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Sample records for 60co internal dosimetry

  1. A review of the (60)Co internal dosimetry at Devonport Royal Dockyard.

    PubMed

    Vickers, J M A; Collison, R; Collision, R

    2010-03-01

    The physico-chemical properties of (60)Co contaminants arising from the UK Naval Nuclear Propulsion Programme (NNPP) pressurised water reactor (PWR) plants have been investigated in order to review individual monitoring requirements at Devonport Royal Dockyard (DRD). This has been achieved through laboratory tests on NNPP primary component samples and interpretation of direct bioassay measurements using internal dosimetry modelling software. Interpretation of lung measurements was completed for two inhalation events involving material originating from a PWR plant and post-primary circuit decontamination. Initial estimates of intake and dose were calculated using International Commission on Radiological Protection default parameter values. However, a good fit could only be achieved by fitting the data to alternative absorption parameters where 90-95% of the material dissolved and absorbed rapidly at a rate of 1 day(-1). As a consequence of this review, a number of improvements have been made to monitoring arrangements at DRD. A minimum of three direct measurements are now taken during the 0-30 day period after an intake, the capability of the Canberra Accuscan has been enhanced and dissolution tests are being carried out by the Health Protection Agency (HPA) on samples taken from PWR plants.

  2. Monte Carlo Dosimetry of the 60Co BEBIG High Dose Rate for Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Luciana Tourinho; de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Veloso

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy is currently a widespread practice worldwide. The most common isotope source is 192Ir, but 60Co is also becoming available for HDR. One of main advantages of 60Co compared to 192Ir is the economic and practical benefit because of its longer half-live, which is 5.27 years. Recently, Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG, Germany, introduced a new afterloading brachytherapy machine (MultiSource®); it has the option to use either the 60Co or 192Ir HDR source. The source for the Monte Carlo calculations is the new 60Co source (model Co0.A86), which is referred to as the new BEBIG 60Co HDR source and is a modified version of the 60Co source (model GK60M21), which is also from BEBIG. Objective and Methods The purpose of this work is to obtain the dosimetry parameters in accordance with the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism with Monte Carlo calculations regarding the BEBIG 60Co high-dose-rate brachytherapy to investigate the required treatment-planning parameters. The geometric design and material details of the source was provided by the manufacturer and was used to define the Monte Carlo geometry. To validate the source geometry, a few dosimetry parameters had to be calculated according to the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism. The dosimetry studies included the calculation of the air kerma strength Sk, collision kerma in water along the transverse axis with an unbounded phantom, dose rate constant and radial dose function. The Monte Carlo code system that was used was EGSnrc with a new cavity code, which is a part of EGS++ that allows calculating the radial dose function around the source. The spectrum to simulate 60Co was composed of two photon energies, 1.17 and 1.33 MeV. Only the gamma part of the spectrum was used; the contribution of the electrons to the dose is negligible because of the full absorption by the stainless-steel wall around the metallic 60Co. The XCOM photon cross-section library was used in subsequent simulations, and the

  3. Monte Carlo Dosimetry of the 60Co BEBIG High Dose Rate for Brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Campos, Luciana Tourinho; de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Veloso

    2015-01-01

    The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy is currently a widespread practice worldwide. The most common isotope source is 192Ir, but 60Co is also becoming available for HDR. One of main advantages of 60Co compared to 192Ir is the economic and practical benefit because of its longer half-live, which is 5.27 years. Recently, Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG, Germany, introduced a new afterloading brachytherapy machine (MultiSource®); it has the option to use either the 60Co or 192Ir HDR source. The source for the Monte Carlo calculations is the new 60Co source (model Co0.A86), which is referred to as the new BEBIG 60Co HDR source and is a modified version of the 60Co source (model GK60M21), which is also from BEBIG. The purpose of this work is to obtain the dosimetry parameters in accordance with the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism with Monte Carlo calculations regarding the BEBIG 60Co high-dose-rate brachytherapy to investigate the required treatment-planning parameters. The geometric design and material details of the source was provided by the manufacturer and was used to define the Monte Carlo geometry. To validate the source geometry, a few dosimetry parameters had to be calculated according to the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism. The dosimetry studies included the calculation of the air kerma strength Sk, collision kerma in water along the transverse axis with an unbounded phantom, dose rate constant and radial dose function. The Monte Carlo code system that was used was EGSnrc with a new cavity code, which is a part of EGS++ that allows calculating the radial dose function around the source. The spectrum to simulate 60Co was composed of two photon energies, 1.17 and 1.33 MeV. Only the gamma part of the spectrum was used; the contribution of the electrons to the dose is negligible because of the full absorption by the stainless-steel wall around the metallic 60Co. The XCOM photon cross-section library was used in subsequent simulations, and the photoelectric effect, pair production

  4. Internal dosimetry - a review.

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Charles Augustus

    2004-06-01

    The field history and current status of internal dosimetry is reviewed in this article. Elements of the field that are reviewed include standards and models, derivation of dose coefficients and intake retention fractions, bioassay measurements, and intake and dose calculations. In addition, guidance is developed and provided as to the necessity of internal dosimetry for a particular facility or operation and methodology for implementing a program. A discussion of the purposes of internal dosimetry is included as well as recommendations for future development and direction.

  5. Internal dosimetry: a review.

    PubMed

    Potter, Charles A

    2005-06-01

    The field history and current status of internal dosimetry is reviewed in this article. Elements of the field that are reviewed include standards and models, derivation of dose coefficients and intake retention fractions, bioassay measurements, and intake and dose calculations. In addition, guidance is developed and provided as to the necessity of internal dosimetry for a particular facility or operation and methodology for implementing a program. A discussion of the purposes of internal dosimetry is included as well as recommendations for future development and direction.

  6. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1989-04-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products (/sup 58/Co, /sup 60/Co, /sup 54/Mn, and /sup 59/Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation; and bioassay follow-up treatment. 64 refs., 42 figs., 118 tabs.

  7. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1991-07-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products ({sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, and {sup 59}Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium,. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation and bioassay follow-up treatment. 78 refs., 35 figs., 115 tabs.

  8. Comparative /sup 60/Co total body irradiation and 25 MV total body irradiation dosimetry. [/sup 60/Co and 25 mv photons

    SciTech Connect

    Glasgow, G.P.; Mill, W.B.; Phillips, G.L. II.; Herzig, G.P.

    1980-09-01

    Adults with acute leukemia and malignant lymphoma in relapse after conventional therapy are treated with cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation (TBI) followed by autologous bone marrow transplants. Phantom dosimetry and dosimetry on patients treated reveals that doses are delivered within 5% accuracy. Patient tolerance of treatment, and some biological considerations of low dose rate therapy are reviewed. Certain dosimetry features of an alternate treatment at 370 cm SAD, using 25 MV photons are also presented.

  9. The US radiation dosimetry standards for 60Co therapy level beams, and the transfer to the AAPM accredited dosimetry calibration laboratories.

    PubMed

    Minniti, R; Chen-Mayer, H; Seltzer, S M; Huq, M Saiful; Bryson, L; Slowey, T; Micka, J A; DeWerd, L A; Wells, N; Hanson, W F; Ibbott, G S

    2006-04-01

    This work reports the transfer of the primary standard for air kerma from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to the secondary laboratories accredited by the American Association of Physics in Medicine (AAPM). This transfer, performed in August of 2003, was motivated by the recent revision of the NIST air-kerma standards for 60Co gamma-ray beams implemented on July 1, 2003. The revision involved a complete recharacterization of the two NIST therapy-level 60Co gamma-ray beam facilities, resulting in new values for the air-kerma rates disseminated by the NIST. Some of the experimental aspects of the determination of the new air-kerma rates are briefly summarized here; the theoretical aspects have been described in detail by Seltzer and Bergstrom ["Changes in the U.S. primary standards for the air-kerma from gamma-ray beams," J. Res. Natl. Inst. Stand. Technol. 108, 359-381 (2003)]. The standard was transferred to reference-class chambers submitted by each of the AAPM Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratories (ADCLs). These secondary-standard instruments were then used to characterize the 60Co gamma-ray beams at the ADCLs. The values of the response (calibration coefficient) of the ADCL secondary-standard ionization chambers are reported and compared to values obtained prior to the change in the NIST air-kerma standards announced on July 1, 2003. The relative change is about 1.1% for all of these chambers, and this value agrees well with the expected change in chambers calibrated at the NIST or at any secondary-standard laboratory traceable to the new NIST standard.

  10. International intercomparison for criticality dosimetry: the case of biological dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Roy, L; Buard, V; Delbos, M; Durand, V; Paillole, N; Grégoire, E; Voisin, P

    2004-01-01

    The Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) organized a biological dosimetry international intercomparison with the purpose of comparing (i) dicentrics yield produced in human lymphocytes; (ii) the gamma and neutron dose estimate according to the corresponding laboratory calibration curve. The experimental reactor SILENE was used with different configurations: bare source 4 Gy, lead shield 1 and 2 Gy and a 60Co source 2 Gy. An increasing variation of dicentric yield per cell was observed between participants when there were more damages in the samples. Doses were derived from the observed dicentric rates according to the dose-effect relationship provided by each laboratory. Differences in dicentric rate values are more important than those in the corresponding dose values. The doses obtained by the participants were found to be in agreement with the given physical dose within 20%. The evaluation of the respective gamma and neutron dose was achieved only by four laboratories, with some small variations among them.

  11. Hanford internal dosimetry program manual

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Aldridge, T.L.

    1989-10-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs.

  12. Internal dosimetry--a review.

    PubMed

    Potter, Charles A

    2004-11-01

    The field history and current status of internal dosimetry is reviewed in this article. Elements of the field that are reviewed include standards and models, derivation of dose coefficients and intake retention fractions, bioassay measurements, and intake and dose calculations. In addition, guidance is developed and provided as to the necessity of internal dosimetry for a particular facility or operation and methodology for implementing a program. A discussion of the purposes of internal dosimetry is included as well as recommendations for future development and direction.

  13. Internal dosimetry technical basis manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-20

    The internal dosimetry program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) consists of radiation protection programs and activities used to detect and evaluate intakes of radioactive material by radiation workers. Examples of such programs are: air monitoring; surface contamination monitoring; personal contamination surveys; radiobioassay; and dose assessment. The objectives of the internal dosimetry program are to demonstrate that the workplace is under control and that workers are not being exposed to radioactive material, and to detect and assess inadvertent intakes in the workplace. The Savannah River Site Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (TBM) is intended to provide a technical and philosophical discussion of the radiobioassay and dose assessment aspects of the internal dosimetry program. Detailed information on air, surface, and personal contamination surveillance programs is not given in this manual except for how these programs interface with routine and special bioassay programs.

  14. The International Reactor Dosimetry File.

    SciTech Connect

    DUNFORD, CHARLIE

    2008-08-07

    Version 01 The International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-2002) contains recommended neutron cross-section data to be used for reactor neutron dosimetry by foil activation and subsequent neutron spectrum unfolding. It also contains selected recom�mended values for radiation damage cross-sections and benchmark neutron spectra. Two related programs available from NEADB and RSICC are: SPECTER-ANL (PSR-263) & STAY’SL (PSR-113).

  15. 4.2 Methods for Internal Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.2 Methods for Internal Dosimetry' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy' with the contents:

  16. Fourth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Schlafke-Stelson, A.T.; Watson, E.E.

    1986-04-01

    The focus of the Fourth International Radiopharmaceutical Dosimetry Symposium was to explore the impact of current developments in nuclear medicine on absorbed dose calculations. This book contains the proceedings of the meeting including the edited discussion that followed the presentations. Topics that were addressed included the dosimetry associated with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and blood elements, ultrashort-lived radionuclides, and positron emitters. Some specific areas of discussion were variations in absorbed dose as a result of alterations in the kinetics, the influence of radioactive contaminants on dose, dose in children and in the fetus, available instrumentation and techniques for collecting the kinetic data needed for dose calculation, dosimetry requirements for the review and approval of new radiopharmaceuticals, and a comparison of the effect on the thyroid of internal versus external irradiation. New models for the urinary blader, skeleton including the active marrow, and the blood were presented. Several papers dealt with the validity of traditional ''average-organ'' dose estimates to express the dose from particulate radiation that has a short range in tissue. These problems are particularly important in the use of monoclonal antibodies and agents used to measure intracellular functions. These proceedings have been published to provide a resource volume for anyone interested in the calculation of absorbed radiation dose.

  17. Fifth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, E.E.; Schlafke-Stelson, A.T.

    1992-05-01

    This meeting was held to exchange information on how to get better estimates of the radiation absorbed dose. There seems to be a high interest of late in patient dosimetry; discussions were held in the light of revised risk estimates for radiation. Topics included: Strategies of Dose Assessment; Dose Estimation for Radioimmunotherapy; Dose Calculation Techniques and Models; Dose Estimation for Positron Emission Tomography (PET); Kinetics for Dose Estimation; and Small Scale Dosimetry and Microdosimetry. (VC)

  18. From ``micro`` to ``macro`` internal dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    Radiation dose is the amount of radiation energy deposited per unit mass of absorbing tissue. Internal dosimetry applies to assessments of dose to internal organs from penetrating radiation sources outside the body and from radionuclides taken into the body. Dosimetry is essential for correlating energy deposition with biological effects that are observed when living tissues are irradiated. Dose-response information provides the basis for radiation protection standards and risk assessment. Radiation interactions with living matter takes place on a microscopic scale, and the manifestation of damage may be evident at the cellular, multi-cellular, and even organ levels of biological organization. The relative biological effectiveness of ionization radiation is largely determined by the spatial distribution of energy deposition events within microscopic as well as macroscopic biological targets of interest. The spatial distribution of energy imparted is determined by the spatial distribution of radionuclides and properties of the emitted charged-particle radiation involved. The nonuniformity of energy deposition events in microscopic volumes, particularly from high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, results in large variations in the amount of energy imparted to very small volumes or targets. Microdosimetry is the study of energy deposition events at the cellular level. Macrodosimetry is a term for conventional dose averaging at the tissue or organ level. In between is a level of dosimetry sometimes referred to as multi-cellular dosimetry. The distinction between these terms and their applications in assessment of dose from internally deposited radionuclides is described.

  19. Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.; MacLellan, J.A.; Long, M.P.

    1994-07-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project, as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy and its Hanford contractors. Project services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessment of potential intakes and internal dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. Specific chapters deal with the following subjects: practices of the project, including interpretation of applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for assessment, documentation, and reporting of doses; assessment of internal dose, including summary explanations of when and how assessments are performed; recording and reporting practices for internal dose; selection of workers for bioassay monitoring and establishment of type and frequency of bioassay measurements; capability and scheduling of bioassay monitoring services; recommended dosimetry response to potential internal exposure incidents; quality control and quality assurance provisions of the program.

  20. Test of Prototype Detector for Retrospective Neutron Dosimetry of Reactor Internals and Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Katsumi; Nemezawa, Shigeki; Kubota, Isamu; Hayashi, Haruhisa

    2009-08-01

    A prototype detector for simple and non-destructive retrospective neutron dosimetry was made. A Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detector was used as a detector to measure the nuclides 54Mn, 58Co, and 60Co that were generated in reactor internals and vessels. The detector is surrounded by a tungsten collimator which shields background gamma-rays and detects gamma-rays originating from the measuring point. Neutron fluence is calculated using the pre-calculated response, measuring time, decay time and reactor power history. The applicability of this detector was tested by measuring parts of irradiated reactor internals.

  1. Patient-specific internal radionuclide dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Tsougos, Ioannis; Loudos, George; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Theodorou, Kiki; Kappas, Constantin

    2010-02-01

    The development of patient-specific treatment planning systems is of outmost importance in the development of radionuclide dosimetry, taking into account that quantitative three-dimensional nuclear medical imaging can be used in this regard. At present, the established method for dosimetry is based on the measurement of the biokinetics by serial gamma-camera scans, followed by calculations of the administered activity and the residence times, resulting in the radiation-absorbed doses of critical organs. However, the quantification of the activity in different organs from planar data is hampered by inaccurate attenuation and scatter correction as well as because of background and organ overlay. In contrast, dosimetry based on quantitative three-dimensional data can be more accurate and allows an individualized approach, provided that all effects that degrade the quantitative content of the images have been corrected for. In addition, inhomogeneous organ accumulation of the radionuclide can be detected and possibly taken into account. The aim of this work is to provide adequate information on internal emitter dosimetry and a state-of-the-art review of the current methodology and future trends.

  2. Methods and Models of the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, PNNL-MA-860

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Bihl, Donald E.; Maclellan, Jay A.; Antonio, Cheryl L.; Hill, Robin L.

    2009-09-30

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (HIDP) provides internal dosimetry support services for operations at the Hanford Site. The HIDP is staffed and managed by the Radiation and Health Technology group, within the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Operations supported by the HIDP include research and development, the decontamination and decommissioning of facilities formerly used to produce and purify plutonium, and waste management activities. Radioelements of particular interest are plutonium, uranium, americium, tritium, and the fission and activation product radionuclides 137Cs, 90Sr, and 60Co. This manual describes the technical basis for the design of the routine bioassay monitoring program and for assessment of internal dose. The purposes of the manual are as follows: • Provide assurance that the HIDP derives from a sound technical base. • Promote the consistency and continuity of routine program activities. • Provide a historical record. • Serve as a technical reference for radiation protection personnel. • Aid in identifying and planning for future needs.

  3. Evaluation of the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code for interface dosimetry near high-Z media exposed to kilovolt and 60Co photons.

    PubMed

    Verhaegen, Frank

    2002-05-21

    High atomic number (Z) heterogeneities in tissue exposed to photons with energies of up to about 1 MeV can cause significant dose perturbations in their immediate vicinity. The recently released Monte Carlo (MC) code EGSnrc (Kawrakow 2000a Med. Phys. 27 485-98) was used to investigate the dose perturbation of high-Z heterogeneities in tissue in kilovolt (kV) and 60Co photon beams. Simulations were performed of measurements with a dedicated thin-window parallel-plate ion chamber near a high-Z interface in a 60Co photon beam (Nilsson et al 1992 Med. Phys. 19 1413-21). Good agreement was obtained between simulations and measurements for a detailed set of experiments in which the thickness of the ion chamber window, the thickness of the air gap between ion chamber and heterogeneity, the depth of the ion chamber in polystyrene and the material of the interface was varied. The EGSnrc code offers several improvements in the electron and photon production and transport algorithms over the older EGS4/PRESTA code (Nelson et al 1985 Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Report SLAC-265. Bielajew and Rogers 1987 Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 18 165-81). The influence of the new EGSnrc features was investigated for simulations of a planar slab of a high-Z medium embedded in water and exposed to kV or 60Co photons. It was found that using the new electron transport algorithm in EGSnrc, including relativistic spin effects in elastic scattering, significantly affects the calculation of dose distribution near high-Z interfaces. The simulations were found to be independent of the maximum fractional electron energy loss per step (ESTEPE), which was often a cause for concern in older EGS4 simulations. Concerning the new features of the photon transport algorithm sampling of the photoelectron angular distribution was found to have a significant effect, whereas the effect of binding energies in Compton scatter was found to be negligible. A slight dose artefact very close to high

  4. Sandia National Laboratories Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (Rev 4)

    SciTech Connect

    Goke, Sarah Hayes; Elliott, Nathan Ryan

    2014-09-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories’ Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual is intended to provide extended technical discussion and justification of the internal dosimetry program at SNL. It serves to record the approach to evaluating internal doses from radiobioassay data, and where appropriate, from workplace monitoring data per the Department of Energy Internal Dosimetry Program Guide DOE G 441.1C. The discussion contained herein is directed primarily to current and future SNL internal dosimetrists. In an effort to conserve space in the TBM and avoid duplication, it contains numerous references providing an entry point into the internal dosimetry literature relevant to this program. The TBM is not intended to act as a policy or procedure statement, but will supplement the information normally found in procedures or policy documents. The internal dosimetry program outlined in this manual is intended to meet the requirements of Federal Rule 10CFR835 for monitoring the workplace and for assessing internal radiation doses to workers.

  5. The Mayak Worker Dosimetry System (MWDS-2013): Internal Dosimetry Results.

    PubMed

    Vostrotin, Vadim; Birchall, Alan; Zhdanov, Alexey; Puncher, Matthew; Efimov, Alexander; Napier, Bruce; Sokolova, Alexandra; Miller, Scott; Suslova, Klara

    2016-09-24

    The distribution of calculated internal doses has been determined for 8043 Mayak Production Associate (Mayak PA) workers. This is a subset of the entire cohort of 25 757 workers, for whom monitoring data are available. Statistical characteristics of point estimates of accumulated doses to 17 different tissues and organs and the uncertainty ranges were calculated. Under the MWDS-2013 dosimetry system, the mean accumulated lung dose was 185 ± 594 mGy (geometric mean = 28 mGy; geometric standard deviation = 9.32; median value = 31 mGy; maximum value = 8980 mGy). The ranges of relative standard uncertainty were from 40 to 2200% for accumulated lung dose, from 25-90% to 2600-3000% for accumulated dose to different regions of respiratory tract, from 13-22% to 2300-2500% for systemic organs and tissues. The Mayak PA workers accumulated internal plutonium lung dose is shown to be close to log normal. The accumulated internal plutonium dose to systemic organs was close to a log triangle. The dependency of uncertainty of accumulated absorbed lung and liver doses on the dose estimates itself is also shown. The accumulated absorbed doses to lung, alveolar-interstitial region, liver, bone surface cells and red bone marrow calculated both with MWDS-2013 and MWDS-2008 have been compared. In general, the accumulated lung doses increased by a factor of 1.8 in median value, while the accumulated doses to systemic organs decreased by factor of 1.3-1.4 in median value. For the cases with identical initial data, accumulated lung doses increased by a factor of 2.1 in median value, while accumulated doses to systemic organs decreased by 8-13% in median value. For the cases with both identical initial data and all of plutonium activity in urine measurements above the decision threshold, accumulated lung doses increased by a factor of 2.7 in median value, while accumulated doses to systemic organs increased by 6-12% in median value.

  6. Internal dosimetry verification and validation database.

    PubMed

    Miller, G; Bertelli, L; Little, T; Guilmette, R A

    2007-01-01

    Simulated-data internal dosimetry cases for use in intercomparison exercises or as a software verification and validation tool have been published on the internet (www.lanl.gov/bayesian/software Bayesian software package II). A user may validate their internal dosimetry code or method using this simulated bioassay data. Or, the user may choose to try out the Los Alamos National Laboratory codes ID and UF, which are also supplied. A Poisson-lognormal model of data uncertainty is assumed. A collection of different possible models for each nuclide (e.g. solubility types and particle sizes) are used. For example, for 238Pu, 14 different biokinetic models or types (8 inhalation, 4 wound and 2 ingestion) are assumed. Simulated data are generated for all the assumed biokinetic models, both for incidents, where the time of intake is known, and for non-incidents, where it is not. For the dose calculations, the route of intake, but not the biokinetic model, is considered to be known. The object is to correctly calculate the known true dose from simulated data covering a period of time. A 'correct' result has been defined in two ways: (1) that the credible limits of the calculated dose include the correct dose and (2) that the calculated dose is within a factor of 2 of the correct dose.

  7. Methods and procedures for internal radiation dosimetry at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Gupton, E.D.

    1981-08-01

    Procedures, methods, materials, records, and reports used for accomplishing the personnel, internal radiation monitoring program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described for the purpose of documenting what is done now for future reference. This document does not include procedures for nuclear accident dosimetry except insofar as routine techniques may apply also to nuclear accident dosimetry capability.

  8. Development of probabilistic internal dosimetry computer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Siwan; Kwon, Tae-Eun; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2017-02-01

    Internal radiation dose assessment involves biokinetic models, the corresponding parameters, measured data, and many assumptions. Every component considered in the internal dose assessment has its own uncertainty, which is propagated in the intake activity and internal dose estimates. For research or scientific purposes, and for retrospective dose reconstruction for accident scenarios occurring in workplaces having a large quantity of unsealed radionuclides, such as nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and facilities in which nuclear medicine is practiced, a quantitative uncertainty assessment of the internal dose is often required. However, no calculation tools or computer codes that incorporate all the relevant processes and their corresponding uncertainties, i.e., from the measured data to the committed dose, are available. Thus, the objective of the present study is to develop an integrated probabilistic internal-dose-assessment computer code. First, the uncertainty components in internal dosimetry are identified, and quantitative uncertainty data are collected. Then, an uncertainty database is established for each component. In order to propagate these uncertainties in an internal dose assessment, a probabilistic internal-dose-assessment system that employs the Bayesian and Monte Carlo methods. Based on the developed system, we developed a probabilistic internal-dose-assessment code by using MATLAB so as to estimate the dose distributions from the measured data with uncertainty. Using the developed code, we calculated the internal dose distribution and statistical values ( e.g. the 2.5th, 5th, median, 95th, and 97.5th percentiles) for three sample scenarios. On the basis of the distributions, we performed a sensitivity analysis to determine the influence of each component on the resulting dose in order to identify the major component of the uncertainty in a bioassay. The results of this study can be applied to various situations. In cases of

  9. Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program Manual, PNL-MA-552

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Bihl, Donald E.; Maclellan, Jay A.

    2003-10-10

    This manual is a guide to the services provided by the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (IDP). It describes the roles of and relationships between the IDP and site contractors, and provides recommendations and guidance for consideration in implementing bioassay monitoring and internal dosimetry elements of radiation protection programs. Guidance includes identifying conditions under which workers should be placed on bioassay programs, types, descritptions, and capabilities of measurements, suggested routine bioassay programs, limitations on services, and practices for recording and reporting results.

  10. Distribution of 60Co in steel samples from Hiroshima.

    PubMed

    Hult, M; Marissens, G; Sahin, N; Hoshi, M; Hasai, H; Shizuma, K; Tanaka, K; Endo, S

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry measurements of the (60)Co activity distribution inside one 52 mm and one 41 mm thick steel sample. The samples had been exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb and were from the Aioi bridge and the Yokogawa bridge. Both samples were measured in a recent study aiming to back up model calculation of Hiroshima dosimetry. The (60)Co activity distributions found in this study support the assumptions made in the previous study.

  11. The 3rd international intercomparison on EPR tooth dosimetry: Part 1, general analysis.

    PubMed

    Wieser, A; Debuyst, R; Fattibene, P; Meghzifene, A; Onori, S; Bayankin, S N; Blackwell, B; Brik, A; Bugay, A; Chumak, V; Ciesielski, B; Hoshi, M; Imata, H; Ivannikov, A; Ivanov, D; Junczewska, M; Miyazawa, C; Pass, B; Penkowski, M; Pivovarov, S; Romanyukha, A; Romanyukha, L; Schauer, D; Scherbina, O; Schultka, K; Shames, A; Sholom, S; Skinner, A; Skvortsov, V; Stepanenko, V; Tielewuhan, E; Toyoda, S; Trompier, F

    2005-02-01

    The objective of the 3rd International Intercomparison on Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Tooth Dosimetry was the evaluation of laboratories performing tooth enamel dosimetry below 300 mGy. Participants had to reconstruct the absorbed dose in tooth enamel from 11 molars, which were cut into two halves. One half of each tooth was irradiated in a 60Co beam to doses in the ranges of 30-100 mGy (5 samples), 100-300 mGy (5 samples), and 300-900 mGy (1 sample). Fourteen international laboratories participated in this intercomparison programme. A first analysis of the results and an overview of the essential features of methods applied in different laboratories are presented. The relative standard deviation of results of all methods was better than 27% for applied doses in the range of 79-704 mGy. In the analysis of the unirradiated tooth halves 8% of the samples were identified as outliers with additional absorbed dose above background dose.

  12. Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program Manual, PNL-MA-552

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Bihl, Donald E.; Maclellan, Jay A.

    2009-09-24

    This manual is a guide to the services provided by the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (IDP), which is operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.( ) for the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, Office of River Protection and their Hanford Site contractors. The manual describes the roles of and relationships between the IDP and the radiation protection programs of the Hanford Site contractors. Recommendations and guidance are also provided for consideration in implementing bioassay monitoring and internal dosimetry elements of radiation protection programs.

  13. BUILDING 122 CONTAINS THREE GENERAL AREAS: OFFICE AREAS, INTERNAL DOSIMETRY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BUILDING 122 CONTAINS THREE GENERAL AREAS: OFFICE AREAS, INTERNAL DOSIMETRY, AND MEDICAL/HEALTH. BUILDING 122 SHARES A COMMON WALL WITH BUILDING 121, THE PLANT SECURITY BUILDING. THE TWO-STORY BUILDING IN THE BACKGROUND IS BUILDING 111. (9/26/52) - Rocky Flats Plant, Emergency Medical Services Facility, Southwest corner of Central & Third Avenues, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  14. Bayesian internal dosimetry calculations using Markov Chain Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Miller, G; Martz, H F; Little, T T; Guilmette, R

    2002-01-01

    A new numerical method for solving the inverse problem of internal dosimetry is described. The new method uses Markov Chain Monte Carlo and the Metropolis algorithm. Multiple intake amounts, biokinetic types, and times of intake are determined from bioassay data by integrating over the Bayesian posterior distribution. The method appears definitive, but its application requires a large amount of computing time.

  15. Radiation dosimetry onboard the International Space Station ISS.

    PubMed

    Berger, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Besides the effects of the microgravity environment, and the psychological and psychosocial problems encountered in confined spaces, radiation is the main health detriment for long duration human space missions. The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on earth, consisting mostly of high energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones encountered on earth for occupational radiation workers. Therefore the determination and the control of the radiation load on astronauts is a moral obligation of the space faring nations. The requirements for radiation detectors in space are very different to that on earth. Limitations in mass, power consumption and the complex nature of the space radiation environment define and limit the overall construction of radiation detectors. Radiation dosimetry onboard the International Space Station (ISS) is onboard the International Space Station (ISS) is accomplished to one part as "operational" dosimetry accomplished to one part as "operational" dosimetry aiming for area monitoring of the radiation environment as well as astronaut surveillance. Another part focuses on "scientific" dosimetry aiming for a better understanding of the radiation environment and its constitutes. Various research activities for a more detailed quantification of the radiation environment as well as its distribution in and outside the space station have been accomplished in the last years onboard the ISS. The paper will focus on the current radiation detectors onboard the ISS, their results, as well as on future planned activities.

  16. Computer simulations for internal dosimetry using voxel models.

    PubMed

    Kinase, Sakae; Mohammadi, Akram; Takahashi, Masa; Saito, Kimiaki; Zankl, Maria; Kramer, Richard

    2011-07-01

    In the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, several studies have been conducted on the use of voxel models for internal dosimetry. Absorbed fractions (AFs) and S values have been evaluated for preclinical assessments of radiopharmaceuticals using human voxel models and a mouse voxel model. Computational calibration of in vivo measurement system has been also made using Japanese and Caucasian voxel models. In addition, for radiation protection of the environment, AFs have been evaluated using a frog voxel model. Each study was performed by using Monte Carlo simulations. Consequently, it was concluded that these data of Monte Carlo simulations and voxel models could adequately reproduce measurement results. Voxel models were found to be a significant tool for internal dosimetry since the models are anatomically realistic. This fact indicates that several studies on correction of the in vivo measurement efficiency for the variability of human subjects and interspecies scaling of organ doses will succeed.

  17. Internal radiation dosimetry for clinical testing of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.; Durham, J.S.; Hui, T.E.; Hill, R.L.

    1990-11-01

    In gauging the efficacy of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies in cancer treatment, it is important to know the amount of radiation energy absorbed by tumors and normal tissue per unit administered activity. This paper describes methods for estimating absorbed doses to human tumors and normal tissues, including intraperitoneal tissue surfaces, red marrow, and the intestinal tract from incorporated radionuclides. These methods use the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) scheme; however, they also incorporate enhancements designed to solve specific dosimetry problems encountered during clinical studies, such as patient-specific organ masses obtained from computerized tomography (CT) volumetrics, estimates of the dose to tumor masses within normal organs, and multicellular dosimetry for studying dose inhomogeneities in solid tumors. Realistic estimates of absorbed dose are provided within the short time requirements of physicians so that decisions can be made with regard to patient treatment and procurement of radiolabeled antibodies. Some areas in which further research could improve dose assessment are also discussed. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Effect of respiratory motion on internal radiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Estimation of the radiation dose to internal organs is essential for the assessment of radiation risks and benefits to patients undergoing diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine procedures including PET. Respiratory motion induces notable internal organ displacement, which influences the absorbed dose for external exposure to radiation. However, to their knowledge, the effect of respiratory motion on internal radiation dosimetry has never been reported before. Methods: Thirteen computational models representing the adult male at different respiratory phases corresponding to the normal respiratory cycle were generated from the 4D dynamic XCAT phantom. Monte Carlo calculations were performed using the MCNP transport code to estimate the specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) of monoenergetic photons/electrons, the S-values of common positron-emitting radionuclides (C-11, N-13, O-15, F-18, Cu-64, Ga-68, Rb-82, Y-86, and I-124), and the absorbed dose of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) in 28 target regions for both the static (average of dynamic frames) and dynamic phantoms. Results: The self-absorbed dose for most organs/tissues is only slightly influenced by respiratory motion. However, for the lung, the self-absorbed SAF is about 11.5% higher at the peak exhale phase than the peak inhale phase for photon energies above 50 keV. The cross-absorbed dose is obviously affected by respiratory motion for many combinations of source-target pairs. The cross-absorbed S-values for the heart contents irradiating the lung are about 7.5% higher in the peak exhale phase than the peak inhale phase for different positron-emitting radionuclides. For {sup 18}F-FDG, organ absorbed doses are less influenced by respiratory motion. Conclusions: Respiration-induced volume variations of the lungs and the repositioning of internal organs affect the self-absorbed dose of the lungs and cross-absorbed dose between organs in internal radiation dosimetry. The dynamic

  19. Effect of respiratory motion on internal radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-11-01

    Estimation of the radiation dose to internal organs is essential for the assessment of radiation risks and benefits to patients undergoing diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine procedures including PET. Respiratory motion induces notable internal organ displacement, which influences the absorbed dose for external exposure to radiation. However, to their knowledge, the effect of respiratory motion on internal radiation dosimetry has never been reported before. Thirteen computational models representing the adult male at different respiratory phases corresponding to the normal respiratory cycle were generated from the 4D dynamic XCAT phantom. Monte Carlo calculations were performed using the mcnp transport code to estimate the specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) of monoenergetic photons/electrons, the S-values of common positron-emitting radionuclides (C-11, N-13, O-15, F-18, Cu-64, Ga-68, Rb-82, Y-86, and I-124), and the absorbed dose of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) in 28 target regions for both the static (average of dynamic frames) and dynamic phantoms. The self-absorbed dose for most organs/tissues is only slightly influenced by respiratory motion. However, for the lung, the self-absorbed SAF is about 11.5% higher at the peak exhale phase than the peak inhale phase for photon energies above 50 keV. The cross-absorbed dose is obviously affected by respiratory motion for many combinations of source-target pairs. The cross-absorbed S-values for the heart contents irradiating the lung are about 7.5% higher in the peak exhale phase than the peak inhale phase for different positron-emitting radionuclides. For (18)F-FDG, organ absorbed doses are less influenced by respiratory motion. Respiration-induced volume variations of the lungs and the repositioning of internal organs affect the self-absorbed dose of the lungs and cross-absorbed dose between organs in internal radiation dosimetry. The dynamic anatomical model provides more accurate internal radiation

  20. Internal dosimetry monitoring equipment: Present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Lynch, T.P.; Strom, D.J.; Lardy, M.M.

    1993-09-01

    We have attempted to characterize the current and future status of in vivo and in vitro measurement programs coupled with the associated radioanalytical methods and workplace monitoring. Developments in these areas must be carefully integrated by internal dosimetrists, radiochemists and field health physicists. Their goal should be uniform improvement rather than to focus on one specific area (e.g., dose modeling) to the neglect of other areas where the measurement capabilities are substantially less sophisticated and, therefore, the potential source of error is greatest.

  1. Internal dosimetry: towards harmonisation and coordination of research.

    PubMed

    Lopez, M A; Etherington, G; Castellani, C M; Franck, D; Hurtgen, C; Marsh, J W; Nosske, D; Breustedt, B; Blanchardon, E; Andrasi, A; Bailey, M R; Balashazy, I; Battisti, P; Bérard, P; Birchall, A; Broggio, D; Challeton-de-Vathaire, C; Cruz-Suarez, R; Doerfel, H; Giussani, A; Hodgson, A; Koukouliou, V; Kramer, G H; Le Guen, B; Luciani, A; Malatova, I; Molokanov, A; Moraleda, M; Muikku, M; Oeh, U; Puncher, M; Rahola, T; Stradling, N; Vrba, T

    2008-01-01

    The CONRAD Project is a Coordinated Network for Radiation Dosimetry funded by the European Commission 6th Framework Programme. The activities developed within CONRAD Work Package 5 ('Coordination of Research on Internal Dosimetry') have contributed to improve the harmonisation and reliability in the assessment of internal doses. The tasks carried out included a study of uncertainties and the refinement of the IDEAS Guidelines associated with the evaluation of doses after intakes of radionuclides. The implementation and quality assurance of new biokinetic models for dose assessment and the first attempt to develop a generic dosimetric model for DTPA therapy are important WP5 achievements. Applications of voxel phantoms and Monte Carlo simulations for the assessment of intakes from in vivo measurements were also considered. A Nuclear Emergency Monitoring Network (EUREMON) has been established for the interpretation of monitoring data after accidental or deliberate releases of radionuclides. Finally, WP5 group has worked on the update of the existing IDEAS bibliographic, internal contamination and case evaluation databases. A summary of CONRAD WP5 objectives and results is presented here.

  2. Methods and Models of the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, PNNL-MA-860

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Bihl, Donald E.; Maclellan, Jay A.

    2003-01-03

    This manual describes the technical basis for the design of the routine radiobioassay monitoring program and assessments of internal dose. Its purpose is to provide a historical record of the methods, models, and assumptions used for internal dosimetry at Hanford, and serve as a technical reference for radiation protection and dosimetry staff.

  3. [The estimation of appropriateness of chromosomal aberration assay as a biological dosimetry based on cytogenetic investigation of lung cancer patients given non-uniform fractional exposures to high doses of therapeutic 60Co gamma-rays].

    PubMed

    Khvostunov, I K; Kursova, L V; Shepel', N N; Ragulin, Iu A; Sevan'kaev, A V; Gulidov, I A; Glazyrin, D A; Ivanova, I N

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate in vivo the dose response of radiation induced chromosomal aberrations in human blood lymphocytes of lung cancer patients given non-uniform fractional exposures to high doses of therapeutic 60Co gamma-rays delivered synchronously with polychemotherapy. The chromosome aberration analysis was carried out in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 13 lung cancer patients who manifested II to IV developmental clinical stage. During the course of radiotherapy they received the accumulated tumor dose ranged 47.5 to 70 Gy. The yield ofdicentrics, centric rings and fragments was measured in the blood samples taken before treatment, after the first day and after the complete course of radiotherapy. Based on cytogenetic measurements of 3 patients, the average tumor dose after the first day was estimated to be 2.1 to 3.0 Gy given that the corresponding physical dose was (1.0 Gy + 1.5 Gy). The quotient of the individual dose estimated by the frequency of aberrations to the physical dose after the complete course of radiotherapy was calculated for all 13 patients. The mean quotient was shown to be equal to 93 +/- 9% ranged 50 to 154%.

  4. Sixth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium: Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    S.-Stelson, A.T.; Stabin, M.G.; Sparks, R.B.; Smith, F.B.

    1999-01-01

    This conference was held May 7--10 in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on radiopharmaceutical dosimetry. Attention is focused on the following: quantitative analysis and treatment planning; cellular and small-scale dosimetry; dosimetric models; radiopharmaceutical kinetics and dosimetry; and animal models, extrapolation, and uncertainty.

  5. Dosimetry of {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir gamma-irradiated agarose gels by proton relaxation time measurement and NMR imaging, in a 0-100 Gy dose range

    SciTech Connect

    Chalansonnet, A.; Briguet, A.; Bonnat, J.L.

    1997-05-01

    Localized irradiation of the skin and subcutaneous tissues with large single doses of gamma rays can induce immediate effects characterized by erythema, desquamation, and necrosis. Correlations between the evolution of the lesions and dosimetry studies have to be established by biophysical methods. NMR studies of the effects of an irradiated Fricke solution might be a means of controlling the delivered irradiation doses. After exposition to ionizing radiations, ferrous ions are transformed into ferric ions. Both are paramagnetic ions, and proton spin-lattice relaxation is accelerated depending on the oxidation reaction. In this study, solution of ammonium ferrous sulfate in an acid environment was incorporated into a gelling substance made with agarose, so that T{sub 1} weighted image contrast could be used to detect ferric ion formation. Experiments with {sup 192}Ir and {sup 90}Co gamma rays with doses in the 0 to 100 Gy range were conducted with Fe{sup 2+} concentrations of 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 mM in a gelling substance containing 4% agarose. A relationship was established between the amount of Fe{sup 3+} created and the spin-lattice proton relaxation rate, which led to a straightforward dose-effect relation. The use of such high doses allowed us to reproduce realistic conditions of accidental overexposure. A linear relationship was obtained between the doses absorbed and the NMR parameters measured (T{sub 1} and relative image intensity). 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. National and international standards and calibration of thermoluminescence dosimetry systems.

    PubMed

    Soares, C G

    2002-01-01

    Radiation protection for radiation workers, the public, and the environment is of international concern. The use of thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) is an acceptable method for dose recording in most countries. For reasons of consistency and data gathering (research) it is important that a Sievert (Sv) in one part of the world equals an Sv on the other side of the globe. To this end, much work has gone into the development of standards and calibration practices for TLD systems so that they compare not only with similar systems, but also with other forms of radiation measurement. While most national laboratories provide calibration services for these systems some, as in the United States, depend on services of secondary calibration laboratories that are traceable to the national laboratories through accreditation programmes. The purpose of this paper is to explain how TLD measurements are traceable to their respective national standards for both personnel and environmental dosimetry.

  7. Internal dosimetry performing dose assessments via bioassay measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.M.

    1993-05-11

    The Internal Dosimetry Department at the Y-12 Plant maintains a state-of-the-art bioassay program managed under the guidance and regulations of the Department of Energy. The two major bioassay techniques currently used at Y-12 are the in vitro (urinalysis) and in vivo (lung counting) programs. Fecal analysis (as part of the in vitro program) is another alternative; however, since both urine and fecal analysis provide essentially the same capabilities for detecting exposures to uranium, the urinalysis is the main choice primarily for aesthetic reasons. The bioassay frequency is based on meeting NCRP 87 objectives which are to monitor the accumulation of radioactive material in exposed individuals, and to ensure that significant depositions are detected.

  8. Code for internal dosimetry (CINDY): Part 1, Conceptual representation

    SciTech Connect

    Strenge, D.L.; Peloquin, R.A.; Sula, M.J.; Johnson, J.R.

    1990-10-01

    The computer code CINDY (Computerized Internal Dosimetry Software Package) has been developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to address the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.11 by providing the capabilities to calculate organ dose equivalents and effective dose equivalents using the approach contained in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 30. The code assists in the interpretation of bioassay data, the evaluation of committed and calendar-year doses from intake or bioassay measurement data, and the preparation of reports, consistent with revised DOE orders. The code is easy to use and is generally applicable to DOE sites. Flexible biokinetics models are used to determine organ doses for annual, 50-year, calendar-year, or any other time-point dose necessary for chronic or acute intakes. The CINDY code is an interactive computer program that prompts the user to describe the cases to be analyzed and calculates the necessary results for the type of analysis being performed. 30 refs., 13 figs., 14 tabs.

  9. Current internal-dosimetry practices at US Department of Energy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Traub, R.J.; Murphy, B.L.; Selby, J.M.; Vallario, E.J.

    1985-04-01

    The internal dosimetry practice at DOE facilities were characterized. The purpose was to determine the size of the facilities' internal dosimetry programs, the uniformity of the programs among the facilities, and the areas of greatest concern to health physicists in providing and reporting accurate estimates of internal radiation dose and in meeting proposed changes in internal dosimetry. The differences among the internal-dosimetry programs are related to the radioelements in use at each facility and, to some extent, the number of workers at each facility. The differences include different frequencies in the use of quality control samples, different minimum detection levels, different methods of recording radionuclides, different amounts of data recorded in the permanent record, and apparent differences in modeling the metabolism of radionuclides within the body. Recommendations for improving internal-dosimetry practices include studying the relationship between air-monitoring/survey readings and bioassay data, establishing uniform methods for recording bioassay results, developing more sensitive direct-bioassay procedures, establishing a mechanism for sharing information on internal-dosimetry procedures among DOE facilities, and developing mathematical models and interactive computer codes that can help quantify the uptake of radioactive materials and predict their distribution in the body. 19 refs., 8 tabs.

  10. Comparison of Different Internal Dosimetry Systems for Selected Radionuclides Important to Nuclear Power Production

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Eckerman, Keith F; Manger, Ryan P

    2013-08-01

    This report compares three different radiation dosimetry systems currently applied by various U.S. Federal agencies and dose estimates based on these three dosimetry systems for a set of radionuclides often identified in power reactor effluents. These dosimetry systems were developed and applied by the International Commission on Radiological Protection at different times over the past six decades. Two primary modes of intake of radionuclides are addressed: ingestion in drinking water and inhalation. Estimated doses to individual organs and to the whole body based on each dosimetry system are compared for each of four age groups: infant, child, teenager, and adult. Substantial differences between dosimetry systems in estimated dose per unit intake are found for some individual radionuclides, but differences in estimated dose per unit intake generally are modest for mixtures of radionuclides typically found in nuclear power plant effluents.

  11. Age-dependent small-animal internal radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    2013-09-01

    Rats at various ages were observed to present with different radiosensitivity and bioavailability for radiotracers commonly used in preclinical research. We evaluated the effect of age-induced changes in body weight on radiation dose calculations. A series of rat models at different age periods were constructed based on the realistic four-dimensional digital rat whole-body (ROBY) computational model. Particle transport was simulated using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Absorbed fractions (AFs) and specific absorbed fraction (SAFs) of monoenergetic photons/electrons and S values of eight positron-emitting radionuclides were calculated. The SAFs and S values for most source-target pairs were inversely correlated with body weight. Differences between F-18 S values for most source-target pairs were between -1.5% and -2%/10 g difference in body weight for different computational models. For specific radiotracers, the radiation dose to organs presents a negative correlation with rat body weight. The SAFs for monoenergetic photons/electrons and S values for common positron-emitting radionuclides can be exploited in the assessment of radiation dose delivered to rats at different ages and weights. The absorbed dose to organs is significantly higher in the low-weight young rat model than in the adult model, which would result in steep secondary effects and might be a noteworthy issue in laboratory animal internal dosimetry.

  12. Cellular dosimetry and microdosimetry for internal electron emitters.

    PubMed

    Chao, T C; Huang, Y S; Hsu, F Y; Hsiao, Y; Lee, C C; Tung, C J

    2011-02-01

    Radiobiological descriptions of cellular dosimetry and microdosimetry require both radiation dose and radiation quality. The lineal energy, defined as a ratio of the energy deposition by a particle in the biological target and the mean chord length of this target, is generally adopted to characterise the radiation quality. Most microdosimetry applications assume that the cell nucleus is the target region. Therefore, the lineal energy is obtained for the source (S) to target (T) geometry, T ← S, where S = cell surface, cytoplasm, cell nucleus and T = cell nucleus. The definition of lineal energy is based on the approximation that the particle mean pathlength is equal to target mean chord length. This approximation is valid for crossers of external irradiations. In the case of starters, insiders and stoppers of internal sources, particle pathlengths are always shorter than target chord lengths. Thus, the lineal energy does not reflect the specific energy deposition along particle path. In the present work, the specific energy deposition in a target is calculated using three distance parameters, i.e. target mean chord length, particle mean pathlength in the target and particle individual pathlength in the target. Monte Carlo calculations are performed for electrons of various energies and cells of different sizes. Results are analysed and discussed.

  13. Dosimetry software Hermes Internal Radiation Dosimetry: from quantitative image reconstruction to voxel-level absorbed dose distribution.

    PubMed

    Hippeläinen, Eero T; Tenhunen, Mikko J; Mäenpää, Hanna O; Heikkonen, Jorma J; Sohlberg, Antti O

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this work is to validate a software package called Hermes Internal Radiation Dosimetry (HIRD) for internal dose assessment tailored for clinical practice. The software includes all the necessary steps to perform voxel-level absorbed dose calculations including quantitative reconstruction, image coregistration and volume of interest tools. The basics of voxel-level dosimetry methods and implementations to HIRD software are reviewed. Then, HIRD is validated using simulated SPECT/CT data and data from Lu-DOTATATE-treated patients by comparing absorbed kidney doses with OLINDA/EXM-based dosimetry. In addition, electron and photon dose components are studied separately in an example patient case. The simulation study showed that HIRD can reproduce time-activity curves accurately and produce absorbed doses with less than 10% error for the kidneys, liver and spleen. From the patient data, the absorbed kidney doses calculated using HIRD and using OLINDA/EXM were highly correlated (Pearson's correlation coefficient, r=0.98). From Bland-Altman plot analysis, an average absorbed dose difference of -2% was found between the methods. In addition, we found that in Lu-DOTATATE-treated patients, photons can contribute over 10% of the kidney's total dose and is partly because of cross-irradiation from high-uptake lesions close to the kidneys. HIRD is a straightforward voxel-level internal dosimetry software. Its clinical utility was verified with simulated and clinical Lu-DOTATATE-treated patient data. Patient studies also showed that photon contribution towards the total dose can be relatively high and voxel-level dose calculations can be valuable in cases where the target organ is in close proximity to high-uptake organs.

  14. Internal dosimetry estimates using voxelized reference phantoms for thyroid agents.

    PubMed

    Hoseinian-Azghadi, E; Rafat-Motavalli, L; Miri-Hakimabad, H

    2014-05-01

    This work presents internal dosimetry estimates for diagnostic procedures performed for thyroid disorders by relevant radiopharmaceuticals. The organ doses for (131)Iodine, (123)Iodine and (99m)Tc incorporated into the body were calculated for the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantoms using the Monte Carlo transport method. A comparison between different thyroid uptakes of iodine in the range of 0-55% was made, and the effect of various techniques for administration of (99m)Tc on organ doses was studied. To investigate the necessity of calculating organ dose from all source regions, the major source organ and its contribution to total dose were specified for each target organ. Moreover, we compared effective dose in ICRP voxel phantoms with that in stylized phantoms. In our method, we directly calculated the organ dose without using the S values or SAFs, as is commonly done. Hence, a distribution of the absorbed dose to entire tissues was obtained. The chord length distributions (CLDs) were also computed for the selected source-target pairs to make comparison across the genders. The results showed that the S values for radionuclides in the thyroid are not sufficient for calculating the organ doses, especially for (123)I and (99m)Tc. The thyroid and its neighboring organs receive a greater dose as thyroid uptake increases. Our comparisons also revealed an underestimation of organ doses reported for the stylized phantoms compared with the values based on the ICRP voxel phantoms in the uptake range of 5-55%, and an overestimation of absorbed dose by up to 2-fold for Iodine administration using blocking agent and for (99m)Tc incorporation.

  15. Computational hybrid anthropometric paediatric phantom library for internal radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Tianwu; Kuster, Niels; Zaidi, Habib

    2017-04-01

    Hybrid computational phantoms combine voxel-based and simplified equation-based modelling approaches to provide unique advantages and more realism for the construction of anthropomorphic models. In this work, a methodology and C++ code are developed to generate hybrid computational phantoms covering statistical distributions of body morphometry in the paediatric population. The paediatric phantoms of the Virtual Population Series (IT’IS Foundation, Switzerland) were modified to match target anthropometric parameters, including body mass, body length, standing height and sitting height/stature ratio, determined from reference databases of the National Centre for Health Statistics and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The phantoms were selected as representative anchor phantoms for the newborn, 1, 2, 5, 10 and 15 years-old children, and were subsequently remodelled to create 1100 female and male phantoms with 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th body morphometries. Evaluation was performed qualitatively using 3D visualization and quantitatively by analysing internal organ masses. Overall, the newly generated phantoms appear very reasonable and representative of the main characteristics of the paediatric population at various ages and for different genders, body sizes and sitting stature ratios. The mass of internal organs increases with height and body mass. The comparison of organ masses of the heart, kidney, liver, lung and spleen with published autopsy and ICRP reference data for children demonstrated that they follow the same trend when correlated with age. The constructed hybrid computational phantom library opens up the prospect of comprehensive radiation dosimetry calculations and risk assessment for the paediatric population of different age groups and diverse anthropometric parameters.

  16. Internal dosimetry estimates using voxelized reference phantoms for thyroid agents

    PubMed Central

    Hoseinian-Azghadi, E.; Rafat-Motavalli, L.; Miri-Hakimabad, H.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents internal dosimetry estimates for diagnostic procedures performed for thyroid disorders by relevant radiopharmaceuticals. The organ doses for 131Iodine, 123Iodine and 99mTc incorporated into the body were calculated for the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantoms using the Monte Carlo transport method. A comparison between different thyroid uptakes of iodine in the range of 0–55% was made, and the effect of various techniques for administration of 99mTc on organ doses was studied. To investigate the necessity of calculating organ dose from all source regions, the major source organ and its contribution to total dose were specified for each target organ. Moreover, we compared effective dose in ICRP voxel phantoms with that in stylized phantoms. In our method, we directly calculated the organ dose without using the S values or SAFs, as is commonly done. Hence, a distribution of the absorbed dose to entire tissues was obtained. The chord length distributions (CLDs) were also computed for the selected source–target pairs to make comparison across the genders. The results showed that the S values for radionuclides in the thyroid are not sufficient for calculating the organ doses, especially for 123I and 99mTc. The thyroid and its neighboring organs receive a greater dose as thyroid uptake increases. Our comparisons also revealed an underestimation of organ doses reported for the stylized phantoms compared with the values based on the ICRP voxel phantoms in the uptake range of 5–55%, and an overestimation of absorbed dose by up to 2-fold for Iodine administration using blocking agent and for 99mTc incorporation. PMID:24222311

  17. Reference dosimetry measurements for the international intercomparison of criticality accident dosimetry SILENE 9-21 June 2002.

    PubMed

    Asselineau, B; Trompier, F; Texier, C; Itié, C; Médioni, R; Tikunov, D; Muller, H; Pelcot, G

    2004-01-01

    An international intercomparison of criticality accident dosimetry systems took place in the SILENE reactor, in June 2002. Participants from 60 laboratories irradiated their dosemeters (physical and biological) using two different configurations of the reactor. In preparation for this intercomparison, the leakage radiation fields were characterised by spectrometry and dosimetry measurements using the ROSPEC spectrometer associated with a NE-213 scintillator, ionisation chambers, GM counters, diodes and thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs). For this intercomparison, a large area was required to irradiate the dosemeters both in free air and on phantoms. Therefore, measurements of the uniformity of the field were performed with activation detectors and TLDs for neutron and gammas, respectively. This paper describes the procedures used and the results obtained.

  18. Harmonization of internal dosimetry procedures in Latin America--ARCAL/IAEA project.

    PubMed

    Melo, D; Suarez, R Cruz; Rojo, A; Dantas, B M; Julião, L; Serdero, N; Videla, R; Puerta, J A; Lopez, G; Alfaro, M M; Gonzáles, S; Hermida, J C; Navarro, T

    2007-01-01

    Under the auspices of the Regional Coordination Agreement for Latin America, representatives of the eight member states have participated in a project to improve radiological protection for workers exposed to unsealed sources of radiation. The design of the project was based on information obtained from a questionnaire circulated among the participants, from which the initial status of internal dosimetry services in each country was characterised. The objective of the project is to harmonize internal dosimetry procedures, with reference to International Atomic Energy Agency recommendations. After the implementation of new procedures and personnel training, four intercomparison exercises were carried out: measurement of iodine in thyroid phantoms, measurement of gamma emitters in urine samples, measurement of beta emitters in urine samples and internal dose assessments. This project has resulted in important improvements in internal dosimetry services in the region.

  19. Internal exposure to neutron-activated (56)Mn dioxide powder in Wistar rats: part 1: dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, Valeriy; Rakhypbekov, Tolebay; Otani, Keiko; Endo, Satoru; Satoh, Kenichi; Kawano, Noriyuki; Shichijo, Kazuko; Nakashima, Masahiro; Takatsuji, Toshihiro; Sakaguchi, Aya; Kato, Hiroaki; Onda, Yuichi; Fujimoto, Nariaki; Toyoda, Shin; Sato, Hitoshi; Dyussupov, Altay; Chaizhunusova, Nailya; Sayakenov, Nurlan; Uzbekov, Darkhan; Saimova, Aisulu; Shabdarbaeva, Dariya; Skakov, Mazhin; Vurim, Alexandr; Gnyrya, Vyacheslav; Azimkhanov, Almas; Kolbayenkov, Alexander; Zhumadilov, Kasym; Kairikhanova, Yankar; Kaprin, Andrey; Galkin, Vsevolod; Ivanov, Sergey; Kolyzhenkov, Timofey; Petukhov, Aleksey; Yaskova, Elena; Belukha, Irina; Khailov, Artem; Skvortsov, Valeriy; Ivannikov, Alexander; Akhmedova, Umukusum; Bogacheva, Viktoria; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2017-03-01

    There were two sources of ionizing irradiation after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki: (1) initial gamma-neutron irradiation at the moment of detonation and (2) residual radioactivity. Residual radioactivity consisted of two components: radioactive fallout containing fission products, including radioactive fissile materials from nuclear device, and neutron-activated radioisotopes from materials on the ground. The dosimetry systems DS86 and DS02 were mainly devoted to the assessment of initial radiation exposure to neutrons and gamma rays, while only brief considerations were given for the estimation of doses caused by residual radiation exposure. Currently, estimation of internal exposure of atomic bomb survivors due to dispersed radioactivity and neutron-activated radioisotopes from materials on the ground is a matter of some interest, in Japan. The main neutron-activated radionuclides in soil dust were (24)Na, (28)Al, (31)Si, (32)P, (38)Cl, (42)K, (45)Ca, (46)Sc, (56)Mn, (59)Fe, (60)Co, and (134)Cs. The radionuclide (56)Mn (T 1/2 = 2.58 h) is known as one of the dominant beta- and gamma emitters during the first few hours after neutron irradiation of soil and other materials on ground, dispersed in the form of dust after a nuclear explosion in the atmosphere. To investigate the peculiarities of biological effects of internal exposure to (56)Mn in comparison with external gamma irradiation, a dedicated experiment with Wistar rats exposed to neutron-activated (56)Mn dioxide powder was performed recently by Shichijo and coworkers. The dosimetry required for this experiment is described here. Assessment of internal radiation doses was performed on the basis of measured (56)Mn activity in the organs and tissues of the rats and of absorbed fractions of internal exposure to photons and electrons calculated with the MCNP-4C Monte Carlo using a mathematical rat phantom. The first results of this international multicenter study show that the internal

  20. Biokinetics and internal dosimetry of inhaled metal tritide particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yansheng

    1998-12-01

    Metal tritides (MT), stable chemical compounds of tritium, are widely used in nuclear engineering facilities. MT particles can be released as aerosols. Inhaling MT particles is a potential occupational radiation hazard. Little information is available on their dissolution behavior, biokinetics, and dosimetry. The objectives of present dissertation are to estimate dissolution rates, to develop biokinetic models, to improve internal dosimetric considerations, and to classify MT materials. This study consisted of three phases: In vitro dissolution in a simulated lung fluid, In vivo rat experiments on retention and clearance, and biokinetic modeling and dosimetric evaluation. There was a supporting study on self- absorption of tritium beta in MT particles. MT materials used in this study were titanium (Ti) and zirconium (Zr) tritides. Results shows considerable self-absorption of beta particles and their energy, even for respirable MT particles smaller than 5 μm. The self-absorption factors should be required for counting MT particle samples and for estimating absorbed dose to tissues. In vitro and in vivo dissolution data indicate that Ti and Zr tritides are poorly soluble materials. Ti tritide belongs to the W class or M type while Zr tritide can be classified as Y class or S type. Due to long retention time of the MT particles, tritium betas directly from the particles contribute over 90% of the absorbed dose to lung. The lung dose contributes most of the effective dose to the whole body. Dissolved tritium including tritiated water (HTO) and organically bound tritium (OBT) has less effect on the lung dose and effective dose. Results on the annual limit on intake (ALI) indicate that the current radiation protection guideline based on HTO is not adequate for inhalation exposure to MT particles and needs to be modified. The biokinetic models developed in this study have predictive powers to estimate the consequences of a human inhalation exposure to MT aerosols. The

  1. IDEAS internal contamination database: a compilation of published internal contamination cases. A tool for the internal dosimetry community.

    PubMed

    Hurtgen, C; Andrasi, A; Bailey, M; Blanchardon, E; Berkovski, V; Castellani, C-M; Doerfel, H; Jourdain, J-R; LeGuen, B; Malatova, I; Marsh, J; Puncher, M

    2007-01-01

    In the scope of the IDEAS project to develop General Guidelines for the Assessment of Internal Dose from Monitoring data, two databases were compiled. The IDEAS Bibliography database contains references dealing with problems related to cases of internal contamination. The IDEAS Internal Contamination Database now contains more than 200 cases of internal contamination. In the near future, the IDEAS Internal Contamination database will be made available to the internal dosimetry community. The database has several potential applications, including: training, testing biokinetic models, testing software for calculating intakes and doses from bioassay data, comparison of data from a new accidental intake with that from previous exposures to similar materials. The database is by no means complete, and this presentation is also an appeal for internal contamination cases to extend and update it.

  2. Internal radiation dosimetry of orally administered radiotracers for the assessment of gastrointestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Yeong, Chai-Hong; Ng, Kwan-Hoong; Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet; Chung, Lip-Yong; Goh, Khean-Lee; Perkins, Alan Christopher

    2014-12-01

    Radionuclide imaging using (111)In, (99m)Tc and (153)Sm is commonly undertaken for the clinical investigation of gastric emptying, intestinal motility and whole gut transit. However the documented evidence concerning internal radiation dosimetry for such studies is not readily available. This communication documents the internal radiation dosimetry for whole gastrointestinal transit studies using (111)In, (99m)Tc and (153)Sm labeled formulations. The findings were compared to the diagnostic reference levels recommended by the United Kingdom Administration of Radioactive Substances Advisory Committee, for gastrointestinal transit studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. International cooperative effort to establish dosimetry standardization for radiation processing

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, H. IV

    1989-01-01

    Radiation processing is a rapidly developing technology with numerous applications in food treatment, sterilization, and polymer modification. The effectiveness of the process depends, however, on the proper application of dose and its measurement. These aspects are being considered by a wide group of experts from around the world who have joined together to write a comprehensive set of standards for dosimetry for radiation processing. Originally formed in 1984 to develop standards for food processing dosimetry, the group has now expanded into a full subcommittee of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), with 97 members from 19 countries. The scope of the standards now includes dosimetry for all forms of radiation processing. The group has now completed and published four standards, and is working on an additional seven. Three are specifically for food applications and the others are for all radiation applications, including food processing. Together, this set of standards will specify acceptable guidelines and methods for accomplishing the required irradiation treatment, and will be available for adoption by national regulatory agencies in their procedures and protocols. 1 tab.

  4. Worldwide bioassay data resources for plutonium/americium internal dosimetry studies.

    PubMed

    Miller, G; Riddell, A E; Filipy, R; Bertelli, L; Little, T; Guilmette, R

    2007-01-01

    Biokinetic models are the scientific underpinning of internal dosimetry and depend, ultimately, for their scientific validation on comparisons with human bioassay data. Three significant plutonium/americium bioassay databases, known to the authors, are described: (1) Sellafield, (2) Los Alamos and (3) the United States Transuranium Registry. A case is made for a uniform standard for database format, and the XML standard is discussed.

  5. Development, validation, and implementation of a patient-specific Monte Carlo 3D internal dosimetry platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besemer, Abigail E.

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is emerging as an attractive treatment option for a broad spectrum of tumor types because it has the potential to simultaneously eradicate both the primary tumor site as well as the metastatic disease throughout the body. Patient-specific absorbed dose calculations for radionuclide therapies are important for reducing the risk of normal tissue complications and optimizing tumor response. However, the only FDA approved software for internal dosimetry calculates doses based on the MIRD methodology which estimates mean organ doses using activity-to-dose scaling factors tabulated from standard phantom geometries. Despite the improved dosimetric accuracy afforded by direct Monte Carlo dosimetry methods these methods are not widely used in routine clinical practice because of the complexity of implementation, lack of relevant standard protocols, and longer dose calculation times. The main goal of this work was to develop a Monte Carlo internal dosimetry platform in order to (1) calculate patient-specific voxelized dose distributions in a clinically feasible time frame, (2) examine and quantify the dosimetric impact of various parameters and methodologies used in 3D internal dosimetry methods, and (3) develop a multi-criteria treatment planning optimization framework for multi-radiopharmaceutical combination therapies. This platform utilizes serial PET/CT or SPECT/CT images to calculate voxelized 3D internal dose distributions with the Monte Carlo code Geant4. Dosimetry can be computed for any diagnostic or therapeutic radiopharmaceutical and for both pre-clinical and clinical applications. In this work, the platform's dosimetry calculations were successfully validated against previously published reference doses values calculated in standard phantoms for a variety of radionuclides, over a wide range of photon and electron energies, and for many different organs and tumor sizes. Retrospective dosimetry was also calculated for various pre

  6. Design and Fabrication of Kidney Phantoms for Internal Radiation Dosimetry Using 3D Printing Technology.

    PubMed

    Tran-Gia, Johannes; Schlögl, Susanne; Lassmann, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Currently, the validation of multimodal quantitative imaging and absorbed dose measurements is impeded by the lack of suitable, commercially available anthropomorphic phantoms of variable sizes and shapes. To demonstrate the potential of 3-dimensional (3D) printing techniques for quantitative SPECT/CT imaging, a set of kidney dosimetry phantoms and their spherical counterparts was designed and manufactured with a fused-deposition-modeling 3D printer. Nuclide-dependent SPECT/CT calibration factors were determined to assess the accuracy of quantitative imaging for internal renal dosimetry.

  7. The Third International Intercomparison on EPR Tooth Dosimetry: part 2, final analysis.

    PubMed

    Wieser, A; Debuyst, R; Fattibene, P; Meghzifene, A; Onori, S; Bayankin, S N; Brik, A; Bugay, A; Chumak, V; Ciesielski, B; Hoshi, M; Imata, H; Ivannikov, A; Ivanov, D; Junczewska, M; Miyazawa, C; Penkowski, M; Pivovarov, S; Romanyukha, A; Romanyukha, L; Schauer, D; Scherbina, O; Schultka, K; Sholom, S; Skvortsov, V; Stepanenko, V; Thomas, J A; Tielewuhan, E; Toyoda, S; Trompier, F

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the Third International Intercomparison on EPR Tooth Dosimetry was to evaluate laboratories performing tooth enamel dosimetry <300 mGy. Final analysis of results included a correlation analysis between features of laboratory dose reconstruction protocols and dosimetry performance. Applicability of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) tooth dosimetry at low dose was shown at two applied dose levels of 79 and 176 mGy. Most (9 of 12) laboratories reported the dose to be within 50 mGy of the delivered dose of 79 mGy, and 10 of 12 laboratories reported the dose to be within 100 mGy of the delivered dose of 176 mGy. At the high-dose tested (704 mGy) agreement within 25% of the delivered dose was found in 10 laboratories. Features of EPR dose reconstruction protocols that affect dosimetry performance were found to be magnetic field modulation amplitude in EPR spectrum recording, EPR signal model in spectrum deconvolution and duration of latency period for tooth enamel samples after preparation.

  8. An international dosimetry exchange for BNCT part II: computational dosimetry normalizations.

    PubMed

    Riley, K J; Binns, P J; Harling, O K; Albritton, J R; Kiger, W S; Rezaei, A; Sköld, K; Seppälä, T; Savolainen, S; Auterinen, I; Marek, M; Viererbl, L; Nievaart, V A; Moss, R L

    2008-12-01

    The meaningful sharing and combining of clinical results from different centers in the world performing boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) requires improved precision in dose specification between programs. To this end absorbed dose normalizations were performed for the European clinical centers at the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Petten (The Netherlands), Nuclear Research Institute, Rez (Czech Republic), VTT, Espoo (Finland), and Studsvik, Nyköping (Sweden). Each European group prepared a treatment plan calculation that was bench-marked against Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) dosimetry performed in a large, water-filled phantom to uniformly evaluate dose specifications with an estimated precision of +/-2%-3%. These normalizations were compared with those derived from an earlier exchange between Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and MIT in the USA. Neglecting the uncertainties related to biological weighting factors, large variations between calculated and measured dose are apparent that depend upon the 10B uptake in tissue. Assuming a boron concentration of 15 microg g(-1) in normal tissue, differences in the evaluated maximum dose to brain for the same nominal specification of 10 Gy(w) at the different facilities range between 7.6 and 13.2 Gy(w) in the trials using boronophenylalanine (BPA) as the boron delivery compound and between 8.9 and 11.1 Gy(w) in the two boron sulfhydryl (BSH) studies. Most notably, the value for the same specified dose of 10 Gy(w) determined at the different participating centers using BPA is significantly higher than at BNL by 32% (MIT), 43% (VTT), 49% (JRC), and 74% (Studsvik). Conversion of dose specification is now possible between all active participants and should be incorporated into future multi-center patient analyses.

