...titanium and titanium alloy matrices, tungsten matrix, and zinc matrix. Most of the data are for aluminum DD j JAN 73 1473 EDITION OF I NOV6 S IS

  17. Aluminum matrix texture in Al-Al3Ti functionally graded materials analyzed by electron back-scattering diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshimi; Sequeira, Paulo D.; Sato, Hisashi; Inamura, Tomonari; Hosoda, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Al matrix functionally graded materials (FGMs) with oriented Al3Ti platelets were fabricated by a centrifugal solid-particle method. The applied centrifugal forces were 30, 60, and 120G (units of gravity). The orientation and volume fraction gradients of the Al3Ti platelets within the samples were measured. Since a good lattice correspondence was reported for the close-packed directions and the close-packed planes between Al and Al3Ti, the Al matrix in the Al-Al3Ti FGMs fabricated by the centrifugal solid-particle method should have some texture. Al matrix texture was, therefore, analyzed by electron back-scattering diffraction (EBSD). Analysis of the resulting pole figures indicates a preferred orientation along the (200) plane for the Al matrix crystals. Furthermore, increasing the applied centrifugal force enhances the orientation effect. A correlation appears to exist between platelet orientation and the preferred texture of the Al matrix.

  18. Synthesis and analysis of nanocrystalline β1-Cu3Al and β2-NiAl intermetallic-reinforced aluminum matrix composite by high energy ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hong-Hai; Nguyen, Minh-Thuyet; Kim, Won Joo; Kim, Jin-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Nanocrystalline β1-Cu3Al and β2-NiAl intermetallic compounds were in-situ reinforced in the aluminum matrix with the atomic composition of Al67Cu20Ni13 by the mechanical alloying of elemental powders. Both β1-Cu3Al, β2-NiAl phases that can be only co-synthesized in Cu base alloys have been obtained after 15h milling in this study. The phase evolution during milling process was investigated by X-ray diffraction. The β1-Cu3Al, β2-NiAl phases were metastable with further milling time up to 40 h. Specially, unreacted Al matrix has been totally transformed to amorphous state in the final powder. A remarkable crystalline size of 6.5 nm was reached after 15 h milling time. Thermal stability of the milled powder was also studied by differential thermal analysis. It is shown that β1-Cu3Al, β2-NiAl phases were stable up to higher than 550 °C. Moreover, the inter-diffusion between Al matrix and Cu3Al within the temperature range of 620-740 °C led to the formation of superstructure ζ1-Al3Cu4 phase.

  19. Microwave combustion synthesis of in situ Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 3}Zr reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Heguo; Hua, Bo; Cui, Tao; Huang, Jiewen; Li, Jianliang; Xie, Zonghan

    2015-08-15

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 3}Zr reinforced aluminum matrix composites were fabricated from Al and ZrO{sub 2} powders by SiC assisted microwave combustion synthesis. The microstructure and reaction pathways were analyzed by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that the heating rate during microwave synthesis was very high and the entire process took several minutes and that the ignition temperature of the reaction was much lower than that of conventional methods. In addition, the resulting microstructure was found to be finer than that prepared by the conventional methods and no cracks can be seen in the Al{sub 3}Zr reinforcements. As such, the newly developed composites have potential for safety-critical applications where catastrophic failure is not tolerated.

  20. Effect of microstructure (particulate size and volume fraction) and counterface material on the sliding wear resistance of particulate-reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpas, A. T.; Zhang, J.

    1994-05-01

    The effects of microstructure (namely, particulate volume fraction and particulate size) and the counterface materials on the dry-sliding wear resistance of the aluminum matrix composites 2014A1-SiC and 6061Al-Al2O3 were studied. Experiments were performed within a load range of 0.9 to 350 N at a constant sliding velocity of 0.2 ms-1. Two types of counterface materials, SAE 52100 bearing steel and mullite, were used. At low loads, where particles act as loadbearing constituents, the wear resistance of the 2014A1 reinforced with 15.8 µm diameter SiC was superior to that of the alloy with the same volume fraction of SiC but with 2.4 µm diameter. The wear rates of the composites worn against a steel slider were lower compared with those worn against a mullite slider because of the formation of iron-rich layers that act as in situ solid lubricants in the former case. With increasing the applied load, SiC and A12O3 particles fractured and the wear rates of the composites increased to levels comparable to those of unreinforced matrix alloys. The transition to this regime was delayed to higher loads in the composites with a higher volume percentage of particles. Concurrent with particle fracture, large strains and strain gradients were generated within the aluminum layers adjacent to contact surfaces. This led to the subsurface crack growth and delamination. Because the particles and interfaces provided preferential sites for subsurface crack initiation and growth and because of the propensity of the broken particles to act as third-body abrasive elements at the contact surfaces, no improvement of the wear resistance was observed in the composites in this regime relative to unreinforced aluminum alloys. A second transition, to severe wear, occurred at higher loads when the contact surface temperature exceeded a critical value. The transition loads (and temperatures) were higher in the composites. The alloys with higher volume fraction of reinforcement provided better

  1. Coating of 6028 Aluminum Alloy Using Aluminum Piston Alloy and Al-Si Alloy-Based Nanocomposites Produced by the Addition of Al-Ti5-B1 to the Matrix Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Labban, Hashem F.; Abdelaziz, M.; Mahmoud, Essam R. I.

    2014-10-01

    The Al-12 pctSi alloy and aluminum-based composites reinforced with TiB2 and Al3Ti intermetallics exhibit good wear resistance, strength-to-weight ratio, and strength-to-cost ratio when compared to equivalent other commercial Al alloys, which make them good candidates as coating materials. In this study, structural AA 6028 alloy is used as the base material. Four different coating materials were used. The first one is Al-Si alloy that has Si content near eutectic composition. The second, third, and fourth ones are Al-6 pctSi-based reinforced with TiB2 and Al3Ti nano-particles produced by addition of Al-Ti5-B1 master alloy with different weight percentages (1, 2, and 3 pct). The coating treatment was carried out with the aid of GTAW process. The microstructures of the base and coated materials were investigated using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope equipped with EDX analyzer. Microhardness of the base material and the coated layer were evaluated using a microhardness tester. GTAW process results in almost sound coated layer on 6028 aluminum alloy with the used four coating materials. The coating materials of Al-12 pct Si alloy resulted in very fine dendritic Al-Si eutectic structure. The interface between the coated layer and the base metal was very clean. The coated layer was almost free from porosities or other defects. The coating materials of Al-6 pct Si-based mixed with Al-Ti5-B1 master alloy with different percentages (1, 2, and 3 pct), results in coated layer consisted of matrix of fine dendrite eutectic morphology structure inside α-Al grains. Many fine in situ TiAl3 and TiB2 intermetallics were precipitated almost at the grain boundary of α-Al grains. The amounts of these precipitates are increased by increasing the addition of Al-Ti5-B1 master alloy. The surface hardness of the 6028 aluminum alloy base metal was improved with the entire four used surface coating materials. The improvement reached to about 85 pct by the first type of

  2. Tribological Wear Behaviour and Hardness Measurement of SiC, Al2O3 Reinforced Al. Matrix Hybrid Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Senthil Murugan; Vijayan, Jegan; Muthaiah, Velmurugan

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, Aluminium Matrix Hybrid Composite (AMHC) of 6061-T6 alloy reinforced with silicon carbide (SiC) particulate and further addition of aluminium oxide (Al2O3) particulate was fabricated by stir casting process. The wear resistance and frictional properties of that AMHC were studied by performing dry sliding wear test using a pin on disk wear tester. The experiments were conducted at a constant sliding velocity of 1.57 m/s and sliding distance of 1800 m under loading conditions of 10 and 20 N. Further tests were also carried out by keeping Al2O3 percentage (7%) constant and increasing the SiC percentage (10, 15, and 20%). The results show that the reinforcement of the metal matrix with SiC and Al2O3 reduces the wear rate range and also indicate that the wear of the test specimen increases with the increasing load and sliding distance. The coefficient of friction increases with load and increasing volume content of reinforcement. The worn surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscope to study the wear mechanism. By using wear mechanism analysis, the wear surfaces and wear properties of AMHC were determined.

  3. Non-Chromate Aluminum Pretreatments, Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    September 2004 78 ALUMINUM AL2024-T3 ALUMINUM AL7075 -T6 PNL ID 4 Control 5...ALUMINUM - AL2024-T3 192 ALUMINUM - AL7075 -T6 112 Table 5.13: AMCOM – NAVAIR PANEL TEST MATRIX OCTOBER 2003 NCAP Phase II Interim Report

  4. A theoretical approach to the photochemical activation of matrix isolated aluminum atoms and their reaction with methane

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco-Blas, M. A.; Novaro, O. A.; Pacheco-Sanchez, J. H.

    2010-11-07

    The photochemical activation of Al atoms in cryogenic matrices to induce their reaction with methane has been experimentally studied before. Here, a theoretical study of the nonadiabatic transition probabilities for the ground ({sup 2}P:3s{sup 2}3p{sup 1}) and the lowest excited states ({sup 2}S:3s{sup 2}4s{sup 1} and {sup 2}D:3s{sup 2}3d{sup 1}) of an aluminum atom interacting with a methane molecule (CH{sub 4}) was carried out through ab initio Hartree-Fock self-consistent field calculations. This was followed by a multiconfigurational study of the correlation energy obtained by extensive variational and perturbational configuration interaction analyses using the CIPSI program. The {sup 2}D state is readily inserted into a C-H bond, this being a prelude to a sequence of avoided crossings with the initially repulsive (to CH{sub 4}) lower lying states {sup 2}P and {sup 2}S. We then use a direct extension of the Landau-Zener theory to obtain transition probabilities at each avoided crossing, allowing the formation of an HAlCH{sub 3} intermediate that eventually leads to the final pair of products H+AlCH{sub 3} and HAl+CH{sub 3}.

  5. Construction of a Job Exposure Matrix to Dust, Fluoride, and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Norwegian Aluminum Industry using Prediction Models

    PubMed Central

    Søyseth, Vidar; Henneberger, Paul; Virji, Mohammed Abbas; Bakke, Berit; Kongerud, Johny

    2016-01-01

    Background The Norwegian aluminum industry developed and implemented a protocol for prospective monitoring of employees’ exposure using personal samplers. We analyzed these data to develop prediction lines to construct a job exposure matrix (JEM) for the period 1986–1995. Methods The protocol for personal monitoring of exposure was implemented in all seven Norwegian aluminum plants in 1986 and continued until 1995. Personal samplers were used to collect total dust, fluorides, and total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In addition, exposure could be categorized according to process, i.e. prebake, Søderberg, and ‘other’. We constructed four-dimensional JEMs characterized by: Plant, Job descriptor, Process, and Year. Totally 8074, 6734, and 3524 measurements were available for dust, fluorides, and PAH, respectively. The data were analyzed using linear mixed models with two-way interactions. The models were assessed using the Akaike criterion (AIC) and unadjusted R2. The significance level was set to 10% (two-sided) for retaining variables in the model. Results In 1986, the geometric mean (95% confidence interval in parentheses) for total dust, total fluorides, and PAH were 3.18 (0.46–22.2) mg m−3, 0.58 (0.085–4.00) mg m−3, and 33.9 (2.3–504) μg m−3, respectively. During 10 years of follow-up, the exposure to total dust, fluorides, and PAH decreased by 9.2, 11.7, and 14.9% per year, respectively. Each model encompassed from 49 to 72 significant components of the interaction terms. The interaction components were at least as important as the main effects, and 65 to 91% of the significant components of the interaction terms were time-dependent. Conclusion Our prediction models indicated that exposures were highly time-dependent. We expect that the time-dependent changes in exposure are of major importance for longitudinal studies of health effects in the aluminum industry. PMID:26409268

  6. Modeling the Break-up of Nano-particle Clusters in Aluminum- and Magnesium-Based Metal Matrix Nano-composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoylov, Anton; Bojarevics, Valdis; Pericleous, Koulis

    2015-07-01

    Aluminum- and magnesium-based metal matrix nano-composites with ceramic nano-reinforcements promise low weight with high durability and superior strength, desirable properties in aerospace, automobile, and other applications. However, nano-particle agglomerations lead to adverse effects on final properties: large-size clusters no longer act as dislocation anchors, but instead become defects; the resulting particle distribution will be uneven, leading to inconsistent properties. To prevent agglomeration and to break-up clusters, ultrasonic processing is used via an immersed sonotrode, or alternatively via electromagnetic vibration. A study of the interaction forces holding the nano-particles together shows that the choice of adhesion model significantly affects estimates of break-up force and that simple Stokes drag due to stirring is insufficient to break-up the clusters. The complex interaction of flow and co-joint particles under a high frequency external field (ultrasonic, electromagnetic) is addressed in detail using a discrete-element method code to demonstrate the effect of these fields on de-agglomeration.

  7. A correlation between salt spray and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy test results for conversion-coated aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.; Cunningham, M.; Jensen, H.; Kendig, M.W.; Martinez, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of 33 inorganic conversion coatings applied to five aluminum alloys was tested by salt spray exposure and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Results were evaluated to determine if a relationship existed. Individual salt spray test panels, with an area of 30 in.{sup 2} (194 cm{sup 2}), were inspected visually at regular intervals up to 168 h of exposure. At each inspection interval, panels were assigned a pass rank if <5 pits were observed, or a fail rank if >5 pits were observed. EIS data were analyzed using a simple equivalent circuit which yielded a coating resistance (R{sub c}), which was used as a figure of merit to assess coating performance. Examination of the data showed both tests could be sensitive discriminators of corrosion protection, but that EIS was more discriminating in the extremes of coating performance. Analysis showed the probability of achieving a passing salt spray result increased as R{sub c} increased. In the regimes where both tests were sensitive, regression analysis showed a linear relationship existed for each alloy substrate between the log of R{sub c} and the probability of a coating meeting the pass/fail criterion in salt spray. Based upon these relationships, threshold R{sub c} values were proposed to define the minimum value for which a given coating can be expected to attain a passing result in a 168-h salt spray test. These values were 2 {times} 10{sup 6} {Omega}-cm{sup 2} to 5 {times} 10{sup 6} {Omega}-cm{sup 2} for Al 356 (UNS A13560), Al 2024-T3 (UNS A92024), and Al 6061-T6 (UNS A96061); 1.5 {times} 10{sup 7} for Al 7075-T6 (UNS A97075); and 2.3 {times} 10{sup 6} {Omega}-cm{sup 2} for Al 3003 (UNS A93003).

  8. Mixed Mode Stable Tearing of Thin Sheet Al 6061-T6 Specimens: Experimental Measurements and Finite Element Simulations using a Modified Mohr-Coulomb Fracture Criterion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    grounding. Oliver (1996a,b), Teng (2008) andXue (2007a) reported on successful application of contin- uum damage mechanics in simulating initiation and...the accumulated damage should reach the critical value and the load carrying capacity must vanish in the post-initiate range. It should be noted that...specimen using fracture coupled with damage plastic- ity approach. Different from Mode I, little thickness reduction is observed for Mode III loading, as

  9. Investigation of the structure/property relationship of spray-formed 7XXX series high-strength aluminum alloys and their metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma-Judd, Malavika M.

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify the structure/property relationship of spray formed 7XXX series alloys. High solute, ultra-high strength 7XXX series aluminum alloys with solute contents close to equilibrium solid solubility limits of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu system have been produced by rapid solidification using spray deposition. The process yields massive preforms directly from the liquid state. Various elements, including chromium, manganese, silver, zirconium and scandium, were incorporated to produce a variety of microstructures and mechanical properties. SiC particulate was added to these same alloy compositions to produce metal matrix composites (MMCs). The resulting extruded products in the T6 and T7 conditions were evaluated and compared. Under peak-aged conditions in the unreinforced materials, strengths in excess of 860 MPa were achieved, with one alloy exceeding 900 MPa. Apart from the elongation to failure, the mechanical properties of the composite materials were equal to or superior to those of their unreinforced counterparts. The superior strength properties of the spray formed alloys were attributed to two major substructures with different scale; nanometer sized eta ' metastable precipitates and slightly larger, but finely distributed dispersoids. The large volume fraction of plate-like eta' precipitates (average size 58A, ranging up to 73 A in diameter) were identified as having a hexagonal structure with lattice parameters a = 0.488 nm and c = 1.376. The remarkable strengthening is predominantly attributed to precipitation hardening. The enhanced mechanical properties of the MMC materials are attributed to the increased dislocation density, and thus, a higher concentration of structural particles compared to the unreinforced materials. Higher gas-to-metal ratios of 4.45, as opposed to lower gas-to-metal ratios of 1.95 produced a refined grain structure with an evenly distributed second phase. In both unreinforced and MMC materials

  10. Cathodoluminescent properties of an Am3+ ion in a matrix of yttrium-aluminum garnet Y3Al5O12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Ya. V.; Usacheva, V. P.; Zamoryanskaya, M. V.

    2014-03-01

    The luminescent properties of an americium ion are studied. Luminescence spectra of americium in yttrium-aluminum garnet are recorded for the first time. The luminescence bands are identified, and the levels responsible for the observed optical transitions are determined.

  11. Corrosion resistance and durability of siloxane ceramic/polymer films for aluminum alloys in marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusada, Kentaro

    The objective of this study is to evaluate corrosion resistance and durability of siloxane ceramic/polymer films for aluminum alloys in marine environments. Al5052-H3 and Al6061-T6 were selected as substrates, and HCLCoat11 and HCLCoat13 developed in the Hawaii Corrosion Laboratory were selected for the siloxane ceramic/polymer coatings. The HCLCoat11 is a quasi-ceramic coating that has little to no hydrocarbons in its structure. The HCLCoat13 is formulated to incorporate more hydrocarbons to improve adhesion to substrate surfaces with less active functionalities. In this study, two major corrosion evaluation methods were used, which were the polarization test and the immersion test. The polarization tests provided theoretical corrosion rates (mg/dm 2/day) of bare, HCLCoat11-coated, and HCLCoat13-coated aluminum alloys in aerated 3.15wt% sodium chloride solution. From these results, the HCLCoat13-coated Al5052-H3 was found to have the lowest corrosion rate which was 0.073mdd. The next lowest corrosion rate was 0.166mdd of the HCLCoat11-coated Al5052-H3. Corrosion initiation was found to occur at preexisting breaches (pores) in the films by optical microscopy and SEM analysis. The HCLCoat11 film had many preexisting breaches of 1-2microm in diameter, while the HCLCoat13 film had much fewer preexisting breaches of less than 1microm in diameter. However, the immersion tests showed that the seawater immersion made HCLCoat13 film break away while the HCLCoat11 film did not apparently degrade, indicating that the HCLCoat11 film is more durable against seawater than the HCLCoat13. Raman spectroscopy revealed that there was some degradation of HCLCoat11 and HCLCoat13. For the HCLCoat11 film, the structure relaxation of Si-O-Si linkages was observed. On the other hand, seawater generated C-H-S bonds in the HCLCoat13 film resulting in the degradation of the film. In addition, it was found that the HCLCoat11 coating had anti-fouling properties due to its high water contact

  12. Aluminum Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Aluminum hydroxide is used for the relief of heartburn, sour stomach, and peptic ulcer pain and to ... Aluminum hydroxide comes as a capsule, a tablet, and an oral liquid and suspension. The dose and ...

  13. Shock consolidation of nanocrystalline aluminum for bulk component formation

    SciTech Connect

    Fredenburg, D. A.; Vogler, T. J.; Saldana, C. J.; Thadhani, N. N.

    2007-12-12

    Al 6061-T6 powder particles with a partially nanocrystalline graded microstructure in three distinct morphologies are compacted at an impact velocity of 650 m/s. Recovered samples are characterized to determine degree of compaction, deformation characteristics, and mechanical properties. Compacts range from 96-98% of theoretical density, exhibiting relatively low elastic moduli. Nano-indentation yields relatively consistent hardness values of {approx}1.4 GPa, indicating hardness of starting powders is preserved after compaction. Micro-indentation indicates varying degrees of compaction through specimen cross-section, which is supported by EBSD and optical microscopy.

  14. A Preliminary Report on the Strength and Metallography of a Bimetallic Friction Stir Weld Joint Between AA6061 and MIL-DTL-46100E High Hardness Steel Armor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-26

    plates of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy and High Hardness steel armor (MIL-STD-46100) were successfully joined by the friction stir welding ( FSW ) process using a...b 124 c FSW 194 d High Hardness Steel (HHS) base material 1034 e GMAW f tbd g AA6061/HHS FSW joint 176 8 a Kaiser Aluminum Certified Test...bimetallic friction stir weld joint between AA6061 and MIL-DTL-46100E High Hardness steel armor. ABSTRACT One half inch thick plates of 6061-T6 aluminum

  15. Explosively Joining Dissimilar Metal Tubes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    both steel, photograph (7), and the Ni-Cu specimen, photograph (8) , showed considerable pitting corrosion in the aluminum . 4. The paint was then...for 6061 -T6 aluminum and are: collision angle 5 - 200, collision velocity 270 - 350 m/sec, with an impact pressure of at least 27 Kbar (391 Kpsi...Welded Aluminum Alloy 1 .. 5 rn-i (P0 -I Op. 2si 11 6W TABLE I Explosive2 Cladder Metal Base Metal Explosive Loading (gins/in2 6061 -T6 Al 304 SS TSE- 1004

  16. Advanced neutron source materials surveillance program

    SciTech Connect

    Heavilin, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) will be composed of several different materials, one of which is 6061-T6 aluminum. Among other components, the reflector vessel and the core pressure boundary tube (CPBT), are to be made of 6061-T6 aluminum. These components will be subjected to high thermal neutron fluences and will require a surveillance program to monitor the strength and fracture toughness of the 6061-T6 aluminum over their lifetimes. The purpose of this paper is to explain the steps that were taken in the summer of 1994 toward developing the surveillance program. The first goal was to decide upon standard specimens to use in the fracture toughness and tensile testing. Second, facilities had to be chosen for specimens representing the CPBT and the reflector vessel base, weld, and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) metals. Third, a timetable had to be defined to determine when to remove the specimens for testing.

  17. Aluminum Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumrall, William J.

    1998-01-01

    Presents three problems based on the price of aluminum designed to encourage students to be cooperative and to use an investigative approach to learning. Students collect and synthesize information, analyze results, and draw conclusions. (AIM)

  18. Carbothermal synthesis of aluminum nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, L.D. )

    1988-07-01

    A synthetic route is described for making carbothermally reduced powders from colloidal oxide precursors trapped in a polymer matrix. The entrapping resin, which is formed by polymerization of a monomer dissolved in the colloid, serves both to minimize particle agglomeration during reaction and as the source of carbon for reduction. Following reduction, the remaining carbon matrix is removed by oxidation. This strategy was used to synthesize aluminum nitride powder via trapping of colloidal alumina in poly(furfuryl alcohol) resin.

  19. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURAL, MECHANICAL, AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Mechanical Properties of Ni-Coated Single Graphene Sheet and Their Embedded Aluminum Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hai-Yang; Zha, Xin-Wei

    2010-07-01

    The effects of Ni coating on the mechanical behaviors of single graphene sheet and their embedded Al matrix composites under axial tension are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. The results show that the Young's moduli and tensile strength of graphene obviously decrease after Ni coating. The results also show that the mechanical properties of Al matrix can be obviously increased by embedding a single graphene sheet. From the simulation, we also find that the Young's modulus and tensile strength of the Ni-coated graphene/Al composite is obviously larger than those of the uncoated graphene/Al composite. The increased magnitude of the Young's modulus and tensile strength of graphene/Al composite are 52.27% and 32.32% at 0.01 K, respectively, due to Ni coating. By exploring the effects of temperature on the mechanical properties of single graphene sheet and their embedded Al matrix composites, it is found that the higher temperature leads to the lower critical strain and tensile strength.

  20. Aluminum-fly ash metal matrix composites for automotive parts. [Reports for October 1 to December 1998, and January 31 to March 31, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, David; Purgert, Robert; Rhudy, Richard; Rohatgi, P.

    1999-04-21

    Some highlights are: (1) Material development, process development, and part validation are occurring simultaneously on a fast track schedule. (2) Prior project activity has resulted in a program emphasis on three components--manifolds, mounting brackets, and motor mounts; and three casting techniques--squeeze casting, pressure die casting, and sand casting. (3) With the project focus, it appears possible to offer manifolds and mounting brackets for automotive qualification testing on a schedule in line with the PNGV Year 2004 goal. (4) Through an iterative process of fly ash treatment, MMC ingot preparation, foundry process refinement, and parts production, both foundries (Eck Industries and Thompson Aluminum Casting Company) are addressing the pre-competitive issues of: (a) Optimum castability with fly ash shapes and sizes; (b) Best mechanical properties derived from fly ash shapes and sizes; (c) Effective fly ash classification processes; (d) Mechanical properties resulting from various casting processes and fly ash formulations. Eck and TAC continued experiments with batch ingot provided by both Eck and the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee. Castings were run that contained varying amounts of fly ash and different size fractions. Components were cast using cenosphere material to ascertain the effects of squeeze casting and to determine whether the pressure would break the cenospheres. Test parts are currently being machined into substandard test bars for mechanical testing. Also, the affect of heat treatments on ashalloy are being studied through comparison to two lots, one heat treated and one in the ''as cast'' condition.

  1. Aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  2. Interactions of satellite-speed helium atoms with satellite surfaces. 3: Drag coefficients from spatial and energy distributions of reflected helium atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, P. K.; Knuth, E. L.

    1977-01-01

    Spatial and energy distributions of helium atoms scattered from an anodized 1235-0 aluminum surface as well as the tangential and normal momentum accommodation coefficients calculated from these distributions are reported. A procedure for calculating drag coefficients from measured values of spatial and energy distributions is given. The drag coefficient calculated for a 6061 T-6 aluminum sphere is included.

  3. AM2 Opposite Lay Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    fabricated from a single 6061-T6 aluminum alloy extrusion with end connectors welded to the 24-in. ends to form a complete panel. The core of the extruded...commercial products. All product names and trademarks cited are the property of their respective owners. The findings of this report are not to be...19 Figure 21. Insertion of aluminum locking bar between

  4. Aluminum phosphide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Aluminum phosphide ; CASRN 20859 - 73 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  5. The effect of matrix microstructure on cyclic response and fatigue behavior of particle-reinforced 2219 aluminum. Part 2: Behavior at 150 C

    SciTech Connect

    Vyletel, G.M.; Van Aken, D.C.; Allison, J.E.

