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Sample records for 63-day cure rates

  1. Destructive weighted Poisson cure rate models.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Josemar; de Castro, Mário; Balakrishnan, N; Cancho, Vicente G

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we develop a flexible cure rate survival model by assuming the number of competing causes of the event of interest to follow a compound weighted Poisson distribution. This model is more flexible in terms of dispersion than the promotion time cure model. Moreover, it gives an interesting and realistic interpretation of the biological mechanism of the occurrence of event of interest as it includes a destructive process of the initial risk factors in a competitive scenario. In other words, what is recorded is only from the undamaged portion of the original number of risk factors.

  2. Cure-rate data for silicone adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clatterbuck, C.; Fisher, A.

    1978-01-01

    Report describes work with concentrations down to 0.07 percent and is useful when applying adhesives in terrestrial and space applications. Cured Silicone retains low-outgassing properties as well as its snap, elongation, and resilience. Tests for hardness of silicone material also showed good results. No gross hysteresis observable on recovery from stretching nor was there any decrease in hardness.

  3. Modeling the intracellular pathogen-immune interaction with cure rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Balram; Dubey, Preeti; Dubey, Uma S.

    2016-09-01

    Many common and emergent infectious diseases like Influenza, SARS, Hepatitis, Ebola etc. are caused by viral pathogens. These infections can be controlled or prevented by understanding the dynamics of pathogen-immune interaction in vivo. In this paper, interaction of pathogens with uninfected and infected cells in presence or absence of immune response are considered in four different cases. In the first case, the model considers the saturated nonlinear infection rate and linear cure rate without absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells and without immune response. The next model considers the effect of absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells while all other terms are same as in the first case. The third model incorporates innate immune response, humoral immune response and Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) mediated immune response with cure rate and without absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells. The last model is an extension of the third model in which the effect of absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells has been considered. Positivity and boundedness of solutions are established to ensure the well-posedness of the problem. It has been found that all the four models have two equilibria, namely, pathogen-free equilibrium point and pathogen-present equilibrium point. In each case, stability analysis of each equilibrium point is investigated. Pathogen-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable when basic reproduction number is less or equal to unity. This implies that control or prevention of infection is independent of initial concentration of uninfected cells, infected cells, pathogens and immune responses in the body. The proposed models show that introduction of immune response and cure rate strongly affects the stability behavior of the system. Further, on computing basic reproduction number, it has been found to be minimum for the fourth model vis-a-vis other models. The analytical findings of each model have been exemplified by

  4. Chemical control of nadimide cure temperature and rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, R. W. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Polyimide resins suitable for use as composite matrix materials are formed by copolymerization of maleic and norbornenyl endcapped monomers and oligomers. The copolymers can be cured at temperatures under about 300 C by controlling the available concentration of the maleic end-capped reactant. This control can be achieved by adding sufficient amounts of said maleic reactant, or by chemical modification of either copolymer, so as to either increase Diels-Alder retrogression of the norbornenyl capped reactant and/or holding initiation and polymerization to a rate compatible with the availability of the maleic-capped reactant.

  5. Chemical approach for controlling nadimide cure temperature and rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, R. W. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Polyimide resins suitable for use as composite matrix materials are formed by copolymerization of maleic and norbornenyl end-capped monomers and oligomers. The copolymers can be cured at temperatures under about 300 C. by controlling the available concentration of the maleic end-capped reactant. This control can be achieved by adding sufficient amounts of said maleic reactant, or by chemical modification of either copolymer, to increase Diels-Alder retrogression of the norbornenyl-capped reactant and/or holding initiation and polymerization to a rate compatible with the availability of the maleic-capped reactant.

  6. Chemical approach for controlling nadimide cure temperature and rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, R. W. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Polyimide resins suitable for use as composite matrix materials are formed by copolymerization of maleic and norbornenyl endcapped monomers and oligomers. The copolymers can be cured at temperatures under about 300 C by controlling the available concentration of the maleic endcapped reactant. This control is achieved by adding sufficient amounts of said maleic reactant or by chemical modification of either copolymer, to either increase Diels-Alder retrogression of the norbornenyl capped reactant and/or hold initiation and polymerization to a rate compatible with the availability of the maleic capped reactant.

  7. Chemical approach for controlling nadimide cure temperature and rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, R. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Polyimide resins suitable for use as composite matrix materials are formed by copolymerization of maleic and norbornenyl endcapped monomers and oligomers. The copolymers can be cured at temperatures under about 300 C by controlling the available concentration of the maleic capped reactant. This control can be achieved by adding sufficient amounts of said maleic reactant, or by chemical modification of either copolymer, so as to either increase Diels-Alder retrogression of the norbornenyl capped reactant and/or holding initiation and polymerization to a rate compatible with the availability of the maleic capped reactant.

  8. Effect of rheological parameters on curing rate during NBR injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyas, Kamil; Stanek, Michal; Manas, David; Skrobak, Adam

    2013-04-01

    In this work, non-isothermal injection molding process for NBR rubber mixture considering Isayev-Deng curing kinetic model, generalized Newtonian model with Carreau-WLF viscosity was modeled by using finite element method in order to understand the effect of volume flow rate, index of non-Newtonian behavior and relaxation time on the temperature profile and curing rate. It was found that for specific geometry and processing conditions, increase in relaxation time or in the index of non-Newtonian behavior increases the curing rate due to viscous dissipation taking place at the flow domain walls.

  9. Influence of curing rate of resin composite on the bond strength to dentin.

    PubMed

    Benetti, A R; Asmussen, E; Peutzfeldt, A

    2007-01-01

    This study determined whether the strength with which resin composite bonds to dentin is influenced by variations in the curing rate of resin composites. Resin composites were bonded to the dentin of extracted human molars. Adhesive (AdheSE, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied and cured (10 seconds @ 1000 mW/cm2) for all groups. A split Teflon mold was clamped to the treated dentin surface and filled with resin composite. The rate of cure was varied, using one of four LED-curing units of different power densities. The rate of cure was also varied using the continuous or pulse-delay mode. In continuous curing mode, in order to give an energy density totaling 16 J/cm2, the power densities (1000, 720, 550, 200 mW/cm2) emitted by the various curing units were compensated for by the light curing period (16, 22, 29 or 80 seconds). In the pulse-delay curing mode, two seconds of light curing at one of the four power densities was followed by a one-minute interval, after which light cure was completed (14, 29, 27 or 78 seconds), likewise, giving a total energy density of 16 J/cm2. The specimens produced for each of the eight curing protocols and two resin composites (Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar Vivadent; Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE) were stored in water at 37 degrees C for seven days. The specimens were then either immediately subjected to shear bond strength testing or subjected to artificial aging (6,000 cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C baths) prior to testing. Failure modes were also assessed. The shear bond strengths were submitted to factorial analysis of variance, and the failure modes were submitted to a Chi-square test (alpha = 0.05). All but power density (curing mode, resin composite material and mode of aging) significantly affected shear bond strength. The curing mode and resin composite material also influenced the failure mode. At the selected constant energy density, pulse-delay curing reduced bonding of the resin composite to dentin.

  10. A Bayesian destructive weighted Poisson cure rate model and an application to a cutaneous melanoma data.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Josemar; Cancho, Vicente G; de Castro, Mário; Balakrishnan, N

    2012-12-01

    In this article, we propose a new Bayesian flexible cure rate survival model, which generalises the stochastic model of Klebanov et al. [Klebanov LB, Rachev ST and Yakovlev AY. A stochastic-model of radiation carcinogenesis--latent time distributions and their properties. Math Biosci 1993; 113: 51-75], and has much in common with the destructive model formulated by Rodrigues et al. [Rodrigues J, de Castro M, Balakrishnan N and Cancho VG. Destructive weighted Poisson cure rate models. Technical Report, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos-SP. Brazil, 2009 (accepted in Lifetime Data Analysis)]. In our approach, the accumulated number of lesions or altered cells follows a compound weighted Poisson distribution. This model is more flexible than the promotion time cure model in terms of dispersion. Moreover, it possesses an interesting and realistic interpretation of the biological mechanism of the occurrence of the event of interest as it includes a destructive process of tumour cells after an initial treatment or the capacity of an individual exposed to irradiation to repair altered cells that results in cancer induction. In other words, what is recorded is only the damaged portion of the original number of altered cells not eliminated by the treatment or repaired by the repair system of an individual. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are then used to develop Bayesian inference for the proposed model. Also, some discussions on the model selection and an illustration with a cutaneous melanoma data set analysed by Rodrigues et al. [Rodrigues J, de Castro M, Balakrishnan N and Cancho VG. Destructive weighted Poisson cure rate models. Technical Report, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos-SP. Brazil, 2009 (accepted in Lifetime Data Analysis)] are presented.

  11. The destructive negative binomial cure rate model with a latent activation scheme.

    PubMed

    Cancho, Vicente G; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Louzada, Francisco; Yiqi, Bao

    2013-07-01

    A new flexible cure rate survival model is developed where the initial number of competing causes of the event of interest (say lesions or altered cells) follow a compound negative binomial (NB) distribution. This model provides a realistic interpretation of the biological mechanism of the event of interest as it models a destructive process of the initial competing risk factors and records only the damaged portion of the original number of risk factors. Besides, it also accounts for the underlying mechanisms that leads to cure through various latent activation schemes. Our method of estimation exploits maximum likelihood (ML) tools. The methodology is illustrated on a real data set on malignant melanoma, and the finite sample behavior of parameter estimates are explored through simulation studies.

  12. Influence of composition on rate of polymerization contraction of light-curing resin composites.

    PubMed

    Asmussen, Erik; Peutzfeldt, Anne

    2002-06-01

    A slow contraction may result in reduced gap formation when a restorative resin polymerizes in a dental cavity. It was the aim in the present work to investigate the rate of contraction in relation to composition of experimental light-curing resin composites. The monomer of the resin composites consisted of mixtures of BisGMA, TEGDMA, and in one series HEMA. The resins contained varying amounts of initiators, co-initiators, and inhibitor, and were made composite by adding a silanized glass filler to a content of 74% by weight of the composite paste. The polymerization contraction up to 120 sec was determined by means of the bonded-disk method. Within the ranges studied, the concentration of initiator and co-initiator in the monomer mixture had only an insignificant influence on rate of polymerization. In comparison to camphorquinone, the initiators 1-phenyl-1,2-propanedione and benzil reduced the rate of polymerization without affecting the final contraction. In comparison to N,N-dimethyl-p-aminobenzoic acid ethyl ester, N,N-cyanoethyl methylaniline was as effective, while N,N-diethanol-p-toluidine was less effective as co-initiator. A relatively high content of the inhibitor methoxyhydroquinone reduced the initial rate but not the final polymerization contraction. The rate of polymerization increased with the level of HEMA and TEGDMA in the monomer mixture. It was concluded that intrinsic slow cure may be obtained with certain compositions of resin composites without impairing the final extent of polymerization.

  13. Chemical approach for controlling nadimide cure temperature and rate with maleimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, R. W. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Polyimide resins suitable for use as composite matrix materials are formed by copolymerization of maleic and norbornenyl endcapped monomers and oligomers. The copolymers can be cured at temperatures under about 300 C by controlling the available concentration of the maleic end-capped reactant. Control can be achieved by adding sufficient amounts of said maleic reactant, or by chemical modification of either copolymers, so as to either increase Diels-Alder retrogression of the norbornenyl capped reactant and/or holding initiation and polymerization to a rate compatible with the availability of the maleic-capped reactant.

  14. Chemical approach for controlling nadimide cure temperature and rate with maleimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, R. W. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Polyimide resins suitable for use as composite matrix materials are formed by copolymerization of maleic and norbornenyl endcapped monomers and oligomers. The copolymers can be cured at temperatures under about 300 C by controlling the available concentration of the maleic end-capped reactant. This control can be achieved by adding sufficient amounts of said maleic reactant, or by chemical modification of either copolymer, so as to either increase Diels-Alder retrogression of the norbornenyl capped reactant and/or holding initiation and polymerization to a rate compatible with the available of the maleic-capped reactant.

  15. A differential equation model of HIV infection of CD4+ T-cells with cure rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xueyong; Song, Xinyu; Shi, Xiangyun

    2008-06-01

    A differential equation model of HIV infection of CD4+ T-cells with cure rate is studied. We prove that if the basic reproduction number R0<1, the HIV infection is cleared from the T-cell population and the disease dies out; if R0>1, the HIV infection persists in the host. We find that the chronic disease steady state is globally asymptotically stable if R0>1. Furthermore, we also obtain the conditions for which the system exists an orbitally asymptotically stable periodic solution. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the results.

  16. Estimating the personal cure rate of cancer patients using population-based grouped cancer survival data.

    PubMed

    Binbing Yu; Tiwari, Ram C; Feuer, Eric J

    2011-06-01

    Cancer patients are subject to multiple competing risks of death and may die from causes other than the cancer diagnosed. The probability of not dying from the cancer diagnosed, which is one of the patients' main concerns, is sometimes called the 'personal cure' rate. Two approaches of modelling competing-risk survival data, namely the cause-specific hazards approach and the mixture model approach, have been used to model competing-risk survival data. In this article, we first show the connection and differences between crude cause-specific survival in the presence of other causes and net survival in the absence of other causes. The mixture survival model is extended to population-based grouped survival data to estimate the personal cure rate. Using the colorectal cancer survival data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Programme, we estimate the probabilities of dying from colorectal cancer, heart disease, and other causes by age at diagnosis, race and American Joint Committee on Cancer stage.

  17. How to achieve a near 100% cure rate for H. pylori infection in peptic ulcer patients. A personal viewpoint.

    PubMed

    de Boer, W A

    1996-06-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori is the main etiological factor in duodenal and gastric ulcer disease, and eradication of the organism cures peptic ulcer disease. Cure of the infection therefore has become the ultimate treatment goal in ulcer patients. Only therapies that achieve a > 90% cure rate should be used in clinical practice and, as in any other disease, the therapy with the highest cure rates should be used. Bismuth-based triple therapy is considered the gold standard; it has been used successfully in many studies, usually with good tolerability on the part of patients. Many physicians have been hesitant to prescribe this therapy. The regimen is complex, and it is thought to have many side effects. Several groups have shown that concomitant therapy with a proton pump inhibitor increases efficacy and lessens side effects. Moreover, it has become clear that the duration of treatment can be decreased to just 7 days. With this adjustment it now seems sensible to use this short 7-day quadruple therapy, which at present has superior cure rates when compared with any other anti-Helicobacter therapy. This article is a plea for the use of this regimen and gives practical advice about how to employ therapy in general practice. Suggestions are made about how to motivate a patient to comply with the therapy prescribed. If these suggestions are followed, good compliance seems possible, and a near 100% cure rate will be within reach.

  18. Curing rate and flowing properties of silicone rubber at injection molding

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshino, M.; Nakamura, T. )

    1992-04-01

    Generally, silicone rubbers are mold-cured after mixing the rubber and peroxide curing agent with a two-roll mill or a kneader. Typically this is done at pressures of 5 MPa to 10 MPa and at temperatures between 120 to 200 C. Compression molding, transfer molding and injection molding are common molding ways for silicone rubbers. Recently, injection molding techniques are developing rapidly that have the advantages of molding automatically with high cycle mechanisms. To reduce the molding time and to make a precision part, both the flowing and curing properties of a particular rubber compound will be important. In this article, correlations between the curing and the flowing properties of silicone rubber are investigated by using the Rheovulkameter device.

  19. Evaluation of treatment response in depression studies using a Bayesian parametric cure rate model.

    PubMed

    Santen, Gijs; Danhof, Meindert; Della Pasqua, Oscar

    2008-10-01

    Efficacy trials with antidepressant drugs often fail to show significant treatment effect even though efficacious treatments are investigated. This failure can, amongst other factors, be attributed to the lack of sensitivity of the statistical method as well as of the endpoints to pharmacological activity. For regulatory purposes the most widely used efficacy endpoint is still the mean change in HAM-D score at the end of the study, despite evidence from literature showing that the HAM-D scale might not be a sensitive tool to assess drug effect and that changes from baseline at the end of treatment may not reflect the extent of response. In the current study, we evaluate the prospect of applying a Bayesian parametric cure rate model (CRM) to analyse antidepressant effect in efficacy trials with paroxetine. The model is based on a survival approach, which allows for a fraction of surviving patients indefinitely after completion of treatment. Data was extracted from GlaxoSmithKline's clinical databases. Response was defined as a 50% change from baseline HAM-D at any assessment time after start of therapy. Survival times were described by a log-normal distribution and drug effect was parameterised as a covariate on the fraction of non-responders. The model was able to fit the data from different studies accurately and results show that response to treatment does not lag for two weeks, as is mythically believed. In conclusion, we demonstrate how parameterisation of a survival model can be used to characterise treatment response in depression trials. The method contrasts with the long-established snapshot on changes from baseline, as it incorporates the time course of response throughout treatment.

  20. The Cure Rate after Placebo or No Therapy in American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fereguetti, Tatiani Oliveira; Saleme, Priscila Said; Alvarisa, Thais Kawagoe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There are few drugs with proven efficacy in cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), and pentavalent antimonial derivatives are still the main first-line therapeutic agents worldwide, despite their recognized high toxicities. Randomized controlled clinical trials assessing the efficacy and safety of new therapeutic modalities are of high priority, and the definition of the design of such trials raises debate about the use of placebo as a comparator. To support the use of placebo as a comparator, two main points need to be addressed: 1- the cure rate without any therapeutic intervention and 2- the damage caused by CL and its impact on patients. Objective The aim of this study was to systematically assess the spontaneous cure rate for American CL and to broaden the discussion about placebo use in CL trials. Methods The PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews and the Cochrane manual were followed. The sources used were the PubMed and LILACS databases. Studies were included if they reported cure rates using placebo or no treatment in American CL. Results Thirteen studies of a total of 352 patients were ultimately included in this review. The summarized global cure rates for all Leishmania species according to the intention-to-treat analyses performed at approximately three (“initial cure”) and nine (“definitive cure”) months after “no treatment” or placebo use were 26% (CI95%: 16 to 40%) and 26% (CI95%:16 to 38%), respectively. Notably, a significantly lower cure rate was observed for L. braziliensis infection (6.4%, CI95%:0.2 to 20%) than for L. mexicana infection (44%, CI95%:19 to 72%), p = 0.002. Of note, relapse occurred in 20% of patients with initial healing (CI95%:9.2 to 38.9%). Conclusion These results clearly demonstrate a low spontaneous cure rate following no-treatment or placebo use, confirming that this strategy for the control group in CL studies expose patients to greater morbidity, especially for CL caused by L. braziliensis. Therefore

  1. Identifying Differences Between Biochemical Failure and Cure: Incidence Rates and Predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, Frank A.; Shah, Chirag; Kestin, Larry; Ghilezan, Mihai; Krauss, Daniel; Ye Hong; Brabbins, Donald; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    2011-11-15

    Background: Patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer were evaluated to estimate the length of time required to document biochemical cure (BC) after treatment and the variables associated with long-term treatment efficacy. Patients and Methods: 2,100 patients received RT alone for localized prostate carcinoma (external-beam RT, n = 1,504; brachytherapy alone, n = 241; or brachytherapy + pelvic radiation, n = 355). The median external-beam dose was 68.4 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 8.6 years. Biochemical failure (BF) was defined according to the Phoenix definition. Results: Biochemical failure was experienced by 685 patients (32.6%). The median times to BF for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 6.0, 5.6, and 4.5 years respectively (p < 0.001). The average annual incidence rates of BF for years 1-5, 5-10,11-15, and 16-20 in low-risk patients were 2.0%, 2.0%, 0.3%, and 0.06% (p < 0.001); for intermediate-risk patients, 4%, 3%, 0.3%, and 0% (p < 0.001); and for high-risk patients, 10.0%, 5.0%, 0.3%, and 0.3% (p < 0.001). After 5 years of treatment, 36.9% of all patients experienced BF. The percentage of total failures occurring during years 1-5, 5-10, 11-15, and 16-20 were 48.7%, 43.5%, 6.5%, and 1.3% for low-risk patients; 64.0%, 32.2%, 3.8%, and 0% for intermediate-risk patients; and 71.9%, 25.9%, 1.1%, and 1.1% for high-risk patients, respectively. Increasing time to nadir was associated with increased time to BF. On multivariate analysis, factors significantly associated with 10-year BC included prostate-specific antigen nadir and time to nadir. Conclusions: The incidence rates for BF did not plateau until later than 10 years after treatment, suggesting that extended follow-up time is required to monitor patients after treatment. Prostate-specific antigen nadir and time to nadir have the strongest association with long-term BC.

  2. Defining cure.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Paul; Robinson, Dudley

    2011-06-01

    This paper is a summary of the presentations made as Proposal 2-"Defining cure" to the 2nd Annual meeting of the ICI-Research Society, in Bristol, 16th June 2010. It reviews definitions of 'cure' and 'outcome', and considers the impact that varying definition may have on prevalence studies and cure rates. The difference between subjective and objective outcomes is considered, and the significance that these different outcomes may have for different stakeholders (e.g. clinicians, patients, carers, industry etc.) is discussed. The development of patient reported outcome measures and patient defined goals is reviewed, and consideration given to the use of composite end-points. A series of proposals are made by authors and discussants as to how currently validated outcomes should be applied, and where our future research activity in this area might be directed.

  3. Global Dynamics of a Virus Dynamical Model with Cell-to-Cell Transmission and Cure Rate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tongqian; Meng, Xinzhu; Zhang, Tonghua

    2015-01-01

    The cure effect of a virus model with both cell-to-cell transmission and cell-to-virus transmission is studied. By the method of next generation matrix, the basic reproduction number is obtained. The locally asymptotic stability of the virus-free equilibrium and the endemic equilibrium is considered by investigating the characteristic equation of the model. The globally asymptotic stability of the virus-free equilibrium is proved by constructing suitable Lyapunov function, and the sufficient condition for the globally asymptotic stability of the endemic equilibrium is obtained by constructing suitable Lyapunov function and using LaSalle invariance principal. PMID:26504489

  4. The effect of intrauterine infusion of dextrose on clinical endometritis cure rate and reproductive performance of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Machado, V S; Oikonomou, G; Ganda, E K; Stephens, L; Milhomem, M; Freitas, G L; Zinicola, M; Pearson, J; Wieland, M; Guard, C; Gilbert, R O; Bicalho, R C

    2015-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the intrauterine administration use of 200 mL of 50% dextrose solution as a treatment against clinical endometritis (CE); CE cure rate and reproductive performance were evaluated. Additionally, the association of several relevant risk factors, such as retained placenta (RP), metritis, CE, anovulation, hyperketonemia, and body condition score with reproductive performance, early embryonic mortality, and CE were evaluated. A total of 1,313 Holstein cows housed on 4 commercial dairy farms were enrolled in the study. At 7±3 DIM cows were examined for metritis and had blood collected to determine serum β-hydroxybutyrate concentration. To determine if cows had ovulated at least once before 44±3 DIM, the presence of a corpus luteum was evaluated by ovarian ultrasonography at 30±3 DIM and at 44±3 DIM. At 30±3 DIM, CE was diagnosed using the Metricheck device (SimcroTech, Hamilton, New Zealand); cows with purulent or mucopurulent vaginal discharge were diagnosed as having CE. Cows diagnosed with CE (n=175) were randomly allocated into 2 treatment groups: treatment (intrauterine infusion of 200 mL of 50% dextrose) or control (no infusion). Clinical endometritis cows were re-evaluated as described above at 44±3 DIM, and cows that were free of purulent or mucopurulent vaginal discharge were considered cured. Intrauterine infusion of dextrose tended to have a detrimental effect on CE cure rate, and treatment did not have an effect on first-service conception rate and early embryonic mortality. A multivariable Cox's proportional hazard model was performed to evaluate the effect of several variables on reproductive performance; the variables RP, CE, parity, anovulation, and the interaction term between parity and anovulation were associated with hazard of pregnancy. Cows that did not have RP or CE were more likely to conceive than cows that were diagnosed with RP or CE. Cows that had RP were at 3.36 times higher odds of

  5. A cure rate survival model under a hybrid latent activation scheme.

    PubMed

    Borges, Patrick; Rodrigues, Josemar; Louzada, Francisco; Balakrishnan, Narayanaswamy

    2016-04-01

    In lifetimes studies, the occurrence of an event (such as tumor detection or death) might be caused by one of many competing causes. Moreover, both the number of causes and the time-to-event associated with each cause are not usually observable. The number of causes can be zero, corresponding to a cure fraction. In this article, we propose a method of estimating the numerical characteristics of unobservable stages (such as initiation, promotion and progression) of carcinogenesis from data on tumor size at detection in the presence of latent competing causes. To this end, a general survival model for spontaneous carcinogenesis under a hybrid latent activation scheme has been developed to allow for a simple pattern of the dynamics of tumor growth. It is assumed that a tumor becomes detectable when its size attains some threshold level (proliferation of tumorais cells (or descendants) generated by the malignant cell), which is treated as a random variable. We assume the number of initiated cells and the number of malignant cells (competing causes) both to follow weighted Poisson distributions. The advantage of this model is that it incorporates into the analysis characteristics of the stage of tumor progression as well as the proportion of initiated cells that had been 'promoted' to the malignant ones and the proportion of malignant cells that die before tumor induction. The lifetimes corresponding to each competing cause are assumed to follow a Weibull distribution. Parameter estimation of the proposed model is discussed through the maximum likelihood estimation method. A simulation study has been carried out in order to examine the coverage probabilities of the confidence intervals. Finally, we illustrate the usefulness of the proposed model by applying it to a real data involving malignant melanoma.

  6. Cure rate is not a valid indicator for assessing drug efficacy and impact of preventive chemotherapy interventions against schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis.

    PubMed

    Montresor, Antonio

    2011-07-01

    Every year in endemic countries, several million individuals are given anthelminthic drugs in the context of preventive chemotherapy programmes for morbidity control of schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis. The capacity to evaluate accurately the efficacy of the drugs used as well as the health impact produced by treatment is of utmost importance for appropriate planning and implementation of these interventions. Cure rate is an indicator of drug efficacy that was originally developed for assessing the clinical efficacy of antibiotics on selected bacterial diseases. Over time, this indicator has also been widely applied to anthelminthic drugs and consequently used to monitor and evaluate preventive chemotherapy interventions. In the author's opinion, however, measurement of cure rate provides information of limited usefulness in the context of helminth control programmes. The present article analyses the peculiarities of helminth infections and those of the drugs used in preventive chemotherapy, explaining the reasons why the cure rate is not an adequate indicator in this specific public health context.

  7. Influence of pretreatment with H2 receptor antagonists on the cure rates of Helicobacter pylori eradication

    PubMed Central

    Tokoro, Chikako; Inamori, Masahiko; Koide, Tomoko; Sekino, Yusuke; Iida, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Yasunari; Endo, Hiroki; Hosono, Kunihiro; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Yoneda, Masato; Yasuzaki, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Masami; Abe, Yasunobu; Kubota, Kensuke; Saito, Satoru; Kawana, Ichiro; Nakajima, Atsushi; Maeda, Shin; Matsuda, Reikei; Takahashi, Daisuke

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Pretreatment with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) reportedly decreases the efficacy of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication, however, the effect of pretreatment with an H2 receptor antagonist (H2RA) on H. pylori eradication has not yet been studied. We compared the efficacy of eradication regimen (lansoprazole/amoxicillin/clarithromycin) in patients with H. pylori infection with or without H2RA pretreatment. Material/Methods In this retrospective study conducted at three centers, 310 patients with H. pylori infection were treated. The diagnosis of H. pylori infection was made using the rapid urease test, bacterial cultures and histological examination of endoscopic biopsy specimens. The patients were assigned to receive an eradication regimen first or following pretreatment with H2RA. Eradication was assessed using the 13C-urea breath test more than 4 weeks after the completion of therapy. Results Overall, H. pylori was eradicated in 79.7% of the cases: the eradication rate was 81.6% in the pretreatment group, and 77.6% in the eradication first group (p=0.3799, chi-square test). No significant difference in the eradication rate was observed between the two groups. Conclusions Pretreatment with H2RA had no significant influence on the efficacy of H. pylori eradication therapy. PMID:21525804

  8. SMS reminders to improve the tuberculosis cure rate in developing countries (TB-SMS Cameroon): a protocol of a randomised control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is a public health problem in Cameroon, just like in many other countries in the world. The National Tuberculosis Control Programme (PNLT) put in place by the state, aims to fight tuberculosis through the implementation of international directives (Directly Observed Treatment Short, DOTS). Despite the deployment of this strategy across the world, its implementation is difficult in the context of low-resource countries. Some expected results are not achieved. In Cameroon, the cure rate for patients with sputum positive pulmonary tuberculosis (TPM+) after 6 months is only about 65%, 20% below the target. This is mainly due to poor patient adherence to treatment. By relying on the potential of mobile Health, the objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of SMS reminders on the cure rate of TPM + patients, measured using 6-month bacilloscopy. Methods/design This is a blinded, randomised controlled multicentre study carried out in Cameroon. The research hypothesis is that sending daily SMS messages to remind patients to take their prescribed tuberculosis medication, together with the standard DOTS strategy, will increase the cure rate from 65% (control group: DOTS, no SMS intervention) to 85% (intervention group: DOTS, with SMS intervention) in a group of new TPM + patients. In accordance with each treatment centre, the participants will be randomly allocated into the two groups using a computer program: the intervention group and the control group. A member of the research team will send daily SMS messages. Study data will be collected by health professionals involved in the care of patients. Data analysis will be done by the intention-to-treat method. Discussion The achieving of expected outcomes by the PNLT through implementation of DOTS requires several challenges. Although it has been demonstrated that the DOTS strategy is effective in the fight against tuberculosis, its application remains difficult in developing countries

  9. Effect of temperature-humidity index on live performance in broiler chickens grown from 49 to 63 days of age

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The thermal environment in poultry housing is a primary influence on production efficiency and live performance. Heavy broilers (body weight > 3.2 kg) typically require high ventilation rates to maintain thermal comfort and production efficiency. However, large birds are observed to pant in mild to ...

  10. Nanomedical strategy to prolong survival period, heighten cure rate, and lower systemic toxicity of S180 mice treated with MTX/MIT

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ning; Zhao, Ming; Wang, Yuji; Hu, Xi; Wu, Jianhui; Jiang, Xueyun; Li, Shan; Cui, Chunying; Peng, Shiqi

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the usual combination form of methotrexate (MTX)/mitoxantrone (MIT) and various complex combination regimens of MTX/MIT with other anticancer drugs, the survival period, cure rate, and systemic toxicity still need to be improved. For this purpose, a nanostructured amino group-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNN)−MTX/MIT was designed. In the preparation, the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) was modified with amino groups to form MSNN. The covalent modification of the amino groups on the surface of MSNN with MTX resulted in MSNN−MTX. The loading of MIT into the surface pores of MSNN−MTX produced nanostructured MSNN−MTX/MIT. Compared with the usual combination form (MTX/MIT), nanostructured MSNN−MTX/MIT increased the survival period greatly, heightened the cure rate to a great extent, and lowered the systemic toxicity of the treated S180 mice, significantly. These superior in vivo properties of nanostructured MSNN−MTX/MIT over the usual combination form (MTX/MIT) were correlated with the former selectively releasing MTX and MIT in tumor tissue and inside cancer cells in vitro. The chemical structure and the nanostructure of MSNN−MTX/MIT were characterized using infrared and differential scanning calorimeter spectra as well as transmission electron microscope images, respectively. PMID:27621591

  11. Nanomedical strategy to prolong survival period, heighten cure rate, and lower systemic toxicity of S180 mice treated with MTX/MIT

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ning; Zhao, Ming; Wang, Yuji; Hu, Xi; Wu, Jianhui; Jiang, Xueyun; Li, Shan; Cui, Chunying; Peng, Shiqi

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the usual combination form of methotrexate (MTX)/mitoxantrone (MIT) and various complex combination regimens of MTX/MIT with other anticancer drugs, the survival period, cure rate, and systemic toxicity still need to be improved. For this purpose, a nanostructured amino group-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNN)−MTX/MIT was designed. In the preparation, the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) was modified with amino groups to form MSNN. The covalent modification of the amino groups on the surface of MSNN with MTX resulted in MSNN−MTX. The loading of MIT into the surface pores of MSNN−MTX produced nanostructured MSNN−MTX/MIT. Compared with the usual combination form (MTX/MIT), nanostructured MSNN−MTX/MIT increased the survival period greatly, heightened the cure rate to a great extent, and lowered the systemic toxicity of the treated S180 mice, significantly. These superior in vivo properties of nanostructured MSNN−MTX/MIT over the usual combination form (MTX/MIT) were correlated with the former selectively releasing MTX and MIT in tumor tissue and inside cancer cells in vitro. The chemical structure and the nanostructure of MSNN−MTX/MIT were characterized using infrared and differential scanning calorimeter spectra as well as transmission electron microscope images, respectively.

  12. Nanomedical strategy to prolong survival period, heighten cure rate, and lower systemic toxicity of S180 mice treated with MTX/MIT.

    PubMed

    Song, Ning; Zhao, Ming; Wang, Yuji; Hu, Xi; Wu, Jianhui; Jiang, Xueyun; Li, Shan; Cui, Chunying; Peng, Shiqi

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the usual combination form of methotrexate (MTX)/mitoxantrone (MIT) and various complex combination regimens of MTX/MIT with other anticancer drugs, the survival period, cure rate, and systemic toxicity still need to be improved. For this purpose, a nanostructured amino group-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNN)-MTX/MIT was designed. In the preparation, the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) was modified with amino groups to form MSNN. The covalent modification of the amino groups on the surface of MSNN with MTX resulted in MSNN-MTX. The loading of MIT into the surface pores of MSNN-MTX produced nanostructured MSNN-MTX/MIT. Compared with the usual combination form (MTX/MIT), nanostructured MSNN-MTX/MIT increased the survival period greatly, heightened the cure rate to a great extent, and lowered the systemic toxicity of the treated S180 mice, significantly. These superior in vivo properties of nanostructured MSNN-MTX/MIT over the usual combination form (MTX/MIT) were correlated with the former selectively releasing MTX and MIT in tumor tissue and inside cancer cells in vitro. The chemical structure and the nanostructure of MSNN-MTX/MIT were characterized using infrared and differential scanning calorimeter spectra as well as transmission electron microscope images, respectively. PMID:27621591

  13. Curing Children's Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... ALL is a cancer of the white blood cells, which fight infection. It is the most common cancer in children, representing 23 percent of all cancers among those 15 or younger. Forty years ago, ALL was incurable. Today, in the United States, its cure rate is a major success story—as many ...

  14. Moderate progress for ovarian cancer in the last 20 years: prolongation of survival, but no improvement in the cure rate.

    PubMed

    Engel, J; Eckel, R; Schubert-Fritschle, G; Kerr, J; Kuhn, W; Diebold, J; Kimmig, R; Rehbock, J; Hölzel, D

    2002-12-01

    Although ovarian cancer treatment has advanced in the last 20 years, long-term survival remains stable. The purpose of this study was to determine whether survival has improved in line with treatment advances in a population-based prospective cohort of ovarian cancer patients (1978-1997, with a follow-up through to 2000). The 10-year overall survival rate for cancer patients was similar before and after 1988: 32.2% (n=1661) and 34.4% (n=2089). For patients after 1988, a 12-month prolongation of median survival was observed. In terms of stage according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO), only FIGO I and FIGO II patients showed, in addition to a prolongation in survival, an absolute improvement of 12.9 and 12.6% after 5 years and of 13.2 and 8.6% after 10 years. This hardly affected the survival of the total sample. For the most frequent stage FIGO III patients and for FIGO IV patients, a prolongation in survival time, but no improvement in survival rate, was seen after five or 10 years. The progress in FIGO I and II patients may be due to more accurate staging. More effective chemotherapy may also explain some of the improvement. The prolongation in FIGO-stages III-IV may be due to more radical surgery. Patient selection criteria, not only the treatment modalities, may be responsible for the superior results reported in clinical trials. Cancer registries are important for evaluating the quality of healthcare delivery.

  15. Accelerated dry curing of hams.

    PubMed

    Marriott, N G; Kelly, R F; Shaffer, C K; Graham, P P; Boling, J W

    1985-01-01

    Uncured pork legs from the right side of 18 carcasses were treated with a Ross Tenderizer and the left side were controls. All 36 samples were dry-cured for 40, 56 or 70 days and evaluated for appearance traits, cure penetration characteristics, microbial load, Kramer Shear force and taste attributes. The tenderization treatment had no effect (P > 0·05) on visual color or cure penetration rate, weight loss before curing, percentage moisture, nitrate level, nitrite level, total plate count, anaerobic counts, psychrotrophic counts, objective and subjective tenderness measurements or juiciness. However, the higher values of salt suggested a possible acceleration of the dry cure penetration process among the tenderized samples. Cure time had no effect (P > 0·05) on percentage moisture, percentage salt, nitrate content, nitrite content, shear force and juiciness. Results suggest a limited effect of the mechanical tenderization process on certain traits related to dry curing and that total process time should be at least 70 days if color stability during cooking is desired. PMID:22056076

  16. Advances in light curing adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Andy

    2001-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a new family of light curing adhesives containing a new reactive additive previously not used in optical grade light curing adhesives are obtained with the addition of functionalized cellulositics. Outgassing as low as 10-6 grams/gram has been observed based on headspace sampling. Other additives have lowered the shrinkage rates of positioning adhesives from near 1 percent to less than 0.1 percent with fractional, percentage movements over thermal range of -40 degrees C to +200 degrees C.

  17. A New Kind of Curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A new curing method using automated tape placement (ATP) with electron beam (EB), or e-beam, produces a combination known as in situ e-beam curing. Through a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Science Research Laboratory, Inc., created the in situ e-beam curing technique, which uses a low-energy electron beam gun to cure various composite materials. One important benefit is the technique's utilization of room temperature curing, which lessens the chance of mismatching the thermal expansion coefficients of different materials. For instance, metals and composites will expand at different rates when heated, but the low-energy e-beam gun reduces the expansion differential. Using a low-energy gun also results in less x-ray shielding, significantly reduced capital costs, reduced facility space, and increased processing capabilities for larger parts. However, using a low-energy gun also means that each tape layer is treated individually because the gun can penetrate only one layer at a time. The e-beam gun emits lower energy x-rays, which are more easily shielded than those emitted by previous guns. The low-energy system is relatively portable due to its light weight and small size. The gun weighs about 70 pounds and can be easily mounted on a robotic arm or an ATP head.

  18. Assessing the prediction accuracy of cure in the Cox proportional hazards cure model: an application to breast cancer data.

    PubMed

    Asano, Junichi; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Hamada, Chikuma

    2014-01-01

    A cure rate model is a survival model incorporating the cure rate with the assumption that the population contains both uncured and cured individuals. It is a powerful statistical tool for prognostic studies, especially in cancer. The cure rate is important for making treatment decisions in clinical practice. The proportional hazards (PH) cure model can predict the cure rate for each patient. This contains a logistic regression component for the cure rate and a Cox regression component to estimate the hazard for uncured patients. A measure for quantifying the predictive accuracy of the cure rate estimated by the Cox PH cure model is required, as there has been a lack of previous research in this area. We used the Cox PH cure model for the breast cancer data; however, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) could not be estimated because many patients were censored. In this study, we used imputation-based AUCs to assess the predictive accuracy of the cure rate from the PH cure model. We examined the precision of these AUCs using simulation studies. The results demonstrated that the imputation-based AUCs were estimable and their biases were negligibly small in many cases, although ordinary AUC could not be estimated. Additionally, we introduced the bias-correction method of imputation-based AUCs and found that the bias-corrected estimate successfully compensated the overestimation in the simulation studies. We also illustrated the estimation of the imputation-based AUCs using breast cancer data.

  19. Intraoperative radiation therapy in patients with bladder cancer. A review of techniques allowing improved tumor doses and providing high cure rates without loss of bladder function

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, W.U.; Kaufman, S.D.; Prout, G.R. Jr.

    1987-10-01

    Conventional external beam irradiation, using modern megavoltage techniques and doses that do not harm bladder function, will permanently eradicate local bladder cancer in 30% to 50% of patients, compared with 70% to 90% with cystectomy. In appropriately chosen patients, open surgery can safely provide excellent exposure for the selective delivery of more radiant energy directly to the tumor and less to the uninvolved portion of the bladder. Intraoperative radiation therapy, by either a removable radium or iridium implant or a large single dose of electrons, has been reported to be safe and can permanently cure the bladder of cancer and also preserve bladder function in more than 75% of patients with solitary tumors that invade into but not beyond the bladder muscle. With the increasing interest in and availability of intraoperative radiation therapy in the US, this curative and bladder-sparing treatment for operable patients with bladder cancer invading the trigone is appropriate for careful clinical trial. 13 references.

  20. Multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares and kinetic modeling applied to near-infrared data from curing reactions of epoxy resins: mechanistic approach and estimation of kinetic rate constants.

    PubMed

    Garrido, M; Larrechi, M S; Rius, F X

    2006-02-01

    This study describes the combination of multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares with a kinetic modeling strategy for obtaining the kinetic rate constants of a curing reaction of epoxy resins. The reaction between phenyl glycidyl ether and aniline is monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy under isothermal conditions for several initial molar ratios of the reagents. The data for all experiments, arranged in a column-wise augmented data matrix, are analyzed using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares. The concentration profiles recovered are fitted to a chemical model proposed for the reaction. The selection of the kinetic model is assisted by the information contained in the recovered concentration profiles. The nonlinear fitting provides the kinetic rate constants. The optimized rate constants are in agreement with values reported in the literature.

  1. Measuring Vapors To Monitor the State of Cure of a Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, Elliott; Perey, Daniel F.; Yost, William T.

    2006-01-01

    A proposed noninvasive method of monitoring the cure path and the state of cure of an epoxy or other resin involves measurement of the concentration( s) of one or more compound(s) in the vaporous effluent emitted during the curing process. The method is based on the following general ideas: (1) The concentrations of the effluent compounds in the vicinity of the curing resin are approximately proportional to the instantaneous rate of curing. (2) As curing proceeds at a given temperature, subsequent decreases in the concentrations are indicative of approaching completion of cure; that is, the lower are the concentrations, the more nearly complete is the cure.

  2. Nothing a hot bath won't cure: infection rates of amphibian chytrid fungus correlate negatively with water temperature under natural field settings.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Matthew J; Schlaepfer, Martin A

    2011-01-01

    Dramatic declines and extinctions of amphibian populations throughout the world have been associated with chytridiomycosis, an infectious disease caused by the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Previous studies indicated that Bd prevalence correlates with cooler temperatures in the field, and laboratory experiments have demonstrated that Bd ceases growth at temperatures above 28°C. Here we investigate how small-scale variations in water temperature correlate with Bd prevalence in the wild. We sampled 221 amphibians, including 201 lowland leopard frogs (Rana [Lithobates] yavapaiensis), from 12 sites in Arizona, USA, and tested them for Bd. Amphibians were encountered in microhabitats that exhibited a wide range of water temperatures (10-50°C), including several geothermal water sources. There was a strong inverse correlation between the water temperature in which lowland leopard frogs were captured and Bd prevalence, even after taking into account the influence of year, season, and host size. In locations where Bd was known to be present, the prevalence of Bd infections dropped from 75-100% in water <15°C, to less than 10% in water >30°C. A strong inverse correlation between Bd infection status and water temperature was also observed within sites. Our findings suggest that microhabitats where water temperatures exceed 30°C provide lowland leopard frogs with significant protection from Bd, which could have important implications for disease dynamics, as well as management applications.There must be quite a few things a hot bath won't cure, but I don't know many of them--Sylvia Plath, "The Bell Jar" (1963).

  3. Nothing a Hot Bath Won't Cure: Infection Rates of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus Correlate Negatively with Water Temperature under Natural Field Settings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Dramatic declines and extinctions of amphibian populations throughout the world have been associated with chytridiomycosis, an infectious disease caused by the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Previous studies indicated that Bd prevalence correlates with cooler temperatures in the field, and laboratory experiments have demonstrated that Bd ceases growth at temperatures above 28°C. Here we investigate how small-scale variations in water temperature correlate with Bd prevalence in the wild. We sampled 221 amphibians, including 201 lowland leopard frogs (Rana [Lithobates] yavapaiensis), from 12 sites in Arizona, USA, and tested them for Bd. Amphibians were encountered in microhabitats that exhibited a wide range of water temperatures (10–50°C), including several geothermal water sources. There was a strong inverse correlation between the water temperature in which lowland leopard frogs were captured and Bd prevalence, even after taking into account the influence of year, season, and host size. In locations where Bd was known to be present, the prevalence of Bd infections dropped from 75–100% in water <15°C, to less than 10% in water >30°C. A strong inverse correlation between Bd infection status and water temperature was also observed within sites. Our findings suggest that microhabitats where water temperatures exceed 30°C provide lowland leopard frogs with significant protection from Bd, which could have important implications for disease dynamics, as well as management applications. There must be quite a few things a hot bath won't cure, but I don't know many of them - Sylvia Plath, “The Bell Jar” (1963). PMID:22205950

  4. Fast Curing of Composite Wood Products

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Arthur J. Ragauskas

    2006-04-26

    The overall objective of this program is to develop low temperature curing technologies for UF and PF resins. This will be accomplished by: • Identifying the rate limiting UF and PF curing reactions for current market resins; • Developing new catalysts to accelerate curing reactions at reduced press temperatures and times. In summary, these new curing technologies will improve the strength properties of the composite wood products and minimize the detrimental effects of wood extractives on the final product while significantly reducing energy costs for wood composites. This study is related to the accelerated curing of resins for wood composites such as medium density fiberboard (MDF), particle board (PB) and oriented strandboard (OSB). The latter is frequently manufactured with a phenol-formaldehyde resin whereas ureaformaldehyde (UF) resins are usually used in for the former two grades of composite wood products. One of the reasons that hinder wider use of these resins in the manufacturing of wood composites is the slow curing speed as well as inferior bondability of UF resin. The fast curing of UP and PF resins has been identified as an attractive process development that would allow wood to be bonded at higher moisture contents and at lower press temperatures that currently employed. Several differing additives have been developed to enhance cure rates of PF resins including the use of organic esters, lactones and organic carbonates. A model compound study by Conner, Lorenz and Hirth (2002) employed 2- and 4-hydroxymethylphenol with organic esters to examine the chemical basis for the reported enhanced reactivity. Their studies suggested that the enhance curing in the presence of esters could be due to enhanced quinone methide formation or enhanced intermolecular SN2 reactions. In either case the esters do not function as true catalysts as they are consumed in the reaction and were not found to be incorporated in the polymerized resin product. An

  5. Curing Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sledge, George W

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is generally considered incurable, and this colors doctor-patient interactions for patients with metastatic disease. Although true for most patients, there appear to be important exceptions, instances where long-term disease-free survival occurs. Although these instances are few in number, they suggest the possibility of cure. How will we move toward cure for a much larger population of patients with metastatic disease? This article outlines a potential research agenda that might move us toward that distant goal. PMID:26759458

  6. Dual cure photocatalyst systems

    SciTech Connect

    DeVoe, R.J.; Brown-Wensley, K.A.; Holmes, G.L.; Mathis, M.D.; McCormick, F.B.; Palazzotto, M.C.; Spurgeon, K.M. . Corporate Research Labs.)

    1990-01-01

    A family of dual cure photocatalyst systems is being developed to be used in the solventless processing of organic coatings. The photocatalyst systems consist of organometallic compounds often in combination with other agents. Upon photolysis, the photocatalyst system generates a Lewis acid and a free radical. The Lewis acid can initiate the polymerization of epoxies or the addition of isocyanates and polyols to form polyurethanes while the free radical can initiate the polymerization of acrylates. The performance of the various photocatalyst systems will be compared on the basis of the physical properties of the cured compositions they produce. 17 figs.

  7. Thermal rheological analysis of cure process of epoxy prepreg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liangfeng

    2002-01-01

    The cure process of epoxy prepreg used as composite pipe joints was studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Bohlin Rheometer and other techniques. Isothermal DSC measurements were conducted between 110 and 220°C, at 10°C intervals. The results show that the complete cure reaction could be achieved at 220°C. The isothermal cure process was simulated with the four-parameter autocatalytic model. Except in the late stage of cure reaction, the model agrees well with the experimental data, especially at high temperatures. To account for the effect of diffusion on the cure rate, a diffusion factor was introduced into the model. The modified model greatly improved the predicated data at the late stage of cure reaction. The dynamic cure process was different from the isothermal cure process in that it is composed of two cure reactions. For dynamic cure process, a three-parameter autocatalytic model was used. The parameters in the model were determined by two methods. One was based on Kissinger and Ozawa approach. The whole curing process was modeled with two reactions. Another method was based on Borchardt and Daniels kinetic approach with whole curing process was modeled with one reaction. The fitting results by first and second method agreed well with experimental value in the late and early cure stage, separately. Rheological properties of epoxy prepreg are closely related to the cure process. With the development of cure reaction, gelation occurs and epoxy prepreg becomes difficult to process. As temperature increases, the gel time decreases. Viscosity profiles were described by different models. Except the first and nth order viscosity models, new viscosity models were proposed. The proposed new viscosity models are better than the old models for both isothermal and dynamic cure processes. To graphically represent the phase changes of the cure process, the isothermal cure diagrams of time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and conversion

  8. Does the eradication of Helicobacter pylori cure duodenal ulcer disease in communities with a high prevalence rate? Comparison with long-term acid suppression.

    PubMed

    Kepekci, Y; Kadayifci, A

    1999-01-01

    The long-term effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on the natural history of duodenal ulcer has been investigated and compared with long-term acid suppression treatment in an endemic community for infection. Seventy-three patients with endoscopically verified H. pylori positive active duodenal ulcer disease were included in this prospective study. Patients were divided into two groups. Group A patients (n = 39) were given an omeprazole-based triple eradication regimen, while group B patients (n = 34) were given omeprazole alone followed by long-term famotidine 20 mg daily as maintenance treatment. A control endoscopy was performed at the third month of treatment. The bacterium was eradicated in 32 (82%) of group A patients. All patients were followed up for two years and an endoscopy performed at the end of each year. H. pylori recurred in 13 patients and the reinfection rate was 44.8% over two years. Duodenal ulcer recurred in seven of these patients at two years (24.1%). There was a close association between H. pylori reinfection and ulcer relapse. Group B patients remained H. pylori positive during the study and the ulcer recurred in five of these patients (6.6%) despite continuous famotidine treatment. There was no statistically significant difference in ulcer relapse rate between the groups. These results suggested that H. pylori eradication is not an absolute solution for duodenal ulcer disease in high endemic regions and continuous maintenance treatment with H2-receptor antagonists is still an alternative approach in some chronic recurrent cases.

  9. Estimating and modeling the cure fraction in population-based cancer survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Paul C; Thompson, John R; Weston, Claire L; Dickman, Paul W

    2007-07-01

    In population-based cancer studies, cure is said to occur when the mortality (hazard) rate in the diseased group of individuals returns to the same level as that expected in the general population. The cure fraction (the proportion of patients cured of disease) is of interest to patients and is a useful measure to monitor trends in survival of curable disease. There are 2 main types of cure fraction model, the mixture cure fraction model and the non-mixture cure fraction model, with most previous work concentrating on the mixture cure fraction model. In this paper, we extend the parametric non-mixture cure fraction model to incorporate background mortality, thus providing estimates of the cure fraction in population-based cancer studies. We compare the estimates of relative survival and the cure fraction between the 2 types of model and also investigate the importance of modeling the ancillary parameters in the selected parametric distribution for both types of model.

  10. Dielectric Monitoring of Curing Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin E.; Semmel, Marie L.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes preliminary attempts at dielectric monitoring of curing of graphite/epoxy and carbon/phenolic composites. Objective is to develop dielectric monitoring for optimizing curing process and reduce incidence of failures of produced composite structures.

  11. Process for curing bismaleimide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, John A. (Inventor); OTHY S.imides alone. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to vinyl pyridine group containing compounds and oligomers, their advantageous copolymerization with bismaleimide resins, and the formation of reinforced composites based on these copolymers. When vinyl pyridines including vinyl stilbazole materials and vinyl styrylpyridine oligomer materials are admixed with bismaleimides and cured to form copolymers the cure temperatures of the copolymers are substantially below the cure temperatures of the bismaleimides alone.

  12. Analysis of cure in composites processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aylward, L.; Roylance, D.; Douglas, C.

    1984-01-01

    Finite element analysis is a general numerical tool for solving the field equations of engineering practice, and this paper demonstrates its use in modeling the nonisothermal cure of pultruded composite material. A very simple grid is used in this case to model a narrow strip of material, and this grid is then solved using a time-stepping transient algorithm to simulate the passage of the strip along the pultruder die. As time proceeds, heat is conducted into the strip from the heated boundaries at the die walls, and cure proceeds at a rate dependent on the local temperature. The computer model can be used to minimize the time needed for sufficient cure, and helps avoid such processing errors as undercure or thermal degradation.

  13. Monitoring resin cure of medium density fiberboard using dielectric sensors

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.J.; Rice, R.W.

    1996-12-31

    Flush mounted, in-press microwave (600--800 MHz) sensors have been developed for monitoring the complex permittivity in real time during the cure of medium density fiberboard. The measured dielectric constant ({var_epsilon}{prime}) and loss factor ({var_epsilon}{double_prime}) are independent diagnostic indicators of dynamic cure events that are catalyzed by heat, pressure and moisture. In particular, with this technique the instantaneous effects of resin viscosity, rate and degree of adhesive cure, the wood density, the changes in phase of the moisture and the rate of moisture depletion can be monitored during the entire curing process. The comparative roles of moisture and adhesive content are discussed, along with the comparative modulus of rupture with cure duration. Results are presented comparing the dynamics of phenol-formaldehyde and isocyanate resins.

  14. Curing system for high voltage cross linked cables

    DOEpatents

    Bahder, George; Katz, Carlos; Bopp, Louis A.

    1978-01-01

    This invention makes extruded, vulcanized, high voltage cables insulated with thermosetting compounds at much higher rates of production and with superior insulation of reduced thickness and with reduced cavities or voids in the insulation. As the cable comes from an extruder, it passes into a curing chamber with a heat booster that quickly raises the insulation to a temperature at which it is cured much more quickly than with steam heating of the prior art. A high temperature liquid in contact with the insulation maintains the high temperature; and because of the greater curing heat, the cable can travel through the curing chamber at a faster rate and into a cooling tube where it contacts with a cooling liquid under high pressure. The insulation compound is treated to reduce the size of cavities; and the high pressure maintained by the curing and cooling mediums prevent expansion of cavities before the insulation is set.

  15. Accelerated curing of silicone adhesive in medical catheter applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Hyun Joong

    This work presents a systematic approach to more effective thermal curing of the silicone adhesive used in medical catheter construction. A 2.45 GHZ microwave energy source provides heat more quickly and uniformly than the conventional oven heating process. Microwave heating effects are due both to dielectric and ohmic phenomena. It is shown experimentally that low frequency (60 HZ) current passed through the conductive catheter coil generates heat internally that facilitates the cross-linking process of cure. The changes with temperature of catheter material dielectric constant and conductivity at microwave frequencies are shown to enhance the curing process. Local humidity also affects the quality of curing process as moisture and acetic acid are driven from the inner radius to outer radius of the catheter body. With the microwave assisted curing technique, the curing process may complete in less than sixty seconds; a significant improvement from days to minutes. Microwave energy reflected from the curing site may be used to monitor the curing process and detect thermal runaway, i.e. The condition of a hot spot with attendant material destruction. Feedback from the reflected signal to the input microwave energy source allows a maximum rate of curing energy delivery without damaging the temperature sensitive polyurethane layer in the medical catheters.

