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Sample records for 63-year-old man underwent

  1. New-onset haematoproteinuria in a 63-year-old man with intraperitoneal lymph node enlargement.

    PubMed

    Minakawa, Akihiro; Hisanaga, Shuichi; Sato, Yuji; Fujimoto, Shouichi

    2016-01-01

    A 63-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of renal dysfunction with haematoproteinuria. Intraperitoneal lymph node enlargement was also noted. M protein was not detected by electrophoresis of his serum and urine; however, an increase in the κ/λ ratio was detected by free light-chain assay. Percutaneous kidney biopsy was performed, and the patient was diagnosed with proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin deposits. Lymph node biopsy showed follicular lymphoma. Urinalysis findings improved after treatment of the lymphoma. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin deposits is rarely considered to be associated with haematological disease. We report a case of lymphoma-associated proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin deposits with light-chain abnormality detected by free light-chain assay, but not by electrophoresis. PMID:26907822

  2. Pathological pelvic fracture following long-term bisphosphonate use in a 63-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Watson, H I; Hopper, G P; Gupta, S; Roberts, J L

    2014-01-01

    A 63-year-old woman presented with a low energy pelvic fracture, which showed no signs of healing. Initial fractures were to the right hemipelvis, later followed by a right fractured neck of femur. We present a complicated patient journey, management dilemmas and highlight the growing concern with long-term bisphosphonate treatment. PMID:25312895

  3. Idiopathic Bilateral Adrenal Hemorrhage in a 63-Year-Old Male: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bodukam, Vijay Kumar; Thakur, Kshitij; Singh, Amandeep; Jenkins, Donald; Bahl, Jaya

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal hemorrhage is a largely uncommon condition typically caused by a number of factors including infection, MI, CHF, anticoagulants, trauma, surgery, and antiphospholipid syndrome. Yet, idiopathic bilateral hemorrhage is rare. The authors present a case of a 63-year-old male who presented with abdominal pain that was eventually diagnosed as bilateral adrenal hemorrhages due to an unknown origin. Abdominal CT revealed normal adrenal glands without enlargement, but an MRI displayed enlargement due to hemorrhage in both adrenals. There was no known cause; the patient had not suffered from an acute infection and was not on anticoagulants, and the patient's history did not reveal any of the other known causative factors. The case underscores the importance of keeping bilateral adrenal hemorrhages on the list of differentials even when a cause is not immediately clear. It also raises the question of whether CT is the most sensitive test in the diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage and whether the diagnostic approach should place greater weight on MRI. The case highlights the need for prompt therapy with steroids once bilateral hemorrhage is suspected to avert the development or progression of adrenal insufficiency. PMID:25973281

  4. Expanding the phenotype in aminoacylase 1 (ACY1) deficiency: characterization of the molecular defect in a 63-year-old woman with generalized dystonia.

    PubMed

    Sass, Jörn Oliver; Vaithilingam, Jathana; Gemperle-Britschgi, Corinne; Delnooz, Cathérine C S; Kluijtmans, Leo A J; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Wevers, Ron A

    2016-06-01

    Aminoacylase 1 (ACY1) deficiency is an organic aciduria due to mutations in the ACY1 gene. It is considered much underdiagnosed. Most individuals known to be affected by ACY1 deficiency have presented with neurologic symptoms. We report here a cognitively normal 63-year-old woman who around the age of 12 years had developed dystonic symptoms that gradually evolved into generalized dystonia. Extensive investigations, including metabolic diagnostics and diagnostic exome sequencing, were performed to elucidate the cause of dystonia. Findings were only compatible with a diagnosis of ACY1 deficiency: the urinary metabolite pattern with N-acetylated amino acids was characteristic, there was decreased ACY1 activity in immortalized lymphocytes, and two compound heterozygous ACY1 mutations were detected, one well-characterized c.1057C>T (p.Arg353Cys) and the other novel c.325A>G (p.Arg109Gly). Expression analysis in HEK293 cells revealed high residual activity of the enzyme with the latter mutation. However, following co-transfection of cells with stable expression of the c.1057C>T variant with either wild-type ACY1 or the c.325A>G mutant, only the wild-type enhanced ACY1 activity and ACY1 presence in the Western blot, suggesting an inhibiting interference between the two variants. Our report extends the clinical spectrum of ACY1 deficiency to include dystonia and indicates that screening for organic acidurias deserves consideration in patients with unexplained generalized dystonia. PMID:26686503

  5. Rocket man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becklake, John

    2008-06-01

    In the 1950s and 1960s, Wernher von Braun was famous as the man who led the West's journey into space. Some also remember him as the German engineer who developed the V-2 missile that bombarded Antwerp and London at the end of the Second World War. However, many still celebrate Von Braun, who died in 1977, as the man who put the astronauts on the Moon. While this is not strictly true, there is no doubt that Von Braun was one of the most influential engineers, lobbyists and personalities in the Moon-landing project.

  6. Remeasuring man.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Samuel George Morton (1799-1851) was the most highly regarded American scientist of the early and middle 19th century. Thanks largely to Stephen Jay Gould's book The Mismeasure of Man, Morton's cranial capacity measurements of different races is now held up as a prime example of and cautionary tale against scientific racism. A team of anthropologists recently reevaluated Morton's work and argued that it was Gould, not Morton, who was biased in his analysis. This article is a reexamination of the Morton and Gould controversy. It argues that most of Gould's arguments against Morton are sound. Although Gould made some errors and overstated his case in a number of places, he provided prima facia evidence, as yet unrefuted, that Morton did indeed mismeasure his skulls in ways that conformed to 19th century racial biases. Gould's critique of Morton ought to remain as an illustration of implicit bias in science. PMID:24761929

  7. Remeasuring man.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Samuel George Morton (1799-1851) was the most highly regarded American scientist of the early and middle 19th century. Thanks largely to Stephen Jay Gould's book The Mismeasure of Man, Morton's cranial capacity measurements of different races is now held up as a prime example of and cautionary tale against scientific racism. A team of anthropologists recently reevaluated Morton's work and argued that it was Gould, not Morton, who was biased in his analysis. This article is a reexamination of the Morton and Gould controversy. It argues that most of Gould's arguments against Morton are sound. Although Gould made some errors and overstated his case in a number of places, he provided prima facia evidence, as yet unrefuted, that Morton did indeed mismeasure his skulls in ways that conformed to 19th century racial biases. Gould's critique of Morton ought to remain as an illustration of implicit bias in science.

  8. Outcomes in children who underwent transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Steven R; Alvarez, Fernando; Anand, Ravinder; Song, Changhong; Yin, Wanrong

    2011-04-01

    The outcomes of 113 children with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), registered with Studies of Pediatric Liver Transplantation and who underwent transplantation between 1995 and 2006, were compared with those who underwent transplantation for other diagnoses (non-AIH). A total of 4.9% of liver transplants were for AIH; 81% of these patients had AIH type 1 and most underwent transplantation for complications of chronic disease (60%), the majority in females (72%). Transplantation for fulminant AIH was more common in males (52.5% versus 47.5% chronic; P = 0.042). Patients with AIH differed from non-AIH patients by: age (13.0 ± 0.4 versus 4.6 ± 0.1 years; P < 0.0001), sex (64.6% female versus 52.9%; P = 0.016), ethnicity (48.7% white versus 58.2%; P < 0.0001), initial immunosuppression (tacrolimus-based: 72.6% versus 62.6%; P = 0.045; mycophenolate mofetil use: 31.0% versus 21.6%; P = 0.02), and immunosuppression at 2 years after transplant (monotherapy: 51.9% versus 17.3%; P < 0.0001). Late (>3 months), but not steroid-resistant or chronic, rejection was more common in AIH (log-rank P = 0.0015). The 5-year posttransplant survival for AIH was 86% (95% confidence interval: 73-93). Patient and graft survival, infectious and metabolic complications, and retransplantation rates did not differ between AIH and non-AIH groups. In conclusion, the higher risk for late acute rejection and greater degree of immunosuppression does not compromise outcomes of liver transplantation for AIH. Children who undergo transplantation for AIH in North America are typically female adolescents with complications of chronic AIH type 1 and include more children of African American or Latino American origin compared to the overall liver transplant population. These observations may inform detection, treatment, and surveillance strategies designed to reduce the progression of autoimmune hepatitis and subsequently, the need for transplantation.

  9. Adrenal Mass in Patients who Underwent Abdominal Computed Tomography Examination

    PubMed Central

    Al-Thani, Hassan; El-Menyar, Ayman; Al-Sulaiti, Marym; ElGohary, Hesham; Al-Malki, Ahmed; Asim, Mohammad; Tabeb, AbdelHakem

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adrenal masses are usually discovered incidentally (IAM) during abdominal computed tomography (CT). Aims: We aimed to describe the prevalence, management, and outcome of incidentally discovered adrenal mass on radiological investigation. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted to look for IAM identified by abdominal CT performed for other reasons between 2004 and 2008 and were followed for 4 years. IAM patients with known malignancy or clinically evident adrenal disease or overt disease originally missed due to insufficient clinical examination were excluded. Results: A total of 13,115 patients underwent abdominal CT, of which 136 were identified with adrenal mass (69 males and 67 females). Overall, 84 patients had benign IAM and six had primary adrenal carcinoma (all had tumor size ≥4 cm and five were males). Hormonal evaluation was performed in 80 cases, which revealed hypersecretion in 10 cases (six had Conn's syndrome and four had pheochromocytoma). Males had higher frequency of right-sided IAMs; whereas, left-sided IAM swere more common among females (P = 0.02). Seven patients underwent surgery and all were males (one Conn's syndrome, one pheochromocytoma, three primary adrenal adenocarcinoma, one benign nonfunctional adenoma, and one metastatic tumor). Only one patient died due to brain metastasis. Conclusion: The overall prevalence of adrenal incidentaloma is 1% in Qatar. Unfortunately, hormonal evaluation, surgical referral, and follow-up are not appropriate in this study. Moreover, screening of IAM warrants more attention to rule out malignancy. This work could be of value as a local auditing for the current management. PMID:26110133

  10. The Computer and Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, William D.

    1976-01-01

    The theme of this article concerns the sketching in of a number of the factors in man's evolutionary interaction with tools, leading toward the predicted eventuality in his development, the replacement of man by machines. (Author)

  11. Man's Evolutionary Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobzhansky, Theodosius

    1972-01-01

    Man can aspire to control his evolution and direct it towards goals which he finds good, salutary, worth living for....The one most 'natural' thing for man is to modify nature by means of his knowledge." (Author/AL)

  12. The Man With “Pseudo-Occlusion” Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Apar; Tayal, Seema; Al-Hashimi, Nada; Okesanya, Adesuwa; Kondamudi, Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with acute colonic pseudo obstruction (Ogilvie’s Syndrome) in a 63-year-old Hispanic male with multiple co morbidities, sent from the Nursing Home for evaluation of progressive abdominal distention. Clinical examination and diagnostic workup confirmed massive colonic dilatation, without mechanical obstruction.

  13. Microorganisms and Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, W. C.

    1983-01-01

    Provides information to update Institute of Biology's Studies in Biology No. 111, "Microorganisms and Man," by W. C. Noble and Jay Naidoo (Edward Arnold, 1979). Topics include: (1) food poisoning; (2) airborn infections in man; (3) infection in animals and plants; and (4) biodegradation and biosynthesis. (JN)

  14. The Green Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson-Newlin, Karen

    2010-01-01

    The Jolly Green Giant. Robin Hood. The Bamberg Cathedral. Tales of King Arthur. Ecology. What do they have in common? What legends and ancient myths are shrouded in the tales of the Green Man? Most often perceived as an ancient Celtic symbol as the god of spring and summer, the Green Man disappears and returns year after year, century after…

  15. Man of Fire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Helene Juarez

    1993-01-01

    The themes of Jose Clemente Orozco's murals, several of which are found on U.S. college campuses, are as relevant today as they were during the Mexican Revolution. Orozco (1883-1949) painted the world as he saw it, portraying corruption, violence, and man's inhumanity to man. (LP)

  16. Man-systems integration and the man-machine interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Joseph P.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on man-systems integration and the man-machine interface are presented. Man-systems integration applies the systems' approach to the integration of the user and the machine to form an effective, symbiotic Man-Machine System (MMS). A MMS is a combination of one or more human beings and one or more physical components that are integrated through the common purpose of achieving some objective. The human operator interacts with the system through the Man-Machine Interface (MMI).

  17. Man in space.

    PubMed

    Solovjev, V A

    1987-09-01

    Today, more than 20 years after the first in the world man's space walk, soviet cosmonautics gained large experience of extravehicular activity (EVA). Space suits of high reliability, onboard facilities for passing through the airlock, sets of special tools and technological rigging, as well as procedures for carrying out various EVA's were developed. In the course of the Salyut-7 space station orbital operation the EVA's have become regular. The author of the report as the participant of the EVA's considers the main steps of man activities in space and analyzes specific problems arised in performing such activities.

  18. Eskimo Medicine Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Otto

    "Eskimo Medicine Man" is a record of primitive Alaskan life in the 1930's. It records the experiences in Alaska's remote areas of Dr. Otto George, the last "traveling physician" for the Department of Interior's Indian Service, when in all the territory (an area one-fifth that of the contiguous United States) there were fewer than sixty thousand…

  19. Why Man Explores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    This NASA Educational Publication was prepared from a transcript of a panel discussion held on July 2, 1976, in conjunction with the Viking Missions to Mars. The members of the Why Man Explores panel were selected as authorities in classical disciplines relating to exploration.

  20. Man--Society--Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taxis, Linda A., Ed.

    The 32nd annual American Industrial Arts Association (AIAA) Convention was held in Louisville in 1970. Topics for the AIAA general session addresses were: (1) "Industrial Arts--The Blender Between Social Form and Technical Function," (2) "Technology and Society: Present and Future Challenges," (3) "A Student-Oriented Industrial Arts," (4) "Man:…

  1. Landing A Man Downtown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, W. G., II

    1973-01-01

    Analyzes the urban transport problems in comparison with those involved in a journey to the Moon. Indicates that the problem of enabling man to travel through the inner space of conurbations may prove to be more difficult than the transport problem of space travel. (CC)

  2. Myth and Modern Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patai, Raphael

    Various theories about the purpose of myth are described briefly, and then the place of myth in modern life is explored. Modern man is found to still create his own myths, and his life is still influenced by mythical prototypes and images. Myths, mythical beliefs, and mythical thinking are discovered in socialist, Communist, and totalitarian…

  3. Man as a Species.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solem, Alan; And Others

    Written in 1964, the document represents experimental material of the Anthropology Curriculum Study Project. The objectives of the project were to discuss the evolution of man as distinguished from the evolution of other species and as related to culture, and to emphasize human diversity. Three brief essays are presented. The first, "The Species…

  4. Reference Man anatomical model

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, M.

    1994-10-01

    The 70-kg Standard Man or Reference Man has been used in physiological models since at least the 1920s to represent adult males. It came into use in radiation protection in the late 1940s and was developed extensively during the 1950s and used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its Publication 2 in 1959. The current Reference Man for Purposes of Radiation Protection is a monumental book published in 1975 by the ICRP as ICRP Publication 23. It has a wealth of information useful for radiation dosimetry, including anatomical and physiological data, gross and elemental composition of the body and organs and tissues of the body. The anatomical data includes specified reference values for an adult male and an adult female. Other reference values are primarily for the adult male. The anatomical data include much data on fetuses and children, although reference values are not established. There is an ICRP task group currently working on revising selected parts of the Reference Man document.

  5. Hypertensive crisis due to contrast-enhanced computed tomography in a patient with malignant pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Sachiko; Tsushima, Yoshito; Taketomi-Takahashi, Ayako; Higuchi, Tetsuya; Amanuma, Makoto; Oriuchi, Noboru; Endo, Keigo

    2011-07-01

    A 63-year-old man underwent computed tomography (CT) using intravenous low-osmolar iodine contrast medium (LOCM) 6 days after undergoing high-dose (131)I-MIBG therapy for metastatic pheochromocytoma. Immediately after the CT examination, his blood pressure increased to 260/160 mmHg (from 179/101 mmHg before the examination). Phentolamine mesilate was administered, and the blood pressure rapidly went back to normal. Although hypertensive crisis after administration of LOCM is rare, this case suggests that high-dose (131)IMIBG therapy may be a risk factor for hypertensive crisis after administration of intravenous LOCM.

  6. Necrotizing sialometaplasia in the mouth floor secondary to reconstructive surgery for tongue carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, T; Kuwabara, N; Shiotsu, H; Fukuda, Y; Yanai, A; Ichikawa, G

    1991-09-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a benign inflammatory process, which histologically can mimic squamous cell carcinoma. A 63-year-old man underwent left hemiglossectomy involving transplantation of a myocutaneous flap for squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue. One month after the operation, necrotizing sialometaplasia occurred in the minor salivary gland tissue of the mouth floor, compressed by the necrotic flap. This case is very unusual because of the occurrence of necrotizing sialometaplasia in the floor of the mouth. The etiology of the lesion was considered to be ischemia secondary to compression by the necrotic myocutaneous flap.

  7. Manned Mars mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Terrapin Technologies proposes a Manned Mars Mission design study. The purpose of the Manned Mars Mission is to transport ten people and a habitat with all required support systems and supplies from low Earth orbit (LEO) to the surface of Mars and, after an expedition of three months to return the personnel safely to LEO. The proposed hardware design is based on systems and components of demonstrated high capability and reliability. The mission design builds on past mission experience but incorporates innovative design approaches to achieve mission priorities. These priorities, in decreasing order of importance, are safety, reliability, minimum personnel transfer time, minimum weight, and minimum cost. The design demonstrates the feasibility and flexibility of a waverider transfer module. Information is given on how the plan meets the mission requirements.

  8. Man-Amplifying Exoskeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosheim, Mark E.

    1990-03-01

    This paper describes a design for a man-amplifying exoskeleton, an electrically powered, articulated frame worn by an operator. The design features modular construction and employ anthropomorphic pitch-yaw joints for arms and legs. These singularity-free designs offer a significant advancement over simple pivot-type joints used in older designs. Twenty-six degrees-of-freedom excluding the hands gives the Man-Amplifier its unique dexterity. A five hundred-pound load capacity is engineered for a diverse range of tasks. Potential applications in emergency rescue work, restoring functionality to the handicapped, and military applications ranging from material handling to an elite fighting core are discussed. A bibliography concludes this paper.

  9. Man in space.

    PubMed

    West, J B

    1986-12-01

    The Challenger disaster focused attention on the hazards as well as the possibilities of man in space. The physiological effects of prolonged weightlessness include important changes in vestibular, bone, muscle, cardiovascular, blood, renal, and pulmonary function. Much has been learned from US and Soviet experiments, but large areas of ignorance remain. Exceptional opportunities for physiological research are provided by Spacelab, a pressurized laboratory planned as a payload of the Space Shuttle.

  10. Man's future in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freitag, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    Studies evaluating potential operational and commercial uses of space are being conducted, taking into account astronomy, astrophysics, manned bases and laboratories in earth orbit, space colonization, terrestrial communications, space processing and manufacturing, interstellar probes, planetary exploration, and the use of space for terrestrial energy supply. The present status in the exploration of the solar system is examined, giving attention to Jupiter, Venus, Mars, and Mercury. A brief outline of the development of human colonies on Mars is presented.

  11. Typhoon Man-Yi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Typhoon Man-Yi was pummeling the Japanese island of Okinawa with winds between 230 and 295 kilometers per hour (125-160 knots, 144-184 miles per hour) and heavy rain on the morning of July 13, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image. The immense storm covered hundreds of kilometers with spiraling bands of thunderstorms, though it had lost the distinctive cloud-free eye it exhibited the day before. Typhoons are common in Japan, but powerful typhoons usually strike the island nation later in the year. The Japan Meteorological Agency said that Man-Yi is the fourth typhoon of the 2007 season and may be the most powerful ever observed in the northwest Pacific in July, reported Kyodo News. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expected the typhoon to strike Kyushu, a southern Japanese island, on July 14, and then curve northeast along the eastern shore of Japan. By the time the storm reaches Tokyo on July 15, it should be degraded to a tropical storm. As of July 13, Typhoon Man-Yi had injured eight and flooded twenty houses in Okinawa, and forced airlines to cancel hundreds of flights, said Kyodo News. The storm was expected to bring heavy rain to Japan's Pacific coast. NASA image created by Jesse Allen, using data provided courtesy of the MODIS Rapid Response team.

  12. Facial lipohypertrophy in HIV-infected subjects who underwent autologous fat tissue transplantation.

    PubMed

    Guaraldi, Giovanni; De Fazio, Domenico; Orlando, Gabriella; Murri, Rita; Wu, Albert; Guaraldi, Pietro; Esposito, Roberto

    2005-01-15

    Of 41 HIV-infected patients with facial lipoatrophy who underwent autologous fat transplantation, disfiguring facial lipohypertrophy at the graft site occurred at the same time as recurrent fat accumulation at the tissue harvest site in 4 patients who had had fat transferred from the dorsocervical fat pad or from subcutaneous abdominal tissue.

  13. The rhinoviruses of man.

    PubMed

    Fiala, M; Guze, L B

    1970-05-01

    Rhinoviruses, prominent agents of the common cold syndrome in man, are small ribonucleic acid (rna) viruses resembling enteroviruses in their physicochemical properties except for high density and lability to acid pH. Rhinoviruses are propagated in human and monkey cells. Highest titers of virus are obtained in HeLa cell cultures. Rhinoviruses produce characteristic cytopathic effect in diploid fibroblasts. A plaque assay in HeLa cells is useful for their titration. The rhinovirus group includes many serotypes. Although rhinoviruses cause predominantly upper respiratory tract symptoms, they may on occasion infect the lower respiratory tract. Volunteers with specific antibody, when challenged with homotypic rhinovirus, are protected against the common cold.

  14. Man and his spaceships

    PubMed Central

    Siefert, Janet L.

    2012-01-01

    The resiliency and adaptive ability of microbial life in real time on Earth relies heavily upon horizontal gene transfer. Based on that knowledge, how likely is earth based microbial life to colonize extraterrestrial targets such as Mars? To address this question, we consider manned and unmanned space exploration, the resident microbiota that is likely to inhabit those vehicles, the adaptive potential of that microbiota in an extraterrestrial setting especially with regards to mobile genetic elements, and the likelihood that Mars like environments could initiate and sustain colonization. PMID:23481263

  15. Mars manned transportation vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Faymon, Karl A.

    1987-01-01

    A viable power system technology for a surface transportation vehicle to explore the planet Mars is presented. A number of power traction systems were investigated, and it was found that a regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell appears to be attractive for a manned Mars rover application. Mission requirements were obtained from the Manned Mars Mission Working Group. Power systems weights, power, and reactants requirements were determined as a function of vehicle weights for vehicles weighing from 6,000 to 16,000 lb (2,722 to 7,257 kg), (Earth weight). The vehicle performance requirements were: velocity, 10 km/hr; range, 100 km; slope climbing capability, 30 deg uphill for 50 km; mission duration, 5 days; and crew, 5. Power requirements for the operation of scientific equipment and support system capabilities were also specified and included in this study. The concept developed here would also be applicable to a Lunar based vehicle for Lunar exploration. The reduced gravity on the Lunar surface, (over that on the Martian surface), would result in an increased range or capability over that of the Mars vehicle since many of the power and energy requirements for the vehicle are gravity dependent.

  16. Mars manned transportation vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Davis, M.E.; Faymon, K.A.

    1987-07-01

    A viable power system technology for a surface transportation vehicle to explore the planet Mars is presented. A number of power traction systems were investigated, and it was found that a regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell appears to be attractive for a manned Mars rover application. Mission requirements were obtained from the Manned Mars Mission Working Group. Power systems weights, power, and reactants requirements were determined as a function of vehicle weights for vehicles weighing from 6,000 to 16,000 lb (2,722 to 7,257 kg), (Earth weight). The vehicle performance requirements were: velocity, 10 km/hr; range, 100 km; slope climbing capability, 30 deg uphill for 50 km; mission duration, 5 days; and crew, 5. Power requirements for the operation of scientific equipment and support system capabilities were also specified and included in this study. The concept developed here would also be applicable to a Lunar based vehicle for Lunar exploration. The reduced gravity on the Lunar surface, (over that on the Martian surface), would result in an increased range or capability over that of the Mars vehicle since many of the power and energy requirements for the vehicle are gravity dependent.

  17. The Nature of Man and Its Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Gregory, Lura N.

    The many problems presented by the nature of man and in studying man are the focus of this paper which attempts to place these problems in perspective in terms of the past and future. The enigma facing man, that man must study man, is related in an introduction. Freud's, Adler's, and Jung's developments in the study of the nature of man are…

  18. Thermodynamic correction of particle concentrations measured by underwing probes on fast flying aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, R.; Spichtinger, P.; Mahnke, C.; Klingebiel, M.; Afchine, A.; Petzold, A.; Krämer, M.; Costa, A.; Molleker, S.; Jurkat, T.; Minikin, A.; Borrmann, S.

    2015-12-01

    Particle concentration measurements with underwing probes on aircraft are impacted by air compression upstream of the instrument body as a function of flight velocity. In particular for fast-flying aircraft the necessity arises to account for compression of the air sample volume. Hence, a correction procedure is needed to invert measured particle number concentrations to ambient conditions that is commonly applicable for different instruments to gain comparable results. In the compression region where the detection of particles occurs (i.e. under factual measurement conditions), pressure and temperature of the air sample are increased compared to ambient (undisturbed) conditions in certain distance away from the aircraft. Conventional procedures for scaling the measured number densities to ambient conditions presume that the particle penetration speed through the instruments' detection area equals the aircraft speed (True Air Speed, TAS). However, particle imaging instruments equipped with pitot-tubes measuring the Probe Air Speed (PAS) of each underwing probe reveal PAS values systematically below those of the TAS. We conclude that the deviation between PAS and TAS is mainly caused by the compression of the probed air sample. From measurements during two missions in 2014 with the German Gulfstream G-550 (HALO - High Altitude LOng range) research aircraft we develop a procedure to correct the measured particle concentration to ambient conditions using a thermodynamic approach. With the provided equation the corresponding concentration correction factor ξ is applicable to the high frequency measurements of each underwing probe which is equipped with its own air speed sensor (e.g. a pitot-tube). ξ-values of 1 to 0.85 are calculated for air speeds (i.e. TAS) between 60 and 260 m s-1. From HALO data it is found that ξ does not significantly vary between the different deployed instruments. Thus, for the current HALO underwing probe configuration a parameterisation of

  19. Man Under Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, D. J.

    1964-01-01

    Current achievements in environments at pressures higher than atmospheric are reviewed, ranging from the uses of hyperbaric oxygen for treatment to the concept of residence at high pressure for extended Continental Shelf exploration and very deep caisson work. A case is made for the use of high oxygen pressures in the treatment of hypoxias of acute onset, of certain infections, and as an adjunct to radiotherapy. Achievement of the desired high tissue tensions of oxygen while avoiding toxicity requires careful choice of both pressure and duration of exposure. Man has successfully dived to 1000 feet in the sea, and has remained for weeks at high pressures. Adequate prophylactic decompression remains a major problem, since current recompression procedures are to a large extent empirically derived. There are grounds for expecting improved prophylactic and therapeutic procedures when present studies are completed. PMID:14217256

  20. Rich Man, Poor Man: Developmental Differences in Attributions and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigelman, Carol K.

    2012-01-01

    In an examination guided by cognitive developmental and attribution theory of how explanations of wealth and poverty and perceptions of rich and poor people change with age and are interrelated, 6-, 10-, and 14-year-olds (N = 88) were asked for their causal attributions and trait judgments concerning a rich man and a poor man. First graders, like…

  1. Anesthetic management of patient with Sjogren's syndrome who underwent cesarean section: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Eun; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Jun Yong

    2016-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is one of the most common autoimmune disorders and has a female predominance. Maternal circulating autoantibodies such as anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibodies can cause congenital heart block of fetus, and in severe case, emergency pacemaker implantation may be needed for neonate. Therefore, it is very important to understand maternal and fetal condition and pay attention to the status of the neonate during delivery. In this paper, we present a case of patient with Sjogren's syndrome who underwent cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. PMID:27274376

  2. Anesthetic management of patient with Sjogren's syndrome who underwent cesarean section: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Eun; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Chung, In Sun; Lee, Jun Yong

    2016-06-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is one of the most common autoimmune disorders and has a female predominance. Maternal circulating autoantibodies such as anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibodies can cause congenital heart block of fetus, and in severe case, emergency pacemaker implantation may be needed for neonate. Therefore, it is very important to understand maternal and fetal condition and pay attention to the status of the neonate during delivery. In this paper, we present a case of patient with Sjogren's syndrome who underwent cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. PMID:27274376

  3. Assessment of the epidemiological profile of patients with dentofacial deformities who underwent orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Castro, Vanessa; do Prado, Celio Jesus; Neto, Antonio Irineu Trindade; Zanetta-Barbosa, Darceny

    2013-05-01

    The present study aimed to establish the profile of patients who underwent orthognathic surgery in a private clinic by evaluating their demographic characteristics, their facial types, and aspects related to the surgical procedures that were performed. The sample consisted of 419 medical records from male and female patients aged 15 to 62 years who underwent orthognathic surgery between 2001 and 2011. A single examiner collected data by evaluating a database of information extracted from medical records, particularly radiographic and photographic analyses. The following criteria were evaluated: gender, age, skin color, type of orthognathic surgery, type of associated temporomandibular joint (TMJ) surgery, complications, and recurrences. Seventeen patients were rejected because they had incomplete records. The average age of the patients was 28.5 years old; most were females (255 patients) and faioderm (295 patients). The most prevalent facial pattern was Pattern III (n = 166, 41.3%). Orthognathic surgery that affected the maxilla, jaw, and chin was the most prevalent type (n = 199, 49.5% of cases). A genioplasty was performed concurrently with combined surgeries and single-jaw surgery in 76.86% of patients (n = 309). TMJ surgery was performed concomitantly with orthognathic surgery in 4% of cases (n = 16). The most common postoperative complication was infection/inflammation (n = 12). We concluded that there was a higher frequency of orthognathic surgery among women and young people, the brunette skin phenotype was prevalent, and most patients had a combination of maxillary and mandibular problems.

  4. Stellar map of neolithic man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pskovskiy, Y. P.

    1978-01-01

    Observations made by ancient man are of great interest to present day astronomers. Drawings made by neolithic man in caves show a surprising sense of perspective. The discoveries in the Fern Grotto in California are of special interest. Photographs of cave drawings are included.

  5. Man Machine Systems in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sall, Malkit S.

    This review of the research literature on the interaction between humans and computers discusses how man machine systems can be utilized effectively in the learning-teaching process, especially in secondary education. Beginning with a definition of man machine systems and comments on the poor quality of much of the computer-based learning material…

  6. Light in man's environment.

    PubMed

    Marshall, J

    2016-02-01

    Light in the form of solar radiation influenced early civilisations and resulted in the independent development of a number of sun-worshipping dieties. These were of particular importance as hunter gatherers transformed into settled agricultural societies. All artificial light sources were synonymous with fire, and early civilisations began to expand their visual day by burning brands, oil, and candles. Fire-based light sources extended for thousands of years and were still present in the era of gas lighting. Light meant fire risk. The advent of incandescent bulbs and the era of electric lighting really only expanded in the early part of the twentieth century. Fluorescent lighting became available in the 1940s, and today the drive for low energy has resulted in a plethora of novel light sources-in particular, light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Evolution governed the development of the eye in relation to roughly 12 h of light gradually changing to 12 h of darkness. Today almost daylight levels can be achieved abruptly at the flick of a switch. Many studies have demonstrated the spectral dependence of eye health, with the retinal hazard zone associated with wavelengths in the blue, peaking at 441 nm- many of today's low-energy sources peak in this region. Given the increased longevity and artificial light sources emitting at biologically unfriendly wavelengths, attention has to be directed towards light in man's environment as a risk factor in age-related ocular diseases.

  7. Light in man's environment.

    PubMed

    Marshall, J

    2016-02-01

    Light in the form of solar radiation influenced early civilisations and resulted in the independent development of a number of sun-worshipping dieties. These were of particular importance as hunter gatherers transformed into settled agricultural societies. All artificial light sources were synonymous with fire, and early civilisations began to expand their visual day by burning brands, oil, and candles. Fire-based light sources extended for thousands of years and were still present in the era of gas lighting. Light meant fire risk. The advent of incandescent bulbs and the era of electric lighting really only expanded in the early part of the twentieth century. Fluorescent lighting became available in the 1940s, and today the drive for low energy has resulted in a plethora of novel light sources-in particular, light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Evolution governed the development of the eye in relation to roughly 12 h of light gradually changing to 12 h of darkness. Today almost daylight levels can be achieved abruptly at the flick of a switch. Many studies have demonstrated the spectral dependence of eye health, with the retinal hazard zone associated with wavelengths in the blue, peaking at 441 nm- many of today's low-energy sources peak in this region. Given the increased longevity and artificial light sources emitting at biologically unfriendly wavelengths, attention has to be directed towards light in man's environment as a risk factor in age-related ocular diseases. PMID:26742864

  8. [Anxiety and depression among men and women who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention].

    PubMed

    Furuya, Rejane Kiyomi; Costa, Eliana de Cássia Arantes; Coelho, Mariana; Richter, Vitor César; Dessotte, Carina Aparecida Marosti; Schmidt, André; Dantas, Rosana Aparecida Spadoti; Rossi, Lídia Aparecida

    2013-12-01

    A descriptive, cross-sectional, correlational study aimed to investigate the association of sex and the presence of anxiety and depression after hospital discharge in patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Fifty-nine patients undergoing PCI and receiving outpatient treatment in the first seven months after hospital discharge were evaluated. To assess the symptoms of anxiety and depression the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used. To test the possible associations between the variables anxiety, depression and sex the Chi-square test was used with a significance level of 5%. The results indicated a greater number of women with depression and the association between the variables sex and depression was statistically significant. In relation to anxiety, cases were more frequent in males and the association between the variables sex and anxiety was not statistically significant. PMID:24626358

  9. Meralgia paresthetica affecting parturient women who underwent cesarean section -A case report-

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kum Hee; Ko, Tong Kyun; Park, Chung Hyun; Chun, Duk Hee; Yang, Hyeon Jeong; Gill, Hyun Jue; Kim, Min Ku

    2010-01-01

    Meralgia paresthetica is commonly caused by a focal entrapment of lateral femoral cuteneous nerve while it passes the inguinal ligament. Common symptoms are paresthesias and numbness of the upper lateral thigh area. Pregnancy, tight cloths, obesity, position of surgery and the tumor in the retroperitoneal space could be causes of meralgia paresthetica. A 29-year-old female patient underwent an emergency cesarean section under spinal anesthesia without any problems. But two days after surgery, the patient complained numbness and paresthesia in anterolateral thigh area. Various neurological examinations and L-spine MRI images were all normal, but the symptoms persisted for a few days. Then, electromyogram and nerve conduction velocity test of the trunk and both legs were performed. Test results showed left lateral cutaneous nerve injury and meralgia paresthetica was diagnosed. Conservative treatment was implemented and the patient was free of symptoms after 1 month follow-up. PMID:21286469

  10. A Pregnant Woman Who Underwent Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy due to Cushing's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bayram, Fahri; Simsek, Yasin; Ozkan, Yusuf; Akcan, Alper; Karahan, Ibrahim; Ileri, Ibrahim; Aribas, Sulbiye; Koc, Mehmet Sait

    2014-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) may lead to severe maternal and fetal morbidities and even mortalities in pregnancy. However, pregnancy complicates the diagnosis and treatment of CS. This study describes a 26-year-old pregnant woman admitted with hypertension-induced headache. Hormonal analyses performed due to her cushingoid phenotype revealed a diagnosis of adrenocorticotropic hormone- (ACTH-) independent CS. MRI showed a 3.5 cm adenoma in her right adrenal gland. After preoperative metyrapone therapy, she underwent a successful unilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy at 14-week gestation. Although she had a temporary postoperative adrenal insufficiency, hormonal analyses showed that she has been in remission since delivery. Findings in this patient, as well as those in previous patients, indicate that pregnancy is not an absolute contraindication for laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Rather, such surgery should be considered a safe and efficient treatment method for pregnant women with cortisol-secreting adrenal adenomas. PMID:25544906

  11. [A Patient with Sinking Skin Flap Syndrome who Underwent Perfusion MRI before and after Cranioplasty].

    PubMed

    Kato, Akihito; Morishima, Hiroyuki; Nagashima, Goro

    2016-09-01

    Background:Sinking skin flap syndrome(SSFS)manifests as subjective symptoms, such as headache, dizziness, and undue fatigability, in addition to neurologic symptoms, such as hemiplegia, aphasia, and perceived failure, when the skin over a bone defect sinks in the weeks or months following a decompressive craniectomy. Indeed, these symptoms can improve after a cranioplasty. Case presentation:A 58-year-old woman presented with a disturbance of consciousness. She was found to have a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured right middle cerebral artery aneurysm. She underwent a craniotomy with clipping of the affected artery and a decompressive craniectomy on the same day. Post-operatively, the disturbance of consciousness improved, but the left-sided paralysis persisted. She complained of intractable headaches, was disoriented, and a lack of spontaneity emerged as the skin over the bone defect sank. She underwent cranioplasty on the 43rd day after admission, and the symptoms resolved promptly after surgery. Rehabilitation was canceled at the onset of symptoms, but resumed after the symptoms improved. Based on perfusion MRI, the cerebral blood flow(CBF):cerebral blood volume(CBV)ratio of the affected side increased before and after surgery compared with the healthy side. A lumboperitoneal shunt was placed on the 52nd day after admission to manage the hydrocephalus. She was discharged from the hospital with higher brain dysfunction and a mild state of paralysis. Conclusion:The timing of cranioplasty in patients with SSFS has not yet been established, but surgery should be performed before symptoms appear because SSFS impairs rehabilitative efforts. PMID:27605477

  12. Poor man`s parallelism in environmental management

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, V.M.; Rogers, L.L.

    1995-02-01

    Poor man`s parallelism is a term to describe the harnessing of commonly available computational approaches containing a high degree of implicit or explicit parallelism with distributed computer resources to produce a large gain in processing time. The distinguishing features of poor man`s techniques are their accessibility and relatively low cost. In some circumstances, the clever exploitation of existing hardware and software may achieve as much improvement in the timely completion of tasks as do high-end, state-of-the-art parallel technologies. The ANN-GA approach to the optimization of environmental remediation strategies is an example of poor man`s parallelism: it integrates two well-known computational technologies, artificial neural networks (ANNs) and the genetic algorithm (GA), with a simple scheme for exploiting a network of Unix workstations to solve a nonlinear combinatorial optimization problem. Although this work has been motivated by the need to tame a computational tiger rather than to experiment with different flavors of parallelism, the approach has reached a level of maturity where it is instructive to examine how parallelism is embodied in its various components. It also stands as a demonstration of how even resource-lean organizations can take advantage of parallelism to solve problems.