  9. Modeling the imprecision in prospective dosimetry of internal exposure to uranium.

    PubMed

    Davesne, E; Chojnacki, E; Paquet, F; Blanchardon, E

    2009-02-01

    The dosimetry of internal exposure to radionuclides is performed on the basis of biokinetic and dosimetric models. For prospective purpose, the organ or effective dose resulting from potential conditions of exposure can be calculated by applying these models with dedicated software. However, it is acknowledged that a significant uncertainty is associated with such calculation due to the variability of individual cases and to the possible lack of knowledge about some factors influencing the dosimetry. This uncertainty has been studied in a range of situations by modeling the uncertainty on the model parameters by probability distributions and propagating this uncertainty onto the dose result by Monte Carlo calculation. However, while probability distributions are well adapted to model the known variability of a parameter, they may lead to an unrealistically low estimate of the uncertainty due to a lack of knowledge about some input parameters. Here we present a mathematical method, based on the Dempster-Shafer theory, to deal with such imprecise knowledge. We apply this method to the prospective dosimetry of inhaled uranium dust in the nuclear fuel cycle when its physico-chemical properties are not precisely known. The results show an increased estimation of the range of uncertainty as compared to the application of a probabilistic method. This Dempster-Shafer method may valuably be applied in future prospective dosimetry of internal exposure in order to more realistically estimate the uncertainty resulting from an imprecise knowledge of the parameters of the dose calculation.

  10. Experimental and Monte Carlo evaluation of an ionization chamber in a 60Co beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perini, A. P.; Neves, L. P.; Santos, W. S.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2016-07-01

    Recently a special parallel-plate ionization chamber was developed and characterized at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares. The operational tests presented results within the recommended limits. In order to determine the influence of some components of the ionization chamber on its response, Monte Carlo simulations were carried out. The experimental and simulation results pointed out that the dosimeter evaluated in the present work has favorable properties to be applied to 60Co dosimetry at calibration laboratories.

  11. Accreditation and training on internal dosimetry in a laboratory network in Brazil: an increasing demand.

    PubMed

    Dantas, B M; Dantas, A L A; Acar, M E D; Cardoso, J C S; Julião, L M Q C; Lima, M F; Taddei, M H T; Arine, D R; Alonso, T; Ramos, M A P; Fajgelj, A

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, Brazilian Nuclear Programme has been reviewed and updated by government authorities in face of the demand for energy supply and its associated environmental constraints. The immediate impact of new national programmes and projects in nuclear field is the increase in the number of exposed personnel and the consequent need for reliable dosimetry services in the country. Several Technical Documents related to internal dosimetry have been released by the International Atomic Energy Agency and International Commission on Radiological Protection. However, standard bioassay procedures and methodologies for bioassay data interpretation are still under discussion and, in some cases, both in routine and emergency internal monitoring, procedures can vary from one laboratory to another and responses may differ markedly among Dosimetry Laboratories. Thus, it may be difficult to interpret and use bioassay data generated from different laboratories of a network. The main goal of this work is to implement a National Network of Laboratories aimed to provide reliable internal monitoring services in Brazil. The establishment of harmonised in vivo and in vitro radioanalytical techniques, dose assessment methods and the implementation of the ISO/IEC 17025 requirements will result in the recognition of technical competence of the network.

  12. PREFACE: 7th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry (IC3DDose)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thwaites, David; Baldock, Clive

    2013-06-01

    IC3DDose 2013, the 7th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry held in Sydney, Australia from 4-8 November 2012, grew out of the DosGel series, which began as DosGel99, the 1st International Workshop on Radiation Therapy Gel Dosimetry in Lexington, Kentucky. Since 1999 subsequent DoSGel conferences were held in Brisbane, Australia (2001), Ghent, Belgium (2004), Sherbrooke, Canada (2006) and Crete, Greece (2008). In 2010 the conference was held on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina and underwent a name-change to IC3DDose. The aim of the first workshop was to bring together individuals, both researchers and users, with an interest in 3D radiation dosimetry techniques, with a mix of presentations from basic science to clinical applications, which has remained an objective for all of the meetings. One rationale of DosGel99 was stated as supporting the increasing clinical implementation of gel dosimetry, as the technique appeared, at that time, to be leaving the laboratories of gel dosimetry enthusiasts and entering clinical practice. Clearly by labelling the first workshop as the 1st, there was a vision of a continuing series, which has been fulfilled. On the other hand, the expectation of widespread clinical use of gel dosimetry has perhaps not been what was hoped for and anticipated. Nevertheless the rapidly increasing demand for advanced high-precision 3D radiotherapy technology and techniques has continued apace. The need for practical and accurate 3D dosimetry methods for development and quality assurance has only increased. By the 6th meeting, held in South Carolina in 2010, the Conference Scientific Committee recognised the wider developments in 3D systems and methods and decided to widen the scope, whilst keeping the same span from basic science to applications. This was signalled by a change of name from 'Dosgel' to 'IC3DDose', a name that has continued to this latest conference. The conference objectives were: to enhance the quality and accuracy of

  13. Internal dosimetry for radioembolization therapy with Yttrium-90 microspheres.

    PubMed

    Fallahpoor, Maryam; Abbasi, Mehrshad; Parach, Ali Asghar; Kalantari, Faraz

    2017-03-01

    The absorbed doses in the liver and adjacent viscera in Yttrium-90 radioembolization therapy for metastatic liver lesions are not well-documented. We sought for a clinically practical way to determine the dosimetry of this advent treatment. Six different female XCAT BMIs and seven different male XCAT BMIs were generated. Using Monte Carlo GATE code simulation, the total of 100MBq (90) Y was deposited uniformly in the source organ, liver. Self-irradiation and absorbed doses in lung, kidney and bone marrow were calculated. The mean energy of Yittrium-90 (i.e., 0.937 MeV) was used. The S-values and equivalent doses in target organs were estimated. The dose absorbed in the liver was between 84 and 53 Gy and below the target of 80 to 150 Gy. The absorbed dose in the bone marrow, lungs, and kidneys are very low and below 0.1 , 0.4, and 0.5 Gy respectively. Our study indicates that larger activities than the conventional dose of 3 GBq may be both required and safe. Further confirmations in clinical settings are needed.

  14. Coordination of research on internal dosimetry in Europe: the CONRAD project.

    PubMed

    Lopez, M A; Etherington, G; Castellani, C M; Franck, D; Hurtgen, C; Marsh, J W; Nosske, D; Doerfel, H; Andrasi, A; Bailey, M; Balashazy, I; Battisti, P; Bérard, P; Berkowski, V; Birchall, A; Blanchardon, E; Bonchuk, Y; de Carlan, L; Cantone, M C; Challeton-de Vathaire, C; Cruz-Suarez, R; Davis, K; Dorrian, D; Giussani, A; Le Guen, B; Hodgson, A; Jourdain, J R; Koukouliou, V; Luciani, A; Malatova, I; Molokanov, A; Moraleda, M; Muikku, M; Oeh, U; Puncher, M; Rahola, T; Ratia, H; Stradling, N

    2007-01-01

    The EUropean RAdiation DOSimetry Group (EURADOS) initiated in 2005 the CONRAD Project, a Coordinated Network for Radiation Dosimetry funded by the European Commission (EC), within the 6th Framework Programme (FP). The main purpose of CONRAD is to generate a European Network in the field of Radiation Dosimetry and to promote both research activities and dissemination of knowledge. The objective of CONRAD Work Package 5 (WP5) is the coordination of research on assessment and evaluation of internal exposures. Nineteen institutes from 14 countries participate in this action. Some of the activities to be developed are continuations of former European projects supported by the EC in the 5th FP (OMINEX and IDEAS). Other tasks are linked with ICRP activities, and there are new actions never considered before. A collaboration is established with CONRAD Work Package 4, dealing with Computational Dosimetry, to organise an intercomparison on Monte Carlo modelling for in vivo measurements of (241)Am deposited in a knee phantom. Preliminary results associated with CONRAD WP5 tasks are presented here.

  15. Criticality accident dosimetry systems: an international intercomparison at the SILENE reactor in 2002.

    PubMed

    Médioni, R; Asselineau, B; Verrey, B; Trompier, F; Itié, C; Texier, C; Muller, H; Pelcot, G; Clairand, I; Jacquet, X; Pochat, J L

    2004-01-01

    In criticality accident dosimetry and more generally for high dose measurements, special techniques are used to measure separately the gamma ray and neutron components of the dose. To improve these techniques and to check their dosimetry systems (physical and/or biological), a total of 60 laboratories from 29 countries (America, Europe, Asia) participated in an international intercomparaison, which took place in France from 9 to 21 June 2002, at the SILENE reactor in Valduc and at a pure gamma source in Fontenay-aux-Roses. This intercomparison was jointly organised by the IRSN and the CEA with the help of the NEA/OCDE and was partly supported by the European Communities. This paper describes the aim of this intercomparison, the techniques used by the participants and the two radiation sources and their characteristics. The experimental arrangements of the dosemeters for the irradiations in free air or on phantoms are given. Then the dosimetric quantities measured and reported by the participants are summarised, analysed and compared with the reference values. The present paper concerns only the physical dosimetry and essentially experiments performed on the SILENE facility. The results obtained with the biological dosimetry are published in two other papers of this issue.

  16. Internal in vitro dosimetry for fish using hydroxyapatite-based EPR detectors.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, D V; Shishkina, E A; Osipov, D I; Razumeev, R A; Pryakhin, E A

    2015-08-01

    A number of aquatic ecosystems were exposed to ionizing radiation as a result of the activities of the Mayak Production Association in the Southern Urals, former Soviet Union, in the 1950s. Currently, fishes inhabiting contaminated lakes are being actively studied. These investigations need dosimetric support. In the present paper the results of a pilot study for elaborating an EPR dosimeter which can be used for internal dosimetry in vitro are described. Biological hydroxyapatite is proposed here to be used as a detecting substance. More specifically, small hydroxyapatite grains are proposed for use as point detectors fixed in a solid matrix. After having been pelletized, the detectors were covered by Mylar and placed in the body of a fish to be stored in the fridge for several months. Application of the detectors for internal fish dosimetry demonstrated that the enamel sensitivity is sufficient for passive detection of ionizing radiation in fishes inhabiting contaminated lakes in the Southern Urals.

  17. General guidelines for safe and expeditious international transport of samples subjected to biological dosimetry assessment.

    PubMed

    Di Giorgio, Marina; Radl, Analía; Taja, María R; Bubniak, Ruth; Deminge, Mayra; Sapienza, Carla; Vázquez, Marina; Baciu, Florian; Kenny, Pat

    2014-06-01

    It has been observed that victims of accidental overexposures show better chance of survival if they receive medical treatment early. The increased risk of scenarios involving mass casualties has stimulated the scientific community to develop tools that would help the medical doctors to treat victims. The biological dosimetry has become a routine test to estimate the dose, supplementing physical and clinical dosimetry. In case of radiation emergencies, in order to provide timely and effectively biological dosimetry assistance it is essential to guarantee an adequate transport of blood samples in principal, for providing support to countries that do not have biodosimetry laboratories. The objective of the present paper is to provide general guidelines, summarised in 10 points, for timely and proper receiving and sending of blood samples under National and International regulations, for safe and expeditious international transport. These guidelines cover the classification, packaging, marking, labelling, refrigeration and documentation requirements for the international shipping of blood samples and pellets, to provide assistance missions with a tool that would contribute with the preparedness for an effective biodosimetric response in cases of radiological or nuclear emergencies.

  18. Development of a software tool for an internal dosimetry using MIRD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaichana, A.; Tocharoenchai, C.

    2016-03-01

    Currently, many software packages for the internal radiation dosimetry have been developed. Many of them do not provide sufficient tools to perform all of the necessary steps from nuclear medicine image analysis for dose calculation. For this reason, we developed a CALRADDOSE software that can be performed internal dosimetry using MIRD method within a single environment. MATLAB software version 2015a was used as development tool. The calculation process of this software proceeds from collecting time-activity data from image data followed by residence time calculation and absorbed dose calculation using MIRD method. To evaluate the accuracy of this software, we calculate residence times and absorbed doses of 5 Ga- 67 studies and 5 I-131 MIBG studies and then compared the results with those obtained from OLINDA/EXM software. The results showed that the residence times and absorbed doses obtained from both software packages were not statistically significant differences. The CALRADDOSE software is a user-friendly, graphic user interface-based software for internal dosimetry. It provides fast and accurate results, which may be useful for a routine work.

  19. PREFACE: 8th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry (IC3DDose)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Lars E.; Bäck, S.; Ceberg, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    IC3DDose 2014, the 8th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry was held in Ystad, Sweden, from 4-7 September 2014. This grew out of the DosGel series, which began as DosGel99, the 1st International Workshop on Radiation Therapy Gel Dosimetry in Lexington, Kentucky. Since 1999 subsequent DoSGel conferences were held in Brisbane, Australia (2001), Ghent, Belgium (2004), Sherbrooke, Canada (2006) and Crete, Greece (2008). In 2010 the conference was held on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina and underwent a name-change to IC3DDose. The 7th and last meeting was held in Sydney, Australia from 4-8 November 2012. It is worth remembering that the conference series started at the very beginning of the intensity modulated radiotherapy era and that the dosimeters being developed then were, to some extent, ahead of the clinical need of radiotherapy. However, since then the technical developments in radiation therapy have been dramatic, with dynamic treatments, including tracking, gating and volumetric modulated arc therapy, widely introduced in the clinic with the need for 3D dosimetry thus endless. This was also reflected by the contributions at the meeting in Ystad. Accordingly the scope of the meeting has also broadened to IC3DDOSE - I See Three-Dimensional Dose. A multitude of dosimetry techniques and radiation detectors are now represented, all with the common denominator: three-dimensional or 3D. Additionally, quality assurance (QA) procedures and other aspects of clinical dosimetry are represented. The implementation of new dosimetric techniques in radiotherapy is a process that needs every kind of caution, carefulness and thorough validation. Therefore, the clinical needs, reformulated as the aims for IC3DDOSE - I See Three-Dimensional Dose, are: • Enhance the quality and accuracy of radiation therapy treatments through improved clinical dosimetry. • Investigate and understand the dosimetric challenges of modern radiation treatment techniques. • Provide

  20. PREFACE: The 5th International Conference on Radiotherapy Gel Dosimetry (DOSGEL 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maris, Thomas G.; Pappas, Evangelos

    2009-07-01

    The International Conference on Radiotherapy Gel Dosimetry (DOSGEL) is held every two years. Its purpose is to bring together basic science and clinical researchers, medical physicists and clinicians from around the world to discuss the state-of-the-art of the gel dosimetry technique and to set the directions and trends for its future improvements. Gel dosimetry can be broadly defined as using a gel that can react to the absorption of ionizing radiation, and that can retain this information which can subsequently be retrieved by an external imaging modality. Examples of radiation-sensitive gels include, but are not limited to, polymer gel dosimeters, Fricke gel dosimeters and others. Imaging modalities that are of general use in this field are (in alphabetical order) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical light computed tomography and x-ray computed tomography. This volume comprises the proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Radiotherapy Gel Dosimetry (DOSGEL 2008). The conference, organised by the University of Crete, Medical Physics Department, took place in Hersonissos, Crete, Greece from 29 September to 3 October 2008. The meeting aimed to continue the series of biannual DOSGEL conferences and focused on the promotion of gel dosimetry techniques by setting the trends for their future improvements. The main scientific session topics of DOSGEL 2008 were the following: Chemistry and fundamental properties of polymer gel dosimeters Gel dosimetry with Optical Computed Tomography Gel dosimetry with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Gel dosimetry with other than Optical CT and MR scan Techniques Other 3D dosimeters Gel dosimetry applications Local Organizing Committee Thomas G Maris (University of Crete, Greece, Chairman DOSGEL 2008) John Damilakis (University of Crete, Greece) Evangelos Pappas (University of Crete, Greece) Antonios Papadakis (University of Crete, Greece) Fotini Zacharopoulou (University of Crete, Greece) John Stratakis (University of Crete

  1. Monte Carlo and experimental internal radionuclide dosimetry in RANDO head phantom.

    PubMed

    Ghahraman Asl, Ruhollah; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Parach, Ali Asghar; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Momennezhad, Mehdi; Davenport, David

    2015-09-01

    Monte Carlo techniques are widely employed in internal dosimetry to obtain better estimates of absorbed dose distributions from irradiation sources in medicine. Accurate 3D absorbed dosimetry would be useful for risk assessment of inducing deterministic and stochastic biological effects for both therapeutic and diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine. The goal of this study was to experimentally evaluate the use of Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) Monte Carlo package for 3D internal dosimetry using the head portion of the RANDO phantom. GATE package (version 6.1) was used to create a voxel model of a human head phantom from computed tomography (CT) images. Matrix dimensions consisted of 319 × 216 × 30 voxels (0.7871 × 0.7871 × 5 mm(3)). Measurements were made using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100). One rod-shaped source with 94 MBq activity of (99m)Tc was positioned in the brain tissue of the posterior part of the human head phantom in slice number 2. The results of the simulation were compared with measured mean absorbed dose per cumulative activity (S value). Absorbed dose was also calculated for each slice of the digital model of the head phantom and dose volume histograms (DVHs) were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each slice from the simulation data. The S-values calculated by GATE and TLD methods showed a significant correlation (correlation coefficient, r(2) ≥ 0.99, p < 0.05) with each other. The maximum relative percentage differences were ≤14% for most cases. DVHs demonstrated dose decrease along the direction of movement toward the lower slices of the head phantom. Based on the results obtained from GATE Monte Carlopackage it can be deduced that a complete dosimetry simulation study, from imaging to absorbed dose map calculation, is possible to execute in a single framework.

  2. Development and evaluation of a technique for in vivo monitoring of 60Co in human lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mello, J. Q.; Lucena, E. A.; Dantas, A. L. A.; Dantas, B. M.

    2016-07-01

    60Co is a fission product of 235U and represents a risk of internal exposure of workers in nuclear power plants, especially those involved in the maintenance of potentially contaminated parts and equipment. The control of 60Co intake by inhalation can be performed through in vivo monitoring. This work describes the evaluation of a technique through the minimum detectable activity and the corresponding minimum detectable effective doses, based on biokinetic and dosimetric models of 60Co in the human body. The results allow to state that the technique is suitable either for monitoring of occupational exposures or evaluation of accidental intake.

  3. Experimental investigation of the effect of air cavity size in cylindrical ionization chambers on the measurements in 60Co radiotherapy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanpalmer, John; Johansson, Karl-Axel

    2011-11-01

    In the late 1970s, Johansson et al (1978 Int. Symp. National and International Standardization of Radiation Dosimetry (Atlanta 1977) vol 2 (Vienna: IAEA) pp 243-70) reported experimentally determined displacement correction factors (pdis) for cylindrical ionization chamber dosimetry in 60Co and high-energy photon beams. These pdis factors have been implemented and are currently in use in a number of dosimetry protocols. However, the accuracy of these factors has recently been questioned by Wang and Rogers (2009a Phys. Med. Biol. 54 1609-20), who performed Monte Carlo simulations of the experiments performed by Johansson et al. They reported that the inaccuracy of the pdis factors originated from the normalization procedure used by Johansson et al. In their experiments, Johansson et al normalized the measured depth-ionization curves at the depth of maximum ionization for each of the different ionization chambers. In this study, we experimentally investigated the effect of air cavity size of cylindrical ionization chambers in a PMMA phantom and 60Co γ-beam. Two different pairs of air-filled cylindrical ionization chambers were used. The chambers in each pair had identical construction and materials but different air cavity volume (diameter). A 20 MeV electron beam was utilized to determine the ratio of the mass of air in the cavity of the two chambers in each pair. This ratio of the mass of air in each pair was then used to compare the ratios of the ionizations obtained at different depths in the PMMA phantom and 60Co γ-beam using the two pairs of chambers. The diameter of the air cavity of cylindrical ionization chambers influences both the depth at which the maximum ionization is observed and the ionization per unit mass of air at this depth. The correction determined at depths of 50 mm and 100 mm is smaller than the correction currently used in many dosimetry protocols. The results presented here agree with the findings of Wang and Rogers' Monte Carlo

  4. 1983 international intercomparison of nuclear accident dosimetry systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Greene, R.T.; Sims, C.S.

    1985-04-01

    An international intercomparison of nuclear accident dosimetry systems was conducted during September 12-16, 1983, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the Health Physics Research Reactor operated in the pulse mode to simulate criticality accidents. This study marked the twentieth in a series of annual accident dosimetry intercomparisons conducted at ORNL. Participants from ten organizations attended this intercomparison and measured neutron and gamma doses at area monitoring stations and on phantoms for three different shield conditions. Results of this study indicate that foil activation techniques are the most popular and accurate method of determining accident-level neutron doses at area monitoring stations. For personnel monitoring, foil activation, blood sodium activation, and thermoluminescent (TL) methods are all capable of providing accurate dose estimates in a variety of radiation fields. All participants in this study used TLD's to determine gamma doses with very good results on the average. Chemical dosemeters were also shown to be capable of yielding accurate estimates of total neutron plus gamma doses in a variety of radiation fields. While 83% of all neutron measurements satisfied regulatory standards relative to reference values, only 39% of all gamma results satisfied corresponding guidelines for gamma measurements. These results indicate that continued improvement in accident dosimetry evaluation and measurement techniques is needed.

  5. Influence of voxel S factors on three-dimensional internal dosimetry calculations.

    PubMed

    Berenato, Salvatore; Amato, Ernesto; Fischer, Alexander; Baldari, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    Internal dosimetry is a fundamental instrument for the personalization of nuclear medicine therapies, to maximize the therapeutic effect while minimizing the radiation burden to other organs. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry can quantify the impact of heterogeneous radiopharmaceutical distributions in organs, lesions and tissues. We analysed the influence of radionuclide voxel S factors in 3D dosimetry of (111)In, (177)Lu and (90)Y, the most used radionuclides in Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT). Calculations were carried out for kidneys on a workstation equipped with a software for 3D dosimetry (Imalytics STRATOS, Philips AG), adopting a computational anthropomorphic phantom and, retrospectively, the SPECT-CT image series of a clinical case of PRRT. Two sets of voxel S factors were adopted: the pre-loaded Philips kernels, calculated by direct Monte Carlo simulation, and the ones calculated through a previously proposed analytical approach. Philips (111)In kernel did not account for mono-energetic Auger or Conversion electrons. Results indicate a difference of about -32% in voxel S factors for (111)In in 4.42mm voxel size and around -35% in 4.80mm voxel size, particularly self-dose values; this lead to significant shift in dose histograms and average doses. For (177)Lu and (90)Y, differences are about 2% and 12% for 4.42mm voxels and about -8% and 9% for 4.80mm voxels, respectively, attributable to the different calculation methods of the voxel S factors; this does not lead to significant discrepancies between the two dose histograms. Consequently, voxel S factors must account accurately for all radiations emitted by the nuclide.

  6. Poster - Thur Eve - 46: The upcoming international code of practice for small static photon field dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Palmans, H; Alfonso, R; Andreo, P; Capote, R; Huq, M S; Izewska, J; Johansson, J; Kilby, W; Mackie, T R; Meghzifene, A; Rosser, K; Seuntjens, J; Ullrich, W

    2012-07-01

    The increased use of small photon fields in stereotactic and intensity-modulated radiotherapy has raised the need for standardizing the dosimetry of such fields using procedures consistent with those for conventional radiotherapy. An international working group, established by the IAEA in collaboration with AAPM and IPEM, is finalising a Code of Practice for the dosimetry of small static photon fields. Procedures for reference dosimetry in nonstandard machine specific reference (msr) fields are provided following the formalism of Alfonso et al. (Med. Phys. 35: 5179; 2008). Reference dosimetry using ionization chambers in machines that cannot establish a conventional 10 cm × 10 cm reference field is based on either a direct calibration in the msr field traceable to primary standards, a calibration in a reference field and a generic correction factor or the product of a correction factor for a virtual reference field and a correction factor for the difference between the msr and virtual fields. For the latter method, procedures are provided for determining the beam quality in non-reference conditions. For the measurement of field output factors in small fields, procedures for connecting large field measurements using ionization chambers to small field measurements using high-resolution detectors such as diodes, diamond, liquid ion chambers, organic scintillators and radiochromic film are given. The Code of Practice also presents consensus data on correction factors for use in conjunction with measured, detector-specific output factors. Further research to determine missing data according to the proposed framework will be strongly encouraged by publication of this document. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. An international dosimetry exchange for boron neutron capture therapy. Part I: Absorbed dose measurements.

    PubMed

    Binns, P J; Riley, K J; Harling, O K; Kiger, W S; Munck af Rosenschöld, P M; Giusti, V; Capala, J; Sköld, K; Auterinen, I; Serén, T; Kotiluoto, P; Uusi-Simola, J; Marek, M; Viererbl, L; Spurny, F

    2005-12-01

    An international collaboration was organized to undertake a dosimetry exchange to enable the future combination of clinical data from different centers conducting neutron capture therapy trials. As a first step (Part I) the dosimetry group from the Americas, represented by MIT, visited the clinical centers at Studsvik (Sweden), VTT Espoo (Finland), and the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) at Rez (Czech Republic). A combined VTT/NRI group reciprocated with a visit to MIT. Each participant performed a series of dosimetry measurements under equivalent irradiation conditions using methods appropriate to their clinical protocols. This entailed in-air measurements and dose versus depth measurements in a large water phantom. Thermal neutron flux as well as fast neutron and photon absorbed dose rates were measured. Satisfactory agreement in determining absorbed dose within the experimental uncertainties was obtained between the different groups although the measurement uncertainties are large, ranging between 3% and 30% depending upon the dose component and the depth of measurement. To improve the precision in the specification of absorbed dose amongst the participants, the individually measured dose components were normalized to the results from a single method. Assuming a boron concentration of 15 microg g(-1) that is typical of concentrations realized clinically with the boron delivery compound boronophenylalanine-fructose, systematic discrepancies in the specification of the total biologically weighted dose of up to 10% were apparent between the different groups. The results from these measurements will be used in future to normalize treatment plan calculations between the different clinical dosimetry protocols as Part II of this study.

  8. New calculations for internal dosimetry of beta-emitting radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Zankl, M; Petoussi-Henss, N; Janzen, T; Uusijärvi, H; Schlattl, H; Li, W B; Giussani, A; Hoeschen, C

    2010-01-01

    The calculation of absorbed dose from internally incorporated radionuclides is based on the so-called specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) which represent the fraction of energy emitted in a given source region that is absorbed per unit mass in a specific target organ. Until recently, photon SAFs were calculated using MIRD-type mathematical phantoms. For electrons, the energy released was assumed to be absorbed locally ('ICRP 30 approach'). For this work, photon and electron SAFs were derived with Monte Carlo simulations in the new male voxel-based reference computational phantom adopted by the ICRP and ICRU. The present results show that the assumption of electrons being locally absorbed is not always true at energies above 300-500 keV. For source/target organ pairs in close vicinity, high-energy electrons escaping from the source organ may result in cross-fire electron SAFs in the same order of magnitude as those from photons. Examples of organ absorbed doses per unit activity are given for (18)F-choline and (123)I-iodide. The impact of the new electron SAFs used for absorbed dose calculations compared with the previously used assumptions was found to be small. The organ dose coefficients for the two approaches differ by not more than 6 % for most organs. Only for irradiation of the urinary bladder wall by activity in the contents, the ICRP 30 approach presents an overestimation of approximately 40-50%.

  9. Items Supporting the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program Implementation of the IMBA Computer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Bihl, Donald E.

    2008-01-07

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program has adopted the computer code IMBA (Integrated Modules for Bioassay Analysis) as its primary code for bioassay data evaluation and dose assessment using methodologies of ICRP Publications 60, 66, 67, 68, and 78. The adoption of this code was part of the implementation plan for the June 8, 2007 amendments to 10 CFR 835. This information release includes action items unique to IMBA that were required by PNNL quality assurance standards for implementation of safety software. Copie of the IMBA software verification test plan and the outline of the briefing given to new users are also included.

  10. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Uncertainty assessment for internal dosimetry. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P.; Cooke, R.M.; Harrison, J.D.; Harper, F.T.; Hora, S.C.

    1998-04-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA internal dosimetry models. This volume contains appendices that include (1) a summary of the MACCS and COSYMA consequence codes, (2) the elicitation questionnaires and case structures, (3) the rationales and results for the panel on internal dosimetry, (4) short biographies of the experts, and (5) the aggregated results of their responses.

  11. MIRD pamphlet No. 23: quantitative SPECT for patient-specific 3-dimensional dosimetry in internal radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Dewaraja, Yuni K; Frey, Eric C; Sgouros, George; Brill, A Bertrand; Roberson, Peter; Zanzonico, Pat B; Ljungberg, Michael

    2012-08-01

    In internal radionuclide therapy, a growing interest in voxel-level estimates of tissue-absorbed dose has been driven by the desire to report radiobiologic quantities that account for the biologic consequences of both spatial and temporal nonuniformities in these dose estimates. This report presents an overview of 3-dimensional SPECT methods and requirements for internal dosimetry at both regional and voxel levels. Combined SPECT/CT image-based methods are emphasized, because the CT-derived anatomic information allows one to address multiple technical factors that affect SPECT quantification while facilitating the patient-specific voxel-level dosimetry calculation itself. SPECT imaging and reconstruction techniques for quantification in radionuclide therapy are not necessarily the same as those designed to optimize diagnostic imaging quality. The current overview is intended as an introduction to an upcoming series of MIRD pamphlets with detailed radionuclide-specific recommendations intended to provide best-practice SPECT quantification-based guidance for radionuclide dosimetry.

  12. Low-frequency electrical dosimetry: research agenda of the IEEE International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, J. Patrick; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-06-01

    This article treats unsettled issues in the use of numerical models of electrical dosimetry as applied to international limits on human exposure to low-frequency (typically  <  100 kHz) electromagnetic fields and contact current. The perspective in this publication is that of Subcommittee 6 of IEEE-ICES (International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety) Technical Committee 95. The paper discusses 25 issues needing attention, fitting into three general categories: induction models; electrostimulation models; and human exposure limits. Of these, 9 were voted as ‘high priority’ by members of Subcommittee 6. The list is presented as a research agenda for refinements in numerical modeling with applications to human exposure limits. It is likely that such issues are also important in medical and electrical product safety design applications.

  13. Low-frequency electrical dosimetry: research agenda of the IEEE International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety.

    PubMed

    Reilly, J Patrick; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-06-21

    This article treats unsettled issues in the use of numerical models of electrical dosimetry as applied to international limits on human exposure to low-frequency (typically  <  100 kHz) electromagnetic fields and contact current. The perspective in this publication is that of Subcommittee 6 of IEEE-ICES (International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety) Technical Committee 95. The paper discusses 25 issues needing attention, fitting into three general categories: induction models; electrostimulation models; and human exposure limits. Of these, 9 were voted as 'high priority' by members of Subcommittee 6. The list is presented as a research agenda for refinements in numerical modeling with applications to human exposure limits. It is likely that such issues are also important in medical and electrical product safety design applications.

  14. History of International Workshop on Mini-Micro- and Nano- Dosimetry (MMND) and Innovation Technologies in Radiation Oncology (ITRO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.; Zaider, Marco; Yamada, Josh; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    The biannual MMND (former MMD) - IPCT workshops was founded in collaboration between the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in 2001 and has become an important international multidisciplinary forum for the discussion of advanced quality assurance (QA) dosimetry technology for radiation therapy and space science, as well as advanced technologies for clinical cancer treatment.

  15. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Uncertainty assessment for internal dosimetry. Volume 1: Main report

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P.; Cooke, R.M.; Harrison, J.D.; Harper, F.T.; Hora, S.C.

    1998-04-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA internal dosimetry models.

  16. Prenatal exposure estimation of BPA and DEHP using integrated external and internal dosimetry: A case study.

    PubMed

    Martínez, M A; Rovira, J; Sharma, R Prasad; Nadal, M; Schuhmacher, M; Kumar, V

    2017-10-01

    Prenatal exposure to Endocrine disruptors (EDs), such as Bisphenol A (BPA) and di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), has been associated with obesity and diabetes diseases in childhood, as well as reproductive, behavioral and neurodevelopment problems. The aim of this study was to estimate the prenatal exposure to BPA and DEHP through food consumption for pregnant women living in Tarragona County (Spain). Probabilistic calculations of prenatal exposure were estimated by integrated external and internal dosimetry modelling, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, using a Monte-Carlo simulation. Physical characteristic data from the cohort, along with food intake information from the questionnaires (concentrations of BPA and DEHP in different food categories and the range of the different food ratios), were used to estimate the value of the total dietary intake for the Tarragona pregnancy cohort. The major contributors to the total dietary intake of BPA were canned fruits and vegetables, followed by canned meat and meat products. In turn, milk and dairy products, followed by ready to eat food (including canned dinners), were the most important contributors to the total dietary intake of DEHP. Despite the dietary variations among the participants, the intakes of both chemicals were considerably lower than their respective current tolerable daily intake (TDI) values established by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). Internal dosimetry estimates suggest that the plasma concentrations of free BPA and the most important DEHP metabolite, mono (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), in pregnant women were characterized by transient peaks (associated with meals) and short half-lives (< 2h). In contrast, fetal exposure was characterized by a low and sustained basal BPA and MEHP concentration due to a lack of metabolic activity in the fetus. Therefore, EDs may have a greater effect on developing organs in young children or in the unborn child. Copyright © 2017

  17. Image-based dosimetry for selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) using yttrium-90 microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selwyn, Reed G.

    present a new PET-labeled microsphere for pre- and post-treatment assessment, two new beta dosimetry protocols along with validation studies, a new positron branching ratio for 90Y that led to formation of an accurate non-destructive assay, and the first successful experimental validation of a computer generated internal dose distribution using dose kernel convolution.

  18. Statistical construction of a Japanese male liver phantom for internal radionuclide dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Mofrad, Farshid Babapour; Zoroofi, Reza Aghaeizadeh; Tehrani-Fard, Ali Abbaspour; Akhlaghpoor, Shahram; Hori, Masatoshi; Chen, Yen-Wei; Sato, Yoshinobu

    2010-09-01

    A computational framework is presented, based on statistical shape modelling, for construction of race-specific organ models for internal radionuclide dosimetry and other nuclear-medicine applications. This approach was applied to the construction of a Japanese liver phantom, using the liver of the digital Zubal phantom as the template and 35 liver computed tomography (CT) scans of male Japanese individuals as a training set. The first step was the automated object-space registration (to align all the liver surfaces in one orientation), using a coherent-point-drift maximum-likelihood alignment algorithm, of each CT scan-derived manually contoured liver surface and the template Zubal liver phantom. Six landmark points, corresponding to the intersection of the contours of the maximum-area sagittal, transaxial and coronal liver sections were employed to perform the above task. To find correspondence points in livers (i.e. 2000 points for each liver), each liver surface was transformed into a mesh, was mapped for the parameter space of a sphere (parameterisation), yielding spherical harmonics (SPHARMs) shape descriptors. The resulting spherical transforms were then registered by minimising the root-mean-square distance among the SPHARMs coefficients. A mean shape (i.e. liver) and its dispersion (i.e. covariance matrix) were next calculated and analysed by principal components. Leave-one-out-tests using 5-35 principal components (or modes) demonstrated the fidelity of the foregoing statistical analysis. Finally, a voxelisation algorithm and a point-based registration is utilised to convert the SPHARM surfaces into its corresponding voxelised and adjusted the Zubal phantom data, respectively. The proposed technique used to create the race-specific statistical phantom maintains anatomic realism and provides the statistical parameters for application to radionuclide dosimetry.

  19. Biological Dosimetry by the Triage Dicentric Chromosome Assay – Further validation of International Networking

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Ruth C.; Romm, Horst; Oestreicher, Ursula; Marro, Leonora; Yoshida, Mitsuaki A.; Suto, Y.; Prasanna, Pataje G.S.

    2011-01-01

    Biological dosimetry is an essential tool for estimating radiation doses received to personnel when physical dosimetry is not available or inadequate. The current preferred biodosimetry method is based on the measurement of radiation-specific dicentric chromosomes in exposed individuals' peripheral blood lymphocytes. However, this method is labour-, time- and expertise-demanding. Consequently, for mass casualty applications, strategies have been developed to increase its throughput. One such strategy is to develop validated cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory networks, both national and international. In a previous study, the dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) was validated in our cytogenetic biodosimetry network involving five geographically dispersed laboratories. A complementary strategy to further enhance the throughput of the DCA among inter-laboratory networks is to use a triage DCA where dose assessments are made by truncating the labour-demanding and time-consuming metaphase-spread analysis to 20 to 50 metaphase spreads instead of routine 500 to 1000 metaphase spread analysis. Our laboratory network also validated this triage DCA, however, these dose estimates were made using calibration curves generated in each laboratory from the blood samples irradiated in a single laboratory. In an emergency situation, dose estimates made using pre-existing calibration curves which may vary according to radiation type and dose rate and therefore influence the assessed dose. Here, we analyze the effect of using a pre-existing calibration curve on assessed dose among our network laboratories. The dose estimates were made by analyzing 1000 metaphase spreads as well as triage quality scoring and compared to actual physical doses applied to the samples for validation. The dose estimates in the laboratory partners were in good agreement with the applied physical doses and determined to be adequate for guidance in the treatment of acute radiation syndrome. PMID:21949482

  20. Biological dosimetry in the ENEIDE Mission on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertucci, A.; Durante, M.; Gialanella, G.; Grossi, G.; Manti, L.; Pugliese, M.; Scampoli, P.

    2007-09-01

    Space radiation represents one of the major health hazards to crews of interplanetary missions. As the duration of space flight increases, according to International Space Station (ISS) and Mars mission programs, the risk associated with exposure to ionizing radiation also increases. Although physical dosimetry is routinely performed in manned space missions, it is generally accepted that direct measurement of biological endpoints (biological dosimetry) is necessary for a precise assessment of radiation risk in extraterrestrial activities. Chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) are particularly suitable to this purpose, as they can provide estimates of both equivalent radiation dose and risk. In this study, cytogenetic analysis was performed on PBL chromosomes of an Italian astronaut involved in two different 10-day missions on the ISS (Marco Polo, April 2002, and ENEIDE, May 2005). Blood samples were collected before and after flights. CAs were evaluated in either mitotic spreads or in prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC) by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (FISH). In addition, blood samples were exposed to graded doses of X-rays in vitro before and after the flight and cytogenetic damage evaluated to investigate whether the space environment alters the sensitivity of human cells to ionizing radiation. The yield of baseline chromosomal aberrations was not modified following Marco Polo and ENEIDE mission. This is consistent with the low dose absorbed in these short-term space missions. Preliminary results from Marco Polo mission suggested a significant increase in intrinsic radiosensitivity of lymphocytes after landing compared to pre-flight and follow-up (6 months after landing) samples. However, this effect was not observed during the ENEIDE mission. The results suggest that intra-indi-vidual variations in radiosensitivity are significant, but they cannot be related to the space flight.

  1. Biological Dosimetry by the Triage Dicentric Chromosome Assay - Further validation of International Networking.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Ruth C; Romm, Horst; Oestreicher, Ursula; Marro, Leonora; Yoshida, Mitsuaki A; Suto, Y; Prasanna, Pataje G S

    2011-09-01

    Biological dosimetry is an essential tool for estimating radiation doses received to personnel when physical dosimetry is not available or inadequate. The current preferred biodosimetry method is based on the measurement of radiation-specific dicentric chromosomes in exposed individuals' peripheral blood lymphocytes. However, this method is labour-, time- and expertise-demanding. Consequently, for mass casualty applications, strategies have been developed to increase its throughput. One such strategy is to develop validated cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory networks, both national and international. In a previous study, the dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) was validated in our cytogenetic biodosimetry network involving five geographically dispersed laboratories. A complementary strategy to further enhance the throughput of the DCA among inter-laboratory networks is to use a triage DCA where dose assessments are made by truncating the labour-demanding and time-consuming metaphase-spread analysis to 20 to 50 metaphase spreads instead of routine 500 to 1000 metaphase spread analysis. Our laboratory network also validated this triage DCA, however, these dose estimates were made using calibration curves generated in each laboratory from the blood samples irradiated in a single laboratory. In an emergency situation, dose estimates made using pre-existing calibration curves which may vary according to radiation type and dose rate and therefore influence the assessed dose. Here, we analyze the effect of using a pre-existing calibration curve on assessed dose among our network laboratories. The dose estimates were made by analyzing 1000 metaphase spreads as well as triage quality scoring and compared to actual physical doses applied to the samples for validation. The dose estimates in the laboratory partners were in good agreement with the applied physical doses and determined to be adequate for guidance in the treatment of acute radiation syndrome.

  2. Technical basis for the internal dosimetry program at the Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, J.C.; Barber, J.M.; Snapp, L.M.; Turner, J.E.

    1992-03-02

    Since the beginning of plant operations. almost all work with radioactive materials has involved isotopes associated with uranium, enriched or depleted in U[sup 235]. While limited quantities of isotopes of elements other than uranium are present, workplace monitoring and precess knowledge have established that internal exposure from these other isotopes is insignificant in comparison with uranium. While the changing plant mission may necessitate the consideration of internal exposure from other isotopes at some point in time, only enriched and depleted uranium will be considered in this basis document. The portions of the internal dosimetry technical basis which may be unique to the Y-12 Plant is considered in this manual. This manual presents the technical basis of the routine in vivo and in vitro bioassay programs including choice of frequency, participant selection criteria, and action level guidelines. Protocols for special bioassay will be presented in the chapters which described the basis for intake, uptake, and dam assessment. A discussion of the factors which led to the need to develop a special biokinetic model for uranium at the Y-12 Plant, as well as a description of the model's basic parameters, are included in this document.

  3. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect

    Sega, G.A.

    1990-11-06

    The traveler participated in an International Symposium on Trends in Biological Dosimetry and presented an invited paper entitled, Adducts in sperm protamine and DNA vs mutation frequency.'' The purpose of the Symposium was to examine the applicability of new methods to study quantitatively the effects of xenobiotic agents (radiation and chemicals) on molecular, cellular and organ systems, with special emphasis on human biological dosimetry. The general areas covered at the meeting included studies on parent compounds and metabolites; protein adducts; DNA adducts; gene mutations; cytogenetic end-points and reproductive methods.

  4. Fate of 60Co at a sludge land application site.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael A; Larsen, Ingvar L; Fentiman, Audeen W

    2008-10-01

    Vertical distributions of 60Co are determined in soil cores obtained from a 10-ha grassland, where anaerobically digested sludge was applied by surface spraying from 1986 to 1995 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation. These results, along with historical application records, are used to estimate vertical-migration rates and perform a mass balance. The presence of 60Co results solely from the sludge-application process. Soil, vegetation, and surface-water samples were collected. Eleven soil cores were sectioned into 3-cm increments and analyzed by gamma-ray spectrometry. No 60Co was detected in the vegetation or water samples. The downward migration rate of 60Co in the upper 15 cm of soil ranged from 0.50 to 0.73 cm/yr. About 98%, 0.020+/-0.011 Bq/cm2, of 60Co remained in the upper 15 cm of soil, which compared favorably with the expected 60Co activity based on historical records of 0.019+/-0.010 Bq/cm2.

  5. Development of a 9-months pregnant hybrid phantom and its internal dosimetry for thyroid agents.

    PubMed

    Hoseinian-Azghadi, E; Rafat-Motavalli, L; Miri-Hakimabad, H

    2014-07-01

    As a consequence of fetal radiosensitivity, the estimation of internal dose received by a fetus from radiopharmaceuticals applied to the mother is often important in nuclear medicine. A new 9-months pregnant phantom based on magnetic resonance (MR) images tied to the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantom has been developed. Maternal and fetal organs were segmented from a set of pelvic MR images of a 9-months pregnant subject using 3D-DOCTOR(TM) and then imported into the 3D modeling software package Rhinoceros(TM) for combining with the adult female ICRP voxel phantom and further modeling. Next, the phantom organs were rescaled to match with reference masses described in ICRP Publications. The internal anatomy of previous pregnant phantom models had been limited to the fetal brain and skeleton only, but the fetus model developed in this study incorporates 20 different organs. The current reference phantom has been developed for application in comprehensive dosimetric study in nuclear medicine. The internal dosimetry calculations were performed for thyroid agents using the Monte Carlo transport method. Biokinetic data for these radiopharmaceuticals were used to estimate cumulated activity during pregnancy and maternal and fetal organ doses at seven different maximum thyroid uptake levels. Calculating the dose distribution was also presented in a sagittal view of the pregnant model utilizing the mesh tally function. The comparisons showed, in general, an overestimation of the absorbed dose to the fetus and an underestimation of the fetal thyroid dose in previous studies compared with the values based on the current hybrid phantom.

  6. Development of a 9-months pregnant hybrid phantom and its internal dosimetry for thyroid agents

    PubMed Central

    Hoseinian-Azghadi, E.; Rafat-Motavalli, L.; Miri-Hakimabad, H.

    2014-01-01

    As a consequence of fetal radiosensitivity, the estimation of internal dose received by a fetus from radiopharmaceuticals applied to the mother is often important in nuclear medicine. A new 9-months pregnant phantom based on magnetic resonance (MR) images tied to the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantom has been developed. Maternal and fetal organs were segmented from a set of pelvic MR images of a 9-months pregnant subject using 3D-DOCTORTM and then imported into the 3D modeling software package RhinocerosTM for combining with the adult female ICRP voxel phantom and further modeling. Next, the phantom organs were rescaled to match with reference masses described in ICRP Publications. The internal anatomy of previous pregnant phantom models had been limited to the fetal brain and skeleton only, but the fetus model developed in this study incorporates 20 different organs. The current reference phantom has been developed for application in comprehensive dosimetric study in nuclear medicine. The internal dosimetry calculations were performed for thyroid agents using the Monte Carlo transport method. Biokinetic data for these radiopharmaceuticals were used to estimate cumulated activity during pregnancy and maternal and fetal organ doses at seven different maximum thyroid uptake levels. Calculating the dose distribution was also presented in a sagittal view of the pregnant model utilizing the mesh tally function. The comparisons showed, in general, an overestimation of the absorbed dose to the fetus and an underestimation of the fetal thyroid dose in previous studies compared with the values based on the current hybrid phantom. PMID:24515254

  7. Development of derived investigation levels for use in internal dosimetry at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.

    1991-12-31

    The objective was to determine if the routine intemal dosimetry program at the West Valley Demonstration Project is capable of meeting the performance objective of 1 mSv annual effective dose equivalent due to internal contamination. With the use of the computer code REMedy the annual effective dose equivalent is calculated. Some of the radionuclides of concern result in an annual effective dose equivalent that exceeds the performance objective. Although the results exceed the performance objective, in all but two cases they do not exceed the US DOE regulatory limits. In these instances the Th-232 and Am-241 were determined to exceed the committed dose equivalent limit to their limiting tissue. In order to document the potential missed dose for regulatory compliance, Sr-90 is used as an indicator for Th-232. For Am-241 an investigation as to whether or not the minimum detectable amount can be lowered is performed. The derived investigation levels as a result of this project are 4.9E3 Bq/lung count for Co-60, 2.2E4 Bq/lung count for Cs-137, 1.9 Bq/1 for Sr-90 and for radionuclides other than Sr-90 any value greater than or equal to three standard deviations above their net count is considered to require further investigation.

  8. Measurements of (60)Co in massive steel samples exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb explosion.

    PubMed

    Gasparro, Joël; Hult, Mikael; Marissens, Gerd; Hoshi, Masaharu; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Laubenstein, Matthias; Dombrowski, Harald; Arnold, Dirk

    2012-04-01

    To study discrepancies in retrospective Hiroshima dosimetry, the specific activity of (60)Co in 16 steel samples from Hiroshima was measured using gamma-ray spectrometry in underground laboratories. There is general agreement between these new activity measurements and the specific activities derived from previously calculated dose values on the one hand and former measurements of samples gathered at distances less than 1,000 m from the center of the explosion (< 1,000 m slant range) on the other. It was found that activities at long range (> 1,300 m slant range) were mainly cosmogenically induced. Furthermore, at long range, these results are in disagreement with older measurements whose specific activity values were 10 to 100 times higher than predicted by computer model calculations in DS86 and DS02. As a consequence, the previously reported discrepancy is not confirmed.

  9. Internal photon and electron dosimetry of the newborn patient—a hybrid computational phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayson, Michael; Lee, Choonsik; Sgouros, George; Treves, S. Ted; Frey, Eric; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2012-03-01

    Estimates of radiation absorbed dose to organs of the nuclear medicine patient are a requirement for administered activity optimization and for stochastic risk assessment. Pediatric patients, and in particular the newborn child, represent that portion of the patient population where such optimization studies are most crucial owing to the enhanced tissue radiosensitivities and longer life expectancies of this patient subpopulation. In cases where whole-body CT imaging is not available, phantom-based calculations of radionuclide S values—absorbed dose to a target tissue per nuclear transformation in a source tissue—are required for dose and risk evaluation. In this study, a comprehensive model of electron and photon dosimetry of the reference newborn child is presented based on a high-resolution hybrid-voxel phantom from the University of Florida (UF) patient model series. Values of photon specific absorbed fraction (SAF) were assembled for both the reference male and female newborn using the radiation transport code MCNPX v2.6. Values of electron SAF were assembled in a unique and time-efficient manner whereby the collisional and radiative components of organ dose--for both self- and cross-dose terms—were computed separately. Dose to the newborn skeletal tissues were assessed via fluence-to-dose response functions reported for the first time in this study. Values of photon and electron SAFs were used to assemble a complete set of S values for some 16 radionuclides commonly associated with molecular imaging of the newborn. These values were then compared to those available in the OLINDA/EXM software. S value ratios for organ self-dose ranged from 0.46 to 1.42, while similar ratios for organ cross-dose varied from a low of 0.04 to a high of 3.49. These large discrepancies are due in large part to the simplistic organ modeling in the stylized newborn model used in the OLINDA/EXM software. A comprehensive model of internal dosimetry is presented in this study for

  10. Internal photon and electron dosimetry of the newborn patient--a hybrid computational phantom study.

    PubMed

    Wayson, Michael; Lee, Choonsik; Sgouros, George; Treves, S Ted; Frey, Eric; Bolch, Wesley E

    2012-03-07

    Estimates of radiation absorbed dose to organs of the nuclear medicine patient are a requirement for administered activity optimization and for stochastic risk assessment. Pediatric patients, and in particular the newborn child, represent that portion of the patient population where such optimization studies are most crucial owing to the enhanced tissue radiosensitivities and longer life expectancies of this patient subpopulation. In cases where whole-body CT imaging is not available, phantom-based calculations of radionuclide S values--absorbed dose to a target tissue per nuclear transformation in a source tissue--are required for dose and risk evaluation. In this study, a comprehensive model of electron and photon dosimetry of the reference newborn child is presented based on a high-resolution hybrid-voxel phantom from the University of Florida (UF) patient model series. Values of photon specific absorbed fraction (SAF) were assembled for both the reference male and female newborn using the radiation transport code MCNPX v2.6. Values of electron SAF were assembled in a unique and time-efficient manner whereby the collisional and radiative components of organ dose--for both self- and cross-dose terms--were computed separately. Dose to the newborn skeletal tissues were assessed via fluence-to-dose response functions reported for the first time in this study. Values of photon and electron SAFs were used to assemble a complete set of S values for some 16 radionuclides commonly associated with molecular imaging of the newborn. These values were then compared to those available in the OLINDA/EXM software. S value ratios for organ self-dose ranged from 0.46 to 1.42, while similar ratios for organ cross-dose varied from a low of 0.04 to a high of 3.49. These large discrepancies are due in large part to the simplistic organ modeling in the stylized newborn model used in the OLINDA/EXM software. A comprehensive model of internal dosimetry is presented in this study for the

  11. MIRD Pamphlet No. 23: Quantitative SPECT for Patient-Specific 3-Dimensional Dosimetry in Internal Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dewaraja, Yuni K.; Frey, Eric C.; Sgouros, George; Brill, A. Bertrand; Roberson, Peter; Zanzonico, Pat B.; Ljungberg, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In internal radionuclide therapy, a growing interest in voxel-level estimates of tissue-absorbed dose has been driven by the desire to report radiobiologic quantities that account for the biologic consequences of both spatial and temporal nonuniformities in these dose estimates. This report presents an overview of 3-dimensional SPECT methods and requirements for internal dosimetry at both regional and voxel levels. Combined SPECT/CT image-based methods are emphasized, because the CT-derived anatomic information allows one to address multiple technical factors that affect SPECT quantification while facilitating the patient-specific voxel-level dosimetry calculation itself. SPECT imaging and reconstruction techniques for quantification in radionuclide therapy are not necessarily the same as those designed to optimize diagnostic imaging quality. The current overview is intended as an introduction to an upcoming series of MIRD pamphlets with detailed radionuclide-specific recommendations intended to provide best-practice SPECT quantification–based guidance for radionuclide dosimetry. PMID:22743252

  12. Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2008 (MWDS-2008): assessment of internal dose from measurement results of plutonium activity in urine.

    PubMed

    Khokhryakov, Victor V; Khokhryakov, Valentin F; Suslova, Klara G; Vostrotin, Vadim V; Vvedensky, Vladimir E; Sokolova, Alexandra B; Krahenbuhl, Melinda P; Birchall, Alan; Miller, Scott C; Schadilov, Anatoly E; Ephimov, Alexander V

    2013-04-01

    A new modification of the prior human lung compartment plutonium model, Doses-2005, has been described. The modified model was named "Mayak Worker Dosimetry System-2008" (MWDS-2008). In contrast to earlier models developed for workers at the Mayak Production Association (Mayak PA), the new model more correctly describes plutonium biokinetics and metabolism in pulmonary lymph nodes. The MWDS-2008 also provides two sets of doses estimates: one based on bioassay data and the other based on autopsy data, where available. The algorithm of internal dose calculation from autopsy data will be described in a separate paper. Results of comparative analyses of Doses-2005 and MWDS-2008 are provided. Perspectives on the further development of plutonium dosimetry are discussed.

  13. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1990-12-17

    The traveler attended the 1st International Conference on Biological Dosimetry in Madrid, Spain. This conference was organized to provide information to a general audience of biologists, physicists, radiotherapists, industrial hygiene personnel and individuals from related fields on the current ability of cytogenetic analysis to provide estimates of radiation dose in cases of occupational or environmental exposure. There is a growing interest in Spain in biological dosimetry because of the increased use of radiation sources for medical and occupational uses, and with this the anticipated and actual increase in numbers of overexposure. The traveler delivered the introductory lecture on Biological Dosimetry: Mechanistic Concepts'' that was intended to provide a framework by which the more applied lectures could be interpreted in a mechanistic way. A second component of the trip was to provide advice with regard to several recent cases of overexposure that had been or were being assessed by the Radiopathology and Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital General Gregorio Maranon'' in Madrid. The traveler had provided information on several of these, and had analyzed cells from some exposed or purportedly exposed individuals. The members of the biological dosimetry group were referred to individuals at REACTS at Oak Ridge Associated Universities for advice on follow-up treatment.

  14. Comparative analysis of 60Co intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Christopher; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Lynch, Bart; Men, Chunhua; Aleman, Dionne M.; Dempsey, James F.

    2008-06-01

    In this study, we perform a scientific comparative analysis of using 60Co beams in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In particular, we evaluate the treatment plan quality obtained with (i) 6 MV, 18 MV and 60Co IMRT; (ii) different numbers of static multileaf collimator (MLC) delivered 60Co beams and (iii) a helical tomotherapy 60Co beam geometry. We employ a convex fluence map optimization (FMO) model, which allows for the comparison of plan quality between different beam energies and configurations for a given case. A total of 25 clinical patient cases that each contain volumetric CT studies, primary and secondary delineated targets, and contoured structures were studied: 5 head-and-neck (H&N), 5 prostate, 5 central nervous system (CNS), 5 breast and 5 lung cases. The DICOM plan data were anonymized and exported to the University of Florida optimized radiation therapy (UFORT) treatment planning system. The FMO problem was solved for each case for 5-71 equidistant beams as well as a helical geometry for H&N, prostate, CNS and lung cases, and for 3-7 equidistant beams in the upper hemisphere for breast cases, all with 6 MV, 18 MV and 60Co dose models. In all cases, 95% of the target volumes received at least the prescribed dose with clinical sparing criteria for critical organs being met for all structures that were not wholly or partially contained within the target volume. Improvements in critical organ sparing were found with an increasing number of equidistant 60Co beams, yet were marginal above 9 beams for H&N, prostate, CNS and lung. Breast cases produced similar plans for 3-7 beams. A helical 60Co beam geometry achieved similar plan quality as static plans with 11 equidistant 60Co beams. Furthermore, 18 MV plans were initially found not to provide the same target coverage as 6 MV and 60Co plans; however, adjusting the trade-offs in the optimization model allowed equivalent target coverage for 18 MV. For plans with comparable target coverage

  15. Prenatal Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure in CD-1 Mice: Low-Dose Developmental Effects and Internal Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Macon, Madisa B.; Villanueva, LaTonya R.; Tatum-Gibbs, Katoria; Zehr, Robert D.; Strynar, Mark J.; Stanko, Jason P.; White, Sally S.; Helfant, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an environmental contaminant that causes adverse developmental effects in laboratory animals. To investigate the low-dose effects of PFOA on offspring, timed-pregnant CD-1 mice were gavage dosed with PFOA for all or half of gestation. In the full-gestation study, mice were administered 0, 0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 mg PFOA/kg body weight (BW)/day from gestation days (GD) 1–17. In the late-gestation study, mice were administered 0, 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mg PFOA/kg BW/day from GD 10–17. Exposure to PFOA significantly (p < 0.05) increased offspring relative liver weights in all treatment groups in the full-gestation study and in the 1.0 mg PFOA/kg group in the late-gestation study. In both studies, the offspring of all PFOA-treated dams exhibited significantly stunted mammary epithelial growth as assessed by developmental scoring. At postnatal day 21, mammary glands from the 1.0 mg/kg GD 10–17 group had significantly less longitudinal epithelial growth and fewer terminal end buds compared with controls (p < 0.05). Evaluation of internal dosimetry in offspring revealed that PFOA concentrations remained elevated in liver and serum for up to 6 weeks and that brain concentrations were low and undetectable after 4 weeks. These data indicate that PFOA-induced effects on mammary tissue (1) occur at lower doses than effects on liver weight in CD-1 mice, an observation that may be strain specific, and (2) persist until 12 weeks of age following full-gestational exposure. Due to the low-dose sensitivity of mammary glands to PFOA in CD-1 mice, a no observable adverse effect level for mammary developmental delays was not identified in these studies. PMID:21482639

  16. Physical and biological organ dosimetry analysis for international space station astronauts.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Willingham, Veronica; George, Kerry A

    2008-07-01

    In this study, we analyzed the biological and physical organ dose equivalents for International Space Station (ISS) astronauts. Individual physical dosimetry is difficult in space due to the complexity of the space radiation environment, which consists of protons, heavy ions and secondary neutrons, and the modification of these radiation types in tissue as well as limitations in dosimeter devices that can be worn for several months in outer space. Astronauts returning from missions to the ISS undergo biodosimetry assessment of chromosomal damage in lymphocyte cells using the multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. Individual-based pre-flight dose responses for lymphocyte exposure in vitro to gamma rays were compared to those exposed to space radiation in vivo to determine an equivalent biological dose. We compared the ISS biodosimetry results, NASA's space radiation transport models of organ dose equivalents, and results from ISS and space shuttle phantom torso experiments. Physical and biological doses for 19 ISS astronauts yielded average effective doses and individual or population-based biological doses for the approximately 6-month missions of 72 mSv and 85 or 81 mGy-Eq, respectively. Analyses showed that 80% or more of organ dose equivalents on the ISS are from galactic cosmic rays and only a small contribution is from trapped protons and that GCR doses were decreased by the high level of solar activity in recent years. Comparisons of models to data showed that space radiation effective doses can be predicted to within about a +/-10% accuracy by space radiation transport models. Finally, effective dose estimates for all previous NASA missions are summarized.

  17. Paired organs--Should they be treated jointly or separately in internal dosimetry?

    SciTech Connect

    Parach, Ali-Asghar; Rajabi, Hossein; Askari, Mohammad-Ali

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Size, shape, and the position of paired organs are different in abdomen. However, the counterpart organs are conventionally treated jointly together in internal dosimetry. This study was performed to quantify the difference of specific absorbed fraction of organs in considering paired organs jointly like single organs or as two separate organs. Methods: Zubal phantom and GATE Monte Carlo package were used to calculate the SAF for the self-absorption and cross-irradiation of the lungs, kidneys, adrenal glands (paired organs), liver, spleen, stomach, and pancreas (single organs). The activity was assumed uniformly distributed in the organs, and simulation was performed for monoenergetic photons of 10, 50, 100, 500, 1000 keV and mono-energetic electrons of 350, 500, 690, 935, 1200 keV. Results: The results demonstrated that self-absorption of left and right counterpart organs may be different depending upon the differences in their masses. The cross-irradiations between left-to-right and right-to-left counterpart organs are always equal irrespective of difference in their masses. Cross-irradiation from the left and right counterpart organs to other organs are different (4-24 times in Zubal phantom) depending on the photon energy and organs. The irradiation from a single source organ to the left and right counterpart paired organs is always different irrespective of activity concentration. Conclusions: Left and right counterpart organs always receive different absorbed doses from target organs and deliver different absorbed doses to target organs. Therefore, in application of radiopharmaceuticals in which the dose to the organs plays a role, counterpart organs should be treated separately as two separate organs.

  18. International Intercomparison Exercise for Nuclear Accident Dosimetry at the DAF Using GODIVA-IV

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, David; Hudson, Becka

    2016-12-15

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Program operated under the direction of Dr. Jerry McKamy completed the first NNSA Nuclear Accident Dosimetry exercise on May 27, 2016. Participants in the exercise were from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), Savanah River Site (SRS), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), US Navy, the Atomic Weapons Establishment (United Kingdom) under the auspices of JOWOG 30, and the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (France) by special invitation and NCSP memorandum of understanding. This exercise was the culmination of a series of Integral Experiment Requests (IER) that included the establishment of the Nuclear Criticality Experimental Research Center, (NCERC) the startup of the Godiva Reactor (IER-194), the establishment of a the Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Laboratory (NAD LAB) in Mercury, NV, and the determination of reference dosimetry values for the mixed neutron and photon radiation field of Godiva within NCERC.

  19. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference adult female-internal electron sources.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Shannon E; DeWeese, Lindsay S; Maynard, Matthew R; Rajon, Didier A; Wayson, Michael B; Marshall, Emily L; Bolch, Wesley E

    2016-12-21

    An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for internal electron sources was created for the ICRP-defined reference adult female. Many previous skeletal dosimetry models, which are still employed in commonly used internal dosimetry software, do not properly account for electron escape from trabecular spongiosa, electron cross-fire from cortical bone, and the impact of marrow cellularity on active marrow self-irradiation. Furthermore, these existing models do not employ the current ICRP definition of a 50 µm bone endosteum (or shallow marrow). Each of these limitations was addressed in the present study. Electron transport was completed to determine specific absorbed fractions to both active and shallow marrow of the skeletal regions of the University of Florida reference adult female. The skeletal macrostructure and microstructure were modeled separately. The bone macrostructure was based on the whole-body hybrid computational phantom of the UF series of reference models, while the bone microstructure was derived from microCT images of skeletal region samples taken from a 45 years-old female cadaver. The active and shallow marrow are typically adopted as surrogate tissue regions for the hematopoietic stem cells and osteoprogenitor cells, respectively. Source tissues included active marrow, inactive marrow, trabecular bone volume, trabecular bone surfaces, cortical bone volume, and cortical bone surfaces. Marrow cellularity was varied from 10 to 100 percent for active marrow self-irradiation. All other sources were run at the defined ICRP Publication 70 cellularity for each bone site. A total of 33 discrete electron energies, ranging from 1 keV to 10 MeV, were either simulated or analytically modeled. The method of combining skeletal macrostructure and microstructure absorbed fractions assessed using MCNPX electron transport was found to yield results similar to those determined with the PIRT model applied to the UF adult male skeletal dosimetry model. Calculated

  20. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference adult female—internal electron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Shannon E.; DeWeese, Lindsay S.; Maynard, Matthew R.; Rajon, Didier A.; Wayson, Michael B.; Marshall, Emily L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2016-12-01

    An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for internal electron sources was created for the ICRP-defined reference adult female. Many previous skeletal dosimetry models, which are still employed in commonly used internal dosimetry software, do not properly account for electron escape from trabecular spongiosa, electron cross-fire from cortical bone, and the impact of marrow cellularity on active marrow self-irradiation. Furthermore, these existing models do not employ the current ICRP definition of a 50 µm bone endosteum (or shallow marrow). Each of these limitations was addressed in the present study. Electron transport was completed to determine specific absorbed fractions to both active and shallow marrow of the skeletal regions of the University of Florida reference adult female. The skeletal macrostructure and microstructure were modeled separately. The bone macrostructure was based on the whole-body hybrid computational phantom of the UF series of reference models, while the bone microstructure was derived from microCT images of skeletal region samples taken from a 45 years-old female cadaver. The active and shallow marrow are typically adopted as surrogate tissue regions for the hematopoietic stem cells and osteoprogenitor cells, respectively. Source tissues included active marrow, inactive marrow, trabecular bone volume, trabecular bone surfaces, cortical bone volume, and cortical bone surfaces. Marrow cellularity was varied from 10 to 100 percent for active marrow self-irradiation. All other sources were run at the defined ICRP Publication 70 cellularity for each bone site. A total of 33 discrete electron energies, ranging from 1 keV to 10 MeV, were either simulated or analytically modeled. The method of combining skeletal macrostructure and microstructure absorbed fractions assessed using MCNPX electron transport was found to yield results similar to those determined with the PIRT model applied to the UF adult male skeletal dosimetry model. Calculated

  1. Skeletal dosimetry in a voxel-based rat phantom for internal exposures to photons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Tianwu; Han Dao; Liu Yang; Sun Wenjuan; Liu Qian

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: The skeleton makes a significant contribution to the whole body absorbed dose evaluation of rats, since the bone marrow and bone surface in the skeleton express high radiosensitivity and are considered to be important dose-limiting tissues. The bone marrow can be categorized as red bone marrow (RBM) and yellow bone marrow (YBM). It is important to investigate the bone marrow in skeletal dosimetry. Methods: Cryosectional color images of the skeleton of a 156 g rat were segmented into mineral bone (including cortical bone and trabecular bone), RBM, and YBM. These three tissue types were identified at 40 different bone sites and integrated into a previously developed voxel-based rat computational phantom. Photon and electron skeletal absorbed fractions were then calculated using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Results: Absorbed fraction (AF) and specific absorbed fraction (SAF) for mineral bone, RBM, and YBM at the 40 different bone sites were established for monoenergetic photon and electron sources placed in 18 organs and seven bone sites. Discrete photon energy was varied from 0.01 to 5.0 MeV in 21 discrete steps, while 21 discrete electron energies were studied, from 0.1 to 10.0 MeV. The trends and values found were consistent with the results of other researchers [M. G. Stabin, T. E. Peterson, G. E. Holburn, and M. A. Emmons, ''Voxel-based mouse and rat models for internal dose calculations,'' J. Nucl. Med. 47, 655-659 (2006)]. S-factors for the radionuclides {sup 169}Er, {sup 143}Pr, {sup 89}Sr, {sup 32}P, and {sup 90}Y, located in 18 organs and seven bone sites for the skeleton, were calculated and are provided in detail. Conclusions: For internal dose calculations, the AF data reveal that the mineral bone in the rat skeletal system is responsible for significant attenuation of gamma rays, especially at low energies. The photon SAF curves of RBM show that, for photon energies greater than 0.6 MeV, there is an increase in secondary photons emitted from the

  2. Comparison of high-energy photon and electron dosimetry for various dosimetry protocols.

    PubMed

    Araki, Fujio; Kubo, H Dale

    2002-05-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 51 (TG-51) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) published a new high-energy photon and electron dosimetry protocol, in 1999 and 2000, respectively. These protocols are based on the use of an ion chamber having an absorbed-dose to water calibration factor with a 60Co beam. These are different from the predecessors, the TG-21 and IAEA TRS-277 protocols, which require a 60Co exposure or air-kerma calibration factor. The purpose of this work is to present the dose comparison between various dosimetry protocols and the AAPM TG-51 protocol for clinical reference dosimetry of high-energy photon and electron beams. The absorbed-dose to water calculated according to the Japanese Association of Radiological Physics (JARP), International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Report Series No. 277 (IAEA TRS-277) and No. 398 (IAEA TRS-398) protocols is compared to that calculated using the TG-51 protocol. For various Farmer-type chambers in photon beams, TG-51 is found to predict 0.6-2.1% higher dose than JARP. Similarly, TG-51 is found to be higher by 0.7-1.7% than TRS-277. For electron beams TG-51 is higher than JARP by 1.5-3.8% and TRS-277 by 0.2-1.9%. The reasons for these differences are presented in terms of the cavity-gas calibration factor, Ngas, and a dose conversion factor, Fw, which converts the absorbed-dose to air in the chamber to the absorbed-dose to water. The ratio of cavity-gas calibration factors based on absorbed-dose to water calibration factors, N60Co(D,w), in TG-51 and cavity-gas calibration factors which are equivalent to absorbed-dose to air chamber factors, N(D,air), based on the IAEA TRS-381 protocol is 1.008 on average. However, the estimated uncertainty of the ratio between the two cavity-gas calibration factors is 0.9% (1 s.d.) and consequently, the observed difference of 0.8% is not significant. The absorbed-dose to water and exposure or air-kerma calibration factors are based on

  3. Radiolytic degradation scheme for 60Co-irradiated corticosteroids

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, M.P.; Tsuji, K.