  16. Sample size calculation for the proportional hazards cure model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songfeng; Zhang, Jiajia; Lu, Wenbin

    2012-12-20

    In clinical trials with time-to-event endpoints, it is not uncommon to see a significant proportion of patients being cured (or long-term survivors), such as trials for the non-Hodgkins lymphoma disease. The popularly used sample size formula derived under the proportional hazards (PH) model may not be proper to design a survival trial with a cure fraction, because the PH model assumption may be violated. To account for a cure fraction, the PH cure model is widely used in practice, where a PH model is used for survival times of uncured patients and a logistic distribution is used for the probability of patients being cured. In this paper, we develop a sample size formula on the basis of the PH cure model by investigating the asymptotic distributions of the standard weighted log-rank statistics under the null and local alternative hypotheses. The derived sample size formula under the PH cure model is more flexible because it can be used to test the differences in the short-term survival and/or cure fraction. Furthermore, we also investigate as numerical examples the impacts of accrual methods and durations of accrual and follow-up periods on sample size calculation. The results show that ignoring the cure rate in sample size calculation can lead to either underpowered or overpowered studies. We evaluate the performance of the proposed formula by simulation studies and provide an example to illustrate its application with the use of data from a melanoma trial. PMID:22786805

  17. The Lourdes Medical Cures Revisited†

    PubMed Central

    François, Bernard; Sternberg, Esther M.; Fee, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the cures recorded in Lourdes, France, between 1858, the year of the Visions, and 1976, the date of the last certified cure of the twentieth century. Initially, the records of cures were crude or nonexistent, and allegations of cures were accepted without question. A Medical Bureau was established in 1883 to examine and certify the cures, and the medical methodology improved steadily in the subsequent years. We discuss the clinical criteria of the cures and the reliability of medical records. Some 1,200 cures were said to have been observed between 1858 and 1889, and about one hundred more each year during the “Golden Age” of Lourdes, 1890–1914. We studied 411 patients cured in 1909–14 and thoroughly reviewed the twenty-five cures acknowledged between 1947 and 1976. No cure has been certified from 1976 through 2006. The Lourdes phenomenon, extraordinary in many respects, still awaits scientific explanation. Lourdes concerns science as well as religion. PMID:22843835

  18. Estimation of Cure Fraction for Lognormal Right Censored Data with Covariates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taweab, Fauzia Ali; Ibrahim, Noor Akma; Aljawadi, Bader Ahmad I.

    In clinical studies, a proportion of patients might be unsusceptible to the event of interest and can be considered as cured. The survival models that incorporate the cured proportion are known as cure rate models where the most widely used model is the mixture cure model. However, in cancer clinical trials, mixture model is not the appropriate model and the viable alternative is the Bounded Cumulative Hazard (BCH) model. In this paper we consider the BCH model to estimate the cure fraction based on the lognormal distribution. The parametric estimation of the cure fraction for survival data with right censoring with covariates is obtained by using EM algorithm.

  19. Modeling HIV Cure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelson, Alan; Conway, Jessica; Cao, Youfang

    A large effort is being made to find a means to cure HIV infection. I will present a dynamical model of post-treatment control (PTC) or ``functional cure'' of HIV-infection. Some patients treated with suppressive antiviral therapy have been taken off of therapy and then spontaneously control HIV infection such that the amount of virus in the circulation is maintained undetectable by clinical assays for years. The model explains PTC occurring in some patients by having a parameter regime in which the model exhibits bistability, with both a low and high steady state viral load being stable. The model makes a number of predictions about how to attain the low PTC steady state. Bistability in this model depends upon the immune response becoming exhausted when over stimulated. I will also present a generalization of the model in which immunotherapy can be used to reverse immune exhaustion and compare model predictions with experiments in SIV infected macaques given immunotherapy and then taken off of antiretroviral therapy. Lastly, if time permits, I will discuss one of the hurdles to true HIV eradication, latently infected cells, and present clinical trial data and a new model addressing pharmacological means of flushing out the latent reservoir. Supported by NIH Grants AI028433 and OD011095.

  20. Dielectric cure monitoring: Preliminary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, B. E.; Semmel, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary studies have been conducted on two types of dielectric cure monitoring systems employing both epoxy resins and phenolic composites. An Audrey System was used for 23 cure monitoring runs with very limited success. Nine complete cure monitoring runs have been investigated using a Micromet System. Two additional measurements were performed to investigate the Micromet's sensitivity to water absorption in a post-cure carbon-phenolic material. While further work is needed to determine data significance, the Micromet system appears to show promise as a feedback control device during processing.

  1. Dual cure solventless coating process

    SciTech Connect

    DeVoe, R.J.; Palazzotto, M.C.; Chambers, W.L.; Brown-Wensley, K.A.; Holmes, G.L.; Keipert, S.J.; Mathis, M.D.; McCormick, F.B.; Spurgeon, K.M.; Williams, J.W.

    1992-02-01

    The objective is to determine the feasibility of using the Dual Cure Photocatalyst technology for reduction of gaseous waste emissions through the minimization of coating solvent use. This is to be accomplished by developing a photocuring technology that would allow the use of solvent free (100% solids) formulations while preserving or improving upon the performance of conventional solvent based materials. Four Dual Cure Photocatalyst systems and one conventional catalyst system were investigated for use in curing combinations of epoxies with acrylates and acrylates with polyurethane precursors (polyol/polyisocyanate mixtures). Photocatalyst screening results showed that Dual Cure Photocatalyst Systems based upon cationic organometallic compounds alone or in combination with free radical photoinitiators or oxidants provide significantly better processing performance than systems based upon conventional catalysts or neutral organometallic compounds in combination with oxidants. Mechanical testing of materials prepared with the five catalyst systems showed that: (1) Dual Cure compositions can produce materials with better properties than the component parts and (2) Compositions cured with Dual Cure Photocatalysts produce materials superior to those cured with conventional catalyst systems in a number of cases. Cost, economic and energy analyses are presented based upon laboratory scale coating and curing studies.

  2. Composite cure and shrinkage associated with high intensity curing light.

    PubMed

    Yap, Adrian U J; Wong, N Y; Siow, K S

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of cure and post-gel shrinkage of three visible light-cured composite resins (In Ten-S [IT], Ivoclar Vivadent; Z100 [ZO], 3M-ESPE; Tetric Ceram [TC], Ivoclar Vivadent) when polymerized with a very high intensity (1296 +/- 2 mW/cm2) halogen light (Astralis 10, Ivoclar Vivadent) for 10 seconds. Irradiation with a conventional (494 +/- 3 mW/cm2) halogen light (Spectrum, Dentsply) for 40 seconds was used for comparison. The effectiveness of cure was assessed by computing the hardness gradient between the top and bottom surfaces of 2-mm composite specimens after curing. A strain-monitoring device was used to measure the linear polymerization shrinkage associated with the various composites and curing lights. A sample size of five was used for both experiments. Data was analyzed using ANOVA/Scheffe's post-hoc and Independent Samples t-tests at significance level 0.05. Results showed that the effect of the curing method on the effectiveness of cure and shrinkage was material-dependent. Polymerization of IT and TC with Spectrum for 40 seconds resulted in significantly more effective cure than polymerization with Astralis for 10 seconds. Polymerization of ZO with Spectrum for 40 seconds resulted in significantly more shrinkage than polymerization with Astralis for 10 seconds. In view of the substantial time saving, using high intensity lights may be a viable method to polymerize composites.

  3. Delayed cure bismaleimide resins

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Johnnie E.; Jamieson, Donald R.

    1984-08-07

    Polybismaleimides prepared by delayed curing of bis-imides having the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the --(CH.sub.2).sub.n -- group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine.

  4. Nonpost mold cure compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akihiro

    1997-08-01

    The recent low price trend of electronic products has made IC manufacturing efficiency a top priority in the semiconductor industry. Post mold cure (PMC) process, which generally involves heating the packages in the oven at 175 C for 4 to 8 hours, takes up much longer time than most other assembly processes. If this PMC process can be reduced or eliminated, semiconductor makers will be rewarded with a much higher cost merit. We define the purpose of Non-PMC as 'to get high reliability with suitable physical and electrical properties without PMC'. We compared carious properties of molding compound before and after PMC. We found that curing reaction has almost complete through DSC and C-NMR measurement, but several properties have not stabilized yet, and that not all properties after PMC were better than before PMC. We developed new grade of molding compound considering these facts. And we found that main factors to accomplish non-PMC compound are curability and flowability, and more, increasing of fundamental properties. To accomplish non-PMC, at first, molding compound need to have very high curability. Generally speaking, too high curability causes low flowability, and causes incomplete filing, wire sweep, pad shift, and weak adhesion to inner parts of IC packages. To prevent these failures, various compound properties were studied, and we achieved in adding good flowability to very high curable molding compound. Finally, anti-popcorn property was improved by adding low moisture, high adhesion, high Tg, and high flexural strengths at high temperature. Through this study, we developed new compound grade for various package, especially large QFP using standard ECN resin.

  5. Ionizing radiation post-curing of objects produced by stereolithography and other methods

    DOEpatents

    Howell, David H.; Eberle, Claude C.; Janke, Christopher J.

    2000-01-01

    An object comprised of a curable material and formed by stereolithography or another three-dimensional prototyping method, in which the object has undergone initial curing, is subjected to post-curing by ionizing radiation, such as an electron beam having a predetermined beam output energy, which is applied in a predetermined dosage and at a predetermined dose rate. The post-cured object exhibits a property profile which is superior to that which existed prior to the ionizing radiation post-curing.

  6. Fiber-optic epoxy composite cure sensor. II. Performance characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Kai-Yuen; Afromowitz, Martin A.

    1995-09-01

    The performance of a fiber-optic epoxy composite cure sensor, as previously proposed, depends on the optical properties and the reaction kinetics of the epoxy. The reaction kinetics of a typical epoxy system are presented. It is a third-order autocatalytic reaction with a peak observed in each isothermal reaction-rate curve. A model is derived to describe the performance characteristics of the epoxy cure sensor. If a composite coupon is cured at an isothermal temperature, the sensor signal can be used to predict the time when the gel point occurs and to monitor the cure process. The sensor is also shown to perform well in nonstoichiometric epoxy matrices. In addition the sensor can detect the end of the cure without calibration.

  7. Ambient curing fire resistant foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamermesh, C. L.; Hogenson, P. A.; Tung, C. Y.; Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of development of an ambient curing foam is described. The thermal stability and flame spread index of the foams were found to be comparable to those of the high-temperature cured polyimide foams by Monsanto two-foot tunnel test and NASA T-3 Fire test. Adaptation of the material to spray in place applications is described

  8. Semiparametric Bayesian estimation of quantile function for breast cancer survival data with cured fraction.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Cherry; Cobre, Juliana; Polpo, Adriano; Sinha, Debjayoti

    2016-09-01

    Existing cure-rate survival models are generally not convenient for modeling and estimating the survival quantiles of a patient with specified covariate values. This paper proposes a novel class of cure-rate model, the transform-both-sides cure-rate model (TBSCRM), that can be used to make inferences about both the cure-rate and the survival quantiles. We develop the Bayesian inference about the covariate effects on the cure-rate as well as on the survival quantiles via Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) tools. We also show that the TBSCRM-based Bayesian method outperforms existing cure-rate models based methods in our simulation studies and in application to the breast cancer survival data from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database.

  9. Semiparametric Bayesian estimation of quantile function for breast cancer survival data with cured fraction.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Cherry; Cobre, Juliana; Polpo, Adriano; Sinha, Debjayoti

    2016-09-01

    Existing cure-rate survival models are generally not convenient for modeling and estimating the survival quantiles of a patient with specified covariate values. This paper proposes a novel class of cure-rate model, the transform-both-sides cure-rate model (TBSCRM), that can be used to make inferences about both the cure-rate and the survival quantiles. We develop the Bayesian inference about the covariate effects on the cure-rate as well as on the survival quantiles via Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) tools. We also show that the TBSCRM-based Bayesian method outperforms existing cure-rate models based methods in our simulation studies and in application to the breast cancer survival data from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. PMID:27162061

  10. Cure of incurable lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    De Nardo, Gerald L.

    2006-10-01

    The most potent method for augmenting the cytocidal power of monoclonal antibody (MAb) treatment is to conjugate radionuclides to the MAb to deliver systemic radiotherapy (radioimmunotherapy; RIT). The antigen, MAb, and its epitope can make a difference in the performance of the drug. Additionally, the radionuclide, radiochemistry, chelator for radiometals and the linker between the MAb and chelator can have a major influence on the performance of drugs (radiopharmaceuticals) for RIT. Smaller radionuclide carriers, such as antibody fragments and mimics, and those used for pretargeting strategies, have been described and evaluated. All of these changes in the drugs and strategies for RIT have documented potential for improved performance and patient outcomes. RIT is a promising new therapy that should be incorporated into the management of patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) soon after these patients have proven incurable. Predictable improvements using better drugs, strategies, and combinations with other drugs seem certain to make RIT integral to the management of patients with NHL, and likely lead to cure of currently incurable NHL.

  11. Towards a 'cure' for IBD.

    PubMed

    Fiocchi, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    To discuss a cure for IBD, one should first define the concept 'a cure'. If it is intended as the general restoration of health, this is already possible, as many current therapies do a good job in inducing long periods of remission in Crohn's disease, and colectomy can technically cure ulcerative colitis. If it is more strictly defined as the complete and permanent elimination of the cause, predisposing and permissive factors, reinstatement of normal microbial ecology and restoration of mucosal immune homeostasis, then a cure for IBD is out of reach, at least for now. Regardless of the definition, major strides have been made in attempting to cure IBD by addressing the key components of its pathogenesis: the environment (exposome), the genetic makeup (genome), the gut microbiota (microbiome) and the immune system (immunome). However, the isolated modulation of each component is insufficient to provide a cure, and different requirements may be needed depending on the stage of the disease and each patient subset. To achieve a cure, one key approach is currently missing: the integration of knowledge from all the pathogenic components. We continue to learn more and more about each component using traditional 'canonical' systems, which allow the accumulation of data without taking into consideration the other components. We are still not studying the 'omes' of IBD, we should be using 'omics' technologies that can generate a more global vision of IBD pathogenesis on which to base novel, multiple pathway-integrated therapies. PMID:22796811

  12. Curing HIV: Moving Forward Faster.

    PubMed

    Flores, Marcella; Johnston, Rowena

    2016-02-01

    There is enormous enthusiasm in the scientific community for finding a cure for HIV. Although much remains to be discovered regarding the mechanisms of viral persistence and how it may be disrupted, some assumptions regarding the goals of a cure, applicability to target populations, and what is required of the assays we employ, may lead to missed opportunities and discoveries and hamper the discovery of a product that will safely cure tens of millions of HIV-infected people around the world. The field will benefit from an awareness and critical interrogation of assumptions that may be implicit in their scientific pursuits. PMID:26862662

  13. Curing Efficacy of Light Emitting Diodes of Dental Curing Units

    PubMed Central

    Mousavinasab, Seyed Mostafa; Meyers, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) and light emitting diode (LED) curing lights on polymerization of resin composite. Materials and methods A hybrid resin composite was used to prepare samples which were cured using two QTH and ten LED light curing sources. Twelve groups, each containing ten samples, were prepared using each light source. The cured depth of the resin was determined using ISO 4049 method and Vickers hardness values were determined at 1.0 mm intervals. Data was analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test. Results Data analysis demonstrated a significant difference between light sources for depth of cure. At 1.0 mm below the surface all the tested light sources and at 2.0-mm intervals all light sources except two (Optilux 501 and LEDemetron I) and at 3.0-mm intervals only two light sources (PenCure and LEDemetron II) could produce hardness values higher than 80% of superficial layer values. Conclusion This study showed that a variety of LED light sources used in the present study are as effective as the high-intensity QTH lights in polymerization of resin composite. PMID:23230474

  14. Diamine curing agents for polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, V. L.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Three aromatic diamines have properties that make them promising candidates as curing agents for converting isocyanates to polyurethanes with higher adhesive strengths, higher softening temperatures, better toughness, and improved abrasion resistance.

  15. A 'cure' for Down syndrome: what do parents want?

    PubMed

    Inglis, A; Lohn, Z; Austin, J C; Hippman, C

    2014-10-01

    Recent advancements in molecular genetics raise the possibility that therapeutics or a 'cure' for Down syndrome (DS) may become available. However, there are no data regarding how parents of children with DS perceive the possibility of mitigating specific manifestations such as the intellectual disability (ID) associated with DS, or curing the condition entirely. To explore these issues, we distributed a questionnaire to members of the Lower Mainland Down Syndrome Society in British Columbia, Canada. Questionnaires were completed by 101 parents (response rate=41%). A majority (61%) viewed the possibility of reversing ID in DS positively, but only 41% said that they would 'cure' their child of DS if it were possible. Twenty-seven percent of respondents said they would not 'cure' their child, and 32% were unsure if they would 'cure' their child. The most commonly cited motivation for opting for a 'cure' was to increase their child's independence. However, parental attitudes' towards a 'cure' for DS were complex, affected by ethical issues, perceived societal values, and pragmatic factors such as the age of the individual and long-term care-giving burden. These findings could be used by healthcare professionals supporting families who include a member with DS and to direct future research.

  16. Accelerated Hazards Mixture Cure Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiajia; Peng, Yingwei

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new cure model for survival data with a surviving or cure fraction. The new model is a mixture cure model where the covariate effects on the proportion of cure and the distribution of the failure time of uncured patients are separately modeled. Unlike the existing mixture cure models, the new model allows covariate effects on the failure time distribution of uncured patients to be negligible at time zero and to increase as time goes by. Such a model is particularly useful in some cancer treatments when the treat effect increases gradually from zero, and the existing models usually cannot handle this situation properly. We develop a rank based semiparametric estimation method to obtain the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters in the model. We compare it with existing models and methods via a simulation study, and apply the model to a breast cancer data set. The numerical studies show that the new model provides a useful addition to the cure model literature. PMID:19697127

  17. Curing units' ability to cure restorative composites and dual-cured composite cements under composite overlay.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Ho; Kim, Su-Sun; Cho, Yong-Sik; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Noh, Byng-Duk

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of using conventional low-power density QTH (LQTH) units, high-power density QTH (HQTH) units, argon (Ar) laser and Plasma arc curing (PAC) units for curing dual-cured resin cements and restorative resin composites under a pre-cured resin composite overlay. The microhardness of the two types of restorative resins (Z100 and Tetric Ceram) and a dual-cured resin cement (Variolink II) were measured after they were light cured for 60 seconds in a 2 mm Teflon mold. The recorded microhardness was determined to be the optimum microhard-ness (OM). Either one of the two types of restorative resins (Z100, Tetric Ceram) or the dual cured resin cement (Variolink II) were placed under a 1.5-mm thick and 8 mm diameter pre-cured Targis (Vivadent/Ivoclar AG, Schaan, Liechtenstein) overlay. The specimens that were prepared for each material were divided into four groups depending upon the curing units used (HQTH, PAC, Laser or LQTH) and were further subdi-vided into subgroups according to light curing time. The curing times used were 30, 60, 90 and 120 seconds for HQTH; 12, 24, 36 and 48 seconds for the PAC unit; 15, 30, 45 and 60 for the Laser and 60, 120 or 180 seconds for the LQTH unit. Fifteen specimens were assigned to each sub- group. The microhardness of the upper and and lower composite surfaces under the Targis overlay were measured using an Optidur Vickers hardness-measuring instrument (Göttfert Feinwerktechnik GmbH, Buchen, Germany). In each material, for each group, a three-way ANOVA with Tukey was used at the 0.05 level of significance to compare the microhardnesses of the upper and lower composite surfaces and the previously measured OM of the material. From the OM of each material, 80% OM was calculated and the time required for the microhardness of the upper and lower surface of the specimen to reach 100% and 80% of OM was determined. In Z100 and Tetric Ceram, when the composites were light cured for 120 seconds using the HQTH lamp

  18. What Cure Models Can Teach us About Genome-Wide Survival Analysis.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Sven; Denys, Damiaan; Kahn, René S; Derks, Eske M

    2016-03-01

    The aim of logistic regression is to estimate genetic effects on disease risk, while survival analysis aims to determine effects on age of onset. In practice, genetic variants may affect both types of outcomes. A cure survival model analyzes logistic and survival effects simultaneously. The aim of this simulation study is to assess the performance of logistic regression and traditional survival analysis under a cure model and to investigate the benefits of cure survival analysis. We simulated data under a cure model and varied the percentage of subjects at risk for disease (cure fraction), the logistic and survival effect sizes, and the contribution of genetic background risk factors. We then computed the error rates and estimation bias of logistic, Cox proportional hazards (PH), and cure PH analysis, respectively. The power of logistic and Cox PH analysis is sensitive to the cure fraction and background heritability. Our results show that traditional Cox PH analysis may erroneously detect age of onset effects if no such effects are present in the data. In the presence of genetic background risk even the cure model results in biased estimates of both the odds ratio and the hazard ratio. Cure survival analysis takes cure fractions into account and can be used to simultaneously estimate the effect of genetic variants on disease risk and age of onset. Since genome-wide cure survival analysis is not computationally feasible, we recommend this analysis for genetic variants that are significant in a traditional survival analysis. PMID:26552795

  19. Challenging Roadblocks to Cancer Cure.

    PubMed

    Loda, Massimo

    2016-09-01

    The Pezcoller Symposium in Trento, Italy, June 2015, focused entirely on the question of why advanced cancer cure is so uncommon despite the extraordinarily rapid growth of invaluable therapeutic information. Participants were asked to define and to critically evaluate real and potential obstacles to permanent disease eradication. High-level concepts on potential road blocks to cures as well as opportunities for intervention in diverse areas of investigation ranging from genomic alterations to metabolism, microenvironment, immunity, and mechanotransduction were discussed. Provocative concepts and novel therapeutic avenues were proposed. What follows is a critical analysis of the highlights of this meeting. Cancer Res; 76(17); 4924-30. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27520451

  20. Dynamically cured thermoplastic olefin polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Hazelton, D.R.; Puydak, R.C.; Booth, D.A.

    1986-08-19

    A thermoplastic composition is described comprising a polyolefin resin, a first rubber component selected from the group consisting of polyisobutylene, and ethylene propylene copolymer (EPM) and EPDM and a second rubber component selected from the group consisting of halogenated butyl rubber and polychoroprene, the second rubber component being cured utilizing a curative other than a peroxide, which is a vulcanizing agent for the second rubber but not for the first rubber, the second rubber being cured to a fully vulcanized state by dynamic vulcanization in the presence of the polyolefin resin and first rubber compound.

  1. The viscoelasticity of curing thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Adolf, D.; Martin, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    As a crosslinking polymer cures, dramatic changes in molecular architecture occur. These structural changes in turn affect the viscoelastic behavior of the material. At a critical extent of reaction (the gel point), the polymer undergoes a transition from a viscous liquid to an elastic solid. We have monitored the evolution of structure and viscoelasticity in an epoxy encapsulant used at Sandia, the diglycidyl ether of Bisphenol A (BADGE) cured with diethanolamine (DEA). The structure evolves according to percolation theory, and the viscoelasticity evolves according to out dynamic scaling theory for branched polymers. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Curing efficiency of various types of light-curing units.

    PubMed

    Rahiotis, Chris; Kakaboura, Afrodite; Loukidis, Michalis; Vougiouklakis, George

    2004-02-01

    This study compared monomer conversion (DC), the per cent linear polymerization shrinkage (%LS), the wall-to-wall contraction pattern (per cent of peripheral opening, %DM, and maximal marginal gap, MG) and depth of cure (DOC), of a hybrid resin composite (Spectrum TPH) exposed to different types of light-curing units and exposure modes (Virtuoso-PAC, Elipar TriLight-QTH, and FreeLight-LED). The QTH and LED units were used in two curing modes: the exponential ramp and the continuous output modes. Monomer conversion was investigated by micro Multiple Internal Reflection (MIR)-Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and %LS was measured by the deflective disc method. The wall-to-wall contraction method used a cylindrical cavity model in extracted human teeth. The per cent debonded margins relative to the cavity periphery (%DM) and the width of maximum gap (MG) was evaluated. The DOC was determined using Vickers microhardness measurements (200 g load, 20 s) at the top surface (H0), at 2 mm (H2) and at 4 mm (H4) depths, and the results expressed as H2/H0 and H4/H0 ratios. Significantly lower %DC and %LS values were provided by PAC and LED units. No differences were found in %DM among the curing units and PAC exhibited the highest MG. No significant differences were noted among light-curing groups in terms of H2/H0 microhardness values. The QTH, operated in exponential mode, resulted in the highest H4/H0 value. The exponential mode of the QTH demonstrated superior performance for the total of the characteristics evaluated.

  3. Dynamic dielectric analysis for nondestructive cure monitoring and process control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, D. E.; Delos, S. E.; Hoff, M. S.; Whitham, M. E.; Weller, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic dielectric analysis (DDA) is an effective in situ NDE method that can monitor the reaction status in thermosets and the phase changes in thermoplastics, including slow reactions occuring late in the cure cycle and recrystallization during annealing. The effects of moisture and resin history on reaction rate can also be determined, as can ionic and dipolar contributions. The ionic mobility parameter is noted to be an excellent monitor of viscosity above the glass transition temperature. The ability of DDA to monitor cure rate variations in a thick section during autoclaving has been demonstrated.

  4. Breather cloth for vacuum curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1979-01-01

    Finely-woven nylon cloth that has been treated with Teflon improves vacuum adhesive bonding of coatings to substrates. Cloth is placed over coating; entire assembly, including substrate, coating, and cloth, is placed in plastic vacuum bag for curing. Cloth allows coating to "breathe" when bag is evacuated. Applications include bonding film coatings to solar concentrators and collectors.

  5. Cleaner Vacuum-Bag Curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemons, J. M.; Penn, B. G.; Ledbetter, Frank E., III; Daniels, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    Improvement upon recommended procedures saves time and expense. Autoclave molding in vacuum bag cleaner if adhesive-backed covering placed around caul plate as well as on mold plate. Covering easy to remove after curing and leaves caul plate free of resin deposits.

  6. X-ray curing of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berejka, Anthony J.; Cleland, M. R.; Galloway, R. A.; Gregoire, O.

    2005-12-01

    The development of high current electron beam (EB) accelerators makes it possible to consider X-ray processing for industrial applications. The well-known inefficiency in converting electron beams to X-rays still affords better overall process efficiency when compared with historic thermal processes. X-ray processing permits depth of penetration of ionizing radiation into a material and, when derived from high current accelerators, can yield process through-puts comparable to low powered EB devices. X-rays are generated at lower dose-rates which are controlled by equipment and process parameters. Two feasibility studies were conducted which illustrate the potential for X-ray processing: (1) the curing of a reactive monomeric impregnant in a thick cross-section block of wood and (2) the curing of the matrix binder in fiber reinforced composites while the composite material was still constrained within a metal mold used to form an article. The ability to control dose-rate and to penetrate thick materials, such as the walls of a metal mold, indicate that X-ray processing can be of significant industrial interest.

  7. Fertility cycle influence on surgical breast cancer cure.

    PubMed

    Bove, Kathleen; Lincoln, David W; Wood, Patricia A; Hrushesky, William J M

    2002-09-01

    Cancer growth and spread is an intricate process dependent upon both tumor and host. This laboratory is interested in the role of the fertility cycle, specifically cyclic changes in steroid hormone levels, in tumor growth and metastases. Our previous studies, using a murine model, have documented that breast cancer growth rate and post-resection metastatic behavior each change reproducibly during the estrous cycle, and that post-resection cancer spread depends upon the time within the estrous cycle that an advanced transplanted cancer is resected. Twelve to thiry-two percent cure rates were seen in these studies. That early work described estrous cycle stages just prior and near to putative ovulation to be superior while those stages farther from ovulation were disadvantageous times for surgery. Data presented here confirm the role of the estrous cycle in post-resection metastatic spread. This current work validates vaginal smear determined estrous cycle stage with uterine weight. A primary, transplantable, mammary carcinoma, which metastasizes to the lungs, was resected for surgical cure in cycling C3HeB/FeJ female mice at each fertility cycle stage. A group of oophorectomized (ovx) animals was also used. In two large, independent studies resecting much earlier stage cancers than in prior studies, a 96% surgical cure frequency was documented when the tumor is resected during estrus. The second best surgical cure rate is achieved when tumors are resected during metestrus (79% overall cure rate). Cure frequency in ovx animals is intermediate. These results further support a probable role for circulating E2 and P4 levels in modulating the metastatic process. We conclude that the timing of surgical resection within the estrous cycle affects the cancer's metastatic potential and that the optimal timing of resection may also depend to some extent upon the size (stage) of the resected cancer.

  8. Accelerated Cure Project for Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... main content Accelerating research toward a cure for multiple sclerosis Home Contact Us Search form Search Connect Volunteer ... is to accelerate efforts toward a cure for multiple sclerosis by rapidly advancing research that determines its causes ...

  9. Measurement of the degree of cure in epoxies with ultrasonic velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, W. P.; Parker, F. R.

    1986-01-01

    The use of ultrasonic longitudinal velocity values to measure the degree of cure (defined for an epoxide system as the concentration of epoxide/amine bonds divided by the initial epoxide concentration) in epoxy resins is investigated. The experimental setup used to measure the changes in longitudinal velocity with time is described, together with the technique used to calculate the degree of cure from the acoustic data, using the principle of additive module. Measurements were done with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A epoxy resin cured with an amine adduct agent. Good qualitative agreement was shown between the time dependence of the acoustically measured degree of cure and the predicted rate of reaction.

  10. Behavior of Salmonella typhimurium during manufacture and curing of cheddar cheese.

    PubMed

    Goepfert, J M; Olson, N F; Marth, E H

    1968-06-01

    Nine vats of stirred-curd granular cheddar cheese were made with whole milk contaminated with Salmonella typhimurium after pasteurization. Enumeration of salmonellae by the most probable number technique during manufacture and curing showed that these organisms multiplied rapidly during manufacture until the curd was salted. Thereafter and throughout the curing period, the salmonellae declined in number at a rate dependent on the temperature of curing. Evidence is presented indicating that the production of volatile fatty acids in the curd during curing may be responsible for this decline.

  11. HBV cure: why, how, when?

    PubMed

    Levrero, Massimo; Testoni, Barbara; Zoulim, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    Current HBV treatments control replication and liver disease progression in the vast majority of treated patients. However, HBV patients often require lifelong therapies due to the persistence of transcriptionally active viral cccDNA mini-chromosome in the nucleus, which is not directly targeted by current antiviral therapies. A true complete cure of HBV would require clearance of intranuclear cccDNA from all infected hepatocytes. An intermediate but still relevant step forward that would allow treatment cessation would be reaching a functional cure, equivalent to resolved acute infection, with a durable HBsAg loss±anti-HBs seroconversion, undetectable serum DNA and persistence of cccDNA in a transcriptionally inactive status. Recent advances in technologies and pharmaceutical sciences, including the cloning of the mayor HBV receptor (i.e. the NTCP transporter) and the development in vitro HBV infection models, have heralded a new horizon of innovative antiviral and immune-therapeutic approaches. PMID:27447092

  12. Freud's psychoanalysis: a moral cure.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Johan

    2014-08-01

    That psychoanalytical treatment in its classical Freudian sense is primarily a moral or ethical cure is not a very controversial claim. However, it is far from obvious how we are to understand precisely the moral character of psychoanalysis. It has frequently been proposed that this designation is valid because psychoanalysis strives neither to cure psychological symptoms pharmaceutically, nor to superficially modify the behaviour of the analysand, but to lead the analysand through an interpretive process during which he gradually gains knowledge of the unconscious motives that determine his behaviour, a process that might ideally liberate him to obtain, in relation to his inner desires, the status of a moral agent. There resides something appealing in these claims. But it is the author's belief that there is an even deeper moral dimension applying to psychoanalytical theory and praxis. Freudian psychoanalysis is a moral cure due to its way of thematizing psychological suffering as moral suffering. And this means that the moral subject - the being that can experience moral suffering - is not primarily something that the psychoanalytical treatment strives to realize, but rather the presupposition for the way in which psychoanalysis theorizes psychological problems as such. PMID:24720632

  13. Freud's psychoanalysis: a moral cure.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Johan

    2014-08-01

    That psychoanalytical treatment in its classical Freudian sense is primarily a moral or ethical cure is not a very controversial claim. However, it is far from obvious how we are to understand precisely the moral character of psychoanalysis. It has frequently been proposed that this designation is valid because psychoanalysis strives neither to cure psychological symptoms pharmaceutically, nor to superficially modify the behaviour of the analysand, but to lead the analysand through an interpretive process during which he gradually gains knowledge of the unconscious motives that determine his behaviour, a process that might ideally liberate him to obtain, in relation to his inner desires, the status of a moral agent. There resides something appealing in these claims. But it is the author's belief that there is an even deeper moral dimension applying to psychoanalytical theory and praxis. Freudian psychoanalysis is a moral cure due to its way of thematizing psychological suffering as moral suffering. And this means that the moral subject - the being that can experience moral suffering - is not primarily something that the psychoanalytical treatment strives to realize, but rather the presupposition for the way in which psychoanalysis theorizes psychological problems as such.

  14. Cure shrinkage of thermoset composites

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.D. )

    1993-01-01

    The shrinkage of thermoset composites during cure was studied using a volumetric dilatometer. The material systems studied were AS4 carbon fiber/Hercules' 3501-6 epoxy, IM7 carbon fiber/Hercules 8551-7A toughened epoxy and IM7 carbon fiber/BASF's 5250-4 bismaleimide. Shrinkage of the samples due to both polymerization and thermal expansion effects was seen. The volume changes of the materials during cure were then compared to results from dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and dielectric cure monitoring. Maximums in volume corresponded to minimums in storage and loss modulus from DMA and maximums in the dielectric loss factor. Resin shrinkage during the 177 deg C (350 F) hold corresponded to the onset of polymerization seen by the rapid increase in the storage modulus and the decrease in the dielectric loss factor response due to reduced ion mobility. These results show that volumetric dilatometry can be an effective tool in the development of materials processing strategies and can be useful in studying residual stresses in composites. 9 refs.

  15. Caring and curing: paediatric cancer services since 1960.

    PubMed

    Barnes, E

    2005-09-01

    This paper traces the history of the specialist meanings of 'cure' in paediatric oncology in the UK, how they have changed with increasing organization of the discipline, ever-rising survival rates for all childhood cancers, and with feedback from patients and families. It examines the differing ways in which those involved in researching, treating, and raising funds for work on childhood cancers have understood and used the language of cure, and speculates as to why talking about the 'cure' of survivors of childhood cancers is so problematic. The paper discusses the particular importance of holistic care in the development of paediatric oncology. Psychosocial support is delivered alongside surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The focus for support is the patient's whole family, building a tenet of palliative care into curative treatment. The concept of the 'truly cured child' is argued to have been crucial in the discipline's decision in the 1970s and 1980s to make the psychosocial needs of patients and their families central in the programme of curing children with cancer. PMID:16098123

  16. Composite cure monitoring with Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slattery, Kerry T.; Corona-Bittick, Kelli; Dorr, Donald J.

    1998-03-01

    Residual stress is induced in fiber composite materials during the cure process because the thermal expansion coefficient of the fiber is generally much lower than that of the polymer matrix. The two materials are 'locked' together at the cure temperature. Then, as they cool, the matrix attempts to contract more than the fiber leading to tension in the matrix and compression in the fiber. This can lead to the formation of microcracks parallel to the fibers in thick composite piles or yarns. The magnitude of residual stress can be reduced by modifying the cure cycle; however, optimizing the cure cycle requires a complete understanding of the state of cure throughout the composite. This is a complex problem -- especially in thick composites. Pilot studies have been performed placing Bragg gratin sensors in glass fabric preforms and monitoring the response of the grating during resin infusion and cure. The typical response shows the initial thermal expansion of the Bragg grating, a rapid contraction of the grating as the resin gels, slower contraction during cure, and thermal contraction at the composite thermal expansion coefficient during cool down. This data is then sued with micromechanical models of the fiber/matrix interaction during cure to establish material parameters for cure simulation. Once verified, these cure simulation methods will be used to optimize tooling design and cure cycles in composite components.

  17. Photo-Curing: UV Radiation curing of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Christina A.

    2004-01-01

    The Polymers Branch of the Materials Division is dedicated to the development of high-performance for a variety of applications. Areas of significant interest include high- temperature polymers, low density, and high strength insulating materials, conductive polymers, and high density polymer electrolytes. This summer our group is working diligently on a photo-curing project. There is interest in the medical community feel the need for a new and improved balloon that will be used for angioplasty (a form of heart surgery). This product should maintain flexibility but add many other properties. Like possibly further processability and resistance to infection. Our group intends on coming up with this product by using photo-enolization (or simply, photo-curing) by Diels-Alder trapping. The main objective was to synthesize a series of new polymers by Diels-Alder cycloaddition of photoenols with more elastomeric properties. Our group was responsible for performing the proper photo-curing techniques of the polymers with diacrylates and bismaleimides, synthesizing novel monomers, and evaluating experimental results. We attempted to use a diacrylate to synthesize the polymer because of previous research done within the Polymers Branch here at NASA. Most acrylates are commercially available, have more elastometric properties than a typical rigid aromatic structure has and they contain ethylene oxides in the middle of their structure that create extensive flexibility. The problem we encountered with the acrylates is that they photo chemically and thermally self polymerize and create diradicals at low temperatures; these constraints caused a lot of unnecessary side reactions. We want to promote solely, diketone polymerization because this type of polymerization has the ability to cause very elastic polymers. We chose to direct our attention towards the usage of maleimides because they are known for eliminating these unnecessary side reactions.

  18. An extended cure model and model selection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yingwei; Xu, Jianfeng

    2012-04-01

    We propose a novel interpretation for a recently proposed Box-Cox transformation cure model, which leads to a natural extension of the cure model. Based on the extended model, we consider an important issue of model selection between the mixture cure model and the bounded cumulative hazard cure model via the likelihood ratio test, score test and Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC). Our empirical study shows that AIC is informative and both the score test and the likelihood ratio test have adequate power to differentiate between the mixture cure model and the bounded cumulative hazard cure model when the sample size is large. We apply the tests and AIC methods to leukemia and colon cancer data to examine the appropriateness of the cure models considered for them in the literature.

  19. Curing depth of composite resin light cured by LED and halogen light-curing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calixto, L. R.; Lima, D. M.; Queiroz, R. S.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Andrade, M. F.

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the polymerization effectiveness of a composite resin (Z-250) utilizing microhardness testing. In total, 80 samples with thicknesses of 2 and 4 mm were made, which were photoactivated by a conventional halogen light-curing unit, and light-curing units based on LED. The samples were stored in water distilled for 24 h at 37°C. The Vickers microhardness was performed by the MMT-3 microhardness tester. The microhardness means obtained were as follows: G1, 72.88; G2, 69.35; G3, 67.66; G4, 69.71; G5, 70.95; G6, 75.19; G7, 72.96; and G8, 71.62. The data were submitted to an analysis of variance (ANOVA’s test), adopting a significance level of 5%. The results showed that, in general, there were no statistical differences between the halogen and LED light-curing units used with the same parameters.

  20. Ambient Cured Alkali Activated Flyash Masonry Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, K.; Radhakrishna; Sasalatti, Vinod M.

    2016-09-01

    Geopolymers belong to a category of non-conventional and non-Portland cement based cementitious binders which are produced using industrial by products like fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS). This paper reports on the development of geopolymer mortars for production of masonry units. The geopolymer mortars were prepared by mixing various by products with manufactured sand and a liquid mixture of sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. After curing at ambient conditions, the masonry units were tested for strength properties such as water absorption, initial rate of absorption, compression, shear- bond, and stress-strain behaviour etc. It was observed that the flexural strength of the blocks is more than 2 MPa and shear bond strength is more than 0.4MPa. It was found that the properties of geopolymer blocks were superior to the traditional masonry units. Hence they can be recommended for structural masonry.

  1. ASRM test report: Autoclave cure process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachbar, D. L.; Mitchell, Suzanne

    1992-01-01

    ASRM insulated segments will be autoclave cured following insulation pre-form installation and strip wind operations. Following competitive bidding, Aerojet ASRM Division (AAD) Purchase Order 100142 was awarded to American Fuel Cell and Coated Fabrics Company, Inc. (Amfuel), Magnolia, AR, for subcontracted insulation autoclave cure process development. Autoclave cure process development test requirements were included in Task 3 of TM05514, Manufacturing Process Development Specification for Integrated Insulation Characterization and Stripwind Process Development. The test objective was to establish autoclave cure process parameters for ASRM insulated segments. Six tasks were completed to: (1) evaluate cure parameters that control acceptable vulcanization of ASRM Kevlar-filled EPDM insulation material; (2) identify first and second order impact parameters on the autoclave cure process; and (3) evaluate insulation material flow-out characteristics to support pre-form configuration design.

  2. Interfacial Properties of Electron Beam Cured Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, C.C.

    1999-12-30

    The objectives of the CRADA are to: Confirm that fiber-resin adhesion is responsible for the observed poor shear properties; Determine the mechanism(s) responsible for poor adhesion between carbon fibers and epoxy resins after e-beam curing; Develop and evaluate resin systems and fiber treatments to improve the properties of e-beam cured, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites; and Develop refined methods for processing e-beam cured, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites.

  3. Ultrasonic Mixing of Epoxy Curing Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    New ultrasonic mixing technique used to mix several curing agents/epoxy combinations. Major component of commercially available base epoxy resin used in tetraglycidylmethylenedianiline (TGMDA). In ultrasonic mixing system cup holds resin and curing agent during acoustic excitation. Samples placed in cup with top to ultrasonic horn forming bottom of cup. Ultrasonically treated until amber colored and transparent. Because ultrasonic agitation drives out entrapped air, degassing not necessary before cure.

  4. How visible light curing came into dentistry.

    PubMed

    Wilson, N H F

    2016-01-01

    The present paper details the history of the introduction of visible light curing into dentistry. This history provides an excellent example of 'out of the box', lateral thinking translation of innovative scientific technology into dentistry. Visible light curing is an important UK contribution to the recent history and current practice of dentistry, with several million visible light curing procedures being carried out globally on a daily basis.

  5. Changes on degree of conversion of dual-cure luting light-cured with blue LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandéca, M. C.; El-Mowafy, O.; Saade, E. G.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Porto-Neto, S. T.

    2009-05-01

    The indirect adhesive procedures constitute recently a substantial portion of contemporary esthetic restorative treatments. The resin cements have been used to bond tooth substrate and restorative materials. Due to recently introduction of the self-bonding resin luting cement based on a new monomer, filler and initiation technology has become important to study the degree of conversion of these new materials. In the present work the polymerization reaction and the filler content of dual-cured dental resin cements were studied by means of infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermogravimetry (TG). Twenty specimens were made in a metallic mold (8 mm diameter × 1 mm thick) from each of 2 cements, Panavia® F2.0 (Kuraray) and RelyX™ Unicem Applicap (3M/ESPE). Each specimen was cured with blue LED with power density of 500 mW/cm2 for 30 s. Immediately after curing, 24 and 48 h, and 7 days DC was determined. For each time interval 5 specimens were pulverized, pressed with KBr and analyzed with FT-IR. The TG measurements were performed in Netzsch TG 209 under oxygen atmosphere and heating rate of 10°C/min from 25 to 700°C. A two-way ANOVA showed DC (%) mean values statistically significance differences between two cements ( p < 0.05). The Tukey’s test showed no significant difference only for the 24 and 48 h after light irradiation for both resin cements ( p > 0.05). The Relx-Y™ Unicem mean values were significantly higher than Panavia® F 2.0. The degree of conversion means values increasing with the storage time and the filler content showed similar for both resin cements.

  6. [Nonnius and the Spa cure].

    PubMed

    Lecomte, J; Lemli, J; Marganne, M H; Melard, M

    1996-01-01

    The 12th of July 1635, Jan van Beverwyck wrote a letter from Dordrecht to his esteemed friend Luis Nunez, in Antwerp. He asked him for indications about the cure of kidney stones of which he was suffering. He had just passed two calculi very painfully. Nunez answered on July 31. His letter summarized his own experience with this disease. In such cases, temperate diuretics and emollients are well indicated: ingestion of light decoctions of Malva and Viola, Caerefolium and Parieteria as well as Marshmallow syrup. No purge and no 'chemicals'. However, the best remedy was drinking Spa water. Usually the best way to absorb it is to come to the springs, in the Ardennes, part of the independent Principality of Liège. However, considering the horrors of the war (the Thirty Years War) endangering the country, van Beverwyck would be wise to drink imported water during 40 or 50 days, while staying home quietly, in Dordrecht. The letter points out the importance of provoked diuresis in the treatment of kidney stones. On the other hand the letter is an illustration of the continuing contacts between the United Provinces and the Spanish territories and of the commercial traffic between Antwerp, Dordrecht and Spa. The exported water was bottled from many 'pouhons'. It was acid, ferruginous, sulfurous and saturated with carbon dioxide; no pathogen germs, at least at the spring. Nunez quoted the large number of his patients cured with Spa water in Antwerp. This is an illustration of its commercial expansion even during this critical period. PMID:8848877

  7. Hepatitis C, stigma and cure.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Rui Tato; Barreira, David Pires

    2013-10-28

    The infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the most important global chronic viral infections worldwide. It is estimated to affect around 3% of the world population, about 170-200 million people. Great part of the infections are asymptomatic, the patient can be a chronic carrier for decades without knowing it. The most severe consequences of the chronic infection are liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, which appears in 20%-40% of the patients, leading to hepatic failure and death. The HCV was discovered 25 years ago in 1989, is a RNA virus and classified by the World Health Organization as an oncogenic one. Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most important cancers, the fifth worldwide in terms of mortality. It has been increasing in the Ocidental world, mainly due to chronic hepatitis C. Hepatitis C is not only a liver disease and a cause of cirrhosis, but also a mental, psychological, familiar, and social disease. The stigma that the infected person sometimes carries is tremendous having multiple consequences. The main cause is lack of adequate information, even in the health professionals setting. But, besides the "drama" of being infected, health professionals, family, society and the infected patients, must be aware of the chance of real cure and total and definitive elimination of the virus. The treatment for hepatitis C has begun in the last 80's with a percentage of cure of 6%. Step by step the efficacy of the therapy for hepatitis C is rapidly increasing and nowadays with the very new medications, the so called Direct Antiviral Agents-DAAs of new generation, is around 80%-90%.

  8. Characterizing and monitoring changes in state of polymers during cure and use-aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Andrew Orschel

    2001-10-01

    Multi Angle Laser Light Scattering (MALLS) and Frequency Dependent Electromagnetic Sensing (FDEMS) provide unique characterizations of polymer systems during cure and use- aging. This research illustrates how MALLS is an extremely accurate technique for absolute characterization of macromolecules, giving molecular weight and size information that other widely used and accepted techniques are incapable of measuring. Application of MALLS to monitoring the changing state of a polyamide-11 system in a water aging environment led to the discovery of an equilibrium molecular weight which is the result of two competing reactions, hydrolysis- degradation and a newly discovered recombination- polymerization reaction. The discovery of this recombination reaction creates the possibility of an indefinitely healthy polyamide-11 polymer system. FDEMS successfully monitored changing water content and degree of cure of a moisture-curing adhesive polymer. The data show potential for total in situ cure characterization by FDEMS, including in situ determinations of moisture diffusion rates during a polymer cure in the adhesive bondline.

  9. Premature fractures of platinum-cured Silastic shunts.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, D B; Chadduck, W M

    1992-10-01

    Experience with one unitized ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt system has disclosed an unacceptably high rate of premature distal shunt tube fracturing. From March, 1986, to February, 1989, 114 new or replacement unitized VP shunts were placed; the patients were followed through November, 1991. Twenty-two (19.3%) returned with peritoneal limb fractures, with a mean time from shunt implantation to fracture of 31.5 +/- 11.3 months (range 15-62 months). All shunts broke in the neck 1.1-11.2 cm below the valve. Of the 22 cases, there were no instances of infection, previous peritoneal limb revisions, or recognizable iatrogenic shunt injury at placement. These fractures also occurred earlier than the usual time expected for biodegradation of shunt tubing. The Silastic tubing in all of these shunts had been manufactured using a more recent platinum-curing process. This tubing has decreased elastance and is more brittle than tubing cured with the previously used dichlorobenzoyl peroxide (DCBP) catalyst. Our studies suggest that the premature shunt tube fractures were related to changes in physical characteristics of the platinum-cured Silastic tubing. Therefore, the DCBP-cured Silastic is to be considered preferable for shunting products. Neurosurgeons are asked to report recurring patterns of shunt system failure.

  10. LED Curing Lights and Temperature Changes in Different Tooth Sites.

    PubMed

    Armellin, E; Bovesecchi, G; Coppa, P; Pasquantonio, G; Cerroni, L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this in vitro study was to assess thermal changes on tooth tissues during light exposure using two different LED curing units. The hypothesis was that no temperature increase could be detected within the dental pulp during polymerization irrespective of the use of a composite resin or a light-curing unit. Methods. Caries-free human first molars were selected, pulp residues were removed after root resection, and four calibrated type-J thermocouples were positioned. Two LED lamps were tested; temperature measurements were made on intact teeth and on the same tooth during curing of composite restorations. The data was analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Wilcoxon test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Pearson's χ (2). After ANOVA, the Bonferroni multiple comparison test was performed. Results. Polymerization data analysis showed that in the pulp chamber temperature increase was higher than that without resin. Starlight PRO, in the same condition of Valo lamp, showed a lower temperature increase in pre- and intrapolymerization. A control group (without composite resin) was evaluated. Significance. Temperature increase during resin curing is a function of the rate of polymerization, due to the exothermic polymerization reaction, the energy from the light unit, and time of exposure. PMID:27195282

  11. Recent developments in radiation curing in the USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nablo, Sam V.

    Radiation curing activities in the USA continue to focus strongly on the use of both UV and EB for the polymerization of silicone release coatings on paper and film. The high speeds of cure (200 m/minute) achievable at "room temperature" continue to make this the process of choice for the siliconization of both film and paper. Some of the process difficulties peculiar to this chemistry will be discussed. The success of the multi-color lithographic printing of web using single station electron curing has resulted in a major market for electron processors. The aesthetic and physical properties of the overprint varnishes used in this application are important and will be discussed. The relatively high costs of both the inks and varnishes will probably limit this application to folding carton use for foodstuffs and high quality products, with UV continuing to dominate in lower speed, less demanding applications. The application of electron initiated graft modification of polymer materials, particularly for biological/medical device application, is showing a good rate of development as is the use of selective treatment of materials for functional modification of packaging films, particularly for gas permeability control. Some examples of these applications will be reviewed. Continued work with "deep" curing or vulcanization of composite structures, particularly in the elastomers field, will be discussed with a brief review of the continuing growth of electron processing in this industry, particularly for tires and roofing products.

  12. LED Curing Lights and Temperature Changes in Different Tooth Sites

    PubMed Central

    Armellin, E.; Bovesecchi, G.; Coppa, P.; Pasquantonio, G.; Cerroni, L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this in vitro study was to assess thermal changes on tooth tissues during light exposure using two different LED curing units. The hypothesis was that no temperature increase could be detected within the dental pulp during polymerization irrespective of the use of a composite resin or a light-curing unit. Methods. Caries-free human first molars were selected, pulp residues were removed after root resection, and four calibrated type-J thermocouples were positioned. Two LED lamps were tested; temperature measurements were made on intact teeth and on the same tooth during curing of composite restorations. The data was analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Wilcoxon test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Pearson's χ2. After ANOVA, the Bonferroni multiple comparison test was performed. Results. Polymerization data analysis showed that in the pulp chamber temperature increase was higher than that without resin. Starlight PRO, in the same condition of Valo lamp, showed a lower temperature increase in pre- and intrapolymerization. A control group (without composite resin) was evaluated. Significance. Temperature increase during resin curing is a function of the rate of polymerization, due to the exothermic polymerization reaction, the energy from the light unit, and time of exposure. PMID:27195282

  13. Animal Models for HIV Cure Research.

    PubMed

    Policicchio, Benjamin B; Pandrea, Ivona; Apetrei, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1/AIDS pandemic continues to spread unabated worldwide, and no vaccine exists within our grasp. Effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been developed, but ART cannot clear the virus from the infected patient. A cure for HIV-1 is badly needed to stop both the spread of the virus in human populations and disease progression in infected individuals. A safe and effective cure strategy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection will require multiple tools, and appropriate animal models are tools that are central to cure research. An ideal animal model should recapitulate the essential aspects of HIV pathogenesis and associated immune responses, while permitting invasive studies, thus allowing a thorough evaluation of strategies aimed at reducing the size of the reservoir (functional cure) or eliminating the reservoir altogether (sterilizing cure). Since there is no perfect animal model for cure research, multiple models have been tailored and tested to address specific quintessential questions of virus persistence and eradication. The development of new non-human primate and mouse models, along with a certain interest in the feline model, has the potential to fuel cure research. In this review, we highlight the major animal models currently utilized for cure research and the contributions of each model to this goal.

  14. Framing expectations in early HIV cure research.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Karine; Henderson, Gail E; Margolis, David M

    2014-10-01

    Language used to describe clinical research represents a powerful opportunity to educate volunteers. In the case of HIV cure research there is an emerging need to manage expectations by using the term 'experiment'. Cure experiments are proof-of-concept studies designed to evaluate novel paradigms to reduce persistent HIV-1 reservoirs, without any expectation of medical benefit.

  15. 7 CFR 29.6010 - Cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cured. 29.6010 Section 29.6010 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6010 Cured. Tobacco dried of its sap by either natural or...

  16. Evaluation of Degreasers as Brine Curing Additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The length of time needed for brine curing of raw hides and skins, a minimum of 18 h, is a time-consuming and expensive process. In this paper we initially report the results of an investigation of the stratigraphic distribution of sodium chloride and water in fleshed hides cured for varying interv...