  13. Fundus fluorescein angiographic findings in patients who underwent ventricular assist device implantation.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Taylan; Nalcaci, Serhad; Ozturk, Pelin; Engin, Cagatay; Yagdi, Tahir; Akkin, Cezmi; Ozbaran, Mustafa

    2013-09-01

    Disruption of microcirculation in various tissues as a result of deformed blood rheology due to ventricular assist device (VAD) implantation causes novel arteriovenous malformations. Capillary disturbances and related vascular leakage in the retina and choroidea may also be seen in patients supported by VADs. We aimed to evaluate retinal vasculature deteriorations after VAD implantation. The charts of 17 patients who underwent VAD implantation surgery for the treatment of end-stage heart failure were retrospectively reviewed. Eight cases (47.1%) underwent pulsatile pump implantation (Berlin Heart EXCOR, Berlin Heart Mediprodukt GmbH, Berlin, Germany); however, nine cases (52.9%) had continuous-flow pump using centrifugal design (HeartWare, HeartWare Inc., Miramar, FL, USA). Study participants were selected among the patients who had survived with a VAD for at least 6 months, and results of detailed ophthalmologic examinations including optic coherence tomography (OCT) and fundus fluorescein angiography (FA) were documented. All of the 17 patients were male, with a mean age of 48.5 ± 14.8 years (15-67 years). Detailed ophthalmologic examinations including the evaluation of retinal vascular deteriorations via FA were performed at a mean of 11.8 ± 3.7 months of follow-up (6-18 months). Mean best-corrected visual acuity and intraocular pressure were found as logMAR 0.02 ± 0.08 and 14.6 ± 1.9 mm Hg, respectively in the study population. Dilated fundoscopy revealed severe focal arteriolar narrowing in two patients (11.8%), and arteriovenous crossing changes in four patients (23.5%); however, no pathological alteration was present in macular OCT scans. In patients with continuous-flow blood pumps, mean arm-retina circulation time (ARCT) and arteriovenous transit time (AVTT) were found to be 16.8 ± 3.0 and 12.4 ± 6.2 s, respectively; whereas those with pulsatile-flow blood pumps were found to be 17.4 ± 3.6 and 14.0 ± 2.1 s in patients (P=0.526 and P=0

  14. Pathological Characterization of Ovarian Cancer Patients Who Underwent Debulking Surgery in Combination With Diaphragmatic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Takeshi; Oshiro, Hisashi; Sagawa, Yasukazu; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Terauchi, Fumitoshi; Nagao, Toshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Despite exhaustive efforts to detect early-stage ovarian cancers, greater than two-thirds of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage. Although diaphragmatic metastasis is not rare in advanced ovarian cancer patients and often precludes optimal cytoreductive surgery, little is known about the mechanisms and predictive factors of metastasis to the diaphragm. Thus, as an initial step toward investigating such factors, the present study was conducted to characterize the pathological status of ovarian cancer patients who underwent debulking surgery in combination with diaphragmatic surgery. This is a retrospective and cross-sectional study of patients who underwent debulking surgery in combination with diaphragmatic surgery at our institution between January 2005 and July 2015. Clinicopathological data were reviewed by board-certified gynecologists, pathologists, and cytopathologists. The rates of various pathological findings were investigated and compared by Fisher exact test between 2 groups: 1 group that was pathologically positive for diaphragmatic metastasis (group A) and another group that was pathologically negative for diaphragmatic metastasis (group B). Forty-six patients were included: 41 patients pathologically positive and 5 pathologically negative for diaphragmatic metastasis. The rates of metastasis to the lymph node (95.8% vs 20%, P = 0.001) and metastasis to the peritoneum except for the diaphragm (97.6% vs 60.0%, P = 0.028) were significantly increased in group A compared with group B. However, no significant differences between the 2 groups were found for rates of histological subtypes (high-grade serous or non-high-grade serous), the presence of ascites, the presence of malignant ascites, exposure of cancer cells on the ovarian surface, blood vascular invasion in the primary lesion, and lymphovascular invasion in the primary lesion. Our study demonstrated that metastasis to the lymph node and nondiaphragmatic metastasis to the

  15. The poor man's cell block

    PubMed Central

    Darlington, Ann

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe a simple method for making formalin or isopropyl alcohol vapour fixed cell blocks from fine needle aspiration cytology specimens that we refer to as ‘The Poor Man's Cell Block.’ PMID:20671053

  16. Manned Mars mission cost estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaker, Joseph; Smith, Keith

    1986-01-01

    The potential costs of several options of a manned Mars mission are examined. A cost estimating methodology based primarily on existing Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) parametric cost models is summarized. These models include the MSFC Space Station Cost Model and the MSFC Launch Vehicle Cost Model as well as other modes and techniques. The ground rules and assumptions of the cost estimating methodology are discussed and cost estimates presented for six potential mission options which were studied. The estimated manned Mars mission costs are compared to the cost of the somewhat analogous Apollo Program cost after normalizing the Apollo cost to the environment and ground rules of the manned Mars missions. It is concluded that a manned Mars mission, as currently defined, could be accomplished for under $30 billion in 1985 dollars excluding launch vehicle development and mission operations.

  17. Facing Up to Man's Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Kevin; Brownlee, Shannon

    1983-01-01

    Discusses evidence suggesting that man only recently diverged from the apes. The evidence, still disputed by some scientists, has caused many others to revise their thinking as to when and how the human line originated. (JN)

  18. Man, space flight and medicine.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of experience obtained from space flight to evaluate man's physiological capability to function in space. Results of the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs are presented, with emphasis on the latter. The space medicine requirements which were necessary for assuring man's safe journey into and return from space have resulted in hardware and techniques of great value to terrestrial medicine. The need to monitor the physiologic function of crewmen led to the development of miniaturized, nonirritating, and highly reliable sensors.

  19. Why a Hanging Man Dances.

    PubMed

    Padam, Gurpreet Kaur

    2015-01-01

    "Do you know why a hanging man dances?" asked Mr B. He was once an intensely independent man, now 80 years old and afflicted with end-stage lung disease. He appeared tired, repositioning himself with great effort to sitting at the edge of the bed, tightly holding onto the bed sheets as if clenching to a life that was slowly escaping him. "No. I don't want anything that will make me live longer." PMID:26176577

  20. Intraocular lens power estimation by accurate ray tracing for eyes underwent previous refractive surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Que; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Lu; Meng, Qingyu; Zhu, Qiudong

    2015-08-01

    For normal eyes without history of any ocular surgery, traditional equations for calculating intraocular lens (IOL) power, such as SRK-T, Holladay, Higis, SRK-II, et al., all were relativley accurate. However, for eyes underwent refractive surgeries, such as LASIK, or eyes diagnosed as keratoconus, these equations may cause significant postoperative refractive error, which may cause poor satisfaction after cataract surgery. Although some methods have been carried out to solve this problem, such as Hagis-L equation[1], or using preoperative data (data before LASIK) to estimate K value[2], no precise equations were available for these eyes. Here, we introduced a novel intraocular lens power estimation method by accurate ray tracing with optical design software ZEMAX. Instead of using traditional regression formula, we adopted the exact measured corneal elevation distribution, central corneal thickness, anterior chamber depth, axial length, and estimated effective lens plane as the input parameters. The calculation of intraocular lens power for a patient with keratoconus and another LASIK postoperative patient met very well with their visual capacity after cataract surgery.

  1. Clinical significance of preoperative thrombocytosis in patients who underwent radical nephrectomy for nonmetastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Young; Ko, Young Hwii

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to examine the association of preoperative thrombocytosis with the prognosis of patients with nonmetastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of 187 patients who underwent a radical nephrectomy for nonmetastatic RCC between July 1997 and June 2009. Thrombocytosis was defined as a platelet count≥400,000 µL, and patients were divided into 2 groups according to presence of preoperative thrombocytosis, and the cancer-specific survival rates and overall survival rates of the 2 groups after radical nephrectomy were compared. Results The mean age of the patients was 56.0±11.7 years and the mean follow-up period was 59.3±42.1 months; there were 20 patients with preoperative thrombocytosis. Thirty patients developed metastases and 9 patients died during the follow-up period. In Kaplan-Meier analysis using a univariate log-rank test, both cancer-specific survival rate (p=0.013) and overall survival rate (p=0.012) showed significant association with preoperative thrombocytosis. Controlling for pathological TNM stage, Fuhrman grade and tumor diameter, the Cox proportional hazards model for cancer-specific survival rates showed that preoperative thrombocytosis was an independent prognostic factor (p=0.025). Conclusions Preoperative thrombocytosis was associated with poorer prognosis in patients with nonmetastatic RCC. Thus, preoperative platelet count may be clinically useful for risk stratification of patients undergoing surgery for nonmetastatic RCC.

  2. Mitochondrial genomes from modern horses reveal the major haplogroups that underwent domestication.

    PubMed

    Achilli, Alessandro; Olivieri, Anna; Soares, Pedro; Lancioni, Hovirag; Hooshiar Kashani, Baharak; Perego, Ugo A; Nergadze, Solomon G; Carossa, Valeria; Santagostino, Marco; Capomaccio, Stefano; Felicetti, Michela; Al-Achkar, Walid; Penedo, M Cecilia T; Verini-Supplizi, Andrea; Houshmand, Massoud; Woodward, Scott R; Semino, Ornella; Silvestrelli, Maurizio; Giulotto, Elena; Pereira, Luísa; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Torroni, Antonio

    2012-02-14

    Archaeological and genetic evidence concerning the time and mode of wild horse (Equus ferus) domestication is still debated. High levels of genetic diversity in horse mtDNA have been detected when analyzing the control region; recurrent mutations, however, tend to blur the structure of the phylogenetic tree. Here, we brought the horse mtDNA phylogeny to the highest level of molecular resolution by analyzing 83 mitochondrial genomes from modern horses across Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and the Americas. Our data reveal 18 major haplogroups (A-R) with radiation times that are mostly confined to the Neolithic and later periods and place the root of the phylogeny corresponding to the Ancestral Mare Mitogenome at ~130-160 thousand years ago. All haplogroups were detected in modern horses from Asia, but F was only found in E. przewalskii--the only remaining wild horse. Therefore, a wide range of matrilineal lineages from the extinct E. ferus underwent domestication in the Eurasian steppes during the Eneolithic period and were transmitted to modern E. caballus breeds. Importantly, now that the major horse haplogroups have been defined, each with diagnostic mutational motifs (in both the coding and control regions), these haplotypes could be easily used to (i) classify well-preserved ancient remains, (ii) (re)assess the haplogroup variation of modern breeds, including Thoroughbreds, and (iii) evaluate the possible role of mtDNA backgrounds in racehorse performance.

  3. Clinical significance of preoperative thrombocytosis in patients who underwent radical nephrectomy for nonmetastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Young; Ko, Young Hwii

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to examine the association of preoperative thrombocytosis with the prognosis of patients with nonmetastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of 187 patients who underwent a radical nephrectomy for nonmetastatic RCC between July 1997 and June 2009. Thrombocytosis was defined as a platelet count≥400,000 µL, and patients were divided into 2 groups according to presence of preoperative thrombocytosis, and the cancer-specific survival rates and overall survival rates of the 2 groups after radical nephrectomy were compared. Results The mean age of the patients was 56.0±11.7 years and the mean follow-up period was 59.3±42.1 months; there were 20 patients with preoperative thrombocytosis. Thirty patients developed metastases and 9 patients died during the follow-up period. In Kaplan-Meier analysis using a univariate log-rank test, both cancer-specific survival rate (p=0.013) and overall survival rate (p=0.012) showed significant association with preoperative thrombocytosis. Controlling for pathological TNM stage, Fuhrman grade and tumor diameter, the Cox proportional hazards model for cancer-specific survival rates showed that preoperative thrombocytosis was an independent prognostic factor (p=0.025). Conclusions Preoperative thrombocytosis was associated with poorer prognosis in patients with nonmetastatic RCC. Thus, preoperative platelet count may be clinically useful for risk stratification of patients undergoing surgery for nonmetastatic RCC. PMID:27617313

  4. [Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a pediatric patient who underwent a hematopoietic stem cell transplant].

    PubMed

    Palma, Julia; Catalán, Paula; Mardones, Patricia; Santolaya, M Elena

    2013-04-01

    We report the case of a 10 year old girl with a relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who underwent a haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), with grade II skin and digestive graft versus host disease, treated with corticosteroids and cyclosporine. On day + 54, she presented fever, with no other remarkable clinical findings. Imaging study showed the presence of lung and liver nodules, liver biopsy was performed. The study included histology, staining and culture for bacteria and fungi, and the preservation of a piece of tissue at -20°C for future prospective studies. Ziehl Nielsen stain was positive, and study for Mycobacterium infection was performed. Microbiological smears of tracheal and gastric aspirate, and bronchial fluid obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were positive. The final report confirmed Mycobacterium tuberculosis in gastric content, sputum, BAL and liver tissue, susceptible to rifampin, isoniazid, streptomycin and ethambutol, with determination of mutations for genes rpoβ and kat G (-). Tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis was confirmed. The girl received daily therapy for two months and then she continued on three times per week therapy for 9 months. Controlled by the transplant, infectious diseases and respiratory teams, the patient remained in good general condition, with radiologic resolution of pulmonary and liver involvement and negative smears. We conclude that Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection should be part of differential diagnosis of febrile illness in patients undergoing HSCT, and biopsy should be a standard practice of early diagnosis in these patients. PMID:23677159

  5. Vitellogenin underwent subfunctionalization to acquire caste and behavioral specific expression in the harvester ant Pogonomyrmex barbatus.

    PubMed

    Corona, Miguel; Libbrecht, Romain; Wurm, Yannick; Riba-Grognuz, Oksana; Studer, Romain A; Keller, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    The reproductive ground plan hypothesis (RGPH) proposes that the physiological pathways regulating reproduction were co-opted to regulate worker division of labor. Support for this hypothesis in honeybees is provided by studies demonstrating that the reproductive potential of workers, assessed by the levels of vitellogenin (Vg), is linked to task performance. Interestingly, contrary to honeybees that have a single Vg ortholog and potentially fertile nurses, the genome of the harvester ant Pogonomyrmex barbatus harbors two Vg genes (Pb_Vg1 and Pb_Vg2) and nurses produce infertile trophic eggs. P. barbatus, thus, provides a unique model to investigate whether Vg duplication in ants was followed by subfunctionalization to acquire reproductive and non-reproductive functions and whether Vg reproductive function was co-opted to regulate behavior in sterile workers. To investigate these questions, we compared the expression patterns of P. barbatus Vg genes and analyzed the phylogenetic relationships and molecular evolution of Vg genes in ants. qRT-PCRs revealed that Pb_Vg1 is more highly expressed in queens compared to workers and in nurses compared to foragers. By contrast, the level of expression of Pb_Vg2 was higher in foragers than in nurses and queens. Phylogenetic analyses show that a first duplication of the ancestral Vg gene occurred after the divergence between the poneroid and formicoid clades and subsequent duplications occurred in the lineages leading to Solenopsis invicta, Linepithema humile and Acromyrmex echinatior. The initial duplication resulted in two Vg gene subfamilies preferentially expressed in queens and nurses (subfamily A) or in foraging workers (subfamily B). Finally, molecular evolution analyses show that the subfamily A experienced positive selection, while the subfamily B showed overall relaxation of purifying selection. Our results suggest that in P. barbatus the Vg gene underwent subfunctionalization after duplication to acquire caste- and

  6. Prognostic factors and survival of patients with brain metastasis from breast cancer who underwent craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Leone, José Pablo; Lee, Adrian V; Brufsky, Adam M

    2015-07-01

    Brain metastasis (BM) in patients with breast cancer is a catastrophic event that results in poor prognosis. Identification of prognostic factors associated with breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM) could help to identify patients at risk. The aim of this study was to assess clinical characteristics, prognostic factors, and survival of patients with BCBM who had craniotomy and resection in a series of patients treated with modern multimodality therapy. We analyzed 42 patients with BCBM who underwent resection. Patients were diagnosed with breast cancer between April 1994 and May 2010. Cox proportional hazards regression was selected to describe factors associated with time to BM, survival from the date of first recurrence, and overall survival (OS). Median age was 51 years (range 24-74). Median follow-up was 4.2 years (range 0.6-18.5). The proportion of the biological subtypes of breast cancer was ER+/HER2- 25%, ER+/HER2+ 15%, ER-/HER2+ 30%, and ER-/HER2- 30%. Median OS from the date of primary diagnosis was 5.74 years. Median survival after diagnosis of BM was 1.33 years. In multivariate Cox regression analyses, stage was the only factor associated with shorter time to the development of BM (P = 0.033), whereas age was the only factor associated with survival from the date of recurrence (P = 0.027) and with OS (P = 0.037). Stage at primary diagnosis correlated with shorter time to the development of BM, while age at diagnosis was associated with shorter survival in BCBM. None of the other clinical factors had influence on survival.

  7. Rich man, poor man: developmental differences in attributions and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Sigelman, Carol K

    2012-11-01

    In an examination guided by cognitive developmental and attribution theory of how explanations of wealth and poverty and perceptions of rich and poor people change with age and are interrelated, 6-, 10-, and 14-year-olds (N=88) were asked for their causal attributions and trait judgments concerning a rich man and a poor man. First graders, like older children, perceived the rich man as more competent than the poor man. However, they had difficulty in explaining wealth and poverty, especially poverty, and their trait perceptions were associated primarily with their attributions of wealth to job status, education, and luck. Fifth and ninth graders more clearly attributed wealth and poverty to the equity factors of ability and effort and based their trait perceptions on these attributions. Although the use of structured attribution questions revealed more understanding among young children than previous studies have suggested, the findings suggest a shift with age in the underlying bases for differential evaluation of rich and poor people from a focus on good outcomes associated with wealth (a good education and job) to a focus on personal qualities responsible for wealth (ability and effort).

  8. Turnabout. White Man's Burden and the Black Man's Burden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Bernard

    1996-01-01

    Examines the movie "White Man's Burden" and, by its reversing of social ideologies and stereotypes, the questions arising from it about race relations in America. The author addresses the movie's shortcomings in dealing with race relations in part because it leaves intact ideologies and moralities based on class without defining sociological or…

  9. History of manned space flight

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.

    1981-01-01

    This book is the history of all the great moments of failure, tension, drama, euphoria, and success that characterized the beginning of man's adventure in space. It covers the technology and scientific knowledge, the vision, the politics, and the dedication of all those involved in the space program. One chapter is devoted to the experiments and observations of the astronauts as they explored the moon. An integral part of the history of space exploration is the race between Russia and the US to establish man in space. This is included. The book vividly portrays the experiences of the astronauts from Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, and the Apollo-Soyuz missions. (SC)

  10. The future of manned spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Aaron

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the future of manned spaceflight in context of past accomplishments and possible future benefits of space exploration. Three technological advances mentioned are a device called the rotating wall vessel, also known as the 'bioreactor,' which allows the study of the growth of cells in three dimensions; the use of microgravity to produce high-quality electronic, magnetic, and superconducting thin films; and mining of helium-3 from the lunar surface for use in future fusion reactions with deuterium. The author then makes recommendations on how NASA should meet the challenges of manned spaceflight.

  11. SPEECH--MAN'S NATURAL COMMUNICATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DUDLEY, HOMER; AND OTHERS

    SESSION 63 OF THE 1967 INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION BROUGHT TOGETHER SEVEN DISTINGUISHED MEN WORKING IN FIELDS RELEVANT TO LANGUAGE. THEIR TOPICS INCLUDED ORIGIN AND EVOLUTION OF SPEECH AND LANGUAGE, LANGUAGE AND CULTURE, MAN'S PHYSIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS FOR SPEECH, LINGUISTICS, AND TECHNOLOGY AND…

  12. 'Botanic Man:' Education or Entertainment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Richard

    1979-01-01

    The experience of Thames Television in presenting an educational series during prime time is described. "The Botanic Man," a series on ecology, is a rating success. Several difficulties encountered in collaboration efforts and follow-up activities, including courses and workbook publications, are identified. (JMF)

  13. Insects Affecting Man. MP-21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Fred A.; Spackman, Everett

    The insects discussed in this document are those which have a direct effect upon humans either through a permanent association, as with lice, or a temporary association in the case of flies, bees, wasps, and spiders. In each case, life cycles and identifying characteristics are presented with remarks about the specific effect incurred by man. (CS)

  14. Humanities II: Man and Revolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton School District, Wilmington, DE.

    "Man and Revolution," the second syllabus in a sequential program, provides 11th grade students with a humanities course that deals heavily in political theory. The rationale, objectives, guidelines, methods, and arrangement are the same as those described in SO 004 030. The introductory unit, followed by further units, helps students define and…

  15. Man and Machines: Three Criticisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Edward F.

    As machines have become a more common part of daily life through the passage of time, the idea that the line separating man and machine is slowly fading has become more popular as well. This paper examines three critics of change through their most famous works. One of the most popular views of Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" is that it is a…

  16. Man...An Endangered Species?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Interior, Washington, DC.

    The general theme of this 1968 yearbook is that man is a threatened species, facing overpopulation and unbridled technology - both self induced. The presentation is broad, relating to many aspects of conservation and natural resources in the United States in a descriptive, non-technical style. The yearbook is divided into major topics: Land…

  17. Man-Made Climatic Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsberg, Helmut E.

    1970-01-01

    Reviews environmental studies which show that national climatic fluctuations vary over a wide range. Solar radiation, earth temperatures, precipitation, atmospheric gases and suspended particulates are discussed in relation to urban and extraurban effects. Local weather modifications and attempts at climate control by man seem to have substantial…

  18. Man, Controller of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olowin, R. P.

    2011-06-01

    The Man, Controller of the Universe painted by the renowned Mexican artist Diego Rivera in the gigantic mural of the Palace of Fine Arts in Mexico City is overlooked by a telescope. We acknowledge this instrument as the Plaskett Telescope at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory in Victoria, Canada.

  19. RenderMan design principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apodaca, Tony; Porter, Tom

    1989-01-01

    The two worlds of interactive graphics and realistic graphics have remained separate. Fast graphics hardware runs simple algorithms and generates simple looking images. Photorealistic image synthesis software runs slowly on large expensive computers. The time has come for these two branches of computer graphics to merge. The speed and expense of graphics hardware is no longer the barrier to the wide acceptance of photorealism. There is every reason to believe that high quality image synthesis will become a standard capability of every graphics machine, from superworkstation to personal computer. The significant barrier has been the lack of a common language, an agreed-upon set of terms and conditions, for 3-D modeling systems to talk to 3-D rendering systems for computing an accurate rendition of that scene. Pixar has introduced RenderMan to serve as that common language. RenderMan, specifically the extensibility it offers in shading calculations, is discussed.

  20. Obesity in the ageing man.

    PubMed

    Michalakis, K; Goulis, D G; Vazaiou, A; Mintziori, G; Polymeris, A; Abrahamian-Michalakis, A

    2013-10-01

    As the population is ageing globally, both ageing and obesity are recognized as major public health challenges. The aim of this narrative review is to present and discuss the current evidence on the changes in body composition, energy balance and endocrine environment that occur in the ageing man. Obesity in the ageing man is related to changes in both body weight and composition due to alterations in energy intake and total energy expenditure. In addition, somatopenia (decreased GH secretion), late-onset hypogonadism (LOH), changes in thyroid and adrenal function, as well as changes in appetite-related peptides (leptin, ghrelin) and, most importantly, insulin action are related to obesity, abnormal energy balance, redistribution of the adipose tissue and sarcopenia (decreased muscle mass). A better understanding of the complex relationship of ageing-related endocrine changes and obesity could lead to more effective interventions for elderly men.

  1. Manned maneuvering unit latching mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    The astronaut/Manned Maneuvering Unit interface, which presented a challenging set of requirements for a latching mechanism, is described. A spring loaded cam segment with variable ratio pulley release actuator was developed to meet the requirements. To preclude jamming of the mechanism, special precautions were taken such as spring loaded bearing points and careful selection of materials to resist cold welding. The mechanism successfully passed a number of tests which partially simulated orbital conditions.

  2. Multiple man-machine interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, L.; Cook, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    The multiple man machine interfaces inherent in military pilot training, their social implications, and the issue of possible negative feedback were explored. Modern technology has produced machines which can see, hear, and touch with greater accuracy and precision than human beings. Consequently, the military pilot is more a systems manager, often doing battle against a target he never sees. It is concluded that unquantifiable human activity requires motivation that is not intrinsic in a machine.

  3. A Man With Intractable Convulsion

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yun; Cutrona, Anthony; Barreiro, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tetanus is a rare disease in the United States. Fewer than 40 cases are reported annually because of the high incidence of vaccination. Recognition of the clinical presentations is important because laboratory recovery of pathogen is only 30%, and toxin detection is rare because of consumption at motor neurons. We report a case of tetanus in an elderly man who had a reaction to tetanus vaccination as a child and was nonvaccinated through adult life. PMID:27330266

  4. Searching for the ideal MAN tool

    SciTech Connect

    Herron, B.L.

    1995-09-01

    The quantity of online documentation and viewing tools is overwhelming, with the World Wide Web, vendor-supported and local-site documentation and tools, etc. Maintaining the information and tools is equally overwhelming. However, statistics show that MAN usage far exceeds usage of other online documentation tools. But as one knows, MAN has its own problems, and at the forefront are MAN`S many inconsistencies. MAN is the standard Unix (and POSIX) tool which provides good summary information for those already familiar with a command. Well-written manual pages provide a good overall documentation. However, when a particular manual becomes too long, it becomes a cumbersome method to use for reading documentation. The paper describes MAN`s problems and the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center requirements for MAN.

  5. 46 CFR 151.45-3 - Manning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Manning. 151.45-3 Section 151.45-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Operations § 151.45-3 Manning. Except as provided for in this section, barges need not be manned unless in the...

  6. 46 CFR 151.45-3 - Manning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Manning. 151.45-3 Section 151.45-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Operations § 151.45-3 Manning. Except as provided for in this section, barges need not be manned unless in the...

  7. 46 CFR 151.45-3 - Manning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Manning. 151.45-3 Section 151.45-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Operations § 151.45-3 Manning. Except as provided for in this section, barges need not be manned unless in the...

  8. Characteristics of Patients and Their Ascites Who Underwent Repeated Cell-Free and Concentrated Ascites Reinfusion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Sayako; Yabuuchi, Junko; Nobuta, Hiroshi; Makiishi, Tetsuya; Hirose, Kunihiko

    2015-08-01

    Novel cell-free and concentrated ascites reinfusion therapy (KM-CART) is easy to use, safe and applicable for refractory ascites. We can get the full amount of ascites, filtrate, and concentrate in a short time. KM-CART can be applied as palliative care for dying patients including patients with massive malignant ascites. Some patients who underwent repeated KM-CART survived longer than those who did not repeat the therapy. The aim of this study was to identify the type of patients with ascites for whom KM-CART would be effective and candidates for repeated KM-CART. In this retrospective cohort observational study, we examined 123 CART processes performed on 58 patients with refractory ascites. Data were collected before and after processing of the ascites. We compared two groups; patients who underwent KM-CART ≥ 5 times and those who underwent this process ≤ 4 times. Age, disease, benign or malignant status of the disease, the amount of ascites, concentrations of total protein (TP) and albumin (Alb) and their amounts in the original ascites and the filtered and concentrated ascitic fluid and the recovery ratio of TP and Alb were determined. No significant difference was observed between the two groups in age, disease, amount of ascites, and the recovery ratio of TP and Alb. Significant differences were observed in the amounts of TP and Alb in the original ascites and the filtered and concentrated ascitic fluid. Patients who underwent KM-CART ≥ 5 times had higher Alb levels in the original ascites than those who underwent this therapy ≤ 4 times. Patients with higher Alb concentrations in the original ascites could be candidates for repeated KM-CART. PMID:26386222

  9. Technology and the Nature of Man: Biological Considerations. An Occasional Paper on Man/Society/Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwood, Lauralee

    This seminar paper explores biological aspects of the man-technology relationship. From man's beginning and continuing into the future, technology is interwoven extensively in the biological fabric of man. Five facets of the biology-technology interaction are examined: (1) technological innovations enabling man to learn about his biological…

  10. 77 FR 23806 - Manning Rail, Inc.-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Manning Grain Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Manning Rail, Inc.--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--Manning Grain Company Manning Rail, Inc. (MRI), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption \\1\\ under 49 CFR 1150.31 to acquire from Manning...

  11. Roles and needs of man in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Puttkamer, J.

    1983-01-01

    Human capabilities and requirements on space missions are discussed. Utilitarian and humanistic motivations for manned missions are considered, and a general program of development from easy space access and return, to a permanent LEO presence, to the limited self-sufficiency of man in space, is proposed. Man's potential as scientific observer, operator, and engineer/technician is illustrated with examples from the Apollo and Skylab missions. It is shown that future increases in man's space presence will require significant improvements in habitation technology, crew comfort and safety, operational effectiveness and reliability, and man/machine interactions: man-tended systems must be standardized and adapted to (mainly EVA) human servicing; permanently manned systems must be designed to attain levels of comfort, privacy, and overall habitability more like those expected on the ground.

  12. Effects of weightlessness in man.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    The program for the Apollo 16 flight was designed to include both safeguards against and investigations of the physiological problems arising from increase in the period of manned space flight. Precautions included the provision of a controlled diet with high potassium content, carefully controlled work loads and work-rest cycles, and an emergency cardiology consultation service, and investigations were made to enable preflight vs postflight comparisons of metabolic, cardiovascular, and central nervous system data. Results of these investigations indicate that adjustment to weightlessness can be satisfactorily assisted by appropriate countermeasures, including attention to diet.

  13. Effects of weightlessness in man.

    PubMed

    Berry, C A

    1973-01-01

    The program for the Apollo 16 flight was designed to include both safeguards against and investigations of the physiological problems arising from increase in the period of manned space flight. Precautions included the provision of a controlled diet with high potassium content, carefully controlled work loads and work-rest cycles and an emergency cardiology consultation service, and investigations were made to enable pre-flight-post-flight comparisons of metabolic, cardiovascular and central nervous system data. Results of these investigations indicate that adjustment to weightlessness can be satisfactorily assisted by appropriate countermeasures including attention to diet. PMID:12001951

  14. Effects of weightlessness in man.

    PubMed

    Berry, C A

    1973-01-01

    The program for the Apollo 16 flight was designed to include both safeguards against and investigations of the physiological problems arising from increase in the period of manned space flight. Precautions included the provision of a controlled diet with high potassium content, carefully controlled work loads and work-rest cycles and an emergency cardiology consultation service, and investigations were made to enable pre-flight-post-flight comparisons of metabolic, cardiovascular and central nervous system data. Results of these investigations indicate that adjustment to weightlessness can be satisfactorily assisted by appropriate countermeasures including attention to diet.

  15. Chinese Manned Space Utility Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y.

    Since 1992 China has been carrying out a conspicuous manned space mission A utility project has been defined and created during the same period The Utility Project of the Chinese Manned Space Mission involves wide science areas such as earth observation life science micro-gravity fluid physics and material science astronomy space environment etc In the earth observation area it is focused on the changes of global environments and relevant exploration technologies A Middle Revolution Image Spectrometer and a Multi-model Micro-wave Remote Sensor have been developed The detectors for cirrostratus distribution solar constant earth emission budget earth-atmosphere ultra-violet spectrum and flux have been manufactured and tested All of above equipment was engaged in orbital experiments on-board the Shenzhou series spacecrafts Space life science biotechnologies and micro-gravity science were much concerned with the project A series of experiments has been made both in ground laboratories and spacecraft capsules The environmental effect in different biological bodies in space protein crystallization electrical cell-fusion animal cells cultural research on separation by using free-low electrophoresis a liquid drop Marangoni migration experiment under micro-gravity as well as a set of crystal growth and metal processing was successfully operated in space The Gamma-ray burst and high-energy emission from solar flares have been explored A set of particle detectors and a mass spectrometer measured

  16. The rights of man and animal experimentation.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J

    1990-01-01

    Since emotions give contradictory signals about animal experimentation in medical science, man's relationship to animals must be based upon reason. Thomas Aquinas argues that man is essentially different from animals because man's intellectual processes show evidence of an abstract mechanism not possessed by animals. Man's rights arise in association with this essential difference. The consequence is that only man possesses true rights by Aquinas's definition; animals have them only by analogy. However, cruelty to animals is illicit and they should be protected, principally not because they have rights, but because he who is cruel to animals is more likely to be cruel to his fellowman. If there is a need for animal experimentation in science for the good of man, this approach gives philosophical justification for experimentation, since man's well-being must come before that of animals because of his unique possession of rights. However, those experiments should be carried out in the kindest way possible, to promote kindness towards man. To see man as solely part of a biological continuum in competition for rights with those beings close to him biologically, detracts from man's dignity. PMID:2135948

  17. The rights of man and animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Martin, J

    1990-09-01

    Since emotions give contradictory signals about animal experimentation in medical science, man's relationship to animals must be based upon reason. Thomas Aquinas argues that man is essentially different from animals because man's intellectual processes show evidence of an abstract mechanism not possessed by animals. Man's rights arise in association with this essential difference. The consequence is that only man possesses true rights by Aquinas's definition; animals have them only by analogy. However, cruelty to animals is illicit and they should be protected, principally not because they have rights, but because he who is cruel to animals is more likely to be cruel to his fellowman. If there is a need for animal experimentation in science for the good of man, this approach gives philosophical justification for experimentation, since man's well-being must come before that of animals because of his unique possession of rights. However, those experiments should be carried out in the kindest way possible, to promote kindness towards man. To see man as solely part of a biological continuum in competition for rights with those beings close to him biologically, detracts from man's dignity.

  18. Manned maneuvering unit: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenda, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The space shuttle will provide an opportunity to extend and enhance the crew's inherent capabilities in orbit by allowing them to operate effectively outside of their spacecraft by means of extravehicular activity. For this role, the shuttle crew will have a new, easier to don and operate space suit with integral life support system, and a self-contained propulsive backpack. The backpack, called the manned maneuvering unit, will allow the crew to operate beyond the confines of the Shuttle cargo bay and fly to any part of their own spacecraft or to nearby free-flying payloads or structure. This independent mobility will be used to support a wide variety of activities including free-space transfer of cargo and personnel, inspection and monitoring of orbital operations, and construction and assembly of large structures in orbit.

  19. Fire extinguishers for manned spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylov, S.; Smirnov, N. V.; Tanklevsky, L. T.

    2015-04-01

    Based on an analysis of fires in the oxygen-enriched atmosphere conditions in spacecraft and other sealed chambers of various purposes, the most dangerous groups of fires are identified. For this purpose, groups were compiled to analyze dependences that describe the increase of fire hazard to a critical value. A criterion for determining timely and effective fire extinguishing was offered. Fire experiments in oxygen-enriched atmosphere conditions were conducted, and an array of experimental data on the mass burning rate of materials and their extinguishing by water mist was obtained. Relationships colligating an array of experimental data were offered. Experimental and analytical studies were taken as a basis for hand fire extinguisher implementation for manned spacecraft.

  20. Biomarkers of immunotoxicity in man.

    PubMed

    Descotes, J; Nicolas, B; Vial, T; Nicolas, J F

    1996-01-01

    Abstract The immunotoxic consequences of chemical exposures include direct immunotoxicity (namely immunosuppression and immunostimulation), hypersensitivity and autoimmunity, and because the mechanisms involved are markedly different, no single immune parameter is likely to ever predict or assess all three types of immunotoxicity. A fairly large number of immunological endpoints have been proposed for use as biomarkers of immunotoxicity in man. Unfortunately, they are often not sensitive enough and/or poorly standardized, so that their relevance for assessing immunotoxic effects in humans is debatable, and actually debated. Immune-mediated sentinel events detected in individuals with a defined history of chemical exposure, may prove helpful until methodological advances, notably with the introduction of technologies derived from molecular biology, provide reliable parameters to be used as biomarkers of immunotoxicity. PMID:23888916

  1. Energy exchanges of swimming man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadel, E. R.; Holmer, I.; Bergh, U.; Astrand, P.-O.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Three male swimmers underwent 10-min resting and 20-min swimming (breaststroke) exposures in a swimming flume. Water temperatures in separate exposures were 18, 26, and 33 C. At each water temperature the subjects rested and swam at water velocities of 0.50, 0.75, and 0.95 m/sec, which were designed to produce around 40, 70, and 100% of maximal aerobic power. Measurements were made of esophageal temperature, four skin temperatures, water temperature, heat flow from five local skin surfaces (Hatfield-Turner disks), and oxygen uptake. Calculations were made of mean area-weighted skin temperature and heat flow, metabolic rate, and heat storage. Internal body temperature changes after 20 min of swimming were related to water temperature, swimming intensity, and body composition.

  2. Clinical Characteristics of Patients Who Underwent Surgery for Genital Tract Malformations at Peking Union Medical College Hospital across 31 Years

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guang-Han; Zhu, Lan; Liu, Ai-Ming; Xu, Tao; Lang, Jing-He

    2016-01-01

    Background: Female genital malformations represent miscellaneous deviations from normal anatomy. This study aimed to explore the clinical characteristics of patients who underwent surgery for genital tract malformations at Peking Union Medical College Hospital (PUMCH) during a 31-year period. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed surgical cases of congenital malformation of the female genital tract at PUMCH for a 31-year period, analyzed the clinical characteristics of 1634 hospitalized patients, and investigated their general condition, diagnosis, and treatment process. Results: The average patient age was 27.6 ± 9.9 years. The average ages of patients who underwent surgery for uterine malformation and vaginal malformation were 31.9 ± 8.8 years and 24.7 ± 9.0 years, respectively; these ages differed significantly (P < 0.01). Among patients with genital tract malformation, the percentages of vaginal malformation, uterine malformation, vulva malformation, cervical malformation, and other malformations were 43.9%, 43.5%, 7.4%, 2.3%, and 2.8%, respectively. Among patients with uterine malformation, 34.5% underwent surgery for the genital tract malformation, whereas in patients with vaginal malformation, the proportion is 70.6%; the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The percentage of complications of the urinary system in patients with vaginal malformations was 10.2%, which was statistically significantly higher than that (5.3%) in patients with uterine malformations (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Compared to patients with uterine malformations, patients with vaginal malformations displayed more severe clinical symptoms, a younger surgical age, and a greater need for attention, early diagnosis, and treatment. Patients with genital tract malformations, particularly vaginal malformations, tend to have more complications of the urinary system and other malformations than patients with uterine malformations. PMID:27748336

  3. The Effect of Pulmonary Valve Replacement (PVR) Surgery on Hemodynamics of Patients Who Underwent Repair of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF)

    PubMed Central

    Bigdelian, Hamid; Mardani, Davoud; Sedighi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pulmonary insufficiency (PI) frequently develops in patients who underwent repair of tetralogy of fallot (TOF). The aim of present study was to assess the effect of pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) on hemodynamics of patients who underwent repair of TOF. Methods: This retrospective cohort carried out between July 2010 and October 2012 among consecutive PVRs of 19 patients who underwent TOF surgery. The PVRs was performed using bioprosthetic (n=17) and mechanical (n=2) valves. Our data was collected during follow up visits within 6 to 12 month after PVR. Results: Our results show that PVR significantly decreased right ventricular end-diastolic volume (180.89±13.78 vs. 107.21±12.02 ml/m2, P < .01), right ventricular end-systolic volume (105.42±15.98 vs. 58.15±11.67 ml/m2, P < .01), RV mass (47.78±6.20 vs. 30.68±8.95 g/m2, P < .01), and PI (48.21±1.43% vs. 12.68±5.60%, P < .01). Moreover, left ventricular end-diastolic volume significantly increased (78.05±17.21 vs. 90.78±14.82 ml/m2, P < .01) after PVR. The other hemodynamics indexes did not change, significantly. Conclusion: Despite the controversies about efficacy of PVR after repair of TOF, the remarkable improvement of hemodynamic is a supportive rationale for performing PVR surgery in TOF patients. PMID:26430501

  4. Suppressor nozzle and airframe noise measurements during flyover of a modified F106B aircraft with underwing nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of flight velocity on the jet noise and thrust of a 104-tube suppressor nozzle was investigated using an F-106B delta wing aircraft modified to carry two underwing nacelles each containing a turbojet engine. The nozzle was mounted behind one of the nacelles. Flight velocity had a large adverse effect on thrust and a small adverse effect on suppression when correlated with relative jet velocity. The clean airframe noise of the aircraft was measured at Mach 0.4 and was compared with that predicted from an empirical expression. The 83 db measured value was considerably below the predicted value.

  5. Effect of underwing aft-mounted nacelles on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a high-wing transport airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeyounis, W. K.; Patterson, J. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    As part of a propulsion/airframe integration program, tests were conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the longitudinal aerodynamic effects of installing flow through engine nacelles in the aft underwing position of a high wing transonic transfer airplane. Mixed flow nacelles with circular and D-shaped inlets were tested at free stream Mach numbers from 0.70 to 0.85 and angles of attack from -2.5 deg to 4.0 deg. The aerodynamic effects of installing antishock bodies on the wing and nacelle upper surfaces as a means of attaching and supporting nacelles in an extreme aft position were investigated.

  6. [Anesthetic Management of an Infant who Underwent Awake-intubation for Her Pharyngeal Injury Caused by a Toothbrush].

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yoko; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Arai, Takero; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Okuda, Yasuhisa

    2016-04-01

    A 2-year-and-4-month-old female infant, 12 kg in weight and 90 cm in height fell off from a table, which was about 1 m height with a toothbrush in her mouth without her parents noticing. Urgent CT scan showed that it penetrated the left side of her oropharyngeal wall to the bifurcation of her right carotid artery. According to the initial assessment, carotid artery seemed intact and there seemed to be no sign of CNS involvement. She underwent general anesthesia for further investigation and operation. We could detect vocal code with ease by inserting Glidescope between her tongue and the toothbrush. After the intubation, we administered fentanyl 25 μg rocuronium 15 mg and sevoflulane 3-5% to her, and then she underwent arteriography. The neurosurgeon found no sign of major arterial injury nor traumatic aneurysm nor CNS involvement. She went to the ICU intubated after the removal of the toothbrush. She was extubated 5 days after operation. One of the benefits of the Glidescope is that we can share the visual image, and we chose it this time. When we expect a difficult airway during management for oropharyngeal trauma, we have to consider the way to manage the airway.

