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Sample records for 60hh variant alters

  1. Immunoproteasome LMP2 60HH Variant Alters MBP Epitope Generation and Reduces the Risk to Develop Multiple Sclerosis in Italian Female Population

    PubMed Central

    Mishto, Michele; Bellavista, Elena; Ligorio, Claudia; Textoris-Taube, Kathrin; Santoro, Aurelia; Giordano, Mara; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Listì, Florinda; Nacmias, Benedetta; Cellini, Elena; Leone, Maurizio; Grimaldi, Luigi M.E.; Fenoglio, Chiara; Esposito, Federica; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio; Seifert, Ulrike; Amato, Maria Pia; Caruso, Calogero; Foschini, Maria P.; Kloetzel, Peter M.; Franceschi, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Background Albeit several studies pointed out the pivotal role that CD4+T cells have in Multiple Sclerosis, the CD8+ T cells involvement in the pathology is still in its early phases of investigation. Proteasome degradation is the key step in the production of MHC class I-restricted epitopes and therefore its activity could be an important element in the activation and regulation of autoreactive CD8+ T cells in Multiple Sclerosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunoproteasomes and PA28-αβ regulator are present in MS affected brain area and accumulated in plaques. They are expressed in cell types supposed to be involved in MS development such as neurons, endothelial cells, oligodendrocytes, macrophages/macroglia and lymphocytes. Furthermore, in a genetic study on 1262 Italian MS cases and 845 controls we observed that HLA-A*02+ female subjects carrying the immunoproteasome LMP2 codon 60HH variant have a reduced risk to develop MS. Accordingly, immunoproteasomes carrying the LMP2 60H allele produce in vitro a lower amount of the HLA-A*0201 restricted immunodominant epitope MBP111–119. Conclusion/Significance The immunoproteasome LMP2 60HH variant reduces the risk to develop MS amongst Italian HLA-A*02+ females. We propose that such an effect is mediated by the altered proteasome-dependent production of a specific MBP epitope presented on the MHC class I. Our observations thereby support the hypothesis of an involvement of immunoproteasome in the MS pathogenesis. PMID:20174631

  2. Breast cancer susceptibility variants alter risk in familial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Latif, A; McBurney, H J; Roberts, S A; Lalloo, F; Howell, A; Evans, D G; Newman, W G

    2010-12-01

    Recent candidate gene and genome wide association studies have revealed novel loci associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. We evaluated the effect of these breast cancer associated variants on ovarian cancer risk in individuals with familial ovarian cancer both with and without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. A total of 158 unrelated white British women (54 BRCA1/2 mutation positive and 104 BRCA1/2 mutation negative) with familial ovarian cancer were genotyped for FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3 and CASP8 variants. The p.Asp302His CASP8 variant was associated with reduced ovarian cancer risk in the familial BRCA1/2 mutation negative ovarian cancer cases (P = 0.016). The synonymous TNRC9/TOX3 (Ser51) variant was present at a significantly lower frequency than in patients with familial BRCA1/2 positive breast cancer (P = 0.0002). Our results indicate that variants in CASP8 and TNRC9/TOX3 alter the risk of disease in individuals affected with familial ovarian cancer.

  3. Altered expression of Ano1 variants in human diabetic gastroparesis.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E; Strege, Peter R; Beyder, Arthur; Galietta, Luis J V; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Rae, James L; Parkman, Henry P; Linden, David R; Szurszewski, Joseph H; Ördög, Tamas; Gibbons, Simon J; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2011-04-15

    Diabetes affects many organs including the stomach. Altered number and function of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), the gastrointestinal pacemaker cells, underlie a number of gastrointestinal motility disorders, including diabetic gastroparesis. In the muscle layers, ICC selectively express Ano1, thought to underlie classical Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents. Mice homozygous for Ano1 knock-out exhibit abnormal ICC function and motility. Several transcripts for Ano1 are generated by alternative splicing of four exons. Here, we report expression levels of transcripts encoded by alternative splicing of Ano1 gene in gastric muscles of patients with diabetic gastroparesis and nondiabetic control tissues. Expression of mRNA from two alternatively transcribed exons are significantly different between patients and controls. Furthermore, patients with diabetic gastroparesis express mRNA for a previously unknown variant of Ano1. The 5' end of this novel variant lacks exons 1 and 2 and part of exon 3. Expression of this variant in HEK cells produces a decreased density of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents that exhibit slower kinetics compared with the full-length Ano1. These results identify important changes in expression and splicing of Ano1 in patients with diabetic gastroparesis that alter the electrophysiological properties of the channel. Changes in Ano1 expression in ICC may directly contribute to diabetic gastroparesis. PMID:21349842

  4. Alterations of autonomic nervous activity in recurrence of variant angina

    PubMed Central

    Takusagawa, M; Komori, S; Umetani, K; Ishihara, T; Sawanobori, T; Kohno, I; Sano, S; Yin, D; Ijiri, H; Tamura, K

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate whether autonomic nervous activity is involved in the recurrence of spontaneous coronary spasm in variant angina.
DESIGN—Retrospective analysis.
SETTING—Cardiology department of a university hospital.
PATIENTS—18 patients with variant angina were divided into single attack group (SA; nine patients) and multiple attack group (MA; nine patients) according to the frequency of ischaemic episodes with ST segment elevation during 24 hour Holter monitoring.
METHODS—Heart rate variability indices were calculated using MemCalc method, which is a combination of the maximum entropy method for spectral analysis and the non-linear least squares method for fitting analysis, at 30 second intervals for 30 second periods, from 40 minutes before the attack to 30 minutes after the attack. High frequency (HF; 0.04-0.15 Hz) was defined as a marker of parasympathetic activity, and the ratio of low frequency (LF; 0.15-0.40 Hz) to high frequency (LF/HF) as an indicator of sympathetic activity. The averaged value during the 40 to 30 minute period before an attack was defined as the baseline.
RESULTS—Compared with baseline, the HF component decreased in both groups at two minutes before the attack (p < 0.01), and the LF/HF ratio decreased at three minutes before the attack (p < 0.01). The baseline LF/HF was lower in the MA group than in the SA group (p < 0.01).
CONCLUSIONS—A reduction of sympathetic activity may play a key role in determining the recurrence of transient ischaemic events caused by spontaneous coronary spasm in patients with variant angina.


Keywords: sympathetic activity; recurrence of coronary spasm; MemCalc method; variant angina PMID:10377313

  5. JCL roundtable: Lessons from genetic variants altering lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Brown, William Virgil; Ference, Brian A; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2016-01-01

    Because the Human Genome Project reached its first major milestone in completing the full sequence of human DNA, many new discoveries have been made relating genetic variants to disease. The new methodology that allows much more rapid and focused analyses of selected genes and the ability to screen the entire exome of any individual has provided tools to examine literally thousands of individuals for a given study. Genetic analysis has become a large-scale epidemiologic tool for examining variants in gene structure and correlating them with phenotypic markers of human disorders. These genome-wide association studies have been quite revealing about the mechanism of disorders of many types. These tools have been applied to the appearance of clinical atherosclerosis and to the chronic metabolic risk factors for this disease process. We are joined by 2 individuals who have made very significant contributions to this area of research: Dr Brian Ference of Wayne State University School of Medicine and Dr Sekar Kathiresan from Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. In our discussion, we are going to focus on genetic variants, which lead to changes in lipoprotein concentrations and those that have an association with earlier onset of clinical vascular disease. This roundtable was recorded during the November 2016 American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in Orlando, Florida. PMID:27206929

  6. Alterations and Chromosomal Variants in the Ecuadorian Population

    PubMed Central

    Paz-y-Miño, César; Cumbal, Nadia; Araujo, Santiago; Sánchez, Ma. Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    Medical genetics is a field marked by fast progress. Even though it was at one point confined to a group of relatively rare diseases, today it has become a central component in the understanding of disorders and it is the subject of interest for all medical specialties. This paper, shares data on the chromosomal alterations and variations that have been diagnosed in Ecuadorian patients since 1998. A total of 2,636 individual cases have been analyzed by G-banding technique until February 2012. The present work shows this collection of data and the important findings that have appeared throughout these years in hopes that it can contribute to have a deeper understanding of the incidence of chromosomal aberrations and alterations in the Ecuadorian population. PMID:23091347

  7. Variant human phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase altered in regulatory and catalytic functions.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, M A; Raivio, K O; Bakay, B; Adams, W B; Nyhan, W L

    1980-01-01

    An inherited, structurally abnormal and superactive form of the enzyme 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PP-ribose-P) synthetase (EC 2.7.6.1) has been characterized in fibroblasts cultured from a 14-yr-old male (S.M.) with clinical manifestations of uric acid overproduction present since infancy. PP-ribose-P synthetase from the cells of this child showed four- to fivefold greater than normal resistance to purine nucleotide (ADP and GDP) feedback inhibition of enzyme activity and hyperbolic rather than sigmoidal inorganic phosphate (Pi) activation in incompletely dialyzed extracts. Excessive maximal velocity of the enzyme reaction catalyzed by the mutant enzyme was indicated by: enzyme activities twice those of normal at all concentrations of Pi in chromatographed fibroblast extracts; normal affinity constants for substrates and for the activator, Mg2+; and twofold greater than normal activity per immunoreactive enzyme molecule. The mutant enzyme thus possessed deficient regulatory and superactive catalytic properties, two mechanisms previously demonstrated individually to underlie the excessive PPRribose-P and uric acid synthesis of affected members of families with superactive PP-ribose-P synthetases. Increased PP-ribose-P concentration (4-fold) and generation (2.7-fold) and enhanced rates of PP-ribose-P dependent purine synthetic reactions, including purine synthesis de novo, in S.M. fibroblasts confirmed the functional significance of this patient's mutant enzyme. Diminished stability of the variant PP-ribose-P synthetase was manifested in vitro by increased thermal lability and in vivo by deficiency of enzyme activity at Pi concentrations greater than 0.3 mM in hemolysates and by an accelerated, age-related decrement in enzyme activity in lysates of erythrocytes separated by specific density. Despite the diminished amount of PP-ribose-P synthetase in the S.M. erythrocyte population, S.M. erythrocytes had increased PP-ribose-P concentration and increased rates

  8. A Rare Myelin Protein Zero (MPZ) Variant Alters Enhancer Activity In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Burzynski, Grzegorz; Huynh, Jimmy; Maduro, Valerie; Hodonsky, Chani J.; Khajavi, Mehrdad; Szigeti, Kinga; Mukkamala, Sandeep; Bessling, Seneca L.; Pavan, William J.; McCallion, Andrew S.; Lupski, James R.; Green, Eric D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Myelin protein zero (MPZ) is a critical structural component of myelin in the peripheral nervous system. The MPZ gene is regulated, in part, by the transcription factors SOX10 and EGR2. Mutations in MPZ, SOX10, and EGR2 have been implicated in demyelinating peripheral neuropathies, suggesting that components of this transcriptional network are candidates for harboring disease-causing mutations (or otherwise functional variants) that affect MPZ expression. Methodology We utilized a combination of multi-species sequence comparisons, transcription factor-binding site predictions, targeted human DNA re-sequencing, and in vitro and in vivo enhancer assays to study human non-coding MPZ variants. Principal Findings Our efforts revealed a variant within the first intron of MPZ that resides within a previously described SOX10 binding site is associated with decreased enhancer activity, and alters binding of nuclear proteins. Additionally, the genomic segment harboring this variant directs tissue-relevant reporter gene expression in zebrafish. Conclusions This is the first reported MPZ variant within a cis-acting transcriptional regulatory element. While we were unable to implicate this variant in disease onset, our data suggests that similar non-coding sequences should be screened for mutations in patients with neurological disease. Furthermore, our multi-faceted approach for examining the functional significance of non-coding variants can be readily generalized to study other loci important for myelin structure and function. PMID:21179557

  9. Multiple mechanisms are responsible for altered expression of ornithine decarboxylase in overproducing variant cells.

    PubMed Central

    McConlogue, L; Dana, S L; Coffino, P

    1986-01-01

    We selected and characterized a series of mouse S49 cell variants that overproduce ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). Previously, we described variants that have an amplified ODC gene and produce about 500-fold more ODC than the wild-type cells of origin (L. McConlogue and P. Coffino, J. Biol. Chem. 258:12083-12086, 1983). We examined a series of independent variants that overproduce ODC to a lesser degree and found that a number of mechanisms other than gene amplification are responsible for the increased ODC activity. Variants were selected for resistance to 0.1 mM difluoromethylornithine, an inhibitor of ODC, by either a single or a multistep process. All showed increased ODC activity and increased ODC mRNA steady-state levels. The half-life of the enzyme was not increased in any of the variants. In one class of variant the increase of ODC mRNA was sufficient to account for ODC overproduction. In a second class, the rate of synthesis of ODC polypeptide per ODC mRNA was at least four- to eightfold higher than that in wild-type cells. Therefore, these variants were altered in the translatability of ODC mRNA. Southern analysis showed that gene amplification does not account for the increased ODC mRNA levels in any of the variants. In both variant and wild-type cells, ODC activity was responsive to changes in polyamine pools; activity was reduced following augmentation of pool size. This change in activity was associated with modification of the rate of synthesis and degradation of ODC but no change in the level of ODC mRNA. Images PMID:3023951

  10. Heat-resistant variants of Chinese hamster fibroblasts altered in expression of heat shock protein.

    PubMed Central

    Laszlo, A; Li, G C

    1985-01-01

    Heat-resistant variants of the Chinese hamster HA-1 line have been isolated after repeated heat treatments. The heat-resistant phenotype has been stable for over 70 passages. One of the members of the 70-kDa heat shock protein family was found to be synthesized at greater levels in the heat-resistant variants under normal growth conditions. Mild heat treatment of the variant lines induced a transient thermotolerance that was accompanied by additional increase in the synthesis of the 70-kDa heat shock proteins. Cell-free translation of total cellular RNA revealed greater amounts of 70-kDa heat shock protein mRNA in both control and heated variant cells. The greater levels of 70-kDa heat shock protein synthesized in the variant cells presumably are a reflection of altered levels of its messenger mRNA. In addition, we found that translational control plays a role in the elevated expression of heat shock proteins in heat-shocked HA-1 cells and their heat-resistant variants. The association of the heat-resistant phenotype with increased levels of a 70-kDa heat shock protein suggests strongly that this gene product plays a role in protecting cells from damage inflicted by elevated temperatures. Images PMID:3865213

  11. In silico prediction of splice-altering single nucleotide variants in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Jian, Xueqiu; Boerwinkle, Eric; Liu, Xiaoming

    2014-12-16

    In silico tools have been developed to predict variants that may have an impact on pre-mRNA splicing. The major limitation of the application of these tools to basic research and clinical practice is the difficulty in interpreting the output. Most tools only predict potential splice sites given a DNA sequence without measuring splicing signal changes caused by a variant. Another limitation is the lack of large-scale evaluation studies of these tools. We compared eight in silico tools on 2959 single nucleotide variants within splicing consensus regions (scSNVs) using receiver operating characteristic analysis. The Position Weight Matrix model and MaxEntScan outperformed other methods. Two ensemble learning methods, adaptive boosting and random forests, were used to construct models that take advantage of individual methods. Both models further improved prediction, with outputs of directly interpretable prediction scores. We applied our ensemble scores to scSNVs from the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer database. Analysis showed that predicted splice-altering scSNVs are enriched in recurrent scSNVs and known cancer genes. We pre-computed our ensemble scores for all potential scSNVs across the human genome, providing a whole genome level resource for identifying splice-altering scSNVs discovered from large-scale sequencing studies.

  12. In silico prediction of splice-altering single nucleotide variants in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Xueqiu; Boerwinkle, Eric; Liu, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    In silico tools have been developed to predict variants that may have an impact on pre-mRNA splicing. The major limitation of the application of these tools to basic research and clinical practice is the difficulty in interpreting the output. Most tools only predict potential splice sites given a DNA sequence without measuring splicing signal changes caused by a variant. Another limitation is the lack of large-scale evaluation studies of these tools. We compared eight in silico tools on 2959 single nucleotide variants within splicing consensus regions (scSNVs) using receiver operating characteristic analysis. The Position Weight Matrix model and MaxEntScan outperformed other methods. Two ensemble learning methods, adaptive boosting and random forests, were used to construct models that take advantage of individual methods. Both models further improved prediction, with outputs of directly interpretable prediction scores. We applied our ensemble scores to scSNVs from the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer database. Analysis showed that predicted splice-altering scSNVs are enriched in recurrent scSNVs and known cancer genes. We pre-computed our ensemble scores for all potential scSNVs across the human genome, providing a whole genome level resource for identifying splice-altering scSNVs discovered from large-scale sequencing studies. PMID:25416802

  13. Altered Proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variants Induced by Exposure to Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maleki, Anis Rageh; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Tay, Sun Tee; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei primary diagnostic cultures demonstrate colony morphology variation associated with expression of virulence and adaptation proteins. This study aims to examine the ability of B. pseudomallei colony variants (wild type [WT] and small colony variant [SCV]) to survive and replicate intracellularly in A549 cells and to identify the alterations in the protein expression of these variants, post-exposure to the A549 cells. Intracellular survival and cytotoxicity assays were performed followed by proteomics analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. B. pseudomallei SCV survive longer than the WT. During post-exposure, among 259 and 260 protein spots of SCV and WT, respectively, 19 were differentially expressed. Among SCV post-exposure up-regulated proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (CbbA) and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were associated with adhesion and virulence. Among the down-regulated proteins, enolase (Eno) is implicated in adhesion and virulence. Additionally, post-exposure expression profiles of both variants were compared with pre-exposure. In WT pre- vs post-exposure, 36 proteins were differentially expressed. Of the up-regulated proteins, translocator protein, Eno, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk), ferritin Dps-family DNA binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase B were implicated in invasion and virulence. In SCV pre- vs post-exposure, 27 proteins were differentially expressed. Among the up-regulated proteins, flagellin, Eno, CbbA, Ndk and phenylacetate-coenzyme A ligase have similarly been implicated in adhesion, invasion. Protein profiles differences post-exposure provide insights into association between morphotypic and phenotypic characteristics of colony variants, strengthening the role of B. pseudomallei morphotypes in pathogenesis of melioidosis. PMID:25996927

  14. Altered Proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variants Induced by Exposure to Human Lung Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Maleki, Anis Rageh; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Tay, Sun Tee; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei primary diagnostic cultures demonstrate colony morphology variation associated with expression of virulence and adaptation proteins. This study aims to examine the ability of B. pseudomallei colony variants (wild type [WT] and small colony variant [SCV]) to survive and replicate intracellularly in A549 cells and to identify the alterations in the protein expression of these variants, post-exposure to the A549 cells. Intracellular survival and cytotoxicity assays were performed followed by proteomics analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. B. pseudomallei SCV survive longer than the WT. During post-exposure, among 259 and 260 protein spots of SCV and WT, respectively, 19 were differentially expressed. Among SCV post-exposure up-regulated proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (CbbA) and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were associated with adhesion and virulence. Among the down-regulated proteins, enolase (Eno) is implicated in adhesion and virulence. Additionally, post-exposure expression profiles of both variants were compared with pre-exposure. In WT pre- vs post-exposure, 36 proteins were differentially expressed. Of the up-regulated proteins, translocator protein, Eno, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk), ferritin Dps-family DNA binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase B were implicated in invasion and virulence. In SCV pre- vs post-exposure, 27 proteins were differentially expressed. Among the up-regulated proteins, flagellin, Eno, CbbA, Ndk and phenylacetate-coenzyme A ligase have similarly been implicated in adhesion, invasion. Protein profiles differences post-exposure provide insights into association between morphotypic and phenotypic characteristics of colony variants, strengthening the role of B. pseudomallei morphotypes in pathogenesis of melioidosis. PMID:25996927

  15. Desired Alteration of Protein Affinities: Competitive Selection of Protein Variants Using Yeast Signal Transduction Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Kaishima, Misato; Fukuda, Nobuo; Ishii, Jun; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Molecules that can control protein-protein interactions (PPIs) have recently drawn attention as new drug pipeline compounds. Here, we report a technique to screen desirable affinity-altered (affinity-enhanced and affinity-attenuated) protein variants. We previously constructed a screening system based on a target protein fused to a mutated G-protein γ subunit (Gγcyto) lacking membrane localization ability. This ability, required for signal transmission, is restored by recruiting Gγcyto into the membrane only when the target protein interacts with an artificially membrane-anchored candidate protein, thereby allowing interacting partners (Gγ recruitment system) to be searched and identified. In the present study, the Gγ recruitment system was altered by integrating the cytosolic expression of a third protein as a competitor to set a desirable affinity threshold. This enabled the reliable selection of both affinity-enhanced and affinity-attenuated protein variants. The presented approach may facilitate the development of therapeutic proteins that allow the control of PPIs. PMID:25244640

  16. Disease associations and altered immune function in CD45 138G variant carriers.

    PubMed

    Boxall, Sally; Stanton, Tara; Hirai, Kouzo; Ward, Victoria; Yasui, Tomoyo; Tahara, Hideki; Tamori, Akihiro; Nishiguchi, Shuhei; Shiomi, Susumu; Ishiko, Osamu; Inaba, Masaaki; Nishizawa, Yoshiki; Dawes, Ritu; Bodmer, Walter; Beverley, Peter C L; Tchilian, Elma Z

    2004-10-15

    The CD45 antigen is a haemopoietic cell specific tyrosine phosphatase essential for antigen receptor mediated signalling in lymphocytes. Expression of different patterns of alternatively spliced CD45 isoforms is associated with distinct functions. We recently identified a polymorphism in exon 6 (A138G) of the gene encoding CD45 (PTPRC) that results in altered CD45 splicing. The 138G allele is present at a high frequency among Japanese (23.7%), with 5.1% individuals homozygous for the G allele. In this study we show that the A138G polymorphism is the cause of altered CD45 isoform expression, promoting splicing towards low molecular weight CD45 isoforms. We further report that the frequency of A138G heterozygotes is significantly reduced in number in cohorts of patients with autoimmune Graves' disease or hepatitis B infection, whereas G138G homozygotes are absent from a cohort of Hashimoto's thyroiditis patients. We also show that 138G individuals exhibit altered cytokine production in vitro and an increased proportion of memory T cells. These data suggest that the 138G variant allele strongly influences these diseases by modulation of immune mechanisms and may have achieved its high frequency as a result of a natural selection probably related to pathogen resistance. PMID:15333587

  17. Residues Controlling Facial Selectivity in an Alkene Reductase and Semirational Alterations to Create Stereocomplementary Variants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A systematic saturation mutagenesis campaign was carried out on an alkene reductase from Pichia stipitis (OYE 2.6) to develop variants with reversed stereoselectivities. Wild-type OYE 2.6 reduces three representative Baylis–Hillman adducts to the corresponding S products with almost complete stereoselectivities and good catalytic efficiencies. We created and screened 13 first-generation, site-saturation mutagenesis libraries, targeting residues found near the bound substrate. One variant (Tyr78Trp) showed high R selectivity toward one of the three substrates, but no change (cyclohexenone derivative) and no catalytic activity (acrylate derivative) for the other two. Subsequent rounds of mutagenesis retained the Tyr78Trp mutation and explored other residues that impacted stereoselectivity when altered in a wild-type background. These efforts yielded double and triple mutants that possessed inverted stereoselectivities for two of the three substrates (conversions >99% and at least 91% ee (R)). To understand the reasons underlying the stereochemical changes, we solved crystal structures of two key mutants: Tyr78Trp and Tyr78Trp/Ile113Cys, the latter with substrate partially occupying the active site. By combining these experimental data with modeling studies, we have proposed a rationale that explains the impacts of the most useful mutations. PMID:25068071

  18. Vitamin D Related Host Genetic Variants Alter HIV Disease Progression in Children

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Amaran; Qin, Min; Singh, Kumud K.; Spector, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitamin D deficiency is common in HIV infection and has been associated with advanced disease. This study investigated whether vitamin D related genetic variants were associated with disease progression in HIV-infected children. Methods The Fok-I (C/T), Bsm-I (G/A), GC (A/C), DHCR7 (G/T) and CYP2R1 (G/A) genetic variants were detected by RT-PCR in HIV-infected children who participated in the PACTG P152 and P300 protocols which pre-dated the availability of effective combination antiretroviral therapy. The primary endpoints included time to progression to the first HIV-related disease end-point (≥2 OI's, weight-growth failure) or death, which constituted the progression-free-survival. Analyses were performed for age >2 years and ≤2 years separately adjusting for race and treatment effect. Results Of the 998 children evaluated, 139 experienced HIV disease progression. For children >2 years, rapid disease progression was associated with the DHCR7 G allele compared to the T allele (G/G vs. T/T: HR=5.0, p=0.035, G/T vs. T/T: HR=4.5, p=0.042, G/G+G/T vs. T/T: HR=4.8, p=0.036), and the Bsm-I A allele compared to the G allele (A/G vs. G/G: HR=2.2, p=0.014 and A/G+A/A vs. G/G: HR=2.0, p=0.026). In children ≤2 years, the Bsm-I A allele increased the risk of disease progression in Hispanics (A/A vs. G/A+G/G: HR=2.8, p=0.03; A/A vs. G/G: HR=2.8, p=0.046) and whites (A/A vs. G/G: HR=6.6, p=0.025; A/A vs. G/A+G/G: HR=3.6, p=0.038). Conclusions Vitamin D related host genetic variants that alter the availability and activity of vitamin D are associated with risk of HIV disease progression in children, and may vary by age and race. PMID:23736144

  19. Variants of Aspergillus alutaceus var. alutaceus (formerly Aspergillus ochraceus) with altered ochratoxin a production

    SciTech Connect

    Chelack, W.S.; Borsa, J.; Szekely, J.G. ); Marquardt, R.R.; Frohlich, A.A. )

    1991-09-01

    The present studies, using Asperigillus alutaceus var. alutaceus Berkeley et Curtis (formerly A. ochraceus Wilhelm) NRRL 3174 along with three other wild-type strains, were undertaken in an attempt to understand the effects of irradiation and other treatments on mycotoxin production in grain. Bedford barley was inoculated with spores of NRRL 3174, gamma irradiated, and incubated at 28C and 25% moisture. After 10 days of incubation, two colony types, ocher (parental) and yellow (variant), were isolated from the grain. Further culturing of the yellow variant resulted in the spontaneous appearance of a white variant that exhibited greatly enhanced fluorescence under UV light. In subsequent work, we have also isolated variants producing a soluble red pigment. In addition, in model experiments involving irradiation (1 kGy) of pure cultures, induction frequencies ranging between 2 and 4% (survival basis) were observed for the yellow and red variants. Inoculation of these variants into wheat and incubation for 14 days at 28C and 32% moisture resulted in ochratoxin A production in the relative amounts of 0.09:1:4.6:9.3 for the red, ocher (parental), yellow, and white variants, respectively. Additional characteristics of these isolates are described. Confirmation that the white high-ochratoxin-A-producing variants were derived from the parental strain was demonstrated by obtaining revertant sectors in monoclonal cultures of the variants.

  20. Variants of Aspergillus alutaceus var. alutaceus (formerly Aspergillus ochraceus) with altered ochratoxin A production.

    PubMed Central

    Chelack, W S; Borsa, J; Szekely, J G; Marquardt, R R; Frohlich, A A

    1991-01-01

    The present studies, using Aspergillus alutaceus var. alutaceus Berkeley et Curtis (formerly A. ochraceus Wilhelm) NRRL 3174 along with three other wild-type strains, were undertaken in an attempt to understand the effects of irradiation and other treatments on mycotoxin production in grain. Bedford barley was inoculated with spores of NRRL 3174, gamma irradiated, and incubated at 28 degrees C and 25% moisture. After 10 days of incubation, two colony types, ochre (parental) and yellow (variant), were isolated from the grain. Further culturing of the yellow variant resulted in the spontaneous appearance of a white variant that exhibited greatly enhanced fluorescence under UV light. In subsequent work, we have also isolated variants producing a soluble red pigment. In addition, in model experiments involving irradiation (1 kGy) of pure cultures, induction frequencies ranging between 2 and 4% (survival basis) were observed for the yellow and red variants. Inoculation of these variants into wheat and incubation for 14 days at 28 degrees C and 32% moisture resulted in ochratoxin A production in the relative amounts of 0.09:1:4.6:9.3 for the red, ochre (parental), yellow, and white variants, respectively. Additional characteristics of these isolates are described. Confirmation that the white high-ochratoxin-A-producing variants were derived from the parental strain was demonstrated by obtaining revertant sectors in monoclonal cultures of the variants. Images PMID:1768122

  1. Disease, Models, Variants and Altered Pathways—Journeying RGD Through the Magnifying Glass

    PubMed Central

    Petri, Victoria; Hayman, G. Thomas; Tutaj, Marek; Smith, Jennifer R.; Laulederkind, Stan; Wang, Shur-Jen; Nigam, Rajni; De Pons, Jeff; Shimoyama, Mary; Dwinell, Melinda R.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the pathogenesis of disease is instrumental in delineating its progression mechanisms and for envisioning ways to counteract it. In the process, animal models represent invaluable tools for identifying disease-related loci and their genetic components. Amongst them, the laboratory rat is used extensively in the study of many conditions and disorders. The Rat Genome Database (RGD—http://rgd.mcw.edu) has been established to house rat genetic, genomic and phenotypic data. Since its inception, it has continually expanded the depth and breadth of its content. Currently, in addition to rat genes, QTLs and strains, RGD houses mouse and human genes and QTLs and offers pertinent associated data, acquired through manual literature curation and imported via pipelines. A collection of controlled vocabularies and ontologies is employed for the standardized extraction and provision of biological data. The vocabularies/ontologies allow the capture of disease and phenotype associations of rat strains and QTLs, as well as disease and pathway associations of rat, human and mouse genes. A suite of tools enables the retrieval, manipulation, viewing and analysis of data. Genes associated with particular conditions or with altered networks underlying disease pathways can be retrieved. Genetic variants in humans or in sequenced rat strains can be searched and compared. Lists of rat strains and species-specific genes and QTLs can be generated for selected ontology terms and then analyzed, downloaded or sent to other tools. From many entry points, data can be accessed and results retrieved. To illustrate, diabetes is used as a case study to initiate and embark upon an exploratory journey. PMID:27602200

  2. Disease, Models, Variants and Altered Pathways—Journeying RGD Through the Magnifying Glass

    PubMed Central

    Petri, Victoria; Hayman, G. Thomas; Tutaj, Marek; Smith, Jennifer R.; Laulederkind, Stan; Wang, Shur-Jen; Nigam, Rajni; De Pons, Jeff; Shimoyama, Mary; Dwinell, Melinda R.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the pathogenesis of disease is instrumental in delineating its progression mechanisms and for envisioning ways to counteract it. In the process, animal models represent invaluable tools for identifying disease-related loci and their genetic components. Amongst them, the laboratory rat is used extensively in the study of many conditions and disorders. The Rat Genome Database (RGD—http://rgd.mcw.edu) has been established to house rat genetic, genomic and phenotypic data. Since its inception, it has continually expanded the depth and breadth of its content. Currently, in addition to rat genes, QTLs and strains, RGD houses mouse and human genes and QTLs and offers pertinent associated data, acquired through manual literature curation and imported via pipelines. A collection of controlled vocabularies and ontologies is employed for the standardized extraction and provision of biological data. The vocabularies/ontologies allow the capture of disease and phenotype associations of rat strains and QTLs, as well as disease and pathway associations of rat, human and mouse genes. A suite of tools enables the retrieval, manipulation, viewing and analysis of data. Genes associated with particular conditions or with altered networks underlying disease pathways can be retrieved. Genetic variants in humans or in sequenced rat strains can be searched and compared. Lists of rat strains and species-specific genes and QTLs can be generated for selected ontology terms and then analyzed, downloaded or sent to other tools. From many entry points, data can be accessed and results retrieved. To illustrate, diabetes is used as a case study to initiate and embark upon an exploratory journey.

  3. Disease, Models, Variants and Altered Pathways-Journeying RGD Through the Magnifying Glass.

    PubMed

    Petri, Victoria; Hayman, G Thomas; Tutaj, Marek; Smith, Jennifer R; Laulederkind, Stan; Wang, Shur-Jen; Nigam, Rajni; De Pons, Jeff; Shimoyama, Mary; Dwinell, Melinda R

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the pathogenesis of disease is instrumental in delineating its progression mechanisms and for envisioning ways to counteract it. In the process, animal models represent invaluable tools for identifying disease-related loci and their genetic components. Amongst them, the laboratory rat is used extensively in the study of many conditions and disorders. The Rat Genome Database (RGD-http://rgd.mcw.edu) has been established to house rat genetic, genomic and phenotypic data. Since its inception, it has continually expanded the depth and breadth of its content. Currently, in addition to rat genes, QTLs and strains, RGD houses mouse and human genes and QTLs and offers pertinent associated data, acquired through manual literature curation and imported via pipelines. A collection of controlled vocabularies and ontologies is employed for the standardized extraction and provision of biological data. The vocabularies/ontologies allow the capture of disease and phenotype associations of rat strains and QTLs, as well as disease and pathway associations of rat, human and mouse genes. A suite of tools enables the retrieval, manipulation, viewing and analysis of data. Genes associated with particular conditions or with altered networks underlying disease pathways can be retrieved. Genetic variants in humans or in sequenced rat strains can be searched and compared. Lists of rat strains and species-specific genes and QTLs can be generated for selected ontology terms and then analyzed, downloaded or sent to other tools. From many entry points, data can be accessed and results retrieved. To illustrate, diabetes is used as a case study to initiate and embark upon an exploratory journey. PMID:27602200

  4. Genetic variants of human organic anion transporter 4 demonstrate altered transport of endogenous substrates

    PubMed Central

    Shima, James E.; Komori, Takafumi; Taylor, Travis R.; Stryke, Doug; Kawamoto, Michiko; Johns, Susan J.; Carlson, Elaine J.; Ferrin, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Apical reabsorption from the urine has been shown to be important for such processes as the maintenance of critical metabolites in the blood and the excretion of nephrotoxic compounds. The solute carrier (SLC) transporter OAT4 (SLC22A11) is expressed on the apical membrane of renal proximal tubule cells and is known to mediate the transport of a variety of xenobiotic and endogenous organic anions. Functional characterization of genetic variants of apical transporters thought to mediate reabsorption, such as OAT4, may provide insight into the genetic factors influencing the complex pathways involved in drug elimination and metabolite reclamation occurring in the kidney. Naturally occurring genetic variants of OAT4 were identified in public databases and by resequencing DNA samples from 272 individuals comprising 4 distinct ethnic groups. Nine total nonsynonymous variants were identified and functionally assessed using uptake of three radiolabeled substrates. A nonsense variant, R48Stop, and three other variants (R121C, V155G, and V155M) were found at frequencies of at least 2% in an ethnic group specific fashion. The L29P, R48Stop, and H469R variants displayed a complete loss of function, and kinetic analysis identified a reduced Vmax in the common nonsynonymous variants. Plasma membrane levels of OAT4 protein were absent or reduced in the nonfunctional variants, providing a mechanistic reason for the observed loss of function. Characterization of the genetic variants of reabsorptive transporters such as OAT4 is an important step in understanding variability in tubular reabsorption with important implications in innate homeostatic processes and drug disposition. PMID:20668102

  5. The rare DAT coding variant Val559 perturbs DA neuron function, changes behavior, and alters in vivo responses to psychostimulants.

    PubMed

    Mergy, Marc A; Gowrishankar, Raajaram; Gresch, Paul J; Gantz, Stephanie C; Williams, John; Davis, Gwynne L; Wheeler, C Austin; Stanwood, Gregg D; Hahn, Maureen K; Blakely, Randy D

    2014-11-01

    Despite the critical role of the presynaptic dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT, SLC6A3) in DA clearance and psychostimulant responses, evidence that DAT dysfunction supports risk for mental illness is indirect. Recently, we identified a rare, nonsynonymous Slc6a3 variant that produces the DAT substitution Ala559Val in two male siblings who share a diagnosis of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), with other studies identifying the variant in subjects with bipolar disorder (BPD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Previously, using transfected cell studies, we observed that although DAT Val559 displays normal total and surface DAT protein levels, and normal DA recognition and uptake, the variant transporter exhibits anomalous DA efflux (ADE) and lacks capacity for amphetamine (AMPH)-stimulated DA release. To pursue the significance of these findings in vivo, we engineered DAT Val559 knock-in mice, and here we demonstrate in this model the presence of elevated extracellular DA levels, altered somatodendritic and presynaptic D2 DA receptor (D2R) function, a blunted ability of DA terminals to support depolarization and AMPH-evoked DA release, and disruptions in basal and psychostimulant-evoked locomotor behavior. Together, our studies demonstrate an in vivo functional impact of the DAT Val559 variant, providing support for the ability of DAT dysfunction to impact risk for mental illness.

  6. Altered motor activity of alternative splice variants of the mammalian kinesin-3 protein KIF1B.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Ruri; Mitsui, Keiji; Kanazawa, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    Several mammalian kinesin motor proteins exist as multiple isoforms that arise from alternative splicing of a single gene. However, the roles of many motor protein splice variants remain unclear. The kinesin-3 motor protein KIF1B has alternatively spliced isoforms distinguished by the presence or absence of insertion sequences in the conserved amino-terminal region of the protein. The insertions are located in the loop region containing the lysine-rich cluster, also known as the K-loop, and in the hinge region adjacent to the motor domain. To clarify the functions of these alternative splice variants of KIF1B, we examined the biochemical properties of recombinant KIF1B with and without insertion sequences. In a microtubule-dependent ATPase assay, KIF1B variants that contained both insertions had higher activity and affinity for microtubules than KIF1B variants that contained no insertions. Mutational analysis of the K-loop insertion revealed that variants with a longer insertion sequence at this site had higher activity. However, the velocity of movement in motility assays was similar between KIF1B with and without insertion sequences. Our results indicate that splicing isoforms of KIF1B that vary in their insertion sequences have different motor activities.

  7. Which Genetics Variants in DNase-Seq Footprints Are More Likely to Alter Binding?

    PubMed Central

    Moyerbrailean, Gregory A.; Kalita, Cynthia A.; Harvey, Chris T.; Wen, Xiaoquan; Luca, Francesca; Pique-Regi, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Large experimental efforts are characterizing the regulatory genome, yet we are still missing a systematic definition of functional and silent genetic variants in non-coding regions. Here, we integrated DNaseI footprinting data with sequence-based transcription factor (TF) motif models to predict the impact of a genetic variant on TF binding across 153 tissues and 1,372 TF motifs. Each annotation we derived is specific for a cell-type condition or assay and is locally motif-driven. We found 5.8 million genetic variants in footprints, 66% of which are predicted by our model to affect TF binding. Comprehensive examination using allele-specific hypersensitivity (ASH) reveals that only the latter group consistently shows evidence for ASH (3,217 SNPs at 20% FDR), suggesting that most (97%) genetic variants in footprinted regulatory regions are indeed silent. Combining this information with GWAS data reveals that our annotation helps in computationally fine-mapping 86 SNPs in GWAS hit regions with at least a 2-fold increase in the posterior odds of picking the causal SNP. The rich meta information provided by the tissue-specificity and the identity of the putative TF binding site being affected also helps in identifying the underlying mechanism supporting the association. As an example, the enrichment for LDL level-associated SNPs is 9.1-fold higher among SNPs predicted to affect HNF4 binding sites than in a background model already including tissue-specific annotation. PMID:26901046

  8. Selection and explosive growth alter genetic architecture and hamper the detection of causal rare variants

    PubMed Central

    Zaitlen, Noah A.; Ye, Chun Jimmie; Witte, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The role of rare alleles in complex phenotypes has been hotly debated, but most rare variant association tests (RVATs) do not account for the evolutionary forces that affect genetic architecture. Here, we use simulation and numerical algorithms to show that explosive population growth, as experienced by human populations, can dramatically increase the impact of very rare alleles on trait variance. We then assess the ability of RVATs to detect causal loci using simulations and human RNA-seq data. Surprisingly, we find that statistical performance is worst for phenotypes in which genetic variance is due mainly to rare alleles, and explosive population growth decreases power. Although many studies have attempted to identify causal rare variants, few have reported novel associations. This has sometimes been interpreted to mean that rare variants make negligible contributions to complex trait heritability. Our work shows that RVATs are not robust to realistic human evolutionary forces, so general conclusions about the impact of rare variants on complex traits may be premature. PMID:27197206

  9. Selection and explosive growth alter genetic architecture and hamper the detection of causal rare variants.

    PubMed

    Uricchio, Lawrence H; Zaitlen, Noah A; Ye, Chun Jimmie; Witte, John S; Hernandez, Ryan D

    2016-07-01

    The role of rare alleles in complex phenotypes has been hotly debated, but most rare variant association tests (RVATs) do not account for the evolutionary forces that affect genetic architecture. Here, we use simulation and numerical algorithms to show that explosive population growth, as experienced by human populations, can dramatically increase the impact of very rare alleles on trait variance. We then assess the ability of RVATs to detect causal loci using simulations and human RNA-seq data. Surprisingly, we find that statistical performance is worst for phenotypes in which genetic variance is due mainly to rare alleles, and explosive population growth decreases power. Although many studies have attempted to identify causal rare variants, few have reported novel associations. This has sometimes been interpreted to mean that rare variants make negligible contributions to complex trait heritability. Our work shows that RVATs are not robust to realistic human evolutionary forces, so general conclusions about the impact of rare variants on complex traits may be premature.

  10. Developmental, transcriptome, and genetic alterations associated with parthenocarpy in the grapevine seedless somatic variant Corinto bianco.

    PubMed

    Royo, Carolina; Carbonell-Bejerano, Pablo; Torres-Pérez, Rafael; Nebish, Anna; Martínez, Óscar; Rey, Manuel; Aroutiounian, Rouben; Ibáñez, Javier; Martínez-Zapater, José M

    2016-01-01

    Seedlessness is a relevant trait in grapevine cultivars intended for fresh consumption or raisin production. Previous DNA marker analysis indicated that Corinto bianco (CB) is a parthenocarpic somatic variant of the seeded cultivar Pedro Ximenes (PX). This study compared both variant lines to determine the basis of this parthenocarpic phenotype. At maturity, CB seedless berries were 6-fold smaller than PX berries. The macrogametophyte was absent from CB ovules, and CB was also pollen sterile. Occasionally, one seed developed in 1.6% of CB berries. Microsatellite genotyping and flow cytometry analyses of seedlings generated from these seeds showed that most CB viable seeds were formed by fertilization of unreduced gametes generated by meiotic diplospory, a process that has not been described previously in grapevine. Microarray and RNA-sequencing analyses identified 1958 genes that were differentially expressed between CB and PX developing flowers. Genes downregulated in CB were enriched in gametophyte-preferentially expressed transcripts, indicating the absence of regular post-meiotic germline development in CB. RNA-sequencing was also used for genetic variant calling and 14 single-nucleotide polymorphisms distinguishing the CB and PX variant lines were detected. Among these, CB-specific polymorphisms were considered as candidate parthenocarpy-responsible mutations, including a putative deleterious substitution in a HAL2-like protein. Collectively, these results revealed that the absence of a mature macrogametophyte, probably due to meiosis arrest, coupled with a process of fertilization-independent fruit growth, caused parthenocarpy in CB. This study provides a number of grapevine parthenocarpy-responsible candidate genes and shows how genomic approaches can shed light on the genetic origin of woody crop somatic variants. PMID:26454283

  11. Developmental, transcriptome, and genetic alterations associated with parthenocarpy in the grapevine seedless somatic variant Corinto bianco.

    PubMed

    Royo, Carolina; Carbonell-Bejerano, Pablo; Torres-Pérez, Rafael; Nebish, Anna; Martínez, Óscar; Rey, Manuel; Aroutiounian, Rouben; Ibáñez, Javier; Martínez-Zapater, José M

    2016-01-01

    Seedlessness is a relevant trait in grapevine cultivars intended for fresh consumption or raisin production. Previous DNA marker analysis indicated that Corinto bianco (CB) is a parthenocarpic somatic variant of the seeded cultivar Pedro Ximenes (PX). This study compared both variant lines to determine the basis of this parthenocarpic phenotype. At maturity, CB seedless berries were 6-fold smaller than PX berries. The macrogametophyte was absent from CB ovules, and CB was also pollen sterile. Occasionally, one seed developed in 1.6% of CB berries. Microsatellite genotyping and flow cytometry analyses of seedlings generated from these seeds showed that most CB viable seeds were formed by fertilization of unreduced gametes generated by meiotic diplospory, a process that has not been described previously in grapevine. Microarray and RNA-sequencing analyses identified 1958 genes that were differentially expressed between CB and PX developing flowers. Genes downregulated in CB were enriched in gametophyte-preferentially expressed transcripts, indicating the absence of regular post-meiotic germline development in CB. RNA-sequencing was also used for genetic variant calling and 14 single-nucleotide polymorphisms distinguishing the CB and PX variant lines were detected. Among these, CB-specific polymorphisms were considered as candidate parthenocarpy-responsible mutations, including a putative deleterious substitution in a HAL2-like protein. Collectively, these results revealed that the absence of a mature macrogametophyte, probably due to meiosis arrest, coupled with a process of fertilization-independent fruit growth, caused parthenocarpy in CB. This study provides a number of grapevine parthenocarpy-responsible candidate genes and shows how genomic approaches can shed light on the genetic origin of woody crop somatic variants.

  12. A Variant of GJD2, Encoding for Connexin 36, Alters the Function of Insulin Producing β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Cigliola, Valentina; Populaire, Celine; Pierri, Ciro L; Deutsch, Samuel; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Fadista, João; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Groop, Leif; Rueedi, Rico; Thorel, Fabrizio; Herrera, Pedro Luis; Meda, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Signalling through gap junctions contributes to control insulin secretion and, thus, blood glucose levels. Gap junctions of the insulin-producing β-cells are made of connexin 36 (Cx36), which is encoded by the GJD2 gene. Cx36-null mice feature alterations mimicking those observed in type 2 diabetes (T2D). GJD2 is also expressed in neurons, which share a number of common features with pancreatic β-cells. Given that a synonymous exonic single nucleotide polymorphism of human Cx36 (SNP rs3743123) associates with altered function of central neurons in a subset of epileptic patients, we investigated whether this SNP also caused alterations of β-cell function. Transfection of rs3743123 cDNA in connexin-lacking HeLa cells resulted in altered formation of gap junction plaques and cell coupling, as compared to those induced by wild type (WT) GJD2 cDNA. Transgenic mice expressing the very same cDNAs under an insulin promoter revealed that SNP rs3743123 expression consistently lead to a post-natal reduction of islet Cx36 levels and β-cell survival, resulting in hyperglycemia in selected lines. These changes were not observed in sex- and age-matched controls expressing WT hCx36. The variant GJD2 only marginally associated to heterogeneous populations of diabetic patients. The data document that a silent polymorphism of GJD2 is associated with altered β-cell function, presumably contributing to T2D pathogenesis.

  13. Lupus risk variants in the PXK locus alter B-cell receptor internalization

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Samuel E.; Foley, Corinne; Lu, Xiaoming; Patel, Zubin H.; Zoller, Erin E.; Magnusen, Albert F.; Williams, Adrienne H.; Ziegler, Julie T.; Comeau, Mary E.; Marion, Miranda C.; Glenn, Stuart B.; Adler, Adam; Shen, Nan; Nath, Swapan; Stevens, Anne M.; Freedman, Barry I.; Tsao, Betty P.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Kamen, Diane L.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Reveille, John D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; James, Judith A.; Moser, Kathy L.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Vilá, Luis M.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Petri, Michelle; Scofield, R. Hal; Kimberly, Robert P.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Binjoo, Young; Choi, Jeongim; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Namjou, Bahram; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Harley, Isaac T. W.; Harley, John B.; Kottyan, Leah C.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies have identified variants in PXK that confer risk for humoral autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus), rheumatoid arthritis and more recently systemic sclerosis. While PXK is involved in trafficking of epidermal growth factor Receptor (EGFR) in COS-7 cells, mechanisms linking PXK to lupus pathophysiology have remained undefined. In an effort to uncover the mechanism at this locus that increases lupus-risk, we undertook a fine-mapping analysis in a large multi-ancestral study of lupus patients and controls. We define a large (257kb) common haplotype marking a single causal variant that confers lupus risk detected only in European ancestral populations and spans the promoter through the 3′ UTR of PXK. The strongest association was found at rs6445972 with P < 4.62 × 10−10, OR 0.81 (0.75–0.86). Using stepwise logistic regression analysis, we demonstrate that one signal drives the genetic association in the region. Bayesian analysis confirms our results, identifying a 95% credible set consisting of 172 variants spanning 202 kb. Functionally, we found that PXK operates on the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR); we confirmed that PXK influenced the rate of BCR internalization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that individuals carrying the risk haplotype exhibited a decreased rate of BCR internalization, a process known to impact B cell survival and cell fate. Taken together, these data define a new candidate mechanism for the genetic association of variants around PXK with lupus risk and highlight the regulation of intracellular trafficking as a genetically regulated pathway mediating human autoimmunity. PMID:25620976

  14. Medulloblastoma-associated DDX3 variant selectively alters the translational response to stress

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N.; Purzner, James; Martin, Lance; Do, Brian T.; Schubert, Simone; Vaka, Dedeepya; Morrissy, Sorana; Li, Yisu; Kool, Marcel; Hovestadt, Volker; Jones, David T.W.; Northcott, Paul A.; Risch, Thomas; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Adams, Christopher M.; Leib, Ryan D.; Breese, Marcus; Marra, Marco A.; Malkin, David; Lichter, Peter; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Taylor, Michael D.; Chang, Howard Y.; Cho, Yoon-Jae

    2016-01-01

    DDX3X encodes a DEAD-box family RNA helicase (DDX3) commonly mutated in medulloblastoma, a highly aggressive cerebellar tumor affecting both children and adults. Despite being implicated in several facets of RNA metabolism, the nature and scope of DDX3′s interactions with RNA remain unclear. Here, we show DDX3 collaborates extensively with the translation initiation machinery through direct binding to 5′UTRs of nearly all coding RNAs, specific sites on the 18S rRNA, and multiple components of the translation initiation complex. Impairment of translation initiation is also evident in primary medulloblastomas harboring mutations in DDX3X, further highlighting DDX3′s role in this process. Arsenite-induced stress shifts DDX3 binding from the 5′UTR into the coding region of mRNAs concomitant with a general reduction of translation, and both the shift of DDX3 on mRNA and decreased translation are blunted by expression of a catalytically-impaired, medulloblastoma-associated DDX3R534H variant. Furthermore, despite the global repression of translation induced by arsenite, translation is preserved on select genes involved in chromatin organization in DDX3R534H-expressing cells. Thus, DDX3 interacts extensively with RNA and ribosomal machinery to help remodel the translation landscape in response to stress, while cancer-related DDX3 variants adapt this response to selectively preserve translation. PMID:27058758

  15. Altered tumor formation and evolutionary selection of genetic variants in the human MDM4 oncogene.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Gurinder Singh; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Bond, Elisabeth E; Montagna, Marco; Monagna, Marco; Menin, Chiara; Bertorelle, Roberta; Scaini, Maria Chiara; Bartel, Frank; Böhnke, Anja; Pempe, Christina; Gradhand, Elise; Hauptmann, Steffen; Offit, Kenneth; Levine, Arnold J; Bond, Gareth L

    2009-06-23

    A large body of evidence strongly suggests that the p53 tumor suppressor pathway is central in reducing cancer frequency in vertebrates. The protein product of the haploinsufficient mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) oncogene binds to and inhibits the p53 protein. Recent studies of human genetic variants in p53 and MDM2 have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can affect p53 signaling, confer cancer risk, and suggest that the pathway is under evolutionary selective pressure (1-4). In this report, we analyze the haplotype structure of MDM4, a structural homolog of MDM2, in several different human populations. Unusual patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the haplotype distribution of MDM4 indicate the presence of candidate SNPs that may also modify the efficacy of the p53 pathway. Association studies in 5 different patient populations reveal that these SNPs in MDM4 confer an increased risk for, or early onset of, human breast and ovarian cancers in Ashkenazi Jewish and European cohorts, respectively. This report not only implicates MDM4 as a key regulator of tumorigenesis in the human breast and ovary, but also exploits for the first time evolutionary driven linkage disequilibrium as a means to select SNPs of p53 pathway genes that might be clinically relevant.

  16. SLC6A3 coding variant Ala559Val found in two autism probands alters dopamine transporter function and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Bowton, E; Saunders, C; Reddy, I A; Campbell, N G; Hamilton, P J; Henry, L K; Coon, H; Sakrikar, D; Veenstra-VanderWeele, J M; Blakely, R D; Sutcliffe, J; Matthies, H J G; Erreger, K; Galli, A

    2014-10-14

    Emerging evidence associates dysfunction in the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) with the pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The human DAT (hDAT; SLC6A3) rare variant with an Ala to Val substitution at amino acid 559 (hDAT A559V) was previously reported in individuals with bipolar disorder or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We have demonstrated that this variant is hyper-phosphorylated at the amino (N)-terminal serine (Ser) residues and promotes an anomalous DA efflux phenotype. Here, we report the novel identification of hDAT A559V in two unrelated ASD subjects and provide the first mechanistic description of its impaired trafficking phenotype. DAT surface expression is dynamically regulated by DAT substrates including the psychostimulant amphetamine (AMPH), which causes hDAT trafficking away from the plasma membrane. The integrity of DAT trafficking directly impacts DA transport capacity and therefore dopaminergic neurotransmission. Here, we show that hDAT A559V is resistant to AMPH-induced cell surface redistribution. This unique trafficking phenotype is conferred by altered protein kinase C β (PKCβ) activity. Cells expressing hDAT A559V exhibit constitutively elevated PKCβ activity, inhibition of which restores the AMPH-induced hDAT A559V membrane redistribution. Mechanistically, we link the inability of hDAT A559V to traffic in response to AMPH to the phosphorylation of the five most distal DAT N-terminal Ser. Mutation of these N-terminal Ser to Ala restores AMPH-induced trafficking. Furthermore, hDAT A559V has a diminished ability to transport AMPH, and therefore lacks AMPH-induced DA efflux. Pharmacological inhibition of PKCβ or Ser to Ala substitution in the hDAT A559V background restores AMPH-induced DA efflux while promoting intracellular AMPH accumulation. Although hDAT A559V is a rare variant, it has been found in multiple probands with neuropsychiatric disorders associated with imbalances in DA neurotransmission

  17. Missense variants in the middle domain of DNM1L in cases of infantile encephalopathy alter peroxisomes and mitochondria when assayed in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yu-Hsin; Robak, Laurie A; Xia, Fan; Koenig, Mary K; Adesina, Adekunle; Bacino, Carlos A; Scaglia, Fernando; Bellen, Hugo J; Wangler, Michael F

    2016-05-01

    Defects in organelle dynamics underlie a number of human degenerative disorders, and whole exome sequencing (WES) is a powerful tool for studying genetic changes that affect the cellular machinery. WES may uncover variants of unknown significance (VUS) that require functional validation. Previously, a pathogenic de novo variant in the middle domain of DNM1L (p.A395D) was identified in a single patient with a lethal defect of mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission. We identified two additional patients with infantile encephalopathy and partially overlapping clinical features, each with a novel VUS in the middle domain of DNM1L (p.G350R and p.E379K). To evaluate pathogenicity, we generated transgenic Drosophila expressing wild-type or variant DNM1L. We find that human wild-type DNM1L rescues the lethality as well as specific phenotypes associated with the loss of Drp1 in Drosophila. Neither the p.A395D variant nor the novel variant p.G350R rescue lethality or other phenotypes. Moreover, overexpression of p.A395D and p.G350R in Drosophila neurons, salivary gland and muscle strikingly altered peroxisomal and mitochondrial morphology. In contrast, the other novel variant (p.E379K) rescued lethality and did not affect organelle morphology, although it was associated with a subtle mitochondrial trafficking defect in an in vivo assay. Interestingly, the patient with the p.E379K variant also has a de novo VUS in pyruvate dehydrogenase 1 (PDHA1) affecting the same amino acid (G150) as another case of PDHA1 deficiency suggesting the PDHA1 variant may be pathogenic. In summary, detailed clinical evaluation and WES with functional studies in Drosophila can distinguish different functional consequences of newly-described DNM1L alleles.

  18. A neutralization-resistant Theiler's virus variant produces an altered disease pattern in the mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Zurbriggen, A; Fujinami, R S

    1989-01-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection of mice is an animal model for human demyelinating diseases. To further define the role of this virus in the disease process, we selected a virus variant resistant to neutralization by a monoclonal antibody to VP-1. This virus variant was then injected into SJL/J mice. Central nervous system tissue was compared between variant virus- and wild-type virus-infected mice. Within the brain, no large differences were observed between the two groups as to the distribution of inflammatory infiltrates around the injection site and the number of viral antigen-positive cells during the first weeks of the observation period. In contrast, in the spinal cord major differences were found between variant virus- and wild-type virus-infected mice regarding the number of inflammatory lesions, infected cells, and the size of the areas involved with time. By immunohistochemistry, equivalent numbers of infected cells could be found in the spinal cord 1 week postinfection (p.i.): however, after that time, the number of infected cells in the wild-type virus-infected mice continued to increase, whereas the virus-positive cells from the variant virus-infected mice gradually decreased. Thus, the number of viral antigen-containing cells peaked by 1 week p.i. in the variant virus-infected animals. Conversely, the number of infected cells in the spinal cords from mice inoculated with wild-type virus steadily increased until 8 weeks p.i. At this time (8 weeks p.i.), no more variant virus antigen-positive cells could be observed within the spinal cord. Plaque assay of central nervous system tissue confirmed these differences between the two groups observed by immunohistochemistry. No infectious variant virus could be isolated after 2 weeks p.i. from the brain and 4 weeks p.i. from the spinal cord, whereas infectious wild-type virus could be detected up to the end of the observation period (12 weeks p.i.). Virus which was isolated from variant

  19. A neutralization-resistant Theiler's virus variant produces an altered disease pattern in the mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Zurbriggen, A; Fujinami, R S

    1989-04-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection of mice is an animal model for human demyelinating diseases. To further define the role of this virus in the disease process, we selected a virus variant resistant to neutralization by a monoclonal antibody to VP-1. This virus variant was then injected into SJL/J mice. Central nervous system tissue was compared between variant virus- and wild-type virus-infected mice. Within the brain, no large differences were observed between the two groups as to the distribution of inflammatory infiltrates around the injection site and the number of viral antigen-positive cells during the first weeks of the observation period. In contrast, in the spinal cord major differences were found between variant virus- and wild-type virus-infected mice regarding the number of inflammatory lesions, infected cells, and the size of the areas involved with time. By immunohistochemistry, equivalent numbers of infected cells could be found in the spinal cord 1 week postinfection (p.i.): however, after that time, the number of infected cells in the wild-type virus-infected mice continued to increase, whereas the virus-positive cells from the variant virus-infected mice gradually decreased. Thus, the number of viral antigen-containing cells peaked by 1 week p.i. in the variant virus-infected animals. Conversely, the number of infected cells in the spinal cords from mice inoculated with wild-type virus steadily increased until 8 weeks p.i. At this time (8 weeks p.i.), no more variant virus antigen-positive cells could be observed within the spinal cord. Plaque assay of central nervous system tissue confirmed these differences between the two groups observed by immunohistochemistry. No infectious variant virus could be isolated after 2 weeks p.i. from the brain and 4 weeks p.i. from the spinal cord, whereas infectious wild-type virus could be detected up to the end of the observation period (12 weeks p.i.). Virus which was isolated from variant

  20. Autoimmune disease-associated variants of extracellular endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 induce altered innate immune responses by human immune cells.

    PubMed

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Rastall, David P W; Seregin, Sergey S; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Koumantou, Despoina; Aylsworth, Charles F; Quiroga, Dionisia; Godbehere, Sarah; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) gene polymorphisms have been linked to several autoimmune diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations are not well understood. Recently, we demonstrated that ERAP1 regulates key aspects of the innate immune response. Previous studies show ERAP1 to be endoplasmic reticulum-localized and secreted during inflammation. Herein, we investigate the possible roles that ERAP1 polymorphic variants may have in modulating the innate immune responses of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) using two experimental methods: extracellular exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variants and adenovirus (Ad)-based ERAP1 expression. We found that exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variant proteins as well as ERAP1 overexpression by Ad5 vectors increased inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and enhanced immune cell activation. Investigating the molecular mechanisms behind these responses revealed that ERAP1 is able to activate innate immunity via multiple pathways, including the NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor, pyrin domain-containing 3) inflammasome. Importantly, these responses varied if autoimmune disease-associated variants of ERAP1 were examined in the assay systems. Unexpectedly, blocking ERAP1 cellular internalization augmented IL-1β production. To our knowledge, this is the first report identifying ERAP1 as being involved in modulating innate responses of human immune cells, a finding that may explain why ERAP1 has been genetically associated with several autoimmune diseases.

  1. Co-Expression of Wild-Type P2X7R with Gln460Arg Variant Alters Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Aprile-Garcia, Fernando; Metzger, Michael W.; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Stadler, Herbert; Acuña, Matías; Liberman, Ana C.; Senin, Sergio A.; Gerez, Juan; Hoijman, Esteban; Refojo, Damian; Mitkovski, Mišo; Panhuysen, Markus; Stühmer, Walter; Holsboer, Florian; Deussing, Jan M.; Arzt, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor is a member of the P2X family of ligand-gated ion channels. A single-nucleotide polymorphism leading to a glutamine (Gln) by arginine (Arg) substitution at codon 460 of the purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) has been associated with mood disorders. No change in function (loss or gain) has been described for this SNP so far. Here we show that although the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant per se is not compromised in its function, co-expression of wild-type P2X7R with P2X7R-Gln460Arg impairs receptor function with respect to calcium influx, channel currents and intracellular signaling in vitro. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation and FRET studies show that the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant physically interacts with P2X7R-WT. Specific silencing of either the normal or polymorphic variant rescues the heterozygous loss of function phenotype and restores normal function. The described loss of function due to co-expression, unique for mutations in the P2RX7 gene so far, explains the mechanism by which the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant affects the normal function of the channel and may represent a mechanism of action for other mutations. PMID:26986975

  2. Gene variants in CYP2C19 are associated with altered in vivo bupropion pharmacokinetics but not bupropion-assisted smoking cessation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Andy Z X; Zhou, Qian; Cox, Lisa Sanderson; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S; Benowitz, Neal L; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2014-11-01

    Bupropion is used clinically to treat depression and to promote smoking cessation. It is metabolized by CYP2B6 to its active metabolite hydroxybupropion, yet alterations in CYP2B6 activity have little impact on bupropion plasma levels. Furthermore, less than 10% of a bupropion dose is excreted as urinary bupropion and its characterized metabolites hydroxybupropion, threohydrobupropion, and erythrohydrobupropion, suggesting that alternative metabolic pathways may exist. In vitro data suggested CYP2C19 could metabolize bupropion. The current study investigated the impact of functional CYP2C19 genetic variants on bupropion pharmacokinetics and treatment outcomes. In 42 healthy volunteers, CYP2C19*2 (a reduced activity allele) was associated with higher bupropion area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), but similar hydroxybupropion AUC. The mean bupropion AUC was 771 versus 670 hours⋅ng/ml in individuals with and without CYP2C19*2, respectively (P = 0.017). CYP2C19*2 was also associated with higher threohydrobupropion and erythrohydrobupropion AUC (P < 0.005). Adjusting for CYP2B6 genotype did not alter these associations, and CYP2C19 variants did not alter the utility of the hydroxybupropion/bupropion ratio as a measure of CYP2B6 activity. Finally, in a clinical trial of 540 smokers, CYP2C19 genotype was not associated with smoking cessation outcomes, supporting the hypothesis that bupropion response is mediated by hydroxybupropion, which is not altered by CYP2C19. In conclusion, our study reports the first in vivo evidence that reduced CYP2C19 activity significantly increases the steady-state exposure to bupropion and its reductive metabolites threohydrobupropion and erythrohydrobupropion. These pharmacokinetic changes were not associated with differences in bupropion's ability to promote smoking cessation in smokers, but may influence the side effects and toxicity associated with bupropion.

  3. Novel inhibitors of human leukocyte elastase and cathepsin G. Sequence variants of squash seed protease inhibitor with altered protease selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    McWherter, C.A.; Walkenhorst, W.F.; Glover, G.I. ); Campbell, E.J. )

    1989-07-11

    Novel peptide inhibitors of human leukocyte elastase (HLE) and cathepsin G (CG) were prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis of P1 amino acid sequence variants of Curcurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III (CMTI-III), a 29-residue peptide found in squash seed. A systematic study of P1 variants indicated that P1, Arg, Lys, Leu, Ala, Phe, and Met inhibit trypsin; P1, Val, Ile, Gly, Leu, Ala, Phe, and Met inhibit HLE; P1 Leu, Ala, Phe, and Met inhibit CG and chymotrypsin. Variants with P1, Val, Ile, or Gly were selective inhibitors of HLE, while inhibition of trypsin required P1 amino acids with an unbranched {beta} carbon. Studies of Val-5-CMTI-III (P1 Val) inhibition of HLE demonstrated a 1:1 binding stoichiometry with a (K{sub i}){sub app} of 8.7 nM. Inhibition of HLE by Gly-5-CMTI-III indicated a significant role for reactive-site structural moieties other than the P1 side chain. Val-5-CMTI-III inhibited both HLE and human polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) proteolysis of surface-bound {sup 125}I-labeled fibronectin. Val-5-CMTI-III was more effective at preventing turnover of a peptide p-nitroanilide substrate than halting dissolution of {sup 125}I-labeled fibronectin. It was about as effective as human serum {alpha}{sub 1}-proteinase inhibitor in preventing PMN degradation of the connective tissue substrate. In addition to providing interesting candidates for controlling inflammatory cell proteolytic injury, the CMTI-based inhibitors are ideal for studying molecular recognition because of their small size, their ease of preparation, and the availability of sensitive and quantitative assays for intermolecular interactions.

  4. Common variants in the human platelet PAR4 thrombin receptor alter platelet function and differ by race.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Leonard C; Simon, Lukas M; Lindsay, Cory R; Kong, Xianguo; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Tourdot, Benjamin E; Chen, Edward S; Ma, Lin; Coughlin, Shaun; Nieman, Marvin; Holinstat, Michael; Shaw, Chad A; Bray, Paul F

    2014-11-27

    Human platelets express 2 thrombin receptors: protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR4. Recently, we reported 3.7-fold increased PAR4-mediated aggregation kinetics in platelets from black subjects compared with white subjects. We now show that platelets from blacks (n = 70) express 14% more PAR4 protein than those from whites (n = 84), but this difference is not associated with platelet PAR4 function. Quantitative trait locus analysis identified 3 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PAR4 gene (F2RL3) associated with PAR4-induced platelet aggregation. Among these single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs773902 determines whether residue 120 in transmembrane domain 2 is an alanine (Ala) or threonine (Thr). Compared with the Ala120 variant, Thr120 was more common in black subjects than in white subjects (63% vs 19%), was associated with higher PAR4-induced human platelet aggregation and Ca2+ flux, and generated greater inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate in transfected cells. A second, less frequent F2RL3 variant, Phe296Val, was only observed in blacks and abolished the enhanced PAR4-induced platelet aggregation and 1,4,5-triphosphate generation associated with PAR4-Thr120. PAR4 genotype did not affect vorapaxar inhibition of platelet PAR1 function, but a strong pharmacogenetic effect was observed with the PAR4-specific antagonist YD-3 [1-benzyl-3(ethoxycarbonylphenyl)-indazole]. These findings may have an important pharmacogenetic effect on the development of new PAR antagonists.

  5. Common variants in the human platelet PAR4 thrombin receptor alter platelet function and differ by race

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, Leonard C.; Simon, Lukas M.; Lindsay, Cory R.; Kong, Xianguo; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Tourdot, Benjamin E.; Chen, Edward S.; Ma, Lin; Coughlin, Shaun; Nieman, Marvin; Holinstat, Michael; Shaw, Chad A.

    2014-01-01

    Human platelets express 2 thrombin receptors: protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR4. Recently, we reported 3.7-fold increased PAR4-mediated aggregation kinetics in platelets from black subjects compared with white subjects. We now show that platelets from blacks (n = 70) express 14% more PAR4 protein than those from whites (n = 84), but this difference is not associated with platelet PAR4 function. Quantitative trait locus analysis identified 3 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PAR4 gene (F2RL3) associated with PAR4-induced platelet aggregation. Among these single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs773902 determines whether residue 120 in transmembrane domain 2 is an alanine (Ala) or threonine (Thr). Compared with the Ala120 variant, Thr120 was more common in black subjects than in white subjects (63% vs 19%), was associated with higher PAR4-induced human platelet aggregation and Ca2+ flux, and generated greater inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate in transfected cells. A second, less frequent F2RL3 variant, Phe296Val, was only observed in blacks and abolished the enhanced PAR4-induced platelet aggregation and 1,4,5-triphosphate generation associated with PAR4-Thr120. PAR4 genotype did not affect vorapaxar inhibition of platelet PAR1 function, but a strong pharmacogenetic effect was observed with the PAR4-specific antagonist YD-3 [1-benzyl-3(ethoxycarbonylphenyl)-indazole]. These findings may have an important pharmacogenetic effect on the development of new PAR antagonists. PMID:25293779

  6. A variant in the carboxyl-terminus of connexin 40 alters GAP junctions and increases risk for tetralogy of Fallot

    PubMed Central

    Guida, Valentina; Ferese, Rosangela; Rocchetti, Marcella; Bonetti, Monica; Sarkozy, Anna; Cecchetti, Serena; Gelmetti, Vania; Lepri, Francesca; Copetti, Massimiliano; Lamorte, Giuseppe; Cristina Digilio, Maria; Marino, Bruno; Zaza, Antonio; den Hertog, Jeroen; Dallapiccola, Bruno; De Luca, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    GJA5 gene (MIM no. 121013), localized at 1q21.1, encodes for the cardiac gap junction protein connexin 40. In humans, copy number variants of chromosome 1q21.1 have been associated with variable phenotypes comprising congenital heart disease (CHD), including isolated TOF. In mice, the deletion of Gja5 can cause a variety of complex CHDs, in particular of the cardiac outflow tract, corresponding to TOF in many cases. In the present study, we screened for mutations in the GJA5 gene 178 unrelated probands with isolated TOF. A heterozygous nucleotide change (c.793C>T) in exon 2 of the gene leading to the p.Pro265Ser variant at the carboxyl-terminus of the protein was found in two unrelated sporadic patients, one with classic anatomy and one with pulmonary atresia. This GJA5 missense substitution was not observed in 1568 ethnically-matched control chromosomes. Immunofluorescent staining and confocal microscopy revealed that cells expressing the mutant protein form sparse or no visible gap-junction plaques in the region of cell–cell contact. Moreover, analysis of the transfer of the gap junction permanent tracer lucifer yellow showed that cells expressing the mutant protein have a reduced rate of dye transfer compared with wild-type cells. Finally, use of a zebrafish model revealed that microinjection of the GJA5-p.Pro265Ser mutant disrupts overall morphology of the heart tube in the 37% (22/60) of embryos, compared with the 6% (4/66) of the GJA5 wild-type-injected embryos. These findings implicate GJA5 gene as a novel susceptibility gene for TOF. PMID:22713807

  7. GWAS-identified risk variants for major depressive disorder: Preliminary support for an association with late-life depressive symptoms and brain structural alterations.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joanne; Artero, Sylvaine; Carrière, Isabelle; Maller, Jerome J; Meslin, Chantal; Ritchie, Karen; Ancelin, Marie-Laure

    2016-01-01

    A number of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have investigated risk factors for major depressive disorder (MDD), however there has been little attempt to replicate these findings in population-based studies of depressive symptoms. Variants within three genes, BICC1, PCLO and GRM7 were selected for replication in our study based on the following criteria: they were identified in a prior MDD GWAS study; a subsequent study found evidence that they influenced depression risk; and there is a solid biological basis for a role in depression. We firstly investigated whether these variants were associated with depressive symptoms in our population-based cohort of 929 elderly (238 with clinical depressive symptoms and 691 controls), and secondly to investigate associations with structural brain alterations. A number of nominally significant associations were identified, but none reached Bonferroni-corrected significance levels. Common SNPs in BICC1 and PCLO were associated with a 50% and 30% decreased risk of depression, respectively. PCLO rs2522833 was also associated with the volume of grey matter (p=1.6×10(-3)), and to a lesser extent with hippocampal volume and white matter lesions. Among depressed individuals rs9870680 (GRM7) was associated with the volume of grey and white matter (p=10(-4) and 8.3×10(-3), respectively). Our results provide some support for the involvement of BICC1 and PCLO in late-life depressive disorders and preliminary evidence that these genetic variants may also influence brain structural volumes. However effect sizes remain modest and associations did not reach corrected significance levels. Further large imaging studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  8. Common genetic variants in the CLDN2 and PRSS1-PRSS2 loci alter risk for alcohol-related and sporadic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Whitcomb, David C.; LaRusch, Jessica; Krasinskas, Alyssa M.; Klei, Lambertus; Smith, Jill P.; Brand, Randall E.; Neoptolemos, John P.; Lerch, Markus M.; Tector, Matt; Sandhu, Bimaljit S.; Guda, Nalini M.; Orlichenko, Lidiya; Alkaade, Samer; Amann, Stephen T.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Baillie, John; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin; Coté, Gregory A.; Cotton, Peter B.; DiSario, James; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Forsmark, Chris E.; Johnstone, Marianne; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Greenhalf, William; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hartman, Douglas J.; Hawes, Robert A.; Lawrence, Christopher; Lewis, Michele; Mayerle, Julia; Mayeux, Richard; Melhem, Nadine M.; Money, Mary E.; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam; Papachristou, Georgios I.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Sherman, Stuart; Simon, Peter; Singh, Vijay K.; Slivka, Adam; Stolz, Donna; Sutton, Robert; Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Wilcox, C. Mel; Zarnescu, Narcis Octavian; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Kienholz, Michelle L.; Roeder, Kathryn; Barmada, M. Michael; Yadav, Dhiraj; Devlin, Bernie; Albert, Marilyn S.; Albin, Roger L.; Apostolova, Liana G.; Arnold, Steven E.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Barber, Robert; Barnes, Lisa L.; Beach, Thomas G.; Beecham, Gary W.; Beekly, Duane; Bennett, David A.; Bigio, Eileen H.; Bird, Thomas D.; Blacker, Deborah; Boxer, Adam; Burke, James R.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Cantwell, Laura B.; Cao, Chuanhai; Carney, Regina M.; Carroll, Steven L.; Chui, Helena C.; Clark, David G.; Cribbs, David H.; Crocco, Elizabeth A.; Cruchaga, Carlos; DeCarli, Charles; Demirci, F. Yesim; Dick, Malcolm; Dickson, Dennis W.; Duara, Ranjan; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Faber, Kelley M.; Fallon, Kenneth B.; Farlow, Martin R.; Ferris, Steven; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Ganguli, Mary; Gearing, Marla; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Gilbert, John R.; Gilman, Sid; Glass, Jonathan D.; Goate, Alison M.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Green, Robert C.; Growdon, John H.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Harrell, Lindy E.; Head, Elizabeth; Honig, Lawrence S.; Hulette, Christine M.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Jin, Lee-Way; Jun, Gyungah; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Karydas, Anna; Kaye, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Ronald; Koo, Edward H.; Kowall, Neil W.; Kramer, Joel H.; Kramer, Patricia; Kukull, Walter A.; LaFerla, Frank M.; Lah, James J.; Leverenz, James B.; Levey, Allan I.; Li, Ge; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Mack, Wendy J.; Marson, Daniel C.; Martin, Eden R.; Martiniuk, Frank; Mash, Deborah C.; Masliah, Eliezer; McKee, Ann C.; Mesulam, Marsel; Miller, Bruce L.; Miller, Carol A.; Miller, Joshua W.; Montine, Thomas J.; Morris, John C.; Murrell, Jill R.; Naj, Adam C.; Olichney, John M.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Peskind, Elaine; Petersen, Ronald C.; Pierce, Aimee; Poon, Wayne W.; Potter, Huntington; Quinn, Joseph F.; Raj, Ashok; Raskind, Murray; Reiman, Eric M.; Reisberg, Barry; Reitz, Christiane; Ringman, John M.; Roberson, Erik D.; Rosen, Howard J.; Rosenberg, Roger N.; Sano, Mary; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schneider, Julie A.; Schneider, Lon S.; Seeley, William W.; Smith, Amanda G.; Sonnen, Joshua A.; Spina, Salvatore; Stern, Robert A.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Valladares, Otto; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Vinters, Harry V.; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Wang, Li-San; Weintraub, Sandra; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Williamson, Jennifer; Woltjer, Randall L.; Wright, Clinton B.; Younkin, Steven G.; Yu, Chang-En; Yu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatitis is a complex, progressively destructive inflammatory disorder. Alcohol was long thought to be the primary causative agent, but genetic contributions have been of interest since the discovery that rare PRSS1, CFTR, and SPINK1 variants were associated with pancreatitis risk. We now report two significant genome-wide associations identified and replicated at PRSS1-PRSS2 (1×10-12) and x-linked CLDN2 (p < 1×10-21) through a two-stage genome-wide study (Stage 1, 676 cases and 4507 controls; Stage 2, 910 cases and 4170 controls). The PRSS1 variant affects susceptibility by altering expression of the primary trypsinogen gene. The CLDN2 risk allele is associated with atypical localization of claudin-2 in pancreatic acinar cells. The homozygous (or hemizygous male) CLDN2 genotype confers the greatest risk, and its alleles interact with alcohol consumption to amplify risk. These results could partially explain the high frequency of alcohol-related pancreatitis in men – male hemizygous frequency is 0.26, female homozygote is 0.07. PMID:23143602

  9. Triosephosphate isomerase deficiency: haemolytic anaemia, myopathy with altered mitochondria and mental retardation due to a new variant with accelerated enzyme catabolism and diminished specific activity.

    PubMed

    Eber, S W; Pekrun, A; Bardosi, A; Gahr, M; Krietsch, W K; Krüger, J; Matthei, R; Schröter, W

    1991-09-01

    A new triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) variant is described in an 8-year-old Turkish girl suffering from chronic haemolytic anaemia, myopathy and developmental retardation since early infancy. The enzyme activity profile revealed a generalized deficiency in erythrocytes, granulocytes, mononuclear blood cells, skeletal muscle tissue and cerebrospinal fluid. The concentration of enzyme substrate dihydroxyacetone phosphate was distinctly elevated. Biochemical examination showed accelerated enzyme deamidation, the first step in the normal catabolism of TPI during aging of the erythrocyte. The specific activity of the variant TPI, determined by antibody titration, was reduced to 61% of normal. Its heat stability was markedly decreased. Muscle biopsy and neuropsychological testing further clarified the pathogenesis of the disorder. A prevalent alteration of mitochondria similar to that seen in mitochondrial myopathy and an elevated amount of intracellular glycogen were found. The patient's retarded intellectual development was mainly due to impaired visual perception and sensory-motor co-ordination in addition to a lack of syllogistic reasoning. The findings indicate that the low TPI activity leads to a metabolic block of the glycolytic pathway and hence to a generalized impairment of cellular energy supply.

  10. Catestatin Gly364Ser Variant Alters Systemic Blood Pressure and the Risk for Hypertension in Human Populations via Endothelial Nitric Oxide Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kiranmayi, Malapaka; Chirasani, Venkat R; Allu, Prasanna K R; Subramanian, Lakshmi; Martelli, Elizabeth E; Sahu, Bhavani S; Vishnuprabu, Durairajpandian; Kumaragurubaran, Rathnakumar; Sharma, Saurabh; Bodhini, Dhanasekaran; Dixit, Madhulika; Munirajan, Arasambattu K; Khullar, Madhu; Radha, Venkatesan; Mohan, Viswanathan; Mullasari, Ajit S; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V; Senapati, Sanjib; Mahapatra, Nitish R

    2016-08-01

    Catestatin (CST), an endogenous antihypertensive/antiadrenergic peptide, is a novel regulator of cardiovascular physiology. Here, we report case-control studies in 2 geographically/ethnically distinct Indian populations (n≈4000) that showed association of the naturally-occurring human CST-Gly364Ser variant with increased risk for hypertension (age-adjusted odds ratios: 1.483; P=0.009 and 2.951; P=0.005). Consistently, 364Ser allele carriers displayed elevated systolic (up to ≈8 mm Hg; P=0.004) and diastolic (up to ≈6 mm Hg; P=0.001) blood pressure. The variant allele was also found to be in linkage disequilibrium with other functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the CHGA promoter and nearby coding region. Functional characterization of the Gly364Ser variant was performed using cellular/molecular biological experiments (viz peptide-receptor binding assays, nitric oxide [NO], phosphorylated extracellular regulated kinase, and phosphorylated endothelial NO synthase estimations) and computational approaches (molecular dynamics simulations for structural analysis of wild-type [CST-WT] and variant [CST-364Ser] peptides and docking of peptide/ligand with β-adrenergic receptors [ADRB1/2]). CST-WT and CST-364Ser peptides differed profoundly in their secondary structures and showed differential interactions with ADRB2; although CST-WT displaced the ligand bound to ADRB2, CST-364Ser failed to do the same. Furthermore, CST-WT significantly inhibited ADRB2-stimulated extracellular regulated kinase activation, suggesting an antagonistic role towards ADRB2 unlike CST-364Ser. Consequently, CST-WT was more potent in NO production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells as compared with CST-364Ser. This NO-producing ability of CST-WT was abrogated by ADRB2 antagonist ICI 118551. In conclusion, CST-364Ser allele enhanced the risk for hypertension in human populations, possibly via diminished endothelial NO production because of altered interactions of CST-364Ser

  11. Alzheimer's disease susceptibility variants in the MS4A6A gene are associated with altered levels of MS4A6A expression in blood.

    PubMed

    Proitsi, Petroula; Lee, Sang Hyuck; Lunnon, Katie; Keohane, Aoife; Powell, John; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Furney, Simon; Soininen, Hilkka; Kłoszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Lovestone, Simon; Hodges, Angela

    2014-02-01

    An increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) has previously been found to be associated with variants at the MS4A6A locus. We sought to identify which genes and transcripts in this region have altered expression in AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and are influenced by the AD risk variant(s), as a first step to understanding the molecular basis of AD susceptibility at this locus. Common variants located within highly expressed MS4A6A transcripts were significantly associated with AD and MS4A6A expression levels in blood from MCI and AD subjects (p < 0.05, rs610932, rs7232, rs583791). More copies of the protective (minor) allele were associated with lower MS4A6A expression of each transcript (e.g., p = 0.019; rs610932-total MS4A6A). Furthermore, in heterozygous AD subjects, relative expression of the protective allele of V4-MS4A6A transcripts was lower (p < 0.008). Irrespective of genotype, MS4A6A transcripts were increased in blood from people with AD (p < 0.003), whereas lower expression of full length V1-MS4A6A (p = 0.002) and higher expression of V4-MS4A6A (p = 1.8 × 10(-4)) were observed in MCI, relative to elderly controls. The association between genotype and expression was less consistent in brain, although BA9 did have a similar genotype association with V4-MS4A6A transcripts as in blood. MS4A6A transcripts were widely expressed in tissues and cells, with the exception of V4-MS4A6A, which was not expressed in neuronal cells. Together these results suggest that high levels of MS4A6A in emerging AD pathology are detrimental. Persons with MCI may lower MS4A6A expression to minimize detrimental disease associated MS4A6A activity. However, those with the susceptibility allele appear unable to decrease expression sufficiently, which may explain their increased risk for developing AD. Inhibiting MS4A6A may therefore promote a more neuroprotective phenotype, although further work is needed to establish whether this is the case.

  12. Altered Competitive Fitness, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Cellular Morphology in a Triclosan-Induced Small-Colony Variant of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Sarah; Latimer, Joe; Bazaid, Abdulrahman; McBain, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can produce small-colony variants (SCVs) that express various phenotypes. While their significance is unclear, SCV propagation may be influenced by relative fitness, antimicrobial susceptibility, and the underlying mechanism. We have investigated triclosan-induced generation of SCVs in six S. aureus strains, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Parent strains (P0) were repeatedly passaged on concentration gradients of triclosan using a solid-state exposure system to generate P10. P10 was subsequently passaged without triclosan to generate X10. Susceptibility to triclosan and 7 antibiotics was assessed at all stages. For S. aureus ATCC 6538, SCVs were further characterized by determining microbicide susceptibility and competitive fitness. Cellular morphology was examined using electron microscopy, and protein expression was evaluated through proteomics. Triclosan susceptibility in all SCVs (which could be generated from 4/6 strains) was markedly decreased, while antibiotic susceptibility was significantly increased in the majority of cases. An SCV of S. aureus ATCC 6538 exhibited significantly increased susceptibility to all tested microbicides. Cross-wall formation was impaired in this bacterium, while expression of FabI, a target of triclosan, and IsaA, a lytic transglycosylase involved in cell division, was increased. The P10 SCV was 49% less fit than P0. In summary, triclosan exposure of S. aureus produced SCVs in 4/6 test bacteria, with decreased triclosan susceptibility but with generally increased antibiotic susceptibility. An SCV derived from S. aureus ATCC 6538 showed reduced competitive fitness, potentially due to impaired cell division. In this SCV, increased FabI expression could account for reduced triclosan susceptibility, while IsaA may be upregulated in response to cell division defects.

  13. In vivo generated Citrus exocortis viroid progeny variants display a range of phenotypes with altered levels of replication, systemic accumulation and pathogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus exocortis viroid (CEVd) exists as heterogeneous variants in plant hosts. We inoculated RNA transcripts from a CEVd cDNA clone into protoplasts, seedlings and mature plants of citrus and sequenced 240 in vivo generated progeny variants. Selected progeny variants were further used to evaluate t...

  14. Communication of brain network core connections altered in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia but possibly preserved in early-onset Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Mendez, Mario F.; Bartzokis, George; Jimenez, Elvira E.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-03-01

    Diffusion imaging and brain connectivity analyses can assess white matter deterioration in the brain, revealing the underlying patterns of how brain structure declines. Fiber tractography methods can infer neural pathways and connectivity patterns, yielding sensitive mathematical metrics of network integrity. Here, we analyzed 1.5-Tesla wholebrain diffusion-weighted images from 64 participants - 15 patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 19 with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD), and 30 healthy elderly controls. Using whole-brain tractography, we reconstructed structural brain connectivity networks to map connections between cortical regions. We evaluated the brain's networks focusing on the most highly central and connected regions, also known as hubs, in each diagnostic group - specifically the "high-cost" structural backbone used in global and regional communication. The high-cost backbone of the brain, predicted by fiber density and minimally short pathways between brain regions, accounted for 81-92% of the overall brain communication metric in all diagnostic groups. Furthermore, we found that the set of pathways interconnecting high-cost and high-capacity regions of the brain's communication network are globally and regionally altered in bvFTD, compared to healthy participants; however, the overall organization of the high-cost and high-capacity networks were relatively preserved in EOAD participants, relative to controls. Disruption of the major central hubs that transfer information between brain regions may impair neural communication and functional integrity in characteristic ways typical of each subtype of dementia.

  15. The Small Colony Variant of Listeria monocytogenes Is More Tolerant to Antibiotics and Has Altered Survival in RAW 264.7 Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Thomas D.; Gram, Lone; Knudsen, Gitte M.

    2016-01-01

    Small Colony Variant (SCV) cells of bacteria are a slow-growing phenotype that result from specific defects in the electron transport chain. They form pinpoint colonies on agar plates and have a variety of phenotypic characteristics, such as altered carbon metabolism, decreased toxin and lytic enzyme production, aminoglycoside resistance, and increased intracellular persistence. They are clinically relevant in Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, serving as a reservoir for recurrent or prolonged infections. Here, we found that a SCV mutant in the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (strain SCV E18), similar to the high persister mutant phenotype, survived significantly better than the wild type when exposed over a 48-h period to concentrations above Minimal Inhibitory Concentration for most tested antibiotics. SCV E18 survived more poorly than the wildtype in unactivated RAW264.7 macrophage cells, presumably because of its reduced listeriolysin O expression, however, it survived better in reactive oxygen species producing, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-activated macrophages. Although SCV E18 was sensitive to oxygen as it entered the stationary phase, it was significantly more tolerant to H2O2 than the wild type, which may result from a shift in metabolism, however, further investigation is needed to resolve this. SCV E18 is a spontaneous mutant with a point mutation in the hemA gene. A wild type copy of hemA was complemented on plasmid pSOG30222, which restored the wild type phenotype. The results reported here suggest that the SCV of L. monocytogenes could be of clinical importance and highlight a need for adequate clinical screening for this phenotype, as it could affect antibiotic treatment outcomes. PMID:27458449

  16. Isolation of nontoxigenic variants associated with enhanced sporulation and alteration in the cell wall from Clostridium botulinum type a 190L by treatment with detergents.

    PubMed

    Takumi, K; Kinouchi, T; Kawata, T

    1980-01-01

    Nontoxigenic variants were isolated from Clostridium botulinum type A strain 190L after treatment with detergents such as deoxycholate, sodium dodecyl sulfate, Tween 80 and Brij-58. Deoxycholate was most effective for obtaining the variants. The variants exhibited a markedly increased frequency of sporulation compared with the oligosporogenic parent strain. The cell wall of the parent strain was composed of an outer layer and an inner layer, whereas that of the variants lost the outer layer. After treatment with mitomycin C the parent strain was subjected to lysis and produced bacteriophages with a hexagonal head and a contractible tail, while the nontoxigenic variants did not yield bacteriophages or phage-like structures. There appears to be a close relationship among the toxigenic and sporogenic properties, formation of the outer cell wall layer and lysogeny.

  17. Expression of cancer related BRCA1 missense variants decreases MMS-induced recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae without altering its nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Lodovichi, Samuele; Vitello, Martina; Cervelli, Tiziana; Galli, Alvaro

    2016-10-17

    BRCA1 tumor suppressor gene is found mutated in familial breast and ovarian cancer. Most cancer related mutations were found located at the RING (Really Interesting New Gene) and at the BRCT (BRca1 C-Terminal) domain. However, 20 y after its identification, the biological role of BRCA1 and which domains are more relevant for tumor suppression are still being elucidated. We previously reported that expression of BRCA1 cancer related variants in the RING and BRCT domain increases spontaneous homologous recombination in yeast indicating that BRCA1 may interact with yeast DNA repair/recombination. To finally demonstrate whether BRCA1 interacts with yeast DNA repair, we exposed yeast cells expressing BRCA1wt, the cancer-related variants C-61G and M1775R to different doses of the alkylating agent methyl methane-sulfonate (MMS) and then evaluated the effect on survival and homologous recombination. Cells expressing BRCA1 cancer variants were more sensitive to MMS and less inducible to recombination as compared to cell expressing BRCA1wt. Moreover, BRCA1-C61G and -M1775R did not change their nuclear localization form as compared to the BRCA1wt or the neutral variant R1751Q indicating a difference in the DNA damage processing. We propose a model where BRCA1 cancer variants interact with the DNA double strand break repair pathways producing DNA recombination intermediates, that maybe less repairable and decrease MMS-induced recombination and survival. Again, this study strengthens the use of yeast as model system to characterize the mechanisms leading to cancer in humans carrying the BRCA1 missense variant.

  18. Variants in the DYX2 locus are associated with altered brain activation in reading-related brain regions in subjects with reading disability.

    PubMed

    Cope, Natalie; Eicher, John D; Meng, Haiying; Gibson, Christopher J; Hager, Karl; Lacadie, Cheryl; Fulbright, Robert K; Constable, R Todd; Page, Grier P; Gruen, Jeffrey R

    2012-10-15

    Reading disability (RD) is a complex genetic disorder with unknown etiology. Genes on chromosome 6p22, including DCDC2, KIAA0319, and TTRAP, have been identified as RD associated genes. Imaging studies have shown both functional and structural differences between brains of individuals with and without RD. There are limited association studies performed between RD genes, specifically genes on 6p22, and regional brain activation during reading tasks. Using fourteen variants in DCDC2, KIAA0319, and TTRAP and exhaustive reading measures, we first tested for association with reading performance in 82 parent-offspring families (326 individuals). Next, we determined the association of these variants with activation of sixteen brain regions of interest during four functional magnetic resonance imaging-reading tasks. We nominally replicated associations between reading performance and variants of DCDC2 and KIAA0319. Furthermore, we observed a number of associations with brain activation patterns during imaging-reading tasks with all three genes. The strongest association occurred between activation of the left anterior inferior parietal lobe and complex tandem repeat BV677278 in DCDC2 (uncorrected p=0.00003, q=0.0442). Our results show that activation patterns across regions of interest in the brain are influenced by variants in the DYX2 locus. The combination of genetic and functional imaging data show a link between genes and brain functioning during reading tasks in subjects with RD. This study highlights the many advantages of imaging data as an endophenotype for discerning genetic risk factors for RD and other communication disorders and underscores the importance of integrating neurocognitive, imaging, and genetic data in future investigations.

  19. Cellulase variants

    DOEpatents

    Blazej, Robert; Toriello, Nicholas; Emrich, Charles; Cohen, Richard N.; Koppel, Nitzan

    2015-07-14

    This invention provides novel variant cellulolytic enzymes having improved activity and/or stability. In certain embodiments the variant cellulotyic enzymes comprise a glycoside hydrolase with or comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to one or more of residues F64, A226, and/or E246 in Thermobifida fusca Cel9A enzyme. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a family 9 glycoside hydrolase. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a theme B family 9 glycoside hydrolase.

  20. P450 (Cytochrome) Oxidoreductase Gene (POR) Common Variant (POR*28) Significantly Alters CYP2C9 Activity in Swedish, But Not in Korean Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Fazleen H M; Aklillu, Eleni

    2015-12-01

    CYP2C9 enzyme contributes to the metabolism of several pharmaceuticals and xenobiotics and yet displays large person-to-person and interethnic variation. Understanding the mechanisms of CYP2C9 variation is thus of immense importance for personalized medicine and rational therapeutics. A genetic variant of P450 (cytochrome) oxidoreductase (POR), a CYP450 redox partner, is reported to influence CYP2C9 metabolic activity in vitro. We investigated the impact of a common variant, POR*28, on CYP2C9 metabolic activity in humans. 148 healthy Swedish and 146 healthy Korean volunteers were genotyped for known CYP2C9 defective variant alleles (CYP2C9*2, *3). The CYP2C9 phenotype was determined using a single oral dose of 50 mg losartan. Excluding oral contraceptive (OC) users and carriers of 2C9*2 and *3 alleles, 117 Korean and 65 Swedish were genotyped for POR*5, *13 and *28 using Taqman assays. The urinary losartan to its metabolite E-3174 metabolic ratio (MR) was used as an index of CYP2C9 metabolic activity. The allele frequency of the POR*28 variant allele in Swedes and Koreans was 29% and 44%, respectively. POR*5 and *13 were absent in both study populations. Considering the CYP2C9*1/*1 genotypes only, the CYP2C9 metabolic activity was 1.40-fold higher in carriers of POR*28 allele than non-carriers among Swedes (p = 0.02). By contrast, no influence of the POR*28 on CYP2C9 activity was found in Koreans (p = 0.68). The multivariate analysis showed that ethnicity, POR genotype, and smoking were strong predictors of CYP2C9 MR (p < 0.05). This is the first report to implicate the importance of POR*28 genetic variation for CYP2C9 metabolic activity in humans. These findings contribute to current efforts for global personalized medicine and using medicines by taking into account pharmacogenetic and phenotypic variations. PMID:26669712

  1. Blocking farnesylation of the prelamin A variant in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome alters the distribution of A-type lamins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexia; Ӧstlund, Cecilia; Choi, Jason C.; Swayne, Theresa C.; Gundersen, Gregg G.; Worman, Howard J.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the lamin A/C gene that cause Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome lead to expression of a truncated, permanently farnesylated prelamin A variant called progerin. Blocking farnesylation leads to an improvement in the abnormal nuclear morphology observed in cells expressing progerin, which is associated with a re-localization of the variant protein from the nuclear envelope to the nuclear interior. We now show that a progerin construct that cannot be farnesylated is localized primarily in intranuclear foci and that its diffusional mobility is significantly greater than that of farnesylated progerin localized predominantly at the nuclear envelope. Expression of non-farnesylated progerin in transfected cells leads to a redistribution of lamin A and lamin C away from the nuclear envelope into intranuclear foci but does not significantly affect the localization of endogenous lamin B1 at nuclear envelope. There is a similar redistribution of lamin A and lamin C into intranuclear foci in transfected cells expressing progerin in which protein farnesylation is blocked by treatment with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor. Blocking farnesylation of progerin can lead to a redistribution of normal A-type lamins away from the inner nuclear envelope. This may have implications for using drugs that block protein prenylation to treat children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. These findings also provide additional evidence that A-type and B-type lamins can form separate microdomains within the nucleus. PMID:22895092

  2. Altered regional brain volumes in elderly carriers of a risk variant for drug abuse in the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2).

    PubMed

    Roussotte, Florence F; Jahanshad, Neda; Hibar, Derrek P; Thompson, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    Dopamine D2 receptors mediate the rewarding effects of many drugs of abuse. In humans, several polymorphisms in DRD2, the gene encoding these receptors, increase our genetic risk for developing addictive disorders. Here, we examined one of the most frequently studied candidate variant for addiction in DRD2 for association with brain structure. We tested whether this variant showed associations with regional brain volumes across two independent elderly cohorts, totaling 1,032 subjects. We first examined a large sample of 738 elderly participants with neuroimaging and genetic data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI1). We hypothesized that this addiction-related polymorphism would be associated with structural brain differences in regions previously implicated in familial vulnerability for drug dependence. Then, we assessed the generalizability of our findings by testing this polymorphism in a non-overlapping replication sample of 294 elderly subjects from a continuation of the first ADNI project (ADNI2) to minimize the risk of reporting false positive results. In both cohorts, the minor allele-previously linked with increased risk for addiction-was associated with larger volumes in various brain regions implicated in reward processing. These findings suggest that neuroanatomical phenotypes associated with familial vulnerability for drug dependence may be partially mediated by DRD2 genotype.

  3. Blocking farnesylation of the prelamin A variant in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome alters the distribution of A-type lamins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexia; Ostlund, Cecilia; Choi, Jason C; Swayne, Theresa C; Gundersen, Gregg G; Worman, Howard J

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the lamin A/C gene that cause Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome lead to expression of a truncated, permanently farnesylated prelamin A variant called progerin. Blocking farnesylation leads to an improvement in the abnormal nuclear morphology observed in cells expressing progerin, which is associated with a re-localization of the variant protein from the nuclear envelope to the nuclear interior. We now show that a progerin construct that cannot be farnesylated is localized primarily in intranuclear foci and that its diffusional mobility is significantly greater than that of farnesylated progerin localized predominantly at the nuclear envelope. Expression of non-farnesylated progerin in transfected cells leads to a redistribution of lamin A and lamin C away from the nuclear envelope into intranuclear foci but does not significantly affect the localization of endogenous lamin B1 at nuclear envelope. There is a similar redistribution of lamin A and lamin C into intranuclear foci in transfected cells expressing progerin in which protein farnesylation is blocked by treatment with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor. Blocking farnesylation of progerin can lead to a redistribution of normal A-type lamins away from the inner nuclear envelope. This may have implications for using drugs that block protein prenylation to treat children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. These findings also provide additional evidence that A-type and B-type lamins can form separate microdomains within the nucleus.

  4. A C-terminally truncated mouse Best3 splice variant targets and alters the ion balance in lysosome-endosome hybrids and the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lichang; Sun, Yu; Ma, Liqiao; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Baoxia; Pan, Qingjie; Li, Yuyin; Liu, Huanqi; Diao, Aipo; Li, Yinchuan

    2016-01-01

    The Bestrophin family has been characterized as Cl− channels in mammals and Na+ channels in bacteria, but their exact physiological roles remian unknown. In this study, a natural C-terminally truncated variant of mouse Bestrophin 3 (Best3V2) expression in myoblasts and muscles is demonstrated. Unlike full-length Best3, Best3V2 targets the two important intracellular Ca stores: the lysosome and the ER. Heterologous overexpression leads to lysosome swelling and renders it less acidic. Best3V2 overexpression also results in compromised Ca2+ release from the ER. Knocking down endogenous Best3 expression in myoblasts makes these cells more excitable in response to Ca2+ mobilizing reagents, such as caffeine. We propose that Best3V2 in myoblasts may work as a tuner to control Ca2+ release from intracellular Ca2+ stores. PMID:27265833

  5. Increased red cell calcium, decreased calcium adenosine triphosphatase, and altered membrane proteins during fava bean hemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient (Mediterranean variant) individuals.

    PubMed

    Turrini, F; Naitana, A; Mannuzzu, L; Pescarmona, G; Arese, P

    1985-08-01

    RBCs from four glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient (Mediterranean variant) subjects were studied during fava bean hemolysis. In the density-fractionated RBC calcium level, Ca2+-ATPase activity, reduced glutathione level, and ghost protein pattern were studied. In the bottom fraction, containing most heavily damaged RBCs, calcium level ranged from 143 to 244 mumol/L RBCs (healthy G6PD-deficient controls: 17 +/- 5 mumol/L RBCs). The Ca2+-ATPase activity ranged from 0.87 to 1.84 mumol ATP consumed/g Hb/min (healthy G6PD-deficient controls: 2.27 +/- 0.4). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of ghosts showed: (1) the presence of high mol wt aggregates (in three cases they were reduced by dithioerythritol; in one case, only partial reduction was possible); (2) the presence of multiple, scattered new bands; and (3) the reduction of band 3. Oxidant-mediated damage to active calcium extrusion, hypothetically associated with increased calcium permeability, may explain the large increase in calcium levels. They, in turn, could activate calcium-dependent protease activity, giving rise to the profound changes in the ghost protein pattern.

  6. Constitutive production of c-di-GMP is associated with mutations in a variant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with altered membrane composition.

    PubMed

    Blanka, Andrea; Düvel, Juliane; Dötsch, Andreas; Klinkert, Birgit; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Kaever, Volkhard; Ritter, Christiane; Narberhaus, Franz; Häussler, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Most bacteria can form multicellular communities called biofilms on biotic and abiotic surfaces. This multicellular response to surface contact correlates with an increased resistance to various adverse environmental conditions, including those encountered during infections of the human host and exposure to antimicrobial compounds. Biofilm formation occurs when freely swimming (planktonic) cells encounter a surface, which stimulates the chemosensory-like, surface-sensing system Wsp and leads to generation of the intracellular second messenger 3',5'-cyclic-di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). We identified adaptive mutations in a clinical small colony variant (SCV) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and correlated their presence with self-aggregating growth behavior and an enhanced capacity to form biofilms. We present evidence that a point mutation in the 5' untranslated region of the accBC gene cluster, which encodes components of an enzyme responsible for fatty acid biosynthesis, was responsible for a stabilized mRNA structure that resulted in reduced translational efficiency and an increase in the proportion of short-chain fatty acids in the plasma membrane. We propose a model in which these changes in P. aeruginosa serve as a signal for the Wsp system to constitutively produce increased amounts of c-di-GMP and thus play a role in the regulation of adhesion-stimulated bacterial responses. PMID:25872871

  7. Mutations in the control of virulence sensor gene from Streptococcus pyogenes after infection in mice lead to clonal bacterial variants with altered gene regulatory activity and virulence.

    PubMed

    Mayfield, Jeffrey A; Liang, Zhong; Agrahari, Garima; Lee, Shaun W; Donahue, Deborah L; Ploplis, Victoria A; Castellino, Francis J

    2014-01-01

    The cluster of virulence sensor (CovS)/responder (CovR) two-component operon (CovRS) regulates ∼15% of the genes of the Group A Streptococcal pyogenes (GAS) genome. Bacterial clones containing inactivating mutations in the covS gene have been isolated from patients with virulent invasive diseases. We report herein an assessment of the nature and types of covS mutations that can occur in both virulent and nonvirulent GAS strains, and assess whether a nonvirulent GAS can attain enhanced virulence through this mechanism. A group of mice were infected with a globally-disseminated clonal M1T1 GAS (isolate 5448), containing wild-type (WT) CovRS (5448/CovR+S+), or less virulent engineered GAS strains, AP53/CovR+S+ and Manfredo M5/CovR+S+. SpeB negative GAS clones from wound sites and/or from bacteria disseminated to the spleen were isolated and the covS gene was subjected to DNA sequence analysis. Numerous examples of inactivating mutations were found in CovS in all regions of the gene. The mutations found included frame-shift insertions and deletions, and in-frame small and large deletions in the gene. Many of the mutations found resulted in early translation termination of CovS. Thus, the covS gene is a genomic mutagenic target that gives GAS enhanced virulence. In cases wherein CovS- was discovered, these clonal variants exhibited high lethality, further suggesting that randomly mutated covS genes occur during the course of infection, and lead to the development of a more invasive infection.

  8. Mutations in the Control of Virulence Sensor Gene from Streptococcus pyogenes after Infection in Mice Lead to Clonal Bacterial Variants with Altered Gene Regulatory Activity and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Mayfield, Jeffrey A.; Liang, Zhong; Agrahari, Garima; Lee, Shaun W.; Donahue, Deborah L.; Ploplis, Victoria A.; Castellino, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    The cluster of virulence sensor (CovS)/responder (CovR) two-component operon (CovRS) regulates ∼15% of the genes of the Group A Streptococcal pyogenes (GAS) genome. Bacterial clones containing inactivating mutations in the covS gene have been isolated from patients with virulent invasive diseases. We report herein an assessment of the nature and types of covS mutations that can occur in both virulent and nonvirulent GAS strains, and assess whether a nonvirulent GAS can attain enhanced virulence through this mechanism. A group of mice were infected with a globally-disseminated clonal M1T1 GAS (isolate 5448), containing wild-type (WT) CovRS (5448/CovR+S+), or less virulent engineered GAS strains, AP53/CovR+S+ and Manfredo M5/CovR+S+. SpeB negative GAS clones from wound sites and/or from bacteria disseminated to the spleen were isolated and the covS gene was subjected to DNA sequence analysis. Numerous examples of inactivating mutations were found in CovS in all regions of the gene. The mutations found included frame-shift insertions and deletions, and in-frame small and large deletions in the gene. Many of the mutations found resulted in early translation termination of CovS. Thus, the covS gene is a genomic mutagenic target that gives GAS enhanced virulence. In cases wherein CovS− was discovered, these clonal variants exhibited high lethality, further suggesting that randomly mutated covS genes occur during the course of infection, and lead to the development of a more invasive infection. PMID:24968349

  9. αB-Crystallin R120G variant causes cardiac arrhythmias and alterations in the expression of Ca(2+) -handling proteins and endoplasmic reticulum stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qibin; Sanbe, Atsushi; Zhang, Xingwei; Liu, Jun-Ping; Minamisawa, Susumu

    2014-08-01

    Mutations of αB-crystallin (CryαB), a small heat shock protein abundantly expressed in cardiac and skeletal muscles, are known to cause desmin-related myopathies. The CryαB R120G allele has been linked to a familial desminopathy and, in transgenic mice, causes a sudden death at about 28 weeks of age. To investigate the mechanisms of the sudden cardiac arrest of CryαB R120G transgenic mice, we prepared protein samples from left ventricular tissues of two different age groups (10 and 28 weeks) and examined Ca(2+) -handling proteins. Expression of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) 2, phospholamban, ryanodine receptor 2 and calsequestrin 2 was significantly decreased in 28- versus 10-week-old CryαB R120G transgenic mice. In addition, low heart rate variability, including heart rate, total power and low frequency, was observed and continuous electrocardiogram monitoring revealed cardiac arrhythmias, such as ventricular tachycardia, atrioventricular block and atrial flutter, in 28-week-old CryαB R120G transgenic mice. In contrast, expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) degradation enhancing α-mannosidase-like protein, inositol requirement 1 and X-box binding protein 1 were increased significantly in 28- versus 10-week-old CryαBR120G transgenic mice, suggesting that the CryαBR120G transgenic mice exhibit increased ER stress compared with wild-type mice. Together, the data suggest that the CryαB R120G dominant variant induces ER stress and impairs Ca(2+) regulation, leading to ageing-related cardiac dysfunction, arrhythmias and decreased autonomic tone with shortened lifespan.

  10. CYP4F2 Is a Vitamin K1 Oxidase: An Explanation for Altered Warfarin Dose in Carriers of the V433M Variant

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Matthew G.; Rieder, Mark J.; Nakano, Mariko; Hsia, Clara K.; Rettie, Allan E.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in VKORC1 and CYP2C9, genes controlling vitamin K1 (VK1) epoxide reduction and (S)-warfarin metabolism, respectively, are major contributors to interindividual variability in warfarin dose. The V433M polymorphism (rs2108622) in CYP4F2 has also been associated with warfarin dose and speculatively linked to altered VK1 metabolism. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to determine the role of CYP4F2 and the V433M polymorphism in the metabolism of VK1 by human liver. In vitro metabolic experiments with accompanying liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that recombinant CYP4F2 (Supersomes) and human liver microsomes supplemented with NADPH converted VK1 to a single product. A screen of all commercially available P450 Supersomes showed that only CYP4F2 was capable of metabolizing VK1 to this product. Steady-state kinetic analysis with recombinant CYP4F2 and with human liver microsomes revealed a substrate Km of 8 to 10 μM. Moreover, anti-CYP4F2 IgG, as well as several CYP4F2-selective chemical inhibitors, substantially attenuated the microsomal reaction. Finally, human liver microsomes genotyped for rs2108622 demonstrated reduced vitamin K1 oxidation and lower CYP4F2 protein concentrations in carriers of the 433M minor allele. These data demonstrate that CYP4F2 is a vitamin K1 oxidase and that carriers of the CYP4F2 V433M allele have a reduced capacity to metabolize VK1, secondary to an rs2108622-dependent decrease in steady-state hepatic concentrations of the enzyme. Therefore, patients with the rs2108622 polymorphism are likely to have elevated hepatic levels of VK1, necessitating a higher warfarin dose to elicit the same anticoagulant response. PMID:19297519

  11. Common Genetic Variant Association with Altered HLA Expression, Synergy with Pyrethroid Exposure, and Risk for Parkinson’s Disease: An Observational and Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kannarkat, G. T.; Cook, D. A.; Lee, J-K.; Chang, J.; Chung, J.; Sandy, E.; Paul, K. C.; Ritz, B.; Bronstein, J.; Factor, S. A.; Boss, J. M.; Tansey, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives The common non-coding single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3129882 in HLA-DRA is associated with risk for idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD). The location of the SNP in the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) locus implicates regulation of antigen presentation as a potential mechanism by which immune responses link genetic susceptibility to environmental factors in conferring lifetime risk for PD. Methods For immunophenotyping, blood cells from 81 subjects were analyzed by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry. A case-control study was performed on a separate cohort of 962 subjects to determine association of pesticide exposure and the SNP with risk of PD. Results Homozygosity for G at this SNP was associated with heightened baseline expression and inducibility of MHC class II molecules in B cells and monocytes from peripheral blood of healthy controls and PD patients. In addition, exposure to a commonly used class of insecticide, pyrethroids, synergized with the risk conferred by this SNP (OR = 2.48, p = 0.007), thereby identifying a novel gene-environment interaction that promotes risk for PD via alterations in immune responses. Conclusions In sum, these novel findings suggest that the MHC-II locus may increase susceptibility to PD through presentation of pathogenic, immunodominant antigens and/or a shift toward a more pro-inflammatory CD4+ T cell response in response to specific environmental exposures, such as pyrethroid exposure through genetic or epigenetic mechanisms that modulate MHC-II gene expression. PMID:27148593

  12. Histone variants: emerging players in cancer biology

    PubMed Central

    Vardabasso, Chiara; Hasson, Dan; Ratnakumar, Kajan; Chung, Chi-Yeh; Duarte, Luis F.

    2014-01-01

    Histone variants are key players in shaping chromatin structure, and, thus, in regulating fundamental cellular processes such as chromosome segregation and gene expression. Emerging evidence points towards a role for histone variants in contributing to tumor progression, and, recently, the first cancer-associated mutation in a histone variant-encoding gene was reported. In addition, genetic alterations of the histone chaperones that specifically regulate chromatin incorporation of histone variants are rapidly being uncovered in numerous cancers. Collectively, these findings implicate histone variants as potential drivers of cancer initiation and/or progression, and, therefore, targeting histone deposition or the chromatin remodeling machinery may be of therapeutic value. Here, we review the mammalian histone variants of the H2A and H3 families in their respective cellular functions, and their involvement in tumor biology. PMID:23652611

  13. MTDH genetic variants in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gnosa, Sebastian; Ticha, Ivana; Haapaniemi, Staffan; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The colorectal carcinogenesis is a complex process encompassing genetic alterations. The oncoprotein AEG-1, encoded by the MTDH gene, was shown previously to be involved in colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and the spectrum of MTDH variants in tumor tissue, and their relationship to clinicopathological variables in CRC patients. The study included tumors from 356 unselected CRC patients. Mutation analysis of the MTDH gene, including coding region and adjacent intronic sequences, was performed by direct DNA sequencing. The corresponding normal colorectal tissue was analyzed in the carriers of exonic variant to confirm germline or somatic origin. We detected 42 intronic variants, where 25 were novel. Furthermore, we found 8 exonic variants of which four, one missense (c.977C > G-germline) and three frameshift mutations (c.533delA-somatic, c.1340dupA-unknown origin, c.1731delA-unknown origin), were novel. In silico prediction analyses suggested four deleterious variants (c.232G > T, c.533delA, c.1340dupA, and c.1731delA). There were no correlations between the MTDH variants and tumor stage, differentiation or patient survival. We described several novel exonic and intronic variants of the MTDH gene. The detection of likely pathogenic truncating mutations and alterations in functional protein domains indicate their clinical significance, although none of the variants had prognostic potential. PMID:26983693

  14. Directed Evolution of Streptavidin Variants Using IVC

    PubMed Central

    Levy, M.; Ellington, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    Summary We have developed and implemented an in vitro compartmentalization (IVC) selection scheme for the identification of streptavidin (SA) variants with altered specificities for the biotin analog desthiobiotin. Wild-type SA and selected variants bind desthiobiotin with similar affinities (~10−13 M), but the variants have off-rates almost 50 times slower and a half-life for dissociation of 24 hours at 25°C. The utility of streptavidin variants with altered specificities and kinetic properties was demonstrated by constructing protein microarrays that could be used to differentially organize and immobilize DNAs bearing these ligands. The methods we have developed should prove to be generally useful for generating a variety of novel SA reagents, and for evolving other extremely high affinity protein:ligand couples. PMID:18804035

  15. Rare hemoglobin variants in Tunisian population.

    PubMed

    Zorai, A; Moumni, I; Mosbahi, I; Douzi, K; Chaouachi, D; Guemira, F; Abbes, S

    2015-04-01

    During the last 30 years, many studies concerning hemoglobinopathies were realized among Tunisians. More than twenty different thalassemic alleles were detected on the β-globin gene, and less are affecting the α-globin genes. Unusual hemoglobin (Hb) variants other than Hb S, Hb C, and Hb O-arab, which are the most frequent variants in Tunisia, were also detected. Eight Tunisian subjects were studied at phenotypic and molecular levels. Hematological indices and hemoglobin (Hb) pattern were performed by alkaline electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing (IEF),and the Hb fractions were quantitated by cation exchange HPLC. On genomic level, coding regions were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by a sequencing of the purified PCR products using the dye terminator method. Seven uncommon Hb variants were detected and described for the first time among Tunisians. HbA2-Tunis [δ46(CD5), Gly → Glu, GGG → GAG] is the newly described δ-chain variant in our laboratory, and some other variants (Hb Constant Spring, G San Jose, and Hb J-Bangkok) are very uncommon in the Mediterranean region. We present here an updated review of the Hb variants detected among Tunisians. Twenty-one rare Hb variants were detected affecting the α1-, α2-, δ-, γ-, and β-globin genes, leading in some cases to a severe phenotype especially when the stability is completely altered. The ethnical history of Tunisia could explain this important variability of the observed rare Hb variants. PMID:24905386

  16. Previous failure of interferon-based therapy does not alter the frequency of HCV NS3 protease or NS5B polymerase inhibitor resistance-associated variants: longitudinal analysis in HCV/HIV co-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Sede, Mariano M; Laufer, Natalia L; Quarleri, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    Since 2011, treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) includes direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) in addition to pegylated interferon-α (peg-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV). IFN-based treatment induces strong cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity directed to the protease- and polymerase-derived epitopes. This enhanced immunological pressure could favour the emergence of viral epitope variants able to evade immune surveillance and, when resistance-associated variants (RAVs) are implicated, could also be co-selected as a hitchhiking effect. This study analysed the dynamics of the frequency of protease and polymerase inhibitor RAVs that could affect future HCV treatment in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infected patients on stable antiretroviral therapy with previous IFN-based treatment failure. HCV genotype 1a RNA was extracted from plasma samples of 18 patients prior to and during (24h and 4, 12, 24 and 48 weeks) therapy with peg-IFN+RBV. Next-generation sequencing was performed on HCV-RNA populations using NS3 and NS5B PCR-amplified coding regions. Two measures of genetic diversity were used to compare virus populations: average pairwise nucleotide diversity (π) and Tajima's D statistic. Several protease and polymerase RAVs were detected in all subjects at very low frequencies (<5%), and in most cases their presence was not constant during follow-up. Only samples from two patients for each region exhibited Q80R/K/L and A421V as highly predominant variants. No significant differences were observed among sampling times for either π or D values. In conclusion, previous therapy and failure of peg-IFN+RBV were not associated with an increase in DAA-targeting NS3 or NS5B RAVs that naturally exist in HIV co-infected subjects. PMID:26100213

  17. Hemoglobin variants in Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Kyrri, Andreani R; Felekis, Xenia; Kalogerou, Eleni; Wild, Barbara J; Kythreotis, Loukas; Phylactides, Marios; Kleanthous, Marina

    2009-01-01

    Cyprus, located at the eastern end of the Mediterranean region, has been a place of eastern and western civilizations, and the presence of various hemoglobin (Hb) variants can be considered a testimony to past colonizations of the island. In this study, we report the structural Hb variants identified in the Cypriot population (Greek Cypriots, Maronites, Armenians, and Latinos) during the thalassemia screening of 248,000 subjects carried out at the Thalassaemia Centre, Nicosia, Cyprus, over a period of 26 years. A sample population of 65,668 people was used to determine the frequency and localization of several of the variants identified in Cyprus. The localization of some of the variants in regions where the presence of foreign people was most prevalent provides important clues to the origin of the variants. Twelve structural variants have been identified by DNA sequencing, nine concerning the beta-globin gene and three concerning the alpha-globin gene. The most common beta-globin variants identified were Hb S (0.2%), Hb D-Punjab (0.02%), and Hb Lepore-Washington-Boston (Hb Lepore-WB) (0.03%); the most common alpha-globin variant was Hb Setif (0.1%). The presence of some of these variants is likely to be directly linked to the history of Cyprus, as archeological monuments have been found throughout the island which signify the presence for many years of the Greeks, Syrians, Persians, Arabs, Byzantines, Franks, Venetians, and Turks. PMID:19373583

  18. Histone variants and melanoma: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, Nikifor K; Ulff-Møller, Constance J; Dimitrov, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer with rising incidence and morbidity. Despite advances in treatment, the 10-yr survival for patients with metastatic disease is less than 10%. During the past few years, ongoing research on different epigenomic aberrations in melanoma has catalyzed better understanding of its pathogenesis and identification of new therapeutics. In our review, we will focus on the role of histone variants, key epigenetic players in melanoma initiation and progression. Specifically, incorporation of histone variants enables additional layers of chromatin structure, and here, we will describe how alterations in this epigenetic behavior impact melanoma.

  19. FUNCTIONAL EFFECTS OF POLYMORPHISMS IN THE HUMAN GENE ENCODING 11β-HSD1: A SEQUENCE VARIANT AT THE TRANSLATION START OF 11β-HSD1 ALTERS ENZYME LEVELS

    PubMed Central

    Malavasi, Elise L.V.; Kelly, Val; Nath, Nikita; Gambineri, Alessandra; Dakin, Rachel S.; Pagotto, Uberto; Pasquali, Renato; Walker, Brian R.; Chapman, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of active glucocorticoids within liver and adipose tissue by the enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) may be of pathophysiological importance in obesity and Metabolic Syndrome and is a therapeutic target in type 2 diabetes. Polymorphisms in HSD11B1, the gene encoding 11β-HSD1, have been associated with metabolic phenotype in humans, including type 2 diabetes and hypertension. Here we have tested the functional consequences of 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms located in contexts that potentially affect tissue levels of 11β-HSD1. We report no effect of allelic variation at rs846910, a polymorphism within the 5′-flanking region of the gene on HSD11B1 promoter activity in vitro. However, compared to the common G allele, the A allele of rs13306421, a polymorphism located 2 nucleotides 5′ to the translation initiation site, gave higher 11β-HSD1 expression and activity in vitro and was translated at higher levels in in vitro translation reactions, possibly associated with a lower frequency of “leaky scanning”. These data suggest that this polymorphism may have direct functional consequences on levels of 11β-HSD1 enzyme activity in vivo. However, the rs13306421 A sequence variant originally reported in other ethnic groups may be of low prevalence as it was not detected in a population of 600 European caucasian women. PMID:19934376

  20. Hemoglobin Variants: Biochemical Properties and Clinical Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Christopher S.; Dickson, Claire F.; Gell, David A.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2013-01-01

    Diseases affecting hemoglobin synthesis and function are extremely common worldwide. More than 1000 naturally occurring human hemoglobin variants with single amino acid substitutions throughout the molecule have been discovered, mainly through their clinical and/or laboratory manifestations. These variants alter hemoglobin structure and biochemical properties with physiological effects ranging from insignificant to severe. Studies of these mutations in patients and in the laboratory have produced a wealth of information on hemoglobin biochemistry and biology with significant implications for hematology practice. More generally, landmark studies of hemoglobin performed over the past 60 years have established important paradigms for the disciplines of structural biology, genetics, biochemistry, and medicine. Here we review the major classes of hemoglobin variants, emphasizing general concepts and illustrative examples. PMID:23388674

  1. Hemoglobin variants: biochemical properties and clinical correlates.

    PubMed

    Thom, Christopher S; Dickson, Claire F; Gell, David A; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2013-03-01

    Diseases affecting hemoglobin synthesis and function are extremely common worldwide. More than 1000 naturally occurring human hemoglobin variants with single amino acid substitutions throughout the molecule have been discovered, mainly through their clinical and/or laboratory manifestations. These variants alter hemoglobin structure and biochemical properties with physiological effects ranging from insignificant to severe. Studies of these mutations in patients and in the laboratory have produced a wealth of information on hemoglobin biochemistry and biology with significant implications for hematology practice. More generally, landmark studies of hemoglobin performed over the past 60 years have established important paradigms for the disciplines of structural biology, genetics, biochemistry, and medicine. Here we review the major classes of hemoglobin variants, emphasizing general concepts and illustrative examples.

  2. MicroRNA-9 and microRNA-326 regulate human dopamine D2 receptor expression, and the microRNA-mediated expression regulation is altered by a genetic variant.

    PubMed

    Shi, Sandra; Leites, Catherine; He, Deli; Schwartz, Daniel; Moy, Winton; Shi, Jianxin; Duan, Jubao

    2014-05-01

    The human dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Most antipsychotic drugs influence dopaminergic transmission through blocking dopamine receptors, primarily DRD2. We report here the post-transcriptional regulation of DRD2 expression by two brain-expressed microRNAs (miRs), miR-326 and miR-9, in an ex vivo mode, and show the relevance of miR-mediated DRD2 expression regulation in human dopaminergic neurons and in developing human brains. Both miRs targeted the 3'-UTR (untranslated region) of DRD2 in NT2 (neuron-committed teratocarcinoma, which endogenously expresses DRD2) and CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cell lines, decreasing luciferase activity measured by a luciferase reporter gene assay. miR-326 overexpression reduced DRD2 mRNA and DRD2 receptor synthesis. Both antisense miR-326 and antisense miR-9 increased DRD2 protein abundance, suggesting an endogenous repression of DRD2 expression by both miRs. Furthermore, a genetic variant (rs1130354) within the DRD2 3'-UTR miR-targeting site interferes with miR-326-mediated repression of DRD2 expression. Finally, co-expression analysis identified an inverse correlation of DRD2 expression with both miR-326 and miR-9 in differentiating dopaminergic neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and in developing human brain regions implicated in schizophrenia. Our study provides empirical evidence suggesting that miR-326 and miR-9 may regulate dopaminergic signaling, and miR-326 and miR-9 may be considered as potential drug targets for the treatment of disorders involving abnormal DRD2 function, such as schizophrenia.

  3. Mucopolysaccharidosis: A New Variant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primrose, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Described is a possibly new variant of mucopolysaccharidosis characterized by progressive mental and motor deficiency, bone abnormalities, a generalized skin lesion, and abnormal mucopolysaccharides in the urine as seen in a 20-year-old female. (DB)

  4. Normal Variants in Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Daniel R; Bryg, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Echocardiography is a powerful and convenient tool used routinely in the cardiac evaluation of many patients. Improved resolution and visualization of cardiac anatomy has led to the discovery of many normal variant structures that have no known pathologic consequence. Importantly, these findings may masquerade as pathology prompting unnecessary further evaluation at the expense of anxiety, cost, or potential harm. This review provides an updated and comprehensive collection of normal anatomic variants on both transthoracic and transesophageal imaging. PMID:27612473

  5. Integrated multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assays for the detection of alterations in the HEXB, GM2A and SMARCAL1 genes to support the diagnosis of Morbus Sandhoff, M. Tay-Sachs variant AB and Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia in humans.

    PubMed

    Sobek, Anna K U; Evers, Christina; Dekomien, Gabriele

    2013-02-01

    Multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assays were designed for the genes HEXB (OMIM: 606873), GM2A (OMIM: 613109) and SMARCAL1 (OMIM: 606622) of humans. Two sets of synthetic MLPA probes for these coding exons were tested. Changes in copy numbers were detected as well as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by complementary DNA sequence analyses. The MLPA method was shown to be reliable for mutation detection and identified five published and 12 new mutations. In all cases from a Morbus Sandhoff cohort of patients, exclusively one variation in copy number was observed and linked to a nucleotide alteration called c.1614-14C>A. This deletion comprised exons 1-5. One of these cases is described in detail. Deletions were neither detected in the GM2A nor the SMARCAL1 genes. The MLPA assays complement routine diagnostics for M. Sandhoff (OMIM: 268800), M. Tay-Sachs variant AB (OMIM: 272750) and Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia (OMIM: 242900).

  6. Integrated multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assays for the detection of alterations in the HEXB, GM2A and SMARCAL1 genes to support the diagnosis of Morbus Sandhoff, M. Tay-Sachs variant AB and Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia in humans.

    PubMed

    Sobek, Anna K U; Evers, Christina; Dekomien, Gabriele

    2013-02-01

    Multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assays were designed for the genes HEXB (OMIM: 606873), GM2A (OMIM: 613109) and SMARCAL1 (OMIM: 606622) of humans. Two sets of synthetic MLPA probes for these coding exons were tested. Changes in copy numbers were detected as well as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by complementary DNA sequence analyses. The MLPA method was shown to be reliable for mutation detection and identified five published and 12 new mutations. In all cases from a Morbus Sandhoff cohort of patients, exclusively one variation in copy number was observed and linked to a nucleotide alteration called c.1614-14C>A. This deletion comprised exons 1-5. One of these cases is described in detail. Deletions were neither detected in the GM2A nor the SMARCAL1 genes. The MLPA assays complement routine diagnostics for M. Sandhoff (OMIM: 268800), M. Tay-Sachs variant AB (OMIM: 272750) and Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia (OMIM: 242900). PMID:23010210

  7. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    DOEpatents

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2011-04-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  8. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    SciTech Connect

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2013-02-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  9. Novel variants in GNAI3 associated with auriculocondylar syndrome strengthen a common dominant negative effect

    PubMed Central

    Romanelli Tavares, Vanessa L; Gordon, Christopher T; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M; Kokitsu-Nakata, Nancy Mizue; Voisin, Norine; Tan, Tiong Y; Heggie, Andrew A; Vendramini-Pittoli, Siulan; Propst, Evan J; Papsin, Blake C; Torres, Tatiana T; Buermans, Henk; Capelo, Luciane Portas; den Dunnen, Johan T; Guion-Almeida, Maria L; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Amiel, Jeanne; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2015-01-01

    Auriculocondylar syndrome is a rare craniofacial disorder comprising core features of micrognathia, condyle dysplasia and question mark ear. Causative variants have been identified in PLCB4, GNAI3 and EDN1, which are predicted to function within the EDN1–EDNRA pathway during early pharyngeal arch patterning. To date, two GNAI3 variants in three families have been reported. Here we report three novel GNAI3 variants, one segregating with affected members in a family previously linked to 1p21.1-q23.3 and two de novo variants in simplex cases. Two variants occur in known functional motifs, the G1 and G4 boxes, and the third variant is one amino acid outside of the G1 box. Structural modeling shows that all five altered GNAI3 residues identified to date cluster in a region involved in GDP/GTP binding. We hypothesize that all GNAI3 variants lead to dominant negative effects. PMID:25026904

  10. Novel variants in GNAI3 associated with auriculocondylar syndrome strengthen a common dominant negative effect.

    PubMed

    Romanelli Tavares, Vanessa L; Gordon, Christopher T; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M; Kokitsu-Nakata, Nancy Mizue; Voisin, Norine; Tan, Tiong Y; Heggie, Andrew A; Vendramini-Pittoli, Siulan; Propst, Evan J; Papsin, Blake C; Torres, Tatiana T; Buermans, Henk; Capelo, Luciane Portas; den Dunnen, Johan T; Guion-Almeida, Maria L; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Amiel, Jeanne; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2015-04-01

    Auriculocondylar syndrome is a rare craniofacial disorder comprising core features of micrognathia, condyle dysplasia and question mark ear. Causative variants have been identified in PLCB4, GNAI3 and EDN1, which are predicted to function within the EDN1-EDNRA pathway during early pharyngeal arch patterning. To date, two GNAI3 variants in three families have been reported. Here we report three novel GNAI3 variants, one segregating with affected members in a family previously linked to 1p21.1-q23.3 and two de novo variants in simplex cases. Two variants occur in known functional motifs, the G1 and G4 boxes, and the third variant is one amino acid outside of the G1 box. Structural modeling shows that all five altered GNAI3 residues identified to date cluster in a region involved in GDP/GTP binding. We hypothesize that all GNAI3 variants lead to dominant negative effects.

  11. Europeans have a higher proportion of high‑frequency deleterious variants than Africans.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Sankar

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that a high proportion of rare variants in European and African populations are deleterious in nature. However, the deleterious fraction of high-frequency variants is unclear. Using more than 6500 exomes we show a much higher fraction (11 %) of relatively high-frequency nonsynonymous (amino acid altering) variants (DAF 0.1–10 %) in European Americans (EA) compared to those from African Americans (AA). In contrast, this difference was only marginal (<2 %) for low-frequency nonsynonymous variants (DAF <0.1 %). Our results also revealed that the proportion of high-frequency deleterious nonsynonymous variants in EA was much higher (24 %) than that in AA and this difference was very small (4 %) for the low-frequency deleterious amino acid altering variants. We also show that EA have significantly more number of high-frequency deleterious nonsynonymous variants per genome than AA. The high proportion of high-frequency deleterious variants in EA could be the result of the well-known bottleneck experienced by European populations in which harmful mutations may have drifted to high frequencies. The estimated ages of deleterious variants support this prediction. Our results suggest that high-frequency variants could be relatively more likely to be associated with diseases in Europeans than in Africans and hence emphasize the need for population-specific strategies in genomic medicine studies.

  12. Primary Aldosteronism and ARMC5 Variants

    PubMed Central

    Zilbermint, Mihail; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Faucz, Fabio R.; Berthon, Annabel; Gkourogianni, Alexandra; Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Batsis, Maria; Sinaii, Ninet; Quezado, Martha M.; Merino, Maria; Hodes, Aaron; Abraham, Smita B.; Libé, Rossella; Assié, Guillaume; Espiard, Stéphanie; Drougat, Ludivine; Ragazzon, Bruno; Davis, Adam; Gebreab, Samson Y.; Neff, Ryan; Kebebew, Electron; Bertherat, Jérôme; Lodish, Maya B.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Primary aldosteronism is one of the leading causes of secondary hypertension, causing significant morbidity and mortality. A number of genetic defects have recently been identified in primary aldosteronism, whereas we identified mutations in ARMC5, a tumor-suppressor gene, in cortisol-producing primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia. Objective: We investigated a cohort of 56 patients who were referred to the National Institutes of Health for evaluation of primary aldosteronism for ARMC5 defects. Methods: Patients underwent step-wise diagnosis, with measurement of serum aldosterone and plasma renin activity followed by imaging, saline suppression and/or oral salt loading tests, plus adrenal venous sampling. Cortisol secretion was also evaluated; unilateral or bilateral adrenalectomy was performed, if indicated. DNA, protein, and transfection studies in H295R cells were conducted by standard methods. Results: We identified 12 germline ARMC5 genetic alterations in 20 unrelated and two related individuals in our cohort (39.3%). ARMC5 sequence changes in 6 patients (10.7%) were predicted to be damaging by in silico analysis. All affected patients carrying a variant predicted to be damaging were African Americans (P = .0023). Conclusions: Germline ARMC5 variants may be associated with primary aldosteronism. Additional cohorts of patients with primary aldosteronism and metabolic syndrome, particularly African Americans, should be screened for ARMC5 sequence variants because these may underlie part of the known increased predisposition of African Americans to low renin hypertension. PMID:25822102

  13. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Adams, Hieab H H; Launer, Lenore J; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L; Becker, James T; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W T; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Medland, Sarah E

    2015-04-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction.

  14. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Adams, Hieab H H; Launer, Lenore J; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L; Becker, James T; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W T; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Medland, Sarah E

    2015-04-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  15. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    PubMed Central

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S.; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Launer, Lenore J.; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Becker, James T.; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J.; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W. T.; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M. Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M.; Medland, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  16. Predicting effects of noncoding variants with deep learning–based sequence model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Troyanskaya, Olga G

    2016-01-01

    Identifying functional effects of noncoding variants is a major challenge in human genetics. To predict the noncoding-variant effects de novo from sequence, we developed a deep learning–based algorithmic framework, DeepSEA (http://deepsea.princeton.edu/), that directly learns a regulatory sequence code from large-scale chromatin-profiling data, enabling prediction of chromatin effects of sequence alterations with single-nucleotide sensitivity. We further used this capability to improve prioritization of functional variants including expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) and disease-associated variants. PMID:26301843

  17. Initial Comparisons between the Advanced Technology Development Gen 2 Baseline Cells and Variant C Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Christophersen, Jon Petter; Motloch, Chester George; Wright, Randy Ben; Murphy, Timothy Collins; Belt, Jeffrey R; Ho, Chinh Dac; Bloom, Ira D.; Jones, S. A.; Battaglia, Vincent S.; Jungst, Rudy G.; Case, Herb L.; Sutula, Raymond A.; Barnes, James A.; Duong, Tien Q.

    2002-06-01

    The Advanced Technology Development Program is testing a second generation of lithium-ion cells, consisting of a baseline and three variant chemistries. The cathode composition of the Variant C chemistry was altered with an increase to the aluminum dopant and a decrease to the cobalt dopant to explore the impact on performance. However, it resulted in a 20% drop in rated capacity. Also, the Variant C average power fade is higher, but capacity fade is higher for the Baseline cell chemistry. Initial results indicate that the Variant C chemistry will reach end of life sooner than the Baseline chemistry.

  18. Variants of windmill nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwang-Dong; Shin, Hae Kyung; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hee; Choi, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Zee, David S

    2016-07-01

    Windmill nystagmus is characterized by a clock-like rotation of the beating direction of a jerk nystagmus suggesting separate horizontal and vertical oscillators, usually 90° out of phase. We report oculographic characteristics in three patients with variants of windmill nystagmus in whom the common denominator was profound visual loss due to retinal diseases. Two patients showed a clock-like pattern, while in the third, the nystagmus was largely diagonal (in phase or 180° out of phase) but also periodically changed direction by 180°. We hypothesize that windmill nystagmus is a unique manifestation of "eye movements of the blind." It emerges when the central structures, including the cerebellum, that normally keep eye movements calibrated and gaze steady can no longer perform their task, because they are deprived of the retinal image motion that signals a need for adaptive recalibration.

  19. Variants of windmill nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwang-Dong; Shin, Hae Kyung; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hee; Choi, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Zee, David S

    2016-07-01

    Windmill nystagmus is characterized by a clock-like rotation of the beating direction of a jerk nystagmus suggesting separate horizontal and vertical oscillators, usually 90° out of phase. We report oculographic characteristics in three patients with variants of windmill nystagmus in whom the common denominator was profound visual loss due to retinal diseases. Two patients showed a clock-like pattern, while in the third, the nystagmus was largely diagonal (in phase or 180° out of phase) but also periodically changed direction by 180°. We hypothesize that windmill nystagmus is a unique manifestation of "eye movements of the blind." It emerges when the central structures, including the cerebellum, that normally keep eye movements calibrated and gaze steady can no longer perform their task, because they are deprived of the retinal image motion that signals a need for adaptive recalibration. PMID:27159990

  20. Human FABP1 T94A variant enhances cholesterol uptake.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; McIntosh, Avery L; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Storey, Stephen M; Martin, Gregory G; Gupta, Shipra; Atshaves, Barbara P; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2015-07-01

    Although expression of the human liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1) T94A variant alters serum lipoprotein cholesterol levels in human subjects, nothing is known whereby the variant elicits these effects. This issue was addressed by in vitro cholesterol binding assays using purified recombinant wild-type (WT) FABP1 T94T and T94A variant proteins and in cultured primary human hepatocytes expressing the FABP1 T94T (genotyped as TT) or T94A (genotyped as CC) proteins. The human FABP1 T94A variant protein had 3-fold higher cholesterol-binding affinity than the WT FABP1 T94T as shown by NBD-cholesterol fluorescence binding assays and by cholesterol isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) binding assays. CC variant hepatocytes also exhibited 30% higher total FABP1 protein. HDL- and LDL-mediated NBD-cholesterol uptake was faster in CC variant than TT WT human hepatocytes. VLDL-mediated uptake of NBD-cholesterol did not differ between CC and TT human hepatocytes. The increased HDL- and LDL-mediated NBD-cholesterol uptake was not associated with any significant change in mRNA levels of SCARB1, LDLR, CETP, and LCAT encoding the key proteins in lipoprotein cholesterol uptake. Thus, the increased HDL- and LDL-mediated NBD-cholesterol uptake by CC hepatocytes may be associated with higher affinity of T94A protein for cholesterol and/or increased total T94A protein level. PMID:25732850

  1. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Wogulis, Mark

    2014-10-14

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase II. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the variants.

  2. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Wogulis, Mark

    2014-09-09

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the cellobiohydrolase variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the cellobiohydrolase variants.

  3. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Wogulis, Mark

    2013-09-24

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase II. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the variants.

  4. Rare Copy Number Variants

    PubMed Central

    Grozeva, Detelina; Kirov, George; Ivanov, Dobril; Jones, Ian R.; Jones, Lisa; Green, Elaine K.; St Clair, David M.; Young, Allan H.; Ferrier, Nicol; Farmer, Anne E.; McGuffin, Peter; Holmans, Peter A.; Owen, Michael J.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Craddock, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Context Recent studies suggest that copy number variation in the human genome is extensive and may play an important role in susceptibility to disease, including neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. The possible involvement of copy number variants (CNVs) in bipolar disorder has received little attention to date. Objectives To determine whether large (>100 000 base pairs) and rare (found in <1% of the population) CNVs are associated with susceptibility to bipolar disorder and to compare with findings in schizophrenia. Design A genome-wide survey of large, rare CNVs in a case-control sample using a high-density microarray. Setting The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. Participants There were 1697 cases of bipolar disorder and 2806 nonpsychiatric controls. All participants were white UK residents. Main Outcome Measures Overall load of CNVs and presence of rare CNVs. Results The burden of CNVs in bipolar disorder was not increased compared with controls and was significantly less than in schizophrenia cases. The CNVs previously implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia were not more common in cases with bipolar disorder. Conclusions Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder differ with respect to CNV burden in general and association with specific CNVs in particular. Our data are consistent with the possibility that possession of large, rare deletions may modify the phenotype in those at risk of psychosis: those possessing such events are more likely to be diagnosed as having schizophrenia, and those without them are more likely to be diagnosed as having bipolar disorder. PMID:20368508

  5. Heteromorphic variants of chromosome 9

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Heterochromatic variants of pericentromere of chromosome 9 are reported and discussed since decades concerning their detailed structure and clinical meaning. However, detailed studies are scarce. Thus, here we provide the largest ever done molecular cytogenetic research based on >300 chromosome 9 heteromorphism carriers. Results In this study, 334 carriers of heterochromatic variants of chromosome 9 were included, being 192 patients from Western Europe and the remainder from Easter-European origin. A 3-color-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probe-set directed against for 9p12 to 9q13~21.1 (9het-mix) and 8 different locus-specific probes were applied for their characterization. The 9het-mix enables the characterization of 21 of the yet known 24 chromosome 9 heteromorphic patterns. In this study, 17 different variants were detected including five yet unreported; the most frequent were pericentric inversions (49.4%) followed by 9qh-variants (23.9%), variants of 9ph (11.4%), cenh (8.2%), and dicentric- (3.8%) and duplication-variants (3.3%). For reasons of simplicity, a new short nomenclature for the yet reported 24 heteromorphic patterns of chromosome 9 is suggested. Six breakpoints involved in four of the 24 variants could be narrowed down using locus-specific probes. Conclusions Based on this largest study ever done in carriers of chromosome 9 heteromorphisms, three of the 24 detailed variants were more frequently observed in Western than in Eastern Europe. Besides, there is no clear evidence that infertility is linked to any of the 24 chromosome 9 heteromorphic variants. PMID:23547710

  6. KD4v: Comprehensible Knowledge Discovery System for Missense Variant.

    PubMed

    Luu, Tien-Dao; Rusu, Alin; Walter, Vincent; Linard, Benjamin; Poidevin, Laetitia; Ripp, Raymond; Moulinier, Luc; Muller, Jean; Raffelsberger, Wolfgang; Wicker, Nicolas; Lecompte, Odile; Thompson, Julie D; Poch, Olivier; Nguyen, Hoan

    2012-07-01

    A major challenge in the post-genomic era is a better understanding of how human genetic alterations involved in disease affect the gene products. The KD4v (Comprehensible Knowledge Discovery System for Missense Variant) server allows to characterize and predict the phenotypic effects (deleterious/neutral) of missense variants. The server provides a set of rules learned by Induction Logic Programming (ILP) on a set of missense variants described by conservation, physico-chemical, functional and 3D structure predicates. These rules are interpretable by non-expert humans and are used to accurately predict the deleterious/neutral status of an unknown mutation. The web server is available at http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/kd4v.

  7. KD4v: comprehensible knowledge discovery system for missense variant

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Tien-Dao; Rusu, Alin; Walter, Vincent; Linard, Benjamin; Poidevin, Laetitia; Ripp, Raymond; Moulinier, Luc; Muller, Jean; Raffelsberger, Wolfgang; Wicker, Nicolas; Lecompte, Odile; Thompson, Julie D.; Poch, Olivier; Nguyen, Hoan

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge in the post-genomic era is a better understanding of how human genetic alterations involved in disease affect the gene products. The KD4v (Comprehensible Knowledge Discovery System for Missense Variant) server allows to characterize and predict the phenotypic effects (deleterious/neutral) of missense variants. The server provides a set of rules learned by Induction Logic Programming (ILP) on a set of missense variants described by conservation, physico-chemical, functional and 3D structure predicates. These rules are interpretable by non-expert humans and are used to accurately predict the deleterious/neutral status of an unknown mutation. The web server is available at http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/kd4v. PMID:22641855

  8. Variants of beta-glucosidases

    SciTech Connect

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Gorre-Clancy, Brian

    2014-10-07

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  9. Variants of beta-glucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Gorre-Clancy, Brian

    2015-07-14

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  10. Variants of beta-glucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Gorre-Clancy, Brian

    2009-12-29

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  11. Variants of beta-glucosidases

    DOEpatents

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Clancy, Brian Gorre

    2008-08-19

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  12. Altered CD45 expression and disease.

    PubMed

    Tchilian, Elma Z; Beverley, Peter C L

    2006-03-01

    CD45, the leucocyte common antigen, is a haemopoietic cell-specific tyrosine phosphatase. Many isoforms are generated by alternative splicing, but their function remains obscure. The extracellular domain of CD45 is highly polymorphic in all vertebrates. Importantly, human polymorphic variants that alter CD45 isoform expression are associated with autoimmune and infectious diseases, establishing CD45 as an important immunomodulator with a significant influence on disease burden. Here, we discuss the new opportunities provided by the human variants for investigating and understanding how CD45 regulates antigen receptor signalling, cytokine responses and apoptosis. PMID:16423560

  13. A PYY Q62P variant linked to human obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Ahituv, Nadav; Kavaslar, Nihan; Schackwitz, Wendy; Ustaszewska,Anna; Collier, John Michael; Hebert, Sybil; Doelle, Heather; Dent,Robert; Pennacchio, Len A.; McPherson, Ruth

    2005-06-27

    Members of the pancreatic polypeptide family and the irreceptors have been implicated in the control of food intake in rodents and humans. To investigate whether nucleotide changes in these candidate genes result in abnormal weight in humans, we sequenced the coding exons and splice sites of seven family members (NPY, PYY, PPY, NPY1R, NPY2R, NPY4R, and NPY5R) in a large cohort of extremely obese (n=379) and lean (n=378) individuals. In total we found eleven rare non-synonymous variants, four of which exhibited familial segregation, NPY1R L53P and PPY P63L with leanness and NPY2R D42G and PYY Q62P with obesity. Functional analysis of the obese variants revealed NPY2R D42G to have reduced cell surface expression, while previous cell culture based studies indicated variant PYY Q62P to have altered receptor binding selectivity and we show that it fails to reduce food intake through mouse peptide injection experiments. These results support that rare non-synonymous variants within these genes can alter susceptibility to human body mass index extremes.

  14. Gene Variants Reduce Opioid Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine ... a decreased risk for addiction to heroin or cocaine. The other linked variants in two genes— OPRM1 , ...

  15. CREBRF variant increases obesity risk and protects against diabetes in Samoans.

    PubMed

    Loos, Ruth J F

    2016-08-30

    A genome-wide study in Samoans has identified a protein-altering variant (p.Arg475Gln) in CREBRF as being associated with 1.3-fold increased risk of obesity and, intriguingly, 1.6-fold decreased risk of type 2 diabetes. This variant, which is common among Samoans (minor allele frequency = 26%) but extremely rare in other populations, promotes fat storage and reduces energy use in cellular models. PMID:27573685

  16. Delivering Antisense Morpholino Oligonucleotides to Target Telomerase Splice Variants in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Radan, Lida; Hughes, Chris S; Teichroeb, Jonathan H; Postovit, Lynne-Marie; Betts, Dean H

    2016-01-01

    Morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) are an innovative tool that provides a means for examining and modifying gene expression outcomes by antisense interaction with targeted RNA transcripts. The site-specific nature of their binding facilitates focused modulation to alter splice variant expression patterns. Here we describe the steric-blocking of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) Δα and Δβ splice variants using MO to examine cellular outcomes related to pluripotency and differentiation in human embryonic stem cells.

  17. Frequent somatic CDH1 loss-of-function mutations in plasmacytoid variant bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Iyer, Gopa; Lee, Byron H; Scott, Sasinya N; Mehra, Rohit; Bagrodia, Aditya; Jordan, Emmet J; Gao, Sizhi Paul; Ramirez, Ricardo; Cha, Eugene K; Desai, Neil B; Zabor, Emily C; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Gopalan, Anuradha; Chen, Ying-Bei; Fine, Samson W; Tickoo, Satish K; Gandhi, Anupama; Hreiki, Joseph; Viale, Agnès; Arcila, Maria E; Dalbagni, Guido; Rosenberg, Jonathan E; Bochner, Bernard H; Bajorin, Dean F; Berger, Michael F; Reuter, Victor E; Taylor, Barry S; Solit, David B

    2016-04-01

    Plasmacytoid bladder cancer is an aggressive histologic variant with a high risk of disease-specific mortality. Using whole-exome and targeted sequencing, we find that truncating somatic alterations in the CDH1 gene occur in 84% of plasmacytoid carcinomas and are specific to this histologic variant. Consistent with the aggressive clinical behavior of plasmacytoid carcinomas, which frequently recur locally, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of CDH1 in bladder cancer cells enhanced cell migration.

  18. Prediction and assessment of splicing alterations: implications for clinical testing.

    PubMed

    Spurdle, Amanda B; Couch, Fergus J; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Radice, Paolo; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2008-11-01

    Sequence variants that may result in splicing alterations are a particular class of inherited variants for which consequences can be more readily assessed, using a combination of bioinformatic prediction methods and in vitro assays. There is also a general agreement that a variant would invariably be considered pathogenic on the basis of convincing evidence that it results in transcript(s) carrying a premature stop codon or an in-frame deletion disrupting known functional domain(s). This commentary discusses current practices used to assess the clinical significance of this class of variants, provides suggestions to improve assessment, and highlights the issues involved in routine assessment of potential splicing aberrations. We conclude that classification of sequence variants that may alter splicing is greatly enhanced by supporting in vitro analysis. Additional studies that assess large numbers of variants for induction of splicing aberrations and exon skipping are needed to define the contribution of splicing/exon skipping to cancer and disease. These studies will also provide the impetus for development of algorithms that better predict splicing patterns. To facilitate variant classification and development of more specific bioinformatic tools, we call for the deposition of all laboratory data from splicing analyses into national and international databases. PMID:18951448

  19. Common Variants for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shutong; Tao, Lichan; Wang, Xiuzhi; Kong, Xiangqing; Li, Xinli

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common disease with high morbidity and mortality; however, none of the drugs available are now entirely optimal for the treatment of HF. In addition to various clinical diseases and environment influences, genetic factors also contribute to the development and progression of HF. Identifying the common variants for HF by genome-wide association studies will facilitate the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying HF. This review summarizes the recently identified common variants for HF risk and outcome and discusses their implications for the clinic therapy. PMID:26085806

  20. PREDICTING SIGNIFICANCE OF UNKNOWN VARIANTS IN GLIAL TUMORS THROUGH SUB-CLASS ENRICHMENT.

    PubMed

    Fichtenholtz, Alex M; Camarda, Nicholas D; Neumann, Eric K

    2016-01-01

    Glial tumors have been heavily studied and sequenced, leading to scores of findings about altered genes. This explosion in knowledge has not been matched with clinical success, but efforts to understand the synergies between drivers of glial tumors may alleviate the situation. We present a novel molecular classification system that captures the combinatorial nature of relationships between alterations in these diseases. We use this classification to mine for enrichment of variants of unknown significance, and demonstrate a method for segregating unknown variants with functional importance from passengers and SNPs. PMID:26776195

  1. A rare sequence variant in intron 1 of THAP1 is associated with primary dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Vemula, Satya R; Xiao, Jianfeng; Zhao, Yu; Bastian, Robert W; Perlmutter, Joel S; Racette, Brad A; Paniello, Randal C; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Uitti, Ryan J; Van Gerpen, Jay A; Hedera, Peter; Truong, Daniel D; Blitzer, Andrew; Rudzińska, Monika; Momčilović, Dragana; Jinnah, Hyder A; Frei, Karen; Pfeiffer, Ronald F; LeDoux, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Although coding variants in THAP1 have been causally associated with primary dystonia, the contribution of noncoding variants remains uncertain. Herein, we examine a previously identified Intron 1 variant (c.71+9C>A, rs200209986). Among 1672 subjects with mainly adult-onset primary dystonia, 12 harbored the variant in contrast to 1/1574 controls (P < 0.01). Dystonia classification included cervical dystonia (N = 3), laryngeal dystonia (adductor subtype, N = 3), jaw-opening oromandibular dystonia (N = 1), blepharospasm (N = 2), and unclassified (N = 3). Age of dystonia onset ranged from 25 to 69 years (mean = 54 years). In comparison to controls with no identified THAP1 sequence variants, the c.71+9C>A variant was associated with an elevated ratio of Isoform 1 (NM_018105) to Isoform 2 (NM_199003) in leukocytes. In silico and minigene analyses indicated that c.71+9C>A alters THAP1 splicing. Lymphoblastoid cells harboring the c.71+9C>A variant showed extensive apoptosis with relatively fewer cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Differentially expressed genes from lymphoblastoid cells revealed that the c.71+9C>A variant exerts effects on DNA synthesis, cell growth and proliferation, cell survival, and cytotoxicity. In aggregate, these data indicate that THAP1 c.71+9C>A is a risk factor for adult-onset primary dystonia. PMID:24936516

  2. Inferring causative variants in microRNA target sites.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Laurent F; Saito, Takaya; Sætrom, Pål

    2011-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate genes post transcription by pairing with messenger RNA (mRNA). Variants such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNA regulatory regions might result in altered protein levels and disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) aim at identifying genomic regions that contain variants associated with disease, but lack tools for finding causative variants. We present a computational tool that can help identifying SNPs associated with diseases, by focusing on SNPs affecting miRNA-regulation of genes. The tool predicts the effects of SNPs in miRNA target sites and uses linkage disequilibrium to map these miRNA-related variants to SNPs of interest in GWAS. We compared our predicted SNP effects in miRNA target sites with measured SNP effects from allelic imbalance sequencing. Our predictions fit measured effects better than effects based on differences in free energy or differences of TargetScan context scores. We also used our tool to analyse data from published breast cancer and Parkinson's disease GWAS and significant trait-associated SNPs from the NHGRI GWAS Catalog. A database of predicted SNP effects is available at http://www.bigr.medisin.ntnu.no/mirsnpscore/. The database is based on haplotype data from the CEU HapMap population and miRNAs from miRBase 16.0.

  3. KINOMIC ALTERATIONS IN ATYPICAL MENINGIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Joshua C.; Taylor, Robert B.; Fiveash, John B.; de Wijn, Rik; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Willey, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to profile Atypical Meningioma in a high-throughput manner to better understand the altered signaling within these tumors and specifically the kinases altered in recurrent atypical meningioma. Kinomic Profiles could be used to identify prognostic biomarkers for responders/non-responders to classify future patients that are unlikely to benefit from current therapies. Directly these results could be used to identify drug-actionable kinase targets as well. Methods Peptide-substrate microarray kinase activity analysis was conducted with a PamStation®12 analyzing the tyrosine kinome in each tumor kinetically against ~144 target peptides. These data were then analyzed relative to clinical outcome (e.g., tumor recurrence). Results 3 major clusters of atypical meningiomas were identified with highly variant peptides primarily being targets of EGFR family, ABL, BRK and BMX kinases. Kinomic analysis of recurrent atypical meningiomas indicated patterns of increased phosphorylation of BMX, TYRO3 and FAK substrates as compared to non-recurrent tumors. Conclusion The atypical meningiomas profiled here exhibited molecular sub-clustering that may have phenotypic corollaries predictive of outcome. Recurrent tumors had increases in kinase activity that may predict resistance to current therapies, and may guide selection of directed therapies. Taken together these data further the understanding of kinomic alteration in atypical meningioma, and the processes that may not only mediate recurrence, but additionally may identify kinase targets for intervention. PMID:27158663

  4. Variant (Swine Origin) Influenza Viruses in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Variant Influenza Viruses: Background and CDC Risk Assessment and Reporting Language: ... Background CDC Assessment Reporting Background On Variant Influenza Viruses Swine flu viruses do not normally infect humans. ...

  5. Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Viruses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Humans Key Facts about Human Infections with Variant Viruses Interim Guidance for Clinicians on Human Infections Background, Risk Assessment & Reporting Reported Infections with Variant Influenza Viruses in the United States since 2005 Prevention Treatment ...

  6. Cultural variant interaction in teaching and transmission.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Marshall

    2015-01-01

    Focus on the way in which cultural variants affect other variants' probabilities of transmission in modeling and empirical work can enrich Kline's conceptualization of teaching. For example, the problem of communicating complex cumulative culture is an adaptive problem; teaching methods that manage transmission so that acquisition of some cultural variants increases the probability of acquiring others, provide a partial solution. PMID:26786769

  7. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2011-05-31

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  8. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2008-12-02

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  9. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2012-08-07

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  10. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2011-08-16

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  11. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    SciTech Connect

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2014-03-18

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  12. Variant humicola grisea CBH1.1

    SciTech Connect

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Edmund, Larenas

    2014-09-09

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  13. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    SciTech Connect

    Goedegeburr, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2013-02-19

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  14. Oncotator: cancer variant annotation tool.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alex H; Lichtenstein, Lee; Gupta, Manaswi; Lawrence, Michael S; Pugh, Trevor J; Saksena, Gordon; Meyerson, Matthew; Getz, Gad

    2015-04-01

    Oncotator is a tool for annotating genomic point mutations and short nucleotide insertions/deletions (indels) with variant- and gene-centric information relevant to cancer researchers. This information is drawn from 14 different publicly available resources that have been pooled and indexed, and we provide an extensible framework to add additional data sources. Annotations linked to variants range from basic information, such as gene names and functional classification (e.g. missense), to cancer-specific data from resources such as the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC), the Cancer Gene Census, and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). For local use, Oncotator is freely available as a python module hosted on Github (https://github.com/broadinstitute/oncotator). Furthermore, Oncotator is also available as a web service and web application at http://www.broadinstitute.org/oncotator/.

  15. [Mirizzi syndrome and its variants].

    PubMed

    Meyer, G J; Runge, D; Gebhardt, J

    1990-04-01

    Between 1981 and 1987 5434 patients were studied by ERCP in Allgemeines Krankenhaus Hamburg-Barmbeck. 26 (i.e. 0.43%) suffered from Mirizze syndrome with the triad of cholelithiasis, cholecystitis and obstructive biliary disease. They were classified in four different types according to the variable localisation and origin of the biliary obstruction. 16 patients corresponded to the classical type (I and II) with compression, penetration, and obturation by the concrement, five patients matched borderline with infiltration (III) and five patients were classified as variants of this syndrome. A mild elevation of serum bilirubine and alkaline phosphatase indicated more likely the benign etiology of type I to III, however, a marked elevation of alkaline phosphatase in the variants suggested more likely a malignant underlying disease. The diagnosis was ascertained in all cases by ERC and sonography preoperatively and was verified by laparotomy (n = 18) and follow-up (n = 6).

  16. Rare TREM2 variants associated with Alzheimer's disease display reduced cell surface expression.

    PubMed

    Sirkis, Daniel W; Bonham, Luke W; Aparicio, Renan E; Geier, Ethan G; Ramos, Eliana Marisa; Wang, Qing; Karydas, Anna; Miller, Zachary A; Miller, Bruce L; Coppola, Giovanni; Yokoyama, Jennifer S

    2016-09-02

    Rare variation in TREM2 has been associated with greater risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). TREM2 encodes a cell surface receptor expressed on microglia and related cells, and the R47H variant associated with AD appears to affect the ability of TREM2 to bind extracellular ligands. In addition, other rare TREM2 mutations causing early-onset neurodegeneration are thought to impair cell surface expression. Using a sequence kernel association (SKAT) analysis in two independent AD cohorts, we found significant enrichment of rare TREM2 variants not previously characterized at the protein level. Heterologous expression of the identified variants showed that novel variants S31F and R47C displayed significantly reduced cell surface expression. In addition, we identified rare variant R136Q in a patient with language-predominant AD that also showed impaired surface expression. The results suggest rare TREM2 variants enriched in AD may be associated with altered TREM2 function and that AD risk may be conferred, in part, from altered TREM2 surface expression.

  17. Rare TREM2 variants associated with Alzheimer's disease display reduced cell surface expression.

    PubMed

    Sirkis, Daniel W; Bonham, Luke W; Aparicio, Renan E; Geier, Ethan G; Ramos, Eliana Marisa; Wang, Qing; Karydas, Anna; Miller, Zachary A; Miller, Bruce L; Coppola, Giovanni; Yokoyama, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Rare variation in TREM2 has been associated with greater risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). TREM2 encodes a cell surface receptor expressed on microglia and related cells, and the R47H variant associated with AD appears to affect the ability of TREM2 to bind extracellular ligands. In addition, other rare TREM2 mutations causing early-onset neurodegeneration are thought to impair cell surface expression. Using a sequence kernel association (SKAT) analysis in two independent AD cohorts, we found significant enrichment of rare TREM2 variants not previously characterized at the protein level. Heterologous expression of the identified variants showed that novel variants S31F and R47C displayed significantly reduced cell surface expression. In addition, we identified rare variant R136Q in a patient with language-predominant AD that also showed impaired surface expression. The results suggest rare TREM2 variants enriched in AD may be associated with altered TREM2 function and that AD risk may be conferred, in part, from altered TREM2 surface expression. PMID:27589997

  18. A new variant of blepharospasm.

    PubMed

    Elston, J S

    1992-05-01

    Ten patients who were unable to initiate or sustain eye opening in the absence of overt spasm of the orbicularis oculi, were investigated. In five, the problem was isolated. Three had Parkinson's disease and two progressive supra-nuclear palsy for between one to six years before the eye opening difficulty developed. The clinical features and electrophysiological investigation suggested that the disorder is a variant of blepharospasm due to abnormal contraction in the pre-tarsal orbicularis oculi. PMID:1602309

  19. Differences in regulatory sequences of naturally occurring JC virus variants.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J D; King, D M; Slauch, J M; Frisque, R J

    1985-01-01

    The regulatory region was sequenced for DNAs representative of seven independent isolates of JC virus, the probable agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. The isolates included an oncogenic variant (MAD-4), an antigenic variant (MAD-11), and two different isolates derived from the urine (MAD-7) and from the brain (MAD-8) of the same patient. The representative DNAs were molecularly cloned directly from diseased brain tissue and from human fetal glial cells infected with the corresponding isolated viruses. The regulatory sequences of these DNAs were compared with those of the prototype isolate, MAD-1, sequenced previously (R. J. Frisque, J. Virol. 46:170-176, 1983). We found that the regulatory region of JC viral DNA is highly variable due to complex alterations of the previously described 98-base-pair repeat of MAD-1 DNA. On the basis of these alterations, there are two general types of JC virus. There were no consistent alterations in regulatory sequences which could distinguish brain tissue DNAs from tissue culture DNAs. Furthermore, for each isolate except MAD-1 (R. J. Frisque, J. Virol. 46:170-176, 1983), the regulatory regions of brain tissue and tissue culture DNAs were not identical. The arrangement, sequence, or both of potential regulatory elements (TATA sequence, GGGXGGPuPu, tandem repeats) of JC viral DNAs are sufficiently different from those in other viral and eucaryotic systems that they may effect the unique properties of this slow virus. PMID:2981353

  20. Dorsal variant blister aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Couldwell, William T; Chamoun, Roukoz

    2012-01-01

    Dorsal variant proximal carotid blister aneurysms are treacherous lesions to manage. It is important to recognize this variant on preoperative angiographic imaging, in anticipation of surgical strategies for their treatment. Strategies include trapping the involved segment and revascularization if necessary. Other options include repair of the aneurysm rupture site directly. Given that these are not true berry aneurysms, repair of the rupture site involves wrapping or clip-grafting techniques. The case presented here was a young woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dorsal variant blister aneurysm. The technique used is demonstrated in the video and is a modified clip-wrap technique using woven polyester graft material. The patient was given aspirin preoperatively as preparation for the clip-wrap technique. It is the authors' current protocol to attempt a direct repair with clip-wrapping and leaving artery sacrifice with or without bypass as a salvage therapy if direct repair is not possible. Assessment of vessel patency after repair is performed by intraoperative Doppler and indocyanine green angiography. Intraoperative somatosensory and motor evoked potential monitoring is performed in all cases. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/crUreWGQdGo.

  1. A donor splice mutation and a single-base deletion produce two carboxyl-terminal variants of human serum albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, S.; Madison, J.; Davis, E.; Sakamoto, Yasushi; Putnam, F.W. ); Galliano, M.; Minchiotti, L. )

    1991-07-15

    At least 35 allelic variants of human serum albumin have been sequenced at the protein level. All except two COOH-terminal variants, Catania and Venezia, are readily explainable as single-point substitutions. The two chain-termination variants are clustered in certain locations in Italy and are found in numerous unrelated individuals. In order to correlate the protein change in these variants with the corresponding DNA mutation, the two variant albumin genes have been cloned, sequenced, and compared to normal albumin genomic DNA. In the Catania variant, a single base deletion and subsequent frameshift leads to a shortened and altered COOH terminus. Albumin Venezia is caused by a mutation that alters the first consensus nucleotide of the 5{prime} donor splice junction of intron 14 and the 3{prime} end of exon 14, which is shortened from 68 to 43 base pairs. This change leads to an exon skipping event resulting in direct splicing of exon 13 to exon 15. The predicted Venezia albumin product has a truncated amino acid sequence (580 residues instead of 585), and the COOH-terminal sequence is altered after Glu-571. The variant COOH terminus ends with the dibasic sequence Arg-Lys that is apparently removed through stepwise cleavage by serum carboxypeptidase B to yield several forms of circulating albumin.

  2. The Biotinidase Gene Variants Registry: A Paradigm Public Database

    PubMed Central

    Procter, Melinda; Wolf, Barry; Crockett, David K.; Mao, Rong

    2013-01-01

    The BTD gene codes for production of biotinidase, the enzyme responsible for helping the body reuse and recycle the biotin found in foods. Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder resulting in the inability to recycle the vitamin biotin and affects approximately 1 in 60,000 newborns. If untreated, the depletion of intracellular biotin leads to impaired activities of the biotin-dependent carboxylases and can result in cutaneous and neurological abnormalities in individuals with the disorder. Mutations in the biotinidase gene (BTD) alter enzymatic function. To date, more than 165 mutations in BTD have been reported. Our group has developed a database that characterizes the known mutations and sequence variants in BTD. (http://arup.utah.edu/database/BTD/BTD_welcome.php). All sequence variants have been verified for their positions within the BTD gene and designated according to standard nomenclature suggested by Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS). In addition, we describe the change in the protein, indicate whether the variant is a known or likely mutation vs. a benign polymorphism, and include the reference that first described the alteration. We also indicate whether the alteration is known to be clinically pathological based on an observation of a known symptomatic individual or predicted to be pathological based on enzymatic activity or putative disruption of the protein structure. We incorporated the published phenotype to help establish genotype-phenotype correlations and facilitate this process for those performing mutation analysis and/or interpreting results. Other features of this database include disease information, relevant links about biotinidase deficiency, reference sequences, ability to query by various criteria, and the process for submitting novel variations. This database is free to the public and will be updated quarterly. This database is a paradigm for formulating databases for other inherited metabolic disorders

  3. Amino acid substitutions in inherited albumin variants from Amerindian and Japanese populations

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Isobe, T.; Putnam, F.W.; Fujita, M.; Satoh, C.; Neel, J.V.

    1987-11-01

    The authors report an effort to determine the basis for the altered migration of seven inherited albumin variants detected by one-dimensional electrophoresis in population surveys involving tribal Amerindians and Japanese children. An amino acid substitution has thus far been determined for four of the variants. The randomness in the albumin polypeptide of these and the other sixteen independently ascertained amino acid substitutions of albumin and proalbumin thus far established was analyzed; the clustering of eight of these at two positions in the six-amino acid propeptide sequence seems noteworthy. By comparison with other proteins studied by electrophoresis, albumin exhibits average variability. It is a paradox that individuals who, for genetic reasons, lack albumin exhibit no obvious ill effects; yet, electrophoretic variants of albumin are no more numerous than are variants of proteins, the absence of which results in severe disease.

  4. A protein-truncating R179X variant in RNF186 confers protection against ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Manuel A.; Graham, Daniel; Sulem, Patrick; Stevens, Christine; Desch, A. Nicole; Goyette, Philippe; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Degenhardt, Frauke; Mucha, Sören; Kurki, Mitja I.; Li, Dalin; D'Amato, Mauro; Annese, Vito; Vermeire, Severine; Weersma, Rinse K.; Halfvarson, Jonas; Paavola-Sakki, Paulina; Lappalainen, Maarit; Lek, Monkol; Cummings, Beryl; Tukiainen, Taru; Haritunians, Talin; Halme, Leena; Koskinen, Lotta L. E.; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N.; Luo, Yang; Heap, Graham A.; Visschedijk, Marijn C.; Barrett, J; de Lange, K; Edwards, C; Hart, A; Hawkey, C; Jostins, L; Kennedy, N; Lamb, C; Lee, J; Lees, C; Mansfield, J; Mathew, C; Mowatt, C; Newman, W; Nimmo, E; Parkes, M; Pollard, M; Prescott, N; Randall, J; Rice, D; Satsangi, J; Simmons, A; Tremelling, M; Uhlig, H; Wilson, D; Abraham, C; Achkar, J.P; Bitton, A; Boucher, G; Croitoru, K; Fleshner, P; Glas, J; Kugathasan, S; Limbergen, J.V; Milgrom, R; Proctor, D; Regueiro, M; Schumm, P.L; Sharma, Y; Stempak, J.M; Targan, S.R; Wang, M.H; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Ahmad, Tariq; Anderson, Carl A.; Brant, Steven R.; Duerr, Richard H.; Silverberg, Mark S.; Cho, Judy H; Palotie, Aarno; Saavalainen, Päivi; Kontula, Kimmo; Färkkilä, Martti; McGovern, Dermot P. B.; Franke, Andre; Stefansson, Kari; Rioux, John D.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Daly, Mark J.; Barrett, J.; de Lane, K.; Edwards, C.; Hart, A.; Hawkey, C.; Jostins, L.; Kennedy, N.; Lamb, C.; Lee, J.; Lees, C.; Mansfield, J.; Mathew, C.; Mowatt, C.; Newman, B.; Nimmo, E.; Parkes, M.; Pollard, M.; Prescott, N.; Randall, J.; Rice, D.; Satsangi, J.; Simmons, A.; Tremelling, M.; Uhlig, H.; Wilson, D.; Abraham, C.; Achkar, J. P.; Bitton, A.; Boucher, G.; Croitoru, K.; Fleshner, P.; Glas, J.; Kugathasan, S.; Limbergen, J. V.; Milgrom, R.; Proctor, D.; Regueiro, M.; Schumm, P. L.; Sharma, Y.; Stempak, J. M.; Targan, S. R.; Wang, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-truncating variants protective against human disease provide in vivo validation of therapeutic targets. Here we used targeted sequencing to conduct a search for protein-truncating variants conferring protection against inflammatory bowel disease exploiting knowledge of common variants associated with the same disease. Through replication genotyping and imputation we found that a predicted protein-truncating variant (rs36095412, p.R179X, genotyped in 11,148 ulcerative colitis patients and 295,446 controls, MAF=up to 0.78%) in RNF186, a single-exon ring finger E3 ligase with strong colonic expression, protects against ulcerative colitis (overall P=6.89 × 10−7, odds ratio=0.30). We further demonstrate that the truncated protein exhibits reduced expression and altered subcellular localization, suggesting the protective mechanism may reside in the loss of an interaction or function via mislocalization and/or loss of an essential transmembrane domain. PMID:27503255

  5. Mitochondrial DNA variants observed in Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease patients

    SciTech Connect

    Shoffner, J.M.; Brown, M.D.; Torroni, A.; Lott, M.T.; Cabell, M.F.; Mirra, S.S.; Yang, C.C.; Gearing, M.; Salvo, R. ); Beal, M.F. )

    1993-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD) were sought by restriction endonuclease analysis in a cohort of 71 late-onset Caucasian patients. A tRNA[sup Gln] gene variant at nucleotide pair (np) 4336 that altered a moderately conserved nucleotide was present in 9/173 (5.2%) of the patients surveyed but in only 0.7% of the general Caucasian controls. One of these patients harbored an additional novel 12S rRNA 5-nucleotide insertion at np 956-965, while a second had a missense variant at np 3397 that converted a highly conserved methionine to a valine. This latter mutation was also found in an independent AD + PD patient, as was a heteroplasmic 16S rRNA variant at np 3196. Additional studies will be required to determine the significance, if any, of these mutations. 122 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. A protein-truncating R179X variant in RNF186 confers protection against ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Manuel A; Graham, Daniel; Sulem, Patrick; Stevens, Christine; Desch, A Nicole; Goyette, Philippe; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Degenhardt, Frauke; Mucha, Sören; Kurki, Mitja I; Li, Dalin; D'Amato, Mauro; Annese, Vito; Vermeire, Severine; Weersma, Rinse K; Halfvarson, Jonas; Paavola-Sakki, Paulina; Lappalainen, Maarit; Lek, Monkol; Cummings, Beryl; Tukiainen, Taru; Haritunians, Talin; Halme, Leena; Koskinen, Lotta L E; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N; Luo, Yang; Heap, Graham A; Visschedijk, Marijn C; MacArthur, Daniel G; Neale, Benjamin M; Ahmad, Tariq; Anderson, Carl A; Brant, Steven R; Duerr, Richard H; Silverberg, Mark S; Cho, Judy H; Palotie, Aarno; Saavalainen, Päivi; Kontula, Kimmo; Färkkilä, Martti; McGovern, Dermot P B; Franke, Andre; Stefansson, Kari; Rioux, John D; Xavier, Ramnik J; Daly, Mark J; Barrett, J; de Lane, K; Edwards, C; Hart, A; Hawkey, C; Jostins, L; Kennedy, N; Lamb, C; Lee, J; Lees, C; Mansfield, J; Mathew, C; Mowatt, C; Newman, B; Nimmo, E; Parkes, M; Pollard, M; Prescott, N; Randall, J; Rice, D; Satsangi, J; Simmons, A; Tremelling, M; Uhlig, H; Wilson, D; Abraham, C; Achkar, J P; Bitton, A; Boucher, G; Croitoru, K; Fleshner, P; Glas, J; Kugathasan, S; Limbergen, J V; Milgrom, R; Proctor, D; Regueiro, M; Schumm, P L; Sharma, Y; Stempak, J M; Targan, S R; Wang, M H

    2016-01-01

    Protein-truncating variants protective against human disease provide in vivo validation of therapeutic targets. Here we used targeted sequencing to conduct a search for protein-truncating variants conferring protection against inflammatory bowel disease exploiting knowledge of common variants associated with the same disease. Through replication genotyping and imputation we found that a predicted protein-truncating variant (rs36095412, p.R179X, genotyped in 11,148 ulcerative colitis patients and 295,446 controls, MAF=up to 0.78%) in RNF186, a single-exon ring finger E3 ligase with strong colonic expression, protects against ulcerative colitis (overall P=6.89 × 10(-7), odds ratio=0.30). We further demonstrate that the truncated protein exhibits reduced expression and altered subcellular localization, suggesting the protective mechanism may reside in the loss of an interaction or function via mislocalization and/or loss of an essential transmembrane domain. PMID:27503255

  7. Primary structure of water buffalo alpha-lactalbumin variants A and B.

    PubMed

    Chianese, Lina; Caira, Simonetta; Lilla, Sergio; Pizzolongo, Fabiana; Ferranti, Pasquale; Pugliano, Giovanni; Addeo, Francesco

    2004-02-01

    A novel electrophoretic alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-la) variant was detected in the Italian water buffalo breed. The isoelectric point of the variant, labelled A, was lower than the most frequent variant B. It presented an allelic frequency of 0.5% compared with the 97.1% of the BB allele. From Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization/Mass spectrometry, the molecular mass of the two alpha-la A and B variants were measured as 14,235.1+/-0.8 and 14,236.1+/-0.9 Da, respectively. The two proteins were sequenced and differentiated from one another by a single amino acid substitution, Asn45(B)-->Asp45(A). As this amino acid substitution altered the N-glycosylation sequence consensus Asn45-X-Ser46 it may be deduced that the protein glycosylation level of the alpha-la A would decrease.

  8. Deep resequencing of GWAS loci identifies independent rare variants associated with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Manuel A.; Beaudoin, Melissa; Gardet, Agnes; Stevens, Christine; Sharma, Yashoda; Zhang, Clarence K.; Boucher, Gabrielle; Ripke, Stephan; Ellinghaus, David; Burtt, Noel; Fennell, Tim; Kirby, Andrew; Latiano, Anna; Goyette, Philippe; Green, Todd; Halfvarson, Jonas; Haritunians, Talin; Korn, Joshua M.; Kuruvilla, Finny; Lagacé, Caroline; Neale, Benjamin; Lo, Ken Sin; Schumm, Phil; Törkvist, Leif; Dubinsky, Marla; Brant, Steven R.; Silverberg, Mark; Duerr, Richard H.; Altshuler, David; Gabriel, Stacey; Lettre, Guillaume; Franke, Andre; D’Amato, Mauro; McGovern, Dermot P.B.; Cho, Judy H.; Rioux, John D.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Daly, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    More than a thousand disease susceptibility loci have been identified via genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of common variants; however, the specific genes and full allelic spectrum of causal variants underlying these findings generally remain to be defined. We utilize pooled next-generation sequencing to study 56 genes in regions associated to Crohn’s Disease in 350 cases and 350 controls. Follow up genotyping of 70 rare and low-frequency protein-altering variants (MAF ~ .001-.05) in nine independent case-control series (16054 CD patients, 12153 UC patients, 17575 healthy controls) identifies four additional independent risk factors in NOD2, two additional protective variants in IL23R, a highly significant association to a novel, protective splice variant in CARD9 (p < 1e-16, OR ~ 0.29), as well as additional associations to coding variants in IL18RAP, CUL2, C1orf106, PTPN22 and MUC19. We extend the results of successful GWAS by providing novel, rare, and likely functional variants that will empower functional experiments and predictive models. PMID:21983784

  9. Twenty-One Novel EGFR Kinase Domain variants in Patients with Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hasenahuer, Marcia A; Parisi, Gustavo; Gautier, Marien; Lazarowski, Alberto; Bramuglia, Guillermo F; Fornasari, Maria Silvina

    2015-11-01

    Somatic sequence variants in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase domain are associated with sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients exhibiting sequence variants in this domain that produce kinase activity enhancement, are more likely to benefit from TKIs than patients with EGFR wild-type disease. Although most NSCLC EGFR-related alleles are concentrated in a few positions, established protocols recommend sequencing EGFR exons 18-21. In this study, 21 novel somatic variants belonging to such exons in adult Argentinean patients affected with NSCLC are reported. Of these, 18 were single amino acid substitutions (SASs), occurring alone or in combination with another genetic alteration (complex cases), one was a short deletion, one was a short deletion-short insertion combination, and one was a duplication. New variants and different combinations of previously reported variants were also found. Moreover, two of the reported SASs occurred in previously unreported positions of the EGFR kinase domain. In order to characterize the new sequence variants, physicochemical, sequence and conformational analyses were also performed. A better understanding of sequence variants in NSCLC may facilitate the most appropriate treatment choice for this complex disease. PMID:26420346

  10. Human Thromboxane A2 Receptor Genetic Variants: In Silico, In Vitro and “In Platelet” Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gleim, Scott; Stitham, Jeremiah; Tang, Wai Ho; Li, Hong; Douville, Karen; Chelikani, Prashen; J.Rade, Jeffrey; Martin, Kathleen A.; Hwa, John

    2013-01-01

    Thromboxane and its receptor have emerged as key players in modulating vascular thrombotic events. Thus, a dysfunctional hTP genetic variant may protect against (hypoactivity) or promote (hyperactivity) vascular events, based upon its activity on platelets. After extensive in silico analysis, six hTP-α variants were selected (C68S, V80E, E94V, A160T, V176E, and V217I) for detailed biochemical studies based on structural proximity to key regions involved in receptor function and in silico predictions. Variant biochemical profiles ranged from severe instability (C68S) to normal (V217I), with most variants demonstrating functional alteration in binding, expression or activation (V80E, E94V, A160T, and V176E). In the absence of patient platelet samples, we developed and validated a novel megakaryocyte based system to evaluate human platelet function in the presence of detected dysfunctional genetic variants. Interestingly, variant V80E exhibited reduced platelet activation whereas A160T demonstrated platelet hyperactivity. This report provides the most comprehensive in silico, in vitro and “in platelet” evaluation of hTP variants to date and highlightscurrent inherent problems in evaluating genetic variants, with possible solutions. The study additionally provides clinical relevance to characterized dysfunctional hTP variants. PMID:23840660

  11. Currarino syndrome: Rare clinical variants

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bindey; Sinha, Amit Kumar; Kumar, Prem; Kumar, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Currarino syndrome (CS) is a rare clinical condition. The classical presentation includes a triad of sacral anomaly, anorectal malformations, and presacral mass. This syndrome belongs to the group of persistent neuroenteric malformations. This article presents two cases of Currarino syndrome, where there was rare clinical variants such as rectal atresia in the first case and rectal stenosis in the second case. The clinical presentations were very deceptive as the first case presented as high anorectal malformation and the second case was simulating Hirschprung's disease.

  12. Currarino syndrome: Rare clinical variants

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bindey; Sinha, Amit Kumar; Kumar, Prem; Kumar, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Currarino syndrome (CS) is a rare clinical condition. The classical presentation includes a triad of sacral anomaly, anorectal malformations, and presacral mass. This syndrome belongs to the group of persistent neuroenteric malformations. This article presents two cases of Currarino syndrome, where there was rare clinical variants such as rectal atresia in the first case and rectal stenosis in the second case. The clinical presentations were very deceptive as the first case presented as high anorectal malformation and the second case was simulating Hirschprung's disease. PMID:27695213

  13. Reliably Detecting Clinically Important Variants Requires Both Combined Variant Calls and Optimized Filtering Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Field, Matthew A.; Cho, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    A diversity of tools is available for identification of variants from genome sequence data. Given the current complexity of incorporating external software into a genome analysis infrastructure, a tendency exists to rely on the results from a single tool alone. The quality of the output variant calls is highly variable however, depending on factors such as sequence library quality as well as the choice of short-read aligner, variant caller, and variant caller filtering strategy. Here we present a two-part study first using the high quality ‘genome in a bottle’ reference set to demonstrate the significant impact the choice of aligner, variant caller, and variant caller filtering strategy has on overall variant call quality and further how certain variant callers outperform others with increased sample contamination, an important consideration when analyzing sequenced cancer samples. This analysis confirms previous work showing that combining variant calls of multiple tools results in the best quality resultant variant set, for either specificity or sensitivity, depending on whether the intersection or union, of all variant calls is used respectively. Second, we analyze a melanoma cell line derived from a control lymphocyte sample to determine whether software choices affect the detection of clinically important melanoma risk-factor variants finding that only one of the three such variants is unanimously detected under all conditions. Finally, we describe a cogent strategy for implementing a clinical variant detection pipeline; a strategy that requires careful software selection, variant caller filtering optimizing, and combined variant calls in order to effectively minimize false negative variants. While implementing such features represents an increase in complexity and computation the results offer indisputable improvements in data quality. PMID:26600436

  14. A new high activity plasma cholinesterase variant.

    PubMed Central

    Krause, A; Lane, A B; Jenkins, T

    1988-01-01

    A South African Afrikaans speaking family is reported in which a new high activity plasma cholinesterase variant was found to occur in the mother and son. The variant has the same electrophoretic mobility as the "usual' enzyme, but greater heat stability. Its higher specific activity is associated with a normal number of enzyme molecules. The variant may be inherited as a dominant trait, though its locus is uncertain. Images PMID:3225823

  15. Reduction of Cellular Expression Levels Is a Common Feature of Functionally Affected Pendrin (SLC26A4) Protein Variants

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Vanessa C S; Bernardinelli, Emanuele; Zocal, Nathalia; Fernandez, Jhonathan A; Nofziger, Charity; Castilho, Arthur M; Sartorato, Edi L; Paulmichl, Markus; Dossena, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Sequence alterations in the pendrin gene (SLC26A4) leading to functionally affected protein variants are frequently involved in the pathogenesis of syndromic and nonsyndromic deafness. Considering the high number of SLC26A4 sequence alterations reported to date, discriminating between functionally affected and unaffected pendrin protein variants is essential in contributing to determine the genetic cause of deafness in a given patient. In addition, identifying molecular features common to the functionally affected protein variants can be extremely useful to design future molecule-directed therapeutic approaches. Here we show the functional and molecular characterization of six previously uncharacterized pendrin protein variants found in a cohort of 58 Brazilian deaf patients. Two variants (p.T193I and p.L445W) were undetectable in the plasma membrane, completely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and showed no transport function; four (p.P142L, p.G149R, p.C282Y and p.Q413R) showed reduced function and significant, although heterogeneous, expression levels in the plasma membrane. Importantly, total expression levels of all of the functionally affected protein variants were significantly reduced with respect to the wild-type and a fully functional variant (p.R776C), regardless of their subcellular localization. Interestingly, reduction of expression may also reduce the transport activity of variants with an intrinsic gain of function (p.Q413R). As reduction of overall cellular abundance was identified as a common molecular feature of pendrin variants with affected function, the identification of strategies to prevent reduction in expression levels may represent a crucial step of potential future therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring the transport activity of dysfunctional pendrin variants. PMID:26752218

  16. [Altered states of consciousness].

    PubMed

    Gora, E P

    2005-01-01

    The review of modern ideas concerning the altered states of consciousness is presented in this article. Various methods of entry into the altered states of consciousness are looked over. It is shown that the altered states of consciousness are insufficiently known, but important aspects of human being existence. The role of investigation of the altered states of consciousness for the creation of integrative scientific conception base is discussed.

  17. [Altered states of consciousness].

    PubMed

    Gora, E P

    2005-01-01

    The review of modern ideas concerning the altered states of consciousness is presented in this article. Various methods of entry into the altered states of consciousness are looked over. It is shown that the altered states of consciousness are insufficiently known, but important aspects of human being existence. The role of investigation of the altered states of consciousness for the creation of integrative scientific conception base is discussed. PMID:15810684

  18. Expression and functionality of histone H2A variants in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Fátima Liliana; Baptista, Tiago; Amado, Francisco; Vitorino, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen; Helguero, Luisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression includes the replacement of canonical histones for non-allelic histone variants, as well as their multiple targeting by postranslational modifications. H2A variants are highly conserved between species suggesting they execute important functions that cannot be accomplished by canonical histones. Altered expression of many H2A variants is associated to cancer. MacroH2A variants are enriched in heterocromatic foci and are necessary for chromatin condensation. MacroH2A1.1 and macroH2A1.2 are two mutually exclusive isoforms. MacroH2A1.1 and macroH2A2 inhibit proliferation and are associated with better cancer prognosis; while macroH2A1.2 is associated to cancer progression. H2AX variant functions as a sensor of DNA damage and defines the cellular response towards DNA repair or apoptosis; therefore, screening approaches and therapeutic options targeting H2AX have been proposed. H2A.Z is enriched in euchromatin, acting as a proto-oncogene with established roles in hormone responsive cancers and overexpressed in endocrine-resistant disease. Other H2A family members have also been found altered in cancer, but their function remains unknown. Substantial progress has been made to understand histone H2A variants, their contribution to normal cellular function and to cancer development and progression. Yet, implementation of high resolution mass spectrometry is needed to further our knowledge on highly homologous H2A variants expression and function. PMID:25003966

  19. Genome-wide identification, evolutionary, and expression analyses of histone H3 variants in plants.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jinteng; Zhang, Zhanlu; Shao, Yang; Zhang, Kezhong; Leng, Pingsheng; Liang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Histone variants alter the nucleosome structure and play important roles in chromosome segregation, transcription, DNA repair, and sperm compaction. Histone H3 is encoded by many genes in most eukaryotic species and is the histone that contains the largest variety of posttranslational modifications. Compared with the metazoan H3 variants, little is known about the complex evolutionary history of H3 variants proteins in plants. Here, we study the identification, evolutionary, and expression analyses of histone H3 variants from genomes in major branches in the plant tree of life. Firstly we identified all the histone three related (HTR) genes from the examined genomes, then we classified the four groups variants: centromeric H3, H3.1, H3.3 and H3-like, by phylogenetic analysis, intron information, and alignment. We further demonstrated that the H3 variants have evolved under strong purifying selection, indicating the conservation of HTR proteins. Expression analysis revealed that the HTR has a wide expression profile in maize and rice development and plays important roles in development. PMID:25815311

  20. Cumulative role of rare and common putative functional genetic variants at NPAS3 in schizophrenia susceptibility.

    PubMed

    González-Peñas, Javier; Arrojo, Manuel; Paz, Eduardo; Brenlla, Julio; Páramo, Mario; Costas, Javier

    2015-10-01

    Schizophrenia may be considered a human-specific disorder arisen as a maladaptive by-product of human-specific brain evolution. Therefore, genetic variants involved in susceptibility to schizophrenia may be identified among those genes related to acquisition of human-specific traits. NPAS3, a transcription factor involved in central nervous system development and neurogenesis, seems to be implicated in the evolution of human brain, as it is the human gene with most human-specific accelerated elements (HAEs), i.e., .mammalian conserved regulatory sequences with accelerated evolution in the lineage leading to humans after human-chimpanzee split. We hypothesize that any nucleotide variant at the NPAS3 HAEs may lead to altered susceptibility to schizophrenia. Twenty-one variants at these HAEs detected by the 1000 genomes Project, as well as five additional variants taken from psychiatric genome-wide association studies, were genotyped in 538 schizophrenic patients and 539 controls from Galicia. Analyses at the haplotype level or based on the cumulative role of the variants assuming different susceptibility models did not find any significant association in spite of enough power under several plausible scenarios regarding direction of effect and the specific role of rare and common variants. These results suggest that, contrary to our hypothesis, the special evolution of the NPAS3 HAEs in Homo relaxed the strong constraint on sequence that characterized these regions during mammalian evolution, allowing some sequence changes without any effect on schizophrenia risk. PMID:25982957

  1. Genome-Wide Identification, Evolutionary, and Expression Analyses of Histone H3 Variants in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jinteng; Zhang, Zhanlu; Shao, Yang; Zhang, Kezhong; Leng, Pingsheng; Liang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Histone variants alter the nucleosome structure and play important roles in chromosome segregation, transcription, DNA repair, and sperm compaction. Histone H3 is encoded by many genes in most eukaryotic species and is the histone that contains the largest variety of posttranslational modifications. Compared with the metazoan H3 variants, little is known about the complex evolutionary history of H3 variants proteins in plants. Here, we study the identification, evolutionary, and expression analyses of histone H3 variants from genomes in major branches in the plant tree of life. Firstly we identified all the histone three related (HTR) genes from the examined genomes, then we classified the four groups variants: centromeric H3, H3.1, H3.3 and H3-like, by phylogenetic analysis, intron information, and alignment. We further demonstrated that the H3 variants have evolved under strong purifying selection, indicating the conservation of HTR proteins. Expression analysis revealed that the HTR has a wide expression profile in maize and rice development and plays important roles in development. PMID:25815311

  2. Irrelevance of CHEK2 variants to diagnosis of breast/ovarian cancer predisposition in Polish cohort.

    PubMed

    Myszka, Aleksander; Karpinski, Pawel; Slezak, Ryszard; Czemarmazowicz, Halina; Stembalska, Agnieszka; Gil, Justyna; Laczmanska, Izabela; Bednarczyk, Damian; Szmida, Elzbieta; Sasiadek, Maria Malgorzata

    2011-05-01

    CHEK2 gen encodes cell cycle checkpoint kinase 2 that participates in the DNA repair pathway, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. Mutations in CHEK2 gene may result in kinase inactivation or reduce both catalytic activity and capability of binding other proteins. Some studies indicate that alterations in CHEK2 gene confers increase the risk of breast cancer and some other malignancies, while the results of other studies are inconclusive. Thus the significance of CHEK2 mutations in aetiology of breast cancer is still debatable. The aim of our study was to evaluate the relationship between the breast/ovarian cancer and CHEK2 variants by: i) the analysis of the frequency of selected CHEK2 variants in breast and ovarian cancer patients compared to the controls; ii) evaluation of relationships between the certain CHEK2 variants and clinico-histopathological and pedigree data. The study was performed on 284 breast cancer patients, 113 ovarian cancer patients and 287 healthy women. We revealed the presence of 430T > C, del5395 and IVS2 + 1G > A variants but not 1100delC in individuals from both study and control groups. We did not observe significant differences between cancer patients and controls neither in regard to the frequency nor to the type of CHEK2 variants. We discussed the potential application of CHEK2 variants in the evaluation of breast and ovarian cancer predisposition.

  3. Beta-glucosidase I variants with improved properties

    DOEpatents

    Bott, Richard R.; Kaper, Thijs; Kelemen, Bradley; Goedegebuur, Frits; Hommes, Ronaldus Wilhelmus; Kralj, Slavko; Kruithof, Paulien; Nikolaev, Igor; Van Der Kley, Wilhelmus Antonious Hendricus; Van Lieshout, Johannes Franciscus Thomas; Van Stigt Thans, Sander

    2016-09-20

    The present disclosure is generally directed to enzymes and in particular beta-glucosidase variants. Also described are nucleic acids encoding beta-glucosidase variants, compositions comprising beta-glucosidase variants, methods of using beta-glucosidase variants, and methods of identifying additional useful beta-glucosidase variants.

  4. Alterations of Phosphodiesterases in Adrenocortical Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hannah-Shmouni, Fady; Faucz, Fabio R.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the cyclic (c)AMP-dependent signaling pathway have been implicated in the majority of benign adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) causing Cushing syndrome (CS). Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are enzymes that regulate cyclic nucleotide levels, including cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Inactivating mutations and other functional variants in PDE11A and PDE8B, two cAMP-binding PDEs, predispose to ACTs. The involvement of these two genes in ACTs was initially revealed by a genome-wide association study in patients with micronodular bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia. Thereafter, PDE11A or PDE8B genetic variants have been found in other ACTs, including macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasias and cortisol-producing adenomas. In addition, downregulation of PDE11A expression and inactivating variants of the gene have been found in hereditary and sporadic testicular germ cell tumors, as well as in prostatic cancer. PDEs confer an increased risk of ACT formation probably through, primarily, their action on cAMP levels, but other actions might be possible. In this report, we review what is known to date about PDE11A and PDE8B and their involvement in the predisposition to ACTs. PMID:27625633

  5. Alterations of Phosphodiesterases in Adrenocortical Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hannah-Shmouni, Fady; Faucz, Fabio R.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the cyclic (c)AMP-dependent signaling pathway have been implicated in the majority of benign adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) causing Cushing syndrome (CS). Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are enzymes that regulate cyclic nucleotide levels, including cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Inactivating mutations and other functional variants in PDE11A and PDE8B, two cAMP-binding PDEs, predispose to ACTs. The involvement of these two genes in ACTs was initially revealed by a genome-wide association study in patients with micronodular bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia. Thereafter, PDE11A or PDE8B genetic variants have been found in other ACTs, including macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasias and cortisol-producing adenomas. In addition, downregulation of PDE11A expression and inactivating variants of the gene have been found in hereditary and sporadic testicular germ cell tumors, as well as in prostatic cancer. PDEs confer an increased risk of ACT formation probably through, primarily, their action on cAMP levels, but other actions might be possible. In this report, we review what is known to date about PDE11A and PDE8B and their involvement in the predisposition to ACTs.

  6. Alterations of Phosphodiesterases in Adrenocortical Tumors.

    PubMed

    Hannah-Shmouni, Fady; Faucz, Fabio R; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the cyclic (c)AMP-dependent signaling pathway have been implicated in the majority of benign adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) causing Cushing syndrome (CS). Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are enzymes that regulate cyclic nucleotide levels, including cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Inactivating mutations and other functional variants in PDE11A and PDE8B, two cAMP-binding PDEs, predispose to ACTs. The involvement of these two genes in ACTs was initially revealed by a genome-wide association study in patients with micronodular bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia. Thereafter, PDE11A or PDE8B genetic variants have been found in other ACTs, including macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasias and cortisol-producing adenomas. In addition, downregulation of PDE11A expression and inactivating variants of the gene have been found in hereditary and sporadic testicular germ cell tumors, as well as in prostatic cancer. PDEs confer an increased risk of ACT formation probably through, primarily, their action on cAMP levels, but other actions might be possible. In this report, we review what is known to date about PDE11A and PDE8B and their involvement in the predisposition to ACTs. PMID:27625633

  7. Stimulators of the soluble guanylyl cyclase: promising functional insights from rare coding atherosclerosis-related GUCY1A3 variants.

    PubMed

    Wobst, Jana; von Ameln, Simon; Wolf, Bernhard; Wierer, Michael; Dang, Tan An; Sager, Hendrik B; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Hengstenberg, Christian; Koesling, Doris; Friebe, Andreas; Braun, Siegmund L; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Kessler, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    Stimulators of the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) are emerging therapeutic agents in cardiovascular diseases. Genetic alterations of the GUCY1A3 gene, which encodes the α1 subunit of the sGC, are associated with coronary artery disease. Studies investigating sGC stimulators in subjects with CAD and carrying risk-related variants in sGC are, however, lacking. Here, we functionally investigate the impact of coding GUCY1A3 variants on sGC activity and the therapeutic potential of sGC stimulators in vitro. In addition to a known loss-of-function variant, eight coding variants in GUCY1A3 were cloned and expressed in HEK 293 cells. Protein levels and dimerization capability with the β1 subunit were analysed by immunoblotting and co-immunoprecipitation, respectively. All α1 variants found in MI patients dimerized with the β1 subunit. Protein levels were reduced by 72 % in one variant (p < 0.01). Enzymatic activity was analysed using cGMP radioimmunoassay after stimulation with a nitric oxide (NO) donor. Five variants displayed decreased cGMP production upon NO stimulation (p < 0.001). The addition of the sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 increased cGMP formation in all of these variants (p < 0.01). Except for the variant leading to decreased protein level, cGMP amounts reached the wildtype NO-induced level after addition of BAY 41-2272. In conclusion, rare coding variants in GUCY1A3 lead to reduced cGMP formation which can be rescued by a sGC stimulator in vitro. These results might therefore represent the starting point for discovery of novel treatment strategies for patients at risk with coding GUCY1A3 variants. PMID:27342234

  8. Hypomorphic variants of cationic amino acid transporter 3 in males with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Nava, Caroline; Rupp, Johanna; Boissel, Jean-Paul; Mignot, Cyril; Rastetter, Agnès; Amiet, Claire; Jacquette, Aurélia; Dupuits, Céline; Bouteiller, Delphine; Keren, Boris; Ruberg, Merle; Faudet, Anne; Doummar, Diane; Philippe, Anne; Périsse, Didier; Laurent, Claudine; Lebrun, Nicolas; Guillemot, Vincent; Chelly, Jamel; Cohen, David; Héron, Delphine; Brice, Alexis; Closs, Ellen I; Depienne, Christel

    2015-12-01

    Cationic amino acid transporters (CATs) mediate the entry of L-type cationic amino acids (arginine, ornithine and lysine) into the cells including neurons. CAT-3, encoded by the SLC7A3 gene on chromosome X, is one of the three CATs present in the human genome, with selective expression in brain. SLC7A3 is highly intolerant to variation in humans, as attested by the low frequency of deleterious variants in available databases, but the impact on variants in this gene in humans remains undefined. In this study, we identified a missense variant in SLC7A3, encoding the CAT-3 cationic amino acid transporter, on chromosome X by exome sequencing in two brothers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We then sequenced the SLC7A3 coding sequence in 148 male patients with ASD and identified three additional rare missense variants in unrelated patients. Functional analyses of the mutant transporters showed that two of the four identified variants cause severe or moderate loss of CAT-3 function due to altered protein stability or abnormal trafficking to the plasma membrane. The patient with the most deleterious SLC7A3 variant had high-functioning autism and epilepsy, and also carries a de novo 16p11.2 duplication possibly contributing to his phenotype. This study shows that rare hypomorphic variants of SLC7A3 exist in male individuals and suggest that SLC7A3 variants possibly contribute to the etiology of ASD in male subjects in association with other genetic factors. PMID:26215737

  9. Childhood nail alterations in Polish population.

    PubMed

    Sobjanek, Michał; Michajłowski, Igor; Konczalska, Monika; Włodarkiewicz, Adam; Roszkiewicz, Jadwiga

    2012-01-01

    The epidemiology and nature of childhood nail apparatus pathology is not well known. The aim of our study was to investigate the frequency and nature of nail alterations in Polish pediatric patients. Among 1588 patients diagnosed and treated at our clinic due to nail alterations, 82 (5.16%) patients under age 16 were selected. The most frequent (36.59%) diagnosis were variants of normal nails, which were observed in 30 patients. The most common pathology were viral warts (19.51%). Differences in the distribution of onychomycosis and viral warts in children and adults were statistically significant. Onychomycosis was more common in adults (60.39% vs. 9.76%), whereas viral warts were more common in children (19.51% vs. 5.86%; P<0.0001). Melanonychia was diagnosed in one (1.22%) case. Benign and malignant tumors were not observed. In conclusion, distribution of nail apparatus pathology in children is different comparing with adults. In the group of children under 6 years of age, there were mainly variants of normal nails, whereas in older children viral infection and acquired structural disorders were recorded. The risk of nail apparatus malignancy in childhood seems to be extremely low. PMID:22726282

  10. Disease variants in genomes of 44 centenarians.

    PubMed

    Freudenberg-Hua, Yun; Freudenberg, Jan; Vacic, Vladimir; Abhyankar, Avinash; Emde, Anne-Katrin; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Barzilai, Nir; Oschwald, Dayna; Christen, Erika; Koppel, Jeremy; Greenwald, Blaine; Darnell, Robert B; Germer, Soren; Atzmon, Gil; Davies, Peter

    2014-09-01

    To identify previously reported disease mutations that are compatible with extraordinary longevity, we screened the coding regions of the genomes of 44 Ashkenazi Jewish centenarians. Individual genome sequences were generated with 30× coverage on the Illumina HiSeq 2000 and single-nucleotide variants were called with the genome analysis toolkit (GATK). We identified 130 coding variants that were annotated as "pathogenic" or "likely pathogenic" based on the ClinVar database and that are infrequent in the general population. These variants were previously reported to cause a wide range of degenerative, neoplastic, and cardiac diseases with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked inheritance. Several of these variants are located in genes that harbor actionable incidental findings, according to the recommendations of the American College of Medical Genetics. In addition, we found risk variants for late-onset neurodegenerative diseases, such as the APOE ε4 allele that was even present in a homozygous state in one centenarian who did not develop Alzheimer's disease. Our data demonstrate that the incidental finding of certain reported disease variants in an individual genome may not preclude an extraordinarily long life. When the observed variants are encountered in the context of clinical sequencing, it is thus important to exercise caution in justifying clinical decisions.

  11. A RESISTANT VARIANT OF MUMPS VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Harold S.; Horsfall, Frank L.

    1949-01-01

    Serial passage of mumps virus in the presence of inhibitory quantities of the capsular polysaccharide of Friediänder bacillus type B results in the appearance of a variant strain of the virus. Multiplication of the variant virus is not inhibited by the polysaccharide. A similar resistant variant is obtained with polysaccharide in a single cycle of multiplication when very large inocula of mumps virus are employed. The resistant variant is indistinguishable from the parent strain as to infectivity, reactivity with erythrocytes, and immunological properties, but appears to have a somewhat slower rate of multiplication. Serial passage of the resistant variant in the absence of polysaccharide results in the reappearance of a sensitive strain. It is suggested that mumps virus populations are inhomogeneous; that naturally occurring variants are present in such populations and possess distinctive properties; that the use of a chemical inhibitor of mumps virus multiplication makes possible the selection of a variant possessing a predictable property. The findings are discussed in relation to the mechanism of inhibition of mumps virus multiplication by polysaccharide. PMID:18143585

  12. Histone H3 Variants in Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Zubáčová, Zuzana; Hostomská, Jitka

    2012-01-01

    The parabasalid protist Trichomonas vaginalis is a widespread parasite that affects humans, frequently causing vaginitis in infected women. Trichomonad mitosis is marked by the persistence of the nuclear membrane and the presence of an asymmetric extranuclear spindle with no obvious direct connection to the chromosomes. No centromeric markers have been described in T. vaginalis, which has prevented a detailed analysis of mitotic events in this organism. In other eukaryotes, nucleosomes of centromeric chromatin contain the histone H3 variant CenH3. The principal aim of this work was to identify a CenH3 homolog in T. vaginalis. We performed a screen of the T. vaginalis genome to retrieve sequences of canonical and variant H3 histones. Three variant histone H3 proteins were identified, and the subcellular localization of their epitope-tagged variants was determined. The localization of the variant TVAG_185390 could not be distinguished from that of the canonical H3 histone. The sequence of the variant TVAG_087830 closely resembled that of histone H3. The tagged protein colocalized with sites of active transcription, indicating that the variant TVAG_087830 represented H3.3 in T. vaginalis. The third H3 variant (TVAG_224460) was localized to 6 or 12 distinct spots at the periphery of the nucleus, corresponding to the number of chromosomes in G1 phase and G2 phase, respectively. We propose that this variant represents the centromeric marker CenH3 and thus can be employed as a tool to study mitosis in T. vaginalis. Furthermore, we suggest that the peripheral distribution of CenH3 within the nucleus results from the association of centromeres with the nuclear envelope throughout the cell cycle. PMID:22408228

  13. Histone H3 Variants in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Zubácová, Zuzana; Hostomská, Jitka; Tachezy, Jan

    2012-05-01

    The parabasalid protist Trichomonas vaginalis is a widespread parasite that affects humans, frequently causing vaginitis in infected women. Trichomonad mitosis is marked by the persistence of the nuclear membrane and the presence of an asymmetric extranuclear spindle with no obvious direct connection to the chromosomes. No centromeric markers have been described in T. vaginalis, which has prevented a detailed analysis of mitotic events in this organism. In other eukaryotes, nucleosomes of centromeric chromatin contain the histone H3 variant CenH3. The principal aim of this work was to identify a CenH3 homolog in T. vaginalis. We performed a screen of the T. vaginalis genome to retrieve sequences of canonical and variant H3 histones. Three variant histone H3 proteins were identified, and the subcellular localization of their epitope-tagged variants was determined. The localization of the variant TVAG_185390 could not be distinguished from that of the canonical H3 histone. The sequence of the variant TVAG_087830 closely resembled that of histone H3. The tagged protein colocalized with sites of active transcription, indicating that the variant TVAG_087830 represented H3.3 in T. vaginalis. The third H3 variant (TVAG_224460) was localized to 6 or 12 distinct spots at the periphery of the nucleus, corresponding to the number of chromosomes in G(1) phase and G(2) phase, respectively. We propose that this variant represents the centromeric marker CenH3 and thus can be employed as a tool to study mitosis in T. vaginalis. Furthermore, we suggest that the peripheral distribution of CenH3 within the nucleus results from the association of centromeres with the nuclear envelope throughout the cell cycle. PMID:22408228

  14. Innate immune activity conditions the effect of regulatory variants upon monocyte gene expression.

    PubMed

    Fairfax, Benjamin P; Humburg, Peter; Makino, Seiko; Naranbhai, Vivek; Wong, Daniel; Lau, Evelyn; Jostins, Luke; Plant, Katharine; Andrews, Robert; McGee, Chris; Knight, Julian C

    2014-03-01

    To systematically investigate the impact of immune stimulation upon regulatory variant activity, we exposed primary monocytes from 432 healthy Europeans to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or differing durations of lipopolysaccharide and mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). More than half of cis-eQTLs identified, involving hundreds of genes and associated pathways, are detected specifically in stimulated monocytes. Induced innate immune activity reveals multiple master regulatory trans-eQTLs including the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), coding variants altering enzyme and receptor function, an IFN-β cytokine network showing temporal specificity, and an interferon regulatory factor 2 (IRF2) transcription factor-modulated network. Induced eQTL are significantly enriched for genome-wide association study loci, identifying context-specific associations to putative causal genes including CARD9, ATM, and IRF8. Thus, applying pathophysiologically relevant immune stimuli assists resolution of functional genetic variants.

  15. Molecular studies into the role of CD44 variants in metastasis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, H F; Yu, J C; Ho, L I; Chiu, S C; Harn, H J

    1999-01-01

    CD44, an integral membrane glycoprotein expressed by many cell types, serves as the principal transmembrane hyaluronate receptor and might be a determinant of metastatic and invasive behaviour in carcinomas. The generation of CD44 splice variants might be linked closely with gastric carcinoma tumorigenesis and differentiation. Some studies have reported that the magnitude of CD44 variant synthesis at the protein level correlates with lymph node metastasis. A number of studies have examined the possible mechanism of involvement of the CD44 variant in tumour metastasis. Most studies have reported that the regulation of CD44 binding to hyaluronate results from glycosylation of variably spliced exons. Direct hyaluronate binding studies of CD44 V4-V7 isoforms transfected into the human gastric carcinoma cell line, SC-M1, have indicated that the V4-V7 isoforms themselves, in addition to glycosylation, can alter hyaluronate binding. PMID:10439835

  16. Clinicopathologic features and management of blastoid variant of mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Rajesh; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj; Guru Murthy, Guru Subramanian; Armitage, James O

    2015-01-01

    The blastoid variant of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), which accounts for less than one-third of MCL, may arise de novo or as a transformation from the classical form of MCL. Blastoid variant, which predominantly involves men in their sixth decade, has frequent extranodal involvement (40-60%), stage IV disease (up to 85%) and central nervous system (CNS) involvement. Diagnosis relies on morphological features and is challenging. Immunophenotyping may display CD23 and CD10 positivity and CD5 negativity in a subset. Genetic analysis demonstrates an increased number of complex genetic alterations. Blastoid variant responds poorly to conventional chemotherapy and has a short duration of response. Although the optimal therapy remains to be established, CNS prophylaxis and the use of aggressive immunochemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplant may prolong the remission rate and survival. Further studies are crucial to expand our understanding of this disease entity and improve the clinical outcome. PMID:25747972

  17. Innate Immune Activity Conditions the Effect of Regulatory Variants upon Monocyte Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fairfax, Benjamin P.; Naranbhai, Vivek; Wong, Daniel; Lau, Evelyn; Jostins, Luke; Plant, Katharine; Andrews, Robert; McGee, Chris; Knight, Julian C.

    2014-01-01

    To systematically investigate the impact of immune stimulation upon regulatory variant activity, we exposed primary monocytes from 432 healthy Europeans to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or differing durations of lipopolysaccharide and mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). More than half of cis-eQTLs identified, involving hundreds of genes and associated pathways, are detected specifically in stimulated monocytes. Induced innate immune activity reveals multiple master regulatory trans-eQTLs including the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), coding variants altering enzyme and receptor function, an IFN-β cytokine network showing temporal specificity, and an interferon regulatory factor 2 (IRF2) transcription factor–modulated network. Induced eQTL are significantly enriched for genome-wide association study loci, identifying context-specific associations to putative causal genes including CARD9, ATM, and IRF8. Thus, applying pathophysiologically relevant immune stimuli assists resolution of functional genetic variants. PMID:24604202

  18. Genetic alterations of PTEN in human melanoma.

    PubMed

    Aguissa-Touré, Almass-Houd; Li, Gang

    2012-05-01

    The PTEN gene is one of the most frequently inactivated tumor suppressor genes in sporadic cancers. Inactivating mutations and deletions of the PTEN gene are found in many types of cancers, including melanoma. However, the exact frequency of PTEN alteration in melanoma is unknown. In this study, we comprehensively reviewed 16 studies on PTEN genetic changes in melanoma cell lines and tumor biopsies. To date, 76 PTEN alterations have been reported in melanoma cell lines and 38 PTEN alterations in melanoma biopsies. The rate of PTEN alterations in melanoma cell lines, primary melanoma, and metastatic melanoma is 27.6, 7.3, and 15.2%, respectively. Three mutations were found in both melanoma cell lines and biopsies. These mutations are scattered throughout the gene, with the exception of exon 9. A mutational hot spot is found in exon 5, which encodes the phosphatase activity domain. Evidence is also presented to suggest that numerous homozygous deletions and missense variants exist in the PTEN transcript. Studying PTEN functions and implications of its mutations and other genes could provide insights into the precise nature of PTEN function in melanoma and additional targets for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:22076652

  19. Role of calpain-10 gene variants in familial type 2 diabetes in Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Elbein, Steven C; Chu, Winston; Ren, Qianfang; Hemphill, Chris; Schay, John; Cox, Nancy J; Hanis, Craig L; Hasstedt, Sandra J

    2002-02-01

    The calpain-10 gene (CAPN10) has been implicated in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) susceptibility by both linkage and association in a Hispanic population from Starr County Texas. Common intronic variants seem to alter CAPN10 mRNA levels and were associated with insulin resistance but not diabetes in Pima Indians. The role of these variants in Caucasian populations is less clear. We found some evidence for linkage of T2DM to chromosome 2q approximately 20 cM proximal to the NIDDM1/CAPN10 locus. To test the hypothesis that CAPN10 is a diabetes susceptibility locus in Caucasian families at high risk for T2DM, we examined the influence of the three previously implicated CAPN10 variants on both diabetes risk and measures of insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis. We genotyped approximately 700 members of 63 families for 3 variants (SNP-43, SNP-19, and SNP-63). We tested each variant separately and as haplotype combinations for altered transmission from parents to affected children (transmission disequilibrium test), and we tested for an effect of each variant individually on measures of glucose and insulin during a glucose tolerance test in nondiabetic family members. Finally, we looked for an effect of each variant on measures of insulin sensitivity (S(I)) and insulin secretion estimated by frequently sampled iv glucose tolerance test and Minimal Model analysis. We could not confirm an increase in risk for T2DM susceptibility for any variant or for any haplotype combination, although we found marginal evidence for an increased risk of the 111/221 haplotype combination (P = 0.036) after ascertainment correction. However, both SNP-19 and SNP-63 increased fasting and/or postchallenge insulin levels, consistent with reduced insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, SNP-19 had modest effects on insulin sensitivity measured by homeostatic model, and on postchallenge glucose. The reduction in insulin sensitivity was confirmed by analysis of the subset of individuals who underwent iv

  20. Capillary electrophoresis analysis of conventional splicing assays: IARC analytical and clinical classification of 31 BRCA2 genetic variants.

    PubMed

    de Garibay, Gorka Ruiz; Acedo, Alberto; García-Casado, Zaida; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; Tosar, Alicia; Romero, Atocha; Garre, Pilar; Llort, Gemma; Thomassen, Mads; Díez, Orland; Pérez-Segura, Pedro; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Velasco, Eladio A; Caldés, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Rare sequence variants in "high-risk" disease genes, often referred as unclassified variants (UVs), pose a serious challenge to genetic testing. However, UVs resulting in splicing alterations can be readily assessed by in vitro assays. Unfortunately, analytical and clinical interpretation of these assays is often challenging. Here, we explore this issue by conducting splicing assays in 31 BRCA2 genetic variants. All variants were assessed by RT-PCR followed by capillary electrophoresis and direct sequencing. If assays did not produce clear-cut outputs (Class-2 or Class-5 according to analytical International Agency for Research on Cancer guidelines), we performed qPCR and/or minigene assays. The latter were performed with a new splicing vector (pSAD) developed by authors of the present manuscript (patent #P201231427 CSIC). We have identified three clinically relevant Class-5 variants (c.682-2A>G, c.7617+1G>A, and c.8954-5A>G), and 27 analytical Class-2 variants (not inducing splicing alterations). In addition, we demonstrate that rs9534262 (c.7806-14T>C) is a BRCA2 splicing quantitative trait locus.

  1. Functional Assessment of Disease-Associated Regulatory Variants In Vivo Using a Versatile Dual Colour Transgenesis Strategy in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Shipra; Gordon, Christopher T.; Foster, Robert G.; Melin, Lucie; Abadie, Véronique; Baujat, Geneviève; Vazquez, Marie-Paule; Amiel, Jeanne; Lyonnet, Stanislas; van Heyningen, Veronica; Kleinjan, Dirk A.

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of gene regulation by sequence variation in non-coding regions of the genome is now recognised as a significant cause of human disease and disease susceptibility. Sequence variants in cis-regulatory elements (CREs), the primary determinants of spatio-temporal gene regulation, can alter transcription factor binding sites. While technological advances have led to easy identification of disease-associated CRE variants, robust methods for discerning functional CRE variants from background variation are lacking. Here we describe an efficient dual-colour reporter transgenesis approach in zebrafish, simultaneously allowing detailed in vivo comparison of spatio-temporal differences in regulatory activity between putative CRE variants and assessment of altered transcription factor binding potential of the variant. We validate the method on known disease-associated elements regulating SHH, PAX6 and IRF6 and subsequently characterise novel, ultra-long-range SOX9 enhancers implicated in the craniofacial abnormality Pierre Robin Sequence. The method provides a highly cost-effective, fast and robust approach for simultaneously unravelling in a single assay whether, where and when in embryonic development a disease-associated CRE-variant is affecting its regulatory function. PMID:26030420

  2. Restricted virus replication in the spinal cords of nude mice infected with a Theiler's virus variant.

    PubMed

    Zurbriggen, A; Yamada, M; Thomas, C; Fujinami, R S

    1991-02-01

    The Daniels strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis produces a chronic disease which is an animal model for human demyelinating disorders. Previously, we selected a neutralization-resistant virus variant producing an altered and diminished central nervous system disease in immunocompetent mice which was evident during the later stage of infection (after 4 weeks) (A. Zurbriggen and R. S. Fujinami, J. Virol. 63:1505-1513, 1989). The exact epitope determining neurovirulence was precisely mapped to a capsid protein, VP-1, and represents a neutralizing region (A. Zurbriggen, J. M. Hogle, and R. S. Fujinami, J. Exp. Med. 170:2037-2049, 1989). Here, we present experiments with immunoincompetent animals to determine viral replication, spread, and targeting to the central nervous system in the absence of detectable antibodies or functional T cells. Nude mice were infected orally, and the virus was monitored by plaque assay, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization. Early during the infection (1 week), the variant virus induced an acute disease comparable to that induced by the wild-type virus in these nude mice. Alterations in tropism in the central nervous system were not apparent when wild-type parental Daniels strain virus was compared with the variant virus. Moreover, variant virus replicated in tissue culture (BHK-21 cells) to similarly high titers in a time course identical to that of the wild-type virus (A. Zurbriggen and R. S. Fujinami, J. Virol. 63:1505-1513, 1989). However, replication of the variant virus versus the wild-type virus within the spinal cord of athymic nude mice infected per os was substantially restricted by 6 weeks postinfection. Therefore, the reduced neurovirulence in the later stage (6 weeks) of the disease is most likely due to a diminished growth rate or spread of the variant virus in the central nervous system rather than to marked differences in viral tropism.

  3. Restricted virus replication in the spinal cords of nude mice infected with a Theiler's virus variant.

    PubMed Central

    Zurbriggen, A; Yamada, M; Thomas, C; Fujinami, R S

    1991-01-01

    The Daniels strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis produces a chronic disease which is an animal model for human demyelinating disorders. Previously, we selected a neutralization-resistant virus variant producing an altered and diminished central nervous system disease in immunocompetent mice which was evident during the later stage of infection (after 4 weeks) (A. Zurbriggen and R. S. Fujinami, J. Virol. 63:1505-1513, 1989). The exact epitope determining neurovirulence was precisely mapped to a capsid protein, VP-1, and represents a neutralizing region (A. Zurbriggen, J. M. Hogle, and R. S. Fujinami, J. Exp. Med. 170:2037-2049, 1989). Here, we present experiments with immunoincompetent animals to determine viral replication, spread, and targeting to the central nervous system in the absence of detectable antibodies or functional T cells. Nude mice were infected orally, and the virus was monitored by plaque assay, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization. Early during the infection (1 week), the variant virus induced an acute disease comparable to that induced by the wild-type virus in these nude mice. Alterations in tropism in the central nervous system were not apparent when wild-type parental Daniels strain virus was compared with the variant virus. Moreover, variant virus replicated in tissue culture (BHK-21 cells) to similarly high titers in a time course identical to that of the wild-type virus (A. Zurbriggen and R. S. Fujinami, J. Virol. 63:1505-1513, 1989). However, replication of the variant virus versus the wild-type virus within the spinal cord of athymic nude mice infected per os was substantially restricted by 6 weeks postinfection. Therefore, the reduced neurovirulence in the later stage (6 weeks) of the disease is most likely due to a diminished growth rate or spread of the variant virus in the central nervous system rather than to marked differences in viral tropism. Images PMID:1987366

  4. Obesity-related phenotypes and the beta3-adrenoceptor gene variant in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Tchernof, A; Starling, R D; Walston, J D; Shuldiner, A R; Dvorak, R V; Silver, K; Matthews, D E; Poehlman, E T

    1999-07-01

    We examined the hypothesis that postmenopausal women with the beta3-adrenoceptor gene variant (Trp64Arg) have reduced total daily energy expenditure (TEE), altered free fatty acid kinetics, and increased intra-abdominal fat. A secondary objective was to examine whether the obese state masks the effect of the variant on resting metabolic rate (RMR). There were 23 obese heterozygous women with the genetic variant (age 58 +/- 6 years; BMI 36 +/- 7 kg/m2) who were compared with 19 homozygous obese women with the normal allele (age 56 +/- 4 years; BMI 36 +/- 3 kg/m2). Daily energy expenditure was determined from doubly labeled water and indirect calorimetry, lipolysis from infusion of [1-13C]palmitate, and body fat distribution from computed tomography. No significant differences were found in TEE, RMR, energy expenditure of physical activity, the thermic effect of a meal, fat oxidation as estimated by fasting and postprandial respiratory quotients (RQs), or rate of lipolysis. Similarly, no difference was found in visceral adipose tissue and abdominal subcutaneous fat areas. When RMR was compared between obese (n = 23) and never-obese women with the Trp64Arg variant (n = 16), we found a 317 kcal/day lower RMR in never-obese women after controlling for fat mass, fat-free mass, and age (P < 0.0017). These results do not support the hypothesis that already obese women with the Trp64Arg polymorphism of the beta3-adrenergic receptor gene have lower daily energy expenditure, altered lipolysis, and increased abdominal obesity. On the other hand, the lower RMR in never-obese women suggests that the obese state may mask a moderate effect of the Trp64Arg variant on energy expenditure. Although these results need to be confirmed in other populations, the obese state may have been a confounding factor in previous studies of the beta3-adrenoceptor Trp64Arg variant and energy expenditure. PMID:10389848

  5. Alternative splicing modulated by genetic variants demonstrates accelerated evolution regulated by highly conserved proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yun-Hua Esther; Bahn, Jae Hoon; Lin, Xianzhi; Chan, Tak-Ming; Wang, Rena; Xiao, Xinshu

    2016-01-01

    Identification of functional genetic variants and elucidation of their regulatory mechanisms represent significant challenges of the post-genomic era. A poorly understood topic is the involvement of genetic variants in mediating post-transcriptional RNA processing, including alternative splicing. Thus far, little is known about the genomic, evolutionary, and regulatory features of genetically modulated alternative splicing (GMAS). Here, we systematically identified intronic tag variants for genetic modulation of alternative splicing using RNA-seq data specific to cellular compartments. Combined with our previous method that identifies exonic tags for GMAS, this study yielded 622 GMAS exons. We observed that GMAS events are highly cell type independent, indicating that splicing-altering genetic variants could have widespread function across cell types. Interestingly, GMAS genes, exons, and single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) all demonstrated positive selection or accelerated evolution in primates. We predicted that GMAS SNVs often alter binding of splicing factors, with SRSF1 affecting the most GMAS events and demonstrating global allelic binding bias. However, in contrast to their GMAS targets, the predicted splicing factors are more conserved than expected, suggesting that cis-regulatory variation is the major driving force of splicing evolution. Moreover, GMAS-related splicing factors had stronger consensus motifs than expected, consistent with their susceptibility to SNV disruption. Intriguingly, GMAS SNVs in general do not alter the strongest consensus position of the splicing factor motif, except the more than 100 GMAS SNVs in linkage disequilibrium with polymorphisms reported by genome-wide association studies. Our study reports many GMAS events and enables a better understanding of the evolutionary and regulatory features of this phenomenon. PMID:26888265

  6. Kuru and "new variant" CJD.

    PubMed

    Verdrager, J

    1997-09-01

    Acquired transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in humans include Kuru (a disease which was associated with ritualistic cannibalism in Papua New Guinea), iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and a newly recognized variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (nvCJD). Clinical and neuropathological features of nvCJD are reminiscent of Kuru: early and progressive cerebellar ataxia and numerous characteristic Kuru-type amyloid plaques surrounded by spongiform change. In contrast to typical cases of sporadic CJD, Kuru and nvCJD affect young patients. The newly recognized form of CJD has been identified in ten young people in the UK in 1996, approximately 10 years after the beginning of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) epidemic in the UK. Molecular analysis has shown that nvCJD has strain characteristics that are distinct from other types of CJD but similar to those of BSE. In the UK an estimated half a million BSE-infected cows entered the human food chain before the bovine offal ban of 1989. To be effective the oral route probably requires high-infectivity titers which are encountered only in the brain, spinal cord and eyes of naturally infected cows. In patients with Kuru, titers of more than 10(8) infectious doses per gram were reported in the brain tissues. As a result of the estimated very long incubation period of nvCJD (10 to 30 years or more) the predicted nvCJD epidemic will have the shape of a normal distribution curve with a peak expected in 2009. The epidemic may extend until 2030. There is already an example to illustrate such a curve in its descending line: the decline of Kuru deaths following the interruption of ritual cannibalism. PMID:9561604

  7. Amazing Altered Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieling, Linda W.

    2006-01-01

    Linda Kieling, an art teacher at Rosemont Ridge Middle school in West Linn, Oregon, describes an altered book art project she introduced to her students. Alteration of books is a form of recycling that started in the eleventh century when Italian monks recycled old manuscripts written on vellum by scraping off the ink and adding new text and…

  8. Two distinct sites are essential for virulent infection and support of variant satellite RNA replication in spontaneous beet black scorch virus variants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Wang, Xianbing; Shi, Lindan; Zhou, Yuan; Li, Dawei; Han, Chenggui; Zhang, Ziding; Yu, Jialin

    2012-12-01

    Spontaneous point mutations of virus genomes are important in RNA virus evolution and often result in modifications of their biological properties. Spontaneous variants of beet black scorch virus (BBSV) and its satellite (sat) RNA were generated from cDNA clones by serial propagation in Chenopodium amaranticolor and Nicotiana benthamiana. Inoculation with recombinant RNAs synthesized in vitro revealed BBSV variants with divergent infectious phenotypes that affected either symptom expression or replication of satRNA variants. Sequence alignments showed a correlation between the phenotypes and distinct BBSV genomic loci in the 3'UTR or in the domain encoding the viral replicase. Comparative analysis between a virulent variant, BBSV-m294, and the wild-type (wt) BBSV by site-directed mutagenesis indicated that a single-nucleotide substitution of a uridine to a guanine at nt 3477 in the 3'UTR was responsible for significant increases in viral pathogenicity. Gain-of-function analyses demonstrated that the ability of the BBSV variants to support replication of variant satRNAs was mainly determined by aa 516 in the P82 replicase. In this case, an arginine substitution for a glutamine residue was essential for high levels of replication, and alterations of other residues surrounding position 516 in the wtBBSV isolate led to only minor phenotypic effects. These results provide evidence that divergence of virus functions affecting pathogenicity and supporting parasitic replication can be determined by a single genetic site, either a nucleotide or an amino acid. The results suggest that complex interactions occur between virus and associated satRNAs during virus evolution.

  9. Two distinct sites are essential for virulent infection and support of variant satellite RNA replication in spontaneous beet black scorch virus variants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Wang, Xianbing; Shi, Lindan; Zhou, Yuan; Li, Dawei; Han, Chenggui; Zhang, Ziding; Yu, Jialin

    2012-12-01

    Spontaneous point mutations of virus genomes are important in RNA virus evolution and often result in modifications of their biological properties. Spontaneous variants of beet black scorch virus (BBSV) and its satellite (sat) RNA were generated from cDNA clones by serial propagation in Chenopodium amaranticolor and Nicotiana benthamiana. Inoculation with recombinant RNAs synthesized in vitro revealed BBSV variants with divergent infectious phenotypes that affected either symptom expression or replication of satRNA variants. Sequence alignments showed a correlation between the phenotypes and distinct BBSV genomic loci in the 3'UTR or in the domain encoding the viral replicase. Comparative analysis between a virulent variant, BBSV-m294, and the wild-type (wt) BBSV by site-directed mutagenesis indicated that a single-nucleotide substitution of a uridine to a guanine at nt 3477 in the 3'UTR was responsible for significant increases in viral pathogenicity. Gain-of-function analyses demonstrated that the ability of the BBSV variants to support replication of variant satRNAs was mainly determined by aa 516 in the P82 replicase. In this case, an arginine substitution for a glutamine residue was essential for high levels of replication, and alterations of other residues surrounding position 516 in the wtBBSV isolate led to only minor phenotypic effects. These results provide evidence that divergence of virus functions affecting pathogenicity and supporting parasitic replication can be determined by a single genetic site, either a nucleotide or an amino acid. The results suggest that complex interactions occur between virus and associated satRNAs during virus evolution. PMID:22971822

  10. Environmental responses mediated by histone variants.

    PubMed

    Talbert, Paul B; Henikoff, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Fluctuations in the ambient environment can trigger chromatin disruptions, involving replacement of nucleosomes or exchange of their histone subunits. Unlike canonical histones, which are available only during S-phase, replication-independent histone variants are present throughout the cell cycle and are adapted for chromatin repair. The H2A.Z variant mediates responses to environmental perturbations including fluctuations in temperature and seasonal variation. Phosphorylation of histone H2A.X rapidly marks double-strand DNA breaks for chromatin repair, which is mediated by both H2A and H3 histone variants. Other histones are used as weapons in conflicts between parasites and their hosts, which suggests broad involvement of histone variants in environmental responses beyond chromatin repair. PMID:25150594

  11. The Stepwise Mutation Model: An Experimental Evaluation Utilizing Hemoglobin Variants

    PubMed Central

    Fuerst, Paul A.; Ferrell, Robert E.

    1980-01-01

    The stepwise mutation model of Ohta and Kimura (1973) was proposed to explain patterns of genetic variability revealed by means of electrophoresis. The assumption that electrophoretic mobility was principally determined by unit changes in net molecular charge has been criticized by Johnson (1974, 1977). This assumption has been tested directly using hemoglobin. Twenty-seven human hemoglobin variants with known amino acid substitutions, and 26 nonhuman hemoglobins with known sequences were studied by starch gel electrophoresis. Of these hemoglobins, 60 to 70% had electrophoretic mobilities that could be predicted solely on the basis of net charge calculated from the amino acid composition alone, ignoring tertiary structure. Only four hemoglobins showed a mobility that was clearly different from an expected mobility calculated using only the net charge of the molecule. For the remaining 30% of hemoglobins studied, mobility was determined by a combination of net charge and other unidentified components, probably reflecting changes in ionization of some amino acid residues as a result of small alterations in tertiary structure due to the amino acid substitution in the variant. For the nonhuman hemoglobins, the deviation of a sample from its expected mobility increased with increasing amino acid divergence from human hemoglobin A.—It is concluded that the net electrostatic charge of a molecule is the principal determinant of electrophoretic mobility under the conditions studied. However, because of the significant deviation from strict stepwise mobility detected for 30 to 40% of the variants studied, it is further concluded that the infinite-allele model of Kimura and Crow (1964) or a "mixed model" such as that proposed by Li (1976) may be more appropriate than the stepwise mutation model for the analysis of much of the available electrophoretic data from natural populations. PMID:17248992

  12. Phenomenological and neuropsychological profile across motor variants of delirium in a palliative-care unit.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Maeve; Donnelly, Sinead; Conroy, Marion; Trzepacz, Paula; Meagher, David J

    2011-01-01

    Studies using composite measurement of cognition suggest that cognitive performance is similar across motor variants of delirium. The authors assessed neuropsychological and symptom profiles in 100 consecutive cases of DSM-IV delirium allocated to motor subtypes in a palliative-care unit: Hypoactive (N=33), Hyperactive (N=18), Mixed (N=26), and No-Alteration motor groups (N=23). The Mixed group had more severe delirium, with highest scores for DRS-R-98 sleep-wake cycle disturbance, hallucinations, delusions, and language abnormalities. Neither the total Cognitive Test for Delirium nor its five neuropsychological domains differed across Hyperactive, Mixed, and Hypoactive motor groups. Most patients (70%) with no motor alteration had DRS-R-98 scores in the mild or subsyndromal range even though they met DSM-IV criteria. Motor variants in delirium have similar cognitive profiles, but mixed cases differ in expression of several noncognitive features.

  13. Mutants of PC12 cells with altered cyclic AMP responses

    SciTech Connect

    Block, T.; Kon, C.; Breckenridge, B.M.

    1984-10-01

    PCl2 cells, derived from a rat pheochromocytoma, were mutagenized and selected in media containing agents known to elevate intracellular concentrations of cyclic AMP (cAMP). More than 40 clones were isolated by selection with cholera toxin or 2-chloroadenosine or both. The variants that were deficient in accumulating cAMP were obtained by using a protocol in which 1 ..mu..m 8-bromo-cAMP was included in addition to the agonist. Certain of these variants were partially characterized with respect to the site of altered cAMP metabolism. The profiles of adenylate cyclase activity responsiveness of certain variants to guanosine-5'-(BETA,..gamma..-imido) triphosphate and to forskolin resembled those of UNC and cyc phenotypes of S49 lymphoma cells, which are functionally deficient in the GTP-sensitive coupling protein, N/sub s/. Other variants were characterized by increased cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity at low substrate concentration. Diverse morphological traits were observed among the variants, but it was not possible to assign them to a particular cAMP phenotype. Two revertants of a PCl2 mutant were isolated and observed to have regained a cellular cAMP response to 2-chloroadenosine and to forskolin. It is hoped that these PCl2 mutants will have utility for defining cAMP-mediated functions, including any links to the action of nerve growth factor, in cells derived from the neural crest.

  14. Bisalbuminemia. A new molecular variant, albumin Vancouver.

    PubMed

    Frohlich, J; Kozier, J; Campbell, D J; Curnow, J V; Tárnoky, A L

    1978-11-01

    Of 18 members of a Fiji Indian family investigated, eight of the 12 males and two of the six females had an electrophoretically slow-type bisalbuminemia (alloalbuminemia). The albumin was characterized by the hiterto unique ratio of the two bands (Al A 35%: variant 65%), and by dye-binding studies and electrophoretic mobility in different media. The data suggest that this is a new variant, which we propose to call albumin Vancouver (Al Va).

  15. Molecular Mechanism of Wide Photoabsorption Spectral Shifts of Color Variants of Human Cellular Retinol Binding Protein II.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Kamiya, Motoshi; Uchida, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Shigehiko

    2015-10-21

    Color variants of human cellular retinol binding protein II (hCRBPII) created by protein engineering were recently shown to exhibit anomalously wide photoabsorption spectral shifts over ∼200 nm across the visible region. The remarkable phenomenon provides a unique opportunity to gain insight into the molecular basis of the color tuning of retinal binding proteins for understanding of color vision as well as for engineering of novel color variants of retinal binding photoreceptor proteins employed in optogenetics. Here, we report a theoretical investigation of the molecular mechanism underlying the anomalously wide spectral shifts of the color variants of hCRBPII. Computational modeling of the color variants with hybrid molecular simulations of free energy geometry optimization succeeded in reproducing the experimentally observed wide spectral shifts, and revealed that protein flexibility, through which the active site structure of the protein and bound water molecules is altered by remote mutations, plays a significant role in inducing the large spectral shifts.

  16. Characterization of experimentally induced, nonaflatoxigenic variant strains of Aspergillus parasiticus.

    PubMed Central

    Kale, S P; Cary, J W; Bhatnagar, D; Bennett, J W

    1996-01-01

    Six previously isolated, nonaflatoxigenic variants of Aspergillus parasiticus, designated sec mutants, were characterized morphologically by electron microscopy, biochemically by biotransformation studies with an aflatoxin precursor, and genetically by Northern (RNA) hybridization analysis of aflatoxin biosynthetic gene transcripts. Scanning electron micrographs clearly demonstrated that compared with the parental sec+ forms, the variant sec forms had an abundance of vegetative mycelia, orders of magnitude reduced number of conidiophores and conidia, and abnormal metulae. Conidiospores were detected in sec cultures only at higher magnifications (x 500), in contrast to the sec+ (wild-type) strain, in which abundant conidiospores (masking the vegetative mycelia) were observed at even lower magnifications (x 300). All sec+ forms, but none of the sec forms, showed bioconversion of sterigmatocystin to aflatoxins. Northern blots probed with pathway genes demonstrated lack of expression of both the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway structural (nor-1 and omtA) and regulatory (aflR) genes in the sec forms; PCR and Southern hybridization analysis confirmed the presence of the genes in the sec genomes. Thus, the loss of aflatoxigenic capabilities in the sec form is correlated with alterations in the conidial morphology of the fungus, suggesting that the regulation of aflatoxin synthesis and conidiogenesis may be interlinked. PMID:8795232

  17. Discovery of rare variants for complex phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Kosmicki, Jack A; Churchhouse, Claire L; Rivas, Manuel A; Neale, Benjamin M

    2016-06-01

    With the rise of sequencing technologies, it is now feasible to assess the role rare variants play in the genetic contribution to complex trait variation. While some of the earlier targeted sequencing studies successfully identified rare variants of large effect, unbiased gene discovery using exome sequencing has experienced limited success for complex traits. Nevertheless, rare variant association studies have demonstrated that rare variants do contribute to phenotypic variability, but sample sizes will likely have to be even larger than those of common variant association studies to be powered for the detection of genes and loci. Large-scale sequencing efforts of tens of thousands of individuals, such as the UK10K Project and aggregation efforts such as the Exome Aggregation Consortium, have made great strides in advancing our knowledge of the landscape of rare variation, but there remain many considerations when studying rare variation in the context of complex traits. We discuss these considerations in this review, presenting a broad range of topics at a high level as an introduction to rare variant analysis in complex traits including the issues of power, study design, sample ascertainment, de novo variation, and statistical testing approaches. Ultimately, as sequencing costs continue to decline, larger sequencing studies will yield clearer insights into the biological consequence of rare mutations and may reveal which genes play a role in the etiology of complex traits. PMID:27221085

  18. Histone variants: key players of chromatin.

    PubMed

    Biterge, Burcu; Schneider, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Histones are fundamental structural components of chromatin. Eukaryotic DNA is wound around an octamer of the core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. Binding of linker histone H1 promotes higher order chromatin organization. In addition to their structural role, histones impact chromatin function and dynamics by, e.g., post-translational histone modifications or the presence of specific histone variants. Histone variants exhibit differential expression timings (DNA replication-independent) and mRNA characteristics compared to canonical histones. Replacement of canonical histones with histone variants can affect nucleosome stability and help to create functionally distinct chromatin domains. In line with this, several histone variants have been implicated in the regulation of cellular processes such as DNA repair and transcriptional activity. In this review, we focus on recent progress in the study of core histone variants H2A.X, H2A.Z, macroH2A, H3.3, and CENP-A, as well as linker histone H1 variants, their functions and their links to development and disease.

  19. Characterizing Genetic Variants for Clinical Action

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Erin M.; Din-Lovinescu, Corina; Berg, Jonathan S.; Brooks, Lisa D.; Duncanson, Audrey; Dunn, Michael; Good, Peter; Hubbard, Tim; Jarvik, Gail P.; O'Donnell, Christopher; Sherry, Stephen T.; Aronson, Naomi; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Blumberg, Bruce; Calonge, Ned; Colhoun, Helen M.; Epstein, Robert S.; Flicek, Paul; Gordon, Erynn S.; Green, Eric D.; Green, Robert C.; Hurles, Matthew; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Knaus, William; Ledbetter, David H.; Levy, Howard P.; Lyon, Elaine; Maglott, Donna; McLeod, Howard L.; Rahman, Nazneen; Randhawa, Gurvaneet; Wicklund, Catherine; Manolio, Teri A.; Chisholm, Rex L.; Williams, Marc S.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies, DNA sequencing studies, and other genomic studies are finding an increasing number of genetic variants associated with clinical phenotypes that may be useful in developing diagnostic, preventive, and treatment strategies for individual patients. However, few common variants have been integrated into routine clinical practice. The reasons for this are several, but two of the most significant are limited evidence about the clinical implications of the variants and a lack of a comprehensive knowledge base that captures genetic variants, their phenotypic associations, and other pertinent phenotypic information that is openly accessible to clinical groups attempting to interpret sequencing data. As the field of medicine begins to incorporate genome-scale analysis into clinical care, approaches need to be developed for collecting and characterizing data on the clinical implications of variants, developing consensus on their actionability, and making this information available for clinical use. The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) and the Wellcome Trust thus convened a workshop to consider the processes and resources needed to: 1) identify clinically valid genetic variants; 2) decide whether they are actionable and what the action should be; and 3) provide this information for clinical use. This commentary outlines the key discussion points and recommendations from the workshop. PMID:24634402

  20. Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Adenoma Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Abulí, Anna; Castells, Antoni; Bujanda, Luis; Lozano, Juan José; Bessa, Xavier; Hernández, Cristina; Álvarez-Urturi, Cristina; Pellisé, Maria; Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Hijona, Elizabeth; Burón, Andrea; Macià, Francesc; Grau, Jaume; Guayta, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Common low-penetrance genetic variants have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer risk. Aim To determine if these genetic variants are associated also with adenoma susceptibility and may improve selection of patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity (≥ 3 adenomas). Methods We selected 1,326 patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity and 1,252 controls with normal colonoscopy from population-based colorectal cancer screening programs. We conducted a case-control association study analyzing 30 colorectal cancer susceptibility variants in order to investigate the contribution of these variants to the development of subsequent advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity. Results We found that 14 of the analyzed genetic variants showed a statistically significant association with advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity: the probability of developing these lesions increased with the number of risk alleles reaching a 2.3-fold risk increment in individuals with ≥ 17 risk alleles. Conclusions Nearly half of the genetic variants associated with colorectal cancer risk are also related to advanced adenoma and/or multiplicity predisposition. Assessing the number of risk alleles in individuals within colorectal cancer screening programs may help to identify better a subgroup with increased risk for advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity in the general population. PMID:27078840

  1. Microchip zone electrophoresis for high-throughput analysis of monoclonal antibody charge variants.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Tobias D; Sun, Jing Lucy; Pleiner, Sina; Geier, Holger; Dobberthien, Philine; Studts, Joey; Singh, Rajendra; Fathollahi, Bahram

    2014-06-01

    A high-throughput screening assay on a microfluidic chip was developed for the determination of charge variants of monocolonal antibodies (mAbs) in pI range of 7-10. This method utilizes microchip zone electrophoresis for rapid separation (<90 s) of mAb charge variants that are labeled fluorescently without altering the overall charge. The microfluidic assay achieves between 8- and 90-fold times faster separation time over conventional methods while maintaining comparable resolution and profiles of charge variant distributions. We further characterized the assay with respect to (i) the effect of pH on resolution, (ii) the effect of excipients and buffering agents, (iii) the performance of the assay compared to conventional methods, and (vi) the reproducibility of charge variant profiles. Finally, we explored the utility of the assay with four case studies: (i) monitoring C-terminal lysine modification of a mAb, (ii) quantifying the extent of deamidation of a mAb, (iii) providing charge variant information on which to base clone selection, and (iv) making process parameter-related decisions from a "design of experiment" (DoE) study. The results of these case studies demonstrate the applicability of the microfluidic assay for high-throughput monitoring of mAb quality in process development of biopharmaceuticals.

  2. Isolation and characterization of brewer's yeast variants with improved fermentation performance under high-gravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Blieck, Lies; Toye, Geert; Dumortier, Françoise; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Delvaux, Freddy R; Thevelein, Johan M; Van Dijck, Patrick

    2007-02-01

    To save energy, space, and time, today's breweries make use of high-gravity brewing in which concentrated medium (wort) is fermented, resulting in a product with higher ethanol content. After fermentation, the product is diluted to obtain beer with the desired alcohol content. While economically desirable, the use of wort with an even higher sugar concentration is limited by the inability of brewer's yeast (Saccharomyces pastorianus) to efficiently ferment such concentrated medium. Here, we describe a successful strategy to obtain yeast variants with significantly improved fermentation capacity under high-gravity conditions. We isolated better-performing variants of the industrial lager strain CMBS33 by subjecting a pool of UV-induced variants to consecutive rounds of fermentation in very-high-gravity wort (>22 degrees Plato). Two variants (GT336 and GT344) showing faster fermentation rates and/or more-complete attenuation as well as improved viability under high ethanol conditions were identified. The variants displayed the same advantages in a pilot-scale stirred fermenter under high-gravity conditions at 11 degrees C. Microarray analysis identified several genes whose altered expression may be responsible for the superior performance of the variants. The role of some of these candidate genes was confirmed by genetic transformation. Our study shows that proper selection conditions allow the isolation of variants of commercial brewer's yeast with superior fermentation characteristics. Moreover, it is the first study to identify genes that affect fermentation performance under high-gravity conditions. The results are of interest to the beer and bioethanol industries, where the use of more-concentrated medium is economically advantageous.

  3. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Concannon, Patrick; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Li, Qiyuan; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Berchuck, Andrew; Lee, Janet M.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chen, Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T.; Edwards, Robert P.; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Paul, James; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Kelemen, Linda E.; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Cannioto, Rikki; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; Nevanlinna, Heli; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Narod, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B.; Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Sellers, Thomas A.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Nieuwenhuysen, Els Van; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H.; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Pharoah, Paul D.; Gayther, Simon A.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15 397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association was for CHEK2 SNP rs17507066 with serous EOC (P = 4.74 x 10–7). Additional genotyping and imputation of genotypes from the 1000 genomes project identified a slightly more significant association for CHEK2 SNP rs6005807 (r 2 with rs17507066 = 0.84, odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% CI 1.11–1.24, P = 1.1×10−7). We identified 293 variants in the region with likelihood ratios of less than 1:100 for representing the causal variant. Functional annotation identified 25 candidate SNPs that alter transcription factor binding sites within regulatory elements active in EOC precursor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset, CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72×10−8). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r 2 = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70×10-8). These data suggest that common variants at 22q12.1 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene. PMID:26424751

  4. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S; Tyrer, Jonathan; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Concannon, Patrick; Hazelett, Dennis J; Li, Qiyuan; Marks, Jeffrey R; Berchuck, Andrew; Lee, Janet M; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chen, Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T; Edwards, Robert P; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Paul, James; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Kelemen, Linda E; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Cannioto, Rikki; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; Nevanlinna, Heli; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Narod, Steven A; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B; Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Ramus, Susan J; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Sellers, Thomas A; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Freedman, Matthew L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Pharoah, Paul D; Gayther, Simon A; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15 397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association was for CHEK2 SNP rs17507066 with serous EOC (P = 4.74 x 10(-7)). Additional genotyping and imputation of genotypes from the 1000 genomes project identified a slightly more significant association for CHEK2 SNP rs6005807 (r (2) with rs17507066 = 0.84, odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% CI 1.11-1.24, P = 1.1×10(-7)). We identified 293 variants in the region with likelihood ratios of less than 1:100 for representing the causal variant. Functional annotation identified 25 candidate SNPs that alter transcription factor binding sites within regulatory elements active in EOC precursor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset, CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72×10(-8)). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r (2) = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70×10(-8)). These data suggest that common variants at 22q12.1 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene.

  5. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S; Tyrer, Jonathan; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Concannon, Patrick; Hazelett, Dennis J; Li, Qiyuan; Marks, Jeffrey R; Berchuck, Andrew; Lee, Janet M; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chen, Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T; Edwards, Robert P; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Paul, James; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Kelemen, Linda E; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Cannioto, Rikki; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; Nevanlinna, Heli; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Narod, Steven A; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B; Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Ramus, Susan J; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Sellers, Thomas A; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Freedman, Matthew L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Pharoah, Paul D; Gayther, Simon A; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15 397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association was for CHEK2 SNP rs17507066 with serous EOC (P = 4.74 x 10(-7)). Additional genotyping and imputation of genotypes from the 1000 genomes project identified a slightly more significant association for CHEK2 SNP rs6005807 (r (2) with rs17507066 = 0.84, odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% CI 1.11-1.24, P = 1.1×10(-7)). We identified 293 variants in the region with likelihood ratios of less than 1:100 for representing the causal variant. Functional annotation identified 25 candidate SNPs that alter transcription factor binding sites within regulatory elements active in EOC precursor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset, CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72×10(-8)). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r (2) = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70×10(-8)). These data suggest that common variants at 22q12.1 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene. PMID:26424751

  6. Piezotolerant Small-Colony Variants with Increased Thermotolerance, Antibiotic Susceptibility, and Low Invasiveness in a Clonal Staphylococcus aureus Population▿

    PubMed Central

    Karatzas, Kimon A. G.; Zervos, Angelos; Tassou, Chrysoula C.; Mallidis, Costas G.; Humphrey, Tom J.

    2007-01-01

    Following a pressure treatment of a clonal Staphylococcus aureus culture with 400 MPa for 30 min, piezotolerant variants were isolated. Among 21 randomly selected survivors, 9 were piezotolerant and all formed small colonies on several agar media. The majority of the isolates showed increased thermotolerance, impaired growth, and reduced antibiotic resistance compared to the wild type. However, several nonpiezotolerant isolates also demonstrated impaired growth and the small-colony phenotype. In agglutination tests for the detection of protein A and fibrinogen, the piezotolerant variants showed weaker agglutination reactions than the wild type and the other isolates. All variants also showed defective production of the typical S. aureus golden color, a characteristic which has previously been linked with virulence. They were also less able to invade intestinal epithelial cells than the wild type. These S. aureus variants showed phenotypic similarities to previously isolated Listeria monocytogenes piezotolerant mutants that contained mutations in ctsR. Because of these similarities, possible alterations in the ctsR hypermutable regions of the S. aureus variants were investigated through amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis. No mutations were identified, and subsequently we sequenced the ctsR and hrcA genes of three representative variants, finding no mutations. This work demonstrates that S. aureus probably possesses a strategy resulting in an abundance of multiple-stress-resistant variants within clonal populations. This strategy, however, seems to involve genes and regulatory mechanisms different from those previously reported for L. monocytogenes. We are in the process of identifying these mechanisms. PMID:17259364

  7. The Variant p.(Arg183Trp) in SPTLC2 Causes Late-Onset Hereditary Sensory Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Suriyanarayanan, Saranya; Auranen, Mari; Toppila, Jussi; Paetau, Anders; Shcherbii, Maria; Palin, Eino; Wei, Yu; Lohioja, Tarja; Schlotter-Weigel, Beate; Schön, Ulrike; Abicht, Angela; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Tyynismaa, Henna; Walter, Maggie C; Hornemann, Thorsten; Ylikallio, Emil

    2016-03-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy 1 (HSAN1) is an autosomal dominant disorder that can be caused by variants in SPTLC1 or SPTLC2, encoding subunits of serine palmitoyl-CoA transferase. Disease variants alter the enzyme's substrate specificity and lead to accumulation of neurotoxic 1-deoxysphingolipids. We describe two families with autosomal dominant HSAN1C caused by a new variant in SPTLC2, c.547C>T, p.(Arg183Trp). The variant changed a conserved amino acid and was not found in public variant databases. All patients had a relatively mild progressive distal sensory impairment, with onset after age 50. Small fibers were affected early, leading to abnormalities on quantitative sensory testing. Sural biopsy revealed a severe chronic axonal neuropathy with subtotal loss of myelinated axons, relatively preserved number of non-myelinated fibers and no signs for regeneration. Skin biopsy with PGP9.5 labeling showed lack of intraepidermal nerve endings early in the disease. Motor manifestations developed later in the disease course, but there was no evidence of autonomic involvement. Patients had elevated serum 1-deoxysphingolipids, and the variant protein produced elevated amounts of 1-deoxysphingolipids in vitro, which proved the pathogenicity of the variant. Our results expand the genetic spectrum of HSAN1C and provide further detail about the clinical characteristics. Sequencing of SPTLC2 should be considered in all patients presenting with mild late-onset sensory-predominant small or large fiber neuropathy. PMID:26573920

  8. Influence of loss of function MC1R variants in genetic susceptibility of familial melanoma in Spain.

    PubMed

    de Torre, Carlos; Garcia-Casado, Zaida; Martínez-Escribano, Jorge A; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Bañuls, Jose; Oliver, Vicente; Mercader, Pedro; Azaña, Jose M; Frias, Javier; Nagore, Eduardo

    2010-08-01

    We explored the presence of germline alterations in CDK4 exon 2, CDKN2A and MC1R in a hospital-based study of 89 melanoma cases from 89 families with at least two members affected by cutaneous melanoma. A total of 30% of the melanoma kindreds studied were carriers of CDKN2A variants, and three of these variants were known predominant alleles that have been identified earlier in Mediterranean populations (p.G101W, p.V59G and c.358delG). We observed a higher frequency of nonsynonymous MC1R variants in these Spanish melanoma kindreds (72%) with respect to the general population (60%). We observed a higher frequency of nonsynonymous MC1R variants in this Spanish melanoma kindred (72%) respect to general population (60%). A new classification of MC1R variants based on their functional effects over melanocortin-1 receptor, including the dominant-negative effect of some of them in heterozygotes, suggested an association of loss of function MC1R variants and multiple primary melanoma cases from melanoma kindred (odds ratio: 6.07, 95% confidence interval: 1.35-27.20). This study proposes the relevance of loss of function MC1R variants in the risk of melanoma in multiple primary melanoma cases with family history from areas with low melanoma incidence rate. PMID:20539244

  9. Sternalis muscle: an underestimated anterior chest wall anatomical variant

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Over the recent years, an increased alertness for thorough knowledge of anatomical variants with clinical significance has been recorded in order to minimize the risks of surgical complications. We report a rare case of bilateral strap-like sternalis muscle of the anterior chest wall in a female cadaver. Its presence may evoke alterations in the electrocardiogram or confuse a routine mammography. The incidental finding of a sternalis muscle in mammography, CT, and MRI studies must be documented in a patient's medical records as it can be used as a pedicle flap or flap microvascular anastomosis during reconstructive surgery of the anterior chest wall, head and neck, and breast. Moreover, its presence may be misdiagnosed as a wide range of benign and malignant anterior chest wall lesions and tumors. PMID:21575244

  10. SCN5A variant that blocks fibroblast growth factor homologous factor regulation causes human arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Hassan; Kline, Crystal F.; Sturm, Amy C.; Murphy, Nathaniel; Adelman, Sara; Wang, Chaojian; Yan, Haidun; Johnson, Benjamin L.; Csepe, Thomas A.; Kilic, Ahmet; Higgins, Robert S. D.; Janssen, Paul M. L.; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Weiss, Raul; Salazar, Christina; Hund, Thomas J.; Pitt, Geoffrey S.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Nav channels are essential for metazoan membrane depolarization, and Nav channel dysfunction is directly linked with epilepsy, ataxia, pain, arrhythmia, myotonia, and irritable bowel syndrome. Human Nav channelopathies are primarily caused by variants that directly affect Nav channel permeability or gating. However, a new class of human Nav channelopathies has emerged based on channel variants that alter regulation by intracellular signaling or cytoskeletal proteins. Fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) are a family of intracellular signaling proteins linked with Nav channel regulation in neurons and myocytes. However, to date, there is surprisingly little evidence linking Nav channel gene variants with FHFs and human disease. Here, we provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence that mutations in SCN5A (encodes primary cardiac Nav channel Nav1.5) that alter FHF binding result in human cardiovascular disease. We describe a five*generation kindred with a history of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, cardiac arrest, and sudden cardiac death. Affected family members harbor a novel SCN5A variant resulting in p.H1849R. p.H1849R is localized in the central binding core on Nav1.5 for FHFs. Consistent with these data, Nav1.5 p.H1849R affected interaction with FHFs. Further, electrophysiological analysis identified Nav1.5 p.H1849R as a gain-of-function for INa by altering steady-state inactivation and slowing the rate of Nav1.5 inactivation. In line with these data and consistent with human cardiac phenotypes, myocytes expressing Nav1.5 p.H1849R displayed prolonged action potential duration and arrhythmogenic afterdepolarizations. Together, these findings identify a previously unexplored mechanism for human Nav channelopathy based on altered Nav1.5 association with FHF proteins. PMID:26392562

  11. Assessing the Pathogenicity of Insertion and Deletion Variants with the Variant Effect Scoring Tool (VEST‐Indel)

    PubMed Central

    Douville, Christopher; Masica, David L.; Stenson, Peter D.; Cooper, David N.; Gygax, Derek M.; Kim, Rick; Ryan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Insertion/deletion variants (indels) alter protein sequence and length, yet are highly prevalent in healthy populations, presenting a challenge to bioinformatics classifiers. Commonly used features—DNA and protein sequence conservation, indel length, and occurrence in repeat regions—are useful for inference of protein damage. However, these features can cause false positives when predicting the impact of indels on disease. Existing methods for indel classification suffer from low specificities, severely limiting clinical utility. Here, we further develop our variant effect scoring tool (VEST) to include the classification of in‐frame and frameshift indels (VEST‐indel) as pathogenic or benign. We apply 24 features, including a new “PubMed” feature, to estimate a gene's importance in human disease. When compared with four existing indel classifiers, our method achieves a drastically reduced false‐positive rate, improving specificity by as much as 90%. This approach of estimating gene importance might be generally applicable to missense and other bioinformatics pathogenicity predictors, which often fail to achieve high specificity. Finally, we tested all possible meta‐predictors that can be obtained from combining the four different indel classifiers using Boolean conjunctions and disjunctions, and derived a meta‐predictor with improved performance over any individual method. PMID:26442818

  12. Childhood gene-environment interactions and age-dependent effects of genetic variants associated with refractive error and myopia: The CREAM Consortium.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiao; Guo, Xiaobo; Tideman, J Willem L; Williams, Katie M; Yazar, Seyhan; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Howe, Laura D; Pourcain, Beaté St; Evans, David M; Timpson, Nicholas J; McMahon, George; Hysi, Pirro G; Krapohl, Eva; Wang, Ya Xing; Jonas, Jost B; Baird, Paul Nigel; Wang, Jie Jin; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Teo, Yik-Ying; Wong, Tien-Yin; Ding, Xiaohu; Wojciechowski, Robert; Young, Terri L; Pärssinen, Olavi; Oexle, Konrad; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Paterson, Andrew D; Klaver, Caroline C W; Plomin, Robert; Hammond, Christopher J; Mackey, David A; He, Mingguang; Saw, Seang-Mei; Williams, Cathy; Guggenheim, Jeremy A

    2016-01-01

    Myopia, currently at epidemic levels in East Asia, is a leading cause of untreatable visual impairment. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in adults have identified 39 loci associated with refractive error and myopia. Here, the age-of-onset of association between genetic variants at these 39 loci and refractive error was investigated in 5200 children assessed longitudinally across ages 7-15 years, along with gene-environment interactions involving the major environmental risk-factors, nearwork and time outdoors. Specific variants could be categorized as showing evidence of: (a) early-onset effects remaining stable through childhood, (b) early-onset effects that progressed further with increasing age, or (c) onset later in childhood (N = 10, 5 and 11 variants, respectively). A genetic risk score (GRS) for all 39 variants explained 0.6% (P = 6.6E-08) and 2.3% (P = 6.9E-21) of the variance in refractive error at ages 7 and 15, respectively, supporting increased effects from these genetic variants at older ages. Replication in multi-ancestry samples (combined N = 5599) yielded evidence of childhood onset for 6 of 12 variants present in both Asians and Europeans. There was no indication that variant or GRS effects altered depending on time outdoors, however 5 variants showed nominal evidence of interactions with nearwork (top variant, rs7829127 in ZMAT4; P = 6.3E-04). PMID:27174397

  13. Childhood gene-environment interactions and age-dependent effects of genetic variants associated with refractive error and myopia: The CREAM Consortium.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiao; Guo, Xiaobo; Tideman, J Willem L; Williams, Katie M; Yazar, Seyhan; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Howe, Laura D; Pourcain, Beaté St; Evans, David M; Timpson, Nicholas J; McMahon, George; Hysi, Pirro G; Krapohl, Eva; Wang, Ya Xing; Jonas, Jost B; Baird, Paul Nigel; Wang, Jie Jin; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Teo, Yik-Ying; Wong, Tien-Yin; Ding, Xiaohu; Wojciechowski, Robert; Young, Terri L; Pärssinen, Olavi; Oexle, Konrad; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Paterson, Andrew D; Klaver, Caroline C W; Plomin, Robert; Hammond, Christopher J; Mackey, David A; He, Mingguang; Saw, Seang-Mei; Williams, Cathy; Guggenheim, Jeremy A

    2016-05-13

    Myopia, currently at epidemic levels in East Asia, is a leading cause of untreatable visual impairment. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in adults have identified 39 loci associated with refractive error and myopia. Here, the age-of-onset of association between genetic variants at these 39 loci and refractive error was investigated in 5200 children assessed longitudinally across ages 7-15 years, along with gene-environment interactions involving the major environmental risk-factors, nearwork and time outdoors. Specific variants could be categorized as showing evidence of: (a) early-onset effects remaining stable through childhood, (b) early-onset effects that progressed further with increasing age, or (c) onset later in childhood (N = 10, 5 and 11 variants, respectively). A genetic risk score (GRS) for all 39 variants explained 0.6% (P = 6.6E-08) and 2.3% (P = 6.9E-21) of the variance in refractive error at ages 7 and 15, respectively, supporting increased effects from these genetic variants at older ages. Replication in multi-ancestry samples (combined N = 5599) yielded evidence of childhood onset for 6 of 12 variants present in both Asians and Europeans. There was no indication that variant or GRS effects altered depending on time outdoors, however 5 variants showed nominal evidence of interactions with nearwork (top variant, rs7829127 in ZMAT4; P = 6.3E-04).

  14. Childhood gene-environment interactions and age-dependent effects of genetic variants associated with refractive error and myopia: The CREAM Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qiao; Guo, Xiaobo; Tideman, J. Willem L.; Williams, Katie M.; Yazar, Seyhan; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Howe, Laura D.; Pourcain, Beaté St; Evans, David M.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; McMahon, George; Hysi, Pirro G.; Krapohl, Eva; Wang, Ya Xing; Jonas, Jost B.; Baird, Paul Nigel; Wang, Jie Jin; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Teo, Yik-Ying; Wong, Tien-Yin; Ding, Xiaohu; Wojciechowski, Robert; Young, Terri L.; Pärssinen, Olavi; Oexle, Konrad; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Plomin, Robert; Hammond, Christopher J.; Mackey, David A.; He, Mingguang; Saw, Seang-Mei; Williams, Cathy; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Meguro, Akira; Wright, Alan F.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Young, Alvin L.; Veluchamy, Amutha Barathi; Metspalu, Andres; Paterson, Andrew D.; Döring, Angela; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Klein, Barbara E.; Pourcain, Beate St; Fleck, Brian; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Hayward, Caroline; Williams, Cathy; Delcourt, Cécile; Pang, Chi Pui; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Gieger, Christian; Hammond, Christopher J.; Simpson, Claire L.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Mackey, David A.; Evans, David M.; Stambolian, Dwight; Chew, Emily; Tai, E-Shyong; Krapohl, Eva; Mihailov, Evelin; Smith, George Davey; McMahon, George; Biino, Ginevra; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Seppälä, Ilkka; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wilson, James F.; Craig, Jamie E.; Tideman, J. Willem L.; Ried, Janina S.; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Fondran, Jeremy R.; Wang, Jie Jin; Liao, Jiemin; Zhao, Jing Hua; Xie, Jing; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Kemp, John P.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Jonas, Jost B.; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Wedenoja, Juho; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Williams, Katie M; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Yamashiro, Kenji; Oexle, Konrad; Howe, Laura D.; Chen, Li Jia; Xu, Liang; Farrer, Lindsay; Ikram, M. Kamran; Deangelis, Margaret M.; Morrison, Margaux; Schache, Maria; Pirastu, Mario; Miyake, Masahiro; Yap, Maurice K. H.; Fossarello, Maurizio; Kähönen, Mika; Tedja, Milly S.; He, Mingguang; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Martin, Nicholas G.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Wareham, Nick J.; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Pärssinen, Olavi; Raitakari, Olli; Polasek, Ozren; Tam, Pancy O.; Foster, Paul J.; Mitchell, Paul; Baird, Paul Nigel; Chen, Peng; Hysi, Pirro G.; Cumberland, Phillippa; Gharahkhani, Puya; Fan, Qiao; Höhn, René; Fogarty, Rhys D.; Luben, Robert N.; Igo Jr, Robert P.; Plomin, Robert; Wojciechowski, Robert; Klein, Ronald; Mohsen Hosseini, S.; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Saw, Seang-Mei; Yazar, Seyhan; Ping Yip, Shea; Feng, Sheng; Vaccargiu, Simona; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; MacGregor, Stuart; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Rantanen, Taina; Lehtimäki, Terho; Young, Terri L.; Meitinger, Thomas; Wong, Tien-Yin; Aung, Tin; Haller, Toomas; Vitart, Veronique; Nangia, Vinay; Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Jhanji, Vishal; Zhao, Wanting; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Xiangtian; Guo, Xiaobo; Ding, Xiaohu; Wang, Ya Xing; Lu, Yi; Teo, Yik-Ying; Vatavuk, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Myopia, currently at epidemic levels in East Asia, is a leading cause of untreatable visual impairment. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in adults have identified 39 loci associated with refractive error and myopia. Here, the age-of-onset of association between genetic variants at these 39 loci and refractive error was investigated in 5200 children assessed longitudinally across ages 7–15 years, along with gene-environment interactions involving the major environmental risk-factors, nearwork and time outdoors. Specific variants could be categorized as showing evidence of: (a) early-onset effects remaining stable through childhood, (b) early-onset effects that progressed further with increasing age, or (c) onset later in childhood (N = 10, 5 and 11 variants, respectively). A genetic risk score (GRS) for all 39 variants explained 0.6% (P = 6.6E–08) and 2.3% (P = 6.9E–21) of the variance in refractive error at ages 7 and 15, respectively, supporting increased effects from these genetic variants at older ages. Replication in multi-ancestry samples (combined N = 5599) yielded evidence of childhood onset for 6 of 12 variants present in both Asians and Europeans. There was no indication that variant or GRS effects altered depending on time outdoors, however 5 variants showed nominal evidence of interactions with nearwork (top variant, rs7829127 in ZMAT4; P = 6.3E–04). PMID:27174397

  15. Frequency of thermostability variants: estimation of total rare variant frequency in human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Mohrenweiser, H.W.; Neel, J.V.

    1981-09-01

    Eight erythrocyte enzymes were examine for thermostability in an unselected sample of 100 newborn infants. Three thermolabile variants, one each of lactate dehydrogenase, glucosephosphate isomerase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, were identified, none of which was detectable as a variant by standard electrophoretic techniques. All were inherited. This frequency of 3.8 heritable thermostability variants per 1000 determinations is to be compared with a frequency of electrophoretically detectable variants of 1.1 per 1000 determinations, a frequency of 2.4 enzyme-deficiency variants per 1000 determinations, and a frequency of individuals with rare enzyme deficiency or electrophoretic or thermostability (or both) variants at these loci is 8.4 per 1000 determinations. A similar distribution and frequency is seen when the comparison is limited to the seven loci studied by all techniques. it is clear that not all of the electrophoretic and thermostability variants present in the population are detected by the techniques used in this study. Accordingly, it is estimated that the true frequency of carriers of a rare variant for each of these enzyme-coding loci averages greater than 10/1000. Some implications of these frequencies for human disease are discussed.

  16. Sequence Variant Descriptions: HGVS Nomenclature and Mutalyzer.

    PubMed

    den Dunnen, Johan T

    2016-01-01

    Consistent and unambiguous description of sequence variants is essential to report and exchange information on the analysis of a genome, in particular in DNA diagnostics. The HGVS nomenclature-recommendations for the description of sequence variants as originally proposed by the Human Genome Variation Society-has gradually been accepted as the international standard for variant description. In this unit, we describe the current recommendations (HGVS version 15.11) regarding how to describe variants at the DNA, RNA, and protein level. We explain the rationale and give example descriptions for all variant types: substitution, deletion, duplication, insertion, inversion, conversion, and complex, as well as special types occurring only on the RNA (splicing) or protein level (nonsense, frame shift, extension). Finally, we point users to available support tools and give examples for the use of the freely available Mutalyzer suite. An extensive version of the HGVS recommendations is available online at http://varnomen.hgvs.org/. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367167

  17. Selection of multiple human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants that encode viral proteases with decreased sensitivity to an inhibitor of the viral protease.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, A H; Michael, S F; Wehbie, R S; Knigge, M F; Paul, D A; Everitt, L; Kempf, D J; Norbeck, D W; Erickson, J W; Swanstrom, R

    1994-01-01

    Inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease represent a promising addition to the available agents used to inhibit virus replication in a therapeutic setting. HIV-1 is capable of generating phenotypic variants in the face of a variety of selective pressures. The potential to generate variants with reduced sensitivity to a protease inhibitor was examined by selecting for virus growth in cell culture in the presence of the protease inhibitor A-77003. Virus variants grew out in the presence of the inhibitor, and these variants encoded proteases with reduced sensitivity to the inhibitor. Variants were identified that encoded changes in each of the three subsites of the protease that interact with the inhibitor. HIV-1 displays significant potential for altering its interaction with this protease inhibitor, suggesting the need for multiple protease inhibitors with varying specificities. Images PMID:8202533

  18. An IL-4R alpha allelic variant, I50, acts as a gain-of-function variant relative to V50 for Stat6, but not Th2 differentiation.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Linda; Johns, Mary H; Woodward, Emily; Mora, Ana L; Boothby, Mark

    2004-10-01

    Signaling through the IL-4R alpha-chain (IL-4Ralpha) is crucial for the development of Th2 cells, central effectors in atopic disease. Alleles of the IL-4Ralpha have been identified that have been variably associated with increased incidence of allergic disease, but there is little direct evidence that any variant is sufficient to alter a target that determines allergic pathophysiology or susceptibility. Variants of IL-4Ralpha encoding isoleucine instead of valine at position 50 (I50 vs V50, respectively) can signal increased Stat6-dependent transcriptional activity, whether in an I50, Q551 or I50, R551 haplotype. Strikingly, signaling through these receptors did not increase the efficiency of Th2 development or the IL-4 mediated repression of Th1 development or a target gene, IL-18Ralpha. Further, IL-4-induced proliferation was similar for Th2 cells independent of the variant expressed. Together these findings indicate that IL-4Ralpha variants that exhibit gain-of-function with respect to Stat6 do not act directly through alterations in Th2/Th1 induction after Ag exposure. The data further suggest that for such variants, any mechanistic involvement is based on a role in cellular targets of Th2 cytokines.

  19. In silico comparative characterization of pharmacogenomic missense variants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Missense pharmacogenomic (PGx) variants refer to amino acid substitutions that potentially affect the pharmacokinetic (PK) or pharmacodynamic (PD) response to drug therapies. The PGx variants, as compared to disease-associated variants, have not been investigated as deeply. The ability to computationally predict future PGx variants is desirable; however, it is not clear what data sets should be used or what features are beneficial to this end. Hence we carried out a comparative characterization of PGx variants with annotated neutral and disease variants from UniProt, to test the predictive power of sequence conservation and structural information in discriminating these three groups. Results 126 PGx variants of high quality from PharmGKB were selected and two data sets were created: one set contained 416 variants with structural and sequence information, and, the other set contained 1,265 variants with sequence information only. In terms of sequence conservation, PGx variants are more conserved than neutral variants and much less conserved than disease variants. A weighted random forest was used to strike a more balanced classification for PGx variants. Generally structural features are helpful in discriminating PGx variant from the other two groups, but still classification of PGx from neutral polymorphisms is much less effective than between disease and neutral variants. Conclusions We found that PGx variants are much more similar to neutral variants than to disease variants in the feature space consisting of residue conservation, neighboring residue conservation, number of neighbors, and protein solvent accessibility. Such similarity poses great difficulty in the classification of PGx variants and polymorphisms. PMID:25057096

  20. Human mitochondrial variants influence on oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Marcuello, Ana; Martínez-Redondo, Diana; Dahmani, Yahya; Casajús, José A; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Montoya, Julio; López-Pérez, Manuel J; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen

    2009-02-01

    This work investigates if human mitochondrial variants influence on maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2max)). With this purpose we recruited, as a uniform population in term of nutritional habits and life style, 114 healthy male Spanish subjects that practiced fitness exercises 3-4 times a week. Once mtDNA haplogroups were determined, we found that J presents with lower VO(2max) (P=0.02) than nonJ variants. J has been related with a lower efficiency of electron transport chain (ETC), diminished ATP and ROS production. Thus, the difficult to compensate the mitochondrial energetic deficiency could explain the accumulation of J haplogroup in LHON and multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, the lower ROS production associated to J could also account for the accrual of this variant in elderly people consequent to a decreased oxidative damage.

  1. Identification of variants in the 4q35 gene FAT1 in patients with a facioscapulohumeral dystrophy-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Puppo, Francesca; Dionnet, Eugenie; Gaillard, Marie-Cécile; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Castro, Christel; Vovan, Catherine; Bertaux, Karine; Bernard, Rafaelle; Attarian, Shahram; Goto, Kanako; Nishino, Ichizo; Hayashi, Yukiko; Magdinier, Frédérique; Krahn, Martin; Helmbacher, Françoise; Bartoli, Marc; Lévy, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Facioscapulohumeralmuscular dystrophy (FSHD) is linked to copy-number reduction (N < 10) of the 4q D4Z4 subtelomeric array, in association with DUX4-permissive haplotypes. This main form is indicated as FSHD1. FSHD-like phenotypes may also appear in the absence of D4Z4 copy-number reduction. Variants of the SMCHD1 gene have been reported to associate with D4Z4 hypomethylation in DUX4-compatible haplotypes, thus defining FSHD2. Recently, mice carrying a muscle-specific knock-out of the protocadherin gene Fat1 or its constitutive hypomorphic allele were shown to develop muscular and nonmuscular defects mimicking human FSHD. Here, we report FAT1 variants in a group of patients presenting with neuromuscular symptoms reminiscent of FSHD. The patients do not carry D4Z4 copy-number reduction, 4q hypomethylation, or SMCHD1 variants. However, abnormal splicing of the FAT1 transcript is predicted for all identified variants. To determine their pathogenicity, we elaborated a minigene approach coupled to an antisense oligonucleotide (AON) assay. In vitro, four out of five selected variants induced partial or complete alteration of splicing by creating new splice sites or modifying splicing regulators. AONs confirmed these effects. Altered transcripts may affect FAT1 protein interactions or stability. Altogether, our data suggest that defective FAT1 is associated with an FSHD-like phenotype. PMID:25615407

  2. Phenotypic extremes in rare variant study designs.

    PubMed

    Peloso, Gina M; Rader, Daniel J; Gabriel, Stacey; Kathiresan, Sekar; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M

    2016-06-01

    Currently, next-generation sequencing studies aim to identify rare and low-frequency variation that may contribute to disease. For a given effect size, as the allele frequency decreases, the power to detect genes or variants of interest also decreases. Although many methods have been proposed for the analysis of such data, study design and analytic issues still persist in data interpretation. In this study we present sequencing data for ABCA1 that has known rare variants associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). We contrast empirical findings from two study designs: a phenotypic extreme sample and a population-based random sample. We found differing strengths of association with HDL-C across the two study designs (P=0.0006 with n=701 phenotypic extremes vs P=0.03 with n=1600 randomly sampled individuals). To explore this apparent difference in evidence for association, we performed a simulation study focused on the impact of phenotypic selection on power. We demonstrate that the power gain for an extreme phenotypic selection study design is much greater in rare variant studies than for studies of common variants. Our study confirms that studying phenotypic extremes is critical in rare variant studies because it boosts power in two ways: the typical increases from extreme sampling and increasing the proportion of relevant functional variants ascertained and thereby tested for association. Furthermore, we show that when combining statistical evidence through meta-analysis from an extreme-selected sample and a second separate population-based random sample, power is lower when a traditional sample size weighting is used compared with weighting by the noncentrality parameter. PMID:26350511

  3. Predominant fatty variant of myofibroblastoma of breast

    PubMed Central

    Baxendine-Jones, J; Theaker, J; Baldwin, L

    2001-01-01

    Myofibroblastoma of the breast is an uncommon but well defined benign stromal tumour. This report describes a case in which the predominant histological component was mature adipose tissue and two further cases with a major adipocytic component. Although small foci of adipose tissue are a recognised feature of this tumour, the dominance of the histological pattern by fat has not been described previously, and the recognition of this variant is important to allow confident diagnosis and avoid confusion with other primary adipocytic or stromal lesions, especially in the setting of potential needle core biopsy of such a lesion. Key Words: myofibroblastoma • variant • fatty PMID:11429434

  4. An altered Q sub B polypeptide as the basis for atrazine resistance in photoautotrophic potato cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smeda, R.J.; Hasegawa, P.M.; Weller, S.C. )

    1990-05-01

    A photoautotrophic potato cell line (variant) was isolated and is capable of sustained growth in media containing the herbicide atrazine at concentrations up to 100-fold greater than the lethal concentration (1.0 {mu}M) for the unselected (wild type) cell line. The basis for atrazine resistance could not be identified by differential uptake or metabolism. Photosynthetic electron transport rates for both intact cell and isolated thylakoid membranes from chloroplasts were unaffected in variant cells at atrazine concentrations up to 100-fold greater than for wild type cells. Photoaffinity labeling of isolated thylakoid membranes from both cell lines with {sup 14}C-azidoatrazine revealed an altered Q{sub B} polypeptide in variant cells resulting in low or no affinity for atrazine. A portion of the chloroplast psbA gene, encoding the Q{sub B} polypeptide, was sequenced for both cell lines. The basis for atrazine resistance in variant cells was identified as a single base change resulting in the alteration of serine to threonine at position 264 of the Q{sub B} polypeptide. In addition to atrazine resistance, variant cells exhibit enhanced tolerance to the herbicides DCMU and metribuzin, but greater sensitivity to bentazon. No reductions in variant cell growth and photosynthetic efficiency in the absence of atrazine were observed.

  5. Parkinson-associated risk variant in distal enhancer of α-synuclein modulates target gene expression.

    PubMed

    Soldner, Frank; Stelzer, Yonatan; Shivalila, Chikdu S; Abraham, Brian J; Latourelle, Jeanne C; Barrasa, M Inmaculada; Goldmann, Johanna; Myers, Richard H; Young, Richard A; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2016-05-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous genetic variants associated with complex diseases, but mechanistic insights are impeded by a lack of understanding of how specific risk variants functionally contribute to the underlying pathogenesis. It has been proposed that cis-acting effects of non-coding risk variants on gene expression are a major factor for phenotypic variation of complex traits and disease susceptibility. Recent genome-scale epigenetic studies have highlighted the enrichment of GWAS-identified variants in regulatory DNA elements of disease-relevant cell types. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-specific changes in transcription factor binding are correlated with heritable alterations in chromatin state and considered a major mediator of sequence-dependent regulation of gene expression. Here we describe a novel strategy to functionally dissect the cis-acting effect of genetic risk variants in regulatory elements on gene expression by combining genome-wide epigenetic information with clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 genome editing in human pluripotent stem cells. By generating a genetically precisely controlled experimental system, we identify a common Parkinson's disease associated risk variant in a non-coding distal enhancer element that regulates the expression of α-synuclein (SNCA), a key gene implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Our data suggest that the transcriptional deregulation of SNCA is associated with sequence-dependent binding of the brain-specific transcription factors EMX2 and NKX6-1. This work establishes an experimental paradigm to functionally connect genetic variation with disease-relevant phenotypes. PMID:27096366

  6. Contributions of PTCH Gene Variants to Isolated Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla, M.A.; Cooper, M.E.; Goldstein, T.; Castilla, E.E.; Camelo, J.S. Lopez; Marazita, M.L.; Murray, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Mutations in patched (PTCH) cause the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), or Gorlin syndrome. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome may present with developmental anomalies, including rib and craniofacial abnormalities, and predisposes to several tumor types, including basal cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma. Cleft palate is found in 4% of individuals with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Because there might be specific sequence alterations in PTCH that limit expression to orofacial clefting, a genetic study of PTCH was undertaken in cases with cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) known not to have nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Results Seven new normal variants spread along the entire gene and three missense mutations were found among cases with cleft lip and/or palate. One of these variants (P295S) was not found in any of 1188 control samples. A second variant was found in a case and also in 1 of 1119 controls. The third missense (S827G) was found in 5 of 1369 cases and in 5 of 1104 controls and is likely a rare normal variant. Linkage and linkage desequilibrium also was assessed using normal variants in and adjacent to the PTCH gene in 220 families (1776 individuals), each with two or more individuals with isolated clefting. Although no statistically significant evidence of linkage (multipoint HLOD peak = 2.36) was uncovered, there was borderline evidence of significant transmission distortion for one haplotype of two single nucleotide polymorphisms located within the PTCH gene (p = .08). Conclusion Missense mutations in PTCH may be rare causes of isolated cleft lip and/or palate. An as yet unidentified variant near PTCH may act as a modifier of cleft lip and/or palate. PMID:16405370

  7. Parkinson-associated risk variant in enhancer element produces subtle effect on target gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Soldner, Frank; Stelzer, Yonatan; Shivalila, Chikdu S.; Abraham, Brian J.; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Barrasa, M. Inmaculada; Goldmann, Johanna; Myers, Richard H.; Young, Richard A.; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous genetic variants associated with complex diseases but mechanistic insights are impeded by the lack of understanding of how specific risk variants functionally contribute to the underlying pathogenesis1. It has been proposed that cis-acting effects of non-coding risk variants on gene expression are a major factor for phenotypic variation of complex traits and disease susceptibility. Recent genome-scale chromatin mapping studies have highlighted the enrichment of GWAS variants in regulatory DNA elements of disease-relevant cell types2–6. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-specific changes in transcription factor (TF) binding are correlated with heritable alterations in chromatin state and considered a major mediator of sequence-dependent regulation of gene expression7–10. Here we describe a novel strategy to functionally dissect the cis-acting effect of genetic risk variants in regulatory elements on gene expression by combining genome-wide epigenetic information with clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 genome editing in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). By generating a genetically precisely controlled experimental system we identify a common Parkinson’s disease (PD)-associated risk variant in a non-coding distal enhancer element that regulates the expression of alpha-synuclein (SNCA), a key gene implicated in the pathogenesis of PD. Our data suggest that the transcriptional deregulation of SNCA is associated with sequence-dependent binding of the brain-specific TFs EMX2 and NKX6-1. This work establishes an experimental paradigm to functionally connect genetic variation with disease relevant phenotypes. PMID:27096366

  8. Evidence of Trem2 Variant Associated with Triple Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Athar, Mohammad; Shahzad, Naiyer; Taher, Mohiuddin M.; Elrobh, Mohamed; Alanazi, Mohammed S.; El-Huneidi, Waseem

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is one of the main causes of dementia among elderly individuals and leads to the neurodegeneration of different areas of the brain, resulting in memory impairments and loss of cognitive functions. Recently, a rare variant that is associated with 3-fold higher risk of Alzheimer’s disease onset has been found. The rare variant discovered is a missense mutation in the loop region of exon 2 of Trem2 (rs75932628-T, Arg47His). The aim of this study was to investigate the evidence for potential structural and functional significance of Trem2 gene variant (Arg47His) through molecular dynamics simulations. Our results showed the alteration caused due to the variant in TREM2 protein has significant effect on the ligand binding affinity as well as structural configuration. Based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulation under salvation, the results confirmed that native form of the variant (Arg47His) might be responsible for improved compactness, hence thereby improved protein folding. Protein simulation was carried out at different temperatures. At 300K, the deviation of the theoretical model of TREM2 protein increased from 2.0 Å at 10 ns. In contrast, the deviation of the Arg47His mutation was maintained at 1.2 Å until the end of the simulation (t = 10 ns), which indicated that Arg47His had reached its folded state. The mutant residue was a highly conserved region and was similar to “immunoglobulin V-set” and “immunoglobulin-like folds”. Taken together, the result from this study provides a biophysical insight on how the studied variant could contribute to the genetic susceptibility to Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:24663666

  9. Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase POLG1 Disease Mutations and Germline Variants Promote Tumorigenic Properties.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupendra; Owens, Kjerstin M; Bajpai, Prachi; Desouki, Mohamed Mokhtar; Srinivasasainagendra, Vinodh; Tiwari, Hemant K; Singh, Keshav K

    2015-01-01

    Germline mutations in mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (POLG1) induce mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, depletion, and decrease oxidative phosphorylation. Earlier, we identified somatic mutations in POLG1 and the contribution of these mutations in human cancer. However, a role for germline variations in POLG1 in human cancers is unknown. In this study, we examined a role for disease associated germline variants of POLG1, POLG1 gene expression, copy number variation and regulation in human cancers. We analyzed the mutations, expression and copy number variation in POLG1 in several cancer databases and validated the analyses in primary breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines. We discovered 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine led epigenetic regulation of POLG1, mtDNA-encoded genes and increased mitochondrial respiration. We conducted comprehensive race based bioinformatics analyses of POLG1 gene in more than 33,000 European-Americans and 5,000 African-Americans. We identified a mitochondrial disease causing missense variation in polymerase domain of POLG1 protein at amino acid 1143 (E1143G) to be 25 times more prevalent in European-Americans (allele frequency 0.03777) when compared to African-American (allele frequency 0.00151) population. We identified T251I and P587L missense variations in exonuclease and linker region of POLG1 also to be more prevalent in European-Americans. Expression of these variants increased glucose consumption, decreased ATP production and increased matrigel invasion. Interestingly, conditional expression of these variants revealed that matrigel invasion properties conferred by these germline variants were reversible suggesting a role of epigenetic regulators. Indeed, we identified a set of miRNA whose expression was reversible after variant expression was turned off. Together, our studies demonstrate altered genetic and epigenetic regulation of POLG1 in human cancers and suggest a role for POLG1 germline variants in promoting tumorigenic

  10. Attention Alters Perceived Attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Störmer, Viola S; Alvarez, George A

    2016-04-01

    Can attention alter the impression of a face? Previous studies showed that attention modulates the appearance of lower-level visual features. For instance, attention can make a simple stimulus appear to have higher contrast than it actually does. We tested whether attention can also alter the perception of a higher-order property-namely, facial attractiveness. We asked participants to judge the relative attractiveness of two faces after summoning their attention to one of the faces using a briefly presented visual cue. Across trials, participants judged the attended face to be more attractive than the same face when it was unattended. This effect was not due to decision or response biases, but rather was due to changes in perceptual processing of the faces. These results show that attention alters perceived facial attractiveness, and broadly demonstrate that attention can influence higher-level perception and may affect people's initial impressions of one another. PMID:26966228

  11. Development and Validation of a Scalable Next-Generation Sequencing System for Assessing Relevant Somatic Variants in Solid Tumors12

    PubMed Central

    Hovelson, Daniel H.; McDaniel, Andrew S.; Cani, Andi K.; Johnson, Bryan; Rhodes, Kate; Williams, Paul D.; Bandla, Santhoshi; Bien, Geoffrey; Choppa, Paul; Hyland, Fiona; Gottimukkala, Rajesh; Liu, Guoying; Manivannan, Manimozhi; Schageman, Jeoffrey; Ballesteros-Villagrana, Efren; Grasso, Catherine S.; Quist, Michael J.; Yadati, Venkata; Amin, Anmol; Siddiqui, Javed; Betz, Bryan L.; Knudsen, Karen E.; Cooney, Kathleen A.; Feng, Felix Y.; Roh, Michael H.; Nelson, Peter S.; Liu, Chia-Jen; Beer, David G.; Wyngaard, Peter; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Sadis, Seth; Rhodes, Daniel R.; Tomlins, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled genome-wide personalized oncology efforts at centers and companies with the specialty expertise and infrastructure required to identify and prioritize actionable variants. Such approaches are not scalable, preventing widespread adoption. Likewise, most targeted NGS approaches fail to assess key relevant genomic alteration classes. To address these challenges, we predefined the catalog of relevant solid tumor somatic genome variants (gain-of-function or loss-of-function mutations, high-level copy number alterations, and gene fusions) through comprehensive bioinformatics analysis of >700,000 samples. To detect these variants, we developed the Oncomine Comprehensive Panel (OCP), an integrative NGS-based assay [compatible with < 20 ng of DNA/RNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues], coupled with an informatics pipeline to specifically identify relevant predefined variants and created a knowledge base of related potential treatments, current practice guidelines, and open clinical trials. We validated OCP using molecular standards and more than 300 FFPE tumor samples, achieving >95% accuracy for KRAS, epidermal growth factor receptor, and BRAF mutation detection as well as for ALK and TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusions. Associating positive variants with potential targeted treatments demonstrated that 6% to 42% of profiled samples (depending on cancer type) harbored alterations beyond routine molecular testing that were associated with approved or guideline-referenced therapies. As a translational research tool, OCP identified adaptive CTNNB1 amplifications/mutations in treated prostate cancers. Through predefining somatic variants in solid tumors and compiling associated potential treatment strategies, OCP represents a simplified, broadly applicable targeted NGS system with the potential to advance precision oncology efforts. PMID:25925381

  12. Characterizing genomic alterations in cancer by complementary functional associations | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Systematic efforts to sequence the cancer genome have identified large numbers of mutations and copy number alterations in human cancers. However, elucidating the functional consequences of these variants, and their interactions to drive or maintain oncogenic states, remains a challenge in cancer research. We developed REVEALER, a computational method that identifies combinations of mutually exclusive genomic alterations correlated with functional phenotypes, such as the activation or gene dependency of oncogenic pathways or sensitivity to a drug treatment.

  13. A large genome-wide association study of age-related macular degeneration highlights contributions of rare and common variants.

    PubMed

    Fritsche, Lars G; Igl, Wilmar; Bailey, Jessica N Cooke; Grassmann, Felix; Sengupta, Sebanti; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Burdon, Kathryn P; Hebbring, Scott J; Wen, Cindy; Gorski, Mathias; Kim, Ivana K; Cho, David; Zack, Donald; Souied, Eric; Scholl, Hendrik P N; Bala, Elisa; Lee, Kristine E; Hunter, David J; Sardell, Rebecca J; Mitchell, Paul; Merriam, Joanna E; Cipriani, Valentina; Hoffman, Joshua D; Schick, Tina; Lechanteur, Yara T E; Guymer, Robyn H; Johnson, Matthew P; Jiang, Yingda; Stanton, Chloe M; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Zhan, Xiaowei; Kwong, Alan M; Boleda, Alexis; Brooks, Matthew; Gieser, Linn; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Branham, Kari E; Foerster, Johanna R; Heckenlively, John R; Othman, Mohammad I; Vote, Brendan J; Liang, Helena Hai; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; McAllister, Ian L; Isaacs, Timothy; Hall, Janette; Lake, Stewart; Mackey, David A; Constable, Ian J; Craig, Jamie E; Kitchner, Terrie E; Yang, Zhenglin; Su, Zhiguang; Luo, Hongrong; Chen, Daniel; Ouyang, Hong; Flagg, Ken; Lin, Danni; Mao, Guanping; Ferreyra, Henry; Stark, Klaus; von Strachwitz, Claudia N; Wolf, Armin; Brandl, Caroline; Rudolph, Guenther; Olden, Matthias; Morrison, Margaux A; Morgan, Denise J; Schu, Matthew; Ahn, Jeeyun; Silvestri, Giuliana; Tsironi, Evangelia E; Park, Kyu Hyung; Farrer, Lindsay A; Orlin, Anton; Brucker, Alexander; Li, Mingyao; Curcio, Christine A; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Sahel, José-Alain; Audo, Isabelle; Benchaboune, Mustapha; Cree, Angela J; Rennie, Christina A; Goverdhan, Srinivas V; Grunin, Michelle; Hagbi-Levi, Shira; Campochiaro, Peter; Katsanis, Nicholas; Holz, Frank G; Blond, Frédéric; Blanché, Hélène; Deleuze, Jean-François; Igo, Robert P; Truitt, Barbara; Peachey, Neal S; Meuer, Stacy M; Myers, Chelsea E; Moore, Emily L; Klein, Ronald; Hauser, Michael A; Postel, Eric A; Courtenay, Monique D; Schwartz, Stephen G; Kovach, Jaclyn L; Scott, William K; Liew, Gerald; Tan, Ava G; Gopinath, Bamini; Merriam, John C; Smith, R Theodore; Khan, Jane C; Shahid, Humma; Moore, Anthony T; McGrath, J Allie; Laux, Reneé; Brantley, Milam A; Agarwal, Anita; Ersoy, Lebriz; Caramoy, Albert; Langmann, Thomas; Saksens, Nicole T M; de Jong, Eiko K; Hoyng, Carel B; Cain, Melinda S; Richardson, Andrea J; Martin, Tammy M; Blangero, John; Weeks, Daniel E; Dhillon, Bal; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Doheny, Kimberly F; Romm, Jane; Klaver, Caroline C W; Hayward, Caroline; Gorin, Michael B; Klein, Michael L; Baird, Paul N; den Hollander, Anneke I; Fauser, Sascha; Yates, John R W; Allikmets, Rando; Wang, Jie Jin; Schaumberg, Debra A; Klein, Barbara E K; Hagstrom, Stephanie A; Chowers, Itay; Lotery, Andrew J; Léveillard, Thierry; Zhang, Kang; Brilliant, Murray H; Hewitt, Alex W; Swaroop, Anand; Chew, Emily Y; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; DeAngelis, Margaret; Stambolian, Dwight; Haines, Jonathan L; Iyengar, Sudha K; Weber, Bernhard H F; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Heid, Iris M

    2016-02-01

    Advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, with limited therapeutic options. Here we report on a study of >12 million variants, including 163,714 directly genotyped, mostly rare, protein-altering variants. Analyzing 16,144 patients and 17,832 controls, we identify 52 independently associated common and rare variants (P < 5 × 10(-8)) distributed across 34 loci. Although wet and dry AMD subtypes exhibit predominantly shared genetics, we identify the first genetic association signal specific to wet AMD, near MMP9 (difference P value = 4.1 × 10(-10)). Very rare coding variants (frequency <0.1%) in CFH, CFI and TIMP3 suggest causal roles for these genes, as does a splice variant in SLC16A8. Our results support the hypothesis that rare coding variants can pinpoint causal genes within known genetic loci and illustrate that applying the approach systematically to detect new loci requires extremely large sample sizes. PMID:26691988

  14. The Leu22Pro tumor-associated variant of DNA polymerase beta is dRP lyase deficient.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Shibani; Chikova, Anna; Jaeger, Joachim; Sweasy, Joann B

    2008-02-01

    Approximately 30% of human tumors characterized to date express DNA polymerase beta (pol beta) variant proteins. Two of the polymerase beta cancer-associated variants are sequence-specific mutators, and one of them binds to DNA but has no polymerase activity. The Leu22Pro (L22P) DNA polymerase beta variant was identified in a gastric carcinoma. Leu22 resides within the 8 kDa amino terminal domain of DNA polymerase beta, which exhibits dRP lyase activity. This domain catalyzes the removal of deoxyribose phosphate during short patch base excision repair. We show that this cancer-associated variant has very little dRP lyase activity but retains its polymerase activity. Although residue 22 has no direct contact with the DNA, we report here that the L22P variant has reduced DNA-binding affinity. The L22P variant protein is deficient in base excision repair. Molecular dynamics calculations suggest that alteration of Leu22 to Pro changes the local packing, the loop connecting helices 1 and 2 and the overall juxtaposition of the helices within the N-terminal domain. This in turn affects the shape of the binding pocket that is required for efficient dRP lyase catalysis. PMID:18039710

  15. A large genome-wide association study of age-related macular degeneration highlights contributions of rare and common variants

    PubMed Central

    Fritsche, Lars G.; Igl, Wilmar; Cooke Bailey, Jessica N.; Grassmann, Felix; Sengupta, Sebanti; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Hebbring, Scott J.; Wen, Cindy; Gorski, Mathias; Kim, Ivana K.; Cho, David; Zack, Donald; Souied, Eric; Scholl, Hendrik P. N.; Bala, Elisa; Lee, Kristine E.; Hunter, David J.; Sardell, Rebecca J.; Mitchell, Paul; Merriam, Joanna E.; Cipriani, Valentina; Hoffman, Joshua D.; Schick, Tina; Lechanteur, Yara T. E.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Johnson, Matthew P.; Jiang, Yingda; Stanton, Chloe M.; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H. S.; Zhan, Xiaowei; Kwong, Alan M.; Boleda, Alexis; Brooks, Matthew; Gieser, Linn; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Branham, Kari E.; Foerster, Johanna R.; Heckenlively, John R.; Othman, Mohammad I.; Vote, Brendan J.; Liang, Helena Hai; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; McAllister, Ian L.; Isaacs, Timothy; Hall, Janette; Lake, Stewart; Mackey, David A.; Constable, Ian J.; Craig, Jamie E.; Kitchner, Terrie E.; Yang, Zhenglin; Su, Zhiguang; Luo, Hongrong; Chen, Daniel; Ouyang, Hong; Flagg, Ken; Lin, Danni; Mao, Guanping; Ferreyra, Henry; Stark, Klaus; von Strachwitz, Claudia N.; Wolf, Armin; Brandl, Caroline; Rudolph, Guenther; Olden, Matthias; Morrison, Margaux A.; Morgan, Denise J.; Schu, Matthew; Ahn, Jeeyun; Silvestri, Giuliana; Tsironi, Evangelia E.; Park, Kyu Hyung; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Orlin, Anton; Brucker, Alexander; Li, Mingyao; Curcio, Christine; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Sahel, José-Alain; Audo, Isabelle; Benchaboune, Mustapha; Cree, Angela J.; Rennie, Christina A.; Goverdhan, Srinivas V.; Grunin, Michelle; Hagbi-Levi, Shira; Campochiaro, Peter; Katsanis, Nicholas; Holz, Frank G.; Blond, Frédéric; Blanché, Hélène; Deleuze, Jean-François; Igo, Robert P.; Truitt, Barbara; Peachey, Neal S.; Meuer, Stacy M.; Myers, Chelsea E.; Moore, Emily L.; Klein, Ronald; Hauser, Michael A.; Postel, Eric A.; Courtenay, Monique D.; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Kovach, Jaclyn L.; Scott, William K.; Liew, Gerald; Tƒan, Ava G.; Gopinath, Bamini; Merriam, John C.; Smith, R. Theodore; Khan, Jane C.; Shahid, Humma; Moore, Anthony T.; McGrath, J. Allie; Laux, Reneé; Brantley, Milam A.; Agarwal, Anita; Ersoy, Lebriz; Caramoy, Albert; Langmann, Thomas; Saksens, Nicole T. M.; de Jong, Eiko K.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Cain, Melinda S.; Richardson, Andrea J.; Martin, Tammy M.; Blangero, John; Weeks, Daniel E.; Dhillon, Bal; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Romm, Jane; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Hayward, Caroline; Gorin, Michael B.; Klein, Michael L.; Baird, Paul N.; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Fauser, Sascha; Yates, John R. W.; Allikmets, Rando; Wang, Jie Jin; Schaumberg, Debra A.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Hagstrom, Stephanie A.; Chowers, Itay; Lotery, Andrew J.; Léveillard, Thierry; Zhang, Kang; Brilliant, Murray H.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Swaroop, Anand; Chew, Emily Y.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; DeAngelis, Margaret; Stambolian, Dwight; Haines, Jonathan L.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Heid, Iris M.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly with limited therapeutic options. Here, we report on a study of >12 million variants including 163,714 directly genotyped, most rare, protein-altering variant. Analyzing 16,144 patients and 17,832 controls, we identify 52 independently associated common and rare variants (P < 5×10–8) distributed across 34 loci. While wet and dry AMD subtypes exhibit predominantly shared genetics, we identify the first signal specific to wet AMD, near MMP9 (difference-P = 4.1×10–10). Very rare coding variants (frequency < 0.1%) in CFH, CFI, and TIMP3 suggest causal roles for these genes, as does a splice variant in SLC16A8. Our results support the hypothesis that rare coding variants can pinpoint causal genes within known genetic loci and illustrate that applying the approach systematically to detect new loci requires extremely large sample sizes. PMID:26691988

  16. Guidelines for investigating causality of sequence variants in human disease.

    PubMed

    MacArthur, D G; Manolio, T A; Dimmock, D P; Rehm, H L; Shendure, J; Abecasis, G R; Adams, D R; Altman, R B; Antonarakis, S E; Ashley, E A; Barrett, J C; Biesecker, L G; Conrad, D F; Cooper, G M; Cox, N J; Daly, M J; Gerstein, M B; Goldstein, D B; Hirschhorn, J N; Leal, S M; Pennacchio, L A; Stamatoyannopoulos, J A; Sunyaev, S R; Valle, D; Voight, B F; Winckler, W; Gunter, C

    2014-04-24

    The discovery of rare genetic variants is accelerating, and clear guidelines for distinguishing disease-causing sequence variants from the many potentially functional variants present in any human genome are urgently needed. Without rigorous standards we risk an acceleration of false-positive reports of causality, which would impede the translation of genomic research findings into the clinical diagnostic setting and hinder biological understanding of disease. Here we discuss the key challenges of assessing sequence variants in human disease, integrating both gene-level and variant-level support for causality. We propose guidelines for summarizing confidence in variant pathogenicity and highlight several areas that require further resource development.

  17. A variant of Rubus yellow net virus with altered genomic organization.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Lara, Alfredo; Mosier, Nola J; Keller, Karen E; Martin, Robert R

    2015-02-01

    Rubus yellow net virus (RYNV) is a member of the genus Badnavirus (family: Caulimoviridae). RYNV infects Rubus species causing chlorosis of the tissue along the leaf veins, giving an unevenly distributed netted symptom in some cultivars of red and black raspberry. Recently, a strain of RYNV was sequenced from a Rubus idaeus plant in Alberta, Canada, exhibiting such symptoms. The viral genome contained seven open reading frames (ORFs) with five of them in the sense-strand, including a large polyprotein. Here we describe a graft-transmissible strain of RYNV from Europe infecting cultivar 'Baumforth's Seedling A' (named RYNV-BS), which was sequenced using rolling circle amplification, enzymatic digestion, cloning and primer walking, and it was resequenced at a 5X coverage. This sequence was then compared with the RYNV-Ca genome and significant differences were observed. Genomic analysis identified differences in the arrangement of coding regions, promoter elements, and presence of motifs. The genomic organization of RYNV-BS consisted of five ORFs (four ORFs in the sense-strand and one ORF in the antisense-strand). ORFs 1, 2, and 3 showed a high degree of homology to RYNV-Ca, while ORFs 4 and 6 of RYNV-BS were quite distinct. Also, the predicted ORFs 5 and 7 in the RYNV-Ca were absent in the RYNV-BS sequence. These differences may account for the lack of aphid transmissibility of RYNV-BS.

  18. Amino acid substitutions in naturally occurring variants of ail result in altered invasion activity.

    PubMed Central

    Beer, K B; Miller, V L

    1992-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is the causative agent of a variety of gastrointestinal syndromes ranging from acute enteritis to mesenteric lymphadenitis. In addition, systemic infections resulting in high mortality rates can occur in elderly and immunocompromised patients. More than 50 serotypes of Y. enterocolitica have been identified, but only a few of them commonly cause disease in otherwise healthy hosts. Those serotypes that cause disease have been divided into two groups, American and non-American, based on their geographical distributions, biotypes, and pathogenicity. We have been studying two genes, inv and ail, from Y. enterocolitica that confer in tissue culture assays an invasive phenotype that strongly correlates with virulence. Some differences between the American and non-American serotypes at the ail locus were noted previously and have been investigated further in this report. The ail locus was cloned from seven Y. enterocolitica strains (seven different serotypes). Although the different clones produced similar amounts of Ail, the product of the ail gene from non-American serotypes (AilNA) was less able to promote invasion by Escherichia coli than was the product of the ail gene from American serotypes (AilA). This difference is probably due to one or more of the eight amino acid changes found in the derived amino acid sequence for the mature form of AilNA compared with that of AilA. Seven of these changes are predicted to be in cell surface domains of the protein (a model for the proposed folding of Ail within the outer membrane is presented). These results are discussed in relation to the growing family of outer membrane proteins, which includes Lom from bacteriophage lambda, PagC from salmonella typhimurium, and OmpX from Enterobacter cloacae. Images PMID:1370953

  19. Emergence of variants with altered survival properties in stationary phase cultures of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rodriguez, A; Kelly, A F; Park, S F; Mackey, B M

    2004-02-01

    During the stationary phase of Campylobacter jejuni NCTC 11351 viable numbers fluctuate in a characteristic fashion. After reaching the maximum cell count (ca. 2 x 10(9) CFU/ml) in early stationary phase (denoted phase 1), viable numbers subsequently decrease to about 10(6) CFU/ml after 48 h and then increase again to about 10(8) CFU/ml (denoted phase 2) before decreasing once more to a value intermediate between the previous maximum and minimum values. To investigate whether the increase in viable numbers following the initial decline was due to the emergence of a new strain with a growth advantage in stationary phase analogous to the 'GASP' phenotype described in Escherichia coli [Science 259 (1993) 1757], we conducted mixed culture experiments with cells from the original culture and antibiotic-resistant marked organisms isolated from the re-growth phase. In many experiments of this type, strains isolated from phase 2 failed to out-compete the original strain and we have thus been unable to demonstrate a convincing GASP phenotype. However, strains isolated from phase 2 showed a much lower rate of viability loss in early stationary phase and a small increase in resistance to aeration, peroxide challenge and heat, indicating that the emergent strain was different from the parent. These results support the view that dynamic population changes occur during the stationary phase of C. jejuni that may play a role in the survival of this organism. PMID:14751687

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in human subjects with function-altering melanocortin-4 receptor variants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In rodents, hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression appears to be regulated by melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) activity. The impact of MC4R genetic variation on circulating BDNF in humans is unknown. The objective of this study is to compare BDNF concentrations of subjects wi...

  1. A variant of Rubus yellow net virus with altered genomic organization.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Lara, Alfredo; Mosier, Nola J; Keller, Karen E; Martin, Robert R

    2015-02-01

    Rubus yellow net virus (RYNV) is a member of the genus Badnavirus (family: Caulimoviridae). RYNV infects Rubus species causing chlorosis of the tissue along the leaf veins, giving an unevenly distributed netted symptom in some cultivars of red and black raspberry. Recently, a strain of RYNV was sequenced from a Rubus idaeus plant in Alberta, Canada, exhibiting such symptoms. The viral genome contained seven open reading frames (ORFs) with five of them in the sense-strand, including a large polyprotein. Here we describe a graft-transmissible strain of RYNV from Europe infecting cultivar 'Baumforth's Seedling A' (named RYNV-BS), which was sequenced using rolling circle amplification, enzymatic digestion, cloning and primer walking, and it was resequenced at a 5X coverage. This sequence was then compared with the RYNV-Ca genome and significant differences were observed. Genomic analysis identified differences in the arrangement of coding regions, promoter elements, and presence of motifs. The genomic organization of RYNV-BS consisted of five ORFs (four ORFs in the sense-strand and one ORF in the antisense-strand). ORFs 1, 2, and 3 showed a high degree of homology to RYNV-Ca, while ORFs 4 and 6 of RYNV-BS were quite distinct. Also, the predicted ORFs 5 and 7 in the RYNV-Ca were absent in the RYNV-BS sequence. These differences may account for the lack of aphid transmissibility of RYNV-BS. PMID:25480633

  2. A variant of Rubus yellow net virus with altered genomic organization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubus yellow net virus (RYNV) is a member of the family Caulimoviridae, genus Badnavirus. RYNV infects Rubus species causing chlorosis of the tissue along the leaf veins, giving an unevenly distributed netted symptom in some cultivars of red and black raspberry. Recently, this virus was isolated and...

  3. Adoptive T cell therapy promotes the emergence of genomically altered tumor escape variants.

    PubMed

    Kaluza, Karen M; Thompson, Jill M; Kottke, Timothy J; Flynn Gilmer, Heather C; Knutson, Darlene L; Vile, Richard G

    2012-08-15

    Adoptive T cell therapy has been proven effective against melanoma in mice and humans. However, because most responses are incomplete or transient, cures remain rare. To maximize the efficacy of this therapy, it will be essential to gain a better understanding of the processes which result in tumor relapse. We studied these processes using B16ova murine melanoma and adoptive transfer of OT-I T cells. Transfer of T cells as a single therapy provided a significant survival benefit for mice with established subcutaneous tumors. However, tumors which initially regressed often recurred. By analyzing tumors which emerged in the presence of a potent OT-I response, we identified a novel tumor escape mechanism in which tumor cells evaded T cell pressure by undergoing major genomic changes involving loss of the gene encoding the target tumor antigen. Furthermore, we show that these in vivo processes can be recapitulated in vitro using T cell/tumor cell co-cultures. A single round of in vitro co-culture led to significant loss of the ova gene and a tumor cell population with rapidly induced and diverse karyotypic changes. Although these current studies focus on the model OVA antigen, the finding that T cells can directly promote genomic instability has important implications for the development of adoptive T cell therapies.

  4. New genetic variants associated with prostate cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have newly identified 23 common genetic variants -- one-letter changes in DNA known as single-nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs -- that are associated with risk of prostate cancer. These results come from an analysis of more than 10 million SNP

  5. Cellobiohydrolase I gene and improved variants

    DOEpatents

    Adney, William S.; Decker, Stephen R.; Mc Carter, Suzanne; Baker, John O.; Nieves, Raphael; Himmel, Michael E.; Vinzant, Todd B.

    2008-05-20

    The disclosure provides a method for preparing an active exoglucanase in a heterologous host of eukaryotic origin. The method includes mutagenesis to reduce glycosylation of the exoglucanase when expressed in a heterologous host. It is further disclosed a method to produce variant cellobiohydrolase that is stable at high temperature through mutagenesis.

  6. New variant for whole pancreas grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Kootstra, G.; van Hooff, J.P.; Joerning, P.J.L.; Leunissen, K.M.; van der Linden, C.J.; Beukers, E.; Buurman, W.A.

    1987-02-01

    A new variant for whole pancreas grafting is described in which a segment of the duodenum and the spleen is included in the graft. The graft is placed extraperitoneally as in kidney transplantation. The exocrine drainage is with side-to-side anastomosis between duodenum and bladder. The spleen is irradiated to prevent the occurrence of GVHD, as is reported in splenic transplantation.

  7. Regional Phonological Variants in Louisiana Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubrecht, August Weston

    Based on tape recorded conversations of 28 informants in 18 Louisiana communities, this study investigated regional phonological variants in Louisiana speech. On the basis of settlement history and previous dialect studies, four regions are defined: northern Louisiana, the Florida Parishes, French Louisiana, and New Orleans. The informants are all…

  8. Normal variants of the accessory hemiazygos vein

    PubMed Central

    Blackmon, J M; Franco, A

    2011-01-01

    This short communication describes two normal variants of the accessory hemiazygous vein in a 15-year-old female. The article demonstrates that knowledge of the aberrant venous anatomy and the collateral pathway is important for the practising radiologist. PMID:21697414

  9. Truncated variants of apolipoprotein B cause hypobetalipoproteinaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, D R; Knott, T J; Pease, R J; Powell, L M; Wallis, S C; Robertson, S; Pullinger, C R; Milne, R W; Marcel, Y L; Humphries, S E

    1988-01-01

    Familial hypobetalipoproteinaemia is a rare autosomal dominant disorder in which levels of apo-B-containing plasma lipoproteins are approximately half-normal in heterozygotes and virtually absent in homozygotes. Here we describe mutations of the apo-B gene that cause two different truncated variants of apo-B in unrelated individuals with hypobetalipoproteinaemia. One variant, apo-B(His1795----Met-Trp-Leu-Val-Thr-Term) is predicted to be 1799 amino acids long and arises from deletion of a single nucleotide (G) from leucine codon 1794. This protein was found at low levels in very low density and low density lipoprotein fractions in the blood. The second, shorter variant, apo-B(Arg1306----Term), is caused by mutation of a CpG dinucleotide in arginine codon 1306 converting it to a stop codon and predicting a protein of 1305 residues. The product of this allele could not be detected in the circulation. The differences in size and behaviour of these two variants compared to apo-B100 or apo-B48 point to domains that may be important for the assembly, secretion or stability of apo-B-containing lipoproteins. Images PMID:2843815

  10. New lymphogranuloma venereum Chlamydia trachomatis variant, Amsterdam.

    PubMed

    Spaargaren, Joke; Fennema, Han S A; Morré, Servaas A; de Vries, Henry J C; Coutinho, Roel A

    2005-07-01

    We retrospectively conducted a study of men who have sex with men who visited the Amsterdam, the Netherlands, sexually transmitted diseases clinic from January 2002 to December 2003 and had rectal Chlamydia trachomatis infections. We found that symptomatic (73%) as well as asymptomatic (43%) patients were infected with a new C. trachomatis LGV variant.

  11. Splicing variants of porcine synphilin-1.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Knud; Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Farajzadeh, Leila; Bendixen, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), idiopathic and familial, is characterized by degradation of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of Lewy bodies (LB) in the substantia nigra. LBs contain aggregated proteins of which α-synuclein is the major component. The protein synphilin-1 interacts and colocalizes with α-synuclein in LBs. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize porcine synphilin-1 and isoforms hereof with the future perspective to use the pig as a model for Parkinson's disease. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA was cloned by reverse transcriptase PCR. The spatial expression of SNCAIP mRNA was investigated by RNAseq. The presented work reports the molecular cloning and characterization of the porcine (Sus scrofa) synphilin-1 cDNA (SNCAIP) and three splice variants hereof. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA codes for a protein (synphilin-1) of 919 amino acids which shows a high similarity to human (90%) and to mouse (84%) synphilin-1. Three shorter transcript variants of the synphilin-1 gene were identified, all lacking one or more exons. SNCAIP transcripts were detected in most examined organs and tissues and the highest expression was found in brain tissues and lung. Conserved splicing variants and a novel splice form of synhilin-1 were found in this study. All synphilin-1 isoforms encoded by the identified transcript variants lack functional domains important for protein degradation. PMID:26101749

  12. Monomorphic adenoma, canalicular variant: report of case.

    PubMed

    Wiener, A P; Meadows, F

    1977-05-01

    A case of monomorphic adenoma, canalicular variant, has been presented. This lesion is a rare benign neoplasm most often found in the minor salivary glands of the upper lip. This appears to be the first reported case of the lesion in a non-Caucasian.

  13. Mitochondrial and Ion Channel Gene Alterations in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Moyra; Flodman, Pamela L.; Gargus, John J.; Simon, Mariella T; Verrell, Kimberley; Haas, Richard; Reiner, Gail E.; Naviaux, Robert; Osann, Katherine; Spence, M. Anne; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the potential importance in autistic subjects of copy number variants (CNVs) that alter genes of relevance to bioenergetics, ionic metabolism, and synaptic function, we conducted a detailed microarray analysis of 69 autism probands and 35 parents, compared to 89 CEU HapMap controls. This revealed that the frequency CNVs of ≥ 100 kb and CNVs of ≥ 10 Kb were markedly increased in probands over parents and in probands and parents over controls. Evaluation of CNVs ≥ 1 Mb by chromosomal FISH confirmed the molecular identity of a subset of the CNVs, some of which were associated with chromosomal rearrangements. In a number of the cases, CNVs were found to alter the copy number of genes that are important in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), ion and especially calcium transport, and synaptic structure. Hence, autism might result from alterations in multiple bioenergetic and metabolic genes required for mental function. PMID:22538295

  14. Immunization alters body odor.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Bruce A; Opiekun, Maryanne; Yamazaki, Kunio; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2014-04-10

    Infections have been shown to alter body odor. Because immune activation accompanies both infection and immunization, we tested the hypothesis that classical immunization might similarly result in the alteration of body odors detectable by trained biosensor mice. Using a Y-maze, we trained biosensor mice to distinguish between urine odors from rabies-vaccinated (RV) and unvaccinated control mice. RV-trained mice generalized this training to mice immunized with the equine West Nile virus (WNV) vaccine compared with urine of corresponding controls. These results suggest that there are similarities between body odors of mice immunized with these two vaccines. This conclusion was reinforced when mice could not be trained to directly discriminate between urine odors of RV- versus WNV-treated mice. Next, we trained biosensor mice to discriminate the urine odors of mice treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; a general elicitor of innate immunological responses) from the urine of control mice. These LPS-trained biosensors could distinguish between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and RV-treated mouse urine. Finally, biosensor mice trained to distinguish between the odors of RV-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine did not generalize this training to discriminate between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine. From these experiments, we conclude that: (1) immunization alters urine odor in similar ways for RV and WNV immunizations; and (2) immune activation with LPS also alters urine odor but in ways different from those of RV and WNV. PMID:24524972

  15. How Misinformation Alters Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Daniel B.; Loftus, Elizabeth F.

    1998-01-01

    Notes that a multitude of studies have demonstrated that misleading postevent information affects people's memories. Contents that the fuzzy-trace theory is a positive step toward understanding the malleability of memory. Discusses fuzzy-trace theory in terms of three primary areas of study: altered response format, maximized misinformation…

  16. Human acetyl CoA:arylamine N-acetyltransferase variants generated by random mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Summerscales, Joanna E; Josephy, P David

    2004-01-01

    Acetyl CoA:arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) enzymes catalyze the N-acetylation of aromatic amines and the O-acetylation of aryl hydroxylamines, reactions that govern the disposition and toxicity of many drugs and carcinogens. The human NAT genes and enzymes NAT1 and NAT2 are highly polymorphic and constitute one of the best studied examples of the genetic control of drug metabolism. Naturally occurring human NAT variants provide limited insight into the relationship between NAT amino acid sequence and enzyme activity. We have shown previously that the expression of recombinant NAT2 in bacterial tester strains results in greatly enhanced sensitivity to mutagenic nitroaromatic compounds (which are reduced to aryl hydroxylamines by bacterial enzymes). We hypothesized that random mutagenesis combined with rapid screening could be used to identify functionally significant amino acid residues in NAT enzymes. Pools of NAT2 variants were generated by polymerase chain reaction-mediated random mutagenesis of the complete coding sequence. Reversion induced by a NAT-dependent mutagen, 3-methyl-2-nitroimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline, was used as the basis for screening these pools to identify variants with altered enzyme activity. Eighteen variants were characterized by quantitative mutagenicity assays and enzyme kinetic measurements. This approach can provide new insight into the biochemistry of enzymes involved in the metabolic activation of mutagens. PMID:14722254

  17. A novel Mcl1 variant inhibits apoptosis via increased Bim sequestration.

    PubMed

    Hagenbuchner, Judith; Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, Ursula; Obexer, Petra; Ausserlechner, Michael J

    2013-08-01

    Members of the Bcl-2 protein family are frequently deregulated in tumors as they critically control cell death induction in mammalian cells. Alterations of these proteins may cause resistance to chemotherapy-induced cell death and immune responses. By serendipity we cloned a variant of the anti-apoptotic Bcl2-family member Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl1) from human neuroblastoma and leukemia cells. This Mcl1L variant lacks a 45 bp sequence that codes for 15 highly conserved amino acids ranging from Gly158 to Asp172. This region is part of the so called PEST-sequence of Mcl1L and contains two phosphorylation sites (Ser159 and Thr163) that regulate Mcl1L stability. A caspase 3/caspase 8 cleavage site at Asp157 which has been reported to be critical for death-receptor-induced apoptosis and for the conversion of Mcl1L into a pro-apoptotic protein is also missing in this novel variant. Importantly, Mcl1LdelGly158-Asp172 bound significantly more pro-apoptotic Bim compared to Mcl1L and showed increased anti-proliferative and anti-apoptotic activity compared to Mcl1L during death receptor-induced cell death. This suggests that this novel Mcl1L variant efficiently protects tumor cells against extrinsic death signalling and therefore may provide a survival advantage for highly aggressive tumors. PMID:23872733

  18. Association of Variants in Estrogen-Related Pathway Genes with Prostate Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Sarah K.; Kwon, Erika M.; Fu, Rong; Kolb, Suzanne; Feng, Ziding; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Stanford, Janet L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Through mediation of estrogen receptors, estradiol has been shown to have both carcinogenic and anti-carcinogenic effects on the prostate. We performed a population-based case-control study to investigate variants in estrogen-related genes ESR1, ESR2, CYP19A1, CYP1A1, and CYP1B1 and the potential association with risk of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods We evaluated prostate cancer risk conferred by 73 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 1,304 incident prostate cancer cases and 1,266 age-matched controls. Analysis included stratification by clinical features and assessment of environmental modifiers. Results There was evidence of altered risk of developing prostate cancer for variants in ESR1, CYP1A1, and CYP1B1, however, only CYP1B1 rs1056836 retained significance after adjustment for multiple comparisons. An association with risk for more aggressive prostate cancer was observed for variants in ESR1, ESR2, and CYP19A1, but none was significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. There was no effect modification by obesity. Conclusions Germline genetic variation of these estrogen pathway genes may contribute to risk of prostate cancer. Additional studies to validate these results and examine the functional consequence of validated variants are warranted. PMID:22549291

  19. Common variants of the vitamin D binding protein gene and adverse health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Suneil; Fu, Lei; Juras, David James; Karmali, Mohamed; Wong, Betty Y. L.; Gozdzik, Agnes

    2013-01-01

    The vitamin D binding protein (DBP) is the major plasma carrier for vitamin D and its metabolites, but it is also an actin scavenger, and is the precursor to the immunomodulatory protein, Gc-MAF. Two missense variants of the DBP gene – rs7041 encoding Asp432Glu and rs4588 encoding Thr436Lys – change the amino acid sequence and alter the protein function. They are common enough to generate population-wide constitutive differences in vitamin D status, based on assay of the serum metabolite, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD). Whether these variants also influence the role of vitamin D in an immunologic milieu is not known. However, the issue is relevant, given the immunomodulatory effects of DBP and the role of protracted innate immune-related inflammation in response to tissue injury or repeated infection. Indeed, DBP and vitamin D may jointly or independently contribute to a variety of adverse health outcomes unrelated to classical notions of their function in bone and mineral metabolism. This review summarizes the reports to date of associations between DBP variants, and various chronic and infectious diseases. The available information leads us to conclude that DBP variants are a significant and common genetic factor in some common disorders, and therefore, are worthy of closer attention. In view of the heightened interest in vitamin D as a public health target, well-designed studies that look simultaneously at vitamin D and its carrier in relation to genotypes and adverse health outcome should be encouraged. PMID:23427793

  20. MutaBind estimates and interprets the effects of sequence variants on protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Simonetti, Franco L; Goncearenco, Alexander; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-07-01

    Proteins engage in highly selective interactions with their macromolecular partners. Sequence variants that alter protein binding affinity may cause significant perturbations or complete abolishment of function, potentially leading to diseases. There exists a persistent need to develop a mechanistic understanding of impacts of variants on proteins. To address this need we introduce a new computational method MutaBind to evaluate the effects of sequence variants and disease mutations on protein interactions and calculate the quantitative changes in binding affinity. The MutaBind method uses molecular mechanics force fields, statistical potentials and fast side-chain optimization algorithms. The MutaBind server maps mutations on a structural protein complex, calculates the associated changes in binding affinity, determines the deleterious effect of a mutation, estimates the confidence of this prediction and produces a mutant structural model for download. MutaBind can be applied to a large number of problems, including determination of potential driver mutations in cancer and other diseases, elucidation of the effects of sequence variants on protein fitness in evolution and protein design. MutaBind is available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/mutabind/. PMID:27150810

  1. In1-ghrelin splicing variant is overexpressed in pituitary adenomas and increases their aggressive features.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Gahete, Manuel D; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Rincón-Fernández, David; Nelson, Richard; Beltrán, Manuel; de la Riva, Andrés; Japón, Miguel A; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Gálvez, Ma Ángeles; García-Arnés, Juan A; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Morgan, Jennifer; Tsomaia, Natia; Culler, Michael D; Dieguez, Carlos; Castaño, Justo P; Luque, Raúl M

    2015-03-04

    Pituitary adenomas comprise a heterogeneous subset of pathologies causing serious comorbidities, which would benefit from identification of novel, common molecular/cellular biomarkers and therapeutic targets. The ghrelin system has been linked to development of certain endocrine-related cancers. Systematic analysis of the presence and functional implications of some components of the ghrelin system, including native ghrelin, receptors and the recently discovered splicing variant In1-ghrelin, in human normal pituitaries (n = 11) and pituitary adenomas (n = 169) revealed that expression pattern of ghrelin system suffers a clear alteration in pituitary adenomasas compared with normal pituitary, where In1-ghrelin is markedly overexpressed. Interestingly, in cultured pituitary adenoma cells In1-ghrelin treatment (acylated peptides at 100 nM; 24-72 h) increased GH and ACTH secretion, Ca(2+) and ERK1/2 signaling and cell viability, whereas In1-ghrelin silencing (using a specific siRNA; 100 nM) reduced cell viability. These results indicate that an alteration of the ghrelin system, specially its In1-ghrelin variant, could contribute to pathogenesis of different pituitary adenomas types, and suggest that this variant and its related ghrelin system could provide new tools to identify novel, more general diagnostic, prognostic and potential therapeutic targets in pituitary tumors.

  2. In1-ghrelin splicing variant is overexpressed in pituitary adenomas and increases their aggressive features

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Gahete, Manuel D.; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Rincón-Fernández, David; Nelson, Richard; Beltrán, Manuel; de la Riva, Andrés; Japón, Miguel A.; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Gálvez, Ma Ángeles; García-Arnés, Juan A.; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Morgan, Jennifer; Tsomaia, Natia; Culler, Michael D.; Dieguez, Carlos; Castaño, Justo P.; Luque, Raúl M.

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas comprise a heterogeneous subset of pathologies causing serious comorbidities, which would benefit from identification of novel, common molecular/cellular biomarkers and therapeutic targets. The ghrelin system has been linked to development of certain endocrine-related cancers. Systematic analysis of the presence and functional implications of some components of the ghrelin system, including native ghrelin, receptors and the recently discovered splicing variant In1-ghrelin, in human normal pituitaries (n = 11) and pituitary adenomas (n = 169) revealed that expression pattern of ghrelin system suffers a clear alteration in pituitary adenomasas comparedwith normal pituitary, where In1-ghrelin is markedly overexpressed. Interestingly, in cultured pituitary adenoma cells In1-ghrelin treatment (acylated peptides at 100 nM; 24–72 h) increased GH and ACTH secretion, Ca2+ and ERK1/2 signaling and cell viability, whereas In1-ghrelin silencing (using a specific siRNA; 100 nM) reduced cell viability. These results indicate that an alteration of the ghrelin system, specially its In1-ghrelin variant, could contribute to pathogenesis of different pituitary adenomas types, and suggest that this variant and its related ghrelin system could provide new tools to identify novel, more general diagnostic, prognostic and potential therapeutic targets in pituitary tumors. PMID:25737012

  3. Identification of altered cis-regulatory elements in human disease.

    PubMed

    Mathelier, Anthony; Shi, Wenqiang; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2015-02-01

    It has long been appreciated that variations in regulatory regions of genes can impact gene expression. With the advent of whole-genome sequencing (WGS), it has become possible to begin cataloging these noncoding variants. Evidence continues to accumulate linking clinical cases with cis-regulatory element disruption in a wide range of diseases. Identifying variants is becoming routine, but assessing their impact on regulation remains challenging. Bioinformatics approaches that identify variations functionally altering transcription factor (TF) binding are increasingly important for meeting this challenge. We present the current state of computational tools and resources for identifying the genomic regulatory components (cis-regulatory regions and TF binding sites, TFBSs) controlling gene transcriptional regulation. We review how such approaches can be used to interpret the potential disease causality of point mutations and small insertions or deletions. We hope this will motivate further the development of methods enabling the identification of etiological cis-regulatory variations.

  4. Altered sense of humor in dementia.

    PubMed

    Clark, Camilla N; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Gordon, Elizabeth; Golden, Hannah L; Cohen, Miriam H; Woodward, Felix J; Macpherson, Kirsty; Slattery, Catherine F; Mummery, Catherine J; Schott, Jonathan M; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Warren, Jason D

    2015-01-01

    Sense of humor is potentially relevant to social functioning in dementias, but has been little studied in these diseases. We designed a semi-structured informant questionnaire to assess humor behavior and preferences in patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD; n = 15), semantic dementia (SD; n = 7), progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA; n = 10), and Alzheimer's disease (AD; n = 16) versus healthy age-matched individuals (n = 21). Altered (including frankly inappropriate) humor responses were significantly more frequent in bvFTD and SD (all patients) than PNFA or AD (around 40% of patients). All patient groups liked satirical and absurdist comedy significantly less than did healthy controls. This pattern was reported premorbidly for satirical comedy in bvFTD, PNFA, and AD. Liking for slapstick comedy did not differ between groups. Altered sense of humor is particularly salient in bvFTD and SD, but also frequent in AD and PNFA. Humor may be a sensitive probe of social cognitive impairment in dementia, with diagnostic, biomarker and social implications.

  5. Altered Sense of Humor in Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Camilla N.; Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Gordon, Elizabeth; Golden, Hannah L.; Cohen, Miriam H.; Woodward, Felix J.; Macpherson, Kirsty; Slattery, Catherine F.; Mummery, Catherine J.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Warren, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Sense of humor is potentially relevant to social functioning in dementias, but has been little studied in these diseases. We designed a semi-structured informant questionnaire to assess humor behavior and preferences in patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD; n = 15), semantic dementia (SD; n = 7), progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA; n = 10), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD; n = 16) versus healthy age-matched individuals (n = 21). Altered (including frankly inappropriate) humor responses were significantly more frequent in bvFTD and SD (all patients) than PNFA or AD (around 40% of patients). All patient groups liked satirical and absurdist comedy significantly less than did healthy controls. This pattern was reported premorbidly for satirical comedy in bvFTD, PNFA, and AD. Liking for slapstick comedy did not differ between groups. Altered sense of humor is particularly salient in bvFTD and SD, but also frequent in AD and PNFA. Humor may be a sensitive probe of social cognitive impairment in dementia, with diagnostic, biomarker and social implications. PMID:26444779

  6. Functional annotation of non-coding sequence variants

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Graham R. S.; Dunham, Ian; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Flicek, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Identifying functionally relevant variants against the background of ubiquitous genetic variation is a major challenge in human genetics. For variants that fall in protein-coding regions our understanding of the genetic code and splicing allow us to identify likely candidates, but interpreting variants that fall outside of genic regions is more difficult. Here we present a new tool, GWAVA, which supports prioritisation of non-coding variants by integrating a range of annotations. PMID:24487584

  7. Selective amplification of variants of a complex repeating unit in DNA of a crustacean

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, N.T.; Skinner, D.M.

    1980-05-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the repeating unit of a fraction of the highly repetitive DNA of the red crab, Geryon quinquedens, is reported. Treatment of total DNA with HindIII nuclease produced an 81-base-pair monomer and multimers to the size of an octamer. Several of the multimers contained large amounts of fragments of variant sequences, which cannot easily be explained by random mutation alone. That the alterations were not random was corroborated by divergence measurements made on the distribution of Hha I nuclease sites within several multimers. The analyses showed that a fraction of each of them is characterized by 4% divergence, while the amounts of dimer, tetramer, and octamer suggest that they have undergone 2 to 4 times more divergence than that. These results, coupled with the data on sequence variants that are more prevalent in the dimer, indicate that amplification of divergent repeating units could easily explain enhanced amounts of selected multimers.

  8. Genome-wide burden of deleterious coding variants increased in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Loohuis, Loes M. Olde; Vorstman, Jacob A. S.; Ori, Anil P.; Staats, Kim A.; Wang, Tina; Richards, Alexander L.; Leonenko, Ganna; Walters, James T.; DeYoung, Joseph; Kahn, René S.; Linszen, Don; Os, Jim van; Wiersma, Durk; Bruggeman, Richard; Cahn, Wiepke; Haan, Lieuwe de; Krabbendam, Lydia; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Cantor, Rita M.; Ophoff, Roel A.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common complex disorder with polygenic inheritance. Here we show that by using an approach that compares the individual loads of rare variants in 1,042 schizophrenia cases and 961 controls, schizophrenia cases carry an increased burden of deleterious mutations. At a genome-wide level, our results implicate non-synonymous, splice site as well as stop-altering single-nucleotide variations occurring at minor allele frequency of ≥0.01% in the population. In an independent replication sample of 5,585 schizophrenia cases and 8,103 controls of European ancestry we confirm an enrichment in cases of the alleles identified in our study. In addition, the genes implicated by the increased burden of rare coding variants highlight the involvement of neurodevelopment in the aetiology of schizophrenia. PMID:26158538

  9. Common variants spanning PLK4 are associated with mitotic-origin aneuploidy in human embryos.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Rajiv C; Demko, Zachary; Ryan, Allison; Banjevic, Milena; Hill, Matthew; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Rabinowitz, Matthew; Fraser, Hunter B; Petrov, Dmitri A

    2015-04-10

    Aneuploidy, the inheritance of an atypical chromosome complement, is common in early human development and is the primary cause of pregnancy loss. By screening day-3 embryos during in vitro fertilization cycles, we identified an association between aneuploidy of putative mitotic origin and linked genetic variants on chromosome 4 of maternal genomes. This associated region contains a candidate gene, Polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4), that plays a well-characterized role in centriole duplication and has the ability to alter mitotic fidelity upon minor dysregulation. Mothers with the high-risk genotypes contributed fewer embryos for testing at day 5, suggesting that their embryos are less likely to survive to blastocyst formation. The associated region coincides with a signature of a selective sweep in ancient humans, suggesting that the causal variant was either the target of selection or hitchhiked to substantial frequency.

  10. Variant Influenza Associated with Live Animal Markets, Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Choi, M J; Morin, C A; Scheftel, J; Vetter, S M; Smith, K; Lynfield, R

    2015-08-01

    Variant influenza viruses are swine-origin influenza A viruses that cause illness in humans. Surveillance for variant influenza A viruses, including characterization of exposure settings, is important because of the potential emergence of novel influenza viruses with pandemic potential. In Minnesota, we have documented variant influenza A virus infections associated with swine exposure at live animal markets.

  11. Strategies to choose from millions of imputed sequence variants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Millions of sequence variants are known, but subsets are needed for routine genomic predictions or to include on genotyping arrays. Variant selection and imputation strategies were tested using 26 984 simulated reference bulls, of which 1 000 had 30 million sequence variants, 773 had 600 000 markers...

  12. Processing of No-Release Variants in Connected Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoCasto, Paul C.; Connine, Cynthia M.

    2011-01-01

    The cross modal repetition priming paradigm was used to investigate how potential lexically ambiguous no-release variants are processed. In particular we focus on segmental regularities that affect the variant's frequency of occurrence (voicing of the critical segment) and phonological context in which the variant occurs (status of the following…

  13. Neuronal Calcium Sensor 1 Has Two Variants with Distinct Calcium Binding Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baisheng; Boeckel, Göran R.; Huynh, Larry; Nguyen, Lien; Cao, Wenxiang; De La Cruz, Enrique M.; Kaftan, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1 Var1) is a calcium-binding protein expressed in most tissues. We examined a poorly characterized variant of NCS-1 (Var2), identified only in humans where the N-terminal 22 amino acid residues of native NCS-1(MGKSNSKLKPEVVEELTRKTY) were replaced with 4 different residues (MATI). Because alterations in the level of expression of NCS-1 Var1 and the expression of NCS-1 variants have been correlated with several neurological diseases, the relative expression and functional role of NCS-1 Var2 was examined. We found that NCS-1 Var2 mRNA levels are not found in mouse tissues and are expressed at levels ~1000-fold lower than NCS-1 Var1 in three different human cell lines (SHSY5Y, HEK293, MB231). Protein expression of both variants was only identified in cell lines overexpressing exogenous NCS-1 Var2. The calcium binding affinity is ~100 times weaker in purified NCS-1 Var2 than NCS-1 Var1. Because truncation of NCS-1 Var1 has been linked to functional changes in neurons, we determined whether the differing properties of the NCS-1 variants could potentially contribute to the altered cell function. In contrast to previous reports showing that overexpression of NCS-1 Var1 increases calcium-dependent processes, functional differences in cells overexpressing NCS-1 Var2 were undetectable in assays for cell growth, cell death and drug (paclitaxel) potency. Our results suggest that NCS-1 Var1 is the primary functional version of NCS-1. PMID:27575489

  14. Neuronal Calcium Sensor 1 Has Two Variants with Distinct Calcium Binding Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baisheng; Boeckel, Göran R; Huynh, Larry; Nguyen, Lien; Cao, Wenxiang; De La Cruz, Enrique M; Kaftan, Edward J; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1 Var1) is a calcium-binding protein expressed in most tissues. We examined a poorly characterized variant of NCS-1 (Var2), identified only in humans where the N-terminal 22 amino acid residues of native NCS-1(MGKSNSKLKPEVVEELTRKTY) were replaced with 4 different residues (MATI). Because alterations in the level of expression of NCS-1 Var1 and the expression of NCS-1 variants have been correlated with several neurological diseases, the relative expression and functional role of NCS-1 Var2 was examined. We found that NCS-1 Var2 mRNA levels are not found in mouse tissues and are expressed at levels ~1000-fold lower than NCS-1 Var1 in three different human cell lines (SHSY5Y, HEK293, MB231). Protein expression of both variants was only identified in cell lines overexpressing exogenous NCS-1 Var2. The calcium binding affinity is ~100 times weaker in purified NCS-1 Var2 than NCS-1 Var1. Because truncation of NCS-1 Var1 has been linked to functional changes in neurons, we determined whether the differing properties of the NCS-1 variants could potentially contribute to the altered cell function. In contrast to previous reports showing that overexpression of NCS-1 Var1 increases calcium-dependent processes, functional differences in cells overexpressing NCS-1 Var2 were undetectable in assays for cell growth, cell death and drug (paclitaxel) potency. Our results suggest that NCS-1 Var1 is the primary functional version of NCS-1. PMID:27575489

  15. Superluminescent variants of marine luciferases for bioassays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bae; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Sato, Moritoshi; Tao, Hiroaki

    2011-11-15

    In this study, a rational synthesis of superluminescent variants from marine luciferases with prolonged bioluminescence has been demonstrated. A putative active site of a model marine luciferase, Gaussia princeps Luciferase (GLuc), was assigned and modified by a site-directed mutagenesis. The potent variants were found to generate up to 10 times stronger bioluminescence, emitting red shifts of up to 33 nm with natural coelenterazine than native GLuc, rendering an efficient optical signature in bioassays. The advantageous properties were demonstrated with mammalian two-hybrid assays, single-chain probes, and metastases of murine B16 melanoma in BALB/c nude mice. The unique ideas for engineering GLuc are proved to be valid even for other marine luciferases. PMID:21951281

  16. Wham: Identifying Structural Variants of Biological Consequence.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Zev N; Osborne, Edward J; Cone, Kelsey R; Kennedy, Brett J; Domyan, Eric T; Shapiro, Michael D; Elde, Nels C; Yandell, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Existing methods for identifying structural variants (SVs) from short read datasets are inaccurate. This complicates disease-gene identification and efforts to understand the consequences of genetic variation. In response, we have created Wham (Whole-genome Alignment Metrics) to provide a single, integrated framework for both structural variant calling and association testing, thereby bypassing many of the difficulties that currently frustrate attempts to employ SVs in association testing. Here we describe Wham, benchmark it against three other widely used SV identification tools-Lumpy, Delly and SoftSearch-and demonstrate Wham's ability to identify and associate SVs with phenotypes using data from humans, domestic pigeons, and vaccinia virus. Wham and all associated software are covered under the MIT License and can be freely downloaded from github (https://github.com/zeeev/wham), with documentation on a wiki (http://zeeev.github.io/wham/). For community support please post questions to https://www.biostars.org/.

  17. Xeroderma pigmentosum variant associated with multiple cancers.

    PubMed

    Kuwamoto, K; Miyauchi-Hashimoto, H; Isei, T; Horio, T

    1999-01-01

    A 62-year-old Japanese man with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) variant is reported. The patient had developed at least 6 basal cell carcinomas, a squamous cell carcinoma, and a malignant melanoma on sun-exposed areas, and an atypical carcinoid on the right lung. In vivo phototesting showed a normal response. The minimal erythema dose of ultraviolet B (UVB) was not lowered and no delayed peaking of the erythema reaction was observed. His skin fibroblasts exhibited higher sensitivity to UV irradiation, but a normal level of unscheduled DNA and RNA synthesis. Cell fusions with XP group A, C, D, E, F, and G cells after UV irradiation were all complemented. Previous reports together with this case suggest that older XP variant patients have a high frequency of not only skin cancers, but also internal malignancies. PMID:10404723

  18. The Saccharomyces Genome Database Variant Viewer

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Travis K.; Hitz, Benjamin C.; Engel, Stacia R.; Song, Giltae; Balakrishnan, Rama; Binkley, Gail; Costanzo, Maria C.; Dalusag, Kyla S.; Demeter, Janos; Hellerstedt, Sage T.; Karra, Kalpana; Nash, Robert S.; Paskov, Kelley M.; Skrzypek, Marek S.; Weng, Shuai; Wong, Edith D.; Cherry, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD; http://www.yeastgenome.org) is the authoritative community resource for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae reference genome sequence and its annotation. In recent years, we have moved toward increased representation of sequence variation and allelic differences within S. cerevisiae. The publication of numerous additional genomes has motivated the creation of new tools for their annotation and analysis. Here we present the Variant Viewer: a dynamic open-source web application for the visualization of genomic and proteomic differences. Multiple sequence alignments have been constructed across high quality genome sequences from 11 different S. cerevisiae strains and stored in the SGD. The alignments and summaries are encoded in JSON and used to create a two-tiered dynamic view of the budding yeast pan-genome, available at http://www.yeastgenome.org/variant-viewer. PMID:26578556

  19. Application of a 5-tiered scheme for standardized classification of 2,360 unique mismatch repair gene variants in the InSiGHT locus-specific database.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Bryony A; Spurdle, Amanda B; Plazzer, John-Paul; Greenblatt, Marc S; Akagi, Kiwamu; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Bapat, Bharati; Bernstein, Inge; Capellá, Gabriel; den Dunnen, Johan T; du Sart, Desiree; Fabre, Aurelie; Farrell, Michael P; Farrington, Susan M; Frayling, Ian M; Frebourg, Thierry; Goldgar, David E; Heinen, Christopher D; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Kohonen-Corish, Maija; Robinson, Kristina Lagerstedt; Leung, Suet Yi; Martins, Alexandra; Moller, Pal; Morak, Monika; Nystrom, Minna; Peltomaki, Paivi; Pineda, Marta; Qi, Ming; Ramesar, Rajkumar; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Scott, Rodney J; Sijmons, Rolf; Tavtigian, Sean V; Tops, Carli M; Weber, Thomas; Wijnen, Juul; Woods, Michael O; Macrae, Finlay; Genuardi, Maurizio

    2014-02-01

    The clinical classification of hereditary sequence variants identified in disease-related genes directly affects clinical management of patients and their relatives. The International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours (InSiGHT) undertook a collaborative effort to develop, test and apply a standardized classification scheme to constitutional variants in the Lynch syndrome-associated genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Unpublished data submission was encouraged to assist in variant classification and was recognized through microattribution. The scheme was refined by multidisciplinary expert committee review of the clinical and functional data available for variants, applied to 2,360 sequence alterations, and disseminated online. Assessment using validated criteria altered classifications for 66% of 12,006 database entries. Clinical recommendations based on transparent evaluation are now possible for 1,370 variants that were not obviously protein truncating from nomenclature. This large-scale endeavor will facilitate the consistent management of families suspected to have Lynch syndrome and demonstrates the value of multidisciplinary collaboration in the curation and classification of variants in public locus-specific databases.

  20. TVFMCATS. Time Variant Floating Mean Counting Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, R.K.

    1999-05-01

    This software was written to test a time variant floating mean counting algorithm. The algorithm was developed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company and a provisional patent has been filed on the algorithm. The test software was developed to work with the Val Tech model IVB prototype version II count rate meter hardware. The test software was used to verify the algorithm developed by WSRC could be correctly implemented with the vendor`s hardware.

  1. Time Variant Floating Mean Counting Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, Russell Kevin

    1999-06-03

    This software was written to test a time variant floating mean counting algorithm. The algorithm was developed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company and a provisional patent has been filed on the algorithm. The test software was developed to work with the Val Tech model IVB prototype version II count rate meter hardware. The test software was used to verify the algorithm developed by WSRC could be correctly implemented with the vendor''s hardware.

  2. Clock gene variants differentiate mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika Paulina; Pawlak, Joanna Maria; Maciukiewicz, Malgorzata; Moczko, Jerzy; Wilkosc, Monika; Leszczynska-Rodziewicz, Anna; Zaremba, Dorota; Hauser, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variations in clock-related genes were hypothesized to be involved to in the susceptibility of mood disorders MD (both unipolar (UPD) and bipolar (BPD) disorders). In our work we investigated role of gene variants form four core period proteins: CLOCK, ARNTL, TIM and PER3. The total sample comprised from 744 mood disorders inpatients (UPD = 229, BPD = 515) and 635 healthy voluntary controls. The 42 SNPs from four genes of interest were genotyped. We used single polymorphisms, haplotypes, SNPs interactions and prediction analysis using classical statistical and machine learning methods. We observed association between two polymorphisms of CLOCK (rs1801260 and rs11932595) with BPDII and two polymorphisms of TIM (rs2291739, rs11171856) with UPD. We also detected ARNTL haplotype variant (rs1160996C/rs11022779G/rs1122780T) to be associated with increased risk of MD, BPD (both types). We established significant epistatic interaction between PER3 (rs2172563) and ARNTL (rs4146388 and rs7107287) in case of BPD. Additionally relation between PER3 (rs2172563) and CLOCK (rs1268271 and rs3805148) appeared in case of UPD. Classification and Regression Trees (C and RT) showed significant predictive value for 10 polymorphisms in all analyzed genes. However we failed to obtain model with sufficient predictive power. During analyses of sleep disturbances sample, we found carriers of homozygote variants (ARNTL: rs11022778 TT, rs1562438 TT, rs1982350 AA and PER3: rs836755 CC) showing more frequent falling asleep difficulties when compare to other genotypes carriers. Our study suggested a putative role of the CLOCK, TIM, ARNTL and PER3 and polymorphisms in MD susceptibility. In our analyses we showed association of specific gene variants with particular types of MD. We also confirmed necessity of performing separate analyzes for BPD and UPD patients. Comprehensive statistical approach is required even with individual symptoms analyses.

  3. [Lynch syndrome, Muir Torre variant: 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Castro-Mujica, María Del Carmen; Barletta-Carrillo, Claudia; Acosta-Aliaga, Marisa; Montenegro-Garreaud, Ximena

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an autosomal-dominant inherited cancer predisposition syndrome caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2). Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS) is a phenotypic variant of LS that includes a predisposition to sebaceous glands tumors and keratoacanthomas. We report two patients with MTS, with more than one LS-related cancer, skin lesions, family history of cancer andmicrosatellite instability and immunohistochemistry analysis. PMID:27131946

  4. Sex steroids and variants of gender identity.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F L

    2013-09-01

    This article summarizes for the practicing endocrinologist the current literature on the psychobiology of the development of gender identity and its variants in individuals with disorders of sex development (DSD) or with non-DSD transgenderism. Gender reassignment remains the treatment of choice for strong and persistent gender dysphoria in both categories, but more research is needed on the short-term and long-term effects of puberty-suppressing medications and cross-sex hormones on brain and behavior.

  5. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants.

    PubMed

    Du, Mengmeng; Jiao, Shuo; Bien, Stephanie A; Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J; Carlson, Christopher S; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V; Curtis, Keith R; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Harrison, Tabitha A; Hayes, Richard B; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L; Hudson, Thomas J; Jenkins, Mark A; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M; Newcomb, Polly A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Potter, John D; Schoen, Robert E; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s).

  6. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants.

    PubMed

    Du, Mengmeng; Jiao, Shuo; Bien, Stephanie A; Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J; Carlson, Christopher S; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V; Curtis, Keith R; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Harrison, Tabitha A; Hayes, Richard B; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L; Hudson, Thomas J; Jenkins, Mark A; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M; Newcomb, Polly A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Potter, John D; Schoen, Robert E; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s). PMID:27379672

  7. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V.; Curtis, Keith R.; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Potter, John D.; Schoen, Robert E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T.; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I.; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s). PMID:27379672

  8. Tay-Sachs disease: B1 variant.

    PubMed

    Gordon, B A; Gordon, K E; Hinton, G G; Cadera, W; Feleki, V; Bayleran, J; Hechtman, P

    1988-01-01

    This first child of non-Jewish parents had nystagmus at 4 months of age, bilateral cherry-red macular spots at 7 months of age, and hyperacusis at 8 months of age; the patient has deteriorated progressively following a clinical course typical of Tay-Sachs disease B variant. Total beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase assayed with 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-glucosamine (4 MU GlcNAc) as substrate was within the normal range in plasma and cultured dermal fibroblasts and 2/3 the normal mean in leukocytes. The hexosaminidase A activity, assayed with the same substrate in plasma and cultured fibroblasts, approximated Tay-Sachs disease heterozygote levels; however, the activity of hexosaminidase A assayed with 4 MU Glc NAc-6-sulfate in the plasma, leukocytes, and cultured fibroblasts was less than 8, 2, and 1%, respectively of the control mean. This female infant with the B1 variant of Tay-Sachs disease demonstrated an earlier onset and more rapidly progressive course than was observed in 4 of the 5 previously reported patients with this Tay-Sachs disease variant.

  9. Orosomucoid-1 Expression in Ameloblastoma Variants.

    PubMed

    García-Muñoz, Alejandro; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; A Rodríguez, Mario; Liceága-Reyes, Rodrigo; Farfán-Morales, Jose Eduardo; Aranda-Romo, Saray; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; González-González, Rogelio

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors constitute a group of heterogeneous lesions of benign and malignant neoplasms with variable aggressiveness. Ameloblastomas are a group of benign but locally invasive neoplasms that occur in the jaws and are derived from epithelial elements of the tooth-forming apparatus. We previously described orosomucoid-1 protein expression in odontogenic myxomas. However, whether orosomucoid-1 is expressed in other odontogenic tumors remains unknown. Since orosomucoid-1 belongs to a group of acute-phase proteins and has many functions in health and disease, we identified and analyzed orosomucoid-1 expression in ameloblastoma variants and ameloblastic carcinoma using western blot and immunohistochemical techniques. Thirty cases of ameloblastoma were analyzed for orsomucoid-1; five specimens were fresh for western blot study (four benign ameloblastomas and one ameloblastic carcinoma), and 25 cases of benign ameloblastoma for immunohistochemical assays. Orosomucoid-1 was widely expressed in each tumor variant analyzed in this study, and differential orosomucoid-1 expression was observed between benign and malignant tumor. Orosomucoid-1 may play an important role in the behavior of ameloblastomas and influence the biology and development of the variants of this tumor. PMID:27386438

  10. Negative feedback buffers effects of regulatory variants

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Daniel M; Wilkening, Stefan; Lin, Gen; Tekkedil, Manu M; Dietrich, Kim; Steinmetz, Lars M; Gagneur, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms conferring robustness against regulatory variants have been controversial. Previous studies suggested widespread buffering of RNA misexpression on protein levels during translation. We do not find evidence that translational buffering is common. Instead, we find extensive buffering at the level of RNA expression, exerted through negative feedback regulation acting in trans, which reduces the effect of regulatory variants on gene expression. Our approach is based on a novel experimental design in which allelic differential expression in a yeast hybrid strain is compared to allelic differential expression in a pool of its spores. Allelic differential expression in the hybrid is due to cis-regulatory differences only. Instead, in the pool of spores allelic differential expression is not only due to cis-regulatory differences but also due to local trans effects that include negative feedback. We found that buffering through such local trans regulation is widespread, typically compensating for about 15% of cis-regulatory effects on individual genes. Negative feedback is stronger not only for essential genes, indicating its functional relevance, but also for genes with low to middle levels of expression, for which tight regulation matters most. We suggest that negative feedback is one mechanism of Waddington's canalization, facilitating the accumulation of genetic variants that might give selective advantage in different environments. PMID:25634765

  11. UCSC Data Integrator and Variant Annotation Integrator

    PubMed Central

    Hinrichs, Angie S.; Raney, Brian J.; Speir, Matthew L.; Rhead, Brooke; Casper, Jonathan; Karolchik, Donna; Kuhn, Robert M.; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Zweig, Ann S.; Haussler, David; Kent, W. James

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Two new tools on the UCSC Genome Browser web site provide improved ways of combining information from multiple datasets, optionally including the user's own custom track data and/or data from track hubs. The Data Integrator combines columns from multiple data tracks, showing all items from the first track along with overlapping items from the other tracks. The Variant Annotation Integrator is tailored to adding functional annotations to variant calls; it offers a more restricted set of underlying data tracks but adds predictions of each variant's consequences for any overlapping or nearby gene transcript. When available, it optionally adds additional annotations including effect prediction scores from dbNSFP for missense mutations, ENCODE regulatory summary tracks and conservation scores. Availability and implementation: The web tools are freely available at http://genome.ucsc.edu/ and the underlying database is available for download at http://hgdownload.cse.ucsc.edu/. The software (written in C and Javascript) is available from https://genome-store.ucsc.edu/ and is freely available for academic and non-profit usage; commercial users must obtain a license. Contact: angie@soe.ucsc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26740527

  12. Spatially variant periodic structures in electromagnetics

    PubMed Central

    Rumpf, Raymond C.; Pazos, Javier J.; Digaum, Jennefir L.; Kuebler, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial transforms are a popular technique for designing periodic structures that are macroscopically inhomogeneous. The structures are often required to be anisotropic, provide a magnetic response, and to have extreme values for the constitutive parameters in Maxwell's equations. Metamaterials and photonic crystals are capable of providing these, although sometimes only approximately. The problem still remains about how to generate the geometry of the final lattice when it is functionally graded, or spatially varied. This paper describes a simple numerical technique to spatially vary any periodic structure while minimizing deformations to the unit cells that would weaken or destroy the electromagnetic properties. New developments in this algorithm are disclosed that increase efficiency, improve the quality of the lattices and provide the ability to design aplanatic metasurfaces. The ability to spatially vary a lattice in this manner enables new design paradigms that are not possible using spatial transforms, three of which are discussed here. First, spatially variant self-collimating photonic crystals are shown to flow unguided waves around very tight bends using ordinary materials with low refractive index. Second, multi-mode waveguides in spatially variant band gap materials are shown to guide waves around bends without mixing power between the modes. Third, spatially variant anisotropic materials are shown to sculpt the near-field around electric components. This can be used to improve electromagnetic compatibility between components in close proximity. PMID:26217058

  13. Novel RNA variants in colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Alagaratnam, Sharmini; Zhao, Sen; Nome, Torfinn; Løvf, Marthe; Bakken, Anne C.; Hektoen, Merete; Sveen, Anita; Lothe, Ragnhild A.; Skotheim, Rolf I.

    2015-01-01

    With an annual estimated incidence of 1.4 million, and a five-year survival rate of 60%, colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major clinical burden. To identify novel RNA variants in CRC, we analyzed exon-level microarray expression data from a cohort of 202 CRCs. We nominated 25 genes with increased expression of their 3′ parts in at least one cancer sample each. To efficiently investigate underlying transcript structures, we developed an approach using rapid amplification of cDNA ends followed by high throughput sequencing (RACE-seq). RACE products from the targeted genes in 23 CRC samples were pooled together and sequenced. We identified VWA2-TCF7L2, DHX35-BPIFA2 and CASZ1-MASP2 as private fusion events, and novel transcript structures for 17 of the 23 other candidate genes. The high-throughput approach facilitated identification of CRC specific RNA variants. These include a recurrent read-through fusion transcript between KLK8 and KLK7, and a splice variant of S100A2. Both of these were overrepresented in CRC tissue and cell lines from external RNA-seq datasets. PMID:26474385

  14. Orosomucoid-1 Expression in Ameloblastoma Variants

    PubMed Central

    García-Muñoz, Alejandro; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; A. Rodríguez, Mario; Liceága-Reyes, Rodrigo; Farfán-Morales, Jose Eduardo; Aranda-Romo, Saray; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; González-González, Rogelio

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors constitute a group of heterogeneous lesions of benign and malignant neoplasms with variable aggressiveness. Ameloblastomas are a group of benign but locally invasive neoplasms that occur in the jaws and are derived from epithelial elements of the tooth-forming apparatus. We previously described orosomucoid-1 protein expression in odontogenic myxomas. However, whether orosomucoid-1 is expressed in other odontogenic tumors remains unknown. Since orosomucoid-1 belongs to a group of acute-phase proteins and has many functions in health and disease, we identified and analyzed orosomucoid-1 expression in ameloblastoma variants and ameloblastic carcinoma using western blot and immunohistochemical techniques. Thirty cases of ameloblastoma were analyzed for orsomucoid-1; five specimens were fresh for western blot study (four benign ameloblastomas and one ameloblastic carcinoma), and 25 cases of benign ameloblastoma for immunohistochemical assays. Orosomucoid-1 was widely expressed in each tumor variant analyzed in this study, and differential orosomucoid-1 expression was observed between benign and malignant tumor. Orosomucoid-1 may play an important role in the behavior of ameloblastomas and influence the biology and development of the variants of this tumor. PMID:27386438

  15. Cytokines and Tumor Metastasis Gene Variants in Oral Cancer and Precancer in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Erdei, Esther; Luo, Li; Sheng, Huiping; Maestas, Erika; White, Kirsten A. M.; Mackey, Amanda; Dong, Yan; Berwick, Marianne; Morse, Douglas E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives A cross-sectional epidemiological study explored genetic susceptibility to oral precancer and cancer in Puerto Rico (PR). Materials and Methods Three hundred three individuals with a benign oral condition, oral precancer (oral epithelial hyperplasia/hyperkeratosis, oral epithelial dysplasia), or oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) were identified via PR pathology laboratories. A standardized, structured questionnaire obtained information on epidemiological variables; buccal cells were collected for genetic analysis. Genotyping was performed using Taqman® assays. Allelic frequencies of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were evaluated in cytokine genes and genes influencing tumor metastasis. Risk estimates for a diagnosis of oral precancer or SCCA while having a variant allele were generated using logistic regression. Adjusted models controlled for age, gender, ancestry, education, smoking and alcohol consumption. Results Relative to persons with a benign oral lesion, individuals with homozygous recessive allelic variants of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) −238 A/G SNP had a reduced odds of having an oral precancer (ORadjusted = 0.15; 95% CI 0.03–0.70). The transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFβ-1 −509 C/T) polymorphism was inversely associated with having an oral SCCA among persons homozygous for the recessive variant (ORcrude = 0.27; 95% CI 0.09–0.79). The matrix metalloproteinase gene (MMP-1) variant, rs5854, was associated with oral SCCA; participants with even one variant allele were more likely to have oral SCCA (ORadjusted = 2.62, 95% CI 1.05–6.53) compared to people with ancestral alleles. Conclusion Our exploratory analyses suggest that genetic alterations in immune system genes and genes with metastatic potential are associated with oral precancer and SCCA risk in PR. PMID:24278120

  16. Incomplete segregation of MYH11 variants with thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections and patent ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Harakalova, Magdalena; van der Smagt, Jasper; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Van't Slot, Ruben; Poot, Martin; Nijman, Isaac J; Medic, Jelena; Joziasse, Irene; Deckers, Jaap; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Wessels, Marja W; Baars, Hubert F; Weiss, Marjan M; Pals, Gerard; Golmard, Lisa; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Lindhout, Dick; Cuppen, Edwin; Baas, Annette F

    2013-05-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) is a serious condition with high morbidity and mortality. It is estimated that 20% of non-syndromic TAAD cases are inherited in an autosomal-dominant pattern with variable expression and reduced penetrance. Mutations in myosin heavy chain 11 (MYH11), one of several identified TAAD genes, were shown to simultaneously cause TAAD and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). We identified two large Dutch families with TAAD/PDA and detected two different novel heterozygote MYH11 variants in the probands. These variants, a heterozygote missense variant and a heterozygote in-frame deletion, were predicted to have damaging effects on protein structure and function. However, these novel alterations did not segregate with the TAAD/PDA in 3 out of 11 cases in family TAAD01 and in 2 out of 6 cases of family TAAD02. No mutation was detected in other known TAAD genes. Thus, it is expected that within these families other genetic factors contribute to the disease either by themselves or by interacting with the MYH11 variants. Such an oligogenic model for TAAD would explain the variable onset and progression of the disorder and its reduced penetrance in general. We conclude that in familial TAAD/PDA with an MYH11 variant in the index case caution should be exercised upon counseling family members. Specialized surveillance should still be offered to the non-carriers to prevent catastrophic aortic dissections or ruptures. Furthermore, our study underscores that segregation analysis remains very important in clinical genetics. Prediction programs and mutation evaluation algorithms need to be interpreted with caution.

  17. Formin Homology 2 Domain Containing 3 (FHOD3) Variants Associated with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wooten, Eric C.; Hebl, Virginia Bartleson; Wolf, Matthew J.; Greytak, Sarah R.; Orr, Nicole; Draper, Isabelle; Calvino, Jenna E.; Kapur, Navin K.; Maron, Martin S.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Ommen, Steve R.; Bos, J. Martijn; Ackerman, Michael J.; Huggins, Gordon S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Incomplete penetrance and variable expression of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is well appreciated. Common genetic polymorphisms variants that may affect HCM penetrance and expression have been predicted but are not well established. Methods and Results We performed a case-control genome wide association (GWA) study to identify common HCM-associated genetic polymorphisms and then asked whether such common variants were more represented in HCM or could explain the heterogeneity of HCM phenotypes. We identified an intronic FHOD3 variant (rs516514) associated with HCM (OR = 2.45 (95% CI 1.76–3.41), p=1.25 × 10−7) and validated this finding in an independent cohort. Next, we tested FHOD3-V1151I (rs2303510), a non-synonymous variant in partial linkage disequilibrium (LD) with rs516514, and we detected an even stronger association with HCM (p=1.76 × 10−9). While HCM patients were more likely to carry these FHOD3 alleles subjects homozygous for FHOD3-1151I had similar HCM phenotypes as carriers of the V1151 allele. FHOD3 expression is increased in the setting of HCM and both alleles of FHOD3-V1151I were detected in HCM myectomy tissue. Previously FHOD3 was found to be required for formation of the sarcomere and here we demonstrate that its fly homolog fhos is required for normal adult heart systolic contraction. Conclusions Here we demonstrate the association of a common non-synonymous FHOD3 genetic variant with HCM. This discovery further strengthens the potential role of gene mutations and polymorphisms that alter the amino acid sequence of sarcomere proteins and HCM. PMID:23255317

  18. New genetic variants of LATS1 detected in urinary bladder and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Saadeldin, Mona K; Shawer, Heba; Mostafa, Ahmed; Kassem, Neemat M; Amleh, Asma; Siam, Rania

    2014-01-01

    LATS1, the large tumor suppressor 1 gene, encodes for a serine/threonine kinase protein and is implicated in cell cycle progression. LATS1 is down-regulated in various human cancers, such as breast cancer, and astrocytoma. Point mutations in LATS1 were reported in human sarcomas. Additionally, loss of heterozygosity of LATS1 chromosomal region predisposes to breast, ovarian, and cervical tumors. In the current study, we investigated LATS1 genetic variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in 28 Egyptian patients with either urinary bladder or colon cancers. The LATS1 gene was amplified and sequenced and the expression of LATS1 at the RNA level was assessed in 12 urinary bladder cancer samples. We report, the identification of a total of 29 variants including previously identified SNPs within LATS1 coding and non-coding sequences. A total of 18 variants were novel. Majority of the novel variants, 13, were mapped to intronic sequences and un-translated regions of the gene. Four of the five novel variants located in the coding region of the gene, represented missense mutations within the serine/threonine kinase catalytic domain. Interestingly, LATS1 RNA steady state levels was lost in urinary bladder cancerous tissue harboring four specific SNPs (16045 + 41736 + 34614 + 56177) positioned in the 5'UTR, intron 6, and two silent mutations within exon 4 and exon 8, respectively. This study identifies novel single-base-sequence alterations in the LATS1 gene. These newly identified variants could potentially be used as novel diagnostic or prognostic tools in cancer.

  19. GM2 gangliosidosis B1 variant: biochemical and molecular characterization of hexosaminidase A.

    PubMed

    Peleg, L; Meltzer, F; Karpati, M; Goldman, B

    1995-04-01

    The biochemical properties of hexosaminidase A (HexA) and the coding sequence of the alpha-subunit were examined in a patient of Syrian ancestry with the B1 form of Tay-Sachs disease (TSD). The biochemical characteristics of the variant HexA suggest that both active sites are affected by the mutation(s). Kinetic studies with the beta-subunit specific substrate, 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-N-acetylglucosamine (MUG), revealed a significant difference between the Km values. of normal and variant HexA, while no difference was found when the sulfated substrate MUG-6-sulfate (MUGS), which is specific for the alpha-subunit active site, was used. The Vmax values for both substrates were significantly lower in extracts from B1 variant cells than in control extracts, implying a reduced enzyme level in the variant cells. A noncompetitive inhibitor of the reaction with MUGS, N-acetylglucosamine (NAG), induced a significant inhibition (30%) in the mutant cells only. When MUG was used as substrate, variant HexA was found to be more heat stable (T50 = 170 min) than normal HexA (T50 = 65 min). Furthermore, the mutant cell preparation differed from control in the relation between Hex thermosensitivity and protein concentration in the reaction. Two new mutations were identified in exon 5 of the HexA gene: a C496 to G transversion, which produced an Arg166 -->Gly alteration and a deletion of C498 which generated a shift in the reading frame. The patient was a heterozygote for both mutations even though her parents are first cousins. There is no evidence as yet which of these mutations accounts for the B1 phenotype. PMID:8581357

  20. Stability and Cu(II) Binding of Prion Protein Variants Related to Inherited Human Prion Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cereghetti, Grazia M.; Schweiger, Arthur; Glockshuber, Rudi; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2003-01-01

    All inherited forms of human prion diseases are linked with mutations in the prion protein (PrP) gene. Here we have investigated the stability and Cu(II) binding properties of three recombinant variants of murine full-length PrP(23–231)-containing destabilizing point mutations that are associated with human Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease (F198S), Creutzfeld-Jakob disease (E200K), and fatal familial insomnia (D178N) by electron paramagnetic resonance and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Furthermore, we analyzed the variants H140S, H177S, and H187S of the isolated C-terminal domain of murine PrP, mPrP(121–231), to test a role of the histidine residues in Cu(II) binding. The F198S and E200K variants of PrP(23–231) differed in Cu(II) binding from the wild-type mPrP(23–231). However, circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the variants and the wild type did not undergo conformational changes in the presence of Cu(II). The D178N variant showed a high tendency to aggregate at pH 7.4 both with and without Cu(II). At lower pH values, it showed the same Cu(II) binding behavior as the wild type. The analysis allowed for a better location of the Cu(II) binding sites in the C-terminal part of the protein. Our present data indicate that hereditary forms of prion diseases cannot be rationalized on the basis of altered Cu(II) binding or mutation-induced protein destabilization alone. PMID:12609901

  1. Variants in the interleukin 6 receptor gene are associated with obesity in Pima Indians.

    PubMed

    Wolford, Johanna K; Colligan, Peter B; Gruber, Jonathan D; Bogardus, Clifton

    2003-11-01

    Circulating levels of the cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6) are elevated in obesity, correlate with body mass index (BMI), and predict the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A promoter polymorphism in the IL6 gene is associated with obesity, altered levels of insulin sensitivity, and T2DM. IL-6 exerts its effects by binding to the IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) and levels of IL-6R have been correlated with BMI. It is possible that IL6R variants may also be related to obesity, but to our knowledge, no study has yet examined this relationship. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between genetic variants in the IL6R gene and obesity in Pima Indians, a population prone to excess adiposity. We sequenced 6kb of the IL6R gene, corresponding to all exons, exon-intron boundaries, and 2kb of promoter in 30 Pima Indians. We identified six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL6R gene: a predicted Asp --> Ala substitution at position 358, a variant in the 3'-untranslated region, and 4 intronic SNPs. All SNPs were in strong linkage disequilibrium (D' >/= 0.90) and varied in minor allele frequency from 0.33 to 0.48. Association between IL6R genotype and BMI (kg/m(2)) was assessed in approximately 700 nondiabetic, full-heritage Pima Indians. For each SNP, individuals carrying the variant allele had a higher mean BMI compared to those with the wild-type allele (range: [37.3+/-7.2-38.2+/-7.0] vs. [35.5+/-7.3-36.0+/-7.5]; P=0.02-0.004). Our findings suggest that genetic variants in the IL6R gene may play a role in susceptibility to obesity. Assessment of these SNPs in other populations will be useful to determine the magnitude of obesity risk.

  2. New genetic variants of LATS1 detected in urinary bladder and colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saadeldin, Mona K.; Shawer, Heba; Mostafa, Ahmed; Kassem, Neemat M.; Amleh, Asma; Siam, Rania

    2015-01-01

    LATS1, the large tumor suppressor 1 gene, encodes for a serine/threonine kinase protein and is implicated in cell cycle progression. LATS1 is down-regulated in various human cancers, such as breast cancer, and astrocytoma. Point mutations in LATS1 were reported in human sarcomas. Additionally, loss of heterozygosity of LATS1 chromosomal region predisposes to breast, ovarian, and cervical tumors. In the current study, we investigated LATS1 genetic variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in 28 Egyptian patients with either urinary bladder or colon cancers. The LATS1 gene was amplified and sequenced and the expression of LATS1 at the RNA level was assessed in 12 urinary bladder cancer samples. We report, the identification of a total of 29 variants including previously identified SNPs within LATS1 coding and non-coding sequences. A total of 18 variants were novel. Majority of the novel variants, 13, were mapped to intronic sequences and un-translated regions of the gene. Four of the five novel variants located in the coding region of the gene, represented missense mutations within the serine/threonine kinase catalytic domain. Interestingly, LATS1 RNA steady state levels was lost in urinary bladder cancerous tissue harboring four specific SNPs (16045 + 41736 + 34614 + 56177) positioned in the 5′UTR, intron 6, and two silent mutations within exon 4 and exon 8, respectively. This study identifies novel single-base-sequence alterations in the LATS1 gene. These newly identified variants could potentially be used as novel diagnostic or prognostic tools in cancer. PMID:25628642

  3. Incomplete segregation of MYH11 variants with thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections and patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Harakalova, Magdalena; van der Smagt, Jasper; de Kovel, Carolien G F; van't Slot, Ruben; Poot, Martin; Nijman, Isaac J; Medic, Jelena; Joziasse, Irene; Deckers, Jaap; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Wessels, Marja W; Baars, Hubert F; Weiss, Marjan M; Pals, Gerard; Golmard, Lisa; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Lindhout, Dick; Cuppen, Edwin; Baas, Annette F

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) is a serious condition with high morbidity and mortality. It is estimated that 20% of non-syndromic TAAD cases are inherited in an autosomal-dominant pattern with variable expression and reduced penetrance. Mutations in myosin heavy chain 11 (MYH11), one of several identified TAAD genes, were shown to simultaneously cause TAAD and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). We identified two large Dutch families with TAAD/PDA and detected two different novel heterozygote MYH11 variants in the probands. These variants, a heterozygote missense variant and a heterozygote in-frame deletion, were predicted to have damaging effects on protein structure and function. However, these novel alterations did not segregate with the TAAD/PDA in 3 out of 11 cases in family TAAD01 and in 2 out of 6 cases of family TAAD02. No mutation was detected in other known TAAD genes. Thus, it is expected that within these families other genetic factors contribute to the disease either by themselves or by interacting with the MYH11 variants. Such an oligogenic model for TAAD would explain the variable onset and progression of the disorder and its reduced penetrance in general. We conclude that in familial TAAD/PDA with an MYH11 variant in the index case caution should be exercised upon counseling family members. Specialized surveillance should still be offered to the non-carriers to prevent catastrophic aortic dissections or ruptures. Furthermore, our study underscores that segregation analysis remains very important in clinical genetics. Prediction programs and mutation evaluation algorithms need to be interpreted with caution. PMID:22968129

  4. Accumulation of distinct prelamin A variants in human diploid fibroblasts differentially affects cell homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Candelario, Jose; Borrego, Stacey; Reddy, Sita; Comai, Lucio

    2011-02-01

    Lamin A is a component of the nuclear lamina that plays a major role in the structural organization and function of the nucleus. Lamin A is synthesized as a prelamin A precursor which undergoes four sequential post-translational modifications to generate mature lamin A. Significantly, a large number of point mutations in the LMNA gene cause a range of distinct human disorders collectively known as laminopathies. The mechanisms by which mutations in lamin A affect cell function and cause disease are unclear. Interestingly, recent studies have suggested that alterations in the normal lamin A pathway can contribute to cellular dysfunction. Specifically, we and others have shown, at the cellular level, that in the absence of mutations or altered splicing events, increased expression of wild-type prelamin A results in a growth defective phenotype that resembles that of cells expressing the mutant form of lamin A, termed progerin, associated with Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS). Remarkably, the phenotypes of cells expressing elevated levels of wild-type prelamin A can be reversed by either treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitors or overexpression of ZMPSTE24, a critical prelamin A processing enzyme, suggesting that minor increases in the steady-state levels of one or more prelamin A intermediates is sufficient to induce cellular toxicity. Here, to investigate the molecular basis of the lamin A pathway toxicity, we characterized the phenotypic changes occurring in cells expressing distinct prelamin A variants mimicking specific prelamin A processing intermediates. This analysis demonstrates that distinct prelamin A variants differentially affect cell growth, nuclear membrane morphology, nuclear distribution of lamin A and the fundamental process of transcription. Expression of prelamin A variants that are constitutively farnesylated induced the formation of lamin A aggregates and dramatic changes in nuclear membrane morphology, which led to reduced

  5. Dataset of mitochondrial genome variants associated with asymptomatic atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sazonova, Margarita A.; Zhelankin, Andrey V.; Barinova, Valeria A.; Sinyov, Vasily V.; Khasanova, Zukhra B.; Postnov, Anton Y.; Sobenin, Igor A.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.; Orekhov, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    This dataset report is dedicated to mitochondrial genome variants associated with asymptomatic atherosclerosis. These data were obtained using the method of next generation pyrosequencing (NGPS). The whole mitochondrial genome of the sample of patients from the Moscow region was analyzed. In this article the dataset including anthropometric, biochemical and clinical parameters along with detected mtDNA variants in patients with carotid atherosclerosis and healthy individuals was presented. Among 58 of the most common homoplasmic mtDNA variants found in the observed sample, 7 variants occurred more often in patients with atherosclerosis and 16 variants occurred more often in healthy individuals. PMID:27222855

  6. Engineered CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases with altered PAM specificities

    PubMed Central

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P.; Prew, Michelle S.; Tsai, Shengdar Q.; Topkar, Ved; Nguyen, Nhu T.; Zheng, Zongli; Gonzales, Andrew P.W.; Li, Zhuyun; Peterson, Randall T.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Aryee, Martin J.; Joung, J. Keith

    2015-01-01

    Although CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for genome editing1, 2, the range of sequences that Cas9 can recognize is constrained by the need for a specific protospacer adjacent motif (PAM)3–6. As a result, it can often be difficult to target double-stranded breaks (DSBs) with the precision that is necessary for various genome editing applications. The ability to engineer Cas9 derivatives with purposefully altered PAM specificities would address this limitation. Here we show that the commonly used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) can be modified to recognize alternative PAM sequences using structural information, bacterial selection-based directed evolution, and combinatorial design. These altered PAM specificity variants enable robust editing of endogenous gene sites in zebrafish and human cells not currently targetable by wild-type SpCas9, and their genome-wide specificities are comparable to wild-type SpCas9 as judged by GUIDE-Seq analysis7. In addition, we identified and characterized another SpCas9 variant that exhibits improved specificity in human cells, possessing better discrimination against off-target sites with non-canonical NAG and NGA PAMs and/or mismatched spacers. We also found that two smaller-size Cas9 orthologues, Streptococcus thermophilus Cas9 (St1Cas9) and Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SaCas9), function efficiently in the bacterial selection systems and in human cells, suggesting that our engineering strategies could be extended to Cas9s from other species. Our findings provide broadly useful SpCas9 variants and, more importantly, establish the feasibility of engineering a wide range of Cas9s with altered and improved PAM specificities. PMID:26098369

  7. Engineered CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases with altered PAM specificities.

    PubMed

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P; Prew, Michelle S; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Topkar, Ved V; Nguyen, Nhu T; Zheng, Zongli; Gonzales, Andrew P W; Li, Zhuyun; Peterson, Randall T; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Aryee, Martin J; Joung, J Keith

    2015-07-23

    Although CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for genome editing, the range of sequences that Cas9 can recognize is constrained by the need for a specific protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). As a result, it can often be difficult to target double-stranded breaks (DSBs) with the precision that is necessary for various genome-editing applications. The ability to engineer Cas9 derivatives with purposefully altered PAM specificities would address this limitation. Here we show that the commonly used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) can be modified to recognize alternative PAM sequences using structural information, bacterial selection-based directed evolution, and combinatorial design. These altered PAM specificity variants enable robust editing of endogenous gene sites in zebrafish and human cells not currently targetable by wild-type SpCas9, and their genome-wide specificities are comparable to wild-type SpCas9 as judged by GUIDE-seq analysis. In addition, we identify and characterize another SpCas9 variant that exhibits improved specificity in human cells, possessing better discrimination against off-target sites with non-canonical NAG and NGA PAMs and/or mismatched spacers. We also find that two smaller-size Cas9 orthologues, Streptococcus thermophilus Cas9 (St1Cas9) and Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SaCas9), function efficiently in the bacterial selection systems and in human cells, suggesting that our engineering strategies could be extended to Cas9s from other species. Our findings provide broadly useful SpCas9 variants and, more importantly, establish the feasibility of engineering a wide range of Cas9s with altered and improved PAM specificities.

  8. Genetically Altered Plant Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Researchers in Robert Ferl's lab at the University of Florida in Gainesville, genetically altered this Arabdopsis Thaliana (a brassica species) plant to learn how extreme environments, such as the low atmospheric pressure on Mars, affect plant genes. They inserted green fluorescent protein (GFP) near the on/off switches for anoxia and drought genes. When those genes were turned on after exposure to reduced atmospheric pressure, GFP was turned on as well, causing cells expressing those genes to glow green under a blue light. The natural fluorescence of chlorophyll accounts for the red glow.

  9. Quantitative Analysis of Variant Selection for Displacive Transformations Under Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Saurabh; Verma, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Vikram

    2012-07-01

    The existing variant selection models for displacive transformations are mostly qualitative in nature and attempt to predict the bulk texture using several fitting parameters. Many of these models use Kurdjumov-Sach (K-S) type orientation relationships (ORs) and ignore the phenomenological theory of martensite crystallography. So far there has not been any attempt to assess variant selection in the level of individual variants within one austenite grain. In this work, new kinds of experiments and innovative mathematical models have been developed to critically assess the variant selection phenomenon during bainite transformation under externally applied stress. Volume fractions of individual variants in a austenite grain have been calculated for the first time. Patel and Cohen's theory on variant selection has been used in a new mathematical framework. Hitherto unknown aspects of variant selection have been found, which is exciting and provides new insight into the subject.

  10. Identification of a novel mouse Dbl proto-oncogene splice variant: evidence that SEC14 domain is involved in GEF activity regulation.

    PubMed

    Ognibene, Marzia; Vanni, Cristina; Blengio, Fabiola; Segalerba, Daniela; Mancini, Patrizia; De Marco, Patrizia; Torrisi, Maria R; Bosco, Maria C; Varesio, Luigi; Eva, Alessandra

    2014-03-10

    The Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor protoDbl is involved in different biochemical pathways affecting cell proliferation and migration. The N-terminal sequence of protoDbl contains negative regulatory elements that restrict the catalytic activity of the DH-PH module. Here, we report the identification of a new mouse protoDbl splice variant lacking exon 3. We found that the splice variant mRNA is expressed in the spleen and bone marrow lymphocytes, adrenal gland, gonads and brain. The protoDbl variant protein was detectable in the brain. The newly identified variant displays the disruption of the SEC14 domain, positioned on exons 2 and 3 in the protoDbl N-terminal region. We show here that an altered SEC14 sequence leads to enhanced Dbl translocation to the plasma membrane and to augmented transforming and exchange activity.

  11. Variants selected by treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells with an immunotoxin

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    An immunotoxin has been made by coupling anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope antibody 907 to ricin A chain (907-RAC). 907 recognizes an epitope within the immunodominant PB-1 loop of gp120. Variant cells were selected by cloning persistently infected H9/human T lymphocyte virus IIIB cells in the presence of the immunotoxin. Clones resistant to 907-RAC arose at a frequency of 0.1-1.0%. Seven clones were selected for intensive analysis. When studied, these clones fell into two distinct groups, members of which appeared to be identical, suggesting that the variation arose before the selection process. In contrast to the parent cells, none of the cloned variants produced infectious HIV. The first set of clones, designated the "E" variants, expressed decreased levels of the HIV envelope on the cell surface. However, levels of intracellular HIV antigens and reverse transcriptase were equal to or greater than that of the parental cell line. Radioimmunoprecipitation demonstrated that the gp160 was truncated to 145 kD (gp120 was normal length), capable of binding to CD4, and, unlike normal gp160, was released in its unprocessed form into the cellular supernatant. Sequence analysis demonstrated that a deletion at codon 687 of the envelope gene resulted in the production of this truncated protein. Ultrastructural analysis of E variants demonstrated some budding forms of virus, but also large numbers of HIV within intracellular vesicles. The second set of variants, the "F" series, produced no HIV antigens, reverse transcriptase, nor was there ultrastructural evidence of virus. However, proviral DNA was present. Virus could not be induced with agents known to activate latent HIV. These cells also lacked cell surface CD4 and could not be infected with HIV. These studies demonstrate that variation in HIV can affect the phenotype of the cells carrying the altered virus, allowing for escape from immunologic destruction. The E variants may serve as prototypes for

  12. Human keratin 8 variants promote mouse acetaminophen hepatotoxicity coupled with JNK activation and protein adduct formation

    PubMed Central

    Guldiken, Nurdan; Zhou, Qin; Kucukoglu, Ozlem; Rehm, Melanie; Levada, Kateryna; Gross, Annika; Kwan, Raymond; James, Laura P.; Trautwein, Christian; Omary, M. Bishr; Strnad, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Keratins 8 and 18 (K8/K18) are the intermediate filaments proteins of simple-type digestive epithelia, and provide important cytoprotective function. K8/K18 variants predispose humans to chronic liver disease progression and to poor outcomes in acute acetaminophen (APAP)-related liver failure. Given that K8 G62C and R341H/R341C are common K8 variants in European and North American populations, we studied their biological significance using transgenic mice. Methods Mice that overexpress the human K8 variants R341H or R341C were generated and used together with previously described mice that overexpress wild-type (WT) K8 or K8 G62C. Mice were injected with 600 mg/kg APAP, or underwent bile duct ligation (BDL). Livers were evaluated by microarray analysis, quantitative RT-PCR, immunoblotting, histological and immunological staining, and biochemical assays. Results Under basal conditions, the K8 G62C/R341H/R341C variant-expressing mice did not show an obvious liver phenotype or altered keratin filament distribution, while K8 G62C/R341C animals had aberrant disulphide-crosslinked keratins. Animals carrying the K8 variants displayed limited gene expression changes but had lower nicotinamide N-methyl transferase (NNMT) levels and were predisposed to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. NNMT represents a novel K8/K18-associated protein that becomes upregulated after K8/K18 transfection. The more pronounced liver damage was accompanied by increased and prolonged JNK activation; elevated APAP protein adducts; K8 hyperphosphorylation at S74/S432 with enhanced K8 solubility; and prominent pericentral keratin network disruption. No differences in APAP serum levels, glutathione or ATP levels were noted. BDL resulted in similar liver injury and biliary fibrosis in all mouse genotypes. Conclusion Expression of human K8 variants G62C, R341H, or R341C in mice predisposes to acute acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, thereby providing direct evidence for the importance of these

  13. Molecular Imprint of Exposure to Naturally Occurring Genetic Variants of Human Cytomegalovirus on the T cell Repertoire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Corey; Gras, Stephanie; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Bird, Nicola L.; Valkenburg, Sophie A.; Twist, Kelly-Anne; Burrows, Jacqueline M.; Miles, John J.; Chambers, Daniel; Bell, Scott; Campbell, Scott; Kedzierska, Katherine; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Khanna, Rajiv

    2014-02-01

    Exposure to naturally occurring variants of herpesviruses in clinical settings can have a dramatic impact on anti-viral immunity. Here we have evaluated the molecular imprint of variant peptide-MHC complexes on the T-cell repertoire during human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and demonstrate that primary co-infection with genetic variants of CMV was coincident with development of strain-specific T-cell immunity followed by emergence of cross-reactive virus-specific T-cells. Cross-reactive CMV-specific T cells exhibited a highly conserved public T cell repertoire, while T cells directed towards specific genetic variants displayed oligoclonal repertoires, unique to each individual. T cell recognition foot-print and pMHC-I structural analyses revealed that the cross-reactive T cells accommodate alterations in the pMHC complex with a broader foot-print focussing on the core of the peptide epitope. These findings provide novel molecular insight into how infection with naturally occurring genetic variants of persistent human herpesviruses imprints on the evolution of the anti-viral T-cell repertoire.

  14. Characterization of 2 genetic variants of Na(v) 1.5-arginine 689 found in patients with cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Sottas, Valentin; Rougier, Jean-Sébastien; Jousset, Florian; Kucera, Jan P; Shestak, Anna; Makarov, Leonid M; Zaklyazminskaya, Elena V; Abriel, Hugues

    2013-09-01

    Hundreds of genetic variants in SCN5A, the gene coding for the pore-forming subunit of the cardiac sodium channel, Na(v) 1.5, have been described in patients with cardiac channelopathies as well as in individuals from control cohorts. The aim of this study was to characterize the biophysical properties of 2 naturally occurring Na(v) 1.5 variants, p.R689H and p.R689C, found in patients with cardiac arrhythmias and in control individuals. In addition, this study was motivated by the finding of the variant p.R689H in a family with sudden cardiac death (SCD) in children. When expressed in HEK293 cells, most of the sodium current (I(Na)) biophysical properties of both variants were indistinguishable from the wild-type (WT) channels. In both cases, however, an ∼2-fold increase of the tetrodotoxin-sensitive late I(Na) was observed. Action potential simulations and reconstruction of pseudo-ECGs demonstrated that such a subtle increase in the late I(Na) may prolong the QT interval in a nonlinear fashion. In conclusion, despite the fact that the causality link between p.R689H and the phenotype of the studied family cannot be demonstrated, this study supports the notion that subtle alterations of Na(v) 1.5 variants may increase the risk for cardiac arrhythmias.

  15. Elevated pCO2 causes a shift towards more toxic microcystin variants in nitrogen-limited Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Van Oosterhout, Elmer; Faassen, Elisabeth J; Lürling, Miquel; Helmsing, Nico R; Van de Waal, Dedmer B

    2016-02-01

    Elevated pCO2 may promote phytoplankton growth, and potentially alleviate carbon limitation during dense blooms. Under nitrogen-limited conditions, elevated pCO2 may furthermore alter the phytoplankton carbon-nitrogen (C:N) balance and thereby the synthesis of secondary metabolites, such as cyanobacterial toxins. A common group of these toxins are the microcystins, with variants that differ not only in C:N stoichiometry, but also in toxicity. Here, we hypothesized that elevated pCO2 will increase the cellular C:N ratios of cyanobacteria, thereby promoting the more toxic microcystin variants with higher C:N ratios. To test this hypothesis, we performed chemostat experiments under nitrogen-limited conditions, exposing three Microcystis aeruginosa strains to two pCO2 treatments: 400 and 1200 μatm. Biomass, cellular C:N ratios and total microcystin contents at steady state remained largely unaltered in all three strains. Across strains and treatments, however, cellular microcystin content decreased with increasing cellular C:N ratios, suggesting a general stoichiometric regulation. Furthermore, as predicted, microcystin variants with higher C:N ratios generally increased with elevated pCO2, while the variant with a low C:N ratio decreased. Thus, elevated pCO2 under nitrogen-limited conditions may shift the cellular microcystin composition towards the more toxic variants. Such CO2-driven changes may have consequences for the toxicity of Microcystis blooms.

  16. Next generation exome sequencing of paediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients identifies rare and novel variants in candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    Christodoulou, Katja; Wiskin, Anthony E; Gibson, Jane; Tapper, William; Willis, Claire; Afzal, Nadeem A; Upstill-Goddard, Rosanna; Holloway, John W; Simpson, Michael A; Beattie, R Mark; Collins, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple genes have been implicated by association studies in altering inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) predisposition. Paediatric patients often manifest more extensive disease and a particularly severe disease course. It is likely that genetic predisposition plays a more substantial role in this group. Objective To identify the spectrum of rare and novel variation in known IBD susceptibility genes using exome sequencing analysis in eight individual cases of childhood onset severe disease. Design DNA samples from the eight patients underwent targeted exome capture and sequencing. Data were processed through an analytical pipeline to align sequence reads, conduct quality checks, and identify and annotate variants where patient sequence differed from the reference sequence. For each patient, the entire complement of rare variation within strongly associated candidate genes was catalogued. Results Across the panel of 169 known IBD susceptibility genes, approximately 300 variants in 104 genes were found. Excluding splicing and HLA-class variants, 58 variants across 39 of these genes were classified as rare, with an alternative allele frequency of <5%, of which 17 were novel. Only two patients with early onset Crohn's disease exhibited rare deleterious variations within NOD2: the previously described R702W variant was the sole NOD2 variant in one patient, while the second patient also carried the L1007 frameshift insertion. Both patients harboured other potentially damaging mutations in the GSDMB, ERAP2 and SEC16A genes. The two patients severely affected with ulcerative colitis exhibited a distinct profile: both carried potentially detrimental variation in the BACH2 and IL10 genes not seen in other patients. Conclusion For each of the eight individuals studied, all non-synonymous, truncating and frameshift mutations across all known IBD genes were identified. A unique profile of rare and potentially damaging variants was evident for each patient with this

  17. A multifactorial likelihood model for MMR gene variant classification incorporating probabilities based on sequence bioinformatics and tumor characteristics: a report from the Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Bryony A; Goldgar, David E; Paterson, Carol; Clendenning, Mark; Walters, Rhiannon; Arnold, Sven; Parsons, Michael T; Michael D, Walsh; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Lemarchand, Loic; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Young, Joanne P; Buchanan, Daniel D; Tavtigian, Sean V; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2013-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) gene sequence variants of uncertain clinical significance are often identified in suspected Lynch syndrome families, and this constitutes a challenge for both researchers and clinicians. Multifactorial likelihood model approaches provide a quantitative measure of MMR variant pathogenicity, but first require input of likelihood ratios (LRs) for different MMR variation-associated characteristics from appropriate, well-characterized reference datasets. Microsatellite instability (MSI) and somatic BRAF tumor data for unselected colorectal cancer probands of known pathogenic variant status were used to derive LRs for tumor characteristics using the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CFR) resource. These tumor LRs were combined with variant segregation within families, and estimates of prior probability of pathogenicity based on sequence conservation and position, to analyze 44 unclassified variants identified initially in Australasian Colon CFR families. In addition, in vitro splicing analyses were conducted on the subset of variants based on bioinformatic splicing predictions. The LR in favor of pathogenicity was estimated to be ~12-fold for a colorectal tumor with a BRAF mutation-negative MSI-H phenotype. For 31 of the 44 variants, the posterior probabilities of pathogenicity were such that altered clinical management would be indicated. Our findings provide a working multifactorial likelihood model for classification that carefully considers mode of ascertainment for gene testing.

  18. Systematic Functional Interrogation of Rare Cancer Variants Identifies Oncogenic Alleles | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer genome characterization efforts now provide an initial view of the somatic alterations in primary tumors. However, most point mutations occur at low frequency, and the function of these alleles remains undefined. We have developed a scalable systematic approach to interrogate the function of cancer-associated gene variants. We subjected 474 mutant alleles curated from 5,338 tumors to pooled in vivo tumor formation assays and gene expression profiling. We identified 12 transforming alleles, including two in genes (PIK3CB, POT1) that have not been shown to be tumorigenic.

  19. Somatic genomic alterations in retinoblastoma beyond RB1 are rare and limited to copy number changes

    PubMed Central

    Kooi, Irsan E.; Mol, Berber M.; Massink, Maarten P. G.; Ameziane, Najim; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Dommering, Charlotte J.; van Mil, Saskia E.; de Vries, Yne; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Moll, Annette C.; te Riele, Hein; Cloos, Jacqueline; Dorsman, Josephine C.

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is a rare childhood cancer initiated by RB1 mutation or MYCN amplification, while additional alterations may be required for tumor development. However, the view on single nucleotide variants is very limited. To better understand oncogenesis, we determined the genomic landscape of retinoblastoma. We performed exome sequencing of 71 retinoblastomas and matched blood DNA. Next, we determined the presence of single nucleotide variants, copy number alterations and viruses. Aside from RB1, recurrent gene mutations were very rare. Only a limited fraction of tumors showed BCOR (7/71, 10%) or CREBBP alterations (3/71, 4%). No evidence was found for the presence of viruses. Instead, specific somatic copy number alterations were more common, particularly in patients diagnosed at later age. Recurrent alterations of chromosomal arms often involved less than one copy, also in highly pure tumor samples, suggesting within-tumor heterogeneity. Our results show that retinoblastoma is among the least mutated cancers and signify the extreme sensitivity of the childhood retina for RB1 loss. We hypothesize that retinoblastomas arising later in retinal development benefit more from subclonal secondary alterations and therefore, these alterations are more selected for in these tumors. Targeted therapy based on these subclonal events might be insufficient for complete tumor control. PMID:27126562

  20. Somatic genomic alterations in retinoblastoma beyond RB1 are rare and limited to copy number changes.

    PubMed

    Kooi, Irsan E; Mol, Berber M; Massink, Maarten P G; Ameziane, Najim; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Dommering, Charlotte J; van Mil, Saskia E; de Vries, Yne; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Moll, Annette C; Te Riele, Hein; Cloos, Jacqueline; Dorsman, Josephine C

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is a rare childhood cancer initiated by RB1 mutation or MYCN amplification, while additional alterations may be required for tumor development. However, the view on single nucleotide variants is very limited. To better understand oncogenesis, we determined the genomic landscape of retinoblastoma. We performed exome sequencing of 71 retinoblastomas and matched blood DNA. Next, we determined the presence of single nucleotide variants, copy number alterations and viruses. Aside from RB1, recurrent gene mutations were very rare. Only a limited fraction of tumors showed BCOR (7/71, 10%) or CREBBP alterations (3/71, 4%). No evidence was found for the presence of viruses. Instead, specific somatic copy number alterations were more common, particularly in patients diagnosed at later age. Recurrent alterations of chromosomal arms often involved less than one copy, also in highly pure tumor samples, suggesting within-tumor heterogeneity. Our results show that retinoblastoma is among the least mutated cancers and signify the extreme sensitivity of the childhood retina for RB1 loss. We hypothesize that retinoblastomas arising later in retinal development benefit more from subclonal secondary alterations and therefore, these alterations are more selected for in these tumors. Targeted therapy based on these subclonal events might be insufficient for complete tumor control. PMID:27126562

  1. Rare human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4 subunit (CHRNA4) variants affect expression and function of high-affinity nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    McClure-Begley, T D; Papke, R L; Stone, K L; Stokes, C; Levy, A D; Gelernter, J; Xie, P; Lindstrom, J; Picciotto, M R

    2014-03-01

    Nicotine, the primary psychoactive component in tobacco smoke, produces its behavioral effects through interactions with neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). α4β2 nAChRs are the most abundant in mammalian brain, and converging evidence shows that this subtype mediates the rewarding and reinforcing effects of nicotine. A number of rare variants in the CHRNA4 gene that encode the α4 nAChR subunit have been identified in human subjects and appear to be underrepresented in a cohort of smokers. We compared three of these variants (α4R336C, α4P451L, and α4R487Q) to the common variant to determine their effects on α4β2 nAChR pharmacology. We examined [(3)H]epibatidine binding, interacting proteins, and phosphorylation of the α4 nAChR subunit with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in HEK 293 cells and voltage-clamp electrophysiology in Xenopus laevis oocytes. We observed significant effects of the α4 variants on nAChR expression, subcellular distribution, and sensitivity to nicotine-induced receptor upregulation. Proteomic analysis of immunopurified α4β2 nAChRs incorporating the rare variants identified considerable differences in the intracellular interactomes due to these single amino acid substitutions. Electrophysiological characterization in X. laevis oocytes revealed alterations in the functional parameters of activation by nAChR agonists conferred by these α4 rare variants, as well as shifts in receptor function after incubation with nicotine. Taken together, these experiments suggest that genetic variation at CHRNA4 alters the assembly and expression of human α4β2 nAChRs, resulting in receptors that are more sensitive to nicotine exposure than those assembled with the common α4 variant. The changes in nAChR pharmacology could contribute to differences in responses to smoked nicotine in individuals harboring these rare variants.

  2. Penicillinase Studies on L-Phase Variants, G-Phase Variants, and Reverted Strains of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Simon, H J; Yin, E J

    1970-11-01

    L-phase variants and small colony (G-phase) variants derived from penicillinase-producing Staphylococcus aureus strains were tested for penicillinase (beta lactamase) production. A refined variation of the modified Gots test for penicillinase was used to demonstrate penicillinase synthesis. Penicillinase synthesis was reduced in L-phase variants and G-phase variants when compared to parental strains. After reversion of variants to vegetative stages had been induced, revertants were tested for production of penicillinase, coagulase, and alpha hemolysin, mannitol fermentation, and pigment production, and comparisons were made between parent and reverted vegetative forms. All revertants of G-phase variants retained penicillinase activity. Most revertants of L-phase variants showed reduction or loss of penicillinase activity. Retention of coagulase activity, alpha hemolysin production, mannitol fermentation, pigmentation, and phage type varied among revertants.

  3. Mutation update: the spectra of nebulin variants and associated myopathies.

    PubMed

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Kiiski, Kirsi; Sandaradura, Sarah A; Laporte, Jocelyn; Repo, Pauliina; Frey, Jennifer A; Donner, Kati; Marttila, Minttu; Saunders, Carol; Barth, Peter G; den Dunnen, Johan T; Beggs, Alan H; Clarke, Nigel F; North, Kathryn N; Laing, Nigel G; Romero, Norma B; Winder, Thomas L; Pelin, Katarina; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2014-12-01

    A mutation update on the nebulin gene (NEB) is necessary because of recent developments in analysis methodology, the identification of increasing numbers and novel types of variants, and a widening in the spectrum of clinical and histological phenotypes associated with this gigantic, 183 exons containing gene. Recessive pathogenic variants in NEB are the major cause of nemaline myopathy (NM), one of the most common congenital myopathies. Moreover, pathogenic NEB variants have been identified in core-rod myopathy and in distal myopathies. In this update, we present the disease-causing variants in NEB in 159 families, 143 families with NM, and 16 families with NM-related myopathies. Eighty-eight families are presented here for the first time. We summarize 86 previously published and 126 unpublished variants identified in NEB. Furthermore, we have analyzed the NEB variants deposited in the Exome Variant Server (http://evs.gs.washington.edu/EVS/), identifying that pathogenic variants are a minor fraction of all coding variants (∼7%). This indicates that nebulin tolerates substantial changes in its amino acid sequence, providing an explanation as to why variants in such a large gene result in relatively rare disorders. Lastly, we discuss the difficulties of drawing reliable genotype-phenotype correlations in NEB-associated disease. PMID:25205138

  4. Non-coding genetic variants in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variants, including single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) and copy number variants (CNVs), in the non-coding regions of the human genome can play an important role in human traits and complex diseases. Most of the genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals map to non-coding regions and potentially point to non-coding variants, whereas their functional interpretation is challenging. In this review, we discuss the human non-coding variants and their contributions to human diseases in the following four parts. (i) Functional annotations of non-coding SNPs mapped by GWAS: we discuss recent progress revealing some of the molecular mechanisms for GWAS signals affecting gene function. (ii) Technical progress in interpretation of non-coding variants: we briefly describe some of the technologies for functional annotations of non-coding variants, including the methods for genome-wide mapping of chromatin interaction, computational tools for functional predictions and the new genome editing technologies useful for dissecting potential functional consequences of non-coding variants. (iii) Non-coding CNVs in human diseases: we review our emerging understanding the role of non-coding CNVs in human disease. (iv) Compound inheritance of large genomic deletions and non-coding variants: compound inheritance at a locus consisting of coding variants plus non-coding ones is described. PMID:26152199

  5. Mutation Update: The Spectra of Nebulin Variants and Associated Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Kiiski, Kirsi; Sandaradura, Sarah A.; Laporte, Jocelyn; Repo, Pauliina; Frey, Jennifer A.; Donner, Kati; Marttila, Minttu; Saunders, Carol; Barth, Peter G.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Beggs, Alan H.; Clarke, Nigel F.; North, Kathryn N.; Laing, Nigel G.; Romero, Norma B.; Winder, Thomas L.; Pelin, Katarina; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2015-01-01

    A mutation update on the nebulin gene (NEB) is necessary because of recent developments in analysis methodology, the identification of increasing numbers and novel types of variants, and a widening in the spectrum of clinical and histological phenotypes associated with this gigantic, 183 exons containing gene. Recessive pathogenic variants in NEB are the major cause of nemaline myopathy (NM), one of the most common congenital myopathies. Moreover, pathogenic NEB variants have been identified in core-rod myopathy and in distal myopathies. In this update, we present the disease-causing variants in NEB in 159 families, 143 families with NM, and 16 families with NM-related myopathies. Eighty-eight families are presented here for the first time. We summarize 86 previously published and 126 unpublished variants identified in NEB. Furthermore, we have analyzed the NEB variants deposited in the Exome Variant Server (http://evs.gs.washington.edu/EVS/), identifying that pathogenic variants are a minor fraction of all coding variants (~7%). This indicates that nebulin tolerates substantial changes in its amino acid sequence, providing an explanation as to why variants in such a large gene result in relatively rare disorders. Lastly, we discuss the difficulties of drawing reliable genotype–phenotype correlations in NEB-associated disease. PMID:25205138

  6. Spread of Plasmids Carrying Multiple GES Variants.

    PubMed

    Cuzon, Gaelle; Bogaerts, Pierre; Bauraing, Caroline; Huang, Te-Din; Bonnin, Rémy A; Glupczynski, Youri; Naas, Thierry

    2016-08-01

    Five GES-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates that displayed an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype harbored two GES variants: GES-7 ESBL and GES-6 carbapenemase. In all isolates, the two GES alleles were located on the same integron that was inserted into an 80-kb IncM1 self-conjugative plasmid. Whole-genome sequencing suggested in vivo horizontal gene transfer of the plasmid along with clonal diffusion of Enterobacter cloacae To our knowledge, this is the first description in Europe of clustered Enterobacteriaceae isolates carrying two GES β-lactamases, of which one has extended activity toward carbapenems. PMID:27216071

  7. Pitfalls and variants in pediatric chest imaging.

    PubMed

    García Asensio, D; Fernández Martín, M

    2016-05-01

    Most pitfalls in the interpretation of pediatric chest imaging are closely related with the technique used and the characteristics of pediatric patients. To obtain a quality image that will enable the correct diagnosis, it is very important to use an appropriate technique. It is important to know how technical factors influence the image and to be aware of the possible artifacts that can result from poor patient cooperation. Moreover, radiologists need to be familiar with the normal anatomy in children, with the classic radiologic findings, and with the anatomic and developmental variants to avoid misinterpreting normal findings as pathological.

  8. Muscarinic M1 receptor partially modulates higher sensitivity to cadmium-induced cell death in primary basal forebrain cholinergic neurons: A cholinesterase variants dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Del Pino, Javier; Zeballos, Gabriela; Anadon, María José; Díaz, María Jesús; Moyano, Paula; Díaz, Gloria Gómez; García, Jimena; Lobo, Margarita; Frejo, María Teresa

    2016-06-15

    Cadmium is a toxic compound reported to produce cognitive dysfunctions, though the mechanisms involved are unknown. In a previous work we described how cadmium blocks cholinergic transmission and induces greater cell death in primary cholinergic neurons from the basal forebrain. It also induces cell death in SN56 cholinergic neurons from the basal forebrain through M1R blockage, alterations in the expression of AChE variants and GSK-3β, and an increase in Aβ and total and phosphorylated Tau protein levels. It was observed that the silencing or blockage of M1R altered ChAT activity, GSK-3β, AChE splice variants gene expression, and Aβ and Tau protein formation. Furthermore, AChE-S variants were associated with the same actions modulated by M1R. Accordingly, we hypothesized that cholinergic transmission blockage and higher sensitivity to cadmium-induced cell death of primary basal forebrain cholinergic neurons is mediated by M1R blockage, which triggers this effect through alteration of the expression of AChE variants. To prove this hypothesis, we evaluated, in primary culture from the basal forebrain region, whether M1R silencing induces greater cell death in cholinergic neurons than cadmium does, and whether in SN56 cells M1R mediates the mechanisms described so as to play a part in the cadmium induction of cholinergic transmission blockage and cell death in this cell line through alteration of the expression of AChE variants. Our results prove that M1R silencing by cadmium partially mediates the greater cell death observed on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. Moreover, all previously described mechanisms for blocking cholinergic transmission and inducing cell death on SN56 cells after cadmium exposure are partially mediated by M1R through the alteration of AChE expression. Thus, our results may explain cognitive dysfunctions observed in cadmium toxicity. PMID:27377441

  9. SubmiRine: assessing variants in microRNA targets using clinical genomic data sets

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Evan K.; Campbell, Joshua D.; Spira, Avrum; Baxevanis, Andreas D.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by binding to partially complementary sequences on target mRNA transcripts, thereby causing their degradation, deadenylation, or inhibiting their translation. Genomic variants can alter miRNA regulation by modifying miRNA target sites, and multiple human disease phenotypes have been linked to such miRNA target site variants (miR-TSVs). However, systematic genome-wide identification of functional miR-TSVs is difficult due to high false positive rates; functional miRNA recognition sequences can be as short as six nucleotides, with the human genome encoding thousands of miRNAs. Furthermore, while large-scale clinical genomic data sets are becoming increasingly commonplace, existing miR-TSV prediction methods are not designed to analyze these data. Here, we present an open-source tool called SubmiRine that is designed to perform efficient miR-TSV prediction systematically on variants identified in novel clinical genomic data sets. Most importantly, SubmiRine allows for the prioritization of predicted miR-TSVs according to their relative probability of being functional. We present the results of SubmiRine using integrated clinical genomic data from a large-scale cohort study on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), making a number of high-scoring, novel miR-TSV predictions. We also demonstrate SubmiRine's ability to predict and prioritize known miR-TSVs that have undergone experimental validation in previous studies. PMID:25813044

  10. The Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Variant CCR6DNP Regulates CCR6 via PARP-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Cunin, Pierre; Wu, Di; Diogo, Dorothée; Yang, Yu; Okada, Yukinori; Plenge, Robert M; Nigrovic, Peter A

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the implications of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for disease biology requires both identification of causal variants and definition of how these variants alter gene function. The non-coding triallelic dinucleotide polymorphism CCR6DNP is associated with risk for rheumatoid arthritis, and is considered likely causal because allelic variation correlates with expression of the chemokine receptor CCR6. Using transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) gene editing, we confirmed that CCR6DNP regulates CCR6. To identify the associated transcription factor, we applied a novel assay, Flanking Restriction Enhanced Pulldown (FREP), to identify specific association of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) with CCR6DNP consistent with the established allelic risk hierarchy. Correspondingly, manipulation of PARP-1 expression or activity impaired CCR6 expression in several lineages. These findings show that CCR6DNP is a causal variant through which PARP-1 regulates CCR6, and introduce a highly efficient approach to interrogate non-coding genetic polymorphisms associated with human disease. PMID:27626929

  11. Rare variants in NR2F2 cause congenital heart defects in humans.

    PubMed

    Al Turki, Saeed; Manickaraj, Ashok K; Mercer, Catherine L; Gerety, Sebastian S; Hitz, Marc-Phillip; Lindsay, Sarah; D'Alessandro, Lisa C A; Swaminathan, G Jawahar; Bentham, Jamie; Arndt, Anne-Karin; Louw, Jacoba; Low, Jacoba; Breckpot, Jeroen; Gewillig, Marc; Thienpont, Bernard; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Harnack, Christine; Hoff, Kirstin; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Schubert, Stephan; Siebert, Reiner; Toka, Okan; Cosgrove, Catherine; Watkins, Hugh; Lucassen, Anneke M; O'Kelly, Ita M; Salmon, Anthony P; Bu'lock, Frances A; Granados-Riveron, Javier; Setchfield, Kerry; Thornborough, Chris; Brook, J David; Mulder, Barbara; Klaassen, Sabine; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Devriendt, Koen; Fitzpatrick, David F; Wilson, David I; Mital, Seema; Hurles, Matthew E

    2014-04-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common birth defect worldwide and are a leading cause of neonatal mortality. Nonsyndromic atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs) are an important subtype of CHDs for which the genetic architecture is poorly understood. We performed exome sequencing in 13 parent-offspring trios and 112 unrelated individuals with nonsyndromic AVSDs and identified five rare missense variants (two of which arose de novo) in the highly conserved gene NR2F2, a very significant enrichment (p = 7.7 × 10(-7)) compared to 5,194 control subjects. We identified three additional CHD-affected families with other variants in NR2F2 including a de novo balanced chromosomal translocation, a de novo substitution disrupting a splice donor site, and a 3 bp duplication that cosegregated in a multiplex family. NR2F2 encodes a pleiotropic developmental transcription factor, and decreased dosage of NR2F2 in mice has been shown to result in abnormal development of atrioventricular septa. Via luciferase assays, we showed that all six coding sequence variants observed in individuals significantly alter the activity of NR2F2 on target promoters.

  12. Rare Variants in NR2F2 Cause Congenital Heart Defects in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Al Turki, Saeed; Manickaraj, Ashok K.; Mercer, Catherine L.; Gerety, Sebastian S.; Hitz, Marc-Phillip; Lindsay, Sarah; D’Alessandro, Lisa C.A.; Swaminathan, G. Jawahar; Bentham, Jamie; Arndt, Anne-Karin; Low, Jacoba; Breckpot, Jeroen; Gewillig, Marc; Thienpont, Bernard; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Harnack, Christine; Hoff, Kirstin; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Schubert, Stephan; Siebert, Reiner; Toka, Okan; Cosgrove, Catherine; Watkins, Hugh; Lucassen, Anneke M.; O’Kelly, Ita M.; Salmon, Anthony P.; Bu’Lock, Frances A.; Granados-Riveron, Javier; Setchfield, Kerry; Thornborough, Chris; Brook, J. David; Mulder, Barbara; Klaassen, Sabine; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Devriendt, Koen; FitzPatrick, David F.; Wilson, David I.; Mital, Seema; Hurles, Matthew E.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common birth defect worldwide and are a leading cause of neonatal mortality. Nonsyndromic atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs) are an important subtype of CHDs for which the genetic architecture is poorly understood. We performed exome sequencing in 13 parent-offspring trios and 112 unrelated individuals with nonsyndromic AVSDs and identified five rare missense variants (two of which arose de novo) in the highly conserved gene NR2F2, a very significant enrichment (p = 7.7 × 10−7) compared to 5,194 control subjects. We identified three additional CHD-affected families with other variants in NR2F2 including a de novo balanced chromosomal translocation, a de novo substitution disrupting a splice donor site, and a 3 bp duplication that cosegregated in a multiplex family. NR2F2 encodes a pleiotropic developmental transcription factor, and decreased dosage of NR2F2 in mice has been shown to result in abnormal development of atrioventricular septa. Via luciferase assays, we showed that all six coding sequence variants observed in individuals significantly alter the activity of NR2F2 on target promoters. PMID:24702954

  13. Transcription variants of SLA-7, a swine non classical MHC class I gene.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rui; Lemonnier, Gaëtan; Bourneuf, Emmanuelle; Vincent-Naulleau, Silvia; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire

    2011-06-03

    In pig, very little information is available on the non classical class I (Ib) genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) i.e. SLA-6, -7 and -8. Our aim was to focus on the transcription pattern of the SLA-7 gene. RT-PCR experiments were carried out with SLA-7 specific primers targeting either the full coding sequence (CDS) from exon 1 to the 3 prime untranslated region (3UTR) or a partial CDS from exon 4 to the 3UTR. We show that the SLA-7 gene expresses a full length transcript not yet identified that refines annotation of the gene with eight exons instead of seven as initially described from the existing RefSeq RNA. These two RNAs encode molecules that differ in cytoplasmic tail length. In this study, another SLA-7 transcript variant was characterized, which encodes a protein with a shorter alpha 3 domain, as a consequence of a splicing site within exon 4. Surprisingly, a cryptic non canonical GA-AG splicing site is used to generate this transcript variant. An additional SLA-7 variant was also identified in the 3UTR with a splicing site occurring 31 nucleotides downstream to the stop codon. In conclusion, the pig SLA-7 MHC class Ib gene presents a complex transcription pattern with two transcripts encoding various molecules and transcripts that do not alter the CDS and may be subject to post-transcriptional regulation.

  14. Rare Copy Number Variants Identified Suggest the Regulating Pathways in Hypertension-Related Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Christian R.; Majid, Fadhlina; Danuri, Norlaila; Basir, Fashieha; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Scherer, Stephen W.; Yusoff, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and a powerful predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in the hypertensive patients. It has complex multifactorial and polygenic basis for its pathogenesis. We hypothesized that rare copy number variants (CNVs) contribute to the LVH pathogenesis in hypertensive patients. Copy number variants (CNV) were identified in 258 hypertensive patients, 95 of whom had LVH, after genotyping with a high resolution SNP array. Following stringent filtering criteria, we identified 208 rare, or private CNVs that were only present in our patients with hypertension related LVH. Preliminary findings from Gene Ontology and pathway analysis of this study confirmed the involvement of the genes known to be functionally involved in cardiac development and phenotypes, in line with previously reported transcriptomic studies. Network enrichment analyses suggested that the gene-set was, directly or indirectly, involved in the transcription factors regulating the “foetal cardiac gene programme” which triggered the hypertrophic cascade, confirming previous reports. These findings suggest that multiple, individually rare copy number variants altering genes may contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension-related LVH. In summary, we have provided further supporting evidence that rare CNV could potentially impact this common and complex disease susceptibility with lower heritability. PMID:26930585

  15. Discovery of Novel Splice Variants and Regulatory Mechanisms for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein in Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takashi; Swift, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a unique lipid transfer protein essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by the liver and intestine. Previous studies in mice identified a splice variant of MTP with an alternate first exon. Splice variants of human MTP have not been reported. Using PCR approaches we have identified two splice variants in human tissues, which we have named MTP-B and MTP-C. MTP-B has a unique first exon (Ex1B) located 10.5 kb upstream of the first exon (Ex1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A); MTP-C contains both first exons for MTP-A and MTP-B. MTP-B was found in a number of tissues, whereas MTP-C was prominent in brain and testis. MTP-B does not encode a protein; MTP-C encodes the same protein encoded by MTP-A, although MTP-C translation is strongly inhibited by regulatory elements within its 5′-UTR. Using luciferase assays, we demonstrate that the promoter region upstream of exon 1B is quite adequate to drive expression of MTP. We conclude that alternate splicing plays a key role in regulating cellular MTP levels by introducing distinct promoter regions and unique 5′-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP activity. PMID:27256115

  16. The Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Variant CCR6DNP Regulates CCR6 via PARP-1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Cunin, Pierre; Wu, Di; Diogo, Dorothée; Yang, Yu; Okada, Yukinori; Plenge, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the implications of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for disease biology requires both identification of causal variants and definition of how these variants alter gene function. The non-coding triallelic dinucleotide polymorphism CCR6DNP is associated with risk for rheumatoid arthritis, and is considered likely causal because allelic variation correlates with expression of the chemokine receptor CCR6. Using transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) gene editing, we confirmed that CCR6DNP regulates CCR6. To identify the associated transcription factor, we applied a novel assay, Flanking Restriction Enhanced Pulldown (FREP), to identify specific association of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) with CCR6DNP consistent with the established allelic risk hierarchy. Correspondingly, manipulation of PARP-1 expression or activity impaired CCR6 expression in several lineages. These findings show that CCR6DNP is a causal variant through which PARP-1 regulates CCR6, and introduce a highly efficient approach to interrogate non-coding genetic polymorphisms associated with human disease. PMID:27626929

  17. Discovery of Novel Splice Variants and Regulatory Mechanisms for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein in Human Tissues.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takashi; Swift, Larry L

    2016-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a unique lipid transfer protein essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by the liver and intestine. Previous studies in mice identified a splice variant of MTP with an alternate first exon. Splice variants of human MTP have not been reported. Using PCR approaches we have identified two splice variants in human tissues, which we have named MTP-B and MTP-C. MTP-B has a unique first exon (Ex1B) located 10.5 kb upstream of the first exon (Ex1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A); MTP-C contains both first exons for MTP-A and MTP-B. MTP-B was found in a number of tissues, whereas MTP-C was prominent in brain and testis. MTP-B does not encode a protein; MTP-C encodes the same protein encoded by MTP-A, although MTP-C translation is strongly inhibited by regulatory elements within its 5'-UTR. Using luciferase assays, we demonstrate that the promoter region upstream of exon 1B is quite adequate to drive expression of MTP. We conclude that alternate splicing plays a key role in regulating cellular MTP levels by introducing distinct promoter regions and unique 5'-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP activity. PMID:27256115

  18. Population genetic simulations of complex phenotypes with implications for rare variant association tests

    PubMed Central

    Uricchio, Lawrence H.; Torres, Raul; Witte, John S.; Hernandez, Ryan D.

    2014-01-01

    Demographic events and natural selection alter patterns of genetic variation within populations, and may play a substantial role in shaping the genetic architecture of complex phenotypes and disease. However, the joint impact of these basic evolutionary forces is often ignored in the assessment of statistical tests of association. Here, we provide a simulation-based framework for generating DNA sequences that incorporates selection and demography with flexible models for simulating phenotypic variation (sfs_coder). This tool also allows the user to perform locus-specific simulations by automatically querying annotated genomic functional elements and genetic maps. We demonstrate the effects of evolutionary forces on patterns of genetic variation by simulating recently inferred models of human selection and demography. We use these simulations to show that the demographic model and locus-specific features, such as the proportion of sites under selection, may have practical implications for estimating the statistical power of sequencing-based rare variant association tests. In particular, for some phenotype models, there may be higher power to detect rare variant associations in African populations compared to non-Africans, but power is considerably reduced in regions of the genome with rampant negative selection. Furthermore, we show that existing methods for simulating large samples based on resampling from a small set of observed haplotypes fail to recapitulate the distribution of rare variants in the presence of rapid population growth (as has been observed in several human populations). PMID:25417809

  19. Alteration of amino acid 101 within capsid protein VP-1 changes the pathogenicity of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Chronic Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection of susceptible mice is an animal model for human demyelinating diseases. Previously we described an altered and diminished pattern of central nervous system disease in immunocompetent SJL/J mice infected with a variant virus. This variant virus H7A6-2 was selected with a neutralizing mAb recognizing the capsid protein VP-1 of Theiler's virus. Here we characterize the variant virus by ELISA and neutralization assays and by sequencing selected regions of the viral RNA genome and relate the alteration to disease. The variant virus contains one single point mutation within a neutralizing epitope of VP- 1. This nucleotide change lead to an amino acid replacement at amino acid 101 of VP-1, a threonine (wild type) to an isoleucine (variant). Model building based on sequence alignments and the known structure of the related Mengo virus indicates that the altered amino acid is located in an exposed loop on the surface of the virus at the periphery of a site that has been proposed to be the receptor binding site. The results of ELISA, neutralization assay, and direct RNA sequencing provide for the first time an opportunity to precisely map an important structural determinant of neurovirulence. PMID:2479706

  20. Alteration of amino acid 101 within capsid protein VP-1 changes the pathogenicity of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus.

    PubMed

    Zurbriggen, A; Hogle, J M; Fujinami, R S

    1989-12-01

    Chronic Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection of susceptible mice is an animal model for human demyelinating diseases. Previously we described an altered and diminished pattern of central nervous system disease in immunocompetent SJL/J mice infected with a variant virus. This variant virus H7A6-2 was selected with a neutralizing mAb recognizing the capsid protein VP-1 of Theiler's virus. Here we characterize the variant virus by ELISA and neutralization assays and by sequencing selected regions of the viral RNA genome and relate the alteration to disease. The variant virus contains one single point mutation within a neutralizing epitope of VP-1. This nucleotide change lead to an amino acid replacement at amino acid 101 of VP-1, a threonine (wild type) to an isoleucine (variant). Model building based on sequence alignments and the known structure of the related Mengo virus indicates that the altered amino acid is located in an exposed loop on the surface of the virus at the periphery of a site that has been proposed to be the receptor binding site. The results of ELISA, neutralization assay, and direct RNA sequencing provide for the first time an opportunity to precisely map an important structural determinant of neurovirulence.

  1. Personality factors and profiles in variants of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Farnam, Alireza; Somi, Mohammad H; Sarami, Firouz; Farhang, Sara; Yasrebinia, Sanaz

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the association between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) variants (constipation, diarrhea, or both) and personality traits in non-psychiatric patients. METHODS: IBS was diagnosed using the Rome II diagnostic criteria after exclusion of organic bowel pathology. The entry of each patient was confirmed following a psychiatric interview. Personality traits and the score of each factor were evaluated using the NEO Five Factor Inventory. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty patients were studied. The mean age (± SD) was 33.4 (± 11.0) year (62% female). Subjects scored higher in neuroticism (26.25 ± 7.80 vs 22.92 ± 9.54, P < 0.0005), openness (26.25 ± 5.22 vs 27.94 ± 4.87, P < 0.0005) and conscientiousness (32.90 ± 7.80 vs 31.62 ± 5.64, P < 0.01) compared to our general population derived from universities of Iran. Our studied population consisted of 71 patients with Diarrhea dominant-IBS, 33 with Constipation dominant-IBS and 46 with Altering type-IBS. Scores of conscientiousness and neuroticism were significantly higher in C-IBS compared to D-IBS and A-IBS (35.79 ± 5.65 vs 31.95 ± 6.80, P = 0.035 and 31.97 ± 9.87, P = 0.043, respectively). Conscientiousness was the highest dimension of personality in each of the variants. Patients with C-IBS had almost similar personality profiles, composed of higher scores for neuroticism and conscientiousness, with low levels of agreeableness, openness and extraversion that were close to those of the general population. CONCLUSION: Differences were observed between IBS patients and the general population, as well as between IBS subtypes, in terms of personality factors. Patients with constipation-predominant IBS showed similar personality profiles. Patients with each subtype of IBS may benefit from psychological interventions, which can be focused considering the characteristics of each subtype. PMID:18081232

  2. Discovery of structural alterations in solid tumor oligodendroglioma by single molecule analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Solid tumors present a panoply of genomic alterations, from single base changes to the gain or loss of entire chromosomes. Although aberrations at the two extremes of this spectrum are readily defined, comprehensive discernment of the complex and disperse mutational spectrum of cancer genomes remains a significant challenge for current genome analysis platforms. In this context, high throughput, single molecule platforms like Optical Mapping offer a unique perspective. Results Using measurements from large ensembles of individual DNA molecules, we have discovered genomic structural alterations in the solid tumor oligodendroglioma. Over a thousand structural variants were identified in each tumor sample, without any prior hypotheses, and often in genomic regions deemed intractable by other technologies. These findings were then validated by comprehensive comparisons to variants reported in external and internal databases, and by selected experimental corroborations. Alterations range in size from under 5 kb to hundreds of kilobases, and comprise insertions, deletions, inversions and compound events. Candidate mutations were scored at sub-genic resolution and unambiguously reveal structural details at aberrant loci. Conclusions The Optical Mapping system provides a rich description of the complex genomes of solid tumors, including sequence level aberrations, structural alterations and copy number variants that power generation of functional hypotheses for oligodendroglioma genetics. PMID:23885787

  3. COMT gene locus: new functional variants.

    PubMed

    Meloto, Carolina B; Segall, Samantha K; Smith, Shad; Parisien, Marc; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia M; Gauthier, Josée; Tsao, Douglas; Convertino, Marino; Piltonen, Marjo H; Slade, Gary Dmitri; Fillingim, Roger B; Greenspan, Joel D; Ohrbach, Richard; Knott, Charles; Maixner, William; Zaykin, Dmitri; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Reenilä, Ilkka; Männistö, Pekka T; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-10-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholaminergic neurotransmitters. Numerous studies have linked COMT to pivotal brain functions such as mood, cognition, response to stress, and pain. Both nociception and risk of clinical pain have been associated with COMT genetic variants, and this association was shown to be mediated through adrenergic pathways. Here, we show that association studies between COMT polymorphic markers and pain phenotypes in 2 independent cohorts identified a functional marker, rs165774, situated in the 3' untranslated region of a newfound splice variant, (a)-COMT. Sequence comparisons showed that the (a)-COMT transcript is highly conserved in primates, and deep sequencing data demonstrated that (a)-COMT is expressed across several human tissues, including the brain. In silico analyses showed that the (a)-COMT enzyme features a distinct C-terminus structure, capable of stabilizing substrates in its active site. In vitro experiments demonstrated not only that (a)-COMT is catalytically active but also that it displays unique substrate specificity, exhibiting enzymatic activity with dopamine but not epinephrine. They also established that the pain-protective A allele of rs165774 coincides with lower COMT activity, suggesting contribution to decreased pain sensitivity through increased dopaminergic rather than decreased adrenergic tone, characteristic of reference isoforms. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of the (a)-COMT isoform in nociceptive signaling and suggest that genetic variations in (a)-COMT isoforms may contribute to individual variability in pain phenotypes. PMID:26207649

  4. COMT gene locus: new functional variants

    PubMed Central

    Meloto, Carolina B.; Segall, Samantha K.; Smith, Shad; Parisien, Marc; Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia M.; Gauthier, Josée; Tsao, Douglas; Convertino, Marino; Piltonen, Marjo H.; Slade, Gary Dmitri; Fillingim, Roger B.; Greenspan, Joel D.; Ohrbach, Richard; Knott, Charles; Maixner, William; Zaykin, Dmitri; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Reenilä, Ilkka; Männistö, Pekka T.; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholaminergic neurotransmitters. Numerous studies have linked COMT to pivotal brain functions such as mood, cognition, response to stress, and pain. Both nociception and risk of clinical pain have been associated with COMT genetic variants, and this association was shown to be mediated through adrenergic pathways. Here, we show that association studies between COMT polymorphic markers and pain phenotypes in 2 independent cohorts identified a functional marker, rs165774, situated in the 3′ untranslated region of a newfound splice variant, (a)-COMT. Sequence comparisons showed that the (a)-COMT transcript is highly conserved in primates, and deep sequencing data demonstrated that (a)-COMT is expressed across several human tissues, including the brain. In silico analyses showed that the (a)-COMT enzyme features a distinct C-terminus structure, capable of stabilizing substrates in its active site. In vitro experiments demonstrated not only that (a)-COMT is catalytically active but also that it displays unique substrate specificity, exhibiting enzymatic activity with dopamine but not epinephrine. They also established that the pain-protective A allele of rs165774 coincides with lower COMT activity, suggesting contribution to decreased pain sensitivity through increased dopaminergic rather than decreased adrenergic tone, characteristic of reference isoforms. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of the (a)-COMT isoform in nociceptive signaling and suggest that genetic variations in (a)-COMT isoforms may contribute to individual variability in pain phenotypes. PMID:26207649

  5. Genetic variants of dental plaque Methanobrevibacter oralis.

    PubMed

    Huynh, H T T; Nkamga, V D; Drancourt, M; Aboudharam, G

    2015-06-01

    Methanobrevibacter oralis is the major methanogenic archaea found in the oral cavity. It has been implicated in periodontitis, including the severe form. It is unknown whether certain M. oralis genetic variants are associated with severe periodontitis. Here, we developed multispacer sequence typing (MST) as a sequencing-based genotyping method for the assessment of M. oralis. The sequencing of four intergenic spacers from a collection of 17 dental plaque M. oralis isolates obtained from seven individuals revealed 482 genetic polymorphisms, including 401 single nucleotide polymorphisms (83.2 %), 55 deletions (11.4 %) and 26 insertions (5.4 %). Concatenation of the four spacers yielded nine genotypes, which were clustered into six groups with an index of discrimination of 0.919. One periodontitis patient may have harboured up to three genetic variants of M. oralis, revealing the previously unknown diversity of this archaea. MST will allow for the study of the dynamics of M. oralis populations, including inter-individual transmission and any correlations with the severity of periodontitis. PMID:25633825

  6. Canonical and variant histones of protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Dalmasso, Maria Carolina; Sullivan, William Joseph; Angel, Sergio Oscar

    2011-06-01

    Protozoan parasites have tremendously diverse lifestyles that require adaptation to a remarkable assortment of different environmental conditions. In order to complete their life cycles, protozoan parasites rely on fine-tuning gene expression. In general, protozoa use novel regulatory elements, transcription factors, and epigenetic mechanisms to regulate their transcriptomes. One of the most surprising findings includes the nature of their histones--these primitive eukaryotes lack some histones yet harbor novel histone variants of unknown function. In this review, we describe the histone components of different protozoan parasites based on literature and database searching. We summarize the key discoveries regarding histones and histone variants and their impact on chromatin regulation in protozoan parasites. In addition, we list histone genes IDs, sequences, and genomic localization of several protozoan parasites and Microsporidia histones, obtained from a thorough search of genome databases. We then compare these findings with those observed in higher eukaryotes, allowing us to highlight some novel aspects of epigenetic regulation in protists and to propose questions to be addressed in the upcoming years.

  7. [Cutaneous lymphomas: new entities and rare variants].

    PubMed

    Kempf, W; Mitteldorf, C

    2015-02-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are the second most common group of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Recently several new variants and entities have been described but have not yet become part of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. These forms include the granulomatous form of mycosis fungoides, which is associated with a poorer prognosis, as well as indolent CD8+ lymphoproliferations on the head and at acral localizations. Within the group of cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders, new histological types of lymphomatoid papulosis have been identified, such as type D (CD8+ epidermotropic) and type E (angioinvasive) which simulate aggressive lymphomas. Cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphomas are a prognostically heterogeneous group of cutaneous lymphomas. The cutaneous CD8+ aggressive epidermotropic cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma and cutaneous gamma/delta T-cell lymphoma are very aggressive neoplasms, whereas cutaneous CD4+ small to medium-sized T-cell lymphoma in its solitary or localized form represents an indolent lymphoproliferation: the terminology, histogenesis and differentiation from nodular T-cell pseudolymphoma are still a matter of debate. Among B-cell lymphomas, disorders associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are discussed focusing on EBV diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly and EBV-associated mucocutaneous ulcer. This review describes the clinical, histological and immunophenotypic features of new and rare entities and variants of cutaneous lymphomas and highlights the impact of the clinicopathological correlation in the diagnostic process.

  8. False discovery rates for rare variants from sequenced data.

    PubMed

    Capanu, Marinela; Seshan, Venkatraman E

    2015-02-01

    The detection of rare deleterious variants is the preeminent current technical challenge in statistical genetics. Sorting the deleterious from neutral variants at a disease locus is challenging because of the sparseness of the evidence for each individual variant. Hierarchical modeling and Bayesian model uncertainty are two techniques that have been shown to be promising in pinpointing individual rare variants that may be driving the association. Interpreting the results from these techniques from the perspective of multiple testing is a challenge and the goal of this article is to better understand their false discovery properties. Using simulations, we conclude that accurate false discovery control cannot be achieved in this framework unless the magnitude of the variants' risk is large and the hierarchical characteristics have high accuracy in distinguishing deleterious from neutral variants.

  9. Altered fingerprints: analysis and detection.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Soweon; Feng, Jianjiang; Jain, Anil K

    2012-03-01

    The widespread deployment of Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems (AFIS) in law enforcement and border control applications has heightened the need for ensuring that these systems are not compromised. While several issues related to fingerprint system security have been investigated, including the use of fake fingerprints for masquerading identity, the problem of fingerprint alteration or obfuscation has received very little attention. Fingerprint obfuscation refers to the deliberate alteration of the fingerprint pattern by an individual for the purpose of masking his identity. Several cases of fingerprint obfuscation have been reported in the press. Fingerprint image quality assessment software (e.g., NFIQ) cannot always detect altered fingerprints since the implicit image quality due to alteration may not change significantly. The main contributions of this paper are: 1) compiling case studies of incidents where individuals were found to have altered their fingerprints for circumventing AFIS, 2) investigating the impact of fingerprint alteration on the accuracy of a commercial fingerprint matcher, 3) classifying the alterations into three major categories and suggesting possible countermeasures, 4) developing a technique to automatically detect altered fingerprints based on analyzing orientation field and minutiae distribution, and 5) evaluating the proposed technique and the NFIQ algorithm on a large database of altered fingerprints provided by a law enforcement agency. Experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed approach in detecting altered fingerprints and highlight the need to further pursue this problem.

  10. Altered fingerprints: analysis and detection.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Soweon; Feng, Jianjiang; Jain, Anil K

    2012-03-01

    The widespread deployment of Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems (AFIS) in law enforcement and border control applications has heightened the need for ensuring that these systems are not compromised. While several issues related to fingerprint system security have been investigated, including the use of fake fingerprints for masquerading identity, the problem of fingerprint alteration or obfuscation has received very little attention. Fingerprint obfuscation refers to the deliberate alteration of the fingerprint pattern by an individual for the purpose of masking his identity. Several cases of fingerprint obfuscation have been reported in the press. Fingerprint image quality assessment software (e.g., NFIQ) cannot always detect altered fingerprints since the implicit image quality due to alteration may not change significantly. The main contributions of this paper are: 1) compiling case studies of incidents where individuals were found to have altered their fingerprints for circumventing AFIS, 2) investigating the impact of fingerprint alteration on the accuracy of a commercial fingerprint matcher, 3) classifying the alterations into three major categories and suggesting possible countermeasures, 4) developing a technique to automatically detect altered fingerprints based on analyzing orientation field and minutiae distribution, and 5) evaluating the proposed technique and the NFIQ algorithm on a large database of altered fingerprints provided by a law enforcement agency. Experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed approach in detecting altered fingerprints and highlight the need to further pursue this problem. PMID:21808092

  11. Improving coeliac disease risk prediction by testing non-HLA variants additional to HLA variants

    PubMed Central

    Romanos, Jihane; Rosén, Anna; Kumar, Vinod; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Szperl, Agata; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; van Diemen, Cleo C; Kanninga, Roan; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A; Steck, Andrea; Eisenbarth, Georges; van Heel, David A; Cukrowska, Bozena; Bruno, Valentina; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Núñez, Concepcion; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Mearin, M Luisa; Barisani, Donatella; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M; Ivarsson, Anneli; Boezen, H Marieke; Liu, Edwin; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of coeliac disease (CD) patients are not being properly diagnosed and therefore remain untreated, leading to a greater risk of developing CD-associated complications. The major genetic risk heterodimer, HLA-DQ2 and DQ8, is already used clinically to help exclude disease. However, approximately 40% of the population carry these alleles and the majority never develop CD. Objective We explored whether CD risk prediction can be improved by adding non-HLA-susceptible variants to common HLA testing. Design We developed an average weighted genetic risk score with 10, 26 and 57 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 2675 cases and 2815 controls and assessed the improvement in risk prediction provided by the non-HLA SNP. Moreover, we assessed the transferability of the genetic risk model with 26 non-HLA variants to a nested case–control population (n=1709) and a prospective cohort (n=1245) and then tested how well this model predicted CD outcome for 985 independent individuals. Results Adding 57 non-HLA variants to HLA testing showed a statistically significant improvement compared to scores from models based on HLA only, HLA plus 10 SNP and HLA plus 26 SNP. With 57 non-HLA variants, the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve reached 0.854 compared to 0.823 for HLA only, and 11.1% of individuals were reclassified to a more accurate risk group. We show that the risk model with HLA plus 26 SNP is useful in independent populations. Conclusions Predicting risk with 57 additional non-HLA variants improved the identification of potential CD patients. This demonstrates a possible role for combined HLA and non-HLA genetic testing in diagnostic work for CD. PMID:23704318

  12. eXtasy: variant prioritization by genomic data fusion.

    PubMed

    Sifrim, Alejandro; Popovic, Dusan; Tranchevent, Leon-Charles; Ardeshirdavani, Amin; Sakai, Ryo; Konings, Peter; Vermeesch, Joris R; Aerts, Jan; De Moor, Bart; Moreau, Yves

    2013-11-01

    Massively parallel sequencing greatly facilitates the discovery of novel disease genes causing Mendelian and oligogenic disorders. However, many mutations are present in any individual genome, and identifying which ones are disease causing remains a largely open problem. We introduce eXtasy, an approach to prioritize nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variants (nSNVs) that substantially improves prediction of disease-causing variants in exome sequencing data by integrating variant impact prediction, haploinsufficiency prediction and phenotype-specific gene prioritization.

  13. Pharmacognostical studies on Cissus quadrangularis L. variant I & II

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Anoop; Kannan, R.; Jegadeesan, M.

    2004-01-01

    The aerial parts of Cissus quadrangularis L.Variant I and II are being used therapeutically for various ailments in indigenous system of medicine. Detailed pharmacognostical studies on the aerial parts were made. Variant I and II were analysed for their physiochemical, microscopical, fluorescent, qualitative and quantitative phytochemical, TLC and HPTLC characteristics. Quantitative variations were noted among seasonal samples and between variants and the results are presented. PMID:22557140

  14. [Transferrin variants: significance and identification in paternity cases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Mauff, G; Doppelfeld, E; Weber, W

    1975-08-01

    Transferrin phenotypes were determined in 3380 sera of unrelated persons of the western region of Germany with 97.60 percent for TfC and 2.40 percent for Tf variants. Identification was achieved by immunochemical means or through autoradiography. Relative mobilities in some variants were measured using Tf B2C (0.7) as reference. Application of Tf variants is demonstrated in paternity cases.

  15. The power of multiplexed functional analysis of genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Gasperini, Molly; Starita, Lea; Shendure, Jay

    2016-10-01

    New technologies have recently enabled saturation mutagenesis and functional analysis of nearly all possible variants of regulatory elements or proteins of interest in single experiments. Here we discuss the past, present, and future of such multiplexed (functional) assays for variant effects (MAVEs). MAVEs provide detailed insight into sequence-function relationships, and they may prove critical for the prospective clinical interpretation of genetic variants. PMID:27583640

  16. Parasites alter community structure.

    PubMed

    Wood, Chelsea L; Byers, James E; Cottingham, Kathryn L; Altman, Irit; Donahue, Megan J; Blakeslee, April M H

    2007-05-29

    Parasites often play an important role in modifying the physiology and behavior of their hosts and may, consequently, mediate the influence hosts have on other components of an ecological community. Along the northern Atlantic coast of North America, the dominant herbivorous snail Littorina littorea structures rocky intertidal communities through strong grazing pressure and is frequently parasitized by the digenean trematode Cryptocotyle lingua. We hypothesized that the effects of parasitism on host physiology would induce behavioral changes in L. littorea, which in turn would modulate L. littorea's influence on intertidal community composition. Specifically, we hypothesized that C. lingua infection would alter the grazing rate of L. littorea and, consequently, macroalgal communities would develop differently in the presence of infected versus uninfected snails. Our results show that uninfected snails consumed 40% more ephemeral macroalgal biomass than infected snails in the laboratory, probably because the digestive system of infected snails is compromised by C. lingua infection. In the field, this weaker grazing by infected snails resulted in significantly greater expansion of ephemeral macroalgal cover relative to grazing by uninfected snails. By decreasing the per-capita grazing rate of the dominant herbivore, C. lingua indirectly affects the composition of the macroalgal community and may in turn affect other species that depend on macroalgae for resources or habitat structure. In light of the abundance of parasites across systems, we suggest that, through trait-mediated indirect effects, parasites may be a common determinant of structure in ecological communities. PMID:17517667

  17. ApoE variant p.V236E is associated with markedly reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) which show significant association at the well-known APOE locus and at nineteen additional loci. Among the functional, disease-associated variants at these loci, missense variants are particularly important because they can be readily investigated in model systems to search for novel therapeutic targets. It is now possible to perform a low-cost search for these “actionable” variants by genotyping the missense variants at known LOAD loci already cataloged on the Exome Variant Server (EVS). In this proof-of-principle study designed to explore the efficacy of this approach, we analyzed three rare EVS variants in APOE, p.L28P, p.R145C and p.V236E, in our case control series of 9114 subjects. p.R145C proved to be too rare to analyze effectively. The minor allele of p.L28P, which was in complete linkage disequilibrium (D’ = 1) with the far more common APOE ϵ4 allele, showed no association with LOAD (P = 0.75) independent of the APOE ϵ4 allele. p.V236E was significantly associated with a marked reduction in risk of LOAD (P = 7.5×10−05; OR = 0.10, 0.03 to 0.45). The minor allele of p.V236E, which was in complete linkage disequilibrium (D’ = 1) with the common APOE ϵ3 allele, identifies a novel LOAD-associated haplotype (APOE ϵ3b) which is associated with decreased risk of LOAD independent of the more abundant APOE ϵ2, ϵ3 and ϵ4 haplotypes. Follow-up studies will be important to confirm the significance of this association and to better define its odds ratio. The ApoE p.V236E substitution is the first disease-associated change located in the lipid-binding, C-terminal domain of the protein. Thus our study (i) identifies a novel APOE missense variant which may profitably be studied to better understand how ApoE function may be modified to reduce risk of LOAD and (ii) indicates that analysis of protein-altering

  18. A Disease-Causing Variant in PCNA Disrupts a Promiscuous Protein Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Caroline M; Hilbert, Brendan J; Kelch, Brian A

    2016-03-27

    The eukaryotic DNA polymerase sliding clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen or PCNA, is a ring-shaped protein complex that surrounds DNA to act as a sliding platform for increasing processivity of cellular replicases and for coordinating various cellular pathways with DNA replication. A single point mutation, Ser228Ile, in the human PCNA gene was recently identified to cause a disease whose symptoms resemble those of DNA damage and repair disorders. The mutation lies near the binding site for most PCNA-interacting proteins. However, the structural consequences of the S228I mutation are unknown. Here, we describe the structure of the disease-causing variant, which reveals a large conformational change that dramatically transforms the binding pocket for PCNA client proteins. We show that the mutation markedly alters the binding energetics for some client proteins, while another, p21(CIP1), is only mildly affected. Structures of the disease variant bound to peptides derived from two PCNA partner proteins reveal that the binding pocket can adjust conformation to accommodate some ligands, indicating that the binding site is dynamic and pliable. Our work has implications for the plasticity of the binding site in PCNA and reveals how a disease mutation selectively alters interactions to a promiscuous binding site that is critical for DNA metabolism.

  19. Germline PTPN11 and somatic PIK3CA variant in a boy with megalencephaly-capillary malformation syndrome (MCAP)--pure coincidence?

    PubMed

    Döcker, Dennis; Schubach, Max; Menzel, Moritz; Spaich, Christiane; Gabriel, Heinz-Dieter; Zenker, Martin; Bartholdi, Deborah; Biskup, Saskia

    2015-03-01

    Megalencephaly-capillary malformation (MCAP) syndrome is an overgrowth syndrome that is diagnosed by clinical criteria. Recently, somatic and germline variants in genes that are involved in the PI3K-AKT pathway (AKT3, PIK3R2 and PIK3CA) have been described to be associated with MCAP and/or other related megalencephaly syndromes. We performed trio-exome sequencing in a 6-year-old boy and his healthy parents. Clinical features were macrocephaly, cutis marmorata, angiomata, asymmetric overgrowth, developmental delay, discrete midline facial nevus flammeus, toe syndactyly and postaxial polydactyly--thus, clearly an MCAP phenotype. Exome sequencing revealed a pathogenic de novo germline variant in the PTPN11 gene (c.1529A>G; p.(Gln510Arg)), which has so far been associated with Noonan, as well as LEOPARD syndrome. Whole-exome sequencing (>100 × coverage) did not reveal any alteration in the known megalencephaly genes. However, ultra-deep sequencing results from saliva (>1000 × coverage) revealed a 22% mosaic variant in PIK3CA (c.2740G>A; p.(Gly914Arg)). To our knowledge, this report is the first description of a PTPN11 germline variant in an MCAP patient. Data from experimental studies show a complex interaction of SHP2 (gene product of PTPN11) and the PI3K-AKT pathway. We hypothesize that certain PTPN11 germline variants might drive toward additional second-hit alterations.

  20. Germline PTPN11 and somatic PIK3CA variant in a boy with megalencephaly-capillary malformation syndrome (MCAP)--pure coincidence?

    PubMed

    Döcker, Dennis; Schubach, Max; Menzel, Moritz; Spaich, Christiane; Gabriel, Heinz-Dieter; Zenker, Martin; Bartholdi, Deborah; Biskup, Saskia

    2015-03-01

    Megalencephaly-capillary malformation (MCAP) syndrome is an overgrowth syndrome that is diagnosed by clinical criteria. Recently, somatic and germline variants in genes that are involved in the PI3K-AKT pathway (AKT3, PIK3R2 and PIK3CA) have been described to be associated with MCAP and/or other related megalencephaly syndromes. We performed trio-exome sequencing in a 6-year-old boy and his healthy parents. Clinical features were macrocephaly, cutis marmorata, angiomata, asymmetric overgrowth, developmental delay, discrete midline facial nevus flammeus, toe syndactyly and postaxial polydactyly--thus, clearly an MCAP phenotype. Exome sequencing revealed a pathogenic de novo germline variant in the PTPN11 gene (c.1529A>G; p.(Gln510Arg)), which has so far been associated with Noonan, as well as LEOPARD syndrome. Whole-exome sequencing (>100 × coverage) did not reveal any alteration in the known megalencephaly genes. However, ultra-deep sequencing results from saliva (>1000 × coverage) revealed a 22% mosaic variant in PIK3CA (c.2740G>A; p.(Gly914Arg)). To our knowledge, this report is the first description of a PTPN11 germline variant in an MCAP patient. Data from experimental studies show a complex interaction of SHP2 (gene product of PTPN11) and the PI3K-AKT pathway. We hypothesize that certain PTPN11 germline variants might drive toward additional second-hit alterations. PMID:24939587

  1. Rare deficiency {alpha}{sub 1} Antitrypsin variants; current status and SSCP analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Billingsley, G.D.; Cox, D.W.

    1994-09-01

    The serine protease inhibitor {alpha}{sub 1} Antitrypsin ({alpha}{sub 1}AT) is an inhibitor of neutrophil elastase. A deficiency of {alpha}{sub 1}AT (< 20% of the normal amount of {alpha}{sub 1}AT) is associated with early-onset emphysema and childhood liver disease. The most common deficiency allele, PI{sup *}Z, has a frequency of 1-2% in the North American white population. Several rare deficiency alleles (including null (QO) alleles; < 1% of normal) with a combined frequency of approximately 10{sup -4}, have been reported. Of 24 sequenced deficiency variants, the defect in 15 has been proven to be due to gene deletion (2), mRNA degradation (2), error in mRNA processing (1), intracellular protein accumulation (5) and intracellular protein degradation (5). We have determined conditions for detection of new mutations. We have screened DNA from 20 individuals carrying rare deficiency alleles. In some individuals, RFLP haplotype analysis suggested the presence of a new variant. The root alleles, M1 (Ala 213) or M1 (Val 213), and the presence of variants whose mutant sequence alters a restriction endonuclease site were determined by digestion of the amplified exon. Mutation detection was performed by SSCP analysis of each of the four coding exons followed by direct sequencing of the amplified exon. 12 of 14 known mutations (85%) were detected by SSCP analysis. We detected a new null allele in a patient that also carries the QO{sup *}hongkong allele. C to A transversion at the third nucleotide of codon 38 creates a stop codon on the M1(Val 213) root allele. This new variant allele has been named PI{sup *}QOkowloon. Characterization of the mutations leading to {alpha}{sub 1}AT deficiency allows delineation of amino acids critical for stability, for normal secretion and for normal function.

  2. Rapid identification of human SNAP-25 transcript variants by a miniaturized capillary electrophoresis system.

    PubMed

    Németh, Nóra; Kerékgyártó, Márta; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Rónai, Zsolt; Guttman, András

    2014-02-01

    The 25 kDa synaptosomal-associated protein (SNAP-25) is a crucial component of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor complex and plays an important role in neurotransmission in the central nervous system. SNAP-25 has two different splice variants, SNAP-25a and SNAP-25b, differing in nine amino acids that results in a slight functional alteration of the generated soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor complex. Two independent techniques, a PCR-miniaturized CE method and a real-time PCR based approach were elaborated for the specific and quantitative detection of the two SNAP-25 transcription variants. DNA-constructs coding for the two isoforms were used for optimization. Excellent specificity was observed with the use of our previously described highly sensitive miniaturized CE system in combination with quantitative PCR. The ratio of the two isoforms were reliably detected in a range of at least four orders of magnitude with a linear regression of R(2) = 0.987. Expression of the two isoforms was determined in human samples, where SNAP-25 was detected even in non-neural tissues, although at approximately a 100-fold lower level compared to the central nervous system. The relative amount of the SNAP-25b isoform was higher in the brain, whereas expression of SNAP-25a variant proved to be slightly higher in extra-neural cell types. The genomics approach in conjunction with the miniaturized CE system introduced in this paper is readily applicable for rapid alternative splice variant analysis.

  3. Identification and pharmacological characterization of the prostaglandin FP receptor and FP receptor variant complexes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Y; Woodward, D F; Guzman, V M; Li, C; Scott, D F; Wang, J W; Wheeler, L A; Garst, M E; Landsverk, K; Sachs, G; Krauss, A H-P; Cornell, C; Martos, J; Pettit, S; Fliri, H

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: A prostamide analogue, bimatoprost, has been shown to be effective in reducing intraocular pressure, but its precise mechanism of action remains unclear. Hence, to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of this effect of bimatoprost, we focused on pharmacologically characterizing prostaglandin FP receptor (FP) and FP receptor variant (altFP) complexes. Experimental approach: FP receptor mRNA variants were identified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The FP-altFP4 heterodimers were established in HEK293/EBNA cells co-expressing FP and altFP4 receptor variants. A fluorometric imaging plate reader was used to study Ca2+ mobilization. Upregulation of cysteine-rich angiogenic protein 61 (Cyr61) mRNA was measured by Northern blot analysis, and phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) by western analysis. Key results: Six splicing variants of FP receptor mRNA were identified in human ocular tissues. Immunoprecipitation confirmed that the FP receptor is dimerized with altFP4 receptors in HEK293/EBNA cells co-expressing FP and altFP4 receptors. In the studies of the kinetic profile for Ca2+ mobilization, prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) elicited a rapid increase in intracellular Ca2+ followed by a steady state phase. In contrast, bimatoprost elicited an immediate increase in intracellular Ca2+ followed by a second phase. The prostamide antagonist, AGN211335, selectively and dose-dependently inhibited the bimatoprost-initiated second phase of Ca2+ mobilization, Cyr61 mRNA upregulation and MLC phosphorylation, but did not block the action of PGF2α. Conclusion and implications: Bimatoprost lacks effects on the FP receptor but may interact with the FP-altFP receptor heterodimer to induce alterations in second messenger signalling. Hence, FP-altFP complexes may represent the underlying basis of bimatoprost pharmacology. PMID:18587449

  4. Variants in the ATM gene associated with a reduced risk of contralateral breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Concannon, Patrick; Haile, Robert W.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Rosenstein, Barry S.; Gatti, Richard A.; Teraoka, Sharon N.; Diep, Anh T.; Jansen, Laila; Atencio, David P.; Langholz, Bryan; Capanu, Marinela; Liang, Xiaolin; Begg, Colin B.; Thomas, Duncan C.; Bernstein, Leslie; Olsen, Jørgen H.; Malone, Kathleen E.; Lynch, Charles F.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Bernstein, Jonine L.

    2008-01-01

    Between five and ten percent of women who survive a first primary breast cancer will subsequently develop a second primary cancer in the contralateral breast. The Women’s Environment Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology (WECARE) Study was designed to identify genetic and environmental determinants of contralateral breast cancer (CBC). In this study, 708 women with asynchronous CBC served as cases and 1397 women with unilateral breast cancer served as controls. ATM, a serine-threonine kinase, controls the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks, and has been implicated in breast cancer risk. Complete mutation screening of the ATM gene in all 2105 study participants identified 240 distinct sequence variants; only 15 were observed in more than 1% of subjects. Among the rare variants, deleterious alleles resulting in loss of ATM function were associated with a non-significant increase in risk of CBC. In contrast, carriers of common variants had a statistically significant reduction in risk of CBC. Four of these 15 variants were individually associated with a significantly decreased risk of second primary breast cancer (c.1899-55T>G, RR=0.5, 95% CI=0.3–0.8; c.3161C>G, RR=0.5, 95% CI=0.3–0.9; c.5558A>T, RR=0.2, 95% CI=0.1–0.6; c.6348-54T>C RR=0.2, 95% CI=0.1–0.8). These data suggest that some alleles of ATM may exert an anti-neoplastic effect, perhaps by altering the activity of ATM as an initiator of DNA damage responses or a regulator of p53. PMID:18701470

  5. Neurobehavioral Differences Between Mice Receiving Distinct Neuregulin Variants as Neonates; Impact on Sensitivity to MK-801

    PubMed Central

    Kato, T.; Abe, Y.; Hirokawa, S.; Iwakura, Y.; Mizuno, M.; Namba, H.; Nawa, H.

    2015-01-01

    Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) is a well-recognized risk gene for schizophrenia and is often implicated in the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of this illness. Alternative splicing and proteolytic processing of the NRG1 gene produce more than 30 structural variants; however, the neuropathological roles of individual variants remain to be characterized. On the basis of the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia, we administered eNRG1 (0.1~1.0 µg/g), a core epidermal growth factor-like (EGF) domain common for all splicing NRG1 variants, to neonatal mice and compared their behavioral performance with mice challenged with a full mature form of type 1 NRG1 variant. During the neonatal stage, recombinant eNRG1 protein administrated from the periphery passed the blood-brain barrier and activated its receptor (ErbB4) in the brain. In adults, the mice receiving the highest dose exhibited lower locomotor activity and deficits in prepulse inhibition and tonedependent fear learning, although the hearing reduction of the eNRG1-treated mice may explain these behavioral deficits. Neonatal eNRG1 treatment also significantly potentiated MK-801-driven locomotor activity in an eNRG1 dose-dependent manner. In parallel eNRG1 treatment enhanced MK-801-driven c-Fos induction and decreased immunoreactivity for NMDA receptor subunits in adult brain. In contrast, mice that had been treated with the same molar dose of a full mature form of type 1 NRG1 as neonates did not exhibit hypersensitivity to MK-801. However, both animal models exhibited similar hypersensitivity to methamphetamine. Collectively, our findings suggest that aberrant peripheral NRG1 signals during neurodevelopment alter later behavioral traits and auditory functions in the NRG1 subtype-dependent manner. PMID:25817857

  6. Hybrid optoelectronic neurocomputer: variants of realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtikhiev, Nickolay N.; Starikov, Rostislav S.; Scherbakov, Igor B.; Gaponov, Alexandr E.; Onyky, Boris N.

    1995-04-01

    The optoelectronic devices are the most effective for realization in the form of the vector- matrix multiplier. Proposed optoelectronic neurocomputers (OENC) consist of optical vector- matrix multiplier (OVMM), random access memory (RAM) and electronic control system. There are two variants of realization. The first neurocomputer scheme includes OVMM based on MAOM -- multichannel multifrequency acousto-optic modulator (Bragg cell). MAOM is the fastest up-to-date spatial light modulator. The second neurocomputer is constructed on the basis of planar OVMM (POVMM). Vector-matrix multiplication in POVMM is executed in a very small volume. The POVMM consists of matrix of light emitting diodes and array of linear photodetectors. A special computer program `NEUROEMULATOR' was designed to learn and to test performance of neural networks. Neural networks were trained with gradient and stochastic algorithms. The paper presents results of computer simulation and hardware implementation of neural networks.

  7. A look-ahead variant of TFQMR

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, R.W.; Nachtigal, N.M.

    1994-12-31

    Recently, Freund proposed a Krylov subspace iteration, the transpose-free quasi-minimal residual method (TFQMR), for solving general nonsingular non-Hermitian linear systems. The algorithm relies on a version of the squared Lanczos process to generate the basis vectors for the underlying Krylov subspace. It then constructs iterates defined by a quasi-minimization property, which leads to a smooth and nearly monotone convergence behavior. The authors investigate a variant of TFQMR that uses look-ahead to avoid some of the problems associated with breakdowns in the underlying squared Lanczos procedure. They also present some numerical examples that illustrate the properties of the new method, as compared to the original TFQMR algorithm.

  8. Genetic and epigenetic variants contributing to clofarabine cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Eadon, Michael T; Wheeler, Heather E; Stark, Amy L; Zhang, Xu; Moen, Erika L; Delaney, Shannon M; Im, Hae Kyung; Cunningham, Patrick N; Zhang, Wei; Dolan, M Eileen

    2013-10-01

    2-chloro-2-fluoro-deoxy-9-D-arabinofuranosyladenine (Clofarabine), a purine nucleoside analog, is used in the treatment of hematologic malignancies and as induction therapy for stem cell transplantation. The discovery of pharmacogenomic markers associated with chemotherapeutic efficacy and toxicity would greatly benefit the utility of this drug. Our objective was to identify genetic and epigenetic variants associated with clofarabine toxicity using an unbiased, whole genome approach. To this end, we employed International HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines (190 LCLs) of European (CEU) or African (YRI) ancestry with known genetic information to evaluate cellular sensitivity to clofarabine. We measured modified cytosine levels to ascertain the contribution of genetic and epigenetic factors influencing clofarabine-mediated cytotoxicity. Association studies revealed 182 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 143 modified cytosines associated with cytotoxicity in both populations at the threshold P ≤ 0.0001. Correlation between cytotoxicity and baseline gene expression revealed 234 genes at P ≤ 3.98 × 10(-6). Six genes were implicated as: (i) their expression was directly correlated to cytotoxicity, (ii) they had a targeting SNP associated with cytotoxicity, and (iii) they had local modified cytosines associated with gene expression and cytotoxicity. We identified a set of three SNPs and three CpG sites targeting these six genes explaining 43.1% of the observed variation in phenotype. siRNA knockdown of the top three genes (SETBP1, BAG3, KLHL6) in LCLs revealed altered susceptibility to clofarabine, confirming relevance. As clofarabine's toxicity profile includes acute kidney injury, we examined the effect of siRNA knockdown in HEK293 cells. siSETBP1 led to a significant change in HEK293 cell susceptibility to clofarabine.

  9. Mechanisms of CFTR Functional Variants That Impair Regulated Bicarbonate Permeation and Increase Risk for Pancreatitis but Not for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Michele D.; Park, Hyun Woo; Brand, Randall E.; Gelrud, Andres; Anderson, Michelle A.; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin; Lawrence, Christopher; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Baillie, John; Alkaade, Samer; Cote, Gregory; Gardner, Timothy B.; Amann, Stephen T.; Slivka, Adam; Sandhu, Bimaljit; Aloe, Amy; Kienholz, Michelle L.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Barmada, M. Michael; Bahar, Ivet; Lee, Min Goo; Whitcomb, David C.

    2014-01-01

    CFTR is a dynamically regulated anion channel. Intracellular WNK1-SPAK activation causes CFTR to change permeability and conductance characteristics from a chloride-preferring to bicarbonate-preferring channel through unknown mechanisms. Two severe CFTR mutations (CFTRsev) cause complete loss of CFTR function and result in cystic fibrosis (CF), a severe genetic disorder affecting sweat glands, nasal sinuses, lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, and male reproductive system. We hypothesize that those CFTR mutations that disrupt the WNK1-SPAK activation mechanisms cause a selective, bicarbonate defect in channel function (CFTRBD) affecting organs that utilize CFTR for bicarbonate secretion (e.g. the pancreas, nasal sinus, vas deferens) but do not cause typical CF. To understand the structural and functional requirements of the CFTR bicarbonate-preferring channel, we (a) screened 984 well-phenotyped pancreatitis cases for candidate CFTRBD mutations from among 81 previously described CFTR variants; (b) conducted electrophysiology studies on clones of variants found in pancreatitis but not CF; (c) computationally constructed a new, complete structural model of CFTR for molecular dynamics simulation of wild-type and mutant variants; and (d) tested the newly defined CFTRBD variants for disease in non-pancreas organs utilizing CFTR for bicarbonate secretion. Nine variants (CFTR R74Q, R75Q, R117H, R170H, L967S, L997F, D1152H, S1235R, and D1270N) not associated with typical CF were associated with pancreatitis (OR 1.5, p = 0.002). Clones expressed in HEK 293T cells had normal chloride but not bicarbonate permeability and conductance with WNK1-SPAK activation. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest physical restriction of the CFTR channel and altered dynamic channel regulation. Comparing pancreatitis patients and controls, CFTRBD increased risk for rhinosinusitis (OR 2.3, p<0.005) and male infertility (OR 395, p<<0.0001). WNK1-SPAK pathway-activated increases in CFTR

  10. A double mutation in exon 6 of the [beta]-hexosaminidase [alpha] subunit in a patient with the B1 variant of Tay-Sachs disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, P.J. Child Health Research Institute, London, Ontario ); Coulter-Mackie, M.B. Child Health Research Institute, London, Ontario Children's Psychiatric Research Institute, London, Ontario )

    1992-10-01

    The B1 variant form of Tay-Sachs disease is enzymologically unique in that the causative mutation(s) appear to affect the active site in the [alpha] subunit of [beta]-hexosaminidase A without altering its ability to associate with the [beta] subunit. Most previously reported B1 variant mutations were found in exon 5 within codon 178. The coding sequence of the [alpha] subunit gene of a patient with the B1 variant form was examined with a combination of reverse transcription of mRNA to cDNA, PCR, and dideoxy sequencing. A double mutation in exon 6 has been identified: a G[sub 574][yields]C transversion causing a val[sub 192][yields]leu change and a G[sub 598][yields] A transition resulting in a val[sub 200][yields]met alteration. The amplified cDNAs were otherwise normal throughout their sequence. The 574 and 598 alterations have been confirmed by amplification directly from genomic DNA from the patient and her mother. Transient-expression studies of the two exon 6 mutations (singly or together) in COS-1 cells show that the G[sub 574][yields]C change is sufficient to cause the loss of enzyme activity. The biochemical phenotype of the 574 alteration in transfection studies is consistent with that expected for a B1 variant mutation. As such, this mutation differs from previously reported B1 variant mutations, all of which occur in exon 5. 31 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) is a prion disease that was first ...

  12. The bisection point across variants of the task

    PubMed Central

    García-Pérez, Miguel A.; Peli, Eli

    2014-01-01

    Bisection tasks are used in research on normal space and time perception and to assess the perceptual distortions accompanying neurological disorders. Several variants of the bisection task are used, which often yield inconsistent results, prompting the question of which variant is most dependable and which results are to be trusted. We addressed this question using theoretical and experimental approaches. Theoretical performance in bisection tasks is derived from a general model of psychophysical performance that includes sensory components and decisional processes. The model predicts how performance should differ across variants of the task, even when the sensory component is fixed. To test these predictions, data were collected in a within-subjects study with several variants of a spatial bisection task, including a two-response variant in which observers indicated whether a line was transected to the right or left of the midpoint, a three-response variant (which included the additional option to respond “midpoint”), and a paired-comparison variant of the three-response format. The data supported the model predictions, revealing that estimated bisection points were least dependable with the two-response variant, because this format confounds perceptual and decisional influences. Only the three-response paired-comparison format can separate out these influences. Implications for research in basic and clinical fields are discussed. PMID:24811039

  13. CBH1 homologs and variant CBH1 cellulases

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Neefe, Paulien

    2008-11-18

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  14. CBH1 homologs and variant CBH1 cellulases

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Neefe, Paulien

    2011-05-31

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  15. Searching for missing heritability: Designing rare variant association studies

    PubMed Central

    Zuk, Or; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Samocha, Kaitlin; Do, Ron; Hechter, Eliana; Kathiresan, Sekar; Daly, Mark J.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; Lander, Eric S.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies have revealed thousands of loci predisposing to hundreds of human diseases and traits, revealing important biological pathways and defining novel therapeutic hypotheses. However, the genes discovered to date typically explain less than half of the apparent heritability. Because efforts have largely focused on common genetic variants, one hypothesis is that much of the missing heritability is due to rare genetic variants. Studies of common variants are typically referred to as genomewide association studies, whereas studies of rare variants are often simply called sequencing studies. Because they are actually closely related, we use the terms common variant association study (CVAS) and rare variant association study (RVAS). In this paper, we outline the similarities and differences between RVAS and CVAS and describe a conceptual framework for the design of RVAS. We apply the framework to address key questions about the sample sizes needed to detect association, the relative merits of testing disruptive alleles vs. missense alleles, frequency thresholds for filtering alleles, the value of predictors of the functional impact of missense alleles, the potential utility of isolated populations, the value of gene-set analysis, and the utility of de novo mutations. The optimal design depends critically on the selection coefficient against deleterious alleles and thus varies across genes. The analysis shows that common variant and rare variant studies require similarly large sample collections. In particular, a well-powered RVAS should involve discovery sets with at least 25,000 cases, together with a substantial replication set. PMID:24443550

  16. Detecting Rare Variants in Case-Parents Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kuang-Fu; Chen, Jin-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Despite the success of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in detecting common variants (minor allele frequency ≥0.05) many suggested that rare variants also contribute to the genetic architecture of diseases. Recently, researchers demonstrated that rare variants can show a strong stratification which may not be corrected by using existing methods. In this paper, we focus on a case-parents study and consider methods for testing group-wise association between multiple rare (and common) variants in a gene region and a disease. All tests depend on the numbers of transmitted mutant alleles from parents to their diseased children across variants and hence they are robust to the effect of population stratification. We use extensive simulation studies to compare the performance of four competing tests: the largest single-variant transmission disequilibrium test (TDT), multivariable test, combined TDT, and a likelihood ratio test based on a random-effects model. We find that the likelihood ratio test is most powerful in a wide range of settings and there is no negative impact to its power performance when common variants are also included in the analysis. If deleterious and protective variants are simultaneously analyzed, the likelihood ratio test was generally insensitive to the effect directionality, unless the effects are extremely inconsistent in one direction. PMID:24086332

  17. Identification of a new splice variant of BDNF in chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) appears to be involved in the central regulation of energy homeostasis. BDNF splicing variants were discovered in vertebrates. Results from human, mouse and rat suggest that alternative BDNF splicing variants potentially play a role in fat deposition. Using t...

  18. The personal genome browser: visualizing functions of genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Juan, Liran; Teng, Mingxiang; Zang, Tianyi; Hao, Yafeng; Wang, Zhenxing; Yan, Chengwu; Liu, Yongzhuang; Li, Jie; Zhang, Tianjiao; Wang, Yadong

    2014-07-01

    Advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have brought us into the individual genome era. Projects such as the 1000 Genomes Project have led the individual genome sequencing to become more and more popular. How to visualize, analyse and annotate individual genomes with knowledge bases to support genome studies and personalized healthcare is still a big challenge. The Personal Genome Browser (PGB) is developed to provide comprehensive functional annotation and visualization for individual genomes based on the genetic-molecular-phenotypic model. Investigators can easily view individual genetic variants, such as single nucleotide variants (SNVs), INDELs and structural variations (SVs), as well as genomic features and phenotypes associated to the individual genetic variants. The PGB especially highlights potential functional variants using the PGB built-in method or SIFT/PolyPhen2 scores. Moreover, the functional risks of genes could be evaluated by scanning individual genetic variants on the whole genome, a chromosome, or a cytoband based on functional implications of the variants. Investigators can then navigate to high risk genes on the scanned individual genome. The PGB accepts Variant Call Format (VCF) and Genetic Variation Format (GVF) files as the input. The functional annotation of input individual genome variants can be visualized in real time by well-defined symbols and shapes. The PGB is available at http://www.pgbrowser.org/. PMID:24799434

  19. The Structural Determinants behind the Epigenetic Role of Histone Variants

    PubMed Central

    Cheema, Manjinder S.; Ausió, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Histone variants are an important part of the histone contribution to chromatin epigenetics. In this review, we describe how the known structural differences of these variants from their canonical histone counterparts impart a chromatin signature ultimately responsible for their epigenetic contribution. In terms of the core histones, H2A histone variants are major players while H3 variant CenH3, with a controversial role in the nucleosome conformation, remains the genuine epigenetic histone variant. Linker histone variants (histone H1 family) haven’t often been studied for their role in epigenetics. However, the micro-heterogeneity of the somatic canonical forms of linker histones appears to play an important role in maintaining the cell-differentiated states, while the cell cycle independent linker histone variants are involved in development. A picture starts to emerge in which histone H2A variants, in addition to their individual specific contributions to the nucleosome structure and dynamics, globally impair the accessibility of linker histones to defined chromatin locations and may have important consequences for determining different states of chromatin metabolism. PMID:26213973

  20. Selection of sequence variants to improve dairy cattle genomic predictions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic prediction reliabilities improved when adding selected sequence variants from run 5 of the 1,000 bull genomes project. High density (HD) imputed genotypes for 26,970 progeny tested Holstein bulls were combined with sequence variants for 444 Holstein animals. The first test included 481,904 c...

  1. Foodborne outbreak and nonmotile Salmonella enterica variant, France.

    PubMed

    Le Hello, Simon; Brisabois, Anne; Accou-Demartin, Marie; Josse, Adeline; Marault, Muriel; Francart, Sylvie; Da Silva, Nathalie Jourdan; Weill, François-Xavier

    2012-01-01

    We report a food-related outbreak of salmonellosis in humans caused by a nonmotile variant of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in France in 2009. This nonmotile variant had been circulating in laying hens but was not considered as Typhimurium and consequently escaped European poultry flock regulations.

  2. Destabilizing interactions among [PSI(+)] and [PIN(+)] yeast prion variants.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Michael E; Liebman, Susan W

    2003-01-01

    The yeast Sup35 and Rnq1 proteins can exist in either the noninfectious soluble forms, [psi-] or [pin-], respectively, or the multiple infectious amyloid-like forms called [PSI+] or [PIN+] prion variants (or prion strains). It was previously shown that [PSI+] and [PIN+] prions enhance one another's de novo appearance. Here we show that specific prion variants of [PSI+] and [PIN+] disrupt each other's stable inheritance. Acquiring [PSI+] often impedes the inheritance of particular [PIN+] variants. Conversely, the presence of some [PIN+] variants impairs the inheritance of weak [PSI+] but not strong [PSI+] variants. These same [PIN+] variants generate a single-dot fluorescence pattern when a fusion of Rnq1 and green fluorescent protein is expressed. Another [PIN+] variant, which forms a distinctly different multiple-dot fluorescence pattern, does not impair [PSI+] inheritance. Thus, destabilization of prions by heterologous prions depends upon the variants involved. These findings may have implications for understanding interactions among other amyloid-forming proteins, including those associated with certain human diseases. PMID:14704158

  3. Germline Variants of Prostate Cancer in Japanese Families

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Ohtake, Nobuaki; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Ituro

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the second most common cancer in men. Family history is the major risk factor for PC. Only two susceptibility genes were identified in PC, BRCA2 and HOXB13. A comprehensive search of germline variants for patients with PC has not been reported in Japanese families. In this study, we conducted exome sequencing followed by Sanger sequencing to explore responsible germline variants in 140 Japanese patients with PC from 66 families. In addition to known susceptibility genes, BRCA2 and HOXB13, we identified TRRAP variants in a mutually exclusive manner in seven large PC families (three or four patients per family). We also found shared variants of BRCA2, HOXB13, and TRRAP from 59 additional small PC families (two patients per family). We identified two deleterious HOXB13 variants (F127C and G132E). Further exploration of the shared variants in rest of the families revealed deleterious variants of the so-called cancer genes (ATP1A1, BRIP1, FANCA, FGFR3, FLT3, HOXD11, MUTYH, PDGFRA, SMARCA4, and TCF3). The germline variant profile provides a new insight to clarify the genetic etiology and heterogeneity of PC among Japanese men. PMID:27701467

  4. Altering the interfacial activation mechanism of a lipase by solid-phase selective chemical modification.

    PubMed

    López-Gallego, Fernando; Abian, Olga; Guisán, Jose Manuel

    2012-09-01

    This study presents a combined protein immobilization, directed mutagenesis, and site-selective chemical modification approach, which was used to create a hyperactivated semisynthetic variant of BTL2. Various alkane chains were tethered at three different positions in order to mimic the lipase interfacial activation exogenously triggered by detergents. Optimum results were obtained when a dodecane chain was introduced at position 320 by solid-phase site-selective chemical modification. The resulting semisynthetic variant showed a 2.5-fold higher activity than the wild-type nonmodified variant in aqueous conditions. Remarkably, this is the maximum hyperactivation ever observed for BTL2 in the presence of detergents such as Triton X-100. We present evidence to suggest that the endogenous dodecane chain hyperactivates the enzyme in a similar fashion as an exogenous detergent molecule. In this way, we also observe a faster irreversible enzyme inhibition and an altered detergent sensitivity profile promoted by the site-selective chemical modification. These findings are also supported by fluorescence studies, which reveal that the structural conformation changes of the semisynthetic variant are different to those of the wild type, an effect that is more pronounced in the presence of detergent. Finally, the optimal immobilized semisynthetic variant was successfully applied to the selective synthesis of oxiran-2-yl butyrate. Significantly, this biocatalyst is 12-fold more efficient than the immobilized wild-type enzyme, producing the S-enantiomer with higher enantiospecificity (ee = 92%). PMID:22876885

  5. Hypertension resistance polymorphisms in ROMK (Kir1.1) alter channel function by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fang, Liang; Li, Dimin; Welling, Paul A

    2010-12-01

    The renal outer medullary K(+) (ROMK) channel plays a critical role in renal sodium handling. Recent genome sequencing efforts in the Framingham Heart Study offspring cohort (Ji W, Foo JN, O'Roak BJ, Zhao H, Larson MG, Simon DB, Newton-Cheh C, State MW, Levy D, and Lifton RP. Nat Genet 40: 592-599, 2008) recently revealed an association between suspected loss-of-function polymorphisms in the ROMK channel and resistance to hypertension, suggesting that ROMK activity may also be a determinant of blood pressure control in the general population. Here we examine whether these sequence variants do, in fact, alter ROMK channel function and explore the mechanisms. As assessed by two-microelectrode voltage clamp in Xenopus oocytes, 3/5 of the variants (R193P, H251Y, and T313FS) displayed an almost complete attenuation of whole cell ROMK channel activity. Surface antibody binding measurements of external epitope-tagged channels and analysis of glycosylation-state maturation revealed that these variants prevent channel expression at the plasmalemma, likely as a consequence of retention in the endoplasmic reticulum. The other variants (P166S, R169H) had no obvious effects on the basal channel activity or surface expression but, instead, conferred a gain in regulated-inhibitory gating. As assessed in giant excised patch-clamp studies, apparent phosphotidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) binding affinity of the variants was reduced, causing channels to be more susceptible to inhibition upon PIP(2) depletion. Unlike the protein product of the major ROMK allele, these two variants are sensitive to the inhibitory affects of a G protein-coupled receptor, which stimulates PIP(2) hydrolysis. In summary, we have found that hypertension resistance sequence variants inhibit ROMK channel function by different mechanisms, providing new insights into the role of the channel in the maintenance of blood pressure. PMID:20926634

  6. Two variants of the Drosophila melanogaster retrotransposon gypsy (mdg4): structural and functional differences, and distribution in fly stocks.

    PubMed

    Lyubomirskaya, N V; Smirnova, J B; Razorenova, O V; Karpova, N N; Surkov, S A; Avedisov, S N; Kim, A I; Ilyin, Y V

    2001-04-01

    Two variants of the Drosophila melanogaster retrotransposon gypsy were subjected to detailed structural and functional analysis. A series of hybrid constructs containing various combinations of "active" and "inactive" gypsy copies were tested for their ability to produce new DNA copies in cultured cells by means of reverse transcription. It was shown that the previously demonstrated variations in retrotranspositional activity are associated with either one or both of two amino acid substitutions at the beginning of ORF2. The first substitution is located at the boundary between the putative protease and reverse transcriptase domains and, hence, may influence the processing of the polyprotein. The other substitution may alter reverse transcriptase activity since it is located in the second of the seven conserved domains of the RT gene. To address the question of the evolutionary relationship between the two gypsy variants, their distribution was analyzed in among various fly stocks. Southern analysis revealed that all D. melanogaster strains studied so far contain the "inactive" gypsy variant, while the "active" copies are present only in some strains; most of the latter were established from flies recently isolated from natural populations. Finally, in stocks carrying the flamenco mutation the "active" gypsy variant is much more abundant than the "inactive" form. Possible scenarios for the orgin of the "active" form of gypsy are discussed. PMID:11361349

  7. Comparative structural analysis of HLA-A2 antigens distinguishable by cytotoxic T lymphocytes: variants M7 and DR1.

    PubMed

    Krangel, M S; Taketani, S; Biddison, W E; Strong, D M; Strominger, J L

    1982-11-23

    Comparative primary structural analyses have begun to elucidate polymorphic residues and segments of the class I antigens of the major histocompatibility complex, at least some of which presumably contribute to determinants important in immune recognition events. HLA-A2 structural variants have been described which are serologically indistinguishable from other HLA-A2 antigens, yet which can be recognized neither by HLA-A2 specific alloimmune nor by HLA-A2 restricted, virus immune cytotoxic T lymphocytes. This study utilizes double-label tryptic peptide comparisons in combination with both conventional and microsequence analyses to investigate the structure of two such variants, M7 and DR1. We find that these variants are identical with each other and differ from the predominant HLA-A2 heavy chain species by a glutamine to arginine substitution at residue 43, by an unidentified substitution in the tryptic peptide spanning residues 147-157, and by an as yet poorly defined alteration in glycosylation. Structural information from these and other variants should be useful in precisely defining functionally important determinants on the molecule. PMID:6983890

  8. Variant upstream regulatory region sequences differentially regulate human papillomavirus type 16 DNA replication throughout the viral life cycle.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Walter G

    2005-05-01

    While the central role of the viral upstream regulatory region (URR) in the human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle has been well established, its effects on viral replication factor expression and plasmid replication of HPV type 16 (HPV16) remain unclear. Some nonprototypic variants of HPV16 contain altered URR sequences and are considered to increase the oncogenic risk of infections. To determine the relationship between viral replication and variant URRs, hybrid viral genomes were constructed with the replication-competent HPV16 prototype W12 and analyzed in assays which recapitulate the different phases of normal viral replication. The establishment efficiencies of hybrid HPV16 genomes differed about 20-fold among European prototypes and variants from Africa and America. Generally, European and African genomes exhibited the lowest replication efficiencies. The high replication levels observed with American variants were primarily attributable to their efficient expression of the replication factors E1 and E2. The maintenance levels of these viral genomes varied about fivefold, which correlated with their respective establishment phenotypes and published P(97) activities. Vegetative DNA amplification could also be observed with replicating HPV16 genomes. These results indicate that efficient E1/E2 expression and elevated plasmid replication levels during the persistent stage of infection may comprise a risk factor in HPV16-mediated oncogenesis.

  9. Histone variants as emerging regulators of embryonic stem cell identity

    PubMed Central

    Turinetto, Valentina; Giachino, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of chromatin structure is an important mechanism for balancing the pluripotency and cell fate decision in embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Indeed ESCs are characterized by unusual chromatin packaging, and a wide variety of chromatin regulators have been implicated in control of pluripotency and differentiation. Genome-wide maps of epigenetic factors have revealed a unique epigenetic signature in pluripotent ESCs and have contributed models to explain their plasticity. In addition to the well known epigenetic regulation through DNA methylation, histone posttranslational modifications, chromatin remodeling, and non-coding RNA, histone variants are emerging as important regulators of ESC identity. In this review, we summarize and discuss the recent progress that has highlighted the central role of histone variants in ESC pluripotency and ESC fate, focusing, in particular, on H1 variants, H2A variants H2A.X, H2A.Z and macroH2A and H3 variant H3.3. PMID:26114724

  10. Variants of RhD--current testing and clinical consequences.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Geoff

    2013-05-01

    Anti-D (-RH1) of the Rh blood group system is clinically important as it causes haemolytic transfusion reactions and haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Although most people are either D+ or D-, there is a plethora of D variants, often categorized as either weak D or partial D. These two types are inadequately defined and the dichotomy is potentially misleading. DVI is the D variant most commonly associated with anti-D production and UK guidelines recommend that patients are tested with anti-D reagents that do not react with DVI. Weak D types 1, 2, and 3 are seldom, if ever, associated with alloanti-D production, so a policy recommendation would be to treat patients with those D variants as D+, to preserve D- stocks, whereas patients with all other D variants would be treated as D-. All donors with D variant red cells, including DVI, should be treated as D+.

  11. Genetic variants in Alzheimer disease - molecular and brain network approaches.

    PubMed

    Gaiteri, Chris; Mostafavi, Sara; Honey, Christopher J; De Jager, Philip L; Bennett, David A

    2016-07-01

    Genetic studies in late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) are aimed at identifying core disease mechanisms and providing potential biomarkers and drug candidates to improve clinical care of AD. However, owing to the complexity of LOAD, including pathological heterogeneity and disease polygenicity, extraction of actionable guidance from LOAD genetics has been challenging. Past attempts to summarize the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants have used pathway analysis and collections of small-scale experiments to hypothesize functional convergence across several variants. In this Review, we discuss how the study of molecular, cellular and brain networks provides additional information on the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants. We then discuss emerging combinations of these omic data sets into multiscale models, which provide a more comprehensive representation of the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants at multiple biophysical scales. Furthermore, we highlight the clinical potential of mechanistically coupling genetic variants and disease phenotypes with multiscale brain models. PMID:27282653

  12. Detection of rare functional variants using group ISIS.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yue S; Hao, Ning; An, Lingling

    2011-11-29

    Genome-wide association studies have been firmly established in investigations of the associations between common genetic variants and complex traits or diseases. However, a large portion of complex traits and diseases cannot be explained well by common variants. Detecting rare functional variants becomes a trend and a necessity. Because rare variants have such a small minor allele frequency (e.g., <0.05), detecting functional rare variants is challenging. Group iterative sure independence screening (ISIS), a fast group selection tool, was developed to select important genes and the single-nucleotide polymorphisms within. The performance of the group ISIS and group penalization methods is compared for detecting important genes in the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 data. The results suggest that the group ISIS is an efficient tool to discover genes and single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated to phenotypes.

  13. RBP-Var: a database of functional variants involved in regulation mediated by RNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Fengbiao; Xiao, Luoyuan; Li, Xianfeng; Liang, Jialong; Teng, Huajing; Cai, Wanshi; Sun, Zhong Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors bind to the genome by forming specific contacts with the primary DNA sequence; however, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have greater scope to achieve binding specificity through the RNA secondary structure. It has been revealed that single nucleotide variants (SNVs) that alter RNA structure, also known as RiboSNitches, exhibit 3-fold greater local structure changes than replicates of the same DNA sequence, demonstrated by the fact that depletion of RiboSNitches could result in the alteration of specific RNA shapes at thousands of sites, including 3′ UTRs, binding sites of microRNAs and RBPs. However, the network between SNVs and post-transcriptional regulation remains unclear. Here, we developed RBP-Var, a database freely available at http://www.rbp-var.biols.ac.cn/, which provides annotation of functional variants involved in post-transcriptional interaction and regulation. RBP-Var provides an easy-to-use web interface that allows users to rapidly find whether SNVs of interest can transform the secondary structure of RNA and identify RBPs whose binding may be subsequently disrupted. RBP-Var integrates DNA and RNA biology to understand how various genetic variants and post-transcriptional mechanisms cooperate to orchestrate gene expression. In summary, RBP-Var is useful in selecting candidate SNVs for further functional studies and exploring causal SNVs underlying human diseases. PMID:26635394

  14. Mono and dual cofactor dependence of human cystathionine β-synthase enzyme variants in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dimster-Denk, Dago; Tripp, Katherine W; Marini, Nicholas J; Marqusee, Susan; Rine, Jasper

    2013-10-03

    Any two individuals differ from each other by an average of 3 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Some polymorphisms have a functional impact on cofactor-using enzymes and therefore represent points of possible therapeutic intervention through elevated-cofactor remediation. Because most known disease-causing mutations affect protein stability, we evaluated how the in vivo impact caused by single amino acid substitutions in a prototypical enzyme of this type compared with physical characteristics of the variant enzymes in vitro. We focused on cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) because of its clinical relevance in homocysteine metabolism and because some variants of the enzyme are clinically responsive to increased levels of its B6 cofactor. Single amino-acid substitutions throughout the CBS protein caused reduced function in vivo, and a subset of these altered sensitivity to limiting B6-cofactor. Some of these B6-sensitive substitutions also had altered sensitivity to limiting heme, another CBS cofactor. Limiting heme resulted in reduced incorporation of heme into these variants, and subsequently increased protease sensitivity of the enzyme in vitro. We hypothesize that these alleles caused a modest, yet significant, destabilization of the native state of the protein, and that the functional impact of the amino acid substitutions caused by these alleles can be influenced by cofactor(s) even when the affected amino acid is distant from the cofactor binding site.

  15. Alpha1a-adrenoceptor genetic variant induces cardiomyoblast-to-fibroblast-like cell transition via distinct signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kleine-Brueggeney, Maren; Gradinaru, Irina; Babaeva, Ekaterina; Schwinn, Debra A; Oganesian, Anush

    2014-09-01

    The role of naturally occurring human α1a-Adrenergic Receptor (α1aAR) genetic variants associated with cardiovascular disorders is poorly understood. Here, we present the novel findings that expression of human α1aAR-247R (247R) genetic variant in cardiomyoblasts leads to transition of cardiomyoblasts into a fibroblast-like phenotype, evidenced by morphology and distinct de novo expression of characteristic genes. These fibroblast-like cells exhibit constitutive, high proliferative capacity and agonist-induced hypertrophy compared with cells prior to transition. We demonstrate that constitutive, synergistic activation of EGFR, Src and ERK kinases is the potential molecular mechanism of this transition. We also demonstrate that 247R triggers two distinct EGFR transactivation-dependent signaling pathways: 1) constitutive Gq-independent β-arrestin-1/Src/MMP/EGFR/ERK-dependent hyperproliferation and 2) agonist-induced Gq- and EGFR/STAT-dependent hypertrophy. Interestingly, in cardiomyoblasts agonist-independent hyperproliferation is MMP-dependent, but in fibroblast-like cells it is MMP-independent, suggesting that expression of α1aAR genetic variant in cardiomyocytes may trigger extracellular matrix remodeling. Thus, these novel findings demonstrate that EGFR transactivation by α1aAR-247R leads to hyperproliferation, hypertrophy and alterations in cardiomyoblasts, suggesting that these unique genetically-mediated alterations in signaling pathways and cellular function may lead to myocardial fibrosis. Such extracellular matrix remodeling may contribute to the genesis of arrhythmias in certain types of heart failure.

  16. Mono and Dual Cofactor Dependence of Human Cystathionine β-Synthase Enzyme Variants In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dimster-Denk, Dago; Tripp, Katherine W.; Marini, Nicholas J.; Marqusee, Susan; Rine, Jasper

    2013-01-01

    Any two individuals differ from each other by an average of 3 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Some polymorphisms have a functional impact on cofactor-using enzymes and therefore represent points of possible therapeutic intervention through elevated-cofactor remediation. Because most known disease-causing mutations affect protein stability, we evaluated how the in vivo impact caused by single amino acid substitutions in a prototypical enzyme of this type compared with physical characteristics of the variant enzymes in vitro. We focused on cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) because of its clinical relevance in homocysteine metabolism and because some variants of the enzyme are clinically responsive to increased levels of its B6 cofactor. Single amino-acid substitutions throughout the CBS protein caused reduced function in vivo, and a subset of these altered sensitivity to limiting B6-cofactor. Some of these B6-sensitive substitutions also had altered sensitivity to limiting heme, another CBS cofactor. Limiting heme resulted in reduced incorporation of heme into these variants, and subsequently increased protease sensitivity of the enzyme in vitro. We hypothesize that these alleles caused a modest, yet significant, destabilization of the native state of the protein, and that the functional impact of the amino acid substitutions caused by these alleles can be influenced by cofactor(s) even when the affected amino acid is distant from the cofactor binding site. PMID:23934999

  17. Emergence of immunoglobulin variants following treatment of a B cell leukemia with an immunotoxin composed of antiidiotypic antibody and saporin

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    The potency and specificity of immunotoxins consisting of monoclonal antiidiotype conjugated to the ribosome-inactivating protein, saporin, have been evaluated in the treatment of guinea pig L2C B lymphocytic leukemia. The immunotoxins were therapeutically much more effective than their parent antibodies. Their specificity reflected that of their antiidiotype component. Although the leukemia emerged eventually in most animals treated with these conjugates, most of the cells showed altered Ig expression, which rendered them resistant to the therapy. Commonly, the emerging cells had lost mu heavy chain production, leaving them negative for intracellular, surface, and secreted IgM, but still positive for lambda light chain production. In addition, a minor group of L2C variants was identified in a protocol designed to detect mutants at very low frequency: here the cells were exposed in vitro to immunotoxin and, while still viable as judged by dye-exclusion, inoculated in large numbers into animals. In tumor that emerged under these circumstances, the majority of cells were again immunoglobulin- negative; however a minority exhibited IgM with an altered idiotype (Idiotope-loss variants), rendering them unreactive with immunotoxin. Immunotherapy with unmodified anti-Id antibody alone does not reveal these variants, and we suggest it is the increased selective force exerted by the highly potent immunotoxins that allow these minor nonreactive populations to emerge. PMID:3110351

  18. Incorporating Non-Coding Annotations into Rare Variant Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Tom G.; Campbell, Colin; Timpson, Nicholas J; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The success of collapsing methods which investigate the combined effect of rare variants on complex traits has so far been limited. The manner in which variants within a gene are selected prior to analysis has a crucial impact on this success, which has resulted in analyses conventionally filtering variants according to their consequence. This study investigates whether an alternative approach to filtering, using annotations from recently developed bioinformatics tools, can aid these types of analyses in comparison to conventional approaches. Methods & Results We conducted a candidate gene analysis using the UK10K sequence and lipids data, filtering according to functional annotations using the resource CADD (Combined Annotation-Dependent Depletion) and contrasting results with ‘nonsynonymous’ and ‘loss of function’ consequence analyses. Using CADD allowed the inclusion of potentially deleterious intronic variants, which was not possible when filtering by consequence. Overall, different filtering approaches provided similar evidence of association, although filtering according to CADD identified evidence of association between ANGPTL4 and High Density Lipoproteins (P = 0.02, N = 3,210) which was not observed in the other analyses. We also undertook genome-wide analyses to determine how filtering in this manner compared to conventional approaches for gene regions. Results suggested that filtering by annotations according to CADD, as well as other tools known as FATHMM-MKL and DANN, identified association signals not detected when filtering by variant consequence and vice versa. Conclusion Incorporating variant annotations from non-coding bioinformatics tools should prove to be a valuable asset for rare variant analyses in the future. Filtering by variant consequence is only possible in coding regions of the genome, whereas utilising non-coding bioinformatics annotations provides an opportunity to discover unknown causal variants in non

  19. Molecular screening and association analyses of the interleukin 6 receptor gene variants with type 2 diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, and insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Zhang, Zhengxian; Chu, Winston; Hale, Terri; Cooper, Judith J; Elbein, Steven C

    2005-02-01

    IL-6 levels and polymorphisms have been implicated in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and insulin resistance. The IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) comprises two subunits, IL-6R and gp130, of which IL-6R confers specificity to IL-6 action and is located in a region of replicated linkage to T2DM on chromosome 1q21. We screened this gene for variation in Northern European Caucasian and African-American ethnic groups. We identified 11 variants with a minor allele frequency over 5%, including two amino acid changes (D358A and V385I) and four variants in the 3' untranslated region. No variant was associated with obesity or measures of insulin sensitivity, but two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the 3' untranslated region showed a trend to an association with T2DM in all Caucasians, and three single nucleotide polymorphisms, including D358A, showed a trend (P < 0.06) to an association with T2DM among the subset of Northern European Caucasians. Variant V385I was unique to African-Americans and was significantly associated with diabetes and diabetic nephropathy (P < 0.05). Among individuals heterozygous for the four variants in the transcribed sequence, one allele was significantly overrepresented, thus suggesting the existence of a regulatory variant controlling mRNA stability or expression. IL-6R is not likely to explain the linkage to diabetes in this region, but our work supports a minor role of variants in T2DM risk and suggests that sequence variants may alter IL-6R mRNA levels and possibly levels of soluble IL-6R.

  20. An Improved Variant of Soybean Type 1 Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase Increases the Oil Content and Decreases the Soluble Carbohydrate Content of Soybeans.

    PubMed

    Roesler, Keith; Shen, Bo; Bermudez, Ericka; Li, Changjiang; Hunt, Joanne; Damude, Howard G; Ripp, Kevin G; Everard, John D; Booth, John R; Castaneda, Leandro; Feng, Lizhi; Meyer, Knut

    2016-06-01

    Kinetically improved diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) variants were created to favorably alter carbon partitioning in soybean (Glycine max) seeds. Initially, variants of a type 1 DGAT from a high-oil, high-oleic acid plant seed, Corylus americana, were screened for high oil content in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nearly all DGAT variants examined from high-oil strains had increased affinity for oleoyl-CoA, with S0.5 values decreased as much as 4.7-fold compared with the wild-type value of 0.94 µm Improved soybean DGAT variants were then designed to include amino acid substitutions observed in promising C. americana DGAT variants. The expression of soybean and C. americana DGAT variants in soybean somatic embryos resulted in oil contents as high as 10% and 12%, respectively, compared with only 5% and 7.6% oil achieved by overexpressing the corresponding wild-type DGATs. The affinity for oleoyl-CoA correlated strongly with oil content. The soybean DGAT variant that gave the greatest oil increase contained 14 amino acid substitutions out of a total of 504 (97% sequence identity with native). Seed-preferred expression of this soybean DGAT1 variant increased oil content of soybean seeds by an average of 3% (16% relative increase) in highly replicated, single-location field trials. The DGAT transgenes significantly reduced the soluble carbohydrate content of mature seeds and increased the seed protein content of some events. This study demonstrated that engineering of the native DGAT enzyme is an effective strategy to improve the oil content and value of soybeans.

  1. An Improved Variant of Soybean Type 1 Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase Increases the Oil Content and Decreases the Soluble Carbohydrate Content of Soybeans[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bo; Damude, Howard G.; Everard, John D.; Booth, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetically improved diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) variants were created to favorably alter carbon partitioning in soybean (Glycine max) seeds. Initially, variants of a type 1 DGAT from a high-oil, high-oleic acid plant seed, Corylus americana, were screened for high oil content in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nearly all DGAT variants examined from high-oil strains had increased affinity for oleoyl-CoA, with S0.5 values decreased as much as 4.7-fold compared with the wild-type value of 0.94 µm. Improved soybean DGAT variants were then designed to include amino acid substitutions observed in promising C. americana DGAT variants. The expression of soybean and C. americana DGAT variants in soybean somatic embryos resulted in oil contents as high as 10% and 12%, respectively, compared with only 5% and 7.6% oil achieved by overexpressing the corresponding wild-type DGATs. The affinity for oleoyl-CoA correlated strongly with oil content. The soybean DGAT variant that gave the greatest oil increase contained 14 amino acid substitutions out of a total of 504 (97% sequence identity with native). Seed-preferred expression of this soybean DGAT1 variant increased oil content of soybean seeds by an average of 3% (16% relative increase) in highly replicated, single-location field trials. The DGAT transgenes significantly reduced the soluble carbohydrate content of mature seeds and increased the seed protein content of some events. This study demonstrated that engineering of the native DGAT enzyme is an effective strategy to improve the oil content and value of soybeans. PMID:27208257

  2. An Improved Variant of Soybean Type 1 Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase Increases the Oil Content and Decreases the Soluble Carbohydrate Content of Soybeans.

    PubMed

    Roesler, Keith; Shen, Bo; Bermudez, Ericka; Li, Changjiang; Hunt, Joanne; Damude, Howard G; Ripp, Kevin G; Everard, John D; Booth, John R; Castaneda, Leandro; Feng, Lizhi; Meyer, Knut

    2016-06-01

    Kinetically improved diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) variants were created to favorably alter carbon partitioning in soybean (Glycine max) seeds. Initially, variants of a type 1 DGAT from a high-oil, high-oleic acid plant seed, Corylus americana, were screened for high oil content in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nearly all DGAT variants examined from high-oil strains had increased affinity for oleoyl-CoA, with S0.5 values decreased as much as 4.7-fold compared with the wild-type value of 0.94 µm Improved soybean DGAT variants were then designed to include amino acid substitutions observed in promising C. americana DGAT variants. The expression of soybean and C. americana DGAT variants in soybean somatic embryos resulted in oil contents as high as 10% and 12%, respectively, compared with only 5% and 7.6% oil achieved by overexpressing the corresponding wild-type DGATs. The affinity for oleoyl-CoA correlated strongly with oil content. The soybean DGAT variant that gave the greatest oil increase contained 14 amino acid substitutions out of a total of 504 (97% sequence identity with native). Seed-preferred expression of this soybean DGAT1 variant increased oil content of soybean seeds by an average of 3% (16% relative increase) in highly replicated, single-location field trials. The DGAT transgenes significantly reduced the soluble carbohydrate content of mature seeds and increased the seed protein content of some events. This study demonstrated that engineering of the native DGAT enzyme is an effective strategy to improve the oil content and value of soybeans. PMID:27208257

  3. Genetic analysis of in vivo-selected viral variants causing chronic infection: importance of mutation in the L RNA segment of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, R; Simon, R S; Matloubian, M; Kolhekar, S R; Southern, P J; Freedman, D M

    1988-01-01

    Viral variants with different biological properties are present in the central nervous systems (CNS) and lymphoid tissues of mice persistently infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Viral isolates from the CNS are similar to the original Armstrong LCMV strain and induce potent virus-specific T-cell responses in adult mice, and the infection is rapidly cleared. In contrast, LCMV isolates derived from spleens of carrier mice cause persistent infections in adult mice. This chronic infection is associated with low levels of antiviral T-cell responses. In this study, we genetically characterized two independently derived spleen variants by making recombinants (reassortants) between the spleen isolates and wild-type (wt) LCMV and showed that the ability to persist in adult mice and the associated suppression of T-cell responses segregates with the large (L) RNA segment. In addition, we analyzed a revertant (isolated from the CNS) derived from one of the spleen variants. By comparing the biological properties of three reassortants that contained the same S segment but had the L segment of either the original wt Armstrong LCMV, the spleen variant derived from it, or the CNS revertant derived from the spleen variant, we were able to show unequivocally that biologically relevant mutations occurred in the L segment not only during generation of the spleen variant from wt LCMV but also in reversion of the spleen variant to the wt phenotype. Thus, our results showed that (i) genetic alterations in the L genomic segment were involved in organ-specific selection of viral variants, and (ii) these mutations profoundly affected the ability of LCMV to cause chronic infections in adult mice. Images PMID:3261347

  4. Recognition of lipid A variants by the TLR4-MD-2 receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Maeshima, Nina; Fernandez, Rachel C.

    2012-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a component of the outer membrane of almost all Gram-negative bacteria and consists of lipid A, core sugars, and O-antigen. LPS is recognized by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and MD-2 on host innate immune cells and can signal to activate the transcription factor NFκB, leading to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines that initiate and shape the adaptive immune response. Most of what is known about how LPS is recognized by the TLR4-MD-2 receptor complex on animal cells has been studied using Escherichia coli lipid A, which is a strong agonist of TLR4 signaling. Recent work from several groups, including our own, has shown that several important pathogenic bacteria can modify their LPS or lipid A molecules in ways that significantly alter TLR4 signaling to NFκB. Thus, it has been hypothesized that expression of lipid A variants is one mechanism by which pathogens modulate or evade the host immune response. Additionally, several key differences in the amino acid sequences of human and mouse TLR4-MD-2 receptors have been shown to alter the ability to recognize these variations in lipid A, suggesting a host-specific effect on the immune response to these pathogens. In this review, we provide an overview of lipid A variants from several human pathogens, how the basic structure of lipid A is recognized by mouse and human TLR4-MD-2 receptor complexes, as well as how alteration of this pattern affects its recognition by TLR4 and impacts the downstream immune response. PMID:23408095

  5. Brain Injury Alters Volatile Metabolome.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Bruce A; Cohen, Akiva S; Gordon, Amy R; Opiekun, Maryanne; Martin, Talia; Elkind, Jaclynn; Lundström, Johan N; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2016-06-01

    Chemical signals arising from body secretions and excretions communicate information about health status as have been reported in a range of animal models of disease. A potential common pathway for diseases to alter chemical signals is via activation of immune function-which is known to be intimately involved in modulation of chemical signals in several species. Based on our prior findings that both immunization and inflammation alter volatile body odors, we hypothesized that injury accompanied by inflammation might correspondingly modify the volatile metabolome to create a signature endophenotype. In particular, we investigated alteration of the volatile metabolome as a result of traumatic brain injury. Here, we demonstrate that mice could be trained in a behavioral assay to discriminate mouse models subjected to lateral fluid percussion injury from appropriate surgical sham controls on the basis of volatile urinary metabolites. Chemical analyses of the urine samples similarly demonstrated that brain injury altered urine volatile profiles. Behavioral and chemical analyses further indicated that alteration of the volatile metabolome induced by brain injury and alteration resulting from lipopolysaccharide-associated inflammation were not synonymous. Monitoring of alterations in the volatile metabolome may be a useful tool for rapid brain trauma diagnosis and for monitoring recovery. PMID:26926034

  6. αIIbβ3 variants defined by next-generation sequencing: Predicting variants likely to cause Glanzmann thrombasthenia

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago, Lorena; Rendon, Augusto; Liang, Yupu; Simeoni, Ilenia; Negri, Ana; Filizola, Marta; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Coller, Barry S.; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Ballmaier, Matthias; Bariana, Tadbir; Bellissimo, Daniel; Bertoli, Marta; Bray, Paul; Bury, Loredana; Carrell, Robin; Cattaneo, Marco; Collins, Peter; French, Deborah; Favier, Remi; Freson, Kathleen; Furie, Bruce; Germeshausen, Manuela; Ghevaert, Cedric; Gomez, Keith; Goodeve, Anne; Gresele, Paolo; Guerrero, Jose; Hampshire, Dan J.; Hadinnapola, Charaka; Heemskerk, Johan; Henskens, Yvonne; Hill, Marian; Hogg, Nancy; Johnsen, Jill; Kahr, Walter; Kerr, Ron; Kunishima, Shinji; Laffan, Michael; Natwani, Amit; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite; Nurden, Paquita; Nurden, Alan; Ormiston, Mark; Othman, Maha; Ouwehand, Willem; Perry, David; Vilk, Shoshana Ravel; Reitsma, Pieter; Rondina, Matthew; Simeoni, Ilenia; Smethurst, Peter; Stephens, Jonathan; Stevenson, William; Szkotak, Artur; Turro, Ernest; Van Geet, Christel; Vries, Minka; Ward, June; Waye, John; Westbury, Sarah; Whiteheart, Sidney; Wilcox, David; Zhang, Bi

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing is transforming our understanding of human genetic variation but assessing the functional impact of novel variants presents challenges. We analyzed missense variants in the integrin αIIbβ3 receptor subunit genes ITGA2B and ITGB3 identified by whole-exome or -genome sequencing in the ThromboGenomics project, comprising ∼32,000 alleles from 16,108 individuals. We analyzed the results in comparison with 111 missense variants in these genes previously reported as being associated with Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT), 20 associated with alloimmune thrombocytopenia, and 5 associated with aniso/macrothrombocytopenia. We identified 114 novel missense variants in ITGA2B (affecting ∼11% of the amino acids) and 68 novel missense variants in ITGB3 (affecting ∼9% of the amino acids). Of the variants, 96% had minor allele frequencies (MAF) < 0.1%, indicating their rarity. Based on sequence conservation, MAF, and location on a complete model of αIIbβ3, we selected three novel variants that affect amino acids previously associated with GT for expression in HEK293 cells. αIIb P176H and β3 C547G severely reduced αIIbβ3 expression, whereas αIIb P943A partially reduced αIIbβ3 expression and had no effect on fibrinogen binding. We used receiver operating characteristic curves of combined annotation-dependent depletion, Polyphen 2-HDIV, and sorting intolerant from tolerant to estimate the percentage of novel variants likely to be deleterious. At optimal cut-off values, which had 69–98% sensitivity in detecting GT mutations, between 27% and 71% of the novel αIIb or β3 missense variants were predicted to be deleterious. Our data have implications for understanding the evolutionary pressure on αIIbβ3 and highlight the challenges in predicting the clinical significance of novel missense variants. PMID:25827233

  7. Anatomical variant of the liver blood supply

    PubMed Central

    MASLARSKI, IVAN

    2015-01-01

    Vascular variations are significant for liver transplantations, radiological procedures, laparoscopic method of operation and for the healing of penetrating injuries, including the space close to the hepatic area. These variants are very common in the abdominal region, and their description will be useful. During a routine dissection of a 73 year old female cadaver, we found in the subhepatic region that the blood supply of the liver differed from a normal one. The difference was found in the absence of the right liver branch and the cystic artery, which normally arises from the common hepatic artery. After a detailed dissection of the superior mesenteric artery we distinguished a branchthat was routed to the right lobe of the liver. The diameter of this vessel was 3.7 mm and the length 8.2 cm. In the artery pathway, three consecutive branches were observed. The first branch was found about 2.02 cm before the portal region of the liver. The second one became visible after another millimeter and finally the artery made one little curve and became a cystic artery. PMID:26609280

  8. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Ironside, James W

    2012-01-01

    Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) is a novel human prion disease caused by the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent. Most cases have occurred in the UK, with smaller numbers in 11 other countries. All definite vCJD cases have occurred in methionine homozygotes at codon 129 in the prion protein gene. Following oral infection, the vCJD agent appears to replicate in lymphoid tissues during the asymptomatic phase of the incubation period. At present, four probable cases of vCJD infection have been identified following transfusion of red blood cells from asymptomatic donors who subsequently died from vCJD. Recently, one case of likely transmission of vCJD infection by UK Factor VIII concentrates has been reported in an elderly haemophilic patient in the UK. The recent report of a blood test that may be used to detect vCJD has raised the possibility of a new way to identify infected individuals, perhaps even before the onset of clinical symptoms.

  9. Treatment of pediatric multiple sclerosis and variants.

    PubMed

    Pohl, D; Waubant, E; Banwell, B; Chabas, D; Chitnis, T; Weinstock-Guttman, B; Tenembaum, S

    2007-04-17

    Studies in adult patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) suggest significant benefit of early treatment initiation. However, there are no approved therapies for children and adolescents with MS. For adult MS, tolerability and efficacy of several immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive drugs have been demonstrated. Guidelines for the use of these MS therapies in children do not exist. Several small cohort studies of the safety and tolerability of disease-modifying therapies (DMT) in children and adolescents with MS have been recently reported. The side effects of interferon beta (IFNB) and glatiramer acetate (GA) appear to be similar to those reported by adults. The long-term tolerability and safety have yet to be established and efficacy data have yet to be studied. In view of the potential for significant long-term physical and cognitive disability in children with MS, and recent evidence that initiation of immunomodulatory therapy early in the course of MS improves long-term prognosis, an increasing number of children and adolescents with MS are being offered the DMT approved for adults. This review summarizes current knowledge of DMT in pediatric MS and experience in several centers treating pediatric MS and MS variants such as neuromyelitis optica or Devic disease, Balo concentric sclerosis, Marburg acute MS, and Schilder disease (myelinoclastic diffuse sclerosis). Finally, an overview of symptomatic MS therapies and experiences with these treatments in pediatric patients is provided. PMID:17438239

  10. Variants of human papillomavirus type 16 predispose toward persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Liao, Hong; Yang, Binlie; Geffre, Christopher P; Zhang, Ai; Zhou, Aizhi; Cao, Huimin; Wang, Jieru; Zhang, Zhenbo; Zheng, Wenxin

    2015-01-01

    A cohort study of 292 Chinese women was conducted to determine the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 variants and persistent viral infection. Enrolled patients were HPV16 positive and had both normal cytology and histology. Flow-through hybridization and gene chip technology was used to identify the HPV type. A PCR sequencing assay was performed to find HPV16 E2, E6 and E7 gene variants. The associations between these variants and HPV16 persistent infection was analyzed by Fisher's exact test. It was found that the variants T178G, T350G and A442C in the E6 gene, as well as C3158A and G3248A variants in the E2 gene were associated with persistent HPV16 infection. No link was observed between E7 variants and persistent viral infection. Our findings suggest that detection of specific HPV variants would help identify patients who are at high risk for viral persistence and development of cervical neoplasia.

  11. How important are rare variants in common disease?

    PubMed

    Saint Pierre, Aude; Génin, Emmanuelle

    2014-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies have uncovered hundreds of common genetic variants involved in complex diseases. However, for most complex diseases, these common genetic variants only marginally contribute to disease susceptibility. It is now argued that rare variants located in different genes could in fact play a more important role in disease susceptibility than common variants. These rare genetic variants were not captured by genome-wide association studies using single nucleotide polymorphism-chips but with the advent of next-generation sequencing technologies, they have become detectable. It is now possible to study their contribution to common disease by resequencing samples of cases and controls or by using new genotyping exome arrays that cover rare alleles. In this review, we address the question of the contribution of rare variants in common disease by taking the examples of different diseases for which some resequencing studies have already been performed, and by summarizing the results of simulation studies conducted so far to investigate the genetic architecture of complex traits in human. So far, empirical data have not allowed the exclusion of many models except the most extreme ones involving only a small number of rare variants with large effects contributing to complex disease. To unravel the genetic architecture of complex disease, case-control data will not be sufficient, and alternative study designs need to be proposed together with methodological developments.

  12. Rare variant analysis for family-based design.

    PubMed

    De, Gourab; Yip, Wai-Ki; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Laird, Nan

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been able to identify disease associations with many common variants; however most of the estimated genetic contribution explained by these variants appears to be very modest. Rare variants are thought to have larger effect sizes compared to common SNPs but effects of rare variants cannot be tested in the GWAS setting. Here we propose a novel method to test for association of rare variants obtained by sequencing in family-based samples by collapsing the standard family-based association test (FBAT) statistic over a region of interest. We also propose a suitable weighting scheme so that low frequency SNPs that may be enriched in functional variants can be upweighted compared to common variants. Using simulations we show that the family-based methods perform at par with the population-based methods under no population stratification. By construction, family-based tests are completely robust to population stratification; we show that our proposed methods remain valid even when population stratification is present.

  13. Rare Variant Analysis for Family-Based Design

    PubMed Central

    De, Gourab; Yip, Wai-Ki; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Laird, Nan

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been able to identify disease associations with many common variants; however most of the estimated genetic contribution explained by these variants appears to be very modest. Rare variants are thought to have larger effect sizes compared to common SNPs but effects of rare variants cannot be tested in the GWAS setting. Here we propose a novel method to test for association of rare variants obtained by sequencing in family-based samples by collapsing the standard family-based association test (FBAT) statistic over a region of interest. We also propose a suitable weighting scheme so that low frequency SNPs that may be enriched in functional variants can be upweighted compared to common variants. Using simulations we show that the family-based methods perform at par with the population-based methods under no population stratification. By construction, family-based tests are completely robust to population stratification; we show that our proposed methods remain valid even when population stratification is present. PMID:23341868

  14. Robust and powerful affected sibpairtest for rare variant association

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Keng-Han; Zöllner, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing technology facilitate investigating the impact of rare variants on complex diseases. However, using a conventional case-control design, large samples are needed to capture enough rare variants to achieve sufficient power for testing the association between suspected loci and complex diseases. In such large samples, population stratification may easily cause spurious signals. One approach to overcome stratification is to use a family-based design. For rare variants, this strategy is especially appropriate, as power can be increased considerably by analyzing cases with affected relatives. We propose a novel framework for association testing in affected sibpairs by comparing the allele count of rare variants on chromosome regions shared identical by descent to the allele count of rare variants on non-shared chromosome regions, referred to as test for rare-variant association with family-based internal control (TRAFIC). This design is generally robust to population stratification as cases and controls are matched within each sibpair. We evaluate the power analytically using general model for effect size of rare variants. For the same number of genotyped people, TRAFIC shows superior power over the conventional case-control study for variants with summed risk allele frequency f < 0.05; this power advantage is even more substantial when considering allelic heterogeneity. For complex models of gene-gene interaction, this power advantage depends on the direction of interaction and overall heritability. In sum, we introduce a new method for analyzing rare variants in affected sibpairs that is robust to population stratification, and provide freely available software. PMID:25966809

  15. Human papillomavirus type-16 variants in Quechua aboriginals from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Picconi, María Alejandra; Alonio, Lidia Virginia; Sichero, Laura; Mbayed, Viviana; Villa, Luisa Lina; Gronda, Jorge; Campos, Rodolfo; Teyssié, Angélica

    2003-04-01

    Cervical carcinoma is the leading cause of cancer death in Quechua indians from Jujuy (northwestern Argentina). To determine the prevalence of HPV-16 variants, 106 HPV-16 positive cervical samples were studied, including 33 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 28 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), 9 invasive cervical cancer (ICC), and 36 samples from women with normal colposcopy and cytology. HPV genome variability was examined in the L1 and E6 genes by PCR-hybridization. In a subset of 20 samples, a LCR fragment was also analyzed by PCR-sequencing. Most variants belonged to the European branch with subtle differences that depended on the viral gene fragment studied. Only about 10% of the specimens had non-European variants, including eight Asian-American, two Asian, and one North-American-1. E6 gene analysis revealed that 43% of the samples were identical to HPV-16 prototype, while 57% corresponded to variants. Interestingly, the majority (87%) of normal smears had HPV-16 prototype, whereas variants were detected mainly in SIL and ICC. LCR sequencing yielded 80% of variants, including 69% of European, 19% Asian-American, and 12% Asian. We identified a new variant, the Argentine Quechua-51 (AQ-51), similar to B-14 plus two additional changes: G7842-->A and A7837-->C; phylogenetic inference allocated it in the Asian-American branch. The high proportion of European variants may reflect Spanish colonial influence on these native Inca descendants. The predominance of HPV-16 variants in pathologic samples when compared to normal controls could have implications for the natural history of cervical lesions.

  16. LasR Variant Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Reveal an Adaptable Quorum-Sensing Hierarchy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Feltner, John B.; Wolter, Daniel J.; Pope, Christopher E.; Groleau, Marie-Christine; Smalley, Nicole E.; Greenberg, E. Peter; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Burns, Jane; Hoffman, Lucas R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections cause significant morbidity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Over years to decades, P. aeruginosa adapts genetically as it establishes chronic lung infections. Nonsynonymous mutations in lasR, the quorum-sensing (QS) master regulator, are common in CF. In laboratory strains of P. aeruginosa, LasR activates transcription of dozens of genes, including that for another QS regulator, RhlR. Despite the frequency with which lasR coding variants have been reported to occur in P. aeruginosa CF isolates, little is known about their consequences for QS. We sequenced lasR from 2,583 P. aeruginosa CF isolates. The lasR sequences of 580 isolates (22%) coded for polypeptides that differed from the conserved LasR polypeptides of well-studied laboratory strains. This collection included 173 unique lasR coding variants, 116 of which were either missense or nonsense mutations. We studied 31 of these variants. About one-sixth of the variant LasR proteins were functional, including 3 with nonsense mutations, and in some LasR-null isolates, genes that are LasR dependent in laboratory strains were nonetheless expressed. Furthermore, about half of the LasR-null isolates retained RhlR activity. Therefore, in some CF isolates the QS hierarchy is altered such that RhlR quorum sensing is independent of LasR regulation. Our analysis challenges the view that QS-silent P. aeruginosa is selected during the course of a chronic CF lung infection. Rather, some lasR sequence variants retain functionality, and many employ an alternate QS strategy involving RhlR. PMID:27703072

  17. Germline Heterozygous Variants in SEC23B Are Associated with Cowden Syndrome and Enriched in Apparently Sporadic Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yehia, Lamis; Niazi, Farshad; Ni, Ying; Ngeow, Joanne; Sankunny, Madhav; Liu, Zhigang; Wei, Wei; Mester, Jessica L.; Keri, Ruth A.; Zhang, Bin; Eng, Charis

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-predisposing genes associated with inherited cancer syndromes help explain mechanisms of sporadic carcinogenesis and often inform normal development. Cowden syndrome (CS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by high lifetime risks of epithelial cancers, such that ∼50% of affected individuals are wild-type for known cancer-predisposing genes. Using whole-exome and Sanger sequencing of a multi-generation CS family affected by thyroid and other cancers, we identified a pathogenic missense heterozygous SEC23B variant (c.1781T>G [p.Val594Gly]) that segregates with the phenotype. We also found germline heterozygous SEC23B variants in 3/96 (3%) unrelated mutation-negative CS probands with thyroid cancer and in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), representing apparently sporadic cancers. We note that the TCGA thyroid cancer dataset is enriched with unique germline deleterious SEC23B variants associated with a significantly younger age of onset. SEC23B encodes Sec23 homolog B (S. cerevisiae), a component of coat protein complex II (COPII), which transports proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus. Interestingly, germline homozygous or compound-heterozygous SEC23B mutations cause an unrelated disorder, congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II, and SEC23B-deficient mice suffer from secretory organ degeneration due to ER-stress-associated apoptosis. By characterizing the p.Val594Gly variant in a normal thyroid cell line, we show that it is a functional alteration that results in ER-stress-mediated cell-colony formation and survival, growth, and invasion, which reflect aspects of a cancer phenotype. Our findings suggest a different role for SEC23B, whereby germline heterozygous variants associate with cancer predisposition potentially mediated by ER stress “addiction.” PMID:26522472

  18. High-Throughput Sequencing of mGluR Signaling Pathway Genes Reveals Enrichment of Rare Variants in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Hovhannisyan, Hayk; Trautman, Edwin; Pinard, Robert; Rathmell, Barbara; Carpenter, Randall; Margulies, David

    2012-01-01

    Identification of common molecular pathways affected by genetic variation in autism is important for understanding disease pathogenesis and devising effective therapies. Here, we test the hypothesis that rare genetic variation in the metabotropic glutamate-receptor (mGluR) signaling pathway contributes to autism susceptibility. Single-nucleotide variants in genes encoding components of the mGluR signaling pathway were identified by high-throughput multiplex sequencing of pooled samples from 290 non-syndromic autism cases and 300 ethnically matched controls on two independent next-generation platforms. This analysis revealed significant enrichment of rare functional variants in the mGluR pathway in autism cases. Higher burdens of rare, potentially deleterious variants were identified in autism cases for three pathway genes previously implicated in syndromic autism spectrum disorder, TSC1, TSC2, and SHANK3, suggesting that genetic variation in these genes also contributes to risk for non-syndromic autism. In addition, our analysis identified HOMER1, which encodes a postsynaptic density-localized scaffolding protein that interacts with Shank3 to regulate mGluR activity, as a novel autism-risk gene. Rare, potentially deleterious HOMER1 variants identified uniquely in the autism population affected functionally important protein regions or regulatory sequences and co-segregated closely with autism among children of affected families. We also identified rare ASD-associated coding variants predicted to have damaging effects on components of the Ras/MAPK cascade. Collectively, these findings suggest that altered signaling downstream of mGluRs contributes to the pathogenesis of non-syndromic autism. PMID:22558107

  19. Search for new loci and low-frequency variants influencing glioma risk by exome-array analysis.

    PubMed

    Kinnersley, Ben; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Labussière, Marianne; Wang, Yufei; Galan, Pilar; Mokhtari, Karima; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Gousias, Konstantinos; Schramm, Johannes; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Swerdlow, Anthony; Fleming, Sarah J; Herms, Stefan; Heilmann, Stefanie; Nöthen, Markus M; Simon, Matthias; Sanson, Marc; Lathrop, Mark; Houlston, Richard S

    2016-05-01

    To identify protein-altering variants (PAVs) for glioma, we analysed Illumina HumanExome BeadChip exome-array data on 1882 glioma cases and 8079 controls from three independent European populations. In addition to single-variant tests we incorporated information on the predicted functional consequences of PAVs and analysed sets of genes with a higher likelihood of having a role in glioma on the basis of the profile of somatic mutations documented by large-scale sequencing initiatives. Globally there was a strong relationship between effect size and PAVs predicted to be damaging (P=2.29 × 10(-49)); however, these variants which are most likely to impact on risk, are rare (MAF<5%). Although no single variant showed an association which was statistically significant at the genome-wide threshold a number represented promising associations - BRCA2:c.9976A>T, p.(Lys3326Ter), which has been shown to influence breast and lung cancer risk (odds ratio (OR)=2.3, P=4.00 × 10(-4) for glioblastoma (GBM)) and IDH2:c.782G>A, p.(Arg261His) (OR=3.21, P=7.67 × 10(-3), for non-GBM). Additionally, gene burden tests revealed a statistically significant association for HARS2 and risk of GBM (P=2.20 × 10(-6)). Genome scans of low-frequency PAVs represent a complementary strategy to identify disease-causing variants compared with scans based on tagSNPs. Strategies to lessen the multiple testing burden by restricting analysis to PAVs with higher priors affords an opportunity to maximise study power.

  20. Search for new loci and low-frequency variants influencing glioma risk by exome-array analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kinnersley, Ben; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Labussière, Marianne; Wang, Yufei; Galan, Pilar; Mokhtari, Karima; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Gousias, Konstantinos; Schramm, Johannes; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Swerdlow, Anthony; Fleming, Sarah J; Herms, Stefan; Heilmann, Stefanie; Nöthen, Markus M; Simon, Matthias; Sanson, Marc; Lathrop, Mark; Houlston, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    To identify protein-altering variants (PAVs) for glioma, we analysed Illumina HumanExome BeadChip exome-array data on 1882 glioma cases and 8079 controls from three independent European populations. In addition to single-variant tests we incorporated information on the predicted functional consequences of PAVs and analysed sets of genes with a higher likelihood of having a role in glioma on the basis of the profile of somatic mutations documented by large-scale sequencing initiatives. Globally there was a strong relationship between effect size and PAVs predicted to be damaging (P=2.29 × 10−49); however, these variants which are most likely to impact on risk, are rare (MAF<5%). Although no single variant showed an association which was statistically significant at the genome-wide threshold a number represented promising associations – BRCA2:c.9976A>T, p.(Lys3326Ter), which has been shown to influence breast and lung cancer risk (odds ratio (OR)=2.3, P=4.00 × 10−4 for glioblastoma (GBM)) and IDH2:c.782G>A, p.(Arg261His) (OR=3.21, P=7.67 × 10−3, for non-GBM). Additionally, gene burden tests revealed a statistically significant association for HARS2 and risk of GBM (P=2.20 × 10−6). Genome scans of low-frequency PAVs represent a complementary strategy to identify disease-causing variants compared with scans based on tagSNPs. Strategies to lessen the multiple testing burden by restricting analysis to PAVs with higher priors affords an opportunity to maximise study power. PMID:26264438

  1. Meta-analysis of gene-level associations for rare variants based on single-variant statistics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi-Juan; Berndt, Sonja I; Gustafsson, Stefan; Ganna, Andrea; Hirschhorn, Joel; North, Kari E; Ingelsson, Erik; Lin, Dan-Yu

    2013-08-01

    Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) has led to the discoveries of many common variants associated with complex human diseases. There is a growing recognition that identifying "causal" rare variants also requires large-scale meta-analysis. The fact that association tests with rare variants are performed at the gene level rather than at the variant level poses unprecedented challenges in the meta-analysis. First, different studies may adopt different gene-level tests, so the results are not compatible. Second, gene-level tests require multivariate statistics (i.e., components of the test statistic and their covariance matrix), which are difficult to obtain. To overcome these challenges, we propose to perform gene-level tests for rare variants by combining the results of single-variant analysis (i.e., p values of association tests and effect estimates) from participating studies. This simple strategy is possible because of an insight that multivariate statistics can be recovered from single-variant statistics, together with the correlation matrix of the single-variant test statistics, which can be estimated from one of the participating studies or from a publicly available database. We show both theoretically and numerically that the proposed meta-analysis approach provides accurate control of the type I error and is as powerful as joint analysis of individual participant data. This approach accommodates any disease phenotype and any study design and produces all commonly used gene-level tests. An application to the GWAS summary results of the Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium reveals rare and low-frequency variants associated with human height. The relevant software is freely available. PMID:23891470

  2. Meta-analysis of Gene-Level Associations for Rare Variants Based on Single-Variant Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yi-Juan; Berndt, Sonja I.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Ganna, Andrea; Berndt, Sonja I.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Mägi, Reedik; Ganna, Andrea; Wheeler, Eleanor; Feitosa, Mary F.; Justice, Anne E.; Monda, Keri L.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Day, Felix R.; Esko, Tõnu; Fall, Tove; Ferreira, Teresa; Gentilini, Davide; Jackson, Anne U.; Luan, Jian’an; Randall, Joshua C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Willer, Cristen J.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Wood, Andrew R.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Hu, Yi-Juan; Lee, Sang Hong; Liang, Liming; Lin, Dan-Yu; Min, Josine L.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Yang, Jian; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Cadby, Gemma; den Heijer, Martin; Eklund, Niina; Fischer, Krista; Goel, Anuj; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Jarick, Ivonne; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E.; König, Inke R.; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lamina, Claudia; Lecoeur, Cecile; Li, Guo; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Perola, Markus; Peters, Marjolein J.; Preuss, Michael; Rose, Lynda M.; Shi, Jianxin; Shungin, Dmitry; Smith, Albert Vernon; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Surakka, Ida; Teumer, Alexander; Trip, Mieke D.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Waite, Lindsay L.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atalay, Mustafa; Attwood, Antony P.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Basart, Hanneke; Beilby, John; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Brambilla, Paolo; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Campbell, Harry; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chines, Peter S.; Collins, Francis S.; Connell, John M.; Cookson, William; de Faire, Ulf; de Vegt, Femmie; Dei, Mariano; Dimitriou, Maria; Edkins, Sarah; Estrada, Karol; Evans, David M.; Farrall, Martin; Ferrario, Marco M.; Ferrières, Jean; Franke, Lude; Frau, Francesca; Gejman, Pablo V.; Grallert, Harald; Grönberg, Henrik; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Alistair S.; Hall, Per; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hebebrand, Johannes; Homuth, Georg; Hu, Frank B.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Hyppönen, Elina; Iribarren, Carlos; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jansson, John-Olov; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kee, Frank; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kivimaki, Mika; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana H.; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J.; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Liu, Jianjun; Liuzzi, Antonio; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Madden, Pamela A.; Magnusson, Patrik K.; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; März, Winfried; Leach, Irene Mateo; McKnight, Barbara; Medland, Sarah E.; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mooser, Vincent; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Musk, Arthur W.; Narisu, Narisu; Navis, Gerjan; Nicholson, George; Nohr, Ellen A.; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Palotie, Aarno; Peden, John F.; Pedersen, Nancy; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Prokopenko, Inga; Pütter, Carolin; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Raitakari, Olli; Rendon, Augusto; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Saaristo, Timo E.; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Sanders, Alan R.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Shin, So-Youn; Signorini, Stefano; Sinisalo, Juha; Skrobek, Boris; Soranzo, Nicole; Stančáková, Alena; Stark, Klaus; Stephens, Jonathan C.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P.; Stumvoll, Michael; Swift, Amy J.; Theodoraki, Eirini V.; Thorand, Barbara; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Tremoli, Elena; Van der Klauw, Melanie M.; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Viikari, Jorma; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vitart, Veronique; Waeber, Gérard; Wang, Zhaoming; Widén, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F.

    2013-01-01

    Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) has led to the discoveries of many common variants associated with complex human diseases. There is a growing recognition that identifying “causal” rare variants also requires large-scale meta-analysis. The fact that association tests with rare variants are performed at the gene level rather than at the variant level poses unprecedented challenges in the meta-analysis. First, different studies may adopt different gene-level tests, so the results are not compatible. Second, gene-level tests require multivariate statistics (i.e., components of the test statistic and their covariance matrix), which are difficult to obtain. To overcome these challenges, we propose to perform gene-level tests for rare variants by combining the results of single-variant analysis (i.e., p values of association tests and effect estimates) from participating studies. This simple strategy is possible because of an insight that multivariate statistics can be recovered from single-variant statistics, together with the correlation matrix of the single-variant test statistics, which can be estimated from one of the participating studies or from a publicly available database. We show both theoretically and numerically that the proposed meta-analysis approach provides accurate control of the type I error and is as powerful as joint analysis of individual participant data. This approach accommodates any disease phenotype and any study design and produces all commonly used gene-level tests. An application to the GWAS summary results of the Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium reveals rare and low-frequency variants associated with human height. The relevant software is freely available. PMID:23891470

  3. DNA repair variants and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Anne; Richardson, Harriet; Schuetz, Johanna M; Burstyn, Igor; Spinelli, John J; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Aronson, Kristan J

    2016-05-01

    A functional DNA repair system has been identified as important in the prevention of tumour development. Previous studies have hypothesized that common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes could play a role in breast cancer risk and also identified the potential for interactions between these polymorphisms and established breast cancer risk factors such as physical activity. Associations with breast cancer risk for 99 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from genes in ten DNA repair pathways were examined in a case-control study including both Europeans (644 cases, 809 controls) and East Asians (299 cases, 160 controls). Odds ratios in both additive and dominant genetic models were calculated separately for participants of European and East Asian ancestry using multivariate logistic regression. The impact of multiple comparisons was assessed by correcting for the false discovery rate within each DNA repair pathway. Interactions between several breast cancer risk factors and DNA repair SNPs were also evaluated. One SNP (rs3213282) in the gene XRCC1 was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in the dominant model of inheritance following adjustment for the false discovery rate (P < 0.05), although no associations were observed for other DNA repair SNPs. Interactions of six SNPs in multiple DNA repair pathways with physical activity were evident prior to correction for FDR, following which there was support for only one of the interaction terms (P < 0.05). No consistent associations between variants in DNA repair genes and breast cancer risk or their modification by breast cancer risk factors were observed. PMID:27060854

  4. A Unique Hairy Cell Leukemia Variant.

    PubMed

    Jian, Charles; Hsia, Cyrus C

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented with easy bruising, left upper quadrant pain, decreased appetite, and weight loss. She had splenomegaly and lymphocytosis (lymphocyte count of 11.6 × 10(9)/l), with remarkably abnormal appearing morphology. Her hemoglobin and platelet counts were normal. Peripheral blood flow cytometry revealed a monoclonal B-cell population expressing CD11c, CD25, CD19, CD20, and CD103. An initial diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia (HCL) was made, and the patient was treated with a standard 5-day course of cladribine. However, her lymphocytosis improved transiently, with a relapse 4 months later. There was no improvement in her splenomegaly. An HCL variant (HCL-v) was considered based on her resistance to treatment with a purine nucleoside analog. A subsequent splenectomy improved symptoms. Two years after, the patient suffered a relapse and underwent 6 cycles of CHOP-R (cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunomycin, oncovin, prednisone, and rituximab), achieving partial remission. While under observation, she progressed with lymphocytosis 6 months later and was treated with pentostatin. There was no significant improvement in her disease, and she died 8 weeks following treatment initiation. HCL-v is a clinically more aggressive mature B-cell lymphoma than HCL with worse splenomegaly, higher lymphocyte counts, and resistance to typical HCL therapy with purine nucleoside analogs. Early recognition of HCL-v in the history, physical examination, and investigations with morphology and flow cytometry is key to patient management. Further, as in our case of HCL-v, cell morphology can be distinctly atypical, with large nucleoli and extremely convoluted nuclei. The distinction between HCL and HCL-v is important as HCL-v patients require more aggressive therapy and closer follow-up. PMID:27462230

  5. A Unique Hairy Cell Leukemia Variant

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Charles; Hsia, Cyrus C.

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented with easy bruising, left upper quadrant pain, decreased appetite, and weight loss. She had splenomegaly and lymphocytosis (lymphocyte count of 11.6 × 109/l), with remarkably abnormal appearing morphology. Her hemoglobin and platelet counts were normal. Peripheral blood flow cytometry revealed a monoclonal B-cell population expressing CD11c, CD25, CD19, CD20, and CD103. An initial diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia (HCL) was made, and the patient was treated with a standard 5-day course of cladribine. However, her lymphocytosis improved transiently, with a relapse 4 months later. There was no improvement in her splenomegaly. An HCL variant (HCL-v) was considered based on her resistance to treatment with a purine nucleoside analog. A subsequent splenectomy improved symptoms. Two years after, the patient suffered a relapse and underwent 6 cycles of CHOP-R (cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunomycin, oncovin, prednisone, and rituximab), achieving partial remission. While under observation, she progressed with lymphocytosis 6 months later and was treated with pentostatin. There was no significant improvement in her disease, and she died 8 weeks following treatment initiation. HCL-v is a clinically more aggressive mature B-cell lymphoma than HCL with worse splenomegaly, higher lymphocyte counts, and resistance to typical HCL therapy with purine nucleoside analogs. Early recognition of HCL-v in the history, physical examination, and investigations with morphology and flow cytometry is key to patient management. Further, as in our case of HCL-v, cell morphology can be distinctly atypical, with large nucleoli and extremely convoluted nuclei. The distinction between HCL and HCL-v is important as HCL-v patients require more aggressive therapy and closer follow-up. PMID:27462230

  6. Two variants of minimum discarded fill ordering

    SciTech Connect

    D'Azevedo, E.F. ); Forsyth, P.A.; Tang, Wei-Pai . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-01-01

    It is well known that the ordering of the unknowns can have a significant effect on the convergence of Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) methods. There has been considerable experimental work on the effects of ordering for regular finite difference problems. In many cases, good results have been obtained with preconditioners based on diagonal, spiral or natural row orderings. However, for finite element problems having unstructured grids or grids generated by a local refinement approach, it is difficult to define many of the orderings for more regular problems. A recently proposed Minimum Discarded Fill (MDF) ordering technique is effective in finding high quality Incomplete LU (ILU) preconditioners, especially for problems arising from unstructured finite element grids. Testing indicates this algorithm can identify a rather complicated physical structure in an anisotropic problem and orders the unknowns in the preferred'' direction. The MDF technique may be viewed as the numerical analogue of the minimum deficiency algorithm in sparse matrix technology. At any stage of the partial elimination, the MDF technique chooses the next pivot node so as to minimize the amount of discarded fill. In this work, two efficient variants of the MDF technique are explored to produce cost-effective high-order ILU preconditioners. The Threshold MDF orderings combine MDF ideas with drop tolerance techniques to identify the sparsity pattern in the ILU preconditioners. These techniques identify an ordering that encourages fast decay of the entries in the ILU factorization. The Minimum Update Matrix (MUM) ordering technique is a simplification of the MDF ordering and is closely related to the minimum degree algorithm. The MUM ordering is especially for large problems arising from Navier-Stokes problems. Some interesting pictures of the orderings are presented using a visualization tool. 22 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. DNA repair variants and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Anne; Richardson, Harriet; Schuetz, Johanna M; Burstyn, Igor; Spinelli, John J; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Aronson, Kristan J

    2016-05-01

    A functional DNA repair system has been identified as important in the prevention of tumour development. Previous studies have hypothesized that common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes could play a role in breast cancer risk and also identified the potential for interactions between these polymorphisms and established breast cancer risk factors such as physical activity. Associations with breast cancer risk for 99 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from genes in ten DNA repair pathways were examined in a case-control study including both Europeans (644 cases, 809 controls) and East Asians (299 cases, 160 controls). Odds ratios in both additive and dominant genetic models were calculated separately for participants of European and East Asian ancestry using multivariate logistic regression. The impact of multiple comparisons was assessed by correcting for the false discovery rate within each DNA repair pathway. Interactions between several breast cancer risk factors and DNA repair SNPs were also evaluated. One SNP (rs3213282) in the gene XRCC1 was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in the dominant model of inheritance following adjustment for the false discovery rate (P < 0.05), although no associations were observed for other DNA repair SNPs. Interactions of six SNPs in multiple DNA repair pathways with physical activity were evident prior to correction for FDR, following which there was support for only one of the interaction terms (P < 0.05). No consistent associations between variants in DNA repair genes and breast cancer risk or their modification by breast cancer risk factors were observed.

  8. Nanopore sequencing detects structural variants in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Alexis L.; Workman, Rachael E.; Fan, Yunfan; Eshleman, James R.; Timp, Winston

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite advances in sequencing, structural variants (SVs) remain difficult to reliably detect due to the short read length (<300 bp) of 2nd generation sequencing. Not only do the reads (or paired-end reads) need to straddle a breakpoint, but repetitive elements often lead to ambiguities in the alignment of short reads. We propose to use the long-reads (up to 20 kb) possible with 3rd generation sequencing, specifically nanopore sequencing on the MinION. Nanopore sequencing relies on a similar concept to a Coulter counter, reading the DNA sequence from the change in electrical current resulting from a DNA strand being forced through a nanometer-sized pore embedded in a membrane. Though nanopore sequencing currently has a relatively high mismatch rate that precludes base substitution and small frameshift mutation detection, its accuracy is sufficient for SV detection because of its long reads. In fact, long reads in some cases may improve SV detection efficiency. We have tested nanopore sequencing to detect a series of well-characterized SVs, including large deletions, inversions, and translocations that inactivate the CDKN2A/p16 and SMAD4/DPC4 tumor suppressor genes in pancreatic cancer. Using PCR amplicon mixes, we have demonstrated that nanopore sequencing can detect large deletions, translocations and inversions at dilutions as low as 1:100, with as few as 500 reads per sample. Given the speed, small footprint, and low capital cost, nanopore sequencing could become the ideal tool for the low-level detection of cancer-associated SVs needed for molecular relapse, early detection, or therapeutic monitoring. PMID:26787508

  9. Frequency of enzyme deficiency variants in erythrocytes of newborn infants

    SciTech Connect

    Mohrenweiser, H.W.

    1981-08-01

    The frequency of enzyme deficiency variants, defined as alleles whose products are either absent or almost devoid of normal activity in erythrocytes, was determined for nine erythrocyte enzymes in some 675 newborn infants and in approximately 200 adults. Examples of this type of genetic abnormality, which in the homozygous condition are often associated with significant health consequences, were detected for seven of the nine enzymes studied. Fifteen inherited enzyme deficiency variants in 1809 determinations from adults were identified. Seven of the deficiency variants involved triosephosphate isomerase, a frequency of 0.01 in the newborn population. The average frequency of 2.4/1000 is 2 to 3 times the frequency observed for rare electrophoretic variants of erythrocyte enzymes in this same population.

  10. Genetic variant as a marker for bladder cancer therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Patients who have inherited a specific common genetic variant develop bladder cancer tumors that strongly express a protein known as prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), which is also expressed in many pancreatic and prostate tumors, according to research a

  11. Common Gene Variants Account for Most Genetic Risk for Autism

    MedlinePlus

    ... 20, 2014 Common gene variants account for most genetic risk for autism Roles of heritability, mutations, environment ... ASD) was traced to inherited variations in the genetic code shared by many people. These and other ( ...

  12. Statistical Analysis Strategies for Association Studies Involving Rare Variants

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Vikas; Libiger, Ondrej; Torkamani, Ali; Schork, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    The limitations of genome-wide association (GWA) studies that focus on the phenotypic influence of common genetic variants have motivated human geneticists to consider the contribution of rare variants to phenotypic expression. The increasing availability of high-throughput sequencing technology has enabled studies of rare variants, but will not be sufficient for their success since appropriate analytical methods are also needed. We consider data analysis approaches to testing associations between a phenotype and collections of rare variants in a defined genomic region or set of regions. Ultimately, although a wide variety of analytical approaches exist, more work is needed to refine them and determine their properties and power in different contexts. PMID:20940738

  13. Leapfrog variants of iterative methods for linear algebra equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saylor, Paul E.

    1988-01-01

    Two iterative methods are considered, Richardson's method and a general second order method. For both methods, a variant of the method is derived for which only even numbered iterates are computed. The variant is called a leapfrog method. Comparisons between the conventional form of the methods and the leapfrog form are made under the assumption that the number of unknowns is large. In the case of Richardson's method, it is possible to express the final iterate in terms of only the initial approximation, a variant of the iteration called the grand-leap method. In the case of the grand-leap variant, a set of parameters is required. An algorithm is presented to compute these parameters that is related to algorithms to compute the weights and abscissas for Gaussian quadrature. General algorithms to implement the leapfrog and grand-leap methods are presented. Algorithms for the important special case of the Chebyshev method are also given.

  14. A variant of human transferrin with abnormal properties.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, R W; Williams, J; Moreton, K

    1982-01-01

    Screening of human serum samples by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis in the presence of 6 M-urea revealed an individual who is heterozygous for a variant transferrin. The variant transferrin is able to bind two atoms of iron, but the iron in the C-terminal binding site is bound abnormally, as judged by its spectral properties, and is dissociated from the protein on electrophoresis in the presence of 6 M-urea. The iron-free C-terminal domain of the variant protein is less stable than normal to thermal and urea denaturation. Structural changes in the variant protein have not yet been characterized. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 6. Fig. 9. PMID:7082283

  15. Risk variants in BMP4 promoters for nonsyndromic cleft lip/palate in a Chilean population

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bone morphogenetic protein 4 gene (BMP4) plays a key role during maxillofacial development, since orofacial clefts are observed in animals when this gene is conditionally inactivated. We recently reported the existence of association between nonsyndromic cleft lip/palate (NSCLP) and BMP4 polymorphisms by detecting transmission deviations for haplotypes that include a region containing a BMP4 promoter in case-parent trios. The aim of the present study was to search for possible causal mutations within BMP4 promoters (BMP4.1 and BMP4.2). Methods We analyzed the sequence of BMP4.1 and BMP4.2 in 167 Chilean NSCLP cases and 336 controls. Results We detected three novel variants in BMP4.1 (c.-5514G > A, c.-5365C > T and c.-5049C > T) which could be considered as cleft risk factors due to their absence in controls. Additionally, rs2855530 G allele (BMP4.2) carriers showed an increased risk for NSCLP restricted to males (OR = 1.52; 95% C.I. = 1.07-2.15; p = 0.019). For this same SNP the dominant genotype model showed a higher frequency of G/G+G/C and a lower frequency of C/C in cases than controls in the total sample (p = 0.03) and in the male sample (p = 0.003). Bioinformatic prediction analysis showed that all the risk variants detected in this study could create new transcription factor binding motifs. Conclusions The sex-dependent association between rs2855530 and NSCLP could indirectly be related to the differential gene expression observed between sexes in animal models. We concluded that risk variants detected herein could potentially alter BMP4 promoter activity in NSCLP. Further functional and developmental studies are necessary to support this hypothesis. PMID:22182590

  16. Functional characterization of the human organic cation transporter 2 variant p.270Ala>Ser.

    PubMed

    Zolk, Oliver; Solbach, Thomas F; König, Jörg; Fromm, Martin F

    2009-06-01

    The organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2, SLC22A2) plays an important role for renal drug elimination. Recent clinical studies indicate an impact of the frequent nonsynonymous c.808G>T (p.270Ala>Ser) polymorphism on renal clearance of metformin and the extent of the metformin-cimetidine interaction. The role of this polymorphism for renal disposition of endogenous compounds and drugs other than metformin has not been investigated. In addition, it is unclear whether the observed genotype dependence of an OCT2-mediated drug-drug interaction might occur also with other OCT inhibitors. To address these issues, we generated human embryonic kidney cells stably expressing wild-type OCT2 or the p.270Ala>Ser variant. No differences in protein expression levels and membrane incorporation pattern were observed between the two cell lines. The p.270Ala>Ser variant significantly impaired uptake kinetics of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, dopamine, norepinephrine, and propranolol. V(max) values were significantly reduced for uptake of all four compounds mediated by the p.270Ala>Ser variant compared with wild-type OCT2. In addition, a significant difference in the affinity to wild-type and mutant OCT2 was observed for dopamine (K(m) dopamine: 932 +/- 77 versus 1285 +/- 132 microM). Moreover, out of a set of 27 compounds p.270Ala>Ser OCT2 was significantly less sensitive to inhibition by cimetidine, flurazepam, metformin, mexiletine, propranolol, and verapamil than wild-type OCT2 (e.g., for propranolol: IC(50) wild type versus p.270Ala>Ser 189 versus 895 microM, P < 0.001). Our results indicate that the common OCT2 c.808G>T single nucleotide polymorphism significantly alters uptake of endogenous compounds and drugs. Moreover, for selected compounds the extent of OCT2-mediated drug interactions could depend on OCT2 c.808G>T genotype. PMID:19251820

  17. Detection of Clinically Relevant Genetic Variants in Autism Spectrum Disorder by Whole-Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yong-hui; Yuen, Ryan K.C.; Jin, Xin; Wang, Mingbang; Chen, Nong; Wu, Xueli; Ju, Jia; Mei, Junpu; Shi, Yujian; He, Mingze; Wang, Guangbiao; Liang, Jieqin; Wang, Zhe; Cao, Dandan; Carter, Melissa T.; Chrysler, Christina; Drmic, Irene E.; Howe, Jennifer L.; Lau, Lynette; Marshall, Christian R.; Merico, Daniele; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Thompson, Ann; Uddin, Mohammed; Walker, Susan; Luo, Jun; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Ring, Robert H.; Wang, Jian; Lajonchere, Clara; Wang, Jun; Shih, Andy; Szatmari, Peter; Yang, Huanming; Dawson, Geraldine; Li, Yingrui; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) demonstrates high heritability and familial clustering, yet the genetic causes remain only partially understood as a result of extensive clinical and genomic heterogeneity. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) shows promise as a tool for identifying ASD risk genes as well as unreported mutations in known loci, but an assessment of its full utility in an ASD group has not been performed. We used WGS to examine 32 families with ASD to detect de novo or rare inherited genetic variants predicted to be deleterious (loss-of-function and damaging missense mutations). Among ASD probands, we identified deleterious de novo mutations in six of 32 (19%) families and X-linked or autosomal inherited alterations in ten of 32 (31%) families (some had combinations of mutations). The proportion of families identified with such putative mutations was larger than has been previously reported; this yield was in part due to the comprehensive and uniform coverage afforded by WGS. Deleterious variants were found in four unrecognized, nine known, and eight candidate ASD risk genes. Examples include CAPRIN1 and AFF2 (both linked to FMR1, which is involved in fragile X syndrome), VIP (involved in social-cognitive deficits), and other genes such as SCN2A and KCNQ2 (linked to epilepsy), NRXN1, and CHD7, which causes ASD-associated CHARGE syndrome. Taken together, these results suggest that WGS and thorough bioinformatic analyses for de novo and rare inherited mutations will improve the detection of genetic variants likely to be associated with ASD or its accompanying clinical symptoms. PMID:23849776

  18. Interpopulation hybridization generates meiotically stable rDNA epigenetic variants in allotetraploid Tragopogon mirus.

    PubMed

    Matyášek, Roman; Dobešová, Eva; Húska, Dalibor; Ježková, Ivana; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E; Kovařík, Aleš

    2016-02-01

    Uniparental silencing of 35S rRNA genes (rDNA), known as nucleolar dominance (ND), is common in interspecific hybrids. Allotetraploid Tragopogon mirus composed of Tragopogon dubius (d) and Tragopogon porrifolius (p) genomes shows highly variable ND. To examine the molecular basis of such variation, we studied the genetic and epigenetic features of rDNA homeologs in several lines derived from recently and independently formed natural populations. Inbred lines derived from T. mirus with a dominant d-rDNA homeolog transmitted this expression pattern over generations, which may explain why it is prevalent among natural populations. In contrast, lines derived from the p-rDNA dominant progenitor were meiotically unstable, frequently switching to co-dominance. Interpopulation crosses between progenitors displaying reciprocal ND resulted in d-rDNA dominance, indicating immediate suppression of p-homeologs in F1 hybrids. Original p-rDNA dominance was not restored in later generations, even in those segregants that inherited the corresponding parental rDNA genotype, thus indicating the generation of additional p-rDNA and d-rDNA epigenetic variants. Despite preserved intergenic spacer (IGS) structure, they showed altered cytosine methylation and chromatin condensation patterns, and a correlation between expression, hypomethylation of RNA Pol I promoters and chromatin decondensation was apparent. Reversion of such epigenetic variants occurred rarely, resulting in co-dominance maintained in individuals with distinct genotypes. Generally, interpopulation crosses may generate epialleles that are not present in natural populations, underlying epigenetic dynamics in young allopolyploids. We hypothesize that highly expressed variants with distinct IGS features may induce heritable epigenetic reprogramming of the partner rDNA arrays, harmonizing the expression of thousands of genes in allopolyploids. PMID:26711705

  19. Colocalisation of predicted exonic splicing enhancers in BRCA2 with reported sequence variants.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, Christopher A; Wayte, Nicola; Wronski, Ania; Lovelock, Paul K; Spurdle, Amanda B; Brown, Melissa A

    2008-07-01

    Disruption of the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2 is associated with increased risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. Over 1800 sequence changes in BRCA2 have been reported, although for many the pathogenicity is unclear. Classifying these changes remains a challenge, as they may disrupt regulatory sequences as well as the primary protein coding sequence. Sequence changes located in the splice site consensus sequences often disrupt splicing, however sequence changes located within exons are also able to alter splicing patterns. Unfortunately, the presence of these exonic splicing enhancers (ESEs) and the functional effect of variants within ESEs it is currently difficult to predict. We have previously developed a method of predicting which sequence changes within exons are likely to affect splicing, using BRCA1 as an example. In this paper, we have predicted ESEs in BRCA2 using the web-based tool ESEfinder and incorporated the same series of filters (increased threshold, 125 nt limit and evolutionary conservation of the motif) in order to identify predicted ESEs that are more likely to be functional. Initially 1114 ESEs were predicted for BRCA2, however after all the filters were included, this figure was reduced to 31, 3% of the original number of predicted ESEs. Reported unclassified sequence variants in BRCA2 were found to colocalise to 55% (17/31) of these conserved ESEs, while polymorphisms colocalised to 0 of the conserved ESEs. In summary, we have identified a subset of unclassified sequence variants in BRCA2 that may adversely affect splicing and thereby contribute to BRCA2 disruption.

  20. Prevalence of Titin Truncating Variants in General Population

    PubMed Central

    Akinrinade, Oyediran; Koskenvuo, Juha W.; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Background Truncating titin (TTN) mutations, especially in A-band region, represent the most common cause of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Clinical interpretation of these variants can be challenging, as these variants are also present in reference populations. We carried out systematic analyses of TTN truncating variants (TTNtv) in publicly available reference populations, including, for the first time, data from Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC). The goal was to establish more accurate estimate of prevalence of different TTNtv to allow better clinical interpretation of these findings. Methods and Results Using data from 1000 Genomes Project, Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) and ExAC, we estimated the prevalence of TTNtv in the population. In the three population datasets, 52–54% of TTNtv were not affecting all TTN transcripts. The frequency of truncations affecting all transcripts in ExAC was 0.36% (0.32% - 0.41%, 95% CI) and 0.19% (0.16% - 0.23%, 95% CI) for those affecting the A-band. In the A-band region, the prevalences of frameshift, nonsense and essential splice site variants were 0.057%, 0.090%, and 0.047% respectively. Cga/Tga (arginine/nonsense–R/*) transitional change at CpG mutation hotspots was the most frequent type of TTN nonsense mutation accounting for 91.3% (21/23) of arginine residue nonsense mutation (R/*) at TTN A-band region. Non-essential splice-site variants had significantly lower proportion of private variants and higher proportion of low-frequency variants compared to essential splice-site variants (P = 0.01; P = 5.1 X 10−4, respectively). Conclusion A-band TTNtv are more rare in the general population than previously reported. Based on this analysis, one in 500 carries a truncation in TTN A-band suggesting the penetrance of these potentially harmful variants is still poorly understood, and some of these variants do not manifest as autosomal dominant DCM. This calls for caution when interpreting TTNtv in individuals and families

  1. Schizophrenia-risk variant rs6994992 in the neuregulin-1 gene on brain developmental trajectories in typically developing children

    PubMed Central

    Douet, V; Chang, L; Pritchett, A; Lee, K; Keating, B; Bartsch, H; Jernigan, T L; Dale, A; Akshoomoff, N; Murray, S; Bloss, C; Kennedy, D N; Amaral, D; Gruen, J; Kaufmann, W E; Casey, B J; Sowell, E; Ernst, T

    2014-01-01

    The neuregulin-1 (NRG1) gene is one of the best-validated risk genes for schizophrenia, and psychotic and bipolar disorders. The rs6994992 variant in the NRG1 promoter (SNP8NRG243177) is associated with altered frontal and temporal brain macrostructures and/or altered white matter density and integrity in schizophrenic adults, as well as healthy adults and neonates. However, the ages when these changes begin and whether neuroimaging phenotypes are associated with cognitive performance are not fully understood. Therefore, we investigated the association of the rs6994992 variant on developmental trajectories of brain macro- and microstructures, and their relationship with cognitive performance. A total of 972 healthy children aged 3–20 years had the genotype available for the NRG1-rs6994992 variant, and were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological tests. Age-by-NRG1-rs6994992 interactions and genotype effects were assessed using a general additive model regression methodology, covaried for scanner type, socioeconomic status, sex and genetic ancestry factors. Compared with the C-carriers, children with the TT-risk-alleles had subtle microscopic and macroscopic changes in brain development that emerge or reverse during adolescence, a period when many psychiatric disorders are manifested. TT-children at late adolescence showed a lower age-dependent forniceal volume and lower fractional anisotropy; however, both measures were associated with better episodic memory performance. To our knowledge, we provide the first multimodal imaging evidence that genetic variation in NRG1 is associated with age-related changes on brain development during typical childhood and adolescence, and delineated the altered patterns of development in multiple brain regions in children with the T-risk allele(s). PMID:24865593

  2. Candidate genes for congenital diaphragmatic hernia from animalmodels: sequencing of fog2 and pdgfra reveals rare variants indiaphragmatic hernia patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bleyl, S.B.; Moshrefi, A.; Shaw, G.M.; Saijoh, Y.; Schoenwolf,G.C.; Pennacchio, L.A.; Slavotinek, A.M.

    2007-05-11

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common, lifethreatening birth defect. Although there is strong evidence implicatinggenetic factors in its pathogenesis, few causative genes have beenidentified, and in isolated CDH, only one de novo, nonsense mutation hasbeen reported in FOG2 in a female with posterior diaphragmaticeventration. We report here that the homozygous null mouse for the Pdgfragene has posterolateral diaphragmatic defects and thus is a model forhuman CDH. We hypothesized that mutations in this gene could cause humanCDH. We sequenced PDGFRa and FOG2 in 96 patients with CDH, of which 53had isolated CDH (55.2 percent), 36 had CDH and additional anomalies(37.5 percent), and 7 had CDH and known chromosome aberrations (7.3percent). For FOG2, we identified novel sequence alterations predictingp.M703L and p.T843A in two patients with isolated CDH that were absent in526 and 564 control chromosomes respectively. These altered amino acidswere highly conserved. However, due to the lack of available parental DNAsamples we were not able to determine if the sequence alterations were denovo. For PDGFRa, we found a single variant predicting p.L967V in apatient with CDH and multiple anomalies that was absent in 768 controlchromosomes. This patient also had one cell with trisomy 15 on skinfibroblast culture, a finding of uncertain significance. Although ourstudy identified sequence variants in FOG2 and PDGFRa, we have notdefinitively established the variants as mutations and we found noevidence that CDH commonly results from mutations in thesegenes.

  3. The genomic signature of trait-associated variants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies have identified thousands of SNP variants associated with hundreds of phenotypes. For most associations the causal variants and the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogenesis remain unknown. Exploration of the underlying functional annotations of trait-associated loci has thrown some light on their potential roles in pathogenesis. However, there are some shortcomings of the methods used to date, which may undermine efforts to prioritize variants for further analyses. Here, we introduce and apply novel methods to rigorously identify annotation classes showing enrichment or depletion of trait-associated variants taking into account the underlying associations due to co-location of different functional annotations and linkage disequilibrium. Results We assessed enrichment and depletion of variants in publicly available annotation classes such as genic regions, regulatory features, measures of conservation, and patterns of histone modifications. We used logistic regression to build a multivariate model that identified the most influential functional annotations for trait-association status of genome-wide significant variants. SNPs associated with all of the enriched annotations were 8 times more likely to be trait-associated variants than SNPs annotated with none of them. Annotations associated with chromatin state together with prior knowledge of the existence of a local expression QTL (eQTL) were the most important factors in the final logistic regression model. Surprisingly, despite the widespread use of evolutionary conservation to prioritize variants for study we find only modest enrichment of trait-associated SNPs in conserved regions. Conclusion We established odds ratios of functional annotations that are more likely to contain significantly trait-associated SNPs, for the purpose of prioritizing GWAS hits for further studies. Additionally, we estimated the relative and combined influence of the different genomic

  4. Better prediction of functional effects for sequence variants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the effects of naturally occurring genetic variation is one of the major challenges for personalized health and personalized medicine. Here, we introduce SNAP2, a novel neural network based classifier that improves over the state-of-the-art in distinguishing between effect and neutral variants. Our method's improved performance results from screening many potentially relevant protein features and from refining our development data sets. Cross-validated on >100k experimentally annotated variants, SNAP2 significantly outperformed other methods, attaining a two-state accuracy (effect/neutral) of 83%. SNAP2 also outperformed combinations of other methods. Performance increased for human variants but much more so for other organisms. Our method's carefully calibrated reliability index informs selection of variants for experimental follow up, with the most strongly predicted half of all effect variants predicted at over 96% accuracy. As expected, the evolutionary information from automatically generated multiple sequence alignments gave the strongest signal for the prediction. However, we also optimized our new method to perform surprisingly well even without alignments. This feature reduces prediction runtime by over two orders of magnitude, enables cross-genome comparisons, and renders our new method as the best solution for the 10-20% of sequence orphans. SNAP2 is available at: https://rostlab.org/services/snap2web Definitions used Delta, input feature that results from computing the difference feature scores for native amino acid and feature scores for variant amino acid; nsSNP, non-synoymous SNP; PMD, Protein Mutant Database; SNAP, Screening for non-acceptable polymorphisms; SNP, single nucleotide polymorphism; variant, any amino acid changing sequence variant. PMID:26110438

  5. Identification of Genetic Alterations, as Causative Genetic Defects in Long QT Syndrome, Using Next Generation Sequencing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Mademont-Soler, Irene; Allegue, Catarina; Cesar, Sergi; Ferrer-Costa, Carles; Coll, Monica; Mates, Jesus; Iglesias, Anna; Brugada, Josep; Brugada, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Background Long QT Syndrome is an inherited channelopathy leading to sudden cardiac death due to ventricular arrhythmias. Despite that several genes have been associated with the disease, nearly 20% of cases remain without an identified genetic cause. Other genetic alterations such as copy number variations have been recently related to Long QT Syndrome. Our aim was to take advantage of current genetic technologies in a family affected by Long QT Syndrome in order to identify the cause of the disease. Methods Complete clinical evaluation was performed in all family members. In the index case, a Next Generation Sequencing custom-built panel, including 55 sudden cardiac death-related genes, was used both for detection of sequence and copy number variants. Next Generation Sequencing variants were confirmed by Sanger method. Copy number variations variants were confirmed by Multiplex Ligation dependent Probe Amplification method and at the mRNA level. Confirmed variants and copy number variations identified in the index case were also analyzed in relatives. Results In the index case, Next Generation Sequencing revealed a novel variant in TTN and a large deletion in KCNQ1, involving exons 7 and 8. Both variants were confirmed by alternative techniques. The mother and the brother of the index case were also affected by Long QT Syndrome, and family cosegregation was observed for the KCNQ1 deletion, but not for the TTN variant. Conclusions Next Generation Sequencing technology allows a comprehensive genetic analysis of arrhythmogenic diseases. We report a copy number variation identified using Next Generation Sequencing analysis in Long QT Syndrome. Clinical and familiar correlation is crucial to elucidate the role of genetic variants identified to distinguish the pathogenic ones from genetic noise. PMID:25494010

  6. The activity-dependent histone variant H2BE modulates the life span of olfactory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Stephen W; Dulac, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    We have identified a replication-independent histone variant, Hist2h2be (referred to herein as H2be), which is expressed exclusively by olfactory chemosensory neurons. Levels of H2BE are heterogeneous among olfactory neurons, but stereotyped according to the identity of the co-expressed olfactory receptor (OR). Gain- and loss-of-function experiments demonstrate that changes in H2be expression affect olfactory function and OR representation in the adult olfactory epithelium. We show that H2BE expression is reduced by sensory activity and that it promotes neuronal cell death, such that inactive olfactory neurons display higher levels of the variant and shorter life spans. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of H2BE differ from those of the canonical H2B, consistent with a role for H2BE in altering transcription. We propose a physiological function for H2be in modulating olfactory neuron population dynamics to adapt the OR repertoire to the environment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00070.001 PMID:23240083

  7. A PERIOD3 variant causes a circadian phenotype and is associated with a seasonal mood trait

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoying; Hirano, Arisa; Hsu, Pei-Ken; Jones, Christopher R.; Sakai, Noriaki; Okuro, Masashi; McMahon, Thomas; Yamazaki, Maya; Xu, Ying; Saigoh, Noriko; Saigoh, Kazumasa; Lin, Shu-Ting; Kaasik, Krista; Nishino, Seiji; Ptáček, Louis J.; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2016-01-01

    In humans, the connection between sleep and mood has long been recognized, although direct molecular evidence is lacking. We identified two rare variants in the circadian clock gene PERIOD3 (PER3-P415A/H417R) in humans with familial advanced sleep phase accompanied by higher Beck Depression Inventory and seasonality scores. hPER3-P415A/H417R transgenic mice showed an altered circadian period under constant light and exhibited phase shifts of the sleep-wake cycle in a short light period (photoperiod) paradigm. Molecular characterization revealed that the rare variants destabilized PER3 and failed to stabilize PERIOD1/2 proteins, which play critical roles in circadian timing. Although hPER3-P415A/H417R-Tg mice showed a mild depression-like phenotype, Per3 knockout mice demonstrated consistent depression-like behavior, particularly when studied under a short photoperiod, supporting a possible role for PER3 in mood regulation. These findings suggest that PER3 may be a nexus for sleep and mood regulation while fine-tuning these processes to adapt to seasonal changes. PMID:26903630

  8. Detecting Splicing Variants in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis from Non-Differentially Expressed Genes

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Nan; Sanchez, Cecilia G.; Lasky, Joseph A.; Zhu, Dongxiao

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is an interstitial lung disease of unknown cause that lacks a proven therapy for altering its high mortality rate. Microarrays have been employed to investigate the pathogenesis of IPF, but are presented mostly at the gene-expression level due to technologic limitations. In as much as, alternative RNA splicing isoforms are increasingly identified as potential regulators of human diseases, including IPF, we propose a new approach with the capacity to detect splicing variants using RNA-seq data. We conducted a joint analysis of differential expression and differential splicing on annotated human genes and isoforms, and identified 122 non-differentially expressed genes with a high degree of “switch” between major and minor isoforms. Three cases with variant mechanisms for alternative splicing were validated using qRT-PCR, among the group of genes in which expression was not significantly changed at the gene level. We also identified 35 novel transcripts that were unique to the fibrotic lungs using exon-exon junction evidence, and selected a representative for qRT-PCR validation. The results of our study are likely to provide new insight into the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis and may eventuate in new treatment targets. PMID:23844188

  9. A coding variant in RARG confers susceptibility to anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity in childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Aminkeng, Folefac; Bhavsar, Amit P; Visscher, Henk; Rassekh, Shahrad R; Li, Yuling; Lee, Jong W; Brunham, Liam R; Caron, Huib N; van Dalen, Elvira C; Kremer, Leontien C; van der Pal, Helena J; Amstutz, Ursula; Rieder, Michael J; Bernstein, Daniel; Carleton, Bruce C; Hayden, Michael R; Ross, Colin J D

    2015-09-01

    Anthracyclines are used in over 50% of childhood cancer treatment protocols, but their clinical usefulness is limited by anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity (ACT) manifesting as asymptomatic cardiac dysfunction and congestive heart failure in up to 57% and 16% of patients, respectively. Candidate gene studies have reported genetic associations with ACT, but these studies have in general lacked robust patient numbers, independent replication or functional validation. Thus, the individual variability in ACT susceptibility remains largely unexplained. We performed a genome-wide association study in 280 patients of European ancestry treated for childhood cancer, with independent replication in similarly treated cohorts of 96 European and 80 non-European patients. We identified a nonsynonymous variant (rs2229774, p.Ser427Leu) in RARG highly associated with ACT (P = 5.9 × 10(-8), odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 4.7 (2.7-8.3)). This variant alters RARG function, leading to derepression of the key ACT genetic determinant Top2b, and provides new insight into the pathophysiology of this severe adverse drug reaction.

  10. Characterization of H5N1 Influenza Virus Variants with Hemagglutinin Mutations Isolated from Patients

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Yasuha; Daidoji, Tomo; Kawashita, Norihito; Ibrahim, Madiha S.; El-Gendy, Emad El-Din M.; Hiramatsu, Hiroaki; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Takagi, Tatsuya; Murata, Takeomi; Takahashi, Kazuo; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Nakaya, Takaaki; Suzuki, Yasuo; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A change in viral hemagglutinin (HA) receptor binding specificity from α2,3- to α2,6-linked sialic acid is necessary for highly pathogenic avian influenza (AI) virus subtype H5N1 to become pandemic. However, details of the human-adaptive change in the H5N1 virus remain unknown. Our database search of H5N1 clade 2.2.1 viruses circulating in Egypt identified multiple HA mutations that had been selected in infected patients. Using reverse genetics, we found that increases in both human receptor specificity and the HA pH threshold for membrane fusion were necessary to facilitate replication of the virus variants in human airway epithelia. Furthermore, variants with enhanced replication in human cells had decreased HA stability, apparently to compensate for the changes in viral receptor specificity and membrane fusion activity. Our findings showed that H5N1 viruses could rapidly adapt to growth in the human airway microenvironment by altering their HA properties in infected patients and provided new insights into the human-adaptive mechanisms of AI viruses. PMID:25852160

  11. A PERIOD3 variant causes a circadian phenotype and is associated with a seasonal mood trait.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luoying; Hirano, Arisa; Hsu, Pei-Ken; Jones, Christopher R; Sakai, Noriaki; Okuro, Masashi; McMahon, Thomas; Yamazaki, Maya; Xu, Ying; Saigoh, Noriko; Saigoh, Kazumasa; Lin, Shu-Ting; Kaasik, Krista; Nishino, Seiji; Ptáček, Louis J; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2016-03-15

    In humans, the connection between sleep and mood has long been recognized, although direct molecular evidence is lacking. We identified two rare variants in the circadian clock gene PERIOD3 (PER3-P415A/H417R) in humans with familial advanced sleep phase accompanied by higher Beck Depression Inventory and seasonality scores. hPER3-P415A/H417R transgenic mice showed an altered circadian period under constant light and exhibited phase shifts of the sleep-wake cycle in a short light period (photoperiod) paradigm. Molecular characterization revealed that the rare variants destabilized PER3 and failed to stabilize PERIOD1/2 proteins, which play critical roles in circadian timing. Although hPER3-P415A/H417R-Tg mice showed a mild depression-like phenotype, Per3 knockout mice demonstrated consistent depression-like behavior, particularly when studied under a short photoperiod, supporting a possible role for PER3 in mood regulation. These findings suggest that PER3 may be a nexus for sleep and mood regulation while fine-tuning these processes to adapt to seasonal changes.

  12. A coding variant in RARG confers susceptibility to anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity in childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Aminkeng, Folefac; Bhavsar, Amit P; Visscher, Henk; Rassekh, Shahrad R; Li, Yuling; Lee, Jong W; Brunham, Liam R; Caron, Huib N; van Dalen, Elvira C; Kremer, Leontien C; van der Pal, Helena J; Amstutz, Ursula; Rieder, Michael J; Bernstein, Daniel; Carleton, Bruce C; Hayden, Michael R; Ross, Colin J D

    2015-09-01

    Anthracyclines are used in over 50% of childhood cancer treatment protocols, but their clinical usefulness is limited by anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity (ACT) manifesting as asymptomatic cardiac dysfunction and congestive heart failure in up to 57% and 16% of patients, respectively. Candidate gene studies have reported genetic associations with ACT, but these studies have in general lacked robust patient numbers, independent replication or functional validation. Thus, the individual variability in ACT susceptibility remains largely unexplained. We performed a genome-wide association study in 280 patients of European ancestry treated for childhood cancer, with independent replication in similarly treated cohorts of 96 European and 80 non-European patients. We identified a nonsynonymous variant (rs2229774, p.Ser427Leu) in RARG highly associated with ACT (P = 5.9 × 10(-8), odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 4.7 (2.7-8.3)). This variant alters RARG function, leading to derepression of the key ACT genetic determinant Top2b, and provides new insight into the pathophysiology of this severe adverse drug reaction. PMID:26237429

  13. Induction of apoptosis by the overexpression of an alternative splicing variant of mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Chang, En Young; Son, Seong-Kweon; Ko, Hyun Sook; Baek, Suk-Hwan; Kim, Jung Hye; Kim, Jae-Ryong

    2005-12-15

    Mammalian cells harbor two forms of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), cytosolic TrxR1 and mitochondrial TrxR2, both of which are involved in the redox regulation of cell growth and apoptosis. Furthermore, several alternative splicing variants of TrxR1 and TrxR2 have been identified. However, little remains known with regard to their functions in cells. Here, we report an alternative splicing variant of TrxR2 (TrxR2A), which displays a 3-bp deletion in the coding region and an insertion of 1228 bp in the 3'-UTR, between the stop codon and the SECIS element, of the TrxR2 cDNA. In order to determine the cellular function of TrxR2A, we established TrxR2A-inducible HeLa cell lines in which TrxR2A transcription was regulated via a Tet-off expression system. We observed that the induction of TrxR2A resulted in increased apoptosis, due to the reduction of NADPH and alterations in cellular ROS levels. These results suggest that TrxR2A may play a vital role in the regulation of TrxR2 and may confer functional complexity onto the thioredoxin system. PMID:16298692

  14. FTO gene variant modulates the neural correlates of visual food perception.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Anne B; Feis, Delia-Lisa; Schilbach, Leonhard; Kracht, Lutz; Hess, Martin E; Mauer, Jan; Brüning, Jens C; Tittgemeyer, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Variations in the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene are currently the strongest known genetic factor predisposing humans to non-monogenic obesity. Recent experiments have linked these variants to a broad spectrum of behavioural alterations, including food choice and substance abuse. Yet, the underlying neurobiological mechanisms by which these genetic variations influence body weight remain elusive. Here, we explore the brain structural substrate of the obesity-predisposing rs9939609 T/A variant of the FTO gene in non-obese subjects by means of multivariate classification and use fMRI to investigate genotype-specific differences in neural food-cue reactivity by analysing correlates of a visual food perception task. Our findings demonstrate that MRI-derived measures of morphology along middle and posterior fusiform gyrus (FFG) are highly predictive for FTO at-risk allele carriers, who also show enhanced neural responses elicited by food cues in the same posterior FFG area. In brief, these findings provide first-time evidence for FTO-specific differences in both brain structure and function already in non-obese individuals, thereby contributing to a mechanistic understanding of why FTO is a predisposing factor for obesity. PMID:26767945

  15. Structures of the G85R Variant of SOD1 in Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Xiaohang; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.; Seetharaman, Sai V.; Whitson, Lisa J.; Taylor, Alexander B.; Holloway, Stephen P.; Strange, Richard W.; Doucette, Peter A.; Valentine, Joan Selverstone; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Hayward, Lawrence J.; Padua, Shelby; Cohlberg, Jeffrey A.; Hasnain, S. Samar; Hart, P. John

    2008-07-21

    Mutations in the gene encoding human copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause a dominant form of the progressive neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Transgenic mice expressing the human G85R SOD1 variant develop paralytic symptoms concomitant with the appearance of SOD1-enriched proteinaceous inclusions in their neural tissues. The process(es) through which misfolding or aggregation of G85R SOD1 induces motor neuron toxicity is not understood. Here we present structures of the human G85R SOD1 variant determined by single crystal x-ray diffraction. Alterations in structure of the metal-binding loop elements relative to the wild type enzyme suggest a molecular basis for the metal ion deficiency of the G85R SOD1 protein observed in the central nervous system of transgenic mice and in purified recombinant G85R SOD1. These findings support the notion that metal-deficient and/or disulfide-reduced mutant SOD1 species contribute to toxicity in SOD1-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  16. Sonographic and cytopathologic correlation of papillary thyroid carcinoma variants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Shin, Jung Hee; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Oh, Young Lyun; Hahn, Soo Yeon; Ko, Eun Young

    2015-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common thyroid cancer and constitutes more than 70% of thyroid malignancies. Although TNM staging is the most widely used parameter for determination of therapeutic plans, recent studies have suggested that different histopathologic variants of PTC can also have different clinical courses and patient prognoses. Sonographic criteria for PTC are well established and include a taller-than-wide shape, an irregular margin, microcalcifications, and marked hypoechogenicity. The role of sonography has expanded to enable the characterization of PTC variants based on their sonographic features. Tall cell and diffuse sclerosing variants appear to have more aggressive clinical courses with unfavorable prognoses, whereas the more recently described cribriform-morular and Warthin-like variants have relatively indolent clinical courses. The prognoses of patients with follicular, solid, columnar cell, and oncocytic variants are still controversial and may be similar to the prognosis of conventional PTC. Understanding the sonographic characteristics of PTC variants with clinicopathologic correlation may be helpful for suggesting an appropriate treatment plan.

  17. Generalization of Rare Variant Association Tests for Longitudinal Family Studies.

    PubMed

    Chien, Li-Chu; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Bowden, Donald W; Chiu, Yen-Feng

    2016-02-01

    Given the functional relevance of many rare variants, their identification is frequently critical for dissecting disease etiology. Functional variants are likely to be aggregated in family studies enriched with affected members, and this aggregation increases the statistical power to detect rare variants associated with a trait of interest. Longitudinal family studies provide additional information for identifying genetic and environmental factors associated with disease over time. However, methods to analyze rare variants in longitudinal family data remain fairly limited. These methods should be capable of accounting for different sources of correlations and handling large amounts of sequencing data efficiently. To identify rare variants associated with a phenotype in longitudinal family studies, we extended pedigree-based burden (BT) and kernel (KS) association tests to genetic longitudinal studies. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) approaches were used to generalize the pedigree-based BT and KS to multiple correlated phenotypes under the generalized linear model framework, adjusting for fixed effects of confounding factors. These tests accounted for complex correlations between repeated measures of the same phenotype (serial correlations) and between individuals in the same family (familial correlations). We conducted comprehensive simulation studies to compare the proposed tests with mixed-effects models and marginal models, using GEEs under various configurations. When the proposed tests were applied to data from the Diabetes Heart Study, we found exome variants of POMGNT1 and JAK1 genes were associated with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26783077

  18. Homolog-specific PCR primer design for profiling splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Gyan Prakash; Hanumappa, Mamatha; Kushwaha, Garima; Nguyen, Henry T.; Xu, Dong

    2011-01-01

    To study functional diversity of proteins encoded from a single gene, it is important to distinguish the expression levels among the alternatively spliced variants. A variant-specific primer pair is required to amplify each alternatively spliced variant individually. For this purpose, we developed a new feature, homolog-specific primer design (HSPD), in our high-throughput primer and probe design software tool, PRIMEGENS-v2. The algorithm uses a de novo approach to design primers without any prior information of splice variants or close homologs for an input query sequence. It not only designs primer pairs but also finds potential isoforms and homologs of the input sequence. Efficiency of this algorithm was tested for several gene families in soybean. A total of 187 primer pairs were tested under five different abiotic stress conditions with three replications at three time points. Results indicate a high success rate of primer design. Some primer pairs designed were able to amplify all splice variants of a gene. Furthermore, by utilizing combinations within the same multiplex pool, we were able to uniquely amplify a specific variant or duplicate gene. Our method can also be used to design PCR primers to specifically amplify homologs in the same gene family. PRIMEGENS-v2 is available at: http://primegens.org. PMID:21415011

  19. Five Rare β Globin Chain Hemoglobin Variants in India.

    PubMed

    Colah, Roshan B; Nadkarni, Anita; Gorakshakar, Ajit; Sawant, Pratibha; Gorivale, Manju; Mehta, Pallavi; Sawant, Madhavi; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-06-01

    Thalassemias as well as structural hemoglobin (Hb) variants are common monogenic inherited disorders of Hb in India. In this paper we describe 5 rare β-chain Hb variants identified in the Indian population on the basis of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Of these 3 were identified during antenatal screening of β-thalassemia while the other 2 cases were referred to us for a diagnostic work up. These 5 Hb variants were Hb British Columbia (β CD 101 GAG → AAG), Hb Saint Louis (β CD28 CTG → CAG), Hb G Coushatta (β CD 22 GAA → GCA), Hb Pyrgos (β CD 83 GGC → GAC) and Hb Agenogi (β CD 90 GAG → AAG). Hb Saint Louis and Hb G Coushatta eluted in the HbA2 window, Hb British Columbia and Hb Agenogi eluted in the Hb C window while Hb Pyrgos eluted in an unknown window on HPLC. They were all identified by DNA sequencing. The child having Hb St. Louis had hepatosplenomegaly and anemia while the individuals with the other 4 variants were asymptomatic. Rare Hb variants are diagnostic curiosities that may be encountered by laboratories. Correct identification requires the application of more than one technique to avoid misdiagnosing them as more common variants (e.g. St. Louis and G Coushatta as E or D Iran on HPLC. Some, like G Coushatta may interfere with HPLC-based HbA1c estimation). PMID:27408413

  20. Variants Affecting Exon Skipping Contribute to Complex Traits

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Younghee; Gamazon, Eric R.; Rebman, Ellen; Lee, Yeunsook; Lee, Sanghyuk; Dolan, M. Eileen; Cox, Nancy J.; Lussier, Yves A.

    2012-01-01

    DNA variants that affect alternative splicing and the relative quantities of different gene transcripts have been shown to be risk alleles for some Mendelian diseases. However, for complex traits characterized by a low odds ratio for any single contributing variant, very few studies have investigated the contribution of splicing variants. The overarching goal of this study is to discover and characterize the role that variants affecting alternative splicing may play in the genetic etiology of complex traits, which include a significant number of the common human diseases. Specifically, we hypothesize that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in splicing regulatory elements can be characterized in silico to identify variants affecting splicing, and that these variants may contribute to the etiology of complex diseases as well as the inter-individual variability in the ratios of alternative transcripts. We leverage high-throughput expression profiling to 1) experimentally validate our in silico predictions of skipped exons and 2) characterize the molecular role of intronic genetic variations in alternative splicing events in the context of complex human traits and diseases. We propose that intronic SNPs play a role as genetic regulators within splicing regulatory elements and show that their associated exon skipping events can affect protein domains and structure. We find that SNPs we would predict to affect exon skipping are enriched among the set of SNPs reported to be associated with complex human traits. PMID:23133393

  1. Epigenetic reprogramming in mammalian reproduction: contribution from histone variants.

    PubMed

    Santenard, Angèle; Torres-Padilla, Maria-Elena

    2009-02-16

    Development of the mammalian embryo is, by definition, epigenetic. At the level of the nucleosome, the building block of the chromatin, changes in chromatin structure can be regulated through histone content. Apart from the canonical histones whose synthesis is restricted to S-phase, different histone variants have been identified. Histone variants can help to establish specialised chromatin regions and to regulate developmental and cell differentiation processes. While the role of histone variants has been extensively explored in differentiated cells, less is known in germ cells and embryos. Increasing lines of evidence suggest that the functions and/or properties of histone variants in embryos might be different to those in somatic cells. During reprogramming, histone variants such as H3.3 or H2A.Z are candidates to play potential important roles. We suggest that H3.3 has an important role in setting up a 'transition' signature, and provides the possibility to infer changes in chromatin architecture independent of DNA replication. This should confer flexibility during important developmental processes. The specific pathways through which H3.3 could regulate different chromatin conformations at different loci and the identification of specific proteins responsible for this deposition are an important challenge for future investigation. Lastly, the set of variants incorporated within the nucleosome can have important consequences in the regulation of epigenetic mechanisms during development. PMID:19242119

  2. Exploring the role of exposure frequency in recognizing pronunciation variants

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Mark A.; Dilley, Laura; Tat, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Words can be pronounced in multiple ways in casual speech. Corpus analyses of the frequency with which these pronunciation variants occur (e.g., Patterson & Connine, 2001) show that typically, one pronunciation variant tends to predominate; this raises the question of whether variant recognition is aligned with exposure frequency. We explored this issue in words containing one of four phonological contexts, each of which favors one of four surface realizations of word-medial /t/: [t], [ʔ], [ɾ], or a deleted variant. The frequencies of the four realizations in all four contexts were estimated for a set of words in a production experiment. Recognition of all pronunciation variants was then measured in a lexical decision experiment. Overall, the data suggest that listeners are sensitive to variant frequency: Word classification rates closely paralleled production frequency. The exceptions to this were [t] realizations (i.e., canonical pronunciations of the words), a finding which confirms other results in the literature and indicates that factors other than exposure frequency affect word recognition. PMID:21822340

  3. Generalization of Rare Variant Association Tests for Longitudinal Family Studies.

    PubMed

    Chien, Li-Chu; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Bowden, Donald W; Chiu, Yen-Feng

    2016-02-01

    Given the functional relevance of many rare variants, their identification is frequently critical for dissecting disease etiology. Functional variants are likely to be aggregated in family studies enriched with affected members, and this aggregation increases the statistical power to detect rare variants associated with a trait of interest. Longitudinal family studies provide additional information for identifying genetic and environmental factors associated with disease over time. However, methods to analyze rare variants in longitudinal family data remain fairly limited. These methods should be capable of accounting for different sources of correlations and handling large amounts of sequencing data efficiently. To identify rare variants associated with a phenotype in longitudinal family studies, we extended pedigree-based burden (BT) and kernel (KS) association tests to genetic longitudinal studies. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) approaches were used to generalize the pedigree-based BT and KS to multiple correlated phenotypes under the generalized linear model framework, adjusting for fixed effects of confounding factors. These tests accounted for complex correlations between repeated measures of the same phenotype (serial correlations) and between individuals in the same family (familial correlations). We conducted comprehensive simulation studies to compare the proposed tests with mixed-effects models and marginal models, using GEEs under various configurations. When the proposed tests were applied to data from the Diabetes Heart Study, we found exome variants of POMGNT1 and JAK1 genes were associated with type 2 diabetes.

  4. Genetic variants in or near ADH1B and ADH1C affect susceptibility to alcohol dependence in a British and Irish population.

    PubMed

    Way, Michael; McQuillin, Andrew; Saini, Jit; Ruparelia, Kush; Lydall, Gregory J; Guerrini, Irene; Ball, David; Smith, Iain; Quadri, Giorgia; Thomson, Allan D; Kasiakogia-Worlley, Katherine; Cherian, Raquin; Gunwardena, Priyanthi; Rao, Harish; Kottalgi, Girija; Patel, Shamir; Hillman, Audrey; Douglas, Ewen; Qureshi, Sherhzad Y; Reynolds, Gerry; Jauhar, Sameer; O'Kane, Aideen; Dedman, Alex; Sharp, Sally; Kandaswamy, Radhika; Dar, Karim; Curtis, David; Morgan, Marsha Y; Gurling, Hugh M D

    2015-05-01

    Certain single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzymes confer a significant protective effect against alcohol dependence syndrome (ADS) in East Asian populations. Recently, attention has focused on the role of these SNPs in determining ADS risk in European populations. To further elucidate these associations, SNPs of interest in ADH1B, ADH1C and the ADH1B/1C intergenic region were genotyped in a British and Irish population (ADS cases n = 1076: controls n = 1027) to assess their relative contribution to ADS risk. A highly significant, protective association was observed between the minor allele of rs1229984 in ADH1B and ADS risk [allelic P = 8.4 × 10(-6) , odds ratio (OR) = 0.26, 95 percent confidence interval, 0.14, 0.49]. Significant associations were also observed between ADS risk and the ADH1B/1C intergenic variant, rs1789891 [allelic P = 7.2 × 10(-5) , OR = 1.4 (1.2, 1.6)] and three non-synonymous SNPs rs698, rs1693482 and rs283413 in ADH1C. However, these associations were not completely independent; thus, while the ADH1B rs1229984 minor allele association was independent of those of the intergenic variant rs1789891 and the three ADH1C variants, the three ADH1C variants were not individually independent. In conclusion, the rare ADH1B rs1229984 mutation provides significant protection against ADS in this British and Irish population; other variants in the ADH gene cluster also alter ADS risk, although the strong linkage disequilibrium between SNPs at this location precluded clear identification of the variant(s) driving the associations.

  5. Gain-of-function missense variant in SLC12A2, encoding the bumetanide-sensitive NKCC1 cotransporter, identified in human schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Merner, Nancy D; Mercado, Adriana; Khanna, Arjun R; Hodgkinson, Alan; Bruat, Vanessa; Awadalla, Philip; Gamba, Gerardo; Rouleau, Guy A; Kahle, Kristopher T

    2016-06-01

    Perturbations of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission in the human prefrontal cortex have been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia (SCZ), but the mechanisms are unclear. NKCC1 (SLC12A2) is a Cl(-)-importing cation-Cl(-) cotransporter that contributes to the maintenance of depolarizing GABA activity in immature neurons, and variation in SLC12A2 has been shown to increase the risk for schizophrenia via alterations of NKCC1 mRNA expression. However, no disease-causing mutations or functional variants in NKCC1 have been identified in human patients with SCZ. Here, by sequencing three large French-Canadian (FC) patient cohorts of SCZ, autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and intellectual disability (ID), we identified a novel heterozygous NKCC1 missense variant (p.Y199C) in SCZ. This variant is located in an evolutionarily conserved residue in the critical N-terminal regulatory domain and exhibits high predicted pathogenicity. No NKCC1 variants were detected in ASD or ID, and no KCC3 variants were identified in any of the three neurodevelopmental disorder cohorts. Functional experiments show Y199C is a gain-of-function variant, increasing Cl(-)-dependent and bumetanide-sensitive NKCC1 activity even in conditions in which the transporter is normally functionally silent (hypotonicity). These data are the first to describe a functional missense variant in SLC12A2 in human SCZ, and suggest that genetically encoded dysregulation of NKCC1 may be a risk factor for, or contribute to the pathogenesis of, human SCZ.

  6. The MKK7 p.Glu116Lys Rare Variant Serves as a Predictor for Lung Cancer Risk and Prognosis in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Jiansong; Wu, Di; Wei, Yongfang; Nong, Qingqing; Zhang, Lisha; Fang, Wenxiang; Chen, Xiaoliang; Ling, Xiaoxuan; Yang, Binyao; Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Yifeng; Lu, Jiachun

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence indicates that rare variants exert a vi