  17. Animal Models for HIV Cure Research

    PubMed Central

    Policicchio, Benjamin B.; Pandrea, Ivona; Apetrei, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1/AIDS pandemic continues to spread unabated worldwide, and no vaccine exists within our grasp. Effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been developed, but ART cannot clear the virus from the infected patient. A cure for HIV-1 is badly needed to stop both the spread of the virus in human populations and disease progression in infected individuals. A safe and effective cure strategy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection will require multiple tools, and appropriate animal models are tools that are central to cure research. An ideal animal model should recapitulate the essential aspects of HIV pathogenesis and associated immune responses, while permitting invasive studies, thus allowing a thorough evaluation of strategies aimed at reducing the size of the reservoir (functional cure) or eliminating the reservoir altogether (sterilizing cure). Since there is no perfect animal model for cure research, multiple models have been tailored and tested to address specific quintessential questions of virus persistence and eradication. The development of new non-human primate and mouse models, along with a certain interest in the feline model, has the potential to fuel cure research. In this review, we highlight the major animal models currently utilized for cure research and the contributions of each model to this goal. PMID:26858716

  18. A new hypothesis on HIV cure

    PubMed Central

    Hladik, Florian

    2015-01-01

    In this opinion article, I provide the rationale for my hypothesis that nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) may prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) cure by promoting the survival of cells with integrated provirus. If correct, we may be closer to a cure than we realize. PMID:26380071

  19. Ultrasonic mixing of epoxy curing agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; St.clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique for mixing solid curing agents into liquid epoxy resins using ultrasonic energy was developed. This procedure allows standard curing agents such as 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS) and its 3,3 prime-isomer, (3,3 prime-DDS) to be mixed without prior melting of the curing agent. It also allows curing agents such as 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS) and its 3,3 prime-isomer, (3,3 prime-DDS) to be mixed without prior melting of the curing agent. It also allows curing agents with very high melt temperatures such as 4,4 prime-diaminobenzophenone (4,4 prime-DABP) (242 C) to be mixed without premature curing. Four aromatic diamines were ultrasonically blended into MY-720 epoxy resin. These were 4,4 prime-DDS; 3,3 prime-DDA; 4,4 prime-DABP and 3,3 prime-DABP. Unfilled moldings were cast and cured for each system and their physical and mechanical properties compared.

  20. Ultrasonic mixing of epoxy curing agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique for mixing solid curing agents into liquid epoxy resins using ultrasonic energy was developed. This procedure allows standard curing agents such as 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS) and its 3,3 prime-isomer, (3,3 prime-DDS) to be mixed without prior melting of the curing agent. It also allows curing agents with very high melt temperatures such as 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS) and its 3,3 prime-isomer, (3,3 prime-DDS) to be mixed without prior melting of the curing agent. It also allows curing agents with very high melt temperatures such as 4,4 prime-diaminobenzophenone (4,4 prime-DABP) (242 C) to be mixed without premature curing. Four aromatic diamines were ultrasonically blended into MY-720 epoxy resin. These were 4, 4 prime-DDS; 3,3 prime-DDA; 4, 4 prime-DABP and 3,3 prime-DABP. Unfilled moldings were cast and cured for each system and their physical and mechanical properties compared. Previously announced in STAR as N83-27018

  1. Dental resin cure monitoring by inherent fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qun; Zhou, Jack X.; Li, Qingxiong; Wang, Sean X.

    2008-02-01

    It is demonstrated that the inherent fluorescence of a dental composite resin can be utilized to monitor the curing status, i.e. degree of conversion of the resin. The method does not require any sample preparation and is potentially very fast for real time cure monitoring. The method is verified by Raman spectroscopy analysis.

  2. Biodegradable Epoxy Networks Cured with Polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shigeo; Kramer, Edward J.

    2006-03-01

    Epoxy resins are used widely for adhesives as well as coatings. However, once cured they are usually highly cross-linked and are not biodegradable. To obtain potentially biodegradable polypeptides that can cure with epoxy resins and achieve as good properties as the conventional phenol novolac hardeners, poly(succinimide-co-tyrosine) was synthesized by thermal polycondensation of L-aspartic acid and L-tyrosine with phosphoric acid under reduced pressure. The tyrosine/succinimide ratio in the polypeptide was always lower than the tyrosine/(aspartic acid) feed ratio and was influenced by the synthesis conditions. Poly(succinimide-tyrosine- phenylalanine) was also synthesized from L-aspartic acid, L- tyrosine and L-phenylalanine. The thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy resins cured with these polypeptides are comparable to those of similar resins cured with conventional hardeners. In addition, enzymatic degradability tests showed that Chymotrypsin or Subtilisin A could cleave cured films in an alkaline borate buffer.

  3. Cure Chemistry of Phenylethynyl Terminated Oligomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Karen H.; Orwoll, Robert A.; Young, Philip R.; Jensen, Brian J.; McNair, Harold M.

    1997-01-01

    The ability to process high performance polymers into quality, void-free composites has been significantly advanced using oligomers terminated with reactive groups which cure or crosslink at elevated temperature without the evolution of volatile byproducts. Several matrix resin systems of considerable interest to the aerospace community utilize phenylethynyl-terminated imide (PETI) technology to achieve this advantage. The present paper addresses the cure chemistry of PETI oligomers. The thermal cure of a low molecular weight model compound was studied using a variety of analytical techniques including differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The studies indicate an extremely complex cure process. Many stable products were isolated and this paper reports current work on identification of those products. The intent of this research is to provide fundamental insight into the molecular structure of the cured PETI engineering materials so that performance and durability can be more fully assessed.

  4. 7 CFR 29.2519 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2519 Section 29.2519 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Kentucky and Tennessee Fire-Cured and Foreign-Grown Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2519 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured...

  5. 7 CFR 29.2519 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2519 Section 29.2519 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Kentucky and Tennessee Fire-Cured and Foreign-Grown Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2519 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured...

  6. 7 CFR 29.2519 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2519 Section 29.2519 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Kentucky and Tennessee Fire-Cured and Foreign-Grown Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2519 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured...

  7. 7 CFR 29.2519 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2519 Section 29.2519 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Kentucky and Tennessee Fire-Cured and Foreign-Grown Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2519 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured...

  8. 7 CFR 29.2519 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2519 Section 29.2519 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Kentucky and Tennessee Fire-Cured and Foreign-Grown Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2519 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured...

  9. 9 CFR 319.103 - Cured beef tongue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cured beef tongue. 319.103 Section 319... Cured beef tongue. In preparing “Cured Beef Tongue,” the application of curing solution to the fresh beef tongue shall not result in an increase in the weight of the cured beef tongue of more than...

  10. 9 CFR 319.103 - Cured beef tongue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cured beef tongue. 319.103 Section 319... Cured beef tongue. In preparing “Cured Beef Tongue,” the application of curing solution to the fresh beef tongue shall not result in an increase in the weight of the cured beef tongue of more than...

  11. 9 CFR 319.103 - Cured beef tongue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cured beef tongue. 319.103 Section 319... Cured beef tongue. In preparing “Cured Beef Tongue,” the application of curing solution to the fresh beef tongue shall not result in an increase in the weight of the cured beef tongue of more than...

  12. 9 CFR 319.103 - Cured beef tongue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cured beef tongue. 319.103 Section 319... Cured beef tongue. In preparing “Cured Beef Tongue,” the application of curing solution to the fresh beef tongue shall not result in an increase in the weight of the cured beef tongue of more than...

  13. 9 CFR 319.103 - Cured beef tongue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cured beef tongue. 319.103 Section 319... Cured beef tongue. In preparing “Cured Beef Tongue,” the application of curing solution to the fresh beef tongue shall not result in an increase in the weight of the cured beef tongue of more than...

  14. Curing agent for polyepoxides and epoxy resins and composites cured therewith. [preventing carbon fiber release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A curing for a polyepoxide is described which contains a divalent aryl radical such as phenylene a tetravalent aryl radical such as a tetravalent benzene radical. An epoxide is cured by admixture with the curing agent. The cured epoxy product retains the usual properties of cured epoxides and, in addition, has a higher char residue after burning, on the order of 45% by weight. The higher char residue is of value in preventing release to the atmosphere of carbon fibers from carbon fiber-epoxy resin composites in the event of burning of the composite.

  15. Effectiveness of light emitting diode and halogen light curing units for curing microhybrid and nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Shwetha; Suprabha, BS

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To compare the polymerization efficacy of micro-hybrid and nanocomposites cured with Quartz-tungsten halogen (QTH) and light emitting diode (LED) light curing units (LCUs). The effectiveness of pulse cure mode in LED LCU was also investigated. Materials and Methods: Both micro-hybrid and nanocomposite specimens were cured using four different curing protocols giving a total of eight experimental groups. Ten cylindrical specimens were prepared for each group, and light cured for 40 s on the top surface, thus giving a total of eighty specimens. Vicker hardness measurements were carried out on the top and bottom surfaces after 24 h and hardness ratio was calculated. Results: For both micro-hybrid and nanocomposites, highest mean VHN was observed for the group cured with QTH LCU, and the lowest was observed for the group cured with second LED LCU in standard mode but the difference was significant only in case of nanocomposite. Conclusion: Curing nanocomposites with QTH LCU results in better micro hardness. Pulse cure mode does not effectively increase polymerization efficacy than the standard mode of curing. PMID:23833457

  16. [Is it possible to cure HIV infection?].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Carolina; Madrid, Nadia P; Moreno, Santiago

    2015-09-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has significantly improved the life expectancy in HIV-infected people, but it cannot cure the disease by itself. Several barriers have been identified for the cure of HIV infection, including a reservoir of latently infected cells, persistent viral replication in tissues, and anatomical sanctuaries. The main strategy proposed for the cure of HIV consists on the administration of drugs that, through the reactivation of latent HIV, would eliminate the cell reservoir. Ongoing clinical trials have shown the proof of concept, but the efficacy of these drugs in decreasing the reservoir size has not been proved so far.

  17. [Is it possible to cure HIV infection?].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Carolina; Madrid, Nadia P; Moreno, Santiago

    2015-09-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has significantly improved the life expectancy in HIV-infected people, but it cannot cure the disease by itself. Several barriers have been identified for the cure of HIV infection, including a reservoir of latently infected cells, persistent viral replication in tissues, and anatomical sanctuaries. The main strategy proposed for the cure of HIV consists on the administration of drugs that, through the reactivation of latent HIV, would eliminate the cell reservoir. Ongoing clinical trials have shown the proof of concept, but the efficacy of these drugs in decreasing the reservoir size has not been proved so far. PMID:26365737

  18. One-step microwave foaming and curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, J.; Lee, R.; Sorathia, U. A. K.; Wilcoxson, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    Process that combines microwave foaming and curing of polyimide precursors in single step produces fire-resistant foam slabs of much larger volume than has previously been possible. By adding selected conductive fillers to powder precursors and by using high-power microwave oven, foam slabs with dimensions in excess of 61 by 61 by 7.6 cm are made. Typical foaming and curing and curing time is 35 minutes in microwave oven with additional 1 to 2 hour postcure in conventional oven.

  19. Acceleration of curing of resin composite at the bottom surface using slow-start curing methods.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takako; Morigami, Makoto; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two slow-start curing methods on acceleration of the curing of resin composite specimens at the bottom surface. The light-cured resin composite was polymerized using one of three curing techniques: (1) 600 mW/cm(2) for 60 s, (2) 270 mW/cm(2) for 10 s+0-s interval+600 mW/cm(2) for 50 s, and (3) 270 mW/cm(2) for 10 s+5-s interval+600 mW/cm(2) for 50 s. After light curing, Knoop hardness number was measured at the top and bottom surfaces of the resin specimens. The slow-start curing method with the 5-s interval caused greater acceleration of curing of the resin composite at the bottom surface of the specimens than the slow-start curing method with the 0-s interval. The light-cured resin composite, which had increased contrast ratios during polymerization, showed acceleration of curing at the bottom surface.

  20. [Mineral water as a cure].

    PubMed

    Nocco, Priska Binz

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of diseases with mineral spring water belongs to the oldest medical therapies. The "remedy" mineral water is therefore of importance also within the pharmacy. The present pharmacy historical work examines the impact of the use of mineral waters, as well as of their dried components, as therapeutic agents in the 19th and early 20th centuries, i.e. from approx. 1810 to 1930, as well as the contributions given by pharmacists in the development and analysis of mineral water springs. Beside these aspects, the aim here is also to describe the role played by pharmacists in the production of artificial mineral water as well as in the sale and wholesale of natural and artificial mineral water. In the first part of this work the situation in Switzerland and its surrounding countries, such as Germany, France, Italy and Austria, is discussed. The second part contains a case-study of the particular situation in the Canton Tessin. It is known from the scientific literature published at that time that information on mineral water was frequently reported. Starting from the beginning of the 19th century the number of such publications increased tremendously. The major part of them were publications in scientific journals or contributions to medical and pharmaceutical manuals and reference books. In particular the spa-related literature, such as spa-guides, was of growing interest to a broad public. The inclusion of monographs into the Swiss, the Cantonal as well the foreign pharmacopoeias granted a legal frame for the mineral waters and their dried components. These works are of major importance from a pharmacy historical standpoint and represent a unique proof of historical evidence of the old medicinal drug heritage. The most frequently used therapies based on mineral waters were drinking and bath cures. Several diseases, particularly those of a chronic character, were treated with mineral waters. The positive influence of these cures on the recovery of the patients

  1. Financing cures in the United States.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban

    2015-02-01

    True cures in health care are rare but likely not for long. The high price tag that accompanies a cure along with its rapid uptake create challenges in the financing of cures by public and private payers. In the US, the disaggregated nature of health insurance system adds to this challenge as patients frequently churn across multiple health plans. This creates a 'free-rider' problem, where no one health plan has the incentive to invest in cure since the returns will be scattered over many health plans. Here, a new health currency is proposed as a generalized version of a social impact bond that has the potential to solve this free-rider problem, as it can be traded not only between public and private payers but also within the private sector. An ensuing debate as to whether and how to develop such a currency can serve the US health care system well. PMID:25482146

  2. Financing cures in the United States.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban

    2015-02-01

    True cures in health care are rare but likely not for long. The high price tag that accompanies a cure along with its rapid uptake create challenges in the financing of cures by public and private payers. In the US, the disaggregated nature of health insurance system adds to this challenge as patients frequently churn across multiple health plans. This creates a 'free-rider' problem, where no one health plan has the incentive to invest in cure since the returns will be scattered over many health plans. Here, a new health currency is proposed as a generalized version of a social impact bond that has the potential to solve this free-rider problem, as it can be traded not only between public and private payers but also within the private sector. An ensuing debate as to whether and how to develop such a currency can serve the US health care system well.

  3. Curing of Furfuryl Alcohol-Impregnated Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, J. W.; Brayden, T. H.

    1983-01-01

    Delamination problem in reinforced carbon/carbon parts impregnated with oxalic acid-catalyzed furfuryl alcohol overcome by instituting two additional quality-control tests on alcohol and by changing curing conditions.

  4. Thread-Pull Test Of Curing Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Hardness (and degree of cure) of adhesive layer measured by pulling previously inserted thread out of layer. Strength of bond measured directly on assembly rather than on samples, which can be misleading.

  5. Energy curable compositions having improved cure speeds

    DOEpatents

    Halm, L.W.

    1993-05-18

    The composition and method provide improved physical properties and cure speed of polyurethane precursors, with or without free radical polymerizable monomers or oligomers present, by use of a two component catalyst system. The resin blend can be activated with a latent organometallic catalyst combined with an organic peroxide which can be a hydroperoxide or an acyl peroxide to decrease the cure time while increasing the break energy and tangent modulus of the system.

  6. Energy curable compositions having improved cure speeds

    DOEpatents

    Halm, Leo W.

    1993-01-01

    A composition and method provide improved physical properties and cure speed of polyurethane precursors, with or without free radical polymerizable monomers or oligomers present, by use of a two component catalyst system. The resin blend can be activated with a latent organometallic catalyst combined with an organic peroxide which can be a hydroperoxide or an acyl peroxide to decrease the cure time while increasing the break energy and tangent modulus of the system.

  7. New advanced shotcrete admixtures: Internal curing

    SciTech Connect

    Melbye, T.A.

    1995-12-31

    Tunnels and other underground construction projects have one of the worst curing conditions due to the ventilation that blows continuously dry (cold or hot) air into the tunnel. It can be compared with concrete exposed to a windy area. One would think that tunnels have ideal curing conditions with high humidity (water leakage), no wind and no sun exposure. However, this is not the case. MBT has developed a new system for more efficient and secure curing of wet shotcrete, repair mortars as well as concrete. Internal curing means that a special admixture is added to the concrete/mortar during batching as a normal admixture. This admixture produces an internal barrier in the shotcrete/concrete which secures safer hydration and better chemical resistance than the application of conventional curing agents. The benefits resulting from the new technology are impressive: The time consuming application and, in the case of various shotcrete layers, removal of curing agents are no longer necessary; curing is guaranteed from the very beginning of hydration; and there is no negative influence on bonding between layers. As a consequence of th is optimum curing effect, all other shotcrete characteristics are improved: density, final strengths, freeze/thaw and chemical resistances, watertightness, less cracking and shrinkage. In addition, MEYCO TCC 735 also improves pumpability and workability of shotcrete, even with low-grade aggregates. It particularly improves the pumpability of steel fiber reinforced shotcrete mixes. In combination with the MEYCO TCC system it contrives to even increase the beneficial effects of the slump killing system by further improving fiber orientation, reducing fiber rebound and thus raising toughness values.

  8. The cure of cancer: a European perspective.

    PubMed

    Francisci, Silvia; Capocaccia, Riccardo; Grande, Enrico; Santaquilani, Mariano; Simonetti, Arianna; Allemani, Claudia; Gatta, Gemma; Sant, Milena; Zigon, Giulia; Bray, Freddie; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska

    2009-04-01

    Cancer survival analyses based on cancer registry data do not provide direct information on the main aim of cancer treatment, the cure of the patient. In fact, classic survival indicators do not distinguish between patients who are cured, and patients who will die of their disease and in whom prolongation of survival is the main objective of treatment. In this study, we applied parametric cure models to the cancer incidence and follow-up data provided by 49 EUROCARE-4 (European Cancer Registry-based study, fourth edition) cancer registries, with the aims of providing additional insights into the survival of European cancer patients diagnosed from 1988 to 1999, and of investigating between-population differences. Between-country estimates the proportion of cured patients varied from about 4-13% for lung cancer, from 9% to 30% for stomach cancer, from 25% to 49% for colon and rectum cancer, and from 55% to 73% for breast cancer. For all cancers combined, estimates varied between 21% and 47% in men, and 38% and 59% in women and were influenced by the distribution of cases by cancer site. Countries with high proportions of cured and long fatal case survival times for all cancers combined were characterised by generally favourable case mix. For the European pool of cases both the proportion of cured and the survival time of fatal cases were associated with age, and increased from the early to the latest diagnosis period. The increases over time in the proportions of Europeans estimated cured of lung, stomach and colon and rectum cancers are noteworthy and suggest genuine progress in cancer control. The proportion of cured of all cancers combined is a useful general indicator of cancer control as it reflects progress in diagnosis and treatment, as well as success in the prevention of rapidly fatal cancers.

  9. Tracking Polymer Cure Via Embedded Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, David L.; Davidson, T. Fred

    1993-01-01

    Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy applied in interior of specimen of material by bringing infrared light through specimen in optical fiber. Light interacts with material via evanescent-wave effect. Spectra obtained in this way at various times during curing process also combined with data from ultrasonic, thermographic, and dielectric-impedance monitoring, and other measurement techniques to obtain more complete characterization of progress of curing process.

  10. Juxta CURES: compression for healing venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Lisa

    2013-09-01

    Clinicians are expected to show improved healing rates, reduction in recurrence rates and to demonstrate greater patient satisfaction. All patients should rightly expect a high standard of holistic care that supports both their physical and emotional needs. Keeping the patient engaged in the "healing process" has many beneficial outcomes, not least to their emotional wellbeing. Managing to heal the wounds within a realistic timeframe is the required outcome for all parties. This article demonstrates how a new compression device, Juxta CURES, has a positive impact on patients' quality of life, also benefiting the clinician while maintaining cost-saving efficiencies.

  11. Independent dispute resolution process: no cure for the rate issue.

    PubMed

    Fedor, Frank P

    2007-05-01

    California's pilot independent dispute resolution process to resolve underpayments of noncontracted emergency services went into effect on Feb. 1. Unfortunately, it is a nonstarter for hospitals because it cannot establish the legal precedent that will settle how such services should be valued.

  12. High Power UV LED Industrial Curing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karlicek, Robert, F., Jr; Sargent, Robert

    2012-05-14

    UV curing is a green technology that is largely underutilized because UV radiation sources like Hg Lamps are unreliable and difficult to use. High Power UV LEDs are now efficient enough to replace Hg Lamps, and offer significantly improved performance relative to Hg Lamps. In this study, a modular, scalable high power UV LED curing system was designed and tested, performing well in industrial coating evaluations. In order to achieve mechanical form factors similar to commercial Hg Lamp systems, a new patent pending design was employed enabling high irradiance at long working distances. While high power UV LEDs are currently only available at longer UVA wavelengths, rapid progress on UVC LEDs and the development of new formulations designed specifically for use with UV LED sources will converge to drive more rapid adoption of UV curing technology. An assessment of the environmental impact of replacing Hg Lamp systems with UV LED systems was performed. Since UV curing is used in only a small portion of the industrial printing, painting and coating markets, the ease of use of UV LED systems should increase the use of UV curing technology. Even a small penetration of the significant number of industrial applications still using oven curing and drying will lead to significant reductions in energy consumption and reductions in the emission of green house gases and solvent emissions.

  13. Cure fraction estimation from the mixture cure models for grouped survival data.

    PubMed

    Yu, Binbing; Tiwari, Ram C; Cronin, Kathleen A; Feuer, Eric J

    2004-06-15

    Mixture cure models are usually used to model failure time data with long-term survivors. These models have been applied to grouped survival data. The models provide simultaneous estimates of the proportion of the patients cured from disease and the distribution of the survival times for uncured patients (latency distribution). However, a crucial issue with mixture cure models is the identifiability of the cure fraction and parameters of kernel distribution. Cure fraction estimates can be quite sensitive to the choice of latency distributions and length of follow-up time. In this paper, sensitivity of parameter estimates under semi-parametric model and several most commonly used parametric models, namely lognormal, loglogistic, Weibull and generalized Gamma distributions, is explored. The cure fraction estimates from the model with generalized Gamma distribution is found to be quite robust. A simulation study was carried out to examine the effect of follow-up time and latency distribution specification on cure fraction estimation. The cure models with generalized Gamma latency distribution are applied to the population-based survival data for several cancer sites from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program. Several cautions on the general use of cure model are advised.

  14. Efficient composite fabrication using electron-beam rapidly cured polymers engineered for several manufacturing processes

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, T.C.; Crivello, J.V.

    1995-10-01

    Low cost, efficiently processed ultra high specific strength and stiffness graphite fiber reinforced polymeric composite materials are of great interest to commercial transportation, construction and aerospace industries for use in various components with enhanced degrees of weight reduction, corrosion/erosion resistance and fatigue resistance. 10 MeV Electron Beam cure processing has been found to increase the cure rate by an order of magnitude over thermally cured systems yet provide less molded in stresses and high T{sub g}s. However, a limited range of resins are available which are easily processed with low shrinkage and with performance properties equal or exceeding those of state of the art toughened epoxies and BMI`s. The technology, introduced by an academia-industry partnership sparked by Langley Research Center utilizes a cost effective, rapid curing polymeric composite processing technique which effectively reduces the need for expensive tooling and energy inefficient autoclave processing and can cure the laminate in seconds (compared to hours for thermal curing) in ambient or sub-ambient conditions. The process is based on electron beam (E-Beam) curing of a new series of (65 to 1,000,000 cPs.) specially formulated resins that have been shown to exhibit excellent mechanical and physical properties once cured. Fabrication processes utilizing these specially formulated and newly commercialized resins, (e.g. including Vacuum Assist Resin Transfer molding (VARTM), vacuum bag prepreg layup, pultrusion and filament winding grades) are engineered to cure with low shrinkage, provide excellent mechanical properties, be processed solventless (environmentally friendly) and are inherently non toxic.

  15. Comparative depths of cure among various curing light types and methods.

    PubMed

    Soh, M S; Yap, Adrian U J; Siow, K S

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the depth of cure associated with commercial LEDs (light-emitting diodes) (Elipar FreeLight [FL], 3M-ESPE; GC e-Light [EL], GC), high intensity (Elipar TriLight [TL], 3M-ESPE) and very high intensity (Astralis 10 [AS], Ivoclar Vivadent) Quartz Tungsten Halogen (QTH) curing lights. Depth of cure of the various lights/curing modes were compared to a conventional QTH light (Max [Mx], Dentsply-Caulk). Ten exposure regimens were investigated: FL1 - 400 mW/cm2 [40 seconds]; FL2 - 0-400 mW/cm2 [12 seconds] --> 400 mW/cm2 [28 seconds]; EL1 - 750 mW/cm2 [10 pulses x 2 seconds], EL2 - 350 mW/cm2 [40 seconds]; EL3 - 600 mW/cm2 [20 seconds]; EL4 - 0 - 600 mW/cm2 [20 seconds] --> 600 mW/cm2 [20 seconds]; TL1 - 800 mW/cm2 [40 seconds]; TL2 - 100- 800 mW/cm2 [15 seconds] --> 800 mW/cm2 [25 seconds]; AS1 - 1200 mW/cm2 [10 seconds]; MX - 400 mW/cm2 [40 seconds]. Depth of cure was determined by penetration, scraping and microhardness techniques. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA/Scheffe's post-hoc test and Pearson's correlation at significance level 0.05 and 0.01, respectively. All light curing regimens met the ISO depth of cure requirement of 1.5 mm with the exception of EL1-EL3 with the microhardness technique. Curing with most modes of EL resulted in significantly lower depths of cure than the control [MX]. No significant difference in depth of cure was observed among the control and the two modes of FL. Curing with TL1 resulted in significantly greater depth of cure compared to MX with all testing techniques. No significant difference in depth of cure was observed between the control and AS1 for all testing techniques except for the penetration technique. The depth of composite cure is light unit and exposure mode dependent. Scraping and penetration techniques were found to correlate well but tend to overestimate depth of cure compared to microhardness.

  16. Application of acid-treated yeast cell wall (AYC) as a pharmaceutical additive. II: effects of curing on the medicine release from AYC-coated tablets.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, H; Kaneshige, J; Ozeki, T; Kasai, T; Eguchi, T; Ishiwaki, N

    2000-11-19

    Acid-treated yeast cell wall (AYC) was newly prepared by acidifying brewers' yeast cell wall. Core tablets containing 3% of acetaminophen (AAP) were coated with the AYC aqueous dispersion containing 5% (w/v) of AYC and 0.35% (w/v) of glycerol. The curing of AYC-coated tablets was performed at various curing periods of time and temperatures. The effects of curing on AAP release from AYC-coated tablets, the weight and thickness of the coated layer of AYC and the water sorption into the AYC-coated tablets were studied. The tensile strength and pore size distribution of the AYC cast film were measured. In the case of 60, 80, or 100 degrees C curing, AAP release from AYC-coated tablets showed a sigmoidal release profile with an initial lag time. The duration of the lag time increased with the increasing curing time and temperature, though the release rate after the lag time hardly changed. At 120 degrees C curing, the release rate after the lag time decreased with the increasing curing time and a sustained release was observed. The weight and thickness of the AYC-coated layer and the water sorption rate into AYC-coated tablets decreased with the increasing curing time and temperature. The tensile strength of the AYC cast film increased with increasing the curing temperature, particularly at 120 degrees C curing. It is considered that the water was evaporated from the AYC-coated layer and the adhesion force between AYC particles increased during curing, making the structure of the AYC-coated layer densely firm. The changes in the duration of lag time and the release rate may be due to changes in the structure of the AYC-coated layer caused by curing. These results show that it is feasible to control the lag time and the release rate of AAP from AYC-coated tablets by varying the curing time and temperature.

  17. 7 CFR 29.3502 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3502 Section 29.3502 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign Type 95) § 29.3502 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions without the use...

  18. 7 CFR 29.3502 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3502 Section 29.3502 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign Type 95) § 29.3502 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions without the use...

  19. 7 CFR 29.3502 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3502 Section 29.3502 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign Type 95) § 29.3502 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions without the use...

  20. 7 CFR 29.3002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3002 Section 29.3002 Agriculture... Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions. Artificial heat is sometimes used to control excess humidity during the curing period to prevent house-burn and barn-burn in damp weather....

  1. 7 CFR 29.3002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3002 Section 29.3002 Agriculture... Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions. Artificial heat is sometimes used to control excess humidity during the curing period to prevent house-burn and barn-burn in damp weather....

  2. 7 CFR 29.3502 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3502 Section 29.3502 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign Type 95) § 29.3502 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions without the use...

  3. 7 CFR 29.3002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3002 Section 29.3002 Agriculture... Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions. Artificial heat is sometimes used to control excess humidity during the curing period to prevent house-burn and barn-burn in damp weather....

  4. 7 CFR 29.3002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3002 Section 29.3002 Agriculture... Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions. Artificial heat is sometimes used to control excess humidity during the curing period to prevent house-burn and barn-burn in damp weather....

  5. 7 CFR 29.2269 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2269 Section 29.2269 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2269 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires from which...

  6. 7 CFR 29.2269 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2269 Section 29.2269 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2269 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires from which...

  7. 7 CFR 29.2269 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2269 Section 29.2269 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2269 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires from which...

  8. 7 CFR 29.2269 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2269 Section 29.2269 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2269 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires from which...

  9. 7 CFR 29.2269 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2269 Section 29.2269 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2269 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires from which...

  10. 7 CFR 29.3502 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3502 Section 29.3502 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign Type 95) § 29.3502 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions without the use...

  11. 7 CFR 29.3002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3002 Section 29.3002 Agriculture... Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions. Artificial heat is sometimes used to control excess humidity during the curing period to prevent house-burn and barn-burn in damp weather....

  12. 7 CFR 29.6002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.6002 Section 29.6002 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6002 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions..., pole-burn, and shed-burn in damp weather. Air-cured tobacco should not carry the odor of smoke or...

  13. DSC and curing kinetics study of epoxy grouting diluted with furfural -acetone slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, H.; Sun, D. W.; Li, B.; Liu, Y. T.; Ran, Q. P.; Liu, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The use of furfural-acetone slurry as active diluents of Bisphenol-A epoxy resin (DGEBA) groutings has been studied by dynamic and non-isothermal DSC for the first time. Curing kinetics study was investigated by non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetries at different heating rates. Activation enery (Ea) was calculated based on Kissinger and Ozawa Methods, and the results showed that Ea increased from 58.87 to 71.13KJ/mol after the diluents were added. The furfural-acetone epoxy matrix could cure completely at the theoretical curing temperature of 365.8K and the curing time of 139mins, which were determined by the kinetic model parameters.

  14. A Class of Semiparametric Mixture Cure Survival Models with Dependent Censoring

    PubMed Central

    Othus, Megan; Li, Yi; Tiwari, Ram C.

    2010-01-01

    Modern cancer treatments have substantially improved cure rates and have generated a great interest in and need for proper statistical tools to analyze survival data with non-negligible cure fractions. Data with cure fractions are often complicated by dependent censoring, and the analysis of this type of data typically involves untestable parametric assumptions on the dependence of the censoring mechanism and the true survival times. Motivated by the analysis of prostate cancer survival trends, we propose a class of semiparametric transformation cure models that allows for dependent censoring without making parametric assumptions on the dependence relationship. The proposed class of models encompasses a number of common models for the latency survival function, including the proportional hazards model and the proportional odds model, and also allows for time-dependent covariates. An inverse censoring probability reweighting scheme is used to derive unbiased estimating equations. We validate small sample properties with simulations and demonstrate the method with a data application. PMID:20706564

  15. [Quantification of the curing effects of phenanthridine on yeast prion [PSI+

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhengwei; Wang, Lijie; Xie, Hui; Li, Hui; He, Jianwei; Song, Youtao

    2012-06-01

    In order to quantify the curing effects of phenanthridine on yeast prion, we introduced semi-denaturing agarose gel electrophoresis and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching techniques to quantify the curing effects of phenanthridine on yeast prion at the protein and cellular levels with the [PSI+] yeast strain expressing GFP-Sup35p (NGMC). The results showed that these two approaches could precisely quantify the curing effects of phenanthridine on [PSI+] cells. After a treatment for 1 through 5 days with phenanthridine, the curing rates of [PSI+] cells were 0%, 0%, 51.7%, 87.5% and 94.4%, respectively. Meanwhile, we quantified the sizes of Sup35p polymers in phenanthridine induced pink phenotype cells. The aggregation status in 1-2 days phenanthridine treated cells were similar to those in [PSI+] cells, while the aggregation status in 3-5 days phenanthridine treated cells were similar to those in [psi(-)] cells. PMID:23016310

  16. Influence of curing temperature on cement hydration and mechanical strength development of fly ash mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Maltais, Y.; Marchand, J.

    1997-07-01

    The influence of fly ash and curing temperature on cement hydration and compressive strength development of mortars was investigated. Test parameters included type of fly ash (two different Class F fly ashes were tested), the level of cement replacement (10, 20 and 30% by mass), and curing temperature (20 C and 40 C). The mortar physical and microstructural properties were determined by means of thermal analyses, compressive strength measurements and SEM observations. Test results confirm that fly ash tends to increase significantly the rate of cement hydration at early age. Data also demonstrate that an elevation of the curing temperature reduces the long-term compressive strength of the reference mortar mixture. In contrast, an increase of the curing temperature seems to have no detrimental effect on the long-term compressive strength of the fly ash mixtures.

  17. Characterization of cure in model photocrosslinking acrylate systems: Relationships among tensile properties, Tg and ultraviolet dose

    SciTech Connect

    Rakas, M.A.

    1996-10-01

    The extent of cure of a thermosetting polymer is governed largely by polymerization kinetics and the difference between the polymerization temperature and the material`s ultimate glass transition temperature (Tg). For prepolymers which cure when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, other factors which strongly determine the extent of cure are the UV intensity and exposure time, and the interrelationship between the optical absorbance of the photoinitiator (PI) and the rate of formation of excited state PI radicals. Beers` Law can be used to understand the relationship between the PI`s molar absorptivity, its concentration, and adhesive film thickness. Many adhesives users are more concerned with bulk properties such as tensile modulus and Tg rather than a numerical measurement of degree of cure. Therefore, this research employed model acrylate formulations and determined changes in tensile properties and Tg as a function of film thickness and UV dose. These results enabled correlation of bulk and photoinitiator properties.

  18. Effect of curing agent and temperature on the rheological behavior of epoxy resin systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chenhui; Zhang, Guangcheng; Zhao, Lei

    2012-01-01

    The effect of curing agent (6610) content and temperature on the rheological behavior of the epoxy resin CYD-128 was studied by DSC analysis and viscosity experiments. The results show that the resin system meets the requirements of processing technology. A complete reaction occurs when the curing agent content (40 parts per hundred resin, phr) is a little higher than the theoretical value (33.33 phr), while the degree of reaction of the resin system is reduced when the curing agent content is lower (25.00 phr) than theoretical value. However, excessive curing agent (50.00 phr) results in a lower reaction rate. Curing agent content has little influence on gel time when curing agent content exceeded 33.33 phr and the temperature was less than 70 °C. The isothermal viscosity-time curves shift towards the -x axis when the temperature rises from 50 °C to 80 °C. Meanwhile, higher temperature results in higher reaction rates.

  19. The cure for colon cancer: results from the EUROCARE study.

    PubMed

    Verdecchia, A; De Angelis, R; Capocaccia, R; Sant, M; Micheli, A; Gatta, G; Berrino, F

    1998-07-29

    The interpretation of time trends and geographical differences of population-based survival rates is generally not easy, due to the difficulty in disentangling the effects of observational biases, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and their interactions. Whereas descriptive analysis of relative survival is generally based on survival levels estimated at fixed time since diagnosis, interpretation issues can take advantage from the analysis of the shape of the considered relative survival. Parametric survival models allowing the estimation of the fraction of cured patients are applied here to analyze and discuss the differences in colon cancer relative survival between European countries, according to age and period of diagnosis. The survival curves of colon cancer patients are described according to 2 parameters: the proportion of cured patients and the mean survival time of fatal cases. These parameters are estimated by least square nonlinear regression of relative survival values derived from the EUROCARE Project publication. Exponential and Weibull survival functions are used to model the relative survival curve for the fraction of fatal cases. The Weibull model gives generally a better fit with respect to the exponential model, thus indicating that the mortality rate for fatal cases is decreasing with time since diagnosis. For the youngest patients, however, the 2 survival functions give practically overlapping estimates. The overall proportion of colon cancer patients in Europe that are estimated to be cured was 38.6%. This proportion increased from 36% to 40% for patients diagnosed in 1978-1980 and in 1983-1985, respectively. Accordingly, mean survival time of fatal cases increased from 1.18 to 1.52 years. According to age, the proportion of cured patients present a marked decrease from young (48.4% at age 15-44 years) to middle-aged patients (38.6% at age 5564 years) and only a mild decrease from these to the oldest patients (34.4% at age 75 or more). The

  20. Evaluation of heat-cured resin bases following the addition of denture teeth using a second heat cure.

    PubMed

    Polukoshko, K M; Brudvik, J S; Nicholls, J I; Smith, D E

    1992-04-01

    This study compared heat-cured acrylic resin denture baseplate distortions following a second heat cure used to add the denture teeth. The second heat cure was done with three different water-bath curing temperatures. The distortions were evaluated in three planes by use of a measuring microscope. Recorded distortions were not clinically significant.

  1. Infrared curing simulations of liquid composites molding

    SciTech Connect

    Nakouzi, S.; Pancrace, J.; Schmidt, F. M.; Le Maoult, Y.; Berthet, F.

    2011-05-04

    Infrared radiation is an effective energy source to cure thermosetting polymers. Its usage is expected to reduce curing time in comparison with thermal heating and mold thermally regulated. In addition, because of the polymerization mechanism and instant on-off control of this power, an improvement in the final properties of the material is also expected. In this paper, we studied the infrared interaction with carbon (or glass) fibers reinforced epoxy matrix, where Liquid resin infusion (LRI) is used to manufacture the composite. Temperature of the composite is a key parameter that affects its mechanical properties and is controlled by the infrared emitters and the exothermic heat released from the polymerization. Radiative heat flux is computed using the in-lab developed software RAYHEAT. Then, the heat flux (or absorbed energy for glass fibers) is exported to the finite element based program COMSOLMULTIPHYSICS where heat balance equation is solved. This equation is coupled with the exothermic heat released during the curing process in order to predict the composite temperature versus time and degree of cure. Numerical simulations will be performed on planar parts (sheet shape) as well as curvilinear shapes. Experimental validations of the infrared curing carbon (glass)-epoxy composite system are presented in this paper Sheet surface temperature distribution are measured thanks to infrared camera. Kinetic parameters were estimated from differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) experimental data.

  2. Integrative physicians and an herbal cancer "cure".

    PubMed

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Rosenberg, Shoshana Keren; Samuels, Noah

    2016-08-01

    Oncologists are frequently asked about herbal remedies claiming to "cure" cancer, or at least delay its progression. While complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) should be aimed primarily at improving quality-of-life (QOL) related concerns, "wonder cures" are part of an alternative health belief model providing hope for a "miracle" where conventional treatment has failed. We describe a physician with extensive small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) undergoing chemotherapy, with significant toxicities and impaired daily function. He had come for an integrative physician (IP) consultation, provided by a medical doctor dually trained in CIM and supportive cancer care, taking place in a conventional supportive cancer care service. We describe the IP consultation in general and regarding an herbal remedy which was being promoted as a "cure" for cancer. The subsequent patient-tailored CIM treatment process, in which patients receive evidence-based guidance on treatments which address QOL-related concerns, are presented. PMID:27652207

  3. Cure-in-place process for seals

    DOEpatents

    Hirasuna, Alan R.

    1981-01-01

    A cure-in-place process which allows a rubber seal element to be deformed to its service configuration before it is cross-linked and, hence, is a plastic and does not build up internal stress as a result of the deformation. This provides maximum residual strength to resist the differential pressure. Furthermore, the process allows use of high modulus formulations of the rubber seal element which would otherwise crack if cured and then deformed to its service configuration, resulting in a seal which has better gap bridging capability. Basically, the process involves positioning an uncured seal element in place, deforming it to its service configuration, heating the seal element, curing it in place, and then fully seating the seal.

  4. Adhesive curing through low-voltage activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Jianfeng; Gao, Feng; Chen, Jian Lin; Webster, Richard D.; Steele, Terry W. J.

    2015-08-01

    Instant curing adhesives typically fall within three categories, being activated by either light (photocuring), heat (thermocuring) or chemical means. These curing strategies limit applications to specific substrates and can only be activated under certain conditions. Here we present the development of an instant curing adhesive through low-voltage activation. The electrocuring adhesive is synthesized by grafting carbene precursors on polyamidoamine dendrimers and dissolving in aqueous solvents to form viscous gels. The electrocuring adhesives are activated at -2 V versus Ag/AgCl, allowing tunable crosslinking within the dendrimer matrix and on both electrode surfaces. As the applied voltage discontinued, crosslinking immediately terminated. Thus, crosslinking initiation and propagation are observed to be voltage and time dependent, enabling tuning of both material properties and adhesive strength. The electrocuring adhesive has immediate implications in manufacturing and development of implantable bioadhesives.

  5. Outdoor durability of radiation-cured coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, R.; Kennedy, R.

    1997-12-31

    Radiation cured coatings are used almost exclusively on products which have little or no exposure to moisture or the weather; inks, furniture varnishes, floor varnishes and coatings for electronic components. However there is considerable interest in being able to use this technology in exterior environments as a substitute for solvent-borne coatings. A 3-year study examining the possible reasons for the poor durability of radiation curable coatings showed that the resistance of the monomers and oligomers to hydrogen abstraction was crucially important, and the water permeability of the cured coating influenced the long-term adhesion performance. The project concluded that with the appropriate combination of curing technology and monomer/oligomer selection, the prospects of UV curable coatings for outdoor exposure are very encouraging.

  6. Adhesive curing through low-voltage activation

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Jianfeng; Gao, Feng; Chen, Jian Lin; Webster, Richard D.; Steele, Terry W. J.

    2015-01-01

    Instant curing adhesives typically fall within three categories, being activated by either light (photocuring), heat (thermocuring) or chemical means. These curing strategies limit applications to specific substrates and can only be activated under certain conditions. Here we present the development of an instant curing adhesive through low-voltage activation. The electrocuring adhesive is synthesized by grafting carbene precursors on polyamidoamine dendrimers and dissolving in aqueous solvents to form viscous gels. The electrocuring adhesives are activated at −2 V versus Ag/AgCl, allowing tunable crosslinking within the dendrimer matrix and on both electrode surfaces. As the applied voltage discontinued, crosslinking immediately terminated. Thus, crosslinking initiation and propagation are observed to be voltage and time dependent, enabling tuning of both material properties and adhesive strength. The electrocuring adhesive has immediate implications in manufacturing and development of implantable bioadhesives. PMID:26282730

  7. Integrative physicians and an herbal cancer "cure".

    PubMed

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Rosenberg, Shoshana Keren; Samuels, Noah

    2016-08-01

    Oncologists are frequently asked about herbal remedies claiming to "cure" cancer, or at least delay its progression. While complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) should be aimed primarily at improving quality-of-life (QOL) related concerns, "wonder cures" are part of an alternative health belief model providing hope for a "miracle" where conventional treatment has failed. We describe a physician with extensive small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) undergoing chemotherapy, with significant toxicities and impaired daily function. He had come for an integrative physician (IP) consultation, provided by a medical doctor dually trained in CIM and supportive cancer care, taking place in a conventional supportive cancer care service. We describe the IP consultation in general and regarding an herbal remedy which was being promoted as a "cure" for cancer. The subsequent patient-tailored CIM treatment process, in which patients receive evidence-based guidance on treatments which address QOL-related concerns, are presented.

  8. Lower-curing-temperature PMR polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    Studies were performed to achieve a lower-curing-temperature PMR polyimide. The use of m-aminostyrene as the end-cap instead of the monoalkyl ester of 5-normbornene-2,3 dicarboxylic acid was investigated in typical PMR formulations. Model compound studies were also performed. Differential scanning calorimetry studies were performed on model compounds and neat resins to establish their melting and curing characteristics. The elevated temperature weight loss characteristics of neat resins and graphite fiber composites were determined. The room temperature and short-time 260 C (500 F) mechanical properties of the composites were also determined. The use of m-aminostyrene end-caps reduced the final cure temperature of PMR resins by about 55 C (100 F), but the composites prepared with these resins are limited to use temperatures of about 260 C (500 F).

  9. Characterization of cure kinetics and physical properties of a high performance, glass fiber-reinforced epoxy prepreg and a novel fluorine-modified, amine-cured commercial epoxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilyeu, Bryan

    Kinetic equation parameters for the curing reaction of a commercial glass fiber reinforced high performance epoxy prepreg composed of the tetrafunctional epoxy tetraglycidyl 4,4-diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM), the tetrafunctional amine curing agent 4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulfone (DDS) and an ionic initiator/accelerator, are determined by various thermal analysis techniques and the results compared. The reaction is monitored by heat generated determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and by high speed DSC when the reaction rate is high. The changes in physical properties indicating increasing conversion are followed by shifts in glass transition temperature determined by DSC, temperature-modulated DSC (TMDSC), step scan DSC and high speed DSC, thermomechanical (TMA) and dynamic mechanical (DMA) analysis and thermally stimulated depolarization (TSD). Changes in viscosity, also indicative of degree of conversion, are monitored by DMA. Thermal stability as a function of degree of cure is monitored by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The parameters of the general kinetic equations, including activation energy and rate constant, are explained and used to compare results of various techniques. The utilities of the kinetic descriptions are demonstrated in the construction of a useful time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram and a continuous heating transformation (CHT) diagram for rapid determination of processing parameters in the processing of prepregs. Shrinkage due to both resin consolidation and fiber rearrangement is measured as the linear expansion of the piston on a quartz dilatometry cell using TMA. The shrinkage of prepregs was determined to depend on the curing temperature, pressure applied and the fiber orientation. Chemical modification of an epoxy was done by mixing a fluorinated aromatic amine (aniline) with a standard aliphatic amine as a curing agent for a commercial Diglycidylether of Bisphenol-A (DGEBA) epoxy. The resulting cured network

  10. Composite cure and pulp-cell cytotoxicity associated with LED curing lights.

    PubMed

    Yap, Adrian U J; Saw, T Y; Cao, T; Ng, Mary M L

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the cure and pulp-cell cytotoxicity of composites polymerized with light-emitting diode (LED) and halogen-based light curing units. A mini-filled resin composite (Tetric Ceram, Vivadent), two LED (E-light [EL], GC and Freelight [FL], 3M-ESPE), a conventional halogen (Max [MX], Dentsply) and a high-intensity halogen light (Astralis 10 [AS], Vivadent) were evaluated. Cure associated with the different lights was determined by measuring the top and bottom surface hardness (KHN; n = 5) of 2-mm thick specimens using a digital microhardness tester (load = 500 gf; dwell time = 15 seconds). Pulp-cell cytotoxicity was assessed using a direct contact method involving incisor tooth slices dissected from 28-day old Wistar rats maintained in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) and 1% agarose. The bottom surfaces of the cured composite specimens (7-mm diameter and 2-mm deep) were placed in contact with the openings of each tooth slice. After incubation in 5% CO2 atmosphere at 37 degrees C for 48 hours, the tooth slices were fixed, demineralized and processed for histological examination. Pulp fibroblasts and odontoblasts were counted histomorphometrically at 400x magnification within a 1500 microm2 area using a computerized micro-imaging system. Eighteen readings were obtained for each curing light. Data was subjected to ANOVA/Scheffe's test and Pearson's correlation at significance level 0.05 and 0.01, respectively. At the top surfaces, the cure with AS was significantly greater than the other curing lights, with MX and FL being significantly greater than EL. At the bottom surfaces, MX, AS and FL had significantly better cure than EL. Specimens cured with MX were less cytotoxic than those polymerized with other curing lights. Specimens cured with AS and EL were significantly less cytotoxic than FL. Composite cure and cytotoxicity associated with LED lights is device dependent. Composite cure was not correlated to pulp-cell cytotoxicity. The response of

  11. Providing a cure for beta thalassaemia major.

    PubMed

    Chan, L L; Lin, H P; Ariffn, W A; Ariffin, H

    2001-12-01

    The current treatment options for beta thalassaemia major patients include conservative treatment with blood cell transfusions and iron chelation or stem cell transplantation. Regular blood transfusions inevitably lead to multi-organ haemosiderosis and are attended by risks of blood-borne infections. Results from stem cell transplantation are good and suggest that this should be offered as first line therapy when a matched sibling donor is available because the patient is often cured and able to live a normal life. Of 38 Malaysian children who underwent bone marrow or cord blood transplantations using matched sibling donors, 29 (76%) are now cured.

  12. Prevent and cure disuse bone loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, Webster S. S.

    1994-01-01

    Anabolic agents like parathyroid hormone and postagladin E-like substances were studied in dogs and rats to determine their effectiveness in the prevention and cure of bone loss due to immobilization. It was determined that postagladin E2 administration prevented immobilization while at the same time it added extra bone in a dose responsive manner. Although bone mass returns, poor trabecular architecture remains after normal ambulation recovery from immobilization. Disuse related bone loss and poor trabecular architecture were cured by post-immobilization postagladin E2 treatment.

  13. The Effect of Curing Temperature on the Fracture Toughness of Fiberglass Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas J.

    The curing reaction in a thermoset polymer matrix composite is often accelerated by the addition of heat in an oven or autoclave. The heat added increases the rate of the polymerization reaction and cross-linking in the material. The cure cycle used (temperature, pressure and time) can therefore alter the final material properties. This research focuses on how the curing temperature (250, 275, 300 °F) affects the yield strength and the mode I interlaminar fracture toughness, GI, of a unidirectional S-2 glass epoxy composite. The test method that was used for the tension test was ASTM D3039 and the test method for the mode I interlaminar fracture toughness, the double cantilever beam (DCB) test, was ASTM D5528. The DCB specimens were fabricated with a non-adhesive insert at the midplane of the composite that serves as the initiatior of the delamination. Opening forces were then applied to the specimen, causing the crack propagation. The results show that increasing the cure temperature by 50 °F increased the tensile strength by 10% (86.54 - 94.73 ksi) and decreased the fracture toughness 20% (506.23 - 381.31 J/m 2). Thus, the curing temperature can cause a trade-off between these two properties, which means that the curing cycle will need to be altered based on the intended use and the required material properties.

  14. About the cure kinetics in natural rubber/styrene Butadiene rubber blends at 433 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansilla, M. A.; Marzocca, A. J.

    2012-08-01

    Vulcanized blends of elastomers are employed in several goods mainly to improve physical properties and reduce costs. One of the most used blends of this kind is that composed by natural rubber (NR) and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR). The cure kinetic of these blends depends mainly on the compound formulation and the cure temperature and time. The preparation method of the blends can influence the mechanical properties of the vulcanized compounds. In this work the cure kinetic at 433 K of NR/SBR blends vulcanized with the system sulfur/TBBS (N-t-butyl-2-benzothiazole sulfenamide) is analyzed in samples prepared by mechanical mixing and solution blending. The two methods produce elastomer domains of NR and SBR, which present different microstructure due to the cure level attained during vulcanization. The cure kinetics is studied by means of rheometer tests and the model proposed by Kamal and Sourour. The analysis of the cure rate is presented and is related to the structure obtained during the vulcanization process.

  15. Curing kinetics of visible light curing dental resin composites investigated by dielectric analysis (DEA).

    PubMed

    Steinhaus, Johannes; Hausnerova, Berenika; Haenel, Thomas; Großgarten, Mandy; Möginger, Bernhard

    2014-03-01

    During the curing process of light curing dental composites the mobility of molecules and molecule segments is reduced leading to a significant increase of the viscosity as well as the ion viscosity. Thus, the kinetics of the curing behavior of 6 different composites was derived from dielectric analysis (DEA) using especially redesigned flat sensors with interdigit comb electrodes allowing for irradiation at the top side and measuring the ion viscosity at the bottom side. As the ion viscosities of dental composites change 1-3 orders of magnitude during the curing process, DEA provides a sensitive approach to evaluate their curing behavior, especially in the phase of undisturbed chain growth. In order to determine quantitative kinetic parameters a kinetic model is presented and examined for the evaluation of the ion viscosity curves. From the obtained results it is seen that DEA might be employed in the investigation of the primary curing process, the quality assurance of ingredients as well as the control of processing stability of the light curing dental composites.

  16. In-situ fiber optic sensor for composite cure monitoring through characterization of resin viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Russell G.; Claus, Richard O.

    1996-11-01

    The curing of thermoset resins is a critical step in the manufacturing of thermoset polymer matrix composites, determining the ultimate mechanical properties of the material, and accounting for a significant fraction of the cost of manufacturing. The use of in-situ cure monitors will permit adaptive control of the cure process, thereby lowering energy costs, reducing scrap rate, and optimizing mechanical properties. We describe here the design and demonstration of an embeddable fiber optic sensor to measure the degree of cure of thermoset resins through characterization of the changing viscoelasticity of a curing resin. By coupling a miniature actuator to a fiber optic strain sensor, the assembly can be made to vibrate while immersed in a curing resin. Comparison of the phase of the electrical actuation to the phase of the resulting strain in the sensor permits a measure of the loss tangent of the resin, where the loss tangent is the ratio of the loss modulus to the storage modulus. As the crosslinking of the resin proceeds, the loss tangent also changes, reflecting the changing rheology of the resin. The loss tangent is found to attain a maximum at the gel point of the resin, when a polymer network is formed. Further crosslinking may be tracked as the loss tangent decreases following gelation. After complete cure of the epoxy, the fiber optic sensor functions as a conventional optical strain sensor, permitting in-service strains in the composite part to be measured. Preliminary experimental results are presented here, which demonstrate that by combining a magnetostrictive actuator with a fiber optic strain sensor, the rheology of a curing thermoset resin may be monitored by measuring the changing loss tangent of the resin.

  17. Light-Cured Self-Etch Adhesives Undergo Hydroxyapatite-Triggered Self-Cure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Bai, X; Liu, Y W; Wang, Y

    2016-03-01

    Light cure is a popular mode of curing for dental adhesives. However, it suffers from inadequate light delivery when the restoration site is less accessible, in which case a self-cure mechanism is desirable to salvage any compromised polymerization. We previously reported a novel self-cure system mediated by ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)-benzoate (4E) and hydroxyapatite (HAp). The present work aims to investigate if such self-cure phenomenon takes place in adhesives that underwent prior inadequate light cure and to elucidate if HAp released from the dental etching process is sufficient to trigger it. Model self-etch adhesives were formulated with various components, including bis[2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-phosphate (2MP) as acidic monomer and trimethylbenzoyl-diphenylphosphine oxide (TPO) as photoinitiator. In vitro evolution of degree of conversion (DC) of HAp-incorporated adhesives was monitored by infrared spectroscopy during light irradiation and dark storage. Selected adhesives were allowed to etch and extract HAp from enamel, light-cured in situ, and stored in the dark, after which Raman line mapping was used to obtain spatially resolved DC across the enamel-resin interface. Results showed that TPO+4E adhesives reached DC similar to TPO-only counterparts upon completion of light irradiation but underwent another round of initiation that boosted DC to ~100% regardless of HAp level or prior light exposure. When applied to enamel, TPO-only adhesives had ~80% DC in resin, which gradually descended to ~50% in enamel, whereas TPO+4E adhesives consistently scored ~80% DC across the enamel-resin interface. These observations suggest that polymerization of adhesives that underwent insufficient light cure is salvaged by the novel self-cure mechanism, and such salvaging effect can be triggered by HAp released from dental substrate during the etching process.

  18. Healing livers, saving lives: Hepatitis C screening in an era of cure.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Courtney M; Walsh, Anne; Forest, Christopher P

    2016-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis C affects more than 3 million people in the United States. In the past, drug therapy with interferon and ribavirin resulted in low overall cure rates and early discontinuation due to adverse reactions. The new direct-acting antivirals offer not only a shorter duration of treatment with fewer adverse reactions, but greatly improved overall cure rates as high as 96%. Updated national screening recommendations (including a one-time screening for patients born between 1945 and 1965), combined with timely referral and treatment, offer a prime opportunity for healthcare providers to improve public health outcomes and reduce healthcare costs. PMID:27049400

  19. Adhesive curing options for photonic packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Steven C.; Hubert, Manfred; Tam, Robin

    2002-06-01

    Varying the intensity of illumination used to cure photoactivated adhesives has been applied in medical and dental applications to improve the performance of polymer materials. For example, it has been observed that dental polymer composite materials express reduced shrinkage, important for durability of non-amalgam restorations, by introducing a phased time-intensity cure schedule. This work identified that curing conditions could influence the final properties of materials, and suggested the possibility of extending the characteristics that could be influenced beyond shrinkage to humidity resistance, Tg, outgassing and other important material properties. Obviously, these results have important ramifications for the photonic industry, with current efforts focused on improved manufacturing techniques. Improvement in low cost packaging solutions, including adhesives, will have to be made to bring the component cost down to address the needs of Metro and similar markets. However, there are perceived problems with the widespread use of adhesives, the most prevalent of these involving long term durability of the bond. Devices are typically aligned to sub-micron precision using active feedback and then must be locked in position to maintain performance. In contrast to traditional fastening methods, adhesive bonding is a highly attractive option due to the ease of deployment, lower equipment costs, and improved flexibility. Moreover, using methods analogous to those employed in dental applications, materials properties of photonic adhesives may be tailored using a programmed cure approach.

  20. Campus Violence: Kinds, Causes, and Cures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Leighton C., Ed.; Pollard, Jeffrey W., Ed.

    This volume offers 14 papers on the types, sources, and possible cures of violence on college campuses from prominent workers in higher education. Following a preface the titles are: (1) "Conceptualizing Campus Violence: Definitions, Underlying Factors, and Effects" by Mary L. Roark; (2) "Administrative Perspectives on Disruptive Student Conduct"…

  1. 7 CFR 30.10 - Cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cure. 30.10 Section 30.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.10...

  2. 7 CFR 30.10 - Cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.10 Cure... done under such conditions as will permit of the chemical and physiological changes necessary to develop the desired quality of color in tobacco....

  3. 7 CFR 30.10 - Cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.10 Cure... done under such conditions as will permit of the chemical and physiological changes necessary to develop the desired quality of color in tobacco....

  4. 7 CFR 30.10 - Cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.10 Cure... done under such conditions as will permit of the chemical and physiological changes necessary to develop the desired quality of color in tobacco....

  5. Heat-cured silicone bimaxillary mouthguard.

    PubMed

    Milward, P J; Jagger, R G

    1995-10-01

    A laboratory procedure for the construction of a heat-cured, silicone, custom-made bimaxillary mouthguard for contact sports is described. Contours and vertical dimension are easier to control than with the conventional thermoformed product, and there is no danger of injury from contact between the maxillary and mandibular components.

  6. Cationic cure kinetics of a polyoxometalate loaded epoxy nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Benjamin J.

    2012-08-06

    The reaction cure kinetics of a novel polyoxometalate (POM) loaded epoxy nanocomposite is described. The POM is dispersed in the epoxy resin up to volume fractions of 0.1. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements show the cure of the epoxy resin to be sensitive to the POM loading. A kinetics study of the cure exotherm confirms that POM acts as a catalyst promoting cationic homopolymerization of the epoxy resin. The cure reaction is shown to propagate through two cure regimes. A fast cure at short time is shown to be propagation by the activated chain end (ACE) mechanism. A slow cure at long time is shown to be propagation by the activated monomer (AM) mechanism. The activation energies for the fast and slow cure regimes agree well with other epoxy based systems that have been confirmed to propagate by the ACE and AM mechanisms.

  7. Curing chemistry of phenylethynyl-terminated imide oligomers: Model compounds, carbon-13 labeling and cure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Christopher Chad

    1998-11-01

    Phenylethynyl-terminated imide oligomers (PETI) are currently considered the state-of-the-art high performance resins for aerospace applications. The processing of these resins is more facile because of their low molecular weight, but PETI's cure to form a tough, solvent-resistant material. However, the final cure structure was a complete mystery. Hence, the present study was set forth with three essential goals. The determination of the final structure of the crosslinked polymer is of obvious importance. Second, the crosslinking mechanism and controlling factors is also of interest. Lastly, the final structure of the crosslinked polymers was correlated with mechanical and thermal properties, thereby helping to establish the structure-processing-properties relationships for PETI resins. These goals were accomplished by using a combination of synthesis of model compounds synthesis and proposed cure products, sp{13}C labeling of the ethynyl endgroup in PETI's, monitoring of the thermal cure using solid state sp{13}C NMR and ESR and molecular modeling techniques. Phenylethynyl endcapping agents, 4-(phenylethynyl)phthalic anhydride (PEPA) and 3-(phenylethynyl)aniline (3PEA), were synthesized via the palladium-catalyzed coupling of phenylacetylene with 4-bromophthalic anhydride or 3-iodonitrobenzene followed by reduction to 3PEA, respectively. Isolated yields of 41 and 86% for 3PEA and PEPA were obtained, respectively. Model compounds were synthesized from 3PEA and PEPA by reacting with them the appropriate aniline or phthalic anhydride derivative. Model compounds included N-pentafluorophenyl-4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/F5An), N-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/F3CAn), N-lbrack 3-(phenylethynyl)phenylrbrack\\ phthalimide (3PEA/PA), N-phenyl-4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/An), N-(4-phenoxyphenyl)4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/POAn), and N-(1-naphthyl)-4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/Anaph). Proposed cure products such as

  8. Time-temperature profiles of post-cure composite ovens.

    PubMed

    Loza-Herrero, M A; Rueggeberg, F A

    1998-01-01

    Previous research indicates that there are improved physical properties resulting from post-cure heating of light-activated resin composite. Currently, a large variety of commercial devices and techniques are used for post-cure heating. This study determined differences among the time-temperature profiles of selected commercial post-cure devices. It also compared the biaxial flexure strength of resin composite which was post-cure heated in each device.

  9. Electron Beam Curing of Polymer Matrix Composites - CRADA Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C. J.; Howell, Dave; Norris, Robert E.

    1997-05-01

    The major cost driver in manufacturing polymer matrix composite (PMC) parts and structures, and one of the elements having the greatest effect on their quality and performance, is the standard thermal cure process. Thermal curing of PMCs requires long cure times and high energy consumption, creates residual thermal stresses in the part, produces volatile toxic by-products, and requires expensive tooling that is tolerant of the high cure temperatures.

  10. Silicone rubber curing by high intensity infrared radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, T.; Tsai, J.; Cherng, C.; Chen, J.

    1994-08-10

    A high-intensity (12 kW) and compact (80 cm) infrared heating oven for fast curing (12 seconds) of tube-like silicone rubber curing studies is reported. Quality inspection by DSC and DMA and results from pilot-scale curing oven all suggest that infrared heating provides a better way of vulcanization regarding to curing time, quality, cost, and spacing over conventional hot air heating. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  11. Gaseous mercury release during steam curing of aerated concretes that contain fly ash and activated carbon sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Danold W. Golightly; Chin-Min Cheng; Ping Sun; Linda K. Weavers; Harold W. Walker; Panuwat Taerakul; William E. Wolfe

    2008-09-15

    Gaseous mercury released from aerated concrete during both presteam curing at 25{sup o}C and steam curing at 80{sup o}C was measured in controlled laboratory experiments. Mercury release originated from two major components in the concrete mixture: (1) class F coal fly ash and (2) a mixture of the fly ash and powdered activated carbon onto which elemental mercury was adsorbed. Mercury emitted during each curing cycle was collected on iodated carbon traps in a purge-and-trap arrangement and subsequently measured by cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Through 3 h of presteam curing, the release of mercury from the freshly prepared mixture was less than 0.03 ng/kg of concrete. Releases of total mercury over the 21 h steam curing process ranged from 0.4 to 5.8 ng of mercury/kg of concrete and depended upon mercury concentrations in the concrete. The steam-cured concrete had a higher mercury release rate (ng kg{sup -1} h{sup -1}) compared to air-cured concrete containing fly ash, but the shorter curing interval resulted in less total release of mercury from the steam-cured concrete. The mercury flux from exposed concrete surfaces to mercury-free air ranged from 0.77 to 11.1 ng m{sup -2} h{sup -1}, which was similar to mercury fluxes for natural soils to ambient air of 4.2 ng m{sup -2} h{sup -1} reported by others. Less than 0.022% of the total quantity of mercury present from all mercury sources in the concrete was released during the curing process, and therefore, nearly all of the mercury was retained in the concrete. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Efficacy of intramammary tilmicosin and risk factors for cure of Staphylococcus aureus infection in the dry period.

    PubMed

    Dingwell, R T; Leslie, K E; Duffield, T F; Schukken, Y H; DesCoteaux, L; Keefe, G P; Kelton, D F; Lissemore, K D; Shewfelt, W; Dick, P; Bagg, R

    2003-01-01

    The objective ofthis study was to evaluate the efficacy of intramammary tilmicosin, administered at drying-off, for eliminating Staphylococcus aureus infection, and to identify risk factors for S. aureus cure during the dry period. A total of 219 naturally infected cows, representing 308 quarters, were randomized to receive either one of two treatments at drying-off. Cows received either an intramammary infusion of 500 mg of benzathine cloxacillin, or a sterile solution containing 1,500 mg of tilmicosin. All cows had quarter milk samples taken aseptically three times before dry-off, and at wk 1, 2, and 4 of the subsequent lactation. Overall, 62% of cows and 67.5% of quarters infected with S. aureus cured during the dry period. The cure following administraton of tilmicosin was 67.3 and 72.5% for cows and quarters, respectively. By comparison, the cure achieved with cloxacillin was 56.9 and 62.9% of cows and quarters. Cows receiving tilmicosin were 2.1 times more likely to cure. The cure rate for cows decreased as the linear score on the last DHI test increased, and as the amount of S. aureus being shed increased. Quarters that cultured positive multiple times before drying-off were less likely to cure. Staphylococcus aureus infections located in front quarters of the udder were 2 times more likely to cure than those in hind quarters. Results of this study demonstrate that intramammary tilmicosin at drying-off is efficacious in curing existing S. aureus during the dry period. Risk factors associated with the cure of S. aureus were identified.

  13. Kinetics of conversion of two dual-cured adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Faria-e-Silva, André Luis; Casselli, Denise Sá Maia; Lima, Giana Silveira; Ogliari, Fabrício Aulo; Piva, Evandro; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the kinetics of conversion of Scotchbond Multi-purpose Plus (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN) and Prime&Bond NT (Dentsply De Trey, Konstanz, Germany) used in light-cured, self-cured, or dual-cured versions. The adhesive systems were used in the light-cured version (without the use of chemical initiator) or mixed with its respective chemical initiator either with light activation (dual-cured) or not (self-cured). The degree of conversion (DC) was monitored as a function of time during 5 minutes with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer equipped with an attenuated total reflectance device. Light-cured and dual-cured modes of Scotchbond Multi-purpose Plus presented the highest DC at 5 minutes. The addition of the self-cure activator (dual-cured mode) to Prime&Bond NT reduced the DC. For the self-cured versions, only the Scotchbond Multi-purpose Plus presented any polymerization reaction at 5 minutes. For the two bonding systems tested, it appears that light curing of the adhesive is important in order to reach a high DC in the first moments after the bonding procedure.

  14. Improved cure method for single component silicone rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lippitt, M. W.

    1969-01-01

    Water is incorporated in a carrier and then thoroughly mixed with the single component silicone rubber containing acetic anhydride as a curing agent. Because curing occurs with the water supplied internally, controlled curing is possible within a reasonable period of time, regardless of the thickness of the material.

  15. 7 CFR 29.6002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6002 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions. Artificial heat sometimes is used to control excess humidity during the curing period to prevent pole-sweat... resulting from the application of artificial heat....

  16. 7 CFR 29.6002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6002 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions. Artificial heat sometimes is used to control excess humidity during the curing period to prevent pole-sweat... resulting from the application of artificial heat....

  17. 7 CFR 29.6002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6002 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions. Artificial heat sometimes is used to control excess humidity during the curing period to prevent pole-sweat... resulting from the application of artificial heat....

  18. 7 CFR 30.12 - Fire-cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire-cure. 30.12 Section 30.12 Agriculture Regulations... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.12 Fire-cure. To cure tobacco under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires, the smoke...

  19. 7 CFR 30.12 - Fire-cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fire-cure. 30.12 Section 30.12 Agriculture Regulations... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.12 Fire-cure. To cure tobacco under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires, the smoke...

  20. 7 CFR 30.12 - Fire-cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fire-cure. 30.12 Section 30.12 Agriculture Regulations... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.12 Fire-cure. To cure tobacco under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires, the smoke...

  1. 7 CFR 30.12 - Fire-cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fire-cure. 30.12 Section 30.12 Agriculture Regulations... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.12 Fire-cure. To cure tobacco under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires, the smoke...

  2. 7 CFR 30.12 - Fire-cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fire-cure. 30.12 Section 30.12 Agriculture Regulations... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.12 Fire-cure. To cure tobacco under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires, the smoke...

  3. 7 CFR 30.11 - Flue-cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...-cure. To cure tobacco under artificial atmospheric conditions by a process of regulating the heat and... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flue-cure. 30.11 Section 30.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  4. 7 CFR 30.11 - Flue-cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-cure. To cure tobacco under artificial atmospheric conditions by a process of regulating the heat and... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flue-cure. 30.11 Section 30.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  5. 7 CFR 30.11 - Flue-cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...-cure. To cure tobacco under artificial atmospheric conditions by a process of regulating the heat and... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flue-cure. 30.11 Section 30.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  6. 7 CFR 30.11 - Flue-cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...-cure. To cure tobacco under artificial atmospheric conditions by a process of regulating the heat and... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flue-cure. 30.11 Section 30.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  7. 7 CFR 30.11 - Flue-cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-cure. To cure tobacco under artificial atmospheric conditions by a process of regulating the heat and... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flue-cure. 30.11 Section 30.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  8. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for HIV cure.

    PubMed

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2016-02-01

    The apparent cure of an HIV-infected person following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from an allogeneic donor homozygous for the ccr5Δ32 mutation has stimulated the search for strategies to eradicate HIV or to induce long-term remission without requiring ongoing antiretroviral therapy. A variety of approaches, including allogeneic HSCT from CCR5-deficient donors and autologous transplantation of genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells, are currently under investigation. This Review covers the experience with HSCT in HIV infection to date and provides a survey of ongoing work in the field. The challenges of developing HSCT for HIV cure in the context of safe, effective, and convenient once-daily antiretroviral therapy are also discussed.

  9. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of "standard" polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal or oxide may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  10. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of "standard" polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  11. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.

    1995-03-07

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of ``standard`` polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal or oxide may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  12. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.

    1993-11-09

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of standard polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  13. Contactless optoelectronic technique for monitoring epoxy cure.

    PubMed

    Cusano, A; Buonocore, V; Breglio, G; Calabrò, A; Giordano, M; Cutolo, A; Nicolais, L

    2000-03-01

    We describe a novel noninvasive optical technique to monitor the refractive-index variation in an epoxy-based resin that is due to the polymerization process. This kind of resin is widely used in polymer matrix composites. It is well known that the process of fabricating a thermoset-based composite involves mass and heat transfer coupled with irreversible chemical reactions that induce physical changes. To improve the quality and the reliability of these materials, monitoring the cure and optimization of the manufacturing process are of key importance. We discuss the basic operating principles of an optical system based on angle deflection measurements and present typical cure-monitoring results obtained from optical characterization. The method provides a flexible, high-sensitivity, material-independent, low-cost, noninvasive tool for monitoring real-time refractive-index variation.

  14. Aloe vera as cure for lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Patil, Bharati A; Bhaskar, Hebbar Pragati; Pol, Jyoti S; Sodhi, Amandeep; Madhu, Asha V

    2013-01-01

    Oral lichen planus is a difficult condition to treat because of its chronic nature. Various treatment modalities have resulted in partial regression of symptoms but not a complete cure. Aloe vera, a product with minimal adverse effects, can be tried to treat this disorder. A 38-year-old male patient diagnosed with lichen planus of the skin and the oral mucosa was suffering from severe pain and a burning sensation intraorally and pruritus of the skin lesions. Considering the extensive involvement, an herbal alternative was considered. The patient was prescribed aloe vera juice and gel application for two months. At the nine-month follow-up, the patient was symptom-free and totally cured of the intraoral and skin lesions.

  15. Light-Curing Adhesive Repair Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Ronald; Haight, Andrea Hoyt

    2009-01-01

    Adhesive tapes, the adhesive resins of which can be cured (and thereby rigidized) by exposure to ultraviolet and/or visible light, are being developed as repair patch materials. The tapes, including their resin components, consist entirely of solid, low-outgassing, nonhazardous or minimally hazardous materials. They can be used in air or in vacuum and can be cured rapidly, even at temperatures as low as -20 C. Although these tapes were originally intended for use in repairing structures in outer space, they can also be used on Earth for quickly repairing a wide variety of structures. They can be expected to be especially useful in situations in which it is necessary to rigidize tapes after wrapping them around or pressing them onto the parts to be repaired.

  16. Coating and curing apparatus and methods

    DOEpatents

    Brophy, Brenor L.; Gonsalves, Peter R.; Maghsoodi, Sina; Colson, Thomas E.; Yang, Yu S.; Abrams, Ze'ev R.

    2016-04-19

    Disclosed is a coating apparatus including flow coating and roll-coating that may be used for uniform sol-gel coating of substrates such as glass, solar panels, windows or part of an electronic display. Also disclosed are methods for substrate preparation, flow coating and roll coating. Lastly, systems and methods for curing sol-gel coatings deposited onto the surface of glass substrates using high temperature air-knives, infrared emitters and direct heat applicators are disclosed.

  17. Photothermal Monitoring Of Curing Of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rooney, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared radiometry (TRIR) adapted to monitoring curing of some polymers in production. Proposal part of continuing effort to perfect production of hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene for use in liners of solid-fuel rocket motors. Applicable to monitoring changing states of many other materials in process. TRIR, non-contact technique implemented with remotely situated equipment and better suited to use in production.

  18. Using Sex to Cure the Genome

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo P. C.

    2016-01-01

    The diversification of prokaryotes is accelerated by their ability to acquire DNA from other genomes. However, the underlying processes also facilitate genome infection by costly mobile genetic elements. The discovery that cells can uptake DNA by natural transformation was instrumental to the birth of molecular biology nearly a century ago. Surprisingly, a new study shows that this mechanism could efficiently cure the genome of mobile elements acquired through previous sexual exchanges. PMID:26987049

  19. Coating and curing apparatus and methods

    DOEpatents

    Brophy, Brenor L; Maghsoodi, Sina; Neyman, Patrick J; Gonsalves, Peter R; Hirsch, Jeffrey G; Yang, Yu S

    2015-02-24

    Disclosed are coating apparatus including flow coating and roll-coating that may be used for uniform sol-gel coating of substrates such as glass, solar panels, windows or part of an electronic display. Also disclosed are methods for substrate preparation, flow coating and roll coating. Lastly systems and methods for skin curing sol-gel coatings deposited onto the surface of glass substrates using a high temperature air-knife are disclosed.

  20. Modelization of structural changes in ultra low k materials during ultraviolet cure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbert, G.; Vo-Than, D.; Trouiller, C.; Lorut, F.

    2013-12-01

    As of 45 nm node, ultralow k (ULK) materials (ɛr < 2.55) are widely used in microelectronic interconnects to reduce signal propagation delay. In order to get such low dielectric constant, most of these ULK are obtained using subtractive method: after co-deposition of matrix and porogen a UV cure process is used to remove labile species (porogen). During this process, porosity is created and films are densified as shrinkage increases. This paper presents an in-depth study of the UV cure process. Two kinetic models are presented to describe shrinkage rate: the nth order and the autocatalytic model. These models also used to describe photo-polymerization shrinkage-strain of dental composite, gives predictions that are in good agreement with experimental data. We find that nth-order model is best suited to describe ULK transformations during UV cure process. CHx bonds loss and carbon content can also be modeled using same kinetic model. In order to be able to build the model, initial SiOCH-CxHy film has to be over-cured to determine the maximum conversion that film can reach when submitted to extra-long cure times. Results show that such SiOCH materials have to be cured more than 250 times their nominal cure time to reach maximum shrinkage (˜50%) and a complete loss of carbon, making them looking like SiO2. When structural changes are observed at different temperature, activation energy of reactions can be determined. In this way, shrinkage reaction has an activation energy close to 1000-1100 kJ/mol and CHx bonds or carbon loss reactions have activation energy in the range of 250-400 kJ/mol, which is pretty close to C-H binding energy.

  1. 9 CFR 318.19 - Compliance procedure for cured pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., consisting of cured pork products which have been water cooked. Any product which does not fit into Group I... production rate is frequency of production, expressed in days per week. (5) Protein fat free percentage, protein fat free content, PFF percentage, PFF content or PFF of a product means the meat...

  2. 9 CFR 318.19 - Compliance procedure for cured pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., consisting of cured pork products which have been water cooked. Any product which does not fit into Group I... production rate is frequency of production, expressed in days per week. (5) Protein fat free percentage, protein fat free content, PFF percentage, PFF content or PFF of a product means the meat...

  3. Lethal acute demyelinization with encephalo-myelitis as a complication of cured Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, N; Hieronimus, S; Vandenbos, F; Delmont, E; Cua, E; Cherick, F; Paquis, P; Michiels, J-F; Fenichel, P; Brucker-Davis, F

    2010-12-01

    Cushing's disease is usually associated with higher mortality rate, especially from cardiovascular causes. Development or exacerbation of autoimmune or inflammatory diseases is known to occur in patients with hypercortisolism after cure. We report for the first time a 34-year old woman with a psychiatric background, who developed four months after the surgical cure of Cushing's disease an acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) presenting initially as a psychiatric illness. We hypothesize that the recent correction of hypercortisolism triggered ADEM and that the atypical presentation, responsible for diagnosis delay, led to the death of this patient. PMID:20850107

  4. A Bayesian long-term survival model parametrized in the cured fraction.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Mário; Cancho, Vicente G; Rodrigues, Josemar

    2009-06-01

    The main goal of this paper is to investigate a cure rate model that comprehends some well-known proposals found in the literature. In our work the number of competing causes of the event of interest follows the negative binomial distribution. The model is conveniently reparametrized through the cured fraction, which is then linked to covariates by means of the logistic link. We explore the use of Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to develop a Bayesian analysis in the proposed model. The procedure is illustrated with a numerical example.

  5. DTI-015 produces cures in T9 gliosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Pietronigro, Dennis; Drnovsky, Frank; Cravioto, Humberto; Ransohoff, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    DTI-015 (BCNU in 100% ethanol) utilizes solvent-facilitated perfusion for the intratumoral treatment of gliomas. The water-miscible organic solvent vehicle, ethanol, facilitates a rapid and thorough saturation of the'tumor with the dissolved anticancer agent, BCNU. Rats bearing established intracranial T9 gliosarcoma tumors received no treatment (group 1), a single intratumoral injection of ethanol vehicle (group 2) or DTI-015 (5 mg/kg BCNU) (group 3), or a single intratumoral injection of DTI-015 followed by systemic BCNU (group 4). Ethanol alone (n=13) had no effect on survival; MST=17 days compared to 18 days for untreated controls (n=35). DTI-015 (n=45) produced an ILS of 417% (MST=93) and 472% (MST=103) when combined with systemic BCNU (n=14). Overall, 24 of 59 rats receiving DTI-015 were judged to be cured, with 20 living a normal life span of 600 to 700 days, and 4 rats sacrificed healthy at 121, 135, 307, and 384 days post DTI-015 with no evidence of viable T9 tumor. Histology demonstrated that DTI-015 totally eradicated the T9 tumors in animals living a normal life span. The results demonstrate that a single injection of DTI-015 produces a 40% cure rate in rats bearing established intracranial T9 tumors.

  6. The effectiveness of cure of LED and halogen curing lights at varying cavity depths.

    PubMed

    Soh, M S; Yap, Adrian U J; Siow, K S

    2003-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of cure of two LED (light-emitting diodes) lights (Elipar FreeLight [FL], 3M-ESPE and GC e-Light [EL], GC) to conventional (Max [MX] (control), Dentsply-Caulk), high intensity (Elipar TriLight [TL], 3M-ESPE) and very high intensity (Astralis 10 [AS], Ivoclar Vivadent) halogen lights at varying cavity depths. Ten light curing regimens were investigated. They include: FL1-400 mW/cm2 [40 seconds], FL2-0-400 mW/cm2 [12 seconds] --> 400 mW/cm2 [28 seconds], EL1-750 mW/cm2 [10 pulses x 2 seconds], EL2-350 mW/cm2 [40 seconds], EL3-600 mW/cm2 [20 seconds], EL4-0-600 mW/cm2 [20 seconds] --> 600 mW/cm2 [20 seconds], TL1-800 mW/cm2 [40 seconds], TL2-100-800 mW/cm2 [15 seconds] --> 800 mW/cm2 [25 seconds], AS1-1200 mW/cm2 [10 seconds], MX-400 mW/cm2 [40 seconds]. The effectiveness of cure of the different modes was determined by measuring the top and bottom surface hardness (KHN) of 2-mm, 3-mm and 4-mm thick composite (Z100, [3M-ESPE]) specimens using a digital microhardness tester (n = 5, load = 500 g; dwell time = 15 seconds). Results were analyzed using ANOVA/Scheffe's post-hoc test and Independent Samples t-Test (p < 0.05). For all lights, effectiveness of cure was found to decrease with increased cavity depths. The mean hardness ratio for all curing lights at a depth of 2 mm was found to be greater than 0.80 (the accepted minimum standard). At 3 mm, all halogen lights produced a hardness ratio greater than 0.80 but some LED light regimens did not; and at a depth of 4 mm, the mean hardness ratio observed with all curing lights was less than 0.80. Significant differences in top and bottom KHN values were observed among different curing regimens for the same light and between LED and halogen lights. While curing with most modes of EL resulted in significantly lower top and bottom KHN values than the control (MX) at all depths, the standard mode of FL resulted in significantly higher top and bottom KHN at a depth of 3 mm and 4 mm. The

  7. The Risk of Tuberculosis Reinfection Soon after Cure of a First Disease Episode Is Extremely High in a Hyperendemic Community

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Robin; van der Spuy, Gian; Hoal, Eileen G.; van Helden, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Elevated rates of reinfection tuberculosis in various hyperendemic regions have been reported and, in particular, it has been shown that in a high-incidence setting near Cape Town, South Africa, the rate of reinfection tuberculosis (TB) disease after cure of a previous TB disease episode is about four times greater than the rate of first-time TB disease. It is not known whether this elevated rate is caused by a high reinfection rate due, for instance, to living circumstances, or a high rate of progress to disease specific to the patients, or both. In order to address that question we analysed an extensive data set from clinics attended by TB patients in the high-incidence setting near Cape Town, South Africa and found that, in fact, the (average) rate of reinfection (as opposed to the rate of reinfection disease) after cure of a previous TB disease episode is initially about 0.85 per annum. This rate diminishes rapidly over time and after about ten years this rate is similar to the rate of infection in the general population. Also, the rate of progress to disease after reinfection is initially high but declines in subsequent years down to the figure typical for the general population. These findings suggest that the first few months after cure of a TB disease episode form a critical period for controlling reinfection disease in a hyperendemic setting and that monitoring such cured patients could pre-empt a reinfection progressing to active disease. PMID:26649422

  8. Characterization of the relationship of the cure cycle chemistry to cure cycle processing properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic Dielectric measurements made over a wide range of frequency provide a sensitive and convenient means for monitoring the cure process in thermosets and thermoplastics. The measurement of dielectric relaxation is one of only a few instrumental techniques available for studying molecular properties in both the liquid and solid states. Furthermore, it is probably the only convenient experimental technique for studying the polymerization process of going from a monomeric liquid of varying viscosity to a crosslinked, insoluble, high temperature solid. The objective of the research is to develop on-line dielectric instrumentation for quantitative nondestructive material evaluation and closed loop smart cure cycle control. The key is to relate the chemistry of the cure cycle process to the dielectric properties of the polymer system by correlating the time, temperature, and frequency dependent dielectric measurements with chemical characterization measurements. Measurement of the wide variation in magnitude of the complex permittivity with both frequency and state of cure, coupled with chemical characterization work, have been shown in the laboratory to have the potential to determine: resin quality, composition and age; cure cycle window boundaries; onset of flow and point of maximum flow; extent of and completion of reaction; evolution of volatiles; T sub g; and, crosslinking and molecular weight buildup.

  9. Relevance of nanocomposite packaging on the stability of vacuum-packed dry cured ham.

    PubMed

    Lloret, Elsa; Fernandez, Avelina; Trbojevich, Raul; Arnau, Jacint; Picouet, Pierre A

    2016-08-01

    In this study effects of a novel high barrier multilayer polyamide film containing dispersed nanoclays (PAN) on the stability of vacuum packed dry-cured ham were investigated during 90days refrigerated storage in comparison with non-modified multilayer polyamide (PA) and a commercial high barrier film. Characteristic bands of the mineral in FT-IR spectra confirmed the presence of nanoclays in PAN, enhancing oxygen transmission barrier properties and UV protection. Packaging in PAN films did not originate significant changes on colour or lipid oxidation during prolonged storage of vacuum-packed dry-cured ham. Larger oxygen transmission rates in PA films caused changes in CIE b* during refrigerated storage. Ham quality was not affected by light exposition during 90days and only curing had a significant benefit on colour and TBARS, being cured samples more stable during storage in all the packages used. Packaging of dry-cured ham in PAN was equivalent to commercial high barrier films. PMID:26998947

  10. Argon Ion Laser Polymerized Acrylic Resin: A Comparative Analysis of Mechanical Properties of Laser Cured, Light Cured and Heat Cured Denture Base Resins

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, S Srinivasa; Murthy, Gargi S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dentistry in general and prosthodontics in particular is evolving at greater pace, but the denture base resins poly methyl methacrylate. There has been vast development in modifying chemically and the polymerization techniques for better manipulation and enhancement of mechanical properties. One such invention was introduction of visible light cure (VLC) denture base resin. Argon ion lasers have been used extensively in dentistry, studies has shown that it can polymerize restorative composite resins. Since composite resin and VLC resin share the same photo initiator, Argon laser is tested as activator for polymerizing VLC resin. In the Phase 1 study, the VLC resin was evaluated for exposure time for optimum polymerization using argon ion laser and in Phase 2; flexural strength, impact strength, surface hardness and surface characteristics of laser cured resin was compared with light cure and conventional heat cure resin. Materials and Methods: Phase 1; In compliance with American Dental Association (ADA) specification no. 12, 80 samples were prepared with 10 each for different curing time using argon laser and evaluated for flexural strength on three point bend test. Results were compared to established performance requirement specified. Phase 2, 10 specimen for each of the mechanical properties (30 specimen) were polymerized using laser, visible light and heat and compared. Surface and fractured surface of laser, light and heat cured resins were examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: In Phase 1, the specimen cured for 7, 8, 9 and 10 min fulfilled ADA requirement. 8 min was taken as suitable curing time for laser curing. Phase 2 the values of mechanical properties were computed and subjected to statistical analysis using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc test. The means of three independent groups showed significant differences between any two groups (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Triad VLC resin can be polymerized by argon ion laser with

  11. Cure mechanisms in materials for use in esthetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tae-Yub; Bagheri, Rafat; Kim, Young K; Kim, Kyo-Han; Burrow, Michael F

    2012-02-01

    The current paper reviews the curing mechanisms found in resin-based materials used in dentistry. Historical aspects of dental products and the associated curing mechanisms are reviewed. In comparison with common industrial procedures, curing methods employed for dental materials are relatively limited because of the need to polymerize quickly in the oral cavity at an ambient temperature. Heat-cure and self-cure dental resins utilize benzoyl peroxide initiator alone with a tertiary amine co-initiator. At present, most dental restorative composites use a camphorquinone-amine complex initiation, visible light-cure, one-component systems, although alternative photoinitiators have been researched and developed. A multiple curing mode in a dual-cure material is a complex combination of various initiation systems. The use of aryl sulfinic acid sodium salt to overcome adverse chemical interactions between simplified adhesives and self- or dual-cure composites is based on another self-cure polymerization mechanism, sulfinic acid-initiated polymerization, proposed by Hagger in 1948. The sodium salt of aryl sulfinic acid reacts with an acidic monomer in simplified adhesives, and is believed to produce radicals. Clinically, it is important to try to optimize the degree of conversion of resin-based materials using proper manipulation and adequate light-curing techniques to ensure the best outcome for materials used to restore teeth.

  12. A cure for HIV: is it in sight?

    PubMed

    Pace, Matthew; Frater, John

    2014-07-01

    HIV is a devastating disease affecting millions of people worldwide despite the advent of successful antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, ART does not result in a cure and has to be taken for life. Accordingly, researchers are turning towards cure efforts, particularly in the light of two patients whose HIV has been seemingly eradicated. Numerous approaches and strategies have been considered for curing HIV, but no scalable and safe solution has yet been reached. With newly discovered difficulties in measuring the HIV reservoir, the main barrier to a cure, the only true test of cure is to stop ART and see whether the virus becomes detectable. However, it is possible that this treatment interruption may be associated with certain risks for patients. Here, we compare the current major approaches and recent advances for curing HIV, as well as discuss ways of evaluating HIV cure and the safety concerns involved.

  13. Curing of yeast [PSI+] prion by guanidine inactivation of Hsp104 does not require cell division.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue-Xuan; Greene, Lois E; Masison, Daniel C; Eisenberg, Evan

    2005-09-01

    Propagation of the yeast prion [PSI+], a self-replicating aggregated form of Sup35p, requires Hsp104. One model to explain this phenomenon proposes that, in the absence of Hsp104, Sup35p aggregates enlarge but fail to replicate thus becoming diluted out as the yeast divide. To test this model, we used live imaging of Sup35p-GFP to follow the changes that occur in [PSI+] cells after the addition of guanidine to inactivate Hsp104. After guanidine addition there was initially an increase in aggregation of Sup35p-GFP; but then, before the yeast divided, the aggregates began to dissolve, and after approximately 6 h the Sup35-GFP looked identical to the Sup35-GFP in [psi+] cells. Although plating studies showed that the yeast were still [PSI+], this reduction in aggregation suggested that curing of [PSI+] by inactivation of Hsp104 might be independent of cell division. This was tested by measuring the rate of curing of [PSI+] cells in both dividing and nondividing cells. Cell division was inhibited by adding either alpha factor or farnesol. Remarkably, with both of these methods, we found that the rate of curing was not significantly affected by cell division. Thus, cell division is not a determining factor for curing [PSI+] by inactivating Hsp104 with guanidine. Rather, curing apparently occurs because Sup35-GFP polymers slowly depolymerize in the absence of Hsp104 activity. Hsp104 then counteracts this curing possibly by catalyzing formation of new polymers. PMID:16123122

  14. Cure shrinkage effects in epoxy and polycyanate matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Spellman, G.P.

    1995-12-22

    A relatively new advanced composite matrix, polycyanate ester, was evaluated for cure shrinkage. The chemical cure shrinkage of composites is difficult to model but a number of clever experimental techniques are available to the investigator. In this work the method of curing a prepreg layup on top of a previously cured laminate of identical ply composition is utilized. The polymeric matrices used in advanced composites have been primarily epoxies and therefore a common system of this type, Fiberite 3501-6, was used as a base case material. Three polycyanate matrix systems were selected for the study. These are: Fiberite 954-2A, YLA RS-3, and Bryte Technology BTCy-1. The first three of these systems were unidirectional prepreg with carbon fiber reinforcement. The Bryte Technology material was reinforced with E-glass fabric. The technique used to evaluate cure shrinkage results in distortion of the flatness of an otherwise symmetric laminate. The first laminate is cured in a conventional fashion. An identical layup is cured on this first laminate. During the second cure all constituents are exposed to the same thermal cycles. However, only the new portion of the laminate will experience volumetric changes associate with matrix cure. The additional strain of cure shrinkage results in an unsymmetric distribution of residual stresses and an associated warpage of the laminate. The baseline material, Fiberite 3501-6, exhibited cure shrinkage that was in accordance with expectations. Cure strains were {minus}4.5E-04. The YLA RS-3 material had cure strains somewhat lower at {minus}3.2E-04. The Fiberite 954-2A cure strain was {minus}1.5E-04 that is 70% lower than the baseline material. The glass fabric material with the Bryte BTCy-1 matrix did not result in meaningful results because the processing methods were not fully compatible with the material.

  15. [Cost-effective medical therapy of hepatitis C employing novel compensation models - pay for cure].

    PubMed

    Foerster, F; Wörns, M A; Galle, P R; Schattenberg, J M

    2015-12-01

    Direct acting antivirals (DAAs) have increased cure rates for chronic hepatitis C infection up to nearly 100 %. At the same time treatment costs have risen significantly. Treating all HCV infected patients in Germany with DAAs would generate medication costs ranging between 19 and 37 billion EUR depending on the drug regimen used. Expenses in patients who fail to respond to treatment would amount to approximately 0.9 to 2.15 billion EUR. In difficult to treat patient populations that are characterized by prior failure to treatment or advanced liver disease, lost drug expenses are particularly high due to lower cure rates and longer treatment duration. Outcome-based reimbursement schemes are used to improve the quality of care and to reduce costs in the health care system. In Germany, disease management programs have been implemented for defined chronic diseases. However, drug reimbursement is still based on packages sold (pay for pill). In this context, it would be appealing to link reimbursement and treatment success (pay for cure) in order to reward successful treatment, limit lost drug spending and develop a shared risk environment that would involve all concerned parties. Under the assumption that 20,000 patients with HCV are treated each year in Germany and that cure rates are 95.4 %, the saved treatment costs would amount up to 45 and 107 million EUR per year. By this approach, economic incentives to withhold therapy from difficult to treat patients could be avoided. PMID:26666278

  16. Modern high powered led curing lights and their effect on pulp chamber temperature of bulk and incrementally cured composite resin.

    PubMed

    Oberholzer, T G; Makofane, M E; du Preez, I C; George, R

    2012-06-01

    Pulpal temperature changes induced by modern high powered light emitting diodes (LEDs) are of concern when used to cure composite resins. This study showed an increase in pulp chamber temperature with an increase in power density for all light cure units (LCU) when used to bulk cure composite resin. Amongst the three LEDs tested, the Elipar Freelight-2 recorded the highest temperature changes. Bulk curing recorded a significantly larger rise in pulp chamber temperature change than incrementally cured resin for all light types except for the Smartligh PS. Both the high powered LED and the conventional curing units can generate heat. Though this temperature rise may not be sufficient to cause irreversible pulpal damage, it would be safer to incrementally cure resins.

  17. Cure kinetics of epoxy matrix resin by differential scanning calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cizmecioglu, M.; Gupta, A.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made on the cure kinetics of an epoxy neat-resin (Narmco 5208) using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Two interrelated analytical methods were applied to dynamic DSC data for evaluating the kinetic parameters, such as activation energy, E, the order of reaction, n, and the total heat of polymerization (or crosslinking), delta H sub t. The first method was proposed by Ellerstein (1968), and uses a thorough differential-integral analysis of a single DSC curve to evaluate the kinetic parameters. The second method was proposed by Kissinger (1957), and uses multiple DSC curves obtained at various heating rates to evaluate E regardless of n. Kinetic analysis of Narmco 5208 epoxy resin showed that the reaction order, n, is substantially affected by the rate of heating; i.e., n is approximately 2 at slow scan rates but is reduced to 1.5 at higher scan rates. The activation energy, E, is not affected by the scan rate, and the average value of E is 25.6 + or - 1.8 kcal/mole.

  18. Electron beam curing of polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C.J.; Wheeler, D.; Saunders, C.

    1998-01-08

    The purpose of the CRADA was to conduct research and development activities to better understand and utilize the electron beam PMC curing technology. This technology will be used to replace or supplement existing PMC thermal curing processes in Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs (DP) projects and American aircraft and aerospace industries. This effort involved Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc./Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. (Contractor), Sandia National Laboratories, and ten industrial Participants including four major aircraft and aerospace companies, three advanced materials companies, and three electron beam processing organizations. The technical objective of the CRADA was to synthesize and/or modify high performance, electron beam curable materials that meet specific end-use application requirements. There were six tasks in this CRADA including: Electron beam materials development; Electron beam database development; Economic analysis; Low-cost Electron Beam tooling development; Electron beam curing systems integration; and Demonstration articles/prototype structures development. The contractor managed, participated and integrated all the tasks, and optimized the project efforts through the coordination, exchange, and dissemination of information to the project participants. Members of the Contractor team were also the principal inventors on several electron beam related patents and a 1997 R and D 100 Award winner on Electron-Beam-Curable Cationic Epoxy Resins. The CRADA achieved a major breakthrough for the composites industry by having successfully developed high-performance electron beam curable cationic epoxy resins for use in composites, adhesives, tooling compounds, potting compounds, syntactic foams, etc. UCB Chemicals, the world`s largest supplier of radiation-curable polymers, has acquired a license to produce and sell these resins worldwide.

  19. Reaction cured glass and glass coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, H. E.; Leiser, D. B.; Katvala, V. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to reaction cured glass and glass coatings prepared by reacting a compound selected from the group consisting of silicon tetraboride, silicon hexaboride, other boron silicides, boron and mixtures with a reactive glass frit composed of a porous high silica borosilicate glass and boron oxide. The glassy composites of the present invention are useful as coatings on low density fibrous porous silica insulations used as heat shields and for articles such as reaction vessels that are subjected to high temperatures with rapid heating and cooling and that require resistance to temperature and repeated thermal shock at temperatures up to about 1482C (2700PF).

  20. The cure for employee malaise--motivation.

    PubMed

    Dawson, K M; Dawson, S N

    1991-01-01

    Although working conditions, hours, pay, and advancement opportunities are better now than in the 1950s--the "golden age" of American business--today's workers are significantly less satisfied. Why? The authors believe the cause of this malaise is lack of motivation. This article examines several techniques to cure employee malaise and discusses the long-term benefits of these techniques, which include empowerment, recognition, career development, the Pygmalion effect, incentives, and rewards. By making a commitment to these motivational techniques, managers will boost the morale and enthusiasm of their employees and their organization. This motivational process is not quick and easy; developing your employees is an ongoing process.

  1. Care not cure: dialogues at the transition.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Geoffrey H

    2003-05-01

    Physicians and patients find it hard to communicate when treatment fails to cure or control cancer. Communication barriers include fear of "giving up," losing the medical team, and discussing death. The quality of physician-patient communication affects important outcomes including patient distress, coping, and quality of life, and physician burnout. Communication skills that can be taught, learned, and maintained for physicians at all levels of training, and effective educational programs have been described. Research on communication skills training should focus on the best method of delivery, the "dose-response" effect, and how to measure success of training in complex health care environments.

  2. The development of low temperature curing adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. E.; Sutherland, J. D.; Hom, J. M.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    An approach for the development of a practical low temperature (293 K-311 K/68 F-100 F) curing adhesive system based on a family of amide/ester resins was studied and demonstrated. The work was conducted on resin optimization and adhesive compounding studies. An improved preparative method was demonstrated which involved the reaction of an amine-alcohol precursor, in a DMF solution with acid chloride. Experimental studies indicated that an adhesive formulation containing aluminum powder provided the best performance when used in conjunction with a commercial primer.

  3. A significant correlation between delayed cure after microvascular decompression and positive response to preoperative anticonvulsant therapy in patients with hemifacial spasm.

    PubMed

    Terasaka, Shunsuke; Asaoka, Katsuyuki; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Motegi, Hiroaki; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2016-10-01

    Although microvascular decompression (MVD) is a reliable treatment for hemifacial spasm (HFS), the postoperative course is varied. We retrospectively analyzed the resolution pattern of the spasm and specified predictors for delayed cure after MVD. This study included 114 consecutive patients with typical HFS. All of them were followed up for at least 1 year after operation. Patients were divided into three groups depending on the postoperative course: immediate cure, delayed cure, and failure. To identify the predictive factors for delayed cure after MVD, logistic regression analyses were applied using candidate clinical factors, such as duration of symptom, the tendency of the spasm, preoperative medical treatment, and offending vessels. Among the 114 patients, 107 patients were cured. For those cured, 65 patients were classified as immediate cure and 42 patients were classified as delayed cure. Cumulative spasm-free rates after 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after MVD were 70, 88, and 97 %, respectively. No predictive factors between the cured and failure groups were observed. According to multivariate analysis, preoperative anticonvulsant therapy was found to be the sole significant predictive factor for delayed cure after MVD (p = 0.025). A significant correlation between delayed cure and preoperative anticonvulsant therapy was found in our study, which suggests that hyperexcitation of the facial nucleus plays an important role in pathogenesis of delayed cure. Therefore, if a patient demonstrating a positive response to preoperative anticonvulsant therapy showed a persistent spasm after MVD, reoperation should be delayed for at least 3 months after the initial operation. PMID:27235129

  4. Critical parameters for electron beam curing of cationic epoxies and property comparison of electron beam cured cationic epoxies versus thermal cured resins and composites

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C.J.; Norris, R.E.; Yarborough, K.; Havens, S.J.; Lopata, V.J.

    1997-01-16

    Electron beam curing of composites is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process offering the following advantages compared to conventional thermal curing: substantially reduced manufacturing costs and curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvements in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance electron beam curing of composites. The CRADA has successfully developed hundreds of new toughened and untoughened resins, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility. Several patent applications have been filed for this work. Composites made from these easily processable, low shrinkage material match the performance of thermal cured composites and exhibit: low void contents comparable to autoclave cured composites (less than 1%); superb low water absorption values in the same range as cyanate esters (less than 1%); glass transition temperatures rivaling those of polyimides (greater than 390 C); mechanical properties comparable to high performance, autoclave cured composites; and excellent property retention after cryogenic and thermal cycling. These materials have been used to manufacture many composite parts using various fabrication processes including hand lay-up, tow placement, filament winding, resin transfer molding and vacuum assisted resin transfer molding.

  5. A Revised Definition for Cure of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pui, CH; Pei, D; Campana, D; Cheng, C; Sandlund, JT; Bowman, WP; Hudson, MM; Ribeiro, RC; Raimondi, SC; Jeha, S; Howard, SC; Bhojwani, D; Inaba, H; Rubnitz, JE; Metzger, ML; Gruber, TA; Coustan-Smith, E; Downing, JR; Leung, WH; Relling, MV; Evans, WE

    2014-01-01

    With improved contemporary therapy, we re-assess long-term outcome in patients completing treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia to determine when cure can be declared with a high degree of confidence. In 6 successive clinical trials between 1984 and 2007, 1291(84.5%) patients completed all therapy in continuous complete remission. The post-therapy cumulative risk of relapse or development of a second neoplasm and the event-free survival rate and overall survival were analyzed according to the presenting features and the three treatment periods defined by relative outcome. Over the three treatment periods, there has been progressive increase in the rate of event-free survival (65.2% vs. 74.8% vs. 85.1% [P<0.001]) and overall survival (76.5% vs. 81.1% vs. 91.7% [P<0.001]) at 10 years. The most important predictor of outcome after completion of therapy was the type of treatment. In the most recent treatment period, which omitted the use of prophylactic cranial irradiation, the post-treatment cumulative risk of relapse was 6.4%, death in remission 1.5%, and development of a second neoplasm 2.3% at 10 years, with all relapses except one occurring within 4 years off therapy. None of the 106 patients with the t(9;22)/BCR-ABL1, t(1;19)/TCF3-PBX1 or t(4;11)/MLL-AFF1 had relapsed after 2 years from completion of therapy. These findings demonstrate that with contemporary effective therapy that excludes cranial irradiation, approximately 6% of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia may relapse after completion of treatment, and those who remain in remission at 4 years post-treatment may be considered cured (i.e., less than 1 % chance of relapse). PMID:24781017

  6. Evaluation of new UV-cured adhesives and effects of post-cure UV exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, John G.

    2002-09-01

    Recent developments in adhesives have yielded products well suited for optical applications. Ultraviolet light-cured adhesives can be cured in seconds and are an attractive candidate. Selection of the adhesive properties can be made to achieve optimum performance. For improved alignment stability and reduced stress, low shrinkage adhesives have been needed. New UV-cured adhesives are evaluated with shrinkage values of less than 0.2%. In addition to controlled bonding for alignment stability, the effects of post-cure UV laser exposure (266 nm) are evaluated. Adhesives needed for systems employing UV lasers must consider off-axis exposure that can cause photo-reactive degradation. Relatively low power laser exposure is used as a simulated source for off-axis or scattered irradiation. None of these candidate adhesives are intended for in-the-light path use at 266 nm, but rather as structural adhesives. Evaluation of these candidates included a outgassing screening test that may be employed to select materials.

  7. Out-of-Autoclave Cure Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Brian S.

    2015-01-01

    As the size of aerospace composite parts exceeds that of even the largest autoclaves, the development of new out-of-autoclave processes and materials is necessary to ensure quality and performance. Many out-of-autoclave prepreg systems can produce high-quality composites initially; however, due to long layup times, the resin advancement commonly causes high void content and variations in fiber volume. Applied Poleramic, Inc. (API), developed an aerospace-grade benzoxazine matrix composite prepreg material that offers more than a year out-time at ambient conditions and provides exceptionally low void content when out-of-autoclave cured. When compared with aerospace epoxy prepreg systems, API's innovation offers significant improvements in terms of out-time at ambient temperature and the corresponding tack retention. The carbon fiber composites developed with the optimized matrix technology have significantly better mechanical performance in terms of hot-wet retention and compression when compared with aerospace epoxy matrices. These composites also offer an excellent overall balance of properties. This matrix system imparts very low cure shrinkage, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and low density when compared with most aerospace epoxy prepreg materials.

  8. Radiation curing of carbon fibre composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spadaro, G.; Alessi, S.; Dispenza, C.; Sabatino, M. A.; Pitarresi, G.; Tumino, D.; Przbytniak, G.

    2014-01-01

    Epoxy/carbon fibre reinforced composites were produced by means of e-beam irradiation through a pulsed 10 MeV electron beam accelerator. The matrix consisted of a difunctional epoxy monomer (DGEBA) and an initiator of cationic polymerisation, while the reinforcement was a unidirectional high modulus carbon fibre fabric. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was carried out in order to determine the cross-linking degree. The analysis pointed out a nonuniformity in the cross-linking degree of the e-beam cured panels, with the formation of clusters at low Tg (glass transition temperature) and clusters at high Tg. An out-of-mould post irradiation thermal treatment on e-beam cured samples provides a higher uniformity in the network although some slight degradation effects. Mode I delamination fracture toughness and Interlaminar Shear Strength (ISS) were also investigated by means of Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and Short Beam Shear tests, respectively. Results from this mechanical characterisation allowed to correlate fracture toughness of the bulk matrix resin, cross-linking density and fibre/matrix interaction to the delamination fracture behaviour of the fibre reinforced material.

  9. Adhesive Properties of Cured Phenylethynyl Containing Imides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J.; Chang, Alice C.

    1997-01-01

    Considerable attention has been directed towards acetylene terminated oligomers over the last 20 years' and recent work has focused on phenylethynyl terminated imide (PETI) oligomers. These reactive oligomers possess several features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives. The phenylethynyl group can be readily incorporated into many different functionalized oligomers. The reactive oligomers possess relatively low melt viscosities and thermally cure without the evolution of volatile by-products. Once cured, they typically display high glass transition temperatures (Tgs), excellent solvent resistance and high mechanical properties. new modified phenylethynyl-terminated imide (LaRC MPEI) oligomers were synthesized at various molecular weights utilizing a small amount of trifunctional amine. As long as the amount of triamine is relatively small, this approach produces a mixture of linear, star-shaped and branched polymer chains that has lower melt and solution viscosity than an equivalent molecular weight linear phenylethynyl terminated imide oligomers. The work reported herein involves the synthesis and characterization of a copolymer using this approach and the preparation of blends utilizing a phenylethynyl containing reactive plasticizer of lower molecular weight called LaRC LV-121. The chemistry and properties of this new MPEI as well as some blends of MPEI with LV-121, are presented and compared to the linear version, LARC-PETI-5.

  10. Dr. Hall and the work cure.

    PubMed

    Reed, Kathlyn L

    2005-01-01

    Herbert James Hall, MD (1870-1923), was a pioneer in the systematic and organized study of occupation as therapy for persons with nervous and mental disorders that he called the "work cure." He began his work in 1904 during the early years of the Arts and Crafts Movement in the United States. His primary interest was the disorder neurasthenia, a condition with many symptoms including chronic fatigue, stress, and inability to work or perform everyday tasks. The prevailing treatment of the day was absolute bed rest known as the "rest cure." Hall believed that neurasthenia was not caused by overwork but by faulty living habits that could be corrected through an ordered life schedule and selected occupations. He identified several principles of therapy that are still used today including graded activity and energy conservation. Dr. Adolph Meyer credits Hall for organizing the ideas on the therapeutic use of occupation (Meyer, 1922). Hall also provided the name American Occupational Therapy Association for the professional organization and served as the fourth president. For his many contributions to the profession Hall deserves to be recognized as a major contributor to the development and organization of occupational therapy. PMID:23927746

  11. CURE: Clean use of reactor energy

    SciTech Connect

    1990-05-01

    This paper presents the results of a joint Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford)-Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) study that considered the feasibility of treating radioactive waste before disposal to reduce the inventory of long-lived radionuclides, making the waste more suitable for geologic disposal. The treatment considered here is one in which waste would be chemically separated so that long-lived radionuclides can be treated using specific processes appropriate for the nuclide. The technical feasibility of enhancing repository performance by this type of treatment is considered in this report. A joint Westinghouse Hanford-PNL study group developed a concept called the Clean Use of Reactor Energy (CURE), and evaluated the potential of current technology to reduce the long-lived radionuclide content in waste from the nuclear power industry. The CURE process consists of three components: chemical separation of elements that have significant quantities of long-lived radioisotopes in the waste, exposure in a neutron flux to transmute the radioisotopes to stable nuclides, and packaging of radionuclides that cannot be transmuted easily for storage or geologic disposal. 76 refs., 32 figs., 24 tabs.

  12. [Current strategy to cure pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masao

    2002-03-01

    For more than a decade extensive retroperitoneal dissection, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy has not prolonged the survival of patients with pancreatic cancer. Two prospective randomized studies addressing the clinical significance of extensive dissection or pancreatic resection for advanced cancer are now in progress. Nonetheless, at present, resection offers the patient the only possibility of cure. Although the diagnosis of curable pancreatic cancer is difficult, recent evidences have given a few hints. The first is pancreatic duct dilatation caused by cancerous stricture. The second is diabetes as a sign of pancreatic cancer. Our prospective pancreatographic screening of diabetic patients selected by our criteria(Table 1) revealed 7 cancers in 98 patients(7.1%). Within 3 years from diagnosis, the prevalence was 15%. Although the 7 cancers were advanced, this suggests that earlier examinations in diabetic patients may possibly lead to earlier diagnosis. The third is a small cystic lesion as a sentinel of pancreatic cancer. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with cytology of the pancreatic juice may show the presence of in situ cancer in patients with a pancreatic cyst. At the moment, careful checks for the presence of these hints seem to be the only strategy to offer a chance for cure to patients with pancreatic cancer.