    1995-12-01

    The 150 C cyclic response of peak-aged and overaged 2219/TiC/15p and 2219 Al was examined using fully reversed plastic strain-controlled testing. The cyclic response of peak-aged and overaged particle-reinforced materials showed extensive cyclic softening. This softening began at the commencement of cycling and continued until failure. At a plastic strain below 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}, the unreinforced materials did not show evidence of cyclic softening until approximately 30 pct of the life was consumed. In addition, the degree of cyclic softening ({Delta}{sigma}) was significantly lower in the unreinforced microstructures. The cyclic softening in both reinforced and unreinforced materials was attributed to the decomposition of the {theta}{prime} strengthening precipitates. The extent of the precipitate decomposition was much greater in the composite materials due to the increased levels of local plastic strain in the matrix caused by constrained deformation near the TiC particles.

  6. Rheocasting Al Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girot, F. A.; Albingre, L.; Quenisset, J. M.; Naslain, R.

    1987-11-01

    Aluminum alloy matrix composites reinforced by SiC short fibers (or whiskers) can be prepared by rheocasting, a process which consists of the incorporation and homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement by stirring within a semi-solid alloy. Using this technique, composites containing fiber volume fractions in the range of 8-15%, have been obtained for various fibers lengths (i.e., 1 mm, 3 mm and 6 mm for SiC fibers). This paper attempts to delineate the best compocasting conditions for aluminum matrix composites reinforced by short SiC (e.g Nicalon) or SiC whiskers (e.g., Tokamax) and characterize the resulting microstructures.

  7. Characterization of tool wear and weld optimization in the friction-stir welding of cast aluminum 359+20% SiC metal-matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, G.J.; Murr, L.E

    2004-03-15

    Tool wear for threaded steel pin tools declines with decreasing rotation speed and increasing traverse or weld speeds for the friction-stir welding (FSW) of Al 359+20% SiC metal-matrix composite (MMC). Less than 10% tool wear occurs when the threaded tool erodes to a self-optimized shape resembling a pseudo-hour glass at weld traverse distances in excess of 3 m. There is only a 7% reduction in the SiC mean particle size in the weld zone for self-optimized pin tools with no threads as compared with a 25% variation for threaded tools wearing significantly at the start of welding. The weld zone becomes more homogeneous for efficient welding with self-optimized tools, and there is a reduction in the weld zone grain size due to dynamic recrystallization, which facilitates the solid-state flow. Transmission electron microscopy shows little difference in the dislocation density from the base material to the weld zone, but there is a propensity of dislocation loops in the weld zone. The weld zone is observed to harden by as much as 30%, in contrast to the base material, as a consequence of the recrystallized grain size reduction and the SiC particles distributed therein.

  8. High conductivity, low cost aluminum composite for thermal management

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, J.L.

    1997-04-01

    In order to produce an inexpensive packaging material that exhibits high thermal conductivity and low CTE, Technical Research Associates, Inc. (TRA) has shown in Phase I the feasibility of incorporating natural flake graphite in an aluminum matrix. TRA has developed a proprietary coating technique where graphite flakes have been coated with a thin layer of molybdenum/molybdenum carbide (approximately 0.2 microns). This barrier coating can protect the graphite flake from chemical reaction and high temperature degradation in molten aluminum silicon alloys. Methods to successfully vacuum infiltrate coated flake with molten aluminum alloys were developed. The resulted metal matrix composites exhibited lower CTE than aluminum metal. The CTE of the composites were significantly lower than aluminum and its alloys. The CTE can potentially be tailored for specific applications. The in plane thermal conductivity was higher than the aluminum matrix alloy. The thermal conductivity and CTE of the composite may be significantly improved by improving the bond strength of the molybdenum coating on the graphite flake. The flake can potentially be incorporated in the molten aluminum and pressure die cast to align the flakes within the aluminum matrix. By preferentially aligning high conductivity graphite flakes within a plane or direction, the thermal conductivity of the resulting composite will be above pure aluminum in the alignment direction.

  9. Evaluating of NASA-Langley Research Center explosion seam welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, H. E.; Wittman, R.

    1977-01-01

    An explosion bonding technique to meet current fabrication requirements was demonstrated. A test program was conducted on explosion bonded joints, compared to fusion joints in 6061-T6 aluminum. The comparison was made in required fixtures, non-destructive testing, static strength and fatigue strength.

  10. Structural Damage Identification in Stiffened Plate Fatigue Specimens Using Piezoelectric Active Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    welded. The base plate and bulkhead material consist of 3/8 and 1/4 inch thick 5083-H116 aluminum, while the stiffeners are made of extruded 6061 - T6...and weld repair on crack propagation behaviour in aluminium alloy 5083 plates,” Materials & Design, 23(2):201-208. 8. Raghavan, A. and C. E. S

  11. Cryomilled Aluminum Stabilized by Diamondoid Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maung, Khinlay

    Nanocrystalline aluminum powder with an average grain size of 22nm was prepared via cryomilling. Hot Isostatic Pressing was used to consolidate the powder followed by hot extrusion to homogenize the consolidated material. The high homologous temperature processes tend to increase the average grain diameter beyond the nanoscle classification, which is less than 100 nm. Diamantane was added during cryomilling to enhance the thermal stability in nanocrystalline aluminum. The thermal stability test data show that aluminum reinforced with 1 wt% diamantane exhibit two to three fold better thermal stability than non-reinforced aluminum when annealed at 773K (0.84 Tm) for ten hours. A similar trend is shown for the samples consolidated at 693K. This finding is explained through Burke's model for grain growth in materials containing secondary particles to inhibit grain boundary motion. The mechanical properties of cryomilled aluminum stabilized by 0.5 wt% and 1 wt% diamantane particles are compared with cryomilled commercial purity (CP) aluminum with no diamantane after high strain rate deformation (trap extrusion). The grain size of cryomilled CP aluminum is 0.6 to 1.2 times larger than the samples containing diamantane. In contrast to Hall-petch predictions, cryomilled aluminum with diamantane has relatively lower flow stress while demonstrating a 2.7-3.7 time higher ductility compared to cryomilled CP aluminum. Possible reasons for this behavior are suggested in mechnical property section. A combination of higher temperature and pressure resulted in formation of Aluminum tris (Al(C9H6NO)3) precipitates from diamantane in the cryomilled aluminum matrix. The precipitates were formed during trap extrusion process but only seen in samples containing 1 wt% diamantane and HIP'ed at 521°C. Therefore, the HIP'ng temperature plays an important role in formation of these precipitates.

  12. Design for aluminum recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This article describes the increasing use of aluminum in automobiles and the need to recycle to benefit further growth of aluminum applications by assuring an economical, high-quality source of metal. The article emphasizes that coordination of material specifications among designers can raise aluminum scrap value and facilitate recycling. Applications of aluminum in automobile construction are discussed.

  13. Aluminum Alloy and Article Cast Therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A cast article from an aluminum alloy, which has improved mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, has the following composition in weight percent: Silicon 14 - 25.0, Copper 5.5 - 8.0, Iron 0.05 - 1.2, Magnesium 0.5 - 1.5, Nickel 0.05 - 0.9, Manganese 0.05 - 1.0, Titanium 0.05 - 1.2, Zirconium 0.05 - 1.2, Vanadium 0.05 - 1.2, Zinc 0.05 - 0.9, Phosphorus 0.001 - 0.1, and the balance is Aluminum, wherein the silicon-to-magnesium ratio is 10 - 25, and the copper-to-magnesium ratio is 4 - 15. The aluminum alloy contains a simultaneous dispersion of three types of Al3X compound particles (X=Ti, V, Zr) having a LI2, crystal structure, and their lattice parameters are coherent to the aluminum matrix lattice. A process for producing this cast article is also disclosed, as well as a metal matrix composite, which includes the aluminum alloy serving as a matrix and containing up to about 60% by volume of a secondary filler material.

  14. The Cleaning of Aluminum Frame Assembly Units

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, T H

    2001-05-16

    The Brulin immersion and the precision cleaning experiments have shown that neither the Brulin solution nor the precision cleaning in AstroPak causes the smut formation on aluminum surfaces. The acid-bath cleaning in GTC is the primary source of the smut formation. The current GTC acid formulation etches the aluminum matrix quite aggressively, but does not appear to appreciably attack the Si particles. Therefore, this acid-bath cleaning will leave the cast-aluminum part surfaces with many protruded Si particles, which could potentially cause smut problems in the cleaning process down-stream. To ensure the removal of all loose Si particles from the cast-aluminum parts, it is necessary to physically hand-wipe and vigorously wash the acid-bath cleaned surfaces. Furthermore, the casting porosity in alloy A356 could be another source in causing high swipe readings in the FAU parts.

  15. LDEF (Postflight)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight) The viscous magnetic damper housing is shown after removal from the interior of the LDEF. The spherical dome is fabricated from 1/32 inch thick 6061-T6 aluminum alloy sheet and is attached to the cylindrical base with aluminum screws. The cylindrical portion of the housing is a fiberglass (181 cloth / epon 828 resin) structure is covered with an aluminum tape, both inside and outside, to meet thermal control requirements. The mounting plate material is 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, with the top and bottom surfaces covered with aluminum tape. A thermistor is mounted in the top center of the dome to provide house keeping data. The lead wire, covered with a strip of aluminum tape, can be seen along the housing periphery. The assembled damper housing, with the damper inside, is mounted to the space end frame with stainless steel fasteners.

  16. Modeling dissolution in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, Tracie Lee

    2005-07-01

    Aluminum and its alloys are used in many aspects of modern life, from soda cans and household foil to the automobiles and aircraft in which we travel. Aluminum alloy systems are characterized by good workability that enables these alloys to be economically rolled, extruded, or forged into useful shapes. Mechanical properties such as strength are altered significantly with cold working, annealing, precipitation-hardening, and/or heat-treatments. Heat-treatable aluminum alloys contain one or more soluble constituents such as copper, lithium, magnesium, silicon and zinc that individually, or with other elements, can form phases that strengthen the alloy. Microstructure development is highly dependent on all of the processing steps the alloy experiences. Ultimately, the macroscopic properties of the alloy depend strongly on the microstructure. Therefore, a quantitative understanding of the microstructural changes that occur during thermal and mechanical processing is fundamental to predicting alloy properties. In particular, the microstructure becomes more homogeneous and secondary phases are dissolved during thermal treatments. Robust physical models for the kinetics of particle dissolution are necessary to predict the most efficient thermal treatment. A general dissolution model for multi-component alloys has been developed using the front-tracking method to study the dissolution of precipitates in an aluminum alloy matrix. This technique is applicable to any alloy system, provided thermodynamic and diffusion data are available. Treatment of the precipitate interface is explored using two techniques: the immersed-boundary method and a new technique, termed here the "sharp-interface" method. The sharp-interface technique is based on a variation of the ghost fluid method and eliminates the need for corrective source terms in the characteristic equations. In addition, the sharp-interface method is shown to predict the dissolution behavior of precipitates in aluminum

  17. Corrosion of aluminum and aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    This new handbook presents comprehensive coverage of the corrosion behavior of aluminum and aluminum alloys, with emphasis on practical information about how to select and process these materials in order to prevent corrosion attack. Described are the characteristics of these materials and the influences of composition, mechanical working, heat treatment, joining methods, microstructure, and environmental variables on their corrosion.

  18. ALUMINUM-CONTAINING POLYMERS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS, *ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, *POLYMERIZATION, *POLYMERS, ACRYLIC RESINS, ALKYL RADICALS, CARBOXYLIC ACIDS, COPOLYMERIZATION, LIGHT TRANSMISSION, STABILITY, STYRENES, TRANSPARENT PANELS.

  19. Aluminum and Young Artists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Thomas

    1980-01-01

    The author suggests a variety of ways in which aluminum and aluminum foil can be used in elementary and junior high art classes: relief drawing and rubbing; printing; repousse; sculpture; mobiles; foil sculpture; and three dimensional design. Sources of aluminum supplies are suggested. (SJL)

  20. Airmobile Shelter Analysis. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    against wind loads. The roof is supported by lightweight aluminum trusses whiie the floor is supported by a system of beams and girders . Therefore, the...ranging from 28 to 74 feet. System 100 Clamshelters substitute aluminum trusses for the beams and provide spans of 94 to 200feet. Fabric for both...frames are constructed using hot dipped galvanized steel trusses (A36 steel) while the FSTFS uses extruded aluminum box beams (6061-T6). The fabric

  1. Brazing of dispersion-strengthened aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoerneklett, B.; Grong, O.; Anisdahl, L.; Hellum, E.; Sande, V.

    1996-03-01

    In recent years, the use of rapid solidification powder metallurgy has made it possible to develop a new family of aluminum alloys exhibiting unique properties. One of these materials, dispersion-strengthened (DS) aluminum, is currently being produced for commercial purposes at Raufoss Technology AS, Norway. Dispersion-strengthened aluminum derives its high strength from nanoscale AlN particles embedded in an aluminum matrix. DS Al is expected to be well suited as construction material for high-temperature applications where weight reductions are of particular concern. The present investigation has focused on the wetting behavior of DS aluminum under conditions applicable to brazing. The results from the Sessile drop experiments show that a eutectic Al-Si brazing alloy will completely wet the base metal both under high-vacuum conditions and in controlled argon atmospheres, provided that the partial pressure of oxygen is sufficiently low. The main problem appears to be the stability of the matrix grain structure. In general, the process of grain erosion and coarsening can be controlled by restricting the supply of the brazing alloy so that only a small metal volume is exposed to erosion. In addition, there is a great potential for reducing the thermodynamic driving force of the erosion reaction by proper adjustments of the brazing alloy composition and/or the brazing temperature. Sill, grain boundary liquidation may be a problem which, in turn, may require additions of surface active elements to the filler metal to control the wetting behavior.

  2. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, D.R.

    1988-08-16

    A stable reference electrode is described for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution. 1 fig.

  3. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    A stable reference electrode for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na.sub.3 AlF.sub.6, wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution.

  4. Aluminum-lithium target behavior

    SciTech Connect

    McDonell, W.R.

    1989-10-01

    Information on physical properties and irradiation behavior of aluminum-lithium target alloys employed for the production of tritium in Savannah River reactors has been reviewed to support development of technology for the New Production Reactor (NPR). Phase compositions and microstructures, thermal conductivity, mechanical properties, and constituent diffusion phenomena of the alloys, established in prior site studies, are presented. Irradiation behavior, including distributions of product tritium and helium and related exposure limits due to swelling and cracking of the target alloys is discussed, along with gas release processes occurring during subsequent product recovery operations. The property review supports designation of the aluminum-lithium alloys as ideally well-suited target materials for low-temperature, tritium-producing reactors, demonstrated over 35 years of Savannah River reactor operation. Low temperature irradiation and reaction with lithium in the alloy promotes tritium retention during reactor exposure, and the aluminum provides a matrix from which the product is readily recovered on heating following irradiation. 33 refs., 26 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Evaluation of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelly, K. P.

    1971-01-01

    The results of an evaluation of candidate metal-matrix composite materials for shuttle space radiators mounted to external structure are presented. The evaluation was specifically applicable to considerations of the manufacturing and properties of a potential space radiator. Two candidates, boron/aluminum and graphite/aluminum were obtained or made in various forms and tested in sufficient depth to allow selection of one of the two for future scale-up programs. The effort accomplished on this program verified that aluminum reinforced with boron was within the state-of-the-art in industry and possessed properties usable in the external skin areas available for shuttle radiators where re-entry temperatures will not exceed 800 F. It further demonstrated that graphite/aluminum has an apparently attractive future for space applications but requires extension development prior to scale-up.

  6. Aluminum: Recycling of Aluminum Dross/Saltcake

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, S.

    1999-01-29

    As this NICE3 publication details, the objective of this project is to commercialize the process technology to eliminate all landfill waste associated with black dross and saltcake generated from aluminum recycling in the United States.

  7. Synthesis of Aluminum-Aluminum Nitride Nanocomposites by Gas-Liquid Reactions I. Thermodynamic and Kinetic Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgonovo, Cecilia; Makhlouf, Makhlouf M.

    2016-10-01

    In-situ fabrication of the reinforcing particles directly in the metal matrix is an answer to many of the challenges encountered in manufacturing metal matrix nanocomposite materials. In this method, the nanosized particles are formed directly within the melt by means of a chemical reaction between a specially designed metallic alloy and a reactive gas. The thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of this chemical reaction dictate the particle size and distribution in the matrix alloy, as well as the nature of the particle/matrix interface, and consequently, they govern many of the material's mechanical and physical properties. This article focuses on aluminum-aluminum-nitride nanocomposite materials that are synthesized by injecting a nitrogen-bearing gas into a molten aluminum alloy. The thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the process are modeled, and the detrimental role of oxygen is elucidated.

  8. Aspects of aluminum toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hewitt, C.D.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R. )

    1990-06-01

    Aluminum is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. The widespread occurrence of aluminum, both in the environment and in foodstuffs, makes it virtually impossible for man to avoid exposure to this metal ion. Attention was first drawn to the potential role of aluminum as a toxic metal over 50 years ago, but was dismissed as a toxic agent as recently as 15 years ago. The accumulation of aluminum, in some patients with chronic renal failure, is associated with the development of toxic phenomena; dialysis encephalopathy, osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy, and an anemia. Aluminum accumulation also occurs in patients who are not on dialysis, predominantly infants and children with immature or impaired renal function. Aluminum has also been implicated as a toxic agent in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, Guamiam amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and parkinsonism-dementia. 119 references.

  9. Lithium-aluminum-magnesium electrode composition

    DOEpatents

    Melendres, Carlos A.; Siegel, Stanley

    1978-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary, high-temperature electrochemical cell. The cell also includes a molten salt electrolyte of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides and a positive electrode including a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent and a magnesium-aluminum alloy as a structural matrix. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, magnesium, and aluminum are formed but the electrode composition in both its charged and discharged state remains substantially free of the alpha lithium-aluminum phase and exhibits good structural integrity.

  10. Fine Grain Aluminum Superplasticity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    time at elevated temperature for 7475 aluminum alloy 5 2 Optical micrographs of 7075 aluminum alloy after exposure to 5160C (960oF) for times...applied to Al-Zn-Mg-Cu ( 7075 Al) alloy. Subsequent developments by Waldman et al. (refs. 8-11) resulted in the demonstration that 7000 series alloys...a number of aluminum alloys. With such a fine grain structure, high temperature deformation character- istics approaching superplastic behavior

  11. BONDING ALUMINUM METALS

    DOEpatents

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1961-06-13

    A process is given for bonding aluminum to aluminum. Silicon powder is applied to at least one of the two surfaces of the two elements to be bonded, the two elements are assembled and rubbed against each other at room temperature whereby any oxide film is ruptured by the silicon crystals in the interface; thereafter heat and pressure are applied whereby an aluminum-silicon alloy is formed, squeezed out from the interface together with any oxide film, and the elements are bonded.

  12. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    SciTech Connect

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  13. Advanced Technology Lightweight Gondola System Experimental Fabrication Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    10400 10400 3. SECTION I SPECIFICATIONS FOR ALUMINUM STRUCTURES, The Aluminum Association, In., 750 Third Avenue, New York, New York. 50 5.3 17 - 4PH ...Material 6061-T6 Aluminum tubing Lower End Fitting Material 6061-T6 Aluminum bar Upper Fitting Material 17 - 4PH Cond 1025 Limit Load - 6.2 kips 7.2.2.4.1...Material 17 - 4PH Cond 1025 Thread 1-3/4-8UN-2B 2 PLIMIT - 2 (6.2) Limit Shear Stress f 2-lLMI) ( .) sy lTdh 7(l.75) (1.0) 85 f = 2.26 ksisy f = 1.5 f = 1.5

  14. Carbothermic Aluminum Production Using Scrap Aluminum As A Coolant

    DOEpatents

    LaCamera, Alfred F.

    2002-11-05

    A process for producing aluminum metal by carbothermic reduction of alumina ore. Alumina ore is heated in the presence of carbon at an elevated temperature to produce an aluminum metal body contaminated with about 10-30% by wt. aluminum carbide. Aluminum metal or aluminum alloy scrap then is added to bring the temperature to about 900-1000.degree. C. and precipitate out aluminum carbide. The precipitated aluminum carbide is filtered, decanted, or fluxed with salt to form a molten body having reduced aluminum carbide content.

  15. MTBE OXIDATION BY BIFUNCTIONAL ALUMINUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bifunctional aluminum, prepared by sulfating zero-valent aluminum with sulfuric acid, has a dual functionality of simultaneously decomposing both reductively- and oxidatively-degradable contaminants. In this work, the use of bifunctional aluminum for the degradation of methyl te...

  16. High energy density aluminum battery

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; Manthiram, Arumugan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Hansan

    2016-10-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a material capable of intercalating aluminum or lithium ions during a discharge cycle and deintercalating the aluminum or lithium ions during a charge cycle. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of aluminum or lithium at the cathode.

  17. Survey - Monomethylhydrazine Propellant/Material Compatibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-07-01

    Alloys Martin Marietta (Refs.l0, 20) rated 1100-0, 2014- T6 , and 2219 -T87 compatible with MMH for 300 hours at 135’C, no corrosion or MMH decomposition...Ti, 6061- T6 Al. The aluminum alloys show no susceptibility. The order of decreasing stress corrosion cracking promotion for the fuels is hydrazine...decomposition of propellant and no noticeable corrosion of the metal surfaces. The metals were aluminum alloys 1100, 2014, 6061; corrosion -resistant steels

  18. Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution Of Sludge Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, M.T.; Hamm, B.A.; Pike, J.A.

    2008-07-01

    High Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently stored in aging underground storage tanks. This waste is a complex mixture of insoluble solids, referred to as sludge, and soluble salts. Continued long-term storage of these radioactive wastes poses an environmental risk. The sludge is currently being stabilized in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) through a vitrification process immobilizing the waste in a borosilicate glass matrix for long-term storage in a federal repository. Without additional treatment, the existing volume of sludge would produce nearly 8000 canisters of vitrified waste. Aluminum compounds, along with other non-radioactive components, represent a significant portion of the sludge mass currently planned for vitrification processing in DWPF. Removing the aluminum from the waste stream reduces the volume of sludge requiring vitrification and improves production rates. Treating the sludge with a concentrated sodium hydroxide (caustic) solution at elevated temperatures (>90 deg. C) to remove aluminum is part of an overall sludge mass reduction effort to reduce the number of vitrified canisters, shorten the life cycle for the HLW system, and reduce the risk associated with the long term storage of radioactive wastes at SRS. A projected reduction of nearly 900 canisters will be achieved by performing aluminum dissolution on six targeted sludge batches; however, a project to develop and install equipment will not be ready for operation until 2013. The associated upgrades necessary to implement a high temperature process in existing facilities are costly and present many technical challenges. Efforts to better understand the characteristics of the sludge mass and dissolution kinetics are warranted to overcome these challenges. Opportunities to further reduce the amount of vitrified waste and increase production rates should also be pursued. Sludge staged in Tank 51 as the next sludge batch for feed to DWPF consisted

  19. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis Dead?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed with concern by some of the public. This review article discusses reasons that mainstream science has largely abandoned the Aluminum Hypothesis and explores a possible reason for some in the general public continuing to view aluminum with mistrust. PMID:24806729

  20. Anodizing Aluminum with Frills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doeltz, Anne E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    "Anodizing Aluminum" (previously reported in this journal) describes a vivid/relevant laboratory experience for general chemistry students explaining the anodizing of aluminum in sulfuric acid and constrasting it to electroplating. Additions to this procedure and the experiment in which they are used are discussed. Reactions involved are…

  1. The Aluminum Smelting Process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development. PMID:24806722

  2. Fiber-matrix interface failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabenberg, Lew; Marcus, Harris L.; Park, Hun Sub; Zong, Gui Sheng; Brown, Lloyd D.

    1989-01-01

    Interface fractures of aluminum-graphite composites under transverse loading are expected to occur within the graphite fibers, but very near the interface. Residual stresses in aluminum, reinforced with the new high modulus pitch-based fibers, are much lower than would be expected based on simple elasticity calculations. The excess stress may be relaxed by shearing internal to the fibers or at the interface rather than by plastic flow of the matrix. The internal shearing also occurs during repeated thermal cycling of these composites; the fibers are repeatedly intruded, then extruded, during repeated temperature excursions.

  3. Interactions of satellite-speed helium atoms with satellite surfaces. 2: Energy distributions of reflected helium atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, S. M.; Knuth, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    Energy transfer in collisions of satellite-speed (7,000 m/sec) helium atoms with a cleaned 6061-T6 satellite-type aluminum surface was investigated using the molecular-beam technique. The amount of energy transferred was determined from the measured energy of the molecular-beam and the measured spatial and energy distributions of the reflected atoms. Spatial distributions of helium atoms scattered from a 6061-T6 aluminum surface were measured. The scattering pattern exhibits a prominent backscattering, probably due to the gross surface roughness and/or the relative lattice softness of the aluminum surface. Energy distributions of reflected helium atoms from the same surface were measured for six different incidence angles. For each incidence angle, distributions were measured at approximately sixty scattering positions. At a given scattering position, the energy spectra of the reflected helium atoms and the background gas were obtained using the retarding-field energy analyzer.

  4. Preliminary Investigation of Zircaloy-4 as a Research Reactor Cladding Material

    SciTech Connect

    Brian K Castle

    2012-05-01

    As part of a scoping study for the ATR fuel conversion project, an initial comparison of the material properties of Zircaloy-4 and Aluminum-6061 (T6 and O-temper) is performed to provide a preliminary evaluation of Zircaloy-4 for possible inclusion as a candidate cladding material for ATR fuel elements. The current fuel design for the ATR uses Aluminum 6061 (T6 and O temper) as a cladding and structural material in the fuel element and to date, no fuel failures have been reported. Based on this successful and longstanding operating history, Zircaloy-4 properties will be evaluated against the material properties for aluminum-6061. The preliminary investigation will focus on a comparison of density, oxidation rates, water chemistry requirements, mechanical properties, thermal properties, and neutronic properties.

  5. The impact of atmospheric aerosols on trace metal chemistry in open ocean surface seawater, 1. Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maring, H. B.; Duce, R. A.