  7. The Role of Speech Therapy in Patients Who Underwent Laryngeal Microsurgery due to Phonotraumatic Lesions and Lesions Unrelated to Phonotrauma

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Claudia de Assis Corrêa de; Macedo, Evaldo Dacheux de; Malafaia, Osvaldo; Catani, Guilherme Simas do Amaral; Ido, Jorge Massaki; Stahlke, Henrique Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The role of the speech-language pathology in the multiprofessional team dealing with laryngology and the voice has been recognized for a long time. Scientific studies in this field recommend therapies for laryngeal microsurgeries; few of the studies, however, effectively evaluate the result of postoperative speech therapy. Objective To compare speech therapy evaluation and treatment among patients with phonotraumatic lesions and patients with lesions unrelated to phonotrauma who underwent laryngeal microsurgery. Methods This study was performed at IPO Hospital (Paranaense Institute of Otorhinolaryngology, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil) between February 2010 and February 2011. Of 254 patients who underwent laryngeal microsurgery, 208 patients were included in the study and divided in two groups: group A with phonotraumatic lesions (n = 131) and group B with lesions unrelated to phonotrauma (n = 77). The number of sessions and the functional result after speech therapy were evaluated. Results The number of postoperative phonotherapy sessions after microsurgery was up to 10 sessions in 89.31% and 87.71% for groups A and B, respectively. Phonotherapy treatment showed a better functional evolution in group A (92.37%). Conclusion A significant difference was observed only in functional evolution, which was better in the group with phonotraumatic lesions (p < 0.0001). PMID:25992078

  8. Analysis of Ulcer Recurrences After Metatarsal Head Resection in Patients Who Underwent Surgery to Treat Diabetic Foot Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Corbalán, Irene; Lázaro-Martínez, José Luis; Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; García-Morales, Esther; Molines-Barroso, Raúl; Alvaro-Afonso, Francisco Javier

    2015-06-01

    Metatarsal head resection is a common and standardized treatment used as part of the surgical routine for metatarsal head osteomyelitis. The aim of this study was to define the influence of the amount of the metatarsal resection on the development of reulceration or ulcer recurrence in patients who suffered from plantar foot ulcer and underwent metatarsal surgery. We conducted a prospective study in 35 patients who underwent metatarsal head resection surgery to treat diabetic foot osteomyelitis with no prior history of foot surgeries, and these patients were included in a prospective follow-up over the course of at least 6 months in order to record reulceration or ulcer recurrences. Anteroposterior plain X-rays were taken before and after surgery. We also measured the portion of the metatarsal head that was removed and classified the patients according the resection rate of metatarsal (RRM) in first and second quartiles. We found statistical differences between the median RRM in patients who had an ulcer recurrence and patients without recurrences (21.48 ± 3.10% vs 28.12 ± 10.8%; P = .016). Seventeen (56.7%) patients were classified in the first quartile of RRM, which had an association with ulcer recurrence (P = .032; odds ratio = 1.41; 95% confidence interval = 1.04-1.92). RRM of less than 25% is associated with the development of a recurrence after surgery in the midterm follow-up, and therefore, planning before surgery is undertaken should be considered to avoid postsurgical complications.

  9. Predictors of survival in patients who underwent video‐assisted thoracic surgery talc pleurodesis for malignant pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Dong Woog; Choi, Yong Soo; Kim, Jhingook; Kim, Hong Kwan; Zo, Jae Ill; Shim, Young Mog

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with malignant pleural effusion have a limited life expectancy. An increase in pleural and oncological treatment options and more accurate prognostic evaluation may help individualize treatment strategies. The aim of this study was to identify the prognostic indicators of overall survival (OS) after video‐assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) talc pleurodesis for malignant pleural effusion. Methods We examined the medical records of all consecutive patients with malignant pleural effusion who underwent VATS talc pleurodesis from 2006 to 2008 at the Samsung Medical Center. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify predictors of OS after VATS talc pleurodesis. Results During the study period, 91 patients underwent VATS talc pleurodesis to treat malignant pleural effusion. Early (within 30 days) and late (within 90 days) postoperative mortality rates were 9.9% (9 patients), and 25.3% (23), respectively. Median survival time after VATS talc pleurodesis was 10.5 months. The postoperative respiratory complication rate was 11% (10 patients), and included pneumonia (9) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (4). Multivariate analysis revealed that preoperative chemotherapy (P = 0.012), preoperative radiotherapy (P = 0.003), and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance score 3 or 4 (P = 0.013) were independent risk factors of OS after VATS talc pleurodesis. Conclusions We identified previous chemotherapy or radiotherapy and poor performance status (ECOG 3 or 4) as significant predictors of OS after VATS talc pleurodesis. These prognostic factors can help surgeons select candidates for VATS pleurodesis for malignant pleural effusion. PMID:27385980

  10. Analysis of Risk Factors Contributing to Recurrence of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in Chinese Patients Who Underwent Total Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Jiao, De; Liu, Baoguo; Sun, Shanping

    2016-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer is a very common endocrine malignancy, with a rate of total thyroidectomy reported to be up to 27.8%. However, studies analyzing the risk factors that contribute to recurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) after total thyroidectomy in China are still scarce. Material/Methods A total of 536 patients with PTC who underwent total thyroidectomy were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into 2 groups: patients with no recurrent tumor were included in group 1 and patients with tumor recurrence were included in group 2. Results Of 536 patients, 65 patients (12.1%) developed a recurrence of PTC, and 471 patients (87.9%) did not have a recurrence. Univariate analysis indicated that male sex, age ≥50 years, tumor ≥1 cm, poor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, bilaterality, and multifocality may be related to PTC recurrence. Additionally, the results of the logistic regression analysis indicated that male sex, age ≥50 years, primary tumor ≥1 cm, poor dedifferentiation of the tumor, lymph node metastasis, and multifocality may be independent factors contributing to PTC recurrence. Conclusions Male sex, age more than 50 years, primary tumor larger than 1 cm, poor dedifferentiation of the primary tumor, lymph node metastasis, and multifocality were found to increase the risk of PTC recurrence in patients who underwent total thyroidectomy. Additionally, it is necessary to use strictly aggressive and extensive surgery, as well as close monitoring, after the operation. PMID:27084873

  11. [Anesthetic Management of an Infant who Underwent Awake-intubation for Her Pharyngeal Injury Caused by a Toothbrush].

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yoko; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Arai, Takero; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Okuda, Yasuhisa

    2016-04-01

    A 2-year-and-4-month-old female infant, 12 kg in weight and 90 cm in height fell off from a table, which was about 1 m height with a toothbrush in her mouth without her parents noticing. Urgent CT scan showed that it penetrated the left side of her oropharyngeal wall to the bifurcation of her right carotid artery. According to the initial assessment, carotid artery seemed intact and there seemed to be no sign of CNS involvement. She underwent general anesthesia for further investigation and operation. We could detect vocal code with ease by inserting Glidescope between her tongue and the toothbrush. After the intubation, we administered fentanyl 25 μg rocuronium 15 mg and sevoflulane 3-5% to her, and then she underwent arteriography. The neurosurgeon found no sign of major arterial injury nor traumatic aneurysm nor CNS involvement. She went to the ICU intubated after the removal of the toothbrush. She was extubated 5 days after operation. One of the benefits of the Glidescope is that we can share the visual image, and we chose it this time. When we expect a difficult airway during management for oropharyngeal trauma, we have to consider the way to manage the airway. PMID:27188104

  12. The man and the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodziejska, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    The universe has always aroused people's curiosity. It fascinates and at the same time scares in its vastness. Encourages us to reflect of the meaning of human life. This begs the questions: whether there is a life beyond Earth? Whether is it possible that the man is alone in such a large space? These questions still remain unanswered, and topics concerning "the cosmos" constantly evoke many emotions. It is especially fascinating for the youngest students. Quite often, preschoolers can flawlessly name the planets according to their order of appearance in relation to the sun. They are happy to take the fun inspired by journeys into space. Teaching through action is extremely important for the development of the child-man* (Piaget, 2006). The thinking originates primarily from the action. Therefore, students should undertake independent research activities, perform experiments and conduct observations and thus raise questions about the world, looking for meanings and solutions. Adults (a teacher, a person with a passion) are to be the support in the search for knowledge, its processing and cleaning. Its role is to ensure a proper development of environment that is conducive to research activity. The answer to these requirements was to create in the oldest technical school in Poland (Railway Technical College, now Technical College No. 7) the astronomical observatory, which can be used by pupils of Warsaw's kindergartens and schools. There are organized activities for children and youth in this school, as well as trainings for teachers. Younger students during such an interdisciplinary courses are, among others, the opportunity to get acquainted with the construction of the telescope, they can build their own rockets and organize their racing or create your own star constellations. Older students as a result of observations and experiments may confirm or refute the hypothesis that the universe is within each of us. The classes are enriched using applications on

  13. Man: A Course of Study. Evaluation Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA.

    Strategies suggested in this handbook provide ways for the intermediate grade teacher and the class to share in summarizing and analyzing educational developments associated with "Man: A Course of Study (MACOS)". The evaluation devices focus on pupils' perceptions and critical insights to develop their ability to explore questions about man's…

  14. The War in Man; Media and Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelmsen, Frederick D.; Bret, Jane

    The authors present a picture of contemporary man torn by conflicting forces, caught in a psychic house divided against itself, a victim of war between media and machines. Machines, they state, represent the rationalistic tradition which has brought man to the brink of psychic and social disaster. The media they see as offering hope--true…

  15. Human Behaviour and the Origin of Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raleigh, M. J.; Washburn, S. L.

    1973-01-01

    The study of origin and evolution of man gives new perspective for understanding his behavior. Physical behaviors such as walking and throwing are results of biological evolution which has not kept pace with sociocultural evolution. Irrational decisions by man in social, cultural, and political fields are results of this brain activity. (PS)

  16. THE MAN MADE WORLD, TEACHER'S MANUAL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Engineering Education, Washington, DC.

    THIS TEACHER'S MANUAL FOR THE ENGINEERING CONCEPTS CURRICULUM PROJECT'S HIGH SCHOOL COURSE, "THE MAN MADE WORLD," IS THE THIRD DRAFT OF THE EXPERIMENTAL VERSION. THE MATERIAL WRITTEN BY ENGINEERS, SCIENTISTS, AND EDUCATORS, EMPHASIZES ENGINEERING--MAN'S APPLICATION OF SCIENTIFIC PRINCIPLES TO THE CONTROL AND UTILIZATION OF HIS ENVIRONMENT.…

  17. MAN-MACHINE SYSTEMS IN EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LOUGHARY, JOHN W.

    THIS BOOK INCLUDES 5 PARTS. THE FIRST, BACKGROUND, PROVIDES A THEORETICAL AND CONCEPTUAL BASE FOR THE MAN-MACHINE SYSTEMS DESCRIBED LATER. IT DEFINES MAN-MACHINE SYSTEMS, DESCRIBES COMPUTERS, AND DISCUSSES THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN MEDIA TECHNOLOGY AND LEARNING PROCESSES. PART 2, INSTRUCTION, DESCRIBES ADVANCED SYSTEMS IN EDUCATION WHICH ARE…

  18. Alternative Frameworks for the Study of Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markova, Ivana

    1979-01-01

    Two frameworks for the study of man are discussed. The Cartesian model views man as a physical object. A dialectic framework, with the emphasis on the self, grew out of nineteenth century romanticism and reflects the theories of Hegel. Both models have had an effect on social psychology and the study of interpersonal communication. (BH)

  19. On the Naturalist Nature of Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graber, Richard R.

    1969-01-01

    Suggests that man, endowed with intellect, has a moral obligation to revere and to conserve all forms of life. In addition, human resources are to be applied toward ecological investigation and education. A warning is sounded against man's continual plundering of the earth's resources. (LC)

  20. Man and Nature, Resource Paper No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuan, Yi-Fu

    Man and nature is the theme of this resource paper which is part of a series designed to supplement existing texts and to fill a gap between significant research in geography and readily accessible materials. The approach followed in the paper is loosely dialectical: the intent is to understand man and nature by posing one concept against the…

  1. Teaching Ideas About Man and the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phoenix Union High School District, AZ.

    This is a collection of papers which resulted from an assignment given in a seminar dealing with the topic Man and His Environment at Phoenix Union High School, Arizona. The interdisciplinary seminar focused on the relationships between man and his physical environment. Its purpose was to introduce the participants to the spectrum of environmental…

  2. Man and His Physical Environment: Teacher's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mank, Evans R.

    Building upon Course I, this teaching guide for the first of four units of Course II introduces the secondary student to geographic concepts and generalizations of the physical world to which man has related over time. All units of the second course emphasize the process of development whereby man, coping with given conditions in his physical…

  3. Man's Size in Terms of Fundamental Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, William H.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews calculations that derive an order of magnitude expression for the size of man in terms of fundamental constants, assuming that man satifies these three properties: he is made of complicated molecules; he requires an atmosphere which is not hydrogen and helium; he is as large as possible. (CS)

  4. Man Is the Measure...the Measurer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Mark H.

    1998-01-01

    The science of metrology has moved from man as the measure to man as the measurer. This transformation is documented with examples from the history of metrology. Outcome measures, which rest on the same history of measurement, are units constructed and maintained for their utility, constancy, and generality. (Author/SLD)

  5. Marihuana in Man: Three Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollister, Leo E.

    1971-01-01

    Reviews three years of research on the effects of marihuana in man. Previously known clinical mental and physical effects have been confirmed. Causes and mechanisms of these effects generally remain undetermined in man and animals. Social implications and long term effects require additional study, although usage appears detrimental. (JM)

  6. 33 CFR 143.407 - Manning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Manning. 143.407 Section 143.407 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Standby Vessels § 143.407 Manning. Standby vessels must be crewed in accordance with their certificate...

  7. 33 CFR 143.407 - Manning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manning. 143.407 Section 143.407 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Standby Vessels § 143.407 Manning. Standby vessels must be crewed in accordance with their certificate...

  8. 33 CFR 143.407 - Manning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Manning. 143.407 Section 143.407 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Standby Vessels § 143.407 Manning. Standby vessels must be crewed in accordance with their certificate...

  9. 33 CFR 143.407 - Manning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Manning. 143.407 Section 143.407 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Standby Vessels § 143.407 Manning. Standby vessels must be crewed in accordance with their certificate...

  10. 33 CFR 143.407 - Manning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Manning. 143.407 Section 143.407 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Standby Vessels § 143.407 Manning. Standby vessels must be crewed in accordance with their certificate...

  11. Human capabilities in space. [man machine interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    Man's ability to live and perform useful work in space was demonstrated throughout the history of manned space flight. Current planning envisions a multi-functional space station. Man's unique abilities to respond to the unforeseen and to operate at a level of complexity exceeding any reasonable amount of previous planning distinguish him from present day machines. His limitations, however, include his inherent inability to survive without protection, his limited strength, and his propensity to make mistakes when performing repetitive and monotonous tasks. By contrast, an automated system does routine and delicate tasks, exerts force smoothly and precisely, stores, and recalls large amounts of data, and performs deductive reasoning while maintaining a relative insensitivity to the environment. The establishment of a permanent presence of man in space demands that man and machines be appropriately combined in spaceborne systems. To achieve this optimal combination, research is needed in such diverse fields as artificial intelligence, robotics, behavioral psychology, economics, and human factors engineering.

  12. Manned NEO Mission EVA Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2011-01-01

    The President has proposed to land astronauts on an asteroid by 2025. However, Manned NEO (Near Earth Objects) Missions will present a host of new and exciting problems that will need to be better defined and solved before such a mission is launched. Here I will focus on the challenges for conducting asteroidal EVAs. Specfically, crew locomotion, sampling, drilling, documentation, and instrument deployment issues arising from the micro gravity environments associated with NEOs. Therefore, novel methods and techniques will need to be developed and tested in order to achieve specific mission science objectives. Walking or driving on the surface will not be a realistic option due to the small sizes (10 s to 100 s of meters in diameter) and hence extremely low gravity of the present day known candidate NEOs. EVAs will have to be carried out with crew members either using a self propelled device (akin to the MMU and SAFER units used on Shuttle/ISS) and or tethers. When using tethers a grid system could be deployed which is anchored to the asteroid. These anchor points could be inserted by firing penetrators into the surface from the spacecraft while it is still at a safe standoff distance. These penetrators would pull double duty by being laden with scientific instrumentation to probe the subsurface. Dust and debris generated by sample collection and locomotion in a microgravity environment could also pose some problems that will require forethought.

  13. Hermes - A manned European system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cretenet, J.-C.

    Features of a European hypersonic winged reentry vehicle, Hermes, are presented, together with the technology requirements for its development and the missions it would serve. LEO is beginning to hold promise for the manufacture of materials in microgravity and/or vacuum conditions in orbiting facilities which need to be serviced. A manned, reusable, winged reentry vehicle would permit the delivery and return of payloads from space, recovery of the first stage of the Ariane V rocket for reuse, and return of the Hermes to a landing at the Kourou launch site. The avionics would be similar to those of modern aircraft, as would the landing system. In-orbit operational techniques would be needed, as would an internal environment similar to Spacelab, a rigid turnaround time, high utilization rate, and a 10 yr lifetime. The length of the Hermes is projected as 12.5 m, wingtip to wingtip breadth of 7.4 m, and a total mass of 11,400 kg for a heliosynchronous orbit mission, while 15,400 kg are available for a circular, 490 m/sec orbit.

  14. Manned spacecraft electrical power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, William E.; Nored, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A brief history of the development of electrical power systems from the earliest manned space flights illustrates a natural trend toward a growth of electrical power requirements and operational lifetimes with each succeeding space program. A review of the design philosophy and development experience associated with the Space Shuttle Orbiter electrical power system is presented, beginning with the state of technology at the conclusion of the Apollo Program. A discussion of prototype, verification, and qualification hardware is included, and several design improvements following the first Orbiter flight are described. The problems encountered, the scientific and engineering approaches used to meet the technological challenges, and the results obtained are stressed. Major technology barriers and their solutions are discussed, and a brief Orbiter flight experience summary of early Space Shuttle missions is included. A description of projected Space Station power requirements and candidate system concepts which could satisfy these anticipated needs is presented. Significant challenges different from Space Shuttle, innovative concepts and ideas, and station growth considerations are discussed. The Phase B Advanced Development hardware program is summarized and a status of Phase B preliminary tradeoff studies is presented.

  15. Oncocytoma of the Submandibular Gland: Diagnosis and Treatment Based on Clinicopathology

    PubMed Central

    Hentzelman, Joshua I.; Walker, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Submandibular oncocytomas are rare benign salivary gland neoplasms. They are typically found in Caucasian patients aged 50–70 years with no gender preference. Due to the overlapping histological and clinical features of head and neck tumors, they are often misdiagnosed. Methods. We report a case of unilateral submandibular gland oncocytoma in a 63-year-old Caucasian man. Results. The patient underwent unilateral submandibular gland resection and histopathologic analysis of the tumor specimen. On follow-up at 2 weeks and 1 year, no recurrence was identified. Conclusion. Submandibular oncocytomas are best diagnosed with preoperative FNA and CT imaging and have distinctive findings on cytology and histology. CT followed by fine-needle aspiration cytology would be the preferred diagnostic modalities. Due to its low rate of malignant transformation and recurrence, the best treatment is local resection with follow-up as necessary. PMID:27722003

  16. A Case of Long-Term Complete Remission of Advanced Gastric Adenocarcinoma with Liver Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Ch'angbum; Lee, Jung-Ae; Gong, Soojung; Kang, Dong Wook; Yang, Heebum; Han, Hyun Young

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with gastric adenocarcinoma with multiple liver metastases. This patient showed complete remission for more than 68 months after S-1/cisplatin combination chemotherapy and radical total gastrectomy. The patient, a 63-year-old man, presented with dyspepsia and difficulty in swallowing. Endoscopic findings showed a huge ulcero-infiltrative mass at the lesser curvature of the mid-body, extending to the distal esophagus. Biopsy revealed a poorly differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma. An abdominal computed tomography scan demonstrated multiple hepatic metastases. S-1/cisplatin combination chemotherapy was initiated, and following completion of six cycles of chemotherapy, the gastric masses and hepatic metastatic lesions had disappeared on abdominal computed tomography. Radical total gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy combined with splenectomy were performed. The patient underwent three cycles of S-1/cisplatin combination chemotherapy followed by tegafur-uracil therapy for 1 year. He remained in complete remission for more than 68 months after surgery. PMID:27433398

  17. A Case of Long-Term Complete Remission of Advanced Gastric Adenocarcinoma with Liver Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Rim, Ch'angbum; Lee, Jung-Ae; Gong, Soojung; Kang, Dong Wook; Yang, Heebum; Han, Hyun Young; Kim, Nae Yu

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a patient with gastric adenocarcinoma with multiple liver metastases. This patient showed complete remission for more than 68 months after S-1/cisplatin combination chemotherapy and radical total gastrectomy. The patient, a 63-year-old man, presented with dyspepsia and difficulty in swallowing. Endoscopic findings showed a huge ulcero-infiltrative mass at the lesser curvature of the mid-body, extending to the distal esophagus. Biopsy revealed a poorly differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma. An abdominal computed tomography scan demonstrated multiple hepatic metastases. S-1/cisplatin combination chemotherapy was initiated, and following completion of six cycles of chemotherapy, the gastric masses and hepatic metastatic lesions had disappeared on abdominal computed tomography. Radical total gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy combined with splenectomy were performed. The patient underwent three cycles of S-1/cisplatin combination chemotherapy followed by tegafur-uracil therapy for 1 year. He remained in complete remission for more than 68 months after surgery. PMID:27433398

  18. Resistance Pattern of Antibiotics in Patient Underwent Open Heart Surgery with Nosocomial Infection in North of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Davoudi, Alireza; Najafi, Narges; Alian, Shahriar; Tayebi, Atefe; Ahangarkani, Fatemeh; Rouhi, Samaneh; Heydari, Amirhosein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients who undergo cardiac surgery appear to be at increased risk for the development of Nosocomial infections (NIs). The development of antibiotic-resistant infections has been associated with significantly greater hospital mortality rates compared to similar infections caused by antibiotic-sensitive pathogens. Objectives: The purpose of this study is survey of Nis and antibiotic resistance patterns of causative bacteria among patients who underwent open heart surgery in the north of Iran during a 2-year period between September 2012 and September 2014. Methods: In this cross-sectional study we evaluated 187 patients that underwent open heart surgery with NIs. Demographic feature, clinical characteristics and risk factors of each infection were recorded. The antibiotic susceptibility test was performed using the Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method according to the standard protocol of Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Detection of Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria was performed by the double-disk synergy (DDS) test; also Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (MRSA) strains were identified by MRSA Screen Agar. The collected data were analyzed using the SPSS software (ver. 16) and, descriptive statistics were used. Results: Out Of total of 2253 hospitalized patients who underwent open heart surgery, 187(5.05%) patients had NIs. 51.9% of the patients were female. The rates of surgical site infection (SSI), respiratory tract infection, endocarditis, Urinary tract infection (UTI), blood Infection and mediastinitis were 27.80, 25.66%, 17.64, 17.11% 8.55% and 3.20% respectively. E.coli and S.aureus were the most causative agents of NIs. The rate of ESBL-producing bacteria was 14.28- 71.42% among enterobacteriaceae and the rate of MRSA was 54.2% among S.aureus strains. All isolated Acinetobacter.spp were Multi-drug resistance (MDR). Conclusions: We showed that the rate of NIs among these high-risk patients

  19. The ancestry and affiliations of Kennewick Man.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Morten; Sikora, Martin; Albrechtsen, Anders; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Moreno-Mayar, J Víctor; Poznik, G David; Zollikofer, Christoph P E; Ponce de León, Marcia S; Allentoft, Morten E; Moltke, Ida; Jónsson, Hákon; Valdiosera, Cristina; Malhi, Ripan S; Orlando, Ludovic; Bustamante, Carlos D; Stafford, Thomas W; Meltzer, David J; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske

    2015-07-23

    Kennewick Man, referred to as the Ancient One by Native Americans, is a male human skeleton discovered in Washington state (USA) in 1996 and initially radiocarbon dated to 8,340-9,200 calibrated years before present (BP). His population affinities have been the subject of scientific debate and legal controversy. Based on an initial study of cranial morphology it was asserted that Kennewick Man was neither Native American nor closely related to the claimant Plateau tribes of the Pacific Northwest, who claimed ancestral relationship and requested repatriation under the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). The morphological analysis was important to judicial decisions that Kennewick Man was not Native American and that therefore NAGPRA did not apply. Instead of repatriation, additional studies of the remains were permitted. Subsequent craniometric analysis affirmed Kennewick Man to be more closely related to circumpacific groups such as the Ainu and Polynesians than he is to modern Native Americans. In order to resolve Kennewick Man's ancestry and affiliations, we have sequenced his genome to ∼1× coverage and compared it to worldwide genomic data including for the Ainu and Polynesians. We find that Kennewick Man is closer to modern Native Americans than to any other population worldwide. Among the Native American groups for whom genome-wide data are available for comparison, several seem to be descended from a population closely related to that of Kennewick Man, including the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville), one of the five tribes claiming Kennewick Man. We revisit the cranial analyses and find that, as opposed to genome-wide comparisons, it is not possible on that basis to affiliate Kennewick Man to specific contemporary groups. We therefore conclude based on genetic comparisons that Kennewick Man shows continuity with Native North Americans over at least the last eight millennia.

  20. The ancestry and affiliations of Kennewick Man.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Morten; Sikora, Martin; Albrechtsen, Anders; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Moreno-Mayar, J Víctor; Poznik, G David; Zollikofer, Christoph P E; Ponce de León, Marcia S; Allentoft, Morten E; Moltke, Ida; Jónsson, Hákon; Valdiosera, Cristina; Malhi, Ripan S; Orlando, Ludovic; Bustamante, Carlos D; Stafford, Thomas W; Meltzer, David J; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske

    2015-07-23

    Kennewick Man, referred to as the Ancient One by Native Americans, is a male human skeleton discovered in Washington state (USA) in 1996 and initially radiocarbon dated to 8,340-9,200 calibrated years before present (BP). His population affinities have been the subject of scientific debate and legal controversy. Based on an initial study of cranial morphology it was asserted that Kennewick Man was neither Native American nor closely related to the claimant Plateau tribes of the Pacific Northwest, who claimed ancestral relationship and requested repatriation under the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). The morphological analysis was important to judicial decisions that Kennewick Man was not Native American and that therefore NAGPRA did not apply. Instead of repatriation, additional studies of the remains were permitted. Subsequent craniometric analysis affirmed Kennewick Man to be more closely related to circumpacific groups such as the Ainu and Polynesians than he is to modern Native Americans. In order to resolve Kennewick Man's ancestry and affiliations, we have sequenced his genome to ∼1× coverage and compared it to worldwide genomic data including for the Ainu and Polynesians. We find that Kennewick Man is closer to modern Native Americans than to any other population worldwide. Among the Native American groups for whom genome-wide data are available for comparison, several seem to be descended from a population closely related to that of Kennewick Man, including the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville), one of the five tribes claiming Kennewick Man. We revisit the cranial analyses and find that, as opposed to genome-wide comparisons, it is not possible on that basis to affiliate Kennewick Man to specific contemporary groups. We therefore conclude based on genetic comparisons that Kennewick Man shows continuity with Native North Americans over at least the last eight millennia. PMID:26087396

  1. Sepsis associated delirium mimicking postoperative delirium as the initial presenting symptom of urosepsis in a patient who underwent nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Deb Sanjay; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Samaddar, Devi Prasad; Singh, Harprit

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of 70 years old male who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy for renal calculi. After an uneventful recovery from anaesthesia, the patient developed delirium which manifested as restlessness, agitation, irritability and combative behavior. All other clinical parameters including arterial blood gas, chest X-ray and core temperature were normal and the patient remained haemodynamically stable. But 45 min later the patient developed florid manifestations of septic shock. He was aggressively managed in a protocolized manner as per the Surviving Sepsis Guidelines in the Critical Care Unit and recovered completely. There are no case reports showing postoperative delirium as the only initial presentation of severe sepsis, with other clinical parameters remaining normal. Both urosepsis and sepsis associated delirium have very high mortality. High index of suspicion and a protocolized approach in the management of sepsis can save lives. PMID:27182528

  2. Retrospective Comparison of Radiological and Clinical Outcomes of PLIF and TLIF Techniques in Patients Who Underwent Lumbar Spinal Posterior Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Asil, Kiyasettin; Yaldiz, Can

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Degenerative disc disease and spinal stenosis lead to various symptoms. Degeneration of facet joints is added to this degenerative process with aging. Seventy-four patients who were admitted to the Spinal Column Outpatient Clinic of the Neurosurgery Department with a diagnosis of degenerative narrow spinal canal and lumbar spondylolisthesis between 2011 and 2013 and who underwent surgery were included in the study. Our study was conducted with 74 patients of whom 73.0% (n = 54) were female and 27.0% (n = 20) were male. Mean age was 54.86 ± 7.87 years (range 34–74). Although we did not detect a difference between the two surgical methods with regard to clinical improvement, transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is preferred due to radiological advantages observed one year later, ease of application, and the development of fewer complications. PMID:27124016

  3. Sepsis associated delirium mimicking postoperative delirium as the initial presenting symptom of urosepsis in a patient who underwent nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Nag, Deb Sanjay; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Samaddar, Devi Prasad; Singh, Harprit

    2016-05-16

    We report a case of 70 years old male who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy for renal calculi. After an uneventful recovery from anaesthesia, the patient developed delirium which manifested as restlessness, agitation, irritability and combative behavior. All other clinical parameters including arterial blood gas, chest X-ray and core temperature were normal and the patient remained haemodynamically stable. But 45 min later the patient developed florid manifestations of septic shock. He was aggressively managed in a protocolized manner as per the Surviving Sepsis Guidelines in the Critical Care Unit and recovered completely. There are no case reports showing postoperative delirium as the only initial presentation of severe sepsis, with other clinical parameters remaining normal. Both urosepsis and sepsis associated delirium have very high mortality. High index of suspicion and a protocolized approach in the management of sepsis can save lives. PMID:27182528

  4. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Resolving Within 48 Hours in a Normotensive Patient Who Underwent Thoracic Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Vakharia, Kunal; Siasios, Ioannis; Dimopoulos, Vassilios G.; Pollina, John

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) usually manifests with severe headaches, seizures, and visual disturbances due to uncontrollable hypertension. A patient (age in the early 60s) with a history of renal cell cancer presented with lower-extremity weakness and paresthesias. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracic spine revealed a T8 vertebral body metastatic lesion with cord compression at that level. The patient underwent preoperative embolization of the tumor followed by posterior resection and placement of percutaneous pedicle screws and rods. Postoperatively, the patient experienced decreased visual acuity bilaterally. Abnormal MRI findings consisted of T2 hyperintense lesions and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery changes in both occipital lobes, consistent with the unique brain imaging pattern associated with PRES. The patient’s blood pressure was normal and stable from the first day of hospitalization. The patient was kept on high-dose steroid therapy, which was started intraoperatively, and improved within 48 hours after symptom onset. PMID:26858804

  5. The association between orthostatic hypotension and cognitive state among adults 65 years and older who underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment.

    PubMed

    Punchick, Boris; Freud, Tamar; Press, Yan

    2016-07-01

    The prevalence of cognitive impairment and orthostatic hypotension (OH) increases with age, but the results of studies that assessed possible associations between them are inconsistent.The aim of this study is to assess possible associations between cognitive impairment and OH in patients ≥65 years of age who underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment.A retrospective analysis was conducted of the computerized medical records of the study population from 2005 to 2013. Data collected included blood pressure measurements that enabled the calculation of OH, results of the mini-mental state examination (MMSE), results of the Montreal cognitive assessment (MoCA) test, and cognitive diagnoses that were determined over the course of the assessment.The rate of OH in the study population of 571 adults was 32.1%. The mean MMSE score was 22.5 ± 5.2 among participants with OH and 21.6 ± 5.8 among those without OH (P = 0.09). The absence of a significant association between OH and MMSE remained after adjusting the MMSE score for age and education level. The mean MoCA score was 16.4 ± 5.0 among participants with OH and 16.4 ± 4.8 among those without (P = 0.33). The prevalence of OH was 39% among participants without cognitive impairment, 28.9% among those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 30.6% among those with dementia (P = 0.13).There was no association between OH and cognitive impairment in adults who underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment. PMID:27442658

  6. The Ancestry and Affiliations of Kennewick Man

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Morten; Poznik, G. David; Zollikofer, Christoph P. E.; de León, Marcia Ponce; Allentoft, Morten E.; Moltke, Ida; Jónsson, Hákon; Valdiosera, Cristina; Malhi, Ripan S.; Orlando, Ludovic; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Meltzer, David J.; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske

    2016-01-01

    Kennewick Man, referred to as the Ancient One by Native Americans, is a male human skeleton discovered in Washington state (USA) in 1996 and initially radiocarbon-dated to 8340–9200 calibrated years BP1. His population affinities have been the subject of scientific debate and legal controversy. Based on initial study of cranial morphology it was asserted that Kennewick Man was neither Native American nor closely related to the Claimant Plateau tribes of the Pacific Northwest, who claimed ancestral relationship and requested repatriation under the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). The morphological analysis was important to judicial decisions that Kennewick Man was not Native American and that therefore NAGPRA did not apply. Instead of repatriation, additional studies of the remains were permitted2. Subsequent craniometric analysis affirmed Kennewick Man to be more closely related to circumpacific groups such as the Ainu and Polynesians than he is to modern Native Americans2. In order to resolve Kennewick Man’s ancestry and affiliations, we have sequenced his genome to ~1× coverage and compared it to worldwide genomic data including the Ainu and Polynesians. We find that Kennewick Man is closer to modern Native Americans than to any other population worldwide. Among the Native American groups for whom genome wide data is available for comparison, several appear to be descended from a population closely related to that of Kennewick Man, including the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville), one of the five tribes claiming Kennewick Man. We revisit the cranial analyses and find that, as opposed to genomic-wide comparisons, it is not possible on that basis to affiliate Kennewick Man to specific contemporary groups. We therefore conclude based on genetic comparisons that Kennewick Man shows continuity with Native North Americans over at least the last eight millennia. PMID:26087396

  7. MAN or FA from n-butane

    SciTech Connect

    Di Cio, A.; Verde, L.

    1985-08-01

    Unsaturated polyester resins were first produced mostly from fumaric acid (FA) rather than from maleic anhydride (MAN). This is perfectly understandable if we consider that, using fumaric acid as raw material, polycondensates with a more homogeneous (less branched) structure are obtained, thus producing resins characterized by a more uniform and reproducible chemical and mechanical properties. Presently, for economical reasons, fumaric acid is used marginally as a MAN substitute in the production of polyester resins. These resins account for a major share (50%) of the overall MAN consumption in the U.S. and in Western Europe.

  8. Synergistic Man: Outcome Model for Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousseve, Ronald J.

    1973-01-01

    Drawing on the insights of Ruth Benedict and Abraham Maslow in their search for an ethical gauge by which to rate personal-social health, this article proposes synergistic man'' as the desired outcome model for counselors. (Author)

  9. Mission analyses for manned flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orth, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The investigations to develop a high altitude aircraft program plan are reported along with an analysis of manned comet and asteroid missions, the development of shuttle sortie mission objectives, and an analysis of major management issues facing the shuttle sortie.

  10. QX MAN: Q and X file manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krein, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    QX MAN is a grid and solution file manipulation program written primarily for the PARC code and the GRIDGEN family of grid generation codes. QX MAN combines many of the features frequently encountered in grid generation, grid refinement, the setting-up of initial conditions, and post processing. QX MAN allows the user to manipulate single block and multi-block grids (and their accompanying solution files) by splitting, concatenating, rotating, translating, re-scaling, and stripping or adding points. In addition, QX MAN can be used to generate an initial solution file for the PARC code. The code was written to provide several formats for input and output in order for it to be useful in a broad spectrum of applications.

  11. Laser Pyro System Standardization and Man Rating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Christopher W.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews an X-38 laser pyro system standardization system designed for a new manned rated program. The plans to approve this laser initiation system and preliminary ideas for this system are also provided.

  12. Association of Age at Menarche With Increasing Number of Fibroids in a Cohort of Women Who Underwent Standardized Ultrasound Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Baird, Donna D.; Hartmann, Katherine E.

    2013-01-01

    Age at menarche has been associated with several reproductive conditions, and frequencies differ by race. Racial disparities also impact fibroid risk. We comprehensively examined the relationship between age at menarche, fibroid characteristics, and race. Women were enrolled in Right From the Start (2001–2010), a multistate study that systematically screened for fibroids during very early pregnancy. Endovaginal ultrasounds were conducted, and fibroid presence, number, type, volume, and diameter were recorded according to standardized definitions. Generalized estimating equations adjusted for correlations within study site were used to estimate associations between age at menarche and fibroid status and to test for interactions with race. Of 5,023 participants, 11% had a fibroid. Seven percent underwent menarche before 11 years of age and 11% at 15 years or later. We did not observe interactions between age at menarche and race. A 1-year increase in age at menarche was inversely associated with fibroids (adjusted risk ratio = 0.87, 95% confidence interval: 0.82, 0.91). Early age at menarche had a similar positive association in individual analyses with fibroid size, type, and location but was stronger for multiple fibroids (adjusted risk ratio = 0.75, 95% confidence interval: 0.68, 0.83). Our findings confirm other reports of an association between age at menarche and fibroid development (regardless of characteristics), demonstrate no effect modification by race, and suggest a stronger association for women with multiple fibroids, possibly reflecting a stronger association for early-onset disease. PMID:23817917

  13. Expression of magnesium transporter genes in head and neck cancer patients underwent neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Jung; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Chien, Li-Sheng; Lin, Jin-Ching; Jiang, Rong-San; Liu, Shih-An

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to investigate expression of magnesium transporter genes in patients with head and neck cancer who underwent cisplatin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and their association with serum magnesium level. Head and neck cancer patients scheduled to undergo neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy were eligible for enrollment. Blood samples were obtained at three time points: prior to, during, and after completion of chemotherapy. Expression levels of magnesium transporter genes were determined by quantitative real-time PCR. A total of 23 patients were included in the final analysis. The average serum magnesium levels dropped 6.98 and 5.20% during and after completion of chemotherapy. There were neither significant associations between serum magnesium level and demographic variables nor tumor-related variables. SLC41A1 expression level was positively correlated with serum magnesium whereas TRPM6 expression level was negatively correlated with serum magnesium. Serum magnesium level decreased during cisplatin-based chemotherapy in head and neck cancer patients. Further studies are warranted to investigate optimal magnesium measurement and substitution protocol.

  14. An Analysis of Patients That Underwent Computed Tomography Pulmonary Angiography with the Prediagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Ozakin, Engin; Kaya, Filiz Baloglu; Acar, Nurdan; Cevik, Arif Alper

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this study is to analyze the frequency of other diagnoses and findings in patients that were diagnosed with or not diagnosed with PE following the CTPA in the ED and to analyze the relationship between diagnosis and D-dimer. Instrument and Method. This study involves all patients that presented to the ED that underwent CTPA with the prediagnosis of PE. The items considered in this study were their reason for presenting to the ED and pretest clinical risks for PE, D-dimer, and CTPA results. Findings. Of the 696 cases, the most common cause was shortness of breath (59.3%). The CTPA showed that 145 (20.83%) patients were suffering from PE. Among the remaining cases, 464 (66.66%) patients had pathological findings other than PE and 87 (12.5%) patients were reported as normal. The most common pathological results other than PE found in CTPA were atelectasis in 244 (39.9%) and ground glass in 165 (23.7%), as well as nonpulmonary results in 70 (10.05%) patients. The differences in D-dimer results of patients diagnosed with PE, patients diagnosed with another pathology, and patients with normal CTPA results were statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion. CTPA scanning, performed on the basis of assessment scoring, helps in discovering other fatal pathologies in addition to PE. PMID:24955406

  15. Association of age at menarche with increasing number of fibroids in a cohort of women who underwent standardized ultrasound assessment.