    1983-01-01

    The cobalt 60 radiolytic degradation products have been identified in the following corticosteroids: cortisone, cortisone acetate, hydrocortisone, hydrocortisone acetate, hydrocortisone sodium succinate, isoflupredone acetate, methylprednisolone, methylprednisolone acetate, prednisolone, prednisolone acetate, and prednisone. Two major types of degradation processes have been identified: loss of the corticoid side chain on the D-ring to produce the C-17 ketone and conversion of the C-11 alcohol, if present, to the C-11 ketone. Minor degradation products derived from other changes affecting the side chain are also identified in several corticosteroids. These compounds are frequently associated in corticosteroids as process impurities or degradation compounds. No new radiolytic compounds unique to 60Co-irradiation have been found. The majority of corticosteroids have been shown to be stable to 60Co-irradiation. The rates of radiolytic degradation ranged from 0.2 to 1.4%/Mrad.

  4. The clinical safety, biodistribution and internal radiation dosimetry of flutemetamol (¹⁸F) injection in healthy Japanese adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Senda, Michio; Brooks, David J; Farrar, Gill; Somer, Edward J; Paterson, Carolyn L; Sasaki, Masahiro; McParland, Brian J

    2015-08-01

    The Phase I safety, biodistribution and internal radiation dosimetry study in adult healthy Japanese males of flutemetamol ((18)F) injection, an in vivo β-amyloid imaging agent, is reported and compared with previously obtained Caucasian data. Whole-body PET scans of 6 healthy volunteers (age 51.8-61.7 years) were acquired approximately 4 h post-injection (administered activity 102-160 MBq). Venous blood sampling determined (18)F activity concentrations in whole blood and plasma and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) established the percentages of parent [(18)F]flutemetamol and its metabolites. Voided urine activity was recorded. The decay-corrected and normalised (18)F activity of 14 source organ regions as a function of time was entered into the OLINDA/EXM software to calculate the internal radiation dosimetry and effective dose of each subject following the MIRD schema. The pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and dosimetry profiles were compared to data obtained from a cohort of healthy Caucasian adult volunteers from a previous Phase I study of [(18)F]flutemetamol. Flutemetamol ((18)F) injection was well tolerated. The highest mean initial uptakes were measured in the liver (15.2%), lungs (10.2%) and brain (6.6%). The highest mean radiation absorbed doses were received by the gallbladder wall (366 μGy/MBq), upper large intestine (138 μGy/MBq) and small intestine (121 μGy/MBq). The mean effective dose was 34.9 μSv/MBq. HPLC analysis demonstrated that at 5-min post-injection about 75% of plasma (18)F radioactivity was in the form of parent [(18)F]flutemetamol, reducing to 8 and 2% at 25 and 90 min, respectively, giving rise to less lipophilic (18)F-labelled metabolites. Comparisons with the Caucasian cohort showed no differences that could be regarded as clinically significant. The clinical safety of [(18)F]flutemetamol demonstrated no differences of clinical significance in the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and internal radiation dosimetry

  5. Evaluation of a semiautomated lung mass calculation technique for internal dosimetry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Busse, Nathan; Erwin, William; Pan, Tinsu

    2013-12-15

    calculated using the formula (lung HU − air HU)/(tissue HU − air HU), and mass = specific gravity × total volume × 1.04 g/cm{sup 3}.Results: The range of calculated lung masses was 0.51–1.29 kg. The average male and female lung masses during FB CT were 0.80 and 0.71 kg, respectively. The calculated lung mass varied across the respiratory cycle but changed to a lesser degree than did lung volume measurements (7.3% versus 15.4%). Lung masses calculated using deep inspiration breath-hold and average CT were significantly larger (p < 0.05) than were some masses calculated using respiratory-phase and FB CT. Increased voxel size and smooth reconstruction kernels led to high lung mass estimates owing to partial volume effects.Conclusions: Organ mass correction is an important component of patient-specific internal radionuclide dosimetry. Lung mass calculation necessitates scan-based density correction to account for volume changes owing to respiration. The range of lung masses in the authors’ patient population represents lung doses for the same absorbed energy differing from 25% below to 64% above the dose found using reference phantom organ masses. With proper management of acquisition parameters and selection of FB or midexpiration breath hold scans, lung mass estimates with about 10% population precision may be achieved.

  6. A dose reconstruction of 60Co-contaminated window frames in a Taiwanese school.

    PubMed

    Brock, K M; Neumann, C M; Higley, K A; Chang, W P; Rossignol, A M

    2001-07-01

    Since 1992, hundreds of buildings in Taiwan were discovered to have 60Co contamination in the structural rebar. The contamination resulted from improper handling of 60Co-contaminated scrap metal in 1982 and 1983, which subsequently was recycled and used throughout Taiwan. Hsin-hsin Kindergarten school enrolled about 600 students over the 10-y period before the contamination was discovered. Hsin-hsin Kindergarten had three 60Co-contaminated steel window frames with measured dose rates on contact up to 150 microSv h(-1). In this study, a range of potential doses received by the Hsin-hsin Kindergarten students were estimated using ISOSHLD dose modeling software. ISOSHLD is a rapid, inexpensive screening tool to reconstruct dose ranges. To assess the potential risks to habitants of the school for the first year after construction, calculated dose rate ranges of 0.08 microSv h(-1) to 75.38 microSv h(-1) were then applied to the International Commission [corrected] on Radiation Protection 60 nominal detriment coefficients for stochastic effects. Risk estimates ranged from 1.46 x 10(-4) to 7.42 x 10(-4) excess fatal cancers per lifetime.

  7. Dosimetry of yttrium-labelled radiopharmaceuticals for internal therapy: 86Y or 90Y imaging?

    PubMed

    Walrand, Stephan; Flux, Glenn D; Konijnenberg, Mark W; Valkema, Roelf; Krenning, Eric P; Lhommel, Renaud; Pauwels, Stanislas; Jamar, Francois

    2011-05-01

    This paper reviews issues concerning (86)Y positron emission tomography (PET), (90)Y PET and (90)Y bremsstrahlung imaging. Specific methods and corrections developed for quantitative imaging, for application in preclinical and clinical studies, and to assess (90)Y dosimetry are discussed. The potential imaging capabilities with the radioisotopes (87)Y and (88)Y are also considered. Additional studies required to assess specific unaddressed issues are also identified.

  8. A computational tool for patient specific dosimetry and radiobiological modeling of selective internal radiation therapy with (90)Y microspheres.

    PubMed

    Kalantzis, Georgios; Leventouri, Theodora; Apte, Aditiya; Shang, Charles

    2015-11-01

    In recent years we have witnessed tremendous progress in selective internal radiation therapy. In clinical practice, quite often, radionuclide therapy is planned using simple models based on standard activity values or activity administered per unit body weight or surface area in spite of the admission that radiation-dose methods provide more accurate dosimetric results. To address that issue, the authors developed a Matlab-based computational software, named Patient Specific Yttrium-90 Dosimetry Toolkit (PSYDT). PSYDT was designed for patient specific voxel-based dosimetric calculations and radiobiological modeling of selective internal radiation therapy with (90)Y microspheres. The developed toolkit is composed of three dimensional dose calculations for both bremsstrahlung and beta emissions. Subsequently, radiobiological modeling is performed on a per-voxel basis and cumulative dose volume histograms (DVHs) are generated. In this report we describe the functionality and visualization features of PSYDT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Internal dosimetry with the Monte Carlo code GATE: validation using the ICRP/ICRU female reference computational model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villoing, Daphnée; Marcatili, Sara; Garcia, Marie-Paule; Bardiès, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to validate GATE-based clinical scale absorbed dose calculations in nuclear medicine dosimetry. GATE (version 6.2) and MCNPX (version 2.7.a) were used to derive dosimetric parameters (absorbed fractions, specific absorbed fractions and S-values) for the reference female computational model proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in ICRP report 110. Monoenergetic photons and electrons (from 50 keV to 2 MeV) and four isotopes currently used in nuclear medicine (fluorine-18, lutetium-177, iodine-131 and yttrium-90) were investigated. Absorbed fractions, specific absorbed fractions and S-values were generated with GATE and MCNPX for 12 regions of interest in the ICRP 110 female computational model, thereby leading to 144 source/target pair configurations. Relative differences between GATE and MCNPX obtained in specific configurations (self-irradiation or cross-irradiation) are presented. Relative differences in absorbed fractions, specific absorbed fractions or S-values are below 10%, and in most cases less than 5%. Dosimetric results generated with GATE for the 12 volumes of interest are available as supplemental data. GATE can be safely used for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry at the clinical scale. This makes GATE a viable option for Monte Carlo modelling of both imaging and absorbed dose in nuclear medicine.

  10. Review of the ICRP tritium and 14C internal dosimetry models and their implementation in the Genmod-PC code.

    PubMed

    Richardson, R B; Dunford, D W

    2001-09-01

    Biokinetic models for tritium and 14C compounds, as described by various ICRP publications, have been incorporated into the Genmod-PC internal dosimetry code. This work reviews the models for tritium and 14C labeled compounds that the ICRP has formulated over several decades. The ICRP dosimetry prescribed for hydrogen and carbon radionuclides is fundamentally different from that recommended for other elements in that it is based on retention functions for whole body activity instead of compartmental biokinetic models. The ICRP recommends dosimetric methods for tritium and 14C compounds, ten of which are coded in Genmod-PC as compartmental models, namely, five tritium compounds, e.g., tritiated water, tritium gas, and five 14C compounds, e.g., carbon dioxide, carbon-labeled methane. The values of the Genmod-PC calculated dose coefficients were compared with the ICRP's values. It is shown how the dose coefficients for intakes of tritium and 14C compounds are affected by different interpretations of the methods recommended by the ICRP for two of the three classes of vapors and gases. Some aspects of the ICRP models, such as the percent oxidized, would benefit from reconsideration so as to produce tritium and 14C biokinetics that are less dependent on the radionuclide.

  11. Final Design for an International Intercomparison Exercise for Nuclear Accident Dosimetry at the DAF Using Godiva-IV: IER-148 CED-2 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrichs, Dave; Beller, Tim; Burch, Jennifer; Cummings, Rick; Duluc, Matthieu; Gadd, Milan; Goda, Joetta; Hickman, David; McAvoy, Doug; Rathbone, Bruce; Sullivan, Randy; Trompier, Francois; Veinot, Ken; Ward, Dann; Will, Rashelle; Wilson, Chris; Zieziulewicz, Thomas

    2014-09-30

    This document is the Final Design (CED-2) Report for IER-148, “International Inter-comparison Exercise for Nuclear Accident Dosimetry at the DAF Using Godiva-IV.” The report describes the structure of the exercise consisting of three irradiations; identifies the participating laboratories and their points of contact; provides the details of all dosimetry elements and their placement in proximity to Godiva-IV on support stands or phantoms ; and lists the counting and spectroscopy equipment each laboratory will utilize in the Mercury NAD Lab. The exercise is tentatively scheduled for one week in August 2015.

  12. Protocols for the dosimetry of high-energy photon and electron beams: a comparison of the IAEA TRS-398 and previous international codes of practice. International Atomic Energy Agency.

    PubMed

    Andreo, Pedro; Huq, M Saiful; Westermark, Mathias; Song, Haijun; Tilikidis, Aris; DeWerd, Larry; Shortt, Ken

    2002-09-07

    A new international Code of Practice for radiotherapy dosimetry co-sponsored by several international organizations has been published by the IAEA, TRS-398. It is based on standards of absorbed dose to water, whereas previous protocols (TRS-381 and TRS-277) were based on air kerma standards. To estimate the changes in beam calibration caused by the introduction of TRS-398, a detailed experimental comparison of the dose determination in reference conditions in high-energy photon and electron beams has been made using the different IAEA protocols. A summary of the formulation and reference conditions in the various Codes of Practice, as well as of their basic data, is presented first. Accurate measurements have been made in 25 photon and electron beams from 10 clinical accelerators using 12 different cylindrical and plane-parallel chambers, and dose ratios under different conditions of TRS-398 to the other protocols determined. A strict step-by-step checklist was followed by the two participating clinical institutions to ascertain that the resulting calculations agreed within tenths of a per cent. The maximum differences found between TRS-398 and the previous Codes of Practice TRS-277 (2nd edn) and TRS-381 are of the order of 1.5-2.0%. TRS-398 yields absorbed doses larger than the previous protocols, around 1.0% for photons (TRS-277) and for electrons (TRS-381 and TRS-277) when plane-parallel chambers are cross-calibrated. For the Markus chamber, results show a very large variation, although a fortuitous cancellation of the old stopping powers with the ND,w/NK ratios makes the overall discrepancy between TRS-398 and TRS-277 in this case smaller than for well-guarded plane-parallel chambers. Chambers of the Roos-type with a 60Co ND,w calibration yield the maximum discrepancy in absorbed dose, which varies between 1.0% and 1.5% for TRS-381 and between 1.5% and 2.0% for TRS-277. Photon beam calibrations using directly measured or calculated TPR20,10 from a percentage

  13. 39th Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture: Dosimetry of Internal Emitters: Contribution of Radiation Protection Bodies and Radiological Events.

    PubMed

    Eckerman, Keith F

    2016-02-01

    Since the early days of the Manhattan Engineer District, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has served to advance the dosimetry models used to set protection standards for radionuclides taken into the body. Throughout the years, this effort benefited significantly from ORNL staff's active participation in national and international scientific bodies. The first such interaction was in 1946 with the National Committee on Radiation Protection (NCRP), chaired by L.S. Taylor, which led to the 1949 to 1953 series of tripartite conferences of experts from Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. These conferences addressed the need for standardization of dosimetry models and led to the establishment of an anatomic and physiologic model called "Standard Man," a precursor of the reference worker defined in Publication 23 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Standard Man was used in setting the maximum permissible concentrations in air and water published in NBS Handbook 52 and subsequent reports by NCRP and ICRP. K.Z. Morgan, then director of the Health Physics Division at ORNL, participated in the tripartite conferences and subsequently established ORNL as a modeling and computational resource for development of radiation protection standards. ORNL's role expanded with participation in the work of the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. Results of interactions with the MIRD Committee are evident in the radiation protection guidance for internal emitters in ICRP Publication 30. The annual limit on intake and derived air concentration values tabulated in Publication 30 were computed by an ORNL-based task group of ICRP Committee 2. A few years after the appearance of Publication 30, the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident made clear the need to develop standard dosimetry models for pre-adult ages as members of the public. In the late 1980s, ICRP began an effort to extend its reference

  14. A water calorimeter for on-site absorbed dose to water calibrations in 60Co and MV-photon beams including MRI incorporated treatment equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Prez, Leon; de Pooter, Jacco; Jansen, Bartel; Aalbers, Tony

    2016-07-01

    In reference dosimetry the aim is to establish the absorbed dose to water, D w, under reference conditions. However, existing dosimetry protocols are not always applicable for rapidly emerging new treatment modalities. For primary standard dosimetry laboratories it is generally not feasible to acquire such modalities. Therefore it is strongly desired that D w measurements with primary standards can be performed on-site in clinical beams for the new treatment modalities in order to characterize and calibrate detectors. To serve this need, VSL has developed a new transportable water calorimeter serving as a primary D w standard for 60Co and MV-photons including MRI incorporated treatment equipment. Special attention was paid to its operation in different beam geometries and beam modalities including the application in magnetic fields. The new calorimeter was validated in the VSL 60Co beam and on-site in clinical MV-photon beams. Excellent agreement of 0.1% was achieved with previous 60Co field calibrations, i.e. well within the uncertainty of the previous calorimeter, and with measurements performed in horizontal and vertical MV-photon beams. k Q factors, determined for two PTW 30013 ionization chambers, agreed very well with available literature data. The relative combined standard uncertainty (k  =  1) for D w measurements in 60Co and MV-photons is 0.37%. Calibrations are carried out with a standard uncertainty of 0.42% and k Q -factors are determined with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.40%.

  15. Application for internal dosimetry using biokinetic distribution of photons based on nuclear medicine images.

    PubMed

    Leal Neto, Viriato; Vieira, José Wilson; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a way to obtain estimates of dose in patients submitted to radiotherapy with basis on the analysis of regions of interest on nuclear medicine images. A software called DoRadIo (Dosimetria das Radiações Ionizantes [Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry]) was developed to receive information about source organs and target organs, generating graphical and numerical results. The nuclear medicine images utilized in the present study were obtained from catalogs provided by medical physicists. The simulations were performed with computational exposure models consisting of voxel phantoms coupled with the Monte Carlo EGSnrc code. The software was developed with the Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack and the project template Windows Presentation Foundation for C# programming language. With the mentioned tools, the authors obtained the file for optimization of Monte Carlo simulations using the EGSnrc; organization and compaction of dosimetry results with all radioactive sources; selection of regions of interest; evaluation of grayscale intensity in regions of interest; the file of weighted sources; and, finally, all the charts and numerical results. The user interface may be adapted for use in clinical nuclear medicine as a computer-aided tool to estimate the administered activity.

  16. Application for internal dosimetry using biokinetic distribution of photons based on nuclear medicine images*

    PubMed Central

    Leal Neto, Viriato; Vieira, José Wilson; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Objective This article presents a way to obtain estimates of dose in patients submitted to radiotherapy with basis on the analysis of regions of interest on nuclear medicine images. Materials and Methods A software called DoRadIo (Dosimetria das Radiações Ionizantes [Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry]) was developed to receive information about source organs and target organs, generating graphical and numerical results. The nuclear medicine images utilized in the present study were obtained from catalogs provided by medical physicists. The simulations were performed with computational exposure models consisting of voxel phantoms coupled with the Monte Carlo EGSnrc code. The software was developed with the Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack and the project template Windows Presentation Foundation for C# programming language. Results With the mentioned tools, the authors obtained the file for optimization of Monte Carlo simulations using the EGSnrc; organization and compaction of dosimetry results with all radioactive sources; selection of regions of interest; evaluation of grayscale intensity in regions of interest; the file of weighted sources; and, finally, all the charts and numerical results. Conclusion The user interface may be adapted for use in clinical nuclear medicine as a computer-aided tool to estimate the administered activity. PMID:25741101

  17. The ENEA criticality accident dosimetry system: a contribution to the 2002 international intercomparison at the SILENE reactor.

    PubMed

    Gualdrini, G; Bedogni, R; Fantuzzi, E; Mariotti, F

    2004-01-01

    The present paper summarises the activity carried out at the ENEA Radiation Protection Institute for updating the methodologies employed for the evaluation of the neutron and photon dose to the exposed workers in case of a criticality accident, in the framework of the 'International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems' (Silène reactor, IRSN-CEA-Valduc June 2002). The evaluation of the neutron spectra and the neutron dosimetric quantities relies on activation detectors and on unfolding algorithms. Thermoluminescent detectors are employed for the gamma dose measurement. The work is aimed at accurately characterising the measurement system and, at the same time, testing the algorithms. Useful spectral information were included, based on Monte Carlo simulations, to take into account the potential accident scenarios of practical interest. All along this exercise intercomparison a particular attention was devoted to the 'traceability' of all the experimental and computational parameters and therefore, aimed at an easy treatment by the user.

  18. Dosimetry for Small and Nonstandard Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junell, Stephanie L.

    The proposed small and non-standard field dosimetry protocol from the joint International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and American Association of Physicist in Medicine working group introduces new reference field conditions for ionization chamber based reference dosimetry. Absorbed dose beam quality conversion factors (kQ factors) corresponding to this formalism were determined for three different models of ionization chambers: a Farmer-type ionization chamber, a thimble ionization chamber, and a small volume ionization chamber. Beam quality correction factor measurements were made in a specially developed cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom and a water phantom using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and alanine dosimeters to determine dose to water. The TLD system for absorbed dose to water determination in high energy photon and electron beams was fully characterized as part of this dissertation. The behavior of the beam quality correction factor was observed as it transfers the calibration coefficient from the University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UWADCL) 60Co reference beam to the small field calibration conditions of the small field formalism. TLD-determined beam quality correction factors for the calibration conditions investigated ranged from 0.97 to 1.30 and had associated standard deviations from 1% to 3%. The alanine-determined beam quality correction factors ranged from 0.996 to 1.293. Volume averaging effects were observed with the Farmer-type ionization chamber in the small static field conditions. The proposed small and non-standard field dosimetry protocols new composite-field reference condition demonstrated its potential to reduce or remove ionization chamber volume dependancies, but the measured beam quality correction factors were not equal to the standard CoP's kQ, indicating a change in beam quality in the small and non-standard field dosimetry protocols new composite-field reference condition

  19. Fieldbus: technology application in a 60Co sterilization plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karam, D.; Sampa, M. H. O.; Rela, P. R.

    2000-03-01

    Process instrumentation was made by pressure signals in the 1940s. In the 1960s, 4-20 mA analogue signals were introduced. The development of digital processors in the 1970s sparked the use of computers to monitor and control instruments from a central point. In the 1980s smart sensors were developed and implemented in digital control, microprocessor environments. Fieldbus is a generic-term that describes a new digital communications network. The network is a digital, bi-directional, multidrop, serial-bus, and communications network used to link isolated field devices, such as controllers, transducers, actuators and sensors. Fieldbus technology may improve quality, reduce costs and increase efficiency because information is transmitted digitally without analog to digital or digital to analog converters, which also minimizes hardware errors. Fieldbus communication is based on two-wire communication, interconnecting all the components in the system. This paper introduces Fieldbus technology in a 60Co sterilization plant.

  20. Selective Internal Radiation Therapy With Yttrium-90 Glass Microspheres: Biases and Uncertainties in Absorbed Dose Calculations Between Clinical Dosimetry Models.

    PubMed

    Mikell, Justin K; Mahvash, Armeen; Siman, Wendy; Baladandayuthapani, Veera; Mourtada, Firas; Kappadath, S Cheenu

    2016-11-15

    To quantify differences that exist between dosimetry models used for (90)Y selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT). Retrospectively, 37 tumors were delineated on 19 post-therapy quantitative (90)Y single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography scans. Using matched volumes of interest (VOIs), absorbed doses were reported using 3 dosimetry models: glass microsphere package insert standard model (SM), partition model (PM), and Monte Carlo (MC). Univariate linear regressions were performed to predict mean MC from SM and PM. Analysis was performed for 2 subsets: cases with a single tumor delineated (best case for PM), and cases with multiple tumors delineated (typical clinical scenario). Variability in PM from the ad hoc placement of a single spherical VOI to estimate the entire normal liver activity concentration for tumor (T) to nontumoral liver (NL) ratios (TNR) was investigated. We interpreted the slope of the resulting regression as bias and the 95% prediction interval (95%PI) as uncertainty. MCNL(single) represents MC absorbed doses to the NL for the single tumor patient subset; other combinations of calculations follow a similar naming convention. SM was unable to predict MCT(single) or MCT(multiple) (p>.12, 95%PI >±177 Gy). However, SM(single) was able to predict (p<.012) MCNL(single), albeit with large uncertainties; SM(single) and SM(multiple) yielded biases of 0.62 and 0.71, and 95%PI of ±40 and ± 32 Gy, respectively. PMT(single) and PMT(multiple) predicted (p<2E-6) MCT(single) and MCT(multiple) with biases of 0.52 and 0.54, and 95%PI of ±38 and ± 111 Gy, respectively. The TNR variability in PMT(single) increased the 95%PI for predicting MCT(single) (bias = 0.46 and 95%PI = ±103 Gy). The TNR variability in PMT(multiple) modified the bias when predicting MCT(multiple) (bias = 0.32 and 95%PI = ±110 Gy). The SM is unable to predict mean MC tumor absorbed dose. The PM is statistically correlated with mean MC, but the

  1. Mayak Worker Dosimetry System (MWDS-2013): Phase I-Quality Assurance of Organ Doses and Excretion Rates From Internal Exposures of Plutonium-239 for the Mayak Worker Cohort.

    PubMed

    Dorrian, M-D; Birchall, A; Vostrotin, V

    2016-06-20

    The calculation of reliable and realistic doses for use in epidemiological studies for the quantification of risk from internal exposure to radioactive material is fundamental to the development of advice, guidance and regulations for the control and use of radioactive material. Thus, any programme of work carried out which requires the calculation of doses for use by epidemiologists ideally should contain a rigorous program of quality assurance (QA). This paper describes the initial QA (Phase I) implemented by Public Health England (PHE) and the Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI) as part of the work programme on internal dosimetry in the Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research Project 2.4 for the 2013 Mayak Worker Dosimetry System. SUBI designed and implemented new software (PANDORA) to include the latest Mayak Worker Dosimetry System and to calculate organ burdens, urinary excretion rates, intakes and absorbed doses, while PHE modified their commercially available IMBA Professional Plus software package. Comparisons of output from the two codes for the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 showed calculated values of absorbed doses, intakes, organ burdens and urinary excretion agreed to within 1%. The 1% discrepancy can be explained by the approximation used in IMBA to speed up dose calculations.

  2. 3D dosimetry estimation for selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) using SPECT/CT images: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debebe, Senait A.; Franquiz, Juan; McGoron, Anthony J.

    2015-03-01

    Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) is a common way to treat liver cancer that cannot be treated surgically. SIRT involves administration of Yttrium - 90 (90Y) microspheres via the hepatic artery after a diagnostic procedure using 99mTechnetium (Tc)-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) to detect extrahepatic shunting to the lung or the gastrointestinal tract. Accurate quantification of radionuclide administered to patients and radiation dose absorbed by different organs is of importance in SIRT. Accurate dosimetry for SIRT allows optimization of dose delivery to the target tumor and may allow for the ability to assess the efficacy of the treatment. In this study, we proposed a method that can efficiently estimate radiation absorbed dose from 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT images of liver and the surrounding organs. Bremsstrahlung radiation from 90Y was simulated using the Compton window of 99mTc (78keV at 57%). 99mTc images acquired at the photopeak energy window were used as a standard to examine the accuracy of dosimetry prediction by the simulated bremsstrahlung images. A Liqui-Phil abdominal phantom with liver, stomach and two tumor inserts was imaged using a Philips SPECT/CT scanner. The Dose Point Kernel convolution method was used to find the radiation absorbed dose at a voxel level for a three dimensional dose distribution. This method will allow for a complete estimate of the distribution of radiation absorbed dose by tumors, liver, stomach and other surrounding organs at the voxel level. The method provides a quantitative predictive method for SIRT treatment outcome and administered dose response for patients who undergo the treatment.

  3. A radiation quality correction factor k for well-type ionization chambers for the measurement of the reference air kerma rate of (60)Co HDR brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Schüller, Andreas; Meier, Markus; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Ankerhold, Ulrike

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a chamber-type-specific radiation quality correction factor kQ can be determined in order to measure the reference air kerma rate of (60)Co high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources with acceptable uncertainty by means of a well-type ionization chamber calibrated for (192)Ir HDR sources. The calibration coefficients of 35 well-type ionization chambers of two different chamber types for radiation fields of (60)Co and (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy sources were determined experimentally. A radiation quality correction factor kQ was determined as the ratio of the calibration coefficients for (60)Co and (192)Ir. The dependence on chamber-to-chamber variations, source-to-source variations, and source strength was investigated. For the PTW Tx33004 (Nucletron source dosimetry system (SDS)) well-type chamber, the type-specific radiation quality correction factor kQ is 1.19. Note that this value is valid for chambers with the serial number, SN ≥ 315 (Nucletron SDS SN ≥ 548) onward only. For the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well-type chambers, the type-specific correction factor kQ is 1.05. Both kQ values are independent of the source strengths in the complete clinically relevant range. The relative expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of kQ is UkQ = 2.1% for both chamber types. The calibration coefficient of a well-type chamber for radiation fields of (60)Co HDR brachytherapy sources can be calculated from a given calibration coefficient for (192)Ir radiation by using a chamber-type-specific radiation quality correction factor kQ. However, the uncertainty of a (60)Co calibration coefficient calculated via kQ is at least twice as large as that for a direct calibration with a (60)Co source.

  4. Internal dosimetry through GATE simulations of preclinical radiotherapy using a melanin-targeting ligand.

    PubMed

    Perrot, Y; Degoul, F; Auzeloux, P; Bonnet, M; Cachin, F; Chezal, J M; Donnarieix, D; Labarre, P; Moins, N; Papon, J; Rbah-Vidal, L; Vidal, A; Miot-Noirault, E; Maigne, L

    2014-05-07

    The GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform based on the Geant4 toolkit is under constant improvement for dosimetric calculations. In this study, we explore its use for the dosimetry of the preclinical targeted radiotherapy of melanoma using a new specific melanin-targeting radiotracer labeled with iodine 131. Calculated absorbed fractions and S values for spheres and murine models (digital and CT-scan-based mouse phantoms) are compared between GATE and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes considering monoenergetic electrons and the detailed energy spectrum of iodine 131. The behavior of Geant4 standard and low energy models is also tested. Following the different authors' guidelines concerning the parameterization of electron physics models, this study demonstrates an agreement of 1.2% and 1.5% with EGSnrc, respectively, for the calculation of S values for small spheres and mouse phantoms. S values calculated with GATE are then used to compute the dose distribution in organs of interest using the activity distribution in mouse phantoms. This study gives the dosimetric data required for the translation of the new treatment to the clinic.

  5. Internal dosimetry through GATE simulations of preclinical radiotherapy using a melanin-targeting ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, Y.; Degoul, F.; Auzeloux, P.; Bonnet, M.; Cachin, F.; Chezal, J. M.; Donnarieix, D.; Labarre, P.; Moins, N.; Papon, J.; Rbah-Vidal, L.; Vidal, A.; Miot-Noirault, E.; Maigne, L.

    2014-05-01

    The GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform based on the Geant4 toolkit is under constant improvement for dosimetric calculations. In this study, we explore its use for the dosimetry of the preclinical targeted radiotherapy of melanoma using a new specific melanin-targeting radiotracer labeled with iodine 131. Calculated absorbed fractions and S values for spheres and murine models (digital and CT-scan-based mouse phantoms) are compared between GATE and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes considering monoenergetic electrons and the detailed energy spectrum of iodine 131. The behavior of Geant4 standard and low energy models is also tested. Following the different authors’ guidelines concerning the parameterization of electron physics models, this study demonstrates an agreement of 1.2% and 1.5% with EGSnrc, respectively, for the calculation of S values for small spheres and mouse phantoms. S values calculated with GATE are then used to compute the dose distribution in organs of interest using the activity distribution in mouse phantoms. This study gives the dosimetric data required for the translation of the new treatment to the clinic.

  6. SU-C-201-06: Utility of Quantitative 3D SPECT/CT Imaging in Patient Specific Internal Dosimetry of 153-Samarium with GATE Monte Carlo Package

    SciTech Connect

    Fallahpoor, M; Abbasi, M; Sen, A; Parach, A; Kalantari, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Patient-specific 3-dimensional (3D) internal dosimetry in targeted radionuclide therapy is essential for efficient treatment. Two major steps to achieve reliable results are: 1) generating quantitative 3D images of radionuclide distribution and attenuation coefficients and 2) using a reliable method for dose calculation based on activity and attenuation map. In this research, internal dosimetry for 153-Samarium (153-Sm) was done by SPECT-CT images coupled GATE Monte Carlo package for internal dosimetry. Methods: A 50 years old woman with bone metastases from breast cancer was prescribed 153-Sm treatment (Gamma: 103keV and beta: 0.81MeV). A SPECT/CT scan was performed with the Siemens Simbia-T scanner. SPECT and CT images were registered using default registration software. SPECT quantification was achieved by compensating for all image degrading factors including body attenuation, Compton scattering and collimator-detector response (CDR). Triple energy window method was used to estimate and eliminate the scattered photons. Iterative ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) with correction for attenuation and distance-dependent CDR was used for image reconstruction. Bilinear energy mapping is used to convert Hounsfield units in CT image to attenuation map. Organ borders were defined by the itk-SNAP toolkit segmentation on CT image. GATE was then used for internal dose calculation. The Specific Absorbed Fractions (SAFs) and S-values were reported as MIRD schema. Results: The results showed that the largest SAFs and S-values are in osseous organs as expected. S-value for lung is the highest after spine that can be important in 153-Sm therapy. Conclusion: We presented the utility of SPECT-CT images and Monte Carlo for patient-specific dosimetry as a reliable and accurate method. It has several advantages over template-based methods or simplified dose estimation methods. With advent of high speed computers, Monte Carlo can be used for treatment planning

  7. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference newborn—internal electron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pafundi, Deanna; Rajon, Didier; Jokisch, Derek; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley

    2010-04-01

    In this study, a comprehensive electron dosimetry model of newborn skeletal tissues is presented. The model is constructed using the University of Florida newborn hybrid phantom of Lee et al (2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 3309-33), the newborn skeletal tissue model of Pafundi et al (2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 4497-531) and the EGSnrc-based Paired Image Radiation Transport code of Shah et al (2005 J. Nucl. Med. 46 344-53). Target tissues include the active bone marrow (surrogate tissue for hematopoietic stem cells), shallow marrow (surrogate tissue for osteoprogenitor cells) and unossified cartilage (surrogate tissue for chondrocytes). Monoenergetic electron emissions are considered over the energy range 1 keV to 10 MeV for the following source tissues: active marrow, trabecular bone (surfaces and volumes), cortical bone (surfaces and volumes) and cartilage. Transport results are reported as specific absorbed fractions according to the MIRD schema and are given as skeletal-averaged values in the paper with bone-specific values reported in both tabular and graphic format as electronic annexes (supplementary data). The method utilized in this work uniquely includes (1) explicit accounting for the finite size and shape of newborn ossification centers (spongiosa regions), (2) explicit accounting for active and shallow marrow dose from electron emissions in cortical bone as well as sites of unossified cartilage, (3) proper accounting of the distribution of trabecular and cortical volumes and surfaces in the newborn skeleton when considering mineral bone sources and (4) explicit consideration of the marrow cellularity changes for active marrow self-irradiation as applicable to radionuclide therapy of diseased marrow in the newborn child.

  8. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference newborn--internal electron sources.

    PubMed

    Pafundi, Deanna; Rajon, Didier; Jokisch, Derek; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley

    2010-04-07

    In this study, a comprehensive electron dosimetry model of newborn skeletal tissues is presented. The model is constructed using the University of Florida newborn hybrid phantom of Lee et al (2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 3309-33), the newborn skeletal tissue model of Pafundi et al (2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 4497-531) and the EGSnrc-based Paired Image Radiation Transport code of Shah et al (2005 J. Nucl. Med. 46 344-53). Target tissues include the active bone marrow (surrogate tissue for hematopoietic stem cells), shallow marrow (surrogate tissue for osteoprogenitor cells) and unossified cartilage (surrogate tissue for chondrocytes). Monoenergetic electron emissions are considered over the energy range 1 keV to 10 MeV for the following source tissues: active marrow, trabecular bone (surfaces and volumes), cortical bone (surfaces and volumes) and cartilage. Transport results are reported as specific absorbed fractions according to the MIRD schema and are given as skeletal-averaged values in the paper with bone-specific values reported in both tabular and graphic format as electronic annexes (supplementary data). The method utilized in this work uniquely includes (1) explicit accounting for the finite size and shape of newborn ossification centers (spongiosa regions), (2) explicit accounting for active and shallow marrow dose from electron emissions in cortical bone as well as sites of unossified cartilage, (3) proper accounting of the distribution of trabecular and cortical volumes and surfaces in the newborn skeleton when considering mineral bone sources and (4) explicit consideration of the marrow cellularity changes for active marrow self-irradiation as applicable to radionuclide therapy of diseased marrow in the newborn child.

  9. An internal radiation dosimetry computer program, IDAC 2.0, for estimation of patient doses from radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Andersson, M; Johansson, L; Minarik, D; Mattsson, S; Leide-Svegborn, S

    2014-12-01

    The internal dosimetry computer program internal dose assessment by computer (IDAC) for calculations of absorbed doses to organs and tissues as well as effective doses to patients from examinations with radiopharmaceuticals has been developed. The new version, IDAC2.0, incorporates the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP)/ICRU computational adult male and female voxel phantoms and decay data from the ICRP publication 107. Instead of only 25 source and target regions, calculation can now be made with 63 source regions to 73 target regions. The major advantage of having the new phantom is that the calculations of the effective doses can be made with the latest tissue weighting factors of ICRP publication 103. IDAC2.0 uses the ICRP human alimentary tract (HAT) model for orally administrated activity and for excretion through the gastrointestinal tract and effective doses have been recalculated for radiopharmaceuticals that are orally administered. The results of the program are consistent with published data using the same specific absorption fractions and also compared with published data from the same computational phantoms but with segmentation of organs leading to another set of specific absorption fractions. The effective dose is recalculated for all the 34 radiopharmaceuticals that are administered orally and has been published by the ICRP. Using the new HAT model, new tissue weighting factors and the new adult computational voxel phantoms lead to an average effective dose of half of its earlier estimated value. The reduction mainly depends on electron transport simulations to walled organs and the transition from the stylised phantom with unrealistic interorgan distances to more realistic voxel phantoms.

  10. SU-E-T-507: Internal Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Using GATE and XCAT Phantom: A Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fallahpoor, M; Abbasi, M; Sen, A; Parach, A; Kalantari, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Monte Carlo simulations are routinely used for internal dosimetry studies. These studies are conducted with humanoid phantoms such as the XCAT phantom. In this abstract we present the absorbed doses for various pairs of source and target organs using three common radiotracers in nuclear medicine. Methods The GATE software package is used for the Monte Carlo simulations. A typical female XCAT phantom is used as the input. Three radiotracers 153Sm, 131I and 99mTc are studied. The Specific Absorbed Fraction (SAF) for gamma rays (99mTc, 153Sm and 131I) and Specific Fraction (SF) for beta particles (153Sm and 131I) are calculated for all 100 pairs of source target organs including brain, liver, lung, pancreas, kidney, adrenal, spleen, rib bone, bladder and ovaries. Results The source organs themselves gain the highest absorbed dose as compared to other organs. The dose is found to be inversely proportional to distance from the source organ. In SAF results of 153Sm, when the source organ is lung, the rib bone, gain 0.0730 (Kg-1) that is more than lung itself. Conclusion The absorbed dose for various organs was studied in terms of SAF and SF. Such studies hold importance for future therapeutic procedures and optimization of induced radiotracer.

  11. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference adult male--internal electron sources.

    PubMed

    Hough, Matthew; Johnson, Perry; Rajon, Didier; Jokisch, Derek; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley

    2011-04-21

    -averaged values of absorbed fraction in the present model are noted to be very compatible with those weighted by the skeletal tissue distributions found in the ICRP Publication 110 adult male and female voxel phantoms, but are in many cases incompatible with values used in current and widely implemented internal dosimetry software.

  12. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference adult male—internal electron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hough, Matthew; Johnson, Perry; Rajon, Didier; Jokisch, Derek; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley

    2011-04-01

    -averaged values of absorbed fraction in the present model are noted to be very compatible with those weighted by the skeletal tissue distributions found in the ICRP Publication 110 adult male and female voxel phantoms, but are in many cases incompatible with values used in current and widely implemented internal dosimetry software.

  13. Bioremediation of 60Co from simulated spent decontamination solutions.

    PubMed

    Rashmi, K; Sowjanya, T Naga; Mohan, P Maruthi; Balaji, V; Venkateswaran, G

    2004-07-26

    Bioremediation of 60Co from simulated spent decontamination solutions by utilizing different biomass of (Neurospora crassa, Trichoderma viridae, Mucor recemosus, Rhizopus chinensis, Penicillium citrinum, Aspergillus niger and, Aspergillus flavus) fungi is reported. Various fungal species were screened to evaluate their potential for removing cobalt from very low concentrations (0.03-0.16 microM) in presence of a high background of iron (9.33 mM) and nickel (0.93 mM) complexed with EDTA (10.3 mM). The different fungal isolates employed in this study showed a pickup of cobalt in the range 8-500 ng/g of dry biomass. The [Fe]/[Co] and [Ni]/[Co] ratios in the solutions before and after exposure to the fungi were also determined. At micromolar level the cobalt pickup by many fungi especially the mutants of N. crassa is seen to be proportional to the initial cobalt concentration taken in the solution. However, R. chinensis exhibits a low but iron concentration dependent cobalt pickup. Prior saturating the fungi with excess of iron during their growth showed the presence of selective cobalt pickup sites. The existence of cobalt specific sorption sites is shown by a model experiment with R. chinensis wherein at a constant cobalt concentration (0.034 microM) and varying iron concentrations so as to yield [Fe/Co]initial ratios in solution of 10, 100, 1000 and 287000 have all yielded a definite Co pickup capacity in the range 8-47 ng/g. The presence of Cr(III)EDTA (3 mM) in solution along with complexed Fe and Ni has not influenced the cobalt removal. The significant feature of this study is that even when cobalt is present in trace level (sub-micromolar) in a matrix of high concentration (millimolar levels) of iron, nickel and chromium, a situation typically encountered in spent decontamination solutions arising from stainless steel based primary systems of nuclear reactors, a number of fungi studied in this work showed a good sensitivity for cobalt pickup. Copyright 2004

  14. Decommissioning of a 60Co unit and estimation of personal doses.

    PubMed

    Lin, K H; Lin, J P; Liu, M T; Chu, T C

    2003-01-01

    Chang-hua Christian Hospital needs to uninstall the 60Co unit. The mode of this 60Co teletherapy unit is SHIMADZU RTGS-10. The original lead head was taken as the source container of this 60Co unit. The source head was dismantled and put into the prepared wooden box, after the source was sealed. This study describes the planning and dismantling of the retirement and transport of the 60Co unit, and personal doses measured during the procedure. This work estimates the doses of radiation received by exposed workers during the dismantling of the machine. The workers received doses of approximately 53 microSv. This study shows that the original lead head can be used as the source container of this 60Co unit. The 60Co machine was smoothly dismantled and transported by conscientious and careful workers, using planned and controlled radiation protection, following the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) rule.

  15. Computational dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, B.R.L.; Thomas, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a definition of the term ``Computational Dosimetry`` that is interpreted as the sub-discipline of computational physics which is devoted to radiation metrology. It is shown that computational dosimetry is more than a mere collection of computational methods. Computational simulations directed at basic understanding and modelling are important tools provided by computational dosimetry, while another very important application is the support that it can give to the design, optimization and analysis of experiments. However, the primary task of computational dosimetry is to reduce the variance in the determination of absorbed dose (and its related quantities), for example in the disciplines of radiological protection and radiation therapy. In this paper emphasis is given to the discussion of potential pitfalls in the applications of computational dosimetry and recommendations are given for their avoidance. The need for comparison of calculated and experimental data whenever possible is strongly stressed.

  16. Improvement of the WBC calibration of the Internal Dosimetry Laboratory of the CDTN/CNEN using the physical phantom BOMAB and MCNPX code.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Fernanda Guerra; Oliveira, Arno Heeren de; Mendes, Bruno Melo; Pinto, Jacqueline Rosária; Filho, Nelson do Nascimento A; Dantas, Bernardo Maranhão; Dantas, Ana Letícia A; Silva, Teógenes Augusto da; Lacerda, Marco Aurélio de Sousa; Fonseca, Telma Cristina Ferreira

    2016-11-01

    The Laboratory of Internal Dosimetry of the Center for Development of Nuclear Technology (LDI/CDTN) is responsible for routine internal monitoring of occupationally exposed individuals. The determination of photon emitting radionuclides in the human body requires calibration of the detector in specific counting geometries. The calibration process uses physical phantoms containing certified activities of the radionuclides of interest. The objective of this work was to obtain calibration efficiency curves of the Whole Body Counter in operation at the LDI/CDTN using a BOMAB physical phantom and Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. Realistic reference adult and paediatric phantom series for internal and external dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Stabin, M G; Emmons, M A; Segars, W P; Fernald, M J

    2012-03-01

    A new generation of realistic, image-based anthropomorphic phantoms has been developed based on the reference masses and organ definitions given in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 89. Specific absorbed fractions for internal radiation sources have been calculated for photon and electron sources for many body organs. Values are similar to those from the previous generation of 'stylized' (mathematical equation-based) models, but some differences are seen, particularly at low particle or photon energies, due to the more realistic organ geometries, with organs generally being closer together, and with some touching and overlapping. Extension of this work, to use these phantoms in Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation codes with external radiation sources, is an important area of investigation that should be undertaken.

  18. Dosimetry calculations for internal electron sources using a Korean reference adult stylised phantom.

    PubMed

    Park, S; Lee, J K; Lee, C; Lee, C

    2008-01-01

    Absorbed fractions (AFs) and specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) for internally deposited electron were calculated using a Korean reference adult stylised phantom, where a total of 15 internal organ volumes and external body dimension were designed to match average Korean adult male. The walls of oesophagus, stomach, colon and urinary bladder were additionally divided into the mucosal layer and residual wall to accommodate dose calculation for weakly penetrating electron. The mucosal wall thicknesses were determined by the data reported in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 89 and other literature resources and by direct measurements. The Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX (version 2.5.0) was employed to calculate the electron energy deposited. The SAFs and AFs for monoenergetic electrons with the energies ranging from 10 keV to 2 MeV were calculated. The results were compared with those of the revised Oak Ridge National Laboratory phantoms and showed considerable differences up to 150% in SAFs, whereas no substantial differences were observed in the AFs.

  19. Modernization of Cross Section Library for VVER-1000 Type Reactors Internals and Pressure Vessel Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloschenko, Andrey; Zaritskiy, Sergey; Egorov, Aleksander; Boyarinov, Viktor

    2016-02-01

    The broad-group library BGL1000_B7 for neutron and gamma transport calculations in VVER-1000 internals, RPV and shielding was carried out on a base of fine-group library v7-200n47g from SCALE-6 system. The comparison of the library BGL1000_B7 with the library v7-200n47g and the library BGL1000 (the latter is using for VVER-1000 calculations) is demonstrated on several calculation and experimental tests.

  20. Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of (131)I Radiation Relative to (60)Co Gamma Rays.

    PubMed

    Neshasteh-Riz, Ali; Mahmoud Pashazadeh, Ali; Mahdavi, Seyed Rabie

    2013-01-01

    To assess relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of (131)I radiation relative to (60)Co gamma rays in glioblastoma spheroid cells. : In this experimental study, glioblastoma spheroid cells were exposed to (131)I radiation and (60)Co gamma rays. Radiation induced DNA damage was evaluated by alkaline comet assay. Samples of spheroid cells were treated by radiation from (131)I for four different periods of time to find the dose-response equation. Spheroid cells were also exposed by 200 cGy of (60)Co gamma rays as reference radiation to induce DNA damage as endpoint. Resulted RBE of (131)I radiation relative to (60)Co gamma rays in 100 µm giloblastoma spheroid cells was equal to 1.16. The finding of this study suggests that (131)I photons and electrons can be more effective than (60)Co gamma rays to produce DNA damage in glioblastoma spheroid cells.

  1. RADIATION DOSIMETRY OF THE PRESSURE VESSEL INTERNALS OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.; RECINIELLO,R.N.; HU,J.P.; RORER,D.C.

    2002-08-18

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, both measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose rate have been performed for the reactor pressure vessel and vessel internal structures which included the upper and lower thermal shields, the transition plate, and the control rod blades. The measurements were made using Red Perspex{trademark} polymethyl methacrylate high-level film dosimeters, a Radcal ''peanut'' ion chamber, and Eberline's high-range ion chamber. To compare with measured gamma-ray dose rate, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and geometric progressive Microshield code were used to model the gamma transport and dose buildup.

  2. THE CHALLENGE OF CIEMAT INTERNAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE FOR ACCREDITATION ACCORDING TO ISO/IEC 17025 STANDARD, FOR IN VIVO AND IN VITRO MONITORING AND DOSE ASSESSMENT OF INTERNAL EXPOSURES.

    PubMed

    Lopez, M A; Martin, R; Hernandez, C; Navarro, J F; Navarro, T; Perez, B; Sierra, I

    2016-09-01

    The accreditation of an Internal Dosimetry Service (IDS) according to ISO/IEC 17025 Standard is a challenge. The aim of this process is to guarantee the technical competence for the monitoring of radionuclides incorporated in the body and for the evaluation of the associated committed effective dose E(50). This publication describes the main accreditation issues addressed by CIEMAT IDS regarding all the procedures involving good practice in internal dosimetry, focussing in the difficulties to ensure the traceability in the whole process, the appropriate calculation of detection limit of measurement techniques, the validation of methods (monitoring and dose assessments), the description of all the uncertainty sources and the interpretation of monitoring data to evaluate the intake and the committed effective dose. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Internal dosimetry of nuclear medicine workers through the analysis of (131)I in aerosols.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Luana Gomes; de Lucena, Eder Augusto; Sampaio, Camilla da Silva; Dantas, Ana Letícia Almeida; Sousa, Wanderson Oliveira; Santos, Maristela Souza; Dantas, Bernardo Maranhão

    2015-06-01

    (131)I is widely used in nuclear medicine for diagnostic and therapy of thyroid diseases. Depending of workplace safety conditions, routine handling of this radionuclide may result in a significant risk of exposure of the workers subject to chronic intake by inhalation of aerosols. A previous study including in vivo and in vitro measurements performed recently among nuclear medicine personnel in Brazil showed the occurrence of (131)I incorporation by workers involved in the handling of solutions used for radioiodine therapy. The present work describes the development, optimization and application of a methodology to collect and analyze aerosol samples aiming to assess internal doses based on the activity of (131)I present in a radiopharmacy laboratory. Portable samplers were positioned at one meter distant from the place where non-sealed liquid sources of (131)I are handled. Samples were collected over 1h using high-efficiency filters containing activated carbon and analyzed by gamma spectrometry with a high-purity germanium detection system. Results have shown that, although a fume hood is available in the laboratory, (131)I in the form of vapor was detected in the workplace. The average activity concentration was found to be of 7.4Bq/m(3). This value is about three orders of magnitude below the Derived Air Concentration (DAC) of 8.4kBq/m(3). Assuming that the worker is exposed by inhalation of iodine vapor during 1h, (131)I concentration detected corresponds to an intake of 3.6Bq which results in a committed effective dose of 7.13×10(-5)mSv. These results show that the radiopharmacy laboratory evaluated is safe in terms of internal exposure of the workers. However it is recommended that the presence of (131)I should be periodically re-assessed since it may increase individual effective doses. It should also be pointed out that the results obtained so far reflect a survey carried out in a specific workplace. Thus, it is suggested to apply the methodology

  4. Epid Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Peter B.; Vial, Philip

    2011-05-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were introduced originally for patient position verification. The idea of using EPIDs for dosimetry was realised in the 1980s. Little was published on the topic until the mid 1990's, when the interest in EPIDs for dosimetry increased rapidly and continues to grow. The increasing research on EPID dosimetry coincided with the introduction of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). EPIDs are well suited to IMRT dosimetry because they are high resolution, two-dimensional (2D) digital detectors. They are also pre-existing on almost all modern linear accelerators. They generally show a linear response to increasing dose. Different types of EPIDs have been clinically implemented, and these have been described in several review papers. The current generation of commercially available EPIDs are indirect detection active matrix flat panel imagers, also known as amorphous silicon (a-Si) EPIDs. Disadvantages of a-Si EPIDs for dosimetry include non-water equivalent construction materials, and the energy sensitivity and optical scatter of the phosphor scintillators used to create optical signal from the megavoltage beam. This report discusses current knowledge regarding a-Si EPIDs for dosimetry.

  5. Patient dosimetry for 90Y selective internal radiation treatment based on 90Y PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Ng, Sherry C; Lee, Victor H; Law, Martin W; Liu, Rico K; Ma, Vivian W; Tso, Wai Kuen; Leung, To Wai

    2013-09-06

    Until recently, the radiation dose to patients undergoing the 90Y selective internal radiation treatment (SIRT) procedure is determined by applying the partition model to 99mTc MAA pretreatment scan. There can be great uncertainty in radiation dose calculated from this approach and we presented a method to compute the 3D dose distributions resulting from 90Y SIRT based on 90Y positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Five 90Y SIRT treatments were retrospectively analyzed. After 90Y SIRT, patients had 90Y PET/CT imaging within 6 hours of the procedure. To obtain the 3D dose distribution of the patients, their respective 90Y PET images were convolved with a Monte Carlo generated voxel dose kernel. The sensitivity of the PET/CT scanner for 90Y was determined through phantom studies. The 3D dose distributions were then presented in DICOM RT dose format. By applying the linear quadratic model to the dose data, we derived the biologically effective dose and dose equivalent to 2 Gy/fraction delivery, taking into account the spatial and temporal dose rate variations specific for SIRT. Based on this data, we intend to infer tumor control probability and risk of radiation induced liver injury from SIRT by comparison with established dose limits. For the five cases, the mean dose to target ranged from 51.7 ± 28.6 Gy to 163 ± 53.7 Gy. Due to the inhomogeneous nature of the dose distribution, the GTVs were not covered adequately, leading to very low values of tumor control probability. The mean dose to the normal liver ranged from 21.4 ± 30.7 to 36.7 ± 25.9 Gy. According to QUANTEC recommendation, a patient with primary liver cancer and a patient with metastatic liver cancer has more than 5% risk of radiotherapy-induced liver disease (RILD).

  6. Dosimetry in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Dance, David R; McLean, Donald; Kramer, Hans-Michael

    2010-10-01

    Dosimetry is an area of increasing importance in diagnostic radiology. There is a realisation amongst health professionals that the radiation dose received by patients from modern X-ray examinations and procedures can be at a level of significance for the induction of cancer across a population, and in some unfortunate instances, in the acute damage to particular body organs such as skin and eyes. The formulation and measurement procedures for diagnostic radiology dosimetry have recently been standardised through an international code of practice which describes the methodologies necessary to address the diverging imaging modalities used in diagnostic radiology. Common to all dosimetry methodologies is the measurement of the air kerma from the X-ray device under defined conditions. To ensure the accuracy of the dosimetric determination, such measurements need to be made with appropriate instrumentation that has a calibration that is traceable to a standards laboratory. Dosimetric methods are used in radiology departments for a variety of purposes including the determination of patient dose levels to allow examinations to be optimized and to assist in decisions on the justification of examination choices. Patient dosimetry is important for special cases such as for X-ray examinations of children and pregnant patients. It is also a key component of the quality control of X-ray equipment and procedures. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Comparison of internal dosimetry factors for three classes of adult computational phantoms with emphasis on I-131 in the thyroid.

    PubMed

    Lamart, Stephanie; Bouville, Andre; Simon, Steven L; Eckerman, Keith F; Melo, Dunstana; Lee, Choonsik

    2011-11-21

    source region for selected target organs--small intestine wall, lungs, pancreas and breast--as well as illustrate differences in energy deposition across the energy range (12 photon energies from 0.01 to 4 MeV). Differences were found in the SAFs between phantoms in a similar manner as the differences observed in S values but with larger differences at lower photon energies. To investigate the differences observed in the S and SAF values, the chord length distributions (CLDs) were computed for the selected source--target pairs and compared across the phantoms. As demonstrated by the CLDs, we found that the differences between phantoms in those factors used in internal dosimetry were governed to a significant degree by inter-organ distances which are a function of organ shape as well as organ location.

  8. Comparison of internal dosimetry factors for three classes of adult computational phantoms with emphasis on I-131 in the thyroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamart, Stephanie; Bouville, Andre; Simon, Steven L.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Melo, Dunstana; Lee, Choonsik

    2011-11-01

    source region for selected target organs—small intestine wall, lungs, pancreas and breast—as well as illustrate differences in energy deposition across the energy range (12 photon energies from 0.01 to 4 MeV). Differences were found in the SAFs between phantoms in a similar manner as the differences observed in S values but with larger differences at lower photon energies. To investigate the differences observed in the S and SAF values, the chord length distributions (CLDs) were computed for the selected source-target pairs and compared across the phantoms. As demonstrated by the CLDs, we found that the differences between phantoms in those factors used in internal dosimetry were governed to a significant degree by inter-organ distances which are a function of organ shape as well as organ location.

  9. Investigation of LaBr3:Ce probe for gamma-ray spectroscopy and dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghraby, Ahmed M.; Alzimami, K. S.; Alkhorayef, M. A.; Alsafi, K. G.; Ma, A.; Alfuraih, A. A.; Alghamdi, A. A.; Spyrou, N. M.

    2014-02-01

    The main thrust of this work is the investigation of performance of relatively new commercial LaBr3:Ce probe (Inspector 1000™ with LaBr3:Ce crystal) for gamma-ray spectroscopy and dosimetry measurements in comparison to LaCl3:Ce and NaI:Tl scintillators. The crystals were irradiated by a wide range of energies (57Co, 22Na, 18F, 137Cs and 60Co). The study involved recording of detected spectra and measurement of energy resolution, photopeak efficiency, internal radioactivity measurements as well as dose rate. The Monte Carlo package, Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) was used to validate the experiments. Overall results showed very good agreement between the measurements and the simulations. The LaBr3:Ce crystal has excellent energy resolution, energy resolutions of (3.37±0.05)% and (2.98±0.07)% for a 137Cs 662 keV and a 60Co 1332 keV gamma-ray point sources respectively, were recorded. The disadvantage of the lanthanum halide scintillators is their internal radioactivity. Inspector 1000™ with LaBr3:Ce scintillator has shown an accurate and quick dose measurements at Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Units which allows accurate assessment of the radiation dose received by staff members compared to the use of electronic personal dosimeters (EPD).

  10. Comparative uptake from sea water and tissue distribution of 60Co in marine mollusks

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, F.P.

    1987-07-01

    Five different species of marine mollusks, Mytilus galloprovincialis Lmk., Tapes decussatus L., Cerastoderma (Cardium) edule (L.), Donax vittatus (da Costa) and Patella vulgata L., were exposed to /sup 60/Co-labelled sea water under laboratory conditions. After a 1-mo exposure, tested species reached different whole-body /sup 60/Co concentration factors (CF) over radioactive sea water of 73 +/- 27, 22 +/- 10, 84 +/- 25, 6.3 +/- 1.4 and 31 +/- 10, respectively, which are not dependent upon the size of mollusks. Equations for the experimental uptake curves, obtained using a multi-exponential model, indicate that /sup 60/Co uptake by mollusks involves two or three compartments, according to the species. In all species, the larger compartments turn over with long biological half-lives, dependent upon species. At the beginning of the experiment, /sup 60/CoCl2 added to sea water was mainly in cationic forms. These forms were progressively converted into anionic plus neutral forms most likely due to complex formation with organic ligands. With time this physico-chemical evolution had a lowering effect on /sup 60/Co bioaccumulation by mollusks. Analysis of /sup 60/Co in tissues revealed that Donax shell and mantle do not accumulate the radionuclide in great quantities, generating the low whole-body concentration factor found. In contrast, shell and mantle from all other species displayed variable but high CFs. Shell by itself accounts for more than half of the /sup 60/Co whole-body burden. Among soft tissues, gills and viscera displayed the highest CF and muscle the lowest. From these experiments, one may conclude that significant differences among species do exist regarding Co bioaccumulation potential.

  11. Evaluation of BEBIG HDR 60Co system for non-invasive image-guided breast brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zehtabian, Mehdi; Sina, Sedigheh; Rivard, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose HDR 60Co system has recently been developed and utilized for brachytherapy in many countries outside of the U.S. as an alternative to 192Ir. In addition, the AccuBoost® technique has been demonstrated to be a successful non-invasive image-guided breast brachytherapy treatment option. The goal of this project is to evaluate the possibility of utilizing the BEBIG HDR 60Co system for AccuBoost treatment. These evaluations are performed with Monte Carlo (MC) simulation technique. Material and methods In this project, the MC calculated dose distributions from HDR 60Co for various breast sizes have been compared with the simulated data using an HDR 192Ir source. These calculations were performed using the MCNP5 code. The initial calculations were made with the same applicator dimensions as the ones used with the HDR 192Ir system (referred here after as standard applicator). The activity of the 60Co source was selected such that the dose at the center of the breast would be the same as the values from the 192Ir source. Then, the applicator wall-thickness for the HDR 60Co system was increased to diminish skin dose to levels received when using the HDR 192Ir system. With this geometry, dose values to the chest wall and the skin were evaluated. Finally, the impact of a conical attenuator with the modified applicator for the HDR 60Co system was analyzed. Results These investigations demonstrated that loading the 60Co sources inside the thick-walled applicators created similar dose distributions to those of the 192Ir source in the standard applicators. However, dose to the chest wall and breast skin with 60Co source was reduced using the thick-walled applicators relative to the standard applicators. The applicators with conical attenuator reduced the skin dose for both source types. Conclusions The AccuBoost treatment can be performed with the 60Co source and thick-wall applicators instead of 192Ir with standard applicators. PMID:26816504

  12. Evaluation of BEBIG HDR (60)Co system for non-invasive image-guided breast brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Zehtabian, Mehdi; Sina, Sedigheh; Rivard, Mark J; Meigooni, Ali S

    2015-12-01

    HDR (60)Co system has recently been developed and utilized for brachytherapy in many countries outside of the U.S. as an alternative to (192)Ir. In addition, the AccuBoost(®) technique has been demonstrated to be a successful non-invasive image-guided breast brachytherapy treatment option. The goal of this project is to evaluate the possibility of utilizing the BEBIG HDR (60)Co system for AccuBoost treatment. These evaluations are performed with Monte Carlo (MC) simulation technique. In this project, the MC calculated dose distributions from HDR (60)Co for various breast sizes have been compared with the simulated data using an HDR (192)Ir source. These calculations were performed using the MCNP5 code. The initial calculations were made with the same applicator dimensions as the ones used with the HDR (192)Ir system (referred here after as standard applicator). The activity of the (60)Co source was selected such that the dose at the center of the breast would be the same as the values from the (192)Ir source. Then, the applicator wall-thickness for the HDR (60)Co system was increased to diminish skin dose to levels received when using the HDR (192)Ir system. With this geometry, dose values to the chest wall and the skin were evaluated. Finally, the impact of a conical attenuator with the modified applicator for the HDR (60)Co system was analyzed. These investigations demonstrated that loading the (60)Co sources inside the thick-walled applicators created similar dose distributions to those of the (192)Ir source in the standard applicators. However, dose to the chest wall and breast skin with (60)Co source was reduced using the thick-walled applicators relative to the standard applicators. The applicators with conical attenuator reduced the skin dose for both source types. The AccuBoost treatment can be performed with the (60)Co source and thick-wall applicators instead of (192)Ir with standard applicators.

  13. Neutron personnel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, R.V.

    1981-06-16

    The current state-of-the-art in neutron personnel dosimetry is reviewed. Topics covered include dosimetry needs and alternatives, current dosimetry approaches, personnel monitoring devices, calibration strategies, and future developments. (ACR)

  14. Aminothiol Receptors for Decorporation of Intravenously Administered 60Co in the Rat

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Morris, James E.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Woodstock, Angela D.; Luders, Teresa; Curry, Terry L.; Thrall, Karla D.

    2010-01-01

    The reported investigation provides a comparison of the oral decorporation efficacy of L-glutathione (GSH), L-cysteine (Cys), and a liposomal GSH formulation (ReadiSorb) toward systemic cobalt-60 (60Co) to that observed following intravenous administration of GSH and Cys in F344 rats. L-histidine (His) was tested intravenously to compare in vivo efficacy of the aminothiol GSH and Cys chelators with that of aminoimidazole (His) chelator. 60Co was administered to animals by intravenous injection, followed by intravenous or oral gavage doses of a chelator repeated at 24 hour intervals for a total of 5 doses. The results suggest that GSH and Cys are potent decorporation agents for 60Co in the rat model, although the efficacy of treatment depends largely on systemic availability of a chelator. The intravenous GSH or Cys were most effective in reducing tissue 60Co levels and in increasing excretion of radioactivity compared to control animals. Liposomal encapsulation was found to markedly enhance the oral bioavailability of GSH compared to non-formulated GSH. Oral administration of ReadiSorb reduced 60Co levels in nearly all tissues by 12-43% compared to that observed for non-formulated GSH. Efficacy of oral Cys was only slightly reduced in comparison with intravenous Cys. Further studies to optimize the dosing regimen in order to maximize decorporation efficiency are warranted.

  15. Monte Carlo calculations of doses to tiles irradiated by 60Co and 252Cf simulating atomic bomb gamma-ray fluences.

    PubMed

    Uehara, S; Hoshi, M; Sawada, S; Nagatomo, T; Ichikawa, Y

    1988-03-01

    Dose calculations for tiles exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb radiations were undertaken. A Monte Carlo code, ABOMB, was developed which considers the characteristics of atomic bomb gamma-ray fluences and geometrical configurations. ABOMB was applied to tile dose calculations for the available photon sources with definite fluences. Its validity was tested by comparing the depth-dose curves calculated for 60Co and 252Cf beams with the equivalent experimental data obtained in the laboratory. Selection of parameters, contribution of backscattering, and computing time also were considered. Present calculations are considered to be accurate with uncertainties less than +/- 10%, and may be useful for correcting or reinforcing atomic bomb gamma-ray doses, together with tile dose measurements by thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetry.

  16. 60Co contamination in recycled steel resulting in elevated civilian radiation doses: causes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Chang, W P; Chan, C C; Wang, J D

    1997-09-01

    Since late 1992, more than 100 building complexes containing public and private schools and nearly 1,000 apartments have been identified in Taiwan with elevated levels of gamma-radiation from construction steel contaminated with 60Co. Due to improper handling of 60Co contaminated scrap steel in late 1982 and 1983, contaminated construction materials have been widely distributed throughout the country. These contaminated construction materials have generated elevated radiation exposures to members of the public in Taiwan. As of early 1996, more than 4,000 people, including young students, have been identified as receiving more than 1 mSv y(-1) above the local background for up to 12 y. This report provides a detailed discussion of the sources of the 60Co contamination in construction steel, its discovery in the building complexes, and preliminary evaluation and remediation activities.

  17. Shear Stress in Nickel and Ni-60Co under One-Dimensional Shock Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Workman, A.; Wallwork, A.; Meziere, Y. J. E.; Millett, J. C. F.; Bourne, N. K.

    2006-07-28

    The dynamic response of pure nickel (Ni), and its alloy, Ni-60Co (by weight %), has been investigated during one-dimensional shock loading. Few materials' properties are different and the only significantly altered feature is the reduced stacking fault energy (SFE) for the Ni-60Co. This paper considers the effect of this reduced SFE on the shear strength. Data (in terms of shock stress, particle velocity and shock velocity) are also presented. The influence on the shear stress, {tau} of cobalt additions in nickel are then investigated and presented. Results indicate that the lateral stress is increasing in both materials with the increasing impact stress. The shear stress was found to be higher in the nickel than in the Ni-60Co. The progressive decrease of the lateral stress noted during loading indicates a complex mechanism of deformation behind the shock front.

  18. Monitoring of 60Co radiation-source parameters by optoelectronic instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medved Rogina, Branka; Vojnovic, Bozidar D.

    1995-10-01

    Problems of measurement of the radiation dose level and determining the position of the 60Co radiation source rods are discussed. The continuous gamma ray source 60Co is used for various scientific and industrial, food and medical, irradiation applications with doses up to 104 Gy. For a radiation sensor the PCS optical fiber could be used. By radiation effects testing PCS fiber is found to have adequate sensitivity in the visible range up to 1.47 multiplied by 10-1 dB/kmGy at high exposure, up to 103 Gy 60Co ionizing source irradiation. The position of the source rods is determined relative to the safety position, by the sensor linked with source position using a mechanical transmission system. The digital position sensor based on the optoelectronic impulse source is developed, with accuracy plus or minus 1 mm for the whole vertical position change of the source and great exploitation resistance particularly to vibrations.

  19. [Development of the 60Co gamma-ray standard field for therapy-level dosimeter calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water (N(D,w))].

    PubMed

    Fukumura, Akifumi; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Fukahori, Mai; Sakata, Suoh

    2012-01-01

    A primary standard for the absorbed dose rate to water in a 60Co gamma-ray field was established at National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) in fiscal year 2011. Then, a 60Co gamma-ray standard field for therapy-level dosimeter calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water was developed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) as a secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL). The results of an IAEA/WHO TLD SSDL audit demonstrated that there was good agreement between NIRS stated absorbed dose to water and IAEA measurements. The IAEA guide based on the ISO standard was used to estimate the relative expanded uncertainty of the calibration factor for a therapy-level Farmer type ionization chamber in terms of absorbed dose to water (N(D,w)) with the new field. The uncertainty of N(D,w) was estimated to be 1.1% (k = 2), which corresponds to approximately one third of the value determined in the existing air kerma field. The dissemination of traceability of the calibration factor determined in the new field is expected to diminish the uncertainty of dose delivered to patients significantly.