    1987-08-01

    Significant quantities of aerosol aluminum are transported from continental regions through the atmosphere to the oceans. Enrichments in the concentration of dissolved aluminum in open ocean surface seawater suggest that dissolution of aerosol aluminum is an important source of dissolved aluminum to these waters. Atmospheric aerosols collected at Enewetak Atoll were exposed to seawater and artificial rain water to determine directly the importance of atmospheric deposition as a source of marine dissolved aluminum. The results of these experiments indicate that ˜ 8-10% of the aluminum in atmospheric aerosols of crustal origin over the North Pacific is soluble in seawater. Approximately 5-6% dissolves very rapidly ( < 0.6 hr). An additional 3-4% dissolves within 60 hr. This bimodal dissolution of aerosol aluminum of crustal origin suggests that this aluminum is present in two forms. The rapidly dissolving fraction is likely aluminum already weathered from primary minerals, while the more slowly dissolving fraction is probably aluminum from the aluminosilicate matrix. Nearly the same amount of aerosol aluminum dissolved in artificial rain water ( pH= 5.5) in 6 hr as dissolved in seawater ( pH= 8) in 60 hr. The lower pH appears to not only increase the dissolution rate but may also increase the quantity of aerosol aluminum that dissolves. Dissolved organic matter in seawater appears to have relatively little effect on aerosol aluminum dissolution. Considering measured total aerosol aluminum fluxes, aluminum dissolution of 5-10% would constitute the major source for dissolved aluminum in surface waters of the open North Pacific. The calculated residence time of dissolved aluminum in the upper 100 m of the tropical North Pacific ranges from 2 to 6 years.

  6. Clinical biochemistry of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    King, S.W.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R.

    1981-05-01

    Aluminum toxicity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of clinical disorders in patients with chronic renal failure on long-term intermittent hemodialysis treatment. The predominant disorders have been those involving either bone (osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy) or brain (dialysis encephalopathy). In nonuremic patients, an increased brain aluminum concentration has been implicated as a neurotoxic agent in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and was associated with experimental neurofibrillary degeneration in animals. The brain aluminum concentrations of patients dying with the syndrome of dialysis encephalopathy (dialysis dementia) are significantly higher than in dialyzed patients without the syndrome and in nondialyzed patients. Two potential sources for the increased tissue content of aluminum in patients on hemodialysis have been proposed: (1) intestinal absorption from aluminum containing phosphate-binding gels, and (2) transfer across the dialysis membrane from aluminum in the water used to prepare the dialysate. These findings, coupled with our everyday exposure to the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum in nature, have created concerns over the potential toxicity of this metal.

  7. Cast Aluminum Bonding Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    fabricated using P?-’r;est11 bur)ld II19 te(hnll I Oly with 6 cIsL nqs. The cast a lumi num alloy used was A357 . The sur- face preparation was phosphoric acid...from a cast aluminum alloy designated A357 . The bonding surfaces of the adherends were prepared using PAA. One primer and two adhesives considered...System, Cast Aluminum Lap Shear 18 11 Bond Area of 350°F Adhesive System, Cast Aluminum Lap Shear 19 vi LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE 1 A357 Chemical

  8. Purifying Aluminum by Vacuum Distillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed method for purifying aluminum employs one-step vacuum distillation. Raw material for process impure aluminum produced in electrolysis of aluminum ore. Impure metal melted in vacuum. Since aluminum has much higher vapor pressure than other constituents, boils off and condenses on nearby cold surfaces in proportions much greater than those of other constituents.

  9. Effects of thermal cycling on density, elastic modulus, and vibrational damping in an alumina particulate reinforced aluminum metal matrix composite (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3p}/2014 Al)

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfenden, A.; Tang, H.H.; Chawla, K.; Hermel, T.

    1999-07-01

    The effects of thermal cycling on the mechanical and physical properties, namely, the density, dynamic elastic modulus and vibrational damping, were measured for a particular reinforced metal matrix composite (MMC). The material was made by Duralcan. Specimens were exposed to up thermal cycles from room temperature to 300 C. The density of the material was measured by the Archimedes technique. The dynamic Young`s Modulus and vibrational damping of the material were determined by the piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique (PUCOT). The results showed that the density and elastic modulus of the material increased only slightly due to the thermal cycling while the damping increased significantly. An increase in dislocation concentration near the particle/matrix interfaces caused by the thermal cycling could account for the measured results.

  10. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  11. Walnut Hulls Clean Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colberg, W. R.; Gordon, G. H.; Jackson, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    Hulls inflict minimal substrate damage. Walnut hulls found to be best abrasive for cleaning aluminum surfaces prior to painting. Samples blasted with walnut hulls showed no compressive stress of surface.

  12. Aluminum powder applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gurganus, T.B.

    1995-08-01

    Aluminum powders have physical and metallurgical characteristics related to their method of manufacture that make them extremely important in a variety of applications. They can propel rockets, improve personal hygiene, increase computer reliability, refine exotic alloys, and reduce weight in the family sedan or the newest Air Force fighter. Powders formed into parts for structural and non-structural applications hold the key to some of the most exciting new developments in the aluminum future.

  13. CORROSION PROTECTION OF ALUMINUM

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R.S.; Nelson, W.B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred. (D.C.W.)

  14. Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R. S.; Nelson, W. B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred.

  15. High Strength Aluminum Alloy For High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A cast article from an aluminum alloy has improved mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The cast article has the following composition in weight percent: Silicon 6.0-25.0, Copper 5.0-8.0, Iron 0.05-1.2, Magnesium 0.5-1.5, Nickel 0.05-0.9, Manganese 0.05-1.2, Titanium 0.05-1.2, Zirconium 0.05-1.2, Vanadium 0.05-1.2, Zinc 0.05-0.9, Strontium 0.001-0.1, Phosphorus 0.001-0.1, and the balance is Aluminum, wherein the silicon-to-magnesium ratio is 10-25, and the copper-to-magnesium ratio is 4-15. The aluminum alloy contains a simultaneous dispersion of three types of Al3X compound particles (X=Ti, V, Zr) having a LI2 crystal structure, and their lattice parameters are coherent to the aluminum matrix lattice. A process for producing this cast article is also disclosed, as well as a metal matrix composite, which includes the aluminum alloy serving as a matrix containing up to about 60% by volume of a secondary filler material.

  16. Aluminum, parathyroid hormone, and osteomalacia

    SciTech Connect

    Burnatowska-Hledin, M.A.; Kaiser, L.; Mayor, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    Aluminum exposure in man is unavoidable. The occurrence of dialysis dementia, vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia, and hypochromic microcytic anemia in dialysis patients underscores the potential for aluminum toxicity. Although exposure via dialysate and hyperalimentation leads to significant tissue aluminum accumulation, the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum and the severe pathology associated with large aluminum burdens suggest that smaller exposures via the gastrointestinal tract and lungs could represent an important, though largely unrecognized, public health problem. It is clear that some aluminum absorption occurs with the ingestion of small amounts of aluminum in the diet and medicines, and even greater aluminum absorption is seen in individuals consuming large amounts of aluminum present in antacids. Aluminum absorption is enhanced in the presence of elevated circulating parathyroid hormone. In addition, elevated PTH leads to the preferential deposition of aluminum in brain and bone. Consequently, PTH is likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of toxicities in those organs. PTH excess also seems to lead to the deposition of aluminum in the parathyroid gland. The in vitro demonstration that aluminum inhibits parathyroid hormone release is consistent with the findings of a euparathyroid state in dialysis patients with aluminum related vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia. Nevertheless, it seems likely that hyperparathyroidism is at least initially involved in the pathogenesis of aluminum neurotoxicity and osteomalacia; the increases in tissue aluminum stores are followed by suppression of parathyroid hormone release, which is required for the evolution of osteomalacia. Impaired renal function is not a prerequisite for increased tissue aluminum burdens, nor for aluminum-related organ toxicity. Consequently, it is likely that these diseases will be observed in populations other than those with chronic renal disease.

  17. Lightweight Aluminum/Nano composites for Automotive Drive Train Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chelluri, Bhanumathi; Knoth, Edward A.; Schumaker, Edward J.

    2012-12-14

    During Phase I, we successfully processed air atomized aluminum powders via Dynamic Magnetic Compaction (DMC) pressing and subsequent sintering to produce parts with properties similar to wrought aluminum. We have also showed for the first time that aluminum powders can be processed without lubes via press and sintering to 100 % density. This will preclude a delube cycle in sintering and promote environmentally friendly P/M processing. Processing aluminum powders via press and sintering with minimum shrinkage will enable net shape fabrication. Aluminum powders processed via a conventional powder metallurgy process produce too large a shrinkage. Because of this, sinter parts have to be machined into specific net shape. This results in increased scrap and cost. Fully sintered aluminum alloy under this Phase I project has shown good particle-to-particle bonding and mechanical properties. We have also shown the feasibility of preparing nano composite powders and processing via pressing and sintering. This was accomplished by dispersing nano silicon carbide (SiC) powders into aluminum matrix comprising micron-sized powders (<100 microns) using a proprietary process. These composite powders of Al with nano SiC were processed using DMC press and sinter process to sinter density of 85-90%. The process optimization along with sintering needs to be carried out to produce full density composites.

  18. Nonlinear response of unidirectional boron/aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, M.-J.; Herakovich, C. T.; Becker, W.; Aboudi, J.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results obtained for unidirectional boron/aluminum subjected to combined loading using off-axis tension, compression and Iosipescu shear specimens are correlated with a nonlinear micromechanics model. It is illustrated that the nonlinear response in the principal material directions is markedly influenced by the different loading modes and different ratios of the applied stress components. The observed nonlinear response under pure and combined loading is discussed in terms of initial yielding, subsequent hardening, stress-interaction effects and unloading-reloading characteristics. The micromechanics model is based on the concept of a repeating unit cell representative of the composite-at-large and employs the unified theory of Bodner and Partom to model the inelastic response of the matrix. It is shown that the employed micromechanics model is sufficiently general to predict the observed nonlinear response of unidirectional boron/aluminum with good accuracy.

  19. Aluminum nanocomposites for elevated temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgonovo, C.; Apelian, D.; Makhlouf, M. M.

    2011-02-01

    Aluminum casting alloys conventionally used in the automotive and aerospace industries (i.e., Al-Zn-Mg, and Al-Cu-Mg systems) are able to achieve excellent tensile strength at room temperature. At high temperatures, such alloys lose dimensional stability and their mechanical properties rapidly degrade. Aluminum-based nanocomposites show the potential for enhanced performance at high temperatures. The manufacturing process, however, is difficult; a viable and effective method for large-scale applications has not been developed. In the current study, an innovative and cost-effective approach has been adopted to manufacture Al/AlN composites. A nitrogen-bearing gas is injected into the melt and AlN particles synthesize in-situ via chemical reaction. In a preliminary stage, a model able to predict the amount of reinforcement formed has been developed. AlN dispersoids have been succesfully synthesized in the matrix and the model has been experimentally validated.

  20. Fatal aluminum phosphide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Anger, F; Paysant, F; Brousse, F; Le Normand, I; Develay, P; Gaillard, Y; Baert, A; Le Gueut, M A; Pepin, G; Anger, J P

    2000-03-01

    A 39-year-old man committed suicide by ingestion of aluminum phosphide, a potent mole pesticide, which was available at the victim's workplace. The judicial authority ordered an autopsy, which ruled out any other cause of death. The victim was discovered 10 days after the ingestion of the pesticide. When aluminum phosphide comes into contact with humidity, it releases large quantities of hydrogen phosphine (PH3), a very toxic gas. Macroscopic examination during the autopsy revealed a very important asphyxia syndrome with major visceral congestion. Blood, urine, liver, kidney, adrenal, and heart samples were analyzed. Phosphine gas was absent in the blood and urine but present in the brain (94 mL/g), the liver (24 mL/g), and the kidneys (41 mL/g). High levels of phosphorus were found in the blood (76.3 mg/L) and liver (8.22 mg/g). Aluminum concentrations were very high in the blood (1.54 mg/L), brain (36 microg/g), and liver (75 microg/g) compared to the usual published values. Microscopic examination revealed congestion of all the organs studied and obvious asphyxia lesions in the pulmonary parenchyma. All these results confirmed a diagnosis of poisoning by aluminum phosphide. This report points out that this type of poisoning is rare and that hydrogen phosphine is very toxic. The phosphorus and aluminum concentrations observed and their distribution in the different viscera are discussed in relation to data in the literature.

  1. LDEF (Prelaunch)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch) The LDEF structure is shown mounted on the LDEF Assembly and Transport System in Building 1250 at the Langley Research Center (LaRC), Hampton Virginia, during pre-ship wiring checks. The structure is a welded / bolted assembly fab- ricated from aluminum alloy 6061-T6 extrusions, forgings, tubing and plate materials and assembled with stainless steel fasteners. The eight (8) internal tubular diagonals between the center ring structure and the two end frames provide torsional stiffness to the structure.

  2. Effects of Surface Treatment and Interfacial Strength on the Damage Propagation in Layered Transparent Armor under Impact

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-20

    made of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy with a common diameter of 31.75 mm. An image of this test- ing configuration is shown in Fig. 8. In addition to the...TERMS Impact Response, Transparent Armor, Impact Damage, Surface Effects Wayne Chen Purdue University Sponosored Program Services Purdue University West...Research Symposium Series of School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, March 23, 2010, Purdue University. (c) Presentations 1.00 Number of Presentations

  3. Electron Positron Proton Spectrometer for use at Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, S L

    2010-04-07

    The Electron Positron Proton Spectrometer (EPPS) is mounted in a TIM (Ten-Inch Manipulator) system on the Omega-60 or Omega-EP laser facilities at the University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), when in use, see Fig. 1. The Spectrometer assembly, shown in Fig. 2, is constructed of a steel box containing magnets, surrounded by Lead 6% Antimony shielding with SS threaded insert, sitting on an Aluminum 6061-T6 plate.

  4. Process for stabilization of titanium silicide particulates within titanium aluminide containing metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Christodoulou, L.; Williams, J.C.; Riley, M.A.

    1990-04-10

    This paper describes a method for forming a final composite material comprising titanium silicide particles within a titanium aluminide containing matrix. It comprises: contacting titanium, silicon and aluminum at a temperature sufficient to initiate a reaction between the titanium and silicon to thereby form a first composite comprising titanium silicide particles dispersed within an aluminum matrix; admixing the first composite with titanium and zirconium to form a mixture; heating the mixture to a temperature sufficient to convert at least a portion of the aluminum matrix to titanium aluminide; and recovering a final composite material comprising titanium silicide particles dispersed within a titanium aluminide containing matrix.

  5. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    DOEpatents

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J; Wegrzyn, James E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, and by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  6. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    DOEpatents

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J.

    2009-04-21

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  7. [Analysis of tartrazine aluminum lake and sunset yellow aluminum lake in foods by capillary zone electrophoresis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiding; Chang, Cuilan; Guo, Qilei; Cao, Hong; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2014-04-01

    A novel analytical method for tartrazine aluminum lake and sunset yellow aluminum lake using capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) was studied. The pigments contained in the color lakes were successfully separated from the aluminum matrix in the pre-treatment process, which included the following steps: dissolve the color lakes in 0.1 mol/L H2SO4, adjust the pH of the solution to 5.0, then mix it with the solution of EDTA x 2Na and heat it in a water bath, then use polyamide powder as the stationary phase of solid phase extraction to separate the pigments from the solution, and finally elute the pigments with 0.1 mol/L NaOH. The CZE conditions systematically optimized for tartrazine aluminum lake were: 48.50 cm of a fused silica capillary with 40.00 cm effective length and 50 microm i. d., the temperature controlled at 20.0 degrees C, 29.0 kV applied, HPO4(2-)-PO4(3-) (0.015 mol/L, pH 11.45) solution as running buffer, detection at 263 nm. The conditions for sunset yellow aluminum lake were: the same capillary and temperature, 25.0 kV applied, HPO4(2-)-PO4(3-) (0.025 mol/L, pH 11.45) solution as running buffer, detection at 240 nm. The limits of detection were 0.26 mg/L and 0.27 mg/L, and the linear ranges were 0.53-1.3 x 10(2) mg/L and 0.54-1.4 x 10(2) mg/L for tartrazine aluminum lake and sunset yellow aluminum lake, respectively. The RSDs were 4.3% and 5.7% (run to run, n = 6), 5.6% and 6.0% (day to day, n = 6) for tartrazine aluminum lake and sunset yellow aluminum lake, respectively. Further developments for this method could make it a routinely used method analyzing color lakes in foods.

  8. PROCESS FOR REMOVING ALUMINUM COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Flox, J.

    1959-07-01

    A process is presented for removing aluminum jackets or cans from uranium slugs. This is accomplished by immersing the aluminum coated uranium slugs in an aqueous solution of 9 to 20% sodium hydroxide and 35 to 12% sodium nitrate to selectively dissolve the aluminum coating, the amount of solution being such as to obtain a molar ratio of sodium hydroxide to aluminum of at least

  9. Electrically conductive anodized aluminum coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alwitt, Robert S. (Inventor); Liu, Yanming (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing anodized aluminum with enhanced electrical conductivity, comprising anodic oxidation of aluminum alloy substrate, electrolytic deposition of a small amount of metal into the pores of the anodized aluminum, and electrolytic anodic deposition of an electrically conductive oxide, including manganese dioxide, into the pores containing the metal deposit; and the product produced by the process.

  10. Polymer Matrix Composite Material Oxygen Compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Tom

    2001-01-01

    Carbon fiber/polymer matrix composite materials look promising as a material to construct liquid oxygen (LOX) tanks. Based on mechanical impact tests the risk will be greater than aluminum, however, the risk can probably be managed to an acceptable level. Proper tank design and operation can minimize risk. A risk assessment (hazard analysis) will be used to determine the overall acceptability for using polymer matrix composite materials.

  11. Development of Enriched Borated Aluminum Alloy for Basket Material of Cask for Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Katsura Kajihara; Yasuhiro Aruga; Jun Shimojo; Hiroaki Taniuchi; Tsutomu Takeda; Masatosi Sasaki

    2002-07-01

    New enriched borated aluminum alloys manufactured by melting process are developed, which resulted in supplying structural basket materials for spent nuclear fuel packagings. In this process, the borated aluminum alloys were melted in a vacuum induction furnace at elevated temperature than that of ordinary aluminum melting processes. Boron dissolves into the matrix at the temperature of 1273 K or more, and fine aluminum diboride is precipitated and uniformly dispersed upon cooling rapidity. It is confirmed that boron is homogeneously dispersed with the fine particles of approximate 5 in average size in the product. Tensile strength and creep property at elevated temperature in 1 mass-%B 6061-T651 plate and 1 mass-%B 3004 extruded rectangular pipe as structural materials are examined. It is confirmed that the both of borated aluminum alloys have stable strength and creep properties that are similar to those of ordinary aluminum alloys. (authors)

  12. Fabrication of angleply carbon-aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to fabricate and test angleply composite consisting of NASA-Hough carbon base monofilament in a matrix of 2024 aluminum. The effect of fabrication variables on the tensile properties was determined, and an optimum set of conditions was established. The size of the composite panels was successfully scaled up, and the material was tested to measure tensile behavior as a function of temperature, stress-rupture and creep characteristics at two elevated temperatures, bending fatigue behavior, resistance to thermal cycling, and Izod impact response.

  13. REMOVAL OF ALUMINUM COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, J.H.

    1959-08-25

    A process is presented for dissolving aluminum jackets from uranium fuel elements without attack of the uranium in a boiling nitric acid-mercuric nitrate solution containing up to 50% by weight of nitrtc acid and mercuric nitrate in a concentration of between 0.05 and 1% by weight.

  14. Markets for recovered aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The study describes the operation of the markets for scrap aluminum as an example of how recycling markets are structured, what factors influence the supply of and demand for materials, what projections can be made about recycling markets, and how government policies to increase recycling may affect these markets.

  15. Building an aluminum car

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, S.

    1994-05-01

    This article examines the increasing use of aluminum in automobiles to decrease weight and consequently increase fuel economy. The topics of the article include federal fuel economy goals, the development of optimum body structure and manufacturing techniques, comparison with steel, cost of materials, weight reduction and recycling of materials.

  16. Fluxless aluminum brazing

    DOEpatents

    Werner, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    This invention relates to a fluxless brazing alloy for use in forming brazed composites made from members of aluminum and its alloys. The brazing alloy consists of 35-55% Al, 10--20% Si, 25-60% Ge; 65-88% Al, 2-20% Si, 2--18% In; 65--80% Al, 15-- 25% Si, 5- 15% Y. (0fficial Gazette)

  17. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David S.; Scott, Darwin H.

    1985-01-01

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  18. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, D.S.; Scott, D.H.

    1984-09-28

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cells are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  19. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  20. Bonding aluminum beam leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkett, F. S.

    1978-01-01

    Report makes it relatively easy for hybrid-circuit manufacturers to convert integrated circuit chips with aluminum bead leads. Report covers: techniques for handling tiny chips; proper geometries for ultrasonic bonding tips; best combinations of pressure, pulse time, and ultrasonic energy for bonding; and best thickness for metal films to which beam leads are bonded.

  1. Mechanical properties of several magnesium and aluminum composites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tsangarakis, N.; Taleghani, B.

    1992-12-01

    Several composites of magnesium and aluminum alloys were tested in order to assess and evaluate their mechanical properties. The magnesium alloys were AZ91 C, ZE41 A, and commercially pure magnesium, reinforced with 40% by volume continuous graphite fiber. The tensile properties of these composites were not superior to those of unreinforced magnesium and estimates of their fracture toughness were low. The matrices of the aluminum composites were 2124-T6, 6061-T4, 2124-T4, and 2219-T4. The reinforcements were either particulate or whiskers of silicon carbide or boron carbide and their volume content was 15% to 30%. The aluminum composites which were reinforced with silicon carbide particulate exhibited improved yield and ultimate tensile stresses, as well as tensile elastic modulus over the unreinforced aluminum alloys. The 2124-T4/B4C/25p composite exhibited the highest ultimate tensile strength which was 511 MPa. The composite which was reinforced with whiskers of silicon carbide exhibited an endurance limit which was 20% higher than that of the matrix alloy. The compressive properties and fracture toughness of some of these aluminum composites were not improved over those of the unreinforced matrix alloy.... Composites, Mechanical properties.

  2. High Strength Discontinuously Reinforced Aluminum For Rocket Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, A. B.; Shah, S. R.; Shadoan, M.

    2003-01-01

    This study presents results on the development of a new aluminum alloy with very high strength and ductility. Five compositions of Al-Mg-Sc-Gd-Zr alloy were selected for this purpose. These alloys were also reinforced with 15 volume percent silicon-carbide and boron-carbide particles to produce Discontinuously Reinforced Aluminum (DRA) materials. Matrix alloys and DRA were processed using a powder metallurgy process. The helium gas atomization produced very fine powder with cellular-dentritic microstructure. The microstructure of matrix alloys showed fine Al3Sc based precipitate which provides significant strengthening in these alloys. DRA showed uniform distribution of reinforcement in aluminum matrix. DRA materials were tested at -320 F, 75 F in air and 7S F in gaseous hydrogen environments and matrix alloys were tested at 75 F in air. DRA showed high strengths in the range of 89-111 ksi (614-697 MPa) depending on alloy compositions and test environments. Matrix alloys had a good combination of strength, 84-89 ksi (579-621 MPa) and ductility, 4.5-6.5%. The properties of these materials can further be improved by proper control of processing parameters.

  3. SOLDERING OF ALUMINUM BASE METALS

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1958-02-25

    This patent deals with the soldering of aluminum to metals of different types, such as copper, brass, and iron. This is accomplished by heating the aluminum metal to be soldered to slightly above 30 deg C, rubbing a small amount of metallic gallium into the part of the surface to be soldered, whereby an aluminum--gallium alloy forms on the surface, and then heating the aluminum piece to the melting point of lead--tin soft solder, applying lead--tin soft solder to this alloyed surface, and combining the aluminum with the other metal to which it is to be soldered.

  4. Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Andreas; Llorca, Javier

    2010-08-01

    In metal matrix composites, a metal is combined with another, often nonmetallic, phase to produce a novel material having attractive engineering attributes of its own. A subject of much research in the 1980s and 1990s, this class of materials has, in the past decade, increased significantly in variety. Copper matrix composites, layered composites, high-conductivity composites, nanoscale composites, microcellular metals, and bio-derived composites have been added to a palette that, ten years ago, mostly comprised ceramic fiber- or particle-reinforced light metals together with some well-established engineering materials, such as WC-Co cermets. At the same time, research on composites such as particle-reinforced aluminum, aided by novel techniques such as large-cell 3-D finite element simulation or computed X-ray microtomography, has served as a potent vehicle for the elucidation of the mechanics of high-contrast two-phase elastoplastic materials, with implications that range well beyond metal matrix composites.

  5. Use of in situ atomic force microscopy to image corrosion at inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Rynders, R.M.; Paik, C.H.; Ke, R.; Alkire, R.C. )

    1994-06-01

    In situ atomic force microscopy was used in conjunction with microlithography and scanning Auger electron spectroscopy to monitor localized corrosion near iron-rich inclusions in Al-6061-T6 immersed in 0.6M NaCl and also sulfur-rich inclusions in 304 stainless steel (SS-304) in 0.5M NaCl. The local rate of aluminum corrosion was found to depend on the shape of the nearby iron-rich inclusion. At the corrosion potential, trenches were observed to form in the aluminum host matrix adjacent to the inclusions, and the corrosion sites gradually evolved into circular shapes owing to dissolution. During the dissolution process, the width of the dissolution area was an order of magnitude greater than the depth. Application of a 400 mV cathodic overpotential prevented corrosion initiation, while application of a 500 mV cathodic overpotential greatly accelerated the dissolution rate in comparison with that at the rest potential. On SS-304, exposure to 0.5M NaCl was accompanied by formation of deposits, which decorated the inclusion surface as well as the surrounding area up to four times the radius of the original inclusion.

  6. A comparison of ASTROMAG coils made with aluminum and copper based superconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    The use of an aluminum matrix superconductor in the coils for the ASTROMAG magnet will increase the integrated field for conducting particle astrophysics experiments in space as compared to equal mass coils made with a copper matrix superconductor. The increased ability to detect charged particles can be achieved without decreasing the current margin of the superconductor in the coils. The use of a low-resistivity aluminum matrix conductor increases the energy needed to initiate a quench by two orders or magnitude. The current decay time constant during a quench is substantially increased. As a result, the quench energy dumped into the helium tank is reduced (the ASTROMAG coils are thermally decoupled from the helium tank), and the forces on the shield and shells due to eddy currents will be lower. A description is also given of the problems associated with the use of an aluminum matrix superconductor in the coils.