    PubMed

    Velez Edwards, Digna R; Baird, Donna D; Hartmann, Katherine E

    2013-08-01

    Age at menarche has been associated with several reproductive conditions, and frequencies differ by race. Racial disparities also impact fibroid risk. We comprehensively examined the relationship between age at menarche, fibroid characteristics, and race. Women were enrolled in Right From the Start (2001-2010), a multistate study that systematically screened for fibroids during very early pregnancy. Endovaginal ultrasounds were conducted, and fibroid presence, number, type, volume, and diameter were recorded according to standardized definitions. Generalized estimating equations adjusted for correlations within study site were used to estimate associations between age at menarche and fibroid status and to test for interactions with race. Of 5,023 participants, 11% had a fibroid. Seven percent underwent menarche before 11 years of age and 11% at 15 years or later. We did not observe interactions between age at menarche and race. A 1-year increase in age at menarche was inversely associated with fibroids (adjusted risk ratio = 0.87, 95% confidence interval: 0.82, 0.91). Early age at menarche had a similar positive association in individual analyses with fibroid size, type, and location but was stronger for multiple fibroids (adjusted risk ratio = 0.75, 95% confidence interval: 0.68, 0.83). Our findings confirm other reports of an association between age at menarche and fibroid development (regardless of characteristics), demonstrate no effect modification by race, and suggest a stronger association for women with multiple fibroids, possibly reflecting a stronger association for early-onset disease. PMID:23817917

  16. CORRELATION BETWEEN PRE AND POSTOPERATIVE UPPER DIGESTIVE ENDOSCOPY IN PATIENTS WHO UNDERWENT ROUX-EN-Y GASTROJEJUNAL BYPASS

    PubMed Central

    CZECZKO, Leticia Elizabeth Augustin; CRUZ, Manoela Aguiar; KLOSTERMANN, Flávia Caroline; CZECZKO, Nicolau Gregori; NASSIF, Paulo Afonso Nunes; CZECZKO, Alexandre Eduardo Augusto

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bariatric operations have variable range of complications and postoperative benefits. Gastroesophageal reflux is considered potential factor that may result in damage to the esophageal mucosa and this subject is quite controversial in the literature. Aim : To evaluate patients who underwent to Roux-en-Y gastrojejunal bypass correlating epidemiologic and endoscopic findings in pre and postoperative periods. Method : A retrospective, paired study which evaluated 110 patients. Inclusion criteria were formal indication for bariatric surgery and patients with pre and postoperative endoscopy. Exclusion criteria were previous bariatric surgery, patients subjected to other types of bariatric surgery and those who had no pre or postoperative upper digestive endoscopy. The epidemiological variables were: sex, age, body mass index, type 2 diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance, and preoperative dyslipidemia. Results : The preoperative upper endoscopy was normal in 26.4% of the patients. Among endoscopic alterations, the hiatus hernia was the most prevalent followed by non-erosive gastritis. The postoperative upper endoscopy was normal in 40.9% and stenosis was the most prevalent followed by marginal ulcer. Correlation on pre and postoperative endoscopies, was found 100% reduction of hiatal hernias and 88% of esophagitis. There was no statistical significance in relationship to anastomotic stenosis with preoperative other variables. Conclusions: There was significant decrease in postoperative hiatus hernia, erosive esophagitis, non-erosive esophagitis, erosive gastritis and non-erosive gastritis with the operation. Stenosis of the gastrojejunostomy anastomosis was the most prevalent postoperative complication with no correlation with preoperative variables. PMID:27120737

  17. Factors Associated With Late Specialized Rehabilitation among Veterans with Lower Extremity Amputation Who Underwent Immediate Postoperative Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Kurichi, Jibby E.; Xie, Dawei; Kwong, Pui L.; Bates, Barbara E.; Vogel, W. Bruce; Stineman, Margaret G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine what patient- and facility-level characteristics drive late specialized rehabilitation among veterans who already received immediate postoperative services. Design Data were obtained from 8 administrative databases for 2,453 patients who underwent lower extremity amputation in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in 2002-2004. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine the hazards ratios and 95% confidence intervals of the factors associated with days to readmission for late services after discharge from the surgical hospitalization. Results There were 2,304 patients who received only immediate postoperative services, while 152 also received late specialized rehabilitation. After adjustment, veterans who were less disabled physically, residing in the South Central compared to the Southeast region, and had their surgeries in CARF accredited facilities were all more likely to receive late services. The hazards ratios for type of immediate postoperative rehabilitation were not constant over time. At hospital discharge, there was no difference in receipt, however, after 3 months, those who received early specialized rehabilitation were significantly less likely to receive late services. Conclusion The factors associated with late specialized rehabilitation were due mainly to facility-level characteristics and care process variables. Knowledge of these factors may help with decision-making policies regarding CARF accredited units. PMID:21389847

  18. Factors Associated with the Incidence of Local Recurrences of Breast Cancer in Women Who Underwent Conservative Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tovar, Juliana Rodrigues; Zandonade, Eliana; Amorim, Maria Helena Costa

    2014-01-01

    Conservative surgery is considered the procedure of choice for women who are affected by early stage tumours. The local recurrence of cancer as a consequence of breast tissue conservation is a growing concern. This study aimed to describe the sociodemographic and clinical profiles of women who had local recurrences of breast cancer after conservative surgery and to examine the associations between sociodemographic and clinical variables and the incidence of tumour recurrence in these women. The retrospective cohort included 880 women who were diagnosed with breast cancer and underwent conservative surgery between January 2000 and December 2010. Recurrences occurred in 60 patients, and the mean age of the women at diagnosis was 48.8 years. Predictive factors for local recurrence were young age (<39 years) (P = 0.028 and OR = 10.93), surgical margin involvement (P = 0.001 and OR = 3.66), and Her-2 overexpression (P = 0.045 and OR = 1.94). The establishment of sociodemographic and clinical characteristics might help to select optimum treatments, which is a crucial challenge for public health in Brazil, especially with regard to reductions of surgery and hospitalisation expenditures in the Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde—SUS). PMID:25530886

  19. [A contribution to "stiff man" syndrome].

    PubMed

    Belian, T; Harms, L

    1990-05-01

    A patient with the clinical symptoms of the "Stiff-man"-syndrome, but an atypical course was introduced. Symptoms and course were compared with similar cases mentioned in literature. The "Stiff-man"-syndrome is probably a disease of central origin affecting the relationship between inhibitory and excitatory regulation of the muscle tonus, especially the exteroceptive reflex mechanisms. Several pathological processes of the CNS can be held responsible for the disturbance of the balance in this regulatory system. PMID:2167489

  20. Efficacy of Prothrombin Complex Concentrate Treatment in Patients with Liver Coagulopathy Who Underwent Various Invasive Hepatobiliary and Gastrointestinal Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Lesmana, Cosmas Rinaldi A.; Cahyadinata, Lidwina; Pakasi, Levina S.; Lesmana, Laurentius A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs) containing prothrombin, factors VII, IX, and X, as well as the inhibitors protein C and S have been used as an emergent reversal for oral anticoagulation therapy. The use of PCCs in hepatobiliary disorder patients or patients with liver coagulopathy who need to undergo invasive procedures has not been well studied. Objective To evaluate the efficacy of PCC treatment in order to control or prevent bleeding complications in patients with liver coagulopathy who undergo various invasive procedures. Methods This was a prospective, open-label, non-randomized, before-and-after study in patients with hepatobiliary disorders who underwent invasive procedures accompanied by liver impairment and received PCC injection (Cofact®, Sanquin, The Netherlands). Patients with coagulopathy from various causes were recruited consecutively. Data collected were the episodes of bleeding, liver function test and the international normalized ratio (INR) before and after PCC therapy. The primary endpoint was INR change after treatment, while secondary endpoints included bleeding control and bleeding event after treatment. Results Thirty patients (17 men, 13 women) were enrolled. Patients’ mean age was 57.0 + 15.5 years. Liver cirrhosis was found in 14 patients (46.7%). The procedures consisted of liver biopsy, liver abscess aspiration, abdominal paracentesis, therapeutic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, abdominal surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. After treatment, 25 patients (83.3%) showed a decreased median INR (from 1.6 to 1.3) (p < 0.001, Wilcoxon's signed-rank test). Five patients failed to show INR reduction. No new bleeding event related to the invasive procedures was observed. Conclusion PCC treatment is effective to control and prevent bleeding complications in patients with liver coagulopathy who undergo invasive procedures. PMID:27482190

  1. Delayed leukoencephalopathy of non-small cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases underwent whole brain radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaoling; Huang, Biao; Feng, Jieying; Yang, Wanqun; Liu, Hongjun

    2015-10-01

    To explore the incidence, MR imaging findings, dynamic developing process of delayed leukoencephalopathy (DLE) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with brain metastases patients who undergone whole brain radiation (WBRT) therapy, we retrospectively reviewed 48 NSCLC patients who underwent WBRT for brain metastases from January 2010 through June 2015 and had evaluable magnetic resonance imaging after treatment. The DLE were graded using a scale to evaluate T2-FLAIR (fluid attenuated image recovery) images: grade 1 = little or no white matter hyperintensity, grade 2 = limited periventricular hyperintensity and grade 3 = diffuse white matter hyperintensity. 48 NSCLC patients with brain metastases were enrolled. The median age of these patients was 55.7 years (range 33-75 years). The median follow-up was 12 months. The characteristic MR imaging of DLE in those patients was bilaterally diffuse white matter T2 hyperintensity around the periventricular areas without enhancement, sparing from U-fiber, callosum and gray matter structure. The incidence of DLE developed 6.25% (3/48), 30.00% (12/40), 48.39% (15/31), 61.90% (13/21), 85.71% (6/7), 100% (3/3) in those patients who were followed up for 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 36 months, respectively. Through increased understanding of it, it may be possible to help clinicians develop further therapeutic strategies to maximize benefit while limiting potential long term toxicities. These data supplement existing reports regarding the late effects of WBRT in NSCLC patients with brain metastasis.

  2. A 70-Year-Old Man With Large Cervical and Mediastinal Lymphadenopathies

    PubMed Central

    Narechania, Shraddha; Valent, Jason; Farver, Carol

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 70-year-old man with enlarged mediastinal and cervical lymph nodes that provided interesting radiologic and pathologic observations. The 70-year-old black man was found to have enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes. He had symptoms of atypical chest pain and generalized weakness for 2 weeks prior to the diagnosis. He denied shortness of breath, fever, chills, or night sweats. He was treated for hypertension and onychomycosis. Basic laboratory findings were within normal limits. Pulmonary function tests at the time of presentation showed FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC ratio of 123% predicted, 133% predicted, and 0.7, respectively. Meanwhile, total lung capacity and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity were 103% and 107% predicted, respectively. Two weeks before he presented to our institution, the patient underwent bronchoscopy with transbronchial biopsies of the right lower lobe and endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration of the right hilar lymph nodes. PMID:26149568

  3. Malignant thyroid teratoma: report of an aggressive tumor in a 64-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Vilallonga, R; Zafon, C; Ruiz-Marcellan, C; Obiols, G; Fort, J M; Baena, J A; Villanueva, B; Garcia, A; Sobrinho-Simões, M

    2013-09-01

    Malignant teratoma of the thyroid is a rare and aggressive tumor, frequent in children than in adults. Histologically, thyroid teratomas usually show a predominance of a neuroectodermal component. Mature cartilage and bone may be present. We present the case of primary malignant teratoma of the thyroid in a 64-year-old man. Histologically, the tumor displayed a predominant neuroectodermal component. The diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The patient underwent a radical thyroidectomy with central neck dissection as primary treatment and radioiodine treatment afterwards. The patient had local and distant recurrence. A second surgery was performed with poor results and the patient died 3 months afterwards.

  4. Analysis of subsequent surgery rates among endometriosis patients who underwent surgery with and without concomitant leuprolide acetate therapy.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ahmed M; Bonafede, Machaon; Farr, Amanda M; Castelli-Haley, Jane; Winkel, Craig

    2016-06-01

    Objective To compare subsequent endometriosis-related surgery following initial laparoscopy among women treated with leuprolide acetate (LA) or other endometriosis therapies versus women who received no pharmacotherapy. Research design and methods This retrospective cohort analysis utilized MarketScan Commercial claims data. Women with endometriosis aged 18-49 who underwent laparoscopy between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2011 were identified using diagnosis and procedures codes and were categorized into four cohorts based on claims within 90 days of laparoscopy: surgery plus adherent LA, surgery plus non-adherent LA, surgery plus other therapy, and surgery alone. Patients with proportion of days covered ≥0.80 in the 6 months after laparoscopy were considered adherent to LA. Main outcome measures Subsequent endometriosis-related surgery (laparoscopy, laparotomy or other excision/ablation/fulguration of endometriosis lesions, oophorectomy, or hysterectomy) was measured in the 6 and 12 months following initial laparoscopy. Risk of subsequent surgery was compared using multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling. Results Most women were treated with surgery only (n = 9865); fewer were treated with LA (adherent: n = 202; non-adherent: n = 490) or other therapies (n = 230). The proportion of patients with subsequent surgery ranged from 2.0% to 10.0% during the 6 month follow-up (12 month: 9.7% to 13.5%). Adherent LA use was associated with significantly lower risk of surgery compared to surgery alone (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.31, p = 0.020) while use of other therapies was associated with significantly higher risk (HR = 1.51, p = 0.045) over the 6 month follow-up. There was no significant difference between the surgery plus non-adherent LA and surgery only cohort over 6 months (p = 0.247). The association between adherent LA and subsequent surgery was not significant over the 12 month follow-up. Conclusion Therapy with LA after

  5. Comparison of Standard Catheters Versus Radial Artery-Specific Catheter in Patients Who Underwent Coronary Angiography Through Transradial Access.

    PubMed

    Chen, On; Goel, Sunny; Acholonu, Michael; Kulbak, Guy; Verma, Shivani; Travlos, Efstratios; Casazza, Richard; Borgen, Elliot; Malik, Bilal; Friedman, Michael; Moskovits, Norbert; Frankel, Robert; Shani, Jacob; Ayzenberg, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    In this prospective, randomized controlled study, we aim to compare the performance outcomes of standard catheters with the radial artery-specific catheter. Over the past decade, transradial cardiac catheterization has gained widespread popularity because of its low complication rates compared with transfemoral access. Operators have the choice of using either standard catheters (used for both transfemoral and transradial approach, with need for separate catheter use for either right or left coronary artery engagement) or a dedicated radial artery catheter, which is specifically designed to engage both coronary arteries through radial artery access. A total of 110 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography at our institution from March 2015 to April 2015 were prospectively randomized to either radial artery-specific Tiger catheter (5Fr; Terumo Interventional Systems, Somerset, New Jersey) versus standard Judkins left and right catheters (5Fr R4, L4; Cordis Corporation, Miami, Florida). The end points of the study included fluoroscopy time, dose-area product, contrast volume used, and total procedure time for the coronary angiography. A total of 57 patients (52%) were randomized to radial artery-specific catheter and 53 (48%) to the standard catheter. Tiger catheter was associated with significantly lower fluoroscopy time (184 ± 91 vs 238 ± 131 seconds, p = 0.015), which was statistically significant. Other outcome measures such as dose-area product (2,882.4 ± 1,471.2 vs 3,524.6 ± 2,111.7 Gy·cm(2), p = 0.07), total contrast volume (48.1 ± 16.1 vs 53.4 ± 18.5 ml, p = 0.114), and total procedure time (337 ± 382 vs 434 ± 137 seconds, p = 0.085) were also lower in single-catheter group, but it did not reach statistical significance. A total of 8 patients (14%) were crossed over from radial-specific catheter arm to standard catheter arm because of substandard image quality and difficulty in coronary engagement. Six patients had to be

  6. Usefulness of colchicine to reduce perioperative myocardial damage in patients who underwent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulos, Georgios; Angelidis, Christos; Kouritas, Vasileios K; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Cleman, Michael W; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Siasos, Gerasimos; Tousoulis, Dimitrios; Lekakis, John; Deftereos, Spyridon

    2015-05-15

    The objective of the present study was to test whether a perioperative course of colchicine, in patients who underwent standard coronary artery bypass grafting, would result in reduced postoperative increase of myocardial injury biomarker levels. Patients were prospectively randomized to colchicine or placebo starting 48 hours before scheduled coronary artery bypass grafting and for 8 days thereafter (0.5 mg twice daily). The primary outcome parameter was maximal high-sensitivity troponin T (hsTnT) concentration within 48 hours after surgery. Secondary outcome measures were maximal creatine kinase-myocardial brain fraction (CK-MB) levels and area under the curve (AUC) of hsTnT and CK-MB concentrations; 59 patients were included. Maximal hsTnT was 616 pg/ml (396 to 986) in the colchicine group versus 1,613 pg/ml (732 to 2,587) in controls (p = 0.002). Maximal CK-MB was 44.6 ng/ml (36.6 to 68.8) and 93.0 ng/ml (48.0 to 182.3), respectively (p = 0.002). The median AUC for hsTnT was 40,755 pg h/ml (20,868 to 79,176) in controls versus 20,363 pg h/ml (13,891 to 31,661) in the colchicine group (p = 0.002). AUCs for CK-MB were 2,552 ng h/ml (1,564 to 4,791) in controls and 1,586 ng h/ml (1,159 to 2,073) in the colchicine group (p = 0.003). The main complaints associated with colchicine were, as expected, gastrointestinal, with 5 patients (16.7%) in the colchicine group reporting diarrhea versus 1 control (3.4%) (p = 0.195). In conclusion, a short perioperative course of colchicine was effective in attenuating postoperative increases of hsTnT and CK-MB compared with placebo. This finding, which needs confirmation in a larger clinical trial powered to assess clinical endpoints, suggests a potential role for this agent in reducing cardiac surgery-related myocardial damage.

  7. The Computerized Anatomical Man (CAM) model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, M. P.; Yucker, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    A computerized anatomical man (CAM) model, representing the most detailed and anatomically correct geometrical model of the human body yet prepared, has been developed for use in analyzing radiation dose distribution in man. This model of a 50-percentile standing USAF man comprises some 1100 unique geometric surfaces and some 2450 solid regions. Internal body geometry such as organs, voids, bones, and bone marrow are explicitly modeled. A computer program called CAMERA has also been developed for performing analyses with the model. Such analyses include tracing rays through the CAM geometry, placing results on magnetic tape in various forms, collapsing areal density data from ray tracing information to areal density distributions, preparing cross section views, etc. Numerous computer drawn cross sections through the CAM model are presented.

  8. The Centauri project: Manned interstellar travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciesla, Thomas M.

    1990-01-01

    The development of antimatter engines for spacecraft propulsion will allow man to expand to the nearest stellar neighbors such as the Alpha Centuri system. Compared to chemically powered rockets like the Apollo mission class which would take 50,000 years to reach the Centauri system, antimatter propulsion would reduce one way trip time to 30 years or less. The challenges encountered by manned interstellar travel are formidable. The spacecraft must be a combination of sublight speed transportation system and a traveling microplanet serving an expanding population. As the population expands from the initial 100 people to approximately 300, the terraformed asteroid, enclosed by a man-made shell will allow for expansion over its surface in the fashion of a small terrestrial town. All aspects of human life - birth; death; physical, emotional, and educational needs; and government and law must be met by the structure, systems, and institutions on-board.

  9. Nuclear power: key to man's extraterrestrial civilization

    SciTech Connect

    Angelo, J.A. Jr.; Buden, D.

    1982-01-01

    The start of the Third Millennium will be highlighted by the establishment of man's extraterrestrial civilization with three technical cornerstones leading to the off-planet expansion of the human resource base. These are (1) the availability of compact energy sources for power and propulsion, (2) the creation of permanent manned habitats in space, and (3) the ability to process materials anywhere in the Solar System. In the 1990s and beyond, nuclear reactors could represent the prime source of both space power and propulsion. The manned and unmanned space missions of tomorrow will demand first kilowatt and then megawatt levels of power. Various nuclear power plant technologies will be discussed, with emphasis on derivatives from the nuclear rocket technology.

  10. The cost of landing man on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, H. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    In a period where the space program budget is generally static at about 1/3 of the level reached during the Apollo program, manned planetary flight is not considered by NASA planners to be a realistic near term goal. Much of NASA's current planning is based on the perception that manned planetary flight would be more costly than the Apollo lunar landing. This paper demonstrates that with current technological improvements in avionics, structure, and space transportation, the landing of an American on Mars would cost only 1/3 to 2/3 of the lunar landing; on a per capita basis such a program would cost less than $200, compared to Apollo's $325 (all dollars in 1981 base). Given the fact that a manned Mars landing is the last such exploration feat left to this generation, the cost should clearly not be a major deterrent.

  11. Effects of FLIRT on bubble growth in man.

    PubMed

    Winkler, B E; Koch, A; Schoeppenthau, H; Ludwig, T; Tetzlaff, K; Hartig, F; Kaehler, W; Koehler, A; Kanstinger, A; Ciscato, W; Muth, C-M

    2012-11-01

    Recompression during decompression has been suggested to possibly reduce the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). The main objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of FLIRT (First Line Intermittent Recompression Technique) on bubble detection in man. 29 divers underwent 2 simulated dives in a dry recompression chamber to a depth of 40 msw (500 kPa ambient pressure) in random order. A Buehlmann-based decompression profile served as control and was compared to an experimental profile with intermittent recompression during decompression (FLIRT). Circulating bubbles in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) were monitored by Doppler ultrasound and quantified using the Spencer scoring algorithm. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), thrombocytes, D-Dimers and serum osmolarity were analyzed before and 120 min after the dive. Both dive profiles elicited bubbles in most subjects (range Spencer 0-4). However, no statistically significant difference was found in bubble scores between the control and the experimental dive procedure. There was no significant change in either HSP70, thrombocytes, and D-Dimers. None of the divers had clinical signs or symptoms suggestive of DCS. We conclude that FLIRT did not significantly alter the number of microbubbles and thus may not be considered superior to classical decompression in regards of preventing DCS.

  12. Thoracic aortic dissection in a 38-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Tilney, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A few days before Christmas, a flight team was activated for an interfacility transfer of a 38-year-old man with a history of hypertension and spinal stenosis diagnosed with a thoracic aortic dissection. The patient was presented to a local community hospital complaining of nearly 5 days of left-sided rib pain. This afternoon when he stood up from a chair, he experienced a near-syncopal episode. Concurrently, he had an abrupt onset of a tearing sensation in his chest that radiated to thoracic spine in the region between his shoulder blades. Ground emergency medical services (EMS) was called, and the patient was transported to the community hospital. During the initial transport and evaluation by the emergency department (ED) staff, the patient was noted to be hypertensive, with a systolic blood pressure greater than 180 mmHg. In the ED, the patient received aspirin, morphine, and Lopressor. He underwent a chest x-ray (Figure 1) and computed tomography (CT) scan and was diagnosed with a type B thoracic aorta dissection, which was noted to start on the descending thoracic aorta distal to the left subclavian artery and extend to the level of the celiac trunk (Figure 2). Despite the initial beta blockade, the patient was noted to be profoundly hypertensive, with initial blood pressure greater than 190 mmHg systolic. The flight team was activated for hemodynamic management and rapid transport to a facility capable of vascular and cardiothoracic surgery.

  13. Use of IPsec by Manned Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pajevski, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Program is developing its next generation manned space systems for missions to the International Space Station (ISS) and the Moon. The Program is embarking on a path towards standards based Internet Protocol (IP) networking for space systems communication. The IP based communications will be paired with industry standard security mechanisms such as Internet Protocol Security (IPsec) to ensure the integrity of information exchanges and prevent unauthorized release of sensitive information in-transit. IPsec has been tested in simulations on the ground and on at least one Earth orbiting satellite, but the technology is still unproven in manned space mission situations and significant obstacles remain.

  14. The maturation of ovulatory potential in man.

    PubMed

    Kulin, H E

    1980-01-01

    The maturation of the potential for ovulation in man is reviewed in the light of recent data quantitating gonadotropins and gonadal steroids in the prepubertal child. The primary limitations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis are seen as related to feedback control mechanisms. Based on preliminary data obtained in patients with gonadal dysgenesis, a hypothesis which links positive and negative feedback maturation is proposed. The development of full reproductive potential in man is clearly a process which extends over a decade or more.

  15. Ocular bacillary angiomatosis in an immunocompromised man.

    PubMed

    Murray, Meltzer A; Zamecki, Katherine J; Paskowski, Joseph; Lelli, Gary J

    2010-01-01

    An immunocompromised man presented with an inflammatory eyelid lesion. Biopsy was performed; histopathology and special staining confirmed a diagnosis of bacillary angiomatosis. The man was treated with oral erythromycin, and the lesion resolved. The etiologic agents of bacillary angiomatosis are Bartonella henselae and Bartonella quintana, Gram-negative coccobacilli. The organisms stain positively with the Warthin-Starry silver stain. Lesions can be cutaneous or visceral and have been commonly described in immunocompromised patients. Histopathologic examination of lesions reveals angiogenesis and cellular proliferation. Bacillary angiomatosis can be treated with oral antibiotics.

  16. Man-made Maladies and Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Audy, J. Ralph

    1970-01-01

    Man-made, including iatrogenic, maladies are usually unforeseen and may fall into several categories: those resulting from diagnosis and treatment, those relating to social and psychological attitudes or situations, and those emanating from mass programs to control or eradicate diseases. Examples: the physician-originated spread of “shipyard eye,” tactless behavior toward patients, and lapses in malaria eradication programs. From a presentation of some results from acts of good intention, we may come to anticipate at least some of the unanticipated consequences of health-related interference, much as we are all becoming aware of other consequences of man's tampering with earthly resources. PMID:5485233

  17. The Tree Man: Robert Mazibuko's Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloch, Joanne, Ed.

    This book for beginning readers highlights Robert Mazibuko, the "Tree Man," who spent his life teaching people how to enrich the soil and plant vegetables and trees. Born in South Africa in 1904, he lived on a farm, learning to work with livestock, raise crops, and share with the community. In college, his professor of agriculture provided a…

  18. Alternatives for Man and Environment, Revised Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami-Dade Junior Coll., FL.

    A one-year general education course entitled "Man and Environment" has been developed at Miami-Dade Junior College, Florida. Basic framework for the course was built on the premise that an interdisciplinary, module-structured course represents one of the better approaches to planning environmental education curriculum. Material for the course may…

  19. System safety in manned versus unmanned programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, G. B.

    1971-01-01

    The differences in applying system safety techniques to manned and unmanned spacecraft are outlined. The Skylab Earth Orbiting Laboratory and the Viking Mars Lander were compared. Common aspects, differences, and mission objectives are used as major criteria in developing a safety procedure.

  20. Man and Environment, A Multidisciplinary Teachers Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, F. H.; And Others

    This multidisciplinary guide, developed for teachers in the secondary schools, stresses the use of Man and Environment in Arkansas. The guide illustrates how teachers in social studies, the arts, English, science, physical education and health, home economics, and mathematics can implement these materials into their present classroom situations. A…

  1. Chemistry in "The Ascent of Man."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hostettler, John D.; Brooks, Kenneth

    1980-01-01

    Describes "The Ascent of Man," a course emphasizing science and human values. Detailed are some chemical topics covered in the course, and how these topics are used in other traditional chemistry courses. Topics discussed include alchemy, the chemical revolution, steam engines, the Manhattan project, and several bioethical problems. (CS)

  2. Man's Search: English, Mythology. 5112.22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gundersheimer, Lenore C.

    A course which is an exploration of man's eternal search to understand himself and his world through the study of the mythology of the world is presented. Performance objectives include: (1) Students will recognize the content of the myths studied; (2) Students will identify the specific characteristics of the civilization studied; (3) Students…

  3. THE MAN MADE WORLD, LABORATORY MANUAL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Engineering Education, Washington, DC.

    THIS LABORATORY MANUAL, THE COMPANION VOLUME TO THE STUDENT'S TEXT FOR THE "MAN MADE WORLD" HIGH SCHOOL COURSE, CONTAINS 31 EXPERIMENTS DEALING WITH THE THEORY, CIRCUITRY, AND OPERATION OF COMPUTERS, AND RELATED TECHNOLOGY. THE COURSE WAS WRITTEN BY SCIENTISTS, ENGINEERS, AND EDUCATORS, AND IS INTENDED AS A PART OF THE CULTURAL CURRICULUM FOR ALL…

  4. Space station support of manned Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Alan C.

    1986-01-01

    The assembly of a manned Mars interplanetary spacecraft in low Earth orbit can be best accomplished with the support of the space station. Station payload requirements for microgravity environments of .001 g and pointing stability requirements of less than 1 arc second could mean that the spacecraft may have to be assembled at a station-keeping position about 100 meters or more away from the station. In addition to the assembly of large modules and connective structures, the manned Mars mission assembly tasks may include the connection of power, fluid, and data lines and the handling and activation of components for chemical or nuclear power and propulsion systems. These assembly tasks will require the use of advanced automation and robotics in addition to Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle and Extravehicular Activity (EVA) crew support. Advanced development programs for the space station, including on-orbit demonstrations, could also be used to support manned Mars mission technology objectives. Follow-on studies should be conducted to identify space station activities which could be enhanced or expanded in scope (without significant cost and schedule impact) to help resolve key technical and scientific questions relating to manned Mars missions.

  5. Forests and Man. Environmental Education Curriculum. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topeka Public Schools, KS.

    This environmental education module focuses on forests and man, and contains a series of papers which deal with topics related to forest ecology and conservation. The module is designed around the four following ideas: (1) the kinds of plants and animals and the roles they have in the forest environment; (2) using concepts of food webs and energy…

  6. University for Man Annual Report for 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Univ., Manhattan. University for Man.

    The 1981 report describes current activities, publications and films, sources of financial support, and organizational overview of the University for Man (UFM), founded in 1967 in Manhattan, Kansas, on the concept of citizens learning from each other and involving themselves to affect their community. The organization is divided into three program…

  7. Man and His Environment. Octagon Lectures 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleyard, R. T., Ed.

    Utilizing the theme "Man and His Environment," the Octagon Lectures of 1969 were presented at the University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia. Problems arising from the imbalance between the ancient forces of nature and the new forces of human culture were dealt with by the lecturers. They revealed that the most important…

  8. Asphalt and risk of cancer in man.

    PubMed Central

    Chiazze, L; Watkins, D K; Amsel, J

    1991-01-01

    Epidemiological publications regarding the carcinogenic potential of asphalt (bitumen) are reviewed. In 1984 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) stated that there is "inadequate evidence that bitumens alone are carcinogenic to humans." They did, however, conclude that animal data provided sufficient evidence for the carcinogenicity of certain extracts of steam refined and air refined bitumens. In the absence of data on man, IARC considered it reasonable to regard chemicals with sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in animals as if they presented a carcinogenic risk to man. Epidemiological data for man accumulated since the IARC report do not fulfil the criteria for showing a causal association between exposure to asphalt and development of cancer. The studies cited all suffer from a lack of data on exposure or potential confounders, which are necessary to establish whether or not such an association may or may not exist. In view of the evidence (or lack thereof) regarding asphalt today, an appropriate public health attitude suggests at least that action be taken to protect those working with asphalt by monitoring the workplace, taking whatever steps are possible to minimise exposures and to inform workers of potential hazards. At the same time, a need exists for well designed analytical epidemiological studies to determine whether a risk of cancer in man exists from exposure to asphalt. PMID:1878310

  9. Genetic Engineering: The Modification of Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinsheimer, Robert L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes somatic and genetic manipulations of individual genotypes, using diabetes control as an example of the first mode that is potentially realizable be derepression or viral transduction of genes. Advocates the use of genetic engineering of the second mode to remove man from his biological limitations, but offers maxims to ensure the…

  10. Nomadism as a Man-Environment System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapoport, Amos

    1978-01-01

    Concepts derived from general man-environment system (MES) models are applied to the specific problem of nomadic sedentarization. The analysis focuses on the manner in which residential mobility may function as a central element in nomadic cultures. (Author/MA)

  11. Structuring the Knowledge of Man's Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Willis E.

    Man's knowledge may be conceptualized and ordered into four domains or classes--formal knowledge, descriptive knowledge, prescriptive knowledge, and praxiological knowledge. In today's rapidly changing world of work, the key saleable skills are flexibility and adaptability. A secondary school program based entirely on the formal, descriptive, and…

  12. Teaching Rousseau: Natural Man and Present Existence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Daryl H.

    1989-01-01

    Offers an interpretation of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's "Discourse on the Origin and Foundations of Inequality" and provides examples of classroom exercises designed to make Rousseau's ideas and writings accessible to undergraduates. Stresses Rousseau's philosophy on natural man, language, ethics, and society. Includes interpretive references to…

  13. Man's Response to the Physical Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, R.W., Ed.; Wohlwill, J.F., Ed.

    1966-01-01

    Architects, psychologists, geographers, and biologists discuss the impact of the physical environment on man, and his adaptation to it. Article titles are as follows--(1) Galloping Technology, A New Social Disease, (2) Stimulus and Symbol: The View from the Bridge, (3) The Physical Environment: A Problem for a Psychology of Stimulation, (4)…

  14. The Man-in-the-Middle Defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ross

    The man-in-the-middle defence is all about rehabilitating Charlie. For 20 years we’ve worried about this guy in the middle, Charlie, who’s forever intercalating himself into the communications between Alice and Bob, and people have been very judgemental about poor Charlie, saying that Charlie is a wicked person. Well, we’re not entirely convinced.

  15. Man and Environment, Study Guide, Volume One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami-Dade Junior Coll., FL.

    Subject information, course instructions, and resource materials for a television course, "Man and Environment," are compiled in this student study guide. The interdisciplinary, modular course emphasizes the importance of such concerns as destruction of the environment and the declining quality of life while educating the public about the…

  16. Atmospheric ozone and man-made pollution.

    PubMed

    Fabian, P

    1976-06-01

    Atmospheric photochemistry and transport processes, related to the ozone layer, are discussed. Natural or man-made changes of the biosphere, variations of radiation, or general circulation as well as anthropogenic release of ozone-destroying catalysts are likely to alter the earth's ozone shield. The possible effects of ozone depletion caused by supersonic aircraft, nuclear weapons, nitrogen fertilizers, and chlorofluoromethanes are discussed.

  17. [Albert Schweitzer. The man as a symbol].

    PubMed

    Urdaneta-Carruyo, Eliexer

    2007-01-01

    Albert Schweitzer, the great missionary physician from the XXth century, had a versatile personality that integrated multiple talents, leading to the slightly frequent conjunction of the thinker with the man of action, and the humanist with the scientist and the artist. He studied all these disciplines in a brilliant manner: Philosophy, Theology, Music and Medicine; he was also a great scholar of Bach's work, Jesus Christ and the civilization history. In his maturity, this great man renounced to the fame and glory gained as intellectual and musician, to dedicate his life as a physician for the forgotten African natives. His deeply religious spirit allowed him to penetrate into the most recondite of the human soul; in his personality, he expressed in its entire dimension the eternally unsatisfied desire of the solitary man, against the immensity of the universe. His philosophy, based on the respect for life, was realized throughout the practice of the medical profession. His noble character and personality was based on the man as symbol, since it was not so much what he did helping people but what people could do to others due to him. His singular example represented a moral force in the world, superior to millions of men armed for a war. In 1953, he received the Nobel Peace Prize for his philanthropic work in Africa during more that fifty years, and for his deep love to the living beings. He was transformed in a perennial legend as the Lambaréné doctor. PMID:17585707

  18. Nipple leiomyoma in man: a case report.

    PubMed

    Marrazzo, A; Taormina, P; Noto, A; Cardinale, G; Casa, L; Lo Gerfo, D

    2004-04-01

    We describe a rare case of a man, 38 year old, with a nipple leiomyoma, and report the presentation as a small nodule of the areola spreading the nipple, the symptoms, the clinical signs, the treatment that includes a complete excision; free margins should be histologically established to prevent recurrence. PMID:15283404

  19. [Albert Schweitzer. The man as a symbol].

    PubMed

    Urdaneta-Carruyo, Eliexer

    2007-01-01

    Albert Schweitzer, the great missionary physician from the XXth century, had a versatile personality that integrated multiple talents, leading to the slightly frequent conjunction of the thinker with the man of action, and the humanist with the scientist and the artist. He studied all these disciplines in a brilliant manner: Philosophy, Theology, Music and Medicine; he was also a great scholar of Bach's work, Jesus Christ and the civilization history. In his maturity, this great man renounced to the fame and glory gained as intellectual and musician, to dedicate his life as a physician for the forgotten African natives. His deeply religious spirit allowed him to penetrate into the most recondite of the human soul; in his personality, he expressed in its entire dimension the eternally unsatisfied desire of the solitary man, against the immensity of the universe. His philosophy, based on the respect for life, was realized throughout the practice of the medical profession. His noble character and personality was based on the man as symbol, since it was not so much what he did helping people but what people could do to others due to him. His singular example represented a moral force in the world, superior to millions of men armed for a war. In 1953, he received the Nobel Peace Prize for his philanthropic work in Africa during more that fifty years, and for his deep love to the living beings. He was transformed in a perennial legend as the Lambaréné doctor.

  20. 46 CFR 151.45-3 - Manning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Manning. 151.45-3 Section 151.45-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID... necessary for the protection of life and property and for safe operation of the vessel. Vessels...

  1. 46 CFR 151.45-3 - Manning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Manning. 151.45-3 Section 151.45-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID... necessary for the protection of life and property and for safe operation of the vessel. Vessels...

  2. Symptomatic phrenic nerve palsy after supraclavicular block in an obese man.

    PubMed

    Erickson, John M; Louis, Dean S; Naughton, Norah N

    2009-05-01

    Regional anesthesia has an expanding role in upper extremity surgery. Brachial plexus blocks offer several advantages including providing effective analgesia, reducing narcotic requirements, and facilitating ambulatory care surgery. Despite the popularity of nerve blocks, the surgeon must not forget the complications associated with regional anesthesia. This article describes a case of symptomatic phrenic nerve palsy after supraclavicular brachial plexus block in an obese man. A 46-year-old obese man underwent a left-sided supraclavicular block in preparation for decompression of Guyon's canal for ulnar mononeuropathy at the wrist. The patient experienced acute-onset dyspnea, chest discomfort, and anxiety, and physical examination demonstrated reduced breath sounds in the left hemithorax. Chest radiographs documented elevation of the left hemidiaphragm consistent with an iatrogenic phrenic nerve palsy. The patient was admitted for 23-hour observation and underwent an uncomplicated ulnar nerve decompression under Bier block anesthesia 1 week later. No long-term sequelae have been identified; however, there was a delay in surgical care, admission to the hospital, and transient pulmonary symptoms. We attribute this complication to significant abdominal obesity causing compromised pulmonary reserve and poor tolerance of transient hemidiaphragmatic paresis. In recent studies, waist circumference and abdominal height were inversely related to pulmonary function. We suspect that the incidence of symptomatic phrenic nerve palsy associated with brachial plexus blocks will increase as the prevalence of obesity increases in this country. PMID:19472948

  3. Manned flight and planetary scientific exploration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Christian; Moreau, Didier

    2014-05-01

    Human explorers had a fundamental role in the success of the APOLLO moon programme, they were at the same time the indispensable pilots, scientific operators and on the last missions lead scientists. Since, man did not either return to the moon or land on Mars but manned operation centres on the earth are now conducting extensive telescience on both celestial bodies. Manned flights to moon, Mars and asteroids are however still on the agenda and even if the main drive of these projects is outside science, it is to the planetary scientists to both prepare the data bases necessary for these flights and to ensure that the scientific advantage of conducting research in real time and in situ is exploited to the maximum. The current manned flight programme in Europe concentrates on the use of the International Space Station, the scientific activities can be roughly divided between the pressurized payloads and the external payloads. Technology developments occur also in parallel and prepare new exploration techniques. The current planning leads to exploitation up to 2020 but the space agencies study further extensions, the date of 2028 having already been considered. The relation of these programmes to future manned planetary exploration will be described both from the science and development point of view. The complementary role of astronauts and ground operation centres will be described on the basis of the current experience of operation centres managing the International Space Station. Finally, the NASA ORION project of exploration in the solar system will be described with emphasis on its current European participations. The science opportunities presented by independent ventures as Inspiration Mars or Mars One will be presented.

  4. [Man's place and anthropology in bioethics].