  20. Long-term results for Stage IIIB cervical cancer patients receiving external beam radiotherapy combined with either HDR (252)Cf or HDR (60)Co intracavitary brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Ulinskas, K; Janulionis, E; Valuckas, K P; Samerdokiene, V; Atkocius, V; Rivard, M J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the long-term curative effects and complications of patients diagnosed with cervical cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics IIIB (n = 430) as treated with Californium-252 ((252)Cf) or cobalt-60 ((60)Co) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Cervical cancer cases with a history of treatment with (252)Cf or (60)Co ICBT combined with EBRT were selected from the Lithuanian National Cancer Institute database. Complications and second primary malignancies were compared in both patients groups. Estimates of the 5-, 10-, and 15-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were computed with the Kaplan-Meier method and a Cox proportional hazards model applied using STATA software. At 5, 10, and 15 years, the overall survival rates were 46.9%, 39.3%, and 34.6% for the (252)Cf group and 35.4%, 26.9%, and 22.5% for the (60)Co group (p = 0.004), respectively. The disease-free survival rates were 42.1%, 35.0%, and 31.0% for the (252)Cf group and 32.0%, 25.1%, and 21.4% for the (60)Co group (p = 0.009), respectively. Histopathologic type of adenocarcinoma increased the risk of death for the (252)Cf group (hazard ratio 3.62). Histopathologic tumor type (hazard ratio 7.48) and recurrence (hazard ratio 2.83) were factors that statistically and significantly influenced the patient prognosis for the (60)Co group. Applying (252)Cf ICBT with EBRT was effective for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics IIIB cervical cancer patients. Moreover, long-term followup data demonstrated higher survival rates in patients treated with (252)Cf ICBT than (60)Co ICBT. Complications in patients treated with neutron ICBT were not more frequent or severe than those treated with (60)Co ICBT. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists. PMID:2040250

  2. Comparison of 60Co and 192Ir sources in HDR brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zwierzchowski, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    This paper compares the isotopes 60Co and 192Ir as radiation sources for high-dose-rate (HDR) afterloading brachytherapy. The smaller size of 192Ir sources made it the preferred radionuclide for temporary brachytherapy treatments. Recently also 60Co sources have been made available with identical geometrical dimensions. This paper compares the characteristics of both nuclides in different fields of brachytherapy based on scientific literature. In an additional part of this paper reports from medical physicists of several radiation therapy institutes are discussed. The purpose of this work is to investigate the advantages or disadvantages of both radionuclides for HDR brachytherapy due to their physical differences. The motivation is to provide useful information to support decision-making procedures in the selection of equipment for brachytherapy treatment rooms. The results of this work show that no advantages or disadvantages exist for 60Co sources compared to 192Ir sources with regard to clinical aspects. Nevertheless, there are potential logistical advantages of 60Co sources due to its longer half-life (5.3 years vs. 74 days), making it an interesting alternative especially in developing countries. PMID:23346129

  3. Investigation of Chitosan for Decorporation of 60Co in the Rat

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Curry, Terry L.; Luders, Teresa; Morris, James E.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Woodstock, Angela D.; Thrall, Karla D.

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: The reported investigation is a part of our on-going research aimed at identifying effective in vivo non-toxic decorporation agents and developing new therapies to treat internal contamination with radionuclides. The non-toxic nature of chitosan makes it an especially attractive candidate for unsupervised treatment of the general population in case of radiological/nuclear emergency. In this study, chemically unmodified water-soluble chitosan oligosaccharide of low molecular weight was tested for decorporation of cobalt-60 (Co-60) using a rodent model. Methods: Affinity of chitosan oligosaccharide for Co(II) was tested in vitro under conditions of physiological pH range and ionic strength using combined spectrophotometric and potentiometric titration techniques. Fisher F344 rat model was used for in vivo studies. To evaluate effect of chitosan on ingested Co-60, animals received single oral dose of Co-60 chloride (7 – 13.2 kBq per animal) followed by oral administration of chitosan material (288 – 366 mg per kg body weight); chitosan dosing was repeated in 24 hours. Chitosan was also tested for removal of internalized Co-60. In this study, Co-60 single intravenous injection (7 – 8 kBq per animal) was followed by repetitive oral (300 mg per kg body weight) or intravenous (195 mg per kg body weight) administration of the chitosan material once daily for 5 days. Control animal groups received a single dose of Co-60 without chelator treatment. Excreta was collected daily. Tissues were collected postmortem and analyzed for radioactivity by gamma counting technique. Results: In vitro experiments confirmed binding of Co(II) by chitosan oligosaccharide, formation of mixed cobalt-chitosan-hydroxide complex species was proposed, and stability constants was calculated. Control in vivo studies indicated that about 71% of ingested Co-60 was excreted in two days predominantly through the gastrointestinal tract. For intravenously administered Co-60, urinal excretion

  4. Direct MC conversion of absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water for 60Co radiation.

    PubMed

    Lye, J E; Butler, D J; Franich, R D; Harty, P D; Oliver, C P; Ramanathan, G; Webb, D V; Wright, T

    2013-06-01

    The ARPANSA calibration service for (60)Co gamma rays is based on a primary standard graphite calorimeter that measures absorbed dose to graphite. Measurements with the calorimeter are converted to the absorbed dose to water using the calculation of the ratio of the absorbed dose in the calorimeter to the absorbed dose in a water phantom. ARPANSA has recently changed the basis of this calculation from a photon fluence scaling method to a direct Monte Carlo (MC) calculation. The MC conversion uses an EGSnrc model of the cobalt source that has been validated against water tank and graphite phantom measurements, a step that is required to quantify uncertainties in the underlying interaction coefficients in the MC code. A comparison with the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) as part of the key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K4 showed an agreement of 0.9973 (53).

  5. Effect of Gold Nanoparticles on Prostate Dose Distribution under Ir-192 Internal and 18 MV External Radiotherapy Procedures Using Gel Dosimetry and Monte Carlo Method

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, H.; Hashemi, B.; Mahdavi, S. R.; Hejazi, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gel polymers are considered as new dosimeters for determining radiotherapy dose distribution in three dimensions. Objective The ability of a new formulation of MAGIC-f polymer gel was assessed by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo (MC) method for studying the effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in prostate dose distributions under the internal Ir-192 and external 18MV radiotherapy practices. Method A Plexiglas phantom was made representing human pelvis. The GNP shaving 15 nm in diameter and 0.1 mM concentration were synthesized using chemical reduction method. Then, a new formulation of MAGIC-f gel was synthesized. The fabricated gel was poured in the tubes located at the prostate (with and without the GNPs) and bladder locations of the phantom. The phantom was irradiated to an Ir-192 source and 18 MV beam of a Varian linac separately based on common radiotherapy procedures used for prostate cancer. After 24 hours, the irradiated gels were read using a Siemens 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. The absolute doses at the reference points and isodose curves resulted from the experimental measurement of the gels and MC simulations following the internal and external radiotherapy practices were compared. Results The mean absorbed doses measured with the gel in the presence of the GNPs in prostate were 15% and 8 % higher than the corresponding values without the GNPs under the internal and external radiation therapies, respectively. MC simulations also indicated a dose increase of 14 % and 7 % due to presence of the GNPs, for the same experimental internal and external radiotherapy practices, respectively. Conclusion There was a good agreement between the dose enhancement factors (DEFs) estimated with MC simulations and experiment gel measurements due to the GNPs. The results indicated that the polymer gel dosimetry method as developed and used in this study, can be recommended as a reliable method for investigating the DEF of GNPs in internal and external

  6. Intercomparison in Cytogenetic Dosimetry among 22 Laboratories in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian Xiang; Pan, Yan; Ruan, Jian Lei; Piao, Chunnan; Su, Xu

    2016-01-01

    As part of a regional International Atomic Energy Agency-coordinated research project with the support from the National Health and Family Planning Commission of China, 22 laboratories participated in the intercomparison in cytogenetic dosimetry in China. Slides for chromosomal aberrations were prepared by the Department of Radiation Epidemiology, National Institute for Radiological Protection, which organized the exercise. Slides were sent to the other participating laboratories through Express Mail Service. For estimates of dose, each laboratory scored the frequency of dicentrics plus centric rings chromosomes. The whole blood samples were irradiated with 60Co γ-rays (1.3 Gy, 2.4 Gy and 1.5 Gy, 2.6 Gy). Each laboratory got one group of the slides. Ten of the 44 estimates of dose fell within ±5% of the true physical dose, 12 fell within ±5–10%, 9 fell within ±10–15%, 12 fell within ±15–20%, while only one sample fell ± >20%. The evaluation of the respective dose was achieved by 21 laboratories. PMID:28217282

  7. Comparison of dosimetric standards of Canada and France for photons at 60Co and higher energies.

    PubMed

    Shortt, K; Ross, C; Seuntjens, J; Delaunay, F; Ostrowsky, A; Gross, P; Leroy, E

    2001-08-01

    We report the results of a comparison of the dosimetric standards of Canada and France for photon beams at 60Co and a few higher energies. The present primary standard of absorbed dose to water for NRC, Canada is based on measurements made with a sealed water calorimeter. The corresponding standard of the LNHB, France is based on measurements made with a graphite calorimeter at 60Co energy and transferred to absorbed dose to water for 60Co and higher-energy photon beams using both ion chambers and Fricke dosemeters as transfer instruments. To make this comparison, we used three graphite-walled NE2571 Farmer chambers. The absorbed dose to water determined by the LNHB was greater than that determined by NRC by 0.20% at 60Co energy. This difference is not significant given the uncertainties on the standards. In order to do the comparison for higher-energy photons, we interpolated the NRC data set at the beam qualities used at the LNHB. When %dd(10)x is used as the method of specifying beam quality, the determination of absorbed dose to water by the LNHB is about 0.2% greater than that determined by NRC and consistent with the results at 60Co. However, when using TPR20,10 as the beam quality specifier, the LNHB determination is greater than the NRC's determination by 0.8% and 1.2% at 12 and 20 MV respectively. This discrepancy, which systematically increases with increasing energy, eventually exceeds the uncertainties in the ratio of the standards, estimated to be 0.7%. This underscores the importance of selecting the method of specifying beam quality, either %dd(10)x or TPR20,10, at least for the 'soft' beams used by NRC in this comparison. In the case of the air kerma standards, which were also compared at 60Co energy, the LNHB determination was greater than NRC's by 0.14%, which is not significant given the uncertainties on the standards.

  8. Dosimetry of the Leksell gamma knife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltsner, Sheridan Griffin

    No accepted official protocol exists for the dosimetry of the Leksell Gamma KnifeRTM (GK) stereotactic radiosurgery device. Establishment of a dosimetry protocol has been complicated by the unique partial-hemisphere arrangement of 201 separate 60Co beams simultaneously focused on the treatment volume and by the rigid geometry of the GK unit itself. This paper proposes an air kerma based dosimetry protocol using an in-air or in-acrylic phantom measurement to determine the dose rate of fields collimated by the 18 mm helmet of a GK unit. A small-volume ionization chamber was used to make measurements at the physical isocenter of three GK units. The dose rate to water was determined using a modified version of the AAPM Task Group 21 protocol designed for use with 60Co-based teletherapy machines. This experimentally determined dose rate was compared to the treatment planning system (TPS) dose rate that is determined by the clinical medical physicist at the time of machine commissioning. The TPS dose rate is defined as dose rate to water at a depth of 8 cm. The dose rate to water for the 18 mm helmet determined using the air kerma based calculations presented here is consistently between 1.5% and 2.9% higher than the TPS dose rate. These air kerma based measurements allow GK dosimetry to be performed with an established dosimetry protocol and without complications arising from the use of and possible variations in solid phantom material. Measurements were made with the same chamber in a spherical acrylic phantom for comparison. This methodology will allow future development of calibration methods appropriate for the smaller fields of GK units to be compared to a well established standard. Multiple three-dimensional dosimetry methods were also used to capture the dose distribution of the entire field of the GK. These methods included radiosensitive gel, a novel three-dimensional radiochromic film phantom, and Monte Carlo modeling. These methods were also compared to the

  9. (60)Co in cast steel matrix: A European interlaboratory comparison for the characterisation of new activity standards for calibration of gamma-ray spectrometers in metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Tzika, Faidra; Burda, Oleksiy; Hult, Mikael; Arnold, Dirk; Marroyo, Belén Caro; Dryák, Pavel; Fazio, Aldo; Ferreux, Laurent; García-Toraño, Eduardo; Javornik, Andrej; Klemola, Seppo; Luca, Aurelian; Moser, Hannah; Nečemer, Marijan; Peyrés, Virginia; Reis, Mario; Silva, Lidia; Šolc, Jaroslav; Svec, Anton; Tyminski, Zbigniew; Vodenik, Branko; Wätjen, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    Two series of activity standards of (60)Co in cast steel matrix, developed for the calibration of gamma-ray spectrometry systems in the metallurgical sector, were characterised using a European interlaboratory comparison among twelve National Metrology Institutes and one international organisation. The first standard, consisting of 14 disc shaped samples, was cast from steel contaminated during production ("originally"), and the second, consisting of 15 similar discs, from artificially-contaminated ("spiked") steel. The reference activity concentrations of (60)Co in the cast steel standards were (1.077±0.019) Bqg(-1) on 1 January 2013 12h00 UT and (1.483±0.022) Bqg(-1) on 1 June 2013 12h00 UT, respectively.

  10. Calorimetric study on the effect of 60Co γ-rays on the growth of microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirkner, Sandra; Takahashi, Katsutada; Furuta, Masakazu; Hayashi, Toshio

    2002-03-01

    Using a calorimeter equipped with 24 sample units, the heat evolution from growing Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Escherichia coli and spores of Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus stearothermophilus was detected in the form of growth thermograms. Irradiation with 60Co γ-rays affected the growth pattern, which was used for a quantitative analysis of the effect on microorganisms. Irradiation of B. pumilus and B. stearothermophilus spores led to dose-dependent delays in growth, indicating a bactericidal effect. In case of 60Co γ-irradiated S. cerevisiae, a dose-dependent reduction of the growth rate constant was observed together with the retardation in growth, indicating a combination of bactericidal and bacteriostatic effects. An equation to determine the number of survivors on the basis of the retardation in growth tα and the growth rate constant μ was developed, which proved the opportunity to use the calorimetric technique in predictive microbiology.

  11. 60Co irradiation of Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli induces Stx phage.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Kojio, Seiichi; Taneike, Ikue; Nakagawa, Saori; Iwakura, Nobuhiro; Wakisaka-Saito, Noriko

    2003-05-16

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), an important cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome, was completely killed by (60)Co irradiation at 1 x l0(3) gray (1 kGy) or higher. However, a low dose of irradiation (0.1-0.3 kGy) markedly induced Stx phage from STEC. Stx production was observed in parallel to the phage induction. Inactivation of Stx phage required a higher irradiation dose than that for bacterial killing. Regarding Stx, cytotoxicity was susceptible to irradiation, but cytokine induction activity was more resistant than Stx phage. The findings suggest that (1). although (60)Co irradiation is an effective means to kill the bacteria, it does induce Stx phage at a lower irradiation dose, with a risk of Stx phage transfer and emergence of new Stx-producing strains, and (2). irradiation differentially inactivates some activities of Stx.

  12. A new parallel-plate graphite ionization chamber as a 60Co gamma radiation reference instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perini, Ana P.; Neves, Lucio P.; Fernández-Varea, José M.; Cassola, Vagner F.; Kramer, Richard; Khoury, Helen J.; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2014-02-01

    The calibration procedure in radiotherapy treatments is very important and a sensitive task due to the high doses delivered to the patients. Generally, the air-kerma cavity standards for 60Co gamma rays are graphite cavity ionization chambers. In this work a new parallel-plate graphite ionization chamber was studied to analyze its potential use as a reference instrument. In order to evaluate its performance in 60Co beams, it was submitted to several characterization tests. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations were undertaken using the EGSnrc code to study the influence of the chamber components on its response. The results obtained showed that this new ionization chamber presented a satisfactory performance in all evaluated tests.

  13. Decoloration Kinetics of Waste Cooking Oil by 60Co γ-ray/H2O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yulin; Xiang, Yuxiu; Wang, Lipeng

    2016-03-01

    In order to decolorize, waste cooking oil, a dark red close to black solution from homes and restaurants, was subjected to 60Co γ-ray/H2O2 treatment. By virtue of UV/Vis spectrophotometric method, the influence of Gamma irradiation to decoloration kinetics and rate constants of the waste cooking oil in the presence of H2O2 was researched. In addition, the influence of different factors such as H2O2 concentration and irradiation dose on the decoloration rate of waste cooking oil was investigated. Results indicated that the decoloration kinetics of waste cooking oil conformed to the first-order reaction. The decoloration rate increased with the increase of irradiation dose and H2O2 concentration. Saponification analysis and sensory evaluation showed that the sample by 60Co γ-ray/H2O2 treatment presented better saponification performance and sensory score. Furthermore, according to cost estimate, the cost of the 60Co γ-ray/H2O2 was lower and more feasible than the H2O2 alone for decoloration of waste cooking oil.

  14. Behavior of 60Co and 134Cs in a Canadian Shield lake over 5 years.

    PubMed

    Bird, G A; Schwartz, W J; Motycka, M; Rosentreter, J

    1998-04-08

    Radionuclides were added to the anoxic hypolimnion of a Canadian Shield lake to simulate the nuclear fuel waste disposal scenario where radionuclides might enter the bottom waters of a lake. The radionuclides remained in the hypolimnion until lake mixing at autumn turnover after which 60Co was rapidly lost and 134Cs was slowly lost from the water. Only 0.4% of the 60Co and 0.6% of the 134Cs remained in the water at year 5. Highest concentrations occurred in periphyton and filter feeders, Holopedium gibberum and clams (Anodonata grandis grandis). From maximum annual concentrations in clam tissues, it was estimated that the availability of 60Co for uptake had a half-time (t1/2) of 835 days in the lake, whereas that for 134Cs was 780 days. Loss rate coefficients, k, for the radionuclides from taxa ranged from 0.0008 to 0.0043 day-1 (t1/2 = 161-866 days) for 60Co and from 0.0009 to 0.005 day-1 (t1/2 = 139-770 days) for 134Cs. Cobalt-60 concentrations in forage fish were low, whereas 134Cs concentrations increased over the first year or two, then slowly declined. On the basis of k values measured for forage fish, the biological half-time of 134Cs in forage fish ranged from 428 to 630 days. Maximum 134Cs concentrations in forage fish were higher following hypolimnetic addition than epilimnetic addition. Relatively high 134Cs concentrations in periphyton at year 5 point to the importance of benthic pathways in the recycling of contaminants to higher trophic levels. The presence of 134Cs in biota 5 years after the addition, long after concentrations were no longer detectable in surface waters, is evidence of the persistence of Cs in aquatic systems. The k values (or t1/2 values) for the loss of 60Co and 134Cs from water and their uptake and loss from biota can be used to establish parameter values for assessment models. The results demonstrate that assessment models should account for the release of radionuclides from sediment and their subsequent recycling in the food

  15. Transit dose comparisons for (60)Co and (192)Ir HDR sources.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Alventosa, Vicent; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2016-12-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the ambient dose due to the transit of high dose rate (HDR) (60)Co sources along a transfer tube as compared to (192)Ir ones in a realistic clinical scenario. This goal is accomplished by evaluating air-kerma differences with Monte Carlo calculations using PENELOPE2011. Scatter from both the afterloader and the patient was not taken into account. Two sources, mHDR-v2 and Flexisource Co-60, (Elekta Brachytherapy, Veenendaal, the Netherlands) have been considered. These sources were simulated within a standard transfer tube located in an infinite air phantom. The movement of the source was included by displacing their positions along the connecting tube from z  =  -75 cm to z  =  +75 cm and combining them. Since modern afterloaders like Flexitron (Elekta) or Saginova (BEBIG GmbH) are able to use equally (192)Ir and (60)Co sources, it was assumed that both sources are displaced with equal speed. Typical HDR source activity content values were provided by the manufacturer. 2D distributions were obtained with type-A uncertainties (k  =  2) less than 0.01%. From those, the air-kerma ratio (60)Co/(192)Ir was evaluated weighted by their corresponding typical activities. It was found that it varies slowly with distance (less than 10% variation at 75 cm) but strongly in time due to the shorter half-life of the (192)Ir (73.83 d). The maximum ratio is located close to the tube. It reaches a value of 0.57 when the typical activity of the sources at the time when they were installed by the vendor was used. Such ratio increases up to 1.28 at the end of the recommended working life (90 d) of the (192)Ir source. (60)Co/(192)Ir air-kerma ratios are almost constant (0.51-0.57) in the vicinity of the source-tube with recent installed sources. Nevertheless, air-kerma ratios increase rapidly (1.15-1.29) whenever the (192)Ir is approaching the end of its life. In case of a medical event requiring the medical staff to

  16. Calibration of GafChromic EBT3 for absorbed dose measurements in 5 MeV proton beam and {sup 60}Co γ-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Vadrucci, M. Ronsivalle, C.; Marracino, F.; Montereali, R. M.; Picardi, L.; Piccinini, M.; Vincenti, M. A.; Esposito, G.; De Angelis, C.; Cherubini, R.; Pimpinella, M.

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To study EBT3 GafChromic film in low-energy protons, and for comparison purposes, in a reference {sup 60}Co beam in order to use it as a calibrated dosimetry system in the proton irradiation facility under construction within the framework of the Oncological Therapy with Protons (TOP)-Intensity Modulated Proton Linear Accelerator for RadioTherapy (IMPLART) Project at ENEA-Frascati, Italy. Methods: EBT3 film samples were irradiated at the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy, with a 5 MeV proton beam generated by a 7 MV Van de Graaff CN accelerator. The nominal dose rates used were 2.1 Gy/min and 40 Gy/min. The delivered dose was determined by measuring the particle fluence and the energy spectrum in air with silicon surface barrier detector monitors. A preliminary study of the EBT3 film beam quality dependence in low-energy protons was conducted by passively degrading the beam energy. EBT3 films were also irradiated at ENEA-National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology with gamma radiation produced by a {sup 60}Co source characterized by an absorbed dose to water rate of 0.26 Gy/min as measured by a calibrated Farmer type ionization chamber. EBT3 film calibration curves were determined by means of a set of 40 film pieces irradiated to various doses ranging from 0.5 Gy to 30 Gy absorbed dose to water. An EPSON Expression 11000XL color scanner in transmission mode was used for film analysis. Scanner response stability, intrafilm uniformity, and interfilm reproducibility were verified. Optical absorption spectra measurements were performed on unirradiated and irradiated EBT3 films to choose the most sensitive color channel to the dose range used. Results: EBT3 GafChromic films show an under response up to about 33% for low-energy protons with respect to {sup 60}Co gamma radiation, which is consistent with the linear energy transfer dependence already observed with higher energy protons, and a negligible dose

  17. Calibration of GafChromic EBT3 for absorbed dose measurements in 5 MeV proton beam and (60)Co γ-rays.

    PubMed

    Vadrucci, M; Esposito, G; Ronsivalle, C; Cherubini, R; Marracino, F; Montereali, R M; Picardi, L; Piccinini, M; Pimpinella, M; Vincenti, M A; De Angelis, C

    2015-08-01

    To study EBT3 GafChromic film in low-energy protons, and for comparison purposes, in a reference (60)Co beam in order to use it as a calibrated dosimetry system in the proton irradiation facility under construction within the framework of the Oncological Therapy with Protons (TOP)-Intensity Modulated Proton Linear Accelerator for RadioTherapy (IMPLART) Project at ENEA-Frascati, Italy. EBT3 film samples were irradiated at the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy, with a 5 MeV proton beam generated by a 7 MV Van de Graaff CN accelerator. The nominal dose rates used were 2.1 Gy/min and 40 Gy/min. The delivered dose was determined by measuring the particle fluence and the energy spectrum in air with silicon surface barrier detector monitors. A preliminary study of the EBT3 film beam quality dependence in low-energy protons was conducted by passively degrading the beam energy. EBT3 films were also irradiated at ENEA-National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology with gamma radiation produced by a (60)Co source characterized by an absorbed dose to water rate of 0.26 Gy/min as measured by a calibrated Farmer type ionization chamber. EBT3 film calibration curves were determined by means of a set of 40 film pieces irradiated to various doses ranging from 0.5 Gy to 30 Gy absorbed dose to water. An EPSON Expression 11000XL color scanner in transmission mode was used for film analysis. Scanner response stability, intrafilm uniformity, and interfilm reproducibility were verified. Optical absorption spectra measurements were performed on unirradiated and irradiated EBT3 films to choose the most sensitive color channel to the dose range used. EBT3 GafChromic films show an under response up to about 33% for low-energy protons with respect to (60)Co gamma radiation, which is consistent with the linear energy transfer dependence already observed with higher energy protons, and a negligible dose-rate dependence in the 2-40 Gy/min range

  18. Development and application of a dosimetry model (ExDoM2) for calculating internal dose of specific particle-bound metals in the human body.

    PubMed

    Chalvatzaki, Eleftheria; Lazaridis, Mihalis

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to develop a dosimetry model (ExDoM2) for calculating internal dose of specific particle-bound metals (As, Pb, Cd, Cr and Mn) in the human body. The ExDoM2 is a revised version of a respiratory tract model (ExDoM) incorporating a new particle clearance mechanism in the respiratory tract model and a Physiologically-Based PharmacoKinetic (PBPK) model. The revised respiratory tract model was used to calculate the deposition, clearance and retention of particles in the human respiratory tract and the mass transferred to the oesophagus (gastrointestinal tract) and blood. The PBPK module was used to analyze the distribution of metals (As, Pb, Cd, Cr and Mn) from the blood circulation system to other organs or tissues like liver, kidneys, heart, brain, muscle and bone. The model was applied to calculate the internal human dose for an adult Caucasian male exposed to particulate mass matter (PM), PMPb, PMCd, PMMn and PMCr in an urban area (Athens, Greece). The analysis showed that at the end of the exposure (one day exposure scenario) to PMPb, the major accumulation occurs in the bone, blood and muscle, whereas as regards PMCd the major accumulation occurs in the other tissues, like kidney and liver. In addition, for PMMn, the major accumulation occurs in the other tissues and lungs, whereas as regards PMCr the major accumulation occurs in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and lungs. Therefore, ExDoM2 is an important feature in studying deposition of particles in the human body.

  19. Dosimetry of [177Lu]-DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4 – impact on the feasibility of insulinoma internal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Velikyan, Irina; Bulenga, Thomas N; Selvaraju, Ramkumar; Lubberink, Mark; Espes, Daniel; Rosenström, Ulrika; Eriksson, Olof

    2015-01-01

    [68Ga]-DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4 has been shown to be a promising imaging candidate for targeting glucagon like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R). In the light of radiotheranostics and personalized medicine the 177Lu-labelled analogue is of paramount interest. In this study we have investigated the organ distribution of [177Lu]-DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4 in rat and calculated human dosimetry parameters in order to estimate the maximal acceptable administered radioactivity, and thus potential applicability of [177Lu]-DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4 for internal radiotherapy of insulinomas. Nine male and nine female Lewis rats were injected with [177Lu]-DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4 for ex vivo organ distribution study at nine time points. The estimation of human organ/total body absorbed and total effective doses was performed using Organ Level Internal Dose Assessment Code software (OLINDA/EXM 1.1). Six more rats (male: n = 3; female: n = 3) were scanned by single photon emission tomography and computed tomography (SPECT-CT). The renal function and potential cell dysfunction were monitored by creatinine ISTAT and glucose levels. The fine uptake structure of kidney and pancreas was investigated by ex vivo autoradiography. Blood clearance and washout from most of the organs was fast. The kidney was the dose-limiting organ with absorbed dose of 5.88 and 6.04 mGy/MBq, respectively for female and male. Pancreatic beta cells demonstrated radioactivity accumulation. Renal function and beta cell function remained unaffected by radiation. The absorbed dose of [177Lu]-DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4 to kidneys may limit the clinical application of the agent. However, hypothetically, kidney protection and peptidase inhibition may allow reduction of kidney absorbed dose and amplification of tumour absorbed doses. PMID:25973333

  20. The In-Vitro Transport of (238)PLUTONIUM Oxide and (239)PLUTONIUM Oxide Through a Membrane Filter and its Importance for Internal Radiation Dosimetry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Michael Terrance

    These experiments were designed to determine if ('238)PuO(,2), due to its higher specific activity and attendant aggregate recoil, undergoes higher transfer through a membrane filter into an interstitial human alveolar lung fluid simulant than ('239)PuO(,2). The rate at which such transfer occurs was determined in an in-vitro chamber designed to simulate residence characteristics of particles of insoluble plutonium oxides in human alveolar interstitium. The ratio of the rate of ('238)Pu/('239)Pu transfer was 138 (+OR -) 76%. Calculations were performed to assess the importance of this finding in terms of the internal dosimetry of insoluble ('238)Pu using methods and models recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Three cases were evaluated, namely integral 50-year dose commitment, urinary excretion after single acute intake and urinary excretion rate during chronic constant intake. It was found that integral 50-year dose commitments were not influenced by the rate of plutonium transfer from the pulmonary compartment to blood. The evaluation of calculated urinary excretion data after a single acute inhalation intake showed that in the early period, up to about 30 days post exposure, urinary excretion of ('238)PuO(,2) may be 2 to 10 times higher than the urinary excretion rate for ('238)PuO(,2) predicted by the ICRP reference model. From about 50 days to approximately 1000 days the calculated urinary excretion rate for ('238)PuO(,2) may be lower than that predicted by the reference model by a factor of 2 to 10. In the case of chronic constant intake the calculated urinary excretion rate for ('238)PuO(,2) may be up to a factor of 2 higher than that predicted by the reference ICRP Model.

  1. Experimental studies of combination of PDT and tumor chemotherapy or 60Co irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didziapetriene, Janina; Prasmickiene, Grazina; Sukeliene, Dalija; Rotomskis, Ricardas; Streckyte, Giedre; Atkocius, Vydmantas; Staciokiene, Laima; Smilgevicius, Valerijus

    1995-01-01

    We present experimental results obtained by combining photodynamic therapy (PDT) with tumor chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Dimethoxyhematoporphyrin (DMHp) and photosan (PS) were used as photosensitizers, pharanoxi and vincristine as antitumor drugs. The therapeutic effect of the combination of PDT and antitumor drugs (pharanoxi, vincristine) slightly increases as compared to the treatment of PDT or antitumor drug alone. The additive therapeutic effect is achieved under the combination of PDT and 60Co irradiation. It seems that the sensitizers DMHp and PS regulate lipid peroxidation in blood serum of experimental animals, which becomes more active under the influence of alkylating antitumor drugs. Therefore, they could protect an organism from negative influence of tumor chemotherapy.

  2. Hypodontia in the beagle after perinatal whole-body /sup 60/Co gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.C.; Angleton, G.M.; Benjamin, S.A.

    1989-06-01

    As part of a long-term study to evaluate health effects of pre- and postnatal irradiation, dental development was examined. Beagles were irradiated in utero at 8, 28, or 55 days postcoitus or postnatally at 2, 70, or 365 days postpartum. Whole-body /sup 60/Co gamma radiation doses ranged from 0 to 3.8 Gy. There was an age-dependent dose-related increase in premolar hypodontia for animals irradiated at 55 days postcoitus or 2 days postpartum with doses of 0.83 Gy or higher and for those irradiated at 28 days postcoitus with 1.2 Gy or higher.

  3. Effect of 60Co-gamma radiation on the properties of furs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raina, R. K.; Wali, B. K.; Wani, A. M.

    Furs pretanned with various combinations of vegetable tanning agents and retanned with alum have been irradiated with 60Co γ-radiation in the dose range 5.0-114.0 kGy. The physico-chemical modifications induced by the radiation have been assessed by measuring changes in tensile strength, absorption of water, elongation and shrinkage temperature. For investigations, samples have been taken from the same topographic region of the rabbit furs, belonging to the same age and sex. The results are discussed hereunder.

  4. Doses in sensitive organs during prostate treatment with a 60Co unit.

    PubMed

    Vega-Carrillo, H R; Navarro Becerra, J A; Pérez Arrieta, M L; Pérez-Landeros, L H

    2014-01-01

    Using thermoluminiscent dosimeters the absorbed dose in the bladder, rectum and thyroid have been evaluated when 200 cGy was applied to the prostate. The treatment was applied with a (60)Co unit. A water phantom was built and thermoluminiscent dosimeters were located in the position where the prostate, bladder, rectum and thyroid are located. The therapeutic beam was applied in 4 irradiations at 0, 90, 180 and 270° with the prostate at the isocenter. The TLDs readouts were used to evaluate the absorbed dose in each organ. The absorbed doses were used to estimate the effective doses and the probability of developing secondary malignacies in thyroid, rectum and bladder.

  5. [Clinical calibration dosimetry in JSMP-01: measurements using plane-parallel ion chambers.].

    PubMed

    Araki, Fujio; Kumagai, Kozo; Yoshiura, Takao; Oura, Hiroki; Tachibana, Masayuki; Moribe, Nobuyuki; Tajima, Hidetaka; Yoshida, Atsushi; Kido, Tetsuo

    2005-01-01

    The Japan Society of Medical Physics (JSMP) Task Group published Standard dosimetry of absorbed dose in external beam radiotherapy (Standard dosimetry 01) as a new high-energy photon and electron dosimetry protocol in 2002. In this study, we present Standard dosimetry 01 as the JSMP-01 protocol for the convenience of users. This protocol is based on using an ion chamber having a (60)Co absorbed dose to water calibration coefficient, N(D,w), which is calculated from a (60)Co exposure calibration coefficient, N(c). We present dose comparisons between a reference chamber and various plane-parallel chambers. The absorbed dose to water was compared at the calibration depth of 5 cm for a (60)Co beam and d(c) = 0.6R(50) - 0.1 (cm) for electron beams according to JSMP-01. The absorbed dose to water calibration coefficients, [N(D,w)](Co) and [N(D,w)](18E), for the plane-parallel chambers were also determined by (60)Co and electron beam cross-calibrations using a reference chamber. The dose for the plane-parallel chambers derived from [N(D,w)](Co) and [N(D,w)](18E) was compared to that for the reference chamber using electron beams. The JARP chamber in the Kyushu Regional Center which meets third-order standards in Japan was used as the reference chamber. The doses for the plane-parallel chambers determined according to JSMP-01 agreed with that for the JARP chamber within 1% and 2% for (60)Co and electron beams, respectively. For electron beams, the doses for the plane-parallel chambers calculated from [N(D,w)](Co) and [N(D,w)](18E) were within 1.5% and 1.0% compared to those for the JARP chamber, respectively, except for the Exradin A10 chamber.

  6. [Exploration of relationship between the expression level of DNA polymerase beta and 60Co gamma-ray radiosensitivity].

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Xu, Xin; Yang, Mo; Chen, Chen; Zhao, Wei; Wu, Mei; Zhang, Zun-zhen

    2011-11-01

    To explore the relationship between the expression level of DNA polymerase beta (pol beta) and 60Co gamma-ray radiosensitivity and provide a basis on improving the efficiency of radiotherapy theoretically. pol beta wild-type cells (pol beta +/+), pol beta null cells (pol beta -/-) and pol beta overexpressed cells (polp beta oe) were applied as a model system. The radiosensitivity of 60Co gamma-ray on the cell was detected by MTT assay and clone formation assay. The DCFH-DA fluorescent probe was used to examine the cellular ROS after 60Co gamma-rays radiation. MTT assay showed that after radiation by 60Co gamma-rays followed with 72 h incubation, the cell viabilities in the three kinds of cells decreased significantly with a dose-response relationship (r-/+ = -0.976, r-/- = -0.977, r(oe) = -0.982, P<0.05). In addition, the viability of pol beta -/- cell was lower than those of other two kinds of cells at the same dose (P<0.05). Likewise, the colony number and colony formation rate in all tested cells also decreased after exposure to 60Co gamma-rays. The ROS level in the three kinds of cells was enhanced after treatment with 60Co gamma-ray, and the ROS level in pol beta -/- cells was much higher than that in the other two kinds of cells (P<0.05). Cell death caused by 60Co gamma-ray may associated with the DNA oxidative damage mediated by ROS; Overexpression of pol beta could protect against oxidative DNA damage, thus the cell apoptosis/death, thereby leading to reducing the radiosensitivity of 60Co gamma-rays, while null of DNA pol beta could increase radiosensitivity of 60Co gamma-rays by compromising the DNA repair.

  7. Detection and temporal variation of (60)Co in the digestive glands of the common octopus, Octopus vulgaris, in the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Morita, Takami; Otosaka, Shigeyoshi; Fujimoto, Ken; Nishiuchi, Kou; Kimoto, Katsunori; Yamada, Haruya; Kasai, Hiromi; Minakawa, Masayuki; Yoshida, Katsuhiko

    2010-08-01

    (60)Co were detected in common octopus specimens collected in the East China Sea in 1996-2005. The source of (60)Co has remained unclear yet. Stable isotope analyses showed that there was no difference in stable Co concentrations between octopus samples with (60)Co and without (60)Co. This result showed that the stable Co in the digestive gland of octopus potentially did not include a trace amount of (60)Co and the source of (60)Co existed independently. Furthermore, investigations of octopus in other area and other species indicated that the origin of the source of (60)Co occurred locally in the restricted area in the East China Sea and not in the coastal area of Japan. Concentrations of (60)Co have annually decreased with shorter half-life than the physical half-life. This decrease tendency suggests that the sources of (60)Co were identical and were temporary dumped into the East China Sea as a solid waste.

  8. A radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q} for well-type ionization chambers for the measurement of the reference air kerma rate of {sup 60}Co HDR brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Schüller, Andreas Meier, Markus; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Ankerhold, Ulrike

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether a chamber-type-specific radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q} can be determined in order to measure the reference air kerma rate of {sup 60}Co high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources with acceptable uncertainty by means of a well-type ionization chamber calibrated for {sup 192}Ir HDR sources. Methods: The calibration coefficients of 35 well-type ionization chambers of two different chamber types for radiation fields of {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy sources were determined experimentally. A radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q} was determined as the ratio of the calibration coefficients for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir. The dependence on chamber-to-chamber variations, source-to-source variations, and source strength was investigated. Results: For the PTW Tx33004 (Nucletron source dosimetry system (SDS)) well-type chamber, the type-specific radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q} is 1.19. Note that this value is valid for chambers with the serial number, SN ≥ 315 (Nucletron SDS SN ≥ 548) onward only. For the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well-type chambers, the type-specific correction factor k{sub Q} is 1.05. Both k{sub Q} values are independent of the source strengths in the complete clinically relevant range. The relative expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of k{sub Q} is U{sub k{sub Q}} = 2.1% for both chamber types. Conclusions: The calibration coefficient of a well-type chamber for radiation fields of {sup 60}Co HDR brachytherapy sources can be calculated from a given calibration coefficient for {sup 192}Ir radiation by using a chamber-type-specific radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q}. However, the uncertainty of a {sup 60}Co calibration coefficient calculated via k{sub Q} is at least twice as large as that for a direct calibration with a {sup 60}Co source.

  9. Spread of 60Co contaminated steel and its legal consequences in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J Y; Chang, J B; Chang, W P

    2001-12-01

    Since 1992, over 200 civilian residential and school buildings in Taiwan have been identified to have contained 60Co contaminated steel rebar emitting excessive gamma-radioactivity in living environments. These buildings were mostly constructed in early 1983 and 1984 by employing steels from one steel mill, which had recycled unknown 60Co orphan sources in northern Taiwan. In 1994, a group of residents who once stayed for a protracted period up to 10 y in the contaminated Ming-Sheng Villa filed a civil action against Taiwan's nuclear regulatory office, the Atomic Energy Council, for state tort compensation of 3.4 M U.S. dollars in equivalent. After three years of court processes, the Taipei District Court handed down a decision in partial favor of the exposed residents. Both parties soon appealed against this judgment to the Taiwan Appellate Court. This article analyzes the main legal issues involved, including government's obligations to prevent and eliminate contamination, to take preventive measures, and to take necessary remedial measures; and plaintiffs' assertion on any legal right against governmental offices. Moreover, discussion issues contain the scope of damage and compensation, causation analysis, absence of effective and efficient regulation over radioactive contamination, limit of tort compensation law and compensation amount, weight of medical evidence as well as role of expert witnesses, and related comparative legal studies.

  10. Radiation quality of tritium: a comparison with 60Co gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing

    2013-09-01

    In a previous study, microdosimetric simulations were performed for tritium uniformly distributed in a medium, and for tritium bound to biologically critical sites of dimensions from 10 nm to 2 µm. Results of local energy density, i.e. energy deposition in microscopic regions, are different for these two cases. Based on the spatial distribution of energy deposition, dose mean lineal energies are calculated for tritium in the forms of tritiated water (HTO) and organically bound tritium (OBT). The dose mean lineal energies of OBT are about a factor of 1.7 higher than those of HTO in a wide range of target dimensions of biological interest. The results are consistent with radiobiological findings that OBT is about twice as effective as HTO. In this study, the same calculations were performed for (60)Co gamma rays in a wide range of target dimensions of biological interest (10 nm to 2 µm). Compared with (60)Co gamma rays, the estimated relative biological effectiveness could vary from 1.3 to 3.5 for HTO, and 2.3 to 5.6 for OBT. The results are consistent with radiobiological findings for various biological endpoints in different biological systems that OBT is about twice as effective as HTO.

  11. Modern dosimetric tools for 60Co irradiation at high containment laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Twardoski, Barri; Feldmann, Heinz; Bloom, Marshall E.; Ward, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate an innovative photo-fluorescent film as a routine dosimetric tool during 60Co irradiations at a high containment biological research laboratory, and to investigate whether manufacturer-provided chamber exposure rates can be used to accurately administer a prescribed dose to biological specimens. Materials and methods Photo-fluorescent, lithium fluoride film dosimeters and National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST) transfer dosimeters were co-located in a self-shielded 60Co irradiator and exposed to γ-radiation with doses ranging from 5–85 kGy. Film dose-response relationships were developed for varying temperatures simulating conditions present when irradiating infectious biological specimens. Dose measurement results from NIST transfer dosimeters were compared to doses predicted using manufacturer-provided irradiator chamber exposure rates. Results The film dosimeter exhibited a photo-fluorescent response signal that was consistent and nearly linear in relationship to γ-radiation exposure over a wide dose range. The dosimeter response also showed negligible effects from dose fractionization and humidity. Significant disparities existed between manufacturer-provided chamber exposure rates and actual doses administered. Conclusion This study demonstrates the merit of utilizing dosimetric tools to validate the process of exposing dangerous and exotic biological agents to γ-radiation at high containment laboratories. The film dosimeter used in this study can be utilized to eliminate potential for improperly administering γ-radiation doses. PMID:21961968

  12. Effects of contrast medium on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. [X-ray; /sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, S.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, H.; Kuwabara, Y.; Okano, T.

    1982-07-01

    The effects of contrast material (meglumine iothalamate) on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations were investigated in studies on the lymphocytes of patients who had undergone diagnostic radiography and in vitro experiments with diagnostic x rays and /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays. Chromosome and chromatic aberrations were found to increase significantly with increasing concentrations of contrast material that were added at irradiation. However, the aberrations were not associated with elevation of the ratio of dicentric and ring chromosomes to the number of cells with unstable chromosome aberrations at the first mitosis. Lymphocytes irradiated in the absence of contrast material did not show an increase in chromosome-type aberrations when the agent was given in increasing concentrations during subsequent incubation, but there were greater numbers of chromatid gaps and breaks. When lymphocytes were exposed to 400 R (103.2 mC/kg) of /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays, the presence of contrast agent did not increase the yield of dicentric and ring chromosomes, but induced a marked delay in cell proliferation, especially in lymphocytes with more heavily damaged chromosomes. In additional examination, the contrast agent itself induced sister chromatid exchanges in lymphocytes.

  13. Monte Carlo calculation of the ionization chamber response to 60Co beam using PENELOPE.

    PubMed

    Yi, Chul-Young; Hah, Suck-Ho; Yeom, Min Sun

    2006-05-01

    The calculation of the ionization chamber response is one of key factors to develop a primary standard of air kerma. Using Monte Carlo code PENELOPE, we simulated the cavity response of the plane parallel ionization chamber to the monoenergetic 60Co beam incident normally on a flat surface of the chamber. Two simulation techniques, namely, the uniform interaction technique and the reentrance technique, were introduced. The effect of the input parameters such as C1 (average angular deflection in a single step between hard elastic events), C2 (maximum average fractional energy loss in a step), S(max) (maximum step length) and W(cc) (the lower energy of secondary electrons created as a result of a hard collision) on the simulated cavity dose was evaluated. We found that the simulated cavity response of the graphite and solid air chambers obtained by PENELOPE to the monoenergetic 60Co beam could be consistent with the value expected from the cross-sections of PENELOPE to within 0.2% (one standard deviation) when W(cc) and S(max) were selected carefully.

  14. Dose reconstruction for residents living in 60Co-contaminated rebar buildings.

    PubMed

    Tung, C J; Chao, T C; Chen, T R; Hsu, F Y; Lee, I T; Chang, S L; Liao, C C; Chen, W L

    1998-06-01

    The first 60Co-contaminated rebar building was discovered in Taipei city in 1992. As of 18 July 1997, 144 buildings with 1,327 housing units were confirmed to contain 60Co-contaminated rebars. All these reinforced concrete buildings were constructed between 1982 and 1984. Thousands of residents have been exposed to ionizing radiation of various degrees. Preliminary assessments by the Atomic Energy Council showed that the accumulated maximal doses ranged from a few mSv to several Sv. The purpose of this work was to reconstruct more reliable individual doses for epidemiologic and medical uses. This reconstruction provided the best estimated doses as well as conceivable upper and lower bounds. The variation of residential day-life activities by individual members in a family was considered according to their sex, age, profession, etc. Intensive data on exposure rates were collected using thermoluminescent dosimeters positioned at 1 m height and 1 m x 1 m intersections with additional measurements at special locations such as bed, sofa, dining table, etc. Thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements were performed in all 24 residences studied in this work. This showed that the Atomic Energy Council maximal doses were 2-6 times higher than the present best estimated doses. Among all family members, elders and housewives received the highest doses; children received the lowest doses. The difference in doses among all family members belonging to different cohort categories is within a factor of two.

  15. Experimental Investigations of Changes in β-Decay Rate of 60Co and 137Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baurov, Yu. A.; Konradov, A. A.; Kushniruk, V. F.; Kuznetsov, E. A.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Ryabov, Yu. V.; Senkevich, A. P.; Zadorozsny, S. V.

    Results of simultaneous measurements of β-decay rate with the aid of Ge(Li)-detectors performed at two laboratories 140 km apart (INR RAS, Troitsk, 60Co, and JINR, Dubna, 137Cs) from 15 March 2000 to 10 April 2000 are presented. Regular deviations of the count rate of γ-quanta following the β-decay of ~0.7% (INR RAS, 60Co) and ~0.2% (JINR, 137Cs) from the statistical average, are observed. The analysis of extremum deviations of γ--quanta count rate shows that the set of directions of tangents to the Earth's parallels of latitude at the extremum points of trajectories of motion in the space of each laboratory clearly forms three separate compact subsets of directions which agree, for two laboratories, to an accuracy of +/-10°. This phenomenon is shown not to be explained on the basis of traditional notion. A possible explanation is suggested based on the hypothesis that there exists a new anisotropic interaction caused by the cosmological vectorial potential Ag, a new fundamental constant having, according to the experiments carried out, the coordinate of right ascension α ~ 285° in the second equatorial system. This is in agreement with earlier experiments.

  16. Adsorption and desorption kinetics of (60)Co and (137)Cs in fresh water rivers.

    PubMed

    Fiengo Pérez, Fabricio; Sweeck, Lieve; Bauwens, Willy; Van Hees, May; Elskens, Marc

    2015-11-01

    Radionuclides released in water systems--as well as heavy metals and organic toxicants--sorb to both the suspended solid particles and the bed sediments. Sorption is usually represented mathematically by the distribution coefficient. This approach implies equilibrium between phases and instantaneous fixation (release) of the pollutant onto (from) the surface of the soil particle. However, empirical evidence suggests that for some radionuclides the fixation is not achieved instantaneously and that the reversibility of the process can be slow. Here the adsorption/desorption kinetics of (60)Co and (137)Cs in fresh water environments were simulated experimentally and later on modelled mathematically, while the influence of the most relevant factors affecting the sorption were taken into account. The experimental results suggest that for adsorption and the desorption more than 24 h are needed to reach equilibrium, moreover, It was observed that the desorption rate constants for (60)Co and (137)Cs lie within ranges which are of two to three orders of magnitude lower than the adsorption rate constants.

  17. Repair of neoplastic transformation damage following protracted exposures to /sup 60/Co. gamma. -rays

    SciTech Connect

    Han, A.; Hill, C.K.; Elkind, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    The incidences of neoplastic transformation induced by /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays in exponentially growing mouse embryo 10T1/2 cells were measured following acute and protracted exposures. Delivery of /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays at a low dose rate (0.1, 0.5, 2.5 rad/min) compared with a high dose rate (100 rad/min) results in appreciable, dose rate dependent reductions in cell killing and, independent of the effect on cell survival, reduces significantly the incidence of neoplastic transformation. Exposure of exponentially growing 10T1/2 cells to a dose of ..gamma..-rays in five equal daily fractions also significantly reduces transformation frequency, compared with delivery in a single dose, throughout the dose range examined (25 to 300 rads). The initial parts of the induction curves are fitted quite well by a linear dose dependence. The slopes of the regression lines for multifractionation delivery or irradiation at 0.1 rad/min, are one-third and one-half, respectively, of those for single exposures at a high dose rate. Increasing the interfraction interval up to 48 hours, or reduction of the dose per fraction further reduce incidence of neoplastic transformation. We conclude that protracted exposures of low LET radiation result in a net error-free repair of subtransformation damage.

  18. SU-E-T-340: Dosimetry of a Small Field Electron Beam for Innovative Radiotherapy of Small Surface Or Internal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Reft, C; Lu, Z; Noonan, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: An innovative small high intensity electron beams with energies from 6 to 12 MeV is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory to deliver an absorbed dose via a catheter to small malignant and nonmalignant lesions. This study reports on the initial dosimetric characteristics of this electron beam. These include output calibration, percent depth dose, beam profiles and leakage through the catheter. Methods: To simulate the narrow electron beam, the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is used to produce high energy electron beams. The electron beam from the accelerator is monitored by measuring the current through a transmission coil while the beam shape is observed with a fluorescent screen. The dosimetry properties of the electron beam transmitting through bone and tissue-like materials are measured with nanodot optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters and EDR radiographic film. The 6 MV photon beam from a Varian True beam linac is used to calibrate both the OSLDs and the film. Results: The beam characteristics of the 12 MeV beam were measured. The properties of the small diameter, 5 mm, beam differs from that of broad clinical electron beams from radiotherapy linacs. Due to the lack of scatter from the narrow beam, the maximum dose is at the surface and the depth of the 50% depth dose is 35 mm compared to 51 mm for a clinical 12 MeV. The widths of the 90% isodose measured at the surface and depths of 2, 6, 12, and 16 mm varied from 6.6 to 8.8 mm while the widths of the FWHM isodose varied from 7.8 to 25.5 mm. Conclusion: Initial beam measurements show favorable dosimetric properties for its use in treating either small surface or internal lesions, particularly to deliver radiation at the time of surgery to maximize the dose to the lesion and spare normal tissue.

  19. [Sensitivity of Jatropha curcas seeds to (60)Co-gamma radiation and their medial lethal doses in radiation breeding].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Yu; Lin, Jing-Ming; Luo, Li; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2009-03-01

    To study the sensitivity of Jatropha curcas seeds from three different locations to (60)Co-gamma radiation and to determine the medial lethal doses (LD50) of (60)Co-gamma radiation for these seeds. Six different radiation doses (0, 100, 150, 200, 250 and 300 Gy) were used. Based on the germination rate 50%, LD50 doses of (60)Co-gamma radiation for the seeds were calculated using linear regression equation. LD50 doses of (60)Co-gamma radiation for these seeds were 178 Gy (seeds from Guangdong), 132 Gy (seeds from Hainan) and 198 Gy (seeds from India) respectively. Increasing radiation doses caused more significant changes in leaf shape of the M1 seedlings. The results provides an important experimental basis for the radiation breeding of the important herbal and energy plant J. curcas.

  20. Measurements of 60Co in spoons activated by neutrons during the JCO criticality accident at Tokai-mura in 1999.

    PubMed

    Gasparro, J; Hult, M; Komura, K; Arnold, D; Holmes, L; Johnston, P N; Laubenstein, M; Neumaier, S; Reyss, J-L; Schillebeeckx, P; Tagziria, H; Van Britsom, G; Vasselli, R

    2004-01-01

    Neutron activated items from the vicinity of the place where the JCO criticality accident occurred have been used to determine the fluence of neutrons around the facility and in nearby residential areas. By using underground laboratories for measuring the activation products, it is possible to extend the study to also cover radionuclides with very low activities from long-lived radionuclides. The present study describes gamma-ray spectrometry measurements undertaken in a range of underground laboratories for the purpose of measuring (60)Co more than 2 years after the criticality event. The measurements show that neutron fluence determined from (60)Co activity is in agreement with previous measurements using the short-lived radionuclides (51)Cr and (59)Fe. Limits on contamination of the samples with (60)Co are evaluated and shown to not greatly affect the utility of neutron fluence determinations using (60)Co activation.

  1. Dosimetry studies in Zaborie village.

    PubMed

    Takada, J; Hoshi, M; Endo, S; Stepanenko, V F; Kondrashov, A E; Petin, D; Skvortsov, V; Ivannikov, A; Tikounov, D; Gavrilin, Y; Snykov, V P

    2000-05-01

    Dosimetry studies in Zaborie, a territory in Russia highly contaminated by the Chernobyl accident, were carried out in July, 1997. Studies on dosimetry for people are important not only for epidemiology but also for recovery of local social activity. The local contamination of the soil was measured to be 1.5-6.3 MBq/m2 of Cs-137 with 0.7-4 microSv/h of dose rate. A case study for a villager presently 40 years old indicates estimations of 72 and 269 mSv as the expected internal and external doses during 50 years starting in 1997 based on data of a whole-body measurement of Cs-137 and environmental dose rates. Mean values of accumulated external and internal doses for the period from the year 1986 till 1996 are also estimated to be 130 mSv and 16 mSv for Zaborie. The estimation of the 1986-1996 accumulated dose on the basis of large scale ESR teeth enamel dosimetry provides for this village, the value of 180 mSv. For a short term visitor from Japan to this area, external and internal dose are estimated to be 0.13 mSv/9d (during visit in 1997) and 0.024 mSv/50y (during 50 years starting from 1997), respectively.

  2. Medical dosimetry in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turák, O.; Osvay, M.; Ballay, L.

    2012-09-01

    Radiation exposure of medical staff during cardiological and radiological procedures was investigated. The exposure of medical staff is directly connected to patient exposure. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of doses on uncovered part of body of medical staff using LiF thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters in seven locations. Individual Kodak film dosimeters (as authorized dosimetry system) were used for the assessment of medical staff's effective dose. Results achieved on dose distribution measurements confirm that wearing only one film badge under the lead apron does not provide enough information on the personal dose. The value of estimated annual doses on eye lens and extremities (fingers) were in good correlation with international publications.

  3. Dosimetry of iodoantipyrine.

    PubMed

    Chu, R Y; Ekeh, S; Basmadjian, G

    1989-01-01

    Dosimetry of iodoantipyrine labeled with radioactive iodine was determined by measuring the biodistribution of 131I-iodoantipyrine in 41 female rabbits. Following administration of the radiopharmaceutical, subjects were killed at 0.5, 6, 12, 17, 24, 36, and 48 h. Organs and samples of tissues and body fluids were assayed. Results were corrected for physical decay. Exponential functions were employed to describe the time-concentration curves; representative value would be the biological half life of 9.96 +/- 0.55 h for blood. Cumulated activity estimates for 123I, 125I and 131I were then computed. Extrapolation to absorbed dose in humans followed the formulation of the Medical International Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. The whole body absorbed doses are 7 mu Gray, 5 mu Gray and 29 mu Gray per MBq of 123I, 125I, and 131I administered respectively.

  4. Enhancement of epoxide hydrolase production by (60) Co gamma and UV irradiation mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger ZJB-09103.

    PubMed

    Jin, Huo-Xi; OuYang, Xiao-Kun; Hu, Zhong-Ce

    2017-05-01

    An effective epoxide hydrolase (EH) production strain was mutagenized using (60) Co gamma and UV irradiation. Among positive mutant strains, the EH activity of C2-44 reached 33.7 U/g, which was 267% as much as that of the original Aspergillus niger ZJB-09103. Compared with the wild type, there were significant changes in morphology for C2-44, including the color of mycelia on the slants and the shape of conidial head. In addition, glucose and soybean cake were the optimal carbon and nitrogen source in terms of EH activity for the mutant C2-44 instead of soluble starch and peptone for the wild-type strain. The reaction time required to reach 99% enantiomeric excesses of (S)-epichlorohydrin from racemic substrate was shortened significantly by the mutant C2-44. This phenomenon was probably explained by the higher Vmax for hydrolysis of racemic epichlorohydrin by C2-44 compared with Aspergillus niger ZJB-09103. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Sensitivity to. gamma. rays of avian sarcoma and murine leukemia viruses. [/sup 60/Co, uv

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoshima, K.; Niwa, O.; Yutsudo, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Tahara, S.; Sugahara, T.

    1980-09-01

    The direct inactivation of avian and murine oncoviruses by ..gamma.. rays was examined using /sup 60/Co as a ..gamma..-ray source. The inactivation of murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) followed single-hit kinetics while the subgroup D Schmidt-Ruppin strain of avian sarcoma virus (SR-RSV D) showed multihit inactivation kinetics with an extrapolation number of 5. The two viruses showed similar uv-inactivation kinetics. The genomic RNA of the SR-RSV D strain was degraded by ..gamma.. irradiation faster than its infectivity, but viral clones isolated from the foci formed after ..gamma.. irradiation had a complete genome. These results suggest that SR-RSV D has a strong repair function, possibly connected with reverse transcriptase activity.

  6. Long-term follow-up after accidental gamma irradiation from a 60Co source

    SciTech Connect

    Klener, V.; Tuscany, R.; Vejlupkova, J.; Dvorak, J.; Vlkovic, P.

    1986-11-01

    In December 1973 a technician was accidentally irradiated when attempting to bring under control a sealed /sup 60/Co source (110 TBq) which had been lodged in the head of a medical irradiation unit during a replacement operation. In the early period after the accident, severe skin changes on the left hand, epilation in a small area of the left temporal region and minor deviations in peripheral blood developed. In the following years, repeated surgery due to secondary skin defects of the left hand resulted in the loss of the fingers 2-5. Since 1975, changes in the lens of the left eye began to appear leading gradually to the deterioration of visual acuity. Later, opacities of the lens of the right eye were found. The patient's psychological and emotional attitude about the accident changed in the course of time. The factors influencing the psychic state of the patient are identified.

  7. Radiation esophagitis in the opossum: radioprotection with indomethacin. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Northway, M.G.; Libshitz, H.I.; Osborne, B.M.; Feldman, M.S.; Mamel, J.J.; West, J.H.; Szwarc, I.A.

    1980-05-01

    Twenty-five opossums were evaluated before irradiation by fiberoptic endoscopy and air-contrast barium esophagram examination. All animals received 2250 rad /sup 60/Co-irradiated in a single exposure to the entire esophagus and lower exophageal sphincter. Animals received treatment with indomethacin. Acute esophagitis occurred 7 to 10 days postirradiation in control animals and was characterized by erythema, ulceration, and sloughing of esophageal mucosa as determined by air-contrast barium esophagram, endoscopy, and histology. Prostaglandin-treated animals showed more severe evidence of esophagitis than control animals. Indomethacin-treated animals showed no signs or only mild esophagitis posttreatment. It is concluded that indomethacin treatment may significantly reduce the severity of radiation esophagitis perhaps by blockade of prostaglandin synthesis.

  8. EVALUATION OF THE MIGRATION POTENTIAL FOR 60Co AND 137Cs AT THE MAINE YANKEE SITE.

    SciTech Connect

    FUHRMANN,M.SULLIVAN,T.

    2002-08-08

    The objective of this report is to discuss the degree of sorption and desorption of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co that may be associated with the granite bedrock and the ''popcorn'' cement drain system that underlie the Maine Yankee Containment Foundation. The purpose is to estimate how much retardation of these two radionuclides takes place in groundwater that flows in the near-field of the Containment Foundation, specifically with respect to contamination originating at the PAB Test Pit. Specific concerns revolve around the potential for the contamination originating near the PAB to create a radioactive dose to a hypothetical ''resident farmer'' using a well intercepting this water to exceed 4 millirems/yr.

  9. Time resolution of a 1-inch cylindrical CeBr3 crystal at 60Co energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedia, V.; Fraile, L. M.; Mach, H.; Olaizola, B.; Paziy, V.; Picado, E.; Udías, J. M.

    2013-06-01

    We have measured time resolutions of a cylindrical CeBr3 scintillator of 1-inch in height and 1-inch in diameter coupled to two different fast photomultiplier tubes, Hamamatsu R9779 and Photonis XP20D0, as a function of applied high voltages and different settings of a Constant Fraction Discriminator ORTEC 935. The time resolution was measured using a time-delayed coincidence set-up involving a fast reference detector. The best result of 119(2) ps at 60Co energies was obtained for the CeBr3 crystal coupled to the Hamamatsu PMT. This result is comparable to the resolution of 107 ps reported for a LaBr3(Ce) crystal of the same size. For the coupling of the CeBr3 scintillator to the Photonis PMT we got the time resolution of 146(2) ps.

  10. Radiation-induced pulmonary arterial perfusion defects: modification by D-penicillamine. [Rats; /sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.F.

    1981-04-01

    D-penicillamine, previously shown to have a beneficial effect on radiation-induced pulmonary histopathology, was tested to determine its effect on function in the irradiated lung. Male rats were irradiated with /sup 60/Co gamma rays; half then received 10 mg D-penicillamine per day, and half received no further treatment. One to nine months after irradiation, animals were subjected to lung perfusion scans. Untreated irradiated rats exhibited hyperemia, hypoperfusion, and perfusion defects of the irradiated lung. In penicillamine-treated rats, the appearance of perfusion defects was delayed, the peak incidence and severity of the defects was reduced, and recovery from pulmonary hypoperfusion was accelerated. Thus, using functional criteria, penicillamine appears to improve arterial perfusion and to ameliorate radiation injury in the rat lung.

  11. Proficiency Testing as a tool to monitor consistency of measurements in the IAEA/WHO Network of Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Czap, Ladislav; Shortt, Ken

    2008-08-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) established a Network of Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories (IAEA/WHO SSDL Network) in 1976. Through SSDLs designated by Member States, the Network provides a direct link of national dosimetry standards to the international measurement system of standards traceable to the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM). Within this structure and through the proper calibration of field instruments, the SSDLs disseminate S.I. quantities and units. To ensure that the services provided by SSDL members to end-users follow internationally accepted standards, the IAEA has set up two different comparison programmes. One programme relies on the IAEA/WHO postal TLD service and the other uses comparisons of calibrated ionization chambers to help the SSDLs verify the integrity of their national standards and the procedures used for the transfer of the standards to the end-users. The IAEA comparisons include 60Co air kerma (NK) and absorbed dose to water (ND,W) coefficients. The results of the comparisons are confidential and are communicated only to the participants. This is to encourage participation of the laboratories and their full cooperation in the reconciliation of any discrepancy. This work describes the results of the IAEA programme comparing calibration coefficients for radiotherapy dosimetry, using ionization chambers. In this programme, ionization chambers that belong to the SSDLs are calibrated sequentially at the SSDL, at the IAEA, and again at the SSDL. As part of its own quality assurance programme, the IAEA has participated in several regional comparisons organized by Regional Metrology Organizations. The results of the IAEA comparison programme show that the majority of SSDLs are capable of providing calibrations that fall inside the acceptance level of 1.5% compared to the IAEA.

  12. Basic principles in the radiation dosimetry of nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Stabin, Michael; Xu, Xie George

    2014-05-01

    The basic principles of the use of radiation dosimetry in nuclear medicine are reviewed. The basic structure of the main mathematical equations are given and formal dosimetry systems are discussed. An extensive overview of the history and current status of anthropomorphic models (phantoms) is given. The sources and magnitudes of uncertainties in calculated internal dose estimates are reviewed.

  13. 60Co irradiation for sterilization of veterinary mastitis products containing antibiotics and steroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, K.; Kane, M. P.; Rahn, P. D.; Steindler, K. A.

    Effects of 60Co irradiation for sterilization of veterinary mastitis products were evaluated. The mastitis products which were examined contained various combinations of antibiotics and steroids suspended in peanut oil vehicle. Bioburden data indicated that the unirradiated products were only occasionally contaminated with microorganisms. The D-values of the nonsterile product and environmental isolates were 0.028, 0.15, 0.017, and 0.018 Mrads for Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium oxalicum, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Pseudomonas maltophilia, respectively. The D-value of the biological indicator organism, Bacillus pumilus spores, in the vehicle was 0.27 Mrads. Thus, an irradiation dose of 1.6 Mrads would be sufficient to achieve six log cycles of destruction of the biological indicator organism. The minimum absorbed irradiation dose of 2.5 Mrads preferred by many countries for sterilization would achieve 9.3 log cycle destruction of the indicator organism and guarantee a probability of 1 × 10 -15 assurance for the most radio-resistant product isolate, Penicillium oxalicum. In order to examine short and long term chemical stabilities of active components, stability indicating high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods for the determination of the following antibiotics and steroids were developed. They were: dihydrostreptomycin, neomycin, novobiocin, penicillin G, hydrocortisone acetate, hydrocortisone sodium succinate, and prednisolone. The rates of degradation and radiolytic degradation schemes for the majority of these compounds were elucidated. Formation of new compounds was not observed in these antibiotics and steroids upon 60Co irradiation. The compounds that increased by irradiation were inherently present in commercially available non-irradiated lots and/or can easily be formed by either acidic, basic, or thermal treatment.

  14. Measurements and calculations of the absorbed dose distribution around a 60Co source.

    PubMed

    Tiourina, T B; Dries, W J; van der Linden, P M

    1995-05-01

    The data from Meisberger et al. [Radiology 90, 953-957 (1968)] are often used as a basis for dose calculations in brachytherapy. In order to describe the absorbed dose in water around a brachytherapy point source, Meisberger provided a polynomial fit for different isotopes taking into account the effect of attenuation and scattering. The validity of the Meisberger coefficients is restricted to distances up to 10 cm from the source, which is regarded to be satisfactory for most brachytherapy applications. However, for more distant organs it may lead to errors in calculated absorbed dose. For this reason dose measurements have been performed in air and in water around a high activity 60Co source used in high dose rate brachytherapy. Measurements were carried out to distances of 20 cm, using ionization chambers. These data show that at a distance of about 15 cm the amount of scattered radiation virtually equals the amount of primary radiation. This emphasizes the contribution of scattered radiation to the dose in healthy tissue far from the target volume, even with relatively high energy photon radiation of 60Co. It is also shown that the Meisberger data as well as the approach of Van Kleffens and Star [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Phys. 5, 557-563 (1979)] lead to significant errors in absorbed dose between distances of 10 and 20 cm from the source. In addition to these measurements, the Monte Carlo code has been used to calculate separately primary dose and scattered dose from a cobalt point source. The calculated results agree with the experimental data within 1% for a most distant dose scoring region.

  15. Characteristics of nucleoplasmic bridges induced by 60Co γ-rays in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua; Lu, Xue; Li, Shuang; Chen, De-Qing; Liu, Qing-Jie

    2013-12-16

    Few studies have shown that the yields of ionising-radiation-induced nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) in human cells are dose dependent. However, a dose-response curve between the NPB frequency and the absorbed dose of ionising radiation has not yet been established. This study aimed to investigate NPB frequencies in human peripheral blood lymphocytes induced by cobalt-60 ((60)Co) γ-rays and to establish a dose-response curve. Human peripheral blood samples were collected from three healthy males, and some of these samples were irradiated with 0-6 Gy (60)Co γ-rays. A cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay was then carried out to analyse NPBs and micronuclei (MN) in binucleated cells. The remaining blood samples were irradiated with 0, 2 and 5 Gy of γ-rays, and unstable chromosome aberrations (dicentric chromosome, ring chromosome and acentric chromosome fragment) were analysed. The correlation between NPBs and dicentric plus ring chromosome (dic+r) induced by the same γ-ray dose was also analysed. Results showed that the NPB yields among the three subjects at each dose level were not significantly different. NPBs in binucleated cells at all γ-ray doses conformed to Poisson distribution. The dose-response curve of the γ-ray-induced NPB frequencies followed the linear-quadratic model y = (1.39×10(-3))x (2) + (4.94×10(-3))x. A positive correlation was observed between the frequencies of NPB and dic+r, as well as between the frequencies of MN and acentric fragments. Therefore, NPB is an important biomarker of early chromosome damage event induced by ionising radiation.

  16. The treatment of solid tumors by alpha emitters released from 224Ra-loaded sources—internal dosimetry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arazi, L.; Cooks, T.; Schmidt, M.; Keisari, Y.; Kelson, I.

    2010-02-01

    Diffusing alpha-emitters radiation therapy (DART) is a proposed new form of brachytherapy, allowing the treatment of solid tumors by alpha particles. DART utilizes implantable sources carrying small activities of radium-224, which continually release into the tumor radon-220, polonium-216 and lead-212 atoms, while radium-224 itself remains fixed to the source. The released atoms disperse inside the tumor by diffusive and convective processes, creating, through their alpha emissions, a high-dose region measuring several mm in diameter about each source. The efficacy of DART has been demonstrated in preclinical studies on mice-borne squamous cell carcinoma and lung tumors and the method is now being developed toward clinical trials. This work studies DART safety with respect to the dose delivered to distant organs as a result of lead-212 leakage from the tumor through the blood, relying on a biokinetic calculation coupled to internal dose assessments. It is found that the dose-limiting organs are the kidneys and red bone marrow. Assuming a typical source spacing of ~5 mm and a typical radium-224 activity density of 0.4-0.8 MBq g-1 of tumor tissue, it is predicted that tumors weighing up to several hundred grams may be treated without reaching the tolerance dose in any organ.