  7. Nitrogen Trifluoride (NF3) Oxidizer Systems Design Criteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    17 - 4PH , A-286 1010-1020 Steel OFHC copper, annealed Aluminums 2219 T-87, 6061 T-6, 1100, 2014 Nickels 200 annealed, 270 annealed Monel 400...1) the aluminum alloys, (2) the titanium alloys, (3) aluminum bronze 623, (4) tungsten- 2% thoria, (5) beryllium copper, (6) CRES 17 - 4PH , H-1025...plate was procured for the titanium alloys, CRES 347 and C-1018 steel materials. 3/4 inch plate was procured for aluminum, CRES 17 - 4PH and 250

  8. Integrated Battlefield Effects Research for the National Training Center. Appendix H. Designs of Nuclear and Chemical Field Simulators for the National Training Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-31

    illustration). 7 .I. -. • LIGHTNING PROTECTION. Superior " protection against lightning damage is . provided by the aluminum mast with pointed top cap...daa.ls Matrias: MECHANICAL DATA Mast - upper..........6061t-T6 Aluminum 13/4 00 with 4-" to ’/&" wall Mast- lower . . . . .. . 6061-T6 Aluminum 2" 00 with...8217/" to 4 " wall L - , Radiating elements .-- 6063J832 Aluminum t~r~ I outig laps . /2" 00 with .058" wlMonin lmp . . . . Glaie te~"’~ Maximum exposed

  9. Aluminum Carbothermic Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Marshall J.

    2005-03-31

    This report documents the non-proprietary research and development conducted on the Aluminum Carbothermic Technology (ACT) project from contract inception on July 01, 2000 to termination on December 31, 2004. The objectives of the program were to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new carbothermic process for producing commercial grade aluminum, designated as the ''Advanced Reactor Process'' (ARP). The scope of the program ranged from fundamental research through small scale laboratory experiments (65 kW power input) to larger scale test modules at up to 1600 kW power input. The tasks included work on four components of the process, Stages 1 and 2 of the reactor, vapor recovery and metal alloy decarbonization; development of computer models; and economic analyses of capital and operating costs. Justification for developing a new, carbothermic route to aluminum production is defined by the potential benefits in reduced energy, lower costs and more favorable environmental characteristics than the conventional Hall-Heroult process presently used by the industry. The estimated metrics for these advantages include energy rates at approximately 10 kWh/kg Al (versus over 13 kWh/kg Al for Hall-Heroult), capital costs as low as $1250 per MTY (versus 4,000 per MTY for Hall-Heroult), operating cost reductions of over 10%, and up to 37% reduction in CO2 emissions for fossil-fuel power plants. Realization of these benefits would be critical to sustaining the US aluminum industries position as a global leader in primary aluminum production. One very attractive incentive for ARP is its perceived ability to cost effectively produce metal over a range of smelter sizes, not feasible for Hall-Heroult plants which must be large, 240,000 TPY or more, to be economical. Lower capacity stand alone carbothermic smelters could be utilized to supply molten metal at fabrication facilities similar to the mini-mill concept employed by the steel industry. Major

  10. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  11. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  12. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  13. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  14. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  15. Refractory Characteristics of Aluminum Dross-Kaolin Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeosun, S. O.; Akpan, E. I.; Dada, M. O.

    2014-11-01

    The suitability of using aluminum dross waste and kaolin to produce refractory bricks is experimentally studied. Thirty brick samples of different blends are produced, dried at 30°C, dried further at 110°C, and fired at 1200°C. The firing temperature point, bulk density, apparent porosity, thermal conductivity, thermal shock, loss on ignition, permeability, shatter index, and shrinkage of the bricks blends are determined. The results show that some blend samples have good refractory characteristics with mixing ratio 4:1:2 (representing weight in grams of aluminum dross, plastic clay, and kaolin, respectively). The evaluations of studied properties reveal the possibility for aluminum dross waste to be used as matrix in refractory bricks.

  16. Structure and properties of porous ceramics obtained from aluminum hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levkov, R.; Kulkov, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the study of porous ceramics obtained from aluminum hydroxide with gibbsite modification is presented. The dependence of porosity and mechanical characteristics of the material sintered at different temperatures was studied. It was shown that compressive strength of alumina ceramics increases by 40 times with decreasing the pore volume from 65 to 15%. It was shown that aluminum hydroxide may be used for pore formation and pore volume in the sintered ceramics can be controlled by varying the aluminum hydroxide concentration and sintering temperature. Based on these results one can conclude that the obtained structure is very close to inorganic bone matrix and can be used as promising material for bone implants production.

  17. Mineral of the month: aluminum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plunkert, Patricia A.

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum is the second most abundant metallic element in Earth’s crust after silicon. Even so, it is a comparatively new industrial metal that has been produced in commercial quantities for little more than 100 years. Aluminum is lightweight, ductile, malleable and corrosion resistant, and is a good conductor of heat and electricity. Weighing about one-third as much as steel or copper per unit of volume, aluminum is used more than any other metal except iron. Aluminum can be fabricated into desired forms and shapes by every major metalworking technique to add to its versatility.

  18. Laser welding of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K.H.; Sabo, K.R.; Sanders, P.G.; Spawr, W.J.

    1997-03-01

    Recent interest in reducing the weight of automobiles to increase fuel mileage has focused attention on the use of aluminum and associated joining technologies. Laser beam welding is one of the more promising methods for high speed welding of aluminum. Consequently, substantial effort has been expended in attempting to develop a robust laser beam welding process. Early results have not been very consistent in the process requirements but more definitive data has been produced recently. This paper reviews the process parameters needed to obtain consistent laser welds on 5,000 series aluminum alloys and discusses the research necessary to make laser processing of aluminum a reality for automotive applications.

  19. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Minh, N.Q.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1982-04-01

    Metallic aluminum may be produced by the electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ at 700 to 800/sup 0/C in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  20. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Minh, Nguyen Q.; Loutfy, Raouf O.; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1984-01-01

    Production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of Al.sub.2 S.sub.3 at 700.degree.-800.degree. C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  1. Aluminum nitride grating couplers.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Siddhartha; Doerr, Christopher R; Piazza, Gianluca

    2012-06-10

    Grating couplers in sputtered aluminum nitride, a piezoelectric material with low loss in the C band, are demonstrated. Gratings and a waveguide micromachined on a silicon wafer with 600 nm minimum feature size were defined in a single lithography step without partial etching. Silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) was used for cladding layers. Peak coupling efficiency of -6.6 dB and a 1 dB bandwidth of 60 nm have been measured. This demonstration of wire waveguides and wideband grating couplers in a material that also has piezoelectric and elasto-optic properties will enable new functions for integrated photonics and optomechanics.

  2. Characterization of ultradispersed aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, R.L.; Maienschein, J.L.; Swansiger, R.W.; Garcia, F.; Darling, D.H.

    1994-12-08

    Samples of ultradispersed Al were received, which were produced by electrically exploding Al wires in argon. These samples comprised very small particles that were not significantly oxidized and that were stable in air. Particle morphology were studied with SE, micropycnometry, and gas adsorption surface area. Composition were determined using various techniques, as were thermal stability and reaction exotherms. The inexplicable reports of an Al-Ar compound and of an exothermic reaction were not confirmed. The material is a stable, nonoxidized, small-particle, highly reactive form of aluminum that is of interest in energetic materials formulations.

  3. Damage Accumulation in Advanced Metal Matrix Composites Under Thermal Cycling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-25

    Cyclically Deformed Fe-25 Cr-2 Al Alloy ," Z. Metallke, Bd. 79, H. 3, pp. 189-193. Touloukian , Y. S., Editor, 1967, "Thermophysical Properties of High...Matrix Properties FeCrAIY alloys are primarily used as high temperature oxidation coatings on nickel based superallovs. The alloys have a chromium...Increasing the aluminum content from 2% to 4% created an increasingly smooth and adherent oxide scale. Aluminum contents greater than 4% made the alloy

  4. Microstructure of aluminum-iron alloys subjected to severe plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Senkov, O.N.; Froes, F.H.; Stolyarov, V.V.; Valiev, R.Z.; Liu, J.

    1998-04-14

    The present paper describes detailed experiments on structure and phase characterization carried out on aluminum-iron alloys after intense torsion straining. The equilibrium solubility of iron in the aluminum lattice at room temperature has been reported to be 0.025 at.%. Alloying of aluminum with iron can increase the high-temperature strength due to a dispersion of second-phase particles. This effect can be enhanced by increasing the solid solubility extension of iron in the aluminum matrix and producing non-equilibrium phases by techniques such as RS, MA or even a laser treatment. In the present work, the severe plastic deformation approach has been used to extend the iron solubility in aluminum and to produce a nano-grained structure in several Al-Fe alloys.

  5. Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

    2007-08-16

    Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as “bath” in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

  6. Elevated temperature properties of boron/aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, P. G.

    1978-01-01

    The high temperature properties of boron/aluminum composites, fabricated by an air diffusion bonding technique utilizing vacuum-bonded monolayer tape are reported. Seventeen different combinations of matrix alloy, reinforcement diameter, reinforcement volume percent, angle-ply and matrix enhancement (i.e. titanium cladding and interleaves) were fabricated, inspected, and tested. It is shown that good to excellent mechanical properties could be obtained for air-bonded boron/aluminum composites and that these properties did not decrease significantly up to a test temperature of at least 260 C. Composites made with 8 mil B/W fiber show a much greater longitudinal strength dependence on volume percent fiber than composites made with 5.6 mil fiber. The addition of titanium caused difficulties in composite bonding and yielded composites with reduced strength.

  7. Extrinsic toughening of discontinuously reinforced aluminum composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Lisa Yost

    Discontinuously reinforced aluminum (DRA) composites can exhibit desirable specific stiffness and strength properties as compared to monolithic aluminum alloys. Unfortunately, the addition of ceramic particulates to the aluminum matrix results in decreased fracture resistance. In this dissertation, DRA composites containing discrete regions of unreinforced aluminum (where these unreinforced aluminum regions are subsequently referred to as 'ductile phase' regions or DP regions) were studied with the objective of enhancing damage tolerance compared to the conventional DRA composite. The effects of 'ductile phase' size, shape and mechanical properties as well as the SiCp reinforcement distribution on crack initiation and growth were examined. The incorporation of properly selected DP regions can result in increased crack growth resistance of the DRA composite under monotonic loading conditions. In such cases, stable crack propagation (i.e. R-curve behavior) was observed in contrast to the behavior of the conventional DRA composite which failed catastrophically at about 20 MPasurdm. Increased size and ductility of the 'ductile phase' resulted in improved toughness over the range tested. For instance, materials with small DP regions (10-60 mum in thickness) did not show improvements in fracture toughness compared to the conventional composites while those materials containing large DP regions (80-400 mum in thickness) demonstrated stable crack propagation at elevated levels of stress intensity. The details of the R-curve as well as the dominant toughening mechanisms were also affected by test geometry (i.e. crack arrestor vs. crack divider). In the crack arrestor orientation, toughening was associated primarily with the renucleation of the crack across the DP regions, provided the DP regions possessed sufficient ductility. Apparent stress intensities of 30-50 MPasurdm resulted. In the crack divider orientation, rising R-curves resulted from the bridging action of

  8. Evaluation of Corrosion Protection Methods for Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    also appreciate the efforts of Professors Goo, Sadhal, 3Gershenzon, Langhon and Salovey who served on my Guidance and Dissertation 5 Committees. The...Shih, J. Electrochem. Soc., 135, 1171-1172 (1988). 176. S.E. Frers, M.M. Stefenel, C. Mayer and T. Chierchie, J. Appl. Electrochem., 20, 996-999 (1990...Keddam, Corrosion Science, 21 1-18 (1988). 94. J. Bessone, C. Mayer , K. Juttner and W.J. Lorenz, Electrochimica Acta, 28, 171-175 (1983). 3- 95. W

  9. Mechanical Behavior and Processing of Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-21

    SiCp obtained from image analyses were then used to compute the SiCp interparticle spacing according to the formula discussed by Nardone and Prewo [7...spacing according to the formula discussed by Nardone and Prewo [7] (I t / vf)1/2 (10) where X is the interparticulate spacing; and t, I and Vf are the...17, respectively. The interparticulate spacings were calculated according to the formula used by Nardone and Prewo [7] U-1 t / Vf)1/ 2 (10) where X is

  10. Interface Character of Aluminum-Graphite Metal Matrix Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-27

    due to electron and ion beam damage . X-ray measurements of the residual stress of the commercial composites shows ensile stresses some of which were...the interaction between the electron and ion beams and a carbon containing surface. The damage to the bonding of the carbon is explored and the dangers...artifacts on carbide peak analysis due to electron and ion beam damage . * - X-ray measurements of the residual stress of the commercial composites shows

  11. Metal Compression Forming of aluminum alloys and metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S.; Ren, W.; Porter, W.D.; Brinkman, C.R.; Sabau, A.S.; Purgert, R.M.

    2000-02-01

    Metal Compression Forming (MCF) is a variant of the squeeze casting process, in which molten metal is allowed to solidify under pressure in order to close porosity and form a sound part. However, the MCF process applies pressure on the entire mold face, thereby directing pressure on all regions of the casting and producing a uniformly sound part. The process is capable of producing parts with properties close to those of forgings, while retaining the near net shape, complexity in geometry, and relatively low cost of the casting process.

  12. The Benefits of Aluminum Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goyal, R. C.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses benefits of aluminum windows for college construction and renovation projects, including that aluminum is the most successfully recycled material, that it meets architectural glass deflection standards, that it has positive thermal energy performance, and that it is a preferred exterior surface. (EV)

  13. Lost-Soap Aluminum Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihalow, Paula

    1980-01-01

    Lost-wax casting in sterling silver is a costly experience for the average high school student. However, this jewelry process can be learned at no cost if scrap aluminum is used instead of silver, and soap bars are used instead of wax. This lost-soap aluminum casting process is described. (Author/KC)

  14. Aluminum Nanoholes for Optical Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Carlos Angulo; Canalejas-Tejero, Víctor; Herranz, Sonia; Urraca, Javier; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz; Avella-Oliver, Miquel; Maquieira, Ángel; Puchades, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Sub-wavelength diameter holes in thin metal layers can exhibit remarkable optical features that make them highly suitable for (bio)sensing applications. Either as efficient light scattering centers for surface plasmon excitation or metal-clad optical waveguides, they are able to form strongly localized optical fields that can effectively interact with biomolecules and/or nanoparticles on the nanoscale. As the metal of choice, aluminum exhibits good optical and electrical properties, is easy to manufacture and process and, unlike gold and silver, its low cost makes it very promising for commercial applications. However, aluminum has been scarcely used for biosensing purposes due to corrosion and pitting issues. In this short review, we show our recent achievements on aluminum nanohole platforms for (bio)sensing. These include a method to circumvent aluminum degradation—which has been successfully applied to the demonstration of aluminum nanohole array (NHA) immunosensors based on both, glass and polycarbonate compact discs supports—the use of aluminum nanoholes operating as optical waveguides for synthesizing submicron-sized molecularly imprinted polymers by local photopolymerization, and a technique for fabricating transferable aluminum NHAs onto flexible pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes, which could facilitate the development of a wearable technology based on aluminum NHAs. PMID:26184330

  15. Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide - 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1999-01-01

    The 1990 U.S. Bureau of Mines publication, Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide, has been updated and is now available. The 1998 USGS edition of Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide is published in two parts. Part I—Detail contains information on individual primary smelter capacity, location, ownership, sources of energy, and other miscellaneous information. Part II—Summary summarizes the capacity data by country

  16. Interfacial preferential dissolution on silicon carbide particulate/aluminum composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, H.Y.; Zhu, R.Z.

    1998-07-01

    Previous studies on corrosion of discontinuously reinforced aluminum alloy composites have assumed that the role of the reinforcement-matrix interface is merely as a preferable site for pitting. In this work, the interfacial preferential dissolution (IPD) occurring on silicon carbide particulate/aluminum (SiC{sub p}/Al) composites in a medium of aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) solution was studied. IPD was quite distinct from pitting. IPD occurred on the composites with either a pure aluminum matrix or an aluminum alloy Al 2024 (UNS A92024) matrix, whether they were fabricated by a cast process or by a powder metallurgy process. In the light of elastoplastic mechanics, the width of the plastically deformed zone around SiC particles (created by the contraction misfit between SiC particles and the matrix during quenching) was deduced to be 0.5 D, where D is the diameter of the SiC particles. This was in agreement with the measured width of the IPD region (0.3 D to 0.4 D). It was concluded that IPD was caused by the poor integrity of the surface oxide film upon the plastically deformed zone near the interface and was independent of the chemical, metallurgical, and galvanic coupling factors around the interface, if any. A copper-deposition experiment indicated this poor integrity. IPD caused increased dissolution at SiC clusters and uniform corrosion for the composites with high SiC content. Moreover, IPD and pitting suppressed each other by a means of cathodic protection.

  17. Wettability of Aluminum on Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Sarina; Tang, Kai; Kvithyld, Anne; Tangstad, Merete; Engh, Thorvald Abel

    2011-12-01

    The wettability of molten aluminum on solid alumina substrate has been investigated by the sessile drop technique in a 10-8 bar vacuum or under argon atmosphere in the temperature range from 1273 K to 1673 K (1000 °C to 1400 °C). It is shown that the reduction of oxide skin on molten aluminum is slow under normal pressures even with ultralow oxygen potential, but it is enhanced in high vacuum. To describe the wetting behavior of the Al-Al2O3 system at lower temperatures, a semiempirical calculation was employed. The calculated contact angle at 973 K (700 °C) is approximately 97 deg, which indicates that aluminum does not wet alumina at aluminum casting temperatures. Thus, a priming height is required for aluminum to infiltrate a filter. Wetting in the Al-Al2O3 system increases with temperature.

  18. Matrix thermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-02-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  19. Finite element investigation into the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube/aluminum nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhi, S.; Ansari, R.; Ahmadi, M.

    2017-02-01

    This paper aims to study the thermal conductivity coefficient of aluminum matrices reinforced by single-walled carbon nanotubes. To obtain the thermal conductivity coefficient of the nanocomposites, a small temperature difference is applied on two opposite edges of a representative volume element. The nanotubes are distributed in Al matrix by using three different patterns, including random pattern, regular pattern with nanotube direction along the temperature difference and regular pattern with nanotube direction perpendicular to the temperature change. It is shown that the best enhancement in the thermal conductivity of aluminum matrix occurs by the regular distribution of the nanotubes along the temperature change. Also, increasing the volume fraction of nanotubes in aluminum matrix leads to increasing the thermal conductivity coefficient of the nanocomposite.

  20. The Use of Austenitic Stainless Steel versus Monel (Ni-Cu) Alloy in Pressurized Gaseous Oxygen (GOX) Life Support Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    micron 2219 Aluminum particles as the projectiles. Monel proved superior as Porter was unable to ignite Monel, but was able to icnite AISI 304L CRES with...800 micron 2219 Aluminum particles in the high velocity test appratus (see Figure 3.10). 2. Friction Tribology has been studied as a method of...Monel 400 Copper 102 Aluminum 6061- T6 1015 Carbon Steel Inconel 600 Hastelloy X Inconel718 440C Stainless Steel 17-4 PH Stainless Steel Invar 36 Brass 360

  1. Sync Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, William C.; Metz, W. Chris; Mitrani, Jacques E.; Hewett, Jr., Paul L.; Jones, Christopher A.

    2004-12-31

    Sync Matrix provides a graphic display of the relationships among all of the response activities of each jurisdiction. This is accomplished through software that organizes and displays the activities by jurisdiction, function, and time for easy review and analysis. The software can also integrate the displays of multiple jurisdictions to allow examination of the total response.

  2. The young's modulus of 1018 steel and 67061-T6 aluminum measured from quasi-static to elastic precursor strain-rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rae, Philip J; Trujillo, Carl; Lovato, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The assumption that Young's modulus is strain-rate invariant is tested for 6061-T6 aluminium alloy and 1018 steel over 10 decades of strain-rate. For the same billets of material, 3 quasi-static strain-rates are investigated with foil strain gauges at room temperature. The ultrasonic sound speeds are measured and used to calculate the moduli at approximately 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. Finally, ID plate impact is used to generate an elastic pre-cursor in the alloys at a strain-rate of approximately 10{sup 6} s{sup -1} from which the longitudinal sound speed may be obtained. It is found that indeed the Young's modulus is strain-rate independent within the experimental accuracy.

  3. Effects of Initial Temper Condition and Postweld Heat Treatment on the Properties of Dissimilar Friction-Stir-Welded Joints between AA7075 and AA6061 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    İpekoğlu, Güven; Çam, Gürel

    2014-06-01

    In this study, dissimilar AA7075-O/6061-O and AA7075-T6/6061-T6 butt joints were produced by friction stir welding (FSW), and postweld heat treatment (PWHT) was applied to the joints obtained. The effects of initial temper condition and PWHT on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the dissimilar joints were thus investigated. It was demonstrated that sound dissimilar joints can be produced for both temper conditions. A hardness increase in the joint area ( i.e., strength overmatching) was obtained in the joints produced in the O-temper condition, whereas a hardness loss was observed in the joint area of the joints obtained in the T6 temper condition. It was also well demonstrated that PWHT could be used in order to improve the joint properties for both O and T6 joints provided that the joint is defect-free prior to subsequent heat treatment.

  4. Aluminum plasmonic photocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qi; Wang, Chenxi; Huang, Hao; Li, Wan; Du, Deyang; Han, Di; Qiu, Teng; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of photocatalytic processes is dictated largely by plasmonic materials with the capability to enhance light absorption as well as the energy conversion efficiency. Herein, we demonstrate how to improve the plasmonic photocatalytic properties of TiO2/Al nano-void arrays by overlapping the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) modes with the TiO2 band gap. The plasmonic TiO2/Al arrays exhibit superior photocatalytic activity boasting an enhancement of 7.2 folds. The underlying mechanisms concerning the radiative energy transfer and interface energy transfer processes are discussed. Both processes occur at the TiO2/Al interface and their contributions to photocatalysis are evaluated. The results are important to the optimization of aluminum plasmonic materials in photocatalytic applications. PMID:26497411

  5. Aluminum: Industry of the future

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    For over a century, the US aluminum industry has led the global market with advances in technology, product development, and marketing. Industry leaders recognize both the opportunities and challenges they face as they head into the 21st century, and that cooperative R and D is key to their success. In a unique partnership, aluminum industry leaders have teamed with the US Department of Energy`s Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) to focus on innovative technologies that will help to strengthen the competitive position of the US aluminum industry and, at the same time, further important national goals. This industry-led partnership, the Aluminum Industry of the Future, promotes technologies that optimize the use of energy and materials in operations and reduce wastes and energy-related emissions. Led by The Aluminum Association, industry leaders began by developing a unified vision of future market, business, energy, and environmental goals. Their vision document, Partnerships for the Future, articulates a compelling vision for the next 20 years: to maintain and grow the aluminum industry through the manufacture and sale of competitively priced, socially desirable, and ecologically sustainable products. Continued global leadership in materials markets will require the combined resources of industry, universities, and government laboratories. By developing a unified vision, the aluminum industry has provided a framework for the next step in the Industries of the Future process, the development of a technology roadmap designed to facilitate cooperative R and D.

  6. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    SciTech Connect

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  7. [Microbiological corrosion of aluminum alloys].

    PubMed

    Smirnov, V F; Belov, D V; Sokolova, T N; Kuzina, O V; Kartashov, V R

    2008-01-01

    Biological corrosion of ADO quality aluminum and aluminum-based construction materials (alloys V65, D16, and D16T) was studied. Thirteen microscopic fungus species and six bacterial species proved to be able to attack aluminum and its alloys. It was found that biocorrosion of metals by microscopic fungi and bacteria was mediated by certain exometabolites. Experiments on biocorrosion of the materials by the microscopic fungus Alternaria alternata, the most active biodegrader, demonstrated that the micromycete attack started with the appearance of exudate with pH 8-9 on end faces of the samples.

  8. PREPARATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for preparing uranium--aluminum alloys from a solution of uranium halide in an about equimolar molten alkali metal halide-- aluminum halide mixture and excess aluminum. The uranium halide is reduced and the uranium is alloyed with the excess aluminum. The alloy and salt are separated from each other. (AEC)

  9. 75 FR 70689 - Kaiser Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC; Kaiser Aluminum-Greenwood Forge Division; Currently...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... Employment and Training Administration Kaiser Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC; Kaiser Aluminum- Greenwood... Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC, Kaiser Aluminum-Greenwood Forge Division, including on- site leased... are engaged in the production of aluminum alloy forgings. Information shows that on July 28,...

  10. Characterization of the dimensional stability of advanced metallic materials using an optical test bench structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Cheng; O'Donnell, Timothy P.

    1991-01-01

    The dimensional stability of low-density high specific-strength metal-matrix composites (including 30 vol pct SiC(p)/SXA 24-T6 Al, 25 vol pct SiC(p)/6061-T6 Al, 40 vol pct graphite P100 fiber/6061 Al, 50 vol pct graphite P100 fiber/6061 Al, and 40 vol pct P100 graphite fiber/AZ91D Mg composites) and an Al-Li-Mg metal alloy was evaluated using a specially designed five-strut optical test bench structure. The structure had 30 thermocouple locations, one retroreflector, one linear interferometer multilayer insulation, and various strip heaters. It was placed in a 10 exp -7 torr capability vacuum chamber with a laser head positioned at a window port, and a laser interferometer system for collecting dimensional change data. It was found that composite materials have greater 40-C temporal dimensional stability than the AL-Li-Mg alloy. Aluminum-based composites demonstrated better 40-C temporal stability than Mg-based composites.

  11. Electrolyte treatment for aluminum reduction

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.; Brooks, Richard J.; Frizzle, Patrick B.; Juric, Drago D.

    2002-01-01

    A method of treating an electrolyte for use in the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum employing an anode and a cathode, the alumina dissolved in the electrolyte, the treating improving wetting of the cathode with molten aluminum during electrolysis. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten electrolyte comprised of ALF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF and LiF, and treating the electrolyte by providing therein 0.004 to 0.2 wt. % of a transition metal or transition metal compound for improved wettability of the cathode with molten aluminum during subsequent electrolysis to reduce alumina to aluminum.