    PubMed

    Tomar Romero, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    From the analysis of its epistemological status, the article focuses on the philosophical fundament of bioethics, stressing the need for an authentic anthropology as a reference or starting point. Being an applied ethics, the first fundament of bioethics is in ethics. It shows how only personalistic ethics, which takes as reference the nature or essence of man, can offer objective and universal criteria. Philosophical anthropology studies man as a whole, in an integral manner, from the perspective of its nature or fundamental aspects of his being. It analyzes the distinction and relationship between the philosophical anthropology and the positive anthropologies, as well as with the physical, human and social sciences. Finally, it reflects on the current anthropological crisis and its ethical consequences.

  5. MOOSE: Manned On-Orbit Servicing Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinoff, J. (Editor); Leontsinis, N. (Editor); Lane, J. (Editor); Singh, R. (Editor); Angelone, K.; Boswell, C.; Chamberlain, I.; Concha, M.; Corrodo, M.; Custodio, O.

    1993-01-01

    The ability to service satellites has thus far been limited to low earth orbit platforms within reach of the Space Shuttle. Other orbits, such as geosynchronous orbits containing high-value spacecraft have not been attainable by a servicing vehicle. The useful life of a satellite can be extended by replacing spent propellant and damaged orbital replacement units, forestalling the need for eventual replacement. This growing need for satellite on-orbits servicing can be met by the Manned On-Orbit Servicing Equipment (MOOSE). Missions requiring orbit transfer capability, precision manipulation and maneuvering, and man-in-the-loop control can be accomplished using MOOSE. MOOSE is a flexible, reusable, single operator, aerobraking spacecraft designed to refuel, repair, and service orbiting spacecraft. MOOSE will be deployed from Space Station Freedom, (SSF), where it will be stored, resupplied, and refurbished.

  6. Landing Energy Dissipation for Manned Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    Landing Energy Dissipation for Manned Reentry Vehicles. The film shows experimental investigations to determine the landing-energy-dissipation characteristics for several types of landing gear for manned reentry vehicles. The landing vehicles are considered in two categories: those having essentially vertical-descent paths, the parachute-supported vehicles, and those having essentially horizontal paths, the lifting vehicles. The energy-dissipation devices include crushable materials such as foamed plastics and honeycomb for internal application in couch-support systems, yielding metal elements as part of the structure of capsules or as alternates for oleos in landing-gear struts, inflatable bags, braking rockets, and shaped surfaces for water impact. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030945. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  7. One man electrochemical air revitalization system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, J. C.; Aylward, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    An integrated water vapor electrolysis (WVE) hydrogen depolarized CO2 concentrator (HDC) system sized for one man support over a wide range of inlet air conditions was designed, fabricated, and tested. Data obtained during 110 days of testing verified that this system can provide the necessary oxygen, CO2 removal, and partial humidity control to support one man (without exceeding a cabin partial pressure of 3.0 mmHg for CO2 and while maintaining a 20% oxygen level), when operated at a WVE current of 50 amperes and an HDC current of 18 amperes. An evaluation to determine the physical properties of tetramethylammonium bicarbonate (TMAC) and hydroxide was made. This provides the necessary electrolyte information for designing an HDC cell using TMAC.

  8. Neural networks in support of manned space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werbos, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    Many lobbyists in Washington have argued that artificial intelligence (AI) is an alternative to manned space activity. In actuality, this is the opposite of the truth, especially as regards artificial neural networks (ANNs), that form of AI which has the greatest hope of mimicking human abilities in learning, ability to interface with sensors and actuators, flexibility and balanced judgement. ANNs and their relation to expert systems (the more traditional form of AI), and the limitations of both technologies are briefly reviewed. A Few highlights of recent work on ANNs, including an NSF-sponsored workshop on ANNs for control applications are given. Current thinking on ANNs for use in certain key areas (the National Aerospace Plane, teleoperation, the control of large structures, fault diagnostics, and docking) which may be crucial to the long term future of man in space is discussed.

  9. Design and Construction of Manned Lunar Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhijie

    2016-07-01

    Building manned lunar base is one of the core aims of human lunar exploration project, which is also an important way to carry out the exploitation and utilization of lunar in situ resources. The most important part of manned lunar base is the design and construction of living habitation and many factors should be considered including science objective and site selection. Through investigating and research, the scientific goals of manned lunar base should be status and characteristics ascertainment of lunar available in situ resources, then developing necessary scientific experiments and utilization of lunar in situ resources by using special environment conditions of lunar surface. The site selection strategy of manned lunar base should rely on scientific goals according to special lunar surface environment and engineering capacity constraints, meanwhile, consulting the landing sites of foreign unmanned and manned lunar exploration, and choosing different typical regions of lunar surface and analyzing the landform and physiognomy, reachability, thermal environment, sunlight condition, micro meteoroids protection and utilization of in situ resources, after these steps, a logical lunar living habitation site should be confirmed. This paper brings out and compares three kinds of configurations with fabricating processes of manned lunar base, including rigid module, flexible and construction module manned lunar base. 1.The rigid habitation module is usually made by metal materials. The design and fabrication may consult the experience of space station, hence with mature technique. Because this configuration cannot be folded or deployed, which not only afford limit working and living room for astronauts, but also needs repetitious cargo transit between earth and moon for lunar base extending. 2. The flexible module habitation can be folded in fairing while launching. When deploying on moon, the configuration can be inflatable or mechanically-deployed, which means under

  10. Terrapin technologies manned Mars mission proposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amato, Michael; Bryant, Heather; Coleman, Rodney; Compy, Chris; Crouse, Patrick; Crunkleton, Joe; Hurtado, Edgar; Iverson, Eirik; Kamosa, Mike; Kraft, Lauri (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    A Manned Mars Mission (M3) design study is proposed. The purpose of M3 is to transport 10 personnel and a habitat with all required support systems and supplies from low Earth orbit (LEO) to the surface of Mars and, after an eight-man surface expedition of 3 months, to return the personnel safely to LEO. The proposed hardware design is based on systems and components of demonstrated high capability and reliability. The mission design builds on past mission experience, but incorporates innovative design approaches to achieve mission priorities. Those priorities, in decreasing order of importance, are safety, reliability, minimum personnel transfer time, minimum weight, and minimum cost. The design demonstrates the feasibility and flexibility of a Waverider transfer module.

  11. Portuguese man-of-war envenomation.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, M B

    1992-02-01

    Portuguese man-of-war and jellyfish stings are common occurrence in the coastal waters of the southern United States. Signs and symptoms of Portuguese man-of-war envenomation usually appear immediately following a sting but may be delayed for several hours. Reactions are commonly localized and comprise pain, paresthesia, and intense burning with a linear, red, papular eruption or urticaria at the contact site. Systemic signs may include nausea, myalgia, headache, chills, or pallor. Cardiovascular collapse and death have been reported. Venom can be inactivated with dilute acetic acid (vinegar), proteolytic meat tenderizer, or baking soda. Tentacle debris should be removed. Resolution of symptoms usually occurs within 72 hours, without sequelae. PMID:1351283

  12. Man-machine collaboration using facial expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Ying; Katahera, S.; Cai, D.

    2002-09-01

    For realizing the flexible man-machine collaboration, understanding of facial expressions and gestures is not negligible. In our method, we proposed a hierarchical recognition approach, for the understanding of human emotions. According to this method, the facial AFs (action features) were firstly extracted and recognized by using histograms of optical flow. Then, based on the facial AFs, facial expressions were classified into two calsses, one of which presents the positive emotions, and the other of which does the negative ones. Accordingly, the facial expressions belonged to the positive class, or the ones belonged to the negative class, were classified into more complex emotions, which were revealed by the corresponding facial expressions. Finally, the system architecture how to coordinate in recognizing facil action features and facial expressions for man-machine collaboration was proposed.

  13. Manning's roughness coefficient for Illinois streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soong, David T.; Prater, Crystal D.; Halfar, Teresa M.; Wobig, Loren A.

    2012-01-01

    Manning's roughness coefficients for 43 natural and constructed streams in Illinois are reported and displayed on a U.S. Geological Survey Web site. At a majority of the sites, discharge and stage were measured, and corresponding Manning's coefficients—the n-values—were determined at more than one river discharge. The n-values discussed in this report are computed from data representing the stream reach studied and, therefore, are reachwise values. Presentation of the resulting n-values takes a visual-comparison approach similar to the previously published Barnes report (1967), in which photographs of channel conditions, description of the site, and the resulting n-values are organized for each site. The Web site where the data can be accessed and are displayed is at URL http://il.water.usgs.gov/proj/nvalues/.

  14. Catheter ablation of parahisian premature ventricular complex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun; Kim, Jeong Su; Park, Yong Hyun; Kim, June Hong; Chun, Kook Jin

    2011-12-01

    Catheter ablation is performed in selected patients with a symptomatic premature ventricular complex (PVC) or PVC-induced cardiomyopathy. Ablation of PVC from the His region has a high risk of inducing a complete atrioventricular block. Here we report successful catheter ablation of a parahisian PVC in a 63-year-old man.

  15. Last Breath: Art Therapy with a Lung Cancer Patient Facing Imminent Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furman, Lisa R.

    2011-01-01

    Art therapy can be an effective way to focus on end of life issues with cancer patients facing imminent death. This viewpoint discusses ethical challenges in the treatment of a 63-year-old man with terminal lung cancer who was participating in short-term individual art therapy. Difficult issues that often surface in the final days of life may…

  16. Teaching video neuroimages: orthostatic tremor: the helicopter sign.

    PubMed

    DeOrchis, Vincent S; Geyer, Howard L; Herskovitz, Steven

    2013-04-01

    A 63-year-old man presented with 4 years of orthostatic tremor while standing, resolving after sitting or leaning against a wall. There was marked subjective unsteadiness, but no falls. Surface EMG in arms and legs demonstrated a 14- to 16-Hz synchronous tremor in antagonist muscles (video on the Neurology Web site at www.neurology.org.). PMID:23547274

  17. Baylisascaris procyonis-Associated Meningoencephalitis in a Previously Healthy Adult, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Langelier, Charles; Reid, Michael J; Halabi, Cathra; Wietek, Natalie; LaRiviere, Alejandro; Shah, Maulik; Wilson, Michael R; Chin-Hong, Peter; Douglas, Vanja; Kazacos, Kevin R; Babik, Jennifer M

    2016-08-01

    After severe neurocognitive decline developed in an otherwise healthy 63-year-old man, brain magnetic resonance imaging showed eosinophilic meningoencephalitis and enhancing lesions. The patient tested positive for antibodies to Baylisascaris spp. roundworms, was treated with albendazole and dexamethasone, and showed improvement after 3 months. Baylisascariasis should be considered for all patients with eosinophilic meningitis. PMID:27434260

  18. Baylisascaris procyonis–Associated Meningoencephalitis in a Previously Healthy Adult, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Michael J.; Halabi, Cathra; Wietek, Natalie; LaRiviere, Alejandro; Shah, Maulik; Wilson, Michael R.; Chin-Hong, Peter; Douglas, Vanja; Kazacos, Kevin R.; Babik, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    After severe neurocognitive decline developed in an otherwise healthy 63-year-old man, brain magnetic resonance imaging showed eosinophilic meningoencephalitis and enhancing lesions. The patient tested positive for antibodies to Baylisascaris spp. roundworms, was treated with albendazole and dexamethasone, and showed improvement after 3 months. Baylisascariasis should be considered for all patients with eosinophilic meningitis. PMID:27434260

  19. Man-machine interface requirements - advanced technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, R. W.; Wiener, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    Research issues and areas are identified where increased understanding of the human operator and the interaction between the operator and the avionics could lead to improvements in the performance of current and proposed helicopters. Both current and advanced helicopter systems and avionics are considered. Areas critical to man-machine interface requirements include: (1) artificial intelligence; (2) visual displays; (3) voice technology; (4) cockpit integration; and (5) pilot work loads and performance.

  20. The Manned Spacecraft Center and medical technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, R. S.; Pool, S. L.

    1974-01-01

    A number of medically oriented research and hardware development programs in support of manned space flights have been sponsored by NASA. Blood pressure measuring systems for use in spacecraft are considered. In some cases, complete new bioinstrumentation systems were necessary to accomplish a specific physiological study. Plans for medical research during the Skylab program are discussed along with general questions regarding space-borne health service systems and details concerning the Health Services Support Control Center.

  1. First multiphoton tomography of brain in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Kantelhardt, Sven R.; Kalasauskas, Darius; Kim, Ella; Giese, Alf

    2016-03-01

    We report on the first two-photon in vivo brain tissue imaging study in man. High resolution in vivo histology by multiphoton tomography (MPT) including two-photon FLIM was performed in the operation theatre during neurosurgery to evaluate the feasibility to detect label-free tumor borders with subcellular resolution. This feasibility study demonstrates, that MPT has the potential to identify tumor borders on a cellular level in nearly real-time.

  2. Bobby Fong: Man on a Mission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Bobby Fong, was president of Ursinus College until his death in September 2014 and is the only person to have served twice as chair of the AAC&U Board of Directors. In this article, his son Collin presents remarks made at the memorial service for his father. Collin describes his father as a man with a mission, and that mission was to make the…

  3. Ant-Man and the quantum realm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalakis, Spiros

    2015-11-01

    I was in Los Angeles airport, stuffing French fries into my mouth and waiting for a flight to Charlotte, North Carolina, when my phone buzzed. The e-mail was from the Science and Entertainment Exchange, a non-profit organization working to elevate the level of science in the movies, and it told me to report to Atlanta to consult on a new superhero movie: Ant-Man.

  4. Aerobraking systems for manned Mars missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Charles H.

    1992-08-01

    This paper presents a synopsis of aerobraking uses, benefits, performance requirements, design issues, and technology requirements for manned Mars missions. Aerobraking can provide significant advantages in several key mission functions: Mars orbit capture, Mars entry from orbit, and earth orbit capture or direct entry. The resulting range of aerobraking performance requirements are described. Study results show that none of the aerobrake unique concerns are show stoppers but are issues having reasonable design solutions and operational impacts.

  5. Advanced manned earth-to-orbit vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Charles H.

    1986-10-01

    Advanced manned launch vehicle concepts which are designed to meet the space transportation architecture and mission needs for the early 21st century are described. Concepts are described which are based both on modest (evolutionary) and revolutionary advancements in performance technologies but with emphasis on defining operations cost. Design options feature fully reusable, vertical-takeoff, horizontal-landing, rocket-powered concepts and include a variety of possible staging arrangements depending on the desired mission emphasis and the available technologies.

  6. L1 libration point manned space habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luttges, Marvin; Johnson, Steve; Banks, Gary; Johnson, Richard; Meyer, Christian; Pepin, Scott; Macelroy, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Second generation stations or Manned Space Habitats (MSHs) are discussed for an Earth-Moon libration point and in lunar orbit. The conceptual design of such a station is outlined. Systems and subsystems described reflect anticipation of moderate technology growth. The evolution of the L1 environments is discussed, several selected subsystems are outlined, and how the L1 MSH will complete some of its activities is described.

  7. The Man-in-the-Middle Defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ross; Bond, Mike

    Eliminating middlemen from security protocols helps less than one would think. EMV electronic payments, for example, can be made fairer by adding an electronic attorney - a middleman which mediates access to a customer’s card. We compare middlemen in crypto protocols and APIs with those in the real world, and show that a man-in-the-middle defence is helpful in many circumstances. We suggest that the middleman has been unfairly demonised.

  8. Manned Mars missions: A working group report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, Michael B. (Editor); Keaton, Paul W. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The discussions of the Working Group (based in large part on working papers, which will shortly be published separately) are summarized. These papers cover a broad range of subjects which need to be addressed in the formulation of such a formidable enterprise as a manned Mars program. Science objective and operations; Mars surface infrastructure and activities; mission and system concepts and configurations; life sciences; impacts on the space infrastructure; and costs, schedules, and organizations are addressed.

  9. Possible Scenarios for Mars Manned Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Daniel J.; Schumacher, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last five decades there have been numerous studies devoted to developing, launching and conducting a manned mission to Mars by both Russian and U.S. organizations. These studies have proposed various crew sizes, mission length, propulsion systems, habitation modules, and scientific goals. As a first step towards establishing an international partnership approach to a Mars mission, the most recent Russian concepts are explored and then compared to NASA's current Mars reference mission.

  10. A Study for Mars Manned Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Daniel J.; Scimemi, Sam

    2012-01-01

    Over the last five decades there have been numerous studies devoted to developing, launching and conducting a manned mission to Mars by both Russian and U.S. organizations. These studies have proposed various crew sizes, mission length, propulsion systems, habitation modules, and scientific goals. As a first step towards establishing an international partnership approach to a Mars mission, the most recent Russian concepts are explored and then compared to NASA's latest Mars reference mission.

  11. Sleep monitoring - The second manned Skylab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, J. D., Jr.; Shumate, W. H.; Booher, C. R.; Salamy, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    Sleep patterns were monitored in one subject aboard each of the manned Skylab missions. In all three subjects stage 3 sleep increased during the flight and consistently decreased postflight. Stage REM was elevated, and REM latency decreased in the late postflight period. The number of awakenings remained the same or decreased during flight. No changes were observed which could be expected to adversely affect performance capability.

  12. Manned testing in a simulated space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fender, Donna L.

    1992-01-01

    A view of the facility and operational requirements involved in performing a manned thermal vacuum test is presented. The requirements fall into two major categories. The first category deals with placing the suited crewmen in a hazardous environment and assuring their safety. The second category deals with the constraints and special requirements involved with a suited crewman operating flight hardware in a 1-G environment. Design areas that deal with man rating a chamber, including fire suppression, emergency repress, emergency power, backups, reliable instrumentation and data systems, communications, television monitoring, biomedical monitoring, material compatibilities, and equipment supporting the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) are discussed. The operational issues that are peculiar to manned testing such as test rules, test procedures, test protocol, emergency drills, availability of hyperbaric facilities, test team training and certification engineering concerns for a safe mechanical and instrumentation buildup, hazard analysis, and Failure Modes and Effects Analysis are discussed. The constraints and special requirements involved with a suited crewman operating flight hardware in a 1-G environment are addressed.

  13. Manned Mars missions using propellant from space

    SciTech Connect

    Zuppero, A.C.; Olson, T.S. ); Redd, L.R. )

    1993-01-10

    .A recent discovery (8/14/92) of a near-earth object containing materials potentially useful for space activities could perhaps change the entire way humans access and operate in space. A near-Earth object ([number sign]4015, 1979 VA, comet Wilson-Harrington) contains water ice that could be used for space propulsion. In addition, this type of object may contain structural and lifesustaining materials (complex hydrocarbons, ammonia and/or bound nitrogen compounds) for space structures, manned planetary bases, or planetary surface terraforming. The retrieval and utilization of rocket propellant from near-Earth objects, for manned Mars missions in particular, has been investigated and the benefits of this scenario to over performing a Mars mission with terrestrial propellants have been documented. The results show water extracted from these objects and retrieved to Earth orbit for use in going to Mars may actually enable manned Mars exploration by reducing the number of Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) flights or eliminating the need for HLLV's altogether. The mission can perhaps be supported with existing launch vehicles and not required heavy lift capability. Also, the development of a nuclear thermal rocket for this alternate approach may be simplified substantially by reducing the operating temperature required.

  14. The Ideal Man and Woman According to University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Lawrence; Laverghetta, Antonio V.; Peterson, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    The present study determined if the ideal man has changed over the years and who and what the ideal woman is. We asked students at Cameron University to rate the importance of character traits that define the ideal man and woman. Subjects also provided examples of famous people exemplifying the ideal, good, average, and inferior man and woman. We…

  15. 32 CFR 707.2 - Man overboard lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.2 Man overboard lights. Naval vessels may display, as a means of indicating man overboard, two pulsating, all round red lights in the vertical line... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Man overboard lights. 707.2 Section...

  16. 32 CFR 707.2 - Man overboard lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.2 Man overboard lights. Naval vessels may display, as a means of indicating man overboard, two pulsating, all round red lights in the vertical line... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Man overboard lights. 707.2 Section...

  17. 33 CFR 146.120 - Manning of survival craft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Manning of survival craft. 146.120 Section 146.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS Manned OCS Facilities § 146.120 Manning of survival craft. The owner, the owner's agent, or...

  18. 32 CFR 707.2 - Man overboard lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Man overboard lights. 707.2 Section 707.2 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVIGATION SPECIAL RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.2 Man overboard lights. Naval vessels may display, as a means of indicating man overboard,...

  19. 33 CFR 146.120 - Manning of survival craft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manning of survival craft. 146.120 Section 146.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS Manned OCS Facilities § 146.120 Manning of survival craft. The owner, the owner's agent, or...

  20. 33 CFR 146.120 - Manning of survival craft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Manning of survival craft. 146.120 Section 146.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS Manned OCS Facilities § 146.120 Manning of survival craft. The owner, the owner's agent, or...

  1. 32 CFR 707.2 - Man overboard lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Man overboard lights. 707.2 Section 707.2 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVIGATION SPECIAL RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.2 Man overboard lights. Naval vessels may display, as a means of indicating man overboard,...

  2. 33 CFR 146.120 - Manning of survival craft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Manning of survival craft. 146.120 Section 146.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS Manned OCS Facilities § 146.120 Manning of survival craft. The owner, the owner's agent, or...

  3. 32 CFR 707.2 - Man overboard lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Man overboard lights. 707.2 Section 707.2 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVIGATION SPECIAL RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.2 Man overboard lights. Naval vessels may display, as a means of indicating man overboard,...

  4. 33 CFR 146.120 - Manning of survival craft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Manning of survival craft. 146.120 Section 146.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS Manned OCS Facilities § 146.120 Manning of survival craft. The owner, the owner's agent, or...

  5. Taurus lightweight manned spacecraft Earth orbiting vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, Kevin A.; Vandersall, Eric J.; Plotkin, Jennifer; Travisano, Jeffrey J.; Loveless, Dennis; Kaczmarek, Michael; White, Anthony G.; Est, Andy; Bulla, Gregory; Henry, Chris

    1991-01-01

    The Taurus Lightweight Manned Spacecraft (LMS) was developed by students of the University of Maryland's Aerospace Engineering course in Space Vehicle Design. That course required students to design an Alternative Manned Spacecraft (AMS) to augment or replace the Space Transportation System and meet the following design requirements: (1) launch on the Taurus Booster being developed by Orbital Sciences Corporation; (2) 99.9 percent assured crew survival rate; (3) technology cutoff data of 1 Jan. 1991; (4) compatibility with current space administration infrastructure; and (5) first flight by May 1995. The Taurus LMS design meets the above requirements and represents an initial step towards larger and more complex spacecraft. The Taurus LMS has a very limited application when compared to the Space Shuttle, but it demonstrates that the U.S. can have a safe, reliable, and low cost space system. The Taurus LMS is a short mission duration spacecraft designed to place one man into low earth orbit (LEO). The driving factor for this design was the low payload carrying capabilities of the Taurus Booster--1300 kg to a 300 km orbit. The Taurus LMS design is divided into six major design sections. The human factors system deals with the problems of life support and spacecraft cooling. The propulsion section contains the abort system, the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS), the Reaction Control System (RCS), and power generation. The thermal protection systems and spacecraft structure are contained in the structures section. The avionics section includes navigation, attitude determination, data processing, communication systems, and sensors. The mission analysis section was responsible for ground processing and spacecraft astrodynamics. The systems integration section pulled the above sections together into one spacecraft and addressed costing and reliability.

  6. Taurus Lightweight Manned Spacecraft Earth orbiting vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosset, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Taurus Lightweight Manned Spacecraft (LMS) was developed by students of the University of Maryland's Aerospace Engineering course in Space Vehicle Design. That course required students to design an Alternative Manned Spacecraft (AMS) to augment or replace the Space Transportation System and meet the following design requirements: (1) launch on the Taurus Booster being developed by Orbital Sciences Corporation; (2) 99.9 percent assured crew survival rate; (3) technology cutoff date of 1 Jan. 1991; (4) compatibility with current space administration infrastructure; and (5) first flight by May 1995. The Taurus LMS design meets the above requirements and represents an initial step toward larger and more complex spacecraft. The Taurus LMS has a very limited application when compared to the space shuttle, but it demonstrates that the U.S. can have a safe, reliable, and low-cost space system. The Taurus LMS is a short mission duration spacecraft designed to place one man into low Earth orbit (LEO). The driving factor for this design was the low payload carrying capabilities of the Taurus Booster - 1300 kg to a 300-km orbit. The Taurus LMS design is divided into six major design sections. The Human Factors section deals with the problems of life support and spacecraft cooling. The Propulsion section contains the Abort System, the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS), the Reaction Control System (RCS), and Power Generation. The thermal protection systems and spacecraft structure are contained in the Structures section. The Avionics section includes Navigation, Attitude Determination, Data Processing, Communication systems, and Sensors. The Mission Analysis section was responsible for ground processing and spacecraft astrodynamics. The Systems Integration Section pulled the above sections together into one spacecraft, and addressed costing and reliability.

  7. Taurus Lightweight Manned Spacecraft Earth orbiting vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosset, M.

    The Taurus Lightweight Manned Spacecraft (LMS) was developed by students of the University of Maryland's Aerospace Engineering course in Space Vehicle Design. That course required students to design an Alternative Manned Spacecraft (AMS) to augment or replace the Space Transportation System and meet the following design requirements: (1) launch on the Taurus Booster being developed by Orbital Sciences Corporation; (2) 99.9 percent assured crew survival rate; (3) technology cutoff date of 1 Jan. 1991; (4) compatibility with current space administration infrastructure; and (5) first flight by May 1995. The Taurus LMS design meets the above requirements and represents an initial step toward larger and more complex spacecraft. The Taurus LMS has a very limited application when compared to the space shuttle, but it demonstrates that the U.S. can have a safe, reliable, and low-cost space system. The Taurus LMS is a short mission duration spacecraft designed to place one man into low Earth orbit (LEO). The driving factor for this design was the low payload carrying capabilities of the Taurus Booster - 1300 kg to a 300-km orbit. The Taurus LMS design is divided into six major design sections. The Human Factors section deals with the problems of life support and spacecraft cooling. The Propulsion section contains the Abort System, the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS), the Reaction Control System (RCS), and Power Generation. The thermal protection systems and spacecraft structure are contained in the Structures section. The Avionics section includes Navigation, Attitude Determination, Data Processing, Communication systems, and Sensors. The Mission Analysis section was responsible for ground processing and spacecraft astrodynamics. The Systems Integration Section pulled the above sections together into one spacecraft, and addressed costing and reliability.

  8. Landing Energy Dissipation for Manned Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Loyd. L.

    1960-01-01

    The film shows experimental investigations to determine the landing-energy-dissipation characteristics for several types of landing gear for manned reentry vehicles. The landing vehicles are considered in two categories: those having essentially vertical-descent paths, the parachute-supported vehicles, and those having essentially horizontal paths, the lifting vehicles. The energy-dissipation devices include crushable materials such as foamed plastics and honeycomb for internal application in couch-support systems, yielding metal elements as part of the structure of capsules or as alternates for oleos in landing-gear struts, inflatable bags, braking rockets, and shaped surfaces for water impact.

  9. Design and Construction of Manned Lunar Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhijie

    2016-07-01

    Building manned lunar base is one of the core aims of human lunar exploration project, which is also an important way to carry out the exploitation and utilization of lunar in situ resources. The most important part of manned lunar base is the design and construction of living habitation and many factors should be considered including science objective and site selection. Through investigating and research, the scientific goals of manned lunar base should be status and characteristics ascertainment of lunar available in situ resources, then developing necessary scientific experiments and utilization of lunar in situ resources by using special environment conditions of lunar surface. The site selection strategy of manned lunar base should rely on scientific goals according to special lunar surface environment and engineering capacity constraints, meanwhile, consulting the landing sites of foreign unmanned and manned lunar exploration, and choosing different typical regions of lunar surface and analyzing the landform and physiognomy, reachability, thermal environment, sunlight condition, micro meteoroids protection and utilization of in situ resources, after these steps, a logical lunar living habitation site should be confirmed. This paper brings out and compares three kinds of configurations with fabricating processes of manned lunar base, including rigid module, flexible and construction module manned lunar base. 1.The rigid habitation module is usually made by metal materials. The design and fabrication may consult the experience of space station, hence with mature technique. Because this configuration cannot be folded or deployed, which not only afford limit working and living room for astronauts, but also needs repetitious cargo transit between earth and moon for lunar base extending. 2. The flexible module habitation can be folded in fairing while launching. When deploying on moon, the configuration can be inflatable or mechanically-deployed, which means under

  10. Cystic fibrosis diagnosed in an elderly man.

    PubMed

    Gilljam, Marita; Björck, Eva

    2004-01-01

    Although most patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are diagnosed in early childhood, the diagnosis may be delayed for patients with mild symptoms or single-organ disease. We describe a man with known infertility and a history of productive cough diagnosed with CF at 61 years of age. The patient carries two mutations and one variant in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene: 394delTT, P99L and R75Q. During a 15-year follow-up time he has developed significant pulmonary disease.

  11. Manned space platforms, payloads and tending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, F. C.

    1982-01-01

    A concept has been developed for providing for a permanent manned presence in space for science, applications, and technology plus growth potential to support major future operational missions. An initial crew of two to four is accommodated along with installations for interior, exterior and tended payloads. Tended payloads support includes servicing of remote free-flying spacecraft, basing of reusable orbital transfer vehicles and basing of teleoperator-mounted payloads for near-station excursions. Candidate payloads, plus configuration, flight operation, subsystem and ground logistics aspects are described, as are Shuttle interactions.

  12. Assessment of man's thermal comfort in practice

    PubMed Central

    Fanger, P. O.

    1973-01-01

    Fanger, P. O. (1973).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,30, 313-324. Assessment of man's thermal comfort in practice. A review is given of existing knowledge regarding the conditions for thermal comfort. Both physiological and environmental comfort conditions are discussed. Comfort criteria are shown diagrammatically, and their application is illustrated by numerous practical examples. Furthermore, the effect on the comfort conditions of age, adaptation, sex, seasonal and circadian rhythm, and unilateral heating or cooling of the body is discussed. The term `climate monotony' is considered. A method is recommended for the evaluation of the quality of thermal environments in practice. Images PMID:4584998

  13. Pantex Falling Man - Independent Review Panel Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolini, Louis; Brannon, Nathan; Olson, Jared; Price, Bernard; Wardle, Robert; Steinzig, Mike; Winfield, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Consolidated Nuclear Security (CNS) Pantex took the initiative to organize a Review Panel of subject matter experts to independently assess the adequacy of the Pantex Tripping Man Analysis methodology. The purpose of this report is to capture the details of the assessment including the scope, approach, results, and detailed Appendices. Along with the assessment of the analysis methodology, the panel evaluated the adequacy with which the methodology was applied as well as congruence with Department of Energy (DOE) standards 3009 and 3016. The approach included the review of relevant documentation, interactive discussion with Pantex staff, and the iterative process of evaluating critical lines of inquiry.

  14. Can man be protected against rabies?

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, K. F.

    1954-01-01

    The literature dealing with the protection of man against rabies over the past 70 years in many parts of the world is reviewed, and the salient problems of our present state of knowledge analysed. The author discusses the measures currently in use for eliminating canine rabies by quarantine, regulation of the dog population, and—in particular—mass vaccination of dogs, with a detailed survey of the questions of immunological research which this method raises. Measures for suppressing the disease in other vectors are also described. It is concluded that, given effective education of the public and the widespread use of canine mass vaccination, human rabies is a preventable disease. PMID:13182607

  15. Man-machine interfaces in health care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, Steve; Williams, Roy E.

    1991-01-01

    The surgeon, like the pilot, is confronted with an ever increasing volume of voice, data, and image input. Simultaneously, the surgeon must control a rapidly growing number of devices to deliver care to the patient. The broad disciplines of man-machine interface design, systems integration, and teleoperation will play a role in the operating room of the future. The purpose of this communication is to report the incorporation of these design concepts into new surgical and laser delivery systems. A review of each general problem area and the systems under development to solve the problems are presented.

  16. Manned Mars mission radiation environment and radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtwey, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    Potential radiation hazards to crew members on manned Mars missions are discussed. It deals briefly with radiation sources and environments likely to be encountered during various phases of such missions, providing quantitative estimates of these environments. Also provided are quantitative data and discussions on the implications of such radiation on the human body. Various sorts of protective measures are suggested. Recent re-evaluation of allowable dose limits by the National Council of Radiation Protection is discussed, and potential implications from such activity are assessed.

  17. Manned Mars mission health maintenance facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degioanni, Joseph C.

    1986-01-01

    The Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) requirements which enable/enhance manned Mars missions (MMMs) are addressed. It does not attempt to resolve any issues that may affect the feasibility of any given element in the HMF. Reference is made to current work being conducted in the design of the space station HMF. The HMF requirements are discussed within the context of two distinctly different scenarios: HMF as part of the Mars surface infrastructure, and HMF as part of the nine months translation from low Earth orbit to Mars orbit. Requirements for an HMF are provided, and a concept of HMF is shown.

  18. Geohazards: Natural and man-made

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, G.J.H.; Laming, D.J.C.; Scott, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    This book of conference presentations from a meeting of the Geological Society of London in 1989 includes 20 papers grouped in 5 sections. Sections include the following: volcanos; earthquakes; landslides; quiet hazards such as sea-level changes and loss of soils or biodiversity; discussion of the question of what can be done to reduce such disasters. Interaction of man's activities to initiate disasters, to increase the scope of disasters and/or to mitigate them is included in a number of papers. In the fourth section a final paper provides a summary of the food-soil, energy-climate, waste-garbage, and water-contamination interactions.

  19. Centromere organization in man and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppesen, P.; Mitchell, A.; Kipling, D.; Nicol, L.

    1993-12-31

    The kinetochore, located at the primary constriction or centromere in mammalian metaphase chromosomes, is the site of attachment of spindle microtubules to the mitotic chromosome, and is thus essential for correct chromosome movement and segregation at anaphase. Errors in organization of the kinetochore and/or centromere may therefore lead to non-disjunction and aneuploidy. The centromeres of most, if not all, mammalian chromosomes contain repetitive DNA sequences, which are observed at the cytogenetic level as heterochromatin. We have combined immunofluorescence with primed in situ hybridization (PRINS) techniques to study the organization of repetitive DNA families in relation to chromosomal proteins located at centromeres in both man and mouse species.

  20. [Anaesthetic management of Stiff Man syndrome].

    PubMed

    Marín, T; Hernando, D; Kinast, N; Churruca, I; Sabate, S

    2015-04-01

    Stiff Man syndrome or stiff-person syndrome is a rare autoimmune disorder. It is characterized by increased axial muscular tone and limb musculature, and painful spasms triggered by stimulus. The case is presented of a 44-year-old man with stiff-person syndrome undergoing an injection of botulinum toxin in the urethral sphincter under sedation. Before induction, all the surgical team were ready in order to minimise the anaesthetic time. The patient was monitored by continuous ECG, SpO2 and non-invasive blood pressure. He was induced with fractional dose of propofol 150 mg, fentanyl 50 μg and midazolam 1mg. Despite careful titration, the patient had an O2 saturation level of 90%,which was resolved by manual ventilation. There was no muscle rigidity or spasm during the operation. Post-operative recovery was uneventful and the patient was discharged 2 days later. A review of other cases is presented. The anaesthetic concern in patients with stiff-person syndrome is the interaction between the anaesthetic agents, the preoperative medication, and the GABA system. For a safe anaesthetic management, total intravenous anaesthesia is recommended instead of inhalation anaesthetics, as well as the close monitoring of the respiratory function and the application of the electrical nerve stimulator when neuromuscular blockers are used. PMID:25060949

  1. Postural Control in Man: The Phylogenetic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gramsbergen, Albert

    2005-01-01

    Erect posture in man is a recent affordance from an evolutionary perspective. About eight million years ago, the stock from which modern humans derived split off from the ape family, and from around sixty-thousand years ago, modern man developed. Upright gait and manipulations while standing pose intricate cybernetic problems for postural control. The trunk, having an older evolutionary history than the extremities, is innervated by medially descending motor systems and extremity muscles by the more recent, laterally descending systems. Movements obviously require concerted actions from both systems. Research in rats has demonstrated the interdependencies between postural control and the development of fluent walking. Only 15 days after birth, adult-like fluent locomotion emerges and is critically dependent upon postural development. Vesttibular deprivation induces a retardation in postural development and, consequently, a retarded development of adult-like locomotion. The cerebellum obviously has an important role in mutual adjustments in postural control and extremity movements, or, in coupling the phyiogenetic older and newer structures. In the human, the cerebellum develops partly after birth and therefore is vulnerable to adverse perinatal influences. Such vulnerability seems to justify focusing our scientific research efforts onto the development of this structure. PMID:16097476

  2. Proposal for a remotely manned space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minsky, Marvin

    1990-01-01

    The United States is in trouble in space. The costs of the proposed Space Station Freedom have grown beyond reach, and the present design is obsolete. The trouble has come from imagining that there are only two alternatives: manned vs. unmanned. Both choices have led us into designs that do not appear to be practical. On one side, the United States simply does not possess the robotic technology needed to operate or assemble a sophisticated unmanned space station. On the other side, the manned designs that are now under way seem far too costly and dangerous, with all of its thousands of extravehicular activity (EVA) hours. More would be accomplished at far less cost by proceeding in a different way. The design of a space station made of modular, Erector Set-like parts is proposed which is to be assembled using earth-based remotely-controlled binary-tree telerobots. Earth-based workers could be trained to build the station in space using simulators. A small preassembled spacecraft would be launched with a few telerobots, and then, telerobots could be ferried into orbit along with stocks of additional parts. Trained terrestrial workers would remotely assemble a larger station, and materials for additional power and life support systems could be launched. Finally, human scientists and explorers could be sent to the space station. Other aspects of such a space station program are discussed.

  3. Toxicological safeguards in the manned Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Martin E.

    1986-01-01

    Safeguards against toxic chemical exposures during manned Mars missions (MMMs) will be important for the maintenance of crew health and the accomplishment of mission objectives. Potential sources include offgassing, thermodegradation or combustion of materials, metabolic products of crew members, and escape of chemical from containment. Spacecraft maximum allowable concentration (SMAC) limits will have to be established for potential contaminants during the MMMs. The following factors will be used in establishing these limits: duration of mission, simultaneous exposure to other contaminants, deconditioning of crew members after long periods of reduced gravity, and simultaneous exposure to ionizing radiation. Atmospheric contaminant levels in all compartments of the transit spacecraft and Manned Mars Station (MMS) will be monitored at frequent intervals with a real time analyzer. This analyzer will be highly automated, requiring minimal crew time and expertise. The atmospheric analyzer will find other usages during the MMMs such as analyzing Martian atmospheres and soils, exhaled breath and body fluids of crew members, and reaction products in chemical processing facilities.

  4. Postural control in man: the phylogenetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Gramsbergen, Albert

    2005-01-01

    Erect posture in man is a recent affordance from an evolutionary perspective. About eight million years ago, the stock from which modern humans derived split off from the ape family, and from around sixty-thousand years ago, modern man developed. Upright gait and manipulations while standing pose intricate cybernetic problems for postural control. The trunk, having an older evolutionary history than the extremities, is innervated by medially descending motor systems and extremity muscles by the more recent, laterally descending systems. Movements obviously require concerted actions from both systems. Research in rats has demonstrated the interdependencies between postural control and the development of fluent walking. Only 15 days after birth, adult-like fluent locomotion emerges and is critically dependent upon postural development. Vesttibular deprivation induces a retardation in postural development and, consequently, a retarded development of adult-like locomotion. The cerebellum obviously has an important role in mutual adjustments in postural control and extremity movements, or, in coupling the phylogenetic older and newer structures. In the human, the cerebellum develops partly after birth and therefore is vulnerable to adverse perinatal influences. Such vulnerability seems to justify focusing our scientific research efforts onto the development of this structure. PMID:16097476

  5. [Anaesthetic management of Stiff Man syndrome].