  13. Criteria for cure in acromegaly: report of a case apparently cured in which persisting tumor was found at autopsy.

    PubMed

    Wrightson, P; Holdaway, I M; Synek, B J

    1984-06-01

    A 49-year-old man with acromegaly underwent the apparently complete removal of a pituitary microadenoma by the transsphenoidal route. There was complete remission of the biochemical abnormalities for 2 1/2 years, with basal plasma growth hormone (GH) levels of less than 1 ng/ml and normal somatomedin levels. The patient then died after the rupture of a cerebral aneurysm. Serial sections of the pituitary fossa showed persistent tumor with a volume of about 6% of the remaining normal gland. It is concluded that current endocrine tests are limited in their ability to detect residual GH-secreting tumor. Their sensitivity is likely to depend on the mass of tumor and on the GH secretion rate. Predictions of long term cure based on these tests are only tentative.

  14. Rheokinetic analysis on the curing process of HTPB-DOA- MDI binder system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, T.; Liu, Y. C.; Ma, H.; Yu, Y. W.; Yuan, J. M.; Wang, J. H.; Guo, J. H.

    2016-07-01

    Polymer bonded explosives (PBXs) are a kind of rubbery explosives, in which the explosive components are bound together by a polymeric binder. The hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB)-based polyurethane binder systems possess a unique combination of properties, including superior adhesion, excellent mechanical properties and have been widely used in rocket propellants, PBXs and other weapons. The cure reaction between HTPB and diisocyanates in the castable PBXs plays an important role in the adjustment of process parameters as well as properties of explosive formulations. In this paper, viscosity measurements were carried out at different temperatures (15oC, 25oC, 35oC, 45oC, 55oC) to a series of systemic studies on the viscosity build-up and rheological reaction rate constant during the curing process of the of HTPB- dioctyl adipate (DOA)-diphenyl methane diisocyanate (MDI) binder system, discovered and explained the phenomenon that the pot-life of the binder system was prolonged when the curing temperature raised and the curing reaction rate was accelerated. And the rheology kinetic model of the HTPB-DOA-MDI binder system was established.

  15. Cure Kinetics of Epoxy Nanocomposites Affected by MWCNTs Functionalization: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saeb, Mohammad Reza; Bakhshandeh, Ehsan; Khonakdar, Hossein Ali; Mäder, Edith; Scheffler, Christina; Heinrich, Gert

    2013-01-01

    The current paper provides an overview to emphasize the role of functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in manipulating cure kinetics of epoxy nanocomposites, which itself determines ultimate properties of the resulting compound. In this regard, the most commonly used functionalization schemes, that is, carboxylation and amidation, are thoroughly surveyed to highlight the role of functionalized nanotubes in controlling the rate of autocatalytic and vitrification kinetics. The current literature elucidates that the mechanism of curing in epoxy/MWCNTs nanocomposites remains almost unaffected by the functionalization of carbon nanotubes. On the other hand, early stage facilitation of autocatalytic reactions in the presence of MWCNTs bearing amine groups has been addressed by several researchers. When carboxylated nanotubes were used to modify MWCNTs, the rate of such reactions diminished as a consequence of heterogeneous dispersion within the epoxy matrix. At later stages of curing, however, the prolonged vitrification was seen to be dominant. Thus, the type of functional groups covalently located on the surface of MWCNTs directly affects the degree of polymer-nanotube interaction followed by enhancement of curing reaction. Our survey demonstrated that most widespread efforts ever made to represent multifarious surface-treated MWCNTs have not been directed towards preparation of epoxy nanocomposites, but they could result in property synergism. PMID:24348181

  16. The effect of post-curing on Vickers Hardness of four light-cure resin composite materials.

    PubMed

    Marais, J T; Dannheimer, M F; Oosthuizen, M P; Booyse, A

    1999-03-01

    The use of post-curing ovens to post-cure light-cured resin composite restorations leads to a decrease in the negative effects of polymerization shrinkage and an increase in the hardness and wear resistance of the material. The aim of this study was to compare the Vickers Hardness (VH) of four different light-cure resin composite materials. In one group, samples of the four materials, Z100, Tetric Ceram, F2000 and Heliomolar were light-cured only, and in the other group a similar set of samples were light-cured and also post-cured in a DI 500 post-curing oven. VH vests were then carried out on the samples. All samples in the post-cured group had higher VH values (p = 0.000) than the corresponding samples in the light-cured only group. Z100 and F2000 had, in both groups, significantly higher VH values (p = 0.000) than Tetric Ceram and Heliomolar.

  17. Comparison of three types of light-curing devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, G. L.; Blankenau, Richard J.

    2000-03-01

    Shortened curing times for light activated composites have been sought for many years. This study was conducted to compare diametral tensile strengths (DTS) of four composites cured with three light curing devices: halogen lamp, argon laser and plasma arc. Twelve samples were made for each composite and light curing device for a total of 192 samples. Diametral tensile strengths were measured on the Instron testing machine and statistical analysis performed using ANOVA and Fisher PLSD. Results indicate there wee no statistical differences in the DTS of the composites tested as a result of the curing light source. The Plasma Arc curing light was able to produce statistically equal diametral tensile strengths in 3 and 6 seconds as compared to the argon laser in 10 seconds and the halogen light in 40 seconds. Supported in part by Dental Medical Diagnostics.

  18. Process Formulations And Curing Conditions That Affect Saltstone Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M. M.; Pickenheim, B. R.; Daniel, W. E.

    2012-09-28

    The first objective of this study was to analyze saltstone fresh properties to determine the feasibility of reducing the formulation water to premix (w/p) ratio while varying the amount of extra water and admixtures used during processing at the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). The second part of this study was to provide information for understanding the impact of curing conditions (cure temperature, relative humidity (RH)) and processing formulation on the performance properties of cured saltstone.

  19. Curing of liquid crystalline epoxy resins with a biguanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepaniak, Barbara; Penczek, Piotr; Frisch, Kurt C.; Rejdych, Jerzy

    1998-01-01

    This work extends the authors' investigation son liquid crystalline epoxy resins prepared from diglycidyl ether of 4,4'-dihydroxybiphenyl and aliphatic dicarboxylic compounds or difunctional aromatic compounds. Syntheses and properties of these liquid crystalline epoxy resins are described elsewhere. In this paper a study on the curing reaction of two from the above mentioned liquid crystalline epoxy resins is presented. Ortho-tolylbiguanide was applied as the curing agent. The curing reactions were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, microscopic observations and IR spectroscopy. Depending upon the temperature program of curing, it was possible to obtain polymeric networks with liquid crystalline order.

  20. Dual cure solventless coating process. Phase 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    DeVoe, R.J.; Palazzotto, M.C.; Chambers, W.L.; Brown-Wensley, K.A.; Holmes, G.L.; Keipert, S.J.; Mathis, M.D.; McCormick, F.B.; Spurgeon, K.M.; Williams, J.W.

    1992-02-01

    The objective is to determine the feasibility of using the Dual Cure Photocatalyst technology for reduction of gaseous waste emissions through the minimization of coating solvent use. This is to be accomplished by developing a photocuring technology that would allow the use of solvent free (100% solids) formulations while preserving or improving upon the performance of conventional solvent based materials. Four Dual Cure Photocatalyst systems and one conventional catalyst system were investigated for use in curing combinations of epoxies with acrylates and acrylates with polyurethane precursors (polyol/polyisocyanate mixtures). Photocatalyst screening results showed that Dual Cure Photocatalyst Systems based upon cationic organometallic compounds alone or in combination with free radical photoinitiators or oxidants provide significantly better processing performance than systems based upon conventional catalysts or neutral organometallic compounds in combination with oxidants. Mechanical testing of materials prepared with the five catalyst systems showed that: (1) Dual Cure compositions can produce materials with better properties than the component parts and (2) Compositions cured with Dual Cure Photocatalysts produce materials superior to those cured with conventional catalyst systems in a number of cases. Cost, economic and energy analyses are presented based upon laboratory scale coating and curing studies.

  1. Light-curing acrylic resin as an orthodontic baseplate material.

    PubMed

    Brown, J; Kerr, W J

    1998-08-01

    Heat-curing autopolymerizing (self-cure or cold-cure), thermoplastic, and light-curing acrylic resin are the most commonly used orthodontic baseplate materials. While cured acrylic resins present few problems to the patient, in the laboratory acrylic resin has to be sprayed, mixed, or packed in a fume-extraction unit because of the harmful fumes emitted by the raw inflammable chemicals. Light-curing material, on the other hand, is virtually nonflammable and has virtually no aroma. A light-cure technique for the construction of orthodontic baseplates is described. While buildup of the baseplate is slightly slower than for self-cured material, the shorter time involved in trimming and polishing means that overall construction is faster. It is easier to obtain a uniform thickness with light-cured material, and it provides superior fit. These results, however, are subject to more extensive clinical trials. The only apparent disadvantage is the fine powder produced during trimming. Even with a bench equipped with an extraction unit, it is advisable to use a face mask to prevent the inhalation of dust.

  2. On the heterogeneous structure of thermally cured bis-GMA/TEGDMA resins.

    PubMed

    Jancar, J; Wang, W; DiBenedetto, A T

    2000-11-01

    , revealed total weight loss of the order of 3.2-5.6 wt % regardless of the total conversion. No uncured monomer was detected in the extract solution using FTIR spectroscopy, however, the method used is not sensitive to the presence of oligomers. It was concluded that the remaining unreacted double bonds are the inevitable result of the diffusion controlled heterogeneous cure reaction. The low rate of diffusion in the resin beyond its gel point is controlled by high monomer rigidity, low mobility and radius of gyration of the monomers. The unreacted C=C bonds exist in the form of pendant, side groups chemically attached to the network. In addition, a hypothesis has been proposed that for concentrations of rigid bis-GMA monomers above 50 wt %, preferably only one methacrylate group of its molecule has reacted on the time span of the experiment performed and has been incorporated in the cured network. Hence, a substantial part of unsaturation exists in the solid polymer in the form of pendant groups formed by mechanically ineffective bis-GMA monomers. The results are in good qualitative agreement with computer simulations based on the kinetic gelation model.

  3. Bending strength and depth of cure of light-cured composite resins irradiated using filters that simulate enamel.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, H; Kanie, T; Fujii, K; Shinohara, N

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluates the light-attenuating effects of enamel on the properties of light-cured restorative resins using simple experimental filters. Three filters were designed to replicate the light transmittance characteristics of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mm thick human enamel. The bending strength, depth of cure, and levels of residual monomer for 12 shades of three commercial light-cured composite resins were examined. These resins were cured either using direct irradiation from a light source or irradiation through one of the filters. For all materials, the bending strength and depth of cure of specimens irradiated through a filter were lower and the levels of residual monomer were higher than those found in specimens irradiated directly. The results indicate that the light-attenuating effect of enamel reduces the polymerization efficiency, resulting in poorer mechanical properties of light-cured composite resins. PMID:15125601

  4. Effect of curing mode on the hardness of dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials.

    PubMed

    Arrais, César Augusto Galvão; Kasaz, Aline de Cerqueira; Albino, Luís Gustavo Barrote; Rodrigues, José Augusto; Reis, Andre Figueiredo

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the Knoop Hardness (KHN) values of two dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials and one resin cement exposed to different curing conditions. Two dual-cured core build-up composite resins (LuxaCore-Dual, DMG; and FluoroCore2, Dentsply Caulk), and one dual-cured resin cement (Rely X ARC, 3M ESPE) were used in the present study. The composite materials were placed into a cylindrical matrix (2 mm in height and 3 mm in diameter), and the specimens thus produced were either light-activated for 40 s (Optilux 501, Demetron Kerr) or were allowed to self-cure for 10 min in the dark (n = 5). All specimens were then stored in humidity at 37 degrees C for 24 h in the dark and were subjected to KHN analysis. The results were submitted to 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test at a pre-set alpha of 5%. All the light-activated groups exhibited higher KHN values than the self-cured ones (p = 0.00001), regardless of product. Among the self-cured groups, both composite resin core build-up materials showed higher KHN values than the dual-cured resin cement (p = 0.00001). LuxaCore-Dual exhibited higher KHN values than FluoroCore2 (p = 0.00001) when they were allowed to self-cure, while no significant differences in KHN values were observed among the light-activated products. The results suggest that dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials may be more reliable than dual-cured resin cements when curing light is not available.

  5. Effectiveness of composite cure associated with different curing modes of LED lights.

    PubMed

    Soh, M S; Yap, Adrian U J; Siow, K S

    2003-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of cure of two LED (light-emitting diodes) lights (Elipar FreeLight [FL], 3M-ESPE; GC e-Light [EL], GC) to conventional (Max [MX], Dentsply-Caulk [control]), high intensity (Elipar TriLight [TL], 3M-ESPE) and very high intensity (Astralis 10 [AS], Ivoclar Vivadent) halogen lights. The 10 light-curing regimens investigated were: FL1 400 mW/cm2 [40 seconds], FL2 0-400 mW/cm2 [12 seconds] --> 400 mW/cm2 [28 seconds], EL1 750 mW/cm2 [10 pulses x 2 seconds], EL2 350 mW/cm2 [40 seconds], EL3 600 mW/cm2 [20 seconds], EL4 0-600 mW/cm2 [20 seconds] --> 600 mW/cm2 [20 seconds], TL1 800 mW/cm2 [40 seconds], TL2 100-800 mW/cm2 [15 seconds] --> 800 mW/cm2 [25 seconds], AS1 1200 mW/cm2 [10 seconds], MX 400 mW/cm2 [40 seconds]. Effectiveness of cure with the different modes was determined by measuring the top and bottom surface hardness (KHN) of 2-mm thick composite (Z100, [3M-ESPE]) specimens using a digital microhardness tester (n=5, load=500 g; dwell time=15 seconds). Results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA/Scheffe's post-hoc test and Independent Samples t-test (p<0.05). At the top surface, the mean KHN observed with LED lights ranged from 55.42 +/- 1.47 to 68.54 +/- 1.46, while that of halogen lights was 62.64 +/- 1.87 to 73.14 +/- 0.97. At the bottom surface, the mean KHN observed with LED and halogen lights ranged from 46.90 +/- 1.73 to 66.46 +/- 1.18 and 62.26 +/- 1.93 to 70.50 +/- 0.87, respectively. Significant differences in top and bottom KHN values were observed between different curing regimens for the same light, and between LED and halogen lights. Although curing with most modes of EL resulted in significantly lower top and bottom KHN values than the control, no significant difference was observed for the different modes of FL. Hence, the effectiveness of composite cure with LED LCUs is product dependent.

  6. What Will It Take to Cure HIV?

    PubMed

    Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2015-01-01

    Investigational strategies to attempt HIV cure or remission include very early initiation of antiretroviral therapy to limit the latent HIV reservoir and preinfection vaccination. In the setting of viral suppression, strategies include reactivation of latently infected cells (eg, through "shock" therapy with histone deacetylase inhibitors or other agents); use of broadly neutralizing antibodies, therapeutic vaccines, immunotoxins, or other immune-based therapies to kill latently infected cells; and gene editing to induce target cell resistance (eg, by eliminating the CC chemokine receptor 5 [CCR5] coreceptor). Improved ability to detect and quantify very low levels of virus is needed. This article summarizes a presentation by Jintanat Ananworanich, MD, PhD, at the IAS-USA continuing education program held in New York, New York, in October 2014.

  7. How do we value a cure?

    PubMed

    Husereau, Don

    2015-01-01

    Future perceptions of the value of curative therapies will likely reflect debates happening today about preferences for funding of preventive versus treatment programs, as well as funding orphan drugs. Little is known about how society will value curative therapies versus standard treatments, and the significant role of a host of psychological factors compared to overarching concerns about opportunity costs will likely lead to significant tension between payers and the public. More research to clarify societal preferences and healthcare goals in regards to curative therapies and in light of the potential for significant opportunity costs will be required. Given what we know about preferences for the funding of prevention and treatment measures, we should expect that cures will not be held to a different measure.

  8. Patienthood in medieval Tuscany: beliefs and cures.

    PubMed

    Lawless, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    This paper focuses on intersections of holy and sick bodies in the Tuscan Middle Ages to examine how the faithful accessed miraculous cures from contact with, or belief in, the relics of the saints. Rather than examine the relationship between the long dead martyrs (whose relics were abundant), however, it will look at the relationship between relatively recent saints and their devotees. The miracles discussed are traditional-that is, they are found in the lives of many saints and are not exceptional. It is hoped, however, that by concentrating on Tuscany, some insights can be secured on the relationship between Tuscan individuals of the late middle ages and those of their community who were recognised, either officially or through vox populi, as saints. PMID:27174846

  9. Stratospheric experiments on curing of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudinov, Viacheslav; Kondyurin, Alexey; Svistkov, Alexander L.; Efremov, Denis; Demin, Anton; Terpugov, Viktor; Rusakov, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    Future space exploration requires a large light-weight structure for habitats, greenhouses, space bases, space factories and other constructions. A new approach enabling large-size constructions in space relies on the use of the technology of polymerization of fiber-filled composites with a curable polymer matrix applied in the free space environment on Erath orbit. In orbit, the material is exposed to high vacuum, dramatic temperature changes, plasma of free space due to cosmic rays, sun irradiation and atomic oxygen (in low Earth orbit), micrometeorite fluence, electric charging and microgravitation. The development of appropriate polymer matrix composites requires an understanding of the chemical processes of polymer matrix curing under the specific free space conditions to be encountered. The goal of the stratospheric flight experiment is an investigation of the effect of the stratospheric conditions on the uncured polymer matrix of the composite material. The unique combination of low residual pressure, high intensity UV radiation including short-wave UV component, cosmic rays and other aspects associated with solar irradiation strongly influences the chemical processes in polymeric materials. We have done the stratospheric flight experiments with uncured composites (prepreg). A balloon with payload equipped with heater, temperature/pressure/irradiation sensors, microprocessor, carrying the samples of uncured prepreg has been launched to stratosphere of 25-30 km altitude. After the flight, the samples have been tested with FTIR, gel-fraction, tensile test and DMA. The effect of cosmic radiation has been observed. The composite was successfully cured during the stratospheric flight. The study was supported by RFBR grants 12-08-00970 and 14-08-96011.

  10. Curing of epoxy matrix composite in stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Kondyurina, Irina; Bilek, Marcela

    Large structures for habitats, greenhouses, space bases, space factories are needed for next stage of space exploitation. A new approach enabling large-size constructions in space relies on the use of the polymerization technology of fiber-filled composites with a curable polymer matrix applied in the free space environment. The polymerisation process is proposed for the material exposed to high vacuum, dramatic temperature changes, space plasma, sun irradiation and atomic oxygen (in low Earth orbit), micrometeorite fluence, electric charging and microgravitation. The stratospheric flight experiments are directed to an investigation of the curing polymer matrix under the stratospheric conditions on. The unique combination of low atmospheric pressure, high intensity UV radiation including short wavelength UV and diurnal temperature variations associated with solar irradiation strongly influences the chemical processes in polymeric materials. The first flight experiment with uncured composites was a part of the NASA scientific balloon flight program realised at the NASA stratospheric balloon station in Alice Springs, Australia. A flight cassette installed on payload was lifted with a “zero-pressure” stratospheric balloon filled with Helium. Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (CSBF) provided the launch, flight telemetry and landing of the balloon and payload. A cassette of uncured composite materials with an epoxy resin matrix was exposed 3 days in the stratosphere (40 km altitude). The second flight experiment was realised in South Australia in 2012, when the cassette was exposed in 27 km altitude. An analysis of the chemical structure of the composites showed, that the space irradiations are responsible for crosslinking of the uncured polymers exposed in the stratosphere. The first prepreg in the world was cured successfully in stratosphere. The investigations were supported by Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, NASA and RFBR (12-08-00970) grants.

  11. Spectrophotometric and colorimetric evaluation of staining of the light cured composite after exposure with different intensities of light curing units

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekhar, Veeramachaneni; Reddy, L Pramod; Prakash, T Jaya; Rao, G Anitha; Pradeep, M

    2011-01-01

    Aim/Objective: To understand the importance of intensity of light in polymerizing light cured composites and its relation to color stability. Materials and Methods: Forty specimens of composite disc with 3mm diameter and 1.5 mm thick were divided into two groups of 20 samples each. Group1: Twenty samples were cured with a light curing unit of380mw/cm2. Group2: Twenty samples cured with a light curing unit of 680mw/cm2. These polymerized samples were immersed in methylene blue dye for 24hoursand later washed and immersed in absolute alcohol for 24 hours. The amount of color released into absolute alcohol was assessed by spectrophotometric and colorimetric analysis. Results: Results were analyzed for spectrophotometric and colorimetric values by using the Mann-Whitney test. The group cured with low intensity light stained more compared to the group cured with a normal intensity of light. Conclusions: Intensity of light plays a crucial role in staining of the polymerized light cured composite. The intensity of the curing unit has to be maintained in acceptable limits to achieve good clinical results. PMID:22144810

  12. Fatty acid composition, oxidation status and volatile organic compounds in "Colonnata" lard from Large White or Cinta Senese pigs as affected by curing time.

    PubMed

    Serra, A; Buccioni, A; Rodriguez-Estrada, M T; Conte, G; Cappucci, A; Mele, M

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present paper was to evaluate the fatty acid composition, lipolysis, lipid oxidation and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Colonnata lard from Large White (LW) or Cinta Senese (CS) pigs during one-year of curing. CS lard contained higher amounts of unsaturated fatty acids than that from LW, due to the different rearing and feeding systems. Despite higher lipolysis in CS backfat during the curing period, the rate of fatty acid and cholesterol oxidation was higher in LW. The amount of cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs) significantly decreased after 3 months of curing, regardless of the type of lard. VOCs composition of lard was affected by curing time, but not by breed. While volatile fatty acid oxidation products (mainly aldehydes) were present at the beginning of curing, subsequently other volatile compounds (such as sulphur compounds and terpenes) that derived from ingredients used for lard production, increased in the samples.

  13. Colour Stability of Heat and Cold Cure Acrylic Resins

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, P R; Reddy, Madan Mohan; Ebenezar, A.V. Rajesh; Sivakumar, G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To evaluate the colour stability of heat and cold cure acrylic resins under simulated oral conditions with different colorants. Materials and Methods: Three different brands of heat cure acrylic resin and two rapid cure auto polymerizing acrylic resin of commercial products such as Trevelon Heat Cure (THC), DPI Heat cure (DHC), Pyrax Heat Cure (PHC), DPI Cold cure (DCC) and Acralyn-R-Cold cure (ACC) have been evaluated for discoloration and colour variation on subjecting it to three different, commonly employed food colorants such as Erythrosine, Tartarizine and Sunset yellow. In order to simulate the oral condition the food colorants were diluted with artificial saliva to the samples taken up for the study. These were further kept in an incubator at 37°C ± 1°C. The UV-visible spectrophotometer has been utilized to evaluate the study on the basis of CIE L* a* b* system. The prepared samples for standard evaluation have been grouped as control group, which has been tested with a white as standard, which is applicable for testing the colour variants. Results: The least colour changes was found to be with Sunset Yellow showing AE* value of 3.55 with heat cure acrylic resin branded as PHC material and the highest colour absorption with Tartarizine showing AE* value of 12.43 in rapid cure autopolymerzing acrylic resin material branded as ACC material. Conclusion: ACC which is a self cure acrylic resin shows a higher colour variation to the tartarizine food coloration. There were not much of discoloration values shown on the denture base resins as the food colorants are of organic azodyes. PMID:25738078

  14. Proportion cured models applied to 23 cancer sites in Norway.

    PubMed

    Cvancarova, Milada; Aagnes, Bjarte; Fosså, Sophie D; Lambert, Paul C; Møller, Bjørn; Bray, Freddie

    2013-04-01

    Statistical cure is reached when a group of patients has the same mortality as cancer-free individuals. Cure models predict the cured proportion and the median survival of fatal cases. Cure models have seldom been applied and tested systematically across all major cancer sites. Incidence and follow-up data on 23 cancer sites recorded at the Cancer Registry of Norway 1963-2007 were obtained. Mixture cure models were fitted to obtain trends and up-to-date estimates (based on period approach) assuming cured and uncured groups exist. The model converged for cancers of the mouth and pharynx, oesophagus, stomach, colon, rectum, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, lung and trachea, ovary, kidney, bladder, CNS, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (only for males) and leukemia. The proportion of cured patients increased 1963-2002 for both sexes, with the largest changes (in percent) seen for leukemia (46.4 and 46.7) and CNS (35.9, 42.0), males given first. Median survival time for the uncured cases increased for colon and rectal cancer, and there was a three- fold increase in median survival time for patients with fatal ovarian cancers. Cancers of bladder and CNS had the highest up-to-date proportion cured (in percent), 67.4 and 64.0, respectively, pancreas and liver were amongst the lowest (5.7 and 9.9, respectively). Cure models are useful when monitoring progress in cancer care, but must be applied and interpreted with caution. The absolute estimates of the cure proportion are speculative and should not be calculated where cure is not medically anticipated.

  15. Proportion cured models applied to 23 cancer sites in Norway.

    PubMed

    Cvancarova, Milada; Aagnes, Bjarte; Fosså, Sophie D; Lambert, Paul C; Møller, Bjørn; Bray, Freddie

    2013-04-01

    Statistical cure is reached when a group of patients has the same mortality as cancer-free individuals. Cure models predict the cured proportion and the median survival of fatal cases. Cure models have seldom been applied and tested systematically across all major cancer sites. Incidence and follow-up data on 23 cancer sites recorded at the Cancer Registry of Norway 1963-2007 were obtained. Mixture cure models were fitted to obtain trends and up-to-date estimates (based on period approach) assuming cured and uncured groups exist. The model converged for cancers of the mouth and pharynx, oesophagus, stomach, colon, rectum, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, lung and trachea, ovary, kidney, bladder, CNS, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (only for males) and leukemia. The proportion of cured patients increased 1963-2002 for both sexes, with the largest changes (in percent) seen for leukemia (46.4 and 46.7) and CNS (35.9, 42.0), males given first. Median survival time for the uncured cases increased for colon and rectal cancer, and there was a three- fold increase in median survival time for patients with fatal ovarian cancers. Cancers of bladder and CNS had the highest up-to-date proportion cured (in percent), 67.4 and 64.0, respectively, pancreas and liver were amongst the lowest (5.7 and 9.9, respectively). Cure models are useful when monitoring progress in cancer care, but must be applied and interpreted with caution. The absolute estimates of the cure proportion are speculative and should not be calculated where cure is not medically anticipated. PMID:22927104

  16. Using cure models for analyzing the influence of pathogens on salmon survival

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ray, Adam R; Perry, Russell W.; Som, Nicholas A.; Bartholomew, Jerri L

    2014-01-01

    Parasites and pathogens influence the size and stability of wildlife populations, yet many population models ignore the population-level effects of pathogens. Standard survival analysis methods (e.g., accelerated failure time models) are used to assess how survival rates are influenced by disease. However, they assume that each individual is equally susceptible and will eventually experience the event of interest; this assumption is not typically satisfied with regard to pathogens of wildlife populations. In contrast, mixture cure models, which comprise logistic regression and survival analysis components, allow for different covariates to be entered into each part of the model and provide better predictions of survival when a fraction of the population is expected to survive a disease outbreak. We fitted mixture cure models to the host–pathogen dynamics of Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and Coho Salmon O. kisutch and the myxozoan parasite Ceratomyxa shasta. Total parasite concentration, water temperature, and discharge were used as covariates to predict the observed parasite-induced mortality in juvenile salmonids collected as part of a long-term monitoring program in the Klamath River, California. The mixture cure models predicted the observed total mortality well, but some of the variability in observed mortality rates was not captured by the models. Parasite concentration and water temperature were positively associated with total mortality and the mortality rate of both Chinook Salmon and Coho Salmon. Discharge was positively associated with total mortality for both species but only affected the mortality rate for Coho Salmon. The mixture cure models provide insights into how daily survival rates change over time in Chinook Salmon and Coho Salmon after they become infected with C. shasta.

  17. Hepatitis C Virus Treatment: Is It Possible To Cure All Hepatitis C Virus Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Andrew J.; Naggie, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    The recent advances in hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapeutics have brought combinations of direct acting antiviral medications that offer interferon-free, well-tolerated regimens with sustained virologic response rates greater than 90% in clinical trials for many patient groups. The successes have prompted discussions regarding cure for all patients. These regimens have already demonstrated the ability to cure previously challenging patient groups, including human immunodeficiency virus–HCV coinfection, decompensated cirrhosis, and post-liver transplantation. Limitations exist in the current portfolio of agents, with suboptimal outcomes for genotype 3 and limited data in genotypes 5 and 6. More data are urgently needed in patients with chronic kidney disease and in children. With ongoing developments, highly effective regimens for all these patient groups are within reach. To deliver HCV treatment throughout the world and particularly in low-and middle-income countries, regimens need to be affordable but also pan-genotypic, well-tolerated, and delivered once daily for 4–8 weeks. With such a regimen, cure for all patients would then hinge on the ability to identify patients with HCV infection and deliver treatment within their communities. This review will discuss the strategies that will be necessary to realize this opportunity to cure all persons with HCV infection. PMID:26192145

  18. Cure reaction of epoxy resins catalyzed by graphite-based nanofiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcione, C. Esposito; Acocella, Maria Rosaria; Giuri, Antonella; Maffezzoli, Alfonso; Guerra, Gaetano

    2015-12-01

    A significant effort was directed to the synthesis of graphene stacks/epoxy nanocomposites and to the analysis of the effect of a graphene precursor on cure reaction of a model epoxy matrix. A comparative thermal analysis of epoxy resins filled with an exfoliated graphite oxide eGO were conducted. The main aim was to understand the molecular origin of the influence of eGO on the Tg of epoxy resins. The higher Tg values previously observed for low curing temperatures, for epoxy resins with graphite-based nanofillers, were easily rationalized by a catalytic activity of graphitic layers on the reaction between the epoxy and amine groups of the resin, which leads to higher crosslinking density in milder conditions. A kinetic analysis of the cure mechanism of the epoxy resin associated to the catalytical activity of the graphite based filler was performed by isothermal DSC measurements. The DSC results showed that the addition of graphite based filler greatly increased the enthalpy of epoxy reaction and the reaction rate, confirming the presence of a catalytic activity of graphitic layers on the crosslinking reaction between the epoxy resin components (epoxide oligomer and di-amine). A kinetic modelling analysis, arising from an auto-catalyzed reaction mechanism, was finally applied to isothermal DSC data, in order to predict the cure mechanism of the epoxy resin in presence of the graphite based nanofiller.

  19. A method for observing gas evolution during plastic laminate cure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, A. H.

    1969-01-01

    Polyimide, phenolic, and other resins which develop volatiles during laminating or molding cure are studied using optimum cure cycles. The specimen is placed on a platen and sealed in a plastic bag, then heated and observed for gas evolution using a binocular microscope. A cover plate is added to sumulate an autoclave.

  20. Mental Retardation: The Search for Cures. Research Monograph Number 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menolascino, Frank J.; Neman, Ronald

    The booklet describes the Association for Retarded Citizens' (ARC's) goal of coordinating efforts to seek a cure for mental retardation. Cures are defined as any intervention that would significantly increase intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior beyond the upper level of retardation. It is explained that because of the variety of causes…

  1. Cure cycle evaluation for multilayer printed wiring boards

    SciTech Connect

    Lula, J.W.

    1980-06-01

    The cure cycle for multilayer printed wiring boards (PWBs) made from general-puspore, fire-retardant epoxy/glass (GF) material has been evaluated for the optimum delamination resistance at soldering temperatures. The results that, for the epoxy resin system used to manufacture multilayer PWBs at Bendix Kansas City, a wide range of cure cycle variations has a minimal effect on delamination resistance.

  2. Post-cure heat treatments for composites: properties and fractography.

    PubMed

    Ferracane, J L; Condon, J R

    1992-09-01

    Two commercial and four experimental composites were subjected to post-cure heat treatments of 10 min and 3 h duration immediately after light-curing. Fracture toughness, flexural modulus, microhardness and degree of conversion (FTIR) were evaluated 24 h later. The results showed that post-cure heat treatments at 120 degrees C of short or long duration can be used to produce significant improvements in the degree of cure and the mechanical properties of dental composites used as inlays. A 10 min heat treatment was as effective as a 3 h treatment in enhancing properties and degree of cure. In addition, a 3 h heat treatment carried out 7 days after the initial light-curing was capable of improving properties and cure to almost the same extent as the immediate heat treatments. The improvement in properties, in conjunction with the fractography, indicate a toughening of the filled resin matrix and possibly an improved filler/matrix adhesion in the microfills. The changes appear to be predominantly the result of an increase in degree of cure.

  3. Improved method facilitates debulking and curing of phenolic impregnated asbestos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaines, P.

    1966-01-01

    Workpieces covered with phenolic impregnated asbestos tape and then wrapped with a specified thickness of nylon yarn under pressure, are debulked and cured in a standard oven. This method of debulking and curing is used in the fabrication of ablative chambers for the Gemini and Apollo attitude control engines.

  4. Which therapeutic strategy will achieve a cure for HIV-1?

    PubMed

    Cillo, Anthony R; Mellors, John W

    2016-06-01

    Strategies to achieve a cure for HIV-1 infection can be broadly classified into three categories: eradication cure (elimination of all viral reservoirs), functional cure (immune control without reservoir eradication), or a hybrid cure (reservoir reduction with improved immune control). The many HIV-1 cure strategies being investigated include modification of host cells to resist HIV-1, engineered T cells to eliminate HIV-infected cells, broadly HIV-1 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, and therapeutic vaccination, but the 'kick and kill' strategy to expose latent HIV-1 with latency reversing agents (LRAs) and kill the exposed cells through immune effector functions is currently the most actively pursued. It is unknown, however, whether LRAs can deplete viral reservoirs in vivo or whether current LRAs are sufficiently safe for clinical use.

  5. A penalized likelihood approach for mixture cure models.

    PubMed

    Corbière, Fabien; Commenges, Daniel; Taylor, Jeremy M G; Joly, Pierre

    2009-02-01

    Cure models have been developed to analyze failure time data with a cured fraction. For such data, standard survival models are usually not appropriate because they do not account for the possibility of cure. Mixture cure models assume that the studied population is a mixture of susceptible individuals, who may experience the event of interest, and non-susceptible individuals that will never experience it. Important issues in mixture cure models are estimation of the baseline survival function for susceptibles and estimation of the variance of the regression parameters. The aim of this paper is to propose a penalized likelihood approach, which allows for flexible modeling of the hazard function for susceptible individuals using M-splines. This approach also permits direct computation of the variance of parameters using the inverse of the Hessian matrix. Properties and limitations of the proposed method are discussed and an illustration from a cancer study is presented.

  6. 7 CFR 30.38 - Class 3; air-cured types and groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... produced principally in the Green River section of Kentucky. (g) Type 37. That type of air-cured or sun-cured tobacco commonly known as Virginia Sun-cured, Virginia Sun and Air-cured, or Dark Air-cured...

  7. 7 CFR 30.38 - Class 3; air-cured types and groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... produced principally in the Green River section of Kentucky. (g) Type 37. That type of air-cured or sun-cured tobacco commonly known as Virginia Sun-cured, Virginia Sun and Air-cured, or Dark Air-cured...

  8. Cure models for the analysis of time-to-event data in cancer studies.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaoyu; Sima, Camelia S; Brennan, Murray F; Panageas, Katherine S

    2013-11-01

    In settings when it is biologically plausible that some patients are cured after definitive treatment, cure models present an alternative to conventional survival analysis. Cure models can inform on the group of patients cured, by estimating the probability of cure, and identifying factors that influence it; while simultaneously focusing on time to recurrence and associated factors for the remaining patients.

  9. Stress evolution in a conductive adhesive during curing and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Yuhai

    2000-10-01

    There is increasing interest in using conductive adhesives, which are composites of polymers and conductive fillers, as replacements for solder in different types of microelectronic assemblies. However, conductive adhesives still suffer from several deficiencies, such as unstable electrical conductivity and inadequate adhesion. The reliability of the conductive adhesive joints is always one of the major considerations during their design and operation, and the curing and thermal stresses generated in polymers and composites during curing, cooling and thermal cycling play a very important role in determining reliability. Because of the mismatch in the mechanical properties between the conductive adhesive and the substrate, appreciable curing and thermal stress is generated during manufacturing, which may be detrimental to the reliability of conductive adhesive joints. In this dissertation, an interactive linear viscoelastic model which considers interaction between the initial gel network and the other networks that form during curing is proposed to simulate stress and volume shrinkage during the thermoset curing process, and an effective method for measuring volume shrinkage during the thermoset cure is developed. A systematic experimental study of the material properties of the conductive adhesive and its epoxy matrix during the curing and cooling processes has been conducted. Based on these experimental data, stresses generated during several spatially homogeneous curing and cooling processes of the conductive adhesive and its epoxy matrix are also calculated. It is found that the conductive adhesive possesses mechanical properties which are substantially different from those of the constituents, and that the conductive adhesive has a relaxation process which is similar to its matrix and generates appreciable curing and thermal stresses during curing and cooling. Finally, a processing procedure designed to provide desired residual stresses is discussed.

  10. HIV Cure Strategies: How Good Must They Be to Improve on Current Antiretroviral Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Sax, Paul E.; Sypek, Alexis; Berkowitz, Bethany K.; Morris, Bethany L.; Losina, Elena; Paltiel, A. David; Kelly, Kathleen A.; Seage, George R.; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Weinstein, Milton C.; Eron, Joseph; Freedberg, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Background We examined efficacy, toxicity, relapse, cost, and quality-of-life thresholds of hypothetical HIV cure interventions that would make them cost-effective compared to life-long antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods We used a computer simulation model to assess three HIV cure strategies: Gene Therapy, Chemotherapy, and Stem Cell Transplantation (SCT), each compared to ART. Efficacy and cost parameters were varied widely in sensitivity analysis. Outcomes included quality-adjusted life expectancy, lifetime cost, and cost-effectiveness in dollars/quality-adjusted life year ($/QALY) gained. Strategies were deemed cost-effective with incremental cost-effectiveness ratios <$100,000/QALY. Results For patients on ART, discounted quality-adjusted life expectancy was 16.4 years and lifetime costs were $591,400. Gene Therapy was cost-effective with efficacy of 10%, relapse rate 0.5%/month, and cost $54,000. Chemotherapy was cost-effective with efficacy of 88%, relapse rate 0.5%/month, and cost $12,400/month for 24 months. At $150,000/procedure, SCT was cost-effective with efficacy of 79% and relapse rate 0.5%/month. Moderate efficacy increases and cost reductions made Gene Therapy cost-saving, but substantial efficacy/cost changes were needed to make Chemotherapy or SCT cost-saving. Conclusions Depending on efficacy, relapse rate, and cost, cure strategies could be cost-effective compared to current ART and potentially cost-saving. These results may help provide performance targets for developing cure strategies for HIV. PMID:25397616

  11. Review and implementation of cure models based on first hitting times for Wiener processes.

    PubMed

    Balka, Jeremy; Desmond, Anthony F; McNicholas, Paul D

    2009-06-01

    The development of models and methods for cure rate estimation has recently burgeoned into an important subfield of survival analysis. Much of the literature focuses on the standard mixture model. Recently, process-based models have been suggested. We focus on several models based on first passage times for Wiener processes. Whitmore and others have studied these models in a variety of contexts. Lee and Whitmore (Stat Sci 21(4):501-513, 2006) give a comprehensive review of a variety of first hitting time models and briefly discuss their potential as cure rate models. In this paper, we study the Wiener process with negative drift as a possible cure rate model but the resulting defective inverse Gaussian model is found to provide a poor fit in some cases. Several possible modifications are then suggested, which improve the defective inverse Gaussian. These modifications include: the inverse Gaussian cure rate mixture model; a mixture of two inverse Gaussian models; incorporation of heterogeneity in the drift parameter; and the addition of a second absorbing barrier to the Wiener process, representing an immunity threshold. This class of process-based models is a useful alternative to the standard model and provides an improved fit compared to the standard model when applied to many of the datasets that we have studied. Implementation of this class of models is facilitated using expectation-maximization (EM) algorithms and variants thereof, including the gradient EM algorithm. Parameter estimates for each of these EM algorithms are given and the proposed models are applied to both real and simulated data, where they perform well.

  12. Role of Virechana Karma in cure and prevention of recurrence of Vicharchika (Eczema)

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Mandip; Chandola, Harimohan

    2012-01-01

    Mandip and Chandola reported that administration of Rasayana (Guduchi and Bhringaraja) after Koshtha Shuddhi with Aragvadha Hima and simultaneous giving of Shirishadi decoction orally and applying of Snuhyadi Lepa externally provided complete remission to 22.6% patients of Vicharchika (Eczema) and checked the recurrences of the disease in the 89.5% patients. As in this group, cure rate was not up to the expectation; therefore, it was thought desirable to see whether performing of Virechana Karma instead of Koshtha Shuddhi prior to the administration of the above drugs enhances the cure rate for the Vicharchika (Eczema) patients. For the present study, 39 patients of Vicharchika (Eczema) were registered, of which 32 patients completed the full course of the treatment. These patients were given Virechana after preparing with the proper internal Snehana, Abhyanga, and Svedana as per classical method. After the Samsarjana Krama, they were administered the Shirishadi decoction and Guduchi-Bhringraja Rasayana powder orally with simultaneous local application of Snuhyadi Lepa on the eczematous lesions. The results of this study showed that when Virechana Karma was performed prior to the administration of Guduchi-Bhringaraja Rasayana and Shirishadi decoction orally and SnuhyadiLepa externally, it not only increased the cure rate to 81.3% in the patients of Vicharchika (Eczema) but also checked the recurrences to great extent as only negligible number of the patients reported the recurrence. PMID:23723667

  13. Patient Preferences for Treatment of Basal Cell Carcinoma: Importance of Cure and Cosmetic Outcome.

    PubMed

    Martin, Isabelle; Schaarschmidt, Marthe-Lisa; Glocker, Anne; Herr, Raphael; Schmieder, Astrid; Goerdt, Sergij; Peitsch, Wiebke K

    2016-03-01

    Treatment options for localized resectable basal cell carcinoma (BCC) include micrographically controlled surgery, simple excision, curettage, laser ablation, cryosurgery, imiquimod, 5-fluorouracil, photodynamic therapy and radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to assess the preferences of patients with BCC for outcome (cure and recurrence rate, cosmetic outcome, risk of temporary and permanent complications) and process attributes (type of therapy, treatment location, anaesthesia, method of wound closure, duration of wound healing, out-of-pocket costs) of these treatments with conjoint analysis. Participants (n = 124) attached greatest importance to recurrence rate (relative importance score (RIS) = 17.28), followed by cosmetic outcome (RIS = 16.90) and cure rate (RIS = 15.02). Participants with BCC on the head or neck were particularly interested in cosmetic outcome. Those with a recurrence were willing to trade risk of recurrence, treatment location and duration of wound healing for a better cosmetic result. In summary, participants particularly valued cure and cosmetic outcome, although preferences varied with individual and tumour-associated characteristics.

  14. Novel Multifunctional Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Curing Agent with High Flame-Retardant Efficiency for Epoxy Resin.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yi; Shao, Zhu-Bao; Chen, Xue-Fang; Long, Jia-Wei; Chen, Li; Wang, Yu-Zhong

    2015-08-19

    A novel multifunctional organic-inorganic hybrid was designed and prepared based on ammonium polyphosphate (APP) by cation exchange with diethylenetriamine (DETA), abbreviated as DETA-APP. Then DETA-APP was used as flame-retardant curing agent for epoxy resin (EP). Curing behavior, including the curing kinetic parameters, was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The flame retardance and burning behavior of DETA-APP cured EP were also evaluated. The limiting oxygen index (LOI) value of DETA-APP/EP was enhanced to 30.5% with only 15 wt % of DETA-APP incorporated; and the UL-94 V-0 rating could be easily passed through with only 10 wt % of the hybrid. Compared with DETA/EP, the peak-heat release rate (PHRR), total heat release (THR), total smoke production (TSP), and peak-smoke production release (SPR) of DETA-APP/EP (15 wt % addition), obtained from cone calorimetry, were dropped by 68.3, 79.3, 79.0, and 30.0%, respectively, suggesting excellent flame-retardant and smoke suppression efficiency. The flame-retardant mechanism of DETA-APP/EP has been investigated comprehensively. The results of all the aforementioned studies distinctly confirmed that DETA-APP was an effective flame-retardant curing agent for EP.

  15. Novel Multifunctional Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Curing Agent with High Flame-Retardant Efficiency for Epoxy Resin.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yi; Shao, Zhu-Bao; Chen, Xue-Fang; Long, Jia-Wei; Chen, Li; Wang, Yu-Zhong

    2015-08-19

    A novel multifunctional organic-inorganic hybrid was designed and prepared based on ammonium polyphosphate (APP) by cation exchange with diethylenetriamine (DETA), abbreviated as DETA-APP. Then DETA-APP was used as flame-retardant curing agent for epoxy resin (EP). Curing behavior, including the curing kinetic parameters, was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The flame retardance and burning behavior of DETA-APP cured EP were also evaluated. The limiting oxygen index (LOI) value of DETA-APP/EP was enhanced to 30.5% with only 15 wt % of DETA-APP incorporated; and the UL-94 V-0 rating could be easily passed through with only 10 wt % of the hybrid. Compared with DETA/EP, the peak-heat release rate (PHRR), total heat release (THR), total smoke production (TSP), and peak-smoke production release (SPR) of DETA-APP/EP (15 wt % addition), obtained from cone calorimetry, were dropped by 68.3, 79.3, 79.0, and 30.0%, respectively, suggesting excellent flame-retardant and smoke suppression efficiency. The flame-retardant mechanism of DETA-APP/EP has been investigated comprehensively. The results of all the aforementioned studies distinctly confirmed that DETA-APP was an effective flame-retardant curing agent for EP. PMID:26186089

  16. Dry-cured ham restructured with fibrin.

    PubMed

    Romero de Ávila, M D; Hoz, L; Ordóñez, J A; Cambero, M I

    2014-09-15

    The viability of a fibrinogen-thrombin system (FT) to bind fresh deboned hams for incorporation in the salting and ripening processes, to produce cured ham, was studied. The effects of the different processing variables (pH, NaCl concentration, temperature and gelation time) on FT, a meat emulsion mixed with FT, fresh pork portions and deboned hams restructured with FT were analyzed. The most stable and firmest fibrin gels were obtained after 6h of adding the FT, with less than 2% NaCl and pH 7-8.4. Scanning electron microscopy of the fibrin gel showed fibrillar structures with a high degree of cross-linking and a high density. Two structures were found in the binding area of restructured meat; one in the central part with similar characteristics to fibrin gels and, another in the area of contact between the meat surfaces, where a filamentous structure connected the fibrin gels with the muscle bundles. PMID:24767091

  17. Electron Beam Cured Epoxy Resin Composites for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.; Meador, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam curing of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC's) is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process that has been demonstrated to be a cost effective and advantageous alternative to conventional thermal curing. Advantages of electron beam curing include: reduced manufacturing costs; significantly reduced curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvement in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance the electron beam curing of PMC technology. Over the last several years a significant amount of effort within the CRADA has been devoted to the development and optimization of resin systems and PMCs that match the performance of thermal cured composites. This highly successful materials development effort has resulted in a board family of high performance, electron beam curable cationic epoxy resin systems possessing a wide range of excellent processing and property profiles. Hundreds of resin systems, both toughened and untoughened, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility have been developed and evaluated in the CRADA program.

  18. Development of a resin curing model for UV nanoimprint.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Woo; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2005-10-01

    UV nanoimprint lithography uses UV light as an energy source. It is performed at room temperature and low pressure, and has its own merits as compared to thermal nanoimprint. In this paper, a measurement system was developed to measure the degree of resin curing in UV nanoimprint to improve our understanding of the resin solidification phenomenon. A curing model was then established based on the measurement results. The measurement system measured the degree of cure in real time and was composed of a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy system, a UV light source, and an optical guide. Also, new UV-curable resins that had low viscosity values were developed for the UV nanoimprint process, and imprint tests using these resins were performed successfully. The curing model considered the UV irradiation time, power, and curing temperature, which are important parameters in the UV nanoimprint process. The degree of cure had an exponential relation to UV irradiation time, power, and temperature; thus, the curing model was expressed as an exponential function of the UV irradiation time, power, and temperature. The developed model was verified for various UV-curable resins.

  19. Cured meat consumption increases risk of readmission in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    de Batlle, Jordi; Mendez, Michelle; Romieu, Isabelle; Balcells, Eva; Benet, Marta; Donaire-Gonzalez, David; Ferrer, Jaume J; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Antó, Josep M; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that a high dietary intake of cured meat increases the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) development. However, its potential effects on COPD evolution have not been tested. We aimed to assess the association between dietary intake of cured meat and risk of COPD readmission in COPD patients. 274 COPD patients were recruited during their first COPD admission between 2004 and 2006, provided information on dietary intake of cured meat during the previous 2 yrs, and were followed until December 31, 2007 (median follow-up 2.6 yrs). Associations between cured meat intake and COPD admissions were assessed using parametric regression survival-time models. Mean ± SD age was 68 ± 8 yrs, 93% of patients were male, 42% were current smokers, mean post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) was 53 ± 16% predicted, and median cured meat intake was 23 g · day(-1). After adjusting for age, FEV(1), and total caloric intake, high cured meat intake (more than median value) increased the risk of COPD readmission (adjusted HR 2.02, 95% CI 1.31-3.12; p=0.001). High cured meat consumption increases the risk of COPD readmission in COPD patients. The assessment of the effectiveness of healthy diet advice should be considered in the future.

  20. Variation of Resin Properties Through the Thickness of Cured Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    It is the purpose of this work to gain knowledge of the glassy materials used as matrices in composites and to study the homogeneity resulting from the curing process. An attempt is made to link the glass transition quantitatively with the presence of a given material. Expoxy resins containing various amounts of hardener (TGDDM/DDS system) were cured in a muffle furnace at 473 K for seven hours. The glass transition temperature, T sub g versus weight minus percent of hardener in the epoxy resin were measured. A limit was rapidly reached in T sub g at only two percent hardener. Thus, the glass transition of the fully cured epoxy-amine matrix seems not much different from the epoxide-epoxide cure. The T sub g versus cure-time for the epoxide-epoxide reaction was also studied. My 720 was cured by itself in an oil bath at 473 K for different lengths of time. The T sub g was found to increase exponentially with the cure time, and a maximum T sub g of about 450 K was reached after eleven hours. The reaction was found to be inhibited by running the sample under argon.

  1. Electron beam curing of epoxy resins by cationic polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C.J.; Dorsey, G.F.; Havens, S.J.

    1996-12-31

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners has been established to develop high performance Electron Beam (EB) curable polymer matrix composites. EB curing of composites has a number of advantages over conventional thermal curing. Composites cured by EB have much shorter cure times, lower overall energy requirements, and reduced thermal stresses in the cured part. Furthermore, less expensive tooling can be used since the process occurs at lower temperatures. Preliminary investigations have determined that conventional epoxy resins can be cured at selectable temperatures with high glass transition temperatures (essentially the same as with thermal curing), while still exhibiting equivalent or comparable mechanical properties. A cationic photoinitiator at a concentration of 1-3 parts per hundred of the epoxy resin is required for this process. Gamma cell screening of cationic photoinitiators with bisphenol A, bisphenol F, and cycloaliphatic epoxies demonstrated that diaryliodonium salts of weakly nucleophilic anions such as hexafluoroantimonate are most effective. Diaryliodonium salts were also found to be the most effective initiators for the cationic polymerization of epoxy resins when a high energy/power electron beam accelerator was used as the source of ionizing radiation. For example Dow Tactix 123 (bisphenol A epoxy) containing 3 phr (4-octyloxyphenyl) phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate was irradiated at a total dosage of 100 kGy. Glass transition temperature (tan delta) of the cured material as determined by dynamic mechanical analysis was 182{degrees}C as compared to 165{degrees}C for the thermally cured material.

  2. Thermoanalytical characterization of visible light cure dental composites.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, J; Vaidyanathan, T K; Wang, Y; Viswanadhan, T

    1992-01-01

    Selected commercial and experimental composites and resin systems have been evaluated by thermal analysis techniques of Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Thermogravimetric Analysis and Thermomechanical Analysis. Important thermal data such as heat of cure, coefficient of thermal expansion, dimensional changes over selected temperature ranges, filler weight percent, onset temperature of decomposition, etc. have been determined. Heat of cure, thermal expansion coefficient and dimensional changes appear to follow an inverse linear regression fit with filler fraction in the composite. Thermal expansion changes and exothermic reactions with temperature indicate secondary cure during postcure heating. The thermally-induced decomposition occurs in multiple stages indicating presence of different structural species in the resin matrix.

  3. Micromechanical properties of veneer luting resins after curing through ceramics.

    PubMed

    Oztürk, Elif; Hickel, Reinhard; Bolay, Sükran; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of light-cured luting resin after curing under the ceramic restoration in comparison to dual-cured luting resin, by evaluating the micromechanical properties. Two hundred seventy thin luting composite films of ca. 170 μm in thickness were prepared by using two light-cured luting resins (Variolink Veneer, Ivoclar Vivadent; RelyX Veneer, 3M ESPE) and a dual-cured luting resin (Variolink II, Ivoclar Vivadent). The composites were cured by using a LED-unit (Bluephase®, Ivoclar Vivadent) with three different curing times (10, 20, and 30 s) under two ceramics (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent; IPS Empress® CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent) of different thicknesses (0, 0.75, and 2 mm). Forty-five groups were included, each containing six thin films. The samples were stored after curing for 24 h at 37°C by maintaining moisture conditions with distilled water. Micromechanical properties of the composites were measured with an automatic microhardness indenter (Fisherscope H100C, Germany). For each sample, ten indentations were made, thus totalizing 60 measurements per group. Micromechanical properties of the luting resins were statistically analyzed (SPSS 17.0). Significant differences were observed between the micromechanical properties of the luting resins (p < 0.05). Variolink II showed the highest values in modulus of elasticity (E = 11 ± 0.5)* and Vickers hardness (HV = 48.2 ± 3.2)* and the lowest values in creep (Cr = 4.3 ± 0.1)* and elastic-plastic deformation (We/Wtot = 38.6 ± 0.7)* followed by RelyX Veneer (E = 6.9 ± 0.3, HV = 33 ± 2.5, Cr = 4.6 ± 0.2, We/Wtot = 41.8 ± 1.0)* and Variolink Veneer (E = 4.4 ± 0.4, HV = 20.1 ± 2.6, Cr = 5 ± 0.2, We/Wtot = 43.7 ± 1.3)*. Dual-cured luting resin expressed higher values in the micro-mechanical properties compared to the light-cured luting resins. The effect of luting resin type on the micromechanical properties of the luting resins was higher than the effect of

  4. Cure4Kids - building online learning and collaboration networks.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Yuri; Nambayan, Ayda; Ribeiro, Raul; Bowers, Lynne; Shuler, Ana; O'Brien, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The International Outreach Program of St. Jude Childrens' Research Hospital has been developing programs to help countries with limited resources develop treatment centers to treat children with catastrophic diseases such as pediatric cancer and AIDS. Cure4Kids (www.cure4kids.org) is the Internet learning network that delivers medical education to doctors and nurses on pediatric cancer and AIDS. The objective of Cure4Kids is not only education, but also to provide tools for communications and collaborations among individuals. PMID:14728482

  5. Remnant percolative disorder in highly-cured networks

    SciTech Connect

    Adolf, D.; Hance, B.; Martin, J.E. )

    1993-05-24

    The authors have previously reported viscoelastic measurements demonstrating that fully-cured networks and critical gels exhibit similar relaxation spectra, implying that fully-cured networks are somewhat ill- connected. Here, they present restricted valence percolation simulations of networks well beyond the percolation transition that explicitly display remnant disorder over length scales less than the correlation length of the network. They conclude that the topology of highly-cured networks is not well described by a regular three- dimensional tennis net but is ill-connected over length scales that correspond to relaxation modes of practical interest.

  6. [Influence of the diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease on the quality of life of cured patients].

    PubMed

    Combes, P F; Desclaux, B; Malissard, L; Pons, A

    1977-01-01

    Authors present results of an inquiry dealing with familial and socio-professional reinsertion of 130 patients who have been treated for Hodgkin disease. On a family point of view, after treatment, the rate of single people is higher than in general population. Even though one can observe marriages, and feminine sterility is rare, the number of children by married couple remains low. There is no change in rate of house moving. Most of cured patients return to work. This fact is related to duration of treatment, but variations depend essentially of familial situation, kind to work and quality of previous social insurance. For two groups of people risk of unemployement is higher: agricultural labourers who are often dismissed and contractual civil servants who meet with difficulties to be established. Definitive invalidity is rarely conceded by wearied social organisms. Finally cured patients appear most of the time comparable with healthy population. However they meet with important difficulties to get a loan or to contract a life insurance. Premiums are frequently raised and policies restricted. Difficulties are not related to organic sequelae. Cured patients still remain suspicious for their entourage and employer, that bring them about to hide the pathologic episode.

  7. Investigation of lignite and firewood co-combustion in a furnace for tobacco curing application

    SciTech Connect

    Nakorn Tippayawong; Chutchawan Tantakitti; Satis Thavornun

    2006-07-01

    Co-combustion of lignite and firewood was investigated for an application in tobacco curing industry in Northern Thailand. Extensive experiments have been carried out in a newly developed furnace suitable for small curing unit, in place of locally made furnace. The aim of this investigation is to evaluate the performance of the combustion chamber in the required thermal output range for tobacco curing and to examine the influence of fuel feed rate, fuel mixture ratio and air staging on the combustion and emission characteristics of the furnace during steady state operation. Their effects are characterized in terms of the observed variations of temperature distributions, emissions of CO, SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and combustion efficiency. Co-firing of firewood and lignite has been found to exhibit acceptable temperature distribution, high combustion efficiency and low emissions over a wide thermal output span. Stable operation at low (50 kW) and high (150 kW) thermal output was achieved with average CO and SO{sub 2} content in flue gas typically below 1400 and 100 ppm, respectively. Under the conditions considered, it was showed that the fuel feed rate had greater influence on combustion and emissions than firewood and lignite mixture ratio and air staging.

  8. Balancing cure and long-term risks in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Lewis B

    2014-12-01

    Cure rates for children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have improved dramatically over the last few decades. With this success has come increasing recognition of the adverse late effects of treatment. The significant long-term sequelae in the earliest cohort of long-term survivors treated in the 1970s and 1980s are well documented. To reduce the incidence of these late effects, the majority of pediatric patients treated on more contemporary regimens receive less intensive treatment than did those treated 30-40 years ago. However, current therapies are not risk free; children treated with contemporary regimens remain at risk for developing long-term toxicities, including cardiac dysfunction, osteonecrosis, neurocognitive impairment, and second malignant neoplasms. One of the great challenges facing clinical investigators today is to identify interventions that will reduce the frequency and severity of long-term toxicities without adversely affecting cure rates. The use of dexrazoxane as a cardioprotectant (to prevent anthracycline-associated cardiotoxicity) and alternate-week dosing of dexamethasone (to reduce the risk of osteonecrosis) are examples of 2 such successful strategies. This article provides an overview of the long-term toxicities associated with current therapies and reviews results of clinical trials designed to minimize the burden of cure in long-term survivors.

  9. Whisker-reinforced heat-cured dental resin composites: effects of filler level and heat-cure temperature and time.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H

    2000-06-01

    Currently available dental resin composites are inadequate for use in large stress-bearing crown and multiple-unit restorations. The aim of this study was to reinforce heat-cured composites with ceramic whiskers. It was hypothesized that whiskers substantially strengthen heat-cured composites. It was further hypothesized that whisker filler level and heat-cure temperature and time significantly influence composite properties. Silica particles were fused onto the whiskers to facilitate silanization and to roughen the whiskers for improved retention in the matrix. The whisker filler mass fraction was varied from 0% to 79%, the heat-cure temperature from 80 degrees C to 180 degrees C, and cure time from 10 min to 24 hrs. Flexural strength, work-of-fracture, and fracture toughness of the composites were measured, and specimen fracture surfaces were examined with scanning electron microscopy. Filler level had a significant effect on composite properties. The whisker composite with 70% filler level had a flexural strength in MPa (mean +/- SD; n = 6) of 248 +/- 23, significantly higher than 120 +/- 16 of an inlay/onlay composite control and 123 +/- 21 of a prosthetic composite control (Tukey's multiple comparison test; family confidence coefficient = 0.95). Heat-cure time also played a significant role. At 120 degrees C, the strength of composite cured for 10 min was 178 +/- 17, lower than 236 +/- 14 of composite cured for 3 hrs. The strength of whisker composite did not degrade after water-aging for 100 d. In conclusion, heat-cured composites were substantially reinforced with whiskers. The reinforcement mechanisms appeared to be whiskers bridging and resisting cracks. The strength and fracture toughness of whisker composite were nearly twice those of currently available inlay/onlay and prosthetic composites.

  10. Cure of duodenal ulcer associated with eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Rauws, E A; Tytgat, G N

    1990-05-26

    50 patients with intractable duodenal ulcer were randomly assigned to 4 weeks of treatment with colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS) alone (26 patients) or with amoxicillin and metronidazole (24 patients). 5 patients (all on triple therapy) withdrew because of side-effects. In 17 of the 45 patients who completed the treatment, Helicobacter pylori was eradicated, and there was no ulcer relapse during the first 12 months of follow-up. The ulcer relapse rate was significantly higher (17 of 21 [89%]) among patients who remained positive for H pylori. 9 patients who remained positive for H pylori and had ulcer relapses within 6 months of treatment with CBS alone, were subsequently given triple therapy. 7 of the 9 showed H pylori eradication and no relapses within the next 12 months. The 2 patients still H pylori-positive after triple therapy had further ulcer relapses. H pylori eradication, without altering acid output, will become the mainstay of duodenal ulcer treatment because it cures the disease.

  11. The Effects of Long Term Cure on Offgassed Products of Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engle, Ginger; Whitfield, Steve

    1997-01-01

    The Environmental Chemistry and Compatability Team at The Marshall Space Flight Center conducts toxic offgassing analysis on materials and flight hardware for use in habitable environments aboard the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station. As part of Research and Development, the Toxic Offgassing Laboratory conducted a long term cure study on four polyurethane coatings which are slated for potential use on Space Station. This study demonstrates the effects of cure time and temperature on the total tox value (sum T) and the maximum usage weight for each coating. All analysis was conducted according to test procedures outlined specifically for Space Station environments. Therefore, the ratings and weight limits generated for these materials are most applicable to space environments. However, this test does give some indication of time frames for solvent removal and is therefore of interest to, the environmental community as a whole.

  12. Curing APL through PML/RARA degradation by As2O3.

    PubMed

    Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valerie; Zhu, Jun; Chen, Zhu; de Thé, Hugues

    2012-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a hematological malignancy driven by the PML/RARA oncogene. The prognosis for patients with APL was revolutionized by two treatments: retinoic acid (RA) and As(2)O(3) (arsenic trioxide). These were both shown a posteriori to target PML/RARA, explaining their exquisite specificity for APL. Arsenic, as a single agent, cures up to 70% of patients, whereas APL patients treated with the combination of RA and As(2)O(3) reach a stunning 90% cure rate. Recent physiopathological models highlight the key role of RA- and As(2)O(3)-triggered PML/RARA degradation, and the molecular mechanisms underlying As(2)O(3)-induced PML/RARA degradation have been recently clarified. As discussed below, arsenic binding, oxidation, sumoylation on PML nuclear bodies, and RNF4-mediated ubiquitination all contribute to the As(2)O(3)-triggered catabolism of PML/RARA.

  13. ISOPAR L RELEASE FROM SALTSTONE CURED AT 55 C

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A; Cora Berry, C; Michael Bronikowski, M; Russell Eibling, R; Jack Zamecnik, J

    2006-05-16

    The decontaminated salt solution waste stream from the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit and the Salt Waste Processing Facility is anticipated to contain entrained extraction solvent. The decontaminated salt solution is scheduled to be processed through Tank 50 into the Saltstone Production Facility. This study, among others, has been undertaken because the solvent concentration in the decontaminated salt solution may cause flammability issues within the Saltstone Disposal Facility that may need to be addressed prior to operation. Previous work at the Savannah River National Laboratory determined the release of Isopar{reg_sign} L from saltstone prepared with a simulated DSS with Isopar{reg_sign} L concentrations ranging from 50 to 200 {micro}g/g in the salt fraction and with test temperatures ranging from ambient to 95 C. The results from the curing of the saltstone showed that the Isopar{reg_sign} L release data can be treated as a percentage of initial concentration in the concentration range studied. The majority of the Isopar{reg_sign} L that was released over the test duration was released in the first few days. The release of Isopar{reg_sign} L begins immediately and the rate of release decreases over time. At higher temperatures the immediate release is larger than at lower temperatures. In this study, saltstone was prepared using a simulated decontaminated salt solution containing Isopar{reg_sign} L concentrations of 50 {micro}L/L (30 {micro}g/g) and 100 {micro}L/L (61 {micro}g/g) and cured at 55 C. The headspace of each sample was purged and the Isopar{reg_sign} L was trapped on a coconut shell carbon tube. The amount of Isopar{reg_sign} L captured was determined using NIOSH Method 1501. The percentage of Isopar{reg_sign} L released after 20 days was 1.4 - 3.7% for saltstone containing 50 {micro}L/L concentration and 2.1 - 4.3% for saltstone containing 100 {micro}L/L concentration. Given the measurement uncertainties in this work there is no

  14. Maleate/vinyl ether UV-cured coatings: Effects of composition on curing and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Noren, G.K.

    1996-10-01

    The effect of the composition of the maleate polyester and the vinyl ether terminated compound on their UV-curing and properties has been investigated. Linear unsaturated polyester resins based on maleic anhydride and 1,5-pentane diol were synthesized. The molecular weight of the unsaturated polyesters was varied by changing the ratio of maleic anhydride to 1,5-pentane diol and the double bond equivalent weight was varied by replacing maleic anhydride with succinic anhydride. Coating formulations containing these unsaturated polyesters, triethylene glycol divinyl ether and a free radical photoinitiator were crosslinked in the presence of UV light. The coatings were very brittle, exhibiting tensile strengths in the range of 1.5-4.0 MPa and elongations of only 3-7%. Diethyl maleate and isobutyl vinyl ether were effective diluents for reducing viscosity but reduced the cure speed. A vinyl ether urethane oligomer was synthesized and enhanced the flexibility and toughness of the coatings when substituted for triethylene glycol divinyl ether.

  15. Factors affecting dry-cured ham consumer acceptability.

    PubMed

    Morales, R; Guerrero, L; Aguiar, A P S; Guàrdia, M D; Gou, P

    2013-11-01

    The objectives of the present study were (1) to compare the relative importance of price, processing time, texture and intramuscular fat in purchase intention of dry-cured ham through conjoint analysis, (2) to evaluate the effect of dry-cured ham appearance on consumer expectations, and (3) to describe the consumer sensory preferences of dry-cured ham using external preference mapping. Texture and processing time influenced the consumer preferences in conjoint analysis. Red colour intensity, colour uniformity, external fat and white film presence/absence influenced consumer expectations. The consumer disliked hams with bitter and metallic flavour and with excessive saltiness and piquantness. Differences between expected and experienced acceptability were found, which indicates that the visual preference of consumers does not allow them to select a dry-cured ham that satisfies their sensory preferences of flavour and texture. PMID:23816516

  16. Epoxy foams using multiple resins and curing agents

    DOEpatents

    Russick, Edward M.; Rand, Peter B.

    2000-01-01

    An epoxy foam comprising a plurality of resins, a plurality of curing agents, at least one blowing agent, at least one surfactant and optionally at least one filler and the process for making. Preferred is an epoxy foam comprising two resins of different reactivities, two curing agents, a blowing agent, a surfactant, and a filler. According to the present invention, an epoxy foam is prepared with tailorable reactivity, exotherm, and pore size by a process of admixing a plurality of resins with a plurality of curing agents, a surfactant and blowing agent, whereby a foamable mixture is formed and heating said foamable mixture at a temperature greater than the boiling temperature of the blowing agent whereby said mixture is foamed and cured.

  17. Cure monitoring using ultrasonic guided waves in wires.

    PubMed

    Vogt, T; Lowe, M; Cawley, P

    2003-09-01

    The possibility of using ultrasonic guided waves for monitoring the cure process of epoxy resins is investigated. The two techniques presented use a wire waveguide which is partly embedded in the resin. The first technique is based on the measurement of attenuation due to leakage of bulk waves into the resin surrounding the waveguide. The second technique measures the reflection of the guided wave that occurs at the point where the waveguide enters the resin. Both the attenuation and the reflection coefficient change significantly during cure, and the numerical methods to relate these to the material properties of the curing resin are presented in this paper. The results from the modeling are experimentally verified and show good agreement. The applicability of each testing method is discussed, and typical cure-monitoring curves are presented.

  18. Global strategies are required to cure and eliminate HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Revill, Peter; Testoni, Barbara; Locarnini, Stephen; Zoulim, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    Chronic HBV infection results in >1 million deaths per year from cirrhosis and liver cancer. No known cure for chronic HBV exists, due in part to the continued presence of transcriptionally active DNA in the nucleus that is not directly targeted by current antiviral therapies. A coordinated approach is urgently needed to advance an HBV cure worldwide, such as those established in the HIV field. We propose the establishment of an International Coalition to Eliminate Hepatitis B Virus (ICE-HBV) to facilitate the formation of international working groups on HBV virology, immunology, innovative tools and clinical trials: to promote awareness and education as well as to drive changes in government policy and ensure funds are channelled to HBV cure research and drug development. With the ICE-HBV in place, it should be possible to enable a HBV cure within the next decade. PMID:26907881

  19. Method for curing polymers using variable-frequency microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; Bible, D.W.; Paulauskas, F.L.

    1998-02-24

    A method for curing polymers incorporating a variable frequency microwave furnace system designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity is disclosed. By varying the frequency of the microwave signal, non-uniformities within the cavity are minimized, thereby achieving a more uniform cure throughout the workpiece. A directional coupler is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace. A second power meter detects the magnitude of reflected power. The furnace cavity may be adapted to be used to cure materials defining a continuous sheet or which require compressive forces during curing. 15 figs.

  20. Method for curing polymers using variable-frequency microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Bible, Don W.; Paulauskas, Felix L.

    1998-01-01

    A method for curing polymers (11) incorporating a variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity (34). By varying the frequency of the microwave signal, non-uniformities within the cavity (34) are minimized, thereby achieving a more uniform cure throughout the workpiece (36). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. The furnace cavity (34) may be adapted to be used to cure materials defining a continuous sheet or which require compressive forces during curing.

  1. GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL CORPORATION; CURE ELECTROCOAGULATION TECHNOLOGY: INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The CURE electrocoagulation technology was demonstrated under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), where water from the solar evaporation ponds (SEPs) was contaminat...

  2. Investigation of Adhesive Bond Cure Conditions using Nonlinear Ultrasonic Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Tobias P.; Green, Robert E., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this presentation is to investigate various cure conditions of adhesive bonds using nonlinear ultrasonic methods with water coupling. Several samples were used to obtain normal incidence, oblique incidence, and wave mixing.

  3. Desorption and use of saturated lightweight aggregate in internal curing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briatka, P.; Makýš, P.

    2011-09-01

    Roughly 20 years ago there was a brand new concrete-curing concept presented in the U.S. based on providing "extra curing" water from inside the concrete. The extra water shoul be added to concrete during mixing, but is bound to some kind of carrier, so it does not alter the water-cement ratio. This technique, known as Internal Curing (IC) keeps the cement paste moist from the first moment when it normally would start to desiccate and is not mature enough to apply conventional means of curing. The durability and effectiveness of IC depend on the boundary conditions at the site as well as the properties of the carrier - in this case, Lightweight Aggregate (LWA), which, after the water soaking, replaces some part of the Normalweight Aggregate (NWA). This work deals with LWA (available on the European market) in the context of its properties affecting the efficiency of IC.

  4. Room-Temperature-Cured Copolymers for Lithium Battery Gel Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Tigelaar, Dean M.

    2009-01-01

    Polyimide-PEO copolymers (PEO signifies polyethylene oxide) that have branched rod-coil molecular structures and that can be cured into film form at room temperature have been invented for use as gel electrolytes for lithium-ion electric-power cells. These copolymers offer an alternative to previously patented branched rod-coil polyimides that have been considered for use as polymer electrolytes and that must be cured at a temperature of 200 C. In order to obtain sufficient conductivity for lithium ions in practical applications at and below room temperature, it is necessary to imbibe such a polymer with a suitable carbonate solvent or ionic liquid, but the high-temperature cure makes it impossible to incorporate and retain such a liquid within the polymer molecular framework. By eliminating the high-temperature cure, the present invention makes it possible to incorporate the required liquid.

  5. Light-curing polymers for laser plasma generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loktionov, E. Y.; Protasov, Y. S.; Protasov, Y. Y.; Telekh, V. D.

    2015-07-01

    Solid rather than liquid media are used in pulsed laser plasma generators despite sophisticated transportation and dosing system need for a long-term operation. Liquid media could be more preferable due to transfer and dosing (down to 10-14 L) being well developed, but plasma generation of those results in intense droplet formation and kinetic energy losses. Combination of liquids transportation advantages and solids plasma generation efficiency might resolve this trade-off. Liquid-to-solid transition can be induced by cooling down to sublimation temperature, thermo-, photo- or electron induced polymerization (curing). Light cured polymers seem to be very useful as active media for plasma generators, since they can be solidified very fast (ca. 30 ms) just before impact. We considered experimentally several UV- curing polymer and mixtures ablation regimes and supply schemes for laser plasma generation. The best results were obtained for liquid polymer at high-power pulsed irradiation matching curing optimum wavelength.

  6. Cell survival as a determinant of tumor cure for rat 9L subcutaneous tumors following microwave-induced hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Wallen, C A; Michaelson, S M; Wheeler, K T

    1982-01-01

    The relationship of cell survival to tumor cure after local hyperthermia treatment was studied in subcutaneous 9L rat tumors. Tumors weighing 0.2-0.4 g were heated to 42.5, 43.0, 44.0 and 45.0 degrees C by local exposure to 2450 MHz microwaves. Cell survival data was obtained by an in vivo to in vitro colony forming technique and a cell survival curve was constructed for each temperature as a function of exposure duration (0-180 min). Cell survival followed a simple exponential function with an increasingly steeper slope as temperature increased. At 44 degrees C, it was observed that cells from large tumors (1.0-1.4 g) were inactivated at the same rate as those from small tumors. When tumor response was monitored in the small tumors for 90 days following treatment, a direct correlation between the percentage of tumor cures and time at 44 degrees C (0-60 min) was observed; therefore, at 44 degrees C, tumor cure was exponentially related to cell survival in this range. However, when approximately the same cell survival was obtained with 3 other temperature--time regimens, the resulting percentage of tumor cures was not the same. These results indicate that while cell survival is related to tumor cure, it is probably not the primary determinant of tumor response following local hyperthermia in these 9L subcutaneous tumors.

  7. Cure frailty models for survival data: application to recurrences for breast cancer and to hospital readmissions for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rondeau, Virginie; Schaffner, Emmanuel; Corbière, Fabien; Gonzalez, Juan R; Mathoulin-Pélissier, Simone

    2013-06-01

    Owing to the natural evolution of a disease, several events often arise after a first treatment for the same subject. For example, patients with a primary invasive breast cancer and treated with breast conserving surgery may experience breast cancer recurrences, metastases or death. A certain proportion of subjects in the population who are not expected to experience the events of interest are considered to be 'cured' or non-susceptible. To model correlated failure time data incorporating a surviving fraction, we compare several forms of cure rate frailty models. In the first model already proposed non-susceptible patients are those who are not expected to experience the event of interest over a sufficiently long period of time. The other proposed models account for the possibility of cure after each event. We illustrate the cure frailty models with two data sets. First to analyse time-dependent prognostic factors associated with breast cancer recurrences, metastases, new primary malignancy and death. Second to analyse successive rehospitalizations of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Estimates were obtained by maximization of likelihood using SAS proc NLMIXED for a piecewise constant hazards model. As opposed to the simple frailty model, the proposed methods demonstrate great potential in modelling multivariate survival data with long-term survivors ('cured' individuals).

  8. Towards an HIV cure: a global scientific strategy.

    PubMed

    Deeks, Steven G; Autran, Brigitte; Berkhout, Ben; Benkirane, Monsef; Cairns, Scott; Chomont, Nicolas; Chun, Tae-Wook; Churchill, Melissa; Di Mascio, Michele; Katlama, Christine; Lafeuillade, Alain; Landay, Alan; Lederman, Michael; Lewin, Sharon R; Maldarelli, Frank; Margolis, David; Markowitz, Martin; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Mullins, James I; Mellors, John; Moreno, Santiago; O'Doherty, Una; Palmer, Sarah; Penicaud, Marie-Capucine; Peterlin, Matija; Poli, Guido; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Rouzioux, Christine; Silvestri, Guido; Stevenson, Mario; Telenti, Amalio; Van Lint, Carine; Verdin, Eric; Woolfrey, Ann; Zaia, John; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise

    2012-07-20

    Given the limitations of antiretroviral therapy and recent advances in our understanding of HIV persistence during effective treatment, there is a growing recognition that a cure for HIV infection is both needed and feasible. The International AIDS Society convened a group of international experts to develop a scientific strategy for research towards an HIV cure. Several priorities for basic, translational and clinical research were identified. This Opinion article summarizes the group's recommended key goals for the international community.

  9. Feasibility study for the development of low temperature curing adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. E.; Sutherland, J. D.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of a new approach for the development of stable, easily handled, room temperature (293 K - 311 K) curing adhesives was studied and demonstrated. The work concentrated on a family of unsaturated amide/ester resins. Twelve candidate resins were synthesized and tested for completeness of cure at room temperature, adhesion to aluminum and titanium, shear strength, moisture resistance and heat stability. The three most promising candidate resins were selected and recommended for further development.

  10. Prediction of the curing time to achieve maturity of the nano-cement based concrete using the Weibull distribution model: A complementary data set.

    PubMed

    Jo, Byung Wan; Chakraborty, Sumit; Kim, Heon

    2015-09-01

    This data article provides a comparison data for nano-cement based concrete (NCC) and ordinary Portland cement based concrete (OPCC). Concrete samples (OPCC) were fabricated using ten different mix design and their characterization data is provided here. Optimization of curing time using the Weibull distribution model was done by analyzing the rate of change of compressive strength of the OPCC. Initially, the compressive strength of the OPCC samples was measured after completion of four desired curing times. Thereafter, the required curing time to achieve a particular rate of change of the compressive strength has been predicted utilizing the equation derived from the variation of the rate of change of compressive strength with the curing time, prior to the optimization of the curing time (at the 99.99% confidence level) using the Weibull distribution model. This data article complements the research article entitled "Prediction of the curing time to achieve maturity of the nano-cement based concrete using the Weibull distribution model" [1].

  11. Modeling the cure kinetics of crosslinking free radical polymerizations using the Avrami theory of phase transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Finnegan, G.R.; Shine, A.D.

    1995-12-01

    A model, based on Avrami`s theory of phase transformation, has been developed to describe the cure kinetics of crosslinking free radical polymerizations. The model assumes the growing polymer can be treated as a distinct phase and the nucleation rate is proportional to the initiation rate of the polymerization. The Avrami time exponent was verified to be 4.0. This physically-based, two-parameter model fits vinyl ester resin heat flow data as well as the empirical, four-parameter autocatalytic model, and is capable of describing both neat and fiber-containing resin.

  12. Electron Beam-Cure Polymer Matrix Composites: Processing and Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrenn, G.; Frame, B.; Jensen, B.; Nettles, A.

    2001-01-01

    Researchers from NASA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are evaluating a series of electron beam curable composites for application in reusable launch vehicle airframe and propulsion systems. Objectives are to develop electron beam curable composites that are useful at cryogenic to elevated temperatures (-217 C to 200 C), validate key mechanical properties of these composites, and demonstrate cost-saving fabrication methods at the subcomponent level. Electron beam curing of polymer matrix composites is an enabling capability for production of aerospace structures in a non-autoclave process. Payoffs of this technology will be fabrication of composite structures at room temperature, reduced tooling cost and cure time, and improvements in component durability. This presentation covers the results of material property evaluations for electron beam-cured composites made with either unidirectional tape or woven fabric architectures. Resin systems have been evaluated for performance in ambient, cryogenic, and elevated temperature conditions. Results for electron beam composites and similar composites cured in conventional processes are reviewed for comparison. Fabrication demonstrations were also performed for electron beam-cured composite airframe and propulsion piping subcomponents. These parts have been built to validate manufacturing methods with electron beam composite materials, to evaluate electron beam curing processing parameters, and to demonstrate lightweight, low-cost tooling options.

  13. Tg and Cure of a Polycyanurate at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sindee; Li, Qingxiu

    2008-03-01

    Nanoscale constraint is known to have a significant impact on the thermal properties of materials. Although thermosetting resins have been cured in the presence of nanoparticles and nanotubes, cure of thermosetting resins under the well defined nanoscale constraints imposed by controlled pore glass (CPG) or similar matrices has not been previously documented. In this work, we investigate the isothermal curing under nanoscale constraint of a thermosetting resin, bisphenol M dicyanate ester (BMDC), which trimerizes to form a polycyanurate network material. Differential scanning calorimeter is used to monitor the evolution of the glass transition temperature (Tg) and the conversion during cure as a function of the diameter of the silanized control pore glass matrix which is used for confinement. A Tg depression is observed for both the bisphenol M dicyanate ester monomer and the polycyanurate networks; the depression is only a few degrees for the monomer, whereas a 56 K depression is observed for the ``fully-cured'' network in 11.5 nm pores. The nanoscale constraint is also found to accelerate the cure of the bisphenol M dicyanate ester, but it does not affect the normalized Tg versus conversion relationship. The appearance of a secondary Tg above the primary Tg in the smaller pores and the associated length scale are discussed.

  14. Vacuum Ultraviolet Curing of Low-k Organosilicate Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Huifeng

    The goal of this project is to optimize the vacuum-ultraviolet spectrum to identify those wavelengths that will have the most beneficial effect on improving dielectric properties and minimizing damage. To do this, the effects of vacuum-ultraviolet radiation (VUV) on organosilicate glass (SiCOH) will be examined. Changes to the electrical, chemical and mechanical properties of low-k organosilicate dielectrics induced by vacuum-ultraviolet radiation are investigated. VUV-generated changes to the permittivity and dielectric thickness are measured with both capacitance-voltage characteristics and a reflectometer. FTIR measurements are utilized to find the effect of VUV irradiation on chemical properties of SiCOH and XPS with nanoindentation measurements are used to investigate changes in mechanical properties. Measurements of the band gap and defect-state concentrations of SiCOH are made with VUV spectroscopy. These investigations are used to optimize VUV or UV/VUVexposure conditions to determine the wavelengths and intensities that can mitigate processing-induced damage. Thus, a "UV/VUV curing" process can be established and comparisons between UV/VUV curing and conventional industrial UV curing will be made. Investigations have shown that a combined UV/VUV curing could overcome some drawbacks of industrially UV curing and improve properties of dielectrics more efficiently than UV curing.

  15. A cure Weibull gamma-frailty survival model and its application to exploring the prognosis factors of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Dokhi, Mohammad; Ohtaki, Megu; Hiyama, Eiso

    2009-03-01

    The log rank test and the Cox regression, or modifications thereof, emphasize the effect of covariates on survival rate parameter. In some cases, cured individuals, i.e., individuals who may not experience the event of interest may exist in the population of interest. In this situation, we may wish to examine the effect of covariates on both survival rate and cured fraction parameters. Motivated by the Japanese neuroblastoma dataset, we consider a cure model that accounted for the effect of covariates on both of the abovementioned parameters. To deal with heterogeneity that is not explained by covariates, as well as individual random heterogeneity, we perform a frailty variable. Moreover, some nested models are fitted to deal with the principle of parsimony. The effect of covariates was then evaluated by the best nested model. From a statistical point of view, we found that the model of analysis is flexible and adequate to describe the abovementioned dataset. From a medical point of view, we confirmed AGE and STAGE to be the most dominant prognosis factor of neuroblastoma. We also conclude that NMYC and FERRITIN are the other most important prognosis factors. The analysis designated that some of the prognosis factors of neuroblastoma probably just affected the median life of patients and some others are the fatal prognosis factor indicated by their effect which significance on both of survival rate and cured fraction parameters. The present model of analysis is also potentially extendable to facilitate other aspects of inferences.

  16. Microhardness of composite resin cured through different primary tooth thicknesses with different light intensities and curing times: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mazhari, Fatemeh; Ajami, Behjatolmolok; Moazzami, Saied Mostafa; Baghaee, Bahareh; Hafez, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of increased exposure time and light intensity on microhardness of cured composite through different thicknesses of tooth structure in primary teeth. Materials and Methods: One hundred and seventy cylindrical resin composite specimens were prepared. All specimens were divided into 17 experimental and control groups. “Light-emitting diode” light curing unit (LCU) applied directly or through 1, 2, and 3 mm thicknesses tooth slices for experimental groups. The irradiation protocols were 25 and 50 s at 650 mW/cm2 and 15 and 30 s at 1100 mW/cm2. The “quartz-tungsten-halogen” LCU (400 mW/cm2) for 40 s was used in control group. Microhardness was measured by the Vickers hardness test. Results: Indirectly cured specimens and those cured through a 1 mm thick tooth structure, an increase in intensity caused hardness drop. In the specimens cured through 2 and 3 mm thick tooth structures, increased intensity and/or exposure time did not show any appropriate changes on microhardness. Conclusion: Irradiation through a 1.0 mm thick tooth slice resulted in reduced microhardness although it was still within the clinically acceptable level. The hardness values of the specimens cured through 2 or 3 mm thick tooth slices fell below the clinically acceptable level even after doubling the exposure time and/or light intensity. PMID:27095897

  17. Changes in the temperature of a dental light-cured composite resin by different light-curing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastelli, A. N. S.; Jacomassi, D. P.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temperature increase during the polymerization process through the use of three different light-curing units with different irradiation times. One argon laser (Innova, Coherent), one halogen (Optilight 501, Demetron), and one blue LED (LEC 1000, MM Optics) LCU with 500 mW/cm2 during 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 s of irradiation times were used in this study. The composite resin used was a microhybrid Filtek Z-250 (3M/ESPE) at color A2. The samples were made in a metallic mold 2 mm in thickness and 4 mm in diameter and previously light-cured during 40 s. A thermocouple (Model 120 202 EAJ, Fenwal Electronic, Milford, MA, USA) was introduced in the composite resin to measure the temperature increase during the curing process. The highest temperature increase was recorded with a Curing Light 2500 halogen LCU (5 and 31°C after 5 and 60 s, respectively), while the lowest temperature increase was recorded for the Innova LCU based on an argon laser (2 and 11°C after 5 and 60 s, respectively). The temperature recorded for LCU based on a blue LED was 3 and 22°C after 5 and 60 s, respectively. There was a quantifiable amount of heat generated during the visible light curing of a composite resin. The amount of heat generated was influenced by the characteristics of the light-curing units used and the irradiation times.

  18. Evaluation of microleakage of class II dental composite resin restorations cured with LED or QTH dental curing light; Blind, Cluster Randomized, In vitro cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to compare the microleakage of Class II dental composite resin restorations which have been cured by three different LED (light emitting diode) light curing modes compared to control samples cured by QTH (quartz tungsten halogen) light curing units (LCUs), to determine the most effective light curing unit and mode of curing. Results In this experimental study, class II cavities were prepared on 100 sound human premolars which have been extracted for orthodontic treatment. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups; three experimental and one control group of 25 teeth each. Experimental groups were cured by either conventional, pulse-delay, or ramped curing modes of LED. The control group was cured for 20 seconds by QTH. The restorations were thermocycled (1000 times, between 5 and 55°C, for 5 seconds dwell time), dyed, sectioned mesio-distally and viewed under stereo-microscope (40×) magnification. Teeth were then scored on a 0 to 4 scale based on the amount of microleakage. The data were analyzed by Chi-square test. No significant difference was demonstrated between the different LCUs (light curing units), or modes of curing, at the enamel side (p > 0.05). At the dentin side, all modes of LED curing could significantly reduce microleakage (p < 0.05). The results suggest that slow start curing improves marginal integrity and seal. High intense curing endangers those aims. Conclusions Comparison between the three LED mode cured composite resin restorations and QTH curing showed LED curing in all modes is more effective than QTH for reducing microleakage. Both LED and QTH almost completely eliminate the microleakage on the enamel side, however none of them absolutely eliminated microleakage on the dentin side. PMID:24990296

  19. 7 CFR 30.36 - Class 1; flue-cured types and groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Flue-cured, produced principally in the southern section of Georgia, in northern Florida, and to some...-cured, produced principally in the Piedmont sections of Virginia and North Carolina. (b) Type 11b. That type of flue-cured tobacco commonly known as Middle Belt Flue-cured, produced principally in a...

  20. 7 CFR 30.36 - Class 1; flue-cured types and groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Flue-cured, produced principally in the southern section of Georgia, in northern Florida, and to some...-cured, produced principally in the Piedmont sections of Virginia and North Carolina. (b) Type 11b. That type of flue-cured tobacco commonly known as Middle Belt Flue-cured, produced principally in a...

  1. 7 CFR 30.36 - Class 1; flue-cured types and groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Flue-cured, produced principally in the southern section of Georgia, in northern Florida, and to some...-cured, produced principally in the Piedmont sections of Virginia and North Carolina. (b) Type 11b. That type of flue-cured tobacco commonly known as Middle Belt Flue-cured, produced principally in a...

  2. 7 CFR 30.36 - Class 1; flue-cured types and groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Flue-cured, produced principally in the southern section of Georgia, in northern Florida, and to some...-cured, produced principally in the Piedmont sections of Virginia and North Carolina. (b) Type 11b. That type of flue-cured tobacco commonly known as Middle Belt Flue-cured, produced principally in a...

  3. 7 CFR 30.36 - Class 1; flue-cured types and groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Flue-cured, produced principally in the southern section of Georgia, in northern Florida, and to some...-cured, produced principally in the Piedmont sections of Virginia and North Carolina. (b) Type 11b. That type of flue-cured tobacco commonly known as Middle Belt Flue-cured, produced principally in a...

  4. 21 CFR 170.60 - Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. 170... nitrates in curing premixes. (a) Nitrites and/or nitrates are food additives when combined in curing... nitrates, when packaged separately from flavoring and seasoning in curing premixes, may continue to be...

  5. Optimal cure cycle design of a resin-fiber composite laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Jean W.; Hou, Tan H.; Sheen, Jeen S.

    1987-01-01

    Fibers reinforced composites are used in many applications. The composite parts and structures are often manufactured by curing the prepreg or unmolded material. The magnitudes and durations of the cure temperature and the cure pressure applied during the cure process have significant consequences on the performance of the finished product. The goal of this study is to exploit the potential of applying the optimization technique to the cure cycle design. The press molding process of a polyester is used as an example. Various optimization formulations for the cure cycle design are investigated. Recommendations are given for further research in computerizing the cure cycle design.

  6. Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Study of the Curing and Properties of Highly Cross-Linked Epoxy Polymers.

    PubMed

    Aramoon, Amin; Breitzman, Timothy D; Woodward, Christopher; El-Awady, Jaafar A

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a coarse-grained model is developed for highly cross-linked bisphenol A diglycidyl ether epoxy resin with diaminobutane hardener. In this model, all conformationally relevant coarse-grained degrees of freedom are accounted for by sampling over the free-energy surfaces of the atomic structures using quantum mechanical simulations. The interaction potentials between nonbonded coarse-grained particles are optimized to accurately predict the experimentally measured density and glass-transition temperature of the system. In addition, a new curing algorithm is also developed to model the creation of highly cross-linked epoxy networks. In this algorithm, to create a highly cross-linked network, the reactants are redistributed from regions with an excessive number of reactive molecules to regions with a lower number of reactants to increase the chances of cross-linking. This new algorithm also dynamically controls the rate of cross-linking at each local region to ensure uniformity of the resulting network. The curing simulation conducted using this algorithm is able to develop polymeric networks having a higher average degree of cross-linking, which is more uniform throughout the simulation cell as compared to that in the networks cured using other curing algorithms. The predicted gel point from the current curing algorithm is in the acceptable theoretical and experimental range of measured values. Also, the resulting cross-linked microstructure shows a volume shrinkage of 5%, which is close to the experimentally measured volume shrinkage of the cured epoxy. Finally, the thermal expansion coefficients of materials in the glassy and rubbery states show good agreement with the experimental values.

  7. Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Study of the Curing and Properties of Highly Cross-Linked Epoxy Polymers.

    PubMed

    Aramoon, Amin; Breitzman, Timothy D; Woodward, Christopher; El-Awady, Jaafar A

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a coarse-grained model is developed for highly cross-linked bisphenol A diglycidyl ether epoxy resin with diaminobutane hardener. In this model, all conformationally relevant coarse-grained degrees of freedom are accounted for by sampling over the free-energy surfaces of the atomic structures using quantum mechanical simulations. The interaction potentials between nonbonded coarse-grained particles are optimized to accurately predict the experimentally measured density and glass-transition temperature of the system. In addition, a new curing algorithm is also developed to model the creation of highly cross-linked epoxy networks. In this algorithm, to create a highly cross-linked network, the reactants are redistributed from regions with an excessive number of reactive molecules to regions with a lower number of reactants to increase the chances of cross-linking. This new algorithm also dynamically controls the rate of cross-linking at each local region to ensure uniformity of the resulting network. The curing simulation conducted using this algorithm is able to develop polymeric networks having a higher average degree of cross-linking, which is more uniform throughout the simulation cell as compared to that in the networks cured using other curing algorithms. The predicted gel point from the current curing algorithm is in the acceptable theoretical and experimental range of measured values. Also, the resulting cross-linked microstructure shows a volume shrinkage of 5%, which is close to the experimentally measured volume shrinkage of the cured epoxy. Finally, the thermal expansion coefficients of materials in the glassy and rubbery states show good agreement with the experimental values. PMID:27504803

  8. Influence of curing tip distance on composite Knoop hardness values.

    PubMed

    Sobrinho, L C; de Lima, A A; Consani, S; Sinhoreti, M A; Knowles, J C

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to study the influence of curing tip distance on Knoop hardness values, at different depths, of two composites, Z100 and Silux Plus. Specimens (5 mm in diameter and 2.5 mm in height) were prepared in a copper mold, covered with mylar strip and polymerized for 40 s, at 3 tip-to-composite surface distances: 0 mm (surface contact), 6 and 12 mm, utilizing an XL 3000 curing unit, with 750 mW/cm2 power. The specimens were then stored at 37 degrees C for 24 h. Knoop hardness values were measured using a microhardness tester, with a load of 50 g for 30 s for each indentation. Four specimens were made for each distance and composite and eighteen indentations were made of each specimen. The results were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey test at 5% significance level. The results indicated that 1) composite Z100: the larger the curing tip distance in relation to the composite, the lower the Knoop hardness values; 2) Silux Plus: increasing the curing tip distance did not produce a statistically significant difference in the Knoop hardness values; however, at 6 and 12 mm, the deeper layers showed lower Knoop hardness values in relation to the surface; 3) Z100: statistically superior in relation to Silux Plus at all three curing tip distances and at all depths (P < 0.05).

  9. Studies on microleakage associated with visible light cured dental composites.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, V K; Bindhu, D B; Manjusha, K

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this investigation was twofold: 1) to determine the extent of microleakage associated with two visible light cured dental composites, one of which is an indigenously developed light cure composite (chitra light cure system) compared with a commercially available control material (Prisma APH light cure system), and 2) to study the effect of using bonding agents upon the above phenomena. The bonding agents used along with the above composites during restoration were chitra bonding agent system containing chitra primer/chitra resin and a control (Probond) which was purchased commercially. A comparison of microleakage in freshly restored human premolar teeth by silver nitrate staining technique was made during the above study. Cavities were restored with both composites with and without bonding agents, stored in 50 percent silver nitrate, and sections were cut after developing. The microtomed sections were observed under the optical light microscope and scanning electron microscope. Results indicate that bonding agents are mandatory for effective bonding at the tooth/resin interface and subsequent reduction in marginal leakage. Chitra bonding agent showed excellent adhesive bonding characteristics at the dentine/composite interface with minimal marginal leakage compared to the control bonding system. The chitra light cure composite material also showed lower shrinkage characteristics compared to Prisma APH composite. PMID:8859406

  10. Electron beam curing of thin film polymer dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manepalli, Rahul Nagaraj

    2000-10-01

    Thin film polymer dielectrics are widely used in the microelectronics industry for a variety of applications. In order to be used for these applications, polymers are required to have excellent dielectric, chemical and mechanical properties with dimensional stability at high temperatures. Typically, these polymers are solvent cast onto the desired substrate and a cure process involving treatment at high temperatures for several hours is necessary to chemically cure the film. In this study, a novel cure technique involving electron beam exposure of polymer dielectrics is investigated. It is proposed to replace the long, conventional thermal cure cycle with a shorter, electron beam cure process. Five commercially available and commonly used polymer dielectrics are chosen for this study. The polymers chosen comprise a variety of different backbone chemistries, (polyimides, benzocyclobutene and polynorbornene) which encompass the classes of materials presently used in the microelectronics industry. The electrical, mechanical and optical properties in the film are characterized and correlated to the electron beam dose. Chemical changes in film are examined through FTIR and 13C solid state NMR spectroscopy. The effect of electron beam induced crosslinking on the multilayering behavior in certain polymer systems is also investigated.

  11. Nature cure treatment in the context of India's epidemiological transition.

    PubMed

    Alter, Joseph Stewart; Sharma, Chandrashekar

    2016-07-01

    Scholars have argued that theoretical insights of critical medical anthropology should be applied to the analysis of complementary and alternative medicine in order to develop more critically engaged integrative medicine. In this essay we focus on nature cure in the context of India's contemporary epidemiological transition as an example of why engaged integrative medicine is important for public health, and how the institutionalization of nature cure treatment in India provides a critical framework for the development of programs focused on holistic treatment and prevention. After providing an overview of the epidemiological transition in contemporary India, we develop this argument through an examination of illustrative cases in a clinic that operates within the structure of India's Central Council for Research on Yoga and Naturopathy. Based on a review of recent history and contemporary practice we describe how a system of medicine that makes use exclusively of air, earth, sunlight, water and food has been institutionalized and professionalized in India. Whereas biomedical treatment for chronic non-communicable diseases is focused on the problem of curing individual diseases, nature cure establishes a regimen of personalized public healthcare for the integrated management of symptoms. We argue that nature cure is based on an ecological understanding of health, thus providing treatment that reflects a broad appreciation for the risk factors that characterize India's current crises of public health. PMID:27417171

  12. Caul and method for bonding and curing intricate composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willden, Kurtis S. (Inventor); Goodno, Kenneth N. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The invention disclosed here is a method for forming and curing an intricate structure of criss-crossing composite stringers and frames that are bonded to a skin panel. A structure constructed in accordance with the invention would be well-suited for use as a portion of an aircraft fuselage, a boat hull, or the like. The method is preferably practiced by applying uncured composite stringers to an uncured composite sheet panel. This is followed by placing cured frames crosswise over the stringers. The frames have openings at the locations where they intersect with the stringers which enables the frames to come into direct contact with the skin along most of their length. During the forming and curing process, the stringers are covered with a plurality of cauls, and the entire assembly of skin panel, stringers, frames and cauls is subjected to a vacuum bagging and curing process. The cauls serve to maintain both part shape and to control the flow of resin within the stringers as they are cured. Further, they probably eliminate the need for intermediate protective materials between the vacuum bag and the stringers.

  13. Fiber-Matrix Interface Studies on Electron Beam Cured Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Drazel, L.T.; Janke, C.J.; Yarborough, K.D.

    1999-05-23

    The recently completed Department of Energy (DOE) and industry sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) entitled, ''Electron Beam Curing of Polymer Matrix Composites,'' determined that the interlaminar shear strength properties of the best electron beam cured IM7/epoxy composites were 19-28% lower than autoclave cured IM7/epoxy composites (i.e. IM7/977-2 and IM7/977-3). Low interlaminar shear strength is widely acknowledged as the key barrier to the successful acceptance and implementation of electron beam cured composites in the aircraft/aerospace industry. The objective of this work was to improve the interlaminar shear strength properties of electron beam cured composites by formulating and evaluating several different fiber sizings or coating materials. The researchers have recently achieved some promising results by having discovered that the application of epoxy-based, electron beam compatible sizings or coatings onto surface-treated, unsized IM7 carbon fibers improved the composite interlaminar shear strength properties by as much as 55% versus composites fabricated from surface-treated, unsized IM7 fibers. In addition, by applying these same epoxy-based sizings or coatings onto surface-treated, unsized IM7 fibers it was possible to achieve an 11% increase in the composite interlaminar shear strength compared to composites made from surface-treated, GP-sized IM7 fibers. Work is continuing in this area of research to further improve these properties.

  14. Photothermal radiometry monitoring of light curing in resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambrano-Arjona, M. A.; Medina-Esquivel, R.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2007-10-01

    Real time measurement of thermal diffusivity during the evolution of the light curing process in dental resins is reported using photothermal radiometry. The curing is induced by a non-modulated blue light beam, and at the same time, a modulated red laser beam is sent onto the sample, generating a train of thermal waves that produce modulated infrared radiation. The monitoring of this radiation permits to follow the time evolution of the process. The methodology is applied to two different commercially available light curing resin-based composites. In all cases thermal diffusivity follows a first order kinetics with similar stabilization characteristic times. Analysis of this kinetics permits to exhibit the close relationship of increase in thermal diffusivity with the decrease in monomer concentration and extension of the polymerization in the resin, induced by the curing light. It is also shown that the configuration in which the resin is illuminated by the modulated laser can be the basis for the development of an in situ technique for the determination of the degree of curing.

  15. Gaseous mercury from curing concretes that contain fly ash: laboratory measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Danold W. Golightly; Ping Sun; Chin-Min Cheng; Panuwat Taerakul; Harold W. Walker; Linda K. Weavers; Dean M. Golden

    2005-08-01

    Total gaseous mercury in headspace air was measured for enclosed concretes dry curing at 40 C for intervals of 2, 28, and 56 days. Release of mercury was confirmed for ordinary Portland cement concrete (OPC) and three concretes in which class F fly ash from coal-combustion substituted for a fraction of the cement: (a) 33% fly ash (FA33), (b) 55% fly ash (FA55), and (c) 33% fly ash plus 0.5% mercury-loaded powdered activated carbon (HgPAC). Mean rates of mercury release (0.10-0.43 ng/day per kg of concrete) over the standard first 28 days of curing followed the order OPC {lt} FA33 {approximately} FA55 {lt} HgPAC. The mercury flux from exposed surfaces of these concretes ranged from 1.9 {+-} 0.5 to 8.1 {+-} 2.0 ng/m{sup 2}/h, values similar to the average flux for multiple natural substrates in Nevada, 4.2 {+-} 1.4 ng/m{sup 2}/h, recently published by others. Air sampling extending for 28 days beyond the initial 28-day maturation for OPC, FA55, and HgPAC suggested that the average Hg release rate by OPC is constant over 56 days and that mercury release rates for FA55 and HgPAC may ultimately diminish to levels exhibited by OPC concrete. The release of mercury from all samples was less than 0.1% of total mercury content over the initial curing period, implying that nearly all of the mercury was retained in the concrete. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Light-curing technology: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Hammesfahr, Paul D; O'Connor, Michael T; Wang, Xiuling

    2002-09-01

    The availability of light-curable resin systems has led to the development of a variety of technologies for producing the light necessary to cure them. Light, being electromagnetic radiation, is comprised of a wide spectrum of energies including ultraviolet, visible, and infrared. Each wavelength region of light has different characteristics in terms of chemical reactions, most notably polymerization of dental materials. Quartz tungsten halogen, plasma arc curing, laser, and, recently, light-emitting diode have all been important technologies used to produce light through dental curing units. Each technology has unique advantages and disadvantages. Thus, it is important for dental professionals to understand the polymerization processes and the ways in which these processes are affected by light energy.

  17. Latency reversal and viral clearance to cure HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Margolis, David M; Garcia, J Victor; Hazuda, Daria J; Haynes, Barton F

    2016-07-22

    Research toward a cure for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection has joined prevention and treatment efforts in the global public health agenda. A major approach to HIV eradication envisions antiretroviral suppression, paired with targeted therapies to enforce the expression of viral antigen from quiescent HIV-1 genomes, and immunotherapies to clear latent infection. These strategies are targeted to lead to viral eradication--a cure for AIDS. Paired testing of latency reversal and clearance strategies has begun, but additional obstacles to HIV eradication may emerge. Nevertheless, there is reason for optimism that advances in long-acting antiretroviral therapy and HIV prevention strategies will contribute to efforts in HIV cure research and that the implementation of these efforts will synergize to markedly blunt the effect of the HIV pandemic on society.

  18. Multifarious immunotherapeutic approaches to cure HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Imami, Nesrina; Herasimtschuk, Anna A

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy in the context of treated HIV-1 infection aims to improve immune responses to achieve better control of the virus. To date, multifaceted immunotherapeutic approaches have been shown to reduce immune activation and increase CD4 T-lymphocyte counts, further to the effects of antiretroviral therapy alone, in addition to improving HIV-1-specific T-cell responses. While sterilizing cure of HIV-1 would involve elimination of all replication-competent virus, a functional cure in which the host has long-lasting control of viral replication may be more feasible. In this commentary, we discuss novel strategies aimed at targeting the latent viral reservoir with cure of HIV-1 infection being the ultimate goal, an achievement that would have considerable impact on worldwide HIV-1 infection.

  19. Latency reversal and viral clearance to cure HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Margolis, David M; Garcia, J Victor; Hazuda, Daria J; Haynes, Barton F

    2016-07-22

    Research toward a cure for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection has joined prevention and treatment efforts in the global public health agenda. A major approach to HIV eradication envisions antiretroviral suppression, paired with targeted therapies to enforce the expression of viral antigen from quiescent HIV-1 genomes, and immunotherapies to clear latent infection. These strategies are targeted to lead to viral eradication--a cure for AIDS. Paired testing of latency reversal and clearance strategies has begun, but additional obstacles to HIV eradication may emerge. Nevertheless, there is reason for optimism that advances in long-acting antiretroviral therapy and HIV prevention strategies will contribute to efforts in HIV cure research and that the implementation of these efforts will synergize to markedly blunt the effect of the HIV pandemic on society. PMID:27463679

  20. Remote cure monitoring of polymeric resins by laser Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, K.C.; Vess, T.M.; Lyon, R.E.; Myrick, M.L.

    1993-05-01

    The validity of using Raman spectroscopy to monitor the cure chemistries of amine-cured epoxy is demonstrated by correlating NIR absorbance measurements with Raman measurements for a concentration series of bisphenol-A diglycidylether in its own reaction product with diethylamine. The intensity of a normalized Raman peak at 1240 cm{sup {minus}l}, assigned to the epoxide functionality, was found to be linearly related to the concentration of epoxide groups in the resin mixtures. Also, it is shown that the Ciba-Geigy Matrimid 5292 system can be monitored by ex-situ FT-Raman spectroscopy by observing changes in the carbonyl stretching (1773 cm{sup {minus}1}) or the C=C stretching of maleimide (1587 cm{sup {minus}1}) during the cure reaction.

  1. Relapsed duodenal ulcer after cure of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Miwa, H; Matsushima, H; Terai, T; Tanaka, H; Kawabe, M; Namihisa, A; Watanabe, S; Sato, N

    1998-08-01

    We report a patient--a 42-year-old man--who had suffered from recurrent duodenal ulcer for about 20 years. Successful curative therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection was performed for 2 weeks with new triple omeprazole, anoxicillin, clarithromycin (OAC) treatment in October 1995, and cure of the infection was repeatedly confirmed by histology, culture, and the 13C urea breath test. One month after the curative therapy, recurrence of a small duodenal ulcer was observed and in February another duodenal ulcer and reflux esophagitis occurred, with severe symptoms, despite the continuous administration of ranitidine. None of the examinations to reconfirm cure of the infection revealed the presence of H. pylori. As the patient experienced continual psychological stress and smoked more frequently during the recurrent episode and had not used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, stress and smoking appeared to play important roles in the relapse of duodenal ulcer in this patient after cure of H. pylori infection.

  2. Causes of variation in botulinal inhibition in perishable canned cured meat.

    PubMed Central

    Tompkin, R B; Christiansen, L N; Shaparis, A B

    1978-01-01

    Final internal processing temperatures within the range of 63 to 74 degrees C did not alter the degree of botulinal inhibition in inoculated perishable canned comminuted cured pork abused at 27 degrees C. Adding hemoglobin to the formulation reduced residual nitrite after processing and decreased botulinal inhibition. Different meats yielded different rates of botulinal outgrowth when substituted for fresh pork ham. Pork or beef heart meat showed no inhibition of the Clostridium botulinum inoculum even with a 156-microgram/g amount of sodium nitrite added to the product. This effect appears to be one of stimulating outgrowth, since residual nitrite depletion was not measurably altered. PMID:350156

  3. Causes of variation in botulinal inhibition in perishable canned cured meat.

    PubMed

    Tompkin, R B; Christiansen, L N; Shaparis, A B

    1978-05-01

    Final internal processing temperatures within the range of 63 to 74 degrees C did not alter the degree of botulinal inhibition in inoculated perishable canned comminuted cured pork abused at 27 degrees C. Adding hemoglobin to the formulation reduced residual nitrite after processing and decreased botulinal inhibition. Different meats yielded different rates of botulinal outgrowth when substituted for fresh pork ham. Pork or beef heart meat showed no inhibition of the Clostridium botulinum inoculum even with a 156-microgram/g amount of sodium nitrite added to the product. This effect appears to be one of stimulating outgrowth, since residual nitrite depletion was not measurably altered.

  4. Radiation cured polyester compositions containing metal-properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalińska, H.; Pietrzak, M.; Gonerski, A.

    The subject of the studies was unsaturated polyester resin, Polimal-109 and its compositions containing acrylates of: sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, barium, manganese, iron, cobalt, copper and acrylic acid. Polyester resin modified with acrylic acid salts was cured with 60Co gamma radiation. Measurements of Vicat softening temperature, water absorption, creep current resistance, volume and surface resistivity, the tangent of dielectric loss angle and permittivity of radiation cured compositions were carried out. The results of the studies presented testify to the fact that the properties of cross-linked polymers alter after ionogenic compounds have been introduced into them.

  5. In-situ Frequency Dependent Dielectric Sensing of Cure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, David E.

    1996-01-01

    With the expanding use of polymeric materials as composite matrices, adhesives, coatings and films, the need to develop low cost, automated fabrication processes to produce consistently high quality parts is critical. Essential to the development of reliable, automated, intelligent processing is the ability to continuously monitor the changing state of the polymeric resin in-situ in the fabrication tool. This final report discusses work done on developing dielectric sensing to monitor polymeric material cure and which provides a fundamental understanding of the underlying science for the use of frequency dependent dielectri sensors to monitor the cure process.

  6. [Color changes of light-cured composite resins. (1)].

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Y; Goto, G

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the color changes of light-cured composite resins over specified periods of time. Composite resin disks which were 10 mm in diameter and 1 mm in thickness, and made by the 3M Co. light-cured composite resin Silux Plus (shades: U, Y, DY, L, G, UO, YO) were made with 2 minutes of light exposure through a 1 mm thick glass plate. The specimens were stored in 37 degrees C artical saliva. Chromatical values of the specimens immediately after curing, 1 day, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year after curing were measured without background color, backed by a white plate. Color measuring was performed with the Murakami Color Research Laboratory Fast Spectrophotometer CMS-500 and the Flexible Sensor FS-3. 1) In the cases without background color, the delta E*ab values of all shades increased for 1 year proportionately to the time elapsed. In the cases backed by a white plate, the delta E*ab values of all shades increased for 6 months after curing, however, compared to the 6 month delta E*ab values, the 1 year delta E*ab values increased in some shades and decreased in other shades. 2) Both in the cases of with and without background color, compared to the delta E*ab values of immediately after curing, the 3 month delta E*ab values of all shades were over 1.2, and the 1 year delta E*ab values of many shades were near or over 2.5 and detectable to the naked eye. 3) Both in the cases of with and without background color, the L* values of all shades decreased for 6 months after curing. However, compared to the 6 month L* values, the 1 year L* values decreased in some shades and increased in other shades. 4) In the cases without background color, the a* values of all shades increased for 1 year after curing. In the cases backed by a white plate, the a* values of all shades increased for 6 months, however, compared to the 6 month a* values, the 1 year a* values of all shades decreased.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  7. Hypothalamic dysfunction in "cured" acromegaly is treatment modality dependent.

    PubMed

    Peacey, S R; Toogood, A A; Shalet, S M

    1998-05-01

    The current definition of cure after treatment for acromegaly stipulates a reduction in GH levels to less than 2 ng/mL (< 5 mU/L), as such GH concentrations are believed to be associated with normalization of long term survival. We sought to further define the nature of the cure in such patients, when cure has been achieved by alternative therapeutic modalities, in the expectation that hypothalamic neuroregulatory control of GH secretion might be affected differently by radiotherapy or surgery. In particular we wished to determine the effect of therapy modality on endogenous somatostatin (SMS) tone, using the GH response to i.v. arginine as a paradigm. We studied 20 patients with cured acromegaly (mean 24-h GH concentration, < 2 ng/mL). Eight patients had been cured by surgery only (S; 4 women and 4 men; mean +/- SEM age, 52 +/- 5 yr), and 12 patients had been cured by radiotherapy (R; 4 women and 8 men; age, 52 +/- 3 yr). Sixteen healthy subjects were studied as a control group (C; 6 women and 10 men; age 53 +/- 3]. The median (range) GH during 24-h profiles was similar in each group: S, 1.3 (0.7-1.8) ng/mL; R, 0.6 (0.4-1.8) ng/mL; and C, 0.7 (0.4-3.2) ng/mL (P = 0.57). The median incremental GH responses to arginine were significantly lower in the R group compared with those in the S and C groups: S, 6.4 (2.1-16.6) ng/mL; R, 0.1 (0-1.7) ng/mL; and C, 9.2 (0-16.1) ng/mL (P = 0.0002; S vs. R, P < 0.01; S vs. C, P > 0.05; R vs. C, P < 0.001). We conclude that in acromegalic patients deemed to be cured (GH, < 2 ng/mL), the mode of therapy has considerable influence on the remaining hypothalamic-somatotroph function. In view of the putative mechanism by which arginine releases GH, we suggest that radiotherapy leads to a reduction or complete loss of endogenous SMS tone. This may have implications for the treatment of those acromegalic patients who are not cured (GH, > 2 ng/mL) and who require SMS analog therapy. PMID:9589676

  8. Evolution of structure and viscoelasticity in diethanolamine-cured epoxy

    SciTech Connect

    Adolf, D.; Martin, J.E.

    1990-06-01

    As a crosslinking polymer cures, dramatic changes in molecular architecture occur. These structural changes in turn affect the viscoelastic behavior of the material. At a critical extent of reaction (the gel point), the polymer undergoes a transition from a viscous liquid to an elastic solid. We have monitored the evolution of structure and viscoelasticity in the most common epoxy encapsulant used at Sandia, diethanolamine-cured Epon 828. The structure evolves according to percolation theory, and the viscoelasticity evolves according to our dynamic scaling theory for branched polymers. 9 refs., 12 figs.

  9. Effects of Temperature and Humidity on Wilethane 44 Cure

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Weigle

    2006-10-01

    Wilethane 44 is a polyurethane adhesive developed by the Materials Team within ESA-MEE at Los Alamos National Laboratory as a replacement for Hexcel Corporation Urethane 7200. Urethane 7200 is used in numerous weapon systems, but it was withdrawn from the market in 1989. The weapons complex requires a replacement material for use in the W76-1 LEP and the W88, as well as for assembly of JTAs for other warheads. All polyurethane systems are susceptible to moisture reacting with unreacted isocyanate groups. This side reaction competes with the curing reaction and results in CO{sub 2} formation. Therefore, a polyurethane adhesive can exhibit foaming if appropriate environmental controls are not in place while it cures. A designed experiment has been conducted at TA-16-304 to determine the effects of ambient conditions on the properties of cured Wilethane 44. Temperature was varied from 15 C to 30 C and relative humidity from 15% to 40%. The density, hardness at 24 hours, and butt tensile strength on aluminum substrates were measured and fitted to quadratic equations over the experimental space. Additionally, the loss and storage moduli during cure were monitored as a function of cure temperature. These experiments provide a stronger basis for establishing appropriate environmental conditions and cure times when using Wilethane 44. The current guidelines are a working time of 90 minutes, a cure time of 18 hours, and a relative humidity of less than 25%, regardless of ambient temperature. Viscosity measurements revealed that the working time is a strong function of temperature and can be as long as 130 minutes at 15 C or as short as 90 minutes at 30 C. The experiments also showed that the gel time is much longer than originally thought, as long as 13 hours at 15 C. Consequently, it may be necessary to extend the required cure time at temperatures below 20 C. Allowable humidity varies as a function of temperature from 34% at 15 C to 15% at 30 C.

  10. Effects of feeding high protein or conventional canola meal on dry cured and conventionally cured bacon.

    PubMed

    Little, K L; Bohrer, B M; Stein, H H; Boler, D D

    2015-05-01

    Objectives were to compare belly, bacon processing, bacon slice, and sensory characteristics from pigs fed high protein canola meal (CM-HP) or conventional canola meal (CM-CV). Soybean meal was replaced with 0 (control), 33, 66, or 100% of both types of canola meal. Left side bellies from 70 carcasses were randomly assigned to conventional or dry cure treatment and matching right side bellies were assigned the opposite treatment. Secondary objectives were to test the existence of bilateral symmetry on fresh belly characteristics and fatty acid profiles of right and left side bellies originating from the same carcass. Bellies from pigs fed CM-HP were slightly lighter and thinner than bellies from pigs fed CM-CV, yet bacon processing, bacon slice, and sensory characteristics were unaffected by dietary treatment and did not differ from the control. Furthermore, testing the existence of bilateral symmetry on fresh belly characteristics revealed that bellies originating from the right side of the carcasses were slightly (P≤0.05) wider, thicker, heavier and firmer than bellies from the left side of the carcass.

  11. Ultrasonic characterization of changes in viscoelastic properties of epoxy during cure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, W. P.; Parker, F. R.

    1985-01-01

    A technique for using the longitudinal velocity (LV) of an ultrasonic wave to monitor the extent of cross linking (CL) during the cure of thermosetting resins is described. The method was developed by monitoring the rate of change in LV during the cure of a bisphenol-A epoxy resin with an amine adduct. The experiment included variations in the temperature and stoichiometry in order to express the rate of change in terms of the reaction kinetics. The pulse-echo method was used with a single transducer operating at 20 MHz. Numerical models were defined to account for the acoustic response of a single layer, the attenuation and the reflection coefficient. A linear relationship was observed between the inverse of the temperature and the log of the rate of change in the velocity, supporting the theory that the velocity could be used to monitor the extent of the cross-linking reaction. An activation energy of 11.9 kcal/mole was calculated for the mixture being investigated.

  12. Effect of curing cycle on the tensile strength of the bond between heat cured denture base acrylic resin and acrylic resin denture teeth.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Ayesha; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Radford, David R; Clark, Robert K F

    2009-12-01

    The effect of different curing cycles on the tensile strength of the bond between one brand of cross-linked acrylic resin teeth and three heat cured denture base acrylic resins was tested. There were differences in the tensile bond strength between the three heat cured denture base acrylic resins and the three curing cycles used. The bond strength of the acrylic resin denture base material made by the same manufacturer as the cross-linked acrylic resin denture teeth was higher. The bond strength following the short cycle was lowest in all cases, individual differences between curing cycles failed to reach statistical significance. PMID:20158054

  13. Volatile compounds of dry-cured Iberian ham as affected by the length of the curing process.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J; Ventanas, J; Cava, R; Andrés, A; García, C

    1999-05-01

    Volatile compounds from 10 dry-cured Iberian hams ripened for two different processing times, a prolonged traditional one (600 days) and a shortened process (420 days), were analysed by purge and trap coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Eighty-three compounds were identified which agreed with the major classes found in other ham types. The amount of methyl branched alkanes was much higher than in other dry-cured ham types, probably due to the feeding regime. The percentages of 2- and 3-methylbutanal were higher (p<0.0001 and p<0.0003, respectively) in the longer aged hams, whereas the amounts of some compounds from lipid oxidation decreased from 420 to 600 days aging. In agreement with these observations, 600-day hams had higher scores for those odour and flavour traits usually considered to be positive attributes and lower scores for rancidity. A positive and significant correlation between 2-methyl butanal and cured flavour was found.

  14. Muscle individual phospholipid classes throughout the processing of dry-cured ham: influence of pre-cure freezing.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Palacios, Trinidad; Ruiz, Jorge; Dewettinck, Koen; Le, Thien Trung; Antequera, Teresa

    2010-03-01

    This paper aims to study the profile of phospholipid (PL) classes of Iberian ham throughout its processing and the changes it underwent due to the influence of the pre-cure freezing treatment. The general profile of each PL class did not vary during the ripening stage. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) showed the highest proportion, followed by phosphatidyletanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) being the minor PL. The four PL classes were highly hydrolysed during the salting stage and their degradation continued during the rest of the processing. Pre-cure freezing of Iberian ham influenced the levels of the four PL classes at the initial stage, all of them being higher in refrigerated (R) than in pre-cure frozen (F) hams. Moreover, the pattern of hydrolysis was not the same in these two groups.

  15. Solidification of coatings: Theory and modeling of drying, curing and microstructure growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabral, Mahendra

    1999-10-01

    This thesis explores the crucial link between processing and microstructure formation in multicomponent polymer-solvent based solution coatings that undergo solidification by a combination of drying, curing, and accompanying phase transformations. The drying process is modeled as one-dimensional coupled heat and mass transfer in a multicomponent system. Solution thermodynamics is described with Flory-Huggins theory; solvent diffusion, with multicomponent Fickian diffusion theory, which relates ternary diffusion coefficients to solvent self-diffusion coefficients and solution thermodynamics. Analysis of the model yields families of drying process paths, and time courses of compositions at successive depths into the coating. The trajectories of these paths and speed along them depend on the volatilities and diffusivities of the volatile components, and on the external drying conditions, namely gas flow rate, temperature and partial pressures of solvents in the gas phase. Porous polymeric coatings prepared by drying-induced phase separation illustrate the link between the external drying conditions and the final microstructure. Coatings dried in room air---slow natural convection and low gas phase mass transfer---give rise to a graded porous structure consisting of a dense skin atop a porous substructure. Computed process paths show that the near-surface region can vitrify rapidly. In contrast, the bulk of the solution coating undergoes phase separation by spinodal decomposition followed by coarsening. Coatings of the same solution when dried by impinging air-rapid forced convection-end up dense. All of the process paths followed by the drying coating evade the two-phase region and vitrify rapidly. Another example is drying and curing of a polyamic acid solution coated to produce polyimide film. After the coated layer is gelled, stripped and further dried and cured, the two sides---air side and substrate side, as coated or cast---differ in adhesion performance. This

  16. Is the soft-start polymerisation concept still relevant for modern curing units?

    PubMed

    Ilie, Nicoleta; Jelen, Esther; Hickel, Reinhard

    2011-02-01

    Shrinkage stress, degree of cure and mechanical properties are contradicting properties, forcing to a compromise between an adequate curing and low stress at the interface tooth-restoration. The purpose of this study was to quantify this relations for a micro-hybrid composite, by analysing in real time the development of degree of cure at depths of 2 and 6 mm, shrinkage stress and curing time until gelation, as well as the variation of micro-mechanical properties with depth, after curing with 13 regimes of one halogen and two light-emitting diode (LED) curing units. A nano-dynamic mechanical test was additionally performed on selected regimes (Ramp, Pulse and Fast Cure) of the same curing unit. The present study showed that the soft-start polymerization concept is still valid for less deep cavities (2 mm), even by curing with high-power LED curing units, since a soft-cure polymerization resulted in a delayed gel point and a lower shrinkage stress, keeping simultaneously the degree of cure and mechanical properties constant. At 6 mm depth, curing with soft-start regimes resulted in a significant decrease in degree of cure, although this decrease was less than 10%, while the mechanical properties were maintained. PMID:19937074

  17. Potential for cure in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Piver, M S; Marchetti, D L

    1986-12-01

    There has been steady progress in improving the survival stage by stage for women with ovarian carcinoma. Part of this is the "Will Rogers" phenomenon: the improvement in results among two groups by movement of a subset of patients from one stage to the other stage. For those stage I patients at low risk (stage I-A1, I-B1, well or moderately differentiated) for recurrence, the exceeding of 90% survival rates in these carefully staged patients without postoperative radiation or chemotherapy represents significant progress in comparison to results a decade ago. Moreover, those patients thought to be stage I or II but found to have upper abdominal metastasis by careful surgical staging will now receive the best therapy for stage III ovarian cancer. The combination of the small volume of upper abdominal tumor discovered in these latter patients and the effects of receiving the best therapy for stage III disease should result in improved survival for this subset of patients. The impact of cisplatin-based chemotherapy has already impacted positively on improved survival for women with stage III and IV ovarian carcinoma. With more surgeons now trained in the techniques of debulking surgery in advanced ovarian carcinoma, the recent survival rates for patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy should improve significantly in the next decade.

  18. Radical-cured block copolymer-modified thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Redline, Erica M.; Francis, Lorraine F.; Bates, Frank S.

    2013-01-10

    Poly(ethylene-alt-propylene)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEP-PEO) diblock copolymers were synthesized and added at 4 wt % to 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy)phenyl]propane (BisGMA), a monomer that cures using free radical chemistry. In separate experiments, poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) was combined as a secondary monomer with BisGMA and the monomers were loaded with 4 wt % PEP-PEO. The diblock copolymers self-assembled into well-dispersed spherical micelles with PEP cores and PEO coronas. No appreciable change in the final extent of cure of the thermosets was caused by the addition of diblock copolymer, except in the case of BisGMA, where the addition of the block copolymer increased extent of cure by 12%. Furthermore, the extent of cure was increased by 29% and 37% with the addition of 25 and 50 wt % PEGDMA, respectively. Elastic modulus and fracture resistance were also determined, and the values indicate that the addition of block copolymers does not significantly toughen the thermoset materials. This finding is surprising when compared with the large increase in fracture resistance seen in block copolymer-modified epoxies, and an explanation is proposed.

  19. HIV-1 functional cure: will the dream come true?

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Ma, Xiancai; Liu, Bingfeng; Chen, Cancan; Zhang, Hui

    2015-11-20

    The reservoir of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), a long-lived pool of latently infected cells harboring replication-competent viruses, is the major obstacle to curing acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Although the combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) can successfully suppress HIV-1 viremia and significantly delay the progression of the disease, it cannot eliminate the viral reservoir and the patient must continue to take anti-viral medicines for life. Currently, the appearance of the 'Berlin patient', the 'Boston patients', and the 'Mississippi baby' have inspired many therapeutic strategies for HIV-1 aimed at curing efforts. However, the specific eradication of viral latency and the recovery and optimization of the HIV-1-specific immune surveillance are major challenges to achieving such a cure. Here, we summarize recent studies addressing the mechanisms underlying the viral latency and define two categories of viral reservoir: 'shallow' and 'deep'. We also present the current strategies and recent advances in the development of a functional cure for HIV-1, focusing on full/partial replacement of the immune system, 'shock and kill', and 'permanent silencing' approaches.

  20. 7 CFR 30.13 - Air-cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Air-cure. 30.13 Section 30.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.13...

  1. 7 CFR 30.13 - Air-cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Air-cure. 30.13 Section 30.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.13...

  2. 7 CFR 30.13 - Air-cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Air-cure. 30.13 Section 30.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.13...

  3. 7 CFR 30.13 - Air-cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Air-cure. 30.13 Section 30.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.13...

  4. Can advanced-stage ovarian cancer be cured?

    PubMed

    Narod, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Approximately 20% of women with advanced-stage ovarian cancer survive beyond 12 years after treatment and are effectively cured. Initial therapy for ovarian cancer comprises surgery and chemotherapy, and is given with the goal of eradicating as many cancer cells as possible. Indeed, the three phases of therapy are as follows: debulking surgery to remove as much of the cancer as possible, preferably to a state of no visible residual disease; chemotherapy to eradicate any microscopic disease that remains present after surgery; and second-line or maintenance therapy, which is given to delay disease progression among patients with tumour recurrence. If no cancer cells remain after initial therapy is completed, a cure is expected. By contrast, if residual cancer cells are present after initial treatment, then disease recurrence is likely. Thus, the probability of cure is contingent on the combination of surgery and chemotherapy effectively eliminating all cancer cells. In this Perspectives article, I present the case that the probability of achieving a cancer-free state is maximized through a combination of maximal debulking surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. I discuss the evidence indicating that by taking this approach, cures could be achieved in up to 50% of women with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. PMID:26787282

  5. Antimony to Cure Visceral Leishmaniasis Unresponsive to Liposomal Amphotericin B.

    PubMed

    Morizot, Gloria; Jouffroy, Romain; Faye, Albert; Chabert, Paul; Belhouari, Katia; Calin, Ruxandra; Charlier, Caroline; Miailhes, Patrick; Siriez, Jean-Yves; Mouri, Oussama; Yera, Hélène; Gilquin, Jacques; Tubiana, Roland; Lanternier, Fanny; Mamzer, Marie-France; Legendre, Christophe; Peyramond, Dominique; Caumes, Eric; Lortholary, Olivier; Buffet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We report on 4 patients (1 immunocompetent, 3 immunosuppressed) in whom visceral leishmaniasis had become unresponsive to (or had relapsed after) treatment with appropriate doses of liposomal amphotericin B. Under close follow-up, full courses of pentavalent antimony were administered without life-threatening adverse events and resulted in rapid and sustained clinical and parasitological cure.

  6. An insight of traditional plasmid curing in Vibrio species

    PubMed Central

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-01-01

    As the causative agent of foodborne related illness, Vibrio species causes a huge impact on the public health and management. Vibrio species is often associated with seafood as the latter plays a role as a vehicle to transmit bacterial infections. Hence, antibiotics are used not to promote growth but rather to prevent and treat bacterial infections. The extensive use of antibiotics in the aquaculture industry and environment has led to the emerging of antibiotic resistant strains. This phenomenon has triggered an alarming public health concern due to the increase number of pathogenic Vibrio strains that are resistant to clinically used antibiotics and is found in the environment. Antibiotic resistance and the genes location in the strains can be detected through plasmid curing assay. The results derived from plasmid curing assay is fast, cost effective, sufficient in providing insights, and influence the antibiotic management policies in the aquaculture industry. This presentation aims in discussing and providing insights on various curing agents in Vibrio species. To our best of knowledge, this is a first review written discussing on plasmid curing in Vibrio species. PMID:26347714

  7. Recidivism and Self-Cure of Smoking and Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schacter, Stanley

    1982-01-01

    Data indicate that addictive-appetitive disorders such as obesity, opiate use, and cigarette smoking are not (as most professionals believe) markedly resistant to long-term modification. Studies of nontherapeutic populations indicate that long-term self-cures of smoking, obesity, and drug use are relatively common events. (Author/GC)

  8. 21 CFR 177.2400 - Perfluorocarbon cured elastomers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Perfluorocarbon cured elastomers. 177.2400 Section 177.2400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use Only as Components of Articles Intended...

  9. Electron beam curing of epoxy resins by cationic polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C.J.; Dorsey, G.F.; Havens, S.J.; Lopata, V.J.

    1995-10-01

    Preliminary investigations have determined that conventional epoxy resins can be cured at selectable temperatures with high glass transition temperatures (essentially the same as with thermal curing), while still exhibiting equivalent or comparable mechanical properties. A cationic photoinitiator at a concentration of 1--3 parts per hundred of the epoxy resin is required for this process. Gamma cell screening of cationic photoinitiators with bisphenol A, bisphenol F, and cycloaliphatic epoxies demonstrated that diaryliodonium salts of weakly nucleophilic anions such as hexafluoroantimonate are most effective. Diaryliodonium salts were also found to be most effective initiators for the cationic polymerization of epoxy resins when a high energy/power electron beam accelerator was used as the source of ionizing radiation. For example Dow Tactix 123 (bisphenol A epoxy) containing 3 phr (4-octyloxyphenyl)phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate was irradiated at a total dosage of 100 kGy. Glass transition temperature (tan delta) of the cured material as determined by dynamic mechanical analysis was 182 C as compared to 165 C thermally cured material.

  10. [Biopolitics in the genealogy of psychoanalysis: from salvation to cure].

    PubMed

    Birman, Joel

    2007-01-01

    The initial aim of this essay is to sketch out the historical passage from the ideal of salvation to the ideal of cure in the West, indicating the effects of the process of medicalization of society attained through biopolitics. In second place, it is intended to describe the different ramifications of biopolitics in the origins of psychoanalysis discourse.

  11. Specific pretreatments reduce curing period of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia) beans.

    PubMed

    Sreedhar, R V; Roohie, K; Venkatachalam, L; Narayan, M S; Bhagyalakshmi, N

    2007-04-18

    With the aiming of reducing the curing period, effects of pretreatments on flavor formation in vanilla beans during accelerated curing at 38 degrees C for 40 days were studied. Moisture loss, change in texture, levels of flavoring compounds, and activities of relevant enzymes were compared among various pretreatments as well as the commercial sample. Use of naphthalene acetic acid (NAA; 5 mg/L) or Ethrel (1%) with blanching pretreatment resulted in 3-fold higher vanillin on the 10th day. Other flavoring compounds-vanillic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde-fluctuated greatly, showing no correlation with the pretreatments. Scarification of beans resulted in nearly 4- and 3.6-fold higher vanillin formations on the 10th day in NAA- and Ethrel-treated beans, respectively, as compared to control with a significant change in texture. When activities of major relevant enzymes were followed, addition of NAA or Ethrel helped to retain higher levels of cellulase throughout the curing period and higher levels of beta-glucosidase on the 20th day that correlated with higher vanillin content during curing and subsequent periods. Peroxidase, being highest throughout, did not correlate with the change in levels of major flavoring compounds. The pretreatment methods of the present study may find importance for realizing higher flavor formation in a shorter period because the major quality parameters were found to be comparable to those of a commercial sample.

  12. 7 CFR 30.13 - Air-cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air-cure. 30.13 Section 30.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.13...

  13. HIV-1 functional cure: will the dream come true?

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Ma, Xiancai; Liu, Bingfeng; Chen, Cancan; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The reservoir of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), a long-lived pool of latently infected cells harboring replication-competent viruses, is the major obstacle to curing acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Although the combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) can successfully suppress HIV-1 viremia and significantly delay the progression of the disease, it cannot eliminate the viral reservoir and the patient must continue to take anti-viral medicines for life. Currently, the appearance of the 'Berlin patient', the 'Boston patients', and the 'Mississippi baby' have inspired many therapeutic strategies for HIV-1 aimed at curing efforts. However, the specific eradication of viral latency and the recovery and optimization of the HIV-1-specific immune surveillance are major challenges to achieving such a cure. Here, we summarize recent studies addressing the mechanisms underlying the viral latency and define two categories of viral reservoir: 'shallow' and 'deep'. We also present the current strategies and recent advances in the development of a functional cure for HIV-1, focusing on full/partial replacement of the immune system, 'shock and kill', and 'permanent silencing' approaches. PMID:26588898

  14. Antimony to Cure Visceral Leishmaniasis Unresponsive to Liposomal Amphotericin B

    PubMed Central

    Morizot, Gloria; Jouffroy, Romain; Faye, Albert; Chabert, Paul; Belhouari, Katia; Calin, Ruxandra; Charlier, Caroline; Miailhes, Patrick; Siriez, Jean-Yves; Mouri, Oussama; Yera, Hélène; Gilquin, Jacques; Tubiana, Roland; Lanternier, Fanny; Mamzer, Marie-France; Legendre, Christophe; Peyramond, Dominique; Caumes, Eric; Lortholary, Olivier; Buffet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We report on 4 patients (1 immunocompetent, 3 immunosuppressed) in whom visceral leishmaniasis had become unresponsive to (or had relapsed after) treatment with appropriate doses of liposomal amphotericin B. Under close follow-up, full courses of pentavalent antimony were administered without life-threatening adverse events and resulted in rapid and sustained clinical and parasitological cure. PMID:26735920

  15. 7 CFR 58.412 - Coolers or curing rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Coolers or curing rooms. 58.412 Section 58.412 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF...

  16. 7 CFR 58.412 - Coolers or curing rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Coolers or curing rooms. 58.412 Section 58.412 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF...

  17. Raman spectroscopic studies of the cure of dicyclopentadiene (DCPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, S. E.; Brown, E. C.; Corrigan, N.; Coates, P. D.; Harkin-Jones, E.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    2005-10-01

    The cure of polydicyclopentadiene conducted by ring-opening metathesis polymerisation in the presence of a Grubbs catalyst was studied using non-invasive Raman spectroscopy. The spectra of the monomer precursor and polymerised product were fully characterised and all stages of polymerisation monitored. Because of the monomer's high reactivity, the cure process is adaptable to reaction injection moulding and reactive rotational moulding. The viscosity of the dicyclopentadiene undergoes a rapid change at the beginning of the polymerisation process and it is critical that the induction time of the viscosity increase is determined and controlled for successful manufacturing. The results from this work show non-invasive Raman spectroscopic monitoring to be an effective method for monitoring the degree of cure, paving the way for possible implementation of the technique as a method of real-time analysis for control and optimisation during reactive processing. Agreement is shown between Raman measurements and ultrasonic time of flight data acquired during the initial induction period of the curing process.

  18. Raman spectroscopic studies of the cure of dicyclopentadiene (DCPD).

    PubMed

    Barnes, S E; Brown, E C; Corrigan, N; Coates, P D; Harkin-Jones, E; Edwards, H G M

    2005-10-01

    The cure of polydicyclopentadiene conducted by ring-opening metathesis polymerisation in the presence of a Grubbs catalyst was studied using non-invasive Raman spectroscopy. The spectra of the monomer precursor and polymerised product were fully characterised and all stages of polymerisation monitored. Because of the monomer's high reactivity, the cure process is adaptable to reaction injection moulding and reactive rotational moulding. The viscosity of the dicyclopentadiene undergoes a rapid change at the beginning of the polymerisation process and it is critical that the induction time of the viscosity increase is determined and controlled for successful manufacturing. The results from this work show non-invasive Raman spectroscopic monitoring to be an effective method for monitoring the degree of cure, paving the way for possible implementation of the technique as a method of real-time analysis for control and optimisation during reactive processing. Agreement is shown between Raman measurements and ultrasonic time of flight data acquired during the initial induction period of the curing process.

  19. Sodium nitrite: the "cure" for nitric oxide insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Deepa K; Bryan, Nathan S

    2012-11-01

    This process of "curing" food is a long practice that dates back thousands of years long before refrigeration or food safety regulations. Today food safety and mass manufacturing are dependent upon safe and effective means to cure and preserve foods including meats. Nitrite remains the most effective curing agent to prevent food spoilage and bacterial contamination. Despite decades of rigorous research on its safety and efficacy as a curing agent, it is still regarded by many as a toxic undesirable food additive. However, research within the biomedical science community has revealed enormous therapeutic benefits of nitrite that is currently being developed as novel therapies for conditions associated with nitric oxide (NO) insufficiency. Much of the same biochemistry that has been understood for decades in the meat industry has been rediscovered in human physiology. This review will highlight the fundamental biochemistry of nitrite in human physiology and highlight the risk benefit evaluation surrounding nitrite in food and meat products. Foods or diets enriched with nitrite can have profound positive health benefits.

  20. Utopic ideas of cure and joint exploration in psychoanalytic supervision.

    PubMed

    Werbart, Andrzej

    2007-12-01

    The idea of the decisive and complete cure is deeply rooted in our unconscious and in the sacral roots of symbolic healing. Double sets of private theories of cure can frequently be found among patients in psychoanalysis and their analysts. The utopian cure involves a profound transformation of the personality by way of deep regression. The idea of an attainable and more limited cure includes new ways of managing old problems. The actual ongoing treatment is then seen as the 'next-best solution'. The utopian fantasy of creating 'the new person' by means of 'proper' psychoanalysis or analytic training has far-reaching consequences for psychoanalytic education and supervision. Our awareness of the inevitable temptation in the 'utopian state of mind' can help us to trace and focus on utopic elements in the supervisory process. Exploration of utopic ideas of all the three parties involved can itself be a fruitful and stimulating way of working in supervision. An important aim of psychoanalytic supervision is to promote a distinct state of mind that can counterbalance utopic ideas and counteract the phenomenon of a 'false analytic self'.

  1. 21 CFR 177.2400 - Perfluorocarbon cured elastomers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the terpolymer. (c) Specifications—(1) Infrared identification. Perfluorocarbon cured elastomers may be identified by the characteristic infrared spectra of the pyrolysate breakdown product that is... Kalrez ® by Infrared Examination of Pyrolysate.” This method is incorporated by reference. Copies of...

  2. 21 CFR 177.2400 - Perfluorocarbon cured elastomers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the terpolymer. (c) Specifications—(1) Infrared identification. Perfluorocarbon cured elastomers may be identified by the characteristic infrared spectra of the pyrolysate breakdown product that is... Kalrez ® by Infrared Examination of Pyrolysate.” This method is incorporated by reference. Copies of...

  3. 21 CFR 177.2400 - Perfluorocarbon cured elastomers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the terpolymer. (c) Specifications—(1) Infrared identification. Perfluorocarbon cured elastomers may be identified by the characteristic infrared spectra of the pyrolysate breakdown product that is... Kalrez ® by Infrared Examination of Pyrolysate.” This method is incorporated by reference. Copies of...

  4. 21 CFR 177.2400 - Perfluorocarbon cured elastomers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the terpolymer. (c) Specifications—(1) Infrared identification. Perfluorocarbon cured elastomers may be identified by the characteristic infrared spectra of the pyrolysate breakdown product that is... Kalrez ® by Infrared Examination of Pyrolysate.” This method is incorporated by reference. Copies of...

  5. Preparation and cured properties of novel cycloaliphatic epoxy resins

    SciTech Connect

    Tokizawa, Makoto; Okada, Hiroyoshi; Wakabayashi, Nobukatsu; Kimura, Tomiaki . Research Center)

    1993-10-20

    Preparation and characterization of novel cycloaliphatic epoxy resins, which are derived from octadienyl compounds, were studied. From a model peracetic acid epoxidation reaction using 2,7-octadienyl acetate-1, the structure of the liquid resins is estimated to be mainly terminal epoxides and some amount of inner epoxide depending on the epoxide content. The epoxy resins offer lower toxicity and lower vapor pressure. The reactivity of the resin with acid anhydrides is moderate but faster than that of traditional cyclohexane epoxide-type resins and slower than that of the glycidyl ester-type resins. This reactivity was also examined using model compounds. The heat deflection temperature of the hexahydro-phthalic anhydride-cured resins is shown to be directly proportional to the number of epoxy groups in the molecules. The flexural strength of the cured resins is nearly equivalent to that of the commercial resins, although the flexural elongation of the resins is larger than that of the rigid cyclohexane epoxide-type resins. The thermal stability of the cured resins is compared to typical rigid cycloaliphatic resins; furthermore, high water resistance of the cured resins is suggested to be attributed to the hydrophobic character of the C[sub 8] chain by cross-linking.

  6. 7 CFR 29.6002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.6002 Section 29.6002 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions §...

  7. Infiltration/cure modeling of resin transfer molded composite materials using advanced fiber architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loos, Alfred C.; Weideman, Mark H.; Long, Edward R., Jr.; Kranbuehl, David E.; Kinsley, Philip J.; Hart, Sean M.

    1991-01-01

    A model was developed which can be used to simulate infiltration and cure of textile composites by resin transfer molding. Fabric preforms were resin infiltrated and cured using model generated optimized one-step infiltration/cure protocols. Frequency dependent electromagnetic sensing (FDEMS) was used to monitor in situ resin infiltration and cure during processing. FDEMS measurements of infiltration time, resin viscosity, and resin degree of cure agreed well with values predicted by the simulation model. Textile composites fabricated using a one-step infiltration/cure procedure were uniformly resin impregnated and void free. Fiber volume fraction measurements by the resin digestion method compared well with values predicted using the model.

  8. Curing Composite Materials Using Lower-Energy Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, Catherine A.; Bykanov, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    In an improved method of fabricating composite-material structures by laying up prepreg tapes (tapes of fiber reinforcement impregnated by uncured matrix materials) and then curing them, one cures the layups by use of beams of electrons having kinetic energies in the range of 200 to 300 keV. In contrast, in a prior method, one used electron beams characterized by kinetic energies up to 20 MeV. The improved method was first suggested by an Italian group in 1993, but had not been demonstrated until recently. With respect to both the prior method and the present improved method, the impetus for the use of electron- beam curing is a desire to avoid the high costs of autoclaves large enough to effect thermal curing of large composite-material structures. Unfortunately, in the prior method, the advantages of electron-beam curing are offset by the need for special walls and ceilings on curing chambers to shield personnel from x rays generated by impacts of energetic electrons. These shields must be thick [typically 2 to 3 ft (about 0.6 to 0.9 m) if made of concrete] and are therefore expensive. They also make it difficult to bring large structures into and out of the curing chambers. Currently, all major companies that fabricate composite-material spacecraft and aircraft structures form their layups by use of automated tape placement (ATP) machines. In the present improved method, an electron-beam gun is attached to an ATP head and used to irradiate the tape as it is pressed onto the workpiece. The electron kinetic energy between 200 and 300 keV is sufficient for penetration of the ply being laid plus one or two of the plies underneath it. Provided that the electron-beam gun is properly positioned, it is possible to administer the required electron dose and, at the same time, to protect personnel with less shielding than is needed in the prior method. Adequate shielding can be provided by concrete walls 6 ft (approximately equal to 1.8 m) high and 16 in. (approximately

  9. Light output from six battery operated dental curing lights.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Carlos Alberto Kenji; Turbino, Míriam Lacalle; Harlow, Jessie Eudora; Price, Hannah Louise; Price, Richard Bengt

    2016-12-01

    Light Curing Units (LCUs) are used daily in almost every dental office to photocure resins, but because the light is so bright, the user is unable to tell visually if there are any differences between different LCUs. This study evaluated the light output from six dental LCUs: Elipar Deep Cure-S (3M ESPE), Bluephase G2 (Ivoclar Vivadent), Translux 2Wave (Heraeus Kulzer), Optilight Prime (Gnatus), Slim Blast (First Medica) and Led.B (Guilin Woodpecker) with a fully charged battery, after 50, and again after 100, 20second light exposures. For each situation, the radiant power was measured 10 times with a laboratory-grade power meter. Then, the emission spectrum was measured using a fiber-optic spectrometer followed by an analysis of the light beam profile. It was found there were significant differences in the LCU power and the irradiance values between the LCUs (p<0.01). The Optilight Prime and Slim Blast LCUs showed a significant reduction in light output after a 50 and 100 exposures, while Bluephase G2 exhibited a significant reduction only after 100 exposures (p<0.01). The Bluephase G2 and Translux 2Wave delivered an emission spectrum that had two distinct wavelength emission peaks. Only the Elipar Deep Cure-S and Bluephase G2 LCUs displayed homogeneous light beam profiles, the other LCUs exhibited highly non-homogeneous light beam profiles. It was concluded that contemporary LCUs could have very different light output characteristics. Both manufacturers and researchers should provide more information about the light output from LCUs.

  10. Light output from six battery operated dental curing lights.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Carlos Alberto Kenji; Turbino, Míriam Lacalle; Harlow, Jessie Eudora; Price, Hannah Louise; Price, Richard Bengt

    2016-12-01

    Light Curing Units (LCUs) are used daily in almost every dental office to photocure resins, but because the light is so bright, the user is unable to tell visually if there are any differences between different LCUs. This study evaluated the light output from six dental LCUs: Elipar Deep Cure-S (3M ESPE), Bluephase G2 (Ivoclar Vivadent), Translux 2Wave (Heraeus Kulzer), Optilight Prime (Gnatus), Slim Blast (First Medica) and Led.B (Guilin Woodpecker) with a fully charged battery, after 50, and again after 100, 20second light exposures. For each situation, the radiant power was measured 10 times with a laboratory-grade power meter. Then, the emission spectrum was measured using a fiber-optic spectrometer followed by an analysis of the light beam profile. It was found there were significant differences in the LCU power and the irradiance values between the LCUs (p<0.01). The Optilight Prime and Slim Blast LCUs showed a significant reduction in light output after a 50 and 100 exposures, while Bluephase G2 exhibited a significant reduction only after 100 exposures (p<0.01). The Bluephase G2 and Translux 2Wave delivered an emission spectrum that had two distinct wavelength emission peaks. Only the Elipar Deep Cure-S and Bluephase G2 LCUs displayed homogeneous light beam profiles, the other LCUs exhibited highly non-homogeneous light beam profiles. It was concluded that contemporary LCUs could have very different light output characteristics. Both manufacturers and researchers should provide more information about the light output from LCUs. PMID:27612800

  11. Influence of Thermo-Light Curing with Dental Light-Curing Units on the Microhardness of Glass-Ionomer Cements.

    PubMed

    Gavic, Lidia; Gorseta, Kristina; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Tadin, Antonija; Glavina, Domagoj; van Duinen, Raymond N; Lynch, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify for various glass-ionomer cement (GIC) products whether the application of thermo-light curing on the initial curing material produces an increase in microhardness, and to determine whether this hardness varies depending on the depths of the GIC samples. The efficacy of various polymerization units on this additional hardening was also examined. The GIC samples were thermo-light cured for 60 seconds with three polymerization units. The Vickers microhardness was measured at three different depths: 2 mm, 3 mm, and 4 mm. Analysis of variance and Newman-Keuls test showed statistically significant differences among tested samples for all three GIC groups (P < .001). The results of linear regression analysis showed a statistically significant relationship between the hardness of the material and the temperature for samples with depths of 2 mm (R = 0.78; P = .0028) and 3 mm (R = 0.59; P = .045). The findings of this study indicate that thermo-light curing of GIC with different polymerization units for 60 seconds during setting reaction increases the microhardness of the GICs at all depths tested and may increase resistance to mastication forces, which can be validated in future clinical studies. PMID:27100813

  12. Influence of Thermo-Light Curing with Dental Light-Curing Units on the Microhardness of Glass-Ionomer Cements.

    PubMed

    Gavic, Lidia; Gorseta, Kristina; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Tadin, Antonija; Glavina, Domagoj; van Duinen, Raymond N; Lynch, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify for various glass-ionomer cement (GIC) products whether the application of thermo-light curing on the initial curing material produces an increase in microhardness, and to determine whether this hardness varies depending on the depths of the GIC samples. The efficacy of various polymerization units on this additional hardening was also examined. The GIC samples were thermo-light cured for 60 seconds with three polymerization units. The Vickers microhardness was measured at three different depths: 2 mm, 3 mm, and 4 mm. Analysis of variance and Newman-Keuls test showed statistically significant differences among tested samples for all three GIC groups (P < .001). The results of linear regression analysis showed a statistically significant relationship between the hardness of the material and the temperature for samples with depths of 2 mm (R = 0.78; P = .0028) and 3 mm (R = 0.59; P = .045). The findings of this study indicate that thermo-light curing of GIC with different polymerization units for 60 seconds during setting reaction increases the microhardness of the GICs at all depths tested and may increase resistance to mastication forces, which can be validated in future clinical studies.

  13. Rapid exploration of curing process design space for production of controlled-release pellets.

    PubMed

    Kristan, Katja; Horvat, Matej

    2012-10-01

    Time and cost are among the most often cited hurdles limiting the rate and extent of adoption of Quality by Design (QbD) and Process Analytical Technology. In this article, we demonstrate that, with appropriate techniques, a key QbD element can be achieved with amount of resources comparable to classical development approach. To control the dissolution rate of a highly soluble drug substance from latex polymer coated pellets, we have examined the effect of key variables affecting the curing process step by an experimental design study. To explore and characterize the Design Space, we have produced and tested 62 distinct pellet samples. To achieve this in a reasonable amount of time, we have developed a scaled-down automated dissolution method that demonstrated excellent correlation to the classical method. By careful planning of experimentation, we were able to obtain all samples from just two batches of pellet cores. The curing process Design Space was explored by statistical modeling of samples obtained from the first batch. Robustness and repeatability of the Design Space at the edge of failure was preliminarily investigated by analysis of selected samples from the second batch with encouraging results.

  14. Comparison of composite curing parameters: effects of light source and curing mode on conversion, temperature rise and polymerization shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Tarle, Zrinka; Knezevic, Alena; Demoli, Nazif; Meniga, Andrej; Sutaloa, Jozo; Unterbrink, Gary; Ristic, Mira; Pichler, Goran

    2006-01-01

    This study analyzed the degree of conversion, temperature increase and polymerization shrinkage of two hybrid composite materials polymerized with a halogen lamp using three illumination modes and a photopolymerization device based on blue light emitting diodes. The degree of conversion of Tetric Ceram (TC) (Ivoclar Vivadent) and Filtek Z 250 (F) (3M/ESPE) was measured by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy at the surface and 2-mm depth; temperature rise was measured by digital multimeter, and linear polymerization shrinkage was measured during cure by digital laser interferometry. Composite samples were illuminated by quartz-tungsten-halogen curing unit (QTH) (Astralis 7, Ivoclar Vivadent) under the following modes: "high power" (HH) 40 seconds at 750 mW/cm2, "low power" (HL) 40 seconds at 400 mW/cm2 and "pulse/soft-start" (HP) increasing from 150 to 400 mW/cm2 during 15 seconds followed by 25 seconds pulsating between 400 and 750 mW/cm2 in 2-second intervals and by light emitting diodes (LED) (Lux-o-Max, Akeda Dental) with emitted intensity 10 seconds at 50 mW/cm2 and 30 seconds at 150 mW/cm2. A significantly higher temperature increase was obtained for both materials using the HH curing mode of halogen light compared to the HP and HL modes and the LED curing unit after 40 seconds. Significantly lower temperature values after 10-second illumination were obtained when LED was used compared to all halogen modes. For all curing modes, there was no significant difference in temperature rise between 20 and 40 seconds of illumination. Results for the degree of conversion measurements show that there is a significant difference in the case of illumination of resin composite samples with LED at the surface and 2 mm depth. For polymerization shrinkage, lower values after 40 seconds were obtained using LED compared to QTH.

  15. Dynamic mechanical properties of dental nanofilled light-cured resin composites: Effect of food-simulating liquids.

    PubMed

    Vouvoudi, Evangelia C; Sideridou, Irini D

    2012-06-01

    This work is aimed at the study by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) of viscoelastic properties that is, the elastic modulus (E'), the loss modulus (E″), the loss tangent (tanδ) and the glass transition temperature (T(g)), of two current commercial light-cured resin composites, Filtek Supreme Body and Filtek Supreme Translucent, characterized as nanofilled. These composites show differences in the filler content and type. For DMA analysis the bar-shaped specimens were divided into groups of three samples each. The first group consisted of dry samples measured 1 h after light-curing (at room temperature) during which they were placed in a desiccator at 37 °C. The other groups consisted of samples which had been stored in air, distilled water, artificial saliva SAGF or ethanol/water solution (75 v/v), at 37±1 °C for 1, 7, 30 or 90 days. DMA tests were performed on a Diamond Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (Perkin-Elmer) in bending mode. A frequency of 1 Hz was applied and a temperature range of 25-185 °C, while a heating rate of 2 °C/min were selected to cover mouth temperature and the materials' likely T(g). The studied dry composites showed comparable values for their properties in spite of their differences in the filler content and type. Storage of composites in air 37 °C for 1 day caused a significant post curing which was not continued during storage up to 90 days. Water and artificial saliva showed the same effect on composites. They caused both post curing and plasticization. Ethanol/water solution 75% v/v had a more strong effect than water and artificial saliva due to its organophilic nature. It caused post curing, plasticization and most probably degradation of the bond filler-silane coupling agent. PMID:22520421

  16. Dynamic mechanical properties of dental nanofilled light-cured resin composites: Effect of food-simulating liquids.

    PubMed

    Vouvoudi, Evangelia C; Sideridou, Irini D

    2012-06-01

    This work is aimed at the study by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) of viscoelastic properties that is, the elastic modulus (E'), the loss modulus (E″), the loss tangent (tanδ) and the glass transition temperature (T(g)), of two current commercial light-cured resin composites, Filtek Supreme Body and Filtek Supreme Translucent, characterized as nanofilled. These composites show differences in the filler content and type. For DMA analysis the bar-shaped specimens were divided into groups of three samples each. The first group consisted of dry samples measured 1 h after light-curing (at room temperature) during which they were placed in a desiccator at 37 °C. The other groups consisted of samples which had been stored in air, distilled water, artificial saliva SAGF or ethanol/water solution (75 v/v), at 37±1 °C for 1, 7, 30 or 90 days. DMA tests were performed on a Diamond Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (Perkin-Elmer) in bending mode. A frequency of 1 Hz was applied and a temperature range of 25-185 °C, while a heating rate of 2 °C/min were selected to cover mouth temperature and the materials' likely T(g). The studied dry composites showed comparable values for their properties in spite of their differences in the filler content and type. Storage of composites in air 37 °C for 1 day caused a significant post curing which was not continued during storage up to 90 days. Water and artificial saliva showed the same effect on composites. They caused both post curing and plasticization. Ethanol/water solution 75% v/v had a more strong effect than water and artificial saliva due to its organophilic nature. It caused post curing, plasticization and most probably degradation of the bond filler-silane coupling agent.

  17. Light-curing considerations for resin-based composite materials: a review. Part I.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Neeraj; Mala, Kundabala

    2010-09-01

    There has been a continual advent of improved technologies in dentistry. Among these are the material sciences of resin-based composites (RBCs). Since the introduction of light-cured RBCs, the problem of polymerization shrinkage and the methods used to overcome this have concerned clinicians and researchers. Types of curing light and modes of curing have been shown to affect the degree of polymerization and related shrinkage of RBCs. This review, which is divided into two parts, discusses the contemporary light-curing units. Part I explores the evolution in light-curing units and different curing modes. Part II highlights the clinical considerations regarding light curing of RBCs that are important for achieving optimal curing and maximum polymerization of RBCs in a clinical setting. PMID:20879203

  18. Light-curing considerations for resin-based composite materials: a review. Part II.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Neeraj; Mala, Kundabala

    2010-10-01

    As discussed in Part I, the type of curing light and curing mode impact the polymerization kinetics of resin-based composite (RBC) materials. Major changes in light-curing units and curing modes have occurred. The type of curing light and mode employed affects the polymerization shrinkage and associated stresses, microhardness, depth of cure, degree of conversion, and color change of RBCs. These factors also may influence the microleakage in an RBC restoration. Apart from the type of unit and mode used, the polymerization of RBCs is also affected by how a light-curing unit is used and handled, as well as the aspects associated with RBCs and the environment. Part II discusses the various clinical issues that should be considered while curing RBC restorations in order to achieve the best possible outcome. PMID:20960988

  19. Decreased Cutaneous Resonance Running Time in Cured Leprosy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Song, S.P.; Elias, P.M.; Lv, C.Z.; Shi, Y.J.; Guang, P.; Zhang, X.J.; Feingold, K.R.; Man, M.Q.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Objectives Leprosy prominently involves both the skin and peripheral neural tissues and some symptoms persist after microbial cure. Because alterations in the dermis also occur in leprosy, we assessed here whether there were changes in cutaneous resonance running time (CRRT), a parameter that is influenced by collagen properties, in cured leprosy subjects. Methods A reviscometer was used to measure the CRRT at various directions on the dorsal hand and the flexural forearms of 76 cured leprosy subjects aged 50–85 years and 68 age-matched normal subjects. Results In comparison to normal subjects, CRRTs on the hands and the forearms were significantly reduced in all directions in cured leprosy, except at the 1–7, 2–8 and 3–9 o'clock directions on the forearms. CRRTs were reduced significantly at both the 4–10 and 5–11 o'clock directions on the forearm in lepromatous (73.33 ± 4.19 at 4–10 o'clock and 67.44 ± 2.71 at 5–11 o'clock direction) and borderline lepromatous types (77.58 ± 5.84 at 4–10 o'clock and 79.85 ± 6.81 at 5–11 o'clock direction) as compared with normal (143.10 ± 7.75 at 4–10 o'clock and 125.18 ± 8.14 at 5–11 o'clock direction). On the hand, CRRTs at all directions, except that at 4–10 o'clock direction, were also significantly reduced in lepromatous and borderline lepromatous types in comparison with normal. Significant differences in CRRT at some directions were found among the various subtypes of leprosy. Conclusion CRRTs were abnormal in the cured leprosy subjects as a whole, but varied with leprosy subtypes, which suggested that the extent of reduction of CRRTs correlates with the severity of immune alteration. These results suggest that CRRT measurements could be a useful approach to quantify the extent of some residual abnormalities in cured leprosy and perhaps could also be used to evaluate the efficacy of treatment. PMID:19648783

  20. Progress Toward HIV Eradication: Case Reports, Current Efforts, and the Challenges Associated with Cure.

    PubMed

    Martin, Alyssa R; Siliciano, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 35 million people worldwide are infected with HIV, yet a widely applicable cure strategy remains elusive. Recent case reports have suggested that curing HIV infection is possible, renewing excitement about research efforts. We describe those cases and discuss their relevance to the global HIV epidemic. We also review ongoing cure strategies that are transitioning from the lab to the clinic, and the assays and clinical assessments that can be used to evaluate cure interventions.

  1. 9 CFR 327.23 - Compliance procedure for cured pork products offered for entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Compliance procedure for cured pork... procedure for cured pork products offered for entry. (a) Definitions. For the purposes of this section: (1) A Product is that cured pork article which is contained within one Group as defined in paragraph...

  2. Curing Behavior and Viscoelasticity of Dual-Curable Adhesives Based on High-Reactivity Azo Initiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Gyu; Shim, Gyu-Seong; Park, Ji-Won; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Moon, Sang-Eun; Kim, Young-Kwan; No, Dong-Hun; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Han, Kwan-Young

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the curing behavior of dual-curable acrylic resin to solve problems associated with curing of adhesives in shaded areas during display manufacture. A low-temperature curing-type thermal initiator, 2,2'-azobis (4-methoxy-2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile), with a 30°C half-life decomposition temperature was used in the investigation. Dual-curable adhesives were prepared according to the thermal initiator content and ultraviolet (UV) radiation dose. The effects of thermal initiator and UV irradiation on the curing behavior and viscoelasticity were investigated. Using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and gel-fraction analysis, an evaluation was carried out to determine the degree of curing after dual UV/thermal curing. In addition, the real-time curing behavior was evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and a UV/advanced rheometric expansion system. A lift-off test was carried out to verify the effects of dual curing on adhesion performance. Application of UV irradiation before thermal curing suppressed the thermal curing efficiency. Also, the network structure formed after dual curing with low UV dose showed higher crosslinking density. Therefore, the thermal initiator radical effectively influenced uncured areas with low curing temperature and initiator content without causing problems in UV-curable zones.

  3. Health aspects of the curing of synthetic rubbers.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, D A; Rappaport, S

    1976-01-01

    A commonly used tread rubber formulation was cured in the laboratory under conditions simulating vulcanization in the Bag-O-Matic press. Volatile emissions were collected on charcoal and analyzed by combined GC-mass spectrometry. The compounds identified were either contaminants present in the raw material or reaction products. Some of these compounds were also identified in charcoal tube samples collected in the atmosphere of the industrial operations. Estimates based on the loss of weight of rubber during curing were used to predict airborne concentrations and compared to the concentrations actually found. The literature of the toxicity of raw materials and effluents was reviewed, and no acute or chronic toxicological effects would be anticipated. Information concerning potential carcinogenicity was not available and could not be evaluated. PMID:1026417

  4. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.

    1996-08-20

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of ``standard`` polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal or oxide may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface. 3 figs.

  5. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of "standard" polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal or oxide may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  6. Cure violence: a public health model to reduce gun violence.

    PubMed

    Butts, Jeffrey A; Roman, Caterina Gouvis; Bostwick, Lindsay; Porter, Jeremy R

    2015-03-18

    Scholars and practitioners alike in recent years have suggested that real and lasting progress in the fight against gun violence requires changing the social norms and attitudes that perpetuate violence and the use of guns. The Cure Violence model is a public health approach to gun violence reduction that seeks to change individual and community attitudes and norms about gun violence. It considers gun violence to be analogous to a communicable disease that passes from person to person when left untreated. Cure Violence operates independently of, while hopefully not undermining, law enforcement. In this article, we describe the theoretical basis for the program, review existing program evaluations, identify several challenges facing evaluators, and offer directions for future research. PMID:25581151

  7. Might dolutegravir be part of a functional cure for HIV?

    PubMed

    Wainberg, Mark A; Han, Ying-Shan; Mesplède, Thibault

    2016-05-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has greatly decreased HIV-related morbidity and mortality. However, HIV can establish viral reservoirs that evade both the immune system and ART. Dolutegravir (DTG) is a second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) related to the first-generation INSTIs raltegravir (RAL) and elvitegravir (EVG). DTG shows a higher genetic barrier to the development of HIV-1 resistance than RAL and EVG. More interestingly, clinical resistance mutations to DTG in treatment-naïve patients have not been observed to date. This review summarizes recent studies on strategies toward a cure for HIV, explores resistance profiles of DTG, and discusses how DTG might help in finding a functional cure for HIV. PMID:27031127

  8. Liver transplantation as a cure for acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Soonawalla, Zahir F; Orug, Taner; Badminton, Michael N; Elder, George H; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Bramhall, Simon R; Elias, Elwyn

    2004-02-28

    Acute intermittent porphyria occasionally causes frequent and crippling acute neurovisceral attacks associated with increased hepatic production of porphyrin precursors, resulting in long-term damage, poor quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. There has been no cure for this condition, but replacement of deficient hepatic enzymes might restore excretion of porphyrin precursors to normal and prevent acute attacks. We aimed to treat severe acute intermittent porphyria in a 19-year-old woman by liver transplantation. After the transplant, concentrations of haem precursors in the patient's urine returned to normal, and 1.5 years later her quality of life was good. Our report suggests some hope of cure for selected patients with severe forms of this disease. PMID:15001330

  9. Early hardness and shear bond strength of dual-cure resin cement light cured through resin overlays with different dentin-layer thicknesses.

    PubMed

    Chang, H-S; Kim, J-W

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether dentin-layer thickness of resin overlays could affect the early hardness and shear bond strength of dual-cure resin cement (DCRC, RelyX ARC) after light curing with light curing units (LCUs) of various power densities: Optilux 360 (360), Elipar Freelight 2 (FL2), and Elipar S10 (S10). Resin overlays were fabricated using an indirect composite resin (Sinfony) with a dentin layer, an enamel layer, and a translucent layer of 0.5 mm thickness each (0.5-0.5-0.5) or of 0.2 mm, 0.5 mm, and 0.8 mm thickness (0.2-0.5-0.8), respectively. The DCRC was light cured for 40 seconds through the overlays, and surface hardness and shear bond strength to bovine dentin were tested 10 minutes after the start of light curing. Surface hardness was higher when the DCRC was light cured through the 0.2-0.5-0.8 combination than when the DCRC was light cured through the 0.5-0.5-0.5 combination with all LCUs. The ratio of upper surface hardness of DCRC light cured through resin overlays relative to the upper surface hardness of DCRC light cured directly was more than 90% only when the DCRC was light cured with S10 through the 0.2-0.5-0.8 combination. The shear bond strength value was higher when the DCRC was light cured with S10 through the 0.2-0.5-0.8 combination than when light cured with S10 through the 0.5-0.5-0.5 combination. This study indicates that reducing the dentin-layer thickness while increasing the translucent-layer thickness of resin inlays can increase the photopolymerization of DCRC, thereby increasing the early bond strength of resin inlays to dentin.

  10. Cure-WISE: HETDEX data reduction with Astro-WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snigula, J. M.; Cornell, M. E.; Drory, N.; Fabricius, Max.; Landriau, M.; Hill, G. J.; Gebhardt, K.

    2012-09-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) is a blind spectroscopic survey to map the evolution of dark energy using Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies at redshifts 1:9 < z < 3:5 as tracers. The survey instrument, VIRUS, consists of 75 IFUs distributed across the 22-arcmin field of the upgraded 9.2-m HET. Each exposure gathers 33,600 spectra. Over the projected five year run of the survey we expect about 170 GB of data per night. For the data reduction we developed the Cure pipeline. Cure is designed to automatically find and calibrate the observed spectra, subtract the sky background, and detect and classify different types of sources. Cure employs rigorous statistical methods and complete pixel-level error propagation throughout the reduction process to ensure Poisson-limited performance and meaningful significance values. To automate the reduction of the whole dataset we implemented the Cure pipeline in the Astro-WISE framework. This integration provides for HETDEX a database backend with complete dependency tracking of the various reduction steps, automated checks, and a searchable interface to the detected sources and user management. It can be used to create various web interfaces for data access and quality control. Astro-WISE allows us to reduce the data from all the IFUs in parallel on a compute cluster. This cluster allows us to reduce the observed data in quasi real time and still have excess capacity for rerunning parts of the reduction. Finally, the Astro-WISE interface will be used to provide access to reduced data products to the general community.

  11. Epoxy Nanocomposites - Curing Rheokinetics, Wetting and Adhesion to Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Ilyin, S. O.; Kotomin, S. V.; Kulichikhin, V. G.

    2010-06-02

    Epoxy nanocomposites considered as challenging polymeric matrix for advanced reinforced plastics. Nanofillers change rheokinetics of epoxy resin curing, affect wetting and adhesion to aramid and carbon fibers. In all cases extreme dependence of adhesive strength vs filler content in the binder was observed. New experimental techniques were developed to study wettability and fiber-matrix adhesion interaction, using yarn penetration path length, aramid fiber knot pull-up test and electrical admittance of the fracture surface of CFRP.

  12. Curing preceramic polymers by exposure to nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabe, James A. (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Lu, Paul P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A rapid method of infusibilizing (curing) preceramic polymers comprising treatment said polymers with gaseous nitrogen dioxide. The infusibilized polymers may be pyrolyzed to temperatures in excess of about 800.degree. C. to yield ceramic materials with low oxygen content and, thus, good thermal stability. The methods are especially useful for the production of ceramic fibers and, more specifically, to the on-line production of ceramic fibers.

  13. On the probability of cure for heavy-ion radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hanin, Leonid; Zaider, Marco

    2014-07-21

    The probability of a cure in radiation therapy (RT)-viewed as the probability of eventual extinction of all cancer cells-is unobservable, and the only way to compute it is through modeling the dynamics of cancer cell population during and post-treatment. The conundrum at the heart of biophysical models aimed at such prospective calculations is the absence of information on the initial size of the subpopulation of clonogenic cancer cells (also called stem-like cancer cells), that largely determines the outcome of RT, both in an individual and population settings. Other relevant parameters (e.g. potential doubling time, cell loss factor and survival probability as a function of dose) are, at least in principle, amenable to empirical determination. In this article we demonstrate that, for heavy-ion RT, microdosimetric considerations (justifiably ignored in conventional RT) combined with an expression for the clone extinction probability obtained from a mechanistic model of radiation cell survival lead to useful upper bounds on the size of the pre-treatment population of clonogenic cancer cells as well as upper and lower bounds on the cure probability. The main practical impact of these limiting values is the ability to make predictions about the probability of a cure for a given population of patients treated to newer, still unexplored treatment modalities from the empirically determined probability of a cure for the same or similar population resulting from conventional low linear energy transfer (typically photon/electron) RT. We also propose that the current trend to deliver a lower total dose in a smaller number of fractions with larger-than-conventional doses per fraction has physical limits that must be understood before embarking on a particular treatment schedule.

  14. On the probability of cure for heavy-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanin, Leonid; Zaider, Marco

    2014-07-01

    The probability of a cure in radiation therapy (RT)—viewed as the probability of eventual extinction of all cancer cells—is unobservable, and the only way to compute it is through modeling the dynamics of cancer cell population during and post-treatment. The conundrum at the heart of biophysical models aimed at such prospective calculations is the absence of information on the initial size of the subpopulation of clonogenic cancer cells (also called stem-like cancer cells), that largely determines the outcome of RT, both in an individual and population settings. Other relevant parameters (e.g. potential doubling time, cell loss factor and survival probability as a function of dose) are, at least in principle, amenable to empirical determination. In this article we demonstrate that, for heavy-ion RT, microdosimetric considerations (justifiably ignored in conventional RT) combined with an expression for the clone extinction probability obtained from a mechanistic model of radiation cell survival lead to useful upper bounds on the size of the pre-treatment population of clonogenic cancer cells as well as upper and lower bounds on the cure probability. The main practical impact of these limiting values is the ability to make predictions about the probability of a cure for a given population of patients treated to newer, still unexplored treatment modalities from the empirically determined probability of a cure for the same or similar population resulting from conventional low linear energy transfer (typically photon/electron) RT. We also propose that the current trend to deliver a lower total dose in a smaller number of fractions with larger-than-conventional doses per fraction has physical limits that must be understood before embarking on a particular treatment schedule.

  15. A new method to measure the polymerization shrinkage kinetics of light cured composites.

    PubMed

    Lee, I B; Cho, B H; Son, H H; Um, C M

    2005-04-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a new measurement method to determine the initial dynamic volumetric shrinkage of composite resins during polymerization, and to investigate the effect of curing light intensity on the polymerization shrinkage kinetics. The instrument was basically an electromagnetic balance that was constructed with a force transducer using a position sensitive photo detector (PSPD) and a negative feedback servo amplifier. The volumetric change of composites during polymerization was detected continuously as a buoyancy change in distilled water by means of the Archimedes' principle. Using this new instrument, the dynamic patterns of the polymerization shrinkage of seven commercial composite resins were measured. The polymerization shrinkage of the composites was 1.92 approximately 4.05 volume %. The shrinkage of a packable composite was the lowest, and that of a flowable composite was the highest. The maximum rate of polymerization shrinkage increased with increasing light intensity but the peak shrinkage rate time decreased with increasing light intensity. A strong positive relationship was observed between the square root of the light intensity and the maximum shrinkage rate. The shrinkage rate per unit time, dVol%/dt, showed that the instrument can be a valuable research method for investigating the polymerization reaction kinetics. This new shrinkage-measuring instrument has some advantages that it was insensitive to temperature changes and could measure the dynamic volumetric shrinkage in real time without complicated processes. Therefore, it can be used to characterize the shrinkage kinetics in a wide range of commercial and experimental visible-light-cure materials in relation to their composition and chemistry. PMID:15790386

  16. The electron beam cure of epoxy paste adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.D.; Janke, C.J.; Lopata, V.J.

    1998-07-01

    Recently developed epoxy paste adhesives were electron beam cured and experimentally explored to determine their suitability for use in an aerospace-quality aircraft component. There were two major goals for this program. The first was to determine whether the electron beam-curable past adhesives were capable of meeting the requirements of the US Air Force T-38 supersonic jet trainer composite windshield frame. The T-38 windshield frame`s arch is currently manufactured by bonding thin stainless steel plies using an aerospace-grade thermally-cured epoxy film adhesive. The second goal was to develop the lowest cost hand layup and debulk process that could be used to produce laminated steel plies with acceptable properties. The laminate properties examined to determine adhesive suitability include laminate mechanical and physical properties at room, adhesive tack, out-time capability, and the debulk requirements needed to achieve these properties. Eighteen past adhesives and four scrim cloths were experimentally examined using this criteria. One paste adhesive was found to have suitable characteristics in each of these categories and was later chosen for the manufacture of the T-38 windshield frame. This experimental study shows that by using low-cost debulk and layup processes, the electron beam-cured past adhesive mechanical and physical properties meet the specifications of the T-38 composite windshield frame.

  17. Chromothriptic cure of WHIM syndrome: Implications for bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    McDermott, David H; Gao, Ji-Liang; Murphy, Philip M

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported a 59 year old female, designated WHIM-09, who was born with the rare immunodeficiency disease WHIM syndrome but underwent spontaneous phenotypic reversion as an adult. The causative WHIM mutation CXCR4 (R334X) was absent in her myeloid and erythroid lineage, but present in her lymphoid lineage and in epithelial cells, defining her as a somatic genetic mosaic. Genomic and hematologic analysis revealed chromothripsis (chromosome shattering) on one copy of chromosome 2, which deleted 164 genes including CXCR4 (R334X) in a single haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) (Fig. 1). Experiments in mice indicated that deleting one copy of Cxcr4 is sufficient to confer a selective advantage for engraftment of transplanted HSCs, suggesting a mechanism for clinical cure in WHIM-09. Genome editing may allow autologous transplantation of HSCs lacking one copy of CXCR4 without bone marrow conditioning as a general cure strategy in WHIM syndrome, safely recapitulating the outcome in patient WHIM-09. Figure 1.Chromothripsis (chromosomal shattering) resulted in clinical cure of a patient with a rare immunodeficiency (WHIM syndrome) by deleting the mutant copy of CXCR4. PMID:26459672

  18. Engineering T Cells to Functionally Cure HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Leibman, Rachel S; Riley, James L

    2015-07-01

    Despite the ability of antiretroviral therapy to minimize human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication and increase the duration and quality of patients' lives, the health consequences and financial burden associated with the lifelong treatment regimen render a permanent cure highly attractive. Although T cells play an important role in controlling virus replication, they are themselves targets of HIV-mediated destruction. Direct genetic manipulation of T cells for adoptive cellular therapies could facilitate a functional cure by generating HIV-1-resistant cells, redirecting HIV-1-specific immune responses, or a combination of the two strategies. In contrast to a vaccine approach, which relies on the production and priming of HIV-1-specific lymphocytes within a patient's own body, adoptive T-cell therapy provides an opportunity to customize the therapeutic T cells prior to administration. However, at present, it is unclear how to best engineer T cells so that sustained control over HIV-1 replication can be achieved in the absence of antiretrovirals. This review focuses on T-cell gene-engineering and gene-editing strategies that have been performed in efforts to inhibit HIV-1 replication and highlights the requirements for a successful gene therapy-mediated functional cure.

  19. A 50-Year Journey to Cure Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.

    2013-01-01

    The 50th anniversary of Seminars in Hematology coincides with the 50th of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, and both milestones are inexorably linked to studies contributing to the cure of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We thought it fitting, therefore, to mark these events by traveling back in time to point out some of the achievements, institutions, study groups and individuals that have made cure of childhood ALL a reality. In many instances, progress was driven by new ideas, while in others it was driven by new experimental tools that allowed more precise assessment of the biology of leukemic blasts and their utility in selecting therapy. We also discuss a number of contemporary advances that point the way to exciting future directions. Whatever pathways are taken, a clear challenge will be to use emerging genome-based or immunologic-based treatment options in ways that will enhance, rather than duplicate or compromise, recent gains in outcome with classic cytotoxic chemotherapy. The theme of this journey serves as a reminder of the chief ingredient of any research directed to a catastrophic disease such as ALL. It is the audacity of a small group of investigators who confronted a childhood cancer with the goal of cure, not palliation, as their mindset. PMID:23953334

  20. Investigation of the curing variables of asphalt-rubber binder

    SciTech Connect

    Billiter, T.C.; Chun, J.S.; Davison, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    Currently, the paving industry utilizes a curing time of 1 hour at 177{degrees}C (350{degrees}F) for producing asphalt-rubber binder. Billiter et al. showed that at these curing conditions, 1 hour at 177{degrees}C (350{degrees}F), adding rubber to asphalt was beneficial, with the rubber improving the low-temperature creep stiffness at (-15{degrees}C (5{degrees}F)), the temperature susceptibility in the 0{degrees}C-90{degrees}C (32{degrees}F-194{degrees}F) temperature region, increasing G* and {eta}* at 60{degrees}C (140{degrees}F) and 1.0 rad/sec, and decreasing 8 at 60{degrees}C (140{degrees}F) and 1.0 rad/sec. On the other hand, Billiter et al. (2) showed that the addition of rubber was also detrimental, in that the viscosity increased significantly in the compaction temperature region of 149{degrees}C-193{degrees}C (300{degrees}F-380{degrees}F). This increased viscosity can cause compaction problems, with Allison reporting that engineers blamed the compaction problems of asphalt-rubber on undissolved crumb rubber, which they believed had no beneficial effect. Additionally, the engineers reported that improper compaction led to early road failure. This work investigates the variables of binders, curing tenperature and time, and amount of mechancial energy on asphalt properties.

  1. Dataset of producing and curing concrete using domestic treated wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Asadollahfardi, Gholamreza; Delnavaz, Mohammad; Rashnoiee, Vahid; Fazeli, Alireza; Gonabadi, Navid

    2015-01-01

    We tested the setting time of cement, slump and compressive and tensile strength of 54 triplicate cubic samples and 9 cylindrical samples of concrete with and without a Super plasticizer admixture. We produced concrete samples made with drinking water and treated domestic wastewater containing 300, 400 kg/m3 of cement before chlorination and then cured concrete samples made with drinking water and treated wastewater. Second, concrete samples made with 350 kg/m3 of cement with a Superplasticizer admixture made with drinking water and treated wastewater and then cured with treated wastewater. The compressive strength of all the concrete samples made with treated wastewater had a high coefficient of determination with the control concrete samples. A 28-day tensile strength of all the samples was 96–100% of the tensile strength of the control samples and the setting time was reduced by 30 min which was consistent with a ASTMC191 standard. All samples produced and cured with treated waste water did not have a significant effect on water absorption, slump and surface electrical resistivity tests. However, compressive strength at 21 days of concrete samples using 300 kg/m3 of cement in rapid freezing and thawing conditions was about 11% lower than concrete samples made with drinking water. PMID:26862577

  2. Engineering T Cells to Functionally Cure HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leibman, Rachel S; Riley, James L

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ability of antiretroviral therapy to minimize human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication and increase the duration and quality of patients' lives, the health consequences and financial burden associated with the lifelong treatment regimen render a permanent cure highly attractive. Although T cells play an important role in controlling virus replication, they are themselves targets of HIV-mediated destruction. Direct genetic manipulation of T cells for adoptive cellular therapies could facilitate a functional cure by generating HIV-1–resistant cells, redirecting HIV-1–specific immune responses, or a combination of the two strategies. In contrast to a vaccine approach, which relies on the production and priming of HIV-1–specific lymphocytes within a patient's own body, adoptive T-cell therapy provides an opportunity to customize the therapeutic T cells prior to administration. However, at present, it is unclear how to best engineer T cells so that sustained control over HIV-1 replication can be achieved in the absence of antiretrovirals. This review focuses on T-cell gene-engineering and gene-editing strategies that have been performed in efforts to inhibit HIV-1 replication and highlights the requirements for a successful gene therapy–mediated functional cure. PMID:25896251

  3. Cure of Helicobacter pylori-associated ulcer disease through eradication.

    PubMed

    Malfertheiner, P; Leodolter, A; Peitz, U

    2000-02-01

    The eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has led to a dramatic benefit for patients with gastroduodenal ulcer disease, as the majority of these patients receive a lifelong cure. Relapses after successful H. pylori cure may be caused by either recrudescence or reinfection, both rare events nowadays, or be attributed to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or aspirin intake. In certain geographical areas, H. pylori-negative relapses are proposed as a new, pathophysiological and not yet elucidated entity. The cure of H. pylori infection in uncomplicated duodenal ulcer diseases consists of 7 days of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) based triple therapy, containing two antibiotics from clarithromycin, amoxicillin and metronidazole. In gastric ulcer, it is recommended that the PPI is continued for a further 3 weeks as these ulcers have a prolonged healing time. Rescue therapies after failure need to take into consideration the resistance pattern of the micro-organism and are offered in the form of quadruple therapy or a high-dose PPI with amoxicillin.

  4. Controlling pests in dry-cured ham: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Abbar, S; Amoah, B; Phillips, T W; Schilling, M W

    2016-01-01

    Dry-cured hams can become infested with ham mites, red-legged beetles, cheese skippers, and larder beetles during the aging process. Though other methods may be used for beetles and cheese skippers, methyl bromide is the only available fumigant that is effective at controlling ham mites in dry-cured ham plants in the United States. However, methyl bromide will be phased out of all industries by approximately 2015. This paper will review and explore potential alternatives that have been investigated to determine their feasibility for replacing methyl bromide to control pest infestations in dry-cured ham plants in the United States. Potential alternatives include: 1) fumigants such as phosphine and sulfuryl fluoride; 2) physical control approaches through cold treatment, modified atmosphere, inert dusts, etc.; 3) pesticides and bioactive compounds; 4) food-grade processing aids. The most promising potential alternatives to date include the use of propylene glycol on the ham surface, the exploration of alternative fumigants, and implementation of an integrated pest management plan. PMID:26473293

  5. Cure electrocoagulation demonstration at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, J.L.; Jones, J.; Ball, T.

    1996-12-31

    A demonstration of an innovative technology for remediating radionuclide contamination in water took place at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in Golden, Colorado, during the summer of 1995. The demonstration was part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program and was conducted by EPA, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and General Environmental Corporation (GEC). The SITE program encourages the development and demonstration of innovative treatment and monitoring technologies. The purpose of the demonstration was to evaluate the ability of GEC`s innovative CURE technology to remove uranium, plutonium, and americium from water taken from the A and B solar evaporation ponds at RFETS. The CURE electrocoagulation process uses an anode and cathode in a patented geometry to remove contaminants, including radionuclides, from wastewater in a continuous flow process. Electrocoagulation has been recognized as a method of removing a variety of contaminants from wastewaters. With the CURE process, GEC has refined the technology and adapted it to hazardous waste cleanup. Bench scale treatability testing conducted in April 1995 indicated 99 percent removal efficiencies were possible for uranium, plutonium-239/240, and americium-241. During the field scale demonstration in August and September 1995, samples were collected from four demonstration runs at RFETS. A removal efficiency of approximately 50 percent was achieved for uranium and nearly 99 percent for plutonium and americium.

  6. Development and evaluation of radiopaque light cure composite.

    PubMed

    Valiathan, A; Krishnan, V K; Mohanty, M; Bhat, K S

    1999-01-01

    After the development of a two-paste chemical cure composite, evaluation of its physicochemical properties, toxicological evaluation and in-vivo experiments in dogs teeth with histopathological study of dental tissues, a clinical trial was carried out and commercial production recommended. As the shelf life of the material was not enough, a light cure composite was developed, its material characteristics, toxiclological study, in-vivo experiments in dogs with histopathological evaluation and clinical trials carried out. However, the material was radiolucent, and could not be seen in an x-ray and differentiated from a cavity after filling was done. This led to the development of radiopaque light cure composite. Compressive strength, diametral strength, and microhardness were tested with 200-250 phr range of incorporated radiopaque glass particle filler of the size 0.7 to 1.0 micron this improved the properties when compared to conventional composites. The composite was non-toxic and suitable for animal studies. In vivo studies are underway in dogs with histopathological studied of the pulp and dentin. The material awaits clinical trials prior to commercial production. PMID:11143389

  7. Volatile compounds in Iberian dry-cured loin.

    PubMed

    Muriel, E; Antequera, T; Petrón, M J; Andrés, A I; Ruiz, J

    2004-11-01

    The volatile profile of Iberian dry-cured loin from four different Iberian pig lines (Entrepelado, Lampiño, Retinto and Torbiscal) and two feeding systems (OUT - fed on acorn and grass-vs.-IND - fed on high oleic acid concentrate) was studied using solid phase microextraction (SPME). 133 volatile compounds were identified and assigned to 16 chemical families. Alcohols were the major group, ethanol being the main compound. The high number of esters detected and the levels of ethanol and acetic acid found, points to an important role of microorganism activity in the formation of volatile compounds in Iberian dry-cured loin. Sulphur compounds, coming mostly from garlic, constituted an important group, with 14 compounds. Significant differences were found among loins from pigs reared in different feeding systems but not among Iberian pig lines. Dry-cured loins from OUT pigs showed higher levels of many compounds derived from lipid oxidation, such as octanoic acid (P=0.000), decanoic acid (P=0.018) or hexanal (P=0.014). PMID:22062407

  8. Dataset of producing and curing concrete using domestic treated wastewater.

    PubMed

    Asadollahfardi, Gholamreza; Delnavaz, Mohammad; Rashnoiee, Vahid; Fazeli, Alireza; Gonabadi, Navid

    2016-03-01

    We tested the setting time of cement, slump and compressive and tensile strength of 54 triplicate cubic samples and 9 cylindrical samples of concrete with and without a Super plasticizer admixture. We produced concrete samples made with drinking water and treated domestic wastewater containing 300, 400 kg/m(3) of cement before chlorination and then cured concrete samples made with drinking water and treated wastewater. Second, concrete samples made with 350 kg/m(3) of cement with a Superplasticizer admixture made with drinking water and treated wastewater and then cured with treated wastewater. The compressive strength of all the concrete samples made with treated wastewater had a high coefficient of determination with the control concrete samples. A 28-day tensile strength of all the samples was 96-100% of the tensile strength of the control samples and the setting time was reduced by 30 min which was consistent with a ASTMC191 standard. All samples produced and cured with treated waste water did not have a significant effect on water absorption, slump and surface electrical resistivity tests. However, compressive strength at 21 days of concrete samples using 300 kg/m(3) of cement in rapid freezing and thawing conditions was about 11% lower than concrete samples made with drinking water.

  9. Progress toward curing HIV infection with hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Petz, Lawrence D; Burnett, John C; Li, Haitang; Li, Shirley; Tonai, Richard; Bakalinskaya, Milena; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Armitage, Sue; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Regan, Donna M; Clark, Pamela; Querol, Sergio; Gutman, Jonathan A; Spellman, Stephen R; Gragert, Loren; Rossi, John J

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 infection afflicts more than 35 million people worldwide, according to 2014 estimates from the World Health Organization. For those individuals who have access to antiretroviral therapy, these drugs can effectively suppress, but not cure, HIV-1 infection. Indeed, the only documented case for an HIV/AIDS cure was a patient with HIV-1 and acute myeloid leukemia who received allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) from a graft that carried the HIV-resistant CCR5-∆32/∆32 mutation. Other attempts to establish a cure for HIV/AIDS using HCT in patients with HIV-1 and malignancy have yielded mixed results, as encouraging evidence for virus eradication in a few cases has been offset by poor clinical outcomes due to the underlying cancer or other complications. Such clinical strategies have relied on HIV-resistant hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells that harbor the natural CCR5-∆32/∆32 mutation or that have been genetically modified for HIV-resistance. Nevertheless, HCT with HIV-resistant cord blood remains a promising option, particularly with inventories of CCR5-∆32/∆32 units or with genetically modified, human leukocyte antigen-matched cord blood. PMID:26251620

  10. A discrimination index for selecting markers of tumor growth dynamic across multiple cancer studies with a cure fraction.

    PubMed

    Rouam, Sigrid; Broët, Philippe

    2013-08-01

    To identify genomic markers with consistent effect on tumor dynamics across multiple cancer series, discrimination indices based on proportional hazards models can be used since they do not depend heavily on the sample size. However, the underlying assumption of proportionality of the hazards does not always hold, especially when the studied population is a mixture of cured and uncured patients, like in early-stage cancers. We propose a novel index that quantifies the capability of a genomic marker to separate uncured patients, according to their time-to-event outcomes. It allows to identify genomic markers characterizing tumor growth dynamic across multiple studies. Simulation results show that our index performs better than classical indices based on the Cox model. It is neither affected by the sample size nor the cure rate fraction. In a cross-study of early-stage breast cancers, the index allows to select genomic markers with a potential consistent effect on tumor growth dynamics.

  11. The photodynamic therapy on Streptococcus mutans biofilms using erythrosine and dental halogen curing unit.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Ho; Park, Ho-Won; Lee, Ju-Hyun; Seo, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Si-Young

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT), using erythrosine as a photosensitizing agent and a dental halogen curing unit as a light source, on Streptococcus mutans in a biofilm phase. The S. mutans biofilms were formed in a 24-well cell culture cluster. Test groups consisted of biofilms divided into four groups: group 1: no photosensitizer or light irradiation treatment (control group); group 2: photosensitizer treatment alone; group 3: light irradiation alone; group 4: photosensitizer treatment and light irradiation. After treatments, the numbers of colony-forming unit (CFU) were counted and samples were examined by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (CLSM). Only group 4 (combined treatment) resulted in significant increases in cell death, with rates of 75% and 55% after 8 h of incubation, and 74% and 42% at 12 h, for biofilms formed in brain-heart infusion (BHI) broth supplemented with 0% or 0.1% sucrose, respectively. Therefore, PDT of S. mutans biofilms using a combination of erythrosine and a dental halogen curing unit, both widely used in dental clinics, resulted in a significant increase in cell death. The PDT effects are decreased in biofilms that form in the presence of sucrose.

  12. Simultaneous analysis of consumer variables, acceptability and sensory characteristics of dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masahiro; Obiya, Shinichi; Kaneko, Miku; Enomoto, Ayame; Honma, Mayu; Wakayama, Masataka; Tomita, Masaru

    2016-11-01

    We conducted a consumer acceptability analysis of dry-cured ham based on sensory evaluation. Consumer acceptability data are rendered heterogeneous by the diverse backgrounds and assessment abilities of the participants, requiring versatile analytical methods for their interpretation. Totally, 9 sensory attributes of 12 kinds of dry-cured ham samples collected from Japan (n=9), Italy (n=1), Spain (n=1), and Germany (n=1) were tasted by 117 Japanese consumers who showed acceptable evaluation abilities during blind sampling. Common techniques, such as hierarchical clustering, principal component analysis, and external preference mapping, were simultaneously utilized to analyze each characteristics scored in modified hedonic scale. These analyses revealed the relationships between the features and preferences of the assessors. For example, consumers aged 20-30 with smoking and drinking habits preferred sweetness and saltiness, and gave high ratings to Spanish Jómon serrano and Italian prosciutto. Our approach could assist ham marketers to identify potential purchasers and the preferred characteristics of their products.

  13. The photodynamic therapy on Streptococcus mutans biofilms using erythrosine and dental halogen curing unit

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Ho; Park, Ho-Won; Lee, Ju-Hyun; Seo, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Si-Young

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT), using erythrosine as a photosensitizing agent and a dental halogen curing unit as a light source, on Streptococcus mutans in a biofilm phase. The S. mutans biofilms were formed in a 24-well cell culture cluster. Test groups consisted of biofilms divided into four groups: group 1: no photosensitizer or light irradiation treatment (control group); group 2: photosensitizer treatment alone; group 3: light irradiation alone; group 4: photosensitizer treatment and light irradiation. After treatments, the numbers of colony-forming unit (CFU) were counted and samples were examined by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (CLSM). Only group 4 (combined treatment) resulted in significant increases in cell death, with rates of 75% and 55% after 8 h of incubation, and 74% and 42% at 12 h, for biofilms formed in brain–heart infusion (BHI) broth supplemented with 0% or 0.1% sucrose, respectively. Therefore, PDT of S. mutans biofilms using a combination of erythrosine and a dental halogen curing unit, both widely used in dental clinics, resulted in a significant increase in cell death. The PDT effects are decreased in biofilms that form in the presence of sucrose. PMID:23222991

  14. The implications for the surgical community of bariatric surgery as a "cure" for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Josef E

    2013-07-01

    The United States is in the throes of an epidemic of morbid obesity and, parenthetically, type 2 diabetes. Recent data indicate that bariatric surgery, notably Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, is valid not only for weight loss but also for a high success rate in the amelioration and perhaps "cure" of type 2 diabetes. It clearly is not weight loss alone, because the amelioration of type 2 diabetes occurs before weight loss. The mechanism needs to be elucidated and researched. For the first time since tuberculosis--before antitubercular drugs, when surgical procedures were the principal mechanism for dealing with tuberculosis--surgery has the opportunity to participate in the amelioration and perhaps cure of this epidemic and to regain its professional stature. Included in this article are the author's thoughts and suggestions on how we can keep control of weight loss and bariatric procedures that are valid treatments for morbid obesity and related type 2 diabetes. We should use this opportunity to stop the current conversion of surgeons from professionals to employees.

  15. Polymerization contraction of resin composite vs. energy and power density of light-cure.

    PubMed

    Asmussen, Erik; Peutzfeldt, Anne

    2005-10-01

    This study measured the polymerization contraction of a resin composite cured at three levels of energy density, each attained at six different levels of power density. The polymerization contraction of the composite was recorded by the method of the deflecting disc (n = 5) for 1 h following the start of irradiation. Power densities of 50, 100, 200, 400, 800 and 1,000 mW cm(-2), as measured on a dental radiometer, were obtained by variation of distance and supply voltage of a commercial light-curing unit. The spectral distribution at each power density was recorded using a spectrophotometer. The absorption spectrum of camphorquinone was also recorded, and the efficiency of the radiation at each power density was calculated as the integral over wavelength of the product of absorption and emission. From the slope of the contraction curves, an approximation to the initial rate of polymerization, Rp, was calculated and was taken as an alternative measure of power density. Statistical analyses showed that polymerization contraction increased significantly with increasing levels of energy density received by the resin composite, and, for each level of energy density, that the contraction decreased significantly with increasing power density.

  16. Monitoring cure of composite resins using frequency dependent electromagnetic sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, D. E.; Hoff, M. S.; Loos, A. C.; Freeman, W. T., Jr.; Eichinger, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    A nondestructive in situ measurement technique has been developed for monitoring and measuring the cure processing properties of composite resins. Frequency dependent electromagnetic sensors (FDEMS) were used to directly measure resin viscosity during cure. The effects of the cure cycle and resin aging on the viscosity during cure were investigated using the sensor. Viscosity measurements obtained using the sensor are compared with the viscosities calculated by the Loos-Springer cure process model. Good overall agreement was obtained except for the aged resin samples.

  17. The dimensional accuracy of rectangular acrylic resin specimens cured by three denture base processing methods.

    PubMed

    Salim, S; Sadamori, S; Hamada, T

    1992-06-01

    The dimensional accuracy of rectangular acrylic resin specimens was examined when they were processed by three methods: a conventional method, the SR-Ivocap system, and a microwave curing method. The dimensional accuracy was evaluated by the change of the distance vector V, which is calculated by means of measurements of the distances between fixed points on specimens. The specimen cured by the SR-Ivocap system exhibited less dimensional change (p less than 0.05) than those cured by the conventional and the microwave curing methods. The SR-Ivocap system might produce a more accurate denture base than the conventional and the microwave curing methods.

  18. [The importance for improving the cure rate of lacrimal gland benign pleomorphic adenoma].

    PubMed

    Xiao, L H

    2016-04-11

    The pleomorphic adenoma was the most common epithelial tumor of the lacrimal gland. The 2 major factors determining the prognosis of pleophormic adenoma of lacrimal gland were likelihood of recurrence and evidence of malignant transformation. Management of the recurrent pleomorphic adenoma was difficult. Moreover, the malignant transformation was danger for life. The reason for orbital recurrent involved many factors, but the main reasons may be related to correct preoperative judgment of the nature of the tumor, taking the appropriate surgical approach and operative techniques. Long-term follow-up was available for the patient. It could help doctors detect recurrence of tumor earlier and treat it timely. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 52: 241-243).

  19. Use of Cox's Cure Model to Establish Clinical Determinants of Long-Term Disease-Free Survival in Neoadjuvant-Chemotherapy-Treated Breast Cancer Patients without Pathologic Complete Response.

    PubMed

    Asano, Junichi; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Hamada, Chikuma; Yonemori, Kan; Hirata, Taizo; Shimizu, Chikako; Tamura, Kenji; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    In prognostic studies for breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), the ordinary Cox proportional-hazards (PH) model has been often used to identify prognostic factors for disease-free survival (DFS). This model assumes that all patients eventually experience relapse or death. However, a subset of NAC-treated breast cancer patients never experience these events during long-term follow-up (>10 years) and may be considered clinically "cured." Clinical factors associated with cure have not been studied adequately. Because the ordinary Cox PH model cannot be used to identify such clinical factors, we used the Cox PH cure model, a recently developed statistical method. This model includes both a logistic regression component for the cure rate and a Cox regression component for the hazard for uncured patients. The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical factors associated with cure and the variables associated with the time to recurrence or death in NAC-treated breast cancer patients without a pathologic complete response, by using the Cox PH cure model. We found that hormone receptor status, clinical response, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status, histological grade, and the number of lymph node metastases were associated with cure.

  20. A cure shrinkage model for analyzing the stresses and strains in encapsulated assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, R. S.; Lagasse, R. R.; Guess, T. R.; Plazek, D. J.; Bero, C.

    Electrical component assemblies are encapsulated to provide delicate parts with voltage isolation and protection against damage caused by shock, vibration, and harsh atmospheric environments. During cure, thermosetting resins shrink and harden simultaneously. If the natural deformation of the resin is constrained by adhesion to the mold or to relatively stiff embedded components, cure shrinkage stresses are generated in the encapsulant. Subsequent cooling or thermal cycling produces additional stresses that are caused by the mismatches in thermal strains among the materials in the encapsulated assembly. Although cure shrinkage stresses frequently are neglected because they are considerably smaller than thermal stresses, cure shrinkage stresses can cause delamination or fractures in the encapsulant, since the partially cured resin is not as tough as the fully cured material. Cracks generated during cure can compromise performance (e.g., permit dielectric breakdown), degrade a component's protection, and grow under subsequent thermal cycling producing residual stresses that differ from those found in uncracked assemblies.

  1. Adhesives deliver low-shrink low-stress bonds and fast UV cure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Kyle T.

    2001-03-01

    Lower stress, higher quality assemblies as well as quantum increases in productivity are now possible with `new generation', light curing adhesives. This new technology makes obsolete the industry-accepted assumption that low strain requires slow curing UV adhesives, epoxies and cements. Curing in only seconds and without the need for secondary thermal cure, these new light curing adhesives produce laminates which are essentially strain-free, and edge bonds with shrinkage as low as 0.2%. This paper will compare and contrast these new adhesives with existing bonding technologies in typical applications. Included are comparison between epoxies, UV curing mercaptoesters, and the new light curing Aerobic Acrylates, as well as the incorporation of adhesives into optical component design.

  2. Adhesives deliver low-shrink low-stress bonds and fast UV cure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Kyle T.

    2001-06-01

    Lower stress, higher quality assemblies as well as quantum increases in productivity are now possible with `new generation', light curing adhesives. This new technology makes obsolete the industry-accepted assumption that low strain requires slow curing UV adhesives, epoxies and cements. Curing in only seconds and without the need for secondary thermal cure, these new light curing adhesives produce laminates which are essentially strain-free, and edge bonds with shrinkage as low as 0.2%. This paper will compare and contrast these new adhesives with existing bonding technologies in typical applications. Included are comparisons between epoxies, UV curing mercaptoesters, and the new light curing Aerobic Acrylates, as well as the incorporation of adhesives into optical component design.

  3. Effects of light curing method and resin composite composition on composite adaptation to the cavity wall.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takako; Morigami, Makoto; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of the light curing method and resin composite composition on marginal sealing and resin composite adaptation to the cavity wall. Cylindrical cavities were prepared on the buccal or lingual cervical regions. The teeth were restored using Clearfil Liner Bond 2V adhesive system and filled with Clearfil Photo Bright or Palfique Estelite resin composite. The resins were cured using the conventional or slow-start light curing method. After thermal cycling, the specimens were subjected to a dye penetration test. The slow-start curing method showed better resin composite adaptation to the cavity wall for both composites. Furthermore, the slow-start curing method resulted in significantly improved dentin marginal sealing compared with the conventional method for Clearfil Photo Bright. The light-cured resin composite, which exhibited increased contrast ratios duringpolymerization, seems to suggest high compensation for polymerization contraction stress when using the slow-start curing method.

  4. Influence of the curing mode on fluoride ion release of self-adhesive resin luting cements in water or during pH-cycling regimen.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, T R; Pinto, C F; Cavalli, V; Nobre-dos-Santos, M; Ambrosano, G M B; Mathias, P; Giannini, M

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of curing modes and storage conditions on fluoride release of resin cements. In phase 1, the cumulative fluoride release rate from samples of the resin cements (Panavia F 2.0, RelyX Unicem, MaxCem, and BisCem) was quantified after 15 days storage in water (n=4). In phase 2, the fluoride release profiles from the same materials were analyzed during pH cycling (n=4). In this second phase, fluoride was measured at specific times (one, two, three, five, eight, and 15 days). Disk-shaped specimens were prepared (10 mm × 0.5 mm), and the materials were either light activated or allowed to autopolymerize. For both phases, the fluoride release was measured using a fluoride ion-specific electrode. The fluoride release in water was not affected by the curing mode of RelyX Unicem and Maxcem resin cements. Panavia F. 2.0 and BisCem resin cements, either light cured or autopolymerized modes, released higher amounts of fluoride in water than the other self-adhesive cements. In phase 2, the concentration of fluoride released decreased from the first day of pH cycling until the 15th day for all resin cements, for both curing modes, regardless of the storage solution used (demineralizing/remineralizing). The fluoride release rate during pH cycling by Panavia F 2.0 and MaxCem was not affected by the curing mode. The effect of the curing mode on fluoride ion release in water or during pH cycling was product dependent. PMID:21942239

  5. Cure-WISE: HETDEX Data Reduction with Astro-WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snigula, J. M.; Drory, N.; Fabricius, M.; Landriau, M.; Montesano, F.; Hill, G. J.; Gebhardt, K.; Cornell, M. E.

    2014-05-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX, Hill et al. 2012b) is a blind spectroscopic survey to map the evolution of dark energy using Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies at redshifts 1.9< ɀ <3.5 as tracers. The survey will use an array of 75 integral field spectrographs called the Visible Integral field Replicable Unit (IFU) Spectrograph (VIRUS, Hill et al. 2012c). The 10m HET (Ramsey et al. 1998) currently receives a wide-field upgrade (Hill et al. 2012a) to accomodate the spectrographs and to provide the needed field of view. Over the projected five year run of the survey we expect to obtain approximately 170 GB of data each night. For the data reduction we developed the Cure pipeline, to automatically find and calibrate the observed spectra, subtract the sky background, and detect and classify different types of sources. Cure employs rigorous statistical methods and complete pixel-level error propagation throughout the reduction process to ensure Poisson-limited performance and meaningful significance values. To automate the reduction of the whole dataset we implemented the Cure pipeline in the Astro-WISE framework. This integration provides for HETDEX a database backend with complete dependency tracking of the various reduction steps, automated checks, and a searchable interface to the detected sources and user management. It can be used to create various web interfaces for data access and quality control. Astro-WISE allows us to reduce the data from all the IFUs in parallel on a compute cluster. This cluster allows us to reduce the observed data in quasi real time and still have excess capacity for rerunning parts of the reduction. Finally, the Astro-WISE interface will be used to provide access to reduced data products to the general community.

  6. [Abdominal cure procedures. Adequate use of Nobecutan Spray].

    PubMed

    López Soto, Rosa María

    2009-12-01

    Open abdominal wounds, complicated by infection and/or risk of eventration tend to become chronic and usually require frequent prolonged cure. Habitual changing of bandages develop into one of the clearest risk factors leading to the deterioration of perilesional cutaneous integrity. This brings with it new complications which draw out the evolution of the process, provoking an important deterioration in quality of life for the person who suffers this and a considerable increase in health costs. What is needed is a product and a procedure which control the risk of irritation, which protect the skin, which favor a patient's comfort and which shorten treatment requirements while lowering health care expenses. This report invites medical personnel to think seriously about the scientific rationale, and treatment practice, as to why and how to apply Nobecutan adequately, this reports concludes stating the benefits in the adequate use of this product. The objective of this report is to guarantee the adequate use of this product in treatment of complicated abdominal wounds. This product responds to the needs which are present in these clinical cases favoring skin care apt isolation and protection, while at the same time, facilitating the placement and stability of dressings and bandages used to cure wounds. In order for this to happen, the correct use of this product is essential; medical personnel must pay attention to precautions and recommendations for proper application. The author's experiences in habitual handling of this product during various years, included in the procedures for standardized cures for these wounds, corroborates its usefulness; the author considers use of this product to be highly effective while being simple to apply; furthermore, one succeeds in providing quality care and optimizes resources employed.

  7. In vitro aging of a heat/pressure-cured composite.

    PubMed

    Drummond, J L; Savers, E E

    1993-05-01

    Specimens of a heat/pressure-cured microfill composite were aged in saline or distilled water at 37 degrees C up to 12 mon to determine if the flexure strength was affected by the aging media. No significant difference in the flexure strength was observed between the controls and the 12 mon aged specimens. Cyclic testing in distilled water resulted in a lower flexure strength at fracture than that observed for the aged specimens. This lower strength is attributed to fatigue of the silane bond, the resin matrix, and/or the filler particles.

  8. Porous Ceramic Cures at Moderate Temperatures, Is Good Heat Insulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eubanks, Alfred G.; Hunkeler, Ronald E.

    1965-01-01

    The problem: To develop a foamed-in-place refractory material that would provide good thermal insulation, mechanical support, and vibration shielding for enclosed objects at temperatures up to 30000 F. The preparation of conventional foamed refractory materials required long curing times (as much as 48 hours) and high temperatures (at least 700 F), rendering such materials unusable for in-place potting of heat-sensitive components. The solution: A foamed ceramic material that has the requisite thermal insulation and strength, and also displays other properties that suggest a wide range of applications.

  9. Towards an HIV-1 cure: measuring the latent reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, Katherine M.; Hosmane, Nina N.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    The latent reservoir of HIV-1 in resting memory CD4+ T cells serves as a major barrier to curing HIV-1 infection. While many PCR- and culture-based assays have been used to measure the size of the latent reservoir, correlation between results of different assays is poor and recent studies indicate that no available assay provides an accurate measurement of reservoir size. The discrepancies between assays are a hurdle to clinical trials that aim to measure the efficacy of HIV-1 eradication strategies. Here we describe the advantages and disadvantages of various approaches to measure the latent reservoir. PMID:25747663

  10. The dental curing light: A potential health risk.

    PubMed

    Price, Richard B T; Labrie, Daniel; Bruzell, Ellen M; Sliney, David H; Strassler, Howard E

    2016-08-01

    Powerful blue-light emitting dental curing lights are used in dental offices to photocure resins in the mouth. In addition, many dental personnel use magnification loupes. This study measured the effect of magnification loupes on the "blue light hazard" when the light from a dental curing light was reflected off a human tooth. Loupes with 3.5x magnification (Design for Vision, Carl Zeiss, and Quality Aspirator) and 2.5x magnification (Design for Vision and Quality Aspirator) were placed at the entrance of an integrating sphere connected to a spectrometer (USB 4000, Ocean Optics). A model with human teeth was placed 40 cm away and in line with this sphere. The light guide tip of a broad-spectrum Sapphire Plus (Den-Mat) curing light was positioned at a 45° angle from the facial surface of the central incisor. The spectral radiant power reflected from the teeth was recorded five times with the loupes over the entrance into the sphere. The maximum permissible cumulative exposure times in an 8-hr day were calculated using guidelines set by the ACGIH. It was concluded that at a 40 cm distance, the maximum permissible cumulative daily exposure time to light reflected from the tooth was approximately 11 min without loupes. The weighted blue irradiance values were significantly different for each brand of loupe (Fisher's PLSD p < 0.05) and were up to eight times greater at the pupil than when loupes were not used. However, since the linear dimensions of the resulting images would be 2.5 to 3.5x larger on the retina, the image area was increased by the square of the magnification and the effective blue light hazard was reduced compared to without the loupes. Thus, although using magnification loupes increased the irradiance received at the pupil, the maximum cumulative daily exposure time to reflected light was increased up to 28 min. Further studies are required to determine the ocular hazards of a focused stare when using magnification loupes and the effects of other

  11. Resin flow and void formation in an autoclave cure cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionetto, Francesca; Lucia, Massimo; Dell'Anna, Riccardo; Maffezzoli, Alfonso

    2016-05-01

    A finite element (FE) model able to evaluate both the evolution of resin flow, degree of reaction and void formation during autoclave cure cycles was developed. The model was implemented using a commercial epoxy matrix widely used in aeronautic field. The FE model also included a kinetic and rheological model whose input parameters were experimentally determined by Differential Scanning Calorimetry and rheological analysis. The FE model was able to predict the evolution of degree of reaction with very good agreement with the experimental data. Moreover, the predicted resin losses were lower than 3% of the overall composite resin content.

  12. Invasive Scedosporium sternal osteomyelitis following lung transplant: Cured.

    PubMed

    Denton, E J; Smibert, O; Gooi, J; Morrissey, C O; Snell, G; McGiffin, D; Paraskeva, M

    2016-06-01

    Scedosporium is an important pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) and post-transplant but rarely causes invasive infection. Treatment remains challenging, particularly due to inherent resistance to multiple antifungal agents. We present a young man with CF who developed invasive sternal and rib infection 10-months following lung transplant. The infection has been clinically and radiologically cured with extensive surgery and triazole therapy. This case highlights the importance of adjunctive surgery in addition to prolonged triazole treatment to manage invasive Scedosporium infections in immunosuppressed patients. PMID:27595059

  13. Low toxicity aromatic diamine curing agents for adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsey, G.F.

    1993-08-24

    Increasing severity of regulations for handling of hazardous materials has led to formulation of adhesives with considerably lowered toxicities for use at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Fundamental was the development of Asilamine aromatic diamines, a family of liquid aromatic diamines useful as substitutes for methylenedianiline (MDA), a widely used adhesives curing agent. The use of Asilamine has allowed us to continue operations without dealing with expensive measures for regulation of MDA as a carcinogen promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

  14. Spontaneous recovery of bone mass after cure of endogenous hypercortisolism.

    PubMed

    Randazzo, Maria Elena; Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Vanzulli, Angelo; Loli, Paola

    2012-06-01

    Patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) develop osteopenia-osteoporosis. The present study evaluates the recovery of bone mass within 2 years after remission of hypercortisolism and in long term follow up, an issue rarely addressed. Twenty patients (6M, 14F, 3 post-menopausal, 15-64 years old), 15 with Cushing's disease, 2 with ectopic ACTH syndrome, 3 with ACTH-independent CS were studied. BMD, T and Z scores at lumbar spine and proximal femur were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry before and 7-33 months after treatment of hypercortisolism. Five patients were treated with bisphosphonates. Four patients had hypogonadism and 4 GH-deficiency. At baseline all patients showed osteopenia/osteoporosis and the spine appeared more damaged than the femur; femur BMD was positively related with body mass index (BMI). No correlations were observed between spine and femur bone parameters and duration of disease or severity of hypercortisolism. Bone parameters did not differ in patients with or without GH or other pituitary deficiencies. After cure of hypercortisolism a significant improvement in spine BMD, Z and T scores and in femur Z and T scores was observed with normalization in 3 patients; there was no significant difference in percent improvement between femur and spine. The increase in bone parameters at spine and femur was independent from values at baseline. The percent increase in spine T and Z scores was positively related with time elapsed since cure. Bisphosphonates did not influence the recovery of bone mineralization. In long term follow up, after a median period of 7 years a further improvement in bone density was observed in 100% of patients at spine and in 9/11 at femur, although 8/11 patients still had femoral and/or vertebral T score in the range of osteopenia/osteoporosis. Spontaneous improvement of osteoporosis after cure of hypercortisolism occurs both at spine and femur, is independent from basal conditions and not affected by bisphosphonates

  15. Developing the Manufacturing Process for Hylene MP Curing Agent

    SciTech Connect

    Eastwood, Eric

    2009-02-16

    This report details efforts to scale-up and re-establish the manufacturing process for the curing agent known as Hylene MP. First, small scale reactions were completed with varying conditions to determine key drivers for yielding high quality product. Once the optimum conditions were determined on the small scale, the scaled-up process conditions were determined. New equipment was incorporated into the manufacturing process to create a closed production system and improve chemical exposure controls and improve worker safety. A safe, efficient manufacturing process was developed to manufacture high quality Hylene MP in large quantities.

  16. Spontaneous recovery of bone mass after cure of endogenous hypercortisolism.

    PubMed

    Randazzo, Maria Elena; Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Vanzulli, Angelo; Loli, Paola

    2012-06-01

    Patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) develop osteopenia-osteoporosis. The present study evaluates the recovery of bone mass within 2 years after remission of hypercortisolism and in long term follow up, an issue rarely addressed. Twenty patients (6M, 14F, 3 post-menopausal, 15-64 years old), 15 with Cushing's disease, 2 with ectopic ACTH syndrome, 3 with ACTH-independent CS were studied. BMD, T and Z scores at lumbar spine and proximal femur were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry before and 7-33 months after treatment of hypercortisolism. Five patients were treated with bisphosphonates. Four patients had hypogonadism and 4 GH-deficiency. At baseline all patients showed osteopenia/osteoporosis and the spine appeared more damaged than the femur; femur BMD was positively related with body mass index (BMI). No correlations were observed between spine and femur bone parameters and duration of disease or severity of hypercortisolism. Bone parameters did not differ in patients with or without GH or other pituitary deficiencies. After cure of hypercortisolism a significant improvement in spine BMD, Z and T scores and in femur Z and T scores was observed with normalization in 3 patients; there was no significant difference in percent improvement between femur and spine. The increase in bone parameters at spine and femur was independent from values at baseline. The percent increase in spine T and Z scores was positively related with time elapsed since cure. Bisphosphonates did not influence the recovery of bone mineralization. In long term follow up, after a median period of 7 years a further improvement in bone density was observed in 100% of patients at spine and in 9/11 at femur, although 8/11 patients still had femoral and/or vertebral T score in the range of osteopenia/osteoporosis. Spontaneous improvement of osteoporosis after cure of hypercortisolism occurs both at spine and femur, is independent from basal conditions and not affected by bisphosphonates

  17. Solid Rocket Fuel Constitutive Theory and Polymer Cure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ream, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Solid Rocket Fuel is a complex composite material for which no general constitutive theory, based on first principles, has been developed. One of the principles such a relation would depend on is the morphology of the binder. A theory of polymer curing is required to determine this morphology. During work on such a theory an algorithm was developed for counting the number of ways a polymer chain could assemble. The methods used to develop and check this algorithm led to an analytic solution to the problem. This solution is used in a probability distribution function which characterizes the morphology of the polymer.

  18. UV curing and photoresist outgassing in high energy implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.A.; Erokhin, Y.; Horsky, T.

    1996-12-31

    Thick photoresists, typically 3 microns or more in thickness, necessary for high energy implantation present some unique problems. The outgassing of thick photoresist In high energy applications varies from that of thinner resist and lower energies. It requires appropriate processing to cure without reticulation of field regions deformity of features, or blistering during subsequent processing. This paper examines different resist treatments and their effects on implanter pressure during processing. Data on outgassing of thick photoresist, outgassing effects on absolute dose and dose uniformity as measured by sheet resistance contour maps, and the variation in gas composition are presented.

  19. [Stress profile during curing contraction of composite resin adhesives].

    PubMed

    Kunzelmann, K H; Hickel, R

    1990-11-01

    The wall-to-wall curing contraction of thin composite resin layers was recorded with a tensometer. The composite resin was applied to cylindrically shaped ceramic sample holders with diameters of 3 mm, 4 mm and 8 mm. The distances of the sample holders was set at 50 microns, 100 microns, 150 microns, 200 microns and 300 microns. The shrinkage stress recordings clearly show that the shrinkage forces are governed by the distance of the sample holders and not by the volume or the configuration factor of the composite resin layers.

  20. Cytotoxicity evaluation of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation.

    PubMed

    Dioguardi, M; Perrone, D; Troiano, G; Laino, L; Ardito, F; Lauritano, F; Cicciù, M; Muzio, L Lo

    2015-01-01

    Custom-cast posts and cores are usually used to treat endodontically treated teeth. However, several researches have underlined how these devices may be a much higher elastic modulus than the supporting dentine and the difference in the modulus could lead to stress concentrating in the cement lute, leading to failure. The role of the cement seems to play a fundamental role in order to transfer the strength during the chewing phases. Aim of this research is to record the rate of cytotoxicity of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation. We tested the cytotoxicity of this five materials on MG63 osteoblast-like cells through two different methods: MTT ([3-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide succinate) assay which tests for mitochondrial enzyme activity(6) and xCELLigence® system.