  12. Ballistic Evaluation of 7085 Aluminum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    tempers of aluminum alloy (AA) 7085 produced by Alcoa. The tempers included a high-strength variant, 7085-T7E01, for utilization as an appliqué against...temper. The V50 was then compared to other ballistic-grade aluminum alloys , namely AA7039 and AA2139. The results of these tests were used to derive... alloy 7085-T7E01 and 7085-T7E02. ......................................1 Table 2. Chemistry of AAs, weight-percent ranges

  13. Chrome - Free Aluminum Coating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, John H.; Gugel, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation concerns the program to qualify a chrome free coating for aluminum. The program was required due to findings by OSHA and EPA, that hexavalent chromium, used to mitigate corrosion in aerospace aluminum alloys, poses hazards for personnel. This qualification consisted of over 4,000 tests. The tests revealed that a move away from Cr+6, required a system rather than individual components and that the maximum corrosion protection required pretreatment, primer and topcoat.

  14. Optomechanics of Single Aluminum Nanodisks.

    PubMed

    Su, Man-Nung; Dongare, Pratiksha D; Chakraborty, Debadi; Zhang, Yue; Yi, Chongyue; Wen, Fangfang; Chang, Wei-Shun; Nordlander, Peter; Sader, John E; Halas, Naomi J; Link, Stephan

    2017-04-12

    Aluminum nanostructures support tunable surface plasmon resonances and have become an alternative to gold nanoparticles. Whereas gold is the most-studied plasmonic material, aluminum has the advantage of high earth abundance and hence low cost. In addition to understanding the size and shape tunability of the plasmon resonance, the fundamental relaxation processes in aluminum nanostructures after photoexcitation must be understood to take full advantage of applications such as photocatalysis and photodetection. In this work, we investigate the relaxation following ultrafast pulsed excitation and the launching of acoustic vibrations in individual aluminum nanodisks, using single-particle transient extinction spectroscopy. We find that the transient extinction signal can be assigned to a thermal relaxation of the photoexcited electrons and phonons. The ultrafast heating-induced launching of in-plane acoustic vibrations reveals moderate binding to the glass substrate and is affected by the native aluminum oxide layer. Finally, we compare the behavior of aluminum nanodisks to that of similarly prepared and sized gold nanodisks.

  15. A Virtual Aluminum Reduction Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Zhou, Chenn Q.; Wu, Bing; Li, Jie

    2013-11-01

    The most important component in the aluminum industry is the aluminum reduction cell; it has received considerable interests and resources to conduct research to improve its productivity and energy efficiency. The current study focused on the integration of numerical simulation data and virtual reality technology to create a scientifically and practically realistic virtual aluminum reduction cell by presenting complex cell structures and physical-chemical phenomena. The multiphysical field simulation models were first built and solved in ANSYS software (ANSYS Inc., Canonsburg, PA, USA). Then, the methodology of combining the simulation results with virtual reality was introduced, and a virtual aluminum reduction cell was created. The demonstration showed that a computer-based world could be created in which people who are not analysis experts can see the detailed cell structure in a context that they can understand easily. With the application of the virtual aluminum reduction cell, even people who are familiar with aluminum reduction cell operations can gain insights that make it possible to understand the root causes of observed problems and plan design changes in much less time.

  16. Explosive Welding of Aluminum, Titanium and Zirconium to Copper Sheet Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegazy, A. A.; Mote, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The main material properties affecting the explosive weldability of a certain metal combination are the yield strength, the ductility, the density and the sonic velocity of the two metals. Successful welding of the metal combination depends mainly on the correct choice of the explosive welding parameters; i.e., the stand off distance, the weight of the explosive charge relative to the weight of the flyer plate and the detonation velocity of the explosive. Based on the measured and the handbook values of the properties of interest, the explosive welding parameters were calculated and the arrangements for the explosive welding of the Al alloy 6061-T6, titanium and zirconium to OFHC copper were determined. The relatively small sheet metal thickness (1/8") and the fact that the thickness of the explosive layer must exceed a certain minimum value were considered during the determination of the explosive welding conditions. The results of the metallographic investigations and the measurements of the shear strength at the interface demonstrate the usefulness of these calculations to minimize the number of experimental trials.

  17. Managing aluminum phosphide poisonings.

    PubMed

    Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind K; Azim, Afzal; Sharma, Kalpana

    2011-07-01

    Aluminum phosphide (AlP) is a cheap, effective and commonly used pesticide. However, unfortunately, it is now one of the most common causes of poisoning among agricultural pesticides. It liberates lethal phosphine gas when it comes in contact either with atmospheric moisture or with hydrochloric acid in the stomach. The mechanism of toxicity includes cellular hypoxia due to the effect on mitochondria, inhibition of cytochrome C oxidase and formation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. The signs and symptoms are nonspecific and instantaneous. The toxicity of AlP particularly affects the cardiac and vascular tissues, which manifest as profound and refractory hypotension, congestive heart failure and electrocardiographic abnormalities. The diagnosis of AlP usually depends on clinical suspicion or history, but can be made easily by the simple silver nitrate test on gastric content or on breath. Due to no known specific antidote, management remains primarily supportive care. Early arrival, resuscitation, diagnosis, decrease the exposure of poison (by gastric lavage with KMnO(4), coconut oil), intensive monitoring and supportive therapy may result in good outcome. Prompt and adequate cardiovascular support is important and core in the management to attain adequate tissue perfusion, oxygenation and physiologic metabolic milieu compatible with life until the tissue poison levels are reduced and spontaneous circulation is restored. In most of the studies, poor prognostic factors were presence of acidosis and shock. The overall outcome improved in the last decade due to better and advanced intensive care management.

  18. Managing aluminum phosphide poisonings

    PubMed Central

    Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind K; Azim, Afzal; Sharma, Kalpana

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum phosphide (AlP) is a cheap, effective and commonly used pesticide. However, unfortunately, it is now one of the most common causes of poisoning among agricultural pesticides. It liberates lethal phosphine gas when it comes in contact either with atmospheric moisture or with hydrochloric acid in the stomach. The mechanism of toxicity includes cellular hypoxia due to the effect on mitochondria, inhibition of cytochrome C oxidase and formation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. The signs and symptoms are nonspecific and instantaneous. The toxicity of AlP particularly affects the cardiac and vascular tissues, which manifest as profound and refractory hypotension, congestive heart failure and electrocardiographic abnormalities. The diagnosis of AlP usually depends on clinical suspicion or history, but can be made easily by the simple silver nitrate test on gastric content or on breath. Due to no known specific antidote, management remains primarily supportive care. Early arrival, resuscitation, diagnosis, decrease the exposure of poison (by gastric lavage with KMnO4, coconut oil), intensive monitoring and supportive therapy may result in good outcome. Prompt and adequate cardiovascular support is important and core in the management to attain adequate tissue perfusion, oxygenation and physiologic metabolic milieu compatible with life until the tissue poison levels are reduced and spontaneous circulation is restored. In most of the studies, poor prognostic factors were presence of acidosis and shock. The overall outcome improved in the last decade due to better and advanced intensive care management. PMID:21887030

  19. Carbide coated fibers in graphite-aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imprescia, R. J.; Levinson, L. S.; Reiswig, R. D.; Wallace, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The NASA-supported program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) to develop carbon fiber-aluminum matrix composites is described. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used to uniformly deposit thin, smooth, continuous coats of TiC on the fibers of graphite tows. Wet chemical coating of fibers, followed by high-temperature treatment, was also used, but showed little promise as an alternative coating method. Strength measurements on CVD coated fiber tows showed that thin carbide coats can add to fiber strength. The ability of aluminum alloys to wet TiC was successfully demonstrated using TiC-coated graphite surfaces. Pressure-infiltration of TiC- and ZrC-coated fiber tows with aluminum alloys was only partially successful. Experiments were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of carbide coats on carbon as barriers to prevent reaction between alluminum alloys and carbon. Initial results indicate that composites of aluminum and carbide-coated graphite are stable for long periods of time at temperatures near the alloy solidus.

  20. Review paper: Role of aluminum in glass-ionomer dental cements and its biological effects.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, John W; Czarnecka, Beata

    2009-11-01

    The role of aluminum in glass-ionomers and resin-modified glass-ionomers for dentistry is reviewed. Aluminum is included in the glass component of these materials in the form of Al(2)O(3) to confer basicity on the glass and enable the glass to take part in the acid-base setting reactions. Results of studies of these reactions by FTIR and magic-angle spinning (MAS)-NMR spectroscopy are reported and the role of aluminum is discussed in detail. Aluminum has been shown to be present in the glasses in predominantly 4-coordination, as well as 5- and 6-coordination, and during setting a proportion of this is converted to 6-coordinate species within the matrix of the cement. Despite this, mature cements may contain detectable amounts of both 4- and 5-coordinate aluminum. Aluminum has been found to be leached from glass-ionomer cements, with greater amounts being released under acidic conditions. It may be associated with fluoride, with which it is known to complex strongly. Aluminum that enters the body via the gastro-intestinal tract is mainly excreted, and only about 1% ingested aluminum crosses the gut wall. Calculation shows that, if a glass-ionomer filling dissolved completely over 5 years, it would add only an extra 0.5% of the recommended maximum intake of aluminum to an adult patient. This leads to the conclusion that the release of aluminum from either type of glass-ionomer cement in the mouth poses a negligible health hazard.

  1. Low-aluminum content iron-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Goodwin, G.M.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-06-01

    The low-aluminum-content iron-aluminum program deals with the development of a Fe-Al alloy with aluminum content such as a produce the minimum environmental effect at room temperature. The FAPY is an Fe-16 at. % Al-based alloy developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as the highest aluminum-containing alloy with essentially no environmental effect. The chemical composition for FAPY in weight percent is: aluminum = 8.46, chromium = 5.50, zirconium = 0.20, carbon = 0.03, molybdenum = 2.00, yttrium = 0.10 and iron = 83.71. The ignots of the alloy can be hot worked by extrusion, forging, and rolling processes. The hot-worked cast structure can be cold worked with intermediate anneals at 800{degrees}C. Typical room-temperature ductility of the fine-grained wrought structure is 20 to 25% for this alloy. In contrast to the wrought structure, the cast ductility at room temperature is approximately 1% with a transition temperature of approximately 100 to 150{degrees}C, above which ductility values exceed 20%. The alloy has been melted and processed into bar, sheet, and foil. The alloy has also been cast into slabs, step-blocks of varying thicknesses, and shapes. The purpose of this section is to describe the welding response of cast slabs of three different thicknesses of FAPY alloy. Tensile, creep, and Charpy-impact data of the welded plates are also presented.

  2. Numerical simulation of damage progression in unidirectional composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Michael

    1997-11-01

    The damage growth in unidirectional composite materials is a complex evolutionary process. The initiation, growth and interaction of these damage mechanisms are strongly influenced by the properties of the constituent materials. In addition, thermal residual stresses are usually induced in composite material during the curing process. Therefore it is essential to consider the effect of the properties of the constituent materials and thermal residual stresses on the fracture behavior of composite materials. In this study, a computational methodology that employs a hybrid micromechanical-anisotropic continuum model developed previously to simulate the damage growth on the constituent level of composite materials has been modified and extended to include the effect of temperature change. The unique features of this methodology is that multiple modes of damage can be simulated simultaneously, and the direction of damage growth, in the form of a crack path, needs not be pre-selected. More specifically, the methodology uses a special purpose finite element program, PSEUDO, with a node splitting and nodal force relaxation algorithm that is capable of generating new crack surfaces to simulate damage initiation and growth in unidirectional fiber reinforced composites. An incremental elastic-plastic algorithm with Jsb2 flow theory and isotropic hardening is incorporated to account for matrix plastic deformation when analyzing damage growth in metal matrix composites. Damage progression in two types of metal matrix composites, namely, the as-received boron/aluminum-5.6/6061-AR and the solution aged and treated boron/aluminum-5.6/6061-T6 metal matrix composites, with thermal residual stresses, have been analyzed. The results show that the thermal residual stresses do have significant effects on the damage initiation, damage progression and the notch strengths of the composite materials.

  3. Effective Thermal Conductivity of an Aluminum Foam + Water Two Phase System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskito, John

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the effect of volume fraction and pore size on the effective thermal conductivity of an aluminum foam and water system. Nine specimens of aluminum foam representing a matrix of three volume fractions (4-8% by vol.) and three pore sizes (2-4 mm) were tested with water to determine relationships to the effective thermal conductivity. It was determined that increases in volume fraction of the aluminum phase were correlated to increases in the effective thermal conductivity. It was not statistically possible to prove that changes in pore size of the aluminum foam correlated to changes in the effective thermal conductivity. However, interaction effects between the volume fraction and pore size of the foam were statistically significant. Ten theoretical models were selected from the published literature to compare against the experimental data. Models by Asaad, Hadley, and de Vries provided effective thermal conductivity predictions within a 95% confidence interval.

  4. The Diametrically Loaded Cylinder For The Study Of Nanostructured Aluminum-Graphene And Aluminum-Alumina Nanocomposites Using Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabandeh Khorshid, Meysam; Schultz, Benjamin; Rohatgi, Pradeep; Elhajjar, Rani

    2016-05-01

    Non-contact methods for characterization of metal matrix composites have the potential to accelerate the development and study of advanced composite materials. In this study, diametrical compression of small disk specimens was used to understand the mechanical properties of metal matrix micro and nano composites. Analysis was performed using an inverse method that couples digital image correlation and the analytical closed form formulation. This technique was capable of extracting the tension and compression modulus values in the metal matrix nanocomposite disk specimens. Specimens of aluminum and aluminum reinforced with either Al2O3 nanoparticles or graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) were synthesized using a powder metallurgy approach that involved room temperature milling in ethanol, and low temperature drying followed by single action compaction. The elastic and failure properties of MMNC materials prepared using the procedure above are presented.

  5. Weld Repair of Thin Aluminum Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Weld repairing of thin aluminum sheets now possible, using niobium shield and copper heat sinks. Refractory niobium shield protects aluminum adjacent to hole, while copper heat sinks help conduct heat away from repair site. Technique limits tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding bombardment zone to melt area, leaving surrounding areas around weld unaffected. Used successfully to repair aluminum cold plates on Space Shuttle, Commercial applications, especially in sealing fractures, dents, and holes in thin aluminum face sheets or clad brazing sheet in cold plates, heat exchangers, coolers, and Solar panels. While particularly suited to thin aluminum sheet, this process also used in thicker aluminum material to prevent surface damage near weld area.

  6. Thermal contact conductance between metals in a vacuum environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Basic heat transfer data for structural materials used in the Saturn 1B/V 1U component case structural design were obtained. The main emphasis is on thermal contact conductance between dissimilar metallic surfaces, since thermal conductivity values within solids have been sufficiently established previously. The test program outline and test results are described. The following materials were tested: aluminum 6061-T6 (12 samples), aluminum 356 (as cast), almag 35 (as cast), magnesium AZ91C-T4 (4 samples), and mag lithium LA-141 (2 samples).

  7. Interferometric phase measurement of zerodur, aluminum and SXA mirrors at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magner, Thomas J.; Barney, Richard D.

    1988-01-01

    A research program was undertaken to determine the surface figure error of several different types of mirrors at cryogenic temperatures. Two-inch diameter parabolic, spherical and flat mirrors were fabricated from zerodur, aluminum and a metal matrix composite of silicon carbide reinforced aluminum (SXA). The ratio of silicon carbide to aluminum was selected so that the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the metal matrix matched electroless nickel. A liquuid helium dewar was modified to add an interferometric grade window, a cold electronic shutter and a strain-free copper mirror mount. Interferometric phase measurements on each mirror mounted in the dewar were made without the window, with the window, under vacuum, at around 80K and between 10K and 24K.

  8. Fracture criteria for discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rack, H. J.; Goree, J. G.; Albritton, J.; Ratnarparkhi, P.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of sample configuration on the details of initial crack propagation in discontinuously whisker reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites was investigated. Care was taken to allow direct comparison of fracture toughness values utilizing differing sample configurations and orientations, holding all materials variables constant, e.g., extrusion ration, heat treatment, and chemistry.

  9. Aluminum Trichloride Inhibits the Rat Osteoblasts Mineralization In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Song, Miao; Huo, Hui; Cao, Zheng; Han, Yanfei; Gao, Li

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) is an accumulative toxic metal. Excessive Al accumulation inhibits osteoblasts mineralization and induces osteoporosis. However, the inhibition mechanism of Al on the mineralization is not fully understood. Thus, in this study, the rat osteoblasts were cultured and exposed to 0 mmol L(-1) (control group, CG) and 0.52 mmol L(-1) aluminum trichloride (AlCl3, treatment group, TG) for 7, 14, and 21 days, respectively. We found that mineralized matrix nodules, the activity of bone alkaline phosphatase, the concentration of extracellular calcium, the mRNA expression of type-I collagen, the mRNA and protein expressions of osteopontin, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein were all decreased, while the concentration of extracellular phosphorus was increased in TG compared with CG with time prolonged. Taken together, these results indicated that AlCl3 inhibited osteoblasts mineralization in vitro.

  10. Capillarity in isothermal infiltration of alumina fiber preforms with aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, V.J.; Mortensen, A. . Dept. of Materials Science); Compton, L.M. )

    1994-10-01

    Models derived in petroleum engineering and soil science for flow of two immiscible fluids in a porous medium are extended to the infiltration of ceramic preforms by a liquid metal. SAFFIL alumina fiber preforms are infiltrated with an aluminum matrix in a series of interrupted unidirectional and isothermal experiments at various low applied pressures, to measure profiles of the volume fraction of metal along the length of the preforms. Comparison of experimental data with theory reveals the existence of a pressure-dependent incubation time for wetting of the alumina preforms by molten aluminum at 973 K. If this incubation time is taken into account, experimental curves of metal distribution are well predicted by theory, confirming the validity of the models after initiation of flow.

  11. Aluminum industry applications for OTEC

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.S.; Leshaw, D.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Sprouse, A.M.; Thiagarajan, V.

    1980-12-01

    The objective of the program is to study the integration issues which must be resolved to realize the market potential of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power for the aluminum industry. The study established, as a baseline, an OTEC plant with an electrical output of 100 MWe which would power an aluminum reduction plant. The reduction plant would have a nominal annual output of about 60,000 metric tons of aluminum metal. Three modes of operation were studied, viz: 1. A reduction plant on shore and a floating OTEC power plant moored offshore supplying energy by cable. 2. A reduction plant on shore and a floating OTEC power plant at sea supplying energy by means of an ''energy bridge.'' 3. A floating reduction plant on the same platform as the OTEC power plant. For the floating OTEC/aluminum plantship, three reduction processes were examined. 1. The conventional Hall process with prebaked anodes. 2. The drained cathode Hall cell process. 3. The aluminum chloride reduction process.

  12. Improvement of Transverse Strength in Graphite-Aluminum Composites by High-Strength Surface Foils.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    purchased from Material Concepts Incorporated. The precursor wire had Union Carbide’s VSB-32 or VS0054 pitch mesophase graphite fibers in a matrix of...probably valid. The reason for the low strength of these plates, particularly G4407, is not known. Pitch fiber graphite-aluminum composites usually have

  13. Rechargeable Aluminum-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Liu, Hansan; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng; Brown, Gilbert M

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reports on the development of rechargeable aluminum-ion batteries. A possible concept of rechargeable aluminum/aluminum-ion battery based on low-cost, earth-abundant Al anode, ionic liquid EMImCl:AlCl3 (1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloroaluminate) electrolytes and MnO2 cathode has been proposed. Al anode has been reported to show good reversibility in acid melts. However, due to the problems in demonstrating the reversibility in cathodes, alternate battery cathodes and battery concepts have also been presented. New ionic liquid electrolytes for reversible Al dissolution and deposition are needed in the future for replacing corrosive EMImCl:AlCl3 electrolytes.

  14. PREPARATION OF DIBASIC ALUMINUM NITRATE

    DOEpatents

    Gresky, A.T.; Nurmi, E.O.; Foster, D.L.; Wischow, R.P.; Savolainen, J.E.

    1960-04-01

    A method is given for the preparation and recovery of basic aluminum nltrates having an OH: Al ratio of at least two, comprising two steps. First, metallic aluminum is dissolved in aqueous Al(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, in the presence of a small quantity of elemental or ionic mercury, to increase its Al: NO/sub 3/ ratio into the range 1 to 1.2. The resulting aqueous solution is then added to an excess of a special organic solvent, typically a mixture of five parts methanol and six parts diethyl ether, whereupon the basic aluminum nitrate, e.g. Al/sub 6/(OH)/sub 13/-(NO/sub 3/)/sub 5/, recoverably precipitates.

  15. Short-term aluminum administration in the rat. Effects on bone formation and relationship to renal osteomalacia.

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, W G; Gilligan, J; Horst, R

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum may be pathogenic in the osteomalacia observed in some patients receiving hemodialysis. To study the early effects of Al on bone growth, bone formation, mineralization, and resorption were measured during short-term Al exposure in the tibial cortex of pair-fed control (C, n = 10), aluminum-treated (AL, n = 9), subtotally nephrectomized control (NX-C, n = 7), and subtotally nephrectomized aluminum-treated (NX-AL, n = 8) rats using double tetracycline labeling of bone. Animals received 2 mg/d of elemental Al intraperitoneally for 5 d/wk over 4 wk. Total bone and matrix (osteoid) formation, periosteal bone and matrix formation, and periosteal bone and matrix apposition fell by 20% in AL from C, P less than 0.05 for all values, and by 40% in NX-AL from NX-C, P less than 0.01 for all values. Moreover, each measurement was significantly less in NX-AL than in AL, P less than 0.05 for all values. Osteoid width did not increase following aluminum administration in either AL or NX-AL. Resorption surface increased from control values in both AL and NX-AL; also, resorptive activity at the endosteum was greater in NX-AL than in NX-C, P less than 0.05. Thus, aluminum impairs new bone and matrix formation but does not cause classic osteomalacia in the cortical bone of rats whether renal function is normal or reduced. These findings may represent either a different response to aluminum administration in cortical bone as contrasted to trabecular bone or an early phase in the development of osteomalacia. Aluminum may increase bone resorption and contribute to osteopenia in clinical states associated with aluminum accumulation in bone. PMID:6690476

  16. Dissolution and Separation of Aluminum and Aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Joanna; Benker, Dennis; DePaoli, David W.; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Mattus, Catherine H.

    2015-12-19

    The selection of an aluminum alloy for target irradiation affects post-irradiation target dissolution and separations. Recent tests with aluminum alloy 6061 yielded greater than expected precipitation in the dissolver, forming up to 10 wt.% solids of aluminum hydroxides and aluminosilicates. Aluminosilicate dissolution presents challenges in a number of different areas, metals extraction from minerals, flyash treatment, and separations from aluminum alloys. We present experimental work that attempts to maximize dissolution of aluminum metal, along with silicon, magnesium, and copper impurities, through control of temperature, the rate of reagent addition, and incubation time. Aluminum phase transformations have been identified as a function of time and temperature, using X-ray diffraction. Solutions have been analyzed using wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence. Our data have been compared with published calculations of aluminum phase diagrams. Approaches are given to enhance the dissolution of aluminum and aluminosilicate phases in caustic solution.

  17. Dissolution and Separation of Aluminum and Aluminosilicates

    DOE PAGES

    McFarlane, Joanna; Benker, Dennis; DePaoli, David W.; ...

    2015-12-19

    The selection of an aluminum alloy for target irradiation affects post-irradiation target dissolution and separations. Recent tests with aluminum alloy 6061 yielded greater than expected precipitation in the dissolver, forming up to 10 wt.% solids of aluminum hydroxides and aluminosilicates. Aluminosilicate dissolution presents challenges in a number of different areas, metals extraction from minerals, flyash treatment, and separations from aluminum alloys. We present experimental work that attempts to maximize dissolution of aluminum metal, along with silicon, magnesium, and copper impurities, through control of temperature, the rate of reagent addition, and incubation time. Aluminum phase transformations have been identified as amore » function of time and temperature, using X-ray diffraction. Solutions have been analyzed using wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence. Our data have been compared with published calculations of aluminum phase diagrams. Approaches are given to enhance the dissolution of aluminum and aluminosilicate phases in caustic solution.« less

  18. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  19. Aluminum-carbon composite electrode

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C. Joseph; Dispennette, John M.

    1998-07-07

    A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg.

  20. Aluminum-carbon composite electrode

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C.J.; Dispennette, J.M.

    1998-07-07

    A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg. 3 figs.

  1. The effect of zinc on the aluminum anode of the aluminum-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yougen; Lu, Lingbin; Roesky, Herbert W.; Wang, Laiwen; Huang, Baiyun

    Aluminum is an ideal material for batteries, due to its excellent electrochemical performance. Herein, the effect of zinc on the aluminum anode of the aluminum-air battery, as an additive for aluminum alloy and electrolytes, has been studied. The results show that zinc can decrease the anodic polarization, restrain the hydrogen evolution and increase the anodic utilization rate.

  2. Mineral resource of the month: aluminum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bray, E. Lee

    2012-01-01

    The article offers information on aluminum, a mineral resource which is described as the third-most abundant element in Earth's crust. According to the article, aluminum is the second-most used metal. Hans Christian Oersted, a Danish chemist, was the first to isolate aluminum in the laboratory. Aluminum is described as lightweight, corrosion-resistant and an excellent conductor of electricity and heat.

  3. RECOVERY OF ALUMINUM FROM FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Blanco, R.E.; Higgins, I.R.

    1962-11-20

    A method is given for recovertng aluminum values from aqueous solutions containing said values together with fission products. A mixture of Fe/sub 2/O/ sub 3/ and MnO/sub 2/ is added to a solution containing aluminum and fission products. The resulting aluminum-containing supernatant is then separated from the fission product-bearing metal oxide precipitate and is contacted with a cation exchange resin. The aluminum sorbed on the resin is then eluted and recovered. (AEC)

  4. Blood aluminum levels as a function of aluminum intake from drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Turnquest, E.M.; Hallenbeck, W.H. )

    1991-04-01

    Questions regarding the health effects of aluminum are still unanswered. The speciation, pharmacokinetics, and toxicity of aluminum are not well understood. Furthermore, no animal or human studies of aluminum absorption have been reported using drinking water as the source of aluminum. The following experiment attempted to reach a better understanding of the bioavailability of aluminum from drinking water. Its objective was to determine whether or not increased aluminum ingestion from drinking water would be reflected in increased serum and whole blood aluminum levels in the baboon experimental model.