  17. A simple algorithm for solving the inverse problem of interpretation of uncertain individual measurements in internal dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Molokanov, A; Chojnacki, E; Blanchardon, E

    2010-01-01

    The individual monitoring of internal exposure of workers comprises two steps: measurement and measurement interpretation. The latter consists in reconstructing the intake of a radionuclide from the activity measurement and calculating the dose using a biokinetic model of the radionuclide behavior in the human body. Mathematically, reconstructing the intake is solving an inverse problem described by a measurement-model equation. The aim of this paper is to propose a solution to this inverse problem when the measurement-model parameters are considered as uncertain. For that, an analysis of the uncertainty on the intake calculation is performed taking into account the dispersion of the measured quantity and the uncertainties of the measurement-model parameters. It is shown that both frequentist and Bayesian approaches can be used to solve the problem according to the measurement-model formulation. A common calculation algorithm is proposed to support both approaches and applied to the examples of tritiated water intake and plutonium inhalation by a worker.

  18. Thin film tritium dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Paul R.

    1976-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for tritium dosimetry. A dosimeter comprising a thin film of a material having relatively sensitive RITAC-RITAP dosimetry properties is exposed to radiation from tritium, and after the dosimeter has been removed from the source of the radiation, the low energy electron dose deposited in the thin film is determined by radiation-induced, thermally-activated polarization dosimetry techniques.

  19. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a {sup 60}Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, H. Omar Green, Olga; Yang, Min; DeWees, Todd; Kashani, Rojano; Olsen, Jeff; Michalski, Jeff; Yang, Deshan; Tanderup, Kari; Hu, Yanle; Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating {sup 60}Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. Methods and Materials: The ViewRay treatment planning system (Oakwood Village, OH) was used to create {sup 60}Co IMRT treatment plans for 33 cancer patients with disease in the abdominal, pelvic, thorax, and head and neck regions using physician-specified patient-specific target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) objectives. Backup plans using a third-party linear accelerator (linac)-based planning system were also created. Plans were evaluated by attending physicians and approved for treatment. The {sup 60}Co and linac plans were compared by evaluating conformity numbers (CN) with 100% and 95% of prescription reference doses and heterogeneity indices (HI) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and maximum, mean, and dose-volume histogram (DVH) values for OARs. Results: All {sup 60}Co IMRT plans achieved PTV coverage and OAR sparing that were similar to linac plans. PTV conformity for {sup 60}Co was within <1% and 3% of linac plans for 100% and 95% prescription reference isodoses, respectively, and heterogeneity was on average 4% greater. Comparisons of OAR mean dose showed generally better sparing with linac plans in the low-dose range <20 Gy, but comparable sparing for organs with mean doses >20 Gy. The mean doses for all {sup 60}Co plan OARs were within clinical tolerances. Conclusions: A commercial {sup 60}Co MR-IGRT device can produce highly conformal IMRT treatment plans similar in quality to linac IMRT for a variety of disease sites. Additional work is in progress to evaluate the clinical benefit of other novel features of this MR-IGRT system.

  20. Differential gene expression in human fibroblasts after alpha-particle emitter (211)At compared with (60)Co irradiation.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, Anna; Claesson, Kristina; Parris, Toshima Z; Helou, Khalil; Nemes, Szilárd; Elmroth, Kecke; Elgqvist, Jörgen; Jensen, Holger; Hultborn, Ragnar

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify gene expression profiles distinguishing alpha-particle (211)At and (60)Co irradiation. Gene expression microarray profiling was performed using total RNA from confluent human fibroblasts 5 hours after exposure to (211)At labeled trastuzumab monoclonal antibody (0.25, 0.5, and 1 Gy) and (60)Co (1, 2, and 3 Gy). We report gene expression profiles that distinguish the effect different radiation qualities and absorbed doses have on cellular functions in human fibroblasts. In addition, we identified commonly expressed transcripts between (211)At and (60)Co irradiation. A greater number of transcripts were modulated by (211)At than (60)Co irradiation. In addition, down-regulation was more prevalent than up-regulation following (211)At irradiation. Several biological processes were enriched for both irradiation qualities such as transcription, cell cycle regulation, and cell cycle arrest, whereas mitosis, spindle assembly checkpoint, and apoptotic chromosome condensation were uniquely enriched for alpha particle irradiation. LET-dependent transcriptional modulations were observed in human fibroblasts 5 hours after irradiation exposure. These findings suggest that in comparison with (60)Co, (211)At has the clearest influence on both tumor protein p53-activated and repressed genes, which impose a greater overall burden to the cell following alpha particle irradiation.

  1. Fast Monte Carlo simulation for total body irradiation using a (60)Co teletherapy unit.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodong; Lack, Danielle; Rakowski, Joseph T; Knill, Cory; Snyder, Michael

    2013-05-06

    Our institution delivers TBI using a modified Theratron 780 60Co unit. Due to limitations of our treatment planning system in calculating dose for this treatment, we have developed a fast Monte Carlo code to calculate dose distributions within the patient. The algorithm is written in C and uses voxel density information from CT images to calculate dose in heterogeneous media. To test the algorithm, film-based dose measurements were made separately in a simple water phantom with a high-density insert and a RANDO phantom and then compared to doses calculated by the Monte Carlo algorithm. In addition, a separate simulation in GEANT4 was run for the RANDO phantom and compared to both film and the in-house simulation. All results were analyzed using RIT113 film analysis software. Simulations in the water phantom accurately predict the depth of maximum dose in the phantom at 0.5 cm. The measured PDD along the central axis of the beam closely matches the PDD generated from the Monte Carlo code, deviating on average by only 3% along the depth of the water phantom. Dose measured at planes inside the high-density insert had a mean difference of 4.9% on cross-profile measurement. In the RANDO phantom, gamma pass rates vary between 91% and 99% at 3 mm, 3%, and were >99% at 5 mm, 5% for the four film planes measured. Profiles taken across the film and both simulations resulted in mean relative differences of < 2% for all profiles in each slice measured. The Monte Carlo algorithm presented here is potentially a viable method for calculating dose distributions delivered in TBI treatments at our center. While not yet refined enough to be the primary method of treatment planning, the algorithm at its current resolution determines the dose distribution for one patient within a few hours, and provides clinically useful information in planning TBI. With appropriate optimization, the Monte Carlo method presented here could potentially be implemented as a first-line treatment planning

  2. A 60Co multipurpose radiation processing facility at Bahia Blanca, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curzio, O. A.; Croci, C. A.

    The aim of the project is to have a multipurpose facility which will enable us to show the techno-economic viability of the irradiation process applied to regional products, important from the economic point of view. The topics will fundamentally be connected with regional themes such as food preservation and the modification of polymer structures. This project will make it possible to carry out basic and applied studies related to radiation chemistry, dosimetry and engineering irradiation processes. The facility will operate in the Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS) with a maximum activity of 18.5 PBq of Co-60. The viability and design of the irradiation facility is supported by the Government of the Buenos Aires Province since it is interested in the socio-economic benefit of this technology at the regional level.

  3. Radiotherapy dosimetry using a commercial OSL system

    SciTech Connect

    Viamonte, A.; Rosa, L. A. R. da; Buckley, L. A.; Cherpak, A.; Cygler, J. E.

    2008-04-15

    A commercial optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) system developed for radiation protection dosimetry by Landauer, Inc., the InLight microStar reader, was tested for dosimetry procedures in radiotherapy. The system uses carbon-doped aluminum oxide, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C, as a radiation detector material. Using this OSL system, a percent depth dose curve for {sup 60}Co gamma radiation was measured in solid water. Field size and SSD dependences of the detector response were also evaluated. The dose response relationship was investigated between 25 and 400 cGy. The decay of the response with time following irradiation and the energy dependence of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSL detectors were also measured. The results obtained using OSL dosimeters show good agreement with ionization chamber and diode measurements carried out under the same conditions. Reproducibility studies show that the response of the OSL system to repeated exposures is 2.5% (1sd), indicating a real possibility of applying the Landauer OSL commercial system for radiotherapy dosimetric procedures.

  4. REVIEW OF DOSIMETRY FIELD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    three, oxalic acid , polyisobutylene, and Mylar film, seem sufficiently promising to warrant further development. Their current states of development...ceric sulfate dosimeters be included in the dosimetry handbook, but that additional work should be done on oxalic acid , polyisobutylene, and Mylar as dosimetry materials. (Author)

  5. Dosimetry and Risk Assessment: Fundamental Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Darrell R.

    2005-12-29

    Radiation dosimetry is important for characterizing radiation exposures and for risk assessment. In a medical setting, dosimetry is important for evaluating the safety of administered radiopharmaceuticals and for planning the safe administration of therapeutic radionuclides. Environmental dosimetry helps establish the safety of radionuclide releases from electric power production and other human activities. Internal and external dosimetry help us understand the consequences of radiation exposure. The absorbed dose is the fundamental quantity in radiation dosimetry from which all other operational values in radiation protection are obtained. Equivalent dose to tissue and effective dose to the whole body are derivatives of absorbed dose and constructs of risk. Mathematical systems supported by computer software facilitate dose calculations and make it possible to estimate internal dose based on bioassay or other biokinetic data. Risk coefficients for radiation-induced cancer rely primarily on data from animal studies and long-term observations of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bomb survivors. Low-dose research shows that mechanisms of radiation interactions with tissue are dose-dependent, but the resulting biological effects are not necessarily linear with absorbed dose. Thus, the analysis of radiation effects and associated risks must account for the influences of microscopic energy distributions at the cellular level, dose-rate, cellular repair of sub-lethal radiation damage, and modifying factors such as bystander effects, adaptive response, and genomic instability.

  6. Migration of radioactive {sup 85}Sr, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 60}Co through a loess soil layer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Wang, H.; Takebe, Shinichi; Tanaka, Tadao

    1995-12-31

    Column experiments have been completed on the migration of {sup 85}Sr, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 60}Co through a loess layer in order to examine the migration behavior of radionuclides in an aerated soil layer. Radionuclide concentration distributions between the effluent and the soil layer were measured after the solution containing the radionuclides was introduced into the column from the top of the soil layer and fifty liters of the underground water were introduced at a constant flow. Results indicate most of the {sup 85}Sr, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 60}Co remained attached to the soil layer, and only a small amount of radionuclide was released from the soil layer. Within the soil layer, the migration depths of three radionuclides are {sup 85}Sr > {sup 134}Cs = {sup 60}Co.

  7. Effect of chronic HTO. beta. or /sup 60/Co. gamma. radiation on preimplantation mouse development in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, T.; Yukawa, O.; Asami, K.; Nakazawa, T.

    1982-11-01

    Response of pronuclear, early 2-cell, and late 2-cell mouse embryos to chronic HTO ..beta.. and /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. irradiation was investigated. The pronuclear embryos fertilized in vitro and 2-cell stage embryos of BC3F/sub 1/ (C3H/C57BL) mice were grown in vitro in chemically defined medically defied media containing tritium oxide. Activity levels ranged from 100 to 2000 ..mu..Ci/ml. With development to blastocyst as the end point, the LD/sub 50/ was determined to be 118, 230, and 426 ..mu..Ci/ml for pronuclear, early 2-cell, and late 2-cell embryos, respectively. Similar embryos were exposed in vitro to chronic ..gamma.. radiation from /sup 60/Co during the same period of development, and RBE values of HTO ..beta.. radiation relative to /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays were calculated to be within the range of 1.0 to 1.7.

  8. Dosimetric characterization of the (60)Co BEBIG Co0.A86 high dose rate brachytherapy source using PENELOPE.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Rafael; Almansa, Julio F; Torres, Javier; Lallena, Antonio M

    2014-12-01

    (60)Co sources are being used as an alternative to (192)Ir sources in high dose rate brachytherapy treatments. In a recent document from AAPM and ESTRO, a consensus dataset for the (60)Co BEBIG (model Co0.A86) high dose rate source was prepared by using results taken from different publications due to discrepancies observed among them. The aim of the present work is to provide a new calculation of the dosimetric characteristics of that (60)Co source according to the recommendations of the AAPM and ESTRO report. Radial dose function, anisotropy function, air-kerma strength, dose rate constant and absorbed dose rate in water have been calculated and compared to the results of previous works. Simulations using the two different geometries considered by other authors have been carried out and the effect of the cable density and length has been studied.

  9. Measurement of residual 60Co activity induced by atomic-bomb neutrons in Nagasaki and background contribution by environmental neutrons.

    PubMed

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Takada, Jun; Iwatani, Kazuo; Hasai, Hiromi; Oka, Takamitsu; Shimazaki, Tatsuya; Okumura, Yutaka; Fujita, Shoichiro; Watanabe, Tadaaki; Imanaka, Tetsuji

    2002-12-01

    Residual 60Co activity in five steel samples induced by neutrons from the Nagasaki atomic bomb has been measured within about 1000 m from the hypocenter. The chemical separation of cobalt and nickel from steel samples was performed, and cobalt-enriched samples were prepared for all samples. Gamma-ray measurements were carried out with a low-background well-type germanium detector. The gamma-ray spectra for five samples were compared with the spectrum of a control sample to ensure that the observed 60Co was actually induced by A-bomb neutrons. The activation of cobalt by environmental neutrons was also investigated. It has been shown that the present 60Co data are consistent with earlier Hashizume's data.

  10. HeLa cell tumor response to 60Co, Cs-137, Cf-252 radiations and cisplatin chemotherapy in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Y; Feola, J M; Beach, J L

    1984-07-15

    HeLa cells were implanted into athymic nude mice from tissue culture and solid tumors established (HeLa cell tumor or HCT). Large cell numbers of 1 X 10(7) were required to obtain consistent and progressive growth, and tumor growth followed a Gompertzian mode. Irradiation studies were carried out using acute Cobalt-60 (60Co), low-dose-rate (LDR) Cs-137 and LDR Cf-252. Cf-252, a neutron-emitting radioisotope, produced an immediate tumor shrinkage and regression response after a dose of 279 cGy. Acute 60Co or LDR Cs-137 irradiation with 1000 cGy had little effect on the HCT. After a dose of 2000 cGy of 60Co radiation tumor shrinkage followed a latent period of approximately 5 days. Cisplatin had no effect on the HCT in nude mice in stationary or late exponential growth.

  11. HeLa cell tumor response to 60Co, Cs-137, Cf-252 radiations and cisplatin chemotherapy in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Y.; Feola, J.M.; Beach, J.L.

    1984-07-15

    HeLa cells were implanted into athymic nude mice from tissue culture and solid tumors established (HeLa cell tumor or HCT). Large cell numbers of 1 X 10/sup 7/ were required to obtain consistent and progressive growth, and tumor growth followed a Gompertzian mode. Irradiation studies were carried out using acute Cobalt-60 (60Co), low-dose-rate (LDR) Cs-137 and LDR Cf-252. Cf-252, a neutron-emitting radioisotope, produced an immediate tumor shrinkage and regression response after a dose of 279 cGy. Acute 60Co or LDR Cs-137 irradiation with 1000 cGy had little effect on the HCT. After a dose of 2000 cGy of 60Co radiation tumor shrinkage followed a latent period of approximately 5 days. Cisplatin had no effect on the HCT in nude mice in stationary or late exponential growth.

  12. Studying the Effect of Ionization Radiation of 60Co on the Spirulina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Weidang; Guo, Shuang-Sheng; Ai, Weidang; Dong, Wen-Ping; Qin, Li-Feng; Tang, Yong-Kang

    It studied the effect of ionization radiation on the Spirulina plastensis(No.6) by using the γ-rays of 60 Co. In the experiment, Spirulina were irradiated, and the dose of the ionization radiation covered 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0kGy. After irradiating, these Spirulina were cultured under the same conditions. During the course of the experiment, the growth rate, photosynthetic efficiency and nutrition quality of the Spirulina, were analyzed. From the results, low dose of γ-rays (less than 1.5kGy) could improve the content of phycobilin and protein of Spirulina. Only small changes in the morphology of algae filament were found at dose less than 1.0kGy. But with the increase of the dose of γ-rays (more than 1.5kGy), the filaments would break up or even disintegrate. Spirulina had stronger ionization radiation proof and self-rehabilitation capacity, but the growth of Spirulina was stagnated. The LD50 (i.e. the dose resulted in 50% death of the Spirulina) of the colony was 2.0kGy. Considering the capacity of being resistant to γ-rays irradiation, Spirulina can be considered as one of the key biological components in the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) for future long-term space missions. Keywords: Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS); Spirulina; ionization radiation; biological component

  13. The effect of perinatal sup 60 Co gamma radiation on brain weight in beagles

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, B.F.; Benjamin, S.A.; Angleton, G.M.; Lee, A.C. )

    1989-08-01

    Beagle dogs were given single, whole-body {sup 60}Co gamma-radiation exposures at one of three prenatal (8, 28, or 55 days postcoitus) or three postnatal (2, 70, or 365 days postpartum) ages to evaluate the relative radiosensitivity of various stages of brain development. A total of 387 dogs received mean doses ranging from 0.16 to 3.83 Gy, and 120 dogs were sham-irradiated. Groups of dogs were sacrificed at preselected times from 70 days to 11 years of age. Brain weight decreased significantly with increasing dose in dogs irradiated at 28 or 55 days postcoitus or at 2 days postpartum. Irradiations at 28 days postcoitus were dramatically more effective in causing a reduction in brain weight than those at 55 days postcoitus or 2 days postpartum. Among dogs given 1.0 Gy or more and followed for up to 4 years, there was a radiation effect evident at all three sensitive exposure ages. Among dogs given lower doses and followed for up to 11 years, there was a significant decrease in brain weight in dogs given 0.80-0.88 Gy at 28 days postcoitus. All decreases in brain weight were present after normalization for radiation-induced reductions in skeletal (body) size. No specific morphologic changes were noted in the brains which showed the radiation-related reductions in size.

  14. (56)Mn, (60)Co, (18)F and (22)Na activity measurements by coincidence technique at VNIIM.

    PubMed

    Evgeny, Tereshchenko; Nikolay, Moiseev; Alexander, Kolodka

    2016-03-01

    For modernization of the Russian national activity standard at the Ionizing Radiation Department of the D.I. Mendeleyev Institute for Metrology, a prototype 4π(LS)-γ(NaI) coincidence arrangement was created, and applied to the standardization of long-lived (60)Co and (22)Na and short-lived (56)Mn and (18)F. Efficiency variation was performed using "grey filters", high voltage variation and variation of low threshold. The main metrological characteristics of the setup were determined: long-term stability, background, dead time, resolution time and temperature dependence. The results obtained have practical applications. The (18)F solution with well-known activity is required for calibration of ionizing chamber used in nuclear medicine. The (56)Mn is used for calibration of manganese bath equipment used in neutron laboratory. The results obtained are in good agreement with 4πγ(NaI)-counting and 4πβ(PC)-γ(NaI) methods of Russian national radioactivity standard. The combined uncertainty (k=2) of results was estimated in the range 1-2%.

  15. Effect of 60Co gamma-irradiation on the nonspecific cytotoxicity of alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Y; Hu, L; Wu, D

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the effect of radiation on the nonspecific cytotoxicity of rat alveolar macrophages (AM). AM (effector cells) of bacille Calmette-Guerin-activated Wistar rats were irradiated with 60Co gamma rays in vitro to give doses of 0, 100, 300, and 500 Gy. Three hours after irradiation, the AM were cultured with human lung adenocarcinoma AGZY83-a and HeLa target cells in 125I-deoxyuridine-containing media for 6 hr and the cytotoxicity indexes determined. The results indicated that the cytotoxicity indexes of AM against human lung adenocarcinoma cells and HeLa cells were 94.3 +/- 0.3% and 81.3 +/- 1.9%, respectively. The cytotoxicity indexes using an effector/target cell ratio (E/T) of 10 seemed to be greater than with ratios of 20 and 30. The cytotoxicity indexes of AM (7 rats), irradiated to give doses of 0, 100, 300, and 500 Gy, against adenocarcinoma cells at an E/T ratio of 10 were 87.9 +/- 8.4%, 65.4 +/- 14.1%, 47.5 +/- 17.5%, and 36.7 +/- 9.7%, respectively. The significance of the nonspecific cytotoxicity of AM in the immunological elimination of tumors and the inhibitory effect of radiation on AM cytotoxicity are discussed. PMID:1396453

  16. Succinylcholine-induced hyperkalemia in the rat following radiation injury to muscle. [60Co

    SciTech Connect

    Cairoli, V.J.; Ivankovich, A.D.; Vucicevic, D.; Patel, K.

    1982-02-01

    During anesthetic preparation of a patient who had received routine radiation therapy of sarcoma of the leg, cardiac collapse occurred following succinylcholine (SCh) administration. Experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that radiation injury to muscle might cause increased sensitivity to SCh similar to that reported in patients with muscle trauma, severe burns, and lesions causing muscle denervation. Venous plasma potassium levels and arterial blood gas tensions were measured in rats after they were given SCh (3 mg/kg) at various times following 60Co irradiation of the hind legs. Nonirradiated rats responded to SCh with a slight but statistically significant increase in plasma K+. Rats subjected to high levels of radiation (10,000 to 20,000 R) and given SCh 4 to 7 days later responded in the same way as the control rats. Plasma K+ levels in rats exposed to a fractionated irradiated dosage (25000 R given twice with a 1-week interval) followed by SCh 1 week later were similar to those in the control group, but when SCh was given 2 weeks later (3 weeks after initial irradiation) there was a marked elevation of plasma K+, from 3.6 to 7.7 meq/L, a statistically significant increase.

  17. Gamma 60Co-irradiation of organic matter in the Phosphoria Retort Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewan, M. D.; Ulmishek, G. F.; Harrison, W.; Schreiner, F.

    1991-04-01

    Irradiation experiments were conducted on a thermally immature rock sample of the Phosphoria Retort Shale and its isolated kerogen. A 60Co-source for gamma radiation was employed at dosages ranging from 81 to 885 Mrads, which are attainable by Paleozoic and Precambrian black shales with syngenetic uranium enrichments. Kerogen elemental, isotopic, and pyrolysate compositions are not affected at these dosages, but the bitumens extracted from the irradiated rock are affected. The major effects are reductions in the amounts of bitumen, acyclic isoprenoids, and high-molecular weight acyclic carboxylic acids. Natural differences in the amounts of bitumen and acyclic isoprenoid due to regional and stratigraphie variations in organic source input and depositional conditions make the radiation-induced reductions in these parameters difficult to use as indicators of natural radiation damage in black shales. However, the preferential reduction in the high-molecular weight acyclic carboxylic acids, which are ubiquitous in the living precursory organic matter, is diagnostic of experimental γ-irradiation but may not be diagnostic of natural irradiation. The overall process associated with radiation damage is polymerization by cross-linking through a free radical mechanism. As a result, irradiation of organic matter in black shales is more likely to retard rather than enhance petroleum generation.

  18. Whole-thorax radiation lethality in penicillamine-treated mice. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.F.; Shih-Hoellwarth, A.; Pearlman, H.G.; Kepka, A.G.

    1982-01-01

    A total of 451 male mice received a single exposure of 0-20 Gy of /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays to the whole thorax. Half the animals consumed control diet, and half consumed diet supplemented with the collagen antagonist D-penicllamine (2 mg/day, po). Survival was observed daily, and body weight was recorded biweekly for 1 year after irradiation. The LD /sub 50;60-180 days/ of untreated and penicillamine-treated mice was 15.9 +/- 0.7 and 16.5 +/- 0.9 Gy, respectively, yielding a drug DRF of 1.04 (P > 0.05). In contrast, LD/sub 50;181-360 days/ of the two groups was 12.0 +/- 1.3 and 14.4 +/- 0.9 Gy, respectively, yielding a penicillamine DRF of 1.20 (P < 0.05). Thus it appears that penicillamine is ineffective against fatal radiation pneumonitis but significantly reduces mortality resulting from radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice irradiated to the whole thorax. While penicillamine did not reduce the incidence of early (<6 months) lung deaths, drug-treated mice weighed significantly (P < 0.05) more than their untreated counterparts during that time.

  19. The ultrastructure of radiation injury in rat lung: modification by D-penicillamine. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Port, C.D.; Ward, W.F.

    1982-10-01

    The present study compared the ultrastructure of radiation injury in the lungs of penicillamine-treated and untreated male rats sacrificed 3, 6, 9, or 12 months after a single exposure of 25 Gy of /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays to the right hemithorax. All morphological components of the irradiated lungs exhibited injury typical of pneumonitis progressing to interstitial fibrosis. In addition to these well-documented responses, several less common ultrastructural changes were noted, including capillary recanalization; focal disappearance of interstitial collagen fibers, initially perivascularly, then throughout some septa; and a low-grade but significant cellular reaction in the shielded left lung. Radiation reactions in the lungs of penicillamine-treated rats were qualitatively similar to those of untreated animals, but differed in the degree of change: collagen deposition was less extensive and less highly organized into fibers, capillary recanalization and disappearance of interstitial collagen were more common, and arterial wall thickening was reduced in the drug-treated rats. Thus the beneficial effect of penicillamine on the histopathology of irradiated rat lung does not appear to be attributable to unique ultrastructural phenomena. Rather, penicillamine treatment produces a generalized inhibition of pathologic events such as collagen accumulation and arterial wall thickening, and acceleration of restorative processes such as revascularization and collagen degradation.

  20. WE-E-BRE-01: An Image-Based Skeletal Dosimetry Model for the ICRP Reference Adult Female - Internal Electron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    O'Reilly, S; Maynard, M; Marshall, E; Bolch, W; Sinclair, L; Rajon, D; Wayson, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Limitations seen in previous skeletal dosimetry models, which are still employed in commonly used software today, include the lack of consideration of electron escape and cross-fire from cortical bone, the modeling of infinite spongiosa, the disregard of the effect of varying cellularity on active marrow self-irradiation, and the lack of use of the more recent ICRP definition of a 50 micron surrogate tissue region for the osteoprogenitor cells - shallow marrow. These limitations were addressed in the present dosimetry model. Methods: Electron transport was completed to determine specific absorbed fractions to active marrow and shallow marrow of the skeletal regions of the adult female. The bone macrostructure was obtained from the whole-body hybrid computational phantom of the UF series of reference phantoms, while the bone microstructure was derived from microCT images of skeletal region samples taken from a 45 year-old female cadaver. The target tissue regions were active marrow and shallow marrow. The source tissues were active marrow, inactive marrow, trabecular bone volume, trabecular bone surfaces, cortical bone volume and cortical bone surfaces. The marrow cellularity was varied from 10 to 100 percent for active marrow self-irradiation. A total of 33 discrete electron energies, ranging from 1 keV to 10 MeV, were either simulated or modeled analytically. Results: The method of combining macro- and microstructure absorbed fractions calculated using MCNPX electron transport was found to yield results similar to those determined with the PIRT model for the UF adult male in the Hough et al. study. Conclusion: The calculated skeletal averaged absorbed fractions for each source-target combination were found to follow similar trends of more recent dosimetry models (image-based models) and did not follow current models used in nuclear medicine dosimetry at high energies (due to that models use of an infinite expanse of trabecular spongiosa)

  1. Uncertainty in 3D gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Deene, Yves; Jirasek, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) gel dosimetry has a unique role to play in safeguarding conformal radiotherapy treatments as the technique can cover the full treatment chain and provides the radiation oncologist with the integrated dose distribution in 3D. It can also be applied to benchmark new treatment strategies such as image guided and tracking radiotherapy techniques. A major obstacle that has hindered the wider dissemination of gel dosimetry in radiotherapy centres is a lack of confidence in the reliability of the measured dose distribution. Uncertainties in 3D dosimeters are attributed to both dosimeter properties and scanning performance. In polymer gel dosimetry with MRI readout, discrepancies in dose response of large polymer gel dosimeters versus small calibration phantoms have been reported which can lead to significant inaccuracies in the dose maps. The sources of error in polymer gel dosimetry with MRI readout are well understood and it has been demonstrated that with a carefully designed scanning protocol, the overall uncertainty in absolute dose that can currently be obtained falls within 5% on an individual voxel basis, for a minimum voxel size of 5 mm3. However, several research groups have chosen to use polymer gel dosimetry in a relative manner by normalizing the dose distribution towards an internal reference dose within the gel dosimeter phantom. 3D dosimetry with optical scanning has also been mostly applied in a relative way, although in principle absolute calibration is possible. As the optical absorption in 3D dosimeters is less dependent on temperature it can be expected that the achievable accuracy is higher with optical CT. The precision in optical scanning of 3D dosimeters depends to a large extend on the performance of the detector. 3D dosimetry with X-ray CT readout is a low contrast imaging modality for polymer gel dosimetry. Sources of error in x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry (XCT) are currently under investigation and include inherent

  2. Age-specific models for evaluating dose and risk from internal exposures to radionuclides: Report of current work of the Metabolism and Dosimetry Research Group, July 1, 1985-June 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, R.W.; Warren, B.P.

    1987-09-01

    A projection of the health risk to a population internally exposed to a radionuclide requires explicit or implicit use of demographic, biokinetic, dosimetric, and dose-response models. Exposure guidelines have been based on models for a reference adult with a fixed life span. In this report, we describe recent efforts to develop a comprehensive methodology for estimation of radiogenic risk to individuals and to heterogeneous populations. Emphasis is on age-dependent biokinetics and dosimetry for internal emitters, but consideration also is given to conversion of age-specific doses to estimates of risk using realistic, site-specific demographic models and best available age-specific dose-response functions. We discuss how the methods described here may also improve estimates for the reference adult usually considered in radiation protection. 159 refs.

  3. Effects of 60Co gamma-rays on human osteoprogenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Tomuleasa, C I; Foris, V; Soriţău, Olga; Páll, Emöke; Fischer-Fodor, Eva; Lung-Illes, V; Brie, Ioana; Virág, Piroska; Perde-Schrepler, Maria; Postescu, I D; Cherecheş, Gabriela; Barbos, Otilia; Tatomir, Corina

    2009-01-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the most efficient treatments of neoplastic diseases used worldwide. However, patients who undergo radiotherapy may develop side effects that can be life threatening because tissue complications caused by radiation-induced stem cell depletion may result in structural and functional alterations of the surrounding matrix. This treatment also damages the osteogenic activity of human bone marrow by suppressing osteoblasts, leading to post-irradiation sequelae. Even if widely used in oncology, there is still little information on the fate and potential therapeutic efficacy of electromagnetic rays. We addressed this question using both human mesenchymal stem cells and osteoblasts. Monoclonal antibody characterization identified specific surface markers for stem cells (SSEA-4, CD29, CD105, Oct 3, Nanog and SOX2) and osteoblasts (Osteopontin and Osteonectin). The technique of anti-alkaline phosphatase FITC-staining demonstrated the presence of this specific ectoenzyme. Cells were cultured in complex osteogenic medium (DMEM, 15% fetal calf serum, non-essential amino acids, L-glutamine, dexametazone, ascorbic acid, insulin, TGF-beta, BMP-2 and beta-glycero-phosphate) after being irradiated at 0.5 Gy, 1 Gy, 2 Gy and 4 Gy using a Theratron 1000 60Co source. The viability of irradiated cells was assessed using Trypan Blue staining. The comparison between cell lineages after culture in osteogenic media regarding phenotypical characterization and the intensity of the mineralization process included histology stainings (Alizarin Red S, Alcian Blue and von Kossa), and the MTT-based proliferation assay. After irradiation, the proliferation and differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells is dose-dependent. This study is one among the first papers investigating the biophysics of low-dose gamma-irradiation on stem cell culture, focusing on the potential applications in radiation oncology and various palliative treatments.

  4. Monte Carlo simulations to optimize experimental dosimetry of narrow beams used in Gamma Knife radio-surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lymperopoulou, G.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Papagiannis, P.; Steiner, M.; Spevacek, V.; Semnicka, J.; Dvorak, P.; Seimenis, I.

    2007-09-01

    The Leksell Gamma Knife is a stereotactic radio-surgery unit for the treatment of small volumes (on the order of 25 mm 3) that employs a hemispherical configuration of 201 60Co sources and appropriate configurations of collimation to form beams of 4, 8, 14 and 18 mm nominal diameter at the Unit Center Point (UCP). Although Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is well suited for narrow-beam dosimetry, experimental dosimetry is required at least for acceptance testing and quality assurance purposes. Besides other drawbacks of conventional point dosimeters, the main problems associated with narrow-beam dosimetry in stereotactic applications are accurate positioning and volume averaging. In this work, MCNPX and EGSnrc MC simulation dosimetry results for a Gamma Knife unit are benchmarked through their comparison to treatment planning software calculations based on radio-chromic film measurements. Then, MC dosimetry results are utilized to optimize the only three-dimensional experimental dosimetry method available; the polymer gel-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) method. MC results are used to select the spatial resolution in the imaging session of the irradiated gels and validate a mathematical tool for the localization of the UCP in the three-dimensional experimental dosimetry data acquired. Experimental results are compared with corresponding MC calculations and shown capable to provide accurate dosimetry, free of volume averaging and positioning uncertainties.

  5. 60Co gamma irradiation effects on the the capacitance and conductance characteristics of Au/PMI/n-Si Schottky diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuğluoğlu, N.; Karadeniz, S.; Yüksel, Ö. F.; Şafak, H.; Kuş, M.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, the perylene-monoimide/n-Si (100) Schottky structures have been fabricated by spin coating process. We have studied the capacitance-voltage ( C- V) and conductance-voltage ( G- V) characteristics of the Au/perylene-monoimide/n-Si diodes at 500 kHz before and after 60Co γ-ray irradiation. The effects of 60Co γ -ray irradiation on the electrical characteristics of a perylene-monoimide/n-Si Schottky diode have been investigated. A decrease both in the capacitance and conductance has been observed after 60Co γ -ray irradiation. This has been attributed to a decrease in the net ionized dopant concentration that occurred as a result of 60Co γ-ray irradiation. Some contact parameters such as barrier height (Φ B ) interface state density ( N ss ) and series resistance ( R s ) have been calculated from the C- V and G- V characteristics of the diode before and after irradiation. It has been observed that the Φ B and N ss values are decreased after the applied radiation, while the R s value is increased.

  6. Chemical dosimetry system for criticality accidents.

    PubMed

    Miljanić, Saveta; Ilijas, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Ruder Bosković Institute (RBI) criticality dosimetry system consists of a chemical dosimetry system for measuring the total (neutron + gamma) dose, and a thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetry system for a separate determination of the gamma ray component. The use of the chemical dosemeter solution chlorobenzene-ethanol-trimethylpentane (CET) is based on the radiolytic formation of hydrochloric acid, which protonates a pH indicator, thymolsulphonphthalein. The high molar absorptivity of its red form at 552 nm is responsible for a high sensitivity of the system: doses in the range 0.2-15 Gy can be measured. The dosemeter has been designed as a glass ampoule filled with the CET solution and inserted into a pen-shaped plastic holder. For dose determinations, a newly constructed optoelectronic reader has been used. The RBI team took part in the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002, with the CET dosimetry system. For gamma ray dose determination TLD-700 TL detectors were used. The results obtained with CET dosemeter show very good agreement with the reference values.

  7. 3-D Imaging Based, Radiobiological Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric; Wahl, Richard; He, Bin; Prideaux, Andrew; Hobbs, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy holds promise as a new treatment against cancer. Advances in imaging are making it possible to evaluate the spatial distribution of radioactivity in tumors and normal organs over time. Matched anatomical imaging such as combined SPECT/CT and PET/CT have also made it possible to obtain tissue density information in conjunction with the radioactivity distribution. Coupled with sophisticated iterative reconstruction algorithims, these advances have made it possible to perform highly patient-specific dosimetry that also incorporates radiobiological modeling. Such sophisticated dosimetry techniques are still in the research investigation phase. Given the attendant logistical and financial costs, a demonstrated improvement in patient care will be a prerequisite for the adoption of such highly-patient specific internal dosimetry methods. PMID:18662554

  8. Direction Modulated Brachytherapy (DMBT) for Treatment of Cervical Cancer: A Planning Study with 192Ir, 60Co, and 169Yb HDR Sources.

    PubMed

    Safigholi, Habib; Han, Dae Yup; Mashouf, Shahram; Soliman, Abraam; Meigooni, Ali S; Owrangi, Amir; Song, William Y

    2017-09-22

    To evaluate plan quality of a novel MRI-compatible direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator using 192Ir, 60Co, and 169Yb HDR brachytherapy sources, for various cervical cancer high-risk clinical target volumes (CTVHR ). The novel DMBT tandem applicator has six peripheral grooves of 1.3-mm diameter along a 5.4-mm thick nonmagnetic tungsten alloy rod. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to benchmark the dosimetric parameters of the 192Ir, 60Co, and 169Yb HDR sources in a water phantom against the literature data. 45 clinical cases that were treated using conventional tandem-and-ring applicators with 192Ir source (192Ir-T&R) were selected consecutively from intErnational MRI-guided BRAchytherapy in CErvical cancer (EMBRACE) trial. Then, for each clinical case, 3D dose distribution of each source inside the DMBT and conventional applicators were calculated and imported onto an in-house developed inverse planning optimization code to generate optimal plans. All plans generated by the DMBT tandem-and-ring (DMBT T&R) from all three sources were compared to the respective 192Ir-T&R plans. For consistency, all plans were normalized to the same CTVHR D90 achieved in clinical plans. The D2cm3 for organs at risk (OAR) such as bladder, rectum, and sigmoid, and D90, D98, D10, V100, and V200 for CTVHR were calculated. In general, plan quality significantly improved when a conventional tandem (Con.T) is replaced with the DMBT tandem. The target coverage metrics were similar across 192Ir-T&R and DMBT T&R plans with all three sources (p>0.093). 60Co-DMBT T&R generated greater hot spots and less dose homogeneity in the target volumes compared with the 192Ir- and 169Yb-DMBT T&R plans. Mean OAR doses in the DMBT T&R plans were significantly smaller (P<0.0084) than the 192Ir-T&R plans. Mean bladder D2cm3 was reduced by 4.07%, 4.15%, and 5.13%, for the 192Ir-, 60Co-, and 169Yb-DMBT T&R plans, respectively. Mean rectum (sigmoid) D2cm3 was reduced by 3.17% (3.63%), 2

  9. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K1 of the air-kerma standards of the NIM, China and the BIPM in 60Co gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Burns, D.; Wang, K.; Fan, Y.; Jin, S.; Yang, X.

    2016-01-01

    An indirect comparison of the standards for air kerma of the National Institute of Metrology (NIM), China and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out in the 60Co radiation beam of the BIPM in November 2015. The comparison result, evaluated as a ratio of the NIM and the BIPM standards for air kerma, is 0.9997 with a combined standard uncertainty of 2.7 × 10-3. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  10. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K1 of the air-kerma standards of the ININ, Mexico and the BIPM in 60Co gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Alvarez Romero, J. T.; Tovar-Muñoz, V. M.

    2013-01-01

    A direct comparison of the standards for air kerma of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Mexico, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out in the 60Co radiation beam of the BIPM in 2012. The comparison result, evaluated as a ratio of the ININ and the BIPM standards for air kerma, is 1.0035 with a combined standard uncertainty of 2.1 × 10-3. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  11. Application of IDEAS guidelines: the IDEAS/IAEA intercomparison exercise on internal dose assessment.

    PubMed

    Hurtgen, C; Andrasi, A; Bailey, M R; Birchall, A; Blanchardon, E; Berkovski, V; Castellani, C M; Cruz-Suarez, R; Davis, K; Doerfel, H; Leguen, B; Malatova, I; Marsh, J; Zeger, J

    2007-01-01

    As part of the EU Fifth Framework Programme IDEAS project 'General Guidelines for the Evaluation of Incorporation Monitoring Data', and in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency, a new intercomparison exercise for the assessment of doses from intakes of radionuclides was organised. Several cases were selected, to cover a wide range of practices in the nuclear fuel cycle and medical applications. The cases were: (1) acute intake of HTO, (2) acute inhalation of the fission products 137Cs and 90Sr, (3) acute inhalation of 60Co, (4) repeated intakes of 131I, (5) intake of enriched uranium and (6) single intake of Pu isotopes and 241Am. This intercomparison exercise especially focused on the effect of the Guidelines proposed by the IDEAS project for harmonisation of internal dosimetry.

  12. [Clinical calibration dosimetry in JSMP-01: measurements using Farmer-type cylindrical ion chambers.].

    PubMed

    Araki, Fujio; Kumagai, Kozo; Yoshiura, Takao; Oura, Hiroki; Tachibana, Masayuki; Moribe, Nobuyuki; Tajima, Hidetaka; Yoshida, Atsushi; Kido, Tetsuo

    2005-01-01

    The Japan Society of Medical Physics (JSMP) Task Group published Standard dosimetry of absorbed dose in external beam radiotherapy (Standard dosimetry 01) as a new high-energy photon and electron dosimetry protocol in 2002. In this study, we present Standard dosimetry 01 as the JSMP-01 protocol for the convenience of users. This protocol is based on using an ion chamber having a (60)Co absorbed dose to water calibration coefficient, N(D,w), which is calculated from a (60)Co exposure calibration coefficient, N(c). We present dose comparisons between a reference chamber and various Farmer-type cylindrical chambers with different wall materials. The absorbed dose to water was compared at the calibration depths of 5 cm for a (60)Co beam, 10 cm for photons, and d(c) = 0.6 R(50) - 0.1 (cm) for electrons according to JSMP-01. The JARP chamber in the Kyushu Regional Center which meets third-order standards in Japan was used as the reference chamber. The absorbed dose to water for the Farmer-type chambers determined according to JSMP-01 agreed with that for the JARP chamber within 1% for photon and electron beams. The doses obtained by JSMP-01 and the Japan Association of Radiological Physics protocol (JARP-86) were also compared for photon and electron beams. For the Farmer-type chambers with photon beams, JSMP-01 results were up to 1.5% higher than JARP-86 results. For electron beams JSMP-01 results were higher than JARP-86 results by 1.3-2.8%.

  13. Accumulation of radioactive corrosion products on steel surfaces of VVER-type nuclear reactors. II. 60Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Kálmán; Hirschberg, Gábor; Németh, Zoltán; Myburg, Gerrit; Schunk, János; Tilky, Péter

    2001-10-01

    In the case of intact fuel claddings, the predominant source of radioactivity in the primary circuits of water-cooled nuclear reactors is the activation of corrosion products in the core. The most important corrosion product radionuclides in the primary coolant of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are 60Co, 58Co, 51Cr, 54Mn, 59Fe (as well as 110mAg in some Soviet-made VVER-type reactor). The second part of this series is focused on the complex studies of the formation and build-up of 60Co-containing species on an austenitic stainless steel type 08X18H10T (GOST 5632-61) and magnetite-covered carbon steel often to be used in Soviet-planned VVERs. The kinetics and mechanism of the cobalt accumulation were studied by a combination (coupling) of an in situ radiotracer method and voltammetry in a model solution of the primary circuit coolant. In addition, independent techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and ICP-OES are also used to analyze the chemical state of Co species in the passive layer formed on stainless steel as well as the chemical composition of model solution. The experimental results have revealed that: (i) The passive behavior of the austenitic stainless steel at open-circuit conditions, the slightly alkaline pH and the reducing water chemistry can be considered to be optimal to minimize the 60Co contamination. (ii) The highly potential dependent deposition of various Co-oxides at E>1.10 V (vs. RHE) offers a unique possibility to elaborate a novel electrochemical method for the decrease or removal of cobalt traces from borate-containing coolants contaminated with 60Co and/or 58Co radionuclides.

  14. Patient-specific dosimetry in radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Lyra, Maria; Lagopati, Nefeli; Charalambatou, Paraskevi; Vamvakas, Ioannis

    2011-09-01

    This study presents an attempt to compare individualised palliative treatment absorbed doses, by planar images data and Monte Carlo simulation, in two in vivo treatment cases, one of bone metastases and the other of liver lesions. Medical Internal Radiation Dose schema was employed to estimate the absorbed doses. Radiopharmaceutical volume distributions and absorbed doses in the lesions as well as in critical organs were also calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. Individualised planar data calculations remain the method of choice in internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine, but with the disadvantage of attenuation and scatter corrections lack and organ overlay. The overall error is about 7 % for planar data calculations compared with that using Monte Carlo simulation. Patient-specific three-dimensional dosimetric calculations using single-photon emission computed tomography with a parallel computed tomography study is proposed as an accurate internal dosimetry with the additional use of dose-volume histograms, which express dose distributions in cases with obvious inhomogeneity.

  15. Air kerma based dosimetry calibration for the Leksell Gamma Knife

    SciTech Connect

    Meltsner, Sheridan Griffin; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2009-02-15

    No accepted official protocol exists for the dosimetry of the Leksell Gamma Knife registered (GK) stereotactic radiosurgery device. Establishment of a dosimetry protocol has been complicated by the unique partial-hemisphere arrangement of 201 individual {sup 60}Co beams simultaneously focused on the treatment volume and by the rigid geometry of the GK unit itself. This article proposes an air kerma based dosimetry protocol using either an in-air or in-acrylic phantom measurement to determine the absorbed dose rate of fields of the 18 mm helmet of a GK unit. A small-volume air ionization chamber was used to make measurements at the physical isocenter of three GK units. The absorbed dose rate to water was determined using a modified version of the AAPM Task Group 21 protocol designed for use with {sup 60}Co-based teletherapy machines. This experimentally determined absorbed dose rate was compared to the treatment planning system (TPS) absorbed dose rate. The TPS used with the GK unit is Leksell GammaPlan. The TPS absorbed dose rate at the time of treatment is the absorbed dose rate determined by the physicist at the time of machine commissioning decay corrected to the treatment date. The TPS absorbed dose rate is defined as absorbed dose rate to water at the isocenter of a water phantom with a radius of 8 cm. Measurements were performed on model B and C Gamma Knife units. The absorbed dose rate to water for the 18 mm helmet determined using air-kerma based calculations is consistently between 1.5% and 2.9% higher than the absorbed dose rate provided by the TPS. These air kerma based measurements allow GK dosimetry to be performed with an established dosimetry protocol and without complications arising from the use of and possible variations in solid phantom material. Measurements were also made with the same ionization chamber in a spherical acrylic phantom for comparison. This methodology will allow further development of calibration methods appropriate for the

  16. Cytogenetic comparison of the responses of mouse and human peripheral blood lymphocytes to /sup 60/Co gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kligerman, A.D.; Halperin, E.C.; Erexson, G.L.; Honore, G.; Westbrook-Collins, B.; Allen, J.W.

    1988-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare the chromosome damaging effects of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation on mouse and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Either whole blood or isolated and pelleted mononuclear leucocytes (MNLs) were irradiated with a /sup 60/Co unit to yield exposures of 1, 2, 3, or 4 Gy. In addition, mice were whole-body irradiated in vivo with the same doses so that an in vitro-in vivo comparison could be made. The results indicate that mouse PBLs irradiated in whole blood, whether in vivo or in vitro, respond similarly to /sup 60/Co gamma rays as measured by dicentric chromosome formation. In addition, mouse and human PBLs showed a similar radiosensitivity, but because the mouse PBL data were best fitted to an exponential function and the human PBL data to a quadratic function, direct comparisons were difficult to make. Pelleted MNLs from mice were much less sensitive to the clastogenic effects of gamma radiation than whole blood. This is believed to be due to hypoxic conditions that developed during irradiation and transport. Human PBLs did not show a marked difference whether irradiated in whole blood or as pelleted MNLs in tissue culture medium.

  17. Combined reactor neutron beam and {sup 60}Co γ-ray radiation effects on CMOS APS image sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zujun Chen, Wei; Sheng, Jiangkun; Liu, Yan; Xiao, Zhigang; Huang, Shaoyan; Liu, Minbo

    2015-02-15

    The combined reactor neutron beam and {sup 60}Co γ-ray radiation effects on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors (APS) have been discussed and some new experimental phenomena are presented. The samples are manufactured in the standard 0.35-μm CMOS technology. Two samples were first exposed to {sup 60}Co γ-rays up to the total ionizing dose (TID) level of 200 krad(Si) at the dose rates of 50.0 and 0.2 rad(Si)/s, and then exposed to neutron fluence up to 1 × 10{sup 11} n/cm{sup 2} (1-MeV equivalent neutron fluence). One sample was first exposed to neutron fluence up to 1 × 10{sup 11} n/cm{sup 2} (1-MeV equivalent neutron fluence), and then exposed to {sup 60}Co γ-rays up to the TID level of 200 krad(Si) at the dose rate of 0.2 rad(Si)/s. The mean dark signal (K{sub D}), the dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), and the noise (V{sub N}) versus the total dose and neutron fluence has been investigated. The degradation mechanisms of CMOS APS image sensors have been analyzed, especially for the interaction induced by neutron displacement damage and TID damage.

  18. INTRINSIC DOSIMETRY: A POTENTIAL NEW TOOL FOR NUCLEAR FORENSICS INVESTIGATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Richard A.; Miller, Steven D.; Robertson, Dave J.; Gregg, Roger A.; Murphy, Mark K.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2010-08-11

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry was used to measure dose effects on the raw stock material of borosilicate container glass from different geographical locations. Effects were studied at times up to 60 days post-irradiation at doses from 0.15 to 20 Gy. The minimum detectable dose using this technique was estimated to be 0.15 Gy which is roughly equivalent to a 24 hr irradiation 1 cm from a 50 ng source of 60Co. Two peaks were identified in the TL glow curve, a relatively unstable peak around 125°C and a more stable peak around 225°C. Differences in TL glow curve shape and intensity were also observed for the glasses from different geographical origins. We investigate radiation induced defects in glass to further develop the technique of intrinsic dosimetry–the measurement of the total absorbed dose received by the walls of a container holding radioactive material. Intrinsic dosimetry is intended to be used as an interrogation tool to provide enhanced pathway information on interdicted or newly discovered waste containers of unknown origin or history by considering the total absorbed dose received by a container in tandem with the physical characteristics of the radioactive material housed within that container. One hypothetical scenario is presented to illustrate the application of intrinsic dosimetry to waste management and nuclear forensics.

  19. Verification of total body photon irradiation dosimetry techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, T.H.; Hanson, W.F.; Cates, D.A.

    1988-05-01

    A method of verifying the dosimetry of patients undergoing total body irradiation (TBI) with photon beams having energies from cobalt-60 to 25 MV is presented. A simple set of spot checks at the TBI axis has been used to verify data used for TBI dosimetry. Calculations to verify dose delivered to TBI patients are done in the same manner as those irradiated at standard treatment distances. A simple method of effective field size determination for various anatomical locations in a typical adult is presented. Measurements in an Alderson phantom with thermoluminescent dosimeters and an ion chamber at several anatomical locations indicate that this calculational method can predict the dose along the patient axis to within 4% for /sup 60/Co and 18-MV photon beams, provided the dosimetry data are appropriate (as determined by the spot checks). Results of intercomparisons of TBI beam calibration, off-axis and depth-dose data at various institutions visited by the Radiological Physics Center are also presented.

  20. EANM Dosimetry Committee guidance document: good practice of clinical dosimetry reporting.

    PubMed

    Lassmann, M; Chiesa, C; Flux, G; Bardiès, M

    2011-01-01

    Many recent publications in nuclear medicine contain data on dosimetric findings for existing and new diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In many of these articles, however, a description of the methodology applied for dosimetry is lacking or important details are omitted. The intention of the EANM Dosimetry Committee is to guide the reader through a series of suggestions for reporting dosimetric approaches. The authors are aware of the large amount of data required to report the way a given clinical dosimetry procedure was implemented. Another aim of this guidance document is to provide comprehensive information for preparing and submitting publications and reports containing data on internal dosimetry. This guidance document also contains a checklist which could be useful for reviewers of manuscripts submitted to scientific journals or for grant applications. In addition, this document could be used to decide which data are useful for a documentation of dosimetry results in individual patient records. This may be of importance when the approval of a new radiopharmaceutical by official bodies such as EMA or FDA is envisaged.

  1. Reactor Dosimetry State of the Art 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorbraak, Wim; Debarberis, Luigi; D'Hondt, Pierre; Wagemans, Jan

    2009-08-01

    Oral session 1: Retrospective dosimetry. Retrospective dosimetry of VVER 440 reactor pressure vessel at the 3rd unit of Dukovany NPP / M. Marek ... [et al.]. Retrospective dosimetry study at the RPV of NPP Greifswald unit 1 / J. Konheiser ... [et al.]. Test of prototype detector for retrospective neutron dosimetry of reactor internals and vessel / K. Hayashi ... [et al.]. Neutron doses to the concrete vessel and tendons of a magnox reactor using retrospective dosimetry / D. A. Allen ... [et al.]. A retrospective dosimetry feasibility study for Atucha I / J. Wagemans ... [et al.]. Retrospective reactor dosimetry with zirconium alloy samples in a PWR / L. R. Greenwood and J. P. Foster -- Oral session 2: Experimental techniques. Characterizing the Time-dependent components of reactor n/y environments / P. J. Griffin, S. M. Luker and A. J. Suo-Anttila. Measurements of the recoil-ion response of silicon carbide detectors to fast neutrons / F. H. Ruddy, J. G. Seidel and F. Franceschini. Measurement of the neutron spectrum of the HB-4 cold source at the high flux isotope reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory / J. L. Robertson and E. B. Iverson. Feasibility of cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy for dose rate monitoring on nuclear reactor / H. Tomita ... [et al.]. Measuring transistor damage factors in a non-stable defect environment / D. B. King ... [et al.]. Neutron-detection based monitoring of void effects in boiling water reactors / J. Loberg ... [et al.] -- Poster session 1: Power reactor surveillance, retrospective dosimetry, benchmarks and inter-comparisons, adjustment methods, experimental techniques, transport calculations. Improved diagnostics for analysis of a reactor pulse radiation environment / S. M. Luker ... [et al.]. Simulation of the response of silicon carbide fast neutron detectors / F. Franceschini, F. H. Ruddy and B. Petrović. NSV A-3: a computer code for least-squares adjustment of neutron spectra and measured dosimeter responses / J. G

  2. Absorbed dose to water reference dosimetry using solid phantoms in the context of absorbed-dose protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Seuntjens, Jan; Olivares, Marina; Evans, Michael; Podgorsak, Ervin

    2005-09-15

    For reasons of phantom material reproducibility, the absorbed dose protocols of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) (TG-51) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (TRS-398) have made the use of liquid water as a phantom material for reference dosimetry mandatory. In this work we provide a formal framework for the measurement of absorbed dose to water using ionization chambers calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water but irradiated in solid phantoms. Such a framework is useful when there is a desire to put dose measurements using solid phantoms on an absolute basis. Putting solid phantom measurements on an absolute basis has distinct advantages in verification measurements and quality assurance. We introduce a phantom dose conversion factor that converts a measurement made in a solid phantom and analyzed using an absorbed dose calibration protocol into absorbed dose to water under reference conditions. We provide techniques to measure and calculate the dose transfer from solid phantom to water. For an Exradin A12 ionization chamber, we measured and calculated the phantom dose conversion factor for six Solid Water{sup TM} phantoms and for a single Lucite phantom for photon energies between {sup 60}Co and 18 MV photons. For Solid Water{sup TM} of certified grade, the difference between measured and calculated factors varied between 0.0% and 0.7% with the average dose conversion factor being low by 0.4% compared with the calculation whereas for Lucite, the agreement was within 0.2% for the one phantom examined. The composition of commercial plastic phantoms and their homogeneity may not always be reproducible and consistent with assumed composition. By comparing measured and calculated phantom conversion factors, our work provides methods to verify the consistency of a given plastic for the purpose of clinical reference dosimetry.

  3. Dosimetry with diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervino, G.; Marino, C.; Silvestri, F.; Lavagno, A.; Truc, F.

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we present the dosimetry analysis in terms of stability and repeatability of the signal and dose rate dependence of a synthetic single crystal diamond grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) technique. The measurements carried out by 5 MeV X-ray photons beam show very promising results, even if the dose rate detector response points out that the charge trapping centers distribution is not uniform inside the crystal volume. This handicap that affects the detectors performances, must be ascribed to the growing process. Synthetic single crystal diamonds could be a valuable alternative to air ionization chambers for quality beam control and for intensity modulated radiation therapy beams dosimetry.

  4. Final report on APMP.RI(I)-K1: APMP/TCRI key comparison report of measurement of air kerma for 60Co gamma-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, K. J.; Butler, D. J.; Webb, D.; Mahant, A. K.; Meghzifene, A.; Lee, J. H.; Hah, S. H.; Kadni, T. B.; Zhang, Y.; Kurosawa, T.; Msimang, Z. L. M.; Caseria, E. S.

    2013-01-01

    The APMP.RI(I)-K1 key comparison of the measurement standards of air kerma for 60Co gamma-rays was undertaken by the APMP/TCRI Dosimetry Working Group between 2004 and 2006, coordinated by the Korean Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS). In total, 10 institutes took part in the comparison, among which 7 were APMP member laboratories. Three Farmer-type commercial cavity chambers were used as transfer chambers and circulated among the participants. All the participants carried out their measurements according to the guidelines for the comparison established by the KRISS with the cooperation of the ARPANSA. For each transfer chamber, an NMI calibration coefficient was obtained and a ratio derived by dividing by the average result from the linking laboratories, ARPANSA and NMIJ. The APMP comparison reference value for each chamber was calculated as the mean of the NMI-determined calibration coefficients divided by the average result from the linking laboratories. The results showed that the maximum difference between the APMP linked ratio of a participating NMI and the APMP reference value was 1.76%. The measured ratios of the calibration coefficient RNMI, BIPM between the participating NMI and the BIPM via the link laboratories for the transfer chambers were obtained. The maximum expanded uncertainty of RNMI, BIPM for any participating laboratory was 2.0%. The degree of equivalence of each participating laboratory with respect to the key comparison reference value was also evaluated. The expanded uncertainty of the difference between the results ranged from 0.5% to 1.2%. The pair-wise degree of equivalence between each pair of laboratories was also obtained and the largest difference of the expanded uncertainty of the difference for any pair-wise degree of equivalence was within the expanded uncertainty of the measurement for the pair of laboratories. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that

  5. Plutonium worker dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Birchall, Alan; Puncher, M; Harrison, J; Riddell, A; Bailey, M R; Khokryakov, V; Romanov, S

    2010-05-01

    Epidemiological studies of the relationship between risk and internal exposure to plutonium are clearly reliant on the dose estimates used. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is currently reviewing the latest scientific information available on biokinetic models and dosimetry, and it is likely that a number of changes to the existing models will be recommended. The effect of certain changes, particularly to the ICRP model of the respiratory tract, has been investigated for inhaled forms of (239)Pu and uncertainties have also been assessed. Notable effects of possible changes to respiratory tract model assumptions are (1) a reduction in the absorbed dose to target cells in the airways, if changes under consideration are made to the slow clearing fraction and (2) a doubling of absorbed dose to the alveolar region for insoluble forms, if evidence of longer retention times is taken into account. An important factor influencing doses for moderately soluble forms of (239)Pu is the extent of binding of dissolved plutonium to lung tissues and assumptions regarding the extent of binding in the airways. Uncertainty analyses have been performed with prior distributions chosen for application in epidemiological studies. The resulting distributions for dose per unit intake were lognormal with geometric standard deviations of 2.3 and 2.6 for nitrates and oxides, respectively. The wide ranges were due largely to consideration of results for a range of experimental data for the solubility of different forms of nitrate and oxides. The medians of these distributions were a factor of three times higher than calculated using current default ICRP parameter values. For nitrates, this was due to the assumption of a bound fraction, and for oxides due mainly to the assumption of slower alveolar clearance. This study highlights areas where more research is needed to reduce biokinetic uncertainties, including more accurate determination of particle transport rates

  6. Proceedings of the third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H.

    1991-10-01

    The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21--24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection, and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To meet these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical session included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, accident dosimetry, regulations and standards, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. Individual reports are processed separately on the database.

  7. Steroid hormone production in testis, ovary, and adrenal gland of immature rats irradiated in utero with /sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Inano, H.; Suzuki, K.; Ishii-Ohba, H.; Imada, Y.; Kumagai, R.; Kurihara, S.; Sato, A.

    1989-02-01

    Pregnant rats received whole-body irradiation at 20 days of gestation with 2.6 Gy lambda rays from a 60Co source. Endocrinological effects before maturation were studied using testes and adrenal glands obtained from male offspring and ovaries from female offspring irradiated in utero. Seminiferous tubules of the irradiated male offspring were remarkably atrophied with free germinal epithelium and containing only Sertoli cells. Female offspring also had atrophied ovaries. Testicular tissue obtained from intact and 60Co-irradiated rats was incubated with 14C-labeled pregnenolone, progesterone, 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, and androstenedione as a substrate. Intermediates for androgen production and catabolic metabolites were isolated after the incubation. The amounts of these metabolites produced by the irradiated testes were low in comparison with the control. The activities of delta 5-3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17 alpha-hydroxylase, C17,20-lyase, and delta 4-5 alpha-reductase in the irradiated testes were 30-40% of those in nonirradiated testes. Also, the activities of 17 beta- and 20 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases were 72 and 52% of the control, respectively. In adrenal glands, the 21-hydroxylase activity of the irradiated animals was 38% of the control, but the delta 5-3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity was comparable to that of the control. On the other hand, the activity of delta 5-3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase of the irradiated ovary was only 19% of the control. These results suggest that 60Co irradiation of the fetus in utero markedly affects the production of steroid hormones in testes, ovaries, and adrenal glands after birth.

  8. Transfer of 137Cs and 60Co in a waste retention pond with emphasis on aquatic insects

    SciTech Connect

    Voshell, J.R. Jr.; Eldridge, J.S.; Oakes, T.W.

    1985-11-01

    The objectives of this research were (1) to analyze the transfers of 137Cs and 60Co in a retention pond, with emphasis on aquatic insects and (2) to determine if detectable concentrations of these radionuclides are exported by emerging aquatic insects. We analyzed the radionuclide concentrations in the following components: water solution, bottom sediments, suspended particulate matter, plankton, floating mats of filamentous algae, benthic macroinvertebrates, and emerging aquatic insects. Samples were collected quarterly from June 1981 to April 1982. The lowest concentrations (in picocuries per milliliter) occurred in solution (range: 1.4 X 10(2) to 3.2 X 10(2) for 137Cs and 8.1 X 10(-1) to 2.2 X 10(0) for 60Co). The highest concentrations (in picocuries per gram dry weight) occurred in the sediments (range: 1.5 X 10(4) to 1.1 X 10(8) for 137Cs and 1.0 X 10(2) to 4.3 X 10(6) for 60Co). The primary producers and aquatic insect consumers had concentrations of both radionuclides that were two to four orders of magnitude higher than the respective concentrations dissolved in water but two to three orders of magnitude lower than the concentrations in the sediments. The concentrations of both radionuclides decreased successively at higher trophic levels. There were considerable temporal variations as the radionuclides cycled among the abiotic and biotic components of the pond. Emerging adult aquatic insects had lower concentrations of both radionuclides than the immature stages that lived in the pond (adult/immature ratio about 0.25). Because the emerging adult insects contain detectable concentrations of radionuclides, have relatively long life spans, and disperse away from the aquatic habitat, we conclude that adult aquatic insects would be effective biological monitors.

  9. Transfer of 137Cs and 60Co in a waste retention pond with emphasis on aquatic insects.

    PubMed

    Voshell, J R; Eldridge, J S; Oakes, T W

    1985-11-01

    The objectives of this research were (1) to analyze the transfers of 137Cs and 60Co in a retention pond, with emphasis on aquatic insects and (2) to determine if detectable concentrations of these radionuclides are exported by emerging aquatic insects. We analyzed the radionuclide concentrations in the following components: water solution, bottom sediments, suspended particulate matter, plankton, floating mats of filamentous algae, benthic macroinvertebrates, and emerging aquatic insects. Samples were collected quarterly from June 1981 to April 1982. The lowest concentrations (in picocuries per milliliter) occurred in solution (range: 1.4 X 10(2) to 3.2 X 10(2) for 137Cs and 8.1 X 10(-1) to 2.2 X 10(0) for 60Co). The highest concentrations (in picocuries per gram dry weight) occurred in the sediments (range: 1.5 X 10(4) to 1.1 X 10(8) for 137Cs and 1.0 X 10(2) to 4.3 X 10(6) for 60Co). The primary producers and aquatic insect consumers had concentrations of both radionuclides that were two to four orders of magnitude higher than the respective concentrations dissolved in water but two to three orders of magnitude lower than the concentrations in the sediments. The concentrations of both radionuclides decreased successively at higher trophic levels. There were considerable temporal variations as the radionuclides cycled among the abiotic and biotic components of the pond. Emerging adult aquatic insects had lower concentrations of both radionuclides than the immature stages that lived in the pond (adult/immature ratio about 0.25). Because the emerging adult insects contain detectable concentrations of radionuclides, have relatively long life spans, and disperse away from the aquatic habitat, we conclude that adult aquatic insects would be effective biological monitors.

  10. Impact of Region-of-Interest Delineation Methods, Reconstruction Algorithms, and Intra- and Inter-Operator Variability on Internal Dosimetry Estimates Using PET.

    PubMed

    López-Vilanova, N; Pavía, J; Duch, M A; Catafau, A; Ros, D; Bullich, S

    2017-04-01

    Human dosimetry studies play a central role in radioligand development for positron emission tomography (PET). Drawing regions of interest (ROIs) on the PET images is used to measure the dose in each organ. In the study aspects related to ROI delineation methods were evaluated for two radioligands of different biodistribution (intestinal vs urinary). PET images were simulated from a human voxel-based phantom. Several ROI delineation methods were tested: antero-posterior projections (AP), 3D sub-samples of the organs (S), and a 3D volume covering the whole-organ (W). Inter- and intra-operator variability ROI drawing was evaluated by using human data. The effective dose estimates using S and W methods were comparable to the true values. AP methods overestimated (49 %) the dose for the radioligand with intestinal biodistribution. Moreover, the AP method showed the highest inter-operator variability: 11 ± 1 %. The sub-sampled organ method showed the best balance between quantitative accuracy and inter- and intra-operator variability.

  11. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  12. Ion storage dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, V. K.

    2001-09-01

    The availability of a reliable, accurate and cost-effective real-time personnel dosimetry system is fascinating to radiation workers. Electronic dosimeters are contemplated to meet this demand of active dosimetry. The development of direct ion storage (DIS) dosimeters, a member of the electronic dosimeter family, for personnel dosimetry is also an attempt in this direction. DIS dosimeter is a hybrid of the well-established technology of ion chambers and the latest advances in data storage using metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) analog memory device. This dosimeter is capable of monitoring legal occupational radiation doses of gamma, X-rays, beta and neutron radiation. Similar to an ion chamber, the performance of the dosimeter for a particular application can be optimized through the selection of appropriate wall materials. The use of the floating gate of a MOSFET as one of the electrodes of the ion chamber allows the miniaturization of the device to the size of a dosimetry badge and avoids the use of power supplies during dose accumulation. The concept of the device, underlying physics and the design of the DIS dosimeter are discussed. The results of preliminary testing of the device are also provided.

  13. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  14. Evaluation of Cuprimine and Syprine for decorporation of (60)Co and (210)Po.

    PubMed

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G; Creim, Jeffrey A; Curry, Terry L; Luders, Teresa; Morris, James E; Woodstock, Angela D; Levinson, Barry; Thrall, Karla D

    2010-03-01

    The acknowledged risk of deliberate release of radionuclides into local environments by terrorist activities has prompted a drive to improve novel materials and methods for removing internally deposited radionuclides. These decorporation treatments will also benefit workers in the nuclear industry, should an exposure occur. Cuprimine and Syprine are oral therapeutics based on the active ingredients D-penicillamine and N,N'-bis-(2-aminoethyl)-1,2-ethanediamine dihydrochloride, respectively. These therapeutic drugs have been used for several decades to treat Wilson's disease, a genetic defect leading to copper overload, by chelation and accelerated excretion of internally deposited copper. Studies were undertaken to evaluate these FDA-approved drugs for the in vivo decorporation of radioactive cobalt (Co) and polonium (Po) using male Wistar-Han rats. In these studies, Co or Po was administered to animals by IV injection, followed by oral gavage doses of either Cuprimine or Syprine. Control animals received the radionuclide alone. For Co studies, animals received a single dose of Cuprimine or Syprine, while for Po studies animals were repeatedly dosed at 24-h intervals for a total of 5 doses. Results show that Syprine significantly increased urinary elimination and skeletal concentrations of Co compared to controls. While Cuprimine had little effect on total excretion of Co, the skeletal, kidney, liver, muscle, and stomach tissues had significantly lower radioactivity compared to control animals. The low overall excretion of Po made it difficult to reliably measure urinary or fecal radioactivity and draw a definitive conclusion on the effect of Cuprimine or Syprine treatment on excretion. However, Cuprimine treatment was effective at reducing spleen levels of Po compared to controls. Similarly, Syprine treatment produced statistically significant reductions of Po in the spleen and skeletal tissues compared to control animals. Based on these promising findings, further

  15. Effect of gamma 60Co irradiation on the lipid content and fatty acid composition of Nannochloropsis sp. microalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermavitalini, Dini; Sari, Ika Puspita; Prasetyo, Endry Nugroho; Abdulgani, Nurlita; Saputro, Triono Bagus

    2017-06-01

    Nannochloropsissp. has been identified as a promising feed stock for biodiesel production in recent years. Nannochloropsis sp. have high lipid content between 31-68 % of dry biomass weight. Mutagenesis induced by Gamma 60Co irradiation can be utilized to alter Nannochloropsis sp. characteristic to get microalgae mutant strain that can produce a higher lipid content than the wild strain. The aim of this research was to know the effect of gamma 60Co irradiation to the biomass, lipid content and fatty acid compotition of Nannochloropsis sp. microalgae. In this research, irradiation was done in different doses there were 0, 2, 4, 6 and 10 Gray (Gy). Measuring microalgae biomass and lipid content were done in late exponential phase at the end of each treatment. Research design used is random complete with 95 % confident level for quantitative analysis based on biomass and lipid content. Fatty acid compotition was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Results showed that gamma irradiated gave an effect on lipid content and fatty acid profile of Nannochloropsis sp. Tukey test showed total lipid content of control micoalgae (0 Gy) was significat different with 10 Gy irradiated microalgae, but no significant different with 2,4 and 6 Gy irradiated microalgae. The highest lipid content were found in 10 Gy irradiated microalgae equal to 62.65 %. Fatty acid profile of 10 Gy irradiated Nannochloropsis sp. had 9 fatty acids while control Nannochloropsis sp. had 6 fatty acids.