    PubMed

    Marín, T; Hernando, D; Kinast, N; Churruca, I; Sabate, S

    2015-04-01

    Stiff Man syndrome or stiff-person syndrome is a rare autoimmune disorder. It is characterized by increased axial muscular tone and limb musculature, and painful spasms triggered by stimulus. The case is presented of a 44-year-old man with stiff-person syndrome undergoing an injection of botulinum toxin in the urethral sphincter under sedation. Before induction, all the surgical team were ready in order to minimise the anaesthetic time. The patient was monitored by continuous ECG, SpO2 and non-invasive blood pressure. He was induced with fractional dose of propofol 150 mg, fentanyl 50 μg and midazolam 1mg. Despite careful titration, the patient had an O2 saturation level of 90%,which was resolved by manual ventilation. There was no muscle rigidity or spasm during the operation. Post-operative recovery was uneventful and the patient was discharged 2 days later. A review of other cases is presented. The anaesthetic concern in patients with stiff-person syndrome is the interaction between the anaesthetic agents, the preoperative medication, and the GABA system. For a safe anaesthetic management, total intravenous anaesthesia is recommended instead of inhalation anaesthetics, as well as the close monitoring of the respiratory function and the application of the electrical nerve stimulator when neuromuscular blockers are used.

  6. Integrated shielding systems for manned interplanetary spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Jeffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    The radiation environment encountered by manned interplanetary missions can have a severe impact on both vehicle design and mission performance. This study investigates the potential impact of radiation protection on interplanetary vehicle design for a manned Mars mission. A systems approach was used to investigate the radiation protection requirements of the sum interplanetary environment. Radiation budgets were developed which result in minimum integrated shielding system masses for both nuclear and non-nuclear powered missions. A variety of system configurations and geometries were assessed over a range of dose constraints. For an annual dose equivalent rate limit of 50 rem/yr, an environmental shielding system composed of a habitat shield and storm shelter was found to result in the lowest total mass. For a limit of 65 rem/yr, a system composed of a sleeping quarters shield was least massive, and resulted in significantly reduced system mass. At a limit of 75 rem/yr, a storm shelter alone was found to be sufficient, and exhibited a further mass reduction. Optimal shielding system results for 10 MWe nuclear powered missions were found to follow along similar lines, with the addition of a reactor shadow shield. A solar minimum galactic cosmic ray spectrum and one anomalously large solar particle event during the course of a two year mission were assumed. Water was assumed for environmental radiation shielding.

  7. GridMan: A grid manipulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, Peter R.; Wang, Zhu

    1992-01-01

    GridMan is an interactive grid manipulation system. It operates on grids to produce new grids which conform to user demands. The input grids are not constrained to come from any particular source. They may be generated by algebraic methods, elliptic methods, hyperbolic methods, parabolic methods, or some combination of methods. The methods are included in the various available structured grid generation codes. These codes perform the basic assembly function for the various elements of the initial grid. For block structured grids, the assembly can be quite complex due to a large number of clock corners, edges, and faces for which various connections and orientations must be properly identified. The grid generation codes are distinguished among themselves by their balance between interactive and automatic actions and by their modest variations in control. The basic form of GridMan provides a much more substantial level of grid control and will take its input from any of the structured grid generation codes. The communication link to the outside codes is a data file which contains the grid or section of grid.

  8. "A Man's Gotta Do What a Man's Gotta Do!" Masculinity and Manhood in Social Studies Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, William L.

    2004-01-01

    Men in the United States are products of society's assumptions about what it means to "be a man." Throughout American history, these assumptions have supported aggression, conflict, and war. Seeing American troops in Iraq conjures comparisons not only to past military ventures but also to the changing face of the masculine warrior. One might see…

  9. The Implementation of Madrasah-Based Management (MBM) at Man 1 and Man 2 Serang City, Banten, Indonesia--A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhajir

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to reveal how the real condition of management of Madrasah Aliyah Negeri (MAN) or Islamic Senior High School in Serang is, how the understanding of Madrasah-Based Management (MBM) for the people of MAN 2 and MAN 1 Serang is, and how the implementation of MBM in MAN 2 and MAN 1 Serang. This study has a substantial meaning, both…

  10. Temporal link between plasma thyrotropin levels and electroencephalographic activity in man.

    PubMed

    Gronfier, C; Luthringer, R; Follenius, M; Schaltenbrand, N; Macher, J P; Muzet, A; Brandenberger, G

    1995-11-17

    Plasma thyrotropin (TSH) levels have been previously shown to be associated with the internal sleep structure determined by conventional scoring of sleep stages. This temporal relationship was re-evaluated using spectral analysis of the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG). Eight healthy male subjects underwent two randomized night studies after having received either placebo or 5 mg ritanserin, a selective 5-HT2 receptor antagonist known to increase slow-wave sleep. Delta relative power and TSH levels, determined at 10 min intervals, were found to be inversely related with an average cross-correlation coefficient highly significant (P < 0.0001) in both experimental conditions. Alpha slow-wave index, an estimator of awakenings, and TSH pulses exhibited a significant temporal association in both conditions. These results demonstrate that TSH fluctuations are linked to the sleep EEG activity in man.

  11. Sleep monitoring: the second manned Skylab mission.

    PubMed

    Frost, J D; Shumate, W H; Salamy, J G; Booher, C R

    1976-04-01

    The first objective measurements of man's ability to obtain adequate sleep during prolonged space flight were made during the three manned Skylab missions. EEG, EOG, and head-motion signals were acquired during sleep by use of an elastic recording cap containing sponge electrodes and an attached miniature preamplifier/accelerometer unit. A control-panel assembly, mounted in the sleep compartment, tested electrodes, preserved analog signals, and automatically analyzed data in real time (providing a telementered indication of sleep stage). One subject was studied during each manned mission and, while there was considerable variation among individuals, several characteristics were common to all three: stage 3 sleep increased during the flight and decreased in the postflight period; stage 4 was consistently decreased postflight, although this stage was variable during the flight; stage REM (rapid eye movement) was elevated, and REM latency decreased in the late postflight period (after day 3 postrecovery); and the number of awakenings during sleep either showed no change or decreased during the flight. In only the 28-d mission (Skylab 2) was there a significant decrease in total sleep time; in that case it was a result of voluntarily reduced rest time and was not due to difficulty in sleeping nor frequent awakening. The subject on the 84-d mission (Skylab 4) experienced more difficulty in the first half of the flight, showing a decreased total sleep time and increased sleep latency, but this resolved itself with time. Sleep latency presented no problem in the other flights. While many of the findings are statistically significant, in no case would they be expected to produce a noticeable decrement of performance capability. These findings suggest that men are able to obtain adequate sleep in regularly scheduled 8-h rest periods during extended space flights. It seems likely, based upon these results, that the problems encountered in earlier space flights did not arise

  12. Design and finite element analysis of oval man way

    SciTech Connect

    Hari, Y.; Gryder, B.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents the design of an oval man way in the side wall of a cylindrical pressure vessel. ASME Code Section 8 is used to obtain the design parameters of the oval man way, man way cover and bolts. The code calculations require some assumptions which may not be valid. A typical design example is taken. STAAD III finite element code with plate elements is used to model the oval man way, man way cover and bolts. The stresses calculated using ASME Code Section 8 and other analytical formulas for plate and shells are compared with the stresses obtained by Finite Element Modeling. This paper gives the designer of oval man way the ability to perform a finite element analysis and compare it with the analytical calculations and assumptions made. This gives added confidence to the designer as to the validity of his calculations and assumptions.

  13. Man/computer communication in a space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, B. C.; Montoya, G.

    1973-01-01

    The present work reports on a study of the technology required to advance the state of the art in man/machine communications. The study involved the development and demonstration of both hardware and software to effectively implement man/computer interactive channels of communication. While tactile and visual man/computer communications equipment are standard methods of interaction with machines, man's speech is a natural media for inquiry and control. As part of this study, a word recognition unit was developed capable of recognizing a minimum of one hundred different words or sentences in any one of the currently used conversational languages. The study has proven that efficiency in communication between man and computer can be achieved when the vocabulary to be used is structured in a manner compatible with the rigid communication requirements of the machine while at the same time responsive to the informational needs of the man.

  14. Trauma on the Isle of Man.

    PubMed Central

    Hackney, R G; Varley, G; Stevens, D; Green, A

    1993-01-01

    The Isle of Man Tourist Trophy motorcycle races remain one of the most popular venues for motorcycle races. This is despite the reduced status of the event. The reason for the loss of world championship and formula one status is the nature of the road racing circuit itself. The twisting narrow roads are only closed to the public at certain times during the practice and race weeks. Motorcycling visitors to the event attempt to emulate their heroes on machines capable of high speeds. Casualties from both visitors and racers are dealt with efficiently by an expanded medical service. This includes the use of an aeromedical evacuation helicopter. Casualties from the visitors exceeded those from the racers themselves during the period reported. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8457818

  15. Calysto: Risk Management for Commercial Manned Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillaman, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The Calysto: Risk Management for Commercial Manned Spaceflight study analyzes risk management in large enterprises and how to effectively communicate risks across organizations. The Calysto Risk Management tool developed by NASA's Kennedy Space Center's SharePoint team is used and referenced throughout the study. Calysto is a web-base tool built on Microsoft's SharePoint platform. The risk management process at NASA is examined and incorporated in the study. Using risk management standards from industry and specific organizations at the Kennedy Space Center, three methods of communicating and elevating risk are examined. Each method describes details of the effectiveness and plausibility of using the method in the Calysto Risk Management Tool. At the end of the study suggestions are made for future renditions of Calysto.

  16. The effects of noise on man

    SciTech Connect

    Kryter, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    As a reference source of research concerning effects of noise on people, this book reports and analyzes procedures used in regulation and control of noise. Quantitative relations are formed between physical measures of environmental noise and the reactions of people and communities to noise. The author reviews scientific and engineering research published from 1970 to the present. The Effects of Noise on Man, Second Edition discusses: adverse effects of noise and noise-induced hearing loss on speech communications; damage to hearing from ''everyday'' noise; damage to hearing from industrial noise and gunfire; work performance in noise; effects of noise on non-auditory systems of the body and sleep; aircraft and street traffic noise and its effects on health, annoyance, and house depreciation; physical measurements used for the assessment and control of environmental noise; federal standards and guidelines for community noise and proposed modification based on recent research findings.

  17. The pilot's role in manned space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation regarding the pilot's role in manned space flight takes into account space missions conducted with the Mercury capsule, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, and the Shuttle. It is concluded that advancements in digital systems and automation technology have made many of the space pilot's tasks easier. However, these advancements have also made the space pilot's training more complicated. He must be familiar with the interrelated failure effects in highly complex vehicle systems. The nominal performance of the Shuttle fly-by-wire entry control system depends, for instance, on nominal electrical power from three fuel cells, nominal performance of three hydraulic auxiliary power units, five computers, other equipment, and microwave landing systems. The pilot must monitor and manage failures in these systems, and, in addition, must be prepared to intervene if an abort situation creates off-nominal conditions.

  18. Design challenges for tomorrow's manned launch systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowell, Lawrence F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper attempts to capture some of the technical and national challenges facing the design of America's next manned launch system (MLS). There are three basic paths for pursuing tomorrow's MLS; each with variations. Some characteristics that will be sought regardless of the concept selected include low development (or front-end) and life-cycle costs, safety, operability, availability, and a host of other 'ilities'. In order to discriminate among the concepts, a robust design environment and a variety of new and improved analysis tools are needed that produce critical metrics in a timely, efficient manner from a large study space. This paper presents some of the challenges in development, integration, and application of optimization, costing, operations modeling, and several engineering disciplinary tools including geometry modeling, structures, aerodynamics/aeroheating, and trajectory/performance.

  19. Scrotal cooling increases rectal temperature in man.

    PubMed

    Vash, Peter D; Engels, Thomas M; Kandeel, Fouad R; Greenway, Frank

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of scrotal cooling on rectal temperature in man. Pilot studies suggested that immersing the scrotum in a 30 degrees C water bath increased rectal temperature, but immersing the scrotum in a 0 degree C water bath did not. Six healthy young men immersed their scrotums in a 35 degrees C water bath for 11 min followed by 21 min at 30 degrees C. Rectal temperature rose by 0.38 +/- 0.04 degrees C (P < 0.01) in response to the 30 degrees C water bath. Repetition of the study by immersing the hands instead of the scrotum in the water bath had no effect on rectal temperature. The scrotum appears to play a role in human temperature regulation.

  20. William Cavendish: the man behind the lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constable, Anthony

    2008-02-01

    It is not at all unusual for a wealthy aristocrat to provide substantial funds for building an academic institution. But it is highly unusual that the aristocrat concerned should have been steeped in the education, science and industry for which the institution would become justly famous. The man who provided all the necessary funds to build and equip the Cavendish Laboratory at Cambridge University in the UK was William Cavendish, who succeeded his father's cousin as 7th Duke of Devonshire in 1858 and became chancellor of the university in 1861. He had crowned his own undergraduate career at Cambridge in 1829 at Trinity College with the awards of second Wrangler and first Smiths Prize, and in the same year, aged just 21, was elected a fellow of the Royal Society.

  1. The Proteus syndrome: the Elephant Man diagnosed.

    PubMed Central

    Tibbles, J A; Cohen, M M

    1986-01-01

    Sir Frederick Treves first showed Joseph Merrick, the famous Elephant Man, to the Pathological Society of London in 1884. A diagnosis of neurofibromatosis was suggested in 1909 and was widely accepted. There is no evidence, however, of café au lait spots or histological proof of neurofibromas. It is also clear that Joseph Merrick's manifestations were much more bizarre than those commonly seen in neurofibromatosis. Evidence indicates that Merrick suffered from the Proteus syndrome and had the following features compatible with this diagnosis: macrocephaly; hyperostosis of the skull; hypertrophy of long bones; and thickened skin and subcutaneous tissues, particularly of the hands and feet, including plantar hyperplasia, lipomas, and other unspecified subcutaneous masses. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 PMID:3092979

  2. Man's role in space exploration and exploitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, Joseph P.

    1987-01-01

    The crew workloads on the Space Shuttle are described. The Space Shuttle is designed to minimize the activity of the crew in maintaining and operating the Shuttle in order for the crew to be involved in productive activities. The changing role of the crew due to the use of more automated systems on spacecraft is examined. The Shuttle flight system is dependent on embedded software, and the crew is to manage and support these systems. The primary functions of the Space Station are as a laboratory and for construction and assembly of systems, requiring EVA. Examples of EVA are presented. The correlation between manned and unmanned systems and the future direction of space research are discussed.

  3. Vestibular ataxia and its measurement in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fregly, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    Methods involved in and results obtained with a new comprehensive ataxia test battery are described, and definitions of spontaneous and induced vestibular ataxia in man are given in terms of these findings. In addition, the topic of alcohol-induced ataxia in relation to labyrinth function is investigated. Items in the test battery comprise a sharpened Romberg test, in which the subject stands on the floor with eyes closed and arms folded against his chest, feet heel-to-toe, for 60 seconds; an eyes-open walking test; an eyes-open standing test; an eyes-closed standing test; an eyes-closed on-leg standing test; an eyes-closed walk a line test; an eyes-closed heel-to-toe walking test; and supplementary ataxia tests such as the classical Romberg test.

  4. Values and the quantum conception of man

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1995-06-01

    Classical mechanics is based upon a mechanical picture of nature that is fundamentally incorrect. It has been replaced at the basic level by a radically different theory: quantum mechanics. This change entails an enormous shift in one`s basic conception of nature, one that can profoundly alter the scientific image of man himself. Self-image is the foundation of values, and the replacement of the mechanistic self-image derived from classical mechanics by one concordant with quantum mechanics may provide the foundation of a moral order better suited to today`s times, a self-image that endows human life with meaning, responsibility, and a deeper linkage to nature as a whole.

  5. Human impact: man's role in environmental change

    SciTech Connect

    Goudie, A.

    1982-01-01

    Drawing upon worldwide examples, the author traces mankind's interaction with nature and examines human interference with environmental systems at various stages of social development. Succeeding chapters take up man's specific impact on vegetation, animals, the soil, the waters, landforms, climate, and the atmosphere. With the aid of maps, diagrams, and graphs, the book analyzes the causes and consequences of environmental changes associated with such large-scale events as agricultural expansion, domestication, deforestation, and urbanization, including the spread of salination, extinction, erosion, and pollution. Interrelations, often dynamic and unpredictable, between these phenomena make it difficult to isolate the causes of changes and to determine the resiliency of natural systems to change. 505 references, 82 figures, 97 tables.

  6. Quetelet, the average man and medical knowledge.

    PubMed

    Caponi, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Using two books by Adolphe Quetelet, I analyze his theory of the 'average man', which associates biological and social normality with the frequency with which certain characteristics appear in a population. The books are Sur l'homme et le développement de ses facultés and Du systeme social et des lois qui le régissent. Both reveal that Quetelet's ideas are permeated by explanatory strategies drawn from physics and astronomy, and also by discursive strategies drawn from theology and religion. The stability of the mean as opposed to the dispersion of individual characteristics and events provided the basis for the use of statistics in social sciences and medicine. PMID:23970171

  7. [Quetelet, the average man and medical knowledge].

    PubMed

    Caponi, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Using two books by Adolphe Quetelet, I analyze his theory of the 'average man', which associates biological and social normality with the frequency with which certain characteristics appear in a population. The books are Sur l'homme et le développement de ses facultés and Du systeme social et des lois qui le régissent. Both reveal that Quetelet's ideas are permeated by explanatory strategies drawn from physics and astronomy, and also by discursive strategies drawn from theology and religion. The stability of the mean as opposed to the dispersion of individual characteristics and events provided the basis for the use of statistics in social sciences and medicine. PMID:24141918

  8. Boscovich: scientist and man of letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proverbio, E.

    Ruggiero Giuseppe Boscovich (1711-1781) is known as one of the most important scientists of the second half of XVIII century, but he was active also as a man of letters, especially through an abundant production of poems in Latin verse. We try to interpret these two, apparently antinomic, aspects of his character in the framework of the culture of his epoch, in which science and literary productions were not considered as two separate or opposite fields, but only two different aspects of human knowledge. In particular we review the field of his poetic production in which this fundamental unity of knowledge is most evident, namely his poems with didactic-scientific subjects, which are examples of high-level popularization of the latest progresses in science (in particular astronomy and Newtonian physics) by means of elegant Latin verse.

  9. Manned remote work station development article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The two prime objectives of the Manned Remote Work Station (MRWS) Development Article Study are to first, evaluate the MRWS flight article roles and associated design concepts for fundamental requirements and embody key technology developments into a simulation program; and to provide detail manufacturing drawings and schedules for a simulator development test article. An approach is outlined which establishes flight article requirements based on past studies of Solar Power Satellite, orbital construction support equipments, construction bases and near term shuttle operations. Simulation objectives are established for those technology issues that can best be addressed on a simulator. Concepts for full-scale and sub-scale simulators are then studied to establish an overall approach to studying MRWS requirements. Emphasis then shifts to design and specification of a full-scale development test article.

  10. Space radiation concerns for manned exploration.

    PubMed

    Stanford, M; Jones, J A

    1999-07-01

    Spaceflight exposes astronaut crews to natural ionizing radiation. To date, exposures in manned spaceflight have been well below the career limits recommended to NASA by the National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). This will not be the case for long-duration exploratory class missions. Additionally. International Space Station (ISS) crews will receive higher doses than earlier flight crews. Uncertainties in our understanding of long-term bioeffects, as well as updated analyses of the Hiroshima. Nagasaki and Chernobyl tumorigenesis data, have prompted the NCRP to recommend further reductions by 30-50% for career dose limit guidelines. Intelligent spacecraft design and material selection can provide a shielding strategy capable of maintaining crew exposures within recommended guidelines. Current studies on newer radioprotectant compounds may find combinations of agents which further diminish the risk of radiation-induced bioeffects to the crew.

  11. Quetelet, the average man and medical knowledge.

    PubMed

    Caponi, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Using two books by Adolphe Quetelet, I analyze his theory of the 'average man', which associates biological and social normality with the frequency with which certain characteristics appear in a population. The books are Sur l'homme et le développement de ses facultés and Du systeme social et des lois qui le régissent. Both reveal that Quetelet's ideas are permeated by explanatory strategies drawn from physics and astronomy, and also by discursive strategies drawn from theology and religion. The stability of the mean as opposed to the dispersion of individual characteristics and events provided the basis for the use of statistics in social sciences and medicine.

  12. Water-propellant resistojets for man-tended platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louviere, Allen J.; Jones, Robert E.; Morren, W. Earl; Sovey, James S.

    1987-01-01

    The selection of a propulsion system for a man-tended platform has been influenced by the planned use of resistojets for drag make-up on the manned space station. For that application a resistojet has been designed that is capable of operation with a wide variety of propellants, including water. The reasons for the selection of water as the propellant and the performance of water as a propellant are discussed. The man-tended platform and its mission requirements are described.

  13. Biomedical support of man in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendergast, D. R.; Olszowka, A. J.; Rokitka, M. A.; Farhi, L. E.

    1988-01-01

    In its broadest sense, biomedical support of man in space must not be limited to assisting spacecraft crew during the mission; such support should also ensure that flight personnel be able to perform properly during landing and after leaving the craft. Man has developed mechanisms that allow him to cope with specific stresses in his normal habitat; there is indisputable evidence that, in some cases, the space environment, by relieving these stresses, has also allowed the adaptive mechanisms to lapse, causing serious problems after re-entry. Inflight biomedical support must therefore include means to simulate some of the normal stresses of the Earth environment. In the area of cardiovascular performance, we have come to rely heavily on complex feedback mechanisms to cope with two stresses, often combined: postural changes, which alter the body axis along which gravitational acceleration acts, and physical exercise, which increases the total load on the system. Unless the appropriate responses are reinforced continuously during flight, crew members may be incapacitated upon return. The first step in the support process must be a study of the way in which changes in g, even of short duration, affect these responses. In particular we should learn more about effects of g on the "on" and "off" dynamics, using a variety of approaches: increased acceleration on one hand at recumbency, immersion, lower body positive pressure, and other means of simulating some of the effects of low g, on the other. Once we understand this, we will have to determine the minimal exposure dose required to maintain the response mechanisms. Finally, we shall have to design stresses that simulate Earth environment and can be imposed in the space vehicle. Some of the information is already at hand; we know that several aspects of the response to exercise are affected by posture. Results from a current series of studies on the kinetics of tilt and on the dynamics of readjustment to exercise in

  14. Comparative Effects of Statin Therapy versus Renin-Angiotensin System Blocking Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Heart Failure Who Underwent Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Won, Jumin; Hong, Young Joon; Jeong, Myung Ho; Park, Hyuk Jin; Kim, Min Chul; Kim, Woo Jin; Kim, Hyun Kuk; Sim, Doo Sun; Kim, Ju Han; Ahn, Youngkeun; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Park, Jong Chun

    2016-05-01

    Statins and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers are key drugs for treating patients with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This study was designed to show the association between treatment with statins or RAS blockers and clinical outcomes and the efficacy of two drug combination therapies in patients with ischemic heart failure (IHF) who underwent revascularization for an AMI. A total of 804 AMI patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction <40% who undertook percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) were analyzed using the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR). They were divided into four groups according to the use of medications [Group I: combination of statin and RAS blocker (n=611), Group II: statin alone (n=112), Group III: RAS blocker alone (n=53), Group IV: neither treatment (n=28)]. The cumulative incidence of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCEs) and independent predictors of MACCEs were investigated. Over a median follow-up study of nearly 1 year, MACCEs had occurred in 48 patients (7.9%) in Group I, 16 patients (14.3%) in Group II, 3 patients (5.7%) in Group III, 7 patients (21.4%) in Group IV (p=0.013). Groups using RAS blocker (Group I and III) showed better clinical outcomes compared with the other groups. By multivariate analysis, use of RAS blockers was the most powerful independent predictor of MACCEs in patients with IHF who underwent PCI (odds ratio 0.469, 95% confidence interval 0.285-0.772; p=0.003), but statin therapy was not found to be an independent predictor. The use of RAS blockers, but not statins, was associated with better clinical outcomes in patients with IHF who underwent PCI.

  15. Comparative Effects of Statin Therapy versus Renin-Angiotensin System Blocking Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Heart Failure Who Underwent Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Won, Jumin; Jeong, Myung Ho; Park, Hyuk Jin; Kim, Min Chul; Kim, Woo Jin; Kim, Hyun Kuk; Sim, Doo Sun; Kim, Ju Han; Ahn, Youngkeun; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Park, Jong Chun

    2016-01-01

    Statins and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers are key drugs for treating patients with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This study was designed to show the association between treatment with statins or RAS blockers and clinical outcomes and the efficacy of two drug combination therapies in patients with ischemic heart failure (IHF) who underwent revascularization for an AMI. A total of 804 AMI patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction <40% who undertook percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) were analyzed using the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR). They were divided into four groups according to the use of medications [Group I: combination of statin and RAS blocker (n=611), Group II: statin alone (n=112), Group III: RAS blocker alone (n=53), Group IV: neither treatment (n=28)]. The cumulative incidence of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCEs) and independent predictors of MACCEs were investigated. Over a median follow-up study of nearly 1 year, MACCEs had occurred in 48 patients (7.9%) in Group I, 16 patients (14.3%) in Group II, 3 patients (5.7%) in Group III, 7 patients (21.4%) in Group IV (p=0.013). Groups using RAS blocker (Group I and III) showed better clinical outcomes compared with the other groups. By multivariate analysis, use of RAS blockers was the most powerful independent predictor of MACCEs in patients with IHF who underwent PCI (odds ratio 0.469, 95% confidence interval 0.285-0.772; p=0.003), but statin therapy was not found to be an independent predictor. The use of RAS blockers, but not statins, was associated with better clinical outcomes in patients with IHF who underwent PCI. PMID:27231678

  16. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 23, 1934. FRONT VIEW. - SOUTHWEST - Summerfield College, Music Building, Main & College Streets, Summerfield, Dallas County, AL

  17. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Feb. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Feb. 3, 1934. FRONT VIEW. - SOUTH ELEVATION - Summerfield College, Music Building, Main & College Streets, Summerfield, Dallas County, AL

  18. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer. Feb. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer. Feb. 27, 1934. AUDITORIUM (TOWARD ALTAR) - Government Street Presbyterian Church, Government & Jackson Streets, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  19. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer. Feb. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer. Feb. 27, 1934. FRONT ELEVATION - SOUTH AND EAST - Government Street Presbyterian Church, Government & Jackson Streets, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  20. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, April 16, 1934. GENERAL FRONT VIEW. - EAST ELEVATION - Oliver-Housman House, Wilkerson & Montgomery Streets, Montgomery, Montgomery County, AL

  1. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 23, 1934. Fireplace and Mantel (Second Floor) - Boys' Methodist College, Centenary & Main Streets, Summerfield, Dallas County, AL

  2. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 5, 1935 VIEW SHOWING INNER CONSTRUCTION OF BRIDGE - Covered Bridge, Spanning Choccolocco Creek , Old Eastaboga, Talladega County, AL

  3. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 5, 1935 VIEW SHOWING UNDER CONSTRUCTION OF BRIDGE - Covered Bridge, Spanning Choccolocco Creek , Old Eastaboga, Talladega County, AL

  4. MAN1B1 deficiency: an unexpected CDG-II.

    PubMed

    Rymen, Daisy; Peanne, Romain; Millón, María B; Race, Valérie; Sturiale, Luisa; Garozzo, Domenico; Mills, Philippa; Clayton, Peter; Asteggiano, Carla G; Quelhas, Dulce; Cansu, Ali; Martins, Esmeralda; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Gonçalves-Rocha, Miguel; Topaloglu, Haluk; Jaeken, Jaak; Foulquier, François; Matthijs, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a group of rare metabolic diseases, due to impaired protein and lipid glycosylation. In the present study, exome sequencing was used to identify MAN1B1 as the culprit gene in an unsolved CDG-II patient. Subsequently, 6 additional cases with MAN1B1-CDG were found. All individuals presented slight facial dysmorphism, psychomotor retardation and truncal obesity. Generally, MAN1B1 is believed to be an ER resident alpha-1,2-mannosidase acting as a key factor in glycoprotein quality control by targeting misfolded proteins for ER-associated degradation (ERAD). However, recent studies indicated a Golgi localization of the endogenous MAN1B1, suggesting a more complex role for MAN1B1 in quality control. We were able to confirm that MAN1B1 is indeed localized to the Golgi complex instead of the ER. Furthermore, we observed an altered Golgi morphology in all patients' cells, with marked dilatation and fragmentation. We hypothesize that part of the phenotype is associated to this Golgi disruption. In conclusion, we linked mutations in MAN1B1 to a Golgi glycosylation disorder. Additionally, our results support the recent findings on MAN1B1 localization. However, more work is needed to pinpoint the exact function of MAN1B1 in glycoprotein quality control, and to understand the pathophysiology of its deficiency. PMID:24348268

  5. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, April 7, 1934. TELESCOPE IN OBSERVATORY. - University of Alabama, Observatory, Stadium Drive & Fifth Street, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  6. A 54-year-old man with 12 intracranial aneurysms and familial subarachnoid hemorrhage: case report.

    PubMed

    Hosainey, Sayied Abdol Mohieb; Meling, Torstein R

    2016-10-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms occur in 1-3 % of the general population, and the risk of rupture is generally considered to be low. However, patients with multiple aneurysms and familial predisposition carry a particular risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 54-year-old hypertensive man underwent screening with a head CT angiography (CTA) because of his comorbidities. CTA revealed multiple bilateral aneurysms around the circle of Willis. At first surgery, seven aneurysms were clipped (BA, ACOM, ICA ×2, and MCA ×3), two of which were detected intraoperatively only. During the second surgery, another three aneurysms were surgically clipped (PCOM and MCA ×2), one of which was detected intraoperatively. Follow-up angiography revealed another two aneurysms. A PCOM aneurysm was treated by coil embolization and a VA aneurysm clipped surgically during a third admission. The patient made an uneventful recovery. However, 4 months after his second surgery, his daughter underwent surgical clipping of a right-sided ICA aneurysm. This case report highlights both the importance of screening of high risk patients with family history of SAH, as well as its limitations, as our patient developed two de novo aneurysms during 6-month follow-up and CTA preoperatively missed three small aneurysms. PMID:27452953

  7. A 54-year-old man with 12 intracranial aneurysms and familial subarachnoid hemorrhage: case report.

    PubMed

    Hosainey, Sayied Abdol Mohieb; Meling, Torstein R

    2016-10-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms occur in 1-3 % of the general population, and the risk of rupture is generally considered to be low. However, patients with multiple aneurysms and familial predisposition carry a particular risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 54-year-old hypertensive man underwent screening with a head CT angiography (CTA) because of his comorbidities. CTA revealed multiple bilateral aneurysms around the circle of Willis. At first surgery, seven aneurysms were clipped (BA, ACOM, ICA ×2, and MCA ×3), two of which were detected intraoperatively only. During the second surgery, another three aneurysms were surgically clipped (PCOM and MCA ×2), one of which was detected intraoperatively. Follow-up angiography revealed another two aneurysms. A PCOM aneurysm was treated by coil embolization and a VA aneurysm clipped surgically during a third admission. The patient made an uneventful recovery. However, 4 months after his second surgery, his daughter underwent surgical clipping of a right-sided ICA aneurysm. This case report highlights both the importance of screening of high risk patients with family history of SAH, as well as its limitations, as our patient developed two de novo aneurysms during 6-month follow-up and CTA preoperatively missed three small aneurysms.

  8. Retrospective, Demographic, and Clinical Investigation of the Causes of Postoperative Infection in Patients With Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Who Underwent Posterior Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Yaldiz, Can; Yaldiz, Mahizer; Ceylan, Nehir; Kacira, Ozlem Kitiki; Ceylan, Davut; Kacira, Tibet; Kizilcay, Gokhan; Tanriverdi, Taner

    2015-07-01

    Owing to the increasing population of elderly patients, a large number of patients with degenerative spondylosis are currently being surgically treated. Although basic measures for decreasing postoperative surgical infections (PSIs) are considered, it still remains among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this retrospective analysis is to present possible causes leading to PSI in patients who underwent surgery for lumbar degenerative spondylosis and highlight how it can be avoided to decrease morbidity and mortality. The study included 540 patients who underwent posterior stabilization due to degenerative lumbar stenosis between January 2013 and January 2014. The data before and after surgery was retrieved from the hospital charts. Patients with degenerative lumbar stenosis who were operated upon in this study had >2 levels of laminectomy and facetectomy. For this reason, posterior stabilization was performed for all the patients included in this study. Determining the causes of postoperative infection (PI) following spinal surgeries performed with instrumentation is a struggle. Seventeen different parameters that may be related to PI were evaluated in this study. The presence of systemic diseases, unknown glove perforations, and perioperative blood transfusions were among the parameters that increased the prevalence of PI. Alternatively, prolene sutures, double-layered gloves, and the use of rifampicin Sv (RIS) decreased the incidence of PI. Although the presence of systemic diseases, unnoticed glove perforations, and perioperative blood transfusions increased PIs, prolene suture material, double-layered gloves, and the use of RIS decreased PIs.

  9. Preferential binding of E. coli with type 1 fimbria to D-mannobiose with the Manα1 → 2Man structure.

    PubMed

    Ajisaka, Katsumi; Yuki, Kaoru; Sato, Kaori; Ishii, Nozomi; Matsuo, Ichiro; Kuji, Ryo; Miyazaki, Tatsuo; Furukawa, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Manα1 → 2Man, Manα1 → 3Man, Manα1 → 4Man, and Manα1 → 6Man were converted to the glycosylamine derivatives. Then, they were mixed with monobenzyl succinic acid to obtain their amide derivatives. After removing the benzyl group by hydrogenation, the succinylamide derivatives were coupled with the hydrazino groups on BlotGlyco™ beads in the presence of water-soluble carbodiimide. d-Mannobiose-linked beads were incubated with fluorescence-labeled Escherichia coli with type 1 fimbria, and the number of the fluorescent dots associated with the beads was counted in order to determine the binding preference among d-mannobiose isomers. The results showed that the bacteria bind strongly to Manα1 → 2Man1 → beads, Manα1 → 3Man1 → beads, Manα1 → 4Man1 → beads, and Manα1 → 6Man1 → beads, in order. In the presence of 0.1 M methyl α-d-mannopyranoside, most of the bacteria failed to bind to these beads. These results indicate that E. coli with type 1 fimbria binds to all types of d-mannobiose isomers but preferentially to Manα1 → 2Man disaccharide. PMID:26613404

  10. Operational Philosophy Concerning Manned Spacecraft Cabin Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeSimpelaere, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The last thirty years have seen the Space Shuttle as the prime United States spacecraft for manned spaceflight missions. Many lessons have been learned about spacecraft design and operation throughout these years. Over the next few decades, a large increase of manned spaceflight in the commercial sector is expected. This will result in the exposure of commercial crews and passengers to many of the same risks crews of the Space Shuttle have encountered. One of the more dire situations that can be encountered is the loss of pressure in the habitable volume of the spacecraft during on orbit operations. This is referred to as a cabin leak. This paper seeks to establish a general cabin leak response philosophy with the intent of educating future spacecraft designers and operators. After establishing a relative definition for a cabin leak, the paper covers general descriptions of detection equipment, detection methods, and general operational methods for management of a cabin leak. Subsequently, all these items are addressed from the perspective of the Space Shuttle Program, as this will be of the most value to future spacecraft due to similar operating profiles. Emphasis here is placed upon why and how these methods and philosophies have evolved to meet the Space Shuttle s needs. This includes the core ideas of: considerations of maintaining higher cabin pressures vs. lower cabin pressures, the pros and cons of a system designed to feed the leak with gas from pressurized tanks vs. using pressure suits to protect against lower cabin pressures, timeline and consumables constraints, re-entry considerations with leaks of unknown origin, and the impact the International Space Station (ISS) has had to the standard Space Shuttle cabin leak response philosophy. This last item in itself includes: procedural management differences, hardware considerations, additional capabilities due to the presence of the ISS and its resource, and ISS docking/undocking considerations with a

  11. NASA Laboratory Analysis for Manned Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krihak, Michael (Editor); Shaw, Tianna

    2014-01-01

    The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability Element under the NASA Human Research Program. ELA instrumentation is identified as an essential capability for future exploration missions to diagnose and treat evidence-based medical conditions. However, mission architecture limits the medical equipment, consumables, and procedures that will be available to treat medical conditions during human exploration missions. Allocated resources such as mass, power, volume, and crew time must be used efficiently to optimize the delivery of in-flight medical care. Although commercial instruments can provide the blood and urine based measurements required for exploration missions, these commercial-off-the-shelf devices are prohibitive for deployment in the space environment. The objective of the ELA project is to close the technology gap of current minimally invasive laboratory capabilities and analytical measurements in a manner that the mission architecture constraints impose on exploration missions. Besides micro gravity and radiation tolerances, other principal issues that generally fail to meet NASA requirements include excessive mass, volume, power and consumables, and nominal reagent shelf-life. Though manned exploration missions will not occur for nearly a decade, NASA has already taken strides towards meeting the development of ELA medical diagnostics by developing mission requirements and concepts of operations that are coupled with strategic investments and partnerships towards meeting these challenges. This paper focuses on the remote environment, its challenges, biomedical diagnostics requirements and candidate technologies that may lead to successful blood/urine chemistry and biomolecular measurements in future space exploration missions. SUMMARY The NASA Exploration Laboratory Analysis project seeks to develop capability to diagnose anticipated space exploration medical conditions on future manned missions. To achieve

  12. Manned in Situ Confirmation of Lunar Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerené, S. P. B.; Hummeling, R. W. J.; Ockels, W. J.

    A study is performed to investigate the feasibility of a manned expedition to the Moon using the European Ariane-5 launcher. The primary objective of this lunar mission is to confirm the presence of water at the South-Pole craters. It is believed that these permanently shadowed craters contain water in the form of ice. Secondary objective is to perform lunar surface science and making a first step towards a lunar outpost. Early results show that a minimum of two Ariane-5 launches is required. In this `two Ariane' scenario the first launch will bring a Lunar Landing Vehicle (LLV) into low lunar orbit. The second will launch two astronauts in a Crew Transfer Vehicle into a rendez- vous trajectory with the LLV. Arrived at the Moon, the astronauts will enter the LLV, undock from the CTV and land at the designated site located near the rim of the South-Pole Shackleton crater. The transfer strategy for both spacecraft will be the so-called direct transfer, taking about four days. At arrival the LLV will start mapping the landing site at a ground resolution of one meter. As a consequence of the polar orbit, the CTV has to arrive fourteen days later and surface operations can take about twelve days, accumulating in a total mission-duration of 36 days. 32 days for the CTV and 22 days for the LLV. In case a `two Ariane' flight does not posses sufficient capabilities also a `three Ariane' scenario is developed, in which the LLV is split-up into two stages and launched separately. These two will dock at the Moon forming a descent stage and an ascent stage. The third launch will be a CTV. During surface operations, astronauts will set up a solar power unit, install the sample retrieval system and carry out surface science. Samples of the crater floor will be retrieved by means of a probe or robot guided along a cable suspended over the crater rim. Also, this paper shows the way in which European astronauts can be brought to the Moon for other future missions, like the

  13. T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia in a 63-year-old female with a pre-existing T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia: metachronous T-cell leukemias with discordant subset restrictions (CD4 versus CD8) and distinct clonal identities.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiang; Papavassiliou, Paulie; Rehder, Catherine; Sebastian, Siby; Wang, Endi

    2014-12-01

    A 55-year-old female with T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia (T-LGL) (CD8+) was initially treated with anti-thymocyte globulin and then cyclosporine due to anemia/neutropenia. While the severity of cytopenia varied with the therapy, the T-LGL persisted. Eight years after the initial diagnosis, she developed lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. A complete blood cell count revealed leukocytosis, anemia and thrombocytopenia with ∼ 80% lymphocytes. In contrast to the LGL cells, the blood lymphocytes at this time were medium-large in size and had oval/irregular nuclei, condensed chromatin, indistinct nucleoli and a moderate amount of basophilic cytoplasm, many with elongated vacuoles, and some with cytoplasmic projections. The abnormal lymphocytes comprised ∼ 30% of the bone marrow cellularity with interstitial infiltrates/aggregates. Immunophenotypic analyses demonstrated a T-cell neoplasm with features suggestive of T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) (CD4+). Cytogenetic analysis revealed a novel clone with complex abnormalities. PCR-based TRG gene rearrangement studies detected a clonal amplicon distinct from that of the preexisting T-LGL. Because of the chronological sequence of the two T-cell neoplasms, this case was initially considered an aggressive transformation of T-LGL. However, this was ultimately excluded by a discordant CD4-subset restriction and the presence of a distinct clonal identity. While these two T-cell neoplasms may have intrinsic connections, the underlying pathogenesis remains to be investigated.