  5. 76 FR 23490 - Aluminum tris (O

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    .... Also, EPA is revoking the tolerances for aluminum tris (O-ethylphosphonate) on pineapple fodder and... aluminum tris (O-ethylphosphonate) on pineapple fodder and forage because they are not considered to be... for aluminum tris (O-ethylphosphonate) on pineapple fodder and forage because they are not...

  6. 75 FR 80527 - Aluminum Extrusions From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... COMMISSION Aluminum Extrusions From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION... retarded, by reason of subsidized and less-than-fair-value imports from China of aluminum extrusions... contained in Aluminum Extrusions From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Preliminary Determination...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  8. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  9. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  10. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  11. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  12. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  13. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  14. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  17. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  18. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  19. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  20. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  1. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be safely used as a source of niacin...

  2. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  4. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  5. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  6. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  7. Electrocomposite of Alumina in Nickel Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong-Skiba, Pei; Hulguin, Ryan; Engelhaupt, Darell; Ramsey, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Nickel/aluminum oxide composite was electroformed in a sulfamate bath with 50 g/L of 0.05-micron aluminum oxide powder. Different plating methods including direct current plating, periodic pulse plating, and periodic reverse pulse plating were used. With conventional direct current plating, the maximum particle inclusion in the nickel matrix remains about 2% (wt). However, much higher percentile particle inclusions were achieved when a specific pulse reversal plating technique was applied. The particle incorporation approaches theoretical maximum when the deposit thickness per cycle approaches the particle diameter size at lower duty cycle. The highest particle incorporation achieved is 23% (by weight). Conceptual models interpreting the dramatic differences in the results of these plating methods were also proposed.

  8. Aluminum alloys with improved strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiasi, R.; Adler, P.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanical strength and stress corrosion of new BAR and 7050 alloys that include Zn instead of Cr have been studied and compared with those of 7075 aluminum alloy. Added mechanical strength of new alloys is attributed to finer grain size of 5 to 8 micrometers, however, susceptibility to stress corrosion attack is increased.

  9. Ballistic Evaluation of 6055 Aluminum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    alloy ( AA ) 6055-T651 produced by Alcoa as part of a Defense Acquisition Challenge Program. Ballistic evaluation was performed using armor-piercing...indicating the number of plates tested ............1 Table 2 Chemistry of AAs , weight-percent ranges .............................................2...aluminum alloy ( AA ) 6055, granting it full commercial availability as rolled plate from Davenport, Iowa. AA6055 remains under patent protection and is

  10. Aluminum and its light alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merica, Paul D

    1920-01-01

    Report is a summary of research work which has been done here and abroad on the constitution and mechanical properties of the various alloy systems with aluminum. The mechanical properties and compositions of commercial light alloys for casting, forging, or rolling, obtainable in this country are described.

  11. Aluminum-induced granulomas in a tattoo

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, N.; Lyberg, T.; Hensten-Pettersen, A.

    1989-05-01

    A patient who developed localized, granulomatous reactions in a tattoo is described. With the use of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis, both aluminum and titanium particles were found in the involved skin sections. Intradermal provocation testing with separate suspensions of aluminum and titanium induced a positive response only in the case of aluminum. Examination by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis of the provoked response established aluminum as the only nonorganic element present in the test site tissue. This is the first report of confirmed aluminum-induced, delayed-hypersensitivity granulomas in a tattoo.

  12. Decarbonization process for carbothermically produced aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Bruno, Marshall J.; Carkin, Gerald E.; DeYoung, David H.; Dunlap, Sr., Ronald M.

    2015-06-30

    A method of recovering aluminum is provided. An alloy melt having Al.sub.4C.sub.3 and aluminum is provided. This mixture is cooled and then a sufficient amount of a finely dispersed gas is added to the alloy melt at a temperature of about 700.degree. C. to about 900.degree. C. The aluminum recovered is a decarbonized carbothermically produced aluminum where the step of adding a sufficient amount of the finely dispersed gas effects separation of the aluminum from the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates by flotation, resulting in two phases with the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates being the upper layer and the decarbonized aluminum being the lower layer. The aluminum is then recovered from the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates through decanting.

  13. Characterization of commercially pure aluminum powder for research reactor fuel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, V.D.; Wiencek, T.C.

    1992-11-01

    Aluminum powder is used as the matrix material in the production of uranium aluminide, oxide, and silicide dispersion fuel plates for research and test reactors. variability in the characteristics of the aluminum powder, such as moisture content and particle-size distribution, influences blending and compacting of the aluminum/fuel powder. A detailed study was performed to characterize the physical properties of three aluminum powder lots. An angle-of-shear test was devised to characterize the cohesiveness of the aluminum powder. Flow-rate measurements, apparent density determination, subsieve analysis, surface area measurements, and scanning electron microscopy were also used in the study. It was found that because of the various types of commercially available powders, proper specification of powder variables will ensure the receipt of consistent raw materials. Improved control of the initial powder will reduce the variability of fuel-plate production and will improve overall plate reproducibility. It is recommended that a standard specification be written for the aluminum powder and silicide fuel.

  14. Characterization of commercially pure aluminum powder for research reactor fuel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, V.D. ); Wiencek, T.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Aluminum powder is used as the matrix material in the production of uranium aluminide, oxide, and silicide dispersion fuel plates for research and test reactors. variability in the characteristics of the aluminum powder, such as moisture content and particle-size distribution, influences blending and compacting of the aluminum/fuel powder. A detailed study was performed to characterize the physical properties of three aluminum powder lots. An angle-of-shear test was devised to characterize the cohesiveness of the aluminum powder. Flow-rate measurements, apparent density determination, subsieve analysis, surface area measurements, and scanning electron microscopy were also used in the study. It was found that because of the various types of commercially available powders, proper specification of powder variables will ensure the receipt of consistent raw materials. Improved control of the initial powder will reduce the variability of fuel-plate production and will improve overall plate reproducibility. It is recommended that a standard specification be written for the aluminum powder and silicide fuel.

  15. Energy absorption mechanisms during crack propagation in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, D. P.; Adams, D. F.

    1979-01-01

    The stress distributions around individual fibers in a unidirectional boron/aluminum composite material subjected to axial and transverse loadings are being studied utilizing a generalized plane strain finite element analysis. This micromechanics analysis was modified to permit the analysis of longitudinal sections, and also to incorporate crack initiation and propagation. The analysis fully models the elastoplastic response of the aluminum matrix, as well as temperature dependent material properties and thermal stress effects. The micromechanics analysis modifications are described, and numerical results are given for both longitudinal and transverse models loaded into the inelastic range, to first failure. Included are initially cracked fiber models.

  16. Complex foamed aluminum parts as permanent cores in aluminum castings

    SciTech Connect

    Simancik, F.; Schoerghuber, F.

    1998-12-31

    The feasibility of complex shaped aluminum foam parts as permanent cores in aluminum castings has been investigated. The foamed samples were prepared by injection of the foam into sand molds. It turned out that sound castings can be produced if the foam core is properly preheated and/or surface treated before casting. The effect of the foam core on the performance of the casting was evaluated by in compression testing and by measuring structural damping. The gain in the related properties turned out to be much higher than the weight increase of the casting due to the presence of the core. The weight increase may be partially offset through a reduction of the wall-thickness of the shell.

  17. Diffusion bonded boron/aluminum spar-shell fan blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, C. E. K.; Cutler, J. L.; Fisher, W. J.; Memmott, J. V. W.

    1980-01-01

    Design and process development tasks intended to demonstrate composite blade application in large high by-pass ratio turbofan engines are described. Studies on a 3.0 aspect radio space and shell construction fan blade indicate a potential weight savings for a first stage fan rotor of 39% when a hollow titanium spar is employed. An alternate design which featured substantial blade internal volume filled with titanium honeycomb inserts achieved a 14% potential weight savings over the B/M rotor system. This second configuration requires a smaller development effort and entails less risk to translate a design into a successful product. The feasibility of metal joining large subsonic spar and shell fan blades was demonstrated. Initial aluminum alloy screening indicates a distinct preference for AA6061 aluminum alloy for use as a joint material. The simulated airfoil pressings established the necessity of rigid air surfaces when joining materials of different compressive rigidities. The two aluminum alloy matrix choices both were successfully formed into blade shells.

  18. Reactively Deposited Aluminum Oxide and Fluoropolymer Filled Aluminum Oxide Protective Coatings for Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Hunt, Jason

    1995-01-01

    Reactive ion beam sputter deposition of aluminum simultaneous with low energy arrival of oxygen ions at the deposition surface enables the formation of highly transparent aluminum oxide films. Thick (12 200 A), adherent, low stress, reactively deposited aluminum oxide films were found to provide some abrasion resistance to polycarbonate substrates. The reactively deposited aluminum oxide films are also slightly more hydrophobic and more transmitting in the UV than aluminum oxide deposited from an aluminum oxide target. Simultaneous reactive sputter deposition of aluminum along with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE Teflon) produces fluoropolymer-filled aluminum oxide films which are lower in stress, about the same in transmittance, but more wetting than reactively deposited aluminum oxide films. Deposition properties, processes and potential applications for these coatings will be discussed.

  19. Catalyzed precipitation in aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitlin, David

    The work reported in Chapter 1 concerned the influence of Si on the precipitation of theta' (metastable Al2Cu) during the isothermal aging of Al-2Cu-1Si (wt. %). The binary alloys Al-2Cu and Al-1Si were studied for comparison. Only two precipitate phases were detected: pure Si in Al-Si and Al-Cu-Si, and theta' (metastable Al 2Cu) in Al-Cu and Al-Cu-Si. On aging the ternary, Si precipitates first, and provides heterogeneous sites to nucleate theta'. As a consequence, the density of theta' precipitates in Al-Cu-Si is much higher than in the binary Al-Cu. Also, the theta ' precipitates in the ternary alloy have lower aspect ratio (at given particle size) and lose coherence on their broad faces at a slower rate. The principal focus of Chapter 2 is to explain precipitation in Al-lat.%Si-lat%Ge. The microstructure is characterized using conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy, as well as energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The first precipitates to come out of solid solution have a cube-cube orientation relationship with the matrix. High resolution TEM demonstrated that all the precipitates start out, and remain multiply twinned throughout the aging treatment. There is a variation in the stoichiometry of the precipitates, with the mean composition being Si-44.5at%Ge. It is also shown that in Al-Si-Ge it is not possible to achieve satisfactory hardness through a conventional heat treatment. This result is explained in terms of sluggish precipitation of the diamond-cubic Si-Ge phase coupled with particle coarsening. The purpose of Chapters 3 and 4 is to explain these properties in terms of the role that the Si-Ge additions have on modifying the conventional Al-Cu aging sequence. In both AlCu and AlCuSiGe the room temperature microstructure consists of both GP zones and theta″ precipitates. Upon aging at 190°C Al-Cu displays the well known precipitation sequence; the slow dissolution of GP zones and theta″ and the gradual formation of theta

  20. Aluminum Alloys--Industrial Deformable, Sintered and Light Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-30

    thin film on the particles of the highly dispersed aluminum powder when it is ground in spherical mills in a nitrogen atmosphere in which the...principal elements, certain small admixtures are introduced into the alloys, which have a considerable effect on the decay kinetics of the oversaturated...strengthened by the insoluble dispersed alumina particles. Fine grinding of the original powder provides the dispersion of the oxide films and particles

  1. Microstructure and orientation effects on properties of discontinuous silicon carbide/aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdanels, D. L.; Hoffman, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Composite panels containing up to 40 vol % discontinuous silicon carbide SiC whisker, nodule, or particulate reinforcement in several aluminum matrices are commercially fabricated and the mechanical properties and microstructual characteristics are evaluated. The yield and tensile strengths and the ductility are controlled primarily by the matrix alloy, the temper condition, and the reinforcement content. Particulate and nodule reinforcements are as effective as whisker reinforcement. Increased ductility is attributed to purer, more uniform starting materials and to more mechanical working during fabrication. Comparing mechanical properties with those of other aluminum alloys shows that these low cost, lightweight composites demonstrate very good potential for application to aerospace structures.

  2. Fabrication and Structure Characterization of Alumina-Aluminum Interpenetrating Phase Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolata, Anna J.

    2016-08-01

    Alumina-Aluminum composites with interpenetrating networks structure belong to advanced materials with potentially better properties when compared with composites reinforced by particles or fibers. The paper presents the experimental results of fabrication and structure characterization of Al matrix composites locally reinforced via Al2O3 ceramic foam. The composites were obtained using centrifugal infiltration of porous ceramics by liquid aluminum alloy. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM + EDS) and x-ray tomography were used to determine the structure of foams and composites especially in reinforced areas. The quality of castings, degree of pore filling in ceramic foams by Al alloy, and microstructure in area of interface were assessed.

  3. Three-dimensional elastoplastic stress analysis of unidirectional boron/aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahishi, J. M.; Adams, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    A three dimensional elastoplastic finite element micromechanical model was developed to study the state of stress around a broken fibers in a unidirectional composite. A boron/aluminum composite consisting of 50 percent by volume of fibers in a square array and subjected to an axial loading is taken as a specific example. This loading in the fiber direction is applied in small increments, by prescribing increments of boundary displacement, until the first failure occurs. The effect of reduced material properties of the aluminum matrix material at elevated temperature is also studied. The results are presented in the form of stress contours and stress-strain plots.

  4. Aluminum-Based Cast In Situ Composites: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramod, S. L.; Bakshi, Srinivasa R.; Murty, B. S.

    2015-06-01

    In situ composites are a class of composite materials in which the reinforcement is formed within the matrix by reaction during the processing. In situ method of composite synthesis has been widely followed by researchers because of several advantages over conventional stir casting such as fine particle size, clean interface, and good wettability of the reinforcement with the matrix and homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement compared to other processes. Besides this, in situ processing of composites by casting route is also economical and amenable for large scale production as compared to other methods such as powder metallurgy and spray forming. Commonly used reinforcements for Al and its alloys which can be produced in situ are Al2O3, AlN, TiB2, TiC, ZrB2, and Mg2Si. The aim of this paper is to review the current research and development in aluminum-based in situ composites by casting route.

  5. Characterization of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Chun, H. J.; Karalekas, D.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental methods were developed, adapted, and applied to the characterization of a metal matrix composite system, namely, silicon carbide/aluminim (SCS-2/6061 Al), and its constituents. The silicon carbide fiber was characterized by determining its modulus, strength, and coefficient of thermal expansion. The aluminum matrix was characterized thermomechanically up to 399 C (750 F) at two strain rates. The unidirectional SiC/Al composite was characterized mechanically under longitudinal, transverse, and in-plane shear loading up to 399 C (750 F). Isothermal and non-isothermal creep behavior was also measured. The applicability of a proposed set of multifactor thermoviscoplastic nonlinear constitutive relations and a computer code was investigated. Agreement between predictions and experimental results was shown in a few cases. The elastoplastic thermomechanical behavior of the composite was also described by a number of new analytical models developed or adapted for the material system studied. These models include the rule of mixtures, composite cylinder model with various thermoelastoplastic analyses and a model based on average field theory. In most cases satisfactory agreement was demonstrated between analytical predictions and experimental results for the cases of stress-strain behavior and thermal deformation behavior at different temperatures. In addition, some models yielded detailed three-dimensional stress distributions in the constituents within the composite.

  6. Thermal conductance of augmented pressed metallic contacts at liquid helium temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Spivak, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    The thermal conductance of uncoated oxygen-free high conductivity (OFHC) copper, 6061-T6 aluminum, free-machining brass, and 304 stainless steel sample pairs which were augmented with a gold coated 6061-T6 aluminum washer inserted between the contact surfaces was measured over the temperature range of 1.6 to 6.0 K, with applied forces from 22 to 670 N. The contact surfaces of the sample pairs were prepared with a 0.8 micron lapped finish, while the finish of the aluminum washer was 0.2 micron lapped. The contribution to the overall thermal impedance by the bulk conductance of the aluminum washer was negligible. It was found that addition of the washer offered no significant conductance improvement over an uncoated single contact pair; any benefits from using the gold plated washer were counteracted by the addition of two more contact surfaces. Additionally, the thermal conductance of a 'combination' aluminum sample pair having one gold coated and one uncoated surface was measured and compared to the washer pair. The ratio of the conductance of the washer pair to half the conductance of the 'combination' pair was found to be constant and near unity over the temperature range of the data obtained, within experimental error.

  7. Thermal conductance of augmented pressed metallic contacts at liquid helium temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Salerno, L.J.; Kittel, P.; Spivak, A.L.

    1992-08-01

    The thermal conductance of uncoated oxygen-free high conductivity (OFHC) copper, 6061-T6 aluminum, free-machining brass, and 304 stainless steel sample pairs which were augmented with a gold coated 6061-T6 aluminum washer inserted between the contact surfaces was measured over the temperature range of 1.6 to 6.0 K, with applied forces from 22 to 670 N. The contact surfaces of the sample pairs were prepared with a 0.8 micron lapped finish, while the finish of the aluminum washer was 0.2 micron lapped. The contribution to the overall thermal impedance by the bulk conductance of the aluminum washer was negligible. It was found that addition of the washer offered no significant conductance improvement over an uncoated single contact pair; any benefits from using the gold plated washer were counteracted by the addition of two more contact surfaces. Additionally, the thermal conductance of a 'combination' aluminum sample pair having one gold coated and one uncoated surface was measured and compared to the washer pair. The ratio of the conductance of the washer pair to half the conductance of the 'combination' pair was found to be constant and near unity over the temperature range of the data obtained, within experimental error.

  8. Hybrid matrix fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.

    2003-07-15

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites include two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  9. The use of primary dross from the aluminum industry for manufacturing aluminum sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, B.W.

    1995-12-31

    The use of primary dross as a source for aluminum ion in the manufacture of aluminum sulfate offers opportunities for an inexpensive raw material. The aluminum sulfate industry in the US is a mature market with numerous small plants operating close to major users. The majority of manufacturers use either bauxite or aluminum oxide trihydrate as a source for the aluminum ion. However, using process technology developed and patented by IWC, the oxides are removed from primary dross for use in manufacturing aluminum sulfate prior to metal recovery. This process offers the benefit of reducing costs for metal recovery. This paper discusses some of the methodology used in this process.

  10. A macro-micromechanics analysis of a notched metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Catherine A.; Naik, Rajiv A.

    1992-01-01

    Macro- and micromechanics analysis were conducted to determine the matrix and fiber behaviors near the notch in a center-notched metal-matrix composite. In this approach, the macrolevel analysis models the entire notched specimen using a 3D finite element program that uses the vanishing-fiber-diameter model to simulate the elastic-plastic behavior of the matrix and the elastic behavior of the fiber. The microlevel behavior is analyzed using a discrete fiber-matrix model containing one fiber and the surrounding matrix. The viability of this analysis is demonstrated using results for a boron/aluminum monolayer.

  11. Sorption characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aluminum smelter residues

    SciTech Connect

    Gijs D. Breedveld; Emilien Pelletier; Richard St. Louis; Gerard Cornelissen

    2007-04-01

    High temperature carbon oxidation in primary aluminum smelters results in the release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) into the environment. The main source of PAH are the anodes, which are composed of petroleum coke (black carbon, BC) and coal tar pitch. To elucidate the dominant carbonaceous phase controlling the environmental fate of PAH in aluminum smelter residues (coke BC and/or coal tar), the sorptive behavior of PAHs has been determined, using passive samplers and infinite-sink desorption methods. Samples directly from the wet scrubber were studied as well as ones from an adjacent 20-year old storage lagoon and roof dust from the smelter. Carbon-normalized distribution coefficients of native PAHs were 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected based on amorphous organic carbon (AOC)/water partitioning, which is in the same order of magnitude as reported literature values for soots and charcoals. Sorption isotherms of laboratory-spiked deuterated phenanthrene showed strong (about 100 times stronger than AOC) but nonetheless linear sorption in both fresh and aged aluminum smelter residues. The absence of nonlinear behavior typical for adsorption to BC indicates that PAH sorption in aluminum smelter residues is dominated by absorption into the semi-solid coal tar pitch matrix. Desorption experiments using Tenax showed that fresh smelter residues had a relatively large rapidly desorbing fraction of PAH (35-50%), whereas this fraction was strongly reduced (11-16%) in the lagoon and roof dust material. Weathering of the coal tar residue and/or redistribution of PAH between coal tar and BC phases could explain the reduced availability in aged samples. 38 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Biodiscovery of Aluminum Binding Peptides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high...scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the self- sustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high...removal. An eCPX peptide display library was grown and induced as described in the paragraph above. After rinsing samples briefly in PBS, the aluminum

  13. Electrically Conductive Anodized Aluminum Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Trung Hung

    2006-01-01

    Anodized aluminum components can be treated to make them sufficiently electrically conductive to suppress discharges of static electricity. The treatment was conceived as a means of preventing static electric discharges on exterior satin-anodized aluminum (SAA) surfaces of spacecraft without adversely affecting the thermal-control/optical properties of the SAA and without need to apply electrically conductive paints, which eventually peel off in the harsh environment of outer space. The treatment can also be used to impart electrical conductivity to anodized housings of computers, medical electronic instruments, telephoneexchange equipment, and other terrestrial electronic equipment vulnerable to electrostatic discharge. The electrical resistivity of a typical anodized aluminum surface layer lies between 10(exp 11) and 10(exp 13) Omega-cm. To suppress electrostatic discharge, it is necessary to reduce the electrical resistivity significantly - preferably to < or = 10(exp 9) Omega-cm. The present treatment does this. The treatment is a direct electrodeposition process in which the outer anodized surface becomes covered and the pores in the surface filled with a transparent, electrically conductive metal oxide nanocomposite. Filling the pores with the nanocomposite reduces the transverse electrical resistivity and, in the original intended outer-space application, the exterior covering portion of the nanocomposite would afford the requisite electrical contact with the outer-space plasma. The electrical resistivity of the nanocomposite can be tailored to a value between 10(exp 7) and 10(exp 12) Omega-cm. Unlike electrically conductive paint, the nanocomposite becomes an integral part of the anodized aluminum substrate, without need for adhesive bonding material and without risk of subsequent peeling. The electrodeposition process is compatible with commercial anodizing production lines. At present, the electronics industry uses expensive, exotic

  14. The effect of simulated space thermal environment on damping capacity of metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.; Ouellet, L.; Nikanpour, Darius; Lo, J.

    2003-09-01

    Damping capacity is one of important parameters that engineers need to consider when they select materials for space structure applications. The materials studied in this paper are high performance SiC particulate reinforced aluminum and Al2O3 woven fabric reinforced aluminum composites. Changes in damping capacity of the materials in simulated space thermal environment were studied using Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA). Comparing to the conventional aluminum alloy, the composites have significantly higher damping capacity. The experiment demonstrated that thermal cycling to sub-ambient temperature can significantly affects the damping capacity of metal matrix composites. The long-term effects of space thermal cycling on the composites were also discussed.

  15. Interfacial characteristics of diamond/aluminum composites with high thermal conductivity fabricated by squeeze-casting method

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Longtao; Wang, Pingping; Xiu, Ziyang; Chen, Guoqin; Lin, Xiu; Dai, Chen; Wu, Gaohui

    2015-08-15

    In this work, aluminum matrix composites reinforced with diamond particles (diamond/aluminum composites) were fabricated by squeeze casting method. The material exhibited a thermal conductivity as high as 613 W / (m · K). The obtained composites were investigated by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope in terms of the (100) and (111) facets of diamond particles. The diamond particles were observed to be homogeneously distributed in the aluminum matrix. The diamond{sub (111)}/Al interface was found to be devoid of reaction products. While at the diamond{sub (100)}/Al interface, large-sized aluminum carbides (Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}) with twin-crystal structure were identified. The interfacial characteristics were believed to be responsible for the excellent thermal conductivity of the material. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Squeeze casting method was introduced to fabricate diamond/Al composite. • Sound interfacial bonding with excellent thermal conductivity was produced. • Diamond{sub (111)}/ aluminum interface was firstly characterized by TEM/HRTEM. • Physical combination was the controlling bonding for diamond{sub (111)}/aluminum. • The growth mechanism of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} was analyzed by crystallography theory.

  16. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition

    DOEpatents

    Vandergrift, G.F. III; Krumpelt, M.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1981-10-08

    A process is described for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  17. Assessing the Flight Quality of a Large UAV for Sensors/Ground Robots Aerial Delivery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Lycoming 0320 - 0360 - Continental 0200 or any 100- 200hp 8. Wheels/Brakes — Matco only 9. Wing skins — 2024-T3 alclad aircraft grade only (No...6061-T6 skins used) 10. Fuel tanks — Aluminum fuel tanks in each wing 11. Wing tips — Wing tips have flush fuel caps and strobes 12. Stick system...Fuselage — Semi-monocoque stretched skin and bulkheads 16. Wing — 43"- 35A-415 Riblet corrected (No NACA airfoils) 17. Horz stab — Fully flying tail

  18. Electron beam weld development on a Filter Pack Assembly. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dereskiewicz, J.P.

    1994-06-01

    A continuous electron beam welding procedure was developed to replace the manual gas tungsten arc welding procedure on the Filter Pack Assembly. A statistical study was used to evaluate the feasibility of electron beam welding 6061-T6 aluminum covers to A356 cast weldments throughout the joint tolerance range specified on product drawings. Peak temperature exposures were not high enough to degrade the heat sensitive electrical components inside the cast weldment. Actual weldments with alodine coating on the weld joint area were successfully cleaned using a nonmetallic fiberglass brush cleaning method.

  19. Feasibility of thermal strain measurements during quasi-steady state using neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Feng, Zhili; Wang, Xun-Li; An, Ke; Bailey, William Barton; David, Stan A; Hubbard, Camden R; Choo, Hahn

    2006-01-01

    Localized heating was imposed on a 6061-T6 aluminum alloy plate to cause thermal strains, and simultaneously interplanar spacing changes were measured using in-situ time-resolved neutron diffraction techniques. Two different methods were used: (1) direct real-time measurements of the transient behavior and (2) a series of measurements based on the quasi-steady state (QSS) principle. A comparison of the two results shows that the QSS method can represent the transient behavior under the current experimental conditions.

  20. A distributional model for elastic-plastic behavior of shock loaded materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Vogler, Tracy John; Asay, James Russell

    2003-07-01

    To address known shortcomings of classical metal plasticity for describing material behavior under shock loading, a model which incorporates a distribution in the deviatoric stress state is developed. This distribution will translate in stress space under loading, and growth of the distribution can be included in the model as well. This proposed model is capable of duplicating the key features of a set of reshock and release experiments on 6061-T6 aluminum, many of which are not captured by classical plasticity. The model is relatively simple, is only moderately more computationally intensive, and requires few additional material parameters.

  1. Measuring the Average Thickness of a Plate Using a Bayesian Method and Free Vibration Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    form, the model is constructed with the implicit assumption that the corrosion is uniform. A more detailed model that included details of the pitting ...PROCEDURE The test specimen was a 0.76m by 0.60m (30” by 24”, 5:4 aspect ratio), 1.55mm (1/16”) thick 6061 -T6 aluminum plate. The density was...considering corrosion effect.” Marine Struc- tures, 21(4):402 – 419. [3] T. Nakai, H. Matsushita, N. Yamamoto, and H. Arai, 2004. “Effect of pitting

  2. Dynamic Ring-on-Ring Equibiaxial Flexural Strength of Borosilicate Glass

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    tively, with a ring tip radius of 2.5 mm. The incident and transmission bars of the Kolsky-bar setup are made of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy with a common... Purdue University Sponsored Programs Services West Lafayette, IN 47907-2108 Dr. Ralph Anthenien U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research...Dynamic Ring-on-Ring Equibiaxial Flexural Strength of Borosilicate Glass Xu Nie and Weinong W. Chen* AAE and MSE Schools, Purdue University, West

  3. AMSAHTS 󈨞: Advances in Materials Science and Applications of High Temperature Superconductors Held in Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD on April 2-6, 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    the base plate was an aluminum 6061-T6 alloy , the cover plates were silver, and the cladding plate was copper. The copper clad plate and cover plates...REFERENCES 1. Touloukian , Y.S., Powell, R.W., Ho, C.Y., and Nicolaou, M.C., Thermal Diffusivity -- Vol. 10 of Thermophysical Properties of Matter -- The...flux dynamics, and critical currents. Day 1 finished with a session on fabrication and properties of bulk HTSC. Thin-film devices and applications were

  4. Performance characterization of fiber Bragg grating thermal response in space vacuum thermal environment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junfeng; Song, Luyao; Liu, Tiegen; Zhang, Jingchuan; Liu, Kun; Wang, Shuang; Yin, Jinde; Zhao, Peng; Xie, Jihui; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Xuezhi

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) thermal response in space vacuum thermal environment. The FBGs were packaged with 6061-T6 aluminum. The liquid nitrogen immersion experiment results show that its wavelength shift standard deviation is 0.76 pm for 217 h. The combination effect of vacuum and cryogenic temperature was studied by thermal cycling process in space environment simulator. The FBG sensors show accuracy better than 2% full scale, and the hysteresis errors are below 1%. It proves that these metal packaged FBG sensors can survive and meet the requirement of space measurement.

  5. An ultra-low surface finish process for 6061-Al mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wamboldt, Leonard; Roy, Brian; Crifasi, Joseph; Stephens, Shane; Hanninen, Derek; Woodard, Kenneth; Felock, Robert; Cunha-Vasconcelos, Sofia; Polczwartek, Stephen; Parenteau, Jeffrey

    2015-05-01

    An ultra-low surface finishing process for 6061 T6 type aluminum has been developed by Corning Incorporated, Specialty Materials Division, and has been successfully applied to mirrors up to 13 inches in diameter. This paper presents finish and figure data achieved from the mirror finishing process. Mirror stability is demonstrated through Pre and post thermal cycle surface figure measurements; temperature range of cycle -55°C to +70°C. As an added benefit, the process enables the use of deterministic finishing and enhances the reflective optics resistance to corrosion. Survivability of the reflective optic is evaluated through extended humidity testing.

  6. Thermal conductance of gold plated metallic contacts at liquid helium temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, Peter; Spivak, Alan L.; Salerno, Louis J.

    1992-01-01

    The thermal conductance of gold plated OFHC copper, 6061-T6 aluminum, free-machining brass, and 304 stainless steel contacts has been measured over the temperature range of 1.6 to 4.2 K, with applied forces from 22 N to 670 N. The contact surfaces were prepared with a 0.8 micron lapped finish prior to gold coating. It was found that for all materials, except stainless steel, the thermal conductance was significantly improved as the result of gold coating the contact surfaces.

  7. Theoretical calculation of positron affinities of solute clusters in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Masataka; Araki, Hideki; Shirai, Yasuharu

    2016-01-01

    We have performed theoretical calculations of positron states for solute clusters in aluminum alloys to estimate the positron affinity of solute clusters. Positron states of solute clusters in aluminum alloys were calculated under the electronic structures obtained by first- principles molecular orbital calculations using Al158-X13 clusters. We defined the positron affinity of the solute clusters by the difference in the lowest potential sensed by positrons between the solute clusters and Al bulk. With increasing atomic number of 3d metals, the annihilation fraction of the solute clusters rapidly increases at Mn and shows a maximum at Ni. A similar trend is observed for 4d metals. The localization of positron at the solute clusters mainly arises from charge transfer from Al matrix to solute clusters. The positron affinity defined in this work well represents the localization of positron at the solute clusters in aluminum alloys.

  8. Angle-resolved Auger electron spectra induced by neon ion impact on aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.; Aron, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    Auger electron emission from aluminum bombarded with 1 to 5 keV neon ions was studied by angle-resolved electron spectroscopy. The position and shape of the spectral features depended on the incident ion energy, angle of ion incidence, and electron take-off angle with respect to the aluminum surface. These spectral dependencies were interpreted in terms of the Doppler shift given to the Auger electron velocity by the excited atom ejected into the vacuum. For oblique ion incidence it is concluded that a flux of high energy atoms are ejected in a direction close to the projection of the ion beam on the target surface. In addition, a new spectral feature was found and identified as due to Auger emission from excited neon in the aluminum matrix.

  9. PREPARATION OF ACTINIDE-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    BS>A process is given for preparing alloys of aluminum with plutonium, uranium, and/or thorium by chlorinating actinide oxide dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride with hydrochloric acid, chlorine, and/or phosgene, adding aluminum metal, and passing air and/or water vapor through the mass. Actinide metal is formed and alloyed with the aluminum. After cooling to solidification, the alloy is separated from the salt. (AEC)

  10. Fabrication of Porous Aluminum Using Gases Intrinsically Contained in Aluminum Alloy Die Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Utsunomiya, Takao

    2009-06-01

    Closed-cell porous aluminum was fabricated using gases intrinsically contained in aluminum alloy die castings without using a blowing agent. By incorporating the friction stir processing technique, porous aluminum with a porosity of more than 50 pct was successfully obtained at a holding temperature of 923 to 948 K and a holding time of 10 minutes. This proposed die-casting route has high potential for fabricating porous aluminum at a low cost by a higher productivity process.

  11. Aluminum-stabilized NB3SN superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Scanlan, Ronald M.

    1988-01-01

    An aluminum-stabilized Nb.sub.3 Sn superconductor and process for producing same, utilizing ultrapure aluminum. Ductile components are co-drawn with aluminum to produce a conductor suitable for winding magnets. After winding, the conductor is heated to convert it to the brittle Nb.sub.3 Sn superconductor phase, using a temperature high enough to perform the transformation but still below the melting point of the aluminum. This results in reaction of substantially all of the niobium, while providing stabilization and react-in-place features which are beneficial in the fabrication of magnets utilizing superconducting materials.

  12. Nd:YAG laser welding aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, E. Jr.

    1992-02-01

    Autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding wrought 4047, 1100, 3003, 2219, 5052, 5086, 5456, and 6061 and cast A356 aluminum alloys to cast A356 aluminum alloy in restrained annular weld joints was investigated. The welds were 12.7 mm (0.375 in.) and 9.5 mm (0.375 in.) diameter with approximately 0.30 mm (0.012 in.) penetration. This investigation determined 4047 aluminum alloy to be the optimum alloy for autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding to cast A356 aluminum alloy. This report describes the investigation and its results.

  13. Electrical Resistivity of Aluminum and Manganese.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    Aluminum Alloys ,’ J. Pliys. Soc. lpu., JIM(3, 684-91 (1975). 57 26Srivastava* S.K., ’Model Pseudopotentials and Eiectron4c Properties ...1965). 6 3Powell, R.W.. Tye, R.P., and Metcalf, S.C.. ’Molten Aluminum and an Aluminum Alloy .’ in 3rd Symposium on Thermophvsical Properties (Gratch, S...Transport Properties of Commercial Metals and Alloys . II. Aluminums ,’ J. Appl. Phys., Ul(3), 496-503 (1960). 73Bedgcock, F.T., Muir, W.B., and Wallingford,

  14. 40 CFR 180.1091 - Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1091 Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Aluminum isopropoxide (CAS Reg. No....

  15. 40 CFR 63.5753 - How do I calculate the combined organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? 63.5753...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Standards for Aluminum... aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? (a) Use equation 1 of...

  16. 40 CFR 180.1091 - Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1091 Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Aluminum isopropoxide (CAS Reg. No....

  17. 40 CFR 180.1091 - Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1091 Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Aluminum isopropoxide (CAS Reg. No....

  18. 40 CFR 180.1091 - Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1091 Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Aluminum isopropoxide (CAS Reg. No....

  19. 40 CFR 180.1091 - Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1091 Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Aluminum isopropoxide (CAS Reg. No....

  20. 40 CFR 63.5753 - How do I calculate the combined organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? 63.5753...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Standards for Aluminum... aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? (a) Use equation 1 of...

  1. 40 CFR 63.5753 - How do I calculate the combined organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? 63.5753...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Standards for Aluminum... aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? (a) Use equation 1 of...

  2. The formation and structure of the oxide and hydroxide chemisorbed phases at the aluminum surface, and relevance to hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Michael; Kelly, Robert; Neurock, Matthew

    2010-03-01

    Aluminum alloys used in aerospace structures are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) induced by hydrogen embrittlement (HE) (Gangloff and Ives 1990). Crack growth experiments have demonstrated a linear relation between the relative humidity of the environment and crack growth rates, indicating the importance of water (Speidel and Hyatt 1972). While the presence of water has been demonstrated to be necessary for EAC of aluminum, crack growth rates have been linked to the diffusivity of hydrogen in aluminum (Gangloff 2003) and hydrogen densities at the crack tip as high as Al2H have been observed (Young and Scully 1998). While the mechanism by which hydrogen embrittles aluminum is yet not well understood, without the entry of hydrogen into the aluminum matrix, embrittlement would not occur. While at the crack tip high hydrogen concentrations exist, the solubility of hydrogen in aluminum is normal near 1 ppm (Wolverton 2004). In this work combined first principles and kinetic Monte Carlo methods will be used to examine the oxide and hydroxide structure resulting from exposure of aluminum to H2O or O2 and relevance to hydrogen entry as well as EAC is discussed.

  3. A damage tolerance comparison of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy and IM7/977-2 carbon/epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Lance, David G.; Hodge, Andrew J.

    1991-01-01

    A comparison of low velocity impact damage between one of the strongest aluminum alloys, to a new, damage tolerant resin system as a matrix for high strength carbon fibers was examined in this study. The aluminum and composite materials were used as face sheets on a 0.13 g/cu cm aluminum honeycomb. Four levels of impact energy were used; 2.6 J, 5.3 J, 7.8 J and 9.9 J. The beams were compared for static strength and fatique life by use of the four-point bend flexure test. It was found that in the undamaged state the specific strength of the composite face sheets was about twice that of the aluminum face sheets. A sharp drop in strength was observed for the composite specimens impacted at the lowest (2.6J) energy level, but the overall specific strength was still higher than for the aluminum specimens. At all impact energy levels tested, the static specific strength of the composite face sheets were significantly higher than the aluminum face sheets. The fatigue life of the most severely damaged composite specimen was about 17 times greater than the undamaged aluminum specimens when cycled at 1 Hz between 20 percent and 85 percent of ultimate breaking load.

  4. Aluminum reclamation from dross. (Latest citations from the Aluminum Industry Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning aluminum reclamation from dross. Topics include dross treatment technology, the environmental benefits of aluminum recovery from dross, and the economics of aluminum reclamation in dross processing systems. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  5. Computational modeling of thin ceramic tiles backed by thin substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.D.; Anderson, C.E. Jr.; Cox, P.A.

    1995-12-31

    Building on the work of Wilkins, Eulerian hydrocode calculations were performed with ceramic models to examine the behavior of thin ceramic tiles backed by a thin substrate. In order to match ballistic limit data it was necessary to include a pressure dependent flow stress for failed ceramic. Reasonable agreement is found between the modified model and ballistic limit data for a simulated armor piercing round impacting an AD-85 alumina/6061T6 aluminum laminate. Based upon this success, the modified model was used to examine the performance of a SiC/6061T6 aluminum laminate when impacted by an M80 ball round (7.62 mm) at muzzle velocity. The projectile undergoes large deformation, as does the aluminum backing sheet. The computational results indicate, for the M80 projectile impacting at muzzle velocity, that the ballistic limit thickness for the SiC/aluminum laminate should weigh 10% less than the ballistic limit thickness for steel. The talk will include a video tape of calculations.

  6. NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structures technology program supplement: Aluminum-based materials for high speed aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, E. A., Jr. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This report on the NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structure technology program supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft covers the period from July 1, 1992. The objective of the research is to develop aluminum alloys and aluminum matrix composites for the airframe which can efficiently perform in the HSCT environment for periods as long as 60,000 hours (certification for 120,000 hours) and, at the same time, meet the cost and weight requirements for an economically viable aircraft. Current industry baselines focus on flight at Mach 2.4. The research covers four major materials systems: (1) Ingot metallurgy 2XXX, 6XXX, and 8XXX alloys, (2) Powder metallurgy 2XXX alloys, (3) Rapidly solidified, dispersion strengthened Al-Fe-X alloys, and (4) Discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites. There are ten major tasks in the program which also include evaluation and trade-off studies by Boeing and Douglas aircraft companies.

  7. Cellular Magnesium Matrix Foam Composites for Mechanical Damping Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shunmugasamy, Vasanth Chakravarthy; Mansoor, Bilal; Gupta, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    The damping characteristics of metal alloys and metal matrix composites are relevant to the automotive, aerospace, and marine structures. Use of lightweight materials can help in increasing payload capacity and in decreasing fuel consumption. Lightweight composite materials possessing high damping capabilities that can be designed as structural members can greatly benefit in addressing these needs. In this context, the damping properties of lightweight metals such as aluminum and magnesium and their respective composites have been studied in the existing literature. This review focuses on analyzing the damping properties of aluminum and magnesium alloys and their cellular composites. The damping properties of various lightweight alloys and composites are compared on the basis of their density to understand the potential for weight saving in structural applications. Magnesium alloys are observed to possess better damping properties in comparison to aluminum. However, aluminum matrix syntactic foams reinforced with silicon carbide hollow particles possess a damping capacity and density comparable to magnesium alloy. By using the data presented in the study, composites with specific compositions and properties can be selected for a given application. In addition, the comparison of the results helps in identifying the areas where attention needs to be focused to address the future needs.

  8. Aluminum core structures brazed without use of flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Aluminum alloy face sheets are brazed to aluminum alloy honeycomb cores without using corrosive flux by means of one or three methods. The completed brazed structure has the high-strength characteristics of heat treated aluminum alloys.

  9. A computational procedure to analyze metal matrix laminates with nonlinear lamination residual strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1974-01-01

    An approximate computational procedure is described for the analysis of angleplied laminates with residual nonlinear strains. The procedure consists of a combination of linear composite mechanics and incremental linear laminate theory. The procedure accounts for initial nonlinear strains, unloading, and in-situ matrix orthotropic nonlinear behavior. The results obtained in applying the procedure to boron/aluminum angleplied laminates show that this is a convenient means to accurately predict the initial tangent properties of angleplied laminates in which the matrix has been strained nonlinearly by the lamination residual stresses. The procedure predicted initial tangent properties results which were in good agreement with measured data obtained from boron/aluminum angleplied laminates.

  10. Processing and response of aluminum-lithium alloy composites reinforced with copper-coated silicon carbide particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khor, K. A.; Cao, Y.; Boey, F. Y. C.; Hanada, K.; Murakoshi, Y.; Sudarshan, T. S.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    1998-02-01

    Lithium-containing aluminum alloys have shown promise for demanding aerospace applications because of their light weight, high strength, and good damage tolerance characteristics. Additions of ceramic reinforcements to an aluminum-lithium alloy can significantly enhance specific strength, and specific modulus while concurrently offering acceptable performance at elevated temperatures. The processing and fabrication of aluminum-lithium alloy-based composites are hampered by particulate agglomeration or clustering and the existence of poor interfacial relationships between the reinforcing phase and the matrix. The problem of distribution of the reinforcing phase in the metal matrix can be alleviated by mechanical alloying. This article presents the results of a study aimed at addressing and improving the interfacial relationship between the host matrix and the reinforcing phase. Copper-coated silicon carbide particulates are introduced as the particulate reinforcing phase, and the resultant composite mixture is processed by conventional milling followed by hot pressing and hot extrusion. The influence of extrusion ratio and extrusion temperature on microstructure and mechanical properties was established. Post extrusion processing by hot isostatic pressing was also examined. Results reveal the increase in elastic modulus of the aluminum-lithium alloy matrix reinforced with copper-coated SiC to be significantly more than the mechanically alloyed Al-Li/SiC counterpart. This suggests the possible contributions of interfacial strengthening on mechanical response in direct comparison with a uniform distribution of the reinforcing ceramic particulates.

  11. Cast Aluminum Primary Aircraft Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    ABSTRAC R A A A357 cast aluminum alloy forward fuselage pressure bulkhead has been developed and manufactured for the AMST-YC-14 aircraft. This work...urring in castings. Test coupons were! removed from castings containing defU-ts and subjected to repeated loads. The shift of the S-N curve for A357 ...selected for the casting is A357 . The cast bulkhead (Fig 2) measures approximately 2.29 m (7.5 ft) by 1.37 m (4.5 ft). It is designed to replace the

  12. Electrochemical study of Aluminum-Fly Ash composites obtained by powder metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, E.; Lekka, M.; Andreatta, F.; Fedrizzi, L.; Itskos, G.; Koukouzas, N.

    2012-07-15

    In this paper, two different ASTM C 618 Class C fly ashes (FA) were used for the production of aluminum metal matrix composites (MMCs) using powder metallurgy (PM) technology. Calcareous FAs were sampled from the electrostatic precipitators of two different lignite-fired power stations: from Megalopolis, Southern Greece (MFA) and from Kardia, Northen Greece (KFA), under maximum electricity load. FAs were milled in order to reduce the mean particle diameter and Aluminum-FA composites containing 10% and 20% of FA were then prepared and compacted. The green products were sintered for 2 h at 600 Degree-Sign C. Sintered Al-FA MMCs showed increased hardness and wear resistance suggesting their possible use in industrial applications for example in covers, casings, brake rotors or engine blocks. As most possible industrial applications of MMCs not only require wear resistance, but also corrosion resistance in different mild aggressive medias, this paper aims to study the electrochemical behavior of FA MMCs in order to evaluate their corrosion resistance. The morphology and chemical composition of the phases in the Aluminum-FA composite samples were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDXS). Moreover, topographic and Volta potential maps were acquired by Scanning Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (SKP-FM). Volta potential maps provide information about the electrochemical behavior of the different phases in absence of electrolyte. The electrochemical behavior was investigated by Open Circuit Potential measurements and potentiodynamic polarization, while the corrosion mechanisms were studied by SEM observations after different times of immersion in a mild corrosive medium. In all cases it could be stated that the addition of the FA particles into the Al matrix might cause an increase of the hardness and mechanical properties of the pure aluminum but deteriorates the corrosion resistance. The degradation phenomena

  13. Selection of a mineral binder with potentialities for the stabilization/solidification of aluminum metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cau Dit Coumes, C.; Lambertin, D.; Lahalle, H.; Antonucci, P.; Cannes, C.; Delpech, S.

    2014-10-01

    In a strongly alkaline medium, such as that encountered in conventional cementitious materials based on Portland cement, aluminum metal is corroded, with continued production of hydrogen. In order to develop a mineral matrix having enhanced compatibility with aluminum, a literature review was first undertaken to identify binders capable of reducing the pore solution pH compared with Portland cement. An experimental study was then carried out to measure the hydrogen production resulting from corrosion of aluminum metal rods encapsulated in the different selected cement pastes. The best results were achieved with magnesium phosphate cement, which released very little hydrogen over the duration of the study. This production could be reduced still further by adding a corrosion inhibitor (lithium nitrate) to the mixing solution. Open circuit potential measurement and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy of aluminum electrode encapsulated in two pastes based on Portland cement and magnesium phosphate cement showed different redox behaviors. In the Portland cement paste, the electrochemical data confirmed the corrosion of aluminum whereas this latter tended to a passive state in the magnesium phosphate binder.

  14. Cadmium-Aluminum Layered Double Hydroxide Microspheres for Photocatalytic CO2 Reduction.

    PubMed

    Saliba, Daniel; Ezzeddine, Alaa; Sougrat, Rachid; Khashab, Niveen M; Hmadeh, Mohamad; Al-Ghoul, Mazen

    2016-04-21

    We report the synthesis of cadmium-aluminum layered double hydroxide (CdAl LDH) using the reaction-diffusion framework. As the hydroxide anions diffuse into an agar gel matrix containing the mixture of aluminum and cadmium salts at a given ratio, they react to give the LDH. The LDH self-assembles inside the pores of the gel matrix into a unique spherical-porous shaped microstructure. The internal and external morphologies of the particles are studied by electron microscopy and tomography revealing interconnected channels and a high surface area. This material is shown to exhibit a promising performance in the photoreduction of carbon dioxide using solar light. Moreover, the palladium-decorated version shows a significant improvement in its reduction potential at room temperature.

  15. The effect of corrosion on the fatigue life of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla, P. T.; Tragazikis, I. K.; Exarchos, D. A.; Matikas, T. E.

    2016-04-01

    The corrosion behavior of metallic structures is an important factor of material performance. In case of aluminum matrix composites corrosion occurs via electrochemical reactions at the interface between the metallic matrix and the reinforcement. The corrosion rate is determined by equilibrium between two opposing electrochemical reactions, the anodic and the cathodic. When these two reactions are in equilibrium, the flow of electrons from each reaction type is balanced, and no net electron flow occurs. In the present study, aluminum alloy tensile-shape samples are immersed in NaCl solution with an objective to study the effect of the controlled pitting corrosion in a specific area. The rest of the material is completely sealed. In order to investigate the effect of pitting corrosion on the material performance, the specimens were subjected to cyclic loading. The effect of corrosion on the fatigue life was assessed using two complimentary nondestructive methods, infrared thermography and acoustic emission.

  16. Dynamic Deformation Response of Maraging Steel Hollow Sphere and Aluminum Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Gregory; Scripka, David; Welchel, Ricky; Cochran, Joe; Sanders, Tom; Thadhani, Naresh

    2011-06-01

    The dynamic deformation response of a light-weight composite system consisting of maraging steel hollow spheres in an aluminum matrix is investigated. The composite system made by in-filtrating aluminum alloy melt around the high strength and toughness maraging steel hollow spheres, enables design of a light-weight energy-absorbing structural material. Rod-on-anvil Taylor impact tests are conducted to study the behavior of the composite material under uniaxial stress loading. The transient deformation states are captured using high-speed digital imaging for correlation with AUTODYN simulations. The recovered impacted samples are characterized using microscopy to determine the deformation response of the hollow spheres and the influence of the matrix-sphere interface on the overall properties of the composite material.

  17. Recycling of ceramic particulate reinforced aluminium metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.C.; Murthy, C.S.C.; Kamath, R.; Vinai Babu, B.R.; Satish, B.M.; Girish, B.M.

    1995-12-31

    The aluminum matrix composites with ceramic dispersoids can be separated by the density difference concept. In the proposed work, composite scrap is recycled using an oil fired furnace. The scrap is melted in the furnace and temperature is maintained below 740 degree centigrade. Because of the density difference the lighter dispersoids will float and heavier dispersoids will settle down. The clean melt is separated be removing the floating and settled dispersoids, and then filtering using ceramic filters.

  18. Magnesium Matrix Composite Foams-Density, Mechanical Properties, and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-24

    known that the effect of particle-matrix interfacial bonding is much less significant under compression compared to under tension [33,34]. One of the...parameter). Some syntactic foam composites are found to have less than 0.4 g/cc density in Figure 9. These data points belong to foams that contain...syntactic foams containing porosity only inside hollow particles. The yield strength values for various types of MMSFs, including aluminum, titanium , and

  19. INTERIOR VIEW OF ENTRANCE TO LABORATORY, SHOWING HANDHAMMERED ALUMINUM DOORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF ENTRANCE TO LABORATORY, SHOWING HAND-HAMMERED ALUMINUM DOORS AND MARBLE. NOTE ALUMINUM LIGHT FIXTURE - Alcoa Research Laboratory, Freeport Road, New Kensington, Westmoreland County, PA

  20. Nanostructure of aluminum oxide inclusion and formation of hydrogen bubbles in molten aluminum.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jianmin; Li, Dezhi; Kang, Minglong; He, Huan; Hu, Zhiliu

    2013-10-01

    Hydrogen in molten aluminum is one of the major factors that lead to pore formation in the solidification process of aluminum castings. Previous research showed that aluminum oxide inclusion had a close correlation with the hydrogen content in molten aluminum. Though some researchers thought there must have been a relationship between surface morphology of the inclusion and hydrogen concentration in molten aluminum, very few documents have reported on the surface property of aluminum oxide inclusion. In the present work, AFM (Atomic Force Microscope) was first used to investigate surface morphology of aluminum oxide inclusion in molten aluminum. It was found that there were a large number of nanoscale micropores on the surface of aluminum oxide inclusion. The interior of the micropores was approximated as a tapered shape. These micropores were thought to be helpful to heterogeneous nucleation for hydrogen atoms aggregation because they provided necessary concentration fluctuation and energy undulation for the growth of hydrogen bubbles. Based on the nanostructure observed on the surface of aluminum oxide inclusion, a theoretical model was developed to describe the hydrogen pore formation in aluminum casting under the condition of heterogeneous nucleation.

  1. Improved dual flow aluminum hydrogen peroxide battery

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, C.; Licht, S.L.; Matthews, D.

    1993-11-30

    A novel dual flow battery configuration is provided comprising an aqueous hydrogen peroxide catholyte, an aqueous anolyte, a porous solid electrocatalyst capable of reducing said hydrogen peroxide and separating said anolyte, and an aluminum anode positioned within said anolyte. Separation of catholyte and anolyte chambers prevents hydrogen peroxide poisoning of the aluminum anode.

  2. Improved dual flow aluminum hydrogen peroxide battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Catherine; Licht, Stuart L.; Matthews, Donna

    1993-11-01

    A novel dual flow battery configuration is provided comprising an aqueous hydrogen peroxide catholyte, an aqueous anolyte, a porous solid electrocatalyst capable of reducing said hydrogen peroxide and separating said anolyte, and an aluminum anode positioned within said anolyte. Separation of catholyte and anolyte chambers prevents hydrogen peroxide poisoning of the aluminum anode.

  3. Aluminum induced proteome changes in tomato cotyledons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotyledons of tomato seedlings that germinated in a 20 µM AlK(SO4)2 solution remained chlorotic while those germinated in an aluminum free medium were normal (green) in color. Previously, we have reported the effect of aluminum toxicity on root proteome in tomato seedlings (Zhou et al. J Exp Bot, 20...

  4. RECOVERY OF METAL USING ALUMINUM DISPLACEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of typical metals (Cu, Pb, Sn, Ni) from printed circuit and metal finishing waste streams was evaluated using displacement with aluminum. he metal is recovered as non-hazardous metal particles and can be recycled by smelting. n acceptable aluminum metal configuration ...

  5. Study of stress corrosion in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brummer, S. B.

    1967-01-01

    Mechanism of the stress corrosion cracking of high-strength aluminum alloys was investigated using electrochemical, mechanical, and electron microscopic techniques. The feasibility of detecting stress corrosion damage in fabricated aluminum alloy parts by nondestructive testing was investigated using ultrasonic surface waves and eddy currents.

  6. Recovery of aluminum from composite propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, G. C. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Aluminum was recovered from solid rocket propellant containing a small amount of oxidizer by depolymerizing and dissolving propellant binders (containing functional or hydrolyzable groups in a solution of sodium methoxide) in an alcohol solvent optionally containing an aliphatic or aromatic hydrocarbon co-solvent. The solution was filtered to recover substantially all the aluminum in active form.

  7. Laboratory Powder Metallurgy Makes Tough Aluminum Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royster, D. M.; Thomas, J. R.; Singleton, O. R.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum alloy sheet exhibits high tensile and Kahn tear strengths. Rapid solidification of aluminum alloys in powder form and subsequent consolidation and fabrication processes used to tailor parts made of these alloys to satisfy such specific aerospace design requirements as high strength and toughness.

  8. Virus inactivation in aluminum and polyaluminum coagulation.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Sakuma, Satoru; Gojo, Takahito; Mamiya, Teppei; Suzuoki, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takanobu

    2003-11-15

    Inorganic aluminum salts, such as aluminum sulfate, are coagulants that cause small particles, such as bacteria and viruses as well as inorganic particles, to destabilize and combine into larger aggregates. In this investigation, batch coagulation treatments of water samples spiked with Qbeta, MS2, T4, and P1 viruses were conducted with four different aluminum coagulants. The total infectious virus concentration in the suspension of floc particles that eventually formed by dosing with coagulant was measured after the floc particles were dissolved by raising the pH with an alkaline beef extract solution. The virus concentrations were extremely reduced after the water samples were dosed with aluminum coagulants. Viruses mixed with and adsorbed onto preformed aluminum hydroxide floc were, however, completely recovered after the floc dissolution. These results indicated that the aluminum coagulation process inactivates viruses. Virucidal activity was most prominent with the prehydrolyzed aluminum salt coagulant, polyaluminum chloride (PACl). Virucidal activity was lower in river water than in ultrapure water--natural organic matter in the river water depressed the virucidal activity. Mechanisms and kinetics of the virus inactivation were discussed. Our results suggest that intermediate polymers formed during hydrolysis of the aluminum coagulants sorbed strongly to viruses, either rendering them inactive or preventing infectivity.

  9. METHOD FOR JOINING ALUMINUM TO STAINLESS STEEL

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, L.C.

    1960-05-24

    Aluminum may be joined to stainless steel without the use of flux by tinning the aluminum with a tin solder containing 1% silver and 1% lead, tinning the stainless steel with a 50% lead 50% tin solder, and then sweating the tinned surfaces together.

  10. SOLID STATE BONDING OF THORIUM WITH ALUMINUM

    DOEpatents

    Storchhelm, S.

    1959-12-01

    A method is described for bonding thorium and aluminum by placing clean surfaces of thorium and aluminum in contact with each other and hot pressing the metals together in a protective atmosphere at a temperature of about 375 to 575 deg C and at a pressure of at least 10 tsi to effect a bond.

  11. Aluminum low temperature smelting cell metal collection

    DOEpatents

    Beck, Theodore R.; Brown, Craig W.

    2002-07-16

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten salt electrolyte in an electrolytic cell having an anodic liner for containing the electrolyte, the liner having an anodic bottom and walls including at least one end wall extending upwardly from the anodic bottom, the anodic liner being substantially inert with respect to the molten electrolyte. A plurality of non-consumable anodes is provided and disposed vertically in the electrolyte. A plurality of cathodes is disposed vertically in the electrolyte in alternating relationship with the anodes. The anodes are electrically connected to the anodic liner. An electric current is passed through the anodic liner to the anodes, through the electrolyte to the cathodes, and aluminum is deposited on said cathodes. Oxygen bubbles are generated at the anodes and the anodic liner, the bubbles stirring the electrolyte. Molten aluminum is collected from the cathodes into a tubular member positioned underneath the cathodes. The tubular member is in liquid communication with each cathode to collect the molten aluminum therefrom while excluding electrolyte. Molten aluminum is delivered through the tubular member to a molten aluminum reservoir located substantially opposite the anodes and cathodes. The molten aluminum is collected from the cathodes and delivered to the reservoir while avoiding contact of the molten aluminum with the anodic bottom.

  12. Environmental effects on aluminum fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzberg, F. R.; Shepic, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The sustained load stress corrosion cracking (SCC) threshold for aluminum alloy 214 was determined using smooth (sigma sub TH) and precracked (K sub ISCC) specimens, and cyclic load growth behavior in 3.5% NaCl salt solution was studied. The relationship between K sub ISCC and sigma sub TH was also studied. The work showed that 2124-T851 aluminum alloy in plate gage has a moderately high resistance to stress corrosion attack. Experimental results showed that no SCC occurred in the longitudinal and long transverse directions in any of the tests. Some SCC was found by smooth tests in the short transverse direction, and the data were confirmed by two test methods-sigma sub TH = 275 MN/sq m (40 ksi). No SCC was found from compact specimen tests in any direction: surface flaw and center notch specimens evaluated in the short transverse direction exhibited SCC. The data indicate that stress corrosion behavior is defect, size, and stress dependent, but not entirely in accordance with a stress intensity controlled mechanism.

  13. Nonlinear laminate analysis for metal matrix fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    A nonlinear laminate analysis is described for predicting the mechanical behavior (stress-strain relationships) of angleplied laminates in which the matrix is strained nonlinearly by both the residual stress and the mechanical load and in which additional nonlinearities are induced due to progressive fiber fractures and ply relative rotations. The nonlinear laminate analysis (NLA) is based on linear composite mechanics and a piece wise linear laminate analysis to handle the nonlinear responses. Results obtained by using this nonlinear analysis on boron fiber/aluminum matrix angleplied laminates agree well with experimental data. The results shown illustrate the in situ ply stress-strain behavior and synergistic strength enhancement.

  14. Trends in the global aluminum fabrication industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Subodh; Yin, Weimin

    2007-02-01

    The aluminum fabrication industry has become more vital to the global economy as international aluminum consumption has grown steadily in the past decades. Using innovation, value, and sustainability, the aluminum industry is strengthening its position not only in traditional packaging and construction applications but also in the automotive and aerospace markets to become more competitive and to face challenges from other industries and higher industrial standards. The aluminum fabrication industry has experienced a significant geographical shift caused by rapid growth in emerging markets in countries such as Brazil, Russia, India, and China. Market growth and distribution will vary with different patterns of geography and social development; the aluminum industry must be part of the transformation and keep pace with market developments to benefit.

  15. Gating of Permanent Molds for ALuminum Casting

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-03-30

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-01ID13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings.

  16. Aluminum-based metal-air batteries

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Cody A.; Martinez, Jose Antonio Bautista

    2016-01-12

    Provided in one embodiment is an electrochemical cell, comprising: (i) a plurality of electrodes, comprising a fuel electrode that comprises aluminum and an air electrode that absorbs gaseous oxygen, the electrodes being operable in a discharge mode wherein the aluminum is oxidized at the fuel electrode and oxygen is reduced at the air electrode, and (ii) an ionically conductive medium, comprising an organic solvent; wherein during non-use of the cell, the organic solvent promotes formation of a protective interface between the aluminum of the fuel electrode and the ionically conductive medium, and wherein at an onset of the discharge mode, at least some of the protective interface is removed from the aluminum to thereafter permit oxidation of the aluminum during the discharge mode.

  17. 75 FR 34982 - Aluminum Extrusions from the People's Republic of China: Notice of Postponement of Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... International Trade Administration Aluminum Extrusions from the People's Republic of China: Notice of... countervailing duty investigation of aluminum extrusions from the People's Republic of China. See Aluminum..., Benada Aluminum of Florida, Inc., William L. Bonnell Company, Inc., Frontier Aluminum Corporation,...

  18. Fatigue Resistance of Liquid-assisted Self-repairing Aluminum Alloys Reinforced with Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, M. Clara; Manuel, Michele; Wallace, Terryl

    2013-01-01

    A self-repairing aluminum-based composite system has been developed using a liquid-assisted healing theory in conjunction with the shape memory effect of wire reinforcements. The metal-metal composite was thermodynamically designed to have a matrix with a relatively even dispersion of a low-melting eutectic phase, allowing for repair of cracks at a predetermined temperature. Additionally, shape memory alloy (SMA) wire reinforcements were used within the composite to provide crack closure. Investigators focused the research on fatigue cracks propagating through the matrix in order to show a proof-of-concept Shape Memory Alloy Self-Healing (SMASH) technology for aeronautical applications.

  19. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of microstructural features in aluminum-lithium-copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avalos-Borja, M.; Larson, L. A.; Pizzo, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination of aluminum-lithium-copper alloys was conducted. The principal purpose is to characterize the nature, size, and distribution of stringer particles which result from the powder metallurgy (P/M) processing of these alloys. Microstructural features associated with the stringer particles are reported that help explain the stress corrosion susceptibility of the powder metallurgy-processed Al-Li-Cu alloys. In addition, matrix precipitaton events are documented for a variety of heat treatments and process variations. Hot rolling is observed to significantly alter the nature of matrix precipitation, and the observations are correlated with concomitant mechanical property variations.

  20. Carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum nanocomposite via plasma and high velocity oxy-fuel spray forming.

    PubMed

    Laha, T; Liu, Y; Agarwal, A

    2007-02-01

    Free standing structures of hypereutectic aluminum-23 wt% silicon nanocomposite with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) reinforcement have been successfully fabricated by two different thermal spraying technique viz Plasma Spray Forming (PSF) and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) Spray Forming. Comparative microstructural and mechanical property evaluation of the two thermally spray formed nanocomposites has been carried out. Presence of nanosized grains in the Al-Si alloy matrix and physically intact and undamaged carbon nanotubes were observed in both the nanocomposites. Excellent interfacial bonding between Al alloy matrix and MWCNT was observed. The elastic modulus and hardness of HVOF sprayed nanocomposite is found to be higher than PSF sprayed composites.

  1. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    DOEpatents

    Farooque, Mohammad; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    1996-01-01

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles.

  2. Temperature-dependent tensile and shear response of graphite/aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T.; Pindera, M. J.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1987-01-01

    The thermo-mechanical response of unidirectional P100 graphite fiber/6061 aluminum matrix composites was investigated at four temperatures:-150, +75, +250, and +500 F. Two types of tests, off-axis tension and losipescu shear, were used to obtain the desired properties. Good experimental-theoretical correlation was obtained for Exx, vxy, and G12. It is shown that E11 is temperature independent, but E22, v12, and G12 generally decrease with increasing temperature. Compared with rather high longitudinal strength, very low transverse strength was obtained for the graphite/aluminum. The poor transverse strength is believed to be due to the low interfacial bond strength in this material. The strength decrease significantly with increasing temperature. The tensile response at various temperatures is greatly affected by the residual stresses caused by the mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion of fibers and matrix. The degradation of the aluminum matrix properties at higher temperatures has a deleterious effect on composite properties. The composite has a very low coefficient of thermal expansion in the fiber direction.

  3. Orbital fabrication of aluminum foam and apparatus therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A process for producing foamed aluminum in space comprising the steps of: heating aluminum until it is molten; applying the force of gravity to the molten aluminum; injecting gas into the molten aluminum to produce molten foamed aluminum; and allowing the molten foamed aluminum to cool to below melting temperature. The apparatus for carrying out this invention comprises: a furnace which rotates to simulate the force of gravity and heats the aluminum until it is molten; a door on the furnace, which is opened for charging the aluminum into the furnace, closed for processing and opened again for removal of the foamed aluminum; a gas injection apparatus for injecting gas into the molten aluminum within the furnace; and an extraction apparatus adjacent the door for removing the foamed aluminum from the furnace.

  4. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  5. The intraclass covariance matrix.

    PubMed

    Carey, Gregory

    2005-09-01

    Introduced by C.R. Rao in 1945, the intraclass covariance matrix has seen little use in behavioral genetic research, despite the fact that it was developed to deal with family data. Here, I reintroduce this matrix, and outline its estimation and basic properties for data sets on pairs of relatives. The intraclass covariance matrix is appropriate whenever the research design or mathematical model treats the ordering of the members of a pair as random. Because the matrix has only one estimate of a population variance and covariance, both the observed matrix and the residual matrix from a fitted model are easy to inspect visually; there is no need to mentally average homologous statistics. Fitting a model to the intraclass matrix also gives the same log likelihood, likelihood-ratio (LR) chi2, and parameter estimates as fitting that model to the raw data. A major advantage of the intraclass matrix is that only two factors influence the LR chi2--the sampling error in estimating population parameters and the discrepancy between the model and the observed statistics. The more frequently used interclass covariance matrix adds a third factor to the chi2--sampling error of homologous statistics. Because of this, the degrees of freedom for fitting models to an intraclass matrix differ from fitting that model to an interclass matrix. Future research is needed to establish differences in power-if any--between the interclass and the intraclass matrix.

  6. Characterization of Heavily Doped ALUMINUM(X)GALLIUM(1 -X)ARSENIDE:TELLURIUM Grown on Semi-Insulating Gallium-Arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Kevin John

    The ability to dope a semiconductor into near metallic conduction widens its usefulness as a material and thereby permits the construction of new devices. Aluminum Gallium Arsenide is no exception. Heavily doped n-type Aluminum Gallium Arsenide has important device applications in tandem junction solar cells and in high electron mobility transistors. Aluminum Gallium Arsenide heavily doped with Tellurium was grown on semi-insulating Gallium Arsenide using liquid phase epitaxy. It was found that the addition of 0.4 atomic percent Tellurium to the melt reduced the Aluminum content of solid Aluminum Gallium Arsenide by up to 20 percent. A model was offered for this behavior involving a differential in the degree of association between Aluminum-Tellurium and Gallium-Tellurium in the liquid phase epitaxial melt. The electrical properties of n-type Aluminum Gallium Arsenide grown on semi-insulating Gallium Arsenide were modeled as a two sheet conductor. The two conductors consisted of the epitaxial n-type Aluminum Gallium Arsenide layer and the induced two dimensional electron gas present at the n-type Aluminum Gallium Arsenide-Gallium Arsenide heterojunction. This model showed the two dimensional electron gas as responsible for the constant low temperature carrier concentration observed experimentally. It also successfully explained the observation of a slope equal to the donor ionization potential instead of the donor ionization potential divided by two in the plot of the log of the carrier concentration versus reciprocal temperature. Because of the chemically independent nature of the deep donor ionization potential in Aluminum Gallium Arsenide, a minima interaction model was introduced to describe the donor level. The major matrix elements were determined to be V(,LX) = 4mV (+OR-) 1mV and V(,LL) = 40mV (+OR-) 10mV. These minima interaction matrix elements were an order of magnitude larger than suggested by theory, thus indicating the possible non-coulombic nature of

  7. Process for anodizing aluminum foil

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, J.A.; Scott, J.W.

    1984-11-06

    In an integrated process for the anodization of aluminum foil for electrolytic capacitors including the formation of a hydrous oxide layer on the foil prior to anodization and stabilization of the foil in alkaline borax baths during anodization, the foil is electrochemically anodized in an aqueous solution of boric acid and 2 to 50 ppm phosphate having a pH of 4.0 to 6.0. The anodization is interrupted for stabilization by passing the foil through a bath containing the borax solution having a pH of 8.5 to 9.5 and a temperature above 80/sup 0/ C. and then reanodizing the foil. The process is useful in anodizing foil to a voltage of up to 760 V.

  8. The biological speciation and toxicokinetics of aluminum.

    PubMed Central

    DeVoto, E; Yokel, R A

    1994-01-01

    This review discusses recent literature on the chemical and physiological factors that influence the absorption, distribution, and excretion of aluminum in mammals, with particular regard to gastrointestinal absorption and speciation in plasma. Humans encounter aluminum, a ubiquitous yet highly insoluble element in most forms, in foods, drinking water, and pharmaceuticals. Exposure also occurs by inhalation of dust and aerosols, particularly in occupational settings. Absorption from the gut depends largely on pH and the presence of complexing ligands, particularly carboxylic acids, with which the metal can form absorbable neutral aluminum species. Uremic animals and humans experience higher than normal body burdens of aluminum despite increased urinary clearance of the metal. In plasma, 80-90% of aluminum binds to transferrin, an iron-transport protein for which receptors exist in many tissue. The remaining fraction of plasma aluminum takes the form of small-molecule hydroxy species and small complexes with carboxylic acids, phosphate, and, to a much lesser degree, amino acids. Most of these species have not been observed in vivo but are predicted from equilibrium models derived from potentiometric methods and NMR investigations. These models predict that the major small-molecule aluminum species under plasma conditions are charged and hence unavailable for uptake into tissues. PMID:9738208

  9. Nanocrystal doped matrixes

    DOEpatents

    Parce, J. Wallace; Bernatis, Paul; Dubrow, Robert; Freeman, William P.; Gamoras, Joel; Kan, Shihai; Meisel, Andreas; Qian, Baixin; Whiteford, Jeffery A.; Ziebarth, Jonathan

    2010-01-12

    Matrixes doped with semiconductor nanocrystals are provided. In certain embodiments, the semiconductor nanocrystals have a size and composition such that they absorb or emit light at particular wavelengths. The nanocrystals can comprise ligands that allow for mixing with various matrix materials, including polymers, such that a minimal portion of light is scattered by the matrixes. The matrixes of the present invention can also be utilized in refractive index matching applications. In other embodiments, semiconductor nanocrystals are embedded within matrixes to form a nanocrystal density gradient, thereby creating an effective refractive index gradient. The matrixes of the present invention can also be used as filters and antireflective coatings on optical devices and as down-converting layers. Processes for producing matrixes comprising semiconductor nanocrystals are also provided. Nanostructures having high quantum efficiency, small size, and/or a narrow size distribution are also described, as are methods of producing indium phosphide nanostructures and core-shell nanostructures with Group II-VI shells.

  10. Decontamination and reuse of ORGDP aluminum scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Wilson, D.F.

    1996-12-01

    The Gaseous Diffusion Plants, or GDPs, have significant amounts of a number of metals, including nickel, aluminum, copper, and steel. Aluminum was used extensively throughout the GDPs because of its excellent strength to weight ratios and good resistance to corrosion by UF{sub 6}. This report is concerned with the recycle of aluminum stator and rotor blades from axial compressors. Most of the stator and rotor blades were made from 214-X aluminum casting alloy. Used compressor blades were contaminated with uranium both as a result of surface contamination and as an accumulation held in surface-connected voids inside of the blades. A variety of GDP studies were performed to evaluate the amounts of uranium retained in the blades; the volume, area, and location of voids in the blades; and connections between surface defects and voids. Based on experimental data on deposition, uranium content of the blades is 0.3%, or roughly 200 times the value expected from blade surface area. However, this value does correlate with estimated internal surface area and with lengthy deposition times. Based on a literature search, it appears that gaseous decontamination or melt refining using fluxes specific for uranium removal have the potential for removing internal contamination from aluminum blades. A melt refining process was used to recycle blades during the 1950s and 1960s. The process removed roughly one-third of the uranium from the blades. Blade cast from recycled aluminum appeared to perform as well as blades from virgin material. New melt refining and gaseous decontamination processes have been shown to provide substantially better decontamination of pure aluminum. If these techniques can be successfully adapted to treat aluminum 214-X alloy, internal and, possibly, external reuse of aluminum alloys may be possible.

  11. Mechanical response of unidirectional boron/aluminum under combined loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Wolfgang; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1987-01-01

    Three test methods were employed to characterize the response of unidirectional Boron/Aluminum metal matrix composite material under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions, namely, losipescu shear, off-axis tension and compression. The characterization of the elastic and plastic response includes the elastic material properties, yielding and subsequent hardening of the unidirectional composite under different stress ratios in the material principal coordinate system. Yield loci generated for different stress ratios are compared for the three different test methods, taking into account residual stresses and specimen geometry. Subsequently, the yield locus for in-plane shear is compared with the prediction of an analytical, micromechanical model. The influence of the scatter in the experimental data on the predicted yield surface is also analyzed. Lastly, the experimental material strengths in tension and compression are correlated with the maximum stress and the Tsai-Wu failure criterion.

  12. Domestic aluminum resources: dilemmas of development

    SciTech Connect

    Staats, E.B.

    1980-07-17

    Concerns about supply disruptions and price gouging that could endanger aluminum production in the United States have spurred research in this country on processes to manufacture aluminum from ores other than bauxite. The United States has no large bauxite deposits but it has plentiful resources of other aluminum ores if the technology can be developed to use them economically. Sources of aluminium include alunite, anorthosite, dawsonite, and clay/acid. Miniplants for clay/nitric acid and clay/hydrochloric acid, gas-induced crystallization have been constructed.

  13. Electrically conductive containment vessel for molten aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Scott, D.G.

    1984-06-25

    The present invention is directed to a containment vessel which is particularly useful in melting aluminum. The vessel of the present invention is a multilayered vessel characterized by being electrically conductive, essentially nonwettable by and nonreactive with molten aluminum. The vessel is formed by coating a tantalum substrate of a suitable configuration with a mixture of yttria and particulate metal 10 borides. The yttria in the coating inhibits the wetting of the coating while the boride particulate material provides the electrical conductivity through the vessel. The vessel of the present invention is particularly suitable for use in melting aluminum by ion bombardment.

  14. Cathode for aluminum producing electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.

    2004-04-13

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell comprising the steps of providing an anode in a cell, preferably a non-reactive anode, and also providing a cathode in the cell, the cathode comprised of a base material having low electrical conductivity reactive with molten aluminum to provide a highly electrically conductive layer on the base material. Electric current is passed from the anode to the cathode and alumina is reduced and aluminum is deposited at the cathode. The cathode base material is selected from boron carbide, and zirconium oxide.

  15. Electrically conductive containment vessel for molten aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Scott, Donald G.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a containment vessel which is particularly useful in melting aluminum. The vessel of the present invention is a multilayered vessel characterized by being electrically conductive, essentially nonwettable by and nonreactive with molten aluminum. The vessel is formed by coating a tantalum substrate of a suitable configuration with a mixture of yttria and particulate metal borides. The yttria in the coating inhibits the wetting of the coating while the boride particulate material provides the electrical conductivity through the vessel. The vessel of the present invention is particularly suitable for use in melting aluminum by ion bombardment.

  16. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip for Transportation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. McHugh; Y. Lin; Y. Zhou; E. J. Lavernia; J.-P. Delplanque; S. B. Johnson

    2005-02-01

    Spray rolling is a novel strip casting technology in which molten aluminum alloy is atomized and deposited into the roll gap of mill rolls to produce aluminum strip. A combined experimental/modeling approach has been followed in developing this technology with active participation from industry. The feasibility of this technology has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale and it is currently being scaled-up. This paper provides an overview of the process and compares the microstructure and properties of spray-rolled 2124 aluminum alloy with commercial ingot-processed material

  17. Study of crevice-galvanic corrosion of aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draley, J. E.; Loess, R. E.; Mori, S.

    1967-01-01

    Corrosion effects of aluminum-copper and aluminum-nickel couples in oxygenated distilled water, and aluminum alloys in oxygenated copper sulfate solution were studied. One of each of the couples had a water tight seal, and showed no substantial corrosion, and of the unsealed couples, only the aluminum-copper developed corrosion.

  18. Explosive welding technique for joining aluminum and steel tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakefield, M. E.

    1975-01-01

    Silver sheet is wrapped around aluminum portion of joint. Mylar powder box is wrapped over silver sheet. Explosion welds silver to aluminum. Stainless-steel tube is placed over silver-aluminum interface. Mylar powder box, covered with Mylar tape, is wrapped around steel member. Explosion welds steel to silver-aluminum interface.

  19. Formulation and method for preparing gels comprising hydrous aluminum oxide

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Jack L.

    2014-06-17

    Formulations useful for preparing hydrous aluminum oxide gels contain a metal salt including aluminum, an organic base, and a complexing agent. Methods for preparing gels containing hydrous aluminum oxide include heating a formulation to a temperature sufficient to induce gel formation, where the formulation contains a metal salt including aluminum, an organic base, and a complexing agent.

  20. 49 CFR 229.51 - Aluminum main reservoirs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aluminum main reservoirs. 229.51 Section 229.51... Aluminum main reservoirs. (a) Aluminum main reservoirs used on locomotives shall be designed and fabricated as follows: (1) The heads and shell shall be made of Aluminum Association Alloy No. 5083-0,...