  16. 60Co-irradiation as an alternate method for sterilization of penicillin G, neomycin, novobiocin, and dihydrostreptomycin

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, K.; Rahn, P.D.; Steindler, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of the use of 60Co-irradiation to sterilize antibiotics were evaluated. The antibiotic powders were only occasionally contaminated with microorganisms. The D-values of the products and environmental isolates were 0.028, 0.027, 0.015, 0.046, 0.15, 0.018, and 0.19 Mrads for Aspergillus species (UC 7297, 7298), A. fumigatus (UC 7299), Rhodotorula species (UC 7300), Penicillium oxalicum (UC 7269), Pseudomonas maltophilia (UC 6855), and a biological indicator microorganism, Bacillus pumilus spores (ATCC 27142). An irradiation dose of 1.14 Mrads, therefore, was sufficient to achieve a six-log cycle destruction of B. pumilus spores. Based on the bioburden data, a minimum irradiation dose of 1.05 Mrads was calculated to be sufficient to obtain a 10(-6) probability of sterilizing the most radioresistant isolate, Pen. oxalicum. To determine the radiolytic degradation scheme and the stability of the antibiotics following irradiation, high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods were developed. The resulting rates of degradation for the antibiotics were 0.6, 1.2, 2.3, and 0.95%/Mrad for penicillin G, neomycin, novobiocin, and dihydrostreptomycin, respectively. Furthermore, radiolytic degradation pathways for the antibiotics were identified and found to be similar to those commonly encountered when antibiotics are subjected to acidic, basic, hydrolytic, or oxidative treatments. No radiolytic compounds unique to 60Co-irradiation were found.

  17. Radioprotective effects of sodium tungstate on hematopoietic injury by exposure to 60Co gamma-rays in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Ichimasa, M; Miyahara, K; Shiomi, M; Nishimura, Y; Ichimasa, Y

    1999-06-01

    Radioprotective effects of sodium tungstate (ST) on 60Co gamma-ray induced decrease in hematocrit value and in survival rate in Wistar strain male rats were examined. A long-term administration of ST (less than 150 mg/kg body weight/day) for 60-300 days had no significant effects on body and organs weights and survival days. The LD50/60 in 20 weeks old rats was 220 mg/kg body weight/day. Daily administration of 38, 75 or 150 mg from 7 days before and after irradiation to 60 days significantly mitigated the decrease in hematocrit values, especially at 23 days after irradiation (P < 0.05). The highest mitigation rate of the decrease in hematocrit value was observed in rats administered at a dose of 38 mg ST/day. Simultaneously, a dose of 38 mg ST/day inhibited lethal effect of 60Co gamma-rays significantly. The dose-reduction factor for survival of 38 mg ST administered rats was 1.14.

  18. Modification of the (137)Cs, (90)Sr, and (60)Co transfer to wheat plantlets by NH4(+) fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Guillén, J; Muñoz-Muñoz, G; Baeza, A; Salas, A; Mocanu, N

    2017-03-01

    Inorganic fertilizers are used as agricultural countermeasures intended to inhibit the soil to plant transfer of radionuclides after a radioactive fallout. Two NH4(+) fertilizers, diammonium phosphate (DAP) and NPK, were applied to soil contaminated with a mixture of radionuclides to analyze whether they modify the transfer of (137)Cs, (90)Sr, and (60)Co and stable elements (K, Na, Ca, and Mg) to wheat plantlets grown under controlled laboratory conditions. DAP introduced NH4(+) in the soil, which can increase (137)Cs transfer, while NPK also introduced K(+), which can decrease it. The application of DAP increased the accumulation of (137)Cs in wheat plantlets with increasing application rate, so did the (137)Cs/K in plantlets. Regarding the NPK application, the (137)Cs increased in all treatments, but at maximum rate, the available K introduced by the fertilizer was probably able to partially satisfy the nutritional requirements of the wheat plantlet and the (137)Cs decreased relative to the recommended rate. The (137)Cs/K ratio in plantlet decreased with increasing NPK rates. The transfer of (90)Sr increased with increasing DAP rate and only at the maximum NPK rate. The (60)Co transfer only increased at the maximum application rates for DAP and NPK. These modifications should be considered when using these fertilizers as agricultural countermeasures.

  19. Commissioning of an NRC-type sealed water calorimeter at METAS using 60Co gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Medin, J; Ross, C K; Stucki, G; Klassen, N V; Seuntjens, J P

    2004-09-07

    As part of a collaborative project between the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) and the Swiss Federal Office of Metrology and Accreditation (METAS), a sealed water calorimeter was built at NRC and transferred to METAS. The calorimeter is operated at 4 degrees C and uses two thermistor probes in a sealed glass vessel containing high-purity water to measure the radiation-induced temperature rise. The various correction factors have been evaluated and the estimated standard uncertainty on the absorbed dose to water is 0.41%. An extensive set of measurements using 60Co gamma-rays was carried out at NRC and two ionization chambers were calibrated against the absorbed dose determined calorimetrically. The chambers were also calibrated against the NRC standard for absorbed dose. After transferring the calorimeter to METAS, a similar set of measurements was carried out using their 60Co beam and the same two ionization chambers were calibrated against the absorbed dose to water established at METAS. The discrepancy between the three sets of calibration coefficients was smaller than the estimated standard uncertainty of 0.47% on the ratio of any pair of calibration coefficients.

  20. Effects of (60)Co gamma irradiation on behavior and gill histoarchitecture of giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (DE MAN).

    PubMed

    Stalin, A; Broos, K V; Sadiq Bukhari, A; Syed Mohamed, H E; Singhal, R K; Venu-babu, P

    2013-06-01

    Present study was designed to observe the effects of (60)Co gamma radiation in behavioral and histological changes in the gills of giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The adult prawns were irradiated with four different dose levels (3mGy, 30mGy, 300mGy and 3000mGy) and the control group (without irradiation) was maintained separately. Behavioral changes like hyperactivity, loss of balance, reduced swimming rate, slower rate of food intake and convulsions were observed in higher dose levels of 300mGy and 3000mGy. The histological alterations such as accumulated haemocytes in haemocoelic spaces, abnormal gill tips, lifted lamellar epithelium, swollen and fused lamellae, hyperplasic, necrotic, clavate-globate and complete disorganization of lamellae were observed in (60)Co gamma irradiated prawns. Significantly more considerable histological alterations were observed in the highest dose level of 3000mGy, but no mortality was evidenced. This study serves as biomonitoring tool to assess the radiation pollution in the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Egyptian limestone for gamma dosimetry: an electron paramagnetic resonance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, E.

    2014-04-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) properties of limestone from a certain Egyptian site were investigated in order to propose an efficient and low-cost gamma dosimeter. Radiation-induced free radicals were of one type which was produced in the limestone samples at g=2.0066 after exposure to gamma radiation (60Co). EPR spectrum was recorded and analyzed. The microwave power saturation curve and the effect of changing modulation amplitude on peak-to- peak signal height were investigated. The response of limestone to different radiation doses (0.5-20 kGy) was studied. Except for the decrease in signal intensities during the first five hours following irradiation, over the period of two months fair stabilities of signal intensities were noticed. From the current results, it is possible to conclude that natural limestone may be a suitable material for radiation dosimetry in the range of irradiation processing.

  2. p-type silicon detector for brachytherapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Piermattei, A; Azario, L; Monaco, G; Soriani, A; Arcovito, G

    1995-06-01

    The sensitivity of a cylindrical p-type silicon detector was studied by means of air and water measurements using different photon beams. A lead filter cap around the diode was used to minimize the dependence of the detector response as a function of the brachytherapy photon energy. The radial dose distribution of a high-activity 192Ir source in a brachytherapy phantom was measured by means of the shielded diode and the agreement of these data with theoretical evaluations confirms the method used to compensate diode response in the intermediate energy range. The diode sensitivity was constant over a wide range of dose rates of clinical interest; this allowed one to have a small detector calibrated in terms of absorbed dose in a medium. Theoretical evaluations showed that a single shielding filter around the p-type diode is sufficient to obtain accurate dosimetry for 192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co brachytherapy sources.

  3. In vivo dosimetry for IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Vial, Philip

    2011-05-05

    In vivo dosimetry has a well established role in the quality assurance of 2D radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy. The role of in vivo dosimetry for IMRT is not as well established. IMRT introduces a range of technical issues that complicate in vivo dosimetry. The first decade or so of IMRT implementation has largely relied upon pre-treatment phantom based dose verification. During that time, several new devices and techniques for in vivo dosimetry have emerged with the promise of providing the ultimate form of IMRT dose verification. Solid state dosimeters continue to dominate the field of in vivo dosimetry in the IMRT era. In this report we review the literature on in vivo dosimetry for IMRT, with an emphasis on clinical evidence for different detector types. We describe the pros and cons of different detectors and techniques in the IMRT setting and the roles that they are likely to play in the future.

  4. Evaluation of a novel 4D in vivo dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Cherpak, A.; Ding, W.; Hallil, A.; Cygler, J. E.

    2009-05-15

    A prototype of a new 4D in vivo dosimetry system capable of simultaneous real-time position monitoring and dose measurement has been developed. The radiation positioning system (RADPOS) is controlled by a computer and combines two technologies: MOSFET radiation detector coupled with an electromagnetic positioning device. Special software has been developed that allows sampling position and dose either manually or automatically in user-defined time intervals. Preliminary tests of the new device include a dosimetric evaluation of the detector in {sup 60}Co, 6 MV, and 18 MV beams and measurements of spatial position stability and accuracy. In addition, the effect of metals and other materials on the performance of the positioning system has been investigated. Results show that the RADPOS system can measure in-air dose profiles that agree, on average, within 3%-5% of diode measurements for the energies tested. The response of the detector is isotropic within 1.6% (1 SD) with a maximum deviation of {+-}4.0% over 360 deg. The maximum variation in the calibration coefficient over field sizes from 6x6 to 25x25 cm{sup 2} was 2.3% for RADPOS probe with the high sensitivity MOSFET and 4.6% for the probe with the standard sensitivity MOSFET. Of the materials tested, only aluminum, lead, and brass caused shifts in the RADPOS read position. The magnitude of the shift varied between materials and size of the material sample. Nonmagnetic stainless steel (Grade 304) caused a distortion of less than 2 mm when placed within 10 mm of the detector; therefore, it can provide a reasonable alternative to other metals if required. The results of the preliminary tests indicate that the device can be used for in vivo dosimetry in {sup 60}Co and high-energy beams from linear accelerators.

  5. Dosimetry for Radiopharmaceutical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Hobbs, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) involves the use of radionuclides that are either conjugated to tumor-targeting agents (eg, nanoscale constructs, antibodies, peptides, and small molecules) or concentrated in tissue through natural physiological mechanisms that occur predominantly in neoplastic or otherwise targeted cells (eg, Graves disease). The ability to collect pharmacokinetic data by imaging and use this to perform dosimetry calculations for treatment planning distinguishes RPT from other systemic treatment modalities. Treatment planning has not been widely adopted, in part, because early attempts to relate dosimetry to outcome were not successful. This was partially because a dosimetry methodology appropriate to risk evaluation rather than efficacy and toxicity was being applied to RPT. The weakest links in both diagnostic and therapeutic dosimetry are the accuracy of the input and the reliability of the radiobiological models used to convert dosimetric data to the relevant biologic end points. Dosimetry for RPT places a greater demand on both of these weak links. To date, most dosimetric studies have been retrospective, with a focus on tumor dose-response correlations rather than prospective treatment planning. In this regard, transarterial radioembolization also known as intra-arterial radiation therapy, which uses radiolabeled (90Y) microspheres of glass or resin to treat lesions in the liver holds much promise for more widespread dosimetric treatment planning. The recent interest in RPT with alpha-particle emitters has highlighted the need to adopt a dosimetry methodology that specifically accounts for the unique aspects of alpha particles. The short range of alpha-particle emitters means that in cases in which the distribution of activity is localized to specific functional components or cell types of an organ, the absorbed dose will be equally localized and dosimetric calculations on the scale of organs or even voxels (~5 mm) are no longer sufficient

  6. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Retrospective Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Romanyukha, Alex; Trompier, Francois

    2011-05-05

    Necessity for, principles of, and general concepts of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) retrospective dosimetry are presented. Also presented and given in details are examples of EPR retrospective dosimetry applications in tooth enamel, bone, and fingernails with focus on general approaches for solving technical and methodological problems. Advantages, drawbacks, and possible future developments are discussed and an extensive bibliography on EPR retrospective dosimetry is provided.

  7. Bayesian Methods for Radiation Detection and Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Peter G. Groer

    2002-09-29

    We performed work in three areas: radiation detection, external and internal radiation dosimetry. In radiation detection we developed Bayesian techniques to estimate the net activity of high and low activity radioactive samples. These techniques have the advantage that the remaining uncertainty about the net activity is described by probability densities. Graphs of the densities show the uncertainty in pictorial form. Figure 1 below demonstrates this point. We applied stochastic processes for a method to obtain Bayesian estimates of 222Rn-daughter products from observed counting rates. In external radiation dosimetry we studied and developed Bayesian methods to estimate radiation doses to an individual with radiation induced chromosome aberrations. We analyzed chromosome aberrations after exposure to gammas and neutrons and developed a method for dose-estimation after criticality accidents. The research in internal radiation dosimetry focused on parameter estimation for compartmental models from observed compartmental activities. From the estimated probability densities of the model parameters we were able to derive the densities for compartmental activities for a two compartment catenary model at different times. We also calculated the average activities and their standard deviation for a simple two compartment model.

  8. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: A comparison of ionizing radiation damage in CMOS devices from 60Co gamma rays, electrons and protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bao-Ping; Yao, Zhi-Bin; Zhang, Feng-Qi

    2009-06-01

    Radiation hardened CC4007RH and non-radiation hardened CC4011 devices were irradiated using 60Co gamma rays, 1 MeV electrons and 1-9 MeV protons to compare the ionizing radiation damage of the gamma rays with the charged particles. For all devices examined, with experimental uncertainty, the radiation induced threshold voltage shifts (ΔVth) generated by 60Co gamma rays are equal to that of 1 MeV electron and 1-7 MeV proton radiation under 0 gate bias condition. Under 5 V gate bias condition, the distinction of threshold voltage shifts (ΔVth) generated by 60Co gamma rays and 1 MeV electrons irradiation are not large, and the radiation damage for protons below 9 MeV is always less than that of 60Co gamma rays. The lower energy the proton has, the less serious the radiation damage becomes.

  9. Progress towards an alanine/ESR therapy level reference dosimetry service at NPL.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, P H; Rajendran, K; Sephton, J P

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes work being carried out at the National Physical Laboratory towards the establishment of an alanine reference dosimetry service for radiotherapy applications. A precision fused quartz holder has been constructed to allow precise positioning of alanine dosimeters in the ESR cavity. A novel method of signal analysis based on spectrum fitting has been developed to minimize the effect of baseline distortions. Data are also presented on the relative response of alanine to 60Co gamma rays and high energy photons (4-12 MeV).

  10. Hanford External Dosimetry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, J.J.

    1990-10-01

    This document describes the Hanford External Dosimetry Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include administrating the Hanford personnel dosimeter processing program and ensuring that the related dosimeter data accurately reflect occupational dose received by Hanford personnel or visitors. Specific chapters of this report deal with the following subjects: personnel dosimetry organizations at Hanford and the associated DOE and contractor exposure guidelines; types, characteristics, and procurement of personnel dosimeters used at Hanford; personnel dosimeter identification, acceptance testing, accountability, and exchange; dosimeter processing and data recording practices; standard sources, calibration factors, and calibration processes (including algorithms) used for calibrating Hanford personnel dosimeters; system operating parameters required for assurance of dosimeter processing quality control; special dose evaluation methods applied for individuals under abnormal circumstances (i.e., lost results, etc.); and methods for evaluating personnel doses from nuclear accidents. 1 ref., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Prostate PDT dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Finlay, Jarod C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We provide a review of the current state of dosimetry in prostate photodynamic therapy (PDT). PDT of the human prostate has been performed with a number of different photosensitizers and with a variety of dosimetry schemes. The simplest clinical light dose prescription is to quantify the total light energy emitted per length (J/cm) of cylindrical diffusing fibers (CDF) for patients treated with a defined photosensitizer injection per body weight. However, this approach does not take into account the light scattering by tissue and usually underestimates the local light fluence rate, and consequently the fluence. Techniques have been developed to characterize tissue optical properties and light fluence rates in vivo using interstitial measurements during prostate PDT. Optical methods have been developed to characterize tissue absorption and scattering spectra, which in turn provide information about tissue oxygenation and drug concentration. Fluorescence techniques can be used to quantify drug concentrations and photobleaching rates of photosensitizers. PMID:25046988

  12. Neutron beam measurement dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro, C.R.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes animal dosimetry studies and phantom measurements. During 1994, 12 dogs were irradiated at BMRR as part of a 4 fraction dose tolerance study. The animals were first infused with BSH and irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days. BNL irradiated 2 beagles as part of their dose tolerance study using BPA fructose. In addition, a dog at WSU was irradiated at BMRR after an infusion of BPA fructose. During 1994, the INEL BNCT dosimetry team measured neutron flux and gamma dose profiles in two phantoms exposed to the epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR. These measurements were performed as a preparatory step to the commencement of human clinical trials in progress at the BMRR.

  13. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K1 of the air-kerma standards of the SCK.CEN, Belgium and the BIPM in 60Co gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Burns, D.; Mihailescu, L. C.; Chiriotti, S.

    2017-01-01

    A first key comparison of the standards for air kerma of the Laboratory for Nuclear Calibrations (LNK) from the Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie—Centre d'Etude de l'Energie Nucleaire (SCK.CEN), Belgium and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out in the 60Co radiation beam of the BIPM in September 2016. The comparison result, evaluated as a ratio of the SCK.CEN and the BIPM standards for air kerma, is 1.0021 with a combined standard uncertainty of 2.6 × 10-3. The results for an indirect comparison made at the same time are consistent with the direct results at the level of 7 parts in 104. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence, suitable for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  14. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K4 of the absorbed dose to water standards of the PTB, Germany and the BIPM in 60Co gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Burns, D. T.; Kapsch, R.-P.; Krauss, A.

    2016-01-01

    An indirect comparison has been made of the standards for absorbed dose to water in 60Co radiation of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, (PTB), Germany and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM). The measurements at the BIPM were carried out in October 2015. The comparison result, based on the calibration coefficients for two transfer standards and evaluated as a ratio of the PTB and the BIPM standards for absorbed dose to water, is 0.9977 with a combined standard uncertainty of 3.8 × 10-3. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  15. KEY COMPARISON: Comparison of the standards for absorbed dose to water of the VSL and the BIPM for 60Co γ-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Allisy-Roberts, P. J.; Burns, D. T.; Roger, P.; de Prez, L. A.; de Pooter, J. A.; Damen, P. M. G.

    2009-01-01

    An indirect comparison of the standards for the quantity absorbed dose to water was carried out between the Van Swinden Laboratorium (VSL) and the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) in September 2005. The comparison was based on the calibration coefficients determined for three NE2611A type ionization chambers under reference conditions in the 60Co beams of both institutes. The comparison result, reported as a ratio of the VSL and the BIPM evaluations, is 0.9926 with a relative standard uncertainty of 4.9 × 10-3. This result replaces the previous indirect comparison result obtained in 2000 for the ongoing BIPM.RI(I)-K4 comparison. The degrees of equivalence for the VSL standard and the nine other national metrology institutes in this comparison are presented in the form of a matrix, together with those of a linked regional comparison. The opportunity was also taken to undertake a pilot study using the VSL water calorimeter at the BIPM. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI Section I, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  16. Cosmic Ray Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si Belkhir, F.; Attallah, R.

    2010-10-01

    Radiation levels at aircraft cruising altitudes are twenty times higher than at sea level. Thus, on average, a typical airline pilot receives a larger annual radiation dose than some one working in nuclear industry. The main source of this radiation is from galactic cosmic radiation, high energy particles generated by exploding stars within our own galaxy. In this work we study cosmic rays dosimetry at various aviation altitudes using the PARMA model.

  17. Thorium metabolism and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.R.; Hill, R.L.; Birchall, A.; Jarvis, N.S.

    1994-07-01

    Thorium occurs widely in nature, and has been used in medicine, industry, and advanced nuclear fuel cycles. Despite many studies, there still remains uncertainty in the dosimetry of Th, particularly that associated with the Th-232 decay chain. This presentation reviews past and current uses of thorium, and describes the residual difficulties involved with monitoring methods and calculations used in both environmental and occupational exposure evaluations.

  18. Dosimetry in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Asha, M L; Chatterjee, Ingita; Patil, Preeti; Naveen, S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review various dosimeters used in dentistry and the cumulative results of various studies done with various dosimeters. Several relevant PubMed indexed articles from 1999 to 2013 were electronically searched by typing "dosimeters", "dosimeters in dentistry", "properties of dosimeters", "thermoluminescent and optically stimulated dosimeters", "recent advancements in dosimetry in dentistry." The searches were limited to articles in English to prepare a concise review on dental dosimetry. Titles and abstracts were screened, and articles that fulfilled the criteria of use of dosimeters in dental applications were selected for a full-text reading. Article was divided into four groups: (1) Biological effects of radiation, (2) properties of dosimeters, (3) types of dosimeters and (4) results of various studies using different dosimeters. The present review on dosimetry based on various studies done with dosimeters revealed that, with the advent of radiographic technique the effective dose delivered is low. Therefore, selection of radiological technique plays an important role in dental dose delivery.

  19. Fast neutron dosimetry. Progress report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Attix, F.H.

    1980-01-01

    Progress is reported in: the development and testing of new gas mixtures more suitable for fast neutron dosimetry using the common A150-type Tissue-equivalent plastic ion chambers; comparison of photon doses determined with a graphite-walled proportional counter and with paired dosimeters irradiated by 14.8-MeV neutrons; a detector for the direct measurement of LET distributions from irradiation with fast neutrons; LET distributions from fast neutron irradiation of TE-plastic and graphite measured in a cylindrically symmetric geometry; progress in development of a tandem fast neutron and /sup 60/Co gamma ray source irradiation facility; an approach to the correlation of cellular response with lineal energy; calculated and measured HTO atmospheric dispersion rates within meters of a release site; application of cavity theory to fast neutrons; and fast neutron dosimetry by thermally stimulated currents in Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. (GHT)

  20. Reference dosimetry of proton pencil beams based on dose-area product: a proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Gomà, Carles; Safai, Sairos; Vörös, Sándor

    2017-06-21

    This paper describes a novel approach to the reference dosimetry of proton pencil beams based on dose-area product ([Formula: see text]). It depicts the calibration of a large-diameter plane-parallel ionization chamber in terms of dose-area product in a (60)Co beam, the Monte Carlo calculation of beam quality correction factors-in terms of dose-area product-in proton beams, the Monte Carlo calculation of nuclear halo correction factors, and the experimental determination of [Formula: see text] of a single proton pencil beam. This new approach to reference dosimetry proves to be feasible, as it yields [Formula: see text] values in agreement with the standard and well-established approach of determining the absorbed dose to water at the centre of a broad homogeneous field generated by the superposition of regularly-spaced proton pencil beams.

  1. Reference dosimetry of proton pencil beams based on dose-area product: a proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomà, Carles; Safai, Sairos; Vörös, Sándor

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to the reference dosimetry of proton pencil beams based on dose-area product (DAPw ). It depicts the calibration of a large-diameter plane-parallel ionization chamber in terms of dose-area product in a 60Co beam, the Monte Carlo calculation of beam quality correction factors—in terms of dose-area product—in proton beams, the Monte Carlo calculation of nuclear halo correction factors, and the experimental determination of DAPw of a single proton pencil beam. This new approach to reference dosimetry proves to be feasible, as it yields DAPw values in agreement with the standard and well-established approach of determining the absorbed dose to water at the centre of a broad homogeneous field generated by the superposition of regularly-spaced proton pencil beams.

  2. Dosimetry cross-section evaluation by cubic B-spline fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, S.

    1994-12-31

    Five threshold dosimetry cross-sections have been re-evaluated on the basis of experimental data for update of JENDL DOSIMETRY FILE: {sup 23}Na(n,2n){sup 22}Na, {sup 54}Mn(n,2n){sup 54}Mn, {sup 59}Co(n,2n){sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Ni(n,p){sup 60}Co, and {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92m}Nb. The experimental data selection from the data base was made with the aide of a pattern clustering method. The selected data were fitted by a set of cubic B-spline functions using the least-squares method. The covariance data were simultaneously produced.

  3. Determination of 137Cs and 60Co pollution in the area of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Salas Mar, Bernardo

    2015-11-01

    The project 'Radiological Analysis of Environmental Samples in the Gulf of Mexico and the coast of Quintana Roo', had the aim of identifying and quantifying anthropogenic radionuclides in environmental samples consisting of silt, sand and sea water. This paper presents the results of the radiological analysis of these samples, which was made in the multichannel system for gamma spectrometry with hyperpure germanium detector in the Laboratory of Radiological Analysis of Environmental Samples, located at the Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, of the Autonomous National University of Mexico (UNAM). The sampled points are along the coast of the contiguous states of Tamaulipas, Veracruz, Tabasco, Campeche, Yucatan and Quintana Roo. This paper presents the qualitative and quantitative concentrations of the main identified anthropogenic radionuclides (60)Co and (137)Cs.

  4. Time resolution of a 1-inch cylindrical CeBr{sub 3} crystal at {sup 60}Co energies

    SciTech Connect

    Vedia, V.; Fraile, L. M.; Olaizola, B.; Paziy, V.; Picado, E.; Udias, J. M.; Mach, H.

    2013-06-10

    We have measured time resolutions of a cylindrical CeBr{sub 3} scintillator of 1-inch in height and 1-inch in diameter coupled to two different fast photomultiplier tubes, Hamamatsu R9779 and Photonis XP20D0, as a function of applied high voltages and different settings of a Constant Fraction Discriminator ORTEC 935. The time resolution was measured using a time-delayed coincidence set-up involving a fast reference detector. The best result of 119(2) ps at {sup 60}Co energies was obtained for the CeBr{sub 3} crystal coupled to the Hamamatsu PMT. This result is comparable to the resolution of 107 ps reported for a LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) crystal of the same size. For the coupling of the CeBr{sub 3} scintillator to the Photonis PMT we got the time resolution of 146(2) ps.

  5. Determination of late-time Gamma-Ray (60Co) sensitivity of single diffusion Lot 2N2222A transistors.

    SciTech Connect

    DePriest, Kendall Russell; Kajder, Karen C.; Peters, Curtis D.

    2008-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has embarked on a program to develop a methodology to use damage relations techniques (alternative experimental facilities, modeling, and simulation) to understand the time-dependent effects in transistors (and integrated circuits) caused by neutron irradiations in the Sandia Pulse Reactor-III (SPR-III) facility. The development of these damage equivalence techniques is necessary since SPR-III was shutdown in late 2006. As part of this effort, the late time {gamma}-ray sensitivity of a single diffusion lot of 2N2222A transistors has been characterized using one of the {sup 60}Co irradiation cells at the SNL Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF). This report summarizes the results of the experiments performed at the GIF.

  6. Effect of 60Co-irradiation on the development and immunogenicity of Plasmodium berghei sporozoites in Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes

    SciTech Connect

    Smrkovski, L.L.; McConnell, E.; Tubergen, T.A.

    1983-10-01

    Protection conferred to mice by Plasmodium berghei sporozoites increased significantly when the time interval between 60Co-irradiation of the infected mosquitoes and harvest of sporozoites increased. One thousand sporozoites conferred no protection against challenge if harvested on the day of irradiation, but protected 60% of recipient mice when harvested 28 days postirradiation. When the time between feeding of mosquitoes and irradiation was varied, sporozoites from mosquitoes irradiated 3 days after feeding were infective for mice. Sporozoites from mosquitoes irradiated on day 10 postfeeding were not infective, but were immunogenic. In all experiments a decline occurred in the number of recoverable sporozoites over a 28-day period postirradiation to less than 10% of the yield on the day of irradiation.

  7. Effect of prenatal ionizing radiation on the visual cortex and hippocampus of newborn squirrel monkeys. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Brizzee, K.R.; Ordy, J.M.; Kaack, M.B.; Beavers, T.

    1980-09-01

    Five squirrel monkeys were exposed to 200 rads whole-body ionizing irradiation (/sup 60/Co) at 0.4 rads per second on approximately the seventy-fifth day of gestation, and six squirrel monkeys were sham-irradiated. The mean cortical depth and the mean number of neurons per mm/sup 3/ in the visual cortex was less in irradiated animals than in controls, but the differences were not statistically significant. The mean number of glial cells in this cortical region was significantly lower in the irradiated animals. In the hippocampus, the depth of the stratum oriens and the combined depth of the strata radiatum, lacunosum, and moleculare were significantly less in irradiated than in control animals. Canonical correlations provided statistical evidence for greater radiation vulnerability of the hippocampus compared to motor and visual areas of the cerebral cortex.

  8. Power saturation of ESR signal in ammonium tartrate exposed to 60Co gamma-ray photons, electrons and protons.

    PubMed

    Marrale, Maurizio; Brai, Maria; Triolo, Alessandro; Bartolotta, Antonio; D'Oca, Maria Cristina

    2006-11-01

    In this paper we present an investigation of the electron spin resonance (ESR) line shape of ammonium tartrate (AT) dosimeters exposed to radiation with different linear energy transfer (LET). We exposed our dosimeters to gamma-ray photons ((60)Co), 7 MeV and 14 MeV initial energy electrons, and 19.3 MeV initial energy protons. The differences in the power saturation behavior of ESR spectra of AT irradiated with photons, electrons and protons could be correlated to the effective LET of the radiation beams. We analyzed the behavior of peak-to-peak amplitude as a function of microwave power, and we developed a fitting procedure that permits us to obtain the dependence of the homogeneity parameter of the line shape on the LET of the radiation using the Castner saturation theory. This simple procedure allows us to distinguish the LET of the radiation beam.

  9. Technical Note: Comparison of peripheral patient dose from MR-guided (60) Co therapy and 6 MV linear accelerator IGRT.

    PubMed

    Hauri, Pascal; Hälg, Roger A; Schneider, Uwe

    2017-07-01

    The use of X-ray imaging in radiation therapy can give a substantial dose to the patient. A Cobalt machine combined with an magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was recently introduced to clinical work. One positive aspect of using non-ionizing imaging devices is the reduction of the patient exposure. The purpose of this study was to quantify the difference in out-of-field dose to the patient between the image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) treatment applied with a linear accelerator with cone beam CT (CBCT) equipment and a Cobalt machine combined with an MRI. The treatment of a rhabdomyosarcoma in the prostate was planned and irradiated using different modalities and radiation therapy machines. The whole-body dose was measured for a 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and a volumetric-modulated arc therapy plan applied with a conventional linear accelerator operated at 6 MV beam energy. Additionally, the dose of an IMRT plan applied with a (60) Co machine combined with an MRI was measured. Furthermore, the dose of one CBCT scan using the linear accelerator's on-board imaging system was determined. The 3D dose measurements were performed in an anthropomorphic phantom containing 168 slots for thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs). A combination of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD100) and LiF:Mg,Cu,P (TLD100H) was used to accurately determine the in- and out-of-field dose. The plans were rescaled to different fractionation schemes (2 Gy, 3 Gy, and 5 Gy fraction dose) and the dose of one CBCT scan was additionally added to the treatment dose per fraction applied with the linear accelerator. The resulting absorbed doses per fraction of the two machines were compared. In the target region, all measured treatment plans presented the same magnitude of dose, while the CBCT dose was a factor of 100 smaller. Close to the planned target volume (PTV), the dose from the (60) Co machine was a factor of two higher compared with the 3DCRT + CBCT dose

  10. Effect of temperature on resistance of LEDs based on AlGaAs heterostructures to 60Co gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradoboev, A. V.; Rubanov, P. V.; Sednev, V. V.

    2017-05-01

    The paper presents the results obtained in the study of the change in the parameters of IR LEDs based on AlGaAs double heterostructures under 60Co gamma irradiation with regard to irradiation temperature. The study indicated several consecutive stages of LED emissive power lowering under ionizing radiation. Increased temperature during gamma irradiation enhances radiation resistance at the first stage due to radiation-stimulated defect annealing, which reduces relative contribution of the first stage to the overall emissive power lowering. It was found that in exposure at temperature more than 380 K, the first stage of LED emissive power lowering is completely eliminated. At the second stage, increase in resistance is caused by the decreased relative contribution of the less stable first stage to the overall emissive power lowering. The maximum resistance of LEDs to gamma radiation depends on radiation resistance of metal-semiconductor contacts.

  11. High dose rate /sup 60/Co remote afterloading irradiation in cancer of the cervix in Haiti, 1977-1984

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, O.E. Jr.; Goldson, A.L.; Chevallier, C.; Nibhanupudy, J.R.

    1988-06-01

    From 1977 through 1984, 293 previously untreated patients with biopsy proven carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated by whole pelvis irradiation and high intensity 60Co remote afterloading (RAL) intrauterine tandem techniques in Haiti. The treatment results were analyzed retrospectively to evaluate the therapeutic results and prognostic factors of a strict protocol involving 40 Gy to the whole pelvis (2 Gy/day, 5 days/week). In addition, on the 5th day of the 3rd week, the first outpatient 60Co remote afterloading intracavitary insertion, delivering 7.5 Gy to point A with each insertion, repeated 3 times by a week separation for a total of 4 times. The total TDF for external beam plus RAL was 158 and 175 for early and late effects respectively. One hundred-four patients were evaluable after 1 year or more follow-up, with a median of 26.5 months. No evidence of disease (NED) by Stage at 1 year was: Stage I of 100% (3/3), Stage II of 82% (9/11), Stage III of 80% (47/59), and Stage IV of 58% (18/31). The post-therapeutic complication rate was 7.7%, with no fistulas or requirement of surgical intervention. Those with documented follow-up of at least 2 years (74 patients) had comparable survival to other high dose rate and low dose rate studies. This study shows that outpatient brachytherapy can be carried out without sophisticated and expensive equipment with minimal staff trained in radiation therapy. A detailed description of this outpatient RAL technique and results are described so that this method can be adapted to other developing and industrialized nations where cost containment is becoming a key issue.

  12. An investigation on the radiation sensitivity of DNA conformations to 60Co gamma rays by using Geant4 toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semsarha, F.; Goliaei, B.; Raisali, G.; Khalafi, H.; Mirzakhanian, L.

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the impact of conformational properties of genetic material of living cells on radiation-induced DNA damage, single strand breaks (SSB), double strand breaks (DSB) and some microdosimetric quantities of A, B and Z-DNA conformations caused by 60Co gamma rays, have been calculated. Based on a previous B-DNA geometrical model, models of A and Z forms have been developed. Simple 34 base pairs segments of each model repeated in high number and secondary electron spectrum of 60Co gamma rays have been simulated in a volume of a typical animal cell nucleus. All simulations in this study have been performed by using the Geant4 (GEometry ANd Tracking 4)-DNA extension of the Geant4 toolkit. The results showed that, B-DNA has the lowest yield of simple strand breaks with 2.23 × 10-10 Gy-1 Da-1 and 1.0 × 10-11 Gy-1 Da-1 for the SSB and DSB damage yield, respectively. The A-DNA has the highest SSB yield with 3.59 × 10-10 Gy-1 Da-1 and the Z-DNA has the highest DSB yields with 1.8 × 10-11 Gy-1 Da-1. It has been concluded that there is a direct correlation between the hit probability, mean specific imparted energy and SSB yield in each model of DNA. Moreover, there is a direct correlation between the DSB yield and both the mean lineal energy and topological characteristics of each model.

  13. Relative biologic effectiveness in terms of tumor response of {sup 125}I implants compared with {sup 60}Co gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, Shirley . E-mail: shirley.lehnert@mcgill.ca; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To measure the relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) for {sup 125}I seeds compared with external beam radiotherapy using a clinically relevant in vivo system. Methods and Materials: Photon emission from a detailed source model was simulated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP4C, sampling from a {sup 125}I spectrum. The mouse RIF-1 tumor was treated with either temporary implant of an {sup 125}I seed or with {sup 60}Co gamma rays. The tumors were always the same size at the initiation of treatment, and the endpoint was growth inhibition. Results: The dose-response curve for both modalities was close to linear and was independent of the initial {sup 125}I activity (dose rate) for the range investigated. Calculation of the RBE for tumor response requires assigning a unique value for the tumor dose that is not homogenous but depends on the distance from the {sup 125}I source. Because tumor regrowth will depend on the subpopulation of cells that have the greatest probability of survival (i.e., those at the greatest distance from the {sup 125}I source), one approach is to use the dose to this population. On this basis, the RBE for {sup 125}I compared with {sup 60}Co gamma rays is 1.5. If the {sup 125}I dose is computed as the average dose to the tumor, corrected for the dose that is wasted as overkill in the cell population closest to the center of the {sup 125}I seed, the RBE is 1.4. Conclusion: The result, an RBE of 1.4-1.5 is similar to findings obtained by other methods, supporting the validity of this approach to derive an RBE with validity in a clinical context.

  14. Morphological and histological studies on freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (de man) irradiated with (60)Co gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Stalin, A; Broos, K V; Sadiq Bukhari, A; Syed Mohamed, H E; Singhal, R K; Venu-Babu, P

    2013-11-15

    This study was framed to investigate the (60)Co gamma radiation induced morphological and histological variations in freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The LD50 value of (60)Co gamma irradiated M. rosenbergii observed (by probit analysis) at 30 Gy. Prawns were irradiated to four different dose levels (3 mGy, 30 mGy, 300 mGy and 3,000 mGy) using Theratron Phoenix TeleCobalt Unit [P-33] and one control group (without irradiation) maintained separately. Irradiated groups exhibited several morphological variations such as discoloration; damaged rostrum; opaque coloration in cephalothorax; black bands and dot formation in abdomen; deformed uropods and telson in tail regions when compared with control group. The Hepato Somatic Index reflected the severity of radiation on hepatopancreas. Histological variations in gills, hepatopancreas and muscles of irradiated groups were observed. In gills, structural changes such as swollen and fused lamellae, abnormal gill tips, hyperplasic, necrotic and clavate-globate lamellae were observed in gamma irradiated prawns. Accumulation of hemocytes in hemocoelic space, interstitial sinuses filled with abnormal infiltrated hemocytes, the tubular epithelium with ruptured basal laminae, abnormal and coagulated lumen, necrotic tubules, thickened basal laminae, tissue debris, necrotic hepatocytes were observed in irradiated prawn hepatopancreas. In muscle, shrinkage of muscular fiber and necrotic musculature were observed in irradiated prawns. These structural alterations of the organs it is felt could affect the vital physiological functions such as respiration, osmotic and ionic regulation in gills and muscles; absorption, storage and secretion of the hepatopancreas which in turn could adversely affect the growth and survival of freshwater prawn M. rosenbergii. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Absorbed dose measurement of photon beam with Farmer-type ionization chambers in Japanese dosimetry protocols].

    PubMed

    Fujisaki, Tatsuya; Hiraoka, Takeshi; Osawa, Atsushi; Nakajima, Masaru; Kuwabara, Akio; Yokoyama, Koichi; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Tomaru, Teizo; Inada, Tetsuo

    2004-01-01

    The Japan Society of Medical Physics (JSMP) has published a new dosimetry protocol "JSMP-01" (standard dosimetry of absorbed dose in external beam radiotherapy) which conforms to the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA TRS-398) and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM TG-51) protocols for the calibration of radiotherapy beams. Since the new protocol offers the physical data for the Famer-type ionization chambers of the various wall materials, the user can measure the absorbed dose at reference point (D(r)) using most of the commercially available Famer-type ionization chambers. In this paper, the six Famer-type ionization chambers of the various wall materials are examined for photon beam by two ways. To verify the JSMP-01 protocol as the first way, D(r) was cross-measured based on the JSMP-01 protocol using a Farmer-type ionization chamber of the acrylic wall material which is called "JARP-chamber" and the Farmer-type ionization chambers of the various wall materials, and compared. To compare the basic data in previous and new protocols as the second way, D(r) was measured based on the previous protocol (JSMP-86) and the JSMP-01 protocol using the Farmer-type ionization chambers of the various wall materials. Dose calculation was made using common exposure calibration factor for (60)Co gamma-rays (Nc) for each of the Farmer-type ionization chambers. Measurement was made with each ionization chamber for 6 and 10 MV photon beams in two facilities. D(r) were found to agree to that of JARP-chamber within about +/- 1% despite significant differences of ratio of calibration factor (k(D,X)) and beam quality conversion factor (k(Q)) for photon beams. The ratios JSMP-01/JSMP-86 of the reference dose were found to lie on between 0.999 and 1.004 for 6 MV and on between 0.999 and 1.005 for 10 MV depending upon the Farmer-type ionization chambers used. The largest discrepancies between the previous and new protocols arise from

  16. Thermoluminescence characteristics of Nd-doped SiO2 optical fibers irradiated with the (60)Co gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Refaei, Azadeh; Wagiran, Husin; Saeed, M A; Hosssain, I

    2014-12-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) properties (radiation sensitivity, dose response, signal fading) of Nd-doped SiO2 optical fibers irradiated with 1.25MeV photons to 1-50Gy were studied. The peak of the glow curve is around 190°C regardless of the dose. The dose response is linear up to 50Gy. The radiation sensitivity is 219nCmg(-1)Gy(-1). The fiber can be a potential candidate for photon radiotherapy dosimetry due to its high radiation sensitivity, linear dose response in a wide range, slow fading, and high spatial resolution due to the small size of the fiber.

  17. Comparison of life-stage-dependent internal dosimetry for bisphenol A, ethinyl estradiol, a reference estrogen, and endogenous estradiol to test an estrogenic mode of action in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Churchwell, Mona I; Camacho, Luísa; Vanlandingham, Michelle M; Twaddle, Nathan C; Sepehr, Estatira; Delclos, K Barry; Fisher, Jeffrey W; Doerge, Daniel R

    2014-05-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) was administered by gavage (2.5-300,000 μg/kg body weight (bw)/day) to pregnant Sprague Dawley dams, newborn pups, and continuing into adulthood. Aglycone (i.e., unconjugated and active) and conjugated (i.e., inactive) BPA were evaluated by liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ES/MS/MS) in serum to better interpret toxicological endpoints measured in the study. Ethinyl estradiol (EE2, 0.5 and 5 μg/kg bw/day) and the endogenous hormones, 17β-estradiol (E2) and testosterone, were similarly evaluated. Mean BPA aglycone levels in vehicle and naïve control rat serum (0.02-0.5 ng/ml) indicated sample processing artifact, consistent with literature reports of a propensity for postexposure blood contamination by BPA. Direct measurements of BPA-glucuronide in vehicle and naïve control serum (2-10nM) indicated unintentional exposure and metabolism at levels similar to those produced by 2.5 μg/kg bw/day BPA (7-10nM), despite careful attention to potential BPA inputs (diet, drinking water, vehicle, cages, bedding, and dust) and rigorous dosing solution certification and delivery. The source of this exposure could not be identified, but interpretation of the toxicological effects, observed only at the highest BPA doses, was not compromised. Internal exposures to BPA and EE2 aglycones were highest in young rats. When maximal serum concentrations from the two highest BPA doses and both EE2 doses were compared with concurrent levels of endogenous E2, the ERα binding equivalents were similar to or above those of endogenous E2 in male and female rats of all ages tested. Such evaluations of estrogenic internal dosimetry and comprehensive evaluation of contamination impact should aid in extrapolating risks from human BPA exposures.

  18. Comparison of Life-Stage-Dependent Internal Dosimetry for Bisphenol A, Ethinyl Estradiol, a Reference Estrogen, and Endogenous Estradiol to Test an Estrogenic Mode of Action in Sprague Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Churchwell, Mona I.; Camacho, Luísa; Vanlandingham, Michelle M.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Sepehr, Estatira; Delclos, K. Barry; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) was administered by gavage (2.5–300,000 μg/kg body weight (bw)/day) to pregnant Sprague Dawley dams, newborn pups, and continuing into adulthood. Aglycone (i.e., unconjugated and active) and conjugated (i.e., inactive) BPA were evaluated by liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ES/MS/MS) in serum to better interpret toxicological endpoints measured in the study. Ethinyl estradiol (EE2, 0.5 and 5 μg/kg bw/day) and the endogenous hormones, 17β-estradiol (E2) and testosterone, were similarly evaluated. Mean BPA aglycone levels in vehicle and naïve control rat serum (0.02–0.5 ng/ml) indicated sample processing artifact, consistent with literature reports of a propensity for postexposure blood contamination by BPA. Direct measurements of BPA-glucuronide in vehicle and naïve control serum (2–10nM) indicated unintentional exposure and metabolism at levels similar to those produced by 2.5 μg/kg bw/day BPA (7–10nM), despite careful attention to potential BPA inputs (diet, drinking water, vehicle, cages, bedding, and dust) and rigorous dosing solution certification and delivery. The source of this exposure could not be identified, but interpretation of the toxicological effects, observed only at the highest BPA doses, was not compromised. Internal exposures to BPA and EE2 aglycones were highest in young rats. When maximal serum concentrations from the two highest BPA doses and both EE2 doses were compared with concurrent levels of endogenous E2, the ERα binding equivalents were similar to or above those of endogenous E2 in male and female rats of all ages tested. Such evaluations of estrogenic internal dosimetry and comprehensive evaluation of contamination impact should aid in extrapolating risks from human BPA exposures. PMID:24496641

  19. A survey of physical dosimetry to date and in the near future: Part 1. Review of standards and regulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Cassata, James R

    2002-02-01

    This article summarizes the status of the relevant standards and current regulatory issues for use of physical dosimetry devices for the occupational worker in the United States. Included is a summary of relevant standards from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission NUREG-Series, the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP), the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP), and the U.S. Military Specifications and Standards (MIL-STD). Proposed changes to ANSI N13.11-1993, "American National Standard for Dosimetry-Personnel Dosimetry Performance Criteria for Testing," are listed. The strategic changes that the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is making in rulemaking activities related to dosimetry and standards are given. The status of Measurement Program Description (MPD) C.18, "Implementation of Electronic Dosimetry for Primary Dosimetry," from the Council on Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards (CIRMS) is given.

  20. Nonuniform irradiation of the canine intestine. II. Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, G.H.; Mohaupt, T.H.; Taylor, P.L.; MacVittie, T.J.; Dubois, A.; Vigneulle, R.M. )

    1990-01-01

    An experimental model has been developed for quantitative studies of radiobiological damage to the canine small intestine following partial-body nonuniform irradiation. Animals were irradiated with 60Co gamma rays to simulate the nonuniform irradiation which do occur in victims of radiation accidents. The model used a short source-to-surface distance for unilateral irradiations to produce a dose gradient of a factor of two laterally across the canine intestinal region. The remainder of the animal's body was shielded to prevent lethal damage to the bone marrow. In situ dosimetry measurements were made using thermoluminescent dosimeters to determine the radiation dose delivered as a function of position along a segment of the small intestine. This system made it possible to correlate the radiation dose delivered at a specific point along the small intestine with the macroscopic and microscopic appearance of the intestinal mucosa at that point, as determined by direct observation and biopsy using a fiberoptic endoscope. A key feature of this model is that dosimetry data for multiple sites, which receive a graded range of radiation doses, can be correlated with biological measurements to obtain a dose-response curve. This model is being used to evaluate the efficacy of new therapeutic procedures to improve survival following nonuniform irradiation.

  1. Energy response improvement for photon dosimetry using pulse analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, Dizaji H.

    2016-02-01

    During the last few years, active personal dosimeters have been developed and have replaced passive personal dosimeters in some external monitoring systems, frequently using silicon diode detectors. Incident photons interact with the constituents of the diode detector and produce electrons. These photon-induced electrons deposit energy in the detector's sensitive region and contribute to the response of diode detectors. To achieve an appropriate photon dosimetry response, the detectors are usually covered by a metallic layer with an optimum thickness. The metallic cover acts as an energy compensating shield. In this paper, a software process is performed for energy compensation. Selective data sampling based on pulse height is used to determine the photon dose equivalent. This method is applied to improve the energy response in photon dosimetry. The detector design is optimized for the response function and determination of the photon dose equivalent. Photon personal dose equivalent is determined in the energy range of 0.3-6 MeV. The error values of the calculated data for this wide energy range and measured data for 133Ba, 137Cs, 60Co and 241Am-Be sources respectively are up to 20% and 15%. Fairly good agreement is seen between simulation and dose values obtained from our process and specifications from several photon sources.

  2. Physical dosimetry of chernobyl cleanup workers.

    PubMed

    Chumak, Vadim V

    2007-11-01

    This paper presents a critical review of dosimetric monitoring practices during Chernobyl cleanup from 1986 to 1990. Dosimetric monitoring is considered in time evolution with respect to legislative background (including dose limits), methods of dose assessment, and coverage of workers with radiation monitoring programs as well as availability of data on individual doses of liquidators. Four large independent dosimetry services (Administration of Construction No. 605, Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, Production Association "Combinat," and the troops) had operated in Chernobyl covering different cohorts of cleanup workers with dosimetric monitoring of variable quality and comprehension. Extremes in this range were presented by the highly professional dosimetry service of the Administration of Construction No. 605 (USSR Ministry of Medium Machinery), which had provided total coverage of workers with high quality individual thermoluminescent dosimeter monitoring, and military (troops of the USSR Ministry of Defense) who had received the least precise group dosimetry, which, however, had covered the whole population of military cleanup workers. The main groups of liquidators are considered from the point of view of completeness and quality of their dosimetric data. Main gaps in dosimetric data and limitations of existing dose records are identified. The issues of evolution of dose limits and problems of monitoring internal and beta exposure are considered from the point of view of significance of these components and the need for missing information.

  3. Reconstructive dosimetry for cutaneous radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lima, C M A; Lima, A R; Degenhardt, Ä L; Valverde, N J; Da Silva, F C A

    2015-05-08

    According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a relatively significant number of radiological accidents have occurred in recent years mainly because of the practices referred to as potentially high-risk activities, such as radiotherapy, large irradiators and industrial radiography, especially in gammagraphy assays. In some instances, severe injuries have occurred in exposed persons due to high radiation doses. In industrial radiography, 80 cases involving a total of 120 radiation workers, 110 members of the public including 12 deaths have been recorded up to 2014. Radiological accidents in industrial practices in Brazil have mainly resulted in development of cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) in hands and fingers. Brazilian data include 5 serious cases related to industrial gammagraphy, affecting 7 radiation workers and 19 members of the public; however, none of them were fatal. Some methods of reconstructive dosimetry have been used to estimate the radiation dose to assist in prescribing medical treatment. The type and development of cutaneous manifestations in the exposed areas of a person is the first achievable gross dose estimation. This review article presents the state-of-the-art reconstructive dosimetry methods enabling estimation of local radiation doses and provides guidelines for medical handling of the exposed individuals. The review also presents the Chilean and Brazilian radiological accident cases to highlight the importance of reconstructive dosimetry.

  4. Reconstructive dosimetry for cutaneous radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lima, C M A; Lima, A R; Degenhardt, Ä L; Valverde, N J; Silva, F C A da

    2015-10-01

    According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a relatively significant number of radiological accidents have occurred in recent years mainly because of the practices referred to as potentially high-risk activities, such as radiotherapy, large irradiators and industrial radiography, especially in gammagraphy assays. In some instances, severe injuries have occurred in exposed persons due to high radiation doses. In industrial radiography, 80 cases involving a total of 120 radiation workers, 110 members of the public including 12 deaths have been recorded up to 2014. Radiological accidents in industrial practices in Brazil have mainly resulted in development of cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) in hands and fingers. Brazilian data include 5 serious cases related to industrial gammagraphy, affecting 7 radiation workers and 19 members of the public; however, none of them were fatal. Some methods of reconstructive dosimetry have been used to estimate the radiation dose to assist in prescribing medical treatment. The type and development of cutaneous manifestations in the exposed areas of a person is the first achievable gross dose estimation. This review article presents the state-of-the-art reconstructive dosimetry methods enabling estimation of local radiation doses and provides guidelines for medical handling of the exposed individuals. The review also presents the Chilean and Brazilian radiological accident cases to highlight the importance of reconstructive dosimetry.

  5. Reconstructive dosimetry for cutaneous radiation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lima, C.M.A.; Lima, A.R.; Degenhardt, Ä.L.; Valverde, N.J.; Da Silva, F.C.A.

    2015-01-01

    According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a relatively significant number of radiological accidents have occurred in recent years mainly because of the practices referred to as potentially high-risk activities, such as radiotherapy, large irradiators and industrial radiography, especially in gammagraphy assays. In some instances, severe injuries have occurred in exposed persons due to high radiation doses. In industrial radiography, 80 cases involving a total of 120 radiation workers, 110 members of the public including 12 deaths have been recorded up to 2014. Radiological accidents in industrial practices in Brazil have mainly resulted in development of cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) in hands and fingers. Brazilian data include 5 serious cases related to industrial gammagraphy, affecting 7 radiation workers and 19 members of the public; however, none of them were fatal. Some methods of reconstructive dosimetry have been used to estimate the radiation dose to assist in prescribing medical treatment. The type and development of cutaneous manifestations in the exposed areas of a person is the first achievable gross dose estimation. This review article presents the state-of-the-art reconstructive dosimetry methods enabling estimation of local radiation doses and provides guidelines for medical handling of the exposed individuals. The review also presents the Chilean and Brazilian radiological accident cases to highlight the importance of reconstructive dosimetry. PMID:26445332

  6. Dosimetry in 131I-mIBG therapy: moving toward personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, C; Castellani, R; Mira, M; Lorenzoni, A; Flux, G D

    2013-06-01

    Internal dosimetry was developed as a basis for 131I-mIBG treatment at an early stage and has continued to develop for over the last 20 years. Whole-body dosimetry was introduced to prevent hematological toxicity. It will be the basis for a forthcoming European multicentre trial, in which the activity of a second administration is determined according to the results calculated from the first. Lesion dosimetry has also been performed in a small number of centres. The major goal of dosimetry now is to establish dose-effect correlation studies, which will be the basis for individualized treatment planning. The aim of this paper is to analyse previously published studies and to consider the potential for improvement in order to obtain a stronger predictive power of dosimetry. The intrinsic radiobiological limits of dosimetry are also illustrated. Due to the development and dissemination of methods of internal dosimetry and radiobiology over the last two decades, and to the increasing availability of quantitative 124I PET imaging, dosimetry could provide in the near future a more systematic basis for standardization and individualization of mIBG therapy. This will however require a number of multicentre trials which are performed under good instrumental and scientific methodology.

  7. ESR spectrometry: a future-oriented tool for dosimetry and dating.

    PubMed

    Regulla, Dieter F

    2005-02-01

    ESR spectroscopy is currently taking root as a key technology in dosimetry, dating and imaging. In dosimetry, it competes with cytometry in the fields of biological dosimetry and retrospective dosimetry, leads in high-level reference and routine dosimetry, is high-ranking among the methods to identify radiation preserved foods, represents a method of choice to date geological, archaeological and paleontological materials back millions of years, and has demonstrated capacity for imaging. Further scientific and technological progress as predicted in the recent past (Appl. Radiat. Isot. 52 (2000) 1023) is reviewed here. Additionally, the review is expanded to include international reports and recommendations on ESR dosimetry and dose reconstruction, under way at the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), the International Organisation of Standards (ISO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU). Emphasis is placed on interpretation of tooth enamel doses in terms of organ and effective doses, using CT-based virtual humans. The future of EPR spectroscopy for in situ dose measurements is noted, depicting a non-destructive in vivo dosimetry applicable directly to individuals, but also to hominid and animal fossils for direct dating.

  8. Photostimulable Storage Phosphor Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frye, Douglas Mahaffey Danks

    The feasibility of employing alkaline earth sulfide based photostimulable storage phosphors for relative dosimetry in radiation oncology has been investigated. The dosimetric characteristics, radiologic characteristics, and spacial sensitivity of calcium sulfide and strontium sulfide based phosphors were determined. Dosimetric characteristics were explored by cavity theory calculation, Monte Carlo simulation, and physical measurement. Dosimetric characteristics obtained with cavity theory and Monte Carlo simulations agree well. The dose perturbation of the phosphor base materials were comparable to those produced by clinical dosimeter materials over the energy region employed in radiation oncology. Dose perturbation in regions downstream of the phosphor were measured with a variety of clinical dosimeters and compared with simulation results. The results of the measurements and simulations agreed within the uncertainty levels of the simulations and the measurements. Radiological characteristics of sensitivity, fading, dose response, dose rate response, and energy dependence of response were studied with an experimental phosphor output reader. Relative sensitivity was found to be dependent upon the mass thickness of phosphor layer. Fading was quantified for the calcium sulfide phosphor, with a half time of 2300 minutes. The strontium sulfide sample exhibited some fading, however, the regression lines yielded low correlation coefficients. A linear dose response over the range of doses employed in radiation oncology was obtained for both phosphors. No significant dose rate dependence of response was measured for the phosphors. The phosphor's energy dependence of response paralleled the dose perturbation relative to water predicted by cavity theory and simulations. Spatial sensitivity was demonstrated with an experimental phosphor scanner. The phosphors exhibited spatial sensitivity, however, infrared scattering/piping in the transparent substrate appeared to cause

  9. Standard Practice for Dosimetry of Proton Beams for use in Radiation Effects Testing of Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Blackmore, Ewart; Cascio, Ethan W.; Castaneda, Carlos; von Przewoski, Barbara; Eisen, Harvey

    2008-07-25

    Representatives of facilities that routinely deliver protons for radiation effect testing are collaborating to establish a set of standard best practices for proton dosimetry. These best practices will be submitted to the ASTM International for adoption.

  10. Evaluation of dual energy quantitative CT for determining the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone for dosimetry in internal emitter radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M; Shenoy, Apeksha; Shen, Jincheng; Howard, David; Schipper, Matthew J; Wilderman, Scott; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Chun, Se Young; Dewaraja, Yuni K

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate a three-equation three-unknown dual-energy quantitative CT (DEQCT) technique for determining region specific variations in bone spongiosa composition for improved red marrow dose estimation in radionuclide therapy. The DEQCT method was applied to 80/140 kVp images of patient-simulating lumbar sectional body phantoms of three sizes (small, medium, and large). External calibration rods of bone, red marrow, and fat-simulating materials were placed beneath the body phantoms. Similar internal calibration inserts were placed at vertebral locations within the body phantoms. Six test inserts of known volume fractions of bone, fat, and red marrow were also scanned. External-to-internal calibration correction factors were derived. The effects of body phantom size, radiation dose, spongiosa region segmentation granularity [single (∼17 × 17 mm) region of interest (ROI), 2 × 2, and 3 × 3 segmentation of that single ROI], and calibration method on the accuracy of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow (cellularity) and trabecular bone were evaluated. For standard low dose DEQCT x-ray technique factors and the internal calibration method, the RMS errors of the estimated volume fractions of red marrow of the test inserts were 1.2-1.3 times greater in the medium body than in the small body phantom and 1.3-1.5 times greater in the large body than in the small body phantom. RMS errors of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow within 2 × 2 segmented subregions of the ROIs were 1.6-1.9 times greater than for no segmentation, and RMS errors for 3 × 3 segmented subregions were 2.3-2.7 times greater than those for no segmentation. Increasing the dose by a factor of 2 reduced the RMS errors of all constituent volume fractions by an average factor of 1.40 ± 0.29 for all segmentation schemes and body phantom sizes; increasing the dose by a factor of 4 reduced those RMS errors by an average factor of 1.71 ± 0.25. Results for external calibrations exhibited

  11. Evaluation of dual energy quantitative CT for determining the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone for dosimetry in internal emitter radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M. Shenoy, Apeksha; Howard, David; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Dewaraja, Yuni K.; Shen, Jincheng; Schipper, Matthew J.; Wilderman, Scott; Chun, Se Young

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a three-equation three-unknown dual-energy quantitative CT (DEQCT) technique for determining region specific variations in bone spongiosa composition for improved red marrow dose estimation in radionuclide therapy. Methods: The DEQCT method was applied to 80/140 kVp images of patient-simulating lumbar sectional body phantoms of three sizes (small, medium, and large). External calibration rods of bone, red marrow, and fat-simulating materials were placed beneath the body phantoms. Similar internal calibration inserts were placed at vertebral locations within the body phantoms. Six test inserts of known volume fractions of bone, fat, and red marrow were also scanned. External-to-internal calibration correction factors were derived. The effects of body phantom size, radiation dose, spongiosa region segmentation granularity [single (∼17 × 17 mm) region of interest (ROI), 2 × 2, and 3 × 3 segmentation of that single ROI], and calibration method on the accuracy of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow (cellularity) and trabecular bone were evaluated. Results: For standard low dose DEQCT x-ray technique factors and the internal calibration method, the RMS errors of the estimated volume fractions of red marrow of the test inserts were 1.2–1.3 times greater in the medium body than in the small body phantom and 1.3–1.5 times greater in the large body than in the small body phantom. RMS errors of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow within 2 × 2 segmented subregions of the ROIs were 1.6–1.9 times greater than for no segmentation, and RMS errors for 3 × 3 segmented subregions were 2.3–2.7 times greater than those for no segmentation. Increasing the dose by a factor of 2 reduced the RMS errors of all constituent volume fractions by an average factor of 1.40 ± 0.29 for all segmentation schemes and body phantom sizes; increasing the dose by a factor of 4 reduced those RMS errors by an average factor of 1.71 ± 0.25. Results

  12. Determining superficial dosimetry for the internal canthus from the Monte Carlo simulation of kV photon and MeV electron beams.

    PubMed

    Currie, B E

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents the findings of an investigation into the Monte Carlo simulation of superficial cancer treatments of an internal canthus site using both kilovoltage photons and megavoltage electrons. The EGSnrc system of codes for the Monte Carlo simulation of the transport of electrons and photons through a phantom representative of either a water phantom or treatment site in a patient is utilised. Two clinical treatment units are simulated: the Varian Medical Systems Clinac 2100C accelerator for 6 MeV electron fields and the Pantak Therapax SXT 150 X-ray unit for 100 kVp photon fields. Depth dose, profile and isodose curves for these simulated units are compared against those measured by ion chamber in a PTW Freiburg MP3 water phantom. Good agreement was achieved away from the surface of the phantom between simulated and measured data. Dose distributions are determined for both kV photon and MeV electron fields in the internal canthus site containing lead and tungsten shielding, rapidly sloping surfaces and different density interfaces. There is a relatively high level of deposition of dose in tissue-bone and tissue-cartilage interfaces in the kV photon fields in contrast to the MeV electron fields. This is reflected in the maximum doses in the PTV of the internal canthus field being 12 Gy for kV photons and 4.8 Gy for MeV electrons. From the dose distributions, DVH and dose comparators are used to assess the simulated treatment fields. Any indication as to which modality is preferable to treat the internal canthus requires careful consideration of many different factors, this investigation provides further perspective in being able to assess which modality is appropriate.

  13. Heavy-ion dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmerling, W.

    1980-03-01

    This lecture deals with some of the more important physical characteristics of relativistic heavy ions and their measurement, with beam delivery and beam monitoring, and with conventional radiation dosimetry as used in the operation of the BEVALAC biomedical facility for high energy heavy ions (Lyman and Howard, 1977; BEVALAC, 1977). Even so, many fundamental aspects of the interaction of relativistic heavy ions with matter, including important atomic physics and radiation chemical considerations, are not discussed beyond the reminder that such additional understanding is required before an adequte perspective of the problem can be attained.

  14. Fast neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report concentrates on two major areas of dosimetry research: measurement of fast neutron kerma factors for several elements for monochromatic and white spectrum neutron fields and determination of the response of thermoluminescent phosphors to various ultra-soft X-ray energies and beta-rays. Dr. Zhixin Zhou from the Shanghai Institute of Radiation Medicine, People's Republic of China brought with him special expertise in the fabrication and use of ultra-thin TLD materials. Such materials are not available in the USA. The rather unique properties of these materials were investigated during this grant period.

  15. Uranium Dispersion & Dosimetry Model.

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL,; MOMENI, H.

    2002-03-22

    The Uranium Dispersion and Dosimetry (UDAD) program provides estimates of potential radiation exposure to individuals and to the general population in the vicinity of a uranium processing facility such as a uranium mine or mill. Only transport through the air is considered. Exposure results from inhalation, external irradiation from airborne and ground-deposited activity, and ingestion of foodstuffs. Individual dose commitments, population dose commitments, and environmental dose commitments are computed. The program was developed for application to uranium mining and milling; however, it may be applied to dispersion of any other pollutant.

  16. Instrumental carbon monoxide dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Stetter, J R; Rutt, D R

    1980-10-01

    Modern technology for the ambient monitoring of carbon monoxide has been developed to produce a portable electrochemical instrument capable of the personal exposure to carbon monoxide. The performance characteristics of this device have been studied so that the unambiguous interpretation of field data could be performed. A study of the carbon monoxide exposure in a light manufacturing facility illustrate that effective dosimetry can be performed with expectations of accuracy typically better than +/- 15%, and that voluntary carbon monoxide exposures such as smoking were a significant contribution to the individual's exposure. Significant definition of the carbon monoxide exposure profile can be achieved with an instrument approach to the collection of the dosimetric data.

  17. Application of the ICRP/ICRU reference computational phantoms to internal dosimetry: calculation of specific absorbed fractions of energy for photons and electrons.

    PubMed

    Hadid, L; Desbrée, A; Schlattl, H; Franck, D; Blanchardon, E; Zankl, M

    2010-07-07

    The emission of radiation from a contaminated body region is connected with the dose received by radiosensitive tissue through the specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) of emitted energy, which is therefore an essential quantity for internal dose assessment. A set of SAFs were calculated using the new adult reference computational phantoms, released by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) together with the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU). Part of these results has been recently published in ICRP Publication 110 (2009 Adult reference computational phantoms (Oxford: Elsevier)). In this paper, we mainly discuss the results and also present them in numeric form. The emission of monoenergetic photons and electrons with energies ranging from 10 keV to 10 MeV was simulated for three source organs: lungs, thyroid and liver. SAFs were calculated for four target regions in the body: lungs, colon wall, breasts and stomach wall. For quality assurance purposes, the simulations were performed simultaneously at the Helmholtz Zentrum München (HMGU, Germany) and at the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN, France), using the Monte Carlo transport codes EGSnrc and MCNPX, respectively. The comparison of results shows overall agreement for photons and high-energy electrons with differences lower than 8%. Nevertheless, significant differences were found for electrons at lower energy for distant source/target organ pairs. Finally, the results for photons were compared to the SAF values derived using mathematical phantoms. Significant variations that can amount to 200% were found. The main reason for these differences is the change of geometry in the more realistic voxel body models. For electrons, no SAFs have been computed with the mathematical phantoms; instead, approximate formulae have been used by both the Medical Internal Radiation Dose committee (MIRD) and the ICRP due to the limitations imposed

  18. Application of the ICRP/ICRU reference computational phantoms to internal dosimetry: calculation of specific absorbed fractions of energy for photons and electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadid, L.; Desbrée, A.; Schlattl, H.; Franck, D.; Blanchardon, E.; Zankl, M.

    2010-07-01

    The emission of radiation from a contaminated body region is connected with the dose received by radiosensitive tissue through the specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) of emitted energy, which is therefore an essential quantity for internal dose assessment. A set of SAFs were calculated using the new adult reference computational phantoms, released by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) together with the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU). Part of these results has been recently published in ICRP Publication 110 (2009 Adult reference computational phantoms (Oxford: Elsevier)). In this paper, we mainly discuss the results and also present them in numeric form. The emission of monoenergetic photons and electrons with energies ranging from 10 keV to 10 MeV was simulated for three source organs: lungs, thyroid and liver. SAFs were calculated for four target regions in the body: lungs, colon wall, breasts and stomach wall. For quality assurance purposes, the simulations were performed simultaneously at the Helmholtz Zentrum München (HMGU, Germany) and at the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN, France), using the Monte Carlo transport codes EGSnrc and MCNPX, respectively. The comparison of results shows overall agreement for photons and high-energy electrons with differences lower than 8%. Nevertheless, significant differences were found for electrons at lower energy for distant source/target organ pairs. Finally, the results for photons were compared to the SAF values derived using mathematical phantoms. Significant variations that can amount to 200% were found. The main reason for these differences is the change of geometry in the more realistic voxel body models. For electrons, no SAFs have been computed with the mathematical phantoms; instead, approximate formulae have been used by both the Medical Internal Radiation Dose committee (MIRD) and the ICRP due to the limitations imposed

  19. TOPICAL REVIEW: Polymer gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldock, C.; De Deene, Y.; Doran, S.; Ibbott, G.; Jirasek, A.; Lepage, M.; McAuley, K. B.; Oldham, M.; Schreiner, L. J.

    2010-03-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record the radiation dose distribution in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose gradients exist such as in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery. Polymer gel dosimeters also have specific advantages for brachytherapy dosimetry. Potential dosimetry applications include those for low-energy x-rays, high-linear energy transfer (LET) and proton therapy, radionuclide and boron capture neutron therapy dosimetries. These 3D dosimeters are radiologically soft-tissue equivalent with properties that may be modified depending on the application. The 3D radiation dose distribution in polymer gel dosimeters may be imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical-computerized tomography (optical-CT), x-ray CT or ultrasound. The fundamental science underpinning polymer gel dosimetry is reviewed along with the various evaluation techniques. Clinical dosimetry applications of polymer gel dosimetry are also presented.