  14. User Requirements in Man-Machine Interactive Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dave, Ashok

    The basic objective of the development of man-machine interactive systems is to design a system that will most effectively take into account the limitations and talents of both man and machine, recognizing that the human factors are, in certain aspects, diametrically opposed to those of the computer. This document briefly investigates those…

  15. Manned remote work station development article, executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The mission requirements for the manned remote work station (MRWS) flight article and the manned remote work station open cherry picker development test article is defined. Considerations are given for the near, mid, and far term use of the MRWS with emphasis on its ultimate application: constructing the Solar Power Satellite.

  16. Spacecraft Power Systems Engineering: Solutions for NASA's Manned Space Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, John H.

    2007-01-01

    An overview of spacecraft power systems is presented, with a focus on applications in the manned space program. The topics include: 1) History; 2) State-of-the-art; 3) Development directions; 4) Focus on applications in the manned space program led from JSC; 5) Power Systems Engineering Trade Space; 6) Power Generation and Energy Storage; 7) Power Distribution and Control; and 8) Actuation

  17. Natural Disasters: Acts of God or Acts of Man?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wijkman, Anders; Timberlake, Lloyd

    This eight-chapter publication considers the man-made and natural causes of natural disasters. Following an introduction, Chapter 1 outlines the increase in natural disasters in the past decade and discusses the ratio of disasters from one continent to another. Chapter 2 discusses man-made factors such as deforestation and overused soil in causing…

  18. Man/machine interface development for the REMOTEX concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garin, J.; Clarke, M. M.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a man/machine interface system that can be used to remotely control a system composed of a transporter base and a force-reflecting, survocontrolled manipulator is reported. The concept features the incorporation of totally remote operation. A simulator is build to optimize man/machine interface requirements.

  19. Man and SuperNature. Lecture 12, September 27, 1946

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montessori, Maria

    2015-01-01

    "Man and SuperNature" is a lyrical chapter in the 1946 London course following the emergence of Cosmic Education in Kodaikanal, India. Montessori contrasts the adaptation required of animals for their survival to conscious human adaptation. Animals exist and adapt to nature, but man can alter nature and change the environment.…

  20. Sexual Harassment and Manly Sports: Are They Related?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murolo, Nancy Maurer; Schmelkin, Liora Pedhazur

    This study investigates the relationship between sexual harassment and participation in "manly" sports (i.e., football, baseball, basketball, soccer, and wrestling) at the high school level. Manly sports are defined as those sports that celebrate values of dominance, aggression, male solidarity, and female exclusion. Participants were 353 11th-…

  1. 46 CFR 131.920 - Level of manning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Level of manning. 131.920 Section 131.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 131.920 Level of manning. Each vessel must carry the personnel required by the Certificate of Inspection, as determined by the cognizant...

  2. 46 CFR 131.920 - Level of manning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Level of manning. 131.920 Section 131.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 131.920 Level of manning. Each vessel must carry the personnel required by the Certificate of Inspection, as determined by the cognizant...

  3. 42 CFR 84.101 - Man test 5; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Man test 5; requirements. 84.101 Section 84.101 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.101 Man test 5;...

  4. 46 CFR 169.819 - Manning of lifeboats and liferafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. 169.819 Section 169.819 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.819 Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. (a) The provisions of this section shall apply to all vessels equipped...

  5. 42 CFR 84.103 - Man tests; performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Man tests; performance requirements. 84.103 Section 84.103 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.103 Man...

  6. 46 CFR 131.920 - Level of manning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Level of manning. 131.920 Section 131.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 131.920 Level of manning. Each vessel must carry the personnel required by the Certificate of Inspection, as determined by the cognizant...

  7. 42 CFR 84.103 - Man tests; performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Man tests; performance requirements. 84.103 Section 84.103 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.103 Man...

  8. 46 CFR 131.920 - Level of manning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Level of manning. 131.920 Section 131.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 131.920 Level of manning. Each vessel must carry the personnel required by the Certificate of Inspection, as determined by the cognizant...

  9. A Man: An Autoethnographic Analysis of Black Male Identity Negotiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waymer, Damion

    2008-01-01

    "A Man" is an original text created by the author that deals with the struggles that Black men experience when confronted by White privilege. By using autoethnographic analysis, the author critiques the language, ironies, tensions, emotions, and opportunities expressed within "A Man," then extends findings to confront the issues that Black men…

  10. 42 CFR 84.101 - Man test 5; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Man test 5; requirements. 84.101 Section 84.101 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.101 Man test 5;...

  11. 46 CFR 131.920 - Level of manning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Level of manning. 131.920 Section 131.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 131.920 Level of manning. Each vessel must carry the personnel required by the Certificate of Inspection, as determined by the cognizant...

  12. 42 CFR 84.101 - Man test 5; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Man test 5; requirements. 84.101 Section 84.101 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.101 Man test 5;...

  13. 46 CFR 169.819 - Manning of lifeboats and liferafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. 169.819 Section 169.819 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.819 Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. (a) The provisions of this section shall apply to all vessels equipped...

  14. 42 CFR 84.103 - Man tests; performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Man tests; performance requirements. 84.103 Section 84.103 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.103 Man...

  15. 42 CFR 84.102 - Man test 6; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Man test 6; requirements. 84.102 Section 84.102 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.102 Man test 6;...

  16. 46 CFR 131.420 - Manning and supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Manning and supervision. 131.420 Section 131.420 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS OPERATIONS Sufficiency and Supervision of Crew of Survival Craft § 131.420 Manning and supervision. (a) There must be enough trained persons aboard each survival...

  17. 46 CFR 131.420 - Manning and supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Manning and supervision. 131.420 Section 131.420 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS OPERATIONS Sufficiency and Supervision of Crew of Survival Craft § 131.420 Manning and supervision. (a) There must be enough trained persons aboard each survival...

  18. 46 CFR 169.819 - Manning of lifeboats and liferafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. 169.819 Section 169.819 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.819 Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. (a) The provisions of this section shall apply to all vessels equipped...

  19. 46 CFR 169.819 - Manning of lifeboats and liferafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. 169.819 Section 169.819 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.819 Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. (a) The provisions of this section shall apply to all vessels equipped...

  20. 42 CFR 84.102 - Man test 6; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Man test 6; requirements. 84.102 Section 84.102 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.102 Man test 6;...

  1. 77 FR 21555 - Manning, Richard W.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Manning, Richard W.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on April 2, 2012, Richard W. Manning submitted for filing, an application for authority to hold interlocking positions, pursuant to section 305(b) of the...

  2. 46 CFR 131.420 - Manning and supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Manning and supervision. 131.420 Section 131.420 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS OPERATIONS Sufficiency and Supervision of Crew of Survival Craft § 131.420 Manning and supervision. (a) There must be enough trained persons aboard each survival...

  3. 42 CFR 84.103 - Man tests; performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Man tests; performance requirements. 84.103 Section 84.103 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.103 Man...

  4. 42 CFR 84.102 - Man test 6; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Man test 6; requirements. 84.102 Section 84.102 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.102 Man test 6;...

  5. 42 CFR 84.101 - Man test 5; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Man test 5; requirements. 84.101 Section 84.101 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.101 Man test 5;...

  6. 46 CFR 131.420 - Manning and supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Manning and supervision. 131.420 Section 131.420 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS OPERATIONS Sufficiency and Supervision of Crew of Survival Craft § 131.420 Manning and supervision. (a) There must be enough trained persons aboard each survival...

  7. 46 CFR 131.420 - Manning and supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Manning and supervision. 131.420 Section 131.420 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS OPERATIONS Sufficiency and Supervision of Crew of Survival Craft § 131.420 Manning and supervision. (a) There must be enough trained persons aboard each survival...

  8. 42 CFR 84.102 - Man test 6; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Man test 6; requirements. 84.102 Section 84.102 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.102 Man test 6;...

  9. 42 CFR 84.101 - Man test 5; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Man test 5; requirements. 84.101 Section 84.101 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.101 Man test 5;...

  10. 46 CFR 169.819 - Manning of lifeboats and liferafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. 169.819 Section 169.819 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.819 Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. (a) The provisions of this section shall apply to all vessels equipped...

  11. 42 CFR 84.102 - Man test 6; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Man test 6; requirements. 84.102 Section 84.102 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.102 Man test 6;...

  12. 42 CFR 84.103 - Man tests; performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Man tests; performance requirements. 84.103 Section 84.103 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.103 Man...

  13. Estimation of dose to man from environmental tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwer, P S; Etnier, E L

    1980-01-01

    Factors important for characterization of tritium in environmental pathways leading to exposure of man are reviewed and quantification of those factors is discussed. Parameters characterizing the behavior of tritium in man are also subjected to review. Factors to be discussed include organic binding, bioaccumulation, quality factor and transmutation. A variety of models are presently in use to estimate dose to man from environmental releases of tritium. Results from four representative models are compared and discussed. Site-specific information is always preferable when parameterizing models to estimate dose to man. There may be significant differences in dose potential among geographic regions due to variable factors. An example of one such factor examined is absolute humidity. It is concluded that adequate methodologies exist for estimation of dose to man from environmental tritium although a number of areas are identified where additional tritium research is desirable.

  14. Physiological characteristics of cold acclimatization in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Lazar; Purkayastha, S. S.; Jayashankar, A.; Nayar, H. S.

    1981-09-01

    Studies were conducted on 15 healthy young soldiers to evaluate the effect of a cold acclimatization schedule on the thermoregulatory and metabolic activity on exposure to acute cold stress. These men were exposed to cold (10‡C) for 4 h daily wearing only shorts for 21 days, in a cold chamber. They were subjected to a standard cold test at 10 ± 1‡C the day 1, 6, 11 and 21. The subjects were made to relax in a thermoneutral room (26 28‡C) for 1 h and their heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen consumption, oral temperature, mean skin temperature, mean body temperature, peripheral temperatures, and shivering activity were recorded. Then they were exposed to 10‡C and measurements were repeated at 30 min intervals, for 2 h. The cold induced vasodilatation (CIVD), cold pressor response and thermoregulatory efficiency tests were measured initially and at the end of acclimatization schedule. The data show that the procedure resulted in elevated resting metabolism, less fall in body temperature during acute cold stress, reduction in shivering, improvement in CIVD and thermoregulatory efficiency and less rise in BP and HR during cold pressor response. The data suggest the possibility of cold acclimatization in man by repeated exposure to moderately severe cold stress.

  15. Landing Energy Dissipation for Manned Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lloyd J., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations have been made to determine the landing-energy-dissipation characteristics for several types of landing gear for manned reentry vehicles. The landing vehicles are considered in two categories: those having essentially vertical-descent paths, the parachute-supported vehicles, and those having essentially horizontal paths, the lifting vehicles. The energy-dissipation devices discussed are crushable materials such as foamed plastics and honeycomb for internal application in couch-support systems, yielding metal elements as part of the structure of capsules or as alternates for oleos in landing-gear struts, inflatable bags, braking rockets, and shaped surfaces for water impact. It appears feasible to readily evaluate landing-gear systems for internal or external application in hard-surface or water landings by using computational procedures and free-body landing techniques with dynamic models. The systems investigated have shown very interesting energy-dissipation characteristics over a considerable range of landing parameters. Acceptable gear can be developed along lines similar to those presented if stroke requirements and human-tolerance limits are considered.

  16. NASA Laboratory Analysis for Manned Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krihak, Michael K.; Shaw, Tianna E.

    2014-01-01

    The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability Element under the NASA Human Research Program. ELA instrumentation is identified as an essential capability for future exploration missions to diagnose and treat evidence-based medical conditions. However, mission architecture limits the medical equipment, consumables, and procedures that will be available to treat medical conditions during human exploration missions. Allocated resources such as mass, power, volume, and crew time must be used efficiently to optimize the delivery of in-flight medical care. Although commercial instruments can provide the blood and urine based measurements required for exploration missions, these commercial-off-the-shelf devices are prohibitive for deployment in the space environment. The objective of the ELA project is to close the technology gap of current minimally invasive laboratory capabilities and analytical measurements in a manner that the mission architecture constraints impose on exploration missions. Besides micro gravity and radiation tolerances, other principal issues that generally fail to meet NASA requirements include excessive mass, volume, power and consumables, and nominal reagent shelf-life. Though manned exploration missions will not occur for nearly a decade, NASA has already taken strides towards meeting the development of ELA medical diagnostics by developing mission requirements and concepts of operations that are coupled with strategic investments and partnerships towards meeting these challenges. This paper focuses on the remote environment, its challenges, biomedical diagnostics requirements and candidate technologies that may lead to successful blood-urine chemistry and biomolecular measurements in future space exploration missions.

  17. The manned maneuvering unit flight controller arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falkner, K. E.

    1983-01-01

    The Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) and its support equipment provide an extravehicular astronaut mobility, and the ability to work outside the confines of the Shuttle Orbiter payload bay. The MMU design requirements are based on the highly successful Skylab M-509 maneuvering unit. Design of the MMU was started as an R&D effort in April 1975 and Flight Hardware design was started in August 1979 to support a possible requirement for in-space inspection and repair of Orbiter thermal protection tiles. Subsequently, the qualification test and production activities were slowed, and the current projected earliest first flight is now STS-11 in January, 1984. The MMU propulsion subsystem provides complete redundancy with two identical "system". Each system contains a high pressure gaseous nitrogen tank, an isolation valve, a regulator, and twelve 1.7 lbf (7.5 N) thrusters. The thrusters are packaged to provide the crew member six-degree-of-freedom control in response to commands from translational and rotational hand controllers. This paper discusses the MMU control arm requirements, design, and developmental history.

  18. Wisconsin's study of manned Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The design group focused on three topics: (1) Extravehicular Activities, (2) Sample Return Missions, and (3) Structural and Construction Considerations of a Manned Mars Habitat. Extravehicular Activities permit a Mars based astronaut to exit the habitat and perform mission activities in the harsh Mars environment. Today's spacesuit gloves are bulky, hard to manipulate and fatiguing. A mechanical assistance mechanism has been developed for the glove that will reduce user fatigue and increase the duration of EVA's. Oxygen supply systems are also being developed for the EVA astronaut. A scuba type system of tanked breathing air proves to be the most efficient system for short duration EVA's. A system that extracts the oxygen from atmospheric carbon dioxide can provide oxygen for long duration FVA's. Sample Return Missions require that samples be taken from several sites. Transportation considerations are addressed and two transportation schemes are proposed. The first scheme involves a lighter than air balloon. This system provides excellent range. The second design is a rover that uses tracks rather than wheels. Track rovers perform well in soft, sandy conditions. Engineering aspects of a habitat and domed greenhouse were investigated and plans for the habitat have been made. A configuration has been established and construction details have been made.

  19. Aerobrake design studies for manned Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, M.; Chargin, M.; Henline, W.; Hamm, K. R., Jr.; Miura, H.; Chiu, A.; Yang, L.

    1991-01-01

    The dimensions of aerobrakes and associated heat shields are calculated as a fraction of the vehicle mass required for a high-velocity manned Mars entry. The entry speed and deceleration limit are assumed to be 8.6 km/sec and 5 earth g, respectively, to consider vehicles with low lift-drag ratio (L/D) and ballistic coefficients of 100 and 200 kg/sq m, as well as a vehicle with a medium L/D and a ballistic coefficient of 375 kg/sq m. The aerobrake mass plus the heat shield divided by an optimized, blunt-shaped vehicle's total mass is 15 and 13 percent for ballistic coefficients of 100 and 200 kg/sq m, respectively. For a winged vehicle the mass fraction is 17 percent because the higher ballistic coefficient requires more thermal protection to account for the greater temperatures generated. It is concluded that aerobraking is more efficient than propulsive braking because the mass fraction for a propulsive system would be 4 or 5 times greater than those calculated for aerobraking.

  20. Advanced Manned Launch System (AMLS) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrlich, Carl F., Jr.; Potts, Jack; Brown, Jerry; Schell, Ken; Manley, Mary; Chen, Irving; Earhart, Richard; Urrutia, Chuck; Randolph, Ray; Morris, Jim

    1992-01-01

    To assure national leadership in space operations and exploration in the future, NASA must be able to provide cost effective and operationally efficient space transportation. Several NASA studies and the joint NASA/DoD Space Transportation Architecture Studies (STAS) have shown the need for a multi-vehicle space transportation system with designs driven by enhanced operations and low costs. NASA is currently studying an advanced manned launch system (AMLS) approach to transport crew and cargo to the Space Station Freedom. Several single and multiple stage systems from air-breathing to all-rocket concepts are being examined in a series of studies potential replacements for the Space Shuttle launch system in the 2000-2010 time frame. Rockwell International Corporation, under contract to the NASA Langley Research Center, has analyzed a two-stage all-rocket concept to determine whether this class of vehicles is appropriate for the AMLS function. The results of the pre-phase A study are discussed.

  1. Man-machine cooperation in advanced teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorini, Paolo; Das, Hari; Lee, Sukhan

    1993-01-01

    Teleoperation experiments at JPL have shown that advanced features in a telerobotic system are a necessary condition for good results, but that they are not sufficient to assure consistently good performance by the operators. Two or three operators are normally used during training and experiments to maintain the desired performance. An alternative to this multi-operator control station is a man-machine interface embedding computer programs that can perform some of the operator's functions. In this paper we present our first experiments with these concepts, in which we focused on the areas of real-time task monitoring and interactive path planning. In the first case, when performing a known task, the operator has an automatic aid for setting control parameters and camera views. In the second case, an interactive path planner will rank different path alternatives so that the operator will make the correct control decision. The monitoring function has been implemented with a neural network doing the real-time task segmentation. The interactive path planner was implemented for redundant manipulators to specify arm configurations across the desired path and satisfy geometric, task, and performance constraints.

  2. Soils: man-caused radioactivity and radiation forecast

    SciTech Connect

    Gablin, Vassily

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: One of the main tasks of the radiation safety guarantee is non-admission of the excess over critical radiation levels. In Russia they are man-caused radiation levels. Meanwhile any radiation measurement represents total radioactivity. That is why it is hard to assess natural and man-caused contributions to total radioactivity. It is shown that soil radioactivity depends on natural factors including radioactivity of rocks and cosmic radiation as well as man-caused factors including nuclear and non-nuclear technologies. Whole totality of these factors includes unpredictable (non-deterministic) factors - nuclear explosions and radiation accidents, and predictable ones (deterministic) - all the rest. Deterministic factors represent background radioactivity whose trends is the base of the radiation forecast. Non-deterministic factors represent man-caused radiation treatment contribution which is to be controlled. This contribution is equal to the difference in measured radioactivity and radiation background. The way of calculation of background radioactivity is proposed. Contemporary soils are complicated technologically influenced systems with multi-leveled spatial and temporary inhomogeneity of radionuclides distribution. Generally analysis area can be characterized by any set of factors of soil radioactivity including natural and man-caused factors. Natural factors are cosmic radiation and radioactivity of rocks. Man-caused factors are shown on Fig. 1. It is obvious that man-caused radioactivity is due to both artificial and natural emitters. Any result of radiation measurement represents total radioactivity i.e. the sum of activities resulting from natural and man-caused emitters. There is no gauge which could separately measure natural and man-caused radioactivity. That is why it is so hard to assess natural and man-caused contributions to soil radioactivity. It would have been possible if human

  3. Pediatric keratoconus and iontophoretic corneal crosslinking: refractive and topographic evidence in patients underwent general and topical anesthesia, 18 months of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Magli, Adriano; Chiariello Vecchio, Elisabetta; Carelli, Roberta; Piozzi, Elena; Di Landro, Felicia; Troisi, Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the efficiency and safety of iontophoretic transepithelial corneal crosslinking in pediatric patients with progressive keratoconus underwent general or topical anesthesia in 18 months follow-up. 13 patients (13 eyes) diagnosed with progressive keratoconus underwent corneal CXL with iontophoresis (I-CXL). Riboflavin solution was administered by iontophoresis for 5 min, and then UV-A irradiation (10 mW/cm) was performed for 9 min. Preoperative and post-operative visits at 1, 6, 12, and 18 months assessed the following parameters: uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), slit-lamp biomicroscopy, corneal topography, optical tomography, and pachymetry with Pentacam (Oculus Optikgeräte GmbH, Wetzlar, Germany), endothelial biomicroscopy (Konan Specular Microscope; Konan Medical, Inc., Hyogo, Japan). The paired Student t test was used to compare data during the follow-up. 10 males and 3 females with a mean age of 15.4 ± 1.7 years (range 11-18 years) were included. The results showed a stabilization of the refractive UCVA and BCVA as early as the first post-operative month, with a slight improvement over time. The Kmax remained stable throughout follow-up (p = 0.04). Transepithelial collagen crosslinking by iontophoresis, unlike other transepithelial techniques seems to halt pediatric keratoconus progression over 18 months. This is the second study evaluating CXL with iontophoresis in pediatric patients with progressive keratoconus with 18 months of follow-up using two different ways of anesthesia. PMID:26704375

  4. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS ON MUSCLE STRENGTH AMONG PATIENTS WHO UNDERWENT ARTHROSCOPIC TENOTOMY OF THE LONG HEAD OF THE BICEPS IN RELATION TO ESTHETIC DEFORMITY

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Alexandre; Valin, Márcio Rangel; de Almeida, Nayvaldo Couto; Roveda, Gilberto; Agostini, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there was any discrepancy in elbow flexion strength among patients with and without evident clinical deformity resulting from arthroscopic tenotomy on the long head of the biceps. Method: A group of 120 patients who underwent this procedure were evaluated. After applying the exclusion criteria, 89 patients remained in the analysis. Eighteen months after the operation (median), the elbow flexion strength was measured in newtons using a digital dynamometer. Three consecutive measurements were made and the average was used. The dominant and non-dominant sides were compared. Sex, age and mean elbow flexion strength in the operated and contralateral arms of patients with and without apparent clinical deformity were evaluated. Results: The median elbow flexion strength among the patients with evident clinical deformity was 17.78 N for the dominant arm and 20.87 N for the non-dominant arm. The difference was 2.51 N. In the group without evident clinical deformity, the difference was 2.14 N. The median muscle strength in the operated arm was 17.26 N, while the median was 20.06 N in the non-operated arm, thus suggesting that there was a significant loss of muscle strength (p = 0.005). The difference in muscle strength loss between the patients with and without evident deformity was not considered statistically significant (p = 0.977). Conclusion: The patients who underwent arthroscopic tenotomy on the long head of the biceps with or without apparent clinical deformity from distal migration presented similar elbow flexion muscle strength. PMID:27047871

  5. Comparison of Estimations Versus Measured Oxygen Consumption at Rest in Patients With Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction Who Underwent Right-Sided Heart Catheterization.

    PubMed

    Chase, Paul J; Davis, Paul G; Wideman, Laurie; Starnes, Joseph W; Schulz, Mark R; Bensimhon, Daniel R

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac output during right-sided heart catheterization is an important variable for patient selection of advanced therapies (cardiac transplantation and left ventricular assist device implantation). The Fick method to determine cardiac output is commonly used and typically uses estimated oxygen consumption (VO2) from 1 of 3 published empirical formulas. However, these estimation equations have not been validated in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The objectives of the present study were to determine the accuracy of 3 equations for estimating VO2 compared with direct measurement of VO2 and determine the extent clinically significant error occurred in calculating cardiac output of patients with HFrEF. Breath-by-breath measurements of VO2 from 44 patients who underwent cardiac catheterization (66% men; age, 65 ± 11 years, left ventricular ejection fraction, 22 ± 6%) were compared with the derived estimations of LaFarge and Miettinen, Dehmer et al, and Bergstra et al. Single-sample t tests found only the mean difference between the estimation of LaFarge and Miettinen and the measured VO2 to be nonsignificant (-10.3 ml/min ± 6.2 SE, p = 0.053). Bland-Altman plots demonstrated unacceptably large limits of agreement for all equations. The rate of ≥25% error in the equations by LaFarge and Miettinen, Dehmer et al, and Bergstra et al occurred in 11%, 23%, and 45% of patients, respectively. Misclassification of cardiac index derived from each equation for 2 clinically important classifications: cardiogenic shock-21%, 23%, and 32% and hypoperfusion-16%, 16%, and 25%; respectively. In conclusion, these findings do not support the use of these empiric formulas to estimate the VO2 at rest in patients with HFrEF who underwent right-sided heart catheterization.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of the penicillins in man.

    PubMed

    Barza, M; Weinstein, L

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review and summarise those aspects of the pharmacokinetic behaviour of the penicillins that may be of particular interest to the clinician. While these antibiotics differ markedly in their acid stability and oral absorption, misleading inferences may be drawn from simple inspection of the maximal serum concentrations produced by a given dose administered orally. A more accurate picture emerges when serum protein binding and intrinsic activity of the drugs are taken into account. All of the penicillins are readily and actively secreted by the renal tubles and most are eliminated, almost completely unchanged, in the urine. The majority are excreted in small quantities in the bile, but this is a major route for elimination of nafcillin from the body. Distribution of the penicillins in 'non-specialised' sites is excellent. In contrast, penetration of the central nevous system and eye are poor, and of the prostate, minimal. Inflammation reduces the barries to penetration of these areas. However, quantitative data related to this phenomenon in man are few. Probenecid actively competes with the 'export' pump of the meninges and renal tubular cells. This results in an increase in concentrations of the penicillins in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid. The effect of this agent on active secretion of these antibiotics from the eye and biliary tract is minimal. While elimination of the penicillins from the body takes place largely via renal excretion, penicillin V and oxacillin are extensively degraded as well. In contrast to the situation with respect to 'natural' and 'broad-spectrum' penicillins, the serum half-life of the isoxazolyl congeners and nafcillin is only minimally prolonged in the presence of renal failure. These agents are only weakly haemodialyzable, while the other penicillins are rapidly removed from the circulation by this procedure. PMID:797501

  7. Testosterone and Aggressive Behavior in Man

    PubMed Central

    Batrinos, Menelaos L.

    2012-01-01

    Atavistic residues of aggressive behavior prevailing in animal life, determined by testosterone, remain attenuated in man and suppressed through familial and social inhibitions. However, it still manifests itself in various intensities and forms from; thoughts, anger, verbal aggressiveness, competition, dominance behavior, to physical violence. Testosterone plays a significant role in the arousal of these behavioral manifestations in the brain centers involved in aggression and on the development of the muscular system that enables their realization. There is evidence that testosterone levels are higher in individuals with aggressive behavior, such as prisoners who have committed violent crimes. Several field studies have also shown that testosterone levels increase during the aggressive phases of sports games. In more sensitive laboratory paradigms, it has been observed that participant’s testosterone rises in the winners of; competitions, dominance trials or in confrontations with factitious opponents. Aggressive behavior arises in the brain through interplay between subcortical structures in the amygdala and the hypothalamus in which emotions are born and the prefrontal cognitive centers where emotions are perceived and controlled. The action of testosterone on the brain begins in the embryonic stage. Earlier in development at the DNA level, the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene seems to play a role in the expression of aggressive behavior. Neuroimaging techniques in adult males have shown that testosterone activates the amygdala enhancing its emotional activity and its resistance to prefrontal restraining control. This effect is opposed by the action of cortisol which facilitates prefrontal area cognitive control on impulsive tendencies aroused in the subcortical structures. The degree of impulsivity is regulated by serotonin inhibiting receptors, and with the intervention of this neurotransmitter the major agents of the neuroendocrine

  8. Gabriel Richet: the Man and the Scientist.

    PubMed

    Ardaillou, Raymond; Ronco, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Gabriel Richet who died in Paris in October 2014 was the fourth of a brilliant dynasty of professors of medicine including a Nobel prize, his grandfather, Charles Richet. He behaved courageously during the Second World War and participated in the Campaign of France in 1940 and in the combats in the Vosges Mountains in 1945. His family participated in the resistance during the German occupation of France and three of his parents including his father, one of his brothers and one of his cousins were deported in Germany. At the end of the war, he was with Jean Hamburger the founder of French nephrology at Necker Hospital in Paris. He realized the first hemodialyses in France and was involved in the first allogenic transplantation that was not immediately rejected. From 1961 to 1985, he was the head of a school of nephrology at Tenon Hospital and attracted in his department many young collaborators and scientists. He was the first to describe the role of specialized cells of the collecting duct in the control of acid base equilibrium. He was the subject of a national and international recognition. Founding member of the International Society of Nephrology in 1960, he was elected his President from 1981-1984. His fame could be measured by the number of fellows and visiting facultiesfrom countries all over the world. When he retired in 1985, he left an important legacy involving several departments of nephrology directed by his ancient collaborators. After his retirement, he was an active member of the French Academy of Medicine and devoted much of his time to the history of medicine and, particularly, of nephrology. The main qualities of the man were his constant research of new ideas, his eagerness to work and his open mind to understand others.

  9. Gabriel Richet: the Man and the Scientist.

    PubMed

    Ardaillou, Raymond; Ronco, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Gabriel Richet who died in Paris in October 2014 was the fourth of a brilliant dynasty of professors of medicine including a Nobel prize, his grandfather, Charles Richet. He behaved courageously during the Second World War and participated in the Campaign of France in 1940 and in the combats in the Vosges Mountains in 1945. His family participated in the resistance during the German occupation of France and three of his parents including his father, one of his brothers and one of his cousins were deported in Germany. At the end of the war, he was with Jean Hamburger the founder of French nephrology at Necker Hospital in Paris. He realized the first hemodialyses in France and was involved in the first allogenic transplantation that was not immediately rejected. From 1961 to 1985, he was the head of a school of nephrology at Tenon Hospital and attracted in his department many young collaborators and scientists. He was the first to describe the role of specialized cells of the collecting duct in the control of acid base equilibrium. He was the subject of a national and international recognition. Founding member of the International Society of Nephrology in 1960, he was elected his President from 1981-1984. His fame could be measured by the number of fellows and visiting facultiesfrom countries all over the world. When he retired in 1985, he left an important legacy involving several departments of nephrology directed by his ancient collaborators. After his retirement, he was an active member of the French Academy of Medicine and devoted much of his time to the history of medicine and, particularly, of nephrology. The main qualities of the man were his constant research of new ideas, his eagerness to work and his open mind to understand others. PMID:26913875

  10. Ventilatory drive during face immersion in man.

    PubMed Central

    Mukhtar, M R; Patrick, J M

    1986-01-01

    Four series of experiments have been performed in normal subjects to determine whether face immersion gives rise to a reduction in ventilatory drive. Such a response might be advantageous, like the cardiovascular components of the 'diving response', in prolonging breath-hold diving. In the first series, ventilatory drive was measured indirectly as the maximal voluntary breath-holding time, starting each breath-hold at the same alveolar partial pressures and at the same lung volume. When the face was immersed in cold water, breath-holding times were increased by 14%. The breaking point occurred at a higher alveolar PCO2 and the rate of rise of PCO2 was not affected. Control immersions in warm water had no effect. In the second and third series, subjects lay prone and breathed either air or 5% CO2 through a valve in the bottom of a bowl. Minute ventilation was measured before, during and after 5 min of face immersion in cold water. Transient hypoventilations of 13% and 10% respectively were seen, accompanied by small rises in alveolar PCO2. In control experiments, immersion of the forearm in cold water produced the opposite responses. In the fourth series, a cold wet pack was applied to the face during moderate steady-state exercise. A small irregular hypoventilation was seen, but not in control experiments when a warm pack was applied. Face temperatures fell by about 10 degrees C in these experiments. No material changes were found in the temperatures of the inspired air or of the aural canal. It is concluded that face immersion in cold water causes a modest reduction in ventilatory drive in man. This appears to be a component of the 'diving response'. PMID:3083097

  11. Man-in-the-control-loop simulation of manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J. L.; Lin, Tsung-Chieh; Yae, K. Harold

    1989-01-01

    A method to achieve man-in-the-control-loop simulation is presented. Emerging real-time dynamics simulation suggests a potential for creating an interactive design workstation with a human operator in the control loop. The recursive formulation for multibody dynamics simulation is studied to determine requirements for man-in-the-control-loop simulation. High speed computer graphics techniques provides realistic visual cues for the simulator. Backhoe and robot arm simulations are implemented to demonstrate the capability of man-in-the-control-loop simulation.

  12. Physiologically constrained aerocapture for manned Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyne, James Evans

    1992-01-01

    Aerobraking has been proposed as a critical technology for manned missions to Mars. The variety of mission architectures currently under consideration presents aerobrake designers with an enormous range of potential entry scenarios. Two of the most important considerations in the design of an aerobrake are the required control authority (lift-to-drag ratio) and the aerothermal environment which the vehicle will encounter. Therefore, this study examined the entry corridor width and stagnation-point heating rate and load for the entire range of probable entry velocities, lift-to-drag ratios, and ballistic coefficients for capture at both Earth and Mars. To accomplish this, a peak deceleration limit for the aerocapture maneuvers had to be established. Previous studies had used a variety of load limits without adequate proof of their validity. Existing physiological and space flight data were examined, and it was concluded that a deceleration limit of 5 G was appropriate. When this load limit was applied, numerical studies showed that an aerobrake with an L/D of 0.3 could provide an entry corridor width of at least 1 degree for all Mars aerocaptures considered with entry velocities up to 9 km/s. If 10 km/s entries are required, an L/D of 0.4 to 0.5 would be necessary to maintain a corridor width of at least 1 degree. For Earth return aerocapture, a vehicle with an L/D of 0.4 to 0.5 was found to provide a corridor width of 0.7 degree or more for all entry velocities up to 14.5 km/s. Aerodynamic convective heating calculations were performed assuming a fully catalytic, 'cold' wall; radiative heating was calculated assuming that the shock layer was in thermochemical equilibrium. Heating rates were low enough for selected entries at Mars that a radiatively cooled thermal protection system might be feasible, although an ablative material would be required for most scenarios. Earth return heating rates were generally more severe than those encountered by the Apollo vehicles

  13. Moon manned missions radiation safety analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.; de Anlelis, G.; Badavi, F. F.

    An analysis is performed on the radiation environment found on the surface of the Moon, and applied to different possible lunar base mission scenarios. An optimization technique has been used to obtain mission scenarios minimizing the astronaut radiation exposure and at the same time controlling the effect of shielding, in terms of mass addition and material choice, as a mission cost driver. The optimization process has been realized through minimization of mass along all phases of a mission scenario, in terms of time frame (dates, transfer time length and trajectory, radiation environment), equipment (vehicles, in terms of shape, volume, onboard material choice, size and structure), location (if in space, on the surface, inside or outside a certain habitats), crew characteristics (number, gender, age, tasks) and performance required (spacecraft and habitat volumes), radiation exposure annual and career limit constraint (from NCRP 132), and implementation of the ALARA principle (shelter from the occurrence of Solar Particle Events). On the lunar surface the most important contribution to radiation exposure is given by background Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) particles, mostly protons, alpha particles, and some heavy ions, and by locally induced particles, mostly neutrons, created by the interaction between GCR and surface material and emerging from below the surface due to backscattering processes. In this environment manned habitats are to host future crews involved in the construction and/or in the utilization of moon based infrastructure. Three different kinds of lunar missions are considered in the analysis, Moon Base Construction Phase, during which astronauts are on the surface just to build an outpost for future resident crews, Moon Base Outpost Phase, during which astronaut crews are resident but continuing exploration and installation activities, and Moon Base Routine Phase, with long-term shifting resident crews. In each scenario various kinds of habitats

  14. The biological activity of propolis-containing toothpaste on oral health environment in patients who underwent implant-supported prosthodontic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Morawiec, Tadeusz; Dziedzic, Arkadiusz; Niedzielska, Iwona; Mertas, Anna; Tanasiewicz, Marta; Skaba, Dariusz; Kasperski, Jacek; Machorowska-Pieniążek, Agnieszka; Kucharzewski, Marek; Szaniawska, Karolina; Więckiewicz, Włodzimierz; Więckiewicz, Mieszko

    2013-01-01

    The soft and periodontal tissues surrounding dental implants are particularly susceptible to bacteria invasion and inflammatory reactions due to complex histological structures. This study was carried out to investigate the influence of a propolis-containing hygienic agent on selected oral health parameters, oral microflora, and the condition of periodontal health. Sixteen subjects who underwent an oral rehabilitation with dental implants were selected and randomly assigned into two groups, which received a newly formulated propolis-containing toothpaste (3% (CA)) or a negative control without an active ingredient (CC). Approximal plaque index (API), oral hygiene index (OHI, debris component), and sulcus bleeding index (SBI) were assessed in three subsequent stages. During the first and last examinations, the swabs were employed for microbiological inoculation. Propolis-containing toothpaste was found to be distinctively effective in improving oral health and the occurrence of gingivitis triggered by dental plaque. The qualitative and quantitative changes in oral bacteria spectrum were observed. Antibacterial measures containing propolis might be used as a natural adjuvant to other active substances in individuals with a high risk of periodontal problems against pathogenic oral microflora. PMID:23762153

  15. Hepaticojejunostomy for the management of sump syndrome arising from choledochoduodenostomy in a patient who underwent bariatric Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Mohammed S.; Alshammary, Shadi A.; Alqahtani, Enas M.; Bojal, Shoukat A.; Alaidh, Amal; Osian, Gelu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rapid weight loss following bariatric surgery is associated with high incidence of gallstones and complications that may need bilioenteric diversion. This presents a specific challenge in the management of this group of patients. Case presentation A 37 years old female underwent a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) in 2008 for morbid obesity. In 2009 she presented with obstructive jaundice and was diagnosed with choledocholithiasis successfully managed by open cholecystectomy and choledochoduodenostomy. In the following years, she developed recurrent attacks of fever, chills, jaundice, and right upper quadrant pain and her weight loss was not satisfactory. Imaging of the liver showed multiple cholangitic abscesses. Reflux at the choledochoduodenostomy site was suggestive of sump syndrome as a cause of her recurrent cholangitis and a definitive surgical treatment was indicated. Intraoperative findings confirmed sump at the choledochoduodenostomy site and also revealed the presence of a large superficial accessory duct arising from segment four of the liver with separate drainage into the duodenum distal to the choledochoduodenostomy site. A formal hepaticojejunostomy was done after ductoplasty. The Roux limb was created by transecting the jejunum 40 cm distal to the foot anastomosis of the RYGB. The gastric limb was lengthened as part of this procedure which afforded the patient the additional benefit of weight loss. Conclusion Choledochoduodenostomy should be avoided in patients with RYGB due to the risk of sump syndrome which requires conversion to a formal hepaticojejunostomy. PMID:26921534

  16. The Mouse-colored Tyrannulet (Phaeomyias murina) is a species complex that includes the Cocos Flycatcher (Nesotriccus ridgwayi), an island form that underwent a population bottleneck.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Marc R; Harvey, Michael G; Oswald, Jessica A; Cuervo, Andrés; Derryberry, Elizabeth; Brumfield, Robb T

    2016-08-01

    Simultaneous examination of evolutionary history in island forms and closely related mainland relatives can provide reciprocal insight into the evolution of island and mainland faunas. The Cocos Flycatcher (Nesotriccus ridgwayi) is a small tyrant flycatcher (Tyrannidae) endemic to Cocos Island, an oceanic island in the eastern Pacific Ocean. We first established its close relationship to the mainland species Mouse-colored Tyrannulet (Phaeomyias murina) using a phylogeny from genome-wide ultraconserved elements and exons. We then used mitochondrial DNA to explore the relationships between Nesotriccus and Phaeomyias populations from across its distribution in Central and South America. We found that Nesotriccus is nested within the Phaeomyias evolutionary tree, and that Phaeomyias represents a complex of at least four evolutionarily distinct species that differ in plumage, voice, and habitat association. Nesotriccus underwent a population bottleneck subsequent to its divergence from Central American and northern South American Phaeomyias populations in the middle Pleistocene. The 46 UCE loci containing alleles that are fixed between the two species are widely distributed across the genome, which suggests that selective or neutral processes responsible for divergence have occurred genome-wide. Overall, our simultaneous examination of Phaeomyias and Nesotriccus revealed divergent levels of genetic diversity and evolutionary histories between island and mainland forms. PMID:27126184

  17. The Biological Activity of Propolis-Containing Toothpaste on Oral Health Environment in Patients Who Underwent Implant-Supported Prosthodontic Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Morawiec, Tadeusz; Dziedzic, Arkadiusz; Niedzielska, Iwona; Mertas, Anna; Tanasiewicz, Marta; Skaba, Dariusz; Kasperski, Jacek; Machorowska-Pieniążek, Agnieszka; Kucharzewski, Marek; Szaniawska, Karolina; Więckiewicz, Włodzimierz; Więckiewicz, Mieszko

    2013-01-01

    The soft and periodontal tissues surrounding dental implants are particularly susceptible to bacteria invasion and inflammatory reactions due to complex histological structures. This study was carried out to investigate the influence of a propolis-containing hygienic agent on selected oral health parameters, oral microflora, and the condition of periodontal health. Sixteen subjects who underwent an oral rehabilitation with dental implants were selected and randomly assigned into two groups, which received a newly formulated propolis-containing toothpaste (3% (CA)) or a negative control without an active ingredient (CC). Approximal plaque index (API), oral hygiene index (OHI, debris component), and sulcus bleeding index (SBI) were assessed in three subsequent stages. During the first and last examinations, the swabs were employed for microbiological inoculation. Propolis-containing toothpaste was found to be distinctively effective in improving oral health and the occurrence of gingivitis triggered by dental plaque. The qualitative and quantitative changes in oral bacteria spectrum were observed. Antibacterial measures containing propolis might be used as a natural adjuvant to other active substances in individuals with a high risk of periodontal problems against pathogenic oral microflora. PMID:23762153

  18. The biological activity of propolis-containing toothpaste on oral health environment in patients who underwent implant-supported prosthodontic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Morawiec, Tadeusz; Dziedzic, Arkadiusz; Niedzielska, Iwona; Mertas, Anna; Tanasiewicz, Marta; Skaba, Dariusz; Kasperski, Jacek; Machorowska-Pieniążek, Agnieszka; Kucharzewski, Marek; Szaniawska, Karolina; Więckiewicz, Włodzimierz; Więckiewicz, Mieszko

    2013-01-01

    The soft and periodontal tissues surrounding dental implants are particularly susceptible to bacteria invasion and inflammatory reactions due to complex histological structures. This study was carried out to investigate the influence of a propolis-containing hygienic agent on selected oral health parameters, oral microflora, and the condition of periodontal health. Sixteen subjects who underwent an oral rehabilitation with dental implants were selected and randomly assigned into two groups, which received a newly formulated propolis-containing toothpaste (3% (CA)) or a negative control without an active ingredient (CC). Approximal plaque index (API), oral hygiene index (OHI, debris component), and sulcus bleeding index (SBI) were assessed in three subsequent stages. During the first and last examinations, the swabs were employed for microbiological inoculation. Propolis-containing toothpaste was found to be distinctively effective in improving oral health and the occurrence of gingivitis triggered by dental plaque. The qualitative and quantitative changes in oral bacteria spectrum were observed. Antibacterial measures containing propolis might be used as a natural adjuvant to other active substances in individuals with a high risk of periodontal problems against pathogenic oral microflora.

  19. 15. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 28, 1935 MARBLE MANTEL IN LIVING ROOM (S.W. ROOM) - Haygood House, State Highway 97 (County Road 29), Lowndesboro, Lowndes County, AL

  20. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 27, 1935 CLOSE-UP OF MARBLE MANTEL IN PARLOR - Montgomery-Jones-Whitaker House, County Road 4 (Reynolds Mill Road), Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  1. 23. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, October ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, October 25, 1935 MARBLE MANTEL IN WEST BED ROOM - Colonel Charles Teed Pollard House (Mansion), 117 Jefferson Street, Montgomery, Montgomery County, AL

  2. 18. Photocopy of Photograph (Original Held by the Manning Brothers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of Photograph (Original Held by the Manning Brothers Commercial Photographers, Madison Heights, Michigan, Negative No. 67707). SOUTHERN PORTION OF WEST FACADE, LOOKING EAST, SHOWN ON EXTREME LEFT, 3 June 1925. - Basso Building, 7338 Woodward Avenue, Detroit, MI

  3. 17. Photocopy of Photograph (Original Held by the Manning Brothers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of Photograph (Original Held by the Manning Brothers Commercial Photographers, Madison Heights, Michigan, Negative No. 38750). SOUTHERN PORTION OF WEST FACADE, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWN ON EXTREME LEFT, 24 NOVEMBER 1920. - Basso Building, 7338 Woodward Avenue, Detroit, MI

  4. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, June 13, 1935. MANTEL AND DOOR IN N.E. BED ROOM, UPSTAIRS - Beeland-Stanley House, 218 East Commerce Street, Greenville, Butler County, AL

  5. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 26, 1935 STAIRS IN HALL SHOWING OLD TIME GUN ON WALL, ALSO LIVING ROOM ACROSS HALL - Freeman-Caver-Christian House, Upper Friendship Road, Oxford, Calhoun County, AL

  6. 32. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 27, 1935 OLD SLAVE SMOKE HOUSE, N.E. CORNER - Stone-Young-Baggett House, County Road 54 (Old Selma Road), Montgomery, Montgomery County, AL

  7. 18. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 28, 1935 OLD SLAVE AND SMOKE HOUSES AT REAR OF BLDG. S.W. COR. - Haygood House, State Highway 97 (County Road 29), Lowndesboro, Lowndes County, AL

  8. 33. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, April 11th, 1934. ORIGINAL KITCHEN AND SMOKE HOUSE - Stone-Young-Baggett House, County Road 54 (Old Selma Road), Montgomery, Montgomery County, AL

  9. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey Manning Brothers, Detroit, Photographers, circa ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey Manning Brothers, Detroit, Photographers, circa 1920. Courtesy Save Orchestra Hall, Inc. Photocopy by Jack E. Boucher, 1973 AUDITORIUM, LOOKING NORTH - Orchestra Hall, 3711 Woodward Avenue, Detroit, MI

  10. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Manning Brothers, Detroit, Photographers, circa ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Manning Brothers, Detroit, Photographers, circa 1920. Courtesy Save Orchestra Hall, Inc. Photocopy by Jack E. Boucher, 1973 EAST (FRONT) AND SOUTH ELEVATIONS - Orchestra Hall, 3711 Woodward Avenue, Detroit, MI

  11. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 15, 1935 REAR HALL DOOR TREATMENT, AND OLD SPINNING WHEEL - J. Bruce Airey House, 1202 West Tuskeena Street, Wetumpka, Elmore County, AL

  12. Monkeys as a source of viral diseases in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pille, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    Under institutional scientific-research conditions, during contact with monkeys or their tissues, there is a danger of infection of the associates by simian viruses which are pathogenic to man. Presented in this paper is information on these stimulants.

  13. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, June 12, 1935. PART OF FRONT AND OLD LAW OFFICE, NOW USED AS KITCHEN - Will Crenshaw Plantation (House), County Road 54, Greenville, Butler County, AL

  14. Power system technologies for the manned Mars mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, Dave; Patterson, Michael J.; Berkopec, F.; Myers, Ira; Presler, A.

    1986-01-01

    The high impulse of electric propulsion makes it an attractive option for manned interplanetary missions such as a manned mission to Mars. This option is, however, dependent on the availability of high energy sources for propulsive power in addition to that required for the manned interplanetary transit vehicle. Two power system technologies are presented: nuclear and solar. The ion thruster technology for the interplanetary transit vehicle is described for a typical mission. The power management and distribution system components required for such a mission must be further developed beyond today's technology status. High voltage-high current technology advancements must be achieved. These advancements are described. In addition, large amounts of waste heat must be rejected to the space environment by the thermal management system. Advanced concepts such as the liquid droplet radiator are discussed as possible candidates for the manned Mars mission. These thermal management technologies have great potential for significant weight reductions over the more conventional systems.

  15. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 18, 1935 DOOR TREATMENT, FROM HALL TO WEST FRONT ROOM - Black-Gilling House, County Road 44, Dudleyville, Tallapoosa County, AL

  16. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, October ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, October 23, 1935 PARLOR DOOR DETAIL AND CORNICE - Bibb-Goldthwaithe-Arrington House, 203 Church Street, Montgomery, Montgomery County, AL

  17. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, October ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, October 23, 1935 STAIR IN HALL. VIEW FROM FRONT DOOR - Bibb-Goldthwaithe-Arrington House, 203 Church Street, Montgomery, Montgomery County, AL

  18. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, October ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, October 23, 1935 DOOR TREATMENT AT BASE OF STAIR IN HALL - Bibb-Goldthwaithe-Arrington House, 203 Church Street, Montgomery, Montgomery County, AL

  19. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, October ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, October 23, 1935 VIEW OF HALL TOWARDS FRONT DOOR - Bibb-Goldthwaithe-Arrington House, 203 Church Street, Montgomery, Montgomery County, AL

  20. IET. Coupling station. Man holds flexible couplers to reactor Dolly ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET. Coupling station. Man holds flexible couplers to reactor Dolly and HTRE rig. Date: April 22, 1955. INEEL negative no. 55-1010 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. Not All Dogs Are Man's (Or Kids') Best Friend

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161027.html Not All Dogs Are Man's (or Kids') Best Friend Study suggests ... be told they shouldn't approach a scared dog To use the sharing features on this page, ...

  2. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 25, 1935 MANTEL IN N. BED ROOM UPSTAIRS - Turner-Dickson House, State Highway 97 (County Road 29), Lowndesboro, Lowndes County, AL

  3. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Feb. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Feb. 3, 1934. REAR VIEW SHOWING KITCHEN (EXTERIOR) - Turner-Dickson House, State Highway 97 (County Road 29), Lowndesboro, Lowndes County, AL

  4. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 25, 1935 CLOSE-UP OF BANISTER AND COLUMN BASE AT FRONT ENTRANCE - Turner-Dickson House, State Highway 97 (County Road 29), Lowndesboro, Lowndes County, AL

  5. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Feb. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Feb. 3, 1934. FIREPLACE AND MANTEL (BEDROOM) - Turner-Dickson House, State Highway 97 (County Road 29), Lowndesboro, Lowndes County, AL

  6. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 25, 1935 FRONT DOOR TREATMENT, ALSO BALCONY - Turner-Dickson House, State Highway 97 (County Road 29), Lowndesboro, Lowndes County, AL

  7. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 25, 1935 S. E. CORNER OF HOUSE SHOWING CAPITALS - Turner-Dickson House, State Highway 97 (County Road 29), Lowndesboro, Lowndes County, AL

  8. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 25, 1935 CLOSE- UP OF CAPITALS AND IRON GRILLS - Turner-Dickson House, State Highway 97 (County Road 29), Lowndesboro, Lowndes County, AL

  9. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 25, 1935 STAIRWAY AND DOOR TREATMENT UPSTAIRS, REAR HALL - Turner-Dickson House, State Highway 97 (County Road 29), Lowndesboro, Lowndes County, AL

  10. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, August 16, 1935 VIEW IN HALL, LOOKING SOUTH, SECOND FLOOR - United States Hotel, North Broadnax & East Green Streets, Dadeville, Tallapoosa County, AL

  11. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, August 16, 1935 FRONT DOOR IN OLD POST OFFICE ROOM - United States Hotel, North Broadnax & East Green Streets, Dadeville, Tallapoosa County, AL

  12. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, August 16, 1935 SMALL DOOR IN S. W. FRONT ROOM - United States Hotel, North Broadnax & East Green Streets, Dadeville, Tallapoosa County, AL

  13. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, August 16, 1935 VIEW OF REAR (EAST) AND NORTH END - United States Hotel, North Broadnax & East Green Streets, Dadeville, Tallapoosa County, AL

  14. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, August 16, 1935 FRONT (WEST) AND SOUTH SIDE - United States Hotel, North Broadnax & East Green Streets, Dadeville, Tallapoosa County, AL

  15. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, August 16, 1935 DOOR N. W. ROOM, SECOND FLOOR - United States Hotel, North Broadnax & East Green Streets, Dadeville, Tallapoosa County, AL

  16. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, August 16, 1935 MANTEL IN N. W. FRONT ROOM - United States Hotel, North Broadnax & East Green Streets, Dadeville, Tallapoosa County, AL

  17. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, August 16, 1935 MANTEL IN CENTER WEST ROOM - United States Hotel, North Broadnax & East Green Streets, Dadeville, Tallapoosa County, AL

  18. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 28, 1935 CEILING ORNAMENT OVER LIGHT FIXTURE IN HALL - Mary Reese House, State Highway 97 (County Road 29), Lowndesboro, Lowndes County, AL

  19. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 28, 1935 CEILING ORNAMENT OVER LIGHT FIXTURES, IN HALL - Haygood House, State Highway 97 (County Road 29), Lowndesboro, Lowndes County, AL

  20. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, April 24, 1934. FRONT (GENERAL VIEW). (MAIN ELEV.) - State Bank of Alabama, Decatur Branch, Bank Street & Wilson Avenue, Decatur, Morgan County, AL

  1. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Feb. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Feb. 10th, 1934. MAIN ELEVATION - (FRONT, GEN'L. VIEW) - State Bank of Alabama, Decatur Branch, Bank Street & Wilson Avenue, Decatur, Morgan County, AL

  2. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, April 25, 1934. VIEW ACROSS PARK TOWARD CLIFF AND BANK BUILDING. - First National Bank, Jefferson Street & Fountain Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  3. 121. Man with temperature probe aimed at armature measuring temperature ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    121. Man with temperature probe aimed at armature measuring temperature as armature heats up between the two electrodes. March 27, 1985 - Statue of Liberty, Liberty Island, Manhattan, New York County, NY

  4. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 25, 1935 DETAIL OF COLUMNS-UPPER FRONT PORCH - Green-Woodruff House, Alexandria-Jacksonville Road, Alexandria, Calhoun County, AL

  5. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 25, 1935 FRONT AND SIDE VIEW, S.W., FACING SOUTH - Green-Woodruff House, Alexandria-Jacksonville Road, Alexandria, Calhoun County, AL

  6. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, September 10, 1935 MANTEL AND WINDOW TREATMENT IN PARLOR, WEST FRONT ROOM - James Ellington House, Oak Bowery Road vicinity, Gold Hill, Lee County, AL

  7. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Sept. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Sept. 10, 1935 VIEW OF FRONT PORCH SHOWING DOOR AND WINDOW DETAIL - James Ellington House, Oak Bowery Road vicinity, Gold Hill, Lee County, AL

  8. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, September 10, 1935 VIEW IN HALL SHOWING FRONT DOOR AND TWO SIDE DOORS - James Ellington House, Oak Bowery Road vicinity, Gold Hill, Lee County, AL

  9. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, September 10, 1935 CLOSE-UP OF COLUMN BASE ON FRONT PORCH - James Ellington House, Oak Bowery Road vicinity, Gold Hill, Lee County, AL

  10. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 26, 1935 CLOSE- UP OF FRONT PORCH, SOUTH - Pope-Golson House, 815 Shadow Lane (moved from original location), Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  11. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 26, 1935 MANTEL IN LIVING ROOM, UPSTAIRS - Pope-Golson House, 815 Shadow Lane (moved from original location), Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  12. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 26, 1935 MANTEL IN S.W. BED ROOM UPSTAIRS - Pope-Golson House, 815 Shadow Lane (moved from original location), Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  13. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 26, 1935 MANTEL IN N.W. BED ROOM, UPSTAIRS - Pope-Golson House, 815 Shadow Lane (moved from original location), Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  14. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 26, 1935 MANTEL IN N.E. BED ROOM, UPSTAIRS - Pope-Golson House, 815 Shadow Lane (moved from original location), Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  15. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 26, 1935 FRONT AND SIDE VIEW, S.W. - Pope-Golson House, 815 Shadow Lane (moved from original location), Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  16. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 26, 1935 STAIRWAY AND REAR HALL DOORS - Pope-Golson House, 815 Shadow Lane (moved from original location), Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  17. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 26, 1935 FRONT DOOR TREATMENT, EXTERIOR, UPPER PART OF DOOR - Pope-Golson House, 815 Shadow Lane (moved from original location), Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  18. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 26, 1935 DOOR AND DOOR TREATMENT IN LIVING ROOM (S.E. Rm) - Pope-Golson House, 815 Shadow Lane (moved from original location), Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  19. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 26, 1935 HALL, FRONT HALL DOORS, STAIRS AND CEILING ORNAMENT - Pope-Golson House, 815 Shadow Lane (moved from original location), Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  20. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 26, 1935 DOOR AND DOOR TREATMENT FROM HALL INTO LVING ROOM - Pope-Golson House, 815 Shadow Lane (moved from original location), Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  1. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 26, 1935 REAR AND SIDE VIEW N.E. - Pope-Golson House, 815 Shadow Lane (moved from original location), Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  2. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 26, 1935 DOOR TREATMENT AND STAIRWAY ON 2nd FLOOR - Pope-Golson House, 815 Shadow Lane (moved from original location), Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  3. 23. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, April 3, 1934. INTERIOR (COURT ROOM) - Perry County Court House, Square bounded by State Highway 5, Main Street, Greensboro Avenue & East Street, Marion, Perry County, AL

  4. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 3, 1935 CLOSE UP FRONT VIEW OF WHEEL ON WEST SIDE - Mill with Water Wheel, Aderholdt's Mill Road, Anniston, Calhoun County, AL

  5. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 3, 1935 INTERIOR VIEW OF S.E. CORNER SHOWING FIRE PLACE AND PANELLED DOOR CLOSED - Mill with Water Wheel, Aderholdt's Mill Road, Anniston, Calhoun County, AL

  6. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 13, 1935 ANGLE VIEW, CLOSE-UP OF BIBLE STAND AND LAMP STANDS - Wetumpka Presbyterian Church, West Bridge & North Bridge Streets, Wetumpka, Elmore County, AL

  7. Biology as a Study of Man and Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurd, Paul DeHart

    1971-01-01

    Biology ought to be taught within the context of human culture; "man" can be the "type animal." Consideration should be given to questions of race, population, food resources, environmental quality, intelligence, genetic engineering, and organ transplants. (AL)

  8. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 4, 1935. DINING ROOM INTERIOR. SHOWING CHINA CLOSETS - Dr. E. W. Daugette House, 601 North Pelham Road, Jacksonville, Calhoun County, AL

  9. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, May 16, 1935 MANTEL AND CHINA CLOSET IN DINING ROOM, N. ROOM - McDonald-Smartt House, 315 North Randolph Street, Eufaula, Barbour County, AL

  10. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 14, 1935 VIEW IN DINING ROOM SHOWING JAPANESE CHINA CLOSET, S.W. - John Bullard House, Harrogate Springs Road vicinity, Wetumpka, Elmore County, AL

  11. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 26, 1935 CHINA CABINET IN DINING ROOM, S.W. ROOM - Pope-Golson House, 815 Shadow Lane (moved from original location), Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  12. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 29, 1935 MANTEL AND BUILT-IN CHINA CLOSET IN DINING ROOM, IN BASEMENT - Powell House, State Highway 97 (County Road 29), Lowndesboro, Lowndes County, AL

  13. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, February ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, February 25, 1935 BUILT IN CHINA CABINET IN DINING ROOM, S.W. ROOM - Hunter-Callaway House, 811 North Maple Street, Tuskegee, Macon County, AL

  14. 5. View bay door and single man door on north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View bay door and single man door on north elevation of power plant, looking south - Naval Air Station Fallon, Power Plant, 800 Complex, off Carson Road near intersection of Pasture & Berney Roads, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  15. 6. View of double man door on north elevation of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View of double man door on north elevation of power plant, looking south - Naval Air Station Fallon, Power Plant, 800 Complex, off Carson Road near intersection of Pasture & Berney Roads, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  16. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Feb. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Feb. 2, 1934. ORIG.? - COTTAGE TO SIDE OF HELEN KELLER HOUSE. (OLD OFFICE?) - Helen Keller House, 300 West North Commons, Tuscumbia, Colbert County, AL

  17. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 26, 1935 FRONT AND SIDE VIEW OF OLD SLAVE KITCHEN, N.W. - Borders-Blackman House, DeArmanville-Choccolocco Road, Oxford, Calhoun County, AL

  18. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 26, 1935 S.E. CORNER OF SLAVE KITCHEN SHOWING LARGE CHIMNEY AT REAR - Borders-Blackman House, DeArmanville-Choccolocco Road, Oxford, Calhoun County, AL

  19. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 26, 1935 MANTEL IN WEST BED ROOM UPSTAIRS, PEANUTS ON FLOOR - Borders-Blackman House, DeArmanville-Choccolocco Road, Oxford, Calhoun County, AL

  20. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 26, 1935 CLOSE-UP OF MANTEL DETAIL IN LIVING ROOM (E. room) - Borders-Blackman House, DeArmanville-Choccolocco Road, Oxford, Calhoun County, AL

  1. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 26, 1935 MANTEL IN DINING ROOM OF SLAVE KITCHEN E. END LARGE HOUSE - Borders-Blackman House, DeArmanville-Choccolocco Road, Oxford, Calhoun County, AL

  2. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 26, 1935 MANTEL IN EAST BED ROOM UPSTAIRS - Borders-Blackman House, DeArmanville-Choccolocco Road, Oxford, Calhoun County, AL

  3. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 26, 1935 MANTEL IN SOUTH LIVING ROOM (old fashion parlor) - Freeman-Caver-Christian House, Upper Friendship Road, Oxford, Calhoun County, AL

  4. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 25, 1935 MANTEL IN DINING ROOM (W. end of house) - Freeman-Caver-Christian House, Upper Friendship Road, Oxford, Calhoun County, AL

  5. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 26, 1935 VIEW OF S.E. HALL AND BANISTERS UPSTAIRS, SHOWING MANTEL ACROSS HALL - Freeman-Caver-Christian House, Upper Friendship Road, Oxford, Calhoun County, AL

  6. 15. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 26, 1935 FRONT AND SIDE VIEW OF OLD STORE, S.E. - Freeman-Caver-Christian House, Upper Friendship Road, Oxford, Calhoun County, AL

  7. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 26, 1935 S.W. CORNER OF DOUBLE LOG SLAVE HOUSE - Freeman-Caver-Christian House, Upper Friendship Road, Oxford, Calhoun County, AL

  8. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 26, 1935 HALL AND STAIRWAY FROM FRONT DOOR - Freeman-Caver-Christian House, Upper Friendship Road, Oxford, Calhoun County, AL

  9. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 26, 1935 MANTEL IN SOUTH BED ROOM UPSTAIRS - Freeman-Caver-Christian House, Upper Friendship Road, Oxford, Calhoun County, AL

  10. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 26, 1935 LARGE AND SMALL DOOR IN N. E. ROOM - Freeman-Caver-Christian House, Upper Friendship Road, Oxford, Calhoun County, AL

  11. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, January 26, 1935 S.E. CORNER OF OLD SLAVE KITCHEN N. OF HOUSE - Freeman-Caver-Christian House, Upper Friendship Road, Oxford, Calhoun County, AL

  12. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Feb. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Feb. 27, 1934. General Front View. - ROYAL ST. - Southern Market & Municipal Building, 107-115 South Royal Street, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  13. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Feb. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Feb. 27, 1934. GATES AND GRILL. - ROYAL ST. - Southern Market & Municipal Building, 107-115 South Royal Street, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  14. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Feb. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Feb. 28, 1934. GATES AND GRILLS. - FRONT - ROYAL ST. - Southern Market & Municipal Building, 107-115 South Royal Street, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  15. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Feb. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Feb. 27, 1934. GENERAL FRONT VIEW. - WEST ELEVATION - ROYAL ST. - Southern Market & Municipal Building, 107-115 South Royal Street, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  16. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, December ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, December 11, 1934 MANTEL IN S.E. FRONT ROOM SHOWING PIGEON HOLES - Irwin-McAllister House, Fort Gaines Highway, Shorterville, Henry County, AL

  17. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, July 17, 1935. RAIL ROAD TO SPRING SHOWING WATER POURING INTO BUCKET - Octavia Adkinson House, Wilson Road, Peachburg, Bullock County, AL

  18. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, June 11, 1935. OLD LAW OFFICE (REPRODUCTION) (FROM EMERGENCY RELIEF ADMINISTRATION PHOTO) - Nolan Crenshaw House, County Road 54, Greenville, Butler County, AL

  19. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 29, 1935 LIVING ROOM DOOR TREATMENT, ALSO PART OF MANTEL AND WINDOW - Stone-McCarty House, County Road 40, Burkville, Lowndes County, AL

  20. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 29, 1935 MANTEL AND WINDOW TREATMENT IN LIVING ROOM (N.W. RM.) - Stone-McCarty House, County Road 40, Burkville, Lowndes County, AL

  1. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, April 2, 1934. REAR VIEW. - SOUTH ELEVATION + WEST SIDE - Dr. John H. Drish House, 2300 Seventeenth Street, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  2. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, October ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, October 26, 1935 VIEW IN OLD PARLOR (S. W.) NOW USED AS INSURANCE OFFICE - Gilmer-Shorter-Lomax House, 235 South Court Street, Montgomery, Montgomery County, AL

  3. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, February ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, February 25, 1935 DOUBLE DOOR IN DINING ROOM OPENING INTO PARLOR - Hunter-Callaway House, 811 North Maple Street, Tuskegee, Macon County, AL

  4. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, April 25, 1934. DETAIL OF FIREPLACE IN DIRECTOR'S ROOM. - First National Bank, Jefferson Street & Fountain Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  5. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, March 28, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, March 28, 1935, Photographer SHOWING DOOR TO STUDY IN N.E. CORNER - St. Paul's Episcopal Church, State Highway 97 (County Road 29), Lowndesboro, Lowndes County, AL

  6. Manned Mars mission communication and data management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Ronald E.

    1986-01-01

    A manned Mars mission will involve a small crew and many complex tasks. The productivity of the crew and the entire mission will depend significantly on effective automation of these tasks and the ease with which the crew can interface with them. The technology to support a manned Mars mission is available today; however, evolving software and electronic technology are enabling many interesting possibilities for increasing productivity and safety while reducing life cycle cost. Some of these advanced technologies are identified.

  7. [Knowledge of Man Returns: Some Considerations on Spirituality and Resilience].

    PubMed

    Kumakura, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade,"spirituality" and "resilience" have jointly become a topic in psychiatry. The aim of this paper is to discuss the future of psychiatry suggested by this topic. It may be related to what Jaspers, K. called "Knowledge of Man (die Erkenntnis des Menschen)". Knowledge of man in psychiatry can be learned only through clinical experince: e. g., clinical observations and case studies. Modern academic psychiatry seems to be suffering a loss of knowledge of man, which returns periodically in clinical practice. Hence, I will call the re-discovery of the topic in psychiatry as "Return of Man". Since WW II, there have been three eras in which psychiatrists showed deep concern regarding knowledge of man. Firstly, psychopathology and psychotherapy widely developed, when the destructive impulses of mankind were revealed in the nuclear weapons of WW II. Secondly, in the 1970's, the reforms of psychiatric services and legal systems took place somewhat successfully, when social reforms were concerns of the younger generations. Lastly, over the last decade, the topic again returned as spirituality and resilience, when scientists seemed to be powerless in the aftermath of the West Japan Earthquake. Regarding the definition of health made by the WHO in 1946, I further discuss that "Return of Man" in psychiatry is the necessary dynamism between negative and positive health, or between disease control and health promotion. There is an underlying dynamism between "Knowledge of Man" and natural sciences, which is constantly changing. So long as any theory can exist only as a part of dynamism, the Return of Man may re-surface whenever clinical theories do not fit with clinical realities.

  8. [Knowledge of Man Returns: Some Considerations on Spirituality and Resilience].

    PubMed

    Kumakura, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade,"spirituality" and "resilience" have jointly become a topic in psychiatry. The aim of this paper is to discuss the future of psychiatry suggested by this topic. It may be related to what Jaspers, K. called "Knowledge of Man (die Erkenntnis des Menschen)". Knowledge of man in psychiatry can be learned only through clinical experince: e. g., clinical observations and case studies. Modern academic psychiatry seems to be suffering a loss of knowledge of man, which returns periodically in clinical practice. Hence, I will call the re-discovery of the topic in psychiatry as "Return of Man". Since WW II, there have been three eras in which psychiatrists showed deep concern regarding knowledge of man. Firstly, psychopathology and psychotherapy widely developed, when the destructive impulses of mankind were revealed in the nuclear weapons of WW II. Secondly, in the 1970's, the reforms of psychiatric services and legal systems took place somewhat successfully, when social reforms were concerns of the younger generations. Lastly, over the last decade, the topic again returned as spirituality and resilience, when scientists seemed to be powerless in the aftermath of the West Japan Earthquake. Regarding the definition of health made by the WHO in 1946, I further discuss that "Return of Man" in psychiatry is the necessary dynamism between negative and positive health, or between disease control and health promotion. There is an underlying dynamism between "Knowledge of Man" and natural sciences, which is constantly changing. So long as any theory can exist only as a part of dynamism, the Return of Man may re-surface whenever clinical theories do not fit with clinical realities. PMID:26642730

  9. Results of the First US Manned Orbital Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    The results of the first United States manned orbital space flight conducted on February 20, 1962 are presented. The prelaunch activities, spacecraft description, flight operations, flight data, and postflight analyses presented form a continuation of the information previously published for the two United States manned suborbital space flights conducted on May 5, 1961, and July 21, 1961, respectively, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  10. On the metabolic detoxication of thymol in rabbit and man.

    PubMed

    Takada, M; Agata, I; Sakamoto, M; Yagi, N; Hayashi, N

    1979-11-01

    The metabolic detoxication of thymol was investigated in rabbit and man. Thymol glucuronide which the aglycone is intact, was isolated from thymol medicated rabbit urine and identified as a acetyl derivative of methyl glucuronate. The hydroxylated product of thymol, thymohydroquinone, was recognized in a small amount in thymol medicated human urine. It was presumed that thymohydroquinone is excreted as ethereal sulfuric acid conjugate in man. PMID:548583

  11. Human factors - Man-machine symbiosis in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jeri W.

    1987-01-01

    The relation between man and machine in space is studied. Early spaceflight and the goal of establishing a permanent space presence are described. The need to consider the physiological, psychological, and social integration of humans for each space mission is examined. Human factors must also be considered in the design of spacecraft. The effective utilization of man and machine capabilities, and research in anthropometry and biomechanics aimed at determining the limitations of spacecrews are discussed.

  12. Proceedings of the Second Manned Space Flight Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The papers presented in this report represent the classified portion of the Second Manned Space Flight Meeting which was held in Dallas, TX, on April 22-24, 1963. The meeting was co-sponsored by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The following subjects are discussed in the report: Manned Space Flight Programs, Launch Vehicles, Spacecraft Design, and Guidance and Control.

  13. Emblem for the third manned Skylab mission - Skylab 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This is the emblem for the third manned Skylab mission. It will be a mission of up to 56 days. The symbols in the patch refer to the three major areas of investigation proposed in the mission. The tree represents man's natural environment and relates directly to the Skylab mission objectives of advancing the study of Earth resources. The hydrogen atom, as the basic building block of the universe, represents man's exploration of the physical world, his application of knowledge, and his development of technology. Since the Sun is composed primarily of hydrogen, it is appropriate that the symbol refers to the solar physics mission objectives. The human silhouette represents mankind and the human capacity to direct technology with a wisdom tempered by regard for his natural environment. It also directly relates to the Skylab medical studies of man himself. The rainbow, adopted from the Biblical story of the flood, symbolizes the promise that is offered man. It embraces man and extends to t

  14. A manned lunar outpost. Design considerations for three key elements in an initial manned lunar outpost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Larry; Trotti, Guillermo; Brown, Jeff; Bhattacharya, Nilajan; Moore, Nathan; Polette, Tom; Toups, Larry

    1988-01-01

    The Initial Manned Lunar Outpost (IMLO) is proposed as the initial permanent base for manned activities on the Moon. The study concentrated on identifying the equipment, support systems, and initial base configuration necessary to accomplish the various science, industrial and exploration activities planned. The primary concepts of the MLO were the use of hard modules for habitation areas creating a flexible, modular transportation system; designing a multi-functional vehicle; and using an overhead radiation protection system. The transportation system, dubbed the Lunar Mobile Surface Transport System (LMSTS), carries the hard modules to the surface of the moon and provides a method to move them to the desired location through the use of interchangeable pallets. The avionics pallets are changed-out with wheel and hitch pallets, transforming the LMSTS into a "tractor trailer" used with the Multi-Functional Vehicle (MFV). The modules are placed under the Regolith Support Structure (RSS) which provides a stable environment and radiation protection for the entire base. The overhead structure was chosen over simply burying the modules to provide a study on the advantages and disadvantages of this type of system. The advantages include easy access to the exterior of the modules, providing a protected area for vehicles and equipment used in EVA, and creating an area of constant temperature. Disadvantages include a need for prefabrication of structural components, including the preconstruction and construction phases of the initial MLO. The design approach taken considered existing and near-term materials and technology only, without the consideration of possible future building technologies.

  15. Manned geosynchronous mission requirements and system analysis study extension. Manned Orbital Transfer Vehicle (MOTV) capabilities handbook and user guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The primary change in crew capsule definition is a smaller MOTV crew capsule, switching from a 3-man capsule to a 2-man capsule. A second change permitted crew accommodations for sleeping and privacy to be combined with the flight station. The current baseline DRM, ER1, requires 2 men for 3 to 4 days to repair a multi-disciplined GOE Platform and a modest amount of mission dedicated hardware. A 2-man MOTV crew capsule to be used as a design reference point for the OTV, and its interfaces between the STS and other associated equipment or facilities are described in detail. The functional capabilities of the 2-man capsule, as well as its application to a wide range of generic missions, is also presented. The MOTV turnaround is addressed and significant requirements for both space based and ground based scenarios are summarized.

  16. Oncologic Impact of Fewer Than 12 Lymph Nodes in Patients Who Underwent Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Followed by Total Mesorectal Excision for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Ram; Han, Yoon Dae; Cho, Min Soo; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A minimum of 12 harvested lymph nodes (hLNs) are recommended in colorectal cancer. However, a paucity of hLNs is frequently presented after preoperative chemoradiation (pCRT) in rectal cancer and the significance of this is still uncertain. The aim of this study is to analyze the impact of hLNs on long-term oncologic outcomes. A total of 302 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent pCRT and curative resection between 1989 and 2009 were reviewed. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to the number of hLNs: <12 versus ≥12 LN. The 2 groups were compared with respect to 5-year disease-free and overall survival. The optimal number or ratio of hLNs was investigated in subgroup analysis according to LN status. The median follow-up was 57 months. Patient characteristics other than age did not differ between the 2 groups. The group with <12 LNs had more favorable ypTNM and ypN stage than those with ≥12 LNs. However, the long-term oncologic outcomes were not significantly different between the 2 groups. In subgroup analysis of ypN(−), the group with <5 hLNs had the most favorable oncologic outcomes. In ypN(+) cases, a higher LN ratio tended to be associated with poorer 5-year overall survival. The paucity of hLNs in locally advanced rectal cancer after chemoradiation did not imply poor oncologic outcomes in this study. In addition, <5 hLNs in ypN(−) patients could reflect a good tumor response rather than suboptimal radicality. PMID:26181550

  17. Comparison of ovulation induction and pregnacy outcomes in IVF patients with normal ovarian reserve who underwent long protocol with recombinant-FSH and highly purified-hMG

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Cem; Sofuoğlu, Kenan; Selçuk, Selçuk; Asoğlu, Mehmet Reşit; Abalı, Remzi; Çetingöz, Elçin; Baykal, Bahar; Uludoğan, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Objective Gonadotropins used in controlled ovarian stimulation have been increasing in number. Beside the recombinant preparations such as rec-FSH, rec-LH and h-hMG human-derived preparations have entered the market. We decided to compare the effects of rec-FSH and HP-hMG with GnRHa on embryo quality and pregnancy outcome in women undergoing an IVF cycle. Material and Methods In this study, data of 87 patients who had applied to our center from 2007 to 2008 and who had met all inclusion criteria, were analyzed. The patients underwent controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with HP-hMG, rec-FSH following down-regulation with a GnRHa in a long protocol, selected according to determined criteria and acquired embryo via IVF transfer. Results Of the 87 patients, 44 were stimulated with rec-FSH and 43 with HP-hMG. Distribution of infertility causes was similar between the groups. Duration of gonadotropin administration (p=0.677, Student’s t-test) and the total dose of gonadotropin received (p=0.392, Student’s t-test) were similar between the two groups. The fertilization rate of the rec-FSH group was significantly higher than the HP-hMG group (p=0.001, Mann-Whitney U test). No significant differences were observed between the study groups in biochemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy parameters. Conclusion The higher oocyte yield with rec-FSH does not result in higher quality embryos. LH activity in combination with FSH activity positively affected the oocyte and embryo maturation. Therefore, when we consider the clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates there is no inferiority of HP-hMG in controlled ovarian stimulation. PMID:24591951

  18. Prognostic Value of Fat Mass and Skeletal Muscle Mass Determined by Computed Tomography in Patients Who Underwent Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Mok, Michael; Allende, Ricardo; Leipsic, Jonathon; Altisent, Omar Abdul-Jawad; Del Trigo, Maria; Campelo-Parada, Francisco; DeLarochellière, Robert; Dumont, Eric; Doyle, Daniel; Côté, Mélanie; Freeman, Melanie; Webb, John; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2016-03-01

    Body composition (fat mass [FM] and skeletal muscle mass [SMM]) predicts clinical outcomes. In particular, loss of SMM (sarcopenia) is associated with frailty and mortality. There are no data on the prevalence and impact of FM and SMM in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The objective of this study is to determine body composition from pre-TAVI computed tomography (CT) and evaluate its association with clinical outcomes in patients who underwent TAVI. A total of 460 patients (mean age 81 ± 8 years, men: 51%) were included. Pre-TAVI CTs of the aorto-ilio-femoral axis were analyzed for FM and SMM cross-sectional area at the level of the third lumbar vertebrae (L3). Regression equations correlating cross-sectional area at L3 to total body FM and SMM were used to determine prevalence of sarcopenia, obesity, and sarcopenic obesity in patients (64%, 65%, and 46%, respectively). Most TAVI procedures were performed through a transfemoral approach (59%) using a balloon-expandable valve (94%). The 30-day and mid-term (median 12 months [interquartile range 6 to 27]) mortality rates were 6.1% and 29.6%, respectively. FM had no association with clinical outcomes, but sarcopenia predicted cumulative mortality (hazard ratio 1.55, 95% confidence interval 1.02 to 2.36, p = 0.04). In conclusion, body composition analysis from pre-TAVI CT is feasible. Sarcopenia, obesity, and sarcopenic obesity are prevalent in the TAVI population, with sarcopenia predictive of cumulative mortality. PMID:26754122

  19. [Marked clinical improvement by plasmapheresis in a patient with stiff-man syndrome: a case with a negative anti-GAD antibody].

    PubMed

    Nakamagoe, K; Ohkoshi, N; Hayashi, A; Hisahara, S; Shoji, S

    1995-08-01

    We described a 56-year-old man with stiff-man syndrome, who was markedly improved after plasmapheresis therapy. He had a 12-year history of progressive painful stiffness of his back and limbs, muscle cramps and difficulty in walking. He had been taking oral diazepam and prednisolone. On examination the abdominal and paraspinal muscles and limbs were continuously contracting, confirmed by surface and needle electromyography. Antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and pancreatic islet cells in the serum were negative, but antinuclear antibody and anti-smooth-muscle antibody were present. The patient underwent a course of 4 double filtration plasma exchanges of 3,000 ml each in an 8-day period. Plasmapheresis resulted in marked clinical improvement. The disappearance of muscular cramps and a reduction of stiffness occurred within 24 hours after the first plasmapheresis, and he was able to walk unassisted. The patient's subjective improvement continued over 4 months after the plasma exchange. This case provides additional evidence of the autoimmune mechanism of stiff-man syndrome. Plasmapheresis is one choice in the management for stiff-man syndrome.

  20. Left Main Coronary Artery Atresia in Young Man Examined With 99mTc-Tetrofosmin SPECT: A Rare and Challenging Anomaly.

    PubMed

    Rampin, Lucia; Rinuncini, Massimo; Zuin, Marco; Rigatelli, GianLuca; Roncon, Loris; Colletti, Patrick M; Rubello, Domenico

    2016-10-01

    A young man underwent Tc-tetrofosmin cardiac SPECT/CT for the evaluation of the 8-month history of exertional dyspnea without chest pain. Tc-tetrofosmin SPECT demonstrated absence of perfusion defects and a mildly decreased uptake in post-stress images, consistent with artifact, in the inferior myocardium. Cardiac catheterization showed a large right and a small left coronary artery opacified retrogradely by right collateral vessels without connections between the left main and the left coronary artery. In patients with anomalous coronary arteries, Tc SPECT can shows absence of perfusion defects, in the presence of a collateral circulation.