  20. Topical Review: Polymer gel dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Baldock, C; De Deene, Y; Doran, S; Ibbott, G; Jirasek, A; Lepage, M; McAuley, K B; Oldham, M; Schreiner, L J

    2010-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record the radiation dose distribution in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose gradients exist such as in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery. Polymer gel dosimeters also have specific advantages for brachytherapy dosimetry. Potential dosimetry applications include those for low-energy x-rays, high-linear energy transfer (LET) and proton therapy, radionuclide and boron capture neutron therapy dosimetries. These 3D dosimeters are radiologically soft-tissue equivalent with properties that may be modified depending on the application. The 3D radiation dose distribution in polymer gel dosimeters may be imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical-computerized tomography (optical-CT), x-ray CT or ultrasound. The fundamental science underpinning polymer gel dosimetry is reviewed along with the various evaluation techniques. Clinical dosimetry applications of polymer gel dosimetry are also presented. PMID:20150687

  1. Third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry. Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1991-01-01

    This conference has been designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To partly fulfill these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection has been prepared. General topics include external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, regulations and standards, accreditation and test programs, research advances, and applied program experience. This publication provides a summary of the technical program and a collection of abstracts of the oral presentations.

  2. Relation of structure to function for the US reference standard endotoxin after exposure to /sup 60/Co radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Csako, G.; Suba, E.A.; Ahlgren, A.; Tsai, C.M.; Elin, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    The structure and function of the highly purified US reference standard endotoxin (RSE) were studied after exposure to ionizing radiation from a /sup 60/Co source. With increasing doses of radiation, the trilaminar ribbon-like structure of untreated endotoxin exhibited focal swelling, after which only spherical particles were seen by electron microscopy. These morphological changes were paralleled by the respective loss of O-side chain repeating units and pieces of the R-core from the lipopolysaccharide molecules, as demonstrated by electrophoresis. The biologic function of the irradiated endotoxin was assessed with a variety of tests. At higher doses of radiation, a direct relation was observed between the degradation of the molecular and supramolecular structure and the loss of biologic function. At lower doses of radiation, however, there was variability among the functional assays in their rate of change with progressive irradiation of the RSE. The results suggest that the carbohydrate moiety plays an important role both in determining the supramolecular structure and in modulating certain biologic activities of bacterial endotoxins.

  3. Modification of the chemical composition and structure of the US Reference Standard Endotoxin (RSE) by /sup 60/Co radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Csako, G.; Tsai, C.M.; Slomiany, B.L.; Herp, A.; Elin, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    A highly purified bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preparation was exposed in water to megadoses of ionizing radiation from a /sup 60/Co source. As evidenced by electrophoresis, the radiation treatment progressively degraded the lipopolysaccharide molecules by removing first the O-side chain units and then components of the R-core. Chemical analysis of the irradiated (LPS) preparations showed that, in accord with the structural changes, the most profound effects of ionizing radiation occurred in the hydrophilic oligo/polysaccharide moieties (R-core and O-side chain). Progressively higher doses of radiation degraded the simple sugars in decreasing order of galactose, galactosamine, glucosamine, glucose, and heptose. The R-core component 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate was the most resistant sugar derivative to ionizing radiation. Due to its central position in the LPS aggregates in water, even at comparatively high doses of radiation the hydrophobic lipid A moiety of endotoxin was less affected than the sugar components. Of the fatty acids of lipid A, however, either partial conversion of beta-hydroxymyristic acid into myristic acid or selective loss of the former occurred. The observed structural and chemical changes of LPS are consistent with the effect of active oxygen radicals of radiolysis. In addition, the extensive physicochemical changes explain the altered biological reactivity of radiation-treated endotoxins.

  4. Features of tensoresistance depending on the crystallographic orientation of γ-irradiated (60Co) germanium and silicon single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidar, G. P.; Baranskii, P. I.

    2017-05-01

    The features of the longitudinal tensoresistance of γ-irradiated (60Co) n-Ge and n-Si crystals, as well as γ-irradiated n-Ge crystals after n → p conversion, at fixed temperatures depending on the direction (X → ∥ J → ∥ [111,110], [100]) of application of the mechanical compressive stress 0 ≤ X ≤ 1.2 GPa were investigated. The charge carrier concentrations and the Hall mobility values before and after γ-irradiation were controlled by measurements of the Hall effect. It was established that under conditions of the nonsymmetrical arrangement of deformation axis relative to the isoenergetic ellipsoids, the dependences of tensoresistance in the γ-irradiated n-Ge and n-Si crystals pass through a maximum. With a symmetrical placement of the deformation axis such maximum is not observed. In the converted n-Ge crystals under applying of mechanical stress the presence of the region of the increasing resistivity in the initial area of deformation was found, which is explained by increase of the energy gap between the deep level and the top of the valence band with increasing pressure.

  5. Optical absorption and thermoluminescence in single NaCl:Cu crystals exposed to 60Co and UV light.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Zaragoza, E; Barboza-Flores, M; Chernov, V; Meléndrez, R; Ramos B, S; Negrón-Mendoza, A; Hernández, J M; Murrieta, H

    2006-01-01

    Optical absorption (OA) and thermally stimulated luminescence measurements were performed on NaCl:Cu+(0.04 and 0.08%) crystals blocks grown by the Czochralski technique. The NaCl:Cu+ crystals were exposed to gamma rays from a 60Co source (0.954-30 kGy) as well as UV radiation. The radiation-induced defects were mainly F, Cu- and Cu+ centres, with absorption bands located at 464, 256.7 and 236 nm, respectively. The absorption bands were found to be independent of the Cu impurity concentration. As the gamma-dose irradiation increased, the absorption band at 256.7 nm decreased while the band at 236.3 nm increased highly along with the 256.7 nm band. The F-centres produced at high gamma-radiation dose while thermally bleached showed an increase of the Cu+ OA bands with a simultaneous decrease of Cu- absorption band. The bleaching with F-light showed the participation of the F centre generated by gamma radiation on the ion valence changes of the doping impurity as well as on the TL phenomenon. The TL measurements in NaCl:Cu crystals with both impurity concentrations demonstrated that the Cu+ concentration has a strong influence on the intensity and shape of the glow peaks.

  6. Paramecium tetraurelia growth stimulation under low-level chronic irradiation: investigations on a possible mechanism. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Croute, F.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Vidal, S.; Dupouy, D.; Planel, H.

    1982-12-01

    Experiments were carried out to demonstrate the effects of low-level chronic irradiation on Paramecium tetraurelia proliferation. Biological effects were strongly dependent on the bacterial density of culture medium and more exactly on the catalase content of the medium. Significant growth stimulation was found under /sup 60/Co chronic irradiation at a dose rate of 2 rad/year when paramecia were grown in a medium containing a high bacterial concentration (2.5 x 10/sup 2/ cells/m) or supplemented with catalase (300 U/ml). In a medium with a low bacterial density (1 x 10/sup 6/ cell/ml) or supplemented with a catalase activity inhibitor, growth simulation was preceded by a transitory inhibiting effect which could be correlated with extracellularly radioproduced H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ addition appeared to be able to simulate the biological effects of chronic irradiation. A possible mechanism is discussed.We proposed that the stimulating effects were the result of intracellular enzymatic scavenging of radioproduced H/sub 2/O/sub 2/.

  7. Vertical migration of 60Co, 137Cs and 226Ra in agricultural soils as observed in lysimeters under crop rotation.

    PubMed

    Shinonaga, T; Schimmack, W; Gerzabek, M H

    2005-01-01

    In most studies quantifying the migration parameters - apparent migration velocity and apparent dispersion coefficient - of radionuclides in the soil by model calculations, these parameters are determined for undisturbed soils. For soils disturbed by ploughing, however, no such data are available in the literature. Therefore, in the present study, the migration parameters of (137)Cs, (60)Co and (226)Ra were estimated for ploughed soils by means of a convection-dispersion model. The depth distributions of the radionuclides were determined in four lysimeters (area: 1m(2), depth of soil monolith: 0.75m) filled with artificially contaminated soils of different types in July 1990. The lysimeters were cropped with agricultural plants. The soil in each lysimeter was ploughed manually once a year until 1996 (plough depth 20cm). In July 1999, soil samples were collected from three pits in each lysimeter. The depth distributions of all radionuclides proved to be very similar in each soil pit. The spatial variability of the depth distributions of a given radionuclide within the lysimeters was about the same as their variability between the four lysimeters. Evaluation of the migration parameters revealed that the convective transport of the radionuclides was always rather small or even zero, while the dispersive transport caused a "melting" process of the initially sharp activity edge at the lower border of the Ap horizon. These results are explained by the high evapotranspiration (80-90% of the total precipitation plus irrigation) and the small amounts of seepage water during the observation period of 9 years.

  8. Effects of prenatal /sup 60/Co irradiation on postnatal neural, learning, and hormonal development of the squirrel monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Ordy, J.M.; Brizzee, K.R.; Dunlap, W.P.; Knight, C.

    1982-02-01

    The goals of this study were to examine the effects of 0, 50, and 100 rad of /sup 60/Co administered prenatally on postnatal development of neuromuscular coordination, visual discrimination learning, spontaneous light-dark stabilimeter activity, plasma cortisol, and somatometric growth rates of diurnal squirrel monkeys from birth to 90 days. In terms of accuracy, completeness, and time required for performance of reflexes and neuromuscular coordination, the performance of 50- and 100-rad offspring was less accurate and poorly coordinated and required more time for completion to that of controls. In visual orientation, discrimination, and reversal learning, the percentage correct responses of the 50- and 100-rad offspring were significantly lower than those of controls. Spontaneous light-dark stabilimeter activity of 50- and 100-rad offspring was significantly higher in the dark session than that of controls. Plasma cortisol was significantly higher in 100-rad infants than in controls. Comparisons of somatometric growth rates indicated that postnatal head circumference, crown-rump length, and to a lesser extent body weight increased at significantly slower rates in 50- and 100-rad offspring. These findings should provide essential information for formulating and carrying out multivariate behavioral, biochemical, and morphometric assessments of low-dose effects on the brain of primate offspring within demonstrable dose-response curves.

  9. Impaired colony-forming ability following. gamma. irradiation of skin fibroblasts from tuberous scierosis patients. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, M.C.; Sell, B.M.; Smith, B.P.; Bech-Hansen, N.T.

    1982-05-01

    The radiosensitivity of cultured dermal fibroblasts from human subjects afflicted with tuberous sclerosis (TS), a hereditary neurocutaneous syndrome, was assessed by assaying loss of colony-forming ability in response to acute ..gamma..-ray exposure. Related to control strains from clinically normal donors, three cell lines (GM1635, GM1643, GM2333) from two affected patients displayed enhanced sensitivity to inactivation by /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-ray treatment, whether administered oxically (air-saturated) or hypoxically (N/sub 2/-gassed); a fourth strain (GM1644) from a third patient exhibited normal radiosensitivity under both treatment conditions. The post-..gamma..-irradiaton colony-forming ability of the three hypersensitive TS strains was intermediate between that of normal controls and that of strains from patients inheriting the radiotherapy-sensitive neurovascular disorder ataxia telangiectasia. The variability in the radioresponse of the TS stains (three sensitive and one normal) is not surprising, considering the widely recognized clinical heterogeneity in the disease. Our findings, aside from providing a laboratory marker for early (possible presymptomatic) detection of persons at high risk for TS, may lead to a better understanding of the origin and progressive development of this multifaceted syndrome.

  10. Radiation damage of contact structures with diffusion barriers exposed to irradiation with {sup 60}Co{gamma}-ray photons

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, A. E.; Boltovets, N. S.; Konakova, R. V. Milenin, V. V.; Sveshnikov, Yu. N.; Sheremet, V. N.

    2010-04-15

    The effect of ionizing radiation of {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray photons in the dose range 10{sup 4}-2 x 10{sup 9} rad on metal-semiconductor Au-ZrB{sub x}-AlGaN/GaN and Au-TiB{sub x}-Al-Ti-n-GaN contacts and Au-ZrB{sub x}-n-GaN Schottky diodes is examined. The contacts with the TiB{sub x} and ZrB{sub x} diffusion barriers do not degrade under the effect of ionizing radiation if the dose does not exceed 10{sup 8} rad. The Au-ZrB{sub x}-n-GaN Schottky diodes remain stable in the dose range 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} rad. As the radiation dose is increased to {>=}10{sup 8} rad, the damage to the contact metallization increases and is accompanied by formation of through pores, which is conducive to accumulation of oxygen at the Au-ZrB{sub x}(TiB{sub x}) interfaces and to an increase in mass transport of atoms in contact-forming layers. In this case, irradiation-caused degradation of the Schottky diodes is observed. Possible mechanisms of radiation damage of contact structures with diffusion barriers are analyzed.

  11. Effect of 60Co gamma irradiation on dielectric and complex impedance properties of Dy3+ substituted Ni-Zn nanoferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veena, M.; Somashekarappa, A.; Shankaramurthy, G. J.; Jayanna, H. S.; Somashekarappa, H. M.

    2016-12-01

    Nanocrystalline Ni1-xZnxFe2-yDyyO4 (x=0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0; y=0.0 and 0.1) ferrites were synthesized by combustion method. Ni-Zn-Dy nanoferrites were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, dielectric and impedance properties, before and after γ-irradiation process by 60Co γ-radiation with a dose rate of 310 kGy. The lattice parameter of irradiated samples increased attributed to the conversion of smaller size Fe3+ ions to larger size Fe2+ ions on ionizing effect of gamma radiation. Experimental results reveal that reduction in dielectric constant (ε‧), loss tangent (tan δ), real (Z‧) and imaginary (Z‧‧) impedance and increase in ac conductivity (σac) have been increased with increasing in frequency. It was found that ε‧, tan δ, σac increase, Z‧‧ and Z‧‧ reach a maximum value and thereafter decrease with further Zn ion substitution. The values of ε‧, tan δ and σac decrease with Dy3+ substitution and enhanced after irradiation. The complex impedance analysis suggesting predominant contribution to conduction was through the grain boundary.

  12. Effect of low /sup 60/Co dose rates on sister chromatid exchange incidence in the benthic worm. Neanthes arenaceodentata

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, F.L.; Rice, D.W. Jr.

    1981-10-13

    The usefulness of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induction as a measure of low-level radiation effect was examined in a benthic marine worm, Neanthes arenaceodentata. Larvae were exposed to /sup 60/Co radiation for 12 to 24 h at total doses ranging from 0.5 to 309 R and at dose rates from 0.04 to 13 R/h. Animals exposed at intermediate dose rates (0.5, 0.6, 1.25, 2.0, and 2.5 R/h) had SCE frequencies per chromosome about twice that of those receiving no radiation (controls), whereas those exposed at the higher dose rates (7.0 and 13 R/h) had SCE frequencies lower than the controls. Animals exposed at the lower dose rates (0.04 and 0.1 R/h) had lower SCE frequencies than those exposed at intermediate dose rates (and higher SCE frequencies than controls). The length of chromosome pair number one differed among metaphase spreads and was used as an index of chromosome condensation in a given metaphase. Because there is a possibility that chromosome morphology may affect the ability to resolve SCEs, morphology will be monitored in future studies. A preliminary experiment was performed to assess the effects of 2.2 and 11.5 R/h for 24 h on growth and development. Larvae observed at 6 and 17 d after irradiation did not have significantly different numbers of abnormal larvae or survival rates.

  13. Serum creatine kinase (CK) activity following exposure to cadmium and/or /sup 60/CO gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, R.M.; Kundomal, Y.R.; Hupp, E.W.

    1985-01-01

    Two hundred and sixteen young adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected IP every 3 days for 29 days for a total of 9 injections with 0, 1.0, or 2.5 mg CdCl/sub 2//kg body weight. Total cumulative doses were 0, 9.0 or 22.5 mg CdCl/sub 2//kg body weight. Twenty-four hours after the last cadmium injection (day 30), each rat was irradiated with a total-body exposure of 0, 3.62, or 5.43 Gray of gamma (/sup 60/Co) radiation at a dose rate of 3.04 Gray/min. Eight rats from each of the 9 groups were sacrificed on day 1, 7, or 21. Highest levels of the creatine kinase enzyme were seen in radiation groups at day 1, indicating an immediate radiotoxic response. Enzyme levels decreased through day 21 indicating clearance of the enzyme from the plasma. Although statistically significant differences between the groups, cadmium, radiation, or days were not seen, cadmium did protect against radiation. This protective function is not explainable; however, it is speculated that different conformations of metal-induced metallothionein clusters exist to accommodate various metal ions. Further, that each kind of metal ion may have different and unique distribution patterns between the cluster centers which account for different functions.

  14. The effects of 60Co γ-ray on poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate)/carbon black composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung-Yong; Kim, Ki-Yup

    2008-04-01

    Cables used in a nuclear power plant are irradiation suppressing ones. Until now, researches on the irradiation suppressing cables have mainly been focused on insulation materials. Therefore, in this paper, the non-isothermal crystallization behaviors and degradation characteristics of ethylene vinyl acetate-carbon black (EVA-CB), used as a shielding material, were investigated by means of the Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and chemiluminescence analyzer (CL). The specimens were cooled after removing thermal history at 150 °C for 5 min by changing the cooling rates to 5, 7.5, 10, 15 and 20 °C/min with DSC. In addition, after maintaining a thermal equilibrium at each temperature of 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150 and 175 °C, their thermoluminescence was measured for 20 min with CL equipment. The 60Co γ-ray was used for irradiation. Tc, T0, T∞ and t1/2 in the DSC experiments are found to decrease gradually as radiation dose increases. Secondly, with the CL experiment, the 0.1, 0.25 and 0.5 MGy EVA-CB composites were found to show a much smaller thermoluminescence than the intact EVA-CB composites, while the 0.75 and 1 MGy EVA-CB composites were found to show a much higher thermoluminescence than ones.

  15. USF/Russian dosimetry on STS-57

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The major purpose of this experiment was to conduct an international comparison of passive dosimetry methods in space. Two APD's were flown in the charged particle directional spectrometer (CPDS)/tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) locker on the space shuttle during the STS-57 mission. Due to placement, the shielding and radiation environment of the APD's were nearly the same and the dosimeters distributed in the two boxes can be considered equally exposed. The dosimeter types included plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD's), thermoluminescent detectors (TLD), nuclear emulsions, and thermal/resonance neutron detectors (TRND's). The USF dosimeters included PNTD's, TLD's, and TRND's, while the Russian dosimeters included PNTD's, TLD's, and nuclear emulsions.

  16. Absorbed dose to water based dosimetry versus air kerma based dosimetry for high-energy photon beams: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Palmans, Hugo; Nafaa, Laila; De, Jans Jo; Gillis, Sofie; Hoornaert, Marie-Thérèse; Martens, Chantal; Piessens, Marleen; Thierens, Hubert; Van der Plaetsen, Ann; Vynckier, Stefaan

    2002-02-07

    average 0.1% for IAEA TRS-277, 0.3% for NCS report-2 and AAPM TG-21 and 0.4% for IAEA TRS-398 and AAPM TG-51). Within the air kerma based protocols, the results obtained with the TG-21 protocol were 0.4-0.8% higher mainly due to the differences in the data used. Both absorbed dose to water based formalisms resulted in consistent values within 0.3%. The change from old to new formalisms is discussed together with the traceability of calibration factors obtained at the primary absorbed dose and air kerma standards in the reference beams (60Co). For the particular situation in Belgium (calibrations at the Laboratory for Standard Dosimetry of Ghent) the change amounts to 0.1-0.6%. This is similar to the magnitude of the change determined in other countries.

  17. Relationship between student selection criteria and learner success for medical dosimetry students.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jamie; Tucker, Debra; Raynes, Edilberto; Aitken, Florence; Allen, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Medical dosimetry education occupies a specialized branch of allied health higher education. Noted international shortages of health care workers, reduced university funding, limitations on faculty staffing, trends in learner attrition, and increased enrollment of nontraditional students force medical dosimetry educational leadership to reevaluate current admission practices. Program officials wish to select medical dosimetry students with the best chances of successful graduation. The purpose of the quantitative ex post facto correlation study was to investigate the relationship between applicant characteristics (cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA), science grade point average (SGPA), prior experience as a radiation therapist, and previous academic degrees) and the successful completion of a medical dosimetry program, as measured by graduation. A key finding from the quantitative study was the statistically significant positive correlation between a student׳s previous degree and his or her successful graduation from the medical dosimetry program. Future research investigations could include a larger research sample, representative of more medical dosimetry student populations, and additional studies concerning the relationship of previous work as a radiation therapist and the effect on success as a medical dosimetry student. Based on the quantitative correlation analysis, medical dosimetry leadership on admissions committees could revise student selection rubrics to place less emphasis on an applicant׳s undergraduate cumulative GPA and increase the weight assigned to previous degrees.

  18. Relationship between student selection criteria and learner success for medical dosimetry students

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Jamie; Tucker, Debra; Raynes, Edilberto; Aitken, Florence; Allen, Pamela

    2016-04-01

    Medical dosimetry education occupies a specialized branch of allied health higher education. Noted international shortages of health care workers, reduced university funding, limitations on faculty staffing, trends in learner attrition, and increased enrollment of nontraditional students force medical dosimetry educational leadership to reevaluate current admission practices. Program officials wish to select medical dosimetry students with the best chances of successful graduation. The purpose of the quantitative ex post facto correlation study was to investigate the relationship between applicant characteristics (cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA), science grade point average (SGPA), prior experience as a radiation therapist, and previous academic degrees) and the successful completion of a medical dosimetry program, as measured by graduation. A key finding from the quantitative study was the statistically significant positive correlation between a student's previous degree and his or her successful graduation from the medical dosimetry program. Future research investigations could include a larger research sample, representative of more medical dosimetry student populations, and additional studies concerning the relationship of previous work as a radiation therapist and the effect on success as a medical dosimetry student. Based on the quantitative correlation analysis, medical dosimetry leadership on admissions committees could revise student selection rubrics to place less emphasis on an applicant's undergraduate cumulative GPA and increase the weight assigned to previous degrees.

  19. PET/CT-Based Dosimetry in 90Y-Microsphere Selective Internal Radiation Therapy: Single Cohort Comparison With Pretreatment Planning on (99m)Tc-MAA Imaging and Correlation With Treatment Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Song, Yoo Sung; Paeng, Jin Chul; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Chung, Jin Wook; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo; Kang, Keon Wook

    2015-06-01

    ⁹⁰Y PET/CT can be acquired after ⁹⁰Y-microsphere selective radiation internal therapy (SIRT) to describe radioactivity distribution. We performed dosimetry using ⁹⁰Y-microsphere PET/CT data to evaluate treatment efficacy and appropriateness of activity planning from (99m)Tc-MAA scan and SPECT/CT. Twenty-three patients with liver malignancy were included in the study. (99m)Tc-MAA was injected during planning angiography and whole body (99m)Tc-MAA scan and liver SPECT/CT were acquired. After SIRT using ⁹⁰Y-resin microsphere, ⁹⁰Y-microsphere PET/CT was acquired. A partition model (PM) using 4 compartments (tumor, intarget normal liver, out-target normal liver, and lung) was adopted, and absorbed dose to each compartment was calculated based on measurements from (99m)Tc-MAA SPECT/CT and ⁹⁰Y-microsphere PET/CT, respectively, to be compared with each other. Progression-free survival (PFS) was evaluated in terms of tumor absorbed doses calculated by (99m)Tc-MAA SPECT/CT and ⁹⁰Y-microsphere PET/CT results. Lung shunt fraction was overestimated on (99m)Tc-MAA scan compared with ⁹⁰Y-microsphere PET/CT (0.060 ± 0.037 vs. 0.018 ± 0.026, P < 0.01). Tumor absorbed dose exhibited a close correlation between the results from (99m)Tc-MAA SPECT/CT and ⁹⁰Y-microsphere PET/CT (r = 0.64, P < 0.01), although the result from (99m)Tc-MAA SPECT/CT was significantly lower than that from ⁹⁰Y-microsphere PET/CT (135.4 ± 64.2 Gy vs. 185.0 ± 87.8 Gy, P < 0.01). Absorbed dose to in-target normal liver was overestimated on (99m)Tc-MAA SPECT/CT compared with PET/CT (62.6 ± 38.2 Gy vs. 45.2 ± 32.0 Gy, P = 0.02). Absorbed dose to out-target normal liver did not differ between (99m)Tc-MAA SPECT/CT and ⁹⁰Y-microsphere PET/CT (P = 0.49). Patients with tumor absorbed dose >200 Gy on ⁹⁰Y-microsphere PET/CT had longer PFS than those with tumor absorbed dose ≤200 Gy (286 ± 56 days vs. 92 ± 20

  20. Patient dosimetry in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Sören

    2015-07-01

    In diagnostic nuclear medicine, the biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical (actually of the radionuclide) is determined for a number of representative patients. At therapy, it is essential to determine the patient's individual biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical in order to calculate the absorbed doses to critical normal organs/tissues and to the target volume(s) with high accuracy. For the diagnostic situations, there is still a lack of quantitative determinations of the organ/tissue contents of radiopharmaceuticals and their variation with time. Planar gamma camera imaging using the conjugate view technique combined with a limited number of SPECT/CT images is the main method for such studies. In a similar way, PET/CT is used for 3D image-based internal dosimetry for PET substances. The transition from stylised reference phantoms to voxel phantoms will lead to improved dose estimates for diagnostic procedures. Examples of dose coefficients and effective doses for diagnostic substances are given. For the therapeutic situation, a pre-therapeutic low activity administration is used for quantitative measurements of organ/tissue distribution data by a gamma camera or a SPECT- or PET-unit. Together with CT and/or MR images this will be the base for individual dose calculations using Monte Carlo technique. Treatments based on administered activity should only be used if biological variations between patients are small or if a pre-therapeutic activity administration is impossible.

  1. EVA dosimetry in manned spacecraft.

    PubMed

    Thomson, I

    1999-12-06

    Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) will become a large part of the astronaut's work on board the International Space Station (ISS). It is already well known that long duration space missions inside a spacecraft lead to radiation doses which are high enough to be a significant health risk to the crew. The doses received during EVA, however, have not been quantified to the same degree. This paper reviews the space radiation environment and the current dose limits to critical organs. Results of preliminary radiation dosimetry experiments on the external surface of the BION series of satellites indicate that EVA doses will vary considerably due to a number of factors such as EVA suit shielding, temporal fluctuations and spacecraft orbit and shielding. It is concluded that measurement of doses to crew members who engage in EVA should be done on board the spacecraft. An experiment is described which will lead the way to implementing this plan on the ISS. It is expected that results of this experiment will help future crew mitigate the risks of ionising radiation in space.

  2. Breast dosimetry in clinical mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevides, Luis Alberto Do Rego

    The objective of this study was show that a clinical dosimetry protocol that utilizes a dosimetric breast phantom series based on population anthropometric measurements can reliably predict the average glandular dose (AGD) imparted to the patient during a routine screening mammogram. In the study, AGD was calculated using entrance skin exposure and dose conversion factors based on fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness, mammography unit parameters and modifying parameters for homogeneous phantom (phantom factor), compressed breast lateral dimensions (volume factor) and anatomical features (anatomical factor). The protocol proposes the use of a fiber-optic coupled (FOCD) or Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter to measure the entrance skin exposure at the time of the mammogram without interfering with diagnostic information of the mammogram. The study showed that FOCD had sensitivity with less than 7% energy dependence, linear in all tube current-time product stations, and was reproducible within 2%. FOCD was superior to MOSFET dosimeter in sensitivity, reusability, and reproducibility. The patient fibroglandular content was evaluated using a calibrated modified breast tissue equivalent homogeneous phantom series (BRTES-MOD) designed from anthropomorphic measurements of a screening mammography population and whose elemental composition was referenced to International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 44 tissues. The patient fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness along with unit parameters and spectrum half-value layer were used to derive the currently used dose conversion factor (DgN). The study showed that the use of a homogeneous phantom, patient compressed breast lateral dimensions and patient anatomical features can affect AGD by as much as 12%, 3% and 1%, respectively. The protocol was found to be superior to existing methodologies. In addition, the study population anthropometric

  3. Designing and Dosimetry of a Shield for Photon Fields of Radiation Therapy in Oral Cavity Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Senobari, Somayeh; Roayaei, Mahnaz; Rostampour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    The cancer of oral cavity is related to lesions of mucous membrane of tongue and gum that can be treated with radiation therapy. A lateral photon field can be used to treat this kind of tumor, which has a side-effect on normal tissue in the opposite side of the oral cavity. In this study the dosimetric effect of the various shields in oral cavity is evaluated. In this study, a special phantom similar to the structure of oral cavity with capability of film dosimetry was designed and constructed. The various shield slabs were made of five materials: Lead, Plexiglas, Acrylic resin, Silicon and Plaster. For irradiation, Cobalt 60 (60Co) and 6 MV photon beams were used. The film dosimetry before and after the shield was performed using GAFCHROMIC EBT2 films. The film before the shield measures the magnitude of backscattering radiation from the shield. The prescribed dose was 150 cGy. Results showed that 3 cm of the lead in both energies had the maximum absorption of radiation. The absorbed dose to opposite side of shield for 6 MV photon beams and 60Co were 21 and 32 cGy, respectively. The minimum attenuation on radiation was observed in silicon shield for which the dose of opposite side were 116 and 147 cGy for 6 MV and 60Co respectively. The maximum backscattered dose was measured 177 cGy and 219 cGy using 3 cm thickness of lead, which was quite considerable. The minimum backscattering where for acrylic resin 101 and 118 cGy for 6 MV and cobalt. In this study, it was concluded that the amount of backscattering for 3 cm Lead shield is quite considerable and increases the dose significantly. A composite layer of shield with 1–2 cm lead and 1 cm acrylic resin can have the protective effect and low backscattering radiation at the same time. PMID:26120570

  4. Designing and Dosimetry of a Shield for Photon Fields of Radiation Therapy in Oral Cavity Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Senobari, Somayeh; Roayaei, Mahnaz; Rostampour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    The cancer of oral cavity is related to lesions of mucous membrane of tongue and gum that can be treated with radiation therapy. A lateral photon field can be used to treat this kind of tumor, which has a side-effect on normal tissue in the opposite side of the oral cavity. In this study the dosimetric effect of the various shields in oral cavity is evaluated. In this study, a special phantom similar to the structure of oral cavity with capability of film dosimetry was designed and constructed. The various shield slabs were made of five materials: Lead, Plexiglas, Acrylic resin, Silicon and Plaster. For irradiation, Cobalt 60 (60Co) and 6 MV photon beams were used. The film dosimetry before and after the shield was performed using GAFCHROMIC EBT2 films. The film before the shield measures the magnitude of backscattering radiation from the shield. The prescribed dose was 150 cGy. Results showed that 3 cm of the lead in both energies had the maximum absorption of radiation. The absorbed dose to opposite side of shield for 6 MV photon beams and 60Co were 21 and 32 cGy, respectively. The minimum attenuation on radiation was observed in silicon shield for which the dose of opposite side were 116 and 147 cGy for 6 MV and 60Co respectively. The maximum backscattered dose was measured 177 cGy and 219 cGy using 3 cm thickness of lead, which was quite considerable. The minimum backscattering where for acrylic resin 101 and 118 cGy for 6 MV and cobalt. In this study, it was concluded that the amount of backscattering for 3 cm Lead shield is quite considerable and increases the dose significantly. A composite layer of shield with 1-2 cm lead and 1 cm acrylic resin can have the protective effect and low backscattering radiation at the same time.

  5. Three-dimensional personalized dosimetry for 188Re liver selective internal radiation therapy based on quantitative post-treatment SPECT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbinin, S.; Grimes, J.; Bator, A.; Cwikla, J. B.; Celler, A.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that accurate patient-specific distributions of microspheres labeled with 188Re and resulting absorbed doses can be obtained from single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies performed after 188Re selective internal radiation therapy when accurate correction methods are employed in image reconstruction. Our quantitative image reconstruction algorithm includes corrections for attenuation, resolution degradations and scatter as well as a window-based compensation for contamination. The procedure has been validated using four phantom experiments containing an 18 ml cylindrical source (82-93 MBq of 188Re activity) simulating a liver tumor. In addition, we applied our approach to post-therapy SPECT studies of ten patients with progressive primary or metastatic liver carcinomas. Our quantitative algorithm accurately (within 9%) recovered 188Re activity from four phantom experiments. In addition, for two patients that received three scans, deviations remained consistent between the measured and the reconstructed activities that were determined from studies with differing severity of the dead-time effect. The analysis of absorbed doses for patient studies allowed us to hypothesize that D90 (the minimum dose received by 90% of the tumor volume) may be a reliable metric relating therapy outcomes to the calculated doses. Among several considered metrics, only D90 showed statistically significant correlation with the overall survival.

  6. Radioembolization Dosimetry: The Road Ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Smits, Maarten L. J. Elschot, Mattijs; Sze, Daniel Y.; Kao, Yung H.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Iagaru, Andre H.; Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.

    2015-04-15

    Methods for calculating the activity to be administered during yttrium-90 radioembolization (RE) are largely based on empirical toxicity and efficacy analyses, rather than dosimetry. At the same time, it is recognized that treatment planning based on proper dosimetry is of vital importance for the optimization of the results of RE. The heterogeneous and often clustered intrahepatic biodistribution of millions of point-source radioactive particles poses a challenge for dosimetry. Several studies found a relationship between absorbed doses and treatment outcome, with regard to both toxicity and efficacy. This should ultimately lead to improved patient selection and individualized treatment planning. New calculation methods and imaging techniques and a new generation of microspheres for image-guided RE will all contribute to these improvements. The aim of this review is to give insight into the latest and most important developments in RE dosimetry and to suggest future directions on patient selection, individualized treatment planning, and study designs.

  7. Radioembolization dosimetry: the road ahead.

    PubMed

    Smits, Maarten L J; Elschot, Mattijs; Sze, Daniel Y; Kao, Yung H; Nijsen, Johannes F W; Iagaru, Andre H; de Jong, Hugo W A M; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Lam, Marnix G E H

    2015-04-01

    Methods for calculating the activity to be administered during yttrium-90 radioembolization (RE) are largely based on empirical toxicity and efficacy analyses, rather than dosimetry. At the same time, it is recognized that treatment planning based on proper dosimetry is of vital importance for the optimization of the results of RE. The heterogeneous and often clustered intrahepatic biodistribution of millions of point-source radioactive particles poses a challenge for dosimetry. Several studies found a relationship between absorbed doses and treatment outcome, with regard to both toxicity and efficacy. This should ultimately lead to improved patient selection and individualized treatment planning. New calculation methods and imaging techniques and a new generation of microspheres for image-guided RE will all contribute to these improvements. The aim of this review is to give insight into the latest and most important developments in RE dosimetry and to suggest future directions on patient selection, individualized treatment planning, and study designs.

  8. Linking fate model in freshwater and PBPK model to assess human internal dosimetry of B(a)P associated with drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ciffroy, Philippe; Tanaka, T; Johansson, E; Brochot, C

    2011-08-01

    In the present study, we demonstrate an integrated modeling approach for predicting internal tissue concentrations of chemicals by coupling a multimedia environmental model and a generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. A case study was designed for a region situated on the Seine river watershed, downstream of the Paris megacity, and for benzo(a)pyrene emitted from industrial zones in the region. In this case study, these two models are linked only by water intake from riverine system for the multimedia model into human body for the PBPK model. The limited monitoring data sets of B(a)P concentrations in bottom sediment and in raw river water, obtained at the downstream of Paris, were used to re-construct long-term daily concentrations of B(a)P in river water. The re-construction of long-term series of B(a)P level played a key role for the intermediate model calibration (conducted in multimedia model) and thus for improving model input to PBPK model. In order to take into account the parametric uncertainty in the model inputs, some input parameters relevant for the multimedia model were given by probability density functions (PDFs); some generic PDFs were updated with site-specific measurements by a Bayesian approach. The results of this study showed that the multimedia model fits well with actual annual measurements in sediments over one decade. No accumulation of B(a)P in the organs was observed. In conclusion, this case study demonstrated the feasibility of a full-chain assessment combining multimedia environmental predictions and PBPK modeling, including uncertainty and sensitivity analyses.

  9. Remote optical fiber dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, A. L.; Justus, B. L.; Falkenstein, P. L.; Miller, R. W.; Ning, H.; Altemus, R.

    2001-09-01

    Optical fibers offer a unique capability for remote monitoring of radiation in difficult-to-access and/or hazardous locations. Optical fiber sensors can be located in radiation hazardous areas and optically interrogated from a safe distance. A variety of remote optical fiber radiation dosimetry methods have been developed. All of the methods take advantage of some form of radiation-induced change in the optical properties of materials such as: radiation-induced darkening due to defect formation in glasses, luminescence from native defects or radiation-induced defects, or population of metastable charge trapping centers. Optical attenuation techniques are used to measure radiation-induced darkening in fibers. Luminescence techniques include the direct measurement of scintillation or optical excitation of radiation-induced luminescent defects. Optical fiber radiation dosimeters have also been constructed using charge trapping materials that exhibit thermoluminescence or optically stimulated luminescence (OSL).

  10. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Adrie J. J.

    2011-05-01

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  11. Dosimetry considerations in phototherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Profio, A.E.; Doiron, D.R.

    1981-03-01

    Dosimetry in phototherapy involves a determination of the energy absorbed per unit mass of tissue, corrected for the quantum yield in a photochemical reaction. The dose rate in photochemotherapy of cancer with hematoporphyrin derivative and visible light is related to the extinction coefficient, quantum yield for singlet oxygen production, concentration of sensitizer and energy flux density at depth. Data or methods of determining these quantities are presented. Calculations have been performed for the energy flux density at depth, as a function of the total attenuation coefficient and ratio of scattering coefficient to total attenuation coefficient, for isotropic scattering in slab geometry. For small absorption, these depth dose curves exhibit a maximum within the tissue followed by an exponential decrease.

  12. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bos, Adrie J. J.

    2011-05-05

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  13. Melatonin attenuates (60) Co γ-ray-induced hematopoietic, immunological and gastrointestinal injuries in C57BL/6 male mice.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahanshah; Adhikari, Jawahar Singh; Rizvi, Moshahid Alam; Chaudhury, Nabo Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Protection of hematopoietic, immunological, and gastrointestinal injuries from deleterious effects of ionizing radiation is prime rational for developing radioprotector. The objective of this study, therefore, was to evaluate the radioprotective potential of melatonin against damaging effects of radiation-induced hematopoietic, immunological, and gastrointestinal injuries in mice. C57BL/6 male mice were intraperitoneally administered with melatonin (50-150 mg/kg) 30 min prior to whole-body radiation exposure of 5 and 7.5 Gy using (60) Co-teletherapy unit. Thirty-day survival against 7.5 Gy was monitored. Melatonin (100 mg/kg) pretreatment showed 100% survival against 7.5 Gy radiation dose. Melatonin pretreatment expanded femoral HPSCs, and inhibited spleenocyte DNA strands breaks and apoptosis in irradiated mice. At this time, it also protected radiation-induced loss of T cell sub-populations in spleen. In addition, melatonin pretreatment enhanced crypts regeneration and increased villi number and length in irradiated mice. Translocation of gut bacteria to spleen, liver and kidney were controlled in irradiated mice pretreated with melatonin. Radiation-induced gastrointestinal DNA strand breaks, lipid peroxidation, and expression of proapoptotic-p53, Bax, and antiapoptotic-Bcl-xL proteins were reversed in melatonin pretreated mice. This increase of Bcl-xL was associated with the decrease of Bax/Bcl-xL ratio. ABTS and DPPH radical assays revealed that melatonin treatment alleviated total antioxidant capacity in hematopoietic and gastrointestinal tissues. Present study demonstrated that melatonin pretreatment was able to prevent hematopoietic, immunological, and gastrointestinal radiation-induced injury, therefore, overcoming lethality in mice. These results suggest potential of melatonin in developing radioprotector for protection of bone marrow, spleen, and gastrointestine in planned radiation exposure scenarios including radiotherapy. © 2016 Wiley

  14. Efficiency correction factors of an ACCUSCAN whole-body counter due to the biodistribution of 134Cs, 137Cs and 60Co.

    PubMed

    Bento, J; Barros, S; Teles, P; Vaz, P; Zankl, M

    2013-06-01

    biokinetic models for internal dosimetry studies.

  15. Selected techniques in radioecology: Model development and comparison for internal dosimetry of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and feasibiltiy assessment of reflectance spectroscopy use as a tool in phytoremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Nicole

    The first study in Part 1 examines the effects of lake tropic structure on the uptake of iodine-131 (131I) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and considers a simple computational model for the estimation of resulting radiation dose. Iodine-131 is a major component of the atmospheric releases following reactor accidents, and the passage of 131I through food chains from grass to human thyroids has been extensively studied. By comparison, the fate and effects of 131I deposition onto lakes and other aquatic systems has been less studied. In this study we reanalyze 1960s data from experimental releases of 131I into two small lakes and compare the effects of differences in lake trophic structures on 131I accumulation in fish. The largest concentrations in the thyroids of trout may occur from 8 to 32 days post initial release. DCFs for trout for whole body as well as thyroid were computed using Monte Carlo modeling with an anatomically-appropriate model of trout thyroid structure. Activity concentration data was used in conjunction with the calculated DCFs to estimate dose rates and ultimately determine cumulative radiation dose (Gy) to the thyroids after 32 days. The estimated cumulative thyroid doses at 32 days post-release ranged from 6 mGy to 18 mGy per 1 Bq mL-1 of initial 131I in the water, depending upon fish size. The subsequent studies in Part 1 seek to develop and compare different, increasingly detailed anatomical phantoms for O. mykiss for the purpose of estimating organ radiation dose and dose rates from 131I uptake and from molybdenum-99 (99Mo) uptake. Model comparison and refinement is important to the process of determining both dose rates and dose effects, and we develop and compare three models for O. mykiss: a simplistic geometry considering a single organ, a more specific geometry employing anatomically relevant organ size and location, and voxel reconstruction of internal anatomy obtained from CT imaging (referred to as CSUTROUT). Dose Conversion

  16. Dosimetric comparison of brachytherapy sources for high-dose-rate treatment of endometrial cancer: 192Ir, 60Co and an electronic brachytherapy source

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Alex; Packianathan, Satyaseelan; He, Rui; Yang, Claus C

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy systems with 192Ir, 60Co and electronic brachytherapy source (EBS) for treatment of endometrial cancers. Methods: Two additional plans were generated per patient fraction using a 60Co source and Xoft-EBS on 10 selected patients, previously treated with a vaginal cylinder applicator using a 192Ir source. Dose coverage of “PTV_CYLD”, a 5-mm shell surrounding the cylinder, was evaluated. Doses to the following organs at risk (OARs) the rectum, bladder and sigmoid were evaluated in terms of V35% and V50%, the percentage volume receiving 35% and 50% of the prescription dose, respectively, and D2cm3, the highest dose to a 2-cm3 volume of an OAR. Results: Xoft-EBS reduces doses to all OARs in the lower dose range, but it does not always provide better sparing of the rectum in higher dose range as does evaluation using D2cm3. V150% and V200% for PTV_CYLD was up to four times greater for Xoft-EBS plans than for plans generated with 192Ir or 60Co. Surface mucosal (vaginal cylinder surface) doses were also 23% higher for Xoft-EBS than for 192Ir or 60Co plans. Conclusion: Xoft-EBS is a suitable HDR source for vaginal applicator treatment with advantages of reducing radiation exposure to OARs in the lower dose range, while simultaneously increasing the vaginal mucosal dose. Advances in knowledge: This work presents newer knowledge in dosimetric comparison between 192Ir or 60Co and Xoft-EBS sources for endometrial vaginal cylinder HDR planning. PMID:26743941

  17. SU-E-T-380: Evaluation of BEBIG HDR 60Co System for AccuBoost Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zehtabian, M; Sina, S; Rivard, M; Meigooni, A Soleimani

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this project, the possibility of utilizing the BEBIG 60Co HDR system for AccuBoostTM treatment has been evaluated. Methods: Dose distributions in various breast sizes have been calculated for both Co-60 and Ir-192 sources using the MCNP5 code. These calculations were performed in breast tissues with thicknesses of 4cm, 6cm, and 8cm. The initial calculations were performed with the same applicator dimensions as the existing applicators used with the HDR Ir-192 system. The activity of the Co-60 source was selected such that the dose at the breast center was the same as the values from 192Ir. Then, the applicator thicknesses were increased to twice of those used with HDR Ir-192 system, for reducing skin and chest doses by Co-60 system. Dose to breast skin and chest wall were compared for both applicators types, with and without inclusion of a focusing cone at the applicator center. Results: The results showed that loading HDR Co-60 source inside the thin applicators impose higher doses to breast skin and chest wall compared to the 192Ir source. The area of the chest wall covered by 10Gy when treated by Co-60 with the thin and thick applicators, or treated by Ir-192 with thin applicator are 79cm2, 39cm2, and 3.8cm2, respectively. These values are reduced to 34cm2, 0cm2, and 0cm2 by using the focusing cone. It is worth noting that the breast skin areas covered by the 60Gy isodose line are 9.9cm2 and 7.8cm2 for Co-60 with the thin and thick applicators, respectively, while it is 20cm2 for Ir-192 when no focusing cone is present. These values are 0cm2, 0cm2, and 11cm2 in the presence of the focusing cone. Conclusion: The results indicate that using Co-60 with the thicker applicators is beneficial because of the higher half-life of Co-60, and the reduced maximum skin dose when compared with Ir-192.

  18. APMP key comparison for the measurement of air kerma for 60Co (APMP.RI(I)-K1.1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, D. V.; Lee, J.-H.; Budiantari, C. T.; Laban, J.; Saito, N.; Srimanoroth, S.; Khaled, N. E.

    2016-01-01

    The results are reported for an APMP.R(I)-K1.1 comparison that extends the regional comparison of standards for air kerma APMP.R(I)-K1 to several laboratories unable to participate earlier. The comparison was conducted with the goal of supporting the relevant calibration and measurement capabilities (CMCs) planned for publication by the participant laboratories. The comparison was conducted by the pilot laboratory, the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (ARPANSA), Australia, supported by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), Taiwan, in a modified ring-shaped arrangement from September 2009 to November 2010, in parallel with an APMP.R(I)-K4 comparison being piloted by the INER. The laboratories that took part in the comparison were the ARPANSA, the Centre of Technology of Radiation Safety and Metrology (PTKMR-BATAN), Indonesia, the Division of Radiation and Medical Devices (DMSC), Thailand, the INER, the National Centre for Radiation Science (NCRS), New Zealand, the National Institute for Standards (NIS), Egypt and the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ/AIST), Japan. The two primary laboratories, ARPANSA and NMIJ, were chosen as the linking laboratories. Three ionization chambers were used as transfer instruments to be calibrated in terms of air kerma in 60Co radiotherapy beams. The comparison result is based on the ratio between the air kerma calibration coefficients (NK) determined by the participants and the mean of the results of the linking laboratories. The mean comparison ratio was found to be within 0.5 % of the key comparison reference value KCRV. The largest deviation between any two comparison ratios for the three chambers in terms of air kerma was 2.0 %. An analysis of the participant uncertainty budgets enabled the calculation of degrees of equivalence (DoE) in terms of the deviations of the results and their associated uncertainties. As a result of this APMP comparison, the BIPM key comparison database (KCDB) should

  19. A novel challenge test incorporating irradiation (60Co) of compost sub-samples to validate thermal lethality towards pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Moore, John E; Watabe, Miyuki; Stewart, Andrew; Cherie Millar, B; Rao, Juluri R

    2009-01-01

    Maturing compost heaps normally attaining temperatures ranging from 55 to 65 degrees C is generally regarded to conform to recommended biological risks and sanitation standards for composts stipulated by either EU or US-EPA. Composted products derived from animal sources are further required by EU biohazard safety regulatory legislation that such composts either attain 70 degrees C for over 3h during maturation or via treatment at 70 degrees C for 1h before being considered for dispensation on land. The setting of the upper limit of thermal lethality at 70 degrees C/1h for achieving biosecurity of the animal waste composted products (e.g. pelleted fertilizer formulations) is not properly substantiated by specific validation tests, comprising a 'wipe-out' step (usually via autoclaving) followed by inoculation of a prescribed bacterium, exposure to 70 degrees C/1h and the lethality determined. Pelleted formulations of composts are not amenable for wet methods (autoclaving) for wipe-out sterilization step as this is detrimental to the pellet and compromises sample integrity. This study describes a laboratory method involving the employment of ((60)Co) irradiation 'wipe-out' step to: (a) compost sub-samples drawn from compost formulation heaps and (b) pelleted products derived from composted animal products while determining the thermal lethality of a given time/temperature (70 degrees C/1h) treatment process and by challenging the irradiated sample (not just with one bacterium but), out with 10 potential food-poisoning organisms from the bacterial genera (Campylobacter, Escherichia, Listeria, Salmonella, Yersinia) frequently detected in pig and poultry farm wastes. This challenge test on compost sub-samples can be a useful intervention ploy for 'inspection and validation' technique for composters during the compost maturity process, whose attainment of temperatures of 55-65 degrees C is presumed sufficient for attainment of sanitation. Stringent measures are further

  20. GENII (Generation II): The Hanford Environmental Radiation Dosimetry Software System: Volume 3, Code maintenance manual: Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Strenge, D.L.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1988-09-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project was undertaken to incorporate the internal dosimetry models recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in updated versions of the environmental pathway analysis models used at Hanford. The resulting second generation of Hanford environmental dosimetry computer codes is compiled in the Hanford Environmental Dosimetry System (Generation II, or GENII). This coupled system of computer codes is intended for analysis of environmental contamination resulting from acute or chronic releases to, or initial contamination of, air, water, or soil, on through the calculation of radiation doses to individuals or populations. GENII is described in three volumes of documentation. This volume is a Code Maintenance Manual for the serious user, including code logic diagrams, global dictionary, worksheets to assist with hand calculations, and listings of the code and its associated data libraries. The first volume describes the theoretical considerations of the system. The second volume is a Users' Manual, providing code structure, users' instructions, required system configurations, and QA-related topics. 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. GENII: The Hanford Environmental Radiation Dosimetry Software System: Volume 2, Users' manual: Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Strenge, D.L.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1988-11-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project was undertaken to incorporate the internal dosimetry models recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in updated versions of the environmental pathway analysis models used at Hanford. The resulting second generation of Hanford environmental dosimetry computer codes is compiled in the Hanford Environmental Dosimetry System (Generation II, or GENII). The purpose of this coupled system of computer codes is to analyze environmental contamination of, air, water, or soil. This is accomplished by calculating radiation doses to individuals or populations. GENII is described in three volumes of documentation. This second volume is a Users' Manual, providing code structure, users' instructions, required system configurations, and QA-related topics. The first volume describes the theoretical considerations of the system. The third volume is a Code Maintenance Manual for the user who requires knowledge of code detail. It includes logic diagrams, global dictionary, worksheets, example hand calculations, and listings of the code and its associated data libraries. 27 refs., 17 figs., 23 tabs.

  2. Gene expression-based dosimetry by dose and time in mice following acute radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Tucker, James D; Divine, George W; Grever, William E; Thomas, Robert A; Joiner, Michael C; Smolinski, Joseph M; Auner, Gregory W

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and reliable methods for performing biological dosimetry are of paramount importance in the event of a large-scale nuclear event. Traditional dosimetry approaches lack the requisite rapid assessment capability, ease of use, portability and low cost, which are factors needed for triaging a large number of victims. Here we describe the results of experiments in which mice were acutely exposed to (60)Co gamma rays at doses of 0 (control) to 10 Gy. Blood was obtained from irradiated mice 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 days after exposure. mRNA expression levels of 106 selected genes were obtained by reverse-transcription real time PCR. Stepwise regression of dose received against individual gene transcript expression levels provided optimal dosimetry at each time point. The results indicate that only 4-7 different gene transcripts are needed to explain ≥ 0.69 of the variance (R(2)), and that receiver-operator characteristics, a measure of sensitivity and specificity, of ≥ 0.93 for these statistical models were achieved at each time point. These models provide an excellent description of the relationship between the actual and predicted doses up to 6 Gy. At doses of 8 and 10 Gy there appears to be saturation of the radiation-response signals with a corresponding diminution of accuracy. These results suggest that similar analyses in humans may be advantageous for use in a field-portable device designed to assess exposures in mass casualty situations.

  3. Gene Expression-Based Dosimetry by Dose and Time in Mice Following Acute Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, James D.; Divine, George W.; Grever, William E.; Thomas, Robert A.; Joiner, Michael C.; Smolinski, Joseph M.; Auner, Gregory W.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and reliable methods for performing biological dosimetry are of paramount importance in the event of a large-scale nuclear event. Traditional dosimetry approaches lack the requisite rapid assessment capability, ease of use, portability and low cost, which are factors needed for triaging a large number of victims. Here we describe the results of experiments in which mice were acutely exposed to 60Co gamma rays at doses of 0 (control) to 10 Gy. Blood was obtained from irradiated mice 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 days after exposure. mRNA expression levels of 106 selected genes were obtained by reverse-transcription real time PCR. Stepwise regression of dose received against individual gene transcript expression levels provided optimal dosimetry at each time point. The results indicate that only 4–7 different gene transcripts are needed to explain ≥ 0.69 of the variance (R2), and that receiver-operator characteristics, a measure of sensitivity and specificity, of ≥ 0.93 for these statistical models were achieved at each time point. These models provide an excellent description of the relationship between the actual and predicted doses up to 6 Gy. At doses of 8 and 10 Gy there appears to be saturation of the radiation-response signals with a corresponding diminution of accuracy. These results suggest that similar analyses in humans may be advantageous for use in a field-portable device designed to assess exposures in mass casualty situations. PMID:24358280

  4. Initial radiation dosimetry at Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    1983-09-01

    The dosimetry of A-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki is discussed in light of the new dosimetry developed in 1980 by the author. The important changes resulting from the new dosimetry are the ratios of neutron to gamma doses, particularly at Hiroshima. The implications of these changes in terms of epidemiology and radiation protection standards are discussed. (ACR)

  5. Nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies.

    PubMed

    Sims, C S

    1989-09-01

    Twenty-two nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies utilizing the fast-pulse Health Physics Research Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducted since 1965. These studies have provided a total of 62 different organizations a forum for discussion of criticality accident dosimetry, an opportunity to test their neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry systems under a variety of simulated criticality accident conditions, and the experience of comparing results with reference dose values as well as with the measured results obtained by others making measurements under identical conditions. Sixty-nine nuclear accidents (27 with unmoderated neutron energy spectra and 42 with eight different shielded spectra) have been simulated in the studies. Neutron doses were in the 0.2-8.5 Gy range and gamma doses in the 0.1-2.0 Gy range. A total of 2,289 dose measurements (1,311 neutron, 978 gamma) were made during the intercomparisons. The primary methods of neutron dosimetry were activation foils, thermoluminescent dosimeters, and blood sodium activation. The main methods of gamma dose measurement were thermoluminescent dosimeters, radiophotoluminescent glass, and film. About 68% of the neutron measurements met the accuracy guidelines (+/- 25%) and about 52% of the gamma measurements met the accuracy criterion (+/- 20%) for accident dosimetry.

  6. New developments in internal dosimetry models.

    PubMed

    Nosske, D; Blanchardon, E; Bolch, W E; Breustedt, B; Eckerman, K F; Giussani, A; Harrison, J D; Klein, W; Leggett, R W; Lopez, M A; Luciani, A; Zankl, M

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes new biokinetic and dosimetric models, especially those being developed by ICRP which will be used in the forthcoming documents on Occupational Intakes of Radionuclides. It also presents the results of a working group within the European project CONRAD which is being continued within EURADOS. This group is implementing the new models, performing quality assurance of the model implementation (including their description) and giving guidance to the scientific community on the application of the models for individual dose assessment.

  7. Design and operation of internal dosimetry programs

    SciTech Connect

    LaBone, T.R.

    1991-01-01

    The proposed revision to USNRC 10 CFR 20 and the USDOE Order 5480.11 require intakes of radioactive material to be evaluated. Radiation dose limits are based on the sum of effective dose equivalent from intakes and the whole body dose from external sources. These significant changes in the regulations will require, at a minimum, a complete review of personnel monitoring programs to determine their adequacy. In this session we will review a systematic method of designing a routine personnel monitoring program that will comply with the requirements of the new regulations. Specific questions discussed are: (a) What are the goals and objectives of a routine personnel monitoring program (b) When is a routine personnel monitoring program required (c) What are the required capabilities of the routine personnel monitoring program (d) What should be done with the information generated in a personnel monitoring program Specific recommendations and interpretations are given in the session. 5 refs., 3 figs., 33 tabs.

  8. Studies in Ultrasonic Dosimetry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouni, Abderrachid

    The widespread use of ultrasonic devices in both industry and medicine confirms the great importance of ultrasound as a source of nonionizing radiation. The biological effects of this type of radiation are not completely known up to today, and the need for proper dosimetry is evident. Previous work in the field has been limited to the determination of ultrasonic energy deposition by attenuation measurements of traveling sound waves in homogenized specimens. Alternatively, observed effects were correlated to the output of the source. The objective of this work was to correlate the absorption properties of sound absorbing media to their elastic properties and deduce a correlation between the sonic absorption coefficient and the corresponding Young's modulus. Energy deposition measurements were performed in isotropic rubber samples and in anisotropic meat specimens by the use of the thermocouple probe method which measures the absorbed energy directly. Elasticity measurements were performed for the different types of materials used. The Young's modulus for each type was deduced from defletion measurements on rectangular strips when subjected to successive forces of varying magnitude. The final experimental results showed the existence of a linear relationship between the absorption coefficient of a given elastic material and the inverse square root of its Young's modulus.

  9. Clinical radionuclide therapy dosimetry: the quest for the “Holy Gray”

    PubMed Central

    Bodei, L.; Giammarile, F.; Linden, O.; Luster, M.; Oyen, W. J. G.; Tennvall, J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Radionuclide therapy has distinct similarities to, but also profound differences from external radiotherapy. Review This review discusses techniques and results of previously developed dosimetry methods in thyroid carcinoma, neuro-endocrine tumours, solid tumours and lymphoma. In each case, emphasis is placed on the level of evidence and practical applicability. Although dosimetry has been of enormous value in the preclinical phase of radiopharmaceutical development, its clinical use to optimise administered activity on an individual patient basis has been less evident. In phase I and II trials, dosimetry may be considered an inherent part of therapy to establish the maximum tolerated dose and dose–response relationship. To prove that dosimetry-based radionuclide therapy is of additional benefit over fixed dosing or dosing per kilogram body weight, prospective randomised phase III trials with appropriate end points have to be undertaken. Data in the literature which underscore the potential of dosimetry to avoid under- and overdosing and to standardise radionuclide therapy methods internationally are very scarce. Developments In each section, particular developments and insights into these therapies are related to opportunities for dosimetry. The recent developments in PET and PET/CT imaging, including micro-devices for animal research, and molecular medicine provide major challenges for innovative therapy and dosimetry techniques. Furthermore, the increasing scientific interest in the radiobiological features specific to radionuclide therapy will advance our ability to administer this treatment modality optimally. PMID:17268773

  10. AAPM's TG-51 protocol for clinical reference dosimetry of high-energy photon and electron beams.

    PubMed

    Almond, P R; Biggs, P J; Coursey, B M; Hanson, W F; Huq, M S; Nath, R; Rogers, D W

    1999-09-01

    A protocol is prescribed for clinical reference dosimetry of external beam radiation therapy using photon beams with nominal energies between 60Co and 50 MV and electron beams with nominal energies between 4 and 50 MeV. The protocol was written by Task Group 51 (TG-51) of the Radiation Therapy Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and has been formally approved by the AAPM for clinical use. The protocol uses ion chambers with absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factors, N(60Co)D,w which are traceable to national primary standards, and the equation D(Q)w = MkQN(60Co)D,w where Q is the beam quality of the clinical beam, D(Q)w is the absorbed dose to water at the point of measurement of the ion chamber placed under reference conditions, M is the fully corrected ion chamber reading, and kQ is the quality conversion factor which converts the calibration factor for a 60Co beam to that for a beam of quality Q. Values of kQ are presented as a function of Q for many ion chambers. The value of M is given by M = PionP(TP)PelecPpolMraw, where Mraw is the raw, uncorrected ion chamber reading and Pion corrects for ion recombination, P(TP) for temperature and pressure variations, Pelec for inaccuracy of the electrometer if calibrated separately, and Ppol for chamber polarity effects. Beam quality, Q, is specified (i) for photon beams, by %dd(10)x, the photon component of the percentage depth dose at 10 cm depth for a field size of 10x10 cm2 on the surface of a phantom at an SSD of 100 cm and (ii) for electron beams, by R50, the depth at which the absorbed-dose falls to 50% of the maximum dose in a beam with field size > or =10x10 cm2 on the surface of the phantom (> or =20x20 cm2 for R50>8.5 cm) at an SSD of 100 cm. R50 is determined directly from the measured value of I50, the depth at which the ionization falls to 50% of its maximum value. All clinical reference dosimetry is performed in a water phantom. The reference depth for calibration

  11. Response of lithium formate EPR dosimeters at photon energies relevant to the dosimetry of brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Adolfsson, Emelie; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun; Grindborg, Jan-Erik; Gustafsson, Haakan; Lund, Eva; Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: To investigate experimentally the energy dependence of the detector response of lithium formate EPR dosimeters for photon energies below 1 MeV relative to that at {sup 60}Co energies. High energy photon beams are used in calibrating dosimeters for use in brachytherapy since the absorbed dose to water can be determined with high accuracy in such beams using calibrated ion chambers and standard dosimetry protocols. In addition to any differences in mass-energy absorption properties between water and detector, variations in radiation yield (detector response) with radiation quality, caused by differences in the density of ionization in the energy imparted (LET), may exist. Knowledge of an eventual deviation in detector response with photon energy is important for attaining high accuracy in measured brachytherapy dose distributions. Methods: Lithium formate EPR dosimeters were irradiated to known levels of air kerma in 25-250 kV x-ray beams and in {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co beams at the Swedish Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratory. Conversions from air kerma free in air into values of mean absorbed dose to the detectors were made using EGSnrc MC simulations and x-ray energy spectra measured or calculated for the actual beams. The signals from the detectors were measured using EPR spectrometry. Detector response (the EPR signal per mean absorbed dose to the detector) relative to that for {sup 60}Co was determined for each beam quality. Results: Significant decreases in the relative response ranging from 5% to 6% were seen for x-ray beams at tube voltages {<=}180 kV. No significant reduction in the relative response was seen for {sup 137}Cs and 250 kV x rays. Conclusions: When calibrated in {sup 60}Co or MV photon beams, corrections for the photon energy dependence of detector response are needed to achieve the highest accuracy when using lithium formate EPR dosimeters for measuring absorbed doses around brachytherapy sources emitting photons in the energy

  12. In vivo dosimetry with silicon diodes in total body irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, F. F.; Amaral, L. L.; Costa, A. M.; Netto, T. G.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this work is the characterization and application of silicon diode detectors for in vivo dosimetry in total body irradiation (TBI) treatments. It was evaluated the diode response with temperature, dose rate, gantry angulations and field size. A maximum response variation of 2.2% was obtained for temperature dependence. The response variation for dose rate and angular was within 1.2%. For field size dependence, the detector response increased with field until reach a saturation region, where no more primary radiation beam contributes for dose. The calibration was performed in a TBI setup. Different lateral thicknesses from one patient were simulated and then the calibration factors were determined by means of maximum depth dose readings. Subsequent to calibration, in vivo dosimetry measurements were performed. The response difference between diode readings and the prescribed dose for all treatments was below 4%. This difference is in agreement as recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), which is ±5%. The present work to test the applicability of a silicon diode dosimetry system for performing in vivo dose measurements in TBI techniques presented good results. These measurements demonstrated the value of diode dosimetry as a treatment verification method and its applicability as a part of a quality assurance program in TBI treatments.

  13. The 60Co- γ ray-initiated seeded-emulsion polymerization of methyl methacrylate in the presence of waterborne polyurethane seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guixi; Zhang, Zhicheng

    2004-09-01

    In this work, the waterborne polyurethane (WPU)/poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) composite material was successfully prepared via 60Co- γ ray radiation-induced seeded emulsion polymerization. The kinetic curves of the synthesis of WPU have been obtained in MMA medium and in acetone medium, respectively. The FT-IR spectra were used to investigate the grafting efficiency of the PMMA on WPU backbone.

  14. Study of the dosimetric differences between (192)Ir and (60)Co sources of high dose rate brachytherapy for breast interstitial implant.

    PubMed

    Sinnatamby, Mourougan; Nagarajan, Vivekanandan; Kanipakam Sathyanarayana, Reddy; Karunanidhi, Gunaseelan; Singhavajala, Vivekanandam

    2016-01-01

    The study intends to compare (192)Ir source against the (60)Co source for interstitial breast metal implant in high dose rate brachytherapy. Few studies have been reported to compare (60)Co and (192)Ir on HDR brachytherapy in gynaecology and prostate cancer and very few with reference to breast cancer. Twenty patients who had undergone interstitial template guided breast implant were treated in HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy unit. Plans were generated substituting (60)Co source without changing the dwell positions and optimization. Cumulative dose volume histograms were compared. The reference isodose line enclosing CTV (CTVref) and the 2.34% difference seen in the volume enclosed by the reference isodose line (V ref) between the two isotopes show small but statistically significant difference (p < 0.05). In DHI, no difference was observed in the relative dose between the two sources (p = 0.823). The over dose volume index showed 11% difference. The conformity index showed 2.32% difference compared to (192)Ir (p < 0.05). D mean (%) and D max (%) for the heart, ipsilateral lung, ipsilateral ribs, skin presented very small difference. V 5% and V 10% of the heart shows 25% and 32% difference in dose. D 2cc (%) and D 0.1cc (%) for the contralateral breast, contralateral lung and D 2cc (%) of the skin displayed significant difference (p < 0.05). However, D 0.1cc (%) of the skin indicated no noteworthy difference with p = 0.343. Based on the 3D dosimetric analysis of patient plans considered in this study, most of the DVH parameters showed statistically significant differences which can be reduced by treatment planning optimization techniques. (60)Co isotope can be used as a viable alternative because of its long half-life, logistic advantages in procurement, infrequent need of source replacement and disposal of used source.

  15. Genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of 60Co gamma-rays and 90Sr/90Y beta-rays on Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1).

    PubMed

    Murakami, Daniella; Suzuki, Miriam Fussae; da Silva Dias, Mauro; Okazaki, Kayo

    2004-07-01

    Among various types of ionizing radiation, the beta emitter radionuclides are involved in many sectors of human activity, such as nuclear medicine, nuclear industries and biomedicine, with a consequently increased risk of accidental, occupational or therapeutic exposure. Despite their recognized importance, there is little information about the effect of beta particles at the cellular level when compared to other types of ionizing radiation. Thus, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of (90)Sr/(90)Y-a pure, highly energetic beta source-on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and to compare them with data obtained with (60)Co. CHO cells irradiated with different doses of (60)Co (0.34 Gy min(-1)) and (90)Sr/(90)Y (0.23 Gy min(-1)) were processed for analysis of clonogenic death, induction of micronuclei (MN) and interphase death. The survival curves obtained for both types of radiation were fitted by the exponential quadratic model and were found to be similar. Also, the cytogenetic results showed similar frequencies of radio-induced MN between gamma and beta radiations and the MN distribution pattern among cells did not follow the expected Poisson probability pattern. The relative variance values were significantly higher in cells irradiated with (90)Sr/(90)Y than with (60)Co in all exposure doses. The irradiated cells showed more necrotic cells 72 h and 96 h after exposure to beta than to gamma radiation. In general, the (90)Sr/(90)Y beta-radiation was more damaging than (60)Co gamma-rays. The data obtained also demonstrated the need to use several parameters for a better estimate of cellular sensitivity to the action of genotoxic agents, which would be important in terms of radiobiology, oncology and therapeutics.

  16. Numerical simulation of 60Co-gamma irradiation effects on electrical characteristics of n-type FZ silicon X-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneshwara Raja, P.; Rao, C. V. S.; Narasimha Murty, N. V. L.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the gamma irradiation effects on the electrical characteristics of n-type float zone (FZ) silicon detectors by incorporating a 4-level 60Co-gamma radiation damage model in the commercial device simulator for plasma X-ray tomography diagnostics. In the simulations, a segmented n-type silicon detector (i.e. p+-n-n+ structure) is considered with varying substrate resistivity (ρ = 5.4, 2.5, and 0.3 kΩ cm). The simulation results have been validated with the reported experimental measurements carried out on similar device structures. The 60Co-gamma irradiation induced changes in the electrical characteristics of the detectors are analyzed up to the dose of 3500 Mrad. The possible gamma induced degradation in the X-ray response of the detectors is investigated from the changes in the effective doping concentration and the leakage current of the detectors. The survival of the gamma irradiated detectors is predicted from the simulation studies. The comparison between the 60Co-gamma and 14.1 MeV neutron irradiation effects (typical fusion environments) on silicon detectors is attempted.

  17. Areal distribution of /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 90/Sr in streambed gravels of White Oak Creek Watershed, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Cerling, T.E.; Spalding, B.P.

    1981-01-01

    The concentrations of /sup 90/Sr, /sup 60/Co, and /sup 137/Cs in streambed gravels from contaminated drainages in White Oak Creek Watershed were determined. Methods to determine the relative contributions of various sources to the total discharge from the watershed were developed. Principal sources of /sup 90/Sr were: ORNL plant effluents (50%), leaching from solid waste disposal area (SWDA) 4 (30%), and leaching from SWDA 5 (10%). Minor sources included SWDA 3, the Molten Salt Reactor Facility, and intermediate-level liquid waste pit 1 with each representing 4% or less of the total basin discharge. The cooling water effluent from the High-Flux Isotope Reactor was the dominant source of /sup 60/Co contamination in the watershed. ORNL plant effluents accounted for almost all the /sup 137/Cs discharge from White Oak Creek basin. Downstream radionuclide concentrations were constant until significant dilution by other tributaries occurred. Any future activities giving rise to additional contamination can now be identified. Distribution coefficients between streambed gravels and streamwater for /sup 85/Sr, /sup 60/Co, and /sup 137/Cs were 50, 560, and 8460 ml/g, respectively. An abridged radiochemical fractionation developed for /sup 90/Sr was found to be as accurate and precise for these samples as the standard /sup 90/Sr method above levels of 2 dpm/g. (ERB)

  18. DNA double-strand break misrejoining after exposure of primary human fibroblasts to CK characteristic X rays, 29 kVp X rays and 60Co gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Kühne, Martin; Urban, Gerhard; Frankenberg, Dieter; Löbrich, Markus

    2005-11-01

    The efficiency of ionizing photon radiation for inducing mutations, chromosome aberrations, neoplastic cell transformation, and cell killing depends on the photon energy. We investigated the induction and rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) as possible contributors for the varying efficiencies of different photon energies. A specialized pulsed-field gel electrophoresis assay based on Southern hybridization of single Mbp genomic restriction fragments was employed to assess DSB induction and rejoining by quantifying the restriction fragment band. Unrejoined and misrejoined DSBs were determined in dose fractionation protocols using doses per fraction of 2.2 and 4.4 Gy for CK characteristic X rays, 4 and 8 Gy for 29 kVp X rays, and 5, 10 and 20 Gy for 60Co gamma rays. DSB induction by CK characteristic X rays was about twofold higher than for 60Co gamma rays, whereas 29 kVp X rays showed only marginally elevated levels of induced DSBs compared with 60Co gamma rays (a factor of 1.15). Compared with these modest variations in DSB induction, the variations in the levels of unrejoined and misrejoined DSBs were more significant. Our results suggest that differences in the fidelity of DSB rejoining together with the different efficiencies for induction of DSBs can explain the varying biological effectiveness of different photon energies.

  19. Pre-assessment of dose rates of (134)Cs, (137)Cs, and (60)Co for marine biota from discharge of Haiyang Nuclear Power Plant, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Liu, Senlin; Zhang, Yongxing; Chen, Ling; Yan, Yuan; Cheng, Weiya; Lou, Hailin; Zhang, Yongbao

    2015-09-01

    Haiyang Nuclear Power Plant to be built in China was selected as a case for the dose pre-assessment for marine biota in this study. The concentrations of Cs and Co in organisms (turbot, yellow croaker, swimming crab, abalone, sea cucumber, and sea lettuce), seawater, and bottom sediment sampled on-site were measured by neutron activation analysis, and the site-specific transfer parameters (concentration ratios and distribution coefficients) of Cs and Co were calculated. (134)Cs, (137)Cs, and (60)Co activity concentrations in the organisms and the sediment at the site were calculated with the site-specific transfer parameters and the anticipated activity concentrations in the liquid effluent of the nuclear power plant. The ERICA tool was used to estimate the dose rates of (134)Cs, (137)Cs, and (60)Co to the selected organisms based on the biological models developed. The total dose rates of (134)Cs, (137)Cs, and (60)Co to the six organisms were all <0.001 μGy h(-1). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Education and training activities on personal dosimetry service in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tugrul Zeyrek, C; Akbiyik, Hayri

    2013-10-01

    A personal dosimetry service that evaluates the occupational doses for external and internal radiation of the radiation workers is one of the main components of radiation protection programme. The education and training (E&T) activities in this field are basic aspects of the optimisation of all exposures to radiation. The E&T activities in the field of occupational radiation protection at the national and international level are of main interest and implemented by the Ankara Nuclear Research and Training Center. This study describes the Turkish experience in E&T of the staff of dosimetry services, postgraduate students and medical physics experts. In Turkey, the first individual monitoring training course was conducted in 2012. The aim of this study is to provide a structured description of postgraduate courses that are addressed to qualified experts and medical physics experts, and the modules are mainly dedicated to individual monitoring.

  1. Methods and computer readable medium for improved radiotherapy dosimetry planning

    DOEpatents

    Wessol, Daniel E.; Frandsen, Michael W.; Wheeler, Floyd J.; Nigg, David W.

    2005-11-15

    Methods and computer readable media are disclosed for ultimately developing a dosimetry plan for a treatment volume irradiated during radiation therapy with a radiation source concentrated internally within a patient or incident from an external beam. The dosimetry plan is available in near "real-time" because of the novel geometric model construction of the treatment volume which in turn allows for rapid calculations to be performed for simulated movements of particles along particle tracks therethrough. The particles are exemplary representations of alpha, beta or gamma emissions emanating from an internal radiation source during various radiotherapies, such as brachytherapy or targeted radionuclide therapy, or they are exemplary representations of high-energy photons, electrons, protons or other ionizing particles incident on the treatment volume from an external source. In a preferred embodiment, a medical image of a treatment volume irradiated during radiotherapy having a plurality of pixels of information is obtained.

  2. Liulin-type spectrometry-dosimetry instruments.

    PubMed

    Dachev, Ts; Dimitrov, Pl; Tomov, B; Matviichuk, Yu; Spurny, F; Ploc, O; Brabcova, K; Jadrnickova, I

    2011-03-01

    The main purpose of Liulin-type spectrometry-dosimetry instruments (LSDIs) is cosmic radiation monitoring at the workplaces. An LSDI functionally is a low mass, low power consumption or battery-operated dosemeter. LSDIs were calibrated in a wide range of radiation fields, including radiation sources, proton and heavy-ion accelerators and CERN-EC high-energy reference field. Since 2000, LSDIs have been used in the scientific programmes of four manned space flights on the American Laboratory and ESA Columbus modules and on the Russian segment of the International Space Station, one Moon spacecraft and three spacecraft around the Earth, one rocket, two balloons and many aircraft flights. In addition to relative low price, LSDIs have proved their ability to qualify the radiation field on the ground and on the above-mentioned carriers.

  3. A Novel real-time dosimetry technique based on radiation-induced surface activation.

    PubMed

    Tomozawa, H; Takamasa, T; Okamoto, K; Tsujimura, N; Date, H; Nakata, J

    2006-01-01

    A novel real-time dosimetry technique based on radiation-induced surface activation (RISA) phenomenon has been proposed that is similar to ultraviolet surface activation known typically in anatase-type titanium dioxide. It has been found that the RISA phenomenon occurs on the surface of an oxidised semiconductor or oxidised metal film by radiation incidence. The RISA dosemeter has the following advantageous characteristics: (1) output of the RISA dosemeter is proportional to the dose equivalent rate in harsh environments, (2) fluctuation of output of the RISA dosemeter irradiated by (60)Co gamma-rays is <2.5% beyond the total dose equivalent of 1.8 MSv, (3) the transient current observed in simple insulators for a few seconds or more after onset of irradiation was not detected in the RISA dosemeter and (4) this dosemeter worked well even at high temperatures.

  4. ESR response of phenol compounds for dosimetry of gamma photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, M.; Longo, A.; Panzeca, S.; Gallo, S.; Principato, F.; Tomarchio, E.; Parlato, A.; Buttafava, A.; Dondi, D.; Zeffiro, A.

    2014-11-01

    In the present paper we investigate the features of IRGANOX® 1076 phenols as a material for electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry. We experimentally analyzed the ESR response of pellets of IRGANOX® 1076 phenols irradiated with 60Co photons. The best experimental parameters (modulation amplitude and microwave power) for dosimetric applications have been obtained. The dependence of ESR signal as function of γ dose is found to be linear in the dose range studied (12-60 Gy) and the lowest measurable dose is found to be of the order of 1 Gy. The signal after irradiation is very stable in the first thirty days. From the point of view of the tissue equivalence, these materials have mass energy absorption coefficient values comparable with those of soft tissue.

  5. A report on the implementation aspects of the International Atomic Energy Agency's first doctoral coordinated research project, "Management of liver cancer using radionuclide methods with special emphasis on trans-arterial radio-conjugate therapy and internal dosimetry".

    PubMed

    Padhy, Ajit Kumar; Dondi, Maurizio

    2008-03-01

    Liver cancer is one of the most dreaded cancers, and it is highly prevalent in the developing countries, where the resources are extremely scarce to deal with this disease using the current commercially available and expensive therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), in pursuit of its mandate to promote the application of nuclear technology in the health care in its Member States, has developed and clinically evaluated a new and cost-effective therapeutic radio-conjugate, rhenium-188 ((188)Re)-lipiodol for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma through its first Doctoral Coordinated Research Project. The ready availability of no-carrier-added (188)Re from the tungsten-188/(188)Re generator represents a potentially important source of a therapeutic radioisotope for a broad range of therapeutic applications in nuclear medicine. The alumina-based tungsten-188/(188)Re generator system comes with reasonable cost and exhibits attractive therapeutic properties, excellent performance and very long useful shelf-life. Because of the long shelf-life of several months, the use of this generator offers a unique opportunity for the cost-effective and routine availability of a versatile therapeutic radioisotope on an on-demand basis. Further, using its extensive global network and outreach, the IAEA has also transferred the technology of the in-house preparation and use of (188)Re-labeled lipiodol to many institutions around the world, which can now prepare (188)Re-labeled lipiodol in their own radiopharmacy laboratories and treat patients. This effort of the IAEA in trying to address some of the challenges of liver cancer therapy in developing countries has been and truly a global venture with involvement and contributions from several organizations, institutions and numerous individuals. This article discusses some of the implementation aspects of this very important activity of the Agency.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies for copper-64 PET dosimetry and radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Jeffrey N; Jia, Fang; Mohsin, Huma; Sivaguru, Geethapriya; Anderson, Carolyn J; Miller, William H; Henry, Carolyn J; Lewis, Michael R

    2011-06-15

    We previously described a two-antibody model of (64)Cu radioimmunotherapy to evaluate low-dose, solid-tumor response. This model was designed to test the hypothesis that cellular internalization is critical in causing tumor cell death by mechanisms in addition to radiation damage. The purpose of the present study was to estimate radiation dosimetry for both antibodies (mAbs) using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, and evaluate the effect of internalization on tumor growth. Dosimetry was similar between therapy groups. Median time to tumor progression to 1 g ranged from 7 to 12 days for control groups and was 32 days for both treatment groups (p < 0.0001). No statistically significant difference existed between any control group or between the treatment groups. In female nude mice bearing LS174T colon carcinoma xenografts, tumor dosimetry was calculated using serial PET images of three mice in each group of either internalizing (64)Cu-labeled DOTA-cBR96 (DOTA = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) or non-internalizing (64)Cu-labeled DOTA-cT84.66 from 3 to 48 h. For the therapy study, controls (n = 10) received saline, DOTA-cBR96, or DOTA-cT84.66. Treatment animals (n = 9) received 0.890 mCi of (64)Cu-labeled DOTA-cBR96 or 0.710 mCi of (64)Cu-labeled DOTA-cT84.66. Tumors were measured daily. PET imaging allows the use of (64)Cu for pre-therapy calculation of tumor dosimetry. In spite of highly similar tumor dosimetry, an internalizing antibody did not improve the outcome of (64)Cu radioimmunotherapy. Radioresistance of this tumor cell line and copper efflux may have confounded the study. Further investigations of the 2 therapeutic efficacy of (64)Cu-labeled mAbs will focus on interaction between (64)Cu and tumor suppressor genes and copper chaperones.

  7. Intrinsic dosimetry. Properties and mechanisms of thermoluminescence in commercial borosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Richard A.

    2012-10-01

    Intrinsic dosimetry is the method of measuring total absorbed dose received by the walls of a container holding radioactive material. By considering the total absorbed dose received by a container in tandem with the physical characteristics of the radioactive material housed within that container, this method has the potential to provide enhanced pathway information regarding the history of the container and its radioactive contents. The latest in a series of experiments designed to validate and demonstrate this newly developed tool are reported. Thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry was used to measure dose effects on raw stock borosilicate container glass up to 70 days after gamma ray, x-ray, beta particle or ultraviolet irradiations at doses from 0.15 to 20 Gy. The TL glow curve when irradiated with 60Co was separated into five peaks: two relatively unstable peaks centered near 120 and 165°C, and three relatively stable peaks centered near 225, 285, and 360°C. Depending on the borosilicate glass source, the minimum measurable dose using this technique is 0.15-0.5 Gy, which is roughly equivalent to a 24 hr irradiation at 1 cm from a 50-165 ng source of 60Co. Differences in TL glow curve shape and intensity were observed for the glasses from different geographical origins. These differences can be explained by changes in the intensities of the five peaks. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and multivariate statistical methods were used to relate the TL intensity and peaks to electron/hole traps and compositional variations.

  8. Unexplained overexposures on physical dosimetry reported by biological dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Montoro, A; Almonacid, M; Villaescusa, J I; Verdu, G

    2009-01-01

    The Medical Service of the Radiation Protection Service from the University Hospital La Fe (Valencia, Spain), carries out medical examinations of the workers occupationally exposed to ionising radiation. The Biological Dosimetry Laboratory is developing its activity since 2001. Up to now, the activities have been focused in performing biological dosimetry studies of Interventionists workers from La Fe Hospital. Recently, the Laboratory has been authorized by the Health Authority in the Valencian Community. Unexplained overexposures of workers and patients are also studied. Workers suspected of being overexposed to ionising radiation were referred for investigation by cytogenetic analysis. Two of these were from Hospitals of the Valencian Community and one belonged to an uranium mine from Portugal. Hospital workers had a physical dose by thermoluminiscence dosimeters (TLD) that exceeded the established limit. The worker of the uranium mine received a dose from a lost source of Cesium 137 with an activity of 170 mCi. All three cases showed normal values after the hematological analysis. Finally, the aim of this study consist to determine whether the dose showed by the dosimeter is reliable or not. In the case of workers that wore dosimeter, it is concluded that the doses measured by dosimeter are not corresponding to real doses. Hospital worker with a physical dose of 2.6 Sv and 0.269 Sv had an estimated absorbed dose by biological dosimetry of 0.076 Gy (0-0.165 Gy) and 0 Gy (0-0.089 Gy), respectively. In case of the mine worker an estimated absorbed dose of 0.073 Gy (0-0.159 Gy) was obtained by biological dosimetry. In all cases we used the odds ratio to present the results due to a very low frequency of observed aberrations [1].

  9. Reference dosimetry in clinical high-energy photon beams: comparison of the AAPM TG-51 and AAPM TG-21 dosimetry protocols.

    PubMed

    Saiful Huq, M; Andreo, P

    2001-01-01

    Task Group 51 (TG-51) of the Radiation Therapy Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) has recently developed a new protocol for the calibration of high-energy photon and electron beams used in radiation therapy. The formalism and the dosimetry procedures recommended in this protocol are based on the use of an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of absorbed dose-to-water in a standards laboratory's 60Co gamma ray beam. This is different from the recommendations given in the AAPM TG-21 protocol, which are based on an exposure calibration factor of an ionization chamber in a 60Co beam. The purpose of this work is to compare the determination of absorbed dose-to-water in reference conditions in high-energy photon beams following the recommendations given in the two dosimetry protocols. This is realized by performing calibrations of photon beams with nominal accelerating potential of 6, 18 and 25 MV, generated by an Elekta MLCi and SL25 series linear accelerator. Two widely used Farmer-type ionization chambers having different composition, PTW 30001 (PMMA wall) and NE 2571 (graphite wall), were used for this study. Ratios of AAPM TG-51 to AAPM TG-21 doses to water are found to be 1.008, 1.007 and 1.009 at 6, 18 and 25 MV, respectively when the PTW chamber is used. The corresponding results for the NE chamber are 1.009, 1.010 and 1.013. The uncertainties for the ratios of the absorbed dose determined by the two protocols are estimated to be about 1.5%. A detailed analysis of the reasons for the discrepancies is made which includes comparing the formalisms, correction factors and quantities in the two protocols, as well as the influence of the implementation of the different standards for chamber calibration. The latter has been found to have a considerable influence on the differences in clinical dosimetry, even larger than the adoption of the new data and recommended procedures, as most intrinsic differences cancel out due to the

  10. An experimental study on cervix cancer with combination of HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system and 60Co radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To evaluate the killing effect of HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system combined with 60Co radiotherapy on human cervical cancer Hela cell line in vitro and in vivo, and to explore the radiosensitization by HSV-TK/GCV system. Methods HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system and 60Co radiotherapy were used separately or in combination on human cervical cancer Hela cell line in vitro and in vivo to compare their effects. Colony formation test and the rate of radiosensitization effect (E/O) were employed to observed the radiosensitization by HSV-TK/GCV system. Results HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system had strong therapeutic effects on Hela cells in vitro and in vivo (the inhibition rates were 45.8% and 39.5%, respectively), moreover, the combined administration of gene therapy and radiotherapy had stronger therapeutic effects in vitro and in vivo (the inhibition rate was 87.5% in vitro, and the inhibition rate was 87.9% in vivo) (P < 0.01). The inhibition rate by radiotherapy alone was 42.4% in vitro and 35.8% in vivo. The sensitivity of combined therapy to radiotherapy increased more than that of therapy alone, the ability of colony formation decreased (P < 0.01). The rate of radiosensitivity effect (E/O) was 3.17(> 1.4), indicating HSV-TK/GCV system could exert a sensitizing effect on 60Co radiotherapy of the transplanted human cervical cancer cell in nude mice. Conclusion HSV-TK/GCV system had radiosensitization. Gene therapy combined with radiotherapy may be a good supplementary method for cervix cancer synthetic treatment. PMID:21054886

  11. Cluster pattern analysis of energy deposition sites for the brachytherapy sources 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Fernanda; Tilly, Nina; Bäckström, Gloria; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2014-09-21

    Analysing the pattern of energy depositions may help elucidate differences in the severity of radiation-induced DNA strand breakage for different radiation qualities. It is often claimed that energy deposition (ED) sites from photon radiation form a uniform random pattern, but there is indication of differences in RBE values among different photon sources used in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to analyse the spatial patterns of EDs from 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs sources commonly used in brachytherapy and a 60Co source as a reference radiation. The results suggest that there is both a non-uniform and a uniform random component to the frequency distribution of distances to the nearest neighbour ED. The closest neighbouring EDs show high spatial correlation for all investigated radiation qualities, whilst the uniform random component dominates for neighbours with longer distances for the three higher mean photon energy sources (192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co). The two lower energy photon emitters (103Pd and 125I) present a very small uniform random component. The ratio of frequencies of clusters with respect to 60Co differs up to 15% for the lower energy sources and less than 2% for the higher energy sources when the maximum distance between each pair of EDs is 2 nm. At distances relevant to DNA damage, cluster patterns can be differentiated between the lower and higher energy sources. This may be part of the explanation to the reported difference in RBE values with initial DSB yields as an endpoint for these brachytherapy sources.

  12. Cluster pattern analysis of energy deposition sites for the brachytherapy sources 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas, Fernanda; Tilly, Nina; Bäckström, Gloria; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2014-09-01

    Analysing the pattern of energy depositions may help elucidate differences in the severity of radiation-induced DNA strand breakage for different radiation qualities. It is often claimed that energy deposition (ED) sites from photon radiation form a uniform random pattern, but there is indication of differences in RBE values among different photon sources used in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to analyse the spatial patterns of EDs from 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs sources commonly used in brachytherapy and a 60Co source as a reference radiation. The results suggest that there is both a non-uniform and a uniform random component to the frequency distribution of distances to the nearest neighbour ED. The closest neighbouring EDs show high spatial correlation for all investigated radiation qualities, whilst the uniform random component dominates for neighbours with longer distances for the three higher mean photon energy sources (192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co). The two lower energy photon emitters (103Pd and 125I) present a very small uniform random component. The ratio of frequencies of clusters with respect to 60Co differs up to 15% for the lower energy sources and less than 2% for the higher energy sources when the maximum distance between each pair of EDs is 2 nm. At distances relevant to DNA damage, cluster patterns can be differentiated between the lower and higher energy sources. This may be part of the explanation to the reported difference in RBE values with initial DSB yields as an endpoint for these brachytherapy sources.

  13. Results from 2010 Caliban Criticality Dosimetry Intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.

    2011-10-12

    The external dosimetry program participated in a criticality dosimetry intercomparison conducted at the Caliban facility in Valduc, France in 2010. Representatives from the dosimetry and instrumentation groups were present during testing which included irradiations of whole-body beta/gamma (HBGT) and neutron thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), a fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD), electronic alarming dosimeters, and a humanoid phantom filled with reference man concentrations of sodium. This report reviews the testing procedures, preparations, irradiations, and presents results of the tests.

  14. [Effect of combined treatment of 60Co gamma-ray and EMS on antioxidase activity and ODAP content in Lathyrus sativus].

    PubMed

    Qin, X; Wang, F; Wang, X; Zhou, G; Li, Z

    2000-12-01

    Lathyrus sativus seeds were treated with 60Co gamma-ray and EMS(ethyl methane sulfonate), and their emergence rate and SOD, POD and CAT activities were determined. The result indicated that the treatment decreased the emergence rate. The activities of SOD and POD were changed in accordance with the increase of irradiation dose and EMS concentration, while that of CAT had no obvious change. After treatment, the ODAP content in Lathyrus sativus decreased. Amutant was developed, with toxin content of 0.1%, compared to 0.2% in control.

  15. [Effect of tonicity of the medium on the sensitivity of Escherichia coli bacteria to gamma-quantum 60Co, ultrasound and hyperthermia].

    PubMed

    Morozov, I I; Petin, V G; Morozova, G V

    1998-01-01

    The cell lethality and permeability induced in Escherichia coli B/r and Escherichia coli BS-1 by 60Co gamma-ray irradiation, ultrasound and hyperthermia in media containing different concentrations of NaCl have been investigated. It was shown that independently from the nature of damaging factors hypotonic media increase while hypertonic media in certain range of osmolyte concentration decrease sensitivity of cells to action of this factors. It was proposed that discovered phenomenology was caused by salt modification of status of the cell osmotic homeostasis destabilizing by ionizing radiation, ultrasound or hyperthermia and was not related with the system of dark repair of DNA.

  16. Dose responses for adaption to low doses of (60)Co gamma rays and (3)H beta particles in normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Broome, E J; Brown, D L; Mitchel, R E J

    2002-08-01

    The dose response for adaption to radiation at low doses was compared in normal human fibroblasts (AG1522) exposed to either (60)Co gamma rays or (3)H beta particles. Cells were grown in culture to confluence and exposed at either 37 degrees C or 0 degrees C to (3)H beta-particle or (60)Co gamma-ray adapting doses ranging from 0.1 mGy to 500 mGy. These cells, and unexposed control cells, were allowed to adapt during a fixed 3-h, 37 degrees C incubation prior to a 4-Gy challenge dose of (60)Co gamma rays. Adaption was assessed by measuring micronucleus frequency in cytokinesis-blocked, binucleate cells. No adaption was detected in cells exposed to (60)Co gamma radiation at 37 degrees C after a dose of 0.1 mGy given at a low dose rate or to 500 mGy given at a high dose rate. However, low-dose-rate exposure (1-3 mGy/min) to any dose between 1 and 500 mGy from either radiation, delivered at either temperature, caused cells to adapt and reduced the micronucleus frequency that resulted from the subsequent 4-Gy exposure. Within this dose range, the magnitude of the reduction was the same, regardless of the dose or radiation type. These results demonstrate that doses as low as (on average) about one track per cell (1 mGy) produce the same maximum adaptive response as do doses that deposit many tracks per cell, and that the two radiations were not different in this regard. Exposure at a temperature where metabolic processes, including DNA repair, were inactive (0 degrees C) did not alter the result, indicating that the adaptive response is not sensitive to changes in the accumulation of DNA damage within this range. The results also show that the RBE for low doses of tritium beta-particle radiation is 1, using adaption as the end point.

  17. Separation of iron and cobalt using 59Fe and 60Co by dialysis of polyvinylpyrrolidone-metal complexes: a greener approach.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Susanta; Sarkar, Soumi

    2007-04-01

    An environmentally benign method to separate iron and cobalt has been developed using a safe chemical, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The method involves dialysis of PVP-Fe and PVP-Co complexes against triple-distilled water. (59)Fe and (60)Co were used as radioactive tracers of iron and cobalt throughout the experiment. No other chemicals are required for clean separation of cobalt from iron. The optimum condition for separation has been obtained at pH 5 using 10% aqueous solution of PVP. The method is applicable from trace scale to macro-scale. Very high separation factors have been obtained.

  18. Proton beam dosimetry for radiosurgery: implementation of the ICRU Report 59 at the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Newhauser, Wayne D; Myers, Karla D; Rosenthal, Stanley J; Smith, Alfred R

    2002-04-21

    Recent proton dosimetry intercomparisons have demonstrated that the adoption of a common protocol, e.g. ICRU Report 59, can lead to improved consistency in absorbed dose determinations. We compared absorbed dose values, measured in the 160 MeV proton radiosurgery beamline at the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory, based on ionization chamber methods with those from a Faraday cup technique. The Faraday cup method is based on a proton fluence determination that allows the estimation of absorbed dose with the CEMA approximation, under which the dose is equal to the fluence times the mean mass stopping power. The ionization chamber technique employs an air-kerma calibration coefficient for 60Co radiation and a calculated correction in order to take into account the differences in response to 60Co and proton beam radiations. The absorbed dose to water, based on a diode measurement calibrated with a Faraday cup technique, is approximately 2% higher than was obtained from an ionization chamber measurement. At the Bragg peak depth, the techniques agree to within their respective uncertainties, which are both approximately 4% (1 standard deviation). The ionization chamber technique exhibited superior reproducibility and was adopted in our standard clinical practice for radiosurgery.

  19. Proton beam dosimetry for radiosurgery: implementation of the ICRU Report 59 at the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhauser, Wayne D.; Myers, Karla D.; Rosenthal, Stanley J.; Smith, Alfred R.

    2002-04-01

    Recent proton dosimetry intercomparisons have demonstrated that the adoption of a common protocol, e.g. ICRU Report 59, can lead to improved consistency in absorbed dose determinations. We compared absorbed dose values, measured in the 160 MeV proton radiosurgery beamline at the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory, based on ionization chamber methods with those from a Faraday cup technique. The Faraday cup method is based on a proton fluence determination that allows the estimation of absorbed dose with the CEMA approximation, under which the dose is equal to the fluence times the mean mass stopping power. The ionization chamber technique employs an air-kerma calibration coefficient for 60Co radiation and a calculated correction in order to take into account the differences in response to 60Co and proton beam radiations. The absorbed dose to water, based on a diode measurement calibrated with a Faraday cup technique, is approximately 2% higher than was obtained from an ionization chamber measurement. At the Bragg peak depth, the techniques agree to within their respective uncertainties, which are both approximately 4% (1 standard deviation). The ionization chamber technique exhibited superior reproducibility and was adopted in our standard clinical practice for radiosurgery.

  20. Dosimetry of Radiopharmaceuticals for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Nuclear Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Richard

    2011-05-01

    A standard formalism for radionuclide internal radiation dosimetry was developed in the 1960s and continues to be refined today. Early work was based on a mathematical phantom but this is being replaced by phantoms developed from whole-body CT scans to give more realistic dose estimates. The largest contributors to the uncertainties in these dose estimates are the errors associated with in vivo activity quantitation, the variability of the biokinetics between patients and the limited information that can be obtained on these kinetics in individual patients. Despite these limitations, pre-treatment patient-specific dosimetry is being increasing used, particularly to limit the toxicity to non-target organs such as the bone marrow.

  1. Dosimetry of Radiopharmaceuticals for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Nuclear Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Smart, Richard

    2011-05-05

    A standard formalism for radionuclide internal radiation dosimetry was developed in the 1960s and continues to be refined today. Early work was based on a mathematical phantom but this is being replaced by phantoms developed from whole-body CT scans to give more realistic dose estimates. The largest contributors to the uncertainties in these dose estimates are the errors associated with in vivo activity quantitation, the variability of the biokinetics between patients and the limited information that can be obtained on these kinetics in individual patients. Despite these limitations, pre-treatment patient-specific dosimetry is being increasing used, particularly to limit the toxicity to non-target organs such as the bone marrow.

  2. Dosimetry using MRI: can it really be that difficult?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Simon J.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used in gel dosimetry from the very first studies back in the 1980s. Almost all the imaging problems that we still encounter were known about at that time and many were described in the proceedings of the very first International Workshop on Radiation Therapy Gel Dosimetry (DOSGEL ‘99). The quality of MRI scanners has improved enormously in the intervening two decades, so why are there still issues? This review will draw on the wealth of previously presented material from the literature to attempt to answer this question. The reference list provides a “starter pack” that should be viewed as a “jumping off point” for further investigations by the reader, rather than an exhaustive summary of what is a large domain of work.

  3. A new technique for dosimetry reaction cross-section evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Badikov, S.A.

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: An objective of this paper is a unification of the procedure for dosimetry reaction cross-section evaluation. A set of requirements for the unified evaluation procedure is presented. A new code (ORTHO) was developed in order to meet these requirements. A statistical model, an algorithm, and the basic formulae employed in the code are described. The code was used for Ti48(n,p) reaction cross-section evaluation. The results of the evaluation are compared to International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF)-2002 data. The evaluated cross-sections and their correlations from this work are in good agreement with the IRDF-2002 evaluated data, whereas the uncertainties of the evaluated cross-sections are inconsistent. (authors)

  4. Advanced dosimetry systems for the space transport and space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wailly, L. F.; Schneider, M. F.; Clark, B. C.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced dosimetry system concepts are described that will provide automated and instantaneous measurement of dose and particle spectra. Systems are proposed for measuring dose rate from cosmic radiation background to greater than 3600 rads/hr. Charged particle spectrometers, both internal and external to the spacecraft, are described for determining mixed field energy spectra and particle fluxes for both real time onboard and ground-based computer evaluation of the radiation hazard. Automated passive dosimetry systems consisting of thermoluminescent dosimeters and activation techniques are proposed for recording the dose levels for twelve or more crew members. This system will allow automatic onboard readout and data storage of the accumulated dose and can be transmitted to ground after readout or data records recovered with each crew rotation.

  5. EPR dosimetry in a mixed neutron and gamma radiation field.

    PubMed

    Trompier, F; Fattibene, P; Tikunov, D; Bartolotta, A; Carosi, A; Doca, M C

    2004-01-01

    Suitability of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for criticality dosimetry was evaluated for tooth enamel, mannose and alanine pellets during the 'international intercomparison of criticality dosimetry techniques' at the SILENE reactor held in Valduc in June 2002, France. These three materials were irradiated in neutron and gamma-ray fields of various relative intensities and spectral distributions in order to evaluate their neutron sensitivity. The neutron response was found to be around 10% for tooth enamel, 45% for mannose and between 40 and 90% for alanine pellets according their type. According to the IAEA recommendations on the early estimate of criticality accident absorbed dose, analyzed results show the EPR potentiality and complementarity with regular criticality techniques.

  6. CIEMAT EXTERNAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE: ISO/IEC 17025 ACCREDITATION AND 3 Y OF OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE AS AN ACCREDITED LABORATORY.

    PubMed

    Romero, A M; Rodríguez, R; López, J L; Martín, R; Benavente, J F

    2016-09-01

    In 2008, the CIEMAT Radiation Dosimetry Service decided to implement a quality management system, in accordance with established requirements, in order to achieve ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation. Although the Service comprises the approved individual monitoring services of both external and internal radiation, this paper is specific to the actions taken by the External Dosimetry Service, including personal and environmental dosimetry laboratories, to gain accreditation and the reflections of 3 y of operational experience as an accredited laboratory. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. I-124 Imaging and Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Kuker, Russ; Sztejnberg, Manuel; Gulec, Seza

    2017-01-01

    Although radioactive iodine imaging and therapy are one of the earliest applications of theranostics, there still remain a number of unresolved clinical questions as to the optimization of diagnostic techniques and dosimetry protocols. I-124 as a positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer has the potential to improve the current clinical practice in the diagnosis and treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer. The higher sensitivity and spatial resolution of PET/computed tomography (CT) compared to standard gamma scintigraphy can aid in the detection of recurrent or metastatic disease and provide more accurate measurements of metabolic tumor volumes. However the complex decay schema of I-124 poses challenges to quantitative PET imaging. More prospective studies are needed to define optimal dosimetry protocols and to improve patient-specific treatment planning strategies, taking into account not only the absorbed dose to tumors but also methods to avoid toxicity to normal organs. A historical perspective of I-124 imaging and dosimetry as well as future concepts are discussed. PMID:28117290

  8. I-124 Imaging and Dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Kuker, Russ; Sztejnberg, Manuel; Gulec, Seza

    2016-01-05

    Although radioactive iodine imaging and therapy are one of the earliest applications of theranostics, there still remain a number of unresolved clinical questions as to the optimization of diagnostic techniques and dosimetry protocols. I-124 as a positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer has the potential to improve the current clinical practice in the diagnosis and treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer. The higher sensitivity and spatial resolution of PET/computed tomography (CT) compared to standard gamma scintigraphy can aid in the detection of recurrent or metastatic disease and provide more accurate measurements of metabolic tumor volumes. However the complex decay schema of I-124 poses challenges to quantitative PET imaging. More prospective studies are needed to define optimal dosimetry protocols and to improve patient-specific treatment planning strategies, taking into account not only the absorbed dose to tumors but also methods to avoid toxicity to normal organs. A historical perspective of I-124 imaging and dosimetry as well as future concepts are discussed.

  9. Small fields: Nonequilibrium radiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Indra J.; Ding, George X.; Ahnesjoe, Anders

    2008-01-15

    Advances in radiation treatment with beamlet-based intensity modulation, image-guided radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery (including specialized equipments like CyberKnife, Gamma Knife, tomotherapy, and high-resolution multileaf collimating systems) have resulted in the use of reduced treatment fields to a subcentimeter scale. Compared to the traditional radiotherapy with fields {>=}4x4 cm{sup 2}, this can result in significant uncertainty in the accuracy of clinical dosimetry. The dosimetry of small fields is challenging due to nonequilibrium conditions created as a consequence of the secondary electron track lengths and the source size projected through the collimating system that are comparable to the treatment field size. It is further complicated by the prolonged electron tracks in the presence of low-density inhomogeneities. Also, radiation detectors introduced into such fields usually perturb the level of disequilibrium. Hence, the dosimetric accuracy previously achieved for standard radiotherapy applications is at risk for both absolute and relative dose determination. This article summarizes the present knowledge and gives an insight into the future procedures to handle the nonequilibrium radiation dosimetry problems. It is anticipated that new miniature detectors with controlled perturbations and corrections will be available to meet the demand for accurate measurements. It is also expected that the Monte Carlo techniques will increasingly be used in assessing the accuracy, verification, and calculation of dose, and will aid perturbation calculations of detectors used in small and highly conformal radiation beams.

  10. In vivo dosimetry in the urethra using alanine/ESR during (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer--a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Anton, Mathias; Wagner, Daniela; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Hackel, Thomas; Hermann, Robert Michael; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Vorwerk, Hilke

    2009-05-07

    A phantom study for dosimetry in the urethra using alanine/ESR during (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer is presented. The measurement method of the secondary standard of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt had to be slightly modified in order to be able to measure inside a Foley catheter. The absorbed dose to water response of the alanine dosimetry system to (192)Ir was determined with a reproducibility of 1.8% relative to (60)Co. The resulting uncertainty for measurements inside the urethra was estimated to be 3.6%, excluding the uncertainty of the dose rate constant Lambda. The applied dose calculated by a treatment planning system is compared to the measured dose for a small series of (192)Ir HDR irradiations in a gel phantom. The differences between the measured and applied dose are well within the limits of uncertainty. Therefore, the method is considered to be suitable for measurements in vivo.

  11. In vivo dosimetry in the urethra using alanine/ESR during 192Ir HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer—a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, Mathias; Wagner, Daniela; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Hackel, Thomas; Hermann, Robert Michael; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Vorwerk, Hilke

    2009-05-01

    A phantom study for dosimetry in the urethra using alanine/ESR during 192Ir HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer is presented. The measurement method of the secondary standard of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt had to be slightly modified in order to be able to measure inside a Foley catheter. The absorbed dose to water response of the alanine dosimetry system to 192Ir was determined with a reproducibility of 1.8% relative to 60Co. The resulting uncertainty for measurements inside the urethra was estimated to be 3.6%, excluding the uncertainty of the dose rate constant Λ. The applied dose calculated by a treatment planning system is compared to the measured dose for a small series of 192Ir HDR irradiations in a gel phantom. The differences between the measured and applied dose are well within the limits of uncertainty. Therefore, the method is considered to be suitable for measurements in vivo.

  12. Optimization of foaming properties of sludge protein solution by 60Co γ-ray/H2O2 using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yulin; Xiang, Yuxiu; Wang, Lipeng; Zhang, Zhifang

    2016-10-01

    Response surface methodology and Box-Behnken experimental design were used to model and optimize the operational parameters of foaming properties of the sludge protein solution by 60Co γ-ray/H2O2 treatment. The four variables involved in this research were the protein solution concentration, H2O2, pH and dose. In the range studied, statistical analysis of the results showed that selected variables had a significant effect on protein foaming properties. The optimized conditions contained: protein solution concentration 26.50% (v/v), H2O2 concentration 0.30% (v/v), pH value 9.0, and dose 4.81 kGy. Under optimal conditions, the foamability and foam stability approached 23.3 cm and 21.3 cm, respectively. Regression analysis with R2 value of 0.9923 (foamability) and 0.9922 (foam stability) indicated a satisfactory correlation between the experimental data and predicted values (response). In addition, based on a feasibility analysis, the 60Co γ-ray/H2O2 method can improve odor and color of the protein foaming solution.

  13. Energy response of GR-200A thermoluminescence dosemeters to 60Co and to monoenergetic synchrotron radiation in the energy range 28-40 keV.

    PubMed

    Emiro, F; Di Lillo, F; Mettivier, G; Fedon, C; Longo, R; Tromba, G; Russo, P

    2016-01-01

    The response of LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescence dosemeters (type GR-200A) to monoenergetic radiation of energy 28, 35, 38 and 40 keV was evaluated with respect to irradiation with a calibrated (60)Co gamma-ray source. High-precision measurements of the relative air kerma response performed at the SYRMEP beamline of the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility (Trieste, Italy) showed a significant deviation of the average response to low-energy X-rays from that to (60)Co, with an over-response from 6 % (at 28 keV) to 22 % (at 40 keV). These data are not consistent with literature data for these dosemeters, where model predictions gave deviation from unity of the relative air kerma response of about 10 %. The authors conclude for the need of additional determinations of the low-energy relative response of GR-200A dosemeters, covering a wider range of monoenergetic energies sampled at a fine energy step, as planned in future experiments by their group at the ELETTRA facility.

  14. Antagonistic effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides on the impaired reproductive system of male rats induced by local subchronic exposure to 60Co-γ irradiation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qiong; Cui, Xiaoyan; Yan, Jun; Yang, Mingliang; Liu, Jun; Jiang, Yuanhai; Li, Jingjing; Zhou, Yinzhu

    2011-05-01

    Lycium barbarum, a famous Chinese medicinal herb, has a long history of use in traditional medicine as an antioxidant and to promote sexual fertility. Polysaccharides are the most important functional constituents in L. barbarum fruits. In this study, male rats were exposed to subchronic (60)Co-γ irradiation to investigate the effects of LBP on sperm quantity and motility, sexual ability, serum hormone levels, oxidative status and testicular tissue DNA damage on days 1, 7 and 14 of treatment. It was found that LBP significantly increased the sperm quantity and motility, shortened the erection, capture and ejaculation latencies, increased the number of captures and ejaculations, and improved the sexual ability of male rats. LBP also played a significant role in the recovery of serum testosterone levels, increased superoxide dismutase activity, decreased malondialdehyde levels, promoted oxidative balance and rescued testicular DNA damage. In conclusion, LBP has significant protective effects against damage induced by local subchronic exposure to (60)Co-γ irradiation, allowing rats to achieve near-complete recovery with LBP treatment. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Comparison of dicentric dose response curves of 6MV LINAC X-rays and (60)Co γ-rays for biodosimetry application.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A Arul Anantha; Bakkiam, D; Sonwani, Swetha; Seenisamy, R; Sivasubramanian, K; Venkatraman, B

    2017-11-01

    In vitro Dicentric (DC) dose response curves of 6MV X-rays (3Gy/min) and (60)Co γ-rays (0.63Gy/min) were generated and compared (intra-laboratory) to understand their similarities and differences. Human peripheral blood samples exposed to ten different doses (0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5Gy) of 6MV X-rays and (60)Co γ-rays were subjected to Dicentric Chromosome Assay (DCA) and dicentrics, excess acentric fragments (AF) and chromatid breaks (CB) were scored. Totally about 31,553 metaphase spreads were scored for the purpose. Dose response curves of both radiation qualities were almost same except for a 13.8% higher β value for 6MV X-rays. However, blind tests results revealed that both these curves are biologically equivalent and exhibited good dose prediction accuracy for the entire dose range. This demonstrated the feasibility of interchangeable use of these curves in biodosimetry. Consequently it has been suggested that LINAC facilities worldwide can be roped in for biodosimetry capacity augmentation towards managing nuclear emergency situations involving γ-radiation exposures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Differential Expression of Retrotransposon WIS 2-1A Response to Vacuum, Low-Energy N+ Implantation and 60Coγ-ray Irradiation in Wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huiru; Gu, Yunhong; Ya, Huiyuan; Jiao, Zhen; Qin, Guangyong

    2009-02-01

    Mutagenesis and retrotransposons have a close relationship, but little attention has been paid yet to the activity of retrotransposons produced by physical mutagens. The variation of retrotransposon WIS 2-1A activity in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) embryos at three different growth times (30 h, 45 h and 60 h) was investigated after they had been treated with N+ implantation in a vacuum of 5 × 10-2 Pa and irradiation by 60Coγ-ray respectively. For each of the three growth times the expression of WIS 2-1A showed almost entirely a same trend of downregulation, upregulation, then downregulation, and upregulation again with the increase in dose of N+ implantation, but the expression appeared irregular with the increase in irradiation of 60Coγ-ray. In conclusion, the acutely activating effect of WIS 2-1A stimulated by vacuum and high dose N+ implantation within a shorter incubation time may provide a convenient tool to advance the research on mutagenic breeding and function genes.

  17. Characterization of the Natural Organic Matter (NOM) in groundwater contaminated with (60)Co and (137)Cs using ultrafiltration, Solid Phase Extraction and fluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Caron, François; Siemann, Stefan; Riopel, Rémi

    2014-12-01

    Spot samples of shallow groundwaters have been taken between the years 2004 and 2010 near a site formerly used for the dispersal of radioactive liquid wastes. Three sampling points, one clean (upstream), and two downstream of the contamination source, were processed by ultrafiltration (5000 Da cut-off) and Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) to determine the association of selected artificial radionuclides ((60)Co, (137)Cs) with Natural Organic Matter (NOM). The last two sampling episodes (2008 and 2010) also benefited from fluorescence analysis to determine the major character of the NOM. The fluorescence signals are reported as humic-like, fulvic-like and protein-like, which are used to characterize the different NOM types. The NOM from the clean site comprised mostly fine material, whereas the colloidal content (retained by ultrafiltration) was higher (e.g., 15-40% of the Total Organic Carbon - TOC). Most of the 137Cs was present in the colloidal fraction, whereas (60)Co was found in the filtered fraction. Fluorescence analysis, on the other hand, indicated a contrasting behavior between the clean and contaminated sites, with a dominance of protein-like material, a feature usually associated with human impacts. Finally, SPE removed almost quantitatively the protein-like material (>90%), whereas it removed a much smaller fraction of the (137)Cs (<28%). This finding indicates that the (137)Cs preferential binding occurs with a fraction other than the protein-like NOM, likely the fulvic-like or humic-like portion.

  18. Calculation of direct effects of 60Co gamma rays on the different DNA structural levels: A simulation study using the Geant4-DNA toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajik, Marjan; Rozatian, Amir S. H.; Semsarha, Farid

    2015-03-01

    In this study, simple single strand breaks (SSB) and double strand breaks (DSB) due to direct effects of the secondary electron spectrum of 60Co gamma rays on different organizational levels of a volume model of the B-DNA conformation have been calculated using the Geant4-DNA toolkit. Result of this study for the direct DSB yield shows a good agreement with other theoretical and experimental results obtained by both photons and their secondary electrons; however, in the case of SSB a noticeable difference can be observed. Moreover, regarding the almost constant yields of the direct strand breaks in the different structural levels of the DNA, calculated in this work, and compared with some theoretical studies, it can be deduced that the direct strand breaks yields depend mainly on the primary double helix structure of the DNA and the higher-order structures cannot have a noticeable effect on the direct DNA damage inductions by 60Co gamma rays. In contrast, a direct dependency between the direct SSB and DSB yields and the volume of the DNA structure has been found. Also, a further study on the histone proteins showed that they can play an important role in the trapping of low energy electrons without any significant effect on the direct DNA strand breaks inductions, at least in the range of energies used in the current study.

  19. Evaluation of endogenous control gene(s) for gene expression studies in human blood exposed to 60Co γ-rays ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Vaiphei, S Thangminlal; Keppen, Joshua; Nongrum, Saibadaiahun; Chaubey, R C; Kma, L; Sharan, R N

    2015-01-01

    In gene expression studies, it is critical to normalize data using a stably expressed endogenous control gene in order to obtain accurate and reliable results. However, we currently do not have a universally applied endogenous control gene for normalization of data for gene expression studies, particularly those involving (60)Co γ-ray-exposed human blood samples. In this study, a comparative assessment of the gene expression of six widely used housekeeping endogenous control genes, namely 18S, ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, MT-ATP6 and CDKN1A, was undertaken for a range of (60)Co γ-ray doses (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 Gy) at 8.4 Gy min(-1) at 0 and 24 h post-irradiation time intervals. Using the NormFinder algorithm, real-time PCR data obtained from six individuals (three males and three females) were analyzed with respect to the threshold cycle (Ct) value and abundance, ΔCt pair-wise comparison, intra- and inter-group variability assessments, etc. GAPDH, either alone or in combination with 18S, was found to be the most suitable endogenous control gene and should be used in gene expression studies, especially those involving qPCR of γ-ray-exposed human blood samples.

  20. A study on transfer factors of 60Co and 65Zn from soil to plants in the tropical environment of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Mollah, A S; Begum, A

    2001-04-01

    Soil to plant transfer factor (TF) of 60Co and 65Zn was determined from radioisotope experiments on plants grown in pots under outdoor ambient tropical conditions for three growing seasons (1995-1998). The TFs were obtained for different plants/crops such as, rice, bean, peanuts pineapple, cabbage, tomato, spinach and grass. The average TF values of 60Co are found to be 0.087. 0.15, 0.12, 0.67, 0.28, 0.79, 1.03 and 0.34 respectively for the above mentioned plants/crops. In case of 65Zn, the average TF values are found to be 2.24, 1.17. 0.89, 1.09, 0.78, 1.34, 2.92 and 1.78, respectively, for the above mentioned plants/crops. The data will be useful to assess the radiation exposure to man associated with the releases of radionuclides from nuclear facilities by means of radiological assessment models that require transfer factors as input parameters to predict the contamination of radionuclides in foodchain.

  1. Monte Carlo calculated microdosimetric spread for cell nucleus-sized targets exposed to brachytherapy 125I and 192Ir sources and 60Co cell irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas, Fernanda; Tilly, Nina; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2013-09-01

    The stochastic nature of ionizing radiation interactions causes a microdosimetric spread in energy depositions for cell or cell nucleus-sized volumes. The magnitude of the spread may be a confounding factor in dose response analysis. The aim of this work is to give values for the microdosimetric spread for a range of doses imparted by 125I and 192Ir brachytherapy radionuclides, and for a 60Co source. An upgraded version of the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE was used to obtain frequency distributions of specific energy for each of these radiation qualities and for four different cell nucleus-sized volumes. The results demonstrate that the magnitude of the microdosimetric spread increases when the target size decreases or when the energy of the radiation quality is reduced. Frequency distributions calculated according to the formalism of Kellerer and Chmelevsky using full convolution of the Monte Carlo calculated single track frequency distributions confirm that at doses exceeding 0.08 Gy for 125I, 0.1 Gy for 192Ir, and 0.2 Gy for 60Co, the resulting distribution can be accurately approximated with a normal distribution. A parameterization of the width of the distribution as a function of dose and target volume of interest is presented as a convenient form for the use in response modelling or similar contexts.

  2. Monte Carlo calculated microdosimetric spread for cell nucleus-sized targets exposed to brachytherapy 125I and 192Ir sources and 60Co cell irradiation.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Fernanda; Tilly, Nina; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2013-09-07

    The stochastic nature of ionizing radiation interactions causes a microdosimetric spread in energy depositions for cell or cell nucleus-sized volumes. The magnitude of the spread may be a confounding factor in dose response analysis. The aim of this work is to give values for the microdosimetric spread for a range of doses imparted by (125)I and (192)Ir brachytherapy radionuclides, and for a (60)Co source. An upgraded version of the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE was used to obtain frequency distributions of specific energy for each of these radiation qualities and for four different cell nucleus-sized volumes. The results demonstrate that the magnitude of the microdosimetric spread increases when the target size decreases or when the energy of the radiation quality is reduced. Frequency distributions calculated according to the formalism of Kellerer and Chmelevsky using full convolution of the Monte Carlo calculated single track frequency distributions confirm that at doses exceeding 0.08 Gy for (125)I, 0.1 Gy for (192)Ir, and 0.2 Gy for (60)Co, the resulting distribution can be accurately approximated with a normal distribution. A parameterization of the width of the distribution as a function of dose and target volume of interest is presented as a convenient form for the use in response modelling or similar contexts.

  3. A 3D superposition pencil beam dose calculation algorithm for a 60Co therapy unit and its verification by MC simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koncek, O.; Krivonoska, J.

    2014-11-01

    The MCNP Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the collimating system of the 60Co therapy unit to calculate the primary and scattered photon fluences as well as the electron contamination incident to the isocentric plane as the functions of the irradiation field size. Furthermore, a Monte Carlo simulation for the polyenergetic Pencil Beam Kernels (PBKs) generation was performed using the calculated photon and electron spectra. The PBK was analytically fitted to speed up the dose calculation using the convolution technique in the homogeneous media. The quality of the PBK fit was verified by comparing the calculated and simulated 60Co broad beam profiles and depth dose curves in a homogeneous water medium. The inhomogeneity correction coefficients were derived from the PBK simulation of an inhomogeneous slab phantom consisting of various materials. The inhomogeneity calculation model is based on the changes in the PBK radial displacement and on the change of the forward and backward electron scattering. The inhomogeneity correction is derived from the electron density values gained from a complete 3D CT array and considers different electron densities through which the pencil beam is propagated as well as the electron density values located between the interaction point and the point of dose deposition. Important aspects and details of the algorithm implementation are also described in this study.

  4. a New ENDF/B-VII.0 Based Multigroup Cross-Section Library for Reactor Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpan, F. A.; Anderson, S. L.

    2009-08-01

    The latest of the ENDF/B libraries, ENDF/B-VII.0 was released in December 2006. In this paper, the ENDF/B-VII.O evaluations were used in generating a new coupled neutron/gamma multigroup library having the same group structure of VITAMIN-B6, i.e., the 199-neutron, 42-gamma group library. The new library was generated utilizing NJOY99.259 for pre-processing and the AMPX modules for post-processing of cross sections. An ENDF/B-VI.3 based VITAMIN-B6-like library was also generated. The fine-group libraries and the ENDF/B-VI.3 based 47-neutron, 20-gamma group BUGLE-96 library were used with the discrete ordinates code DORT to obtain a three-dimensional synthesized flux distribution from r, r-θ, and r-z models for a standard Westinghouse 3-loop design reactor. Reaction rates were calculated for ex-vessel neutron dosimetry containing 63Cu(n,α)60Co, 46Ti(n,p)46Sc, 54Fe(n,P)54Mn, 58Ni(n,P)58Co, 238U(n,f)137Cs, 237Np(n,f)137Cs, and 59Co(n,γ)60Co (bare and cadmium covered) reactions. Results were compared to measurements. In comparing the 199-neutron, 42-gamma group ENDF/B-VI.3 and ENDF/B-VII.O libraries, it was observed that the ENDF/B-VI.3 based library results were in better agreement with measurements. There is a maximum difference of 7% (for the 63Cu(n,α)60Co reaction rate calculation) between ENDF/B-VI.3 and ENDF/B-VII.O. Differences between ENDF/B-VI.3 and ENDF/B-VII.O libraries are due to 16O, 1H, 90Zr, 91Zr, 92Zr, 238U, and 239Pu evaluations. Both ENDF/B-VI.3 and ENDF/B-VII.O library calculated reaction rates are within 20% of measurement and meet the criterion specified in the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.190, "Calculational and Dosimetry Methods for Determining Pressure Vessel Neutron Fluence."

  5. The impact of irradiation temperature estimations on the accuracy of dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desrosiers, M. F.; Ostapenko, T.; Puhl, J. M.

    2009-07-01

    Quality-control dosimetry is important to the routine operation of a radiation processing facility. For many applications this dosimetry must be traceable to a national primary standard. After irradiation at an industrial facility, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)-supplied transfer dosimeters are certified by measurement and dose interpolation from the NIST calibration curve. However, prior to computing the absorbed dose the dosimeter response must be adjusted for the temperature difference between irradiation temperature for the alanine system calibration and the irradiation temperature for the industrial process. For most industrial applications, the temperature is not controlled and varies during the irradiation process. The alanine dosimeter response has a dependence on irradiation temperature, which is compensated for by applying a correction factor to the dosimeter response to compute the absorbed dose. Moreover, there is no consensus protocol to estimate the irradiation temperature and apply this correction. This work approximates industrial temperature profiles using a 60Co source with a temperature-controlled irradiation chamber, and then compares the relative effectiveness of commonly used industrial methods to correct for irradiation temperature influence on the alanine dosimeter response.

  6. Polybutadiene and Styrene-Butadiene rubbers for high-dose dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Lucas N.; Vieira, Silvio L.; Schimidt, Fernando; Antonio, Patricia L.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2015-07-01

    Polybutadiene and Styrene-Butadiene are synthetical rubbers used widely for pneumatic tires manufacturing. In this research, the dosimeter characteristics of those rubbers were studied for application in high-dose dosimetry. The rubber samples were irradiated with doses of 10 Gy up to 10 kGy, using a {sup 60}Co Gamma Cell-220 system (dose rate of 1.089 kGy/h) and their readings were taken on a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy-FTIR system (model Frontier/Perkin Elmer). The ratios of two absorbance peaks were taken for each kind of rubber spectrum, Polybutadiene (1306/1130 cm{sup -1}) and Styrene-Butadiene (1449/1306 cm{sup -1}). The ratio calculated was used as the response to the irradiation, and is not uniform across the sample. From the results, it can be concluded for both rubbers: a) the dose-response curves may be useful for high-dose dosimetry (greater than 250 Gy); b) their response for reproducibility presented standard deviations lower than 2.5%; c) the relative sensitivity was higher for Styrene-Butadiene (1.86 kGy{sup -1}) than for Polybutadiene (1.81 kGy{sup -1}), d) for doses of 10 kGy to 200 kGy, there was no variation in the dosimetric response. Both types of rubber samples showed usefulness as high-dose dosimeters. (authors)

  7. An analytical model for calculating internal dose conversion coefficients for non-human biota.

    PubMed

    Amato, Ernesto; Italiano, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    To assess the radiation burden of non-human living organisms, dose coefficients are available in the literature, precalculated by assuming an ellipsoidal shape of each organism. A previously developed analytical method was applied for the determination of absorbed fractions inside ellipsoidal volumes from alpha, beta, and gamma radiations to the calculation of dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) for 15 reference organisms, animals and plants, either terrestrial, amphibian, or aquatic, and six radionuclides ((14)C, (90)Sr, (60)Co, (137)Cs, (238)U, and (241)Am). The results were compared with the reference values reported in Publication 108 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, in which a different calculation approach for DCCs was employed. The results demonstrate that the present analytical method, originally intended for applications in internal dosimetry of nuclear medicine therapy, gives consistent results for all the beta-, beta-gamma-, and alpha-emitting radionuclides tested in a wide range of organism masses, between 8 mg and 1.3 kg. The applicability of the method proposed can take advantage from its ease of implementation in an ordinary electronic spreadsheet, allowing to calculate, for virtually all possible radionuclide emission spectra, the DCCs for ellipsoidal models of non-human living organisms in the environment.

  8. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.630 Dosimetry equipment. (a) Except for low dose...

  9. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.630 Dosimetry equipment. (a) Except for low dose...

  10. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.630 Dosimetry equipment. (a) Except for low dose...

  11. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.630 Dosimetry equipment. (a) Except for low dose...

  12. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.630 Dosimetry equipment. (a) Except for low dose...

  13. Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.7 Necessity of Patient-Specific Dose Planning in Radionuclide Therapy' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy'.

  14. Advances in Inhalation Dosimetry Models and Methods for Occupational Risk Assessment and Exposure Limit Derivation

    PubMed Central

    Kuempel, Eileen D.; Sweeney, Lisa M.; Morris, John B.; Jarabek, Annie M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview and practical guide to occupational health professionals concerning the derivation and use of dose estimates in risk assessment for development of occupational exposure limits (OELs) for inhaled substances. Dosimetry is the study and practice of measuring or estimating the internal dose of a substance in individuals or a population. Dosimetry thus provides an essential link to understanding the relationship between an external exposure and a biological response. Use of dosimetry principles and tools can improve the accuracy of risk assessment, and reduce the uncertainty, by providing reliable estimates of the internal dose at the target tissue. This is accomplished through specific measurement data or predictive models, when available, or the use of basic dosimetry principles for broad classes of materials. Accurate dose estimation is essential not only for dose-response assessment, but also for interspecies extrapolation and for risk characterization at given exposures. Inhalation dosimetry is the focus of this paper since it is a major route of exposure in the workplace. Practical examples of dose estimation and OEL derivation are provided for inhaled gases and particulates. PMID:26551218

  15. Reviewing three dimensional dosimetry: basics and utilization as presented over 17 Years of DosGel and IC3Ddose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, L. J.

    2017-05-01

    For seventeen years a community of basic and clinical scientists and researchers has been meeting bi-annually to promote the clinical advance of techniques to measure radiation dose in three dimensions. The interest in this dosimetry was motivated by its promise as an effective methodology for 3D measurement of the complex conformal dose distributions achieved by modern techniques such as Intensity Modulated and Volumetric Arc Radiation Therapy. Each of the International Conferences on 3D Radiation Dosimetry resulted in the publication of informative proceedings [1-8], the majority openly available on the internet. The proceedings included papers that: i) reviewed the basic science of the radiation sensitive materials used to accumulate the dose information, ii) introduced the science and engineering of the imaging systems required to read the information out, iii) described the work flows and systems required for efficient dosimetry, iv) reported the protocols required for reproducible dosimetry, and v) showed examples of clinical use illustrating advantage and limitations of the dosimetry. This paper is intended to use the framework provided by these proceedings to review the current 3D chemical dosimeters available and to discuss the requirements for their use. The paper describes how 3D dosimetry can complement other dose delivery validation approaches available in the clinic. It closes with some personal reflections of how the motivation for, and practice of, 3D dosimetry have changed (or not) over the years.

  16. A small-scale anatomical dosimetry model of the liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenvall, Anna; Larsson, Erik; Strand, Sven-Erik; Jönsson, Bo-Anders

    2014-07-01

    Radionuclide therapy is a growing and promising approach for treating and prolonging the lives of patients with cancer. For therapies where high activities are administered, the liver can become a dose-limiting organ; often with a complex, non-uniform activity distribution and resulting non-uniform absorbed-dose distribution. This paper therefore presents a small-scale dosimetry model for various source-target combinations within the human liver microarchitecture. Using Monte Carlo simulations, Medical Internal Radiation Dose formalism-compatible specific absorbed fractions were calculated for monoenergetic electrons; photons; alpha particles; and 125I, 90Y, 211At, 99mTc, 111In, 177Lu, 131I and 18F. S values and the ratio of local absorbed dose to the whole-organ average absorbed dose was calculated, enabling a transformation of dosimetry calculations from macro- to microstructure level. For heterogeneous activity distributions, for example uptake in Kupffer cells of radionuclides emitting low-energy electrons (125I) or high-LET alpha particles (211At) the target absorbed dose for the part of the space of Disse, closest to the source, was more than eight- and five-fold the average absorbed dose to the liver, respectively. With the increasing interest in radionuclide therapy of the liver, the presented model is an applicable tool for small-scale liver dosimetry in order to study detailed dose-effect relationships in the liver.

  17. On the reliability of 3D gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Deene, Y.; Vandecasteele, J.

    2013-06-01

    Gel dosimetry has a unique role to play in safeguarding conformal radiotherapy treatments as it covers the whole treatment chain and provides the radiation oncologist with the integrated dose distribution in 3D. A major obstacle that has hindered the wider dissemination of polymer gel dosimetry in radiotherapy centres is the lack of confidence in the reliability of the measured dose. Discrepancies in dose response of small versus large polymer gel dosimeters have been reported and although several hypothesis for these discrepancies have been postulated, the actual contribution of these error sources to the overall inaccuracy of the dose maps has not been determined. Several gel dosimetry research groups have chosen to use an internal calibration of gel dosimeters. In this study, the inter-and intra-batch reproducibility of the current state-of-the-art 3D gel dosimeters has been assessed. It is demonstrated that with a carefully designed scanning set-up, the overall accuracy that can be obtained with an independent calibration is well within 5% of all pixels.

  18. A small-scale anatomical dosimetry model of the liver.

    PubMed

    Stenvall, Anna; Larsson, Erik; Strand, Sven-Erik; Jönsson, Bo-Anders

    2014-07-07

    Radionuclide therapy is a growing and promising approach for treating and prolonging the lives of patients with cancer. For therapies where high activities are administered, the liver can become a dose-limiting organ; often with a complex, non-uniform activity distribution and resulting non-uniform absorbed-dose distribution. This paper therefore presents a small-scale dosimetry model for various source-target combinations within the human liver microarchitecture. Using Monte Carlo simulations, Medical Internal Radiation Dose formalism-compatible specific absorbed fractions were calculated for monoenergetic electrons; photons; alpha particles; and (125)I, (90)Y, (211)At, (99m)Tc, (111)In, (177)Lu, (131)I and (18)F. S values and the ratio of local absorbed dose to the whole-organ average absorbed dose was calculated, enabling a transformation of dosimetry calculations from macro- to microstructure level. For heterogeneous activity distributions, for example uptake in Kupffer cells of radionuclides emitting low-energy electrons ((125)I) or high-LET alpha particles ((211)At) the target absorbed dose for the part of the space of Disse, closest to the source, was more than eight- and five-fold the average absorbed dose to the liver, respectively. With the increasing interest in radionuclide therapy of the liver, the presented model is an applicable tool for small-scale liver dosimetry in order to study detailed dose-effect relationships in the liver.

  19. Proceedings of the second conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R. E.; Sims, C. S.

    1988-11-01

    The Second Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 31--November 3, 1988, at the Holiday Inn, Crowne Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To facilitate meeting these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical sessions included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, calibration, standards and regulations, instrumentation, accreditation and test programs, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. This document provides a summary of the conference technical program and a partial collection of full papers for the oral presentations in order of delivery. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

  20. Current personnel dosimetry practices at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, J.J.

    1981-05-01

    Only three parameters were included in the personnel occupational exposure records by all facilities. These are employee name, social security number, and whole body dose. Approximate percentages of some other parameters included in the record systems are sex (50%), birthdate (90%), occupation (26%), previous employer radiation exposure (74%), etc. Statistical analysis of the data for such parameters as sex versus dose distribution, age versus dose distribution, cumulative lifetime dose, etc. was apparently seldom done. Less than 50% of the facilities reported having formal documentation for either the dosimeter, records system, or reader. Slightly greater than 50% of facilities reported having routine procedures in place. These are considered maximum percentages because some respondents considered computer codes as formal documentation. The repository receives data from DOE facilities regarding the (a) distribution of annual whole body doses, (b) significant internal depositions, and (c) individual doses upon termination. It is expected that numerous differences exist in the dose data submitted by the different facilities. Areas of significant differences would likely include the determination of non-measurable doses, the methods used to determine previous employer radiation dose, the methods of determining cumulative radiation dose, and assessment of internal doses. Undoubtedly, the accuracy of the different dosimetry systems, especially at low doses, is very important to the credibility of data summaries (e.g., man-rem) provided by the repository.

  1. Mayak worker dosimetry study: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilenko, E. K.; Khokhryakov, V. F.; Miller, S C.; Fix, Jack J.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Choe, Dong Ok; Gorelov, Mikhail; Khokhryakov, Victor V.; Knyazev, V.; Krahenbuhl, Melinda P.; Scherpelz, Robert I.; Smetanin, Mikhail; Suslova, K. G.; Vostrotin, V.

    2007-09-01

    The Mayak Production Association (MPA) was the first plutonium production plant in the former Soviet Union. Workers at the MPA were exposed to relatively large internal radiation intakes and external radiation exposures, particularly in the early years of plant operations. This paper describes the updated dosimetry database, Doses-2005. Doses-2005 represents a significant improvement in the determination of absorbed organ dose from external radiation and plutonium intake for the original cohort of 18,831 Mayak workers. The methods of dose reconstruction of absorbed organ doses from external radiation uses: 1) archive records of measured dose and worker exposure history, 2) measured energy and directional response characteristics of historical Mayak film dosimeters, and 3) calculated dose conversion factors for Mayak Study-defined exposure scenarios using Monte Carlo techniques. The methods of dose reconstruction for plutonium intake uses two revised models developed from empirical data derived from bioassay and autopsy cases and/or updates from prevailing or emerging International Commission on Radiological Protection models. Other sources of potential significant exposure to workers such as medical diagnostic x-rays, ambient onsite external radiation, neutron radiation, intake of airborne effluent, and intake of nuclides other than plutonium were evaluated to determine their impact on the dose estimates.

  2. Dosimetry for Microelectronics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    X E +2 kilo pascal (kPa) bar 1.000 000 X E +2 kilo pascal (kPa) barn 1.000 000 X E -28 meter2 ( m 2 ) British thermal unit 1.054 350 X E +3 joule (J...J) gallon (U.S. liquid) 3.785 412 X E -3 meter 3 ( m ) inch 2.540 000 X E -2 meter m ) jerk 1.000 000 X E +9 joule (J) joule/kilogram (J/kg) 1.000 000...kPa) ktap 1.000 000 X E +2 newton-second/ m 2 (N-s/M2 ) micron 1.000 000 X E -6 meter (W) mil 2.540 000 X E -5 meter Cm) mile (international) 1.609

  3. Interpretation of cytogenetic damage induced in the germ line of male mice exposed for over 1 year to /sup 239/Pu alpha particles, fission neutrons, or /sup 60/Co gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Grahn, D.; Lee, C.H.; Farrington, B.F.

    1983-09-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of /sup 239/Pu ..cap alpha.. particles, fission neutrons (0.85 MeV), and /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays has been evaluated for the induction of reciprocal chromosome translocations in spermatogonia and of chromosome/chromatid fragments and chromatid rearrangements in the primary spermatocyte of adult male B6CF/sub 1/ mice. Age concurrency was maintained for both internal and external radiations which were delivered at about 1 rad/week for /sup 239/Pu (single intravenous dose of 10 ..mu..Ci/kg), 0.67, 1.67, and 2.67 rad/week for neutrons, and 6.95, 17.4, and 32 rad/week for ..gamma.. rays for at least 60 weeks. In terms of frequency of translocations, the response to the alpha emitter was nonlinear (concave downward) with little dose-response predictability; to cumulative neutron exposures the response was linear, without evidence of a dose-rate effect; and to ..gamma.. radiation the responses were linear, and a significant dose-rate effect was seen. RBE estimates are variable. The overall response to the ..cap alpha.. emitter is interpreted to be a complex function of (a) microdosimetric heterogeneity, (b) a nearly invariant deposition pattern in the gonad, (c) the high sensitivity of differentiating spermatogonia to cell killing, and (d) the capacity of stem cells in relatively radiation-free areas to progressively assume the major spermatogenic role.

  4. Shared Dosimetry Error in Epidemiological Dose-Response Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Stram, Daniel O.; Preston, Dale L.; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Napier, Bruce; Kopecky, Kenneth J.; Boice, John; Beck, Harold; Till, John; Bouville, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takes up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β) is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the Mayak Worker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed. PMID:25799311

  5. Shared dosimetry error in epidemiological dose-response analyses

    DOE PAGES

    Stram, Daniel O.; Preston, Dale L.; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; ...

    2015-03-23

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takesmore » up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β) is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the Mayak Worker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed.« less

  6. Shared dosimetry error in epidemiological dose-response analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Stram, Daniel O.; Preston, Dale L.; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Napier, Bruce; Kopecky, Kenneth J.; Boice, John; Beck, Harold; Till, John; Bouville, Andre; Zeeb, Hajo

    2015-03-23

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takes up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β) is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the Mayak Worker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans S