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Sample records for 64-bit digital optical

  1. Installation of MCNP on 64-bit parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Meginnis, A.B.; Hendricks, J.S.; McKinney, G.W.

    1995-09-01

    The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP has been successfully ported to two 64-bit workstations, the SGI and DEC Alpha. We found the biggest problem for installation on these machines to be Fortran and C mismatches in argument passing. Correction of these mismatches enabled, for the first time, dynamic memory allocation on 64-bit workstations. Although the 64-bit hardware is faster because 8-bytes are processed at a time rather than 4-bytes, we found no speed advantage in true 64-bit coding versus implicit double precision when porting an existing code to the 64-bit workstation architecture. We did find that PVM multiasking is very successful and represents a significant performance enhancement for scientific workstations.

  2. Design and implementation of low power clock gated 64-bit ALU on ultra scale FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ashutosh; Murgai, Shruti; Gulati, Anmol; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-03-01

    64-bit energy efficient Arithmetic and Logic Unit using negative latch based clock gating technique is designed in this paper. The 64-bit ALU is designed using multiplexer based full adder cell. We have designed a 64-bit ALU with a gated clock. We have used negative latch based circuit for generating gated clock. This gated clock is used to control the multiplexer based 64-bit ALU. The circuit has been synthesized on kintex FPGA through Xilinx ISE Design Suite 14.7 using 28 nm technology in Verilog HDL. The circuit has been simulated on Modelsim 10.3c. The design is verified using System Verilog on QuestaSim in UVM environment. We have achieved 74.07%, 92. 93% and 95.53% reduction in total clock power, 89.73%, 91.35% and 92.85% reduction in I/Os power, 67.14%, 62.84% and 74.34% reduction in dynamic power and 25.47%, 29.05% and 46.13% reduction in total supply power at 20 MHz, 200 MHz and 2 GHz frequency respectively. The power has been calculated using XPower Analyzer tool of Xilinx ISE Design Suite 14.3.

  3. Digital optical conversion module

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.

    1988-07-19

    A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer. 2 figs.

  4. Digital optical conversion module

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, Dale K.; Rankin, Richard A.

    1991-02-26

    A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer.

  5. Supporting 64-bit global indices in Epetra and other Trilinos packages :

    SciTech Connect

    Jhurani, Chetan; Austin, Travis M.; Heroux, Michael Allen; Willenbring, James Michael

    2013-06-01

    The Trilinos Project is an effort to facilitate the design, development, integration and ongoing support of mathematical software libraries within an object-oriented framework. It is intended for large-scale, complex multiphysics engineering and scientific applications [2, 4, 3]. Epetra is one of its basic packages. It provides serial and parallel linear algebra capabilities. Before Trilinos version 11.0, released in 2012, Epetra used the C++ int data-type for storing global and local indices for degrees of freedom (DOFs). Since int is typically 32-bit, this limited the largest problem size to be smaller than approximately two billion DOFs. This was true even if a distributed memory machine could handle larger problems. We have added optional support for C++ long long data-type, which is at least 64-bit wide, for global indices. To save memory, maintain the speed of memory-bound operations, and reduce further changes to the code, the local indices are still 32-bit. We document the changes required to achieve this feature and how the new functionality can be used. We also report on the lessons learned in modifying a mature and popular package from various perspectives design goals, backward compatibility, engineering decisions, C++ language features, effects on existing users and other packages, and build integration.

  6. Digital dual-rate burst-mode receiver for 10G and 1G coexistence in optical access networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado Mendinueta, José Manuel; Mitchell, John E.; Bayvel, Polina; Thomsen, Benn C.

    2011-07-01

    A digital dual-rate burst-mode receiver, intended to support 10 and 1 Gb/s coexistence in optical access networks, is proposed and experimentally characterized. The receiver employs a standard DC-coupled photoreceiver followed by a 20 GS/s digitizer and the detection of the packet presence and line-rate is implemented in the digital domain. A polyphase, 2 samples-per-bit digital signal processing algorithm is then used for efficient clock and data recovery of the 10/1.25 Gb/s packets. The receiver performance is characterized in terms of sensitivity and dynamic range under burst-mode operation for 10/1.25 Gb/s intensity modulated data in terms of both the packet error rate (PER) and the payload bit error rate (pBER). The impact of packet preamble lengths of 16, 32, 48, and 64 bits, at 10 Gb/s, on the receiver performance is investigated. We show that there is a trade-off between pBER and PER that is limited by electrical noise and digitizer clipping at low and high received powers, respectively, and that a 16/2-bit preamble at 10/1.25 Gb/s is sufficient to reliably detect packets at both line-rates over a burst-to-burst dynamic range of 14,5dB with a sensitivity of -18.5dBm at 10 Gb/s.

  7. Digital dual-rate burst-mode receiver for 10G and 1G coexistence in optical access networks.

    PubMed

    Mendinueta, José Manuel Delgado; Mitchell, John E; Bayvel, Polina; Thomsen, Benn C

    2011-07-18

    A digital dual-rate burst-mode receiver, intended to support 10 and 1 Gb/s coexistence in optical access networks, is proposed and experimentally characterized. The receiver employs a standard DC-coupled photoreceiver followed by a 20 GS/s digitizer and the detection of the packet presence and line-rate is implemented in the digital domain. A polyphase, 2 samples-per-bit digital signal processing algorithm is then used for efficient clock and data recovery of the 10/1.25 Gb/s packets. The receiver performance is characterized in terms of sensitivity and dynamic range under burst-mode operation for 10/1.25 Gb/s intensity modulated data in terms of both the packet error rate (PER) and the payload bit error rate (pBER). The impact of packet preamble lengths of 16, 32, 48, and 64 bits, at 10 Gb/s, on the receiver performance is investigated. We show that there is a trade-off between pBER and PER that is limited by electrical noise and digitizer clipping at low and high received powers, respectively, and that a 16/2-bit preamble at 10/1.25 Gb/s is sufficient to reliably detect packets at both line-rates over a burst-to-burst dynamic range of 14,5 dB with a sensitivity of -18.5 dBm at 10 Gb/s. PMID:21934767

  8. Optical digital techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Optical interface losses between transmitter-to-fiber interface, connector-to-connector interface, and fiber-to-receiver interface were studied. System effects such as pulse dispersion, risetimes of the sources and detectors, type of fibers used, output power of the sources, and detector sensitivity were considered. Data bus systems such as TEE, Star, and Hybrid were analyzed. The matter of single fiber versus bundle technologies for future avionics systems was considered. The existing data bus system on Space Shuttle was examined and an optical analog was derived for a fiber bundle system, along with the associated power margin. System tests were performed on a feasibility model of a 9-port Star data bus system including BER, star losses, connector losses, etc. The same system was subjected to EMI between the range of 200 Hz to 10 GHz at 20V/m levels. A lightning test was also performed which simulated the conditions similar to those on Space Shuttle. The data bus system was found to be EMI and lightning hard. It is concluded that an optical data bus system is feasible for shuttle orbiter type vehicles.

  9. Optical analog-to-digital converter

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G. Allen; Raring, James; Skogen, Erik J.

    2009-07-21

    An optical analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is disclosed which converts an input optical analog signal to an output optical digital signal at a sampling rate defined by a sampling optical signal. Each bit of the digital representation is separately determined using an optical waveguide interferometer and an optical thresholding element. The interferometer uses the optical analog signal and the sampling optical signal to generate a sinusoidally-varying output signal using cross-phase-modulation (XPM) or a photocurrent generated from the optical analog signal. The sinusoidally-varying output signal is then digitized by the thresholding element, which includes a saturable absorber or at least one semiconductor optical amplifier, to form the optical digital signal which can be output either in parallel or serially.

  10. Digital Optical Sky Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Kron, R.G.

    1995-08-01

    Cameras containing arrays of charge-coupled devices---or which are otherwise capable of sustained high data rates---enable optical sky surveys that compete in efficiency with photographic surveys in terms of area of sky covered per unit observing time. There are gains in performance as well as efficiency: stellar photometry is more straightforward because of the higher dynamic range of CCDs, and the low noise of CCDs allows narrow-band surveys to be undertaken. The small dead-time between exposures allows surveys for rapid variability as well as near-simultaneous color measurements. The most important new prospect may be real-time analysis for identification of sources changing either in position or in brightness. These gains come only after substantial investment in analysis tools and data handling and storage systems. To illustrate some of this potential, this review will focus on a number of sky surveys with CCDs that are either under way or in advanced implementation stages. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital Astronomical} {ital Society} {ital of} {ital the} {ital Pacific}.

  11. Recent advances in digital camera optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Keizo

    2012-10-01

    The digital camera market has extremely expanded in the last ten years. The zoom lens for digital camera is especially the key determining factor of the camera body size and image quality. Its technologies have been based on several analog technological progresses including the method of aspherical lens manufacturing and the mechanism of image stabilization. Panasonic is one of the pioneers of both technologies. I will introduce the previous trend in optics of zoom lens as well as original optical technologies of Panasonic digital camera "LUMIX", and in addition optics in 3D camera system. Besides, I would like to suppose the future trend in digital cameras.

  12. Digital diffractive optics: Have diffractive optics entered mainstream industry yet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Bernard; Hejmadi, Vic

    2010-05-01

    When a new technology is integrated into industry commodity products and consumer electronic devices, and sold worldwide in retail stores, it is usually understood that this technology has then entered the realm of mainstream technology and therefore mainstream industry. Such a leap however does not come cheap, as it has a double edge sword effect: first it becomes democratized and thus massively developed by numerous companies for various applications, but also it becomes a commodity, and thus gets under tremendous pressure to cut down its production and integration costs while not sacrificing to performance. We will show, based on numerous examples extracted from recent industry history, that the field of Diffractive Optics is about to undergo such a major transformation. Such a move has many impacts on all facets of digital diffractive optics technology, from the optical design houses to the micro-optics foundries (for both mastering and volume replication), to the final product integrators or contract manufacturers. The main causes of such a transformation are, as they have been for many other technologies in industry, successive technological bubbles which have carried and lifted up diffractive optics technology within the last decades. These various technological bubbles have been triggered either by real industry needs or by virtual investment hype. Both of these causes will be discussed in the paper. The adjective ""digital"" in "digital diffractive optics" does not refer only, as it is done in digital electronics, to the digital functionality of the element (digital signal processing), but rather to the digital way they are designed (by a digital computer) and fabricated (as wafer level optics using digital masking techniques). However, we can still trace a very strong similarity between the emergence of micro-electronics from analog electronics half a century ago, and the emergence of digital optics from conventional optics today.

  13. Advanced optical manufacturing digital integrated system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yizheng; Li, Xinglan; Li, Wei; Tang, Dingyong

    2012-10-01

    It is necessarily to adapt development of advanced optical manufacturing technology with modern science technology development. To solved these problems which low of ration, ratio of finished product, repetition, consistent in big size and high precision in advanced optical component manufacturing. Applied business driven and method of Rational Unified Process, this paper has researched advanced optical manufacturing process flow, requirement of Advanced Optical Manufacturing integrated System, and put forward architecture and key technology of it. Designed Optical component core and Manufacturing process driven of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Digital Integrated System. the result displayed effective well, realized dynamic planning Manufacturing process, information integration improved ratio of production manufactory.

  14. A third-generation digital optical computer

    SciTech Connect

    Guilfoyle, P.S. )

    1993-05-01

    A third generation digital optical computer (DOC III) which is currently being developed by OptiComp Corp. is described. DOC III integrates GaAs technology with global optical interconnects and will achieve multipurpose functionality at speeds up to 10 exp 14 bit operations per second. The DOC III project based on a second-generation digital optical computer employs N4 global interconnect technology. Smart pixel technology which is further developed in DOC III within a GaAs smart pixel design makes it possible to reduce the power consumption and the package size, and to increase the throughput of the system. 6 refs.

  15. Digital Photogrammetry Of The Optic Nerve Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, A. Ralph

    1980-07-01

    A digital photogrammetric method capable of providing quantitative measurements from stereophotographs of the optic nerve head has been utilized in our laboratory to study the optic cup in patients with ocular hypertension and chronic glaucoma. Studies on the reproducibi-lity of the digital photogrammetric technique of optic nerve head photographs taken with various cameras has revealed that (1) reproducibility was significantly better when simultaneous stereo-photographs were analyzed and (2) the Donaldson stereofundus camera provided the best reproducibility of the majority of geometric measurements in optic cups of various sizes. In addition, it has been determined that the shallower cups encountered larger percentage errors. Improvements in parameter reproducibility have been obtained when finer sampling intervals have been used during film digitization. An additional study comparing reproducibility of cup parameters as determined by the digital photogrammetric procedure with those values obtained from analog photogrammetry and manual analysis revealed generally superior reproducibility of the digital photogrammetric analyses in the eyes studies. Preliminary observations utilizing the digital photogrammetric procedure in a modified Zeiss model eye indicated that minor shifts in camera posi-tion did not alter the reproducibility of the technique.

  16. Optical interference with digital holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossman, David; Perez-Garcia, Benjamin; Hernandez-Aranda, Raul I.; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    In 1804, Thomas Young reported the observation of fringes in the intensity of light, and attributed it to the concept of interference between coherent sources. In this paper, we revisit this famous experiment and show how it can easily be demonstrated with digital holography. We look closely at the concept of interference with light and ask, "fringes in what?" We then show that depending on how light interferes, fringe patterns in observables other than intensity can be seen. We explain this conceptually and demonstrate it experimentally. We provide a holistic approach to the topic, aided by modern laboratory practices for a straightforward demonstration of the underlying physics.

  17. Digital optical tape: Technology and standardization issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podio, Fernando L.

    1996-01-01

    During the coming years, digital data storage technologies will continue an aggressive growth to satisfy the user's need for higher storage capacities, higher data transfer rates and long-term archival media properties. Digital optical tape is a promising technology to satisfy these user's needs. As any emerging data storage technology, the industry faces many technological and standardization challenges. The technological challenges are great, but feasible to overcome. Although it is too early to consider formal industry standards, the optical tape industry has decided to work together by initiating prestandardization efforts that may lead in the future to formal voluntary industry standards. This paper will discuss current industry optical tape drive developments and the types of standards that will be required for the technology. The status of current industry prestandardization efforts will also be discussed.

  18. Digitally enhanced optical fiber frequency reference.

    PubMed

    McRae, Terry G; Ngo, Silvie; Shaddock, Daniel A; Hsu, Magnus T L; Gray, Malcolm B

    2014-04-01

    We use digitally enhanced heterodyne interferometry to measure the stability of optical fiber laser frequency references. Suppression of laser frequency noise by over four orders of magnitude is achieved using post processing time delay interferometry, allowing us to measure the mechanical stability for frequencies as low as 100 μHz. The performance of the digitally enhanced heterodyne interferometer platform used here is not practically limited by the dynamic range or bandwidth issues that can occur in feedback stabilization systems. This allows longer measurement times, better frequency discrimination, a reduction in spatially uncorrelated noise sources and an increase in interferometer sensitivity. An optical fiber frequency reference with the stability reported here, over a signal band of 20 mHz-1 Hz, has potential for use in demanding environments, such as space-based interferometry missions and optical flywheel applications. PMID:24686596

  19. Optical domain analog to digital conversion methods and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, Gregory A

    2014-05-13

    Methods and apparatus for optical analog to digital conversion are disclosed. An optical signal is converted by mapping the optical analog signal onto a wavelength modulated optical beam, passing the mapped beam through interferometers to generate analog bit representation signals, and converting the analog bit representation signals into an optical digital signal. A photodiode receives an optical analog signal, a wavelength modulated laser coupled to the photodiode maps the optical analog signal to a wavelength modulated optical beam, interferometers produce an analog bit representation signal from the mapped wavelength modulated optical beam, and sample and threshold circuits corresponding to the interferometers produce a digital bit signal from the analog bit representation signal.

  20. Optical encryption in single shot digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Yang; Chen, Gu-Liang; Kuo, Ming-Kuei; Chang, Chi-Ching; Yau, Hon-Fai

    2007-09-01

    We propose a novel optical encryption approach using a lenticular lens array (LLA) as a deterministic phase modulator and the single-shot digital holographic scheme. In the proposed scheme, the input amplitude image is encrypted and interferes with the reference wave phase, which is modulated by a LLA, then recorded holographically by a digital CCD camera to form an encrypted hologram. A decryption key is obtained from the key hologram using numerical reconstruction. The image is decrypted using a digital holographic approach after which the encrypted hologram is multiplying the numerical reconstructed key for decryption. The experimental results show that only an encrypted hologram is needed. Moreover with this approach, the decryption procedure can be rapidly accomplished using a personal computer, presenting a decrypted image of satisfactory image quality. Finally the selective sensitivity of the key rotation is also investigated.

  1. Multifunctional hybrid optical/digital neural net

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casasent, David P.

    1990-08-01

    A multi-functional hybrid neural net is described. It is hybrid since it uses a digital hardware Hecht-Nielsen Corporation (HNC) neural net for adaptive learning and an optical neural net for on-line processing/classification. It is also hybrid in its combination of pattern recognition and neural net techniques. The system is multi-functional. It can function as an optimization and adaptive pattern recognition neural net as well as an auto and heteroassociative processor. I . W. JTRODUCTION Neural nets (NNs) have recently received enormous attention [1 -2] with increasing attention to the use of optical processors and a variety of new learning algorithms. Section 2 describes our hybrid NN with attention to Its fabrication and the role for optical and digital processors. Section 3 details Its use as an associative processor. Section 4 highlights is use in 3 optimization NN problems (a mixture NN a multitarget tracker (MTT) NN and a matrix inversion NN). Section 5 briefly notes it use as a production NN system and symbolic NN. Section 6 describes its use as an adaptive pattern recognition (PR) NN (that marries PR and NN techniques). 2. HYBRID ARCHITECTURE Figure 1 shows our basic hybrid NN [3]. The optical portion of the system is a matrix-vector (M-V) processor whose vector output P3 is the product of the vector at P1 and the matrix at P2. An HNC digital hardware NN is used during learning determine the interconnection weights forP2. If P2 is a spatial light modulator (SLM) its contents can be updated (using gated learning) from thedigital NN. The operations in most adaptive PR NN learning algorithms are sufficiently complex thatthey are best implemented digitally. In addition the learning operations required are often not well suited for optical realization for optimization NNs the weights are fixed and in adaptive learning learning is off-line and once completed the weights can often be fixed. Four gates are shown that determine the final output or the new P1

  2. Digital polarization holography advancing geometrical phase optics.

    PubMed

    De Sio, Luciano; Roberts, David E; Liao, Zhi; Nersisyan, Sarik; Uskova, Olena; Wickboldt, Lloyd; Tabiryan, Nelson; Steeves, Diane M; Kimball, Brian R

    2016-08-01

    Geometrical phase or the fourth generation (4G) optics enables realization of optical components (lenses, prisms, gratings, spiral phase plates, etc.) by patterning the optical axis orientation in the plane of thin anisotropic films. Such components exhibit near 100% diffraction efficiency over a broadband of wavelengths. The films are obtained by coating liquid crystalline (LC) materials over substrates with patterned alignment conditions. Photo-anisotropic materials are used for producing desired alignment conditions at the substrate surface. We present and discuss here an opportunity of producing the widest variety of "free-form" 4G optical components with arbitrary spatial patterns of the optical anisotropy axis orientation with the aid of a digital spatial light polarization converter (DSLPC). The DSLPC is based on a reflective, high resolution spatial light modulator (SLM) combined with an "ad hoc" optical setup. The most attractive feature of the use of a DSLPC for photoalignment of nanometer thin photo-anisotropic coatings is that the orientation of the alignment layer, and therefore of the fabricated LC or LC polymer (LCP) components can be specified on a pixel-by-pixel basis with high spatial resolution. By varying the optical magnification or de-magnification the spatial resolution of the photoaligned layer can be adjusted to an optimum for each application. With a simple "click" it is possible to record different optical components as well as arbitrary patterns ranging from lenses to invisible labels and other transparent labels that reveal different images depending on the side from which they are viewed. PMID:27505793

  3. EDITORIAL: Optical tomography and digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coupland, Jeremy; Lobera, Julia

    2008-07-01

    The articles in this special feature in Measurement Science and Technology concern exciting new developments in the field of digital holography—the process of electronically recording and numerically reconstructing an optical field [1]. Making use of the enormous advances in digital imaging and computer technology, digital holography is presented in a range of applications from fluid flow measurement and structural analysis to medical imaging. The science of digital holography rests on the foundations of optical holography, on the work of Gabor in the late 1940s, and on the development of laser sources in the 1960s, which made his vision a practical reality [2]. Optical holography, however, uses a photosensitive material, both to record a latent image and subsequently to behave as a diffractive optical element with which to reconstruct the incident field. In this way display holograms, using silver halide materials for example, can produce life-size images that are virtually indistinguishable from the object itself [3]. Digital holography, in contrast, separates the steps of recording and reconstruction, and the final image is most often in the form of a 3D computer model. Of course, television cameras have been used from the beginnings of holography to record interferometric images. However, the huge disparity between the resolution of holographic recording materials (more than 3000 cycles/mm) and television cameras (around 50 cycles/mm) was raised as a major concern by early researchers. TV holography, as it was sometimes called, generally recorded low numerical aperture (NA) holograms producing images with characteristically large speckle and was therefore more often referred to as electronic speckle pattern interferomery (ESPI) [4]. It is possible, however, to record large NA holograms on a sensor with restricted resolution by using an objective lens or a diverging reference wave [5]. This is generally referred to as digital holographic microscopy (DHM) since

  4. Parallel algorithms for optical digital computers

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, A.

    1983-01-01

    Conventional computers suffer from several communication bottlenecks which fundamentally limit their performance. These bottlenecks are characterised by an address-dependent sequential transfer of information which arises from the need to time-multiplex information over a limited number of interconnections. An optical digital computer based on a classical finite state machine can be shown to be free of these bottlenecks. Such a processor would be unique since it would be capable of modifying its entire state space each cycle while conventional computers can only alter a few bits. New algorithms are needed to manage and use this capability. A technique based on recognising a particular symbol in parallel and replacing it in parallel with another symbol is suggested. Examples using this parallel symbolic substitution to perform binary addition and binary incrementation are presented. Applications involving Boolean logic, functional programming languages, production rule driven artificial intelligence, and molecular chemistry are also discussed. 12 references.

  5. Planning for optical disk technology with digital cartography.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Light, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    A major shortfall that still exists in digital systems is the need for very large mass storage capacity. The decade of the 1980s has introduced laser optical disk storage technology, which may be the breakthrough needed for mass storage. This paper addresses system concepts for digital cartography during the transition period. Emphasis will be placed on determining USGS mass storage requirements and introducing laser optical disk technology for handling storage problems for digital data in this decade.-from Author

  6. Optical-digital hybrid image search system in cloud environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Kanami; Kodate, Kashiko; Watanabe, Eriko

    2016-09-01

    To improve the versatility and usability of optical correlators, we developed an optical-digital hybrid image search system consisting of digital servers and an optical correlator that can be used to perform image searches in the cloud environment via a web browser. This hybrid system employs a simple method to obtain correlation signals and has a distributed network design. The correlation signals are acquired by using an encoder timing signal generated by a rotating disk, and the distributed network design facilitates the replacement and combination of the digital correlation server and the optical correlator.

  7. Digital associative memory neural network with optical learning capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Minoru; Ohtsubo, Junji

    1994-12-01

    A digital associative memory neural network system with optical learning and recalling capabilities is proposed by using liquid crystal television spatial light modulators and an Optic RAM detector. In spite of the drawback of the limited memory capacity compared with optical analogue associative memory neural network, the proposed optical digital neural network has the advantage of all optical learning and recalling capabilities, thus an all optics network system is easily realized. Some experimental results of the learning and the recalling for character recognitions are presented. This new optical architecture offers compactness of the system and the fast learning and recalling properties. Based on the results, the practical system for the implementation of a faster optical digital associative memory neural network system with ferro-electric liquid crystal SLMs is also proposed.

  8. PLANNING FOR OPTICAL DISK TECHNOLOGY WITH DIGITAL CARTOGRAPHY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Light, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    Progress in the computer field continues to suggest that the transition from traditional analog mapping systems to digital systems has become a practical possibility. A major shortfall that still exists in digital systems is the need for very large mass storage capacity. The decade of the 1980's has introduced laser optical disk storage technology, which may be the breakthrough needed for mass storage. This paper addresses system concepts for digital cartography during the transition period. Emphasis is placed on determining U. S. Geological Survey mass storage requirements and introducing laser optical disk technology for handling storage problems for digital data in this decade.

  9. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea.

  10. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea. PMID:26140334

  11. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea. PMID:26140334

  12. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-11-01

    A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea.

  13. Analysis of a digital microstrip optical switch: a novel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ruwaihi, Khalid M.; Hindy, Moataza A.

    1997-02-01

    A time domain analysis of an optically controlled digital microstrip switch for microwave integrated circuits on Si substrates is studied. A new model for high-frequency pulse propagation on a microstrip optical switch for different optical parameters is presented. A frequency-dependent macromodel for a microstrip line with a gap is implemented in Spice 3, taking into consideration high-frequency pulse dispersion, conductor and dielectric losses, metallization thickness, gap length, and different optical parameters such as optical energy, surface recombination velocities, and diffusion of generated carriers. In addition, the developed model has been used to optimize the switching frequency, gap length, level of optical power, and suitable substrate material parameters.

  14. Investigating digital optical computing with spatial light rebroadcasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAulay, Alastair D.; Wang, Junqing; Xu, Xin

    1991-10-01

    Spatial light rebroadcasters (SLR's) consisting of thin films of luminescing electron trapping materials, are explored for digital optical computing. The status of optical computing is reviewed briefly. SLR's are characterized in detail; fabrication, sensitivity, linearity, speed, resolution, and modulation. A number of optical experiments are described that were conducted to determine the device effectiveness, applications for which the devices are best suited, and the direction for research to develop more useful devices. Optical experiments with basic SLR modules include a cascadable module, binary matrix-vector multiplier, and correlator. The basic modules were then used in memory, adder, interconnection, and learning experiments. These experiments show that the SLR has potential for digital optical computing, particularly where high density long term storage is required. However, the lack of gain, incoherent output, and lot output signal means that other collaborative devices are needed which limit the performance. Future directions are discussed.

  15. Structured-light-assisted wireless digital optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yunfei; Wang, Shuaijun; Wu, Wei; Yang, Xiaomin; Jeon, Gwanggil; Liu, Kai

    2015-11-01

    Camera-projector-pair-based digital optical communications are attractive for safe and flexible usages, while the state-of-the-art systems suffer from various disadvantages or distortions of communication channels, including the irregularity and the non-uniform albedo of projection surfaces, the radial distortion of optical lenses, etc. In this paper, we present a novel method for digital optical communications. Assisted by structured light illumination, we overcome those disadvantages and accurately derive the models of the communication channels. First, by deriving accurate model-free coordinates maps for the camera-projector pair, we overcome the issues caused by the irregularity of projection surfaces and the radial distortion of optical lenses. Second, by normalizing received digital optical signals with calibrated system parameters, we overcome the issue arising from the non-uniform albedo of projection surfaces. Thus, with the models and all pixel-wise operations, we finally achieve robust and real-time wireless digital optical communications. Experimental results verify the validity of the proposed method.

  16. Digital signal processing for fiber-optic thermometers

    SciTech Connect

    Fernicola, V.; Crovini, L.

    1994-12-31

    A digital signal processing scheme for measurement of exponentially-decaying signals, such as those found in fluorescence, lifetime-based, fiber-optic sensors, is proposed. The instrument uses a modified digital phase-sensitive-detection technique with the phase locked to a fixed value and the modulation period tracking the measured lifetime. Typical resolution of the system is 0.05% for slow decay (>500 {mu}s) and 0.1% for fast decay.

  17. KM3NeT Digital Optical Module electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real, Diego

    2016-04-01

    The KM3NeT collaboration is currently building of a neutrino telescope with a volume of several cubic kilometres at the bottom of the Mediterranean Sea. The telescope consists of a matrix of Digital Optical Modules that will detect the Cherenkov light originated by the interaction of the neutrinos in the proximity of the detector. This contribution describes the main components of the read-out electronics of the Digital Optical Module: the Power Board, which delivers all the power supply required by the Digital Optical Molule electronics; the Central Logic Board, the main core of the read-out system, hosting 31 Time to Digital Converters with 1 ns resolution and the White Rabbit protocol embedded in the Central Logic Board Field Programmable Gate Array; the Octopus boards, that transfer the Low Voltage Digital Signals from the PMT bases to the Central Logic Board and finally the PMT bases, in charge of converting the analogue signal produced in the 31 3" PMTs into a Low Voltage Digital Signal.

  18. Holographic fluorescence microscopy with incoherent digital holographic adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Jang, Changwon; Kim, Jonghyun; Clark, David C; Lee, Seungjae; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of adaptive optics technology into astronomy and ophthalmology has made great contributions in these fields, allowing one to recover images blurred by atmospheric turbulence or aberrations of the eye. Similar adaptive optics improvement in microscopic imaging is also of interest to researchers using various techniques. Current technology of adaptive optics typically contains three key elements: a wavefront sensor, wavefront corrector, and controller. These hardware elements tend to be bulky, expensive, and limited in resolution, involving, for example, lenslet arrays for sensing or multiactuator deformable mirrors for correcting. We have previously introduced an alternate approach based on unique capabilities of digital holography, namely direct access to the phase profile of an optical field and the ability to numerically manipulate the phase profile. We have also demonstrated that direct access and compensation of the phase profile are possible not only with conventional coherent digital holography, but also with a new type of digital holography using incoherent light: selfinterference incoherent digital holography (SIDH). The SIDH generates a complex—i.e., amplitude plus phase—hologram from one or several interferograms acquired with incoherent light, such as LEDs, lamps, sunlight, or fluorescence. The complex point spread function can be measured using guide star illumination and it allows deterministic deconvolution of the full-field image. We present experimental demonstration of aberration compensation in holographic fluorescence microscopy using SIDH. Adaptive optics by SIDH provides new tools for improved cellular fluorescence microscopy through intact tissue layers or other types of aberrant media.

  19. Holographic fluorescence microscopy with incoherent digital holographic adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Jang, Changwon; Kim, Jonghyun; Clark, David C; Lee, Seungjae; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of adaptive optics technology into astronomy and ophthalmology has made great contributions in these fields, allowing one to recover images blurred by atmospheric turbulence or aberrations of the eye. Similar adaptive optics improvement in microscopic imaging is also of interest to researchers using various techniques. Current technology of adaptive optics typically contains three key elements: a wavefront sensor, wavefront corrector, and controller. These hardware elements tend to be bulky, expensive, and limited in resolution, involving, for example, lenslet arrays for sensing or multiactuator deformable mirrors for correcting. We have previously introduced an alternate approach based on unique capabilities of digital holography, namely direct access to the phase profile of an optical field and the ability to numerically manipulate the phase profile. We have also demonstrated that direct access and compensation of the phase profile are possible not only with conventional coherent digital holography, but also with a new type of digital holography using incoherent light: selfinterference incoherent digital holography (SIDH). The SIDH generates a complex—i.e., amplitude plus phase—hologram from one or several interferograms acquired with incoherent light, such as LEDs, lamps, sunlight, or fluorescence. The complex point spread function can be measured using guide star illumination and it allows deterministic deconvolution of the full-field image. We present experimental demonstration of aberration compensation in holographic fluorescence microscopy using SIDH. Adaptive optics by SIDH provides new tools for improved cellular fluorescence microscopy through intact tissue layers or other types of aberrant media. PMID:26146767

  20. Holographic fluorescence microscopy with incoherent digital holographic adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Changwon; Kim, Jonghyun; Clark, David C.; Lee, Seungjae; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-11-01

    Introduction of adaptive optics technology into astronomy and ophthalmology has made great contributions in these fields, allowing one to recover images blurred by atmospheric turbulence or aberrations of the eye. Similar adaptive optics improvement in microscopic imaging is also of interest to researchers using various techniques. Current technology of adaptive optics typically contains three key elements: a wavefront sensor, wavefront corrector, and controller. These hardware elements tend to be bulky, expensive, and limited in resolution, involving, for example, lenslet arrays for sensing or multiactuator deformable mirrors for correcting. We have previously introduced an alternate approach based on unique capabilities of digital holography, namely direct access to the phase profile of an optical field and the ability to numerically manipulate the phase profile. We have also demonstrated that direct access and compensation of the phase profile are possible not only with conventional coherent digital holography, but also with a new type of digital holography using incoherent light: self­interference incoherent digital holography (SIDH). The SIDH generates a complex-i.e., amplitude plus phase-hologram from one or several interferograms acquired with incoherent light, such as LEDs, lamps, sunlight, or fluorescence. The complex point spread function can be measured using guide star illumination and it allows deterministic deconvolution of the full-field image. We present experimental demonstration of aberration compensation in holographic fluorescence microscopy using SIDH. Adaptive optics by SIDH provides new tools for improved cellular fluorescence microscopy through intact tissue layers or other types of aberrant media.

  1. Accuracy of optical dental digitizers: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Vandeweghe, Stefan; Vervack, Valentin; Vanhove, Christian; Dierens, Melissa; Jimbo, Ryo; De Bruyn, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy, in terms of trueness and precision, of optical dental scanners. An experimental acrylic resin cast was created and digitized using a microcomputed tomography (microCT) scanner, which served as the reference model. Five polyether impressions were made of the acrylic resin cast to create five stone casts. Each dental digitizer (Imetric, Lava ST, Smart Optics, KaVo Everest) made five scans of the acrylic resin cast and one scan of every stone cast. The scans were superimposed and compared using metrology software. Deviations were calculated between the datasets obtained from the dental digitizers and the microCT scanner (= trueness) and between datasets from the same dental digitizer (= precision). With exception of the Smart Optics scanner, there were no significant differences in trueness for the acrylic resin cast. For the stone casts, however, the Lava ST performed better than Imetric, which did better than the KaVo scanner. The Smart Optics scanner demonstrated the highest deviation. All digitizers demonstrated a significantly higher trueness for the acrylic resin cast compared to the plaster cast, except the Lava ST. The Lava ST was significantly more precise compared to the other scanners. Imetric and Smart Optics also demonstrated a higher level of precision compared to the KaVo scanner. All digitizers demonstrated some degree of error. Stone cast copies are less accurate because of difficulties with scanning the rougher surface or dimensional deformations caused during the production process. For complex, large-span reconstructions, a highly accurate scanner should be selected. PMID:25734714

  2. Digital optical computers at the optoelectronic computing systems center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Harry F.

    1991-01-01

    The Digital Optical Computing Program within the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Opto-electronic Computing Systems has as its specific goal research on optical computing architectures suitable for use at the highest possible speeds. The program can be targeted toward exploiting the time domain because other programs in the Center are pursuing research on parallel optical systems, exploiting optical interconnection and optical devices and materials. Using a general purpose computing architecture as the focus, we are developing design techniques, tools and architecture for operation at the speed of light limit. Experimental work is being done with the somewhat low speed components currently available but with architectures which will scale up in speed as faster devices are developed. The design algorithms and tools developed for a general purpose, stored program computer are being applied to other systems such as optimally controlled optical communication networks.

  3. Optical Disk for Digital Storage and Retrieval Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Denis A.

    1983-01-01

    Availability of low-cost digital optical disks will revolutionize storage and retrieval systems over next decade. Three major factors will effect this change: availability of disks and controllers at low-cost and in plentiful supply; availability of low-cost and better output means for system users; and more flexible, less expensive communication…

  4. Implementation, Control and Programming of Digital Optical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Robert George Alexander

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Optical technology is playing an increasingly important role in modern computer systems including such areas as communications via fiber optic systems and data storage in the form of the optical compact disk (CD-ROM's). One of the aims of research into this technology has been to extend and enhance existing electronic computing systems. This thesis represents work carried out on the implementation of one particular form of parallel digital optical computing architecture known as the optical cellular logic image processor. This architecture performs the information processing all-optically and in parallel while making use of electronic technology for timing and control. One particular component required in this architecture is some form of programmable processing unit. Experimental studies involving the construction of single channel optical processing units were successfully completed. These units had multi-function capability and could be programmed optically under electronic control. Expansion upon one of these basic units to include iterative feedback resulted in the successful implementation of a single channel of the cellular logic image processor architecture. It allowed eight functions to be programmed in real time and demonstrated some of the world's first all-optical digital processing of arbitrary optical data. Further expansion of the system to include 256 simultaneous processing channels using similar technology was also partially completed. A full description is presented of the design concepts, components and the systems that have been developed. Attention is also given to both the hardware and software aspects related to electronic control of the optical systems. Finally, limitations associated with present optical technology are discussed and future possibilities suggested.

  5. Digital reconstruction of optically-induced potentials.

    PubMed

    Barsi, Christopher; Fleischer, Jason W

    2009-12-01

    The holographic reconstruction of optically-induced objects typically assumes that the object is axially thin. Here, we demonstrate a simple approach that works for axially thick objects which evolve dynamically. Results are verified by reconstructing linear scattering experiments in a self-defocusing photorefractive crystal.

  6. Digital optical phase conjugation of fluorescence in turbid tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Vellekoop, Ivo M.; Cui Meng; Yang Changhuei

    2012-08-20

    We demonstrate a method for phase conjugating fluorescence. Our method, called reference free digital optical phase conjugation, can conjugate extremely weak, incoherent optical signals. It was used to phase conjugate fluorescent light originating from a bead covered with 0.5 mm of light-scattering tissue. The phase conjugated beam refocuses onto the bead and causes a local increase of over two orders of magnitude in the light intensity. Potential applications are in imaging, optical trapping, and targeted photochemical activation inside turbid tissue.

  7. Multiplexed interferometric fiber-optic sensors with digital signal processing.

    PubMed

    Sadkowski, R; Lee, C E; Taylor, H F

    1995-09-01

    A microcontroller-based digital signal processing system developed for use with fiber-optic sensors for measuring pressure in internal combustion engines is described. A single distributed feedback laser source provides optical power for four interferometric sensors. The laser current is repetitively modulated so that its optical frequency is nearly a linear function of time over most of a cycle. The interferometer phase shift is proportional to the elapsed time from the initiation of a sawtooth until the sensor output signal level crosses a threshold value proportional to the laser output power. This elapsed time, assumed to vary linearly with the combustion chamber pressure, is determined by the use of a digital timer-counter. The system has been used with fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer transducers for in-cylinder pressure measurement on a four-cylinder gasoline-powered engine.

  8. Holographic fluorescence microscopy with incoherent digital holographic adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Changwon; Kim, Jonghyun; Clark, David C.; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-03-01

    Introduction of adaptive optics technology into astronomy and ophthalmology has made great contributions in these fields, allowing one to recover images blurred by atmospheric turbulence or aberrations of the eye. Similar adaptive optics improvement in microscopic imaging is also of interest to researchers using various techniques. Current technology of adaptive optics typically contains three key elements: wavefront sensor, wavefront corrector and controller. These hardware elements tend to be bulky, expensive, and limited in resolution, involving, e.g., lenslet arrays for sensing or multi-acuator deformable mirrors for correcting. We have previously introduced an alternate approach to adaptive optics based on unique capabilities of digital holography, namely direct access to the phase profile of an optical field and the ability to numerically manipulate the phase profile. We have also demonstrated that direct access and compensation of the phase profile is possible not only with the conventional coherent type of digital holography, but also with a new type of digital holography using incoherent light: self-interference incoherent digital holography (SIDH). The SIDH generates complex - i.e. amplitude plus phase - hologram from one or several interferograms acquired with incoherent light, such as LEDs, lamps, sunlight, or fluorescence. The complex point spread function can be measured using a guide star illumination and it allows deterministic deconvolution of the full-field image. We present experimental demonstration of aberration compensation in holographic fluorescence microscopy using SIDH. The adaptive optics by SIDH provides new tools for improved cellular fluorescence microscopy through intact tissue layers or other types of aberrant media.

  9. A digital optical torquemeter for high rotational speed applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesco, D. J.; Buchele, D. R.; Oberle, L. G.

    1982-01-01

    A digital optical torquemeter system designed for applications at high rotational speeds was fabricated and tested for zero stability at speeds up to 20,000 rpm. Data obtained in a spin rig and with simulated inputs demonstrate that the system is capable of measuring torque bar twist to within 0.03 degrees at speeds of 30,000 rpm. The optical system uses fiber optic bundles to transmit light to the torque bar and to silicon avalanche detectors. The system is microcomputer based and provides measurements of average torque and torque as a function of angular shaft position. The torquemeter requires no bearings or other contact between the rotating torque bar and the nonrotating optics, and tolerates movement of the torque bar as large as 1 mm relative to the optics.

  10. Resolution-enhanced all-optical analog-to-digital converter employing cascade optical quantization operation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Zhe; Zhang, Xianting; Yuan, Jinhui; Sang, Xinzhu; Wu, Qiang; Farrell, Gerald; Yu, Chongxiu

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a cascade optical quantization scheme is proposed to realize all-optical analog-to-digital converter with efficiently enhanced quantization resolution and achievable high analog bandwidth of larger than 20 GHz. Employing the cascade structure of an unbalanced Mach-zehnder modulator and a specially designed optical directional coupler, we predict the enhancement of number-of-bits can be up to 1.59-bit. Simulation results show that a 25 GHz RF signal is efficiently digitalized with the signal-to-noise ratio of 33.58 dB and effective-number-of-bits of 5.28-bit.

  11. The KM3NeT Digital Optical Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivolo, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    KM3NeT is a European deep-sea multidisciplinary research infrastructure in the Mediterranean Sea. It will host a km3-scale neutrino telescope and dedicated instruments for long-term and continuous measurements for Earth and Sea sciences. The KM3NeT neutrino telescope is a 3-dimensional array of Digital Optical Modules, suspended in the sea by means of vertical string structures, called Detection Units, supported by two pre-stretched Dyneema ropes, anchored to the seabed and kept taut with a system of buoys. The Digital Optical Module represents the active part of the neutrino telescope. It is composed by a 17-inch, 14 mm thick borosilicate glass (Vitrovex) spheric vessel housing 31 photomultiplier tubes with 3-inch photocathode diameter and the associated front-end and readout electronics. The technical solution adopted for the KM3NeT optical modules is characterized by an innovative design, considering that existing neutrino telescopes, Baikal, IceCube and ANTARES, all use large photomultipliers, typically with a diameter of 8″ or 10″. It offers several advantages: higher sensitive surface (1260 cm2), weaker sensitivity to Earth's magnetic field, better distinction between single-photon and multi-photon events (photon counting) and directional information with an almost isotropic field of view. In this contribution the design and the performance of the KM3NeT Digital Optical Modules are discussed, with a particular focus on enabling technologies and integration procedure.

  12. Digital processing of RF signals from optical frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cizek, Martin; Smid, Radek; Buchta, Zdeněk.; Mikel, Břetislav; Lazar, Josef; Cip, Ondřej

    2013-01-01

    The presented work is focused on digital processing of beat note signals from a femtosecond optical frequency comb. The levels of mixing products of single spectral components of the comb with CW laser sources are usually very low compared to products of mixing all the comb components together. RF counters are more likely to measure the frequency of the strongest spectral component rather than a weak beat note. Proposed experimental digital signal processing system solves this problem by analyzing the whole spectrum of the output RF signal and using software defined radio (SDR) algorithms. Our efforts concentrate in two main areas: Firstly, using digital servo-loop techniques for locking free running continuous laser sources on single components of the fs comb spectrum. Secondly, we are experimenting with digital signal processing of the RF beat note spectrum produced by f-2f 1 technique used for assessing the offset and repetition frequencies of the comb, resulting in digital servo-loop stabilization of the fs comb. Software capable of computing and analyzing the beat-note RF spectrums using FFT and peak detection was developed. A SDR algorithm performing phase demodulation on the f- 2f signal is used as a regulation error signal source for a digital phase-locked loop stabilizing the offset frequency of the fs comb.

  13. Objective shearing digital holography for removing aberration from optical system.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weiqing; Tian, Kehan; Zhang, Chuhang

    2015-09-01

    We propose a new digital holography based on the lateral shearing interference concept to remove the total aberrations from the reference wave, illumination wave, and the optical elements. It uses three mutually shifted image holograms of the object that are divided from each other to obtain phase differences. The phase aberration can be removed and the original sample phase can be reconstructed by the phase differences. Then, the influence of the stage moving imprecision on the reconstruction quality is analyzed. Optical experiments verified that the proposed method can totally remove the phase aberrations. As a result, the proposed method could be used for ultra-precise optical measurement through eliminating optical phase aberration to increase the measurement accuracy. PMID:26368865

  14. Digital image compression for a 2f multiplexing optical setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, J.; Amaya, D.; Rueda, E.

    2016-07-01

    In this work a virtual 2f multiplexing system was implemented in combination with digital image compression techniques and redundant information elimination. Depending on the image type to be multiplexed, a memory-usage saving of as much as 99% was obtained. The feasibility of the system was tested using three types of images, binary characters, QR codes, and grey level images. A multiplexing step was implemented digitally, while a demultiplexing step was implemented in a virtual 2f optical setup following real experimental parameters. To avoid cross-talk noise, each image was codified with a specially designed phase diffraction carrier that would allow the separation and relocation of the multiplexed images on the observation plane by simple light propagation. A description of the system is presented together with simulations that corroborate the method. The present work may allow future experimental implementations that will make use of all the parallel processing capabilities of optical systems.

  15. Digital holographic optical coherence imaging of tumor tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Kwan; Turek, John J.; Nolte, David D.

    2006-02-01

    Holographic Optical Coherence Imaging (OCI) uses spatial heterodyne detection in direct analogy with the temporal heterodyne detection of time-domain OCT. The spatial demodulator can be a sensitive dynamic holographic film or can be a CCD array placed directly at the hologram plane. We show that a digital hologram captured at the Fourier plane requires only a simple 2D inverse FFT of the digital hologram to compute the real image and its conjugate. Our recording on the optical Fourier plane has an advantage for diffuse targets because the intensity distribution of diffuse targets is relatively uniform at the Fourier plane and hence uses the full dynamic range of CCD camera. We applied this technique to human liver tumor spheroids and produced depth-resolved images to depth of 1.4 mm.

  16. Speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography images using digital filtering

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, Aydogan; Bilenca, Alberto; Desjardins, Adrien E.; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2009-01-01

    Speckle noise is a ubiquitous artifact that limits the interpretation of optical coherence tomography images. Here we apply various speckle-reduction digital filters to optical coherence tomography images and compare their performance. Our results indicate that shift-invariant, nonorthogonal wavelet-transform-based filters together with enhanced Lee and adaptive Wiener filters can significantly reduce speckle and increase the signal-to-noise ratio, while preserving strong edges. The speckle reduction capabilities of these filters are also compared with speckle reduction from incoherent angular compounding. Our results suggest that by using these digital filters, the number of individual angles required to attain a certain level of speckle reduction can be decreased. PMID:17728812

  17. Optical digital microscopy for cyto- and hematological studies in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganilova, Yu. A.; Dolmashkin, A. A.; Doubrovski, V. A.; Yanina, I. Yu.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2013-08-01

    The dependence of the spatial resolution and field of view of an optical microscope equipped with a CCD camera on the objective magnification has been experimentally investigated. Measurement of these characteristics has shown that a spatial resolution of 20-25 px/μm at a field of view of about 110 μm is quite realistic; this resolution is acceptable for a detailed study of the processes occurring in cell. It is proposed to expand the dynamic range of digital camera by measuring and approximating its light characteristics with subsequent plotting of the corresponding calibration curve. The biological objects of study were human adipose tissue cells, as well as erythrocytes and their immune complexes in human blood; both objects have been investigated in vitro. Application of optical digital microscopy for solving specific problems of cytology and hematology can be useful in both biomedical studies in experiments with objects of nonbiological origin.

  18. Advanced optical network architecture for integrated digital avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, D. Reed

    1996-12-01

    For the first time in the history of avionics, the network designer now has a choice in selecting the media that interconnects the sources and sinks of digital data on aircraft. Electrical designs are already giving way to photonics in application areas where the data rate times distance product is large or where special design requirements such as low weight or EMI considerations are critical. Future digital avionic architectures will increasingly favor the use of photonic interconnects as network data rates of one gigabit/second and higher are needed to support real-time operation of high-speed integrated digital processing. As the cost of optical network building blocks is reduced and as temperature-rugged laser sources are matured, metal interconnects will be forced to retreat to applications spanning shorter and shorter distances. Although the trend is already underway, the widespread use of digital optics will first occur at the system level, where gigabit/second, real-time interconnects between sensors, processors, mass memories and displays separated by a least of few meters will be required. The application of photonic interconnects for inter-printed wiring board signalling across the backplane will eventually find application for gigabit/second applications since signal degradation over copper traces occurs before one gigabit/second and 0.5 meters are reached. For the foreseeable future however, metal interconnects will continue to be used to interconnect devices on printed wiring boards since 5 gigabit/second signals can be sent over metal up to around 15 centimeters. Current-day applications of optical interconnects at the system level are described and a projection of how advanced optical interconnect technology will be driven by the use of high speed integrated digital processing on future aircraft is presented. The recommended advanced network for application in the 2010 time frame is a fiber-based system with a signalling speed of around 2

  19. Digital holography applications in ophthalmology, biometry, and optical trapping characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potcoava, Mariana Camelia

    This dissertation combines various holographic techniques with application on the two- and three-dimensional imaging of ophthalmic tissue, fingerprints, and microsphere samples with micrometer resolution. Digital interference holography (DIH) uses scanned wavelengths to synthesize short-coherence interference tomographic images. We used DIH for in vitro imaging of human optic nerve head and retina. Tomographic images were produced by superposition of holograms. Holograms were obtained with a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 50 dB. Optic nerve head characteristics (shape, diameter, cup depth, and cup width) were quantified with a few micron resolution (4.06--4.8mum). Multiple layers were distinguishable in cross-sectional images of the macula. To our knowledge, this is the first report of DIH use to image human macular and optic nerve tissue. Holographic phase microscopy is used to produce images of thin film patterns left by latent fingerprints. Two or more holographic phase images with different wavelengths are combined for optical phase unwrapping of images of patent prints. We demonstrated digital interference holography images of a plastic print, and latent prints. These demonstrations point to significant contributions to biometry by using digital interference holography to identify and quantify Level 1 (pattern), Level 2 (minutia points), and Level 3 (pores and ridge contours). Quantitative studies of physical and biological processes and precise non-contact manipulation of nanometer/micrometer trapped objects can be effectuated with nanometer accuracy due to the development of optical tweezers. A three-dimensional gradient trap is produced at the focus position of a high NA microscope objective. Particles are trapped axially and laterally due to the gradient force. The particle is confined in a potential well and the trap acts as a harmonic spring. The elastic constant or the stiffness along any axis is determined from the particle displacements in

  20. Optical digitizing and strategies to combine different views of an optical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duwe, Hans P.

    1997-09-01

    Non-contact digitization of objects and surfaces with optical sensors based on fringe or pattern projection in combination with a CCD-camera allows a representation of surfaces with pointclouds equals x, y, z data points. To digitize the total surface of an object, it is necessary to combine the different measurement data obtained by the optical sensor from different views. Depending on the size of the object and the required accuracy of the measured data, different sensor set-ups with handling system or a combination of linear and rotation axes are described. Furthermore, strategies to match the overlapping pointclouds of a digitized object are introduced. This is very important especially for the digitization of large objects like 1:1 car models, etc. With different sensor sizes, it is possible to digitize small objects like teeth, crowns, inlays, etc. with an overall accuracy of 20 micrometer as well as large objects like car models, with a total accuracy of 0.5 mm. The various applications in the field of optical digitization are described.

  1. Adaptive optics in digital micromirror based confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, P.; Wilding, D.; Soloviev, O.; Vdovin, G.; Verhaegen, M.

    2016-03-01

    This proceeding reports early results in the development of a new technique for adaptive optics in confocal microscopy. The term adaptive optics refers to the branch of optics in which an active element in the optical system is used to correct inhomogeneities in the media through which light propagates. In its most classical form, mostly used in astronomical imaging, adaptive optics is achieved through a closed loop in which the actuators of a deformable mirror are driven by a wavefront sensor. This approach is severely limited in fluorescence microscopy, as the use of a wavefront sensor requires the presence of a bright, point like source in the field of view, a condition rarely satisfied in microscopy samples. Previously reported approaches to adaptive optics in fluorescence microscopy are therefore limited to the inclusion of fluorescent microspheres in the sample, to use as bright stars for wavefront sensors, or time consuming sensorless optimization procedures, requiring several seconds of optimization before the acquisition of a single image. We propose an alternative approach to the problem, implementing sensorless adaptive optics in a Programmable array microscope. A programmable array microscope is a microscope based on a digital micromirror device, in which the single elements of the micromirror act both as point sources and pinholes.

  2. Digital optical computing; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 13, 14, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Arrathoon, R.

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances in optical technology for digital computation are examined in reviews and reports. Consideration is given to direct and associative optical computing, optical AI and optical expert systems, optical/electronic logic and D/A systems, and optical interconnects. Topics discussed include symbolic substitution using ZnS interference filters, binary logic by spatial filtering, a directed graph optical processor, computer-vision applications of associative networks, decomposition of digital switching functions, variable-accuracy optical matrix/vector processors, CMOS detector cells for holographic optical interconnects in microcircuits, and S/N simulations for small guided-wave optical networks.

  3. Digital optical computing II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 17-19, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Arrathoon, R.

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on digital optical computing are presented. Individual topics addressed include: complexity of networks realized by fiber optic logic elements, optoelectric arrays for hybrid optical/electronic computing, monolithic model-locked laser arrays in optical computing, three-dimensional multistage interconnection networks, optical fiber crossbar switch, multidimensional optical interconnection networks, high-speed photodetectors, disorder-delineated semiconductor waveguides, quantum well structures for integrated optoelectronics, electrooptic polymers for optical interconnects, hybrid content-addressable memory MSD arithmetic, new concept for a photonic switch, digital fiber optic-delay-line memory, optical neural networks using smectic liquid crystals, speech recognition using optical neural networks, solid optical correlators, hybrid optical/digital neural network, unified optical symbolic substitution processor, hybrid higher-order optical symbolic recognition, optoelectronic multilayer network.

  4. Optical Synchrotron Radiation Beam Imaging with a Digital Mask

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorito, R. B.; Zhang, H. D.; Corbett, W. J.; Fisher, A. S.; Mok, W. Y.; Tian, K.; Douglas, D.; Wilson, F. G.; Zhang, S.; Mitsuhashi, T. M.; Shkvarunets, A. G.

    2012-11-01

    We have applied a new imaging/optical masking technique, which employs a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) and optical synchrotron radiation (OSR), to perform high dynamic range (DR) beam imaging at the JLAB Energy Recovery Linac and the SLAC/SPEAR3 Synchrotron Light Source. The OSR from the beam is first focused onto the DMD to produce a primary image; selected areas of this image are spatially filtered by controlling the state of individual micro-mirrors; and finally, the filtered image is refocused onto a CCD camera. At JLAB this technique has been used successfully to view the beam halo with a DR ~ 105. At SPEAR3 the DMD was used to filter out the bright core of the stored beam to study the turn-by-turn dynamics of the 10-3 weaker injected beam. We describe the optical performance, present limitations and our plans to improve the DR of both experimental systems.

  5. Optical processing architecture and its potential application for digital and analog radiography.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Xu, J; Fajardo, L L

    1999-04-01

    In this report we introduce the fundamental architectures and the potential applications of optical processing techniques in medical imaging. Three basic optical processing architectures were investigated for digital and analog radiography. The processors consist of a module that converts either the analog or the digital radiograph into a coherent light distribution; a coherent optical processing architecture that performs various mathematical operations; a programmable digital-optical interface and other accessories. Optical frequency filters were implemented for mammographic and other clinical feature enhancement. In medical image processing, digital computers offer the advantages of programmability and flexibility. In contrast, optical processors perform parallel image processing with high speed. Optical processors also offer analog nature, compact size, and cost effectiveness. With technical advances of digital-optical interface devices, the medical image processor, in the foreseeable future, may be a hybrid device, namely, a programmable optical architecture.

  6. Digital Fluoroscopy with AN Optically Coupled Charge-Coupled Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong

    1992-01-01

    This research was aimed at investigating the potential of developing an optically coupled charge-coupled device (CCD) imaging system for some digital fluoroscopic applications. The viability of this concept for fluoroscopic imaging was studied with respect to image intensifier-television (II -TV) techniques. The anticipated advantages of the optically coupled CCD, compared with II-TV, include higher contrast sensitivity, larger dynamic range, moderate spatial resolution and clinically acceptable dose. Following an investigation of some theoretical and practical issues concerning the optical coupling efficiency between the intensifying screen and the CCD imager, mathematical methods were developed to relate the signal, signal-to -noise ratio, and x-ray quantum efficiency of the optically coupled CCD imaging chain. The spatial resolution of the system was also analyzed. Using an ultra-sensitive CCD, as well as improved scintillating and optical coupling techniques, we built a laboratory system for experiments. We conducted measurements of the modulation transfer function (MTF), contrast sensitivity, contrast-detail detectability and detector contrast. The results suggest that the lesion detectability of our sub-optimal system was comparable to that of a screen-film technique under the same radiation dose, and was significantly better than II-TV fluoroscopy. Potential clinical applications of our system include mammography, pre-operational localization, pediatric chest radiography, and single tracer autoradiography. Images of selected phantoms, pathological specimens and small animals were acquired to demonstrate the radiologic quality attainable for such procedures. We conclude that developing an x-ray quantum limited, pseudo-real time, digital fluoroscopic imaging system (for some applications) without an II appears to be theoretically and technically feasible. The successful development of optically coupled CCD fluoroscopy has the potential for improving the

  7. Digital fluoroscopy with an optically coupled charge-coupled device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong

    1992-07-01

    This research was aimed at investigating the potential of developing an optically coupled charge-coupled device (CCD) imaging system for some digital fluoroscopic applications. The viability of this concept for fluoroscopic imaging was studied with respect to image intensifier-television (II-TV) techniques. The anticipated advantages of the optically coupled CCD, compared with II-TV, include higher contrast sensitivity, larger dynamic range, moderate spatial resolution and clinically acceptable dose. Following an investigation of some theoretical and practical issues concerning the optical coupling efficiency between the intensifying screen and the CCD imager, mathematical methods were developed to relate the signal, signal-to-noise ratio, and x-ray quantum efficiency of the optically coupled CCD imaging chain. The spatial resolution of the system was also analyzed. Using an ultra-sensitive CCD, as well as improved scintillating and optical coupling techniques, we built a laboratory system for experiments. We conducted measurements of the modulation transfer function (MTF), contrast sensitivity, contrast-detail detectability and detector contrast. The results suggest that the lesion detectability of our sub-optimal system was comparable to that of a screen-film technique under the same radiation dose, and was significantly better than II-TV fluoroscopy. Potential clinical applications of our system include mammography, pre-operational localization, pediatric chest radiography, and single tracer autoradiography. Images of selected phantoms, pathological specimens and small animals were acquired to demonstrate the radiologic quality attainable for such procedures. We conclude that developing an x-ray quantum limited, pseudo-real time, digital fluoroscopic imaging system (for some applications) without an II appears to be theoretically and technically feasible. The successful development of optically coupled CCD fluoroscopy has the potential for improving the quality

  8. Optical voice recorder by off-axis digital holography.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Osamu; Inokuchi, Hiroki; Nitta, Kouichi; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro

    2014-11-15

    An optical voice recorder capable of recording and reproducing propagating sound waves by using off-axis digital holography, as well as quantitative visualization, is presented. Propagating sound waves temporally modulate the phase distribution of an impinging light wave via refractive index changes. This temporally modulated phase distribution is recorded in the form of digital holograms by a high-speed image sensor. After inverse propagation using Fresnel diffraction of a series of the recorded holograms, the temporal phase profile of the reconstructed object wave at each three-dimensional position can be used to reproduce the original sound wave. Experimental results using a tuning fork vibrating at 440 Hz and a human voice are presented to show the feasibility of the proposed method.

  9. Preliminary study of digital image correlation based optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cuiru; Vuong, Barry; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Victor

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) provides deformation or material properties mapping of soft tissue, which is important for morphological and pathological studies of the tissue. An OCE technique is developed based on digital image correlation. System calibration and measurement error evaluation are performed. The displacement measurement of 0.6 μm to over 100 μm was obtained through a phantom experiment. The capability of this OCE technique for differentiation of stiffness was evaluated by imaging a two-components phantom. OCE imaging of an aneurysm sample shows promising results for characterization of composites of aneurismal wall in the future.

  10. Time-domain optical coherence tomography with digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massatsch, Pia; Charrière, Florian; Cuche, Etienne; Marquet, Pierre; Depeursinge, Christian D.

    2005-04-01

    We show that digital holography can be combined easily with optical coherence tomography approach. Varying the reference path length is the means used to acquire a series of holograms at different depths, providing after reconstruction images of slices at different depths in the specimen thanks to the short-coherence length of light source. A metallic object, covered by a 150-µm-thick onion cell, is imaged with high resolution. Applications in ophthalmology are shown: structures of the anterior eye, the cornea, and the iris, are studied on enucleated porcine eyes. Tomographic images of the iris border close to the pupil were obtained 165 µm underneath the eye surface.

  11. Optical-spectrum-encoded analog-to-digital converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xiao-Jun; Yang, Ya-Pei

    2007-05-01

    A novel optical-spectrum-encoded (OSE) analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is proposed in this letter. To simply exemplify the conversion idea, a 5-bit device structure consisted of Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPI) is analyzed and numerically simulated. The dependence of peak-transmission wavelength on modulation voltage in an electro-optical FPI and the dependence of transmitted power on incident light wavelength in an FPI are discussed and utilized to implement OSEADC. A linearly tunable mode-locked laser, as a voltage-wavelength transformer and a sampler, and chirped grating FPIs, as an encoder array, can be used to obtain much greater sampling rate and bit-resolution.

  12. Fourier transform digital holographic adaptive optics imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changgeng; Yu, Xiao; Kim, Myung K.

    2013-01-01

    A Fourier transform digital holographic adaptive optics imaging system and its basic principles are proposed. The CCD is put at the exact Fourier transform plane of the pupil of the eye lens. The spherical curvature introduced by the optics except the eye lens itself is eliminated. The CCD is also at image plane of the target. The point-spread function of the system is directly recorded, making it easier to determine the correct guide-star hologram. Also, the light signal will be stronger at the CCD, especially for phase-aberration sensing. Numerical propagation is avoided. The sensor aperture has nothing to do with the resolution and the possibility of using low coherence or incoherent illumination is opened. The system becomes more efficient and flexible. Although it is intended for ophthalmic use, it also shows potential application in microscopy. The robustness and feasibility of this compact system are demonstrated by simulations and experiments using scattering objects. PMID:23262541

  13. Method for auto-alignment of digital optical phase conjugation systems based on digital propagation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Mooseok; Ruan, Haowen; Zhou, Haojiang; Judkewitz, Benjamin; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-06-16

    Optical phase conjugation (OPC) has enabled many optical applications such as aberration correction and image transmission through fiber. In recent years, implementation of digital optical phase conjugation (DOPC) has opened up the possibility of its use in biomedical optics (e.g. deep-tissue optical focusing) due to its ability to provide greater-than-unity OPC reflectivity (the power ratio of the phase conjugated beam and input beam to the OPC system) and its flexibility to accommodate additional wavefront manipulations. However, the requirement for precise (pixel-to-pixel matching) alignment of the wavefront sensor and the spatial light modulator (SLM) limits the practical usability of DOPC systems. Here, we report a method for auto-alignment of a DOPC system by which the misalignment between the sensor and the SLM is auto-corrected through digital light propagation. With this method, we were able to accomplish OPC playback with a DOPC system with gross sensor-SLM misalignment by an axial displacement of up to~1.5 cm, rotation and tip/tilt of ~5° and in-plane displacement of ~5 mm (dependent on the physical size of the sensor and the SLM). Our auto-alignment method robustly achieved a DOPC playback peak-to-background ratio (PBR) corresponding to more than ~30 % of the theoretical maximum. As an additional advantage, the auto-alignment procedure can be easily performed at will and, as such, allows us to correct for small mechanical drifts within the DOPC systems, thus overcoming a previously major DOPC system vulnerability. We believe that this reported method for implementing robust DOPC systems will broaden the practical utility of DOPC systems.

  14. Method for auto-alignment of digital optical phase conjugation systems based on digital propagation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Mooseok; Ruan, Haowen; Zhou, Haojiang; Judkewitz, Benjamin; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-06-16

    Optical phase conjugation (OPC) has enabled many optical applications such as aberration correction and image transmission through fiber. In recent years, implementation of digital optical phase conjugation (DOPC) has opened up the possibility of its use in biomedical optics (e.g. deep-tissue optical focusing) due to its ability to provide greater-than-unity OPC reflectivity (the power ratio of the phase conjugated beam and input beam to the OPC system) and its flexibility to accommodate additional wavefront manipulations. However, the requirement for precise (pixel-to-pixel matching) alignment of the wavefront sensor and the spatial light modulator (SLM) limits the practical usability of DOPC systems. Here, we report a method for auto-alignment of a DOPC system by which the misalignment between the sensor and the SLM is auto-corrected through digital light propagation. With this method, we were able to accomplish OPC playback with a DOPC system with gross sensor-SLM misalignment by an axial displacement of up to~1.5 cm, rotation and tip/tilt of ~5° and in-plane displacement of ~5 mm (dependent on the physical size of the sensor and the SLM). Our auto-alignment method robustly achieved a DOPC playback peak-to-background ratio (PBR) corresponding to more than ~30 % of the theoretical maximum. As an additional advantage, the auto-alignment procedure can be easily performed at will and, as such, allows us to correct for small mechanical drifts within the DOPC systems, thus overcoming a previously major DOPC system vulnerability. We believe that this reported method for implementing robust DOPC systems will broaden the practical utility of DOPC systems. PMID:24977504

  15. Phase aberration correction by correlation in digital holographic adaptive optics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changgeng; Yu, Xiao; Kim, Myung K.

    2013-01-01

    We present a phase aberration correction method based on the correlation between the complex full-field and guide-star holograms in the context of digital holographic adaptive optics (DHAO). Removal of a global quadratic phase term before the correlation operation plays an important role in the correction. Correlation operation can remove the phase aberration at the entrance pupil plane and automatically refocus the corrected optical field. Except for the assumption that most aberrations lie at or close to the entrance pupil, the presented method does not impose any other constraints on the optical systems. Thus, it greatly enhances the flexibility of the optical design for DHAO systems in vision science and microscopy. Theoretical studies show that the previously proposed Fourier transform DHAO (FTDHAO) is just a special case of this general correction method, where the global quadratic phase term and a defocus term disappear. Hence, this correction method realizes the generalization of FTDHAO into arbitrary DHAO systems. The effectiveness and robustness of this method are demonstrated by simulations and experiments. PMID:23669707

  16. Phase resolved digital signal processing in optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Johannes F.; Tripathi, Renu; Park, Boris H.; Nassif, Nader

    2002-06-01

    We present phase resolved digital signal processing techniques for Optical Coherence Tomography to correct for the non Gaussian shape of source spectra and for Group Delay Dispersion (GDD). A broadband source centered at 820 nm was synthesized by combining the spectra of two superluminescent diodes to improve axial image resolution in an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Spectral shaping was used to reduce the side lobes (ringing) in the axial point spread function due to the non-Gaussian shape of the spectra. Images of onion cells taken with each individual source and the combined sources, respectively, show the improved resolution and quality enhancement in a turbid biological sample. An OCT system operating at 1310 nm was used to demonstrate that the broadening effect of group delay dispersion (GDD) on the coherence function could be eliminated completely by introducing a quadratic phase shift in the Fourier domain of the interferometric signal. The technique is demonstrated by images of human skin grafts with group delay dispersion mismatch between sample and reference arm before and after digital processing.

  17. Focusing through dynamic tissue with millisecond digital optical phase conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daifa; Zhou, Edward Haojiang; Brake, Joshua; Ruan, Haowen; Jang, Mooseok; Yang, Changhuei

    2015-01-01

    Digital optical phase conjugation (DOPC) is a new technique employed in wavefront shaping and phase conjugation for focusing light through or within scattering media such as biological tissues. DOPC is particularly attractive as it intrinsically achieves a high fluence reflectivity in comparison to nonlinear optical approaches. However, the slow refresh rate of liquid crystal spatial light modulators and limitations imposed by computer data transfer speeds have thus far made it difficult for DOPC to achieve a playback latency of shorter than ~200 ms and, therefore, prevented DOPC from being practically applied to thick living samples. In this paper, we report a novel DOPC system that is capable of 5.3 ms playback latency. This speed improvement of almost 2 orders of magnitude is achieved by using a digital micromirror device, field programmable gate array (FPGA) processing, and a single-shot binary phase retrieval technique. With this system, we are able to focus through 2.3 mm living mouse skin with blood flowing through it (decorrelation time ~30 ms) and demonstrate that the focus can be maintained indefinitely—an important technological milestone that has not been previously reported, to the best of our knowledge. PMID:26677458

  18. Improvement of quality of optical reconstruction of digital Fourier holograms displayed on phase-only SLM by its digital preprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremkhin, Pavel A.; Evtikhiev, Nikolay N.; Krasnov, Vitaly V.; Porshneva, Liudmila A.; Rodin, Vladislav G.; Starikov, Sergey N.

    2014-10-01

    Digital holography is popular tool for research and practical applications in various fields of science and technology. Most widespread method of optical reconstruction implements digital hologram display on spatial light modulators (SLM). Optical reconstruction of digital holograms is used for remote display of static and dynamic 2D and 3D scenes, in optical information processing, metrology, interferometry, microscopy, etc. Holograms recorded with digital cameras are amplitude type. Therefore quality of its optical reconstruction with phase SLM is worse compared to amplitude SLM. However application of phase SLM can provide higher diffraction efficiency. To improve quality of optical reconstruction with phase SLM, method of SLM phase modulation depth reduction at digital hologram display is proposed. To our knowledge, this method was applied only in analog holography. Also two other methods of quality improvement are considered: hologram to kinoform conversion and holograms multiplexing. Numerical experiments on modelling of digital Fourier holograms recording and their optical reconstruction by phase SLM were performed. Method of SLM phase modulation depth reduction at digital holograms display was proposed and tested. SLM phase modulation depth ranged from 0 to 2π. Quantity of hologram phase levels equal to 256 corresponds to 2π phase modulation depth. To keep SLM settings while changing phase modulation depth hologram phase distribution was renormalized instead. Dependencies of reconstruction quality on hologram phase modulation depth were obtained. Best quality is achieved at 0.27π÷0.31π phase modulation depth. To reduce speckle noise, hologram multiplexing can be applied. Modeling of multiplex holograms optical reconstruction was conducted. Speckle noise reduction was achieved. For improvement of digital hologram optical reconstruction quality and diffraction efficiency hologram to kinoform conversion can be used. Firstly numerically reconstructed image

  19. Closed-loop optical stabilization and digital image registration in adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiang; Zhang, Jie; Nozato, Koji; Saito, Kenichi; Williams, David R; Roorda, Austin; Rossi, Ethan A

    2014-09-01

    Eye motion is a major impediment to the efficient acquisition of high resolution retinal images with the adaptive optics (AO) scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). Here we demonstrate a solution to this problem by implementing both optical stabilization and digital image registration in an AOSLO. We replaced the slow scanning mirror with a two-axis tip/tilt mirror for the dual functions of slow scanning and optical stabilization. Closed-loop optical stabilization reduced the amplitude of eye-movement related-image motion by a factor of 10-15. The residual RMS error after optical stabilization alone was on the order of the size of foveal cones: ~1.66-2.56 μm or ~0.34-0.53 arcmin with typical fixational eye motion for normal observers. The full implementation, with real-time digital image registration, corrected the residual eye motion after optical stabilization with an accuracy of ~0.20-0.25 μm or ~0.04-0.05 arcmin RMS, which to our knowledge is more accurate than any method previously reported.

  20. Closed-loop optical stabilization and digital image registration in adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiang; Zhang, Jie; Nozato, Koji; Saito, Kenichi; Williams, David R.; Roorda, Austin; Rossi, Ethan A.

    2014-01-01

    Eye motion is a major impediment to the efficient acquisition of high resolution retinal images with the adaptive optics (AO) scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). Here we demonstrate a solution to this problem by implementing both optical stabilization and digital image registration in an AOSLO. We replaced the slow scanning mirror with a two-axis tip/tilt mirror for the dual functions of slow scanning and optical stabilization. Closed-loop optical stabilization reduced the amplitude of eye-movement related-image motion by a factor of 10–15. The residual RMS error after optical stabilization alone was on the order of the size of foveal cones: ~1.66–2.56 μm or ~0.34–0.53 arcmin with typical fixational eye motion for normal observers. The full implementation, with real-time digital image registration, corrected the residual eye motion after optical stabilization with an accuracy of ~0.20–0.25 μm or ~0.04–0.05 arcmin RMS, which to our knowledge is more accurate than any method previously reported. PMID:25401030

  1. Optical geometry calibration method for free-form digital tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chtcheprov, Pavel; Hartman, Allison; Shan, Jing; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    Digital tomosynthesis is a type of limited angle tomography that allows 3D information to be reconstructed from a set of x-ray projection images taken at various angles using an x-ray tube, a mechanical arm to rotate the tube about the object, and a digital detector. Tomosynthesis reconstruction requires the precise location of the detector with respect to each x-ray source, forcing all current clinical tomosynthesis systems to use a physically coupled source and detector so the geometry is always known and is always the same. This limits the imaging geometries and its large size is impractical for mobile or field operations. To counter this, we have developed a free form tomosynthesis with a decoupled, free-moving source and detector that uses a novel optical method for accurate and real-time geometry calibration to allow for manual, hand-held tomosynthesis and even CT imaging. We accomplish this by using a camera, attached to the source, to track the motion of the source relative to the detector. Attached to the detector is an optical pattern and the image captured by the camera is then used to determine the relative camera/pattern position and orientation by analyzing the pattern distortion and calculating the source positions for each projection, necessary for 3D reconstruction. This allows for portable imaging in the field and also as an inexpensive upgrade to existing 2D systems, such as in developing countries, to provide 3D image data. Here we report the first feasibility demonstrations of free form digital tomosynthesis systems using the method.

  2. Signal digitizing system and method based on amplitude-to-time optical mapping

    DOEpatents

    Chou, Jason; Bennett, Corey V; Hernandez, Vince

    2015-01-13

    A signal digitizing system and method based on analog-to-time optical mapping, optically maps amplitude information of an analog signal of interest first into wavelength information using an amplitude tunable filter (ATF) to impress spectral changes induced by the amplitude of the analog signal onto a carrier signal, i.e. a train of optical pulses, and next from wavelength information to temporal information using a dispersive element so that temporal information representing the amplitude information is encoded in the time domain in the carrier signal. Optical-to-electrical conversion of the optical pulses into voltage waveforms and subsequently digitizing the voltage waveforms into a digital image enables the temporal information to be resolved and quantized in the time domain. The digital image may them be digital signal processed to digitally reconstruct the analog signal based on the temporal information with high fidelity.

  3. On the digital holographic interferometry of fibrous material, I: Optical properties of polymer and optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassien, K. M.; Agour, M.; von Kopylow, C.; El-Dessouky, H. M.

    2010-05-01

    Digital holographic interferometry (DHI) was utilized for investigating the optical properties of polymer and optical fibers. The samples investigated here were polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymer fiber and graded-index (GRIN) optical fiber. The phase shifting Mach-Zehnder interferometer was used to obtain five phase-shifted holograms, in which the phase difference between two successive holograms is π/2, for each fiber sample. These holograms were recorded using a CCD camera and were combined to gain the complex wavefield, which was numerically reconstructed using the convolution approach into amplitude and phase distributions. The reconstructed phase distribution was used to determine the refractive index, birefringence and refractive index profile of the studied samples. The mean refractive index has been measured with an accuracy up to 4×10 -4. The main advantage of DHI is to overcome the manual focusing limitations by means of the numerical focusing. The results showed accurate measurements of the optical properties of fibers.

  4. Optical/digital identification/verification system based on digital watermarking technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrigel, Alexander; Voloshynovskiy, Sviatoslav V.; Hrytskiv, Zenon D.

    2000-06-01

    This paper presents a new approach for the secure integrity verification of driver licenses, passports or other analogue identification documents. The system embeds (detects) the reference number of the identification document with the DCT watermark technology in (from) the owner photo of the identification document holder. During verification the reference number is extracted and compared with the reference number printed in the identification document. The approach combines optical and digital image processing techniques. The detection system must be able to scan an analogue driver license or passport, convert the image of this document into a digital representation and then apply the watermark verification algorithm to check the payload of the embedded watermark. If the payload of the watermark is identical with the printed visual reference number of the issuer, the verification was successful and the passport or driver license has not been modified. This approach constitutes a new class of application for the watermark technology, which was originally targeted for the copyright protection of digital multimedia data. The presented approach substantially increases the security of the analogue identification documents applied in many European countries.

  5. Optical design of automotive headlight system incorporating digital micromirror device.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chuan-Cheng; Fang, Yi-Chin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hsueh, Bo-Ren; Wang, Shuan-Fu; Wu, Bo-Wen; Lai, Wei-Chi; Chen, Yi-Liang

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, the popular adaptive front-lighting automobile headlight system has become a main emphasis of research that manufacturers will continue to focus great efforts on in the future. In this research we propose a new integral optical design for an automotive headlight system with an advanced light-emitting diode and digital micromirror device (DMD). Traditionally, automobile headlights have all been designed as a low beam light module, whereas the high beam light module still requires using accessory lamps. In anticipation of this new concept of integral optical design, we have researched and designed a single optical system with high and low beam capabilities. To switch on and off the beams, a DMD is typically used. Because DMDs have the capability of redirecting incident light into a specific angle, they also determine the shape of the high or low light beam in order to match the standard of headlight illumination. With collocation of the multicurvature reflection lens design, a DMD can control the light energy distribution and thereby reinforce the resolution of the light beam.

  6. Fiber-optic projected-fringe digital interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Beheim, Glenn

    1990-01-01

    A phase-stepped projected-fringe interferometer was developed which uses a closed-loop fiber-optic phase-control system to make very accurate surface profile measurements. The closed-loop phase-control system greatly reduces phase-stepping error, which is frequently the dominant source of error in digital interferometers. Two beams emitted from a fiber-optic coupler are combined to form an interference fringe pattern on a diffusely reflecting object. Reflections off of the fibers' output faces are used to create a phase-indicating signal for the closed-loop optical phase controller. The controller steps the phase difference between the two beams by pi/2 radians in order to determine the object's surface profile using a solid-state camera and a computer. The system combines the ease of alignment and automated data reduction of phase-stepping projected-fringe interferometry with the greatly improved phase-stepping accuracy of our closed-loop phase-controller. The system is demonstrated by measuring the profile of a plate containing several convex surfaces whose heights range from 15 to 25 micron high.

  7. Simple method of modelling of digital holograms registering and their optical reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtikhiev, N. N.; Cheremkhin, P. A.; Krasnov, V. V.; Kurbatova, E. A.; Molodtsov, D. Yu; Porshneva, L. A.; Rodin, V. G.

    2016-08-01

    The technique of modeling of digital hologram recording and image optical reconstruction from these holograms is described. The method takes into account characteristics of the object, digital camera's photosensor and spatial light modulator used for digital holograms displaying. Using the technique, equipment can be chosen for experiments for obtaining good reconstruction quality and/or holograms diffraction efficiency. Numerical experiments were conducted.

  8. Exploration of operator method digital optical computers for application to NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Digital optical computer design has been focused primarily towards parallel (single point-to-point interconnection) implementation. This architecture is compared to currently developing VHSIC systems. Using demonstrated multichannel acousto-optic devices, a figure of merit can be formulated. The focus is on a figure of merit termed Gate Interconnect Bandwidth Product (GIBP). Conventional parallel optical digital computer architecture demonstrates only marginal competitiveness at best when compared to projected semiconductor implements. Global, analog global, quasi-digital, and full digital interconnects are briefly examined as alternative to parallel digital computer architecture. Digital optical computing is becoming a very tough competitor to semiconductor technology since it can support a very high degree of three dimensional interconnect density and high degrees of Fan-In without capacitive loading effects at very low power consumption levels.

  9. New 3D optical digitizer for orthodontic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canal Bienzobas, Fernando; Dios, Federico; Garcia-Mateos, Jorge; Rivera, Alejandro

    2002-05-01

    A new three-dimensional optical digitizer working with white light and high accuracy has been developed for applications in orthodontic diagnosis, to store and analyze data taken from plaster dental casts. The scanner consists basically of a triangulation device made of a CCD camera and an active light projector using Gray code and the phase stepping method to sample the surfaces under tests. Dense clouds of 3D points of the object's surface, related to the device's reference system, are generated, from which very exact measurements can be taken. This technique allows us to greatly improve the accuracy of results that previously were obtained by using mainly manual methods. Our system has been tested successfully on many different samples.

  10. Some Protocols For Optical-Fiber Digital Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Cavour; Gerla, Mario

    1989-01-01

    One works best in heavy traffic, another, in light traffic. Three protocols proposed for digital communications among stations connected by passive taps to pair of uni-directional optical-fiber buses. Mediate round-robin, bounded-delay access to buses by all stations and particularly suited to fast transmission. Partly because transmission medium passive (no relay stations) and partly because protocols distribute control of network among all stations with provision for addition and deletion of stations (no control stations), communication network able to resist and recover from failures. Implicit token propagates in one direction on one bus and in opposite direction on other bus, minimizing interval of silence between end of one round and beginning of next.

  11. Coherent detection and digital signal processing for fiber optic communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Ezra

    The drive towards higher spectral efficiency in optical fiber systems has generated renewed interest in coherent detection. We review different detection methods, including noncoherent, differentially coherent, and coherent detection, as well as hybrid detection methods. We compare the modulation methods that are enabled and their respective performances in a linear regime. An important system parameter is the number of degrees of freedom (DOF) utilized in transmission. Polarization-multiplexed quadrature-amplitude modulation maximizes spectral efficiency and power efficiency as it uses all four available DOF contained in the two field quadratures in the two polarizations. Dual-polarization homodyne or heterodyne downconversion are linear processes that can fully recover the received signal field in these four DOF. When downconverted signals are sampled at the Nyquist rate, compensation of transmission impairments can be performed using digital signal processing (DSP). Software based receivers benefit from the robustness of DSP, flexibility in design, and ease of adaptation to time-varying channels. Linear impairments, including chromatic dispersion (CD) and polarization-mode dispersion (PMD), can be compensated quasi-exactly using finite impulse response filters. In practical systems, sampling the received signal at 3/2 times the symbol rate is sufficient to enable an arbitrary amount of CD and PMD to be compensated for a sufficiently long equalizer whose tap length scales linearly with transmission distance. Depending on the transmitted constellation and the target bit error rate, the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) should have around 5 to 6 bits of resolution. Digital coherent receivers are naturally suited for the implementation of feedforward carrier recovery, which has superior linewidth tolerance than phase-locked loops, and does not suffer from feedback delay constraints. Differential bit encoding can be used to prevent catastrophic receiver failure due

  12. Digital image correlation-based optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cuiru; Standish, Beau; Vuong, Barry; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Victor

    2013-12-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) provides deformation or material properties, mapping of soft tissue. We aim to develop a robust speckle tracking OCE technique with improved resolution and accuracy. A digital image correlation (DIC)-based OCE technique was developed by combining an advanced DIC algorithm with optical coherence tomography (OCT). System calibration and measurement error evaluation demonstrated that this DIC-based OCE technique had a resolution of ˜0.6 μm displacement and <0.5% strain measurement in the axial scan direction. The measured displacement ranged from 0.6 to 150 μm, obtained via phantom imaging. The capability of the DIC-based OCE technique, for differentiation of stiffness, was evaluated by imaging a candle gel phantom with an irregularly shaped stiff inclusion. OCE imaging of a chicken breast sample differentiated the fat, membrane, and muscle layers. Strain elastograms of an aneurysm sample showed heterogeneity of the tissue and clear contrast between the adventitia and media. These promising results demonstrated the capability of the DIC-based OCE for the characterization of the various components of the tissue sample. Further improvement of the system will be conducted to make this OCE technique a practical tool for measuring and differentiating material properties of soft tissue.

  13. Digital image correlation-based optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cuiru; Standish, Beau; Vuong, Barry; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Victor

    2013-12-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) provides deformation or material properties, mapping of soft tissue. We aim to develop a robust speckle tracking OCE technique with improved resolution and accuracy. A digital image correlation (DIC)-based OCE technique was developed by combining an advanced DIC algorithm with optical coherence tomography (OCT). System calibration and measurement error evaluation demonstrated that this DIC-based OCE technique had a resolution of ~0.6 μm displacement and <0.5% strain measurement in the axial scan direction. The measured displacement ranged from 0.6 to 150 μm, obtained via phantom imaging. The capability of the DIC-based OCE technique, for differentiation of stiffness, was evaluated by imaging a candle gel phantom with an irregularly shaped stiff inclusion. OCE imaging of a chicken breast sample differentiated the fat, membrane, and muscle layers. Strain elastograms of an aneurysm sample showed heterogeneity of the tissue and clear contrast between the adventitia and media. These promising results demonstrated the capability of the DIC-based OCE for the characterization of the various components of the tissue sample. Further improvement of the system will be conducted to make this OCE technique a practical tool for measuring and differentiating material properties of soft tissue. PMID:24346855

  14. Beam halo imaging with a digital optical mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. D.; Fiorito, R. B.; Shkvarunets, A. G.; Kishek, R. A.; Welsch, C. P.

    2012-07-01

    Beam halo is an important factor in any high intensity accelerator. It can cause difficulties in the control of the beam, emittance growth, particle loss, and even damage to the accelerator. It is therefore essential to understand the mechanisms of halo formation and its dynamics. Experimental measurement of the halo distribution is a fundamental tool for such studies. In this paper, we present a new high dynamic range, adaptive masking method to image beam halo, which uses a digital micromirror-array device. This method has been thoroughly tested in the laboratory using standard optical techniques, and with an actual beam produced by the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER). A high dynamic range (DR˜105) has been demonstrated with this new method at UMER and recent studies, with more intense beams, indicate that this DR can be exceeded by more than an order of magnitude. The method is flexible, easy to implement, low cost, and can be used at any accelerator or light source. We present the results of our measurements of the performance of the method and illustrative images of beam halos produced under various experimental conditions.

  15. High-dynamic-range hybrid analog-digital control broadband optical spectral processor using micromirror and acousto-optic devices.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; Reza, Syed Azer

    2008-06-01

    For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the design and demonstration of a programmable spectral filtering processor is presented that simultaneously engages the power of an analog-mode optical device such as an acousto-optic tunable filter and a digital-mode optical device such as the digital micromirror device. The demonstrated processor allows a high 50 dB attenuation dynamic range across the chosen 1530-1565 nm (~C band). The hybrid analog-digital spectral control mechanism enables the processor to operate with greater versatility when compared to analog- or digital-only processor designs. Such a processor can be useful both as a test instrument in biomedical applications and as an equalizer in fiber communication networks.

  16. Matrix-vector multiplication using digital partitioning for more accurate optical computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, C. K.

    1992-01-01

    Digital partitioning offers a flexible means of increasing the accuracy of an optical matrix-vector processor. This algorithm can be implemented with the same architecture required for a purely analog processor, which gives optical matrix-vector processors the ability to perform high-accuracy calculations at speeds comparable with or greater than electronic computers as well as the ability to perform analog operations at a much greater speed. Digital partitioning is compared with digital multiplication by analog convolution, residue number systems, and redundant number representation in terms of the size and the speed required for an equivalent throughput as well as in terms of the hardware requirements. Digital partitioning and digital multiplication by analog convolution are found to be the most efficient alogrithms if coding time and hardware are considered, and the architecture for digital partitioning permits the use of analog computations to provide the greatest throughput for a single processor.

  17. Optical design of cipher block chaining (CBC) encryption mode by using digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Sang Keun; Jeon, Seok Hee; Jung, Jong Rae; Kim, Nam

    2016-03-01

    We propose an optical design of cipher block chaining (CBC) encryption by using digital holographic technique, which has higher security than the conventional electronic method because of the analog-type randomized cipher text with 2-D array. In this paper, an optical design of CBC encryption mode is implemented by 2-step quadrature phase-shifting digital holographic encryption technique using orthogonal polarization. A block of plain text is encrypted with the encryption key by applying 2-step phase-shifting digital holography, and it is changed into cipher text blocks which are digital holograms. These ciphered digital holograms with the encrypted information are Fourier transform holograms and are recorded on CCDs with 256 gray levels quantized intensities. The decryption is computed by these encrypted digital holograms of cipher texts, the same encryption key and the previous cipher text. Results of computer simulations are presented to verify that the proposed method shows the feasibility in the high secure CBC encryption system.

  18. Fiber-optic systems for transmission of digital data: Construction and usage issues

    SciTech Connect

    Karinskii, S.

    1995-04-01

    The principles of fabrication, operation, and problems associated with the construction of a fast-response, fiber-optic transmission system (FOTS) of digital information for various information systems and networks are examined.

  19. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel: Digital image processing, part 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1993-01-01

    A survey of digital image processing techniques and processing systems for aerodynamic images has been conducted. These images covered many types of flows and were generated by many types of flow diagnostics. These include laser vapor screens, infrared cameras, laser holographic interferometry, Schlieren, and luminescent paints. Some general digital image processing systems, imaging networks, optical sensors, and image computing chips were briefly reviewed. Possible digital imaging network systems for the Ames Unitary Wind Tunnel were explored.

  20. Emerging Digital Optical Disc Technologies: An Opportunity and a Challenge for Educational Researchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Francis A.

    1987-01-01

    Description of new applications of digital optical disc storage technologies focuses on CD-ROM (Compact Disc--Read Only Memory); CD-I (Compact Disc--Interactive); and DV-I (Digital Video--Interactive). Features of each technology are described in the context of instructional design and educational technology, and the role of educational research…

  1. Comparison of New Single-Use Digital Flexible Ureteroscope Versus Nondisposable Fiber Optic and Digital Ureteroscope in a Cadaveric Model

    PubMed Central

    Proietti, Silvia; Dragos, Laurian; Molina, Wilson; Doizi, Steeve; Giusti, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To evaluate LithoVue, the new single-use digital flexible ureteroscope, in a human cadaveric model and compare it with a nondisposable fiber optic and digital flexible ureteroscopes. Materials and Methods: LithoVue, a conventional fiber optic, and digital flexible ureteroscopes were each tested in four renal units of recently deceased female cadavers by three surgeons. The following parameters were analyzed: accessibility to the kidney and navigation of the entire collecting system with and without ureteral access sheath (UAS), lower pole access measuring the deflection of the ureteroscope with the working channel empty, and with inside two different baskets and laser fibers. A subjective evaluation of maneuverability and visibility was assessed by each surgeon at the end of every procedure. Results: Kidney access into the Renal unit 1 was not possible without UAS for all ureteroscopes because of noncompliant ureter at the level of sacroiliac joint. The reusable digital ureteroscope was unable to reach one calix of the lower pole and one calix of the upper pole (Renal units 2 and 3) without UAS placement. Lower pole access with baskets and laser fibers was possible for each ureteroscope after UAS placement. No statistically significant differences were detected in angle deflection between ureteroscopes. The digital ureteroscope was preferred for visibility in all procedures: LithoVue for maneuverability in six procedures, fiber optic in five procedures, and the digital ureteroscope in one procedure. Conclusions: LithoVue seems to be comparable with conventional ureteroscopes in terms of visibility and manipulation into the collecting system in fresh human cadavers. Further studies in humans are needed to determine the clinical value of this new instrument. PMID:27084572

  2. Thermo-optic waveguide digital optical switch using symmetrically coupled gratings.

    PubMed

    Sun, De-Gui; Liu, Zhiying; Zha, Ying; Deng, Wenyuan; Zhang, Ying; Li, Xiaoqi

    2005-07-11

    A 2x2 digital optical switch using two symmetrical unidirectional Bragg grating couplers is proposed and studied in this paper. A low-loss polymer is used as waveguide material, and the Bragg grating coupling efficiency is optimized to be 22%, then the unidirectional coupling efficiency of 99.9% is achieved in theory. The performance of the switch based on the unidirectional couplers with Bragg gratings is theoretically modeled and simulated. Finally, the 2.4dB insertion loss, the -17dB crosstalk between two output ports, the 28 dB extinction ratio, the 1.5ms response speed and the 87mW power consumption are experimentally demonstrated with this regime.

  3. Digital pilot aided carrier frequency offset estimation for coherent optical transmission systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Donghe; Xi, Lixia; Tang, Xianfeng; Zhang, Wenbo; Qiao, Yaojun; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2015-09-21

    We present a digital pilot aided carrier frequency offset estimation (FOE) method for coherent optical transmission systems. Unlike the conventional pilot tone insertion scheme, the pilot of the proposed method is generated in a digital manner and can serve as a good FOE indicator. Aided by this kind of digital pilot, the FOE is implemented by determining the location of the digital pilot in the spectrum. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations show that the proposed method has the advantages in wide range, high accuracy, modulation formats independent, no need to remove the modulation, and high tolerance to the residual chromatic dispersion (CD) and polarization mode dispersion (PMD).

  4. Research on the methods of optical image hiding based on double random phase encoding and digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongsheng; Sang, Nong

    2011-12-01

    Optical information hiding system has many features such as high processing speed, high parallel, high encryption dimension and high speed of optical transformation and related operations, more advantages than digital method in some way. But it has not adequate security, and enough combination with techniques of digital image processing. So on basis of analyzing existing image hiding and analyzing techniques, we give out the idea. We should adopt idea of virtual optics on the way of all-digital simulation to do research of optical image hiding and analyzing methods based on optical image processing technique especially technique of double random phase encoding and digital holography.

  5. Wavelet image processing applied to optical and digital holography: past achievements and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Katharine J.

    2005-08-01

    The link between wavelets and optics goes back to the work of Dennis Gabor who both invented holography and developed Gabor decompositions. Holography involves 3-D images. Gabor decompositions involves 1-D signals. Gabor decompositions are the predecessors of wavelets. Wavelet image processing of holography, both optical holography and digital holography, will be examined with respect to past achievements and future challenges.

  6. KEYNOTE ADDRESS: The role of standards in the emerging optical digital data disk storage systems market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bainbridge, Ross C.

    1984-09-01

    The Institute for Computer Sciences and Technology at the National Bureau of Standards is pleased to cooperate with the International Society for Optical Engineering and to join with the other distinguished organizations in cosponsoring this conference on applications of optical digital data disk storage systems.

  7. Hybrid optical-digital encryption system based on wavefront coding paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konnik, Mikhail V.

    2012-04-01

    The wavefront coding is a widely used in the optical systems to compensate aberrations and increase the depth of field. This paper presents experimental results on application of the wavefront coding paradigm for data encryption. We use a synthesised diffractive optical element (DOE) to deliberately introduce a phase distortion during the images registration process to encode the acquired image. In this case, an optical convolution of the input image with the point spread function (PSF) of the DOE is registered. The encryption is performed optically, and is therefore is fast and secure. Since the introduced distortion is the same across the image, the decryption is performed digitally using deconvolution methods. However, due to noise and finite accuracy of a photosensor, the reconstructed image is degraded but still readable. The experimental results, which are presented in this paper, indicate that the proposed hybrid optical-digital system can be implemented as a portable device using inexpensive off-the-shelf components. We present the results of optical encryption and digital restoration with quantitative estimations of the images quality. Details of hardware optical implementation of the hybrid optical-digital encryption system are discussed.

  8. Application of the phase methods to analog and digital optical processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupitsky, E. I.; Morosov, S. V.

    1993-09-01

    Use of phase methods in data input/output and for operations execution in optical processing and data transmission along internal communication channels is considered. Spatial phase difference modulation in digital optical matrix processors and similar time modulation in superfast internal communication channels can be applied for these purposes.

  9. Demonstration of a 3-bit optical digital-to-analog converter based on silicon microring resonators.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Ding, Jianfeng; Chen, Qiaoshan; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Fanfan; Zhang, Lei

    2014-10-01

    We propose an N-bit optical digital-to-analog converter based on silicon microring resonators (MRRs), which can transform an N-bit electrical digital signal to an optical analog signal. A 3-bit optical digital-to-analog convertor is fabricated as proof of concept through a CMOS-compatible process on a silicon-on-insulator platform. The silicon MRRs are modulated through the electric-field-induced carrier injection in forward biased PN junctions embedded in the ring waveguides. The electro-optical 3-dB bandwidths of the silicon MRRs are approximately 800 MHz. The device works well at a speed of 500  MSample/s under driving voltage swings of 0.75 V.

  10. Hybrid (optical/electronic) computing and digital optical computing. Final report, 1 September 1985-31 August 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.

    1988-08-31

    Hybrid optical-analog/electronic computing is performed for optical image processing, optical pattern recognition, and optical solution of partial differential equations. For example, image processing designed and fabricated space-variant filters to optically implement numerous space-variant transformation (e.g., Hough transform for detection of high-order parametric curves, coordinate transforms to detect rotation and scale-invariant features of images, etc.). For spike removal from noisy images, one can develop a new parallel algorithm suitable for optical/analog/electronic hybrid implementation. This parallel algorithm is space-variant and performs better than the space-invariant low-pass filter and the time-consuming median filter. Digital optical computing research develops nonlinear optical devices and studies their uses in parallel architectures for implementation of parallel algorithms. The nonlinear optical devices are based on integrating silicon with PLZT. LPCVD techniques to deposit polycrystalline Si onto the electro-optic PLZT substrate and then recrystallizing the polysilicon using an Ar+ laser are used to produce single crystal silicon grains, to fabricate and test a 12 x 12 electrically addressed spatial light modulator (SLM) array and a 16 x 16 optically addressed SLM array. Optical parallel computing architectures are investigated by different interconnection topologies and holographic optical elements are generated to implement fully interconnected and hypercube interconnected topologies.

  11. Optical Digital Disk Storage: An Application for News Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Mary Jo

    1988-01-01

    Describes the technology, equipment, and procedures necessary for converting a historical newspaper clipping collection to optical disk storage. Alternative storage systems--microforms, laser scanners, optical storage--are also retrieved, and the advantages and disadvantages of optical storage are considered. (MES)

  12. Electro-optic Mach-Zehnder Interferometer based Optical Digital Magnitude Comparator and 1's Complement Calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Raghuwanshi, Sanjeev Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The optical switching activity is one of the most essential phenomena in the optical domain. The electro-optic effect-based switching phenomena are applicable to generate some effective combinational and sequential logic circuits. The processing of digital computational technique in the optical domain includes some considerable advantages of optical communication technology, e.g. immunity to electro-magnetic interferences, compact size, signal security, parallel computing and larger bandwidth. The paper describes some efficient technique to implement single bit magnitude comparator and 1's complement calculator using the concepts of electro-optic effect. The proposed techniques are simulated on the MATLAB software. However, the suitability of the techniques is verified using the highly reliable Opti-BPM software. It is interesting to analyze the circuits in order to specify some optimized device parameter in order to optimize some performance affecting parameters, e.g. crosstalk, extinction ratio, signal losses through the curved and straight waveguide sections.

  13. PREFACE: I International Scientific School Methods of Digital Image Processing in Optics and Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurov, I. P.; Kozlov, S. A.

    2014-09-01

    The first international scientific school "Methods of Digital Image Processing in Optics and Photonics" was held with a view to develop cooperation between world-class experts, young scientists, students and post-graduate students, and to exchange information on the current status and directions of research in the field of digital image processing in optics and photonics. The International Scientific School was managed by: Saint Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (ITMO University) - Saint Petersburg (Russia) Chernyshevsky Saratov State University - Saratov (Russia) National research nuclear University "MEPHI" (NRNU MEPhI) - Moscow (Russia) The school was held with the participation of the local chapters of Optical Society of America (OSA), the Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) and IEEE Photonics Society. Further details, including topics, committees and conference photos are available in the PDF

  14. Active flutter suppression using optical output feedback digital controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A method for synthesizing digital active flutter suppression controllers using the concept of optimal output feedback is presented. A convergent algorithm is employed to determine constrained control law parameters that minimize an infinite time discrete quadratic performance index. Low order compensator dynamics are included in the control law and the compensator parameters are computed along with the output feedback gain as part of the optimization process. An input noise adjustment procedure is used to improve the stability margins of the digital active flutter controller. Sample rate variation, prefilter pole variation, control structure variation and gain scheduling are discussed. A digital control law which accommodates computation delay can stabilize the wing with reasonable rms performance and adequate stability margins.

  15. Optical hybrid analog-digital signal processing based on spike processing in neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fok, Mable P.; Tian, Yue; Rosenbluth, David; Deng, Yanhua; Prucnal, Paul R.

    2011-09-01

    Spike processing is one kind of hybrid analog-digital signal processing, which has the efficiency of analog processing and the robustness to noise of digital processing. When instantiated with optics, a hybrid analog-digital processing primitive has the potential to be scalable, computationally powerful, and have high operation bandwidth. These devices open up a range of processing applications for which electronic processing is too slow. Our approach is based on a hybrid analog/digital computational primitive that elegantly implements the functionality of an integrate-and-fire neuron using a Ge-doped non-linear optical fiber and off-the-shelf semiconductor devices. In this paper, we introduce our photonic neuron architecture and demonstrate the feasibility of implementing simple photonic neuromorphic circuits, including the auditory localization algorithm of the barn owl, which is useful for LIDAR localization, and the crayfish tail-flip escape response.

  16. Distance Learning Using Digital Fiber Optics: Applications, Technologies, and Benefits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currer, Joanne M.

    Distance learning provides special or advanced classes in rural schools where declining population has led to decreased funding and fewer classes. With full-motion video using digital fiber, two or more sites are connected into a two-way, full-motion, video conference. The teacher can see and hear the students, and the students can see and hear…

  17. DIGITAL RADIOGRAPHIC EVALUATION OF OPTICAL DENSITY OF PORCELAINS USED FOR FABRICATION OF INLAY/ONLAY PROSTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    CASTILHO, Julio Cezar de Melo; TAKESHITA, Wilton Mitsunari; dos SANTOS, Luis Roque de Araújo; de MORAES, Luiz Cesar; MEDICI, Edmundo; de MORAES, Mari Eli Leonelli

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to compare the mean value of optical density of four porcelains commonly used for fabrication of inlay/onlay prostheses using direct digital radiograph. The sample consisted of 20 2-mm thick porcelain specimens (measured by digital pachymeter): Empress (Ivoclair), Simbios (Degussa), Vita Omega 900 and Vitadur Alpha (Vita Zahnfabrik). The values of optical density of the specimens were expressed in millimeters aluminum equivalent (mm eq Al). The samples were X-rayed using two charge coupled devices (CCD) - RVG (Trophy) - Visualix (Gendex) and a phosphor plate system – Digora (Soredex). The optical density reading was performed with Image Tool 1.28 in a total of 110 measurements. Statistical analysis showed that there were statistically significant differences in all materials studied (p < 0.05) regardless of the radiographic system used. The highest optical density value was found for Omega 900 (1.8988 mmeqAl – Visualix – Gendex) and the lowest for Vitadur Alpha (0.8647 – Visualix – Gendex). Thus, the material presenting the highest degree of optical density was Omega 900, Empress and Simbios presented intermediate optical density values, Vitadur Alpha presented the lowest value, and the optical density of porcelains was not influenced by the digital radiography systems. PMID:19089024

  18. Optical security features by using information carrier digital screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltai, Ferenc

    2002-04-01

    Jura is an Austrian-Hungarian company providing security printers with proprietary security printing design software, complete security printing pre=press systems (HW + SW), ultrahigh resolution image setters developed for security printing market, security features, developed by Jura for security printing in general, proprietary security features, destined for document personalization systems. In addition to supply such products Jura is providing its customers with full technical support, as integration, installation, training, hot-line remote and/or on-site support, service and maintenance worldwide. Research and development have always been in the focus of Jura's activity. Development and testing of new software, new security features are the most important parts of the work. Jura was the first on the world to release her Engraver Software enabling artist-engravers to create engraving-styled portraits digitally. This development, incompatibility with Jura's security design software package, enabled a full digital workflow for banknote origination. Jura made a lot of remarkable steps to develop security features also for Document Personalization. This development links the personal data with the photography of the document' holder by encoding personal data to the photography, invisibly for naked human eye, however, decodable by an appropriate decoding device. This feature exists also in machine-readable digital version. Experts of Jura started the research and development on digital screening 15 years ago for commercial printing and 10 years ago on special screens for security printing technologies. In very early stage of this development, when knowledge of creating each screen-dot individually in shape, form and position was acquired, the idea was born to use the screen dots as secondary data holder for encoded messages.

  19. Performance Characterization of Digital Optical Data Transfer Systems for Use in the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Robert A.; Ladbury, Ray L.; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Radiation effects in photonic and microelectronic components can impact the performance of high-speed digital optical data link in a variety of ways. This segment of the short course focuses on radiation effects in digital optical data links operating in the MHz to GHz regime. (Some of the information is applicable to frequencies above and below this regime) The three basic component level effects that should be considered are Total Ionizing Dose (TID), Displacement Damage Dose (DDD) and Single Event Effects (SEE). In some cases the system performance degradation can be quantified from component level tests, while in others a more holistic characterization approach must be taken. In Section 2.0 of this segment of the Short Course we will give a brief overview of the space radiation environment follow by a summary of the basic space radiation effects important for microelectronics and photonics listed above. The last part of this section will give an example of a typical mission radiation environment requirements. Section 3.0 gives an overview of intra-satellite digital optical data link systems. It contains a discussion of the digital optical data link and it's components. Also, we discuss some of the important system performance metrics that are impacted by radiation effects degradation of optical and optoelectronic component performance. Section 4.0 discusses radiation effects in optical and optoelectronic components. While each component effect will be discussed, the focus of this section is on degradation of passive optical components and SEE in photodiodes (other mechanisms are covered in segment II of this short course entitled "Photonic Devices with Complex and Multiple Failure Modes"). Section 5.0 will focus on optical data link system response to the space radiation environment. System level SEE ground testing will be discussed. Then we give a discussion of system level assessment of data link performance when operating in the space radiation environment.

  20. Security enhanced optical one-time password authentication method by using digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Sang Keun; Jeon, Seok Hee; Jeong, Jong Rae

    2015-03-01

    We propose a new optical one-time password(OTP) authentication method by using digital holography, which enhances security strength in the cryptosystem compared to the conventional electronic OTP method. In this paper, a challenge-response optical OTP authentication based on two-factor authentication is presented by 2-step quadrature phase-shifting digital holography using orthogonal polarization, and two-way authentication is also performed using the challenge-response handshake in both directions. The ID (identification), PW (password) and OTP information are encrypted with a shared key by applying phase-shifting digital holography, and these encrypted information are verified each other by the shared key. Because the encrypted digital holograms which are transmitted to the other party are expressed as random distribution, it guards against a replay attack and results in higher security level. Optically, encrypted digital hologram in our method is Fourier transform hologram and is recorded on CCD with 256 gray-level quantized intensities. The proposed method has an advantage that it does not need a time-synchronized OTP and can be applied to various security services. Computer experiments show that the proposed method is suitable for high secure OTP authentication.

  1. The Impact of Fiber Nonlinearities on Digital Optical Communication Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Ting-Kuang

    Wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) enables high throughput fiber-optic networks by sending several optical channels through a single fiber. Even though the bandwidth of optical fibers is over 25 THz, fiber nonlinearities can limit the capacity of WDM communication systems. Cross -phase modulation (XPM) is one of the nonlinear effects that affect WDM systems. This thesis provides an in-depth understanding of the properties of XPM-induced phase shift and suggests techniques to suppress XPM in long-distance WDM optical networks. In this thesis, XPM is theoretically and experimentally investigated in fiber links with optical amplifiers and dispersion compensators. The theoretical analysis suggests that the XPM effect can be modeled as a phase modulator with inputs from the intensity of co-propagating waves. The frequency response of the phase modulator depends on fiber dispersion, wavelength separation, and fiber length. In non-dispersive fibers, XPM is frequency-independent; in dispersive fibers, the response is approximately inversely proportional to modulation frequency, fiber dispersion, and wavelength separation. In N-segment amplified links with no dispersion compensators, the XPM frequency response is increased N -fold, but only in very narrow frequency bands. In most other frequency bands, the increase is limited and almost independent of N. However, in N-segment amplified links with dispersion compensators, the frequency response of XPM is increased N-fold at all frequencies if the dispersion is compensated for within each fiber segment. The XPM-induced sensitivity penalty in multichannel continuous-phase frequency-shift-keying optical communication systems is investigated by theoretical analysis, computer simulations, and experimental measurements. It is shown that high-frequency components in the XPM-induced phase shift play a more important role in determining the sensitivity penalty than the low-frequency components. The XPM-induced sensitivity penalty

  2. Electronic polarization-division demultiplexing based on digital signal processing in intensity-modulation direct-detection optical communication systems.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kazuro

    2014-01-27

    We propose a novel configuration of optical receivers for intensity-modulation direct-detection (IM · DD) systems, which can cope with dual-polarization (DP) optical signals electrically. Using a Stokes analyzer and a newly-developed digital signal-processing (DSP) algorithm, we can achieve polarization tracking and demultiplexing in the digital domain after direct detection. Simulation results show that the power penalty stemming from digital polarization manipulations is negligibly small.

  3. Optically-synchronized encoder and multiplexer scheme for interleaved photonics analog-to-digital conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Carlos; Kumavor, Patrick; Donkor, Eric

    2008-04-01

    Photonics Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADCs) utilize a train of optical pulses to sample an electrical input waveform applied to an electrooptic modulator or a reverse biased photodiode. In the former, the resulting train of amplitude-modulated optical pulses is detected (converter to electrical) and quantized using a conversional electronics ADC- as at present there are no practical, cost-effective optical quantizers available with performance that rival electronic quantizers. In the latter, the electrical samples are directly quantized by the electronics ADC. In both cases however, the sampling rate is limited by the speed with which the electronics ADC can quantize the electrical samples. One way to increase the sampling rate by a factor N is by using the time-interleaved technique which consists of a parallel array of N electrical ADC converters, which have the same sampling rate but different sampling phase. Each operating at a quantization rate of fs/N where fs is the aggregated sampling rate. In a system with no real-time operation, the N channels digital outputs are stored in memory, and then aggregated (multiplexed) to obtain the digital representation of the analog input waveform. Alternatively, for real-time operation systems the reduction of storing time in the multiplexing process is desired to improve the time response of the ADC. The complete elimination of memories come expenses of concurrent timing and synchronization in the aggregation of the digital signal that became critical for a good digital representation of the analog signal waveform. In this paper we propose and demonstrate a novel optically synchronized encoder and multiplexer scheme for interleaved photonics ADCs that utilize the N optical signals used to sample different phases of an analog input signal to synchronize the multiplexing of the resulting N digital output channels in a single digital output port. As a proof of concept, four 320 Megasamples/sec 12-bit of resolution digital

  4. Feasibility of direct digital sampling for diffuse optical frequency domain spectroscopy in tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roblyer, Darren; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; Warren, Robert V.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-04-01

    Frequency domain optical spectroscopy in the diffusive regime is currently being investigated for biomedical applications including tumor detection, therapy monitoring, exercise metabolism and others. Analog homodyne or heterodyne detection of sinusoidally modulated signals has been the predominant method for measuring phase and amplitude of photon density waves that have traversed through tissue. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing direct digital sampling of modulated signals using a 3.6 gigasample/second 12 bit analog to digital converter. Digitally synthesized modulated signals between 50 MHz and 400 MHz were measured on tissue-simulating phantoms at six near-infrared wavelengths. An amplitude and phase precision of 1% and 0.6° were achieved during drift tests. Amplitude, phase, scattering and absorption values were compared with a well-characterized network analyzer-based diffuse optical device. Optical properties measured with both systems were within 3.6% for absorption and 2.8% for scattering over a range of biologically relevant values. Direct digital sampling represents a viable method for frequency domain diffuse optical spectroscopy and has the potential to reduce system complexity, size and cost.

  5. Thomson develops new optical reader, digital switching system: Gigadisc reader recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, D.

    1984-01-01

    A digital optical disk, newly developed by Thomson of France, is announced. The disk, which has a greatly enhanced data storage capacity, is capable of capturing a leading position in information processing and business communications systems by overtaking the share of the market now held by the flexible magnetic disk. A marketing strategy is presented.

  6. A high speed, fibre optic, link for digital equipment corporation VAXES

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, R.A.; Gallno, P.; Hollingworth, K. ); Almeida, T.; Astor, C.; Gomes, P. ); Castro, J.; Moreira, P. )

    1989-10-01

    This paper describes a fibre optic link that has been constructed which, used in conjunction with the CERN Host Interface family, connects high performance Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAXes to VMEbus or FASTBUS over distances up to 1000 meters. The modular construction allows other permutations, including VAX/VAX, FASTBUS/FASTBUS, VMEbus/VMEbus, or FASTBUS/VMEbus connections, over similar distances.

  7. Multipoint laser Doppler vibrometry using holographic optical elements and a CMOS digital camera.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Michael J; Szecówka, Przemyslaw M; Jallapuram, Raghavendra; Martin, Suzanne; Toal, Vincent; Whelan, Maurice P

    2008-02-15

    A laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is described in which holographic optical elements are used to provide the interferometer reference and object illumination beams. A complementary metal-oxide semiconductor camera, incorporating a digital signal processor, is used to carry out real-time signal processing of the interferometer output to allow multipoint LDV to be implemented.

  8. A Novel Optical/digital Processing System for Pattern Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boone, Bradley G.; Shukla, Oodaye B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes two processing algorithms that can be implemented optically: the Radon transform and angular correlation. These two algorithms can be combined in one optical processor to extract all the basic geometric and amplitude features from objects embedded in video imagery. We show that the internal amplitude structure of objects is recovered by the Radon transform, which is a well-known result, but, in addition, we show simulation results that calculate angular correlation, a simple but unique algorithm that extracts object boundaries from suitably threshold images from which length, width, area, aspect ratio, and orientation can be derived. In addition to circumventing scale and rotation distortions, these simulations indicate that the features derived from the angular correlation algorithm are relatively insensitive to tracking shifts and image noise. Some optical architecture concepts, including one based on micro-optical lenslet arrays, have been developed to implement these algorithms. Simulation test and evaluation using simple synthetic object data will be described, including results of a study that uses object boundaries (derivable from angular correlation) to classify simple objects using a neural network.

  9. Development of an optical parallel logic device and a half-adder circuit for digital optical processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athale, R. A.; Lee, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the fabrication and operation of an optical parallel logic (OPAL) device which performs Boolean algebraic operations on binary images. Several logic operations on two input binary images were demonstrated using an 8 x 8 device with a CdS photoconductor and a twisted nematic liquid crystal. Two such OPAL devices can be interconnected to form a half-adder circuit which is one of the essential components of a CPU in a digital signal processor.

  10. Optical properties of a photopolymer film for digital holographic storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Changwon; Kim, Junghoi; Kim, Nam; Lee, Hyojin; Kim, Eunkyoung

    2005-09-01

    Tir- and mono functional monomers were dispersed in a solution of polysulfone in organic solvent containing a photo initiator and other additives. New photopolymer film was prepared by dispersing acrylic monomer in a polysulfone matrix. The Polysulfone was adopted as a binder since it affords transparent thick films with low dimensional changes during holographic recording. Optical property of the photopolymer showed high diffraction efficiency (>90%) under an optimized optical condition at 532nm laser. The angular selectivity for angular multiplexing page oriented holographic memories (POHMs), the maximum diffraction efficiency of the material during holographic recording, the diffraction efficiency of the films as a function of an incident angle of two beams, exposure energy for saturation of the holographic material and application for holographic data storage will be discussed.

  11. An evaluation of the financial impacts of optical disk storage for digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Stockburger, W T

    1987-01-01

    While the digitization of radiographic patient information and the use of picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) have become a subject of increased interest and controversy, discussion of the methodology for archiving this information is not common. Optical disks have been proposed as one solution to the archival problem which faces most large radiology departments as the transition to digitization occurs. An in-depth financial analysis of the costs incurred by both traditional film archival and optical disk archival provides sufficient information to emphatically state that over a seven-year period, optical disk archival is more cost efficient than traditional radiographic film archival for radiology facilities with workloads greater than 25,000 procedures. For simplification purposes, however, only those cost directly associated with image archival were considered; all other factors relating to PACs, such as personnel costs and hardware required for image review and transfer, were ignored. PMID:10284737

  12. Lensless coherent imaging by sampling of the optical field with digital micromirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vdovin, G.; Gong, H.; Soloviev, O.; Pozzi, P.; Verhaegen, M.

    2015-12-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated a lensless coherent microscope based on direct registration of the complex optical field by sampling the pupil with a sequence of two-point interferometers formed by a digital micromirror device. Complete registration of the complex amplitude in the pupil of the imaging system, without any reference beam, provides a convenient link between the experimental and computational optics. Unlike other approaches to digital holography, our method does not require any external reference beam, resulting in a simple and robust registration setup. Computer analysis of the experimentally registered field allows for focusing the image in the whole range from zero to infinity, and for virtual correction of the aberrations present in the real optical system, by applying the adaptive wavefront corrections to its virtual model.

  13. Joint digital signal processing for superchannel coherent optical communication systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Pan, Jie; Detwiler, Thomas; Stark, Andrew; Hsueh, Yu-Ting; Chang, Gee-Kung; Ralph, Stephen E

    2013-04-01

    Ultra-high-speed optical communication systems which can support ≥ 1Tb/s per channel transmission will soon be required to meet the increasing capacity demand. However, 1Tb/s over a single carrier requires either or both a high-level modulation format (i.e. 1024QAM) and a high baud rate. Alternatively, grouping a number of tightly spaced "sub-carriers" to form a terabit superchannel increases channel capacity while minimizing the need for high-level modulation formats and high baud rate, which may allow existing formats, baud rate and components to be exploited. In ideal Nyquist-WDM superchannel systems, optical subcarriers with rectangular spectra are tightly packed at a channel spacing equal to the baud rate, thus achieving the Nyquist bandwidth limit. However, in practical Nyquist-WDM systems, precise electrical or optical control of channel spectra is required to avoid strong inter-channel interference (ICI). Here, we propose and demonstrate a new "super receiver" architecture for practical Nyquist-WDM systems, which jointly detects and demodulates multiple channels simultaneously and mitigates the penalties associated with the limitations of generating ideal Nyquist-WDM spectra. Our receiver-side solution relaxes the filter requirements imposed on the transmitter. Two joint DSP algorithms are developed for linear ICI cancellation and joint carrier-phase recovery. Improved system performance is observed with both experimental and simulation data. Performance analysis under different system configurations is conducted to demonstrate the feasibility and robustness of the proposed joint DSP algorithms.

  14. Fiber optic transceiver for interfacing digital superconducting electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCammon, K.; Morse, J.; Masquelier, D.; McConaghey, C.; Garrett, H.; Hugenberg, K.; Lowry, M.; Track, E.; Bunz, L.

    1994-03-01

    Low temperature experiments have been conducted in order to characterize the performance of high speed photodetectors and LiNbO3 optical modulators in cryogenic environments down to 4.2 K. Specific parameters quantified from this study include bandwidth, responsivity, V(sub pi) (half wave voltage), optical loss, and package stability. Metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodiodes fabricated from GaAs and InGaAs have been characterized. Results demonstrate that both the responsivity and bandwidth depend on temperature. Several Mach-Zehnder (MZ) modulator designs were tested over the dc to greater than 20 GHz range. These results demonstrate the performance of LiNbO3 modulators at cryogenic temperatures and enable the design of high sensitivity data links. The experimental results are coupled with optical data link analysis to estimate the performance of transmit and receive modules in cryogenic systems. This further provides insight into the critical issues associated with the integration of optoelectronic networks with superconducting signal processing circuits.

  15. Real-time digital signal processing for live electro-optic imaging.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Kanno, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Masahiro

    2009-08-31

    We present an imaging system that enables real-time magnitude and phase detection of modulated signals and its application to a Live Electro-optic Imaging (LEI) system, which realizes instantaneous visualization of RF electric fields. The real-time acquisition of magnitude and phase images of a modulated optical signal at 5 kHz is demonstrated by imaging with a Si-based high-speed CMOS image sensor and real-time signal processing with a digital signal processor. In the LEI system, RF electric fields are probed with light via an electro-optic crystal plate and downconverted to an intermediate frequency by parallel optical heterodyning, which can be detected with the image sensor. The artifacts caused by the optics and the image sensor characteristics are corrected by image processing. As examples, we demonstrate real-time visualization of electric fields from RF circuits.

  16. Optical Manipulation of Single Magnetic Beads in a Microwell Array on a Digital Microfluidic Chip.

    PubMed

    Decrop, Deborah; Brans, Toon; Gijsenbergh, Pieter; Lu, Jiadi; Spasic, Dragana; Kokalj, Tadej; Beunis, Filip; Goos, Peter; Puers, Robert; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    The detection of single molecules in magnetic microbead microwell array formats revolutionized the development of digital bioassays. However, retrieval of individual magnetic beads from these arrays has not been realized until now despite having great potential for studying captured targets at the individual level. In this paper, optical tweezers were implemented on a digital microfluidic platform for accurate manipulation of single magnetic beads seeded in a microwell array. Successful optical trapping of magnetic beads was found to be dependent on Brownian motion of the beads, suggesting a 99% chance of trapping a vibrating bead. A tailor-made experimental design was used to screen the effect of bead type, ionic buffer strength, surfactant type, and concentration on the Brownian activity of beads in microwells. With the optimal conditions, the manipulation of magnetic beads was demonstrated by their trapping, retrieving, transporting, and repositioning to a desired microwell on the array. The presented platform combines the strengths of digital microfluidics, digital bioassays, and optical tweezers, resulting in a powerful dynamic microwell array system for single molecule and single cell studies. PMID:27448015

  17. Optical Manipulation of Single Magnetic Beads in a Microwell Array on a Digital Microfluidic Chip.

    PubMed

    Decrop, Deborah; Brans, Toon; Gijsenbergh, Pieter; Lu, Jiadi; Spasic, Dragana; Kokalj, Tadej; Beunis, Filip; Goos, Peter; Puers, Robert; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    The detection of single molecules in magnetic microbead microwell array formats revolutionized the development of digital bioassays. However, retrieval of individual magnetic beads from these arrays has not been realized until now despite having great potential for studying captured targets at the individual level. In this paper, optical tweezers were implemented on a digital microfluidic platform for accurate manipulation of single magnetic beads seeded in a microwell array. Successful optical trapping of magnetic beads was found to be dependent on Brownian motion of the beads, suggesting a 99% chance of trapping a vibrating bead. A tailor-made experimental design was used to screen the effect of bead type, ionic buffer strength, surfactant type, and concentration on the Brownian activity of beads in microwells. With the optimal conditions, the manipulation of magnetic beads was demonstrated by their trapping, retrieving, transporting, and repositioning to a desired microwell on the array. The presented platform combines the strengths of digital microfluidics, digital bioassays, and optical tweezers, resulting in a powerful dynamic microwell array system for single molecule and single cell studies.

  18. Implementation theory of distortion-invariant pattern recognition for optical and digital signal processing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhamon, Michael Earl

    A pattern recognition system which uses complex correlation filter banks requires proportionally more computational effort than single-real valued filters. This introduces increased computation burden but also introduces a higher level of parallelism, that common computing platforms fail to identify. As a result, we consider algorithm mapping to both optical and digital processors. For digital implementation, we develop computationally efficient pattern recognition algorithms, referred to as, vector inner product operators that require less computational effort than traditional fast Fourier methods. These algorithms do not need correlation and they map readily onto parallel digital architectures, which imply new architectures for optical processors. These filters exploit circulant-symmetric matrix structures of the training set data representing a variety of distortions. By using the same mathematical basis as with the vector inner product operations, we are able to extend the capabilities of more traditional correlation filtering to what we refer to as "Super Images". These "Super Images" are used to morphologically transform a complicated input scene into a predetermined dot pattern. The orientation of the dot pattern is related to the rotational distortion of the object of interest. The optical implementation of "Super Images" yields feature reduction necessary for using other techniques, such as artificial neural networks. We propose a parallel digital signal processor architecture based on specific pattern recognition algorithms but general enough to be applicable to other similar problems. Such an architecture is classified as a data flow architecture. Instead of mapping an algorithm to an architecture, we propose mapping the DSP architecture to a class of pattern recognition algorithms. Today's optical processing systems have difficulties implementing full complex filter structures. Typically, optical systems (like the 4f correlators) are limited to phase

  19. Suppression of image autocorrelation artefacts in spectral domain optical coherence tomography and multiwave digital holography

    SciTech Connect

    Gelikonov, V M; Gelikonov, G V; Terpelov, D A; Shabanov, D V; Shilyagin, P A

    2012-05-31

    An improved method for suppressing image artefacts in spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) and multiwave digital holography, caused by the influence of coherent noise in the course of successive registration of an autocorrelation component and informative signal is reported. The method allows complete suppression of all types of coherent noises, provided that the sample of values used to record the autocorrelation component satisfies the conditions of Kotelnikov's theorem: in SD OCT - for the transverse structure of the studied medium, in multiwave digital holography - for the envelop function of the radiation source frequency tuning spectrum.

  20. Combining digital holographic microscopy and optical tweezers: a new route in microfluidic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccio, L.; Memmolo, P.; Merola, F.; Paturzo, M.; Finizio, A.; Grilli, S.; Ferraro, P.

    2012-04-01

    An optical configuration is realized to obtain quantitative phase-contrast maps able to characterize particles floating in a microfluidic chamber by interference microscopy. The novelty is the possibility to drive the sample and measure it thorough the same light path. That is realized by an optical setup made of two light beams coming from the same laser source. One beam provides the optical forces for driving the particle along the desired path and, at same time, it works as object beam in the digital holographic microscope (DHM). The second one acts as reference beam, allowing recording of an interference fringe pattern (i.e., the digital hologram) in an out-of-focus image plane. This work finds application in the field of micromanipulation as, the devise developed allows to operate in microfluidic chambers driving samples flowing in very small volumes. Recently, the field of optical particle micro-manipulation has had rapid growth, due to Optical Tweezers development. A particle is trapped or moved along certain trajectories according to the intensity and phase distribution of the laser beam used. Here, particles freely floating are driven by optical forces along preferential directions and then analyzed by a DHM to numerically calculate their phase-contrast signature. The improvement is that one laser source is employed for making two jobs: driving and analyze the sample. We use two slightly off-axis laser beams coming from a single laser source. The interference between them gives the possibility to record in real-time a sequence of digital holograms, while one of the beam creates the driving force. By this method, a great amount of particles can be analyzed by a real-time recording of DH movies. This allows one to examine each particle at time and characterize it. The optical configuration and the working method are illustrated. Experimental results are shown for polymeric particles and in-vitro.

  1. Real-time digital design for an optical coherence tomography acquisition and processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralston, Tyler S.; Mayen, Jose A.; Marks, Dan L.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2004-07-01

    We present a real-time, multi-dimensional, digital, optical coherence tomography (OCT) acquisition and imaging system. The system consists of conventional OCT optics, a rapid scanning optical delay (RSOD) line to support fast data acquisition rates, and a high-speed A/D converter for sampling the interference waveforms. A 1M-gate Virtex-II field programmable gate array (FPGA) is designed to perform digital down conversion. This is analogous to demodulating and low-pass filtering the continuous time signal. The system creates in-phase and quadrature-phase components using a tunable quadrature mixer. Multistage polyphase finite impulse response (FIR) filtering and down sampling is used to remove unneeded high frequencies. A floating-point digital signal processor (DSP) computes the magnitude and phase shifts. The data is read by a host machine and displayed on screen at real-time rates commensurate with the data acquisition rate. This system offers flexible acquisition and processing parameters for a wide range of multi-dimensional optical microscopy techniques.

  2. Sensitivity loss of digital optical receivers caused by intersymbol interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F. S.; Chen, Y. S.

    1980-12-01

    This paper describes studies of the dependence of optical receiver sensitivity on the launched-pulse width, pulse rise and fall times, and fiber dispersion for nonequalizing receivers. For pulse widths less than a time slot T in the return-to-zero (RZ) format and for small fiber dispersion sigma sub f, it is shown that the receiver sensitivity depends principally on the number of photons received per time slot and only weakly on the pulse width and rise and fall times of the launched pulses. For pulse widths equal to or greater than a time slot and/or with increased fiber dispersion (sigma sub f/T greater than 0.2), the receiver sensitivity degrades rapidly. Thus the sensitivity of receivers improves by use of reduced-width launched pulses in RZ format, particularly if the fiber dispersion is large.

  3. Multi-aperture digital coherent combining for free-space optical communication receivers.

    PubMed

    Geisler, David J; Yarnall, Timothy M; Stevens, Mark L; Schieler, Curt M; Robinson, Bryan S; Hamilton, Scott A

    2016-06-13

    Space-to-ground optical communication systems can benefit from reducing the size, weight, and power profiles of space terminals. One way of reducing the required power-aperture product on a space platform is to implement effective, but costly, single-aperture ground terminals with large collection areas. In contrast, we present a ground terminal receiver architecture in which many small less-expensive apertures are efficiently combined to create a large effective aperture while maintaining excellent receiver sensitivity. This is accomplished via coherent detection behind each aperture followed by digitization. The digitized signals are then combined in a digital signal processing chain. Experimental results demonstrate lossless coherent combining of four lasercom signals, at power levels below 0.1 photons/bit/aperture.

  4. Optical Measurement Techniques for Rocket Engine Testing and Component Applications: Digital Image Correlation and Dynamic Photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul

    2016-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been advancing dynamic optical measurement systems, primarily Digital Image Correlation, for extreme environment rocket engine test applications. The Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technology is used to track local and full field deformations, displacement vectors and local and global strain measurements. This technology has been evaluated at MSFC through lab testing to full scale hotfire engine testing of the J-2X Upper Stage engine at Stennis Space Center. It has been shown to provide reliable measurement data and has replaced many traditional measurement techniques for NASA applications. NASA and AMRDEC have recently signed agreements for NASA to train and transition the technology to applications for missile and helicopter testing. This presentation will provide an overview and progression of the technology, various testing applications at NASA MSFC, overview of Army-NASA test collaborations and application lessons learned about Digital Image Correlation.

  5. Multi-aperture digital coherent combining for free-space optical communication receivers.

    PubMed

    Geisler, David J; Yarnall, Timothy M; Stevens, Mark L; Schieler, Curt M; Robinson, Bryan S; Hamilton, Scott A

    2016-06-13

    Space-to-ground optical communication systems can benefit from reducing the size, weight, and power profiles of space terminals. One way of reducing the required power-aperture product on a space platform is to implement effective, but costly, single-aperture ground terminals with large collection areas. In contrast, we present a ground terminal receiver architecture in which many small less-expensive apertures are efficiently combined to create a large effective aperture while maintaining excellent receiver sensitivity. This is accomplished via coherent detection behind each aperture followed by digitization. The digitized signals are then combined in a digital signal processing chain. Experimental results demonstrate lossless coherent combining of four lasercom signals, at power levels below 0.1 photons/bit/aperture. PMID:27410287

  6. Adaptive optical radial basis function neural network for handwritten digit recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foor, Wesley E.; Neifeld, Mark A.

    1994-06-01

    An adaptive optical radial basis function classifier for handwritten digit recognition is experimentally demonstrated. We describe a spatially- multiplexed system incorporating on-line adaptation of weights and basis function widths to provide robustness to optical system imperfections and system noise. The optical system computes the Euclidean distances between a 100-dimensional input and 198 stored reference patterns in parallel using dual vector-matrix multipliers. For this experimental software is used to perform the on-line learning of the weights and basis function widths. An experimental recognition rate of 86.7% correct out of 300 testing samples is achieved with the adaptive training versus 52.3% correct for non-adaptive training. The experimental results from the optical system are compared with data from a computer model of the system in order to identify noise sources and indicate possible improvements for system performance.

  7. On-premises digital communications upgrades with emphasis on fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, J. A.; Hanson, A. G.

    1986-11-01

    The Federal Telecommunications Standards Committee has established a Fiber Optics Task Group, one purpose of which is to develop guidelines for Federal agencies planning to use fiber optics in on-premises communications upgrades. The report describes the key technical elements under consideration in the Task Group. These technical elements include local area networks (LANs), digital private automatic branch exchanges (PABXs), building-wiring distribution architecture, and the application of optical fiber waveguides in the implementation of these on-premises systems. The report develops some fundamental principles necessary to do tradeoff analyses required to make decisions regarding cost versus early technological obsolescence. Some examples of commercially available technology representing the present state of the art are included. Brief summaries of technology readiness, as presented by several key industry representatives to the Fiber Optics Task Group, are provided.

  8. Reconstruction of refractive-index distribution in off-axis digital holography optical diffraction tomographic system.

    PubMed

    Kozacki, Tomasz; Krajewski, Rafal; Kujawińska, Małgorzata

    2009-08-01

    In the paper the optical diffraction tomographic system for reconstruction of the internal refractive index distribution in optical fiber utilizing grating Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration is explored. The setup applies afocal imaging. Conventional grating application gives, however, highly aberrated object beam producing incorrect refractive-index reconstructions. The grating inherent aberrations are characterized, its influence on both image projections and refractive index reconstructions is presented. To remove aberrations and enable tomographic reconstruction a novel digital holographic algorithm, correcting optical system imaging, is developed. The algorithm uses plane wave spectrum decomposition of optical field for solving diffraction problem between parallel and tilted planes and enabling correction of imaging system aberrations. The algorithm concept was successfully proved in simulations and the experiment.

  9. Digital subcarrier multiplexing for fiber nonlinearity mitigation in coherent optical communication systems.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Meng; Zhuge, Qunbi; Chagnon, Mathieu; Gao, Yuliang; Xu, Xian; Morsy-Osman, Mohamed; Plant, David V

    2014-07-28

    In this work we experimentally investigate the improved intra-channel fiber nonlinearity tolerance of digital subcarrier multiplexed (SCM) signals in a single-channel coherent optical transmission system. The digital signal processing (DSP) for the generation and reception of the SCM signals is described. We show experimentally that the SCM signal with a nearly-optimum number of subcarriers can extend the maximum reach by 23% in a 24 GBaud DP-QPSK transmission with a BER threshold of 3.8 × 10(-3) and by 8% in a 24 GBaud DP-16-QAM transmission with a BER threshold of 2 × 10(-2). Moreover, we show by simulations that the improved performance of SCM signals is observed over a wide range of baud rates, further indicating the merits of SCM signals in baud-rate flexible agile transmissions and future high-speed optical transport systems.

  10. Single-shot digital holography for fast measuring optical properties of fibers.

    PubMed

    Agour, Mostafa; El-Farahaty, Keremal; Seisa, Eman; Omar, Emam; Sokkar, Taha

    2015-10-01

    We propose a fast method for measuring optical properties, e.g., the refractive index profile and birefringence, of fibers. It is based on recovering the phase distribution of light refracted by a fiber sample at the recording plane from a single-shot digital hologram. During the recovering process, an optimized approach based on the spatial carrier frequency method was utilized. The proposed approach enhances affects that arise from the limited spatial extent of the bandpass filter associated with the implementation of the spatial carrier frequency method. In contrast to the low spatial resolution of off-axis digital holograms, the method ensures the best utilization of the camera support. From the recovered phase information, the optical path difference is measured; thus, the refractive index profile, the mean refractive index, and the birefringence of isotactic polypropylene (IPP) are determined. Experimental results are given for illustration. PMID:26479652

  11. Low-frequency analog signal distribution on digital photonic networks by optical delta-sigma modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Atsushi; Kawanishi, Tetsuya

    2013-12-01

    We propose a delta-sigma modulation scheme for low- and medium-frequency signal transmission in a digital photonic network system. A 10-Gb/s-class optical transceiver with a delta-sigma modulator utilized as a high-speed analog-to-digital converter (ADC) provides a binary optical signal. On the signal reception side, a low-cost and slow-speed photonic receiver directly converts the binary signal into an analog signal at frequencies from several hundreds of kilohertz several tens of megahertz. Further, by using a clock and data recovery circuit at the receiver to reduce jitters, the single-sideband phase noise of the generated signals can be significantly reduced.

  12. An open source digital servo for atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Leibrandt, D. R. Heidecker, J.

    2015-12-15

    We describe a general purpose digital servo optimized for feedback control of lasers in atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments. The servo is capable of feedback bandwidths up to roughly 1 MHz (limited by the 320 ns total latency); loop filter shapes up to fifth order; multiple-input, multiple-output control; and automatic lock acquisition. The configuration of the servo is controlled via a graphical user interface, which also provides a rudimentary software oscilloscope and tools for measurement of system transfer functions. We illustrate the functionality of the digital servo by describing its use in two example scenarios: frequency control of the laser used to probe the narrow clock transition of {sup 27}Al{sup +} in an optical atomic clock, and length control of a cavity used for resonant frequency doubling of a laser.

  13. Optical digital coherent detection technology enabled flexible and ultra-fast quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan-Hua; Lu, Xing; Song, Lu; Guo, Xiaojie; Wang, Yawei; Zhu, Linyan; Sui, Qi; Li, Jianping; Shi, Kebin; Li, Zhaohui

    2016-07-25

    Quantitative phase imaging has been an important labeling-free microscopy modality for many biomedical and material science applications. In which, ultra-fast quantitative phase imaging is indispensable for dynamic or transient characteristics analysis. Conventional wide field optical interferometry is a common scheme for quantitative phase imaging, while its data acquisition rate is usually hindered by the frame rate of arrayed detector. By utilizing novel balanced-photo-detector based digital optics coherent detection techniques, we report on a method of constructing ultra-fast quantitative phase microscopy at the line-scan rate of 100 MHz with ~2 μm spatial resolution. PMID:27464166

  14. Analysis and preliminary design of an optical digital tip clearance sensor for propulsion control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppel, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    Following the generation of several concepts for passive, digital compatible, optical sensors for propulsion control systems, a tip clearance sensor was chosen for further analysis and preliminary design. Emphasis was placed on application to the TF34 engine compressor section. Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate several optical aspects of the concept. Preliminary design included an assessment of all sensor elements and recommendations for development programs. Quantitative predictions were made of sensor performance. A test plan was written to demonstrate sensor feasibility and that the performance goals can be met. A continuing experimental and design effort was suggested.

  15. Performance evaluation of intensity modulated optical OFDM system with digital baseband distortion.

    PubMed

    Vanin, Evgeny

    2011-02-28

    Bit-Error-Ratio (BER) of intensity modulated optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) system is analytically evaluated accounting for nonlinear digital baseband distortion in the transmitter and additive noise in the photo receiver. The nonlinear distortion that is caused by signal clipping and quantization is taken into consideration. The signal clipping helps to overcome the system performance limitation related to high peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) of the OFDM signal and to minimize the value of optical power that is required for achieving specified BER. The signal quantization due to a limited bit resolution of the digital to analog converter (DAC) causes an optical power penalty in the case when the bit resolution is too low. By introducing an effective signal to noise ratio (SNR) the optimum signal clipping ratio, system BER and required optical power at the input to the receiver is evaluated for the OFDM system with multi-level quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) applied to the optical signal subcarriers. Minimum required DAC bit resolution versus the size of QAM constellation is identified. It is demonstrated that the bit resolution of 7 and higher causes negligibly small optical power penalty at the system BER=10⁻³ when 256-QAM and a constellation of lower size is applied. The performance of the optical OFDM system is compared to the performance of the multi-level amplitude-shift keying (M-ASK) system for the same number of information bits transmitted per signal sample. It is demonstrated that in the case of the matched receiver the M-ASK system outperforms OFDM and requires 3-3.5 dB less of optical power at BER=10⁻³ when 1-4 data bits are transmitted per signal sample. PMID:21369258

  16. Optical Injection Locking of Vertical Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers: Digital and Analog Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, Devang

    With the rise of mobile (cellphones, tablets, notebooks, etc.) and broadband wireline communications (Fiber to the Home), there are increasing demands being placed on transmitters for moving data from device to device and around the world. Digital and analog fiber-optic communications have been the key technology to meet this challenge, ushering in ubiquitous Internet and cable TV over the past 20 years. At the physical layer, high-volume low-cost manufacturing of semiconductor optoelectronic devices has played an integral role in allowing for deployment of high-speed communication links. In particular, vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL) have revolutionized short reach communications and are poised to enter more markets due to their low cost, small size, and performance. However, VCSELs have disadvantages such as limited modulation performance and large frequency chirp which limits fiber transmission speed and distance, key parameters for many fiber-optic communication systems. Optical injection locking is one method to overcome these limitations without re-engineering the VCSEL at the device level. By locking the frequency and phase of the VCSEL by the direct injection of light from another laser oscillator, improved device performance is achieved in a post-fabrication method. In this dissertation, optical injection locking of VCSELs is investigated from an applications perspective. Optical injection locking of VCSELs can be used as a pathway to reduce complexity, cost, and size of both digital and analog fiber-optic communications. On the digital front, reduction of frequency chirp via bit pattern inversion for large-signal modulation is experimentally demonstrated showing up to 10 times reduction in frequency chirp and over 90 times increase in fiber transmission distance. Based on these results, a new reflection-based interferometric model for optical injection locking was established to explain this phenomenon. On the analog side, the resonance

  17. Reconstruction in interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy: comparison with optical coherence tomography and digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Colin J R; Kou, Shan Shan; Depeursinge, Christian

    2012-03-01

    It is shown that the spatial frequencies recorded in interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy do not correspond to exact backscattering [as they do in unistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR)] and that the reconstruction process based on SAR is therefore based on an approximation. The spatial frequency response is developed based on the three-dimensional coherent transfer function approach and compared with that in optical coherence tomography and digital holographic microscopy.

  18. Optical reconstruction of digital off-axis Fresnel holograms using phase-only LCOS SLM "HoloEye PLUTO VIS"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremkhin, P. A.; Evtikhiev, N. N.; Krasnov, V. V.; Porshneva, L. A.; Starikov, R. S.; Starikov, S. N.

    2014-09-01

    Optical reconstruction of digital holograms using SLM is used for imaging of 3D scenes, interferometry, microscopy, and etc. In this article reconstruction of digital off-axis Fresnel holograms using phase-only LCOS SLM "HoloEye PLUTO VIS" is described. Experimental and numerically simulated results of reconstruction are presented.

  19. The prospects for optically bistable devices in digital optical circuits for a simple optical finite state machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. Desmond; Walker, Andrew C.; Wherrett, Brian S.; Tooley, Frank A. P.

    The physical principles underlying logic decision making and communication for both optics and electronics are reviewed. Research directions towards demonstration machines are indicated using the experimentally proven properties of bistable memories, logic gates, and optical transphasors. Results demonstrating a restoring optical logic, a 'lock and clock' architecture, and a simple finite-state machine are presented.

  20. Analog and digital transport of RF channels over converged 5G wireless-optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binh, Le Nguyen

    2016-02-01

    Under the exponential increase demand by the emerging 5G wireless access networking and thus data-center based Internet, novel and economical transport of RF channels to and from wireless access systems. This paper presents the transport technologies of RF channels over the analog and digital domain so as to meet the demands of the transport capacity reaching multi-Tbps, in the followings: (i) The convergence of 5G broadband wireless and optical networks and its demands on capacity delivery and network structures; (ii) Analog optical technologies for delivery of both the information and RF carriers to and from multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) antenna sites so as to control the beam steering of MIMO antenna in the mmW at either 28.6 GHz and 56.8 GHz RF carrier and delivery of channels of aggregate capacity reaching several Tbps; (ii) Transceiver employing advanced digital modulation formats and digital signal processing (DSP) so as to provide 100G and beyond transmission rate to meet the ultra-high capacity demands with flexible spectral grids, hence pay-on-demand services. The interplay between DSP-based and analog transport techniques is examined; (iii) Transport technologies for 5G cloud access networks and associate modulation and digital processing techniques for capacity efficiency; and (iv) Finally the integrated optic technologies with novel lasers, comb generators and simultaneous dual function photonic devices for both demultiplexing/multiplexing and modulation are proposed, hence a system on chip structure can be structured. Quantum dot lasers and matrixes of micro ring resonators are integrated on the same Si-on-Silica substrate are proposed and described.

  1. Adaptive, optical, radial basis function neural network for handwritten digit recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foor, Wesley E.; Neifeld, Mark A.

    1995-11-01

    An adaptive, optical, radial basis function classifier for handwritten digit recognition is experimentally demonstrated. We describe a spatially multiplexed system that incorporates an on-line adaptation of weights and basis function widths to provide robustness to optical system imperfections and system noise. The optical system computes the Euclidean distances between a 100-dimensional input vector and 198 stored reference patterns in parallel by using dual vector-matrix multipliers and a contrast-reversing spatial light modulator. Software is used to emulate an electronic chip that performs the on-line learning of the weights and basis function widths. An experimental recognition rate of 92.7% correct out of 300 testing samples is achieved with the adaptive training, versus 31.0% correct for nonadaptive training. We compare the experimental results with a detailed computer model of the system in order to analyze the influence of various noise sources on the system performance.

  2. DOC II 32-bit digital optical computer: optoelectronic hardware and software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Richard V.; Zeise, Frederick F.; Guilfoyle, Peter S.

    1991-12-01

    This paper describes current electronic hardware subsystems and software code which support OptiComp's 32-bit general purpose digital optical computer (DOC II). The reader is referred to earlier papers presented in this section for a thorough discussion of theory and application regarding DOC II. The primary optoelectronic subsystems include the drive electronics for the multichannel acousto-optic modulators, the avalanche photodiode amplifier, as well as threshold circuitry, and the memory subsystems. This device utilizes a single optical Boolean vector matrix multiplier and its VME based host controller interface in performing various higher level primitives. OptiComp Corporation wishes to acknowledge the financial support of the Office of Naval Research, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Rome Air Development Center, and the Strategic Defense Initiative Office for the funding of this program under contracts N00014-87-C-0077, N00014-89-C-0266 and N00014-89-C- 0225.

  3. Scheme of Optical Image Encryption with Digital Information Input and Dynamic Encryption Key based on Two LC SLMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondareva, A. P.; Cheremkhin, P. A.; Evtikhiev, N. N.; Krasnov, V. V.; Starikov, S. N.

    Scheme of optical image encryption with digital information input and dynamic encryption key based on two liquid crystal spatial light modulators and operating with spatially-incoherent monochromatic illumination is experimentally implemented. Results of experiments on images optical encryption and numerical decryption are presented. Satisfactory decryption error of 0.20÷0.27 is achieved.

  4. Relating Landsat digital count values to ground reflectance for optically thin atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Richardson, A J

    1982-04-15

    The data from seven separate investigations that relate corrected Landsat digital count (DCc) values to ground-measured bidirectional reflectance R were summarized and examined as a single data set. As shown in the results these seven different sources of data were in significant agreement in estimating R from DCc. Thus a simplified linear formulation was derived for estimating R (0-100%) from Landsat DCc for conditions that approximate optically thin atmospheres. The relations are R4 = -5.9 + 0.476DCc4, R5 = -1 94 + 0.373DCc5, R6 = -1.40 + 0.412DCc6, and R7 = -0.49 + 1.220DCc7. The original Landsat digital count (DCo) data were corrected to a sun zenith angle of 39 degrees and for the 1/22/75-7/15/75 Landsat-2 calibration period to determine DCc.

  5. Simple and robust symbol rate estimation method for digital coherent optical receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Sheng; Xia, Wenjuan; Shang, Jin; Ke, Changjian; Fu, Songnian; Liu, Deming

    2016-05-01

    A novel symbol rate estimation (SRE) technique utilizing the clock tone (CT) obtained by Godard timing recovery algorithm is proposed. By this technique, the known sampling rate of the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) in digital coherent optical receivers can used as a reference to directly determine the unknown signal symbol rate. The impact of polarization mode dispersion (PMD) on the CT magnitude can be mitigated by using the hybrid correlation function (HCF) consisting of both auto-correlation function (ACF) and cross-correlation function (XCF) of the received signal spectrum, while the chromatic dispersion (CD) impact can be mitigated by adaptive CD compensation techniques. This technique is simple, accurate, applicable to advanced modulation formats commonly used, and robust to various link impairments. Numerical simulations and experimental results are presented to validate this technique.

  6. Anisotropic aberration correction using region of interest based digital adaptive optics in Fourier domain OCT.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Kamali, Tschackad; Platzer, René; Unterhuber, Angelika; Drexler, Wolfgang; Leitgeb, Rainer A

    2015-04-01

    In this paper a numerical technique is presented to compensate for anisotropic optical aberrations, which are usually present across the lateral field of view in the out of focus regions, in high resolution optical coherence tomography and microscopy (OCT/OCM) setups. The recorded enface image field at different depths in the tomogram is digitally divided into smaller sub-regions or the regions of interest (ROIs), processed individually using subaperture based digital adaptive optics (DAO), and finally stitched together to yield a final image with a uniform diffraction limited resolution across the entire field of view (FOV). Using this method, a sub-micron lateral resolution is achieved over a depth range of 218 [Formula: see text]for a nano-particle phantom sample imaged using a fiber based point scanning spectral domain (SD) OCM system with a limited depth of focus (DOF) of ~7 [Formula: see text]at a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.6. Thus, an increase in DOF by ~30x is demonstrated in this case. The application of this method is also shown in ex vivo mouse adipose tissue.

  7. Anisotropic aberration correction using region of interest based digital adaptive optics in Fourier domain OCT

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhishek; Kamali, Tschackad; Platzer, René; Unterhuber, Angelika; Drexler, Wolfgang; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a numerical technique is presented to compensate for anisotropic optical aberrations, which are usually present across the lateral field of view in the out of focus regions, in high resolution optical coherence tomography and microscopy (OCT/OCM) setups. The recorded enface image field at different depths in the tomogram is digitally divided into smaller sub-regions or the regions of interest (ROIs), processed individually using subaperture based digital adaptive optics (DAO), and finally stitched together to yield a final image with a uniform diffraction limited resolution across the entire field of view (FOV). Using this method, a sub-micron lateral resolution is achieved over a depth range of 218 μmfor a nano-particle phantom sample imaged using a fiber based point scanning spectral domain (SD) OCM system with a limited depth of focus (DOF) of ~7 μmat a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.6. Thus, an increase in DOF by ~30x is demonstrated in this case. The application of this method is also shown in ex vivo mouse adipose tissue. PMID:25908999

  8. The importance of optical optimization in whole slide imaging (WSI) and digital pathology imaging.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Yukako; Gilbertson, John R

    2008-01-01

    In the last 10 years, whole slide imaging (WSI) has seen impressive progress not only in image quality and scanning speed but also in the variety of systems available to pathologists. However, we have noticed that most systems have relatively simple optics axes and rely on software to optimize image quality and colour balance. While much can be done in software, this study examines the importance of optics, in particular optical filters, in WSI.Optical resolution is a function of the wavelength of light used and the numerical aperture of the lens system (Resolution = (f) wavelength/2 NA). When illumining light is not conditioned correctly with filters, there is a tendency for the wavelength to shift to longer values (more red) because of the characteristics of the lamps in common use. Most microscopes (but remarkably few WSI devices) correct for this with ND filter for brightness and Blue filter (depends on the light source) for colour correction.Using H&E slides research microscopes (Axiophot, Carl Zeiss MicroImaging, Inc. NY. Eclipse 50i., Nikon Inc. NY) at 20x, an attached digital camera (SPOT RT741 Slider Color, Diagnosis Instruments., MI USA), and a filter set, we examined the effect of filters and software enhancement on digital image quality. The focus value (as evaluated by focus evaluation software developed in house and SPOT imaging Software v4.6) was used as a proxy for image quality. Resolution of tissue features was best with the use of both the Blue and ND filters (in addition to software enhancement). Images without filters but with software enhancement while superficially good, lacked some details of specimen morphology and were unclear compared with the images with filters.The results indicate that the appropriate use of optical filters could measurably improve the appearance and resolution of WSI images. PMID:18673497

  9. Beam studies at the SPEAR3 synchrotron using a digital optical mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. D.; Fiorito, R. B.; Corbett, J.; Shkvarunets, A. G.; Tian, K.; Fisher, A.

    2016-05-01

    The 3GeV SPEAR3 synchrotron light source operates in top-up injection mode with up to 500 mA circulating in the storage ring (equivalently 392 nC). Each injection pulse contains 40-80 pC producing a contrast ratio between total stored charge and injected charge of about 6500:1. In order to study transient injected beam dynamics during user operations, it is desirable to optically image the injected pulse in the presence of the bright stored beam. In the present work this is done by imaging the visible component of the synchrotron radiation onto a digital micro-mirror-array device (DMD), which is then used as an optical mask to block out light from the bright central core of the stored beam. The physical masking, together with an asynchronously-gated, ICCD imaging camera, makes it possible to observe the weak injected beam component on a turn-by-turn basis. The DMD optical masking system works similar to a classical solar coronagraph but has some distinct practical advantages: i.e. rapid adaption to changes in the shape of the stored beam, a high extinction ratio for unwanted light and minimum scattering from the primary beam into the secondary optics. In this paper we describe the DMD masking method, features of the high dynamic range point spread function for the SPEAR3 optical beam line and measurements of the injected beam in the presence of the stored beam.

  10. All-optical digital 4 × 2 encoder based on 2D photonic crystal ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniem, Tamer A.

    2016-04-01

    The photonic crystals draw significant attention to build all-optical logic devices and are considered one of the solutions for the opto-electronic bottleneck via speed and size. The paper presents a novel optical 4 × 2 encoder based on 2D square lattice photonic crystals of silicon rods. The main realization of optical encoder is based on the photonic crystal ring resonator NOR gates. The proposed structure has four logic input ports, two output ports, and two bias input port. The photonic crystal structure has a square lattice of silicon rods with a refractive index of 3.39 in air. The structure has lattice constant 'a' equal to 630 nm and bandgap range from 0.32 to 044. The total size of the proposed 4 × 2 encoder is equal to 35 μm × 35 μm. The simulation results using the dimensional finite difference time domain and Plane Wave Expansion methods confirm the operation and the feasibility of the proposed optical encoder for ultrafast optical digital circuits.

  11. Accuracy, security, and processing time comparisons of biometric fingerprint recognition system using digital and optical enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsharif, Salim; El-Saba, Aed; Jagapathi, Rajendarreddy

    2011-06-01

    Fingerprint recognition is one of the most commonly used forms of biometrics and has been widely used in daily life due to its feasibility, distinctiveness, permanence, accuracy, reliability, and acceptability. Besides cost, issues related to accuracy, security, and processing time in practical biometric recognition systems represent the most critical factors that makes these systems widely acceptable. Accurate and secure biometric systems often require sophisticated enhancement and encoding techniques that burdens the overall processing time of the system. In this paper we present a comparison between common digital and optical enhancementencoding techniques with respect to their accuracy, security and processing time, when applied to biometric fingerprint systems.

  12. Optical encryption of unlimited-size images based on ptychographic scanning digital holography.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiankun; Wang, Yali; Li, Tuo; Shi, Yishi

    2014-07-20

    The ptychographic scanning operation is introduced into digital holography to expand the field-of-view (FOV). An optical image encryption method based on this technique is further proposed and analyzed. The plaintext is moved sequentially in the way of ptychographic scanning and corresponding pairs of phase-shifted interferograms are recorded as ciphertexts. Then the holographic processing and the ptychographic iterative reconstruction are both employed to retrieve the plaintext. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the proposed system possesses high security level and wide FOV. The proposed method might also be used for other potential applications, such as three-dimensional information encryption and image hiding.

  13. Fast optical sectioning obtained by structured illumination microscopy using a digital mirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dongli; Jiang, Tao; Li, Anan; Hu, Bihe; Feng, Zhao; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2013-06-01

    High-throughput optical imaging is critical to obtain large-scale neural connectivity information of brain in neuroscience. Using a digital mirror device and a scientific complementary metal-oxide semiconductor camera, we report a significant speed improvement of structured illumination microscopy (SIM), which produces a maximum SIM net frame rate of 133 Hz. We perform three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of mouse brain slices at diffraction-limited resolution and demonstrate the fast 3-D imaging capability to a large sample with an imaging rate of 6.9 pixel/s of our system, an order of magnitude faster than previously reported.

  14. A new method of measuring aerosol optical properties from digital twilight photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, M.; Iwabuchi, H.

    2015-10-01

    An optimal-estimation algorithm for inferring aerosol optical properties from digital twilight photographs is proposed. The sensitivity of atmospheric components and surface characteristics to brightness and color of twilight sky is investigated, and the results suggest that tropospheric and stratospheric aerosol optical thickness (AOT) are sensitive to condition of the twilight sky. The coarse-fine particle volume ratio is moderately sensitive to the sky condition near the horizon under a clean-atmosphere condition. A radiative transfer model that takes into account a spherical-shell atmosphere, refraction, and multiple scattering is used as a forward model. Error analysis shows that the tropospheric and stratospheric AOT can be retrieved without significant bias. Comparisons with results from other ground-based instruments exhibit reasonable agreement on AOT. A case study suggests that the AOT retrieval method can be applied to atmospheric conditions with varying aerosol vertical profiles and vertically inhomogeneous species in the troposphere.

  15. A new method of measuring aerosol optical properties from digital twilight photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, M.; Iwabuchi, H.

    2015-01-01

    An optimal-estimation algorithm for inferring aerosol optical properties from digital twilight photographs is proposed. The sensitivity of atmospheric components and surface characteristics to brightness and color of twilight sky is investigated, and the results suggest that tropospheric and stratospheric aerosol optical thickness (AOT) are sensitive to condition of the twilight sky. The coarse-fine particle volume ratio is moderately sensitive to the sky condition near the horizon under a clean-atmosphere condition. A radiative transfer model that takes into account a spherical-shell atmosphere, refraction, and multiple scattering is used as a forward model. Error analysis shows that the tropospheric and stratospheric AOT can be retrieved without significant bias. Comparisons with results from other ground-based instruments exhibit reasonable agreement on AOT. A case study suggests that the AOT retrieval method can be applied to atmospheric conditions with varying aerosol vertical profiles and vertically inhomogeneous species in the troposphere.

  16. Deep sea tests of a prototype of the KM3NeT digital optical module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ageron, M.; Aharonian, F.; Aiello, S.; Albert, A.; Ameli, F.; Anassontzis, E. G.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; de Asmundis, R.; Balasi, K.; Band, H.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Barbato, F.; Baret, B.; Baron, S.; Belias, A.; Berbee, E.; van den Berg, A. M.; Berkien, A.; Bertin, V.; Beurthey, S.; van Beveren, V.; Beverini, N.; Biagi, S.; Bianucci, S.; Billault, M.; Birbas, A.; Boer Rookhuizen, H.; Bormuth, R.; Bouché, V.; Bouhadef, B.; Bourlis, G.; Bouwhuis, M.; Bozza, C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Cacopardo, G.; Caillat, L.; Calamai, M.; Calvo, D.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, F.; Cecchini, S.; Ceres, A.; Cereseto, R.; Champion, C.; Château, F.; Chiarusi, T.; Christopoulou, B.; Circella, M.; Classen, L.; Cocimano, R.; Colonges, S.; Coniglione, R.; Cosquer, A.; Costa, M.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; Cuttone, G.; D'Amato, C.; D'Amico, A.; De Bonis, G.; De Rosa, G.; Deniskina, N.; Destelle, J.-J.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q.; Drakopoulou, E.; Drouhin, D.; Drury, L.; Durand, D.; Eberl, T.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Elsaesser, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Fermani, P.; Fusco, L. A.; Gajana, D.; Gal, T.; Galatà, S.; Gallo, F.; Garufi, F.; Gebyehu, M.; Giordano, V.; Gizani, N.; Gracia Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; Grasso, R.; Grella, G.; Grmek, A.; Habel, R.; van Haren, H.; Heid, T.; Heijboer, A.; Heine, E.; Henry, S.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hevinga, M. A.; van der Hoek, M.; Hofestädt, J.; Hogenbirk, J.; Hugon, C.; Hößl, J.; Imbesi, M.; James, C.; Jansweijer, P.; Jochum, J.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Kappos, E.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Keller, P.; Kieft, G.; Koffeman, E.; Kok, H.; Kooijman, P.; Koopstra, J.; Korporaal, A.; Kouchner, A.; Koutsoukos, S.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Le Provost, H.; Leisos, A.; Lenis, D.; Leonora, E.; Lindsey Clark, M.; Liolios, A.; Llorens Alvarez, C. D.; Löhner, H.; Lo Presti, D.; Louis, F.; Maccioni, E.; Mannheim, K.; Manolopoulos, K.; Margiotta, A.; Mariş, O.; Markou, C.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, A.; Masullo, R.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Migneco, E.; Miraglia, A.; Mollo, C.; Mongelli, M.; Morganti, M.; Mos, S.; Moudden, Y.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Nicolaou, C.; Nicolau, C. A.; Orlando, A.; Orzelli, A.; Papageorgiou, K.; Papaikonomou, A.; Papaleo, R.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Peek, H.; Pellegrino, C.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Perrina, C.; Petridou, C.; Piattelli, P.; Pikounis, K.; Popa, V.; Pradier, Th.; Priede, M.; Pühlhofer, G.; Pulvirenti, S.; Racca, C.; Raffaelli, F.; Randazzo, N.; Rapidis, P. A.; Razis, P.; Real, D.; Resvanis, L.; Reubelt, J.; Riccobene, G.; Rovelli, A.; Royon, J.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Santangelo, A.; Sapienza, P.; Savvidis, I.; Schmelling, J.; Schnabel, J.; Sedita, M.; Seitz, T.; Sgura, I.; Simeone, F.; Siotis, I.; Sipala, V.; Solazzo, M.; Spitaleri, A.; Spurio, M.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steijger, J.; Stolarczyk, T.; Stransky, D.; Taiuti, M.; Terreni, G.; Tézier, D.; Théraube, S.; Thompson, L. F.; Timmer, P.; Trapierakis, H. I.; Trasatti, L.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tsirigotis, A.; Tzamarias, S.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vermeulen, J.; Vernin, P.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.; Werneke, P.; Wiggers, L.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; van Wooning, R. H. L.; Yatkin, K.; Zachariadou, K.; Zonca, E.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; Zwart, A.

    2014-09-01

    The first prototype of a photo-detection unit of the future KM3NeT neutrino telescope has been deployed in the deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea. This digital optical module has a novel design with a very large photocathode area segmented by the use of 31 three inch photomultiplier tubes. It has been integrated in the ANTARES detector for in-situ testing and validation. This paper reports on the first months of data taking and rate measurements. The analysis results highlight the capabilities of the new module design in terms of background suppression and signal recognition. The directionality of the optical module enables the recognition of multiple Cherenkov photons from the same $^{40}$K decay and the localization bioluminescent activity in the neighbourhood. The single unit can cleanly identify atmospheric muons and provide sensitivity to the muon arrival directions.

  17. Scanning-free BOTDA based on ultra-fine digital optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chao; Guo, Nan; Feng, Yuanhua; Wang, Liang; Liang, Hao; Li, Jianping; Li, Zhaohui; Yu, Changyuan; Lu, Chao

    2015-02-23

    We realize a scanning-free Brillouin optical time domain analyzer (BOTDA) based on an ultra-fine digital optical frequency comb (DOFC) with 1.95MHz frequency spacing and 2GHz bandwidth. The DOFC can be used to reconstruct the Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) and locate the Brillouin frequency shift (BFS) without frequency scanning and thus can improve the measurement speed about 100 times compared with the conventional BOTDA. This scanning-free BOTDA scheme has also been demonstrated experimentally with 51.2m spatial resolution over 10km standard single mode fiber (SSMF) and with resolution of 1.5°C for temperature and 43.3με for strain measurement respectively. PMID:25836559

  18. Passive all-optical polarization switch, binary logic gates, and digital processor.

    PubMed

    Zaghloul, Y A; Zaghloul, A R M; Adibi, A

    2011-10-10

    We introduce the passive all-optical polarization switch, which modulates light with light. That switch is used to construct all the binary logic gates of two or more inputs. We discuss the design concepts and the operation of the AND, OR, NAND, and NOR gates as examples. The rest of the 16 logic gates are similarly designed. Cascading of such gates is straightforward as we show and discuss. Cascading in itself does not require a power source, but feedback at this stage of development does. The design and operation of an SR Latch is presented as one of the popular basic sequential devices used for memory cells. That completes the essential components of an all-optical polarization digital processor. The speed of such devices is well above 10 GHz for bulk implementations and is much higher for chip-size implementations. In addition, the presented devices do have the four essential characteristics previously thought unique to the microelectronic ones.

  19. Measurement of subcellular texture by optical Gabor-like filtering with a digital micromirror device

    PubMed Central

    Pasternack, Robert M.; Qian, Zhen; Zheng, Jing-Yi; Metaxas, Dimitris N.; White, Eileen; Boustany, Nada N.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an optical Fourier processing method to quantify object texture arising from subcellular feature orientation within unstained living cells. Using a digital micromirror device as a Fourier spatial filter, we measured cellular responses to two-dimensional optical Gabor-like filters optimized to sense orientation of nonspherical particles, such as mitochondria, with a width around 0.45 μm. Our method showed significantly rounder structures within apoptosis-defective cells lacking the proapoptotic mitochondrial effectors Bax and Bak, when compared with Bax/Bak expressing cells functional for apoptosis, consistent with reported differences in mitochondrial shape in these cells. By decoupling spatial frequency resolution from image resolution, this method enables rapid analysis of nonspherical submicrometer scatterers in an under-sampled large field of view and yields spatially localized morphometric parameters that improve the quantitative assessment of biological function. PMID:18830354

  20. Distributed fiber-optic vibration sensing based on phase extraction from time-gated digital OFDR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Fan, Xinyu; Liu, Qingwen; He, Zuyuan

    2015-12-28

    A novel distributed fiber vibration sensing technique based on phase extraction from time-gated digital optical frequency domain reflectometry (TGD-OFDR) which can achieve quantitative vibration measurement with high spatial resolution and long measurement range is proposed. A 90 degree optical hybrid is used to extract phase information. By increasing frequency sweeping speed, the influence of environmental phase disturbance on TGD-OFDR is mitigated significantly, which makes phase extraction in our new scheme more reliable than that in conventional OFDR-based method, leading to the realization of long distance quantitative vibration measurement. By using the proposed technique, a distributed vibration sensor that has a measurement range of 40 km, a spatial resolution of 3.5 m, a measurable vibration frequency up to 600 Hz, and a minimal measurable vibration acceleration of 0.08g is demonstrated.

  1. Distributed fiber-optic vibration sensing based on phase extraction from time-gated digital OFDR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Fan, Xinyu; Liu, Qingwen; He, Zuyuan

    2015-12-28

    A novel distributed fiber vibration sensing technique based on phase extraction from time-gated digital optical frequency domain reflectometry (TGD-OFDR) which can achieve quantitative vibration measurement with high spatial resolution and long measurement range is proposed. A 90 degree optical hybrid is used to extract phase information. By increasing frequency sweeping speed, the influence of environmental phase disturbance on TGD-OFDR is mitigated significantly, which makes phase extraction in our new scheme more reliable than that in conventional OFDR-based method, leading to the realization of long distance quantitative vibration measurement. By using the proposed technique, a distributed vibration sensor that has a measurement range of 40 km, a spatial resolution of 3.5 m, a measurable vibration frequency up to 600 Hz, and a minimal measurable vibration acceleration of 0.08g is demonstrated. PMID:26831995

  2. Design of fiber-optic digital communication systems. Introductory course for students in communications engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftimov, T. A.

    1991-04-01

    The handbook intends to provide the basic concepts about the components necessary to design a fiber-optic link and the communication system itself. A student or a beginner in optical fiber communications is introduced to the basic concepts, characteristics, and parameters of the components from a practical point of view. Therefore, the text is heavily illustrated. The mathematics involved is reduced to the absolute minimum and all of the calculations can be performed with a simple pocket calculator. Unlike most university textbooks, the practical parameters of devices needed as ordering information are specially outlined. Special attention was paid to simplified design examples of the most typical up-to-date digital communication systems. These together with the problems should help the student acquire the minimum but solid knowledge in this so rapidly developing communications world.

  3. Nonlinearity compensation and complex-to-phase conversion of complex incoherent digital holograms for optical reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jung-Ping; Wang, Sheng-Yen; Tsang, P W M; Poon, Ting-Chung

    2016-06-27

    Incoherent digital holography (IDH) can be realized by optical scanning holography or self-interference incoherent holography. Although IDH can exhibit high quality reconstruction due to its inherently speckle-free property, direct display of an incoherent hologram is a challenge because of its amplitude nonlinearity and the demand of complex modulation. In this paper we propose to compensate the amplitude nonlinearity at the object plane, and use bidirectional error-diffusion method to convert the complex-type incoherent Fresnel hologram to a phase-only Fresnel hologram for display. A spatial light modulator is used to reconstruct the phase-only hologram optically to demonstrate the validity of our proposed method. PMID:27410610

  4. Comparison of a digital and an optical analogue hand-held refractometer for the measurement of canine urine specific gravity.

    PubMed

    Paris, J K; Bennett, A D; Dodkin, S J; Gunn-Moore, D A

    2012-05-01

    Urine specific gravity (USG) is used clinically as a measure of urine concentration, and is routinely assessed by refractometry. A comparison between optical analogue and digital refractometers for evaluation of canine urine has not been reported. The aim of this study was to compare a digital and an optical analogue hand-held refractometer for the measurement of canine USG, and to assess correlation with urine osmolality. Prospective study. Free-catch urine samples were collected from 285 hospitalised adult dogs, and paired USG readings were obtained with a digital and an optical analogue refractometer. In 50 dogs, urine osmolality was also measured using a freezing point depression osmometer. There was a small but statistically significant difference between the two refractometers (P<0.001), with the optical analogue refractometer reading higher than the digital refractometer (mean difference 0.0006, sd 0.0012). Paired refractometer measurements varied by <0.002 in 91.5 per cent of cases. The optical analogue and digital refractometer readings showed excellent correlation with osmolality (r=0.980 and r=0.977, respectively, P<0.001 in both cases). Despite statistical significance, the difference between the two refractometers is unlikely to be clinically significant. Both instruments provide an accurate assessment of USG in dogs. PMID:22505243

  5. Digital-signal-processor-based dynamic imaging system for optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Lasker, Joseph M; Masciotti, James M; Schoenecker, Matthew; Schmitz, Christoph H; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2007-08-01

    In this article, we introduce a dynamic optical tomography system that is, unlike currently available analog instrumentation, based on digital data acquisition and filtering techniques. At the core of this continuous wave instrument is a digital signal processor (DSP) that collects, collates, processes, and filters the digitized data set. The processor is also responsible for managing system timing and the imaging routines which can acquire real-time data at rates as high as 150 Hz. Many of the synchronously timed processes are controlled by a complex programmable logic device that is also used in conjunction with the DSP to orchestrate data flow. The operation of the system is implemented through a comprehensive graphical user interface designed with LABVIEW software which integrates automated calibration, data acquisition, data organization, and signal postprocessing. Performance analysis demonstrates very low system noise (approximately 1 pW rms noise equivalent power), excellent signal precision (<0.04%-0.2%) and long term system stability (<1% over 40 min). A large dynamic range (approximately 190 dB) accommodates a wide scope of measurement geometries and tissue types. First experiments on tissue phantoms show that dynamic behavior is accurately captured and spatial location can be correctly tracked using this system.

  6. H I-SELECTED GALAXIES IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY. I. OPTICAL DATA

    SciTech Connect

    West, Andrew A.; Garcia-Appadoo, Diego A.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Bentz, Misty C.; Disney, Mike J.; Rockosi, Constance M.

    2010-02-15

    We present the optical data for 195 H I-selected galaxies that fall within both the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Parkes Equatorial Survey (ES). The photometric quantities have been independently recomputed for our sample using a new photometric pipeline optimized for large galaxies, thus correcting for SDSS's limited reliability for automatic photometry of angularly large or low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. We outline the magnitude of the uncertainty in the SDSS catalog-level photometry and derive a quantitative method for correcting the over-sky subtraction in the SDSS photometric pipeline. The main thrust of this paper is to present the ES/SDSS sample and discuss the methods behind the improved photometry, which will be used in future scientific analysis. We present the overall optical properties of the sample and briefly compare to a volume-limited, optically selected sample. Compared to the optically selected SDSS sample (in the similar volume), H I-selected galaxies are bluer and more luminous (fewer dwarf ellipticals and more star formation). However, compared to typical SDSS galaxy studies, which have their own selection effect, our sample is bluer, fainter, and less massive.

  7. Accurate and reliable segmentation of the optic disc in digital fundus images

    PubMed Central

    Giachetti, Andrea; Ballerini, Lucia; Trucco, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We describe a complete pipeline for the detection and accurate automatic segmentation of the optic disc in digital fundus images. This procedure provides separation of vascular information and accurate inpainting of vessel-removed images, symmetry-based optic disc localization, and fitting of incrementally complex contour models at increasing resolutions using information related to inpainted images and vessel masks. Validation experiments, performed on a large dataset of images of healthy and pathological eyes, annotated by experts and partially graded with a quality label, demonstrate the good performances of the proposed approach. The method is able to detect the optic disc and trace its contours better than the other systems presented in the literature and tested on the same data. The average error in the obtained contour masks is reasonably close to the interoperator errors and suitable for practical applications. The optic disc segmentation pipeline is currently integrated in a complete software suite for the semiautomatic quantification of retinal vessel properties from fundus camera images (VAMPIRE). PMID:26158034

  8. Digital detection method design of the optic error of the beam expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hao; Liu, Bingqi; Yang, Zhuo; Liu, Shiying; Ying, Jiaju

    2014-12-01

    The beam expander is a device used for extending the action radius of the optical system by removing the optical axis parallel. It is usually composed by a pair of plane mirror or two total reflection prism which is installed parallel. However, limited by manufacturing and installation progress, optical axis parallelism errors can be generated while it is hardly to guarantee the two plane mirror or the two total reflection prism installed completely parallel to each other. To detect the optical axis parallelism error of the beam expander quantitatively, a digital optical axis parallelism error detection method for the beam expander is designed taking advantage of the CCD technology and the Image processing technology. In this method, the reticule of the collimator is regarded as the target at infinity. Firstly, the reticule of the collimator images on the CCD camera directly. Keep the pose of the CCD camera unchanged. Then the parallel optical beam is shifted into the beam expander detected by removing of the pentaprism, and the reticule of the collimator images on the same CCD camera again. The location of the collimator reticule center image on the CCD camera is determined respectively through the corresponding image processing. The error of the beam expander is calculated by comparing the coordinate of the collimator reticule center image. An experiment platform is set up based on and the feasibility of this method is verified that the accuracy of the detection method is less than 3''; this method has the advantage of simple operation, high practicality and high accuracy.

  9. A digital-signal-processor-based optical tomographic system for dynamic imaging of joint diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasker, Joseph M.

    Over the last decade, optical tomography (OT) has emerged as viable biomedical imaging modality. Various imaging systems have been developed that are employed in preclinical as well as clinical studies, mostly targeting breast imaging, brain imaging, and cancer related studies. Of particular interest are so-called dynamic imaging studies where one attempts to image changes in optical properties and/or physiological parameters as they occur during a system perturbation. To successfully perform dynamic imaging studies, great effort is put towards system development that offers increasingly enhanced signal-to-noise performance at ever shorter data acquisition times, thus capturing high fidelity tomographic data within narrower time periods. Towards this goal, I have developed in this thesis a dynamic optical tomography system that is, unlike currently available analog instrumentation, based on digital data acquisition and filtering techniques. At the core of this instrument is a digital signal processor (DSP) that collects, collates, and processes the digitized data set. Complementary protocols between the DSP and a complex programmable logic device synchronizes the sampling process and organizes data flow. Instrument control is implemented through a comprehensive graphical user interface which integrates automated calibration, data acquisition, and signal post-processing. Real-time data is generated at frame rates as high as 140 Hz. An extensive dynamic range (˜190 dB) accommodates a wide scope of measurement geometries and tissue types. Performance analysis demonstrates very low system noise (˜1 pW rms noise equivalent power), excellent signal precision (˜0.04%--0.2%) and long term system stability (˜1% over 40 min). Experiments on tissue phantoms validate spatial and temporal accuracy of the system. As a potential new application of dynamic optical imaging I present the first application of this method to use vascular hemodynamics as a means of characterizing

  10. Tracking Performance Analysis and Simulation of the Digital Pointing System for the Optical Communication Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racho, C.; Portillo, A.

    1998-10-01

    Over the past 3 years, JPL has been heavily engaged in designing and developing a reduced-complexity optical communication terminal for high-data-volume applications. The terminal is called the Optical Communication Demonstrator (OCD) and has the ability to point microradian-level beams with a very small number of detectors and steering elements. Using only a single steering mirror and a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector array, the OCD can accomplish the functions of beacon signal acquisition, beacon tracking, transmit and receive beam coalignment, and transmit beam point-ahead offset. At a higher system level, developing an understanding of the OCD performance is an essential part of achieving a better understanding of the end-to-end optical communication system performance in the field. During the latter half of fiscal year 1998, a series of experiments was conducted between Table Mountain and Strawberry Peak using the OCD as a transmitting terminal for terrestrial ground-to- ground optical link demonstrations. The OCD was taken to Strawberry Peak and set up to receive the multibeam laser beacon from the 0.6-meter telescope located at Table Mountain, a distance of approximately 40 kilometers. In the presence of atmospheric effects, the laser beacon will fluctuate both in intensity and position. The ability to determine the performance of the control loop under atmospheric-induced fades and distortion becomes very important in evaluating the results of the field testing. This article describes the design and performance of the OCD digital control loop system, which includes the steering mirror, the CCD detector array tracker, and the associated electronics. The digital control loop performance is a key factor in the ultimate performance of the laser beacon acquisition and tracking algorithm of the OCD. A model of the OCD digital control loop is developed for use in simulations. The analytical results from control loop simulations are compared with measured data

  11. Scene-of-crime analysis by a 3-dimensional optical digitizer: a useful perspective for forensic science.

    PubMed

    Sansoni, Giovanna; Cattaneo, Cristina; Trebeschi, Marco; Gibelli, Daniele; Poppa, Pasquale; Porta, Davide; Maldarella, Monica; Picozzi, Massimo

    2011-09-01

    Analysis and detailed registration of the crime scene are of the utmost importance during investigations. However, this phase of activity is often affected by the risk of loss of evidence due to the limits of traditional scene of crime registration methods (ie, photos and videos). This technical note shows the utility of the application of a 3-dimensional optical digitizer on different crime scenes. This study aims in fact at verifying the importance and feasibility of contactless 3-dimensional reconstruction and modeling by optical digitization to achieve an optimal registration of the crime scene. PMID:21811148

  12. Scene-of-crime analysis by a 3-dimensional optical digitizer: a useful perspective for forensic science.

    PubMed

    Sansoni, Giovanna; Cattaneo, Cristina; Trebeschi, Marco; Gibelli, Daniele; Poppa, Pasquale; Porta, Davide; Maldarella, Monica; Picozzi, Massimo

    2011-09-01

    Analysis and detailed registration of the crime scene are of the utmost importance during investigations. However, this phase of activity is often affected by the risk of loss of evidence due to the limits of traditional scene of crime registration methods (ie, photos and videos). This technical note shows the utility of the application of a 3-dimensional optical digitizer on different crime scenes. This study aims in fact at verifying the importance and feasibility of contactless 3-dimensional reconstruction and modeling by optical digitization to achieve an optimal registration of the crime scene.

  13. Multichannel analog-to-digital converters based on current mirrors for the optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilenko, Vladimir G.; Nikolskyy, A. I.; Nikolska, M. A.; Lobodzinska, R. F.

    2011-12-01

    The paper considers results of designing and modeling analogue-digital converters (ADC) based on current mirrors for the optical systems and neural networks with parallel inputs-outputs. Such ADC, named us multichannel analog-todigital converters based on current mirrors (M ADC CM). Compared with usual converters, for example, reading, a bitby- bit equilibration, and so forth, have a number of advantages: high speed and reliability, simplicity, small power consumption, the big degree of integration in linear and matrix structures. The considered aspects of designing of M_ADC CM in binary codes. Base digit cells (ABC) of such M_ADC CM, series-pipelined are connected in structures, consist from 20-30 CMOS the transistors, one photodiode, have low (1,5-3,5) supply voltage, work in current modes with the maximum values of currents (10-40)μA. Therefore such new principles of realization high-speed low-discharge M_ADC CM have allowed, as have shown modeling experiments, to reach time of transformation less than 20-30 nS at 5-6 bits of a binary code and the general power 1-5 mW. The quantity easily cascadable ABC depends on wordlength ADC, and makes n, and provides quantity of levels of quantization equal N=2n. Such simple enough on structure M ADC CM, having low power consumption <= 3 ÷ 5mW, supply voltage (3-7)V, is provided at the same time with good dynamic characteristics (frequency of digitization even for 1,5μm or 0,35 μm- CMOS-technologies has made 40 MHz, and can be increased 10 times) and accuracy (Δquantization 156,25nA for I max10μA) characteristics is show. The range can be transformed optical signals, taking into account sensitivity of modern photodetectors makes 20-200 μW in such ADC. M_ADC CM open new prospects for realization linear and matrix (with picture operands) micro photoelectronic structures which are necessary for neural networks, digital optoelectronic processors, neurofuzzy controllers, and so forth.

  14. Fusion of UAV photogrammetry and digital optical granulometry for detection of structural changes in floodplains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhammer, Jakub; Lendzioch, Theodora; Mirijovsky, Jakub

    2016-04-01

    Granulometric analysis represents a traditional, important and for the description of sedimentary material substantial method with various applications in sedimentology, hydrology and geomorphology. However, the conventional granulometric field survey methods are time consuming, laborious, costly and are invasive to the surface being sampled, which can be limiting factor for their applicability in protected areas.. The optical granulometry has recently emerged as an image analysis technique, enabling non-invasive survey, employing semi-automated identification of clasts from calibrated digital imagery, taken on site by conventional high resolution digital camera and calibrated frame. The image processing allows detection and measurement of mixed size natural grains, their sorting and quantitative analysis using standard granulometric approaches. Despite known limitations, the technique today presents reliable tool, significantly easing and speeding the field survey in fluvial geomorphology. However, the nature of such survey has still limitations in spatial coverage of the sites and applicability in research at multitemporal scale. In our study, we are presenting novel approach, based on fusion of two image analysis techniques - optical granulometry and UAV-based photogrammetry, allowing to bridge the gap between the needs of high resolution structural information for granulometric analysis and spatially accurate and data coverage. We have developed and tested a workflow that, using UAV imaging platform enabling to deliver seamless, high resolution and spatially accurate imagery of the study site from which can be derived the granulometric properties of the sedimentary material. We have set up a workflow modeling chain, providing (i) the optimum flight parameters for UAV imagery to balance the two key divergent requirements - imagery resolution and seamless spatial coverage, (ii) the workflow for the processing of UAV acquired imagery by means of the optical

  15. Probing orientation and rotation of red blood cells in optical tweezers by digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Nelson; Yu, Lingfeng; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2011-03-01

    Interaction of red blood cells (RBC) with optical tweezers has been found to differ under varied physiological and pathological conditions as compared to its normal conditions. Earlier, we reported difference in rotation of trapped RBC in hypertonic conditions for detection of malaria infection. Disk-like RBC when trapped in optical tweezers get oriented in the vertical plane to maximize interaction with trapping beam. However, classical bright field, phase contrast or epifluorescence microscopy cannot confirm its orientation, thus leading to ambiguous conclusions such as folding of RBC during trapping by some researchers. Now, with use of digital holographic microscopy (DHM), we achieved high axial sensitivity that confirmed orientation of trapped red blood cell. Further, DHM enabled quantitative phase imaging of RBC under hypertonic condition. Dynamic changes of rotating RBC under optical tweezers at different trapping laser power were evaluated by the use of DHM. The deviation from linear dependence of rotation speed of RBC on laser power, was attributed towards deformation of RBC shape due to higher laser power (or speed).

  16. Intracellular Calcium Gradients in Single Living Cells: Measurement and Analysis by Optical and Digital Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelamarty, Rao Viswanadha

    Intracellular calcium (Ca^{2+ }) has been considered as a regulator of many cellular processes. In addition, Ca^{2+ } also plays a key role in mediating actions of many hormones, growth factors, and drugs. This thesis describes two general approaches, digital video and photomultiplier (PMT) based fluorescence microscopic systems, to measure such Ca^{2+} changes throughout the cell. They reveal the heterogeneous spatial and fast temporal changes of Ca^{2+} within a single isolated living cell. In order to measure spatial Ca^ {2+} in three dimensions (3-D), optical section microscopy (OSM) coupled to digital video imaging is introduced. With this approach, an increase in nuclear Ca^{2+} compared to cytosolic Ca^{2+} is detected in human erythroblasts and rat hepatocytes under the addition of growth factors: erythropoietin and epidermal growth factor respectively. In addition, the primary effect of non growth-promoting hormone vasopressin, raise in cytosolic Ca^{2+}, is also observed. These observations are the first to underscore the importance of nuclear Ca^{2+} increase in cell growth and differentiation. On the other hand, to track fast Ca^ {2+} transients (mesc) during excitation -contraction (EC) cycle and then examine alterations in Ca^{2+} transients in healthy and diseased (hypertensive) heart cells, a PMT based system is implemented. Significant alterations in Ca^{2+} transients in hypertensive heart cells were observed. This finding is compatible with the clinical finding that patients with hypertensive cardiomyopathy suffer a lack of adequate relaxation. Finally, to correlate the Ca^{2+} dynamics in an EC cycle with mechanical activity, a hybrid optical digital processor was developed. The performance of the hybrid processor is analyzed and applied simultaneously with the PMT based system. The mechanical contraction and relaxation of a single cardiac cell closely paralleled that of Ca^{2+} dynamics during an EC cycle. In summary, this thesis illustrates

  17. Overview and applications of Grating-Light-Valve-based optical write engines for high-speed digital imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trisnadi, Jahja I.; Carlisle, Clinton B.; Monteverde, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The Grating Light Valve (GLV) is a diffractive MOEMS spatial light modulator capable of very high-speed modulation of light combined with fine gray-scale attenuation. GLV-based products are field-proven in a variety of applications. In this paper, we describe the GLV device, its structure, theory of operation, and optical performance. The versatility and speed of the GLV device are described. We explain how the GLV device is integrated into an optical write engine to create a complete digital imaging system. In addition to the MOEMS die and drive electronics, the light engine also comprises illumination optics, Fourier filter, and imaging optics. We present current applications of the GLV device for high-resolution displays, and computer-to-plate printing, as well as future plans for digital imaging applications opened up by the unique properties of this diffractive MOEMS technology.

  18. On nonlinearly-induced noise in single-channel optical links with digital backpropagation.

    PubMed

    Beygi, Lotfollah; Irukulapati, Naga V; Agrell, Erik; Johannisson, Pontus; Karlsson, Magnus; Wymeersch, Henk; Serena, Paolo; Bononi, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate the performance limits of electronic chromatic dispersion compensation (EDC) and digital backpropagation (DBP) for a single-channel non-dispersion-managed fiber-optical link. A known analytical method to derive the performance of the system with EDC is extended to derive a first-order approximation for the performance of the system with DBP. In contrast to the cubic growth of the variance of the nonlinear noise-like interference, often called nonlinear noise, with input power for EDC, a quadratic growth is observed with DBP using this approximation. Finally, we provide numerical results to verify the accuracy of the proposed approach and compare it with existing analytical models. PMID:24216860

  19. High-resolution, lensless endoscope based on digital scanning through a multimode optical fiber

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Ioannis N.; Farahi, Salma; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri

    2013-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an ultra-thin rigid endoscope (450 μm diameter) based on a passive multimode optical fiber. We use digital phase conjugation to overcome the modal scrambling of the fiber to tightly focus and scan the laser light at its distal end. By exploiting the maximum number of modes available, sub-micron resolution, high quality fluorescence images of neuronal cells were acquired. The imaging system is evaluated in terms of fluorescence collection efficiency, resolution and field of view. The small diameter of the proposed endoscope, along with its high quality images offer an opportunity for minimally invasive medical endoscopic imaging and diagnosis based on cellular phenotype via direct tissue penetration. PMID:23411747

  20. Digital carrier superposition by Hilbert-Huang transform for optical phase recovery in speckle shearing interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amar, Said; Bahich, Mustapha; Dalimi, Hanane; Barj, ElMostapha; Afifi, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Industrial production constraints often require technical tests and controls. Optical metrology methods allow a non destructive test of wide range of parameters, such as defects and displacements, with very good accuracy. The phase retrieval is an effective way that allows three-dimensional profile reconstruction from intensity shearograms. This research work focuses on the extraction of the phase from one uncarrier shearogram using the Hilbert-Huang transform. An algorithm for the phase calculation based on the bidimensional empirical mode decomposition, Hilbert transform (HT), and Fourier transform (FT) is presented. A spatial digital carrier has been superimposed before the application of the FT or HT which uses two π/2 shifted shearograms, to get access to the phase map via a global analysis of intensity images. An evaluation was made through a numerical simulation to validate and confirm the performance of the proposed algorithm. The main advantage of this technique is its ability to provide a metrological solution for fast dynamic analysis.

  1. Analysis of a dual-reflector antenna system using physical optics and digital computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    The application of physical-optics diffraction theory to a deployable dual-reflector geometry is discussed. The methods employed are not restricted to the Conical-Gregorian antenna, but apply in a general way to dual and even multiple reflector systems. Complex vector wave methods are used in the Fresnel and Fraunhofer regions of the reflectors. Field amplitude, phase, polarization data, and time average Poynting vectors are obtained via an IBM 360/91 digital computer. Focal region characteristics are plotted with the aid of a CalComp plotter. Comparison between the GSFC Huygens wavelet approach, JPL measurements, and JPL computer results based on the near field spherical wave expansion method are made wherever possible.

  2. XMM-NEWTON AND OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS OF CATACLYSMIC VARIABLES FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, Eric J.; Szkody, Paula; Mukadam, Anjum; Henden, Arne; Dillon, William; Schmidt, Gary D. E-mail: szkody@astro.washington.edu

    2009-03-15

    We report on XMM-Newton and optical results for six cataclysmic variables that were selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra because they showed strong He II emission lines, indicative of being candidates for containing white dwarfs with strong magnetic fields. While high X-ray background rates prevented optimum results, we are able to confirm SDSS J233325.92+152222.1 as an intermediate polar from its strong pulse signature at 21 minutes and its obscured hard X-ray spectrum. Ground-based circular polarization and photometric observations were also able to confirm SDSS J142256.31 - 022108.1 as a polar with a period near 4 hr. Photometry of SDSS J083751.00+383012.5 and SDSS J093214.82+495054.7 solidifies the orbital period of the former as 3.18 hr and confirms the latter as a high-inclination system with deep eclipses.

  3. Focusing light through scattering media by full-polarization digital optical phase conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yuecheng; Liu, Yan; Ma, Cheng; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-01-01

    Digital optical phase conjugation (DOPC) is an emerging technique for focusing light through or within scattering media such as biological tissue. Since DOPC systems are based on time reversal, they benefit from collecting as much information about the scattered light as possible. However, existing DOPC techniques record and subsequently phase-conjugate the scattered light in only a single polarization state, limited by the operating principle of spatial light modulators. Here, we develop the first full-polarization DOPC system which records and phase-conjugates scattered light along two orthogonal polarizations. When focusing light through thick scattering media, such as 2 mm and 4 mm thick chicken breast tissue, our full-polarization DOPC system on average doubles the focal peak-to-background ratio achieved by single-polarization DOPC systems and improves the phase conjugation fidelity. PMID:26977651

  4. Hologram encoding strategies for non-Bayesian noise suppression in digital holography reconstructions and optical display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, V.; Memmolo, P.; Finizio, A.; Paturzo, M.; Ferraro, P.

    2016-03-01

    Here we first propose a fast, one-shot, non-Bayesian method which performs a numerical synthesis of a moving aperture in order to reduce the noise in Digital Holography without prior information on its statistics. Starting from one single hologram capture, multiple uncorrelated reconstructions are provided by random sparse resampling masks, which can be incoherently averaged. Thus, the problem of the setup complexity introduced by multiple recordings gets solved. Besides, at the scope of performing DH display using a SLM, it is highly required to operate directly on the hologram, in order to obtain its denoised version without losing the coherence between amplitude and phase information. We then move a step forward, showing a novel encoding formula allowing us to directly synthesize denoised holograms to be optically displayed by SLMs.

  5. Characterization and Design of Digital Pointing Subsystem for Optical Communication Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racho, C.; Portillo, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Optical Communications Demonstrator (OCD) is a laboratory-based lasercom demonstration terminal designed to validate several key technologies, including beacon acquisition, high bandwidth tracking, precision bearn pointing, and point-ahead compensation functions. It has been under active development over the past few years. The instrument uses a CCD array detector for both spatial acquisition and high-bandwidth tracking, and a fiber coupled laser transmitter. The array detector tracking concept provides wide field-of-view acquisition and permits effective platform jitter compensation and point-ahead control using only one steering mirror. This paper describes the detailed design and characterization of the digital control loop system which includes the Fast Steering Mirror (FSM), the CCD image tracker, and the associated electronics. The objective is to improve the overall system performance using laboratory measured data. The. design of the digital control loop is based on a linear time invariant open loop model. The closed loop performance is predicted using the theoretical model. With the digital filter programmed into the OCD control software, data is collected to verify the predictions. This paper presents the results of the, system modeling and performance analysis. It has been shown that measurement data closely matches theoretical predictions. An important part of the laser communication experiment is the ability of FSM to track the laser beacon within the. required tolerances. The pointing must be maintained to an accuracy that is much smaller than the transmit signal beamwidth. For an earth orbit distance, the system must be able to track the receiving station to within a few microradians. The failure. to do so will result in a severely degraded system performance.

  6. Sequential-digital image correlation for mapping human posterior sclera and optic nerve head deformation.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Jeffrey D; Genovese, Katia; Casaletto, Luciana; Vande Geest, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    Optic nerve head (ONH) deformations may be involved in the onset or further development of glaucoma, including in patients with relatively normal intraocular pressures (IOPs). Characterizing posterior scleral deformations over physiological pressures may provide a better understanding of how changes in IOP lead to changes in the mechanical environment of the ONH and possibly retinal ganglion cell death. Pressure inflation measurement test protocols are commonly used to measure deformation of the peripapillary sclera with full-field noncontact optical methods. The purpose of this work was to develop and validate a new sequential 3D digital image correlation (S-DIC) approach for quantification of posterior scleral pressure induced deformation that improves z (in-depth) resolution of the DIC measurement without losing in-plane sensitivity, while also being able to contour and map deformations of the complex-shaped ONH. Our approach combines two orthogonal axes of parallax with standard 3D DIC methods using a single high-resolution camera. The enhanced capabilities of S-DIC with respect to standard 3D DIC has been demonstrated by carrying out a complete benchmark for shape, deformation, and strain measurement on an object of known complex geometry. Our S-DIC method provided a reconstruction accuracy of 0.17% and an uncertainty in z-position measurement of 8 μm. The developed methodology has also been applied to a human posterior scleral shell, including the full peripapillary sclera and optic nerve. The relatively inexpensive S-DIC approach may provide new information on the biomechanical deformations of the optic nerve head and, thus, the death of retinal ganglion cells in primary open angle glaucoma. PMID:24337344

  7. Optical flow in a smart sensor based on hybrid analog-digital architecture.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Pablo; Díaz, Javier; Agís, Rodrigo; Ros, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a motion sensor (delivering optical flow estimations) using a platform that includes the sensor itself, focal plane processing resources, and co-processing resources on a general purpose embedded processor. All this is implemented on a single device as a SoC (System-on-a-Chip). Optical flow is the 2-D projection into the camera plane of the 3-D motion information presented at the world scenario. This motion representation is widespread well-known and applied in the science community to solve a wide variety of problems. Most applications based on motion estimation require work in real-time; hence, this restriction must be taken into account. In this paper, we show an efficient approach to estimate the motion velocity vectors with an architecture based on a focal plane processor combined on-chip with a 32 bits NIOS II processor. Our approach relies on the simplification of the original optical flow model and its efficient implementation in a platform that combines an analog (focal-plane) and digital (NIOS II) processor. The system is fully functional and is organized in different stages where the early processing (focal plane) stage is mainly focus to pre-process the input image stream to reduce the computational cost in the post-processing (NIOS II) stage. We present the employed co-design techniques and analyze this novel architecture. We evaluate the system's performance and accuracy with respect to the different proposed approaches described in the literature. We also discuss the advantages of the proposed approach as well as the degree of efficiency which can be obtained from the focal plane processing capabilities of the system. The final outcome is a low cost smart sensor for optical flow computation with real-time performance and reduced power consumption that can be used for very diverse application domains.

  8. Optical Flow in a Smart Sensor Based on Hybrid Analog-Digital Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, Pablo; Díaz, Javier; Agís, Rodrigo; Ros, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a motion sensor (delivering optical flow estimations) using a platform that includes the sensor itself, focal plane processing resources, and co-processing resources on a general purpose embedded processor. All this is implemented on a single device as a SoC (System-on-a-Chip). Optical flow is the 2-D projection into the camera plane of the 3-D motion information presented at the world scenario. This motion representation is widespread well-known and applied in the science community to solve a wide variety of problems. Most applications based on motion estimation require work in real-time; hence, this restriction must be taken into account. In this paper, we show an efficient approach to estimate the motion velocity vectors with an architecture based on a focal plane processor combined on-chip with a 32 bits NIOS II processor. Our approach relies on the simplification of the original optical flow model and its efficient implementation in a platform that combines an analog (focal-plane) and digital (NIOS II) processor. The system is fully functional and is organized in different stages where the early processing (focal plane) stage is mainly focus to pre-process the input image stream to reduce the computational cost in the post-processing (NIOS II) stage. We present the employed co-design techniques and analyze this novel architecture. We evaluate the system’s performance and accuracy with respect to the different proposed approaches described in the literature. We also discuss the advantages of the proposed approach as well as the degree of efficiency which can be obtained from the focal plane processing capabilities of the system. The final outcome is a low cost smart sensor for optical flow computation with real-time performance and reduced power consumption that can be used for very diverse application domains. PMID:22319283

  9. Digital holographic interferometry: A novel optical calorimetry technique for radiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Cavan, Alicia; Meyer, Juergen

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To develop and demonstrate the proof-of-principle of a novel optical calorimetry method to determine radiation absorbed dose in a transparent medium. Methods: The calorimetric property of water is measured during irradiation by means of an interferometer, which detects temperature-induced changes in the refractive index that can be mathematically related to absorbed dose. The proposed method uses a technique called digital holographic interferometry (DHI), which comprises an optical laser interferometer setup and consecutive physical reconstruction of the recorded wave fronts by means of the Fresnel transform. This paper describes the conceptual framework and provides the mathematical basis for DHI dosimetry. Dose distributions from a high dose rate Brachytherapy source were measured by a prototype optical setup to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach. Results: The developed DHI dosimeter successfully determined absorbed dose distributions in water in the region adjacent to a high dose rate Brachytherapy source. A temperature change of 0.0381 K across a distance of 6.8 mm near the source was measured, corresponding to a dose of 159.3 Gy. The standard deviation in a typical measurement set was ±3.45 Gy (corresponding to an uncertainty in the temperature value of ±8.3 × 10{sup −4} K). The relative dose fall off was in agreement with treatment planning system modeled data. Conclusions: First results with a prototype optical setup and a Brachytherapy source demonstrate the proof-of-principle of the approach. The prototype achieves high spatial resolution of approximately 3 × 10{sup −5} m. The general approach is fundamentally independent of the radiation type and energy. The sensitivity range determined indicates that the method is predominantly suitable for high dose rate applications. Further work is required to determine absolute dose in all three dimensions.

  10. Parametric studies of adaptive optics by self-interference incoherent digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jisoo; Kim, Myung K.

    2014-02-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) in astronomical imaging is a technique to improve the quality of image by compensating aberrations induced by atmospheric turbulence. Digital holographic AO (DHAO) is one attractive option to implement AO scheme because it is capable of directly measuring the phase profile of aberration without complicated calculation or loss of resolution of CCD. Hence, if applicable, DHAO is expected to have advantages over traditional AO systems. Recent development of self-interference incoherent digital holography (SIDH) makes it possible to apply the concept of DHAO for an astronomical application where the illumination is incoherent and cannot be controlled. We have investigated the image characteristics according to various parameters of SIDH AO to derive optimum condition or design of the system. We observe not only well-known super-resolution property of SIDH but also interesting and significant improvement of noise behavior by aberration compensation. Because of many beneficial features, we expect that SIDH AO will be a useful tool for astronomical imaging.

  11. The noise and digital realization of arctangent approach of PGC demodulation for optic interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Fukun; Zhang, Min; Wang, Liwei; Liao, Yanbiao

    2007-01-01

    While the development of the optic interferometric sensors achieves great progress, one fact that restricts this development is the demodulation technique. An applicable demodulation method for interferometric sensors is called "The Phase Generated Carrier (PGC) demodulation". Yet this demodulation fails to content the large-scale sensors application for the limitations of the electronic devices. Another arctangent approach based on digital demodulator proves more advantages than the traditional Differentiate and Cross Multiply (DCM) approach which is used in PGC demodulation. In this paper, the arctangent approach based on PGC demodulation is discussed and simulated. Lookup table is used in the arctangent approach. Values equal to the existent data in the lookup table are chosen from the table, and values between two different data in the table are modulated to the linear approximate values. Two primary objects are aimed to demonstrate the advantages of the arctangent approach: (1). the noise analysis of this demodulation, considered two aspects: a. the relativity of the noise amplitude and the size of lookup table. Simulation result indicates that when double the lookup size, the noise amplitude decreases about 6dB; b. the influence to the noise generation which is leaded in by the rank of the polynomial approximate coefficients, the higher this rank is, the better the result comes. An approximate function is proposed about this relationship. (2). the measurement range, operation complexity, quality of operation, and applicability of the arctangent approach are discussed for an effective digital realization.

  12. The research and realization of digital management platform for ultra-precision optical elements within life-cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Jian; Li, Lijuan; Zhou, Kun

    2014-08-01

    In order to solve the information fusion, process integration, collaborative design and manufacturing for ultra-precision optical elements within life-cycle management, this paper presents a digital management platform which is based on product data and business processes by adopting the modern manufacturing technique, information technique and modern management technique. The architecture and system integration of the digital management platform are discussed in this paper. The digital management platform can realize information sharing and interaction for information-flow, control-flow and value-stream from user's needs to offline in life-cycle, and it can also enhance process control, collaborative research and service ability of ultra-precision optical elements.

  13. The digital optical module - How IceCube will acquire data

    SciTech Connect

    Stokstad, R.G.

    2003-01-09

    IceCube will be a km-scale neutrino detector consisting of 4800 optical modules (OMs) on 80 strings of 60 OMs each. The DAQ technology will have the following desirable features: (1) the robustness of copper cable between the OMs and the surface. (2) digitization and time-stamping of signals that are unattenuated and undispersed. (3) calibration methods (particularly for timing) appropriate for a large number of OMs. The PMT anode waveform is digitized and time-stamped in the OM. The time calibration procedure is both accurate and automatic. A system having these features has been tested in AMANDA. A prototype digital system consisting of 40 OMs was deployed in Jan., 2000. The principal components of the Digital Optical Module (DOM) signal processing circuitry are: the analog transient waveform digitizer (ATWD), a low-power custom integrated circuit that captures the waveform in 128 samples at a rate of {approx}500 Megasamples/s; an ADC operating at {approx}30 MS/s covering several microseconds; a FPGA that provides state control, time stamps events, handles communications, etc.; a low-power 32-bit ARM CPU with a real-time operating system. A 16.8 MHz oscillator, made by Toyocom, is free-running, very stable ({delta}f/f {approx} 5 {center_dot} 10{sup -11} over {approx} 5s) and provides clock signals to several components. Short (12 m) cables connecting adjacent modules enable a local time coincidence, which eliminates most of the {approx}1 kHz of dark noise pulses. A critical requirement is the ability to calibrate the DOM oscillator against a master clock at the surface. In essence, timing pulses sent in one direction at known time intervals can be used to determine relative frequency, and the round trip time of pulses sent in both directions can determine the offset. After receiving a timing pulse at the DOM and waiting for a short time, {delta}t, measured on the DOM clock, a pulse is sent from the DOM to the surface. The shapes of the pulses sent down and up are

  14. Optical phase analysis in drilled cortical porcine bones using digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavera R., César G.; De la Torre I., Manuel H.; Flores M., J. Mauricio; Luna H., Juan M.; Briones R., Manuel de J.; Mendoza S., Fernando

    2016-03-01

    A study in porcine femoral bones with and without the presence of cortical drilling is presented. An out of plane digital holographic interferometer is used to retrieve the optical phase during the controlled compression tests. These tests try to simulate physiological deformations in postmortem healthy bones and compare their mechanical response with those having a cortical hole. The cortical drilling technique is widely used in medical procedures to fix plaques and metallic frames to a bone recovering from a fracture. Several materials and drilling techniques are used for this purpose. In this work we analyze the superficial variations of the bone when different drilling diameters are used. By means of the optical phase it is possible to recover the superficial deformation of the tissue during a controlled deformation with high resolution. This information could give a better understand about the micro structural variations of the bone instead of a bulk response. As proof of principle, several tests were performed to register the modes and ranges of the displacements for compressive loads. From these tests notorious differences are observed between both groups of bones, having less structural stiffness the drilled ones as expected. However, the bone's characteristic to absorb and adjust itself due the load is also highly affected according to the number of holes. Results from different kind of samples (undrilled and drilled) are presented and discussed in this work.

  15. High-Speed Microscale Optical Tracking Using Digital Frequency-Domain Multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Maclachlan, Robert A; Riviere, Cameron N

    2009-06-01

    Position-sensitive detectors (PSDs), or lateral-effect photodiodes, are commonly used for high-speed, high-resolution optical position measurement. This paper describes the instrument design for multidimensional position and orientation measurement based on the simultaneous position measurement of multiple modulated sources using frequency-domain-multiplexed (FDM) PSDs. The important advantages of this optical configuration in comparison with laser/mirror combinations are that it has a large angular measurement range and allows the use of a probe that is small in comparison with the measurement volume. We review PSD characteristics and quantitative resolution limits, consider the lock-in amplifier measurement system as a communication link, discuss the application of FDM to PSDs, and make comparisons with time-domain techniques. We consider the phase-sensitive detector as a multirate DSP problem, explore parallels with Fourier spectral estimation and filter banks, discuss how to choose the modulation frequencies and sample rates that maximize channel isolation under design constraints, and describe efficient digital implementation. We also discuss hardware design considerations, sensor calibration, probe construction and calibration, and 3-D measurement by triangulation using two sensors. As an example, we characterize the resolution, speed, and accuracy of an instrument that measures the position and orientation of a 10 mm × 5 mm probe in 5 degrees of freedom (DOF) over a 30-mm cube with 4-μm peak-to-peak resolution at 1-kHz sampling.

  16. High-Speed Microscale Optical Tracking Using Digital Frequency-Domain Multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Maclachlan, Robert A; Riviere, Cameron N

    2009-06-01

    Position-sensitive detectors (PSDs), or lateral-effect photodiodes, are commonly used for high-speed, high-resolution optical position measurement. This paper describes the instrument design for multidimensional position and orientation measurement based on the simultaneous position measurement of multiple modulated sources using frequency-domain-multiplexed (FDM) PSDs. The important advantages of this optical configuration in comparison with laser/mirror combinations are that it has a large angular measurement range and allows the use of a probe that is small in comparison with the measurement volume. We review PSD characteristics and quantitative resolution limits, consider the lock-in amplifier measurement system as a communication link, discuss the application of FDM to PSDs, and make comparisons with time-domain techniques. We consider the phase-sensitive detector as a multirate DSP problem, explore parallels with Fourier spectral estimation and filter banks, discuss how to choose the modulation frequencies and sample rates that maximize channel isolation under design constraints, and describe efficient digital implementation. We also discuss hardware design considerations, sensor calibration, probe construction and calibration, and 3-D measurement by triangulation using two sensors. As an example, we characterize the resolution, speed, and accuracy of an instrument that measures the position and orientation of a 10 mm × 5 mm probe in 5 degrees of freedom (DOF) over a 30-mm cube with 4-μm peak-to-peak resolution at 1-kHz sampling. PMID:20428484

  17. Refractometry of melanocyte cell nuclei using optical scatter images recorded by digital Fourier microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seet, Katrina Y. T.; Nieminen, Timo A.; Zvyagin, Andrei V.

    2009-07-01

    The cell nucleus is the dominant optical scatterer in the cell. Neoplastic cells are characterized by cell nucleus polymorphism and polychromism-i.e., the nuclei exhibits an increase in the distribution of both size and refractive index. The relative size parameter, and its distribution, is proportional to the product of the nucleus size and its relative refractive index and is a useful discriminant between normal and abnormal (cancerous) cells. We demonstrate a recently introduced holographic technique, digital Fourier microscopy (DFM), to provide a sensitive measure of this relative size parameter. Fourier holograms were recorded and optical scatter of individual scatterers were extracted and modeled with Mie theory to determine the relative size parameter. The relative size parameter of individual melanocyte cell nuclei were found to be 16.5+/-0.2, which gives a cell nucleus refractive index of 1.38+/-0.01 and is in good agreement with previously reported data. The relative size parameters of individual malignant melanocyte cell nuclei are expected to be greater than 16.5.

  18. Novel Perspectives on the Characterization of Species-Dependent Optical Signatures of Bacterial Colonies by Digital Holography

    PubMed Central

    Buzalewicz, Igor; Kujawińska, Małgorzata; Krauze, Wojciech; Podbielska, Halina

    2016-01-01

    The use of light diffraction for the microbiological diagnosis of bacterial colonies was a significant breakthrough with widespread implications for the food industry and clinical practice. We previously confirmed that optical sensors for bacterial colony light diffraction can be used for bacterial identification. This paper is focused on the novel perspectives of this method based on digital in-line holography (DIH), which is able to reconstruct the amplitude and phase properties of examined objects, as well as the amplitude and phase patterns of the optical field scattered/diffracted by the bacterial colony in any chosen observation plane behind the object from single digital hologram. Analysis of the amplitude and phase patterns inside a colony revealed its unique optical properties, which are associated with the internal structure and geometry of the bacterial colony. Moreover, on a computational level, it is possible to select the desired scattered/diffracted pattern within the entire observation volume that exhibits the largest amount of unique, differentiating bacterial features. These properties distinguish this method from the already proposed sensing techniques based on light diffraction/scattering of bacterial colonies. The reconstructed diffraction patterns have a similar spatial distribution as the recorded Fresnel patterns, previously applied for bacterial identification with over 98% accuracy, but they are characterized by both intensity and phase distributions. Our results using digital holography provide new optical discriminators of bacterial species revealed in one single step in form of new optical signatures of bacterial colonies: digital holograms, reconstructed amplitude and phase patterns, as well as diffraction patterns from all observation space, which exhibit species-dependent features. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on bacterial colony analysis via digital holography and our study represents an innovative approach

  19. Novel Perspectives on the Characterization of Species-Dependent Optical Signatures of Bacterial Colonies by Digital Holography.

    PubMed

    Buzalewicz, Igor; Kujawińska, Małgorzata; Krauze, Wojciech; Podbielska, Halina

    2016-01-01

    The use of light diffraction for the microbiological diagnosis of bacterial colonies was a significant breakthrough with widespread implications for the food industry and clinical practice. We previously confirmed that optical sensors for bacterial colony light diffraction can be used for bacterial identification. This paper is focused on the novel perspectives of this method based on digital in-line holography (DIH), which is able to reconstruct the amplitude and phase properties of examined objects, as well as the amplitude and phase patterns of the optical field scattered/diffracted by the bacterial colony in any chosen observation plane behind the object from single digital hologram. Analysis of the amplitude and phase patterns inside a colony revealed its unique optical properties, which are associated with the internal structure and geometry of the bacterial colony. Moreover, on a computational level, it is possible to select the desired scattered/diffracted pattern within the entire observation volume that exhibits the largest amount of unique, differentiating bacterial features. These properties distinguish this method from the already proposed sensing techniques based on light diffraction/scattering of bacterial colonies. The reconstructed diffraction patterns have a similar spatial distribution as the recorded Fresnel patterns, previously applied for bacterial identification with over 98% accuracy, but they are characterized by both intensity and phase distributions. Our results using digital holography provide new optical discriminators of bacterial species revealed in one single step in form of new optical signatures of bacterial colonies: digital holograms, reconstructed amplitude and phase patterns, as well as diffraction patterns from all observation space, which exhibit species-dependent features. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on bacterial colony analysis via digital holography and our study represents an innovative approach

  20. Comparative spectral analysis between the functionality of the human eye and of the optical part of a digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toadere, Florin

    2015-02-01

    A software that comparatively analysis the spectral functionality of the optical part of the human eye and of the optical image acquisition system of the digital camera, is presented. Comparisons are done using demonstrative images which present the spectral color transformations of an image that is considered the test object. To perform the simulations are presented the spectral models and are computed their effects on the colors of the spectral image, during the propagation of the D48 sun light through the eye and the optics of the digital camera. The simulations are made using a spectral image processing algorithm which converts the spectral image into XYZ color space, CIE CAM02 color appearance model and then into RGB color space.

  1. Line Terminal Circuit Module Design For Fiber Optic Digital Subscriber Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; Suto, Koh-ichi; Yoneda, Etsugo

    1990-01-01

    Design philosophy of a fiber optic transmission line terminal circuit (LTC) module for digital subscriber loops is described. A small, cost effective LTC module has been developed that realizes a 52 to 156 Mb/s fiber-to-the-home system. The salient points are ; various combinations of LDs and PDs/APDs can be used to match the subscriber line length requirements, CMI or scrambled NRZ line codes can be used, the module is suitable for single mode fiber (SMF) or graded index fiber (GIF) cables, high density LSI techniques can be used to develop single chip components. The volume of the contructed module is 92.6cm3 with a dispersion power of 3W. A single low power IC chip has been developed that includes decision and timing circuits. Thus timing phase adjustments are not needed. Differential amplification created between the pre-amplifer IC and the main amplifier IC is employed to yield a high common mode rejection ratio and suppress the effects of external noise. The double loop of the auto-power-control (APC) for the LD is adopted to separately control the d.c. bias current (Is) and the pulse modulation current (Ip). The CMI-CODEC-IC is fabricated by a Bi-CMOS process. It includes a PLL circuit that doubles input clock frequency for CMI signal coding. The CMI line code can be adopted to maintain bit sequence independence, facilitate hardware implementation of the timing-extraction circuit, and prevent bit errors caused by received optical power fluctuations. Received optical power fluctuations can happen when fibers are manually handled during cable installation or mid-span branching.

  2. Simplified architecture for photonic analog-to-digital conversion, utilizing an array of optical modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorgyan, Hayk; Khilo, Anatol

    2016-03-01

    In this work a novel photonic sampled and electronically quantized analog-to-digital converter (ADC) system is introduced. High overall sampling rate and relaxed analog bandwidth requirements for photodetectors and electronic quantizers are attained by multichannel architecture. The proposed scheme, with a dedicated electro-optic modulator for each of the channels, is much simpler and has a perspective to outreach the performance of a similar time- wavelength demultiplexed photonic ADC. Absolute optical power isolation between the channels completely eliminates the issue of channel crosstalk, resulting in increased power efficiency of the system. Owing to small number of wavelength demultiplexers less wavelength alignment is required, which reduces the complexity of both photonic and electronic subsystems. Due to the significance of having compact, on-chip photonic ADCs, the analysis of integration of proposed system on a silicon platform is performed. The availability of high performance devices in various Si platforms, such as low loss Si waveguides, microring resonator filters, modulators, photodetectors, necessary for building the system, proves that the photonic ADC is well suited for integration on a silicon chip. For integrated version of proposed architecture Si microring resonator modulators are suitable. They are compact, and can have shorter total length of diode phase shifters as compared to Mach-Zehnder modulators, used in time-wavelength demultiplexed photonic ADCs. To achieve large modulation depth and lower nonlinear distortions, the choice of optimum optical bandwidth of microring modulator is analyzed. Finally, the nonlinearity analysis of ring modulators is performed and the influence of nonlinearities on the ADC performance is discussed.

  3. Observer Performance in the Use of Digital and Optical Microscopy for the Interpretation of Tissue-Based Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Gavrielides, Marios A.; Conway, Catherine; O'Flaherty, Neil; Gallas, Brandon D.; Hewitt, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. We conducted a validation study of digital pathology for the quantitative assessment of tissue-based biomarkers with immunohistochemistry. Objective. To examine observer agreement as a function of viewing modality (digital versus optical microscopy), whole slide versus tissue microarray (TMA) review, biomarker type (HER2 incorporating membranous staining and Ki-67 with nuclear staining), and data type (continuous and categorical). Methods. Eight pathologists reviewed 50 breast cancer whole slides (25 stained with HER2 and 25 with Ki-67) and 2 TMAs (1 stained with HER2, 1 with Ki-67, each containing 97 cores), using digital and optical microscopy. Results. Results showed relatively high overall interobserver and intermodality agreement, with different patterns specific to biomarker type. For HER2, there was better interobserver agreement for optical compared to digital microscopy for whole slides as well as better interobserver and intermodality agreement for TMAs. For Ki-67, those patterns were not observed. Conclusions. The differences in agreement patterns when examining different biomarkers and different scoring methods and reviewing whole slides compared to TMA stress the need for validation studies focused on specific pathology tasks to eliminate sources of variability that might dilute findings. The statistical uncertainty observed in our analyses calls for adequate sampling for each individual task rather than pooling cases. PMID:25763314

  4. Optical analysis of nanomaterial-cell interactions: flow cytometry and digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mues, Sarah; Antunovic, Jan; Ossig, Rainer; Kemper, Björn; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    The in vitro cytotoxicity assessment of engineered nanoparticles commonly involves the measurement of different endpoints like the formation of reactive oxygen species, cell viability or cell death. Usually these parameters are determined by optical readouts of enzymatically converted substrates that often interfere with the tested nanomaterials. Using cell viability (WST-8) and cell death (LDH) as parameter we have initially investigated the toxic effects of spherical (NM 300) and rod shaped (NM 302) silver nanomaterials with a matrix of four cell lines representing different functions: lung and kidney epithelial cells, macrophages and fibroblasts. In addition, we have used a label-free flow cytometer configuration to investigate interactions of particles and macrophages by side scatter signal analysis. Finally, we explored digital holographic microscopy (DHM) for multimodal label-free analysis of nanomaterial toxicity. Quantitative DHM phase images were analyzed for cell thickness, volume, density, dry mass and refractive index. We could demonstrate that silver spheres lead to more cytotoxic effects than rods in all four examined cell lines and both assay. Exemplarily a dose dependent interaction increase of cells with NM 300 and NM 302 analyzed by flow cytometry is shown. Furthermore, we found that the refractive index of cells is influenced by incubation with NM 300 in a decreasing manner. A 24 hours time-lapse measurement revealed a dose dependent decrease of dry mass and surface area development indicating reduced cell viability and cell death. Our results demonstrate digital holographic microscopy and flow cytometry as valuable label-free tools for nanomaterial toxicity and cell interaction studies.

  5. Holographic storage system based on digital holography for recording a phase data page in a compact optical setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobukawa, Teruyoshi; Nomura, Takanori

    2016-03-01

    A holographic storage system based on digital holography is proposed for recording and retrieving a phase data page in a compact and simple optical setup. In the proposed recording system, complex amplitude distribution can be modulated using a single phase-only spatial light modulator. The complex amplitude distribution of a retrieved phase data page is detected with the Fourier fringe analysis. The use of digital holographic techniques enables realizing a compact and simple holographic recording system, which is independent of misalignment problem in conventional holographic storage systems. The capability of the proposed recording system is numerically and experimentally evaluated.

  6. Optically Selected BL Lacertae Candidates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Seven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkin, Richard M.; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W. N.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan, Xiaohui; Hall, Patrick B.; Kimball, Amy E.; Richmond, Michael W.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shemmer, Ohad; Voges, Wolfgang; York, Donald G.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Snedden, Stephanie; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey

    2010-02-01

    We present a sample of 723 optically selected BL Lac candidates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7) spectroscopic database encompassing 8250 deg2 of sky; our sample constitutes one of the largest uniform BL Lac samples yet derived. Each BL Lac candidate has a high-quality SDSS spectrum from which we determine spectroscopic redshifts for ~60% of the objects. Redshift lower limits are estimated for the remaining objects utilizing the lack of host galaxy flux contamination in their optical spectra; we find that objects lacking spectroscopic redshifts are likely at systematically higher redshifts. Approximately 80% of our BL Lac candidates match to a radio source in FIRST/NVSS, and ~40% match to a ROSAT X-ray source. The homogeneous multiwavelength coverage allows subdivision of the sample into 637 radio-loud BL Lac candidates and 86 weak-featured radio-quiet objects. The radio-loud objects broadly support the standard paradigm unifying BL Lac objects with beamed radio galaxies. We propose that the majority of the radio-quiet objects may be lower-redshift (z < 2.2) analogs to high-redshift weak line quasars (i.e., active galactic nucleus with unusually anemic broad emission line regions). These would constitute the largest sample of such objects, being of similar size and complementary in redshift to the samples of high-redshift weak line quasars previously discovered by the SDSS. However, some fraction of the weak-featured radio-quiet objects may instead populate a rare and extreme radio-weak tail of the much larger radio-loud BL Lac population. Serendipitous discoveries of unusual white dwarfs, high-redshift weak line quasars, and broad absorption line quasars with extreme continuum dropoffs blueward of rest-frame 2800 Å are also briefly described.

  7. Speckle reduction process based on digital filtering and wavelet compounding in optical coherence tomography for dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Valverde, Juan J.; Ortuño, Juan E.; Guerra, Pedro; Hermann, Boris; Zabihian, Behrooz; Rubio-Guivernau, José L.; Santos, Andrés.; Drexler, Wolfgang; Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria J.

    2015-07-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has shown a great potential as a complementary imaging tool in the diagnosis of skin diseases. Speckle noise is the most prominent artifact present in OCT images and could limit the interpretation and detection capabilities. In this work we propose a new speckle reduction process and compare it with various denoising filters with high edge-preserving potential, using several sets of dermatological OCT B-scans. To validate the performance we used a custom-designed spectral domain OCT and two different data set groups. The first group consisted in five datasets of a single B-scan captured N times (with N<20), the second were five 3D volumes of 25 Bscans. As quality metrics we used signal to noise (SNR), contrast to noise (CNR) and equivalent number of looks (ENL) ratios. Our results show that a process based on a combination of a 2D enhanced sigma digital filter and a wavelet compounding method achieves the best results in terms of the improvement of the quality metrics. In the first group of individual B-scans we achieved improvements in SNR, CNR and ENL of 16.87 dB, 2.19 and 328 respectively; for the 3D volume datasets the improvements were 15.65 dB, 3.44 and 1148. Our results suggest that the proposed enhancement process may significantly reduce speckle, increasing SNR, CNR and ENL and reducing the number of extra acquisitions of the same frame.

  8. Resolution enhancement of digital laser scanning fluorescence microscopy with a dual-lens optical pickup head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Chen, Jung-Po; Lee, Yuan-Chin; Chiang, Hung-Chih; Huang, Tai-Ting; Huang, Chun-Chieh; Cheng, Chih-Ming; Cheng, Chung-Ta; Lo, Feng-Hsiang; Tiao, Golden

    2016-07-01

    The resolution of the cell fluorescence image captured by a digital laser scanning microscopy with a modified dual-lens BD-ROM optical pickup head is enhanced by image registration and double sample frequency. A dual objective lens of red (655 nm) and blue (405 or 488 nm) laser sources with numerical apertures of 0.6 and 0.85 is used for sample focusing and position tracking and cell fluorescence image capturing, respectively. The image registration and capturing frequency are based on the address-coded patterns of a sample slide. The address-coded patterns are designed as a string of binary code, which comprises a plurality of base-straight lands and grooves and data-straight grooves. The widths of the base-straight lands, base-straight grooves, and data-straight grooves are 0.38, 0.38, and 0.76 μm, respectively. The numbers of sample signals in the x-direction are measured at every intersection point by intersecting the base intensity of the push-pull signal of the address-coded patterns, which has a minimum spacing of 0.38 μm. After taking a double sample frequency, the resolution of the measured cell fluorescence image is enhanced from 0.38 μm to the diffraction limit of the objective lens.

  9. Resolution enhancement of digital laser scanning fluorescence microscopy with a dual-lens optical pickup head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Chen, Jung-Po; Lee, Yuan-Chin; Chiang, Hung-Chih; Huang, Tai-Ting; Huang, Chun-Chieh; Cheng, Chih-Ming; Cheng, Chung-Ta; Lo, Feng-Hsiang; Tiao, Golden

    2016-10-01

    The resolution of the cell fluorescence image captured by a digital laser scanning microscopy with a modified dual-lens BD-ROM optical pickup head is enhanced by image registration and double sample frequency. A dual objective lens of red (655 nm) and blue (405 or 488 nm) laser sources with numerical apertures of 0.6 and 0.85 is used for sample focusing and position tracking and cell fluorescence image capturing, respectively. The image registration and capturing frequency are based on the address-coded patterns of a sample slide. The address-coded patterns are designed as a string of binary code, which comprises a plurality of base-straight lands and grooves and data-straight grooves. The widths of the base-straight lands, base-straight grooves, and data-straight grooves are 0.38, 0.38, and 0.76 μm, respectively. The numbers of sample signals in the x-direction are measured at every intersection point by intersecting the base intensity of the push-pull signal of the address-coded patterns, which has a minimum spacing of 0.38 μm. After taking a double sample frequency, the resolution of the measured cell fluorescence image is enhanced from 0.38 μm to the diffraction limit of the objective lens.

  10. Digital and optical shape representation and pattern recognition; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 4-6, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The present conference discusses topics in pattern-recognition correlator architectures, digital stereo systems, geometric image transformations and their applications, topics in pattern recognition, filter algorithms, object detection and classification, shape representation techniques, and model-based object recognition methods. Attention is given to edge-enhancement preprocessing using liquid crystal TVs, massively-parallel optical data base management, three-dimensional sensing with polar exponential sensor arrays, the optical processing of imaging spectrometer data, hybrid associative memories and metric data models, the representation of shape primitives in neural networks, and the Monte Carlo estimation of moment invariants for pattern recognition.

  11. Individual sarcomere length determination from isolated cardiac cells using high-resolution optical microscopy and digital image processing.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, K P; Brady, A J

    1982-01-01

    Discrete sarcomere lengths have been determined from dynamically contracting isolated cardiac cells with a high-speed, high-resolution direct optical imaging system. Calcium-tolerant cardiac cells from the rat are isolated by perfusion with collagenase and hyaluronidase. Individual sarcomere lengths can be determined by directly imaging the cell's striation pattern onto a solid-state charge-coupled device (CCD) detector interfaced with a digital computer. The precision of detection in a real light microscopic optical system is discussed in relation to the type of image detector, optical contract enhancement techniques, and digital image processing. The optical performance of the direct striation pattern image apparatus has been determined empirically with test grids under standard bright-field and Nomarski-differential interference contrast (DIC) conditions for application to real muscle imaging. Discrete striation positions of isolated cells have been detected and followed with high precision during phasic contraction-relaxation cycles down to average sarcomere lengths as short as 1.43 +/- 0.053 microns. The maximum rates of contraction and relaxation are rapid and synchronous in time course along the length of the cell. These results indicate that direct optical imaging can provide an accurate means to monitor discrete striations and sarcomere lengths along the length of Ca2+-tolerant heart cells. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 PMID:7183337

  12. Advanced optical correlation and digital methods for pattern matching—50th anniversary of Vander Lugt matched filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millán, María S.

    2012-10-01

    On the verge of the 50th anniversary of Vander Lugt’s formulation for pattern matching based on matched filtering and optical correlation, we acknowledge the very intense research activity developed in the field of correlation-based pattern recognition during this period of time. The paper reviews some domains that appeared as emerging fields in the last years of the 20th century and have been developed later on in the 21st century. Such is the case of three-dimensional (3D) object recognition, biometric pattern matching, optical security and hybrid optical-digital processors. 3D object recognition is a challenging case of multidimensional image recognition because of its implications in the recognition of real-world objects independent of their perspective. Biometric recognition is essentially pattern recognition for which the personal identification is based on the authentication of a specific physiological characteristic possessed by the subject (e.g. fingerprint, face, iris, retina, and multifactor combinations). Biometric recognition often appears combined with encryption-decryption processes to secure information. The optical implementations of correlation-based pattern recognition processes still rely on the 4f-correlator, the joint transform correlator, or some of their variants. But the many applications developed in the field have been pushing the systems for a continuous improvement of their architectures and algorithms, thus leading towards merged optical-digital solutions.

  13. Design and implementation of interface units for high speed fiber optics local area networks and broadband integrated services digital networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobagi, Fouad A.; Dalgic, Ismail; Pang, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The design and implementation of interface units for high speed Fiber Optic Local Area Networks and Broadband Integrated Services Digital Networks are discussed. During the last years, a number of network adapters that are designed to support high speed communications have emerged. This approach to the design of a high speed network interface unit was to implement package processing functions in hardware, using VLSI technology. The VLSI hardware implementation of a buffer management unit, which is required in such architectures, is described.

  14. Design and calibration of a digital Fourier holographic microscope for particle sizing via goniometry and optical scatter imaging in transmission.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Vincent M; Jacques, Steven L

    2016-06-13

    Goniometry and optical scatter imaging have been used for optical determination of particle size based upon optical scattering. Polystyrene microspheres in suspension serve as a standard for system validation purposes. The design and calibration of a digital Fourier holographic microscope (DFHM) are reported. Of crucial importance is the appropriate scaling of scattering angle space in the conjugate Fourier plane. A detailed description of this calibration process is described. Spatial filtering of the acquired digital hologram to use photons scattered within a restricted angular range produces an image. A pair of images, one using photons narrowly scattered within 8 - 15° (LNA), and one using photons broadly scattered within 8 - 39° (HNA), are produced. An image based on the ratio of these two images, OSIR = HNA/LNA, following Boustany et al. (2002), yields a 2D Optical Scatter Image (OSI) whose contrast is based on the angular dependence of photon scattering and is sensitive to the microsphere size, especially in the 0.5-1.0µm range. Goniometric results are also given for polystyrene microspheres in suspension as additional proof of principle for particle sizing via the DFHM. PMID:27410298

  15. Optical Science: Deploying Technical Concepts and Engaging Participation through Digital Storytelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. G.; Berry, K.; Arrigo, J.; Hooper, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Technical 'hands-on' training workshops are designed to bring together scientists, technicians, and program managers from universities, government agencies, and the private sector to discuss methods used and advances made in instrumentation and data analysis. Through classroom lectures and discussions combined with a field-day component, hands-on workshop participants get a 'full life cycle' perspective from instrumentation concepts and deployment to data analysis. Using film to document this process is becoming increasingly more popular, allowing scientists to add a story-telling component to their research. With the availability of high-quality and low priced professional video equipment and editing software, scientists are becoming digital storytellers. The science video developed from the 'hands-on' workshop, Optical Water Quality Sensors for Nutrients: Concepts, Deployment, and Analysis, encapsulates the objectives of technical training workshops for participants. Through the use of still photography, video, interviews, and sound, the short video, An Introduction to CUAHSI's Hands-on Workshops, produced by a co-instructor of the workshop acts as a multi-purpose tool. The 10-minute piece provides an overview of workshop field day activities and works to bridge the gap between classroom learning, instrumentation application and data analysis. CUAHSI 'hands-on' technical workshops have been collaboratively executed with faculty from several universities and with the U.S. Geological Survey. The video developed was designed to attract new participants to these professional development workshops, to stimulate a connection with the environment, to act as a workshop legacy resource, and also serve as a guide for prospective hands-on workshop organizers. The effective use of film and short videos in marketing scientific programs, such as technical trainings, allows scientists to visually demonstrate the technologies currently being employed and to provide a more

  16. All-digital signal-processing open-loop fiber-optic gyroscope with enlarged dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Yang, Chuanchuan; Wang, Xinyue; Wang, Ziyu

    2013-12-15

    We propose and realize a new open-loop fiber-optic gyroscope (FOG) with an all-digital signal-processing (DSP) system where an all-digital phase-locked loop is employed for digital demodulation to eliminate the variation of the source intensity and suppress the bias drift. A Sagnac phase-shift tracking method is proposed to enlarge the dynamic range, and, with its aid, a new open-loop FOG, which can achieve a large dynamic range and high sensitivity at the same time, is realized. The experimental results show that compared with the conventional open-loop FOG with the same fiber coil and optical devices, the proposed FOG reduces the bias instability from 0.259 to 0.018 deg/h, and the angle random walk from 0.031 to 0.006 deg/h(1/2), moreover, enlarges the dynamic range to ±360 deg/s, exceeding the maximum dynamic range ±63 deg/s of the conventional open-loop FOG.

  17. A modular, low-cost, digital signal processor-based lock-in card for measuring optical attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragán, L. A.; Artigas, J. I.; Alonso, R.; Villuendas, F.

    2001-01-01

    A modular, low-cost, digital signal processor (DSP)-based lock-in card is described for measuring optical attenuation. By transferring the lock-in operation from the analog domain to the digital domain, the nonlinearities gain, and offset errors and drifts are virtually eliminated. The dual phase lock-in operation has been implemented on the low-cost DSP56002 evaluation module (DSP56002EVM) of Motorola that is widely used in audio signal processing. This evaluation board contains a 24 bit DSP56002 DSP and a stereo CD-quality audio codec that makes the board ideal for implementing signal processing algorithms. Due to the maximum sampling rate of the codec embedded on the DSP56002EVM, the frequencies of the processed signals must be below 20 kHz. This specification is enough for the most common applications in the field of optics, where low or very low frequency (<1 kHz) references are frequent. The software algorithm implementing the lock-in amplifier can be particularized by the user on the basis of the needed performances. The effects of finite word length in the digital filter implementation are analyzed. This analysis reveals that a 24 bit word length is not enough to ensure the filter stability and the required frequency response. To overcome this problem, the double precision multiply mode must be used. When the DSP56002 enters this mode, double precision 48 bit by 48 bit multiplication can be performed. The lock-in performance has been tested. The measured amplitude variations of the reference sine signal are about 0.003%, which do not affect the signal measurement. The lock-in behaves like a band-pass filter centered on the reference frequency whose bandwidth is related to the low-pass filter cutoff frequency. The measured frequency response shows that the lock-in performs as theoretically predicted. The DSP56002EVM can be used as a lock-in for electrical signals in stand-alone operation. Besides, we have designed a card that interconnects to the DSP56002EVM

  18. Accurate and agile digital control of optical phase, amplitude and frequency for coherent atomic manipulation of atomic systems.

    PubMed

    Thom, Joseph; Wilpers, Guido; Riis, Erling; Sinclair, Alastair G

    2013-08-12

    We demonstrate a system for fast and agile digital control of laser phase, amplitude and frequency for applications in coherent atomic systems. The full versatility of a direct digital synthesis radiofrequency source is faithfully transferred to laser radiation via acousto-optic modulation. Optical beatnotes are used to measure phase steps up to 2π, which are accurately implemented with a resolution of ≤ 10 mrad. By linearizing the optical modulation process, amplitude-shaped pulses of durations ranging from 500 ns to 500 ms, in excellent agreement with the programmed functional form, are demonstrated. Pulse durations are limited only by the 30 ns rise time of the modulation process, and a measured extinction ratio of > 5 × 10(11) is achieved. The system presented here was developed specifically for controlling the quantum state of trapped ions with sequences of multiple laser pulses, including composite and bichromatic pulses. The demonstrated techniques are widely applicable to other atomic systems ranging across quantum information processing, frequency metrology, atom interferometry, and single-photon generation.

  19. Implementation of a digital optical matrix-vector multiplier using a holographic look-up table and residue arithmetic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habiby, Sarry F.

    1987-01-01

    The design and implementation of a digital (numerical) optical matrix-vector multiplier are presented. The objective is to demonstrate the operation of an optical processor designed to minimize computation time in performing a practical computing application. This is done by using the large array of processing elements in a Hughes liquid crystal light valve, and relying on the residue arithmetic representation, a holographic optical memory, and position coded optical look-up tables. In the design, all operations are performed in effectively one light valve response time regardless of matrix size. The features of the design allowing fast computation include the residue arithmetic representation, the mapping approach to computation, and the holographic memory. In addition, other features of the work include a practical light valve configuration for efficient polarization control, a model for recording multiple exposures in silver halides with equal reconstruction efficiency, and using light from an optical fiber for a reference beam source in constructing the hologram. The design can be extended to implement larger matrix arrays without increasing computation time.

  20. Optical fiber diameter measurement by the diffraction method with digital processing of the light scattering indicatrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokodii, N. G.; Natarova, A. O.

    2016-07-01

    Relations between the position of the first diffraction minima and the fiber diameter are derived based on the solution of the problem of electromagnetic wave diffraction on a transparent fiber with a circular cross section. The obtained formulas are used to measure the fiber diameter. The diffraction pattern is recorded with a digital camera. The obtained image is digitally processed to determine the positions of the first two scattering indicatrix minima.

  1. Design and evaluation of an optical fine-pointing control system for telescopes utilizing a digital star sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, A. J.; Romanczyk, K. C.

    1973-01-01

    One of the most significant problems associated with the development of large orbiting astronomical telescopes is that of maintaining the very precise pointing accuracy required. A proposed solution to this problem utilizes dual-level pointing control. The primary control system maintains the telescope structure attitude stabilized within the field of view to the desired accuracy. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of optically stabilizing the star images to the desired accuracy a regulating system has been designed and evaluated. The control system utilizes a digital star sensor and an optical star image motion compensator, both of which have been developed for this application. These components have been analyzed mathematically, analytical models have been developed, and hardware has been built and tested.

  2. Fiber optic spectroscopic digital imaging sensor and method for flame properties monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Zelepouga, Serguei A.; Rue, David M.; Saveliev, Alexei V.

    2011-03-15

    A system for real-time monitoring of flame properties in combustors and gasifiers which includes an imaging fiber optic bundle having a light receiving end and a light output end and a spectroscopic imaging system operably connected with the light output end of the imaging fiber optic bundle. Focusing of the light received by the light receiving end of the imaging fiber optic bundle by a wall disposed between the light receiving end of the fiber optic bundle and a light source, which wall forms a pinhole opening aligned with the light receiving end.

  3. Differential-interference-contrast digital in-line holography microscopy based on a single-optical-element.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuchao; Xie, Changqing

    2015-11-01

    Both digital in-line holography (DIH) and zone plate-based microscopy have received considerable interest as powerful imaging tools. However, the former suffers from a twin-image noise problem. The latter suffers from low efficiency and difficulty in fabrication. Here, we present an effective and efficient phase-contrast imaging approach, named differential-interference-contrast digital in-line holography (DIC-DIH), by using a single optical element to split the incident light into a plane wave and a converging spherical wave and generate a two-dimensional (2D) DIC effect simultaneously. Specifically, to improve image contrast, we present a new single optical element, termed 2D DIC compound photon sieves, by combining two overlaid binary gratings and a compound photon sieve through two logical XOR operations. The proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate that the proposed technique can eliminate the twin-image noise problem and improve image contrast with high efficiency. Additionally, we present an example of the phase-contrast imaging nonuniform thick photoresist development process.

  4. Implementation of digital optical capillaroscopy for quantifying and estimating the microvascular abnormalities in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurfinkel, Yu. I.; Suchkova, O. V.; Sasonko, M. L.; Priezzhev, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    This study is aimed to define the extent of digital capillaroscopy possibilities for the quantification and estimation of microvascular abnormalities in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 196 adult persons were enrolled in the study including the group of compensated T2DM (n = 52), decompensated diabetics (n = 68), and healthy volunteers (n = 76) with normal blood glucose and without signs of cardiovascular pathology. All participants of the study were examined with the digital optical capillaroscope ("AET", Russia). This instrument is equipped with an image-processing program allowing for quantifying the diameters of the arterial and venous segments of the capillaries and their ratio (coefficient of remodeling), perivascular zone size, capillary blood velocity, and the degree of arterial loops narrowing and the density of the capillary network. Also we estimated the relative amount of coil-shaped capillaries. The study revealed significant difference in the capillary density and the remodeling coefficient in comparison of T2DM patients with non-diabetic individuals. Significant changes are found in the decompensated T2DM group compared to the compensated group of diabetic patients. Furthermore, the number of coil-shaped capillaries differed greatly in T2DM patients as compared to the healthy subjects. The study did not reveal any statistically significant differences in the capillary density between the patients with compensated and decompensated T2DM. The digital optical capillaroscope equipped with the advanced image-processing algorithm opens up new possibilities for obtaining clinically important information on microvascular abnormalities in patients suffering from diabetes mellitus.

  5. Pre-Processing of Point-Data from Contact and Optical 3D Digitization Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Budak, Igor; Vukelić, Djordje; Bračun, Drago; Hodolič, Janko; Soković, Mirko

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary 3D digitization systems employed by reverse engineering (RE) feature ever-growing scanning speeds with the ability to generate large quantity of points in a unit of time. Although advantageous for the quality and efficiency of RE modelling, the huge number of point datas can turn into a serious practical problem, later on, when the CAD model is generated. In addition, 3D digitization processes are very often plagued by measuring errors, which can be attributed to the very nature of measuring systems, various characteristics of the digitized objects and subjective errors by the operator, which also contribute to problems in the CAD model generation process. This paper presents an integral system for the pre-processing of point data, i.e., filtering, smoothing and reduction, based on a cross-sectional RE approach. In the course of the proposed system development, major emphasis was placed on the module for point data reduction, which was designed according to a novel approach with integrated deviation analysis and fuzzy logic reasoning. The developed system was verified through its application on three case studies, on point data from objects of versatile geometries obtained by contact and laser 3D digitization systems. The obtained results demonstrate the effectiveness of the system. PMID:22368513

  6. Global optical free-space smart interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilfoyle, Peter S.; Hessenbruch, John M.; Zeise, Frederick F.

    1993-07-01

    High fan-in/fan-out, low power (1 fJ per gate), high performance computing (HPC) modules are being developed that integrate global (multidimensional) free space `smart' optical interconnects with GaAs DANE technology. This new architecture implements N4 global free space optical interconnects coupled with 2-D arrays of N-bit Boolean multiplications by DeMorgan's theorem on wide word fan-ins. `Smart' interconnects provide a high speed inter- module alternative without the power requirements and cross-talk limitations of GaAs circuitry. Selected algorithms such as 64-bit addition can operate at lower power and higher speeds using global technology and GaAs logic. Thus, faster processing can be fully realized which allows for a reduction in pipeline delays.

  7. A design for an internet router with a digital optical data plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touch, Joe; Bannister, Joseph; Suryaputra, Stephen; Willner, Alan E.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a complete design for an optical Internet router based on decomposing the steps required for IP packet forwarding. Implementations of hopcount decrement and header matching are integrated with a simulation-based approach to variable-length packet merging that avoids recirculation, resulting in an all-optical data plane. A method for IPv4 checksum computation is introduced, and this and previously designed components are extended from binary to higher-density (multiple bits per symbol) encodings. The implications of this design are considered, including the potential for chip-level and system integration, as well as the requirements of basic optical processing components.

  8. Packet error rate analysis of digital pulse interval modulation in intersatellite optical communication systems with diversified wavefront deformation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jin; Wang, Dayan; Xie, Wanqing

    2015-02-20

    Diversified wavefront deformation is an inevitable phenomenon in intersatellite optical communication systems, which will decrease system performance. In this paper, we investigate the description of wavefront deformation and its influence on the packet error rate (PER) of digital pulse interval modulation (DPIM). With the wavelet method, the diversified wavefront deformation can be described by wavelet parameters: coefficient, dilation, and shift factors, where the coefficient factor represents the depth, dilation factor represents the area, and shift factor is for location. Based on this, the relationship between PER and wavelet parameters is analyzed from a theoretical viewpoint. Numerical results illustrate the validity of theoretical analysis: PER increases with the depth and area and decreases if location gets farther from the center of the optical antenna. In addition to describing diversified deformation, the advantage of the wavelet method over Zernike polynomials in computational complexity is shown via numerical example. This work provides a feasible method for the description along with influence analysis of diversified wavefront deformation from a practical viewpoint and will be helpful for designing optical systems.

  9. Optical spectroscopic observations of blazars and γ-ray blazar candidates in the Sloan digital sky survey data release nine

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Masetti, N.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Funk, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present an analysis of the optical spectra available in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release nine (SDSS DR9) for the blazars listed in the ROMA-BZCAT and for the γ-ray blazar candidates selected according to their IR colors. First, we adopt a statistical approach based on Monte Carlo simulations to find the optical counterparts of the blazars listed in the ROMA-BZCAT catalog. Then, we crossmatched the SDSS spectroscopic catalog with our selected samples of blazars and γ-ray blazar candidates, searching for those with optical spectra available to classify our blazar-like sources and, whenever possible, to confirm their redshifts. Our main objectives are to determine the classification of uncertain blazars listed in the ROMA-BZCAT and to discover new gamma-ray blazars. For the ROMA-BZCAT sources, we investigated a sample of 84 blazars, confirming the classification for 20 of them and obtaining 18 new redshift estimates. For the γ-ray blazars, indicated as potential counterparts of unassociated Fermi sources or with uncertain nature, we established the blazar-like nature of 8 out of the 27 sources analyzed and confirmed 14 classifications.

  10. Synchronous triple-optical-path digital speckle pattern interferometry with fast discrete curvelet transform for measuring three-dimensional displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Guoqing; Wang, Kaifu; Wang, Yanfang; She, Bin

    2016-06-01

    Digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) is a well-established and widely used optical measurement technique for obtaining qualitative as well as quantitative measurements of objects deformation. The simultaneous measurement of an object's surface displacements in three dimensions using DSPI is of great interest. This paper presents a triple-optical-path DSPI based method for the simultaneous and independent measurement of three-dimensional (3D) displacement fields. In the proposed method, in-plane speckle interferometers with dual-observation geometry and an out-of-plane interferometer are optimally combined to construct an integrated triple-optical-path DSPI system employing the phase shift technique, which uses only a single laser source and three cameras. These cameras are placed along a single line to synchronously capture real-time visible speckle fringe patterns in three dimensions. In addition, a pre-filtering method based on the fast discrete curvelet transform (FDCT) is utilized for denoising the obtained wrapped phase patterns to improve measurement accuracy. Finally, the simultaneous measurement of the 3D displacement fields of a simple beam and a composite laminated plate respectively subjected to three-point and single-point bend loading are investigated to validate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. All-optical digital logic: Full addition or subtraction on a three-state system

    SciTech Connect

    Remacle, F.; Levine, R. D.

    2006-03-15

    Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) is a well-studied pump-probe control scheme for manipulating the population of quantum states of atoms or molecules. By encoding the digits to be operated on as 'on' or 'off' laser input signals we show how STIRAP can be used to implement a finite-state logic machine. The physical conditions required for an effective STIRAP operation are related to the physical conditions expected for a logic machine. In particular, a condition is derived on the mean number of photons that represent an on pulse. A finite-state machine computes Boolean expressions that depend both on the input and on the present state of the machine. With two input signals we show how to implement a full adder where the carry-in digit is stored in the state of the machine. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to store the carry-out digit as the next state and thereby return the machine to a state ready for the next full addition. Such a machine operates as a cyclical full adder. We further show how this full adder can equally well be operated as a full subtractor. To the best of our knowledge this is the first example of a nanosized system that implements a full subtraction.

  12. High-temperature optically activated GaAs power switching for aircraft digital electronic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berak, J. M.; Grantham, D. H.; Swindal, J. L.; Black, J. F.; Allen, L. B.

    1983-01-01

    Gallium arsenide high-temperature devices were fabricated and assembled into an optically activated pulse-width-modulated power control for a torque motor typical of the kinds used in jet engine actuators. A bipolar heterojunction phototransistor with gallium aluminum arsenide emitter/window, a gallium arsenide junction field-effect power transistor and a gallium arsenide transient protection diode were designed and fabricated. A high-temperature fiber optic/phototransistor coupling scheme was implemented. The devices assembled into the demonstrator were successfully tested at 250 C, proving the feasibility of actuator-located switching of control power using optical signals transmitted by fibers. Assessments of the efficiency and technical merits were made for extension of this high-temperature technology to local conversion of optical power to electrical power and its control at levels useful for driving actuators. Optical power sources included in the comparisons were an infrared light-emitting diode, an injection laser diode, tungsten-halogen lamps and arc lamps. Optical-to-electrical power conversion was limited to photovoltaics located at the actuator. Impedance matching of the photovoltaic array to the load was considered over the full temperature range, -55 C to 260 C. Loss of photovoltaic efficiency at higher temperatures was taken into account. Serious losses in efficiency are: (1) in the optical source and the cooling which they may require in the assumed 125 C ambient, (2) in the decreased conversion efficiency of the gallium arsenide photovoltaic at 260 C, and (3) in impedance matching. Practical systems require improvements in these areas.

  13. Research of AGC technology in a digital optical fiber sensing system with PGC modulation and demodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jianfeng; Xiong, Shuidong; Zhang, Yan

    2014-11-01

    The magnitude of light intensity on the photo-to-electric detector fluctuates all the time in an optic fiber sensing system, because of the influence of various factors in the fiber optic sensing system and from the external environment. As a result of the excessive intensity, the electric signal will be overload after the amplifier circuit with constant enlargement factor, and when the light intensity becames too small, it will reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the electric signal. Therefore, it is necessary to introduce an automatic gain control (AGC) module into the system, which can insure the electric signal in a reasonable magnitude. In order to solve the problem of optic intensity fluctuating in the optical fiber sensing system with PGC modulation and demodulation, in this paper, firstly, it is analyzed that the impact of different magnitudes of interferential intensity to the PGC demodulation in theory. Secondly, a reasonable control method is put forward and an AGC module based on the AD602 chip is designed and produced. Finally, it is proved that the optic fiber sensor system with an AGC module has strong ability to resist fluctuation of light intensity within 40dB.

  14. An experimental distribution of analog and digital information in a hybrid wireless visible light communication system based on acousto-optic modulation and sinusoidal gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Colín, R.; García Juárez, A.; Zaldívar Huerta, I. E.; Marquina, A. Vera; García Delgado, L. A.; Leal Cruz, A. L.; Gómez Fuentes, R.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we propose a photonic architecture as an alternative tool to distribute point to multipoint analog and digital information over a hybrid wireless visible optical communication system. The experimental set-up is composed of a red laser pointer, an acousto-optic modulator, a sinusoidal grating and a photo-detector array. By using a simple and variable interferometric system, diffraction gratings with different spatial frequencies are generated and recorded on a photoemulsion which is composed of vanilla with dichromate gelatin. Analog video and digital information are first transmitted and recovered over a wireless communication system using a microwave carrier at 4.52 GHz which is generated by distributed feedback lasers operating in the low laser threshold current region. Separately, the recovered video information and digital data are combined with a radio frequency signal of 80 MHz, obtaining a subcarrier of information that is imposed on the optical carrier of the pointer laser using an acousto-optic modulator which is operated with an angle of incident light that satisfies the Bragg condition. The modulated optical carrier is sent to a sinusoidal grating, the diffraction pattern is photo-detected using an array of PIN photo-detectors. The use of sinusoidal gratings with acousto-optic modulators allows that number of channels to be increased when both components are placed in cascade.

  15. Analog-to-digital optical waveguide conversion at sampling periods greater than the free-space wavelength.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Tarek A

    2014-01-01

    Nyquist sampling theorem reveals the possibility of sampling the continuous refractive index profiles of optical waveguides at periods greater than the free-space wavelength, λ(o). Binary encoding of these analog waveguides is investigated using the zero-order effective medium theory, while conserving the quantization of the modal spectrum implied by their boundary conditions. Both analytical and numerical approaches are developed for this analog-to-digital (A-to-D) conversion. An example is presented for the A-to-D conversion of a graded index waveguide with a hyperbolic secant profile at a sample period of 1.3λ(o). The results are confirmed using a beam propagation method.

  16. Elastic stiffness characterization using three-dimensional full-field deformation obtained with optical coherence tomography and digital volume correlation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jiawei; Pierron, Fabrice; Ruiz, Pablo D

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a methodology for stiffness identification from depth-resolved three-dimensional (3-D) full-field deformation fields. These were obtained by performing digital volume correlation on optical coherence tomography volume reconstructions of silicone rubber phantoms. The effect of noise and reconstruction uncertainties on the performance of the correlation algorithm was first evaluated through stationary and rigid body translation tests to give an indication of the minimum strain that can be reliably measured. The phantoms were then tested under tension, and the 3-D deformation fields were used to identify the elastic constitutive parameters using a 3-D manually defined virtual fields method. The identification results for the cases of uniform and heterogeneous strain fields were compared with those calculated analytically through the constant uniaxial stress assumption, showing good agreement.

  17. Near-infrared spectral tomography integrated with digital breast tomosynthesis: Effects of tissue scattering on optical data acquisition design

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelsen, Kelly; Krishnaswamy, Venkat; Pogue, Brian W.; Poplack, Steven P.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Design optimization and phantom validation of an integrated digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and near-infrared spectral tomography (NIRST) system targeting improvement in sensitivity and specificity of breast cancer detection is presented. Factors affecting instrumentation design include minimization of cost, complexity, and examination time while maintaining high fidelity NIRST measurements with sufficient information to recover accurate optical property maps. Methods: Reconstructed DBT slices from eight patients with abnormal mammograms provided anatomical information for the NIRST simulations. A limited frequency domain (FD) and extensive continuous wave (CW) NIRST system was modeled. The FD components provided tissue scattering estimations used in the reconstruction of the CW data. Scattering estimates were perturbed to study the effects on hemoglobin recovery. Breast mimicking agar phantoms with inclusions were imaged using the combined DBT/NIRST system for comparison with simulation results. Results: Patient simulations derived from DBT images show successful reconstruction of both normal and malignant lesions in the breast. They also demonstrate the importance of accurately quantifying tissue scattering. Specifically, 20% errors in optical scattering resulted in 22.6% or 35.1% error in quantification of total hemoglobin concentrations, depending on whether scattering was over- or underestimated, respectively. Limited frequency-domain optical signal sampling provided two regions scattering estimates (for fat and fibroglandular tissues) that led to hemoglobin concentrations that reduced the error in the tumor region by 31% relative to when a single estimate of optical scattering was used throughout the breast volume of interest. Acquiring frequency-domain data with six wavelengths instead of three did not significantly improve the hemoglobin concentration estimates. Simulation results were confirmed through experiments in two-region breast mimicking

  18. Digital compensation of cross-phase modulation distortions using perturbation technique for dispersion-managed fiber-optic systems.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaojun; Kumar, Shiva; Shao, Jing; Malekiha, Mahdi; Plant, David V

    2014-08-25

    A digital compensation scheme based on a perturbation theory for mitigation of cross-phase modulation (XPM) distortions is developed for dispersion-managed fiber-optic communication systems. It is a receiver-side scheme that uses a hard-decision unit to estimate data for the calculation of XPM fields using the perturbation technique. The intra-channel nonlinear distortions are removed by intra-channel digital backward propagation (DBP) based on split-step Fourier scheme before the hard-decision unit. The perturbation technique is shown to be effective in mitigating XPM distortions. However, wrong estimations in the hard-decision unit result in performance degradation. A hard-decision correction method is proposed to correct the wrong estimations. Numerical simulations show that the hybrid compensation scheme with DBP for dispersion and intra-channel nonlinear impairments compensation and the perturbation technique for XPM compensation brings up to 3.7 dBQ and 1.7 dBQ improvements as compared with the schemes of linear compensation only and intra-channel DBP, respectively. The perturbation technique for XPM compensation requires only one-stage (or two-stage when hard-decision correction is applied) compensation and symbol-rate signal processing.

  19. Evaluation of Five Phase Digitally Controlled Rotating Field Plasma Source for Photochemical Mercury Vapor Generation Optical Emission Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Matusiewicz, Henryk; Ślachciński, Mariusz; Pawłowski, Paweł; Portalski, Marek

    2015-01-01

    A new sensitive method for total mercury determination in reference materials using a 5-phase digitally controlled rotating field plasma source (RFP) for optical emission spectrometry (OES) was developed. A novel synergic effect of ultrasonic nebulization (USN) and ultraviolet-visible light (UV-Vis) irradiation when used in combination was exploited for efficient Hg vapor generation. UV- and Vis-based irradiation systems were studied. It was found that the most advantageous design was an ultrasonic nebulizer fitted with a 6 W mercury lamp supplying a microliter sample to a quartz oscillator, converting liquid into aerosol at the entrance of the UV spray chamber. Optimal conditions involved using a 20% v/v solution of acetic acid as the generation medium. The mercury cold vapor, favorably generated from Hg(2+) solutions by UV irradiation, was rapidly transported into a plasma source with rotating field generated within the five electrodes and detected by digitally controlled rotating field plasma optical emission spectrometry (RFP-OES). Under optimal conditions, the experimental concentration detection limit for the determination, calculated as the concentration giving a signal equal to three times the standard deviation of the blank (LOD, 3σblank criterion, peak height), was 4.1 ng mL(-1). The relative standard deviation for samples was equal to or better than 5% for liquid analysis and microsampling capability. The methodology was validated through determination of mercury in three certified reference materials (corresponding to biological and environmental samples) (NRCC DOLT-2, NRCC PACS-1, NIST 2710) using the external aqueous standard calibration techniques in acetic acid media, with satisfactory recoveries. Mercury serves as an example element to validate the capability of this approach. This is a simple, reagent-saving, cost-effective and green analytical method for mercury determination. PMID:26460362

  20. Digital Signal Processing Of Optical Monitoring By Means Of A Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, M.; Seeley, J. S.

    1983-11-01

    A Kalman filter algorithm has been applied to interpret the optical reflectance excursions during vacuum deposition of infrared coatings and multilayer thin-film filters. The application has been described in detail elsewhere and this paper now reports on-line experience for estimating deposition rate and thickness. The estimation proved sufficiently reliable to firstly 'navigate' regular manufacture (as controlled by a skilled operator) and to subsequently reproduce the skill without interpretation or intervention whilst maintaining exemplary product quality. Optical control by means of this Kalman filter application is therefore considered suitable as a basis for the automated manufacture of infrared coatings and multilayer thin-film filters.

  1. Transmission of independent signals through a multimode fiber using digital optical phase conjugation.

    PubMed

    Czarske, Jürgen W; Haufe, Daniel; Koukourakis, Nektarios; Büttner, Lars

    2016-06-27

    Multimode fibers are attractive for a variety of applications such as communication engineering and biophotonics. However, a major hurdle for the optical transmission through multimode fibers is the inherent mode mixing. Although an image transmission was successfully accomplished using wavefront shaping, the image information was not transmitted individually for each of the independent pixels. We demonstrate a transmission of independent signals using individually shaped wavefronts employing a single segmented spatial light modulator for optical phase conjugation regarding each light signal. Our findings pave the way towards transferring independent signals through strongly scattering media. PMID:27410664

  2. Experimental demonstration of a real-time high-throughput digital DC blocker for compensating ADC imperfections in optical fast-OFDM receivers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Ouyang, Xing; Shao, Xiaopeng; Zhao, Jian

    2016-06-27

    Performance degradation induced by the DC components at the output of real-time analogue-to-digital converter (ADC) is experimentally investigated for optical fast-OFDM receiver. To compensate this degradation, register transfer level (RTL) circuits for real-time digital DC blocker with 20GS/s throughput are proposed and implemented in field programmable gate array (FPGA). The performance of the proposed real-time digital DC blocker is experimentally investigated in a 15Gb/s optical fast-OFDM system with intensity modulation and direct detection over 40 km standard single-mode fibre. The results show that the fixed-point DC blocker has negligible performance penalty compared to the offline floating point one, and can overcome the error floor of the fast OFDM receiver caused by the DC components from the real-time ADC output. PMID:27410579

  3. Skin surface and sub-surface strain and deformation imaging using optical coherence tomography and digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Maiti, R.; Liu, X.; Gerhardt, L. C.; Lee, Z. S.; Byers, R.; Franklin, S. E.; Lewis, R.; Matcher, S. J.; Carré, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Bio-mechanical properties of the human skin deformed by external forces at difference skin/material interfaces attract much attention in medical research. For instance, such properties are important design factors when one designs a healthcare device, i.e., the device might be applied directly at skin/device interfaces. In this paper, we investigated the bio-mechanical properties, i.e., surface strain, morphological changes of the skin layers, etc., of the human finger-pad and forearm skin as a function of applied pressure by utilizing two non-invasive techniques, i.e., optical coherence tomography (OCT) and digital image correlation (DIC). Skin deformation results of the human finger-pad and forearm skin were obtained while pressed against a transparent optical glass plate under the action of 0.5-24 N force and stretching naturally from 90° flexion to 180° full extension respectively. The obtained OCT images showed the deformation results beneath the skin surface, however, DIC images gave overall information of strain at the surface.

  4. Achromatic digital speckle pattern interferometer with constant radial in-plane sensitivity by using a diffractive optical element.

    PubMed

    Viotti, Matias R; Kapp, Walter; Albertazzi G, Armando

    2009-04-20

    We report on a digital speckle pattern interferometer that applies a binary diffractive optical element (DOE) to generate double illumination and radial in-plane sensitivity. The application of the DOE ensures independence on the wavelength of the laser used as an illumination source. Furthermore, in-plane sensitivity only depends on the grating period of the DOE. An experimental setup was built allowing the measurement of a set of radial in-plane displacement fields either using a red laser as a light source or a green one. When displacement fields computed from the measured optical phase maps obtained with a red or a green laser were compared, two main results were observed: (a) deviations between mean values ranged only up to 7 nm and (b) phase maps presented the same amount of fringes. In addition, phase maps measured with the red laser were processed as they were obtained with green light. For this case, deviations have ranged only up to 0.5 nm. On the other hand, a set of measurements performed changing the DOE by a conical mirror showed clearly that radial in-plane sensitivity increased when the red laser was changed by the green one. PMID:19381178

  5. Evaluation of data storage layer thickness best fitted for digital data read-out procedure from hard x-ray optical memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezirganyan, Hakob P.; Bezirganyan, Siranush E.; Bezirganyan, Petros H., Jr.; Bezirganyan, Hayk H., Jr.

    2009-08-01

    Paper is devoted to further evolution of the concept of ultra-high density hard x-ray storage media - a radically new x-ray- based optical data storage nanotechnology with terabit-scale digital data density per square centimeter of each storage layer of the memory disk. Forthcoming hard x-ray optical data read-out devices will use an ultra-high density information carrier named x-ray optical memory (X-ROM), which consists of crystalline wafer with the generated sub-surface amorphous nanometer-size reflecting speckles of x-ray high-reflectivity material. X-ROM is designed for long-term archiving of the large volumes of information and digital data handling via read-out systems operating on x-ray wavelength optics. Digital data read-out procedure from X-ROM is performed via grazing-angle incident x-ray micro beam. X-ray-based optical data storage system detects data by measuring changes in x-ray micro beam intensity reflected from the various surface points of data storage media. Grazing-angle incident x-ray configuration allows the handling of data from very large surface area of X-ROM disk and, consequently, the data read-out speed is much faster than in optical data read-out systems. Aim of paper is detailed evaluation of storage data-layer's effective thickness best fitted for a digital data read-out procedure. Penetration depths of non-homogeneous x-ray wave fields inside crystalline substrate and amorphous speckles of X-ROM are investigated theoretically in case of grazing-angle incidence x-ray backscattering diffraction (GIXB) applied in specular beam suppression mode. It is possible to reduce the effective thickness of data storage layer to a value of less than a single-bit linear size i.e. to reduce effective thickness up to 10 nm, according to performed evaluations.

  6. Digital metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Della Giovampaola, Cristian; Engheta, Nader

    2014-12-01

    Balancing complexity and simplicity has played an important role in the development of many fields in science and engineering. One of the well-known and powerful examples of such balance can be found in Boolean algebra and its impact on the birth of digital electronics and the digital information age. The simplicity of using only two numbers, '0' and '1', in a binary system for describing an arbitrary quantity made the fields of digital electronics and digital signal processing powerful and ubiquitous. Here, inspired by the binary concept, we propose to develop the notion of digital metamaterials. Specifically, we investigate how one can synthesize an electromagnetic metamaterial with a desired permittivity, using as building blocks only two elemental materials, which we call 'metamaterial bits', with two distinct permittivity functions. We demonstrate, analytically and numerically, how proper spatial mixtures of such metamaterial bits lead to elemental 'metamaterial bytes' with effective material parameters that are different from the parameters of the metamaterial bits. We then apply this methodology to several design examples of optical elements, such as digital convex lenses, flat graded-index digital lenses, digital constructs for epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) supercoupling and digital hyperlenses, thus highlighting the power and simplicity of the methodology.

  7. A spectral optical flow method for determining velocities from digital imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlburt, Neal; Jaffey, Steve

    2015-12-01

    We present a method for determining surface flows from solar images based upon optical flow techniques. We apply the method to sets of images obtained by a variety of solar imagers to assess its performance. The opflow3d procedure is shown to extract accurate velocity estimates when provided perfect test data and quickly generates results consistent with completely distinct methods when applied on global scales. We also validate it in detail by comparing it to an established method when applied to high-resolution datasets and find that it provides comparable results without the need to tune, filter or otherwise preprocess the images before its application.

  8. Fast and Accurate Cell Tracking by a Novel Optical-Digital Hybrid Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Cisneros, M.; Aviña-Cervantes, J. G.; Pérez-Careta, E.; Ambriz-Colín, F.; Tinoco, Verónica; Ibarra-Manzano, O. G.; Plascencia-Mora, H.; Aguilera-Gómez, E.; Ibarra-Manzano, M. A.; Guzman-Cabrera, R.; Debeir, Olivier; Sánchez-Mondragón, J. J.

    2013-09-01

    An innovative methodology to detect and track cells using microscope images enhanced by optical cross-correlation techniques is proposed in this paper. In order to increase the tracking sensibility, image pre-processing has been implemented as a morphological operator on the microscope image. Results show that the pre-processing process allows for additional frames of cell tracking, therefore increasing its robustness. The proposed methodology can be used in analyzing different problems such as mitosis, cell collisions, and cell overlapping, ultimately designed to identify and treat illnesses and malignancies.

  9. Parallel Optical Control of Spatiotemporal Neuronal Spike Activity Using High-Speed Digital Light Processing

    PubMed Central

    Jerome, Jason; Foehring, Robert C.; Armstrong, William E.; Spain, William J.; Heck, Detlef H.

    2011-01-01

    Neurons in the mammalian neocortex receive inputs from and communicate back to thousands of other neurons, creating complex spatiotemporal activity patterns. The experimental investigation of these parallel dynamic interactions has been limited due to the technical challenges of monitoring or manipulating neuronal activity at that level of complexity. Here we describe a new massively parallel photostimulation system that can be used to control action potential firing in in vitro brain slices with high spatial and temporal resolution while performing extracellular or intracellular electrophysiological measurements. The system uses digital light processing technology to generate 2-dimensional (2D) stimulus patterns with >780,000 independently controlled photostimulation sites that operate at high spatial (5.4 μm) and temporal (>13 kHz) resolution. Light is projected through the quartz–glass bottom of the perfusion chamber providing access to a large area (2.76 mm × 2.07 mm) of the slice preparation. This system has the unique capability to induce temporally precise action potential firing in large groups of neurons distributed over a wide area covering several cortical columns. Parallel photostimulation opens up new opportunities for the in vitro experimental investigation of spatiotemporal neuronal interactions at a broad range of anatomical scales. PMID:21904526

  10. Crowdsourcing as a Screening Tool to Detect Clinical Features of Glaucomatous Optic Neuropathy from Digital Photography

    PubMed Central

    Mitry, Danny; Peto, Tunde; Hayat, Shabina; Blows, Peter; Morgan, James; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Foster, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Crowdsourcing is the process of simplifying and outsourcing numerous tasks to many untrained individuals. Our aim was to assess the performance and repeatability of crowdsourcing in the classification of normal and glaucomatous discs from optic disc images. Methods Optic disc images (N = 127) with pre-determined disease status were selected by consensus agreement from grading experts from a large cohort study. After reading brief illustrative instructions, we requested that knowledge workers (KWs) from a crowdsourcing platform (Amazon MTurk) classified each image as normal or abnormal. Each image was classified 20 times by different KWs. Two study designs were examined to assess the effect of varying KW experience and both study designs were conducted twice for consistency. Performance was assessed by comparing the sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results Overall, 2,540 classifications were received in under 24 hours at minimal cost. The sensitivity ranged between 83–88% across both trials and study designs, however the specificity was poor, ranging between 35–43%. In trial 1, the highest AUC (95%CI) was 0.64(0.62–0.66) and in trial 2 it was 0.63(0.61–0.65). There were no significant differences between study design or trials conducted. Conclusions Crowdsourcing represents a cost-effective method of image analysis which demonstrates good repeatability and a high sensitivity. Optimisation of variables such as reward schemes, mode of image presentation, expanded response options and incorporation of training modules should be examined to determine their effect on the accuracy and reliability of this technique in retinal image analysis. PMID:25692287

  11. THE X-RAY PROPERTIES OF THE OPTICALLY BRIGHTEST MINI-BAL QUASARS FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jianfeng; Brandt, W. N.; Comins, M. L.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Schneider, Donald P.; Gibson, Robert R.; Shemmer, Ohad

    2010-11-20

    We have compiled a sample of 14 of the optically brightest radio-quiet quasars (m{sub i} {<=} 17.5 and z {>=} 1.9) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 quasar catalog that have C IV mini-broad absorption lines (mini-BALs) present in their spectra. X-ray data for 12 of the objects were obtained via a Chandra snapshot survey using ACIS-S, while data for the other two quasars were obtained from archival XMM-Newton observations. Joint X-ray spectral analysis shows that the mini-BAL quasars have a similar average power-law photon index ({Gamma} {approx} 1.9) and level of intrinsic absorption (N{sub H} {approx}< 8 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}) as non-BMB (neither BAL nor mini-BAL) quasars. Mini-BAL quasars are more similar to non-BMB quasars than to BAL quasars in their distribution of relative X-ray brightness (assessed with {Delta}{alpha}{sub ox}). Relative colors indicate mild dust reddening in the optical spectra of mini-BAL quasars. Significant correlations between {Delta}{alpha}{sub ox} and UV absorption properties are confirmed for a sample of 56 sources combining mini-BAL and BAL quasars with high signal-to-noise ratio rest-frame UV spectra, which generally supports models in which X-ray absorption is important in enabling driving of the UV absorption-line wind. We also propose alternative parameterizations of the UV absorption properties of mini-BAL and BAL quasars, which may better describe the broad absorption troughs in some respects.

  12. Extracting Short Rise-Time Velocity Profiles with Digital Down-Shift Analysis of Optically Up-Converted PDV Data

    SciTech Connect

    Abel Diaz, Nathan Riley, Cenobio Gallegos, Matthew Teel, Michael Berninger, Thomas W. Tunnell

    2010-09-08

    This work describes the digital down-shift (DDS) technique, a new method of extracting short rise-time velocity profiles in the analysis of optically up-converted PDV data. The DDS technique manipulates the PDV data by subtracting a constant velocity (i.e., the DDS velocity νDDS) from the velocity profile. DDS exploits the simple fact that the optically up-converted data ride on top of a base velocity (ν0, the apparent velocity at no motion) with a rapid rise to a high velocity (νf) of a few km/s or more. Consequently, the frequency content of the signal must describe a velocity profile that increases from ν0 to ν0 + νf. The DDS technique produces velocity reversals in the processed data before shock breakout when ν0 < νDDS < ν0 + νf. The DDS analysis process strategically selects specific DDS velocities (velocity at which the user down shifts the data) that produce anomalous reversals (maxima and/or minima), which are predictable and easy to identify in the mid-range of the data. Additional analysis determines when these maxima and minima occur. By successive application of the DDS technique and iterative analysis, velocity profiles are extracted as time as a function of velocity rather than as a function of time as it would be in a conventional velocity profile. Presented results include a description of DDS, velocity profiles extracted from laser-driven shock data with rise times of 200 ps or less, and a comparison with other techniques.

  13. The ensemble optical variability of type-1 AGN in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallastegui-Aizpun, Unai; Sarajedini, Vicki L.

    2014-11-01

    We use a sample of over 5000 active galactic nuclei (AGN) with extended morphologies at z < 0.8 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to study the ensemble optical variability as a function of rest-frame time lag and AGN luminosity with the aim of investigating these parameter relationships at lower luminosities than previously studied. We compare photometry from imaging data with spectrophotometry obtained weeks to years later in the Sloan g, r, and i bands. We employ quasar and galaxy eigenspectra fitting to separate the AGN and host galaxy components. A strong correlation between the variability amplitude and rest-frame time lag is observed, in agreement with quasar structure functions but extending to AGN several magnitudes fainter than previously studied. The structure function slopes for our fainter AGN sample are slightly shallower than those found in quasars studies. An anticorrelation with luminosity is clearly detected, with lower luminosity AGN displaying greater variability amplitudes. We demonstrate for the first time that this anticorrelation extends to AGN as faint as MAGNi ˜ -18.5, with a slight trend towards shallower slopes at luminosities fainter than MAGNi ˜ -20.2.

  14. Optical diffraction tomography using a digital micromirror device for stable measurements of 4D refractive index tomography of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungwoo; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Taeho; Yoon, Jonghee; Hong, Kihyun; Park, Jinah; Park, YongKeun

    2016-03-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an interferometric microscopy technique capable of measuring 3-D refractive index (RI) distribution of transparent samples. Multiple 2-D holograms of a sample illuminated with various angles are measured, from which 3-D RI map of the sample is reconstructed via the diffraction theory. ODT has been proved as a powerful tool for the study of biological cells, due to its non-invasiveness, label-free and quantitative imaging capability. Recently, our group has demonstrated that a digital micromirror device (DMD) can be exploited for fast and precise control of illumination beams for ODT. In this work, we systematically study the precision and stability of the ODT system equipped with a DMD and present measurements of 3-D and 4-D RI maps of various types of live cells including human red blood cells, white blood cells, hepatocytes, and HeLa cells. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the effective visualization of 3-D RI maps of live cells utilizing the measured information about the values and gradient of RI tomograms.

  15. Visual appearance effect on modified reconstruction color images of optical Fourier transform hologram by means of digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Masayuki; Kariya, Makoto; Uehara, Shinobu; Nakashima, Yoshio; Takamatsu, Mamoru

    2003-05-01

    A blue white He-Cd laser composed of three R/G/B component beams in place of He-Ne laser is directly applied to fabricate the optical Fourier transform hologram (OFTH) using the red sensitive silver halide material (SO-253 film) for holography. As a result, the red beams play an important role as the coherent beams in the fabrication of OFTH. A green solid state laser is applied to fabricate the OFTH using the same film for holography. The visual appearance of reconstruted color images caused by He-Cd laser is discussed in contrast to that of an ordinary OFTH which can be made using the He-Ne laser and solid state laser. The visual color effect using the He-Cd laser is checked from the viewpoint of the relative real size and its place in the OFTH, and the visual depth sensation of overlapped ghost images called cross-talk in the Fresnel hologram. The purpose using a commercially available software such as HSL color model is to carry out the intuitive modification of overlapped and deteriorated color images in the digital reconstruction of OFTH and Fresnel hologram.

  16. Experimental demonstration of low-complexity fiber chromatic dispersion mitigation for reduced guard-interval OFDM coherent optical communication systems based on digital spectrum sub-band multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Malekiha, Mahdi; Tselniker, Igor; Nazarathy, Moshe; Tolmachev, Alex; Plant, David V

    2015-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel digital signal processing (DSP) structure for reduced guard-interval (RGI) OFDM coherent optical systems. The proposed concept is based on digitally slicing optical channel bandwidth into multiple spectrally disjoint sub-bands which are then processed in parallel. Each low bandwidth sub-band has a smaller delay-spread compared to a full-band signal. This enables compensation of both chromatic dispersion (CD) and polarization mode dispersion using a simple timing and one-tap-per-symbol frequency domain equalizer with a small cyclic prefix overhead. In terms of the DSP architecture, this allows for a highly efficient parallelization of DSP tasks performed over the received signal samples by deploying multiple processors running at a lower clock rate. It should be noted that this parallelization is performed in the frequency domain and it allows for flexible optical transceiver schemes. In addition, the resulting optical receiver is simplified due to the removal of the CD compensation equalizer compared to conventional RGI-OFDM systems. In this paper we experimentally demonstrate digital sub-banding of optical bandwidth. We test the system performance for different modulation formats (QPSK, 16QAM and 32QAM) over various transmission distances and optical launch powers using a 1.5% CP overhead in all scenarios. We also compare the proposed RGI-OFDM architecture performance against common single carrier modulation formats. At the same total data rate and signal bandwidth both systems have similar performance and transmission reach whereas the proposed method allows for a significant reduction of computational complexity due to removal of CD pre/post compensation equalizer.

  17. Experimental demonstration of low-complexity fiber chromatic dispersion mitigation for reduced guard-interval OFDM coherent optical communication systems based on digital spectrum sub-band multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Malekiha, Mahdi; Tselniker, Igor; Nazarathy, Moshe; Tolmachev, Alex; Plant, David V

    2015-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel digital signal processing (DSP) structure for reduced guard-interval (RGI) OFDM coherent optical systems. The proposed concept is based on digitally slicing optical channel bandwidth into multiple spectrally disjoint sub-bands which are then processed in parallel. Each low bandwidth sub-band has a smaller delay-spread compared to a full-band signal. This enables compensation of both chromatic dispersion (CD) and polarization mode dispersion using a simple timing and one-tap-per-symbol frequency domain equalizer with a small cyclic prefix overhead. In terms of the DSP architecture, this allows for a highly efficient parallelization of DSP tasks performed over the received signal samples by deploying multiple processors running at a lower clock rate. It should be noted that this parallelization is performed in the frequency domain and it allows for flexible optical transceiver schemes. In addition, the resulting optical receiver is simplified due to the removal of the CD compensation equalizer compared to conventional RGI-OFDM systems. In this paper we experimentally demonstrate digital sub-banding of optical bandwidth. We test the system performance for different modulation formats (QPSK, 16QAM and 32QAM) over various transmission distances and optical launch powers using a 1.5% CP overhead in all scenarios. We also compare the proposed RGI-OFDM architecture performance against common single carrier modulation formats. At the same total data rate and signal bandwidth both systems have similar performance and transmission reach whereas the proposed method allows for a significant reduction of computational complexity due to removal of CD pre/post compensation equalizer. PMID:26480077

  18. A biomimetic mass-flow transducer utilizing all-optofluidic generation of self-digitized, pulse code-modulated optical pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiwon; Paek, Jungwook; Kim, Jaeyoun

    2012-10-01

    We present a new mass-flow transducer producing responses in the form of optical pulse trains that are encoded with information on the strength and position of the stimulus. We implemented the self-digitization and encoding capabilities all-optofluidically, without involving external electronics, by integrating one optical fiber cantilever with multiple polymer optical waveguides on a microfluidic platform. The transducer can also be configured to respond only to transitional stimuli. These features closely mimic the rate-coding, action potential labeling, and rapid adaptation processes observed in biological mechanoreceptors and allow multiple transducers to transmit signals over a single, shared channel. We fabricated the transducer using polymer-based soft-lithography techniques. Its characterization confirmed the stimulus strength-dependent generation of optical pulses and the feasibility of multiplexing 2(n-1) to 2(n) transducers using n waveguides. PMID:22858863

  19. Automating quality assurance of digital linear accelerators using a radioluminescent phosphor coated phantom and optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Cesare H.; Naczynski, Dominik J.; Yu, Shu-Jung S.; Yang, Yong; Xing, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Performing mechanical and geometric quality assurance (QA) tests for medical linear accelerators (LINAC) is a predominantly manual process that consumes significant time and resources. In order to alleviate this burden this study proposes a novel strategy to automate the process of performing these tests. The autonomous QA system consists of three parts: (1) a customized phantom coated with radioluminescent material; (2) an optical imaging system capable of visualizing the incidence of the radiation beam, light field or lasers on the phantom; and (3) software to process the captured signals. The radioluminescent phantom, which enables visualization of the radiation beam on the same surface as the light field and lasers, is placed on the couch and imaged while a predefined treatment plan is delivered from the LINAC. The captured images are then processed to self-calibrate the system and perform measurements for evaluating light field/radiation coincidence, jaw position indicators, cross-hair centering, treatment couch position indicators and localizing laser alignment. System accuracy is probed by intentionally introducing errors and by comparing with current clinical methods. The accuracy of self-calibration is evaluated by examining measurement repeatability under fixed and variable phantom setups. The integrated system was able to automatically collect, analyze and report the results for the mechanical alignment tests specified by TG-142. The average difference between introduced and measured errors was 0.13 mm. The system was shown to be consistent with current techniques. Measurement variability increased slightly from 0.1 mm to 0.2 mm when the phantom setup was varied, but no significant difference in the mean measurement value was detected. Total measurement time was less than 10 minutes for all tests as a result of automation. The system’s unique features of a phosphor-coated phantom and fully automated, operator independent self-calibration offer the

  20. Automating quality assurance of digital linear accelerators using a radioluminescent phosphor coated phantom and optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Cesare H; Naczynski, Dominik J; Yu, Shu-Jung S; Yang, Yong; Xing, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Performing mechanical and geometric quality assurance (QA) tests for medical linear accelerators (LINAC) is a predominantly manual process that consumes significant time and resources. In order to alleviate this burden this study proposes a novel strategy to automate the process of performing these tests. The autonomous QA system consists of three parts: (1) a customized phantom coated with radioluminescent material; (2) an optical imaging system capable of visualizing the incidence of the radiation beam, light field or lasers on the phantom; and (3) software to process the captured signals. The radioluminescent phantom, which enables visualization of the radiation beam on the same surface as the light field and lasers, is placed on the couch and imaged while a predefined treatment plan is delivered from the LINAC. The captured images are then processed to self-calibrate the system and perform measurements for evaluating light field/radiation coincidence, jaw position indicators, cross-hair centering, treatment couch position indicators and localizing laser alignment. System accuracy is probed by intentionally introducing errors and by comparing with current clinical methods. The accuracy of self-calibration is evaluated by examining measurement repeatability under fixed and variable phantom setups. The integrated system was able to automatically collect, analyze and report the results for the mechanical alignment tests specified by TG-142. The average difference between introduced and measured errors was 0.13 mm. The system was shown to be consistent with current techniques. Measurement variability increased slightly from 0.1 mm to 0.2 mm when the phantom setup was varied, but no significant difference in the mean measurement value was detected. Total measurement time was less than 10 minutes for all tests as a result of automation. The system's unique features of a phosphor-coated phantom and fully automated, operator independent self-calibration offer the

  1. Automating quality assurance of digital linear accelerators using a radioluminescent phosphor coated phantom and optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Cesare H; Naczynski, Dominik J; Yu, Shu-Jung S; Yang, Yong; Xing, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Performing mechanical and geometric quality assurance (QA) tests for medical linear accelerators (LINAC) is a predominantly manual process that consumes significant time and resources. In order to alleviate this burden this study proposes a novel strategy to automate the process of performing these tests. The autonomous QA system consists of three parts: (1) a customized phantom coated with radioluminescent material; (2) an optical imaging system capable of visualizing the incidence of the radiation beam, light field or lasers on the phantom; and (3) software to process the captured signals. The radioluminescent phantom, which enables visualization of the radiation beam on the same surface as the light field and lasers, is placed on the couch and imaged while a predefined treatment plan is delivered from the LINAC. The captured images are then processed to self-calibrate the system and perform measurements for evaluating light field/radiation coincidence, jaw position indicators, cross-hair centering, treatment couch position indicators and localizing laser alignment. System accuracy is probed by intentionally introducing errors and by comparing with current clinical methods. The accuracy of self-calibration is evaluated by examining measurement repeatability under fixed and variable phantom setups. The integrated system was able to automatically collect, analyze and report the results for the mechanical alignment tests specified by TG-142. The average difference between introduced and measured errors was 0.13 mm. The system was shown to be consistent with current techniques. Measurement variability increased slightly from 0.1 mm to 0.2 mm when the phantom setup was varied, but no significant difference in the mean measurement value was detected. Total measurement time was less than 10 minutes for all tests as a result of automation. The system's unique features of a phosphor-coated phantom and fully automated, operator independent self-calibration offer the

  2. Recent advances in joint optical-digital design for optronics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burcklen, Marie-Anne; Diaz, Frédéric; Leprêtre, François; Lee, Mane-Si Laure; Delboulbé, Anne; Loiseaux, Brigitte; Millet, Philippe; Duhem, François; Lemonnier, Fabrice; Sauer, Hervé; Goudail, François

    2016-05-01

    Increasing the capture volume of visible cameras while maintaining high image resolutions, low power consumption and standard video-frame rate operation is of utmost importance for hand-free night vision goggles or embedded surveillance systems. Since such imaging systems require to operate at high aperture, their optical design has become more complex and critical. Therefore new design alternatives have to be considered. Among them, wavefront coding changes and desensitizes the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the lens by inserting a phase mask in the vicinity of the aperture stop. This smart filter is combined with an efficient image processing that ensures optimal image quality over a larger depth of field. In this paper recent advances are discussed concerning design and integration of a compact imaging system based on wavefront coding. We address the design, the integration and the characterization of a High Definition (HD) camera of large aperture (F/1.2) operating in the visible and near infrared spectral ranges, endowed with wavefront coding. Two types of phase masks (pyramidal and polynomial) have been jointly optimized with their deconvolution algorithm in order to meet the best performance along an increased range of focus distances and manufactured. Real time deconvolution processing is implemented on a Field Programmable Gate Array. It is shown that despite the high data throughput of an HD imaging chain, the level of power consumption is far below the initial specifications. We have characterized the performances with and without wavefront coding through MTF measurements and image quality assessments. A depth-of- field increase up to x2.5 has been demonstrated in accordance with the theoretical predictions.

  3. Technical note: Use of a digital and an optical Brix refractometer to estimate total solids in milk replacer solutions for calves.

    PubMed

    Floren, H K; Sischo, W M; Crudo, C; Moore, D A

    2016-09-01

    The Brix refractometer is used on dairy farms and calf ranches for colostrum quality (estimation of IgG concentration), estimation of serum IgG concentration in neonatal calves, and nonsalable milk evaluation of total solids for calf nutrition. Another potential use is to estimate the total solids concentrations of milk replacer mixes as an aid in monitoring feeding consistency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of Brix refractometers to estimate total solids in milk replacer solutions and evaluate different replacer mixes for osmolality. Five different milk replacer powders (2 milk replacers with 28% crude protein and 25% fat and 3 with 22% crude protein and 20% fat) were mixed to achieve total solids concentrations from approximately 5.5 to 18%, for a total of 90 different solutions. Readings from both digital and optical Brix refractometers were compared with total solids. The 2 types of refractometers' readings correlated well with one another. The digital and optical Brix readings were highly correlated with the total solids percentage. A value of 1.08 to 1.47 would need to be added to the Brix reading to estimate the total solids in the milk replacer mixes with the optical and digital refractometers, respectively. Osmolality was correlated with total solids percentage of the mixes, but the relationship was different depending on the type of milk replacer. The Brix refractometer can be beneficial in estimating total solids concentration in milk replacer mixes to help monitor milk replacer feeding consistency. PMID:27394945

  4. Technical note: Use of a digital and an optical Brix refractometer to estimate total solids in milk replacer solutions for calves.

    PubMed

    Floren, H K; Sischo, W M; Crudo, C; Moore, D A

    2016-09-01

    The Brix refractometer is used on dairy farms and calf ranches for colostrum quality (estimation of IgG concentration), estimation of serum IgG concentration in neonatal calves, and nonsalable milk evaluation of total solids for calf nutrition. Another potential use is to estimate the total solids concentrations of milk replacer mixes as an aid in monitoring feeding consistency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of Brix refractometers to estimate total solids in milk replacer solutions and evaluate different replacer mixes for osmolality. Five different milk replacer powders (2 milk replacers with 28% crude protein and 25% fat and 3 with 22% crude protein and 20% fat) were mixed to achieve total solids concentrations from approximately 5.5 to 18%, for a total of 90 different solutions. Readings from both digital and optical Brix refractometers were compared with total solids. The 2 types of refractometers' readings correlated well with one another. The digital and optical Brix readings were highly correlated with the total solids percentage. A value of 1.08 to 1.47 would need to be added to the Brix reading to estimate the total solids in the milk replacer mixes with the optical and digital refractometers, respectively. Osmolality was correlated with total solids percentage of the mixes, but the relationship was different depending on the type of milk replacer. The Brix refractometer can be beneficial in estimating total solids concentration in milk replacer mixes to help monitor milk replacer feeding consistency.

  5. Design challenges of EO polymer based leaky waveguide deflector for 40 Gs/s all-optical analog-to-digital converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjloum, Massinissa; El Gibari, Mohammed; Li, Hongwu; Daryoush, Afshin S.

    2016-08-01

    Design challenges and performance optimization of an all-optical analog-to-digital converter (AOADC) is presented here. The paper addresses both microwave and optical design of a leaky waveguide optical deflector using electro-optic (E-O) polymer. The optical deflector converts magnitude variation of the applied RF voltage into variation of deflection angle out of a leaky waveguide optical beam using the linear E-O effect (Pockels effect) as part of the E-O polymer based optical waveguide. This variation of deflection angle as result of the applied RF signal is then quantized using optical windows followed by an array of high-speed photodetectors. We optimized the leakage coefficient of the leaky waveguide and its physical length to achieve the best trade-off between bandwidth and the deflected optical beam resolution, by improving the phase velocity matching between lightwave and microwave on one hand and using pre-emphasis technique to compensate for the RF signal attenuation on the other hand. In addition, for ease of access from both optical and RF perspective, a via-hole less broad bandwidth transition is designed between coplanar pads and coupled microstrip (CPW-CMS) driving electrodes. With the best reported E-O coefficient of 350 pm/V, the designed E-O deflector should allow an AOADC operating over 44 giga-samples-per-seconds with an estimated effective resolution of 6.5 bits on RF signals with Nyquist bandwidth of 22 GHz. The overall DC power consumption of all components used in this AOADC is of order of 4 W and is dominated by power consumption in the power amplifier to generate a 20 V RF voltage in 50 Ohm system. A higher sampling rate can be achieved at similar bits of resolution by interleaving a number of this elementary AOADC at the expense of a higher power consumption.

  6. Implementation of a digital optical phase conjugation system and its application to study the robustness of turbidity suppression by phase conjugation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Meng; Yang, Changhuei

    2010-02-15

    In this work, we report a novel high capacity (number of degrees of freedom) open loop adaptive optics method, termed digital optical phase conjugation (DOPC), which provides a robust optoelectronic optical phase conjugation (OPC) solution. We showed that our prototype can phase conjugate light fields with approximately 3.9 x 10(-3) degree accuracy over a range of approximately 3 degrees and can phase conjugate an input field through a relatively thick turbid medium (micro(s)l approximately 13). Furthermore, we employed this system to show that the reversing of random scattering in turbid media by phase conjugation is surprisingly robust and accommodating of phase errors. An OPC wavefront with significant spatial phase errors (error uniformly distributed from - pi/2 to pi/2) can nevertheless allow OPC reconstruction through a scattering medium with approximately 40% of the efficiency achieved with phase error free OPC.

  7. An application of the grazing-angle incidence hard x-ray optical nanoscope in ultra-high density digital data read-out device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezirganyan, Hakob P.; Bezirganyan, Siranush E.; Bezirganyan, Petros H., Jr.; Bezirganyan, Hayk H., Jr.

    2008-08-01

    We present in this theoretical paper a set-up of grazing-angle incidence hard x-ray nanoscope (GIXN), which is the essential part of ultra-high density digital data read-out device. The GIXN consists of the asymmetrically cut single crystal, which is operating like an image magnifier. The X-ray high-resolution diffractive optical lens (zone plate) and spatially resolving detector (CCD camera) are arranged like in classical schemes of the X-ray imaging microscopy. Proposed nanoscope operates based on grazing-angle incidence x-ray backscattering diffraction (GIXB) technique applied in the specular beam suppression mode. Grazing-angle incident X-ray configuration allows the handling of data from very large surface area of the X-ray optical memory disk (X-ROM) and, consequently, the data read-out speed is much faster than in optical data read-out systems.

  8. A proposal for digital electro-optic switches with free-carrier dispersion effect and Goos-Hanchen shift in silicon-on-insulator waveguide corner mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, DeGui

    2013-09-01

    In a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide corner mirror (WCM) structure, with the quantum process of a frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR) phenomenon and the time delay principle in the two-dimensional potential barrier tunneling process of a mass of particles, we derive an accurate physical model for the Goos-Hanchen (GH) shift of optical guided-mode in the FTIR process, and in principle match the GH shift jumping states with the independent guided-modes. Then, we propose and demonstrate a new regime of 1 × N digital optical switches with a matching state between the free-carrier dispersion (FCD) based refractive index modulation (RIM) of silicon to create a GH shift jumping function of a photonic signal at the reflecting interface and the independent guided-modes in the FTIR process, where a MOS-capacitor type electro-optic modulation regime is proposed and discussed to realize an effective FCD-based RIM. At the critical matching state, i.e., the incident of an optical beam is at the vicinity of Brewster angle in the WCM, a mini-change of refractive index of waveguide material can cause a great jump of GH shift along the FTIR reflecting interface, and further a 1 × N digital optical switching process could be realized. For a 350-500 nm single-mode rib waveguide made on the 220 nm CMOS-compatible SOI substrate and with the FCD effect based RIM of silicon crystal, a concentration variation of 1018-1019 cm-3 has caused a 0.5-2.5 μm GH shift of reflected beam, which is at 2-5 times of a mode-size and hence radically convinces an optical switching function with a 1 × 3-1 × 10 scale.

  9. Mechanical stress measurement by an achromatic optical digital speckle pattern interferometry strain sensor with radial in-plane sensitivity: experimental comparison with electrical strain gauges.

    PubMed

    Viotti, Matias R; Albertazzi G, Armando; Kapp, Walter A

    2011-03-01

    This paper shows the optical setup of a radial in-plane digital speckle pattern interferometer which uses an axis-symmetrical diffractive optical element (DOE) to obtain double illumination. The application of the DOE gives in-plane sensitivity which only depends on the grating period of the DOE instead of the wavelength of the laser used as illumination source. A compact optical layout was built in order to have a portable optical strain sensor with a circular measurement area of about 5 mm in diameter. In order to compare its performance with electrical strain sensors (strain gauges), mechanical loading was generated by a four-point bending device and simultaneously monitored by the optical strain sensor and by two-element strain gauge rosettes. Several mechanical stress levels were measured showing a good agreement between both sensors. Results showed that the optical sensor could measure applied mechanical strains with a mean uncertainty of about 5% and 4% for the maximum and minimum principal strains, respectively. PMID:21364725

  10. Digital Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    System One, a digital radiography system, incorporates a reusable image medium (RIM) which retains an image. No film is needed; the RIM is read with a laser scanner, and the information is used to produce a digital image on an image processor. The image is stored on an optical disc. System allows the radiologist to "dial away" unwanted images to compare views on three screens. It is compatible with existing equipment and cost efficient. It was commercialized by a Stanford researcher from energy selective technology developed under a NASA grant.

  11. Five-bit parallel operation of optical quantization and coding for photonic analog-to-digital conversion.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Koji; Matsui, Hideki; Satoh, Takema; Itoh, Kazuyoshi

    2011-08-15

    We report the attempt of optical quantization and coding in 5-bit parallel format for photonic A/D conversion. The proposed system is designed to realize generation of 32 different optical codes in proportion to the corresponding signal levels when fed a certain range of amplitude-varied input pulses to the setup. Optical coding in a bit-parallel format made it possible, that provides 5 bit optical codes from 32 optical quantized pulses. The 5-bit parallel operation of an optical quantization and coding module with 5 multi-ports was tested in our experimental setup.

  12. Fiber-optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensor with <50 pm displacement resolution using three-wavelength digital phase demodulation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M; Werther, B; Fuerstenau, N; Matthias, M; Melz, T

    2001-04-01

    A fiber-optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensor (EFPI-S) of ls = 2.5 cm sensor length using three-wavelength digital phase demodulation is demonstrated to exhibit <50 pm displacement resolution (<2nm/m strain resolution) when measuring the cross expansion of a PZT-ceramic plate. The sensing (single-mode downlead-) and reflecting fibers are fused into a 150/360 microm capillary fiber where the fusion points define the sensor length. Readout is performed using an improved version of the previously described three-wavelength digital phase demodulation method employing an arctan-phase stepping algorithm. In the resent experiments the strain sensitivity was varied via the mapping of the arctan - lookup table to the 16-Bit DA-converter range from 188.25 k /V (6 Volt range 1130 k ) to 11.7 k /Volt (range 70 k ).

  13. Successive approximation-like 4-bit full-optical analog-to-digital converter based on Kerr-like nonlinear photonic crystal ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavousi, Alireza; Mansouri-Birjandi, Mohammad Ali; Saffari, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Implementing of photonic sampling and quantizing analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) enable us to extract a single binary word from optical signals without need for extra electronic assisting parts. This would enormously increase the sampling and quantizing time as well as decreasing the consumed power. To this end, based on the concept of successive approximation method, a 4-bit full-optical ADC that operates using the intensity-dependent Kerr-like nonlinearity in a two dimensional photonic crystal (2DPhC) platform is proposed. The Silicon (Si) nanocrystal is chosen because of the suitable nonlinear material characteristic. An optical limiter is used for the clamping and quantization of each successive levels that represent the ADC bits. In the proposal, an energy efficient optical ADC circuit is implemented by controlling the system parameters such as ring-to-waveguide coupling coefficients, the ring's nonlinear refractive index, and the ring's length. The performance of the ADC structure is verified by the simulation using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method.

  14. Candidate isolated neutron stars and other optically blank x-ray fields identified from the rosat all-sky and sloan digital sky surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Agueros, Marcel A.; Anderson, Scott F.; Margon, Bruce; Haberl, Frank; Voges, Wolfgang; Annis, James; Schneider, Donald P.; Brinkmann, Jonathan; /Apache Point Observ.

    2005-11-01

    Only seven radio-quiet isolated neutron stars (INSs) emitting thermal X rays are known, a sample that has yet to definitively address such fundamental issues as the equation of state of degenerate neutron matter. We describe a selection algorithm based on a cross-correlation of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that identifies X-ray error circles devoid of plausible optical counterparts to the SDSS g {approx} 22 magnitudes limit. We quantitatively characterize these error circles as optically blank; they may host INSs or other similarly exotic X-ray sources such as radio-quiet BL Lacs, obscured AGN, etc. Our search is an order of magnitude more selective than previous searches for optically blank RASS error circles, and excludes the 99.9% of error circles that contain more common X-ray-emitting subclasses. We find 11 candidates, nine of which are new. While our search is designed to find the best INS candidates and not to produce a complete list of INSs in the RASS, it is reassuring that our number of candidates is consistent with predictions from INS population models. Further X-ray observations will obtain pinpoint positions and determine whether these sources are entirely optically blank at g {approx} 22, supporting the presence of likely isolated neutron stars and perhaps enabling detailed follow-up studies of neutron star physics.

  15. Performance evaluation of a digital intraoral imaging device based on the CMOS photosensor array coupled with an integrated X-ray conversion fiber-optic faceplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyosung; Choi, Sungil; Kim, Jongguk; Koo, Yangseo; Kim, Taewoo; Ro, Changjoon; Lee, Bongsoo; Kim, Sin; Kim, Hokyung

    2007-08-01

    As a continuation of our digital X-ray imaging sensor R&D, we have developed a cost-effective, intraoral imaging device based on the complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) photosensor array coupled with an integrated X-ray conversion fiber-optic faceplate. It consists of a commercially available CMOS photosensor of a 35×35 μm 2 pixel size and a 688×910 pixel array dimension, and a high-efficiency columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator of a 90 μm thickness directly deposited on a fiber-optic faceplate of a 6 μm core size and an 1.46 mm thickness with 85/15 core-cladding ratio (NA˜1.0 in air). The fiber-optic faceplate is a highly X-ray attenuating material that minimizes X-ray absorption on the end CMOS photosensor array, thus, minimizing X-ray induced noise at the photosensor array. It uses a high light-output columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator with a peak spectral emission at 545 nm, giving better spatial resolution, but attenuates some of this light due to interfacial and optical attenuation factors. In this paper, we presented the performance analysis of the intraoral imaging device with experimental measurements and acquired X-ray images in terms of modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE).

  16. Videodisc and Optical Digital Disk Technologies and Their Applications in Libraries. A Report to the Council on Library Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Systems Consultants, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This report examines the potential impact of optical media--videodiscs, compact audio discs, and optical disks, tapes, and cards--in library related applications. A detailed consideration of the technology includes discussion of the underlying principles, the various forms in which the technology is marketed, production methods and costs, and the…

  17. ISDN: The Digital Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piedmo, Greg

    1995-01-01

    Integrated services digital network (ISDN) is a dial-up digital transmission service supporting transmission of audio, video, and text data over standard copper telephone wires or fiber optic cables. Advantages of ISDN over analog transmission include the ability of one phone line to support up to three simultaneous, separate conversations (phone,…

  18. Speckle reduction by combination of digital filter and optical suppression in a modified Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm computer-generated hologram.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Yue; Deng, Qing-Long; Wu, Pei-Jung; Lin, Bor-Shyh; Chang, Hsuan T; Hwang, Hone-Ene; Huang, Guan-Syun

    2014-09-20

    A speckleless illuminated modified-Gerchberg-Saxton-algorithm-type computer-generated hologram, which adopts a lower frequency of the iterative algorithm and calculation time, is proposed to code a hologram with two signals and position a multiplexing phase-only function, which can reconstruct the left and the right viewing holograms on the pupillary-distance position after the decryption and still maintain the content with high contrast and definition. The reconstructed image quality presents root mean square error of 0.03, with a diffraction efficiency of 87%, and signal-to-noise ratio of 8 dB after the analysis. Furthermore, two denoising techniques for the digital filter and optical suppression are combined, in which the speckle suppression with pseudorandom phase modulation and a rotating diffuser are utilized for successfully reducing the speckle contrast, which was reduced to below 4%. The goal was to reduce visual fatigue for the viewers.

  19. Efficiency analysis on platform over the top (OTT) to deploy content and applications (edutainment) in digital television on optical network link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puche, William S.; Sierra, Javier E.; Moreno, Gustavo A.

    2014-08-01

    The convergence of new technologies in the digital world has made devices with internet connectivity such as televisions, smatphone, Tablet, Blu-ray, game consoles, among others, to increase more and more. Therefore the major research centers are in the task of improving the network performance to mitigate the bottle neck phenomenon regarding capacity and high transmission rates in information and data. The implementation of standard HbbTV (Hybrid Broadcast Broadband TV), and technological platforms OTT (Over the Top), capable of distributing video, audio, TV, and other Internet services via devices connected directly to the cloud. Therefore a model to improve the transmission capacity required by content distribution networks (CDN) for online TV, with high-capacity optical networks is proposed.

  20. Numerical Investigation on Performance of In-Building Plastic Optical Fiber Transmission Systems and Role of Digital Television Broadcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matera, Francesco; Tiano, Stefania; Settembre, Marina

    2012-07-01

    This article reports a numerical investigation on the transmission performance of multilevel systems operating in building links encompassing step-index plastic optical fibers. For such an aim, a simplified model for the multimode fiber propagation is introduced. A sub-carrier multiplexing technique is also simulated to demonstrate the distribution of broadcasting television channels by adopting such fibers. The reported results show that a unique building network based on step-index plastic optical fibers is suitable to carry both Ethernet and broadcast TV signals in all rooms.

  1. Development of a strain analyzer system for sheet metal stamped parts based on an optical 3D digitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carasusan, Eusebio; Canal, Fernando

    2003-05-01

    In this paper a new automatic strain analyzer system for sheet metal stamped parts is presented. This device is based on an optic 3D scanner working with structure white light, that performs measurements with high speed and accuracy. This new device can be a very useful tool in manufacturing industry.

  2. Investigation on cytoskeleton dynamics for no-adherent cells subjected to point-like stimuli by digital holographic microscopy and holographic optical trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccio, Lisa; Merola, Francesco; Memmolo, Pasquale; Mugnano, Martina; Fusco, Sabato; Netti, Paolo A.; Ferraro, Pietro

    2014-05-01

    Guiding, controlling and studying cellular functions are challenging themes in the biomedical field, as they are fundamental prerequisites for new therapeutic strategies from tissue regeneration to controlled drug delivery. In recent years, multidisciplinary studies in nanotechnology offer new tools to investigate important biophysical phenomena in response to the local physical characteristics of the extracellular environment, some examples are the mechanisms of cell adhesion, migration, communication and differentiation. Indeed for reproducing the features of the extracellular matrix in vitro, it is essential to develop active devices that evoke as much as possible the natural cellular environment. Our investigation is in the framework of studying and clarifying the biophysical mechanisms of the interaction between cells and the microenvironment in which they exist. We implement an optical tweezers setup to investigate cell material interaction and we use Digital Holography as non-invasive imaging technique in microscopy. We exploit Holographic Optical Tweezers arrangement in order to trap and manage functionalized micrometric latex beads to induce mechanical deformation in suspended cells. A lot of papers in literature examine the dynamics of the cytoskeleton when cells adhere on substrates and nowadays well established cell models are based on such research activities. Actually, the natural cell environment is made of a complex extracellular matrix and the single cell behavior is due to intricate interactions with the environment and are strongly correlated to the cell-cell interactions. Our investigation is devoted to understand the inner cell mechanism when it is mechanically stressed by point-like stimulus without the substrate influence.

  3. Real-time optical wireless transmissions of digital TV signals using white InGaN LEDs grown with an asymmetric quantum barrier.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Lung; Chen, Yen-Jen

    2015-10-19

    The feasibility of using InGaN LEDs grown with asymmetric barrier layer (ABL) as transmitters in visible light communications is investigated experimentally. Compared with normal LEDs, the improvement in the spontaneous emission rate due to enhanced carrier localization and better uniformity of carrier distribution in ABL-containing MQWs leads to the fabricated LEDs can exhibit a 32.6% (@ 350 mA) increase in emission intensity and a 10.5% increase in modulation bandwidth. After eliminating the slow-responding phosphorescent components emitting from the phosphor-converted white LEDs, an open eye-diagram at 180 Mb/s is demonstrated over a distance of 100 cm in directed line-of-sight optical links. With the use of proposed LEDs, real-time transmissions of digital TV signals over a moderate distance (~100 cm) in free space is shown to be available in a 150 Mbit/s white LED-based optical link with conventional on-off keying modulation. PMID:26480463

  4. Strip silicon waveguide for code synchronization in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion based on a lumped time-delay compensation scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Li; Zhi-Guo, Shi; Zhe, Kang; Chong-Xiu, Yu; Jian-Ping, Wang

    2016-04-01

    An all-optical analog-to-digital converter (ADC) based on the nonlinear effect in a silicon waveguide is a promising candidate for overcoming the limitation of electronic devices and is suitable for photonic integration. In this paper, a lumped time-delay compensation scheme with 2-bit quantization resolution is proposed. A strip silicon waveguide is designed and used to compensate for the entire time-delays of the optical pulses after a soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) module within a wavelength range of 1550 nm–1580 nm. A dispersion coefficient as high as –19800 ps/(km·nm) with ±0.5 ps/(km·nm) variation is predicted for the strip waveguide. The simulation results show that the maximum supportable sampling rate (MSSR) is 50.45 GSa/s with full width at half maximum (FWHM) variation less than 2.52 ps, along with the 2-bit effective-number-of-bit and Gray code output. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. FRF-TP-15-030A1) and China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2015M580978).

  5. Parallel-mode scanning optical sectioning using digital Fresnel holography with three-wave interference phase-shifting.

    PubMed

    Kelner, Roy; Rosen, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    The Fresnel incoherent correlation holography (FINCH) method is applicable to various techniques of imaging, including fluorescence microscopy. Recently, a FINCH configuration capable of optical sectioning, using a scanning phase pinhole, has been suggested [Optica 1, 70 (2014)]. This capability is highly important in situations that demand the suppression of out-of-focus information from the hologram reconstruction of a specific plane of interest, such as the imaging of thick samples in biology. In this study, parallel-mode scanning using multiple phase pinholes is suggested as a means to shorten the acquisition time in an optical sectioning FINCH configuration. The parallel-mode scanning is enabled through a phase-shifting procedure that extracts the mixed term of two out of three interfering beams.

  6. Interface and post-processing requirements to insert an acousto-optic range-Doppler processor into an advanced radar digital signal processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrett, Rodney A.; Dean, R.; McCarthy, Daniel F.; Viveiros, Edward A.; Caraway, Willie

    1995-06-01

    The interfacing and post-processing requirements for the development and insertion of an acousto-optic (AO), range-Doppler processor will be described. This system has been configured to operate as an integral part of the signal processing chain of an advanced spread- spectrum radar developed by the US Army Missile Command (MICOM). This MICOM radar transmits a continuous repeated, biphase-coded waveform and processes a block of received data to detect and track targets i range and Doppler in the presence of severe ground clutter. Multiple code rates are processed to extend the range window through application of residue number techniques. Range and Doppler processing are achieved in the AO processor using an additive triple-product processor architecture that coherently detects the range-Doppler information on a high-speed, custom 3D CCD detector array developed by the Army Research Laboratory. We present the interfaces to the radar and the post-processing of the data produced by the AO range-Doppler processor into the format required by the MICOM signal processor. The interfaces comprise the extraction of digital in-phase and quadrature data, the condition of this data for the AO range-Doppler processor, and the insertion of the post- processed optical data into the radar signal processor. Timing and latency issues are critical to real-time operation (creating range-Doppler images at approximately 1600 Hz frames rates) within the MICOM radar. The post-processing section cover optical processor architecture/post-processing tradeoffs, focusing on requirements, algorithms, and hardware implementation.

  7. Measurement of temperature and temperature distribution in gaseous flames by digital speckle pattern shearing interferometry using holographic optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Shakher, Chandra

    2015-10-01

    Digital speckle pattern lateral shear interferometry (DSPSI) based on volume phase holographic grating for the measurement of temperature and temperature distribution in candle flames is presented. The DSPSI setup uses the volume phase holographic grating combined with ground glass to shear the wavefronts. The shear of the two wavefronts is controlled by the distance between volume phase holographic grating and the ground glass. The sheared wavefronts on the ground glass are imaged onto the CMOS detector by an imaging lens. Two specklegrams are recorded corresponding to the absence of the flame and the presence of the flame. The fringe pattern is observed by subtracting these two specklegrams. A single fringe pattern was used to extract phase by the application of Riesz transform and the monogenic signal. The measured values of the temperature of the candle flame by DSPSI is compared with that of R-type Platinum-Platinum Rhodium thermocouple and the results are well within experimental limits.

  8. MULTI-CORE AND OPTICAL PROCESSOR RELATED APPLICATIONS RESEARCH AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Barhen, Jacob; Kerekes, Ryan A; ST Charles, Jesse Lee; Buckner, Mark A

    2008-01-01

    High-speed parallelization of common tasks holds great promise as a low-risk approach to achieving the significant increases in signal processing and computational performance required for next generation innovations in reconfigurable radio systems. Researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been working on exploiting the parallelization offered by this emerging technology and applying it to a variety of problems. This paper will highlight recent experience with four different parallel processors applied to signal processing tasks that are directly relevant to signal processing required for SDR/CR waveforms. The first is the EnLight Optical Core Processor applied to matched filter (MF) correlation processing via fast Fourier transform (FFT) of broadband Dopplersensitive waveforms (DSW) using active sonar arrays for target tracking. The second is the IBM CELL Broadband Engine applied to 2-D discrete Fourier transform (DFT) kernel for image processing and frequency domain processing. And the third is the NVIDIA graphical processor applied to document feature clustering. EnLight Optical Core Processor. Optical processing is inherently capable of high-parallelism that can be translated to very high performance, low power dissipation computing. The EnLight 256 is a small form factor signal processing chip (5x5 cm2) with a digital optical core that is being developed by an Israeli startup company. As part of its evaluation of foreign technology, ORNL's Center for Engineering Science Advanced Research (CESAR) had access to a precursor EnLight 64 Alpha hardware for a preliminary assessment of capabilities in terms of large Fourier transforms for matched filter banks and on applications related to Doppler-sensitive waveforms. This processor is optimized for array operations, which it performs in fixed-point arithmetic at the rate of 16 TeraOPS at 8-bit precision. This is approximately 1000 times faster than the fastest DSP available today. The optical core

  9. Resolution upgrade toward 6-bit optical quantization using power-to-wavelength conversion for photonic analog-to-digital conversion.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Koji; Matsui, Hideki; Nagashima, Tomotaka; Konishi, Tsuyoshi

    2013-11-15

    We demonstrate a resolution upgrade toward 6 bit optical quantization using a power-to-wavelength conversion without an increment of system parallelism. Expansion of a full-scale input range is employed in conjunction with reduction of a quantization step size with keeping a sampling-rate transparency characteristic over several 100 sGS/s. The effective number of bits is estimated to 5.74 bit, and the integral nonlinearity error and differential nonlinearity error are estimated to less than 1 least significant bit.

  10. Galaxy pairs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - III. Evidence of induced star formation from optical colours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, David R.; Ellison, Sara L.; Simard, Luc; McConnachie, Alan W.; Mendel, J. Trevor

    2011-03-01

    We have assembled a large, high-quality catalogue of galaxy colours from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 and have identified 21 347 galaxies in pairs spanning a range of projected separations (rp < 80 h-170 kpc), relative velocities (Δv < 10 000 km s-1, which includes projected pairs that are essential for quality control) and stellar mass ratios (from 1:10 to 10:1). We find that the red fraction of galaxies in pairs is higher than that of a control sample matched in stellar mass and redshift, and demonstrate that this difference is likely due to the fact that galaxy pairs reside in higher density environments than non-paired galaxies. We detect clear signs of interaction-induced star formation within the blue galaxies in pairs, as evidenced by a higher fraction of extremely blue galaxies, along with blueward offsets between the colours of paired versus control galaxies. These signs are strongest in close pairs (rp < 30 h-170 kpc and Δv < 200 km s-1), diminish for more widely separated pairs (rp > 60 h-170 kpc and Δv < 200 km s-1) and disappear for close projected pairs (rp < 30 h-170 kpc and Δv > 3000 km s-1). These effects are also stronger in central (fibre) colours than in global colours and are found primarily in low- to medium-density environments. Conversely, no such trends are seen in red galaxies, apart from a small reddening at small separations, which may result from residual errors with photometry in crowded fields. When interpreted in conjunction with a simple model of induced starbursts, these results are consistent with a scenario in which close pericentre passages trigger induced star formation in the centres of galaxies which are sufficiently gas rich, after which time the galaxies gradually redden as they separate and their starbursts age.

  11. 3D mechanical analysis of aeronautical plain bearings: Validation of a finite element model from measurement of displacement fields by digital volume correlation and optical scanning tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaneau, A.; Peyruseigt, F.; Mistou, S.; Doumalin, P.; Dupré, J.-C.

    2010-06-01

    On Airbus aircraft, spherical plain bearings are used on many components; in particular to link engine to pylon or pylon to wing. Design of bearings is based on contact pressure distribution on spherical surfaces. To determine this distribution, a 3D analysis of the mechanical behaviour of aeronautical plain bearing is presented in this paper. A numerical model has been built and validated from a comparison with 3D experimental measurements of kinematic components. For that, digital volume correlation (DVC) coupled with optical scanning tomography (OST) is employed to study the mechanical response of a plain bearing model made in epoxy resin. Experimental results have been compared with the ones obtained from the simulated model. This comparison enables us to study the influence of various boundary conditions to build the FE model. Some factors have been highlighted like the fitting behaviour which can radically change contact pressure distribution. This work shows the contribution of a representative mechanical environment to study precisely mechanical response of aeronautical plain bearings.

  12. Loop gain stabilizing with an all-digital automatic-gain-control method for high-precision fiber-optic gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue; Zhang, Chunxi; Li, Lijing; Song, Lailiang; Chen, Wen

    2016-06-10

    For a fiber-optic gyroscope (FOG) using electronic dithers to suppress the dead zone, without a fixed loop gain, the deterministic compensation for the dither signals in the control loop of the FOG cannot remain accurate, resulting in the dither residuals in the FOG rotation rate output and the navigation errors in the inertial navigation system. An all-digital automatic-gain-control method for stabilizing the loop gain of the FOG is proposed. By using a perturbation square wave to measure the loop gain of the FOG and adding an automatic gain control loop in the conventional control loop of the FOG, we successfully obtain the actual loop gain and make the loop gain converge to the reference value. The experimental results show that in the case of 20% variation in the loop gain, the dither residuals are successfully eliminated and the standard deviation of the FOG sampling outputs is decreased from 2.00  deg/h to 0.62  deg/h (sampling period 2.5 ms, 10 points smoothing). With this method, the loop gain of the FOG can be stabilized over the operation temperature range and in the long-time application, which provides a solid foundation for the engineering applications of the high-precision FOG.

  13. Loop gain stabilizing with an all-digital automatic-gain-control method for high-precision fiber-optic gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue; Zhang, Chunxi; Li, Lijing; Song, Lailiang; Chen, Wen

    2016-06-10

    For a fiber-optic gyroscope (FOG) using electronic dithers to suppress the dead zone, without a fixed loop gain, the deterministic compensation for the dither signals in the control loop of the FOG cannot remain accurate, resulting in the dither residuals in the FOG rotation rate output and the navigation errors in the inertial navigation system. An all-digital automatic-gain-control method for stabilizing the loop gain of the FOG is proposed. By using a perturbation square wave to measure the loop gain of the FOG and adding an automatic gain control loop in the conventional control loop of the FOG, we successfully obtain the actual loop gain and make the loop gain converge to the reference value. The experimental results show that in the case of 20% variation in the loop gain, the dither residuals are successfully eliminated and the standard deviation of the FOG sampling outputs is decreased from 2.00  deg/h to 0.62  deg/h (sampling period 2.5 ms, 10 points smoothing). With this method, the loop gain of the FOG can be stabilized over the operation temperature range and in the long-time application, which provides a solid foundation for the engineering applications of the high-precision FOG. PMID:27409016

  14. Optical Evaluation of Digital Micromirror Devices (DMDs) with UV-Grade Fused Silica, Sapphire, and Magnesium Fluoride Windows and Longterm Reflectance of Bare Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Travinsky, Anton; Vorobiev, Dmitry; Ninkov, Zoran; Raisanen, Alan; Robberto, Massimo; Heap, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Digital micromirror devices (DMDs) are commercial micro-electromechanical systems, consisting of millions of mirrors which can be individually addressed and tilted into one of two states (+/-12deg). These devices were developed to create binary patterns in video projectors, in the visible range. Commercially available DMDs are hermetically sealed and extremely reliable. Recently, DMDs have been identified as an alternative to microshutter arrays for space-based multi-object spectrometers (MOS). Specifically, the MOS at the heart of the proposed Galactic Evolution Spectroscopic Explorer (GESE) uses the DMD as a reprogrammable slit mask. Unfortunately, the protective borosilicate windows limit the use of DMDs in the UV and IR regimes, where the glass has insufficient throughput. In this work, we present our efforts to replace standard DMD windows with custom windows made from UV-grade fused silica, low-absorption optical sapphire (LAOS) and magnesium fluoride (MgF2). We present transmission measurements of the antireflection coated windows and the reflectance of bare (window removed) DMDs. Furthermore, we investigated the long-term stability of the DMD reflectance and experiments for coating DMD active area with a layer of pure aluminum (Al) to boost reflectance performance in the UV spectral range (200-400 nm).

  15. Simultaneous optical recording in multiple cells by digital holographic microscopy of chloride current associated to activation of the ligand-gated chloride channel GABA(A) receptor.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Pascal; Boss, Daniel; Rappaz, Benjamin; Moratal, Corinne; Hernandez, Maria-Clemencia; Depeursinge, Christian; Magistretti, Pierre Julius; Marquet, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Chloride channels represent a group of targets for major clinical indications. However, molecular screening for chloride channel modulators has proven to be difficult and time-consuming as approaches essentially rely on the use of fluorescent dyes or invasive patch-clamp techniques which do not lend themselves to the screening of large sets of compounds. To address this problem, we have developed a non-invasive optical method, based on digital holographic microcopy (DHM), allowing monitoring of ion channel activity without using any electrode or fluorescent dye. To illustrate this approach, GABA(A) mediated chloride currents have been monitored with DHM. Practically, we show that DHM can non-invasively provide the quantitative determination of transmembrane chloride fluxes mediated by the activation of chloride channels associated with GABA(A) receptors. Indeed through an original algorithm, chloride currents elicited by application of appropriate agonists of the GABA(A) receptor can be derived from the quantitative phase signal recorded with DHM. Finally, chloride currents can be determined and pharmacologically characterized non-invasively simultaneously on a large cellular sampling by DHM.

  16. Application of ground-penetrating radar, digital optical borehole images, and cores for characterization of porosity hydraulic conductivity and paleokarst in the Biscayne aquifer, southeastern Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, K.J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents examples of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data from two study sites in southeastern Florida where karstic Pleistocene platform carbonates that comprise the unconfined Biscayne aquifer were imaged. Important features shown on resultant GPR profiles include: (1) upward and lateral qualitative interpretative distribution of porosity and hydraulic conductivity; (2) paleotopographic relief on karstic subaerial exposure surfaces; and (3) vertical stacking of chronostratigraphic high-frequency cycles (HFCs). These characteristics were verified by comparison to rock properties observed and measured in core samples, and identified in digital optical borehole images. Results demonstrate that an empirical relation exists between measured whole-core porosity and hydraulic conductivity, observed porosity on digital optical borehole images, formation conductivity, and GPR reflection amplitudes-as porosity and hydraulic conductivity determined from core and borehole images increases, formation conductivity increases, and GPR reflection amplitude decreases. This relation allows for qualitative interpretation of the vertical and lateral distribution of porosity and hydraulic conductivity within HFCs. Two subtidal HFCs in the uppermost Biscayne aquifer have significantly unique populations of whole-core porosity values and vertical hydraulic conductivity values. Porosity measurements from one cycle has a median value about two to three times greater than the values from the other HFC, and median values of vertical hydraulic-conductivity about three orders of magnitude higher than the other HFC. The HFC with the higher porosity and hydraulic conductivity values is shown as a discrete package of relatively low-amplitude reflections, whereas the HFC characterized by lower porosity and hydraulic-conductivity measurements is expressed by higher amplitude reflections. Porosity and hydraulic-conductivity values measured from whole-core samples, and vuggy porosity

  17. Digital Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Edward A.; Urs, Shalini R.

    2002-01-01

    Provides an overview of digital libraries research, practice, and literature. Highlights include new technologies; redefining roles; historical background; trends; creating digital content, including conversion; metadata; organizing digital resources; services; access; information retrieval; searching; natural language processing; visualization;…

  18. Digital Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelbl, Terry G.; Ponchak, Denise; Lamarche, Teresa

    2002-01-01

    The field of digital avionics experienced another year of important advances in civil aviation, military systems, and space applications. As a result of the events of 9/11/2001, NASA has pursued activities to apply its aerospace technologies toward improved aviation security. Both NASA Glenn Research Center and Langley Research Center have performed flight research demonstrations using advanced datalink concepts to transmit live pictures from inside a jetliner, and to downlink the contents of the plane's 'black box' recorder in real time. The U.S. Navy and General Electric demonstrated survivable engine control (SEC) algorithms during engine ground tests at the Weapons Survivability Laboratory at China Lake. The scientists at Boeing Satellite Systems advanced the field of stellar inertial technology with the development of a new method for positioning optical star trackers on satellites.

  19. Digital phosphorimeter with frequency domain signal processing: Application to real-time fiber-optic oxygen sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcala, J. Ricardo; Yu, Clement; Yeh, Gong Jong

    1993-06-01

    An instrument to measure the excited-state lifetimes of phosphorescent materials in real time is described. This apparatus uses pulsed and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG solid-state laser for excitation, sampler for data acquisition, and frequency domain methods for data fitting. The instrument amplifies the ac components of the detector output and band limits the signal to 25 kHz. The fundamental frequency of the excitation is then set to obtain a desired number of harmonics. This band limited signal is sampled and averaged over few thousand cycles in the time domain. The frequency domain representation of the data is obtained by employing fast Fourier transform algorithms. The phase delay and the modulation ratio of each sampled harmonic is then computed. Ten to a hundred values of the phase and modulations are averaged before computing the sensor lifetime. The instrument is capable of measuring precise and accurate excited-state lifetimes from subpicowatt luminescent signals in 100 μm optical fibers. To monitor oxygen for biomedical applications the response time of the system is decreased by collecting only 8 or 16 harmonics. A least-squares fit yields the lifetimes of single exponentials. A component of zero lifetime is introduced to account for the backscatter excitation. The phosphorescence lifetimes measured reproducibly to three parts in a thousand are used to monitor oxygen. Oxygen concentrations are computed employing empirical polynomials. The system drift is less than 1% over 100 h of continuous operation. This instrument is used to measure oxygen concentrations in vitro and in vivo with 2 s update times and 90 s full response times. Examples of measurements in saline solutions and in dogs are presented.

  20. Optical XOR gate

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2013-11-12

    An optical XOR gate is formed as a photonic integrated circuit (PIC) from two sets of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each set of the optical waveguide devices including an electroabsorption modulator electrically connected in series with a waveguide photodetector. The optical XOR gate utilizes two digital optical inputs to generate an XOR function digital optical output. The optical XOR gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  1. Optical NOR gate

    DOEpatents

    Skogen, Erik J.; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna

    2011-09-06

    An optical NOR gate is formed from two pair of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each pair of the optical waveguide devices consisting of an electroabsorption modulator electrically connected in series with a waveguide photodetector. The optical NOR gate utilizes two digital optical inputs and a continuous light input to provide a NOR function digital optical output. The optical NOR gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  2. A Digital Solar Aspect Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albus, James S.

    1961-01-01

    The solar aspect sensor described herein performs the analog-to-digital conversion of data optically. To accomplish this, it uses a binary "Gray code" light mask to produce a digital indication, in vehicle-fixed coordinates, of the elevation and azimuth angles of incident light from the sun. This digital solar aspect sensor system, in Explorer X, provided measurements of both elevation and azimuth angles to +/- 2 degrees at a distance of over 140,000 statute miles.

  3. Digital Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakel, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Reviews research on digital preservation issues, including born-digital and digitally recreated documents. Discusses electronic records research; metadata and other standards; electronic mail; Web-based documents; moving images media; selection of materials for digitization, including primary sources; administrative issues; media stability…

  4. AN OPTICAL CATALOG OF GALAXY CLUSTERS OBTAINED FROM AN ADAPTIVE MATCHED FILTER FINDER APPLIED TO SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DATA RELEASE 6

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, T.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pipino, A.; Dong, F.; Gunn, J. E-mail: pierpaol@usc.edu

    2011-07-20

    We present a new cluster catalog extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6) using an adaptive matched filter (AMF) cluster finder. We identify 69,173 galaxy clusters in the redshift range 0.045 {<=} z < 0.78 in 8420 deg{sup 2} of the sky. We provide angular position, redshift, richness, core, and virial radii estimates for these clusters, as well as an error analysis for each of these quantities. We also provide a catalog of more than 205,000 galaxies representing the three brightest galaxies in the r band which are possible brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) candidates. We show basic properties of the BCG candidates and study how their luminosity scales in redshift and cluster richness. We compare our catalog with the maxBCG and GMBCG catalogs, as well as with that of Wen et al. We match between 30% and 50% of clusters between catalogs over all overlapping redshift ranges. We find that the percentage of matches increases with the richness for all catalogs. We cross match the AMF catalog with available X-ray data in the same area of the sky and find 539 matches, 119 of which with temperature measurements. We present scaling relations between optical and X-ray properties and cluster center comparison. We find that both {Lambda}{sub 200} and R{sub 200} correlate well with both L{sub X} and T{sub X} , with no significant difference in trend if we restrict the matches to flux-limited X-ray samples.

  5. Lattice Boltzmann methods applied to large-scale three-dimensional virtual cores constructed from digital optical borehole images of the karst carbonate Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael Sukop,; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Digital optical borehole images at approximately 2 mm vertical resolution and borehole caliper data were used to create three-dimensional renderings of the distribution of (1) matrix porosity and (2) vuggy megaporosity for the karst carbonate Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida. The renderings based on the borehole data were used as input into Lattice Boltzmann methods to obtain intrinsic permeability estimates for this extremely transmissive aquifer, where traditional aquifer test methods may fail due to very small drawdowns and non-Darcian flow that can reduce apparent hydraulic conductivity. Variogram analysis of the borehole data suggests a nearly isotropic rock structure at lag lengths up to the nominal borehole diameter. A strong correlation between the diameter of the borehole and the presence of vuggy megaporosity in the data set led to a bias in the variogram where the computed horizontal spatial autocorrelation is strong at lag distances greater than the nominal borehole size. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of flow across a 0.4 × 0.4 × 17 m (2.72 m3 volume) parallel-walled column of rendered matrix and vuggy megaporosity indicates a high hydraulic conductivity of 53 m s−1. This value is similar to previous Lattice Boltzmann calculations of hydraulic conductivity in smaller limestone samples of the Biscayne aquifer. The development of simulation methods that reproduce dual-porosity systems with higher resolution and fidelity and that consider flow through horizontally longer renderings could provide improved estimates of the hydraulic conductivity and help to address questions about the importance of scale.

  6. Optical image encryption topology.

    PubMed

    Yong-Liang, Xiao; Xin, Zhou; Qiong-Hua, Wang; Sheng, Yuan; Yao-Yao, Chen

    2009-10-15

    Optical image encryption topology is proposed based on the principle of random-phase encoding. Various encryption topological units, involving peer-to-peer, ring, star, and tree topologies, can be realized by an optical 6f system. These topological units can be interconnected to constitute an optical image encryption network. The encryption and decryption can be performed in both digital and optical methods.

  7. All-optical implementation of ASCII by use of nonlinear material for optical encoding of necessary symbols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Shantanu K.; Mukhopadhyay, Sourangshu

    2005-06-01

    We propose a simple all-optical technique for digital encoding of ASCII. The method accommodates a digital encoding system by using the optical tree architecture and a nonlinear-material-based optical switching operation.

  8. Parallel optical sampler

    DOEpatents

    Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Skogen, Erik J; Vawter, Gregory A

    2014-05-20

    An optical sampler includes a first and second 1.times.n optical beam splitters splitting an input optical sampling signal and an optical analog input signal into n parallel channels, respectively, a plurality of optical delay elements providing n parallel delayed input optical sampling signals, n photodiodes converting the n parallel optical analog input signals into n respective electrical output signals, and n optical modulators modulating the input optical sampling signal or the optical analog input signal by the respective electrical output signals, and providing n successive optical samples of the optical analog input signal. A plurality of output photodiodes and eADCs convert the n successive optical samples to n successive digital samples. The optical modulator may be a photodiode interconnected Mach-Zehnder Modulator. A method of sampling the optical analog input signal is disclosed.

  9. Digital Citizenship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isman, Aytekin; Canan Gungoren, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    Era in which we live is known and referred as digital age.In this age technology is rapidly changed and developed. In light of these technological advances in 21st century, schools have the responsibility of training "digital citizen" as well as a good citizen. Digital citizens must have extensive skills, knowledge, Internet and …

  10. Digital photorefraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Manuel F.; Jorge, Jorge M.

    1997-12-01

    The early evaluation of the visual status of human infants is of a critical importance. It is of utmost importance to the development of the child's visual system that she perceives clear, focused, retinal images. Furthermore if the refractive problems are not corrected in due time amblyopia may occur. Photorefraction is a non-invasive clinical tool rather convenient for application to this kind of population. A qualitative or semi-quantitative information about refractive errors, accommodation, strabismus, amblyogenic factors and some pathologies (cataracts) can the easily obtained. The photorefraction experimental setup we established using new technological breakthroughs on the fields of imaging devices, image processing and fiber optics, allows the implementation of both the isotropic and eccentric photorefraction approaches. Essentially both methods consist on delivering a light beam into the eyes. It is refracted by the ocular media, strikes the retina, focusing or not, reflects off and is collected by a camera. The system is formed by one CCD color camera and a light source. A beam splitter in front of the camera's objective allows coaxial illumination and observation. An optomechanical system also allows eccentric illumination. The light source is a flash type one and is synchronized with the camera's image acquisition. The camera's image is digitized displayed in real time. Image processing routines are applied for image's enhancement and feature extraction.

  11. Digital photorefraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Manuel F. M.; Jorge, Jorge M.

    1998-01-01

    The early evaluation of the visual status of human infants is of a critical importance. It is of utmost importance to the development of the child's visual system that she perceives clear, focused, retinal images. Furthermore if the refractive problems are not corrected in due time amblyopia may occur. Photorefraction is a non-invasive clinical tool rather convenient for application to this kind of population. A qualitative or semi-quantitative information about refractive errors, accommodation, strabismus, amblyogenic factors and some pathologies (cataracts) can the easily obtained. The photorefraction experimental setup we established using new technological breakthroughs on the fields of imaging devices, image processing and fiber optics, allows the implementation of both the isotropic and eccentric photorefraction approaches. Essentially both methods consist on delivering a light beam into the eyes. It is refracted by the ocular media, strikes the retina, focusing or not, reflects off and is collected by a camera. The system is formed by one CCD color camera and a light source. A beam splitter in front of the camera's objective allows coaxial illumination and observation. An optomechanical system also allows eccentric illumination. The light source is a flash type one and is synchronized with the camera's image acquisition. The camera's image is digitized displayed in real time. Image processing routines are applied for image's enhancement and feature extraction.

  12. Exploring virtual reality technology and the Oculus Rift for the examination of digital pathology slides

    PubMed Central

    Farahani, Navid; Post, Robert; Duboy, Jon; Ahmed, Ishtiaque; Kolowitz, Brian J.; Krinchai, Teppituk; Monaco, Sara E.; Fine, Jeffrey L.; Hartman, Douglas J.; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Background: Digital slides obtained from whole slide imaging (WSI) platforms are typically viewed in two dimensions using desktop personal computer monitors or more recently on mobile devices. To the best of our knowledge, we are not aware of any studies viewing digital pathology slides in a virtual reality (VR) environment. VR technology enables users to be artificially immersed in and interact with a computer-simulated world. Oculus Rift is among the world's first consumer-targeted VR headsets, intended primarily for enhanced gaming. Our aim was to explore the use of the Oculus Rift for examining digital pathology slides in a VR environment. Methods: An Oculus Rift Development Kit 2 (DK2) was connected to a 64-bit computer running Virtual Desktop software. Glass slides from twenty randomly selected lymph node cases (ten with benign and ten malignant diagnoses) were digitized using a WSI scanner. Three pathologists reviewed these digital slides on a 27-inch 5K display and with the Oculus Rift after a 2-week washout period. Recorded endpoints included concordance of final diagnoses and time required to examine slides. The pathologists also rated their ease of navigation, image quality, and diagnostic confidence for both modalities. Results: There was 90% diagnostic concordance when reviewing WSI using a 5K display and Oculus Rift. The time required to examine digital pathology slides on the 5K display averaged 39 s (range 10–120 s), compared to 62 s with the Oculus Rift (range 15–270 s). All pathologists confirmed that digital pathology slides were easily viewable in a VR environment. The ratings for image quality and diagnostic confidence were higher when using the 5K display. Conclusion: Using the Oculus Rift DK2 to view and navigate pathology whole slide images in a virtual environment is feasible for diagnostic purposes. However, image resolution using the Oculus Rift device was limited. Interactive VR technologies such as the Oculus Rift are novel tools

  13. Digital Natives or Digital Tribes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Ian Robert

    2013-01-01

    This research builds upon the discourse surrounding digital natives. A literature review into the digital native phenomena was undertaken and found that researchers are beginning to identify the digital native as not one cohesive group but of individuals influenced by other factors. Primary research by means of questionnaire survey of technologies…

  14. Fiber optic multiplex optical transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, C. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A multiplex optical transmission system which minimizes external interference while simultaneously receiving and transmitting video, digital data, and audio signals is described. Signals are received into subgroup mixers for blocking into respective frequency ranges. The outputs of these mixers are in turn fed to a master mixer which produces a composite electrical signal. An optical transmitter connected to the master mixer converts the composite signal into an optical signal and transmits it over a fiber optic cable to an optical receiver which receives the signal and converts it back to a composite electrical signal. A de-multiplexer is coupled to the output of the receiver for separating the composite signal back into composite video, digital data, and audio signals. A programmable optic patch board is interposed in the fiber optic cables for selectively connecting the optical signals to various receivers and transmitters.

  15. Optical Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderstar, John

    1987-01-01

    Classifies and briefly describes several types of optical storage media available today--read-only and write-once analog disks, read-only and write-once digital disks and erasable disks. The appropriateness of CD-ROM (compact disk read-only memory) for use in libraries of developing nations is discussed in terms of users' information needs and…

  16. Effect of optical digitizer selection on the application accuracy of a surgical localization system-a quantitative comparison between the OPTOTRAK and flashpoint tracking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Q.; Zamorano, L.; Jiang, Z.; Gong, J. X.; Pandya, A.; Perez, R.; Diaz, F.

    1999-01-01

    Application accuracy is a crucial factor for stereotactic surgical localization systems, in which space digitization camera systems are one of the most critical components. In this study we compared the effect of the OPTOTRAK 3020 space digitization system and the FlashPoint Model 3000 and 5000 3D digitizer systems on the application accuracy for interactive localization of intracranial lesions. A phantom was mounted with several implantable frameless markers which were randomly distributed on its surface. The target point was digitized and the coordinates were recorded and compared with reference points. The differences from the reference points represented the deviation from the "true point." The root mean square (RMS) was calculated to show the differences, and a paired t-test was used to analyze the results. The results with the phantom showed that, for 1-mm sections of CT scans, the RMS was 0.76 +/- 0. 54 mm for the OPTOTRAK system, 1.23 +/- 0.53 mm for the FlashPoint Model 3000 3D digitizer system, and 1.00 +/- 0.42 mm for the FlashPoint Model 5000 system. These preliminary results showed that there is no significant difference between the three tracking systems, and, from the quality point of view, they can all be used for image-guided surgery procedures. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Effect of optical digitizer selection on the application accuracy of a surgical localization system-a quantitative comparison between the OPTOTRAK and flashpoint tracking systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Zamorano, L; Jiang, Z; Gong, J X; Pandya, A; Perez, R; Diaz, F

    1999-01-01

    Application accuracy is a crucial factor for stereotactic surgical localization systems, in which space digitization camera systems are one of the most critical components. In this study we compared the effect of the OPTOTRAK 3020 space digitization system and the FlashPoint Model 3000 and 5000 3D digitizer systems on the application accuracy for interactive localization of intracranial lesions. A phantom was mounted with several implantable frameless markers which were randomly distributed on its surface. The target point was digitized and the coordinates were recorded and compared with reference points. The differences from the reference points represented the deviation from the "true point." The root mean square (RMS) was calculated to show the differences, and a paired t-test was used to analyze the results. The results with the phantom showed that, for 1-mm sections of CT scans, the RMS was 0.76 +/- 0. 54 mm for the OPTOTRAK system, 1.23 +/- 0.53 mm for the FlashPoint Model 3000 3D digitizer system, and 1.00 +/- 0.42 mm for the FlashPoint Model 5000 system. These preliminary results showed that there is no significant difference between the three tracking systems, and, from the quality point of view, they can all be used for image-guided surgery procedures. PMID:10631374

  18. Comparative digital holography.

    PubMed

    Osten, Wolfgang; Baumbach, Torsten; Jüptner, Werner

    2002-01-01

    We described a method for direct holographic comparison of the shape or the deformation of two objects when it is not necessary that both samples be located at the same place. In contrast to the well-known incoherent techniques based on inverse fringe projection, this new approach uses a coherent mask that is imaged onto a sample object that has a microstructure different from that of the master object. The coherent mask is created by digital holography to permit instant access to complete optical information on the master object at any wanted place. Transmission of the digital master holograms to the relevant places can be made with a broadband digital telecommunication network such as the Internet.

  19. Lattice Boltzmann Methods Applied to Three-Dimensional Virtual Cores Constructed from Digital Optical Borehole Images of a Karst Carbonate Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. S.; Sukop, M. C.; Cunningham, K. J.

    2008-05-01

    Recovery of whole-core samples from macroporous karst carbonate is nearly impossible with conventional drilling technology. Thus, the most porous part of coreholes drilled in karst systems rarely yield whole-core samples. The consequent lack of samples for measurement of fluid-flow properties in karst carbonate aquifers impedes characterization of ground-water flow within these systems. This study uses advanced modeling techniques together with geophysical corehole data acquired from the karst carbonate Biscayne aquifer of southeastern Florida, USA, to explore a combination of innovative technologies designed to compensate for the lack of macroporous whole-core sample data. Specifically, these methods are being used to better understand the ground-water flow regime in the Biscayne aquifer. In this study, digital optical borehole image logs were compiled for test coreholes that penetrate the rocks of the Biscayne aquifer. The borehole image data were then processed to map the 3-D distribution of macropores and rock matrix present on the borehole walls using Stanford geostatistical software (SGeMS). The SGeMS program was used to compute variograms that were used as input for a computer simulation. The simulation results provided virtual 3-D renderings of the complex karst macropore network of the Biscayne aquifer that statistically replicate the borehole wall image data. These renderings provided 3-D visual records of areas of the aquifer that are composed of a carbonate eogenetic macropore system dominated by centimeter-scale vugs produced by fossil molds and voids associated with trace fossils. The vugs can coalesce over broad areas in the Biscayne aquifer to form laterally persistent zones of preferential ground-water flow. Lattice Boltzmann methods (LBMs) were used to measure the intrinsic permeability of the 3-D aquifer renderings. When using LBMs the rock matrix was assumed to be a nonporous media, thus permeability was only measured within the network of

  20. Digital printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotka, Werner K.

    1997-02-01

    Digital printing is described as a tool to replace conventional printing machines completely. Still this goal was not reached until now with any of the digital printing technologies to be described in the paper. Productivity and costs are still the main parameters and are not really solved until now. Quality in digital printing is no problem anymore. Definition of digital printing is to transfer digital datas directly on the paper surface. This step can be carried out directly or with the use of an intermediate image carrier. Keywords in digital printing are: computer- to-press; erasable image carrier; image carrier with memory. Digital printing is also the logical development of the new digital area as it is pointed out in Nicholas Negropotes book 'Being Digital' and also the answer to networking and Internet technologies. Creating images text and color in one country and publishing the datas in another country or continent is the main advantage. Printing on demand another big advantage and last but not least personalization the last big advantage. Costs and being able to coop with this new world of prepress technology is the biggest disadvantage. Therefore the very optimistic growth rates for the next few years are really nonexistent. The development of complete new markets is too slow and the replacing of old markets is too small.

  1. Digital Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blansett, Jim

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the Internet has become a digital commons of commerce and education. However, accessibility standards have often been overlooked online, and the digital equivalents to curb-cuts and other physical accommodations have only rarely been implemented to serve those with print disabilities. (A print disability can be a learning…

  2. Digitizing Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of digital imaging technology focuses on its potential use for preservation of library materials. Topics addressed include converting microfilm to digital; the high cost of conversion from paper or microfilm; quality; indexing; database management issues; incompatibility among imaging systems; longevity; cooperative pilot projects; and…

  3. Digital Roundup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    State policy is crucial to the spread of digital-learning opportunities at the elementary and secondary level. A review of recent legislative action reveals policies that are constantly in flux and differ quite markedly from one state to another. Some have hoped for model digital-learning legislation that could handle all the various issues…

  4. Digital TMI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Presenting the current status of the Digital TMI project to visiting members of the FAA Command Center. Digital TMI is an effort to store national-level traffic management initiatives in a standards-compliant manner. Work is funded by the FAA.

  5. Digital and analog readout systems for fiber-optic strain sensors as applied to the monitoring of roller element bearing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Juan C.; Conkey, Andrew P.; Perez, Robert X.; Taylor, Henry F.

    2003-11-01

    A rotating machinery test rig was instrumented with fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensors for condition monitoring of rolling element bearings. Strain variations produced by ball passes were observed and analyzed in the time and frequency domain. Wavelength division multiplexing was utilized to simultaneously monitor the sensors with analog and digital readout systems-analog for high bandwidth and digital for high dynamic range and the monitoring of multiple sensors. The effects of imbalance on the shaft, changes in rotational speed, effects on the rotor system, and detection of bearing defects were investigated. Frequency peaks observed in the bearing sensor spectra closely matched predicted values. Imbalance and rotational speed tests showed good agreement with expected trends, and bearing defects were successfully detected.

  6. Optical encryption interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An analog optical encryption system based on phase scrambling of two-dimensional optical images and holographic transformation for achieving large encryption keys and high encryption speed. An enciphering interface uses a spatial light modulator for converting a digital data stream into a two dimensional optical image. The optical image is further transformed into a hologram with a random phase distribution. The hologram is converted into digital form for transmission over a shared information channel. A respective deciphering interface at a receiver reverses the encrypting process by using a phase conjugate reconstruction of the phase scrambled hologram.

  7. Optical NAND gate

    DOEpatents

    Skogen, Erik J.; Raring, James; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna

    2011-08-09

    An optical NAND gate is formed from two pair of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each pair of the optical waveguide devices consisting of an electroabsorption modulator and a photodetector. One pair of the optical waveguide devices is electrically connected in parallel to operate as an optical AND gate; and the other pair of the optical waveguide devices is connected in series to operate as an optical NOT gate (i.e. an optical inverter). The optical NAND gate utilizes two digital optical inputs and a continuous light input to provide a NAND function output. The optical NAND gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  8. Digital Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Salathé, Marcel; Bengtsson, Linus; Bodnar, Todd J.; Brewer, Devon D.; Brownstein, John S.; Buckee, Caroline; Campbell, Ellsworth M.; Cattuto, Ciro; Khandelwal, Shashank; Mabry, Patricia L.; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Mobile, social, real-time: the ongoing revolution in the way people communicate has given rise to a new kind of epidemiology. Digital data sources, when harnessed appropriately, can provide local and timely information about disease and health dynamics in populations around the world. The rapid, unprecedented increase in the availability of relevant data from various digital sources creates considerable technical and computational challenges. PMID:22844241

  9. Near-field reflection backscattering apertureless optical microscopy: application to spectroscopy experiments on opaque samples, comparison between lock-in and digital photon counting detection techniques.

    PubMed

    Diziain, S; Bijeon, J-L; Adam, P-M; Lamy de la Chapelle, M; Thomas, B; Déturche, R; Royer, P

    2007-01-01

    An apertureless scanning near-field optical microscope (ASNOM) in reflection backscattering configuration is designed to conduct spectroscopic experiments on opaque samples constituted of latex beads. The ASNOM proposed takes advantage of the depth-discrimination properties of confocal microscopes to efficiently extract the near-field optical signal. Given their importance in a spectroscopic experiment, we systematically compare the lock-in and synchronous photon counting detection methods. Some results of Rayleigh's scattering in the near field of the test samples are used to illustrate the possibilities of this technique for reflection backscattering spectroscopy.

  10. Digital Collections, Digital Libraries & the Digitization of Cultural Heritage Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Clifford

    2002-01-01

    Discusses digital collections and digital libraries. Topics include broadband availability; digital rights protection; content, both non-profit and commercial; digitization of cultural content; sustainability; metadata harvesting protocol; infrastructure; authorship; linking multiple resources; data mining; digitization of reference works;…

  11. New method for quantification of vuggy porosity from digital optical borehole images as applied to the karstic Pleistocene limestone of the Biscayne aquifer, southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, K.J.; Carlson, J.I.; Hurley, N.F.

    2004-01-01

    Vuggy porosity is gas- or fluid-filled openings in rock matrix that are large enough to be seen with the unaided eye. Well-connected vugs can form major conduits for flow of ground water, especially in carbonate rocks. This paper presents a new method for quantification of vuggy porosity calculated from digital borehole images collected from 47 test coreholes that penetrate the karstic Pleistocene limestone of the Biscayne aquifer, southeastern Florida. Basically, the method interprets vugs and background based on the grayscale color of each in digital borehole images and calculates a percentage of vuggy porosity. Development of the method was complicated because environmental conditions created an uneven grayscale contrast in the borehole images that makes it difficult to distinguish vugs from background. The irregular contrast was produced by unbalanced illumination of the borehole wall, which was a result of eccentering of the borehole-image logging tool. Experimentation showed that a simple, single grayscale threshold would not realistically differentiate between the grayscale contrast of vugs and background. Therefore, an equation was developed for an effective subtraction of the changing grayscale contrast, due to uneven illumination, to produce a grayscale threshold that successfully identifies vugs. In the equation, a moving average calculated around the circumference of the borehole and expressed as the background grayscale intensity is defined as a baseline from which to identify a grayscale threshold for vugs. A constant was derived empirically by calibration with vuggy porosity values derived from digital images of slabbed-core samples and used to make the subtraction from the background baseline to derive the vug grayscale threshold as a function of azimuth. The method should be effective in estimating vuggy porosity in any carbonate aquifer. ?? 2003 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Optical technology for flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayanagi, M.

    1986-01-01

    Optical applications to the flight control system including optical data bus, sensors, and transducers are analyzed. Examples of optical data bus include airborne light optical fiber technology (ALOFT), F-5E, YA-7D, MIL-STD-1553 fiber optic data bus and NAL-optic data bus. This NAL-optic data bus is applied to STOL, and its characteristics are stressed. Principles and advantages of optical pulse-digital transducers are discussed.

  13. Organic nonlinear optical materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umegaki, S.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, it became clear that organic compounds with delocalized pi electrons show a great nonlinear optical response. Especially, secondary nonlinear optical constants of more than 2 digits were often seen in the molecular level compared to the existing inorganic crystals such as LiNbO3. The crystallization was continuously tried. Organic nonlinear optical crystals have a new future as materials for use in the applied physics such as photomodulation, optical frequency transformation, opto-bistabilization, and phase conjugation optics. Organic nonlinear optical materials, e.g., urea, O2NC6H4NH2, I, II, are reviewed with 50 references.

  14. Digitally Enhanced Heterodyne Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaddock, Daniel; Ware, Brent; Lay, Oliver; Dubovitsky, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Spurious interference limits the performance of many interferometric measurements. Digitally enhanced interferometry (DEI) improves measurement sensitivity by augmenting conventional heterodyne interferometry with pseudo-random noise (PRN) code phase modulation. DEI effectively changes the measurement problem from one of hardware (optics, electronics), which may deteriorate over time, to one of software (modulation, digital signal processing), which does not. DEI isolates interferometric signals based on their delay. Interferometric signals are effectively time-tagged by phase-modulating the laser source with a PRN code. DEI improves measurement sensitivity by exploiting the autocorrelation properties of the PRN to isolate only the signal of interest and reject spurious interference. The properties of the PRN code determine the degree of isolation.

  15. Metrological digital audio reconstruction

    DOEpatents

    Fadeyev; Vitaliy , Haber; Carl

    2004-02-19

    Audio information stored in the undulations of grooves in a medium such as a phonograph record may be reconstructed, with little or no contact, by measuring the groove shape using precision metrology methods coupled with digital image processing and numerical analysis. The effects of damage, wear, and contamination may be compensated, in many cases, through image processing and analysis methods. The speed and data handling capacity of available computing hardware make this approach practical. Two examples used a general purpose optical metrology system to study a 50 year old 78 r.p.m. phonograph record and a commercial confocal scanning probe to study a 1920's celluloid Edison cylinder. Comparisons are presented with stylus playback of the samples and with a digitally re-mastered version of an original magnetic recording. There is also a more extensive implementation of this approach, with dedicated hardware and software.

  16. Direct-to-digital holography and holovision

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Clarence E.; Baylor, Larry R.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Rasmussen, David A.; Voelkl, Edgar; Castracane, James; Simkulet, Michelle; Clow, Lawrence

    2000-01-01

    Systems and methods for direct-to-digital holography are described. An apparatus includes a laser; a beamsplitter optically coupled to the laser; a reference beam mirror optically coupled to the beamsplitter; an object optically coupled to the beamsplitter, a focusing lens optically coupled to both the reference beam mirror and the object; and a digital recorder optically coupled to the focusing lens. A reference beam is incident upon the reference beam mirror at a non-normal angle, and the reference beam and an object beam are focused by the focusing lens at a focal plane of the digital recorder to form an image. The systems and methods provide advantages in that computer assisted holographic measurements can be made.

  17. Virtual mask digital electron beam lithography

    DOEpatents

    Baylor, L.R.; Thomas, C.E.; Voelkl, E.; Moore, J.A.; Simpson, M.L.; Paulus, M.J.

    1999-04-06

    Systems and methods for direct-to-digital holography are described. An apparatus includes a laser; a beamsplitter optically coupled to the laser; a reference beam mirror optically coupled to the beamsplitter; an object optically coupled to the beamsplitter, a focusing lens optically coupled to both the reference beam mirror and the object; and a digital recorder optically coupled to the focusing lens. A reference beam is incident upon the reference beam mirror at a non-normal angle, and the reference beam and an object beam are focused by the focusing lens at a focal plane of the digital recorder to form an image. The systems and methods provide advantages in that computer assisted holographic measurements can be made. 5 figs.

  18. Virtual mask digital electron beam lithography

    DOEpatents

    Baylor, Larry R.; Thomas, Clarence E.; Voelkl, Edgar; Moore, James A.; Simpson, Michael L.; Paulus, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods for direct-to-digital holography are described. An apparatus includes a laser; a beamsplitter optically coupled to the laser; a reference beam mirror optically coupled to the beamsplitter; an object optically coupled to the beamsplitter, a focusing lens optically coupled to both the reference beam mirror and the object; and a digital recorder optically coupled to the focusing lens. A reference beam is incident upon the reference beam mirror at a non-normal angle, and the reference beam and an object beam are focused by the focusing lens at a focal plane of the digital recorder to form an image. The systems and methods provide advantages in that computer assisted holographic measurements can be made.

  19. Digital Light Processing and MEMS: reflecting the digital display needs of the networked society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornbeck, Larry J.

    1996-08-01

    Digital video technology is becoming increasingly important to the networked society. The natural interface to digital video is a digital display, one that accepts electrical bits at its input and converts them into optical bits at the output. The digital-to-analog processing function is performed in the mind of the observer. Texas Instruments has developed such a display with its recent market introduction of the Digital Light ProcessingTM (DLPTM) projection display. DLP technology is based on the Digital Micromirror DeviceTM (DMDTM), a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) array of semiconductor-based digital light switches. The DMD switching array precisely controls a light source for projection display and digital printing applications. This paper presents an overview of DLP technology along with the architecture, projection operation, manufacture, and reliability of the DMD. Features of DMD technology that distinguish it from conventional MEMS technology are explored. Finally, the paper provides a view of DLP business opportunities.

  20. High-Speed Digital Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Vine, Glenn; Shaddock, Daniel A.; Ware, Brent; Spero, Robert E.; Wuchenich, Danielle M.; Klipstein, William M.; McKenzie, Kirk

    2012-01-01

    Digitally enhanced heterodyne interferometry (DI) is a laser metrology technique employing pseudo-random noise (PRN) codes phase-modulated onto an optical carrier. Combined with heterodyne interferometry, the PRN code is used to select individual signals, returning the inherent interferometric sensitivity determined by the optical wavelength. The signal isolation arises from the autocorrelation properties of the PRN code, enabling both rejection of spurious signals (e.g., from scattered light) and multiplexing capability using a single metrology system. The minimum separation of optical components is determined by the wavelength of the PRN code.

  1. Wavelength-Division Multiplexing Of Bipolar Digital Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, Ronnie D.; Ubele, John L., II

    1994-01-01

    In system, bipolar digital data transmitted by use of wavelength-division multiplexing on single optical fiber. Two different wavelengths used to transmit pulses signifying "positive" or "negative" bipolar digital data. Simultaneous absence of pulses at both wavelengths signifies digital "zero."

  2. A fast and high-sensitive dual-wavelength diffuse optical tomography system using digital lock-in photon-counting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weiting; Yi, Xi; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2014-09-01

    We presented a novel dual-wavelength diffuse optical imaging system which can perform 2-D or 3-D imaging fast and high-sensitively for monitoring the dynamic change of optical parameters. A newly proposed lock-in photon-counting detection method was adopted for week optical signal collection, which brought in excellent property as well as simplified geometry. Fundamental principles of the lock-in photon-counting detection were elaborately demonstrated, and the feasibility was strictly verified by the linearity experiment. Systemic performance of the prototype set up was experimentally accessed, including stray light rejection and inherent interference. Results showed that the system possessed superior anti-interference capability (under 0.58% in darkroom) compared with traditional photon-counting detection, and the crosstalk between two wavelengths was lower than 2.28%. For comprehensive assessment, 2-D phantom experiments towards relatively large dimension model (diameter of 4cm) were conducted. Different absorption targets were imaged to investigate detection sensitivity. Reconstruction image under all conditions was exciting, with a desirable SNR. Study on image quality v.s. integration time put forward a new method for accessing higher SNR with the sacrifice of measuring speed. In summary, the newly developed system showed great potential in promoting detection sensitivity as well as measuring speed. This will make substantial progress in dynamically tracking the blood concentration distribution in many clinical areas, such as small animal disease modeling, human brain activity research and thick tissues (for example, breast) diagnosis.

  3. Initial evaluation of commercially available InGaAsP DFB laser diodes for use in high-speed digital fiber optic transceivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Anthony L.; Hendricks, Herbert D.

    1990-01-01

    NASA has been pursuing the development of high-speed fiber-optic transceivers for use in a number of space data system applications. Current efforts are directed toward a high-performance all-integrated-circuit transceiver operating up to the 3-5 Gb/s range. Details of the evaluation and selection of candidate high-speed optical sources to be used in the space-qualified high-performance transceiver are presented. Data on the performance of commercially available DFB (distributed feedback) lasers are presented, and their performance relative to each other and to their structural design with regard to their use in high-performance fiber-optic transceivers is discussed. The DFB lasers were obtained from seven commercial manufacturers. The data taken on each laser included threshold current, differential quantum efficiency, CW side mode suppression radio, wavelength temperature coefficient, threshold temperature coefficient, natural linewidth, and far field pattern. It was found that laser diodes with buried heterostructures and first-order gratings had, in general, the best CW operating characteristics. The modulated characteristics of the DFB laser diodes are emphasized. Modulated linewidth, modulated side mode suppression ratio, and frequency response are discussed.

  4. Digitally Controlled Beam Attenuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peppler, W. W.; Kudva, B.; Dobbins, J. T.; Lee, C. S.; Van Lysel, M. S.; Hasegawa, B. H.; Mistretta, C. A.

    1982-12-01

    In digital fluorographic techniques the video camera must accommodate a wide dynamic range due to the large variation in the subject thickness within the field of view. Typically exposure factors and the optical aperture are selected such that the maximum video signal is obtained in the most transmissive region of the subject. Consequently, it has been shown that the signal-to-noise ratio is severely reduced in the dark regions. We have developed a prototype digital beam attenuator (DBA) which will alleviate this and some related problems in digital fluorography. The prototype DBA consists of a 6x6 array of pistons which are individually controlled. A membrane containing an attenuating solu-tion of (CeC13) in water and the piston matrix are placed between the x-ray tube and the subject. Under digital control the pistons are moved into the attenuating material in order to adjust the beam intensity over each of the 36 cells. The DBA control unit which digitizes the image during patient positioning will direct the pistons under hydraulic control to produce a uniform x-ray field exiting the subject. The pistons were designed to produce very little structural background in the image. In subtraction studies any structure would be cancelled. For non-subtraction studies such as cine-cardiology we are considering higher cell densities (eg. 64x64). Due to the narrow range of transmission provided by the DBA, in such studies ultra-high contrast films could be used to produce a high resolution quasi-subtraction display. Additional benefits of the DBA are: 1) reduced dose to the bright image areas when the dark areas are properly exposed. 2) improved scatter and glare to primary ratios, leading to improved contrast in the dark areas.

  5. Digital Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubler, Alfred

    2009-03-01

    The energy density in conventional capacitors is limited by sparking. We present nano-capacitor arrays, where - like in laser diodes and quantum wells [1] - quantization prevents dielectric breakthrough. We show that the energy density and the power/weight ratio are very high, possibly larger than in hydrogen [2]. Digital batteries are a potential clean energy source for cars, laptops, and mobile devices. The technology is related to flash drives. However, because of the high energy density, safety is a concern. Digital batteries can be easily and safely charged and discharged. In the discharged state they pose no danger. Even if a charged digital battery were to explode, it would produce no radioactive waste, no long-term radiation, and probably could be designed to produce no noxious chemicals. We discuss methodologies to prevent shorts and other measures to make digital batteries safe. [1] H. Higuraskh, A. Toriumi, F. Yamaguchi, K. Kawamura, A. Hubler, Correlation Tunnel Device, U. S. Patent No. 5,679,961 (1997) [2] Alfred Hubler, http://server10.how-why.com/blog/

  6. Digital Badges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederiksen, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Unlike so much of the current vocabulary in education and technology that seems to stir more confusion than clarity, most public service librarians may already have a general idea about digital badges. As visual representations of individual accomplishments, competencies or skills that are awarded by groups, institutions, or organizations, they…

  7. Digital Tidbits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumaran, Maha; Geary, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Technology has transformed libraries. There are digital libraries, electronic collections, online databases and catalogs, ebooks, downloadable books, and much more. With free technology such as social websites, newspaper collections, downloadable online calendars, clocks and sticky notes, online scheduling, online document sharing, and online…

  8. Nematic Cells for Digital Light Deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pishnyak, Oleg; Golovin, Andrii; Laventovich, Oleg; Kreminska, Liubov; Winker, Bruce; Pouch, John; Miranda, Felix

    2008-01-01

    Smectic A (SmA) materials can be used in non-mechanical, digital beam deflectors (DBDs) as fillers for passive birefringent prisms based on decoupled pairs of electrically controlled, liquid crystalline polarization rotators, like twisted nematic (TN) cells and passive deflectors. DBDs are used in free-space laser communications, optical fiber communications, optical switches, scanners, and in-situ wavefront correction.

  9. Simulation performance of a Sagnac loop terahertz asymmetric optical demultiplexer for OTDM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Antonio A., Jr.; Martinez, Maria A. G.

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this work is to present a customized simulation tool for analysis and design of Sagnac loop TOAD's. Basically, we present a fast and versatile tool to emulate the behavior of some key design parameters like those found on non-linear elements, splitters, fiber delay line among others. After proper optimization, we use two different wavelengths for the control and signal hyperbolic secant pulses. Additionally, a band-pass filter is used to guarantee the transmission of signal pulses only. Furthermore, we analyze a bit to bit all optical demultiplexer, where one channel is extracted from a 64 bit frame at 10 Gbps transmission rate, and extend the implementation to work at 100 Gbps. SNR better than 22 dB are achieved with control pulse energy on the order of 200fJ and SOA bias current of 150 mA. A degradation of SNR of about 17 dB was verified for a variation of splitter coupling factor around 20%.

  10. Scalability of a cross-platform multi-threaded non-sequential optical ray tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greynolds, Alan W.

    2011-10-01

    The GelOE optical engineering software implements multi-threaded ray tracing with just a few simple cross-platform OpenMP directives. Timings as a function of the number of threads are presented for two quite different ZEMAX non-sequential sample problems running on a dual-boot 12-core Apple computer and compared to not only ZEMAX but also FRED (plus single-threaded ASAP and CodeV). Also discussed are the relative merits of using Mac OSX or Windows 7, 32-bit or 64-bit mode, single or double precision floats, and the Intel or GCC compilers. It is found that simple cross-platform multi-threading can be more efficient than the Windows-specific kind used in the commercial codes and who's the fastest ray tracer depends on the specific problem. Note that besides ray trace speed, overall productivity also depends on other things like visualization, ease-of-use, documentation, and technical support of which none are rated here.

  11. Fabrication and test of digital output interface devices for gas turbine electronic controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newirth, D. M.; Koenig, E. W.

    1978-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop an innovative digital output interface device, a digital effector with optical feedback of the fuel metering valve position, for future electronic controls for gas turbine engines. A digital effector (on-off solenoids driven directly by on-off signals from a digital electronic controller) with optical position feedback was fabricated, coupled with the fuel metering valve, and tested under simulated engine operating conditions. The testing indicated that a digital effector with optical position feedback is a suitable candidate, with proper development for future digital electronic gas turbine controls. The testing also identified several problem areas which would have to be overcome in a final production configuration.

  12. Digital optimeter based on linear CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qing; Xu, Yuanling

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, the development of a new type of digital optimeter based on linear CCD is introduced and discussed. It is based on traditional autocollimation optical system and optical lever motion, with linear CCD as measuring element. A light band generated by slit is captured by linear CCD after passing through an autocollimation optical system. A piece of mirror placed in the optical path of this system is controlled by displacement of a measuring slide in order to adjust the light band imaging position. The displacement of light band is detected by CCD and is then displayed in digital format. Such a design successfully eliminates the existing issues of signal quality and signal overspeed in digital optimeters using grating as the measuring element. The final product based on this technique has been released, offering a resolution of 0.1μm and 0.02μm.

  13. High-definition digital endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefliger, Juerg; Lehareinger, Yves; Blessing, Patrick; Niederer, Peter F.; Doswald, Daniel; Felber, Norbert

    1999-07-01

    Present endoscopic systems for routine use are mostly based on Standard Definition TV and analog data transmission for image acquisition and presentation. Accordingly, the intrinsic optical quality of most endoscopes in terms of spatial and dynamic resolution as well as color quality is not fully exploited by this technology. Our newly developed high-definition TV system takes advantage of cutting-edge digital and analog processing stages, combined with real- time digital image processing algorithms, to achieve a substantially improved overall image quality.

  14. Super-Resolution Readout of 50 nm Read-Only-Memory Pits Using Optics Based on High-Definition Digital Versatile Disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, Takayuki; Nakano, Takashi; Kurihara, Kazuma; Kim, Jooho; Tominaga, Junji

    2008-07-01

    A super-resolution near-field structure (super-RENS; ZnS-SiO2/Sb75Te25/ZnS-SiO2) and a read-only-memory (ROM) substrate with its pit wide in the radial direction (200 nm) are combined. The readout of 50-nm-long pits was examined, and the pit length is less than one third the resolution limit of the optics (laser wavelength: 405 nm, numerical aperture: 0.65) used. The carrier-to-noise ratio obtained was 39 dB, and it was possible to observe the reproduced waveform clearly. The results indicate that the capacity along the tangential direction can be increased by a factor of 4.

  15. A 96-channel FPGA-based time-to-digital converter

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdan, Mircea; Frisch, Henry; Heintz, Mary; Paramonov, Alexander; Sanders, Harold; Chappa, Steve; DeMaat, Robert; Klein, Rod; Miao, Ting; Phillips, Thomas J; Wilson, Peter

    2005-02-01

    We describe an FPGA-based, 96-channel, time-to-digital converter (TDC) intended for use with the Central Outer Tracker (COT) [1] in the CDF Experiment [2] at the Fermilab Tevatron. The COT system is digitized and read out by 315 TDC cards, each serving 96 wires of the chamber. The TDC is physically configured as a 9U VME card. The functionality is almost entirely programmed in firmware in two Altera Stratix FPGA’s. The special capabilities of this device are the availability of 840 MHz LVDS inputs, multiple phase-locked clock modules, and abundant memory. The TDC system operates with an input resolution of 1.2 ns, a minimum input pulse width of 4.8 ns and a minimum separation of 4.8 ns between pulses. Each input can accept up to 7 hits per collision. The time-to-digital conversion is done by first sampling each of the 96 inputs in 1.2-ns bins and filling a circular memory; the memory addresses of logical transitions (edges) in the input data are then translated into the time of arrival and width of the COT pulses. Memory pipelines with a depth of 5.5 μs allow deadtime-less operation in the first-level trigger; the data are multiple-buffered to diminish deadtime in the second-level trigger. The complete process of edge-detection and filling of buffers for readout takes 12 μs. The TDC VME interface allows a 64-bit Chain Block Transfer of multiple boards in a crate with transfer-rates up to 47 Mbytes/sec. The TDC also contains a separately-programmed data path that produces prompt trigger data every Tevatron crossing. The trigger bits are clocked onto the P3 VME backplane connector with a 22-ns clock for transmission to the trigger. The full TDC design and multi-card test results are described. The physical simplicity ensures low-maintenance; the functionality being in firmware allows reprogramming for other applications.

  16. Digital psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Tang, S; Helmeste, D

    2000-02-01

    The American managed care movement has been viewed as a big experiment and is being watched closely by the rest of the world. In the meanwhile, computer-based information technology (IT) is changing the practice of medicine, much more rapidly than managed care. A New World of digitized knowledge and information has been created. Although literature on IT in psychiatry is largely absent in peer-reviewed psychiatric journals, IT is finding its way into all aspects of medicine, particularly psychiatry. Telepsychiatry programs are becoming very popular. At the same time, medical information sites are flourishing and evolving into a new health-care industry. Patient-physician information asymmetry is decreasing as patients are gaining easy access to medical information hitherto only available to professionals. Thus, psychiatry is facing another paradigm shift, at a time when most attention has been focused on managed care. In this new digital world, knowledge and information are no longer the sole property of professionals. Value will migrate from traditional in-person office-based therapy to digital clinical products, from in-person library search and classroom didactic instruction to interactive on-line searches and distance learning. In this time of value migration, psychiatrists have to determine what their 'distinctive competence' is and where best to add value in the health-care delivery value chain. The authors assess the impact of IT on clinical psychiatry and review how clinical practice, education and research in psychiatry are expected to change in this emerging digital world. PMID:15558872

  17. Systolic acousto-optic binary convolver

    SciTech Connect

    Guilfoyle, P.S.

    1984-01-01

    A novel high speed array processing optical architecture is described. A multichannel acousto-optic binary convolver is architecturally configured as a systolic array processor. The architecture provides a high speed means of matrix/vector multiplications using the digital multiplication via an analog convolution algorithm. This algorithm and a systolic acousto-optic implementation permit the speed of optics to be combined with the accuracy of digital computation. 15 references.

  18. Digital imaging technology assessment: Digital document storage project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An ongoing technical assessment and requirements definition project is examining the potential role of digital imaging technology at NASA's STI facility. The focus is on the basic components of imaging technology in today's marketplace as well as the components anticipated in the near future. Presented is a requirement specification for a prototype project, an initial examination of current image processing at the STI facility, and an initial summary of image processing projects at other sites. Operational imaging systems incorporate scanners, optical storage, high resolution monitors, processing nodes, magnetic storage, jukeboxes, specialized boards, optical character recognition gear, pixel addressable printers, communications, and complex software processes.

  19. Imaging spectroscopy with digital micromirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, Kevin J.; Corio, Mark A.; Ninkov, Zoran

    2000-05-01

    The availability of optical MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) is promising to revolutionize optical instrument design. We are developing a multiobject imaging spectrometer based on a commercially available optical MEMS--the Texas Instrument's Digital Micromirror Device (DMD)TM. The micromirror array is laced at an image plane of an optical system, and is used as a spatial light modulator to redirect portions of the image into the spectrograph. The programmability of the micromirror array allows the creation of arbitrary `slit' patterns as input to the spectrograph. In addition, by controlling the dwell time of each micromirror individually, it is possible to adaptively extend the dynamic range of the spectral imaging system.

  20. Optical–digital hybrid image search system in cloud environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Kanami; Kodate, Kashiko; Watanabe, Eriko

    2016-09-01

    To improve the versatility and usability of optical correlators, we developed an optical–digital hybrid image search system consisting of digital servers and an optical correlator that can be used to perform image searches in the cloud environment via a web browser. This hybrid system employs a simple method to obtain correlation signals and has a distributed network design. The correlation signals are acquired by using an encoder timing signal generated by a rotating disk, and the distributed network design facilitates the replacement and combination of the digital correlation server and the optical correlator.

  1. Optical transmission techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, Irina B.; Filip, Luminita E.; Vasile, Alexandru

    2005-08-01

    An optical transmission system is a method of transferring information in the shape of bits or symbols for the case of digital systems, and of analogue waves for the case of analogue systems, between fixed points located on a fiber optics cable. Today and in the near future there are numerous such transmission techniques available. The increase of demands for data transfer from phone subscribers can be met only by means of digital techniques applied in the local network, in addition to the use of digital telephone exchange and of the digital transmission systems in the trees network. In order to increase the quantity of information transferred through one fiber, optical multiplexing techniques have been conceived and tested. The optical multiplexing is additional to the electrical signal multiplexing. The requests for the access network will become more and more complex, a larger flexibility and a wider band being needed. For the purpose of complying with these requests, the coherent simultaneous or alternative transmission towards the optical amplifiers represents a factor of technical progress. The multiplexing with wave length division allows for more channels to be transported through the same fiber with different wave lengths, in one or both directions.

  2. Optical Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatak, Ajoy; Thyagarajan, K.

    With the development of extremely low-loss optical fibers and their application to communication systems, a revolution has taken fiber glass place during the last 40 years. In 2001, using glass fibers as the transmission medium and lightwaves as carrier wave waves, information was transmitted at a rate more than 1 Tbit/s (which is roughly equivalent to transmission of about 15 million simultaneous telephone conversations) through one hair thin optical fiber. Experimental demonstration of transmission at the rate of 14 Tbit/s over a 160 km long single fiber was demonstrated in 2006, which is equivalent to sending 140 digital high definition movies in 1 s. Very recently record transmission of more than 100 Tbit/s over 165 km single mode fiber has been reported. These can be considered as extremely important technological achievements. In this chapter we will discuss the propagation characteristics of optical fibers with special applications to optical communication systems and also present some of the noncommunication applications such as sensing.

  3. Digital film library implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, Sheel; Khalsa, Satjeet S.; Seshadri, Sridhar B.; Arenson, Ronald L.

    1991-07-01

    The Radiology Department at the University of Pennsylvania is in the process of clinically testing its PACS implementation. The PACS implementation has been built around a Vortech Image Archival and Retrieval System (IARS) with a 140-platter optical jukebox. The Vortech IARS provides archival services only. A set of software modules have been developed in-house that allow the system to function as a digital film library. The current implementation allows connectivity to a RIS (DECrad), supports the routing of images to two intensive care units, and allows image acquisition from a Du Pont FD2000 laser scanner and two GE SIGNA MR units. All process-to-process communication follows the ACR/NEMA 2.0 protocol. The proposed folder extensions to ACR/NEMA 2.0 are being utilized for sending information to the display nodes. The system has been running clinically for about three months. Details of the design, implementation, and functionality of the PACS are presented.

  4. Digital demodulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, T. A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A digital demodulator for converting pulse code modulated data from phase shift key (PSK) to non return to zero (NRZ) and to biphase data is described. The demodulator is composed of standard integrated logic circuits. The key to the demodulation function is a pair of cross coupled one shot multivibrators and which with a flip-flop produce the NRZ-L is all that is required, the circuitry is greatly simplified and the 2(v) times bit rate contraint can be removed from the carrier. A flip-flop, an OR gate, and AND gate and a binary counter generate the bit rate clock (BTCK) for the NRZ-L. The remainder of the circuitry is for converting the NRZ-L and BTCK into biphase data. The device was designed for use in the space shuttle bay environment measurements.

  5. Digital Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelbl, Terry G.; Ponchak, Denise; Lamarche, Teresa

    2003-01-01

    Digital Avionics activities played an important role in the advancements made in civil aviation, military systems, and space applications. This document profiles advances made in each of these areas by the aerospace industry, NASA centers, and the U.S. military. Emerging communication technologies covered in this document include Internet connectivity onboard aircraft, wireless broadband communication for aircraft, and a mobile router for aircraft to communicate in multiple communication networks over the course of a flight. Military technologies covered in this document include avionics for unmanned combat air vehicles and microsatellites, and head-up displays. Other technologies covered in this document include an electronic flight bag for the Boeing 777, and surveillance systems for managing airport operations.

  6. Digital structural

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dohm, J.M.; Anderson, R.C.; Tanaka, K.L.

    1998-01-01

    Magmatic and tectonic activity have both contributed significantly to the surface geology of Mars. Digital structural mapping techniques have now been used to classify and date centers of tectonic activity in the western equatorial region. For example, our results show a center of tectonic activity at Valles Marineris, which may be associated with uplift caused by intrusion. Such evidence may help explain, in part, the development of the large troughs and associated outflow channels and chaotic terrain. We also find a local centre of tectonic activity near the source region of Warrego Valles. Here, we suggest that the valley system may have resulted largely from intrusive-related hydrothermal activity. We hope that this work, together with the current Mars Global Surveyor mission, will lead to a better understanding of the geological processes that shaped the Martian surface.

  7. Digital Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamberger, Casimir; Renz, Uwe; Bamberger, Andreas

    2011-06-01

    Methods to visualize the two-dimensional (2D) distribution of molecules by mass spectrometric imaging evolve rapidly and yield novel applications in biology, medicine, and material surface sciences. Most mass spectrometric imagers acquire high mass resolution spectra spot-by-spot and thereby scan the object's surface. Thus, imaging is slow and image reconstruction remains cumbersome. Here we describe an imaging mass spectrometer that exploits the true imaging capabilities by ion optical means for the time of flight mass separation. The mass spectrometer is equipped with the ASIC Timepix chip as an array detector to acquire the position, mass, and intensity of ions that are imaged by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) directly from the target sample onto the detector. This imaging mass spectrometer has a spatial resolving power at the specimen of (84 ± 35) μm with a mass resolution of 45 and locates atoms or organic compounds on a surface area up to ~2 cm2. Extended laser spots of ~5 mm2 on structured specimens allows parallel imaging of selected masses. The digital imaging mass spectrometer proves high hit-multiplicity, straightforward image reconstruction, and potential for high-speed readout at 4 kHz or more. This device demonstrates a simple way of true image acquisition like a digital photographic camera. The technology may enable a fast analysis of biomolecular samples in near future.

  8. MEMS digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, R. C.; Tang, T. K.; Calvet, R.; Fossum, E. R.

    2007-02-01

    MEMS technology uses photolithography and etching of silicon wafers to enable mechanical structures with less than 1 μm tolerance, important for the miniaturization of imaging systems. In this paper, we present the first silicon MEMS digital auto-focus camera for use in cell phones with a focus range of 10 cm to infinity. At the heart of the new silicon MEMS digital camera, a simple and low-cost electromagnetic actuator impels a silicon MEMS motion control stage on which a lens is mounted. The silicon stage ensures precise alignment of the lens with respect to the imager, and enables precision motion of the lens over a range of 300 μm with < 5 μm hysteresis and < 2 μm repeatability. Settling time is < 15 ms for 200 μm step, and < 5ms for 20 μm step enabling AF within 0.36 sec at 30 fps. The precise motion allows COTS optics to maintain MTF > 0.8 at 20 cy/mm up to 80% field over the full range of motion. Accelerated lifetime testing has shown that the alignment and precision of motion is maintained after 8,000 g shocks, thermal cycling from - 40 C to 85 C, and operation over 20 million cycles.

  9. Serials on Optical Disks: A Library of Congress Pilot Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criswell, Lela Beth

    1983-01-01

    Description of the Optical Disk Pilot Program of the Library of Congress defines characteristics and differences between analog videodisks and optical digital disk technology. Benefits of the optical digital disk, material selection, and the system configuration (bibliographic indexing, document preparation and input scanning, image and record…

  10. Systems and methods for free space optical communication

    DOEpatents

    Harper, Warren W [Benton City, WA; Aker, Pamela M [Richland, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2011-05-10

    Free space optical communication methods and systems, according to various aspects are described. The methods and systems are characterized by transmission of data through free space with a digitized optical signal acquired using wavelength modulation, and by discrimination between bit states in the digitized optical signal using a spectroscopic absorption feature of a chemical substance.

  11. Can We Teach Digital Natives Digital Literacy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Wan

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much debate about the concept of digital natives, in particular the differences between the digital natives' knowledge and adoption of digital technologies in informal versus formal educational contexts. This paper investigates the knowledge about educational technologies of a group of undergraduate students…

  12. Programmable fiber optic splitters using distributed optical MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riza, Nabeel A.; Reza, Syed Azer

    2007-04-01

    This paper proposes novel intelligent Value Added Modules (VAMs) which employ an intelligent spatial processing technique to realize variable optical power split ratios. To demonstrate the concept of the smart VAM, the Texas Instrument (TI) Digital Micro-mirror Device (DMD TM) has been used. Different optical power split ratios have been experimentally verified.

  13. Optical disk technology and information.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, C M

    1982-02-12

    The optical video disk, spawned by the home entertainment industry, and its counterpart, the optical digital disk, both hold great promise for information storage and retrieval and the scientific enterprise. Optical digital disks for computer mass storage are currently under development by many firms. In addition, efforts are under way to allow encoding of digital information on video disks. This is desirable as an inexpensive publication medium for machine-readable data as well as a means of obtaining both video and digital information on one disk. Potential applications of this technology include inexpensive on-line storage, random access graphics to complement on-line information systems, hybrid network architectures, office automation systems, and archival storage.

  14. The Profiles in Science Digital Library: Behind the Scenes.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Marie E; Moffatt, Christie

    2012-01-01

    This demonstration shows the Profiles in Science® digital library. Profiles in Science contains digitized selections from the personal manuscript collections of prominent biomedical researchers, medical practitioners, and those fostering science and health. The Profiles in Science Web site is the delivery mechanism for content derived from the digital library system. The system is designed according to our basic principles for digital library development [1]. The digital library includes the rules and software used for digitizing items, creating and editing database records and performing quality control as well as serving the digital content to the public. Among the types of data managed by the digital library are detailed item-level, collection-level and cross-collection metadata, digitized photographs, papers, audio clips, movies, born-digital electronic files, optical character recognized (OCR) text, and annotations (see Figure 1). The digital library also tracks the status of each item, including digitization quality, sensitivity of content, and copyright. Only items satisfying all required criteria are released to the public through the World Wide Web. External factors have influenced all aspects of the digital library's infrastructure. PMID:23543833

  15. The Profiles in Science Digital Library: Behind the Scenes

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Marie E.; Moffatt, Christie

    2013-01-01

    This demonstration shows the Profiles in Science® digital library. Profiles in Science contains digitized selections from the personal manuscript collections of prominent biomedical researchers, medical practitioners, and those fostering science and health. The Profiles in Science Web site1 is the delivery mechanism for content derived from the digital library system. The system is designed according to our basic principles for digital library development [1]. The digital library includes the rules and software used for digitizing items, creating and editing database records and performing quality control as well as serving the digital content to the public. Among the types of data managed by the digital library are detailed item-level, collection-level and cross-collection metadata, digitized photographs, papers, audio clips, movies, born-digital electronic files, optical character recognized (OCR) text, and annotations (see Figure 1). The digital library also tracks the status of each item, including digitization quality, sensitivity of content, and copyright. Only items satisfying all required criteria are released to the public through the World Wide Web. External factors have influenced all aspects of the digital library's infrastructure. PMID:23543833

  16. The Profiles in Science Digital Library: Behind the Scenes.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Marie E; Moffatt, Christie

    2012-01-01

    This demonstration shows the Profiles in Science® digital library. Profiles in Science contains digitized selections from the personal manuscript collections of prominent biomedical researchers, medical practitioners, and those fostering science and health. The Profiles in Science Web site is the delivery mechanism for content derived from the digital library system. The system is designed according to our basic principles for digital library development [1]. The digital library includes the rules and software used for digitizing items, creating and editing database records and performing quality control as well as serving the digital content to the public. Among the types of data managed by the digital library are detailed item-level, collection-level and cross-collection metadata, digitized photographs, papers, audio clips, movies, born-digital electronic files, optical character recognized (OCR) text, and annotations (see Figure 1). The digital library also tracks the status of each item, including digitization quality, sensitivity of content, and copyright. Only items satisfying all required criteria are released to the public through the World Wide Web. External factors have influenced all aspects of the digital library's infrastructure.

  17. Optimal quantisation applied to digital holographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shortt, Alison E.; Naughton, Thomas J.; Javidi, Bahram

    2005-06-01

    Digital holography is an inherently three-dimensional (3D) technique for the capture of real-world objects. Many existing 3D imaging and processing techniques are based on the explicit combination of several 2D perspectives (or light stripes, etc.) through digital image processing. The advantage of recording a hologram is that multiple 2D perspectives can be optically combined in parallel, and in a constant number of steps independent of the hologram size. Although holography and its capabilities have been known for many decades, it is only very recently that digital holography has been practically investigated due to the recent development of megapixel digital sensors with sufficient spatial resolution and dynamic range. The applications of digital holography could include 3D television, virtual reality, and medical imaging. If these applications are realised, compression standards will have to be defined. We outline the techniques that have been proposed to date for the compression of digital hologram data and show that they are comparable to the performance of what in communication theory is known as optimal signal quantisation. We adapt the optimal signal quantisation technique to complex-valued 2D signals. The technique relies on knowledge of the histograms of real and imaginary values in the digital holograms. Our digital holograms of 3D objects are captured using phase-shift interferometry.

  18. H. Sapiens Digital: From Digital Immigrants and Digital Natives to Digital Wisdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prensky, Marc

    2009-01-01

    As we move further into the 21st century, the digital native/digital immigrant paradigm created by Marc Prensky in 2001 is becoming less relevant. In this article, Prensky suggests that we should focus instead on the development of what he calls "digital wisdom." Arguing that digital technology can make us not just smarter but truly wiser, Prensky…

  19. DLP switched blaze grating: the heart of optical signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Walter M.; Lee, Benjamin L.; Rancuret, Paul; Sawyers, Bryce D.; Endsley, Lynn; Powell, Donald

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an approach for processing communication signals in the optical domain using a DLP digital mirror array driven by a Digital Signal Processor (DSP). In optical communication systems, modulation rates of 10 GB/s and above are common, hence, direct processing of Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexed (DWDM) optical signals without undergoing Optical to Electrical conversion has become a key requirement for cost effective deployment of dynamic optical networks. This work will discuss primarily applications of Optical Signal Processing (OSP) to coherent DWDM signals. Optical Signal Processing has also found applications in spectroscopy, microscopy, sensing, optical correlation, and testing.

  20. Optical Media in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Ann E.

    1993-01-01

    Provides an overview of five major systems utilizing optical media, including basic descriptions, applications, configurations, and advantages and disadvantages. Systems covered are interactive videodisc, compact disc read only memory (CD-ROM), integrated systems, digital video interactive, and QuickTime and Video for Windows. (five references)…

  1. The Optical Disc Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbreath, Jeremy

    1993-01-01

    Provides an update on optical disk technology as a means of digital media storage and explains why it may become a standard storage technology for telemedia technology. Topics discussed include read-only formats; write-once formats, including WORM and CD-WORM; rewritable formats; videodiscs; and future possibilities. (LRW)

  2. Microprocessor directed optical pyrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.H.; O'neil, J.E.; Tenney, A.S.

    1983-03-01

    A portable automatic disappearing filament optical pyrometer having low power demand incorporating a solid state line scanner as a sensing element is controlled by a microprocessor to perform a balance between the radiation from a target and a lamp filament to provide a digital indication of the temperature of the target including compensation for emissivity of the target.

  3. Direct digital conversion detector technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandl, William J.; Fedors, Richard

    1995-06-01

    Future imaging sensors for the aerospace and commercial video markets will depend on low cost, high speed analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion to efficiently process optical detector signals. Current A/D methods place a heavy burden on system resources, increase noise, and limit the throughput. This paper describes a unique method for incorporating A/D conversion right on the focal plane array. This concept is based on Sigma-Delta sampling, and makes optimum use of the active detector real estate. Combined with modern digital signal processors, such devices will significantly increase data rates off the focal plane. Early conversion to digital format will also decrease the signal susceptibility to noise, lowering the communications bit error rate. Computer modeling of this concept is described, along with results from several simulation runs. A potential application for direct digital conversion is also reviewed. Future uses for this technology could range from scientific instruments to remote sensors, telecommunications gear, medical diagnostic tools, and consumer products.

  4. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

  5. Digital signal processing: Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenberg, L. M.; Matiushkin, B. D.; Poliak, M. N.

    The fundamentals of the theory and design of systems and devices for the digital processing of signals are presented. Particular attention is given to algorithmic methods of synthesis and digital processing equipment in communication systems (e.g., selective digital filtering, spectral analysis, and variation of the signal discretization frequency). Programs for the computer-aided analysis of digital filters are described. Computational examples are presented, along with tables of transfer function coefficients for recursive and nonrecursive digital filters.

  6. Optic glioma

    MedlinePlus

    Glioma - optic; Optic nerve glioma; Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma; Brain cancer - optic glioma ... Optic gliomas are rare. The cause of optic gliomas is unknown. Most optic gliomas are slow-growing ...

  7. Digital Image Processing in Private Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Connie

    1986-01-01

    Examines various types of private industry optical disk installations in terms of business requirements for digital image systems in five areas: records management; transaction processing; engineering/manufacturing; information distribution; and office automation. Approaches for implementing image systems are addressed as well as key success…

  8. Digital image processing of vascular angiograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, R. H.; Beckenbach, E. S.; Blankenhorn, D. H.; Crawford, D. W.; Brooks, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    The paper discusses the estimation of the degree of atherosclerosis in the human femoral artery through the use of a digital image processing system for vascular angiograms. The film digitizer uses an electronic image dissector camera to scan the angiogram and convert the recorded optical density information into a numerical format. Another processing step involves locating the vessel edges from the digital image. The computer has been programmed to estimate vessel abnormality through a series of measurements, some derived primarily from the vessel edge information and others from optical density variations within the lumen shadow. These measurements are combined into an atherosclerosis index, which is found in a post-mortem study to correlate well with both visual and chemical estimates of atherosclerotic disease.

  9. Vibration analysis using digital correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John A.; Lehner, David L.; Dudderar, T. Dixon; Matthys, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of a computer-based optical method for locating the positions of nodes and antinodes in vibrating members. Structured light patterns are projected at an angle onto the vibrating surface using a 35 mm slide projector. The vibrating surface and the projected images are captured in a time averaged photograph which is subsequently digitized. The inherent fringe patterns are filtered to determine amplitudes of vibration, and computer programs are used to compare the time averaged images to images recorded prior to excitation to locate nodes and antinodes. Some of the influences of pattern regularity on digital correlation are demonstrated, and a speckle-based method for determining the mode shapes and the amplitudes of vibration with variable sensitivity is suggested.

  10. Digital x-ray imager

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-18

    The global objective of this cooperation was to lower the cost and improve the quality of breast health care in the United States. We planned to achieve it by designing a very high performance digital radiography unit for breast surgical specimen radiography in the operating room. These technical goals needed to be achieved at reasonable manufacturing costs to enable MedOptics to achieve high market penetration at a profit. Responsibility for overall project execution rested with MedOptics. MedOptics fabricated and demonstrated hardware, and selected components and handled the overall integration. After completion of this CRADA, MedOptics worked with collaborators to demonstrate clinical performance and utility. Finally, the company marketed the device. LLNL convened a multi-directorate expert panel for an intensive review of MedOptics point design. A written brief of panel conclusions and recommendations was prepared. In addition, LLNL was responsible for: computationally simulating the effects of varying source voltage and filtering (predicting the required dynamic range for the detector); evaluating CsI:Tl, CdWO4 and scintillating glass as image converters; recommending image enhancement algorithms. The LLNL modeling results guided the design and experimental elements of the project. The Laboratory's unique array of sources and detectors was employed to resolve specific technical questions. Our image processing expertise was applied to the selection of enhancement tools for image display.

  11. Multiple-Ring Digital Communication Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, Harold

    1992-01-01

    Optical-fiber digital communication network to support data-acquisition and control functions of electric-power-distribution networks. Optical-fiber links of communication network follow power-distribution routes. Since fiber crosses open power switches, communication network includes multiple interconnected loops with occasional spurs. At each intersection node is needed. Nodes of communication network include power-distribution substations and power-controlling units. In addition to serving data acquisition and control functions, each node acts as repeater, passing on messages to next node(s). Multiple-ring communication network operates on new AbNET protocol and features fiber-optic communication.

  12. Advances in digital video for electronic media.

    PubMed

    McAfooes, J A

    1997-01-01

    From media's early days of film strips and records, to today's multimedia CD-ROMs, nurses have embraced educational tools. Today, the capabilities of these tools have placed a tremendous demand for providing information any time, any where. This has led to increasing digitization of sights and sounds. Once digitized, this information can travel over information highways made up of telephone lines, fiberoptic cables, microwaves and satellites, or it can be stored on magnetic and optical media. Technological advances have made it possible for computer users to create, store and retrieve high quality digital still and moving video and audio for inclusion in electronic media. Methods for digitizing include capturing and converting the information with cameras, scanners and capture boards. Digital video compression/decompression (codec) standards vary in quality. Potential uses of digital video abound including video on demand, videoconferencing, distance learning, telemedicine, on-line education and computer-based training. Examples illustrating the differences in digital video formats will be shown during the presentation. PMID:10175444

  13. Advances in digital video for electronic media.

    PubMed

    McAfooes, J A

    1997-01-01

    From media's early days of film strips and records, to today's multimedia CD-ROMs, nurses have embraced educational tools. Today, the capabilities of these tools have placed a tremendous demand for providing information any time, any where. This has led to increasing digitization of sights and sounds. Once digitized, this information can travel over information highways made up of telephone lines, fiberoptic cables, microwaves and satellites, or it can be stored on magnetic and optical media. Technological advances have made it possible for computer users to create, store and retrieve high quality digital still and moving video and audio for inclusion in electronic media. Methods for digitizing include capturing and converting the information with cameras, scanners and capture boards. Digital video compression/decompression (codec) standards vary in quality. Potential uses of digital video abound including video on demand, videoconferencing, distance learning, telemedicine, on-line education and computer-based training. Examples illustrating the differences in digital video formats will be shown during the presentation.

  14. Remote metrology by comparative digital holography

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbach, Torsten; Osten, Wolfgang; Kopylow, Christoph von; Jueptner, Werner

    2006-02-10

    A method for the remote comparison of objects with regard to their shape or response to a load is presented. The method allows interferometric sensitivity for comparing objects with different microstructure. In contrast to the well-known incoherent techniques based on inverse fringe projection this new approach uses the coherent optical wave field of the master object as a mask for the illumination of the sample object. The coherent mask is created by digital holography to allow instant access to the complete optical information of the master object at any place desired. The mask is reconstructed by a spatial light modulator (SLM). The optical reconstruction of digital holograms with SLM technology allows modification of reconstructed wavefronts with respect to improvement of image quality, the skilled introduction of additional information about the object (augmented reality), and the alignment of the master and test object.

  15. A novel digital scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Hong-Chou; Yu, Hsing-Cheng; Cheng, Kuen-Chiuan; Lee, Yuan-Chin; Ju, Jau-Jiu

    2011-06-01

    A novel digital scanning microscope (DSM) for observing cellular fluorescent micro-images is proposed and manufactured in this study. DSM applied in the biomedical field has been designed based on a concept of fast access time of an optical pick-up head (PUH) in optical disc devices; hence, DSM has been developed based on a blue-ray PUH module with a triaxial scanning actuator (TSA) system. High-resolution and high-speed scanning is effectively realized by TSA system instead of utilizing high-precision transpose stage mechanism. In consequent, a PUH module can work with a time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) module and serve as DSM for detecting fluorescent signals on samples.

  16. Pictometry digital video mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciampa, John A.

    1995-09-01

    Pictometry is a proprietary digital imaging process which computationally maps each pixel of a digital land image to actual geographic coordinates, so that features in a mosaic of land images may be located and or measured.

  17. Mixed application MMIC technologies - Progress in combining RF, digital and photonic circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swirhun, S.; Bendett, M.; Sokolov, V.; Bauhahn, P.; Sullivan, C.; Mactaggart, R.; Mukherjee, S.; Hibbs-Brenner, M.; Mondal, J.

    1991-01-01

    Approaches for future 'mixed application' monolithic integrated circuits (ICs) employing optical receive/transmit, RF amplification and modulation and digital control functions are discussed. We focus on compatibility of the photonic component fabrication with conventional RF and digital IC technologies. Recent progress at Honeywell in integrating several parts of the desired RF/digital/photonic circuit integration suite required for construction of a future millimeter-wave optically-controlled phased-array element are illustrated.

  18. Optic neuritis

    MedlinePlus

    Retro-bulbar neuritis; Multiple sclerosis - optic neuritis; Optic nerve - optic neuritis ... The exact cause of optic neuritis is unknown. The optic nerve carries visual information from your eye to the brain. The nerve can swell when ...

  19. Digital flight control research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. E.; Stern, R. G.; Smith, T. B.; Sinha, P.

    1974-01-01

    The results of studies which were undertaken to contribute to the design of digital flight control systems, particularly for transport aircraft are presented. In addition to the overall design considerations for a digital flight control system, the following topics are discussed in detail: (1) aircraft attitude reference system design, (2) the digital computer configuration, (3) the design of a typical digital autopilot for transport aircraft, and (4) a hybrid flight simulator.

  20. Parallel digital modem using multirate digital filter banks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadr, Ramin; Vaidyanathan, P. P.; Raphaeli, Dan; Hinedi, Sami

    1994-01-01

    A new class of architectures for an all-digital modem is presented in this report. This architecture, referred to as the parallel receiver (PRX), is based on employing multirate digital filter banks (DFB's) to demodulate, track, and detect the received symbol stream. The resulting architecture is derived, and specifications are outlined for designing the DFB for the PRX. The key feature of this approach is a lower processing rate then either the Nyquist rate or the symbol rate, without any degradation in the symbol error rate. Due to the freedom in choosing the processing rate, the designer is able to arbitrarily select and use digital components, independent of the speed of the integrated circuit technology. PRX architecture is particularly suited for high data rate applications, and due to the modular structure of the parallel signal path, expansion to even higher data rates is accommodated with each. Applications of the PRX would include gigabit satellite channels, multiple spacecraft, optical links, interactive cable-TV, telemedicine, code division multiple access (CDMA) communications, and others.

  1. Digital Language Death

    PubMed Central

    Kornai, András

    2013-01-01

    Of the approximately 7,000 languages spoken today, some 2,500 are generally considered endangered. Here we argue that this consensus figure vastly underestimates the danger of digital language death, in that less than 5% of all languages can still ascend to the digital realm. We present evidence of a massive die-off caused by the digital divide. PMID:24167559

  2. Digital Literacy. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    21st Century students need a complex set of skills to be successful in a digital environment. Digital literacy, similar to traditional definitions of literacy, is a set of skills students use to locate, organize, understand, evaluate and create information. The difference is that it occurs in an environment where a growing set of digital tools…

  3. Bridging the Digital Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Alan; Milner, Helen; Killer, Terry; Dixon, Genny

    2008-01-01

    As the Government publishes its action plan for consultation on digital inclusion, the authors consider some of the challenges and opportunities for the delivery of digital inclusion. Clarke argues that digital inclusion requires more than access to technology or the skills to use it effectively, it demands information and media literacy. Milner…

  4. Reconceptualising Critical Digital Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pangrazio, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    While it has proved a useful concept during the past 20 years, the notion of "critical digital literacy" requires rethinking in light of the fast-changing nature of young people's digital practices. This paper contrasts long-established notions of "critical digital literacy" (based primarily around the critical consumption of…

  5. Development Of A Digital Mammography System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaffe, M. J.; Nishikawa, R. M.; Maidment, A. D. A.; Fenster, A.

    1988-06-01

    A digital breast imaging system is under development to provide improved detectability of breast cancer. In previous work, the limitations of screen-film mammography were studied using both theoretical and experimental techniques. Important limitations were found in both the acquisition and the display components of imaging. These have been addressed in the design of a scanned-projection digital mammography system. A high resolution x-ray image intensifier (XRII), optically coupled to a self-scanned linear photodiode array, is used to record the image. Pre- and post-patient collimation virtually eliminates scattered radiation and veiling glare of the XRII with only a 20% increase in dose due to penumbra. Geometric magnification of 1.6 times is employed to achieve limiting spatial resolution of 7 1p/mm. For low-contrast objects as small as 0.1 mm in diameter, the digital system is capable of producing images with higher contrast and signal-to-noise ratio than optimally-exposed conventional film-screen mammography systems. Greater latitude is obtainable on the digital system because of its wide dynamic range and linearity. The slit system is limited due to long image acquisition times, and poor quantum efficiency. This motivated our current work on a slot beam digital mammography system which is based on a fiber-optic x-ray detector. Preliminary results of this system will be presented.

  6. LaserData, Mnemos, and Other Data Disks: The Race to Store and Retrieve with Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urrows, Henry; Urrows, Elizabeth

    1984-01-01

    Reports on the state of currently available digital storage and retrieval systems and describes in detail one-sided optical videodisc LaserData and the Mnemos system, which stores graphic images on microfiche discs. Video Patsearch, Matrox, Philips Megadoc, DEMAND, and Digital Recording Corporation's optical digital records and future videodisc…

  7. Parallel phase-shifting digital holography using LCOS-SLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Miao; Nitta, Kouichi; Matoba, Osamu; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro

    2013-12-01

    Parallel phase-shifting digital holography (PPSDH) method can record dynamic three-dimensional events with higher spatial resolution than that of off-axis digital holography. In PPSDH, all amount of phase retardations are included in a multiplexed hologram and can be optically implemented by using a phase-mode spatial light modulator (SLM) located in the reference beam. The SLM can also compensate optical aberration caused by lenses, beam splitters, and air fluctuation as in adaptive optics. In this presentation, we review our experimental results using stationary two-dimensional object using a liquid-crystal on Silicon (LCOS) SLM.

  8. Experimental research of digital holographic microscopic measuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xueliang; Chen, Feifei; Li, Jicheng

    2013-06-01

    Digital holography is a new imaging technique, which is developed on the base of optical holography, Digital processing, and Computer techniques. It is using CCD instead of the conventional silver to record hologram, and then reproducing the 3D contour of the object by the way of computer simulation. Compared with the traditional optical holographic, the whole process is of simple measuring, lower production cost, faster the imaging speed, and with the advantages of non-contact real-time measurement. At present, it can be used in the fields of the morphology detection of tiny objects, micro deformation analysis, and biological cells shape measurement. It is one of the research hot spot at home and abroad. This paper introduced the basic principles and relevant theories about the optical holography and Digital holography, and researched the basic questions which influence the reproduce images in the process of recording and reconstructing of the digital holographic microcopy. In order to get a clear digital hologram, by analyzing the optical system structure, we discussed the recording distance and of the hologram. On the base of the theoretical studies, we established a measurement and analyzed the experimental conditions, then adjusted them to the system. To achieve a precise measurement of tiny object in three-dimension, we measured MEMS micro device for example, and obtained the reproduction three-dimensional contour, realized the three dimensional profile measurement of tiny object. According to the experiment results consider: analysis the reference factors between the zero-order term and a pair of twin-images by the choice of the object light and the reference light and the distance of the recording and reconstructing and the characteristics of reconstruction light on the measurement, the measurement errors were analyzed. The research result shows that the device owns certain reliability.

  9. Resource requirements for digital computations on electrooptical systems.

    PubMed

    Eshaghian, M M; Panda, D K; Kumar, V K

    1991-03-10

    In this paper we study the resource requirements of electrooptical organizations in performing digital computing tasks. We define a generic model of parallel computation using optical interconnects, called the optical model of computation (OMC). In this model, computation is performed in digital electronics and communication is performed using free space optics. Using this model we derive relationships between information transfer and computational resources in solving a given problem. To illustrate our results, we concentrate on a computationally intensive operation, 2-D digital image convolution. Irrespective of the input/output scheme and the order of computation, we show a lower bound of ?(nw) on the optical volume required for convolving a w x w kernel with an n x n image, if the input bits are given to the system only once.

  10. Digital Archiving: Where the Past Lives Again

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxson, K. B.

    2012-06-01

    The process of digital archiving for variable star data by manual entry with an Excel spreadsheet is described. Excel-based tools including a Step Magnitude Calculator and a Julian Date Calculator for variable star observations where magnitudes and Julian dates have not been reduced are presented. Variable star data in the literature and the AAVSO International Database prior to 1911 are presented and reviewed, with recent archiving work being highlighted. Digitization using optical character recognition software conversion is also demonstrated, with editing and formatting suggestions for the OCR-converted text.

  11. Optical temperature sensor utilizing birefringent crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quick, William H. (Inventor); James, Kenneth A. (Inventor); Strahan, Virgil H. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A temperature sensor comprising an optical transducer member having an array of birefringent crystals. The length and, accordingly, the sensitivity to temperature change of successive birefringent crystals varies according to a particular relationship. The transducer is interconnected with a fiber optic transmission and detecting system. Respective optical output signals that are transmitted from the birefringent crystals via the fiber optic transmission system are detected and decoded so as to correspond to digits of a numbering system, whereby an accurate digital representation of temperature can ultimately be provided.

  12. Digital Mammography and Digital Breast Tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Tanya W

    2016-06-01

    Breast imaging technology has advanced significantly from the 1930s until the present. American women have a 1 in 8 chance of developing breast cancer. Mammography has been proven in multiple clinical trials to reduce breast cancer mortality. Although a mainstay of breast imaging and improved from film-screen mammography, digital mammography is not a perfect examination. Overlapping obscuring breast tissue limits mammographic interpretation. Breast digital tomosynthesis reduces and/or eliminates overlapping obscuring breast tissue. Although there are some disadvantages with digital breast tomosynthesis, this relatively lost-cost technology may be used effectively in the screening and diagnostic settings. PMID:27101241

  13. Precise evaluation of the Helmholtz equation for optical propagation.

    PubMed

    Pond, John E; Sutton, George W

    2015-01-01

    A precise computational integration of the Helmholtz equation was performed for laser propagation of an electromagnetic wave with no approximations or linearization. This computation integration was performed using 64-bit processors. This is illustrated for a uniform monochromatic beam from a circular aperture that has a uniform intensity. It predicts many Arago spots and near-field intensity fluctuations for a large ratio of aperture size to wavelength and converges to the usual Airy pattern in the far field. PMID:25531618

  14. High speed optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Michael Y.; Livas, Jeff

    2005-02-01

    This overview will discuss core network technology and cost trade-offs inherent in choosing between "analog" architectures with high optical transparency, and ones heavily dependent on frequent "digital" signal regeneration. The exact balance will be related to the specific technology choices in each area outlined above, as well as the network needs such as node geographic spread, physical connectivity patterns, and demand loading. Over the course of a decade, optical networks have evolved from simple single-channel SONET regenerator-based links to multi-span multi-channel optically amplified ultra-long haul systems, fueled by high demand for bandwidth at reduced cost. In general, the cost of a well-designed high capacity system is dominated by the number of optical to electrical (OE) and electrical to optical (EO) conversions required. As the reach and channel capacity of the transport systems continued to increase, it became necessary to improve the granularity of the demand connections by introducing (optical add/drop multiplexers) OADMs. Thus, if a node requires only small demand connectivity, most of the optical channels are expressed through without regeneration (OEO). The network costs are correspondingly reduced, partially balanced by the increased cost of the OADM nodes. Lately, the industry has been aggressively pursuing a natural extension of this philosophy towards all-optical "analog" core networks, with each demand touching electrical digital circuitry only at the in/egress nodes. This is expected to produce a substantial elimination of OEO costs, increase in network capacity, and a notionally simpler operation and service turn-up. At the same time, such optical "analog" network requires a large amount of complicated hardware and software for monitoring and manipulating high bit rate optical signals. New and more complex modulation formats that provide resiliency to both optical noise and nonlinear propagation effects are important for extended

  15. A 96-channel FPGA-based Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) and fast trigger processor module with multi-hit capability and pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, Mircea; Frisch, Henry; Heintz, Mary; Paramonov, Alexander; Sanders, Harold; Chappa, Steve; DeMaat, Robert; Klein, Rod; Miao, Ting; Wilson, Peter; Phillips, Thomas J.

    2005-12-01

    We describe an field-programmable gate arrays based (FPGA), 96-channel, Time-to-Digital converter (TDC) and trigger logic board intended for use with the Central Outer Tracker (COT) [T. Affolder et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 526 (2004) 249] in the CDF Experiment [The CDF-II detector is described in the CDF Technical Design Report (TDR), FERMILAB-Pub-96/390-E. The TDC described here is intended as a further upgrade beyond that described in the TDR] at the Fermilab Tevatron. The COT system is digitized and read out by 315 TDC cards, each serving 96 wires of the chamber. The TDC is physically configured as a 9U VME card. The functionality is almost entirely programmed in firmware in two Altera Stratix FPGAs. The special capabilities of this device are the availability of 840 MHz LVDS inputs, multiple phase-locked clock modules, and abundant memory. The TDC system operates with an input resolution of 1.2 ns, a minimum input pulse width of 4.8 ns and a minimum separation of 4.8 ns between pulses. Each input can accept up to 7 hits per collision. The time-to-digital conversion is done by first sampling each of the 96 inputs in 1.2-ns bins and filling a circular memory; the memory addresses of logical transitions (edges) in the input data are then translated into the time of arrival and width of the COT pulses. Memory pipelines with a depth of 5.5 μs allow deadtime-less operation in the first-level trigger; the data are multiple-buffered to diminish deadtime in the second-level trigger. The complete process of edge-detection and filling of buffers for readout takes 12 μs. The TDC VME interface allows a 64-bit Chain Block Transfer of multiple boards in a crate with transfer-rates up to 47 Mbytes/s. The TDC module also produces prompt trigger data every Tevatron crossing via a deadtimeless fast logic path that can be easily reprogrammed. The trigger bits are clocked onto the P3 VME backplane connector with a 22-ns clock for transmission to the trigger. The full TDC

  16. Digital Beam Deflectors Based Partly on Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.; Kreminska, Liubov; Pishnyak, Oleg; Golovin, Andrii; Winker, Bruce K.

    2007-01-01

    A digital beam deflector based partly on liquid crystals has been demonstrated as a prototype of a class of optical beam-steering devices that contain no mechanical actuators or solid moving parts. Such beam-steering devices could be useful in a variety of applications, including free-space optical communications, switching in fiber-optic communications, general optical switching, and optical scanning. Liquid crystals are of special interest as active materials in nonmechanical beam steerers and deflectors because of their structural flexibility, low operating voltages, and the relatively low costs of fabrication of devices that contain them.

  17. All-optical reservoir computing.

    PubMed

    Duport, François; Schneider, Bendix; Smerieri, Anteo; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2012-09-24

    Reservoir Computing is a novel computing paradigm that uses a nonlinear recurrent dynamical system to carry out information processing. Recent electronic and optoelectronic Reservoir Computers based on an architecture with a single nonlinear node and a delay loop have shown performance on standardized tasks comparable to state-of-the-art digital implementations. Here we report an all-optical implementation of a Reservoir Computer, made of off-the-shelf components for optical telecommunications. It uses the saturation of a semiconductor optical amplifier as nonlinearity. The present work shows that, within the Reservoir Computing paradigm, all-optical computing with state-of-the-art performance is possible.

  18. All-optical reservoir computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duport, François; Schneider, Bendix; Smerieri, Anteo; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2012-09-01

    Reservoir Computing is a novel computing paradigm which uses a nonlinear recurrent dynamical system to carry out information processing. Recent electronic and optoelectronic Reservoir Computers based on an architecture with a single nonlinear node and a delay loop have shown performance on standardized tasks comparable to state-of-the-art digital implementations. Here we report an all-optical implementation of a Reservoir Computer, made of off-the-shelf components for optical telecommunications. It uses the saturation of a semiconductor optical amplifier as nonlinearity. The present work shows that, within the Reservoir Computing paradigm, all-optical computing with state-of-the-art performance is possible.

  19. Digital processing of signals from femtosecond combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čížek, Martin; Šmíd, Radek; Buchta, Zdeněk.; Mikel, Břetislav; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondrej

    2012-01-01

    The presented work is focused on digital processing of beat note signals from a femtosecond optical frequency comb. The levels of mixing products of single spectral components of the comb with CW laser sources are usually very low compared to products of mixing all the comb components together. RF counters are more likely to measure the frequency of the strongest spectral component rather than a weak beat note. Proposed experimental digital signal processing system solves this problem by analyzing the whole spectrum of the output RF signal and using software defined radio (SDR) algorithms. Our efforts concentrate in two main areas: Firstly, we are experimenting with digital signal processing of the RF beat note spectrum produced by f-2f 1 technique and with fully digital servo-loop stabilization of the fs comb. Secondly, we are using digital servo-loop techniques for locking free running continuous laser sources on single components of the fs comb spectrum. Software capable of computing and analyzing the beat-note RF spectrums using FFT and peak detection was developed. A SDR algorithm performing phase demodulation on the f- 2f signal is used as a regulation error signal source for a digital phase-locked loop stabilizing the offset and repetition frequencies of the fs comb.

  20. Digital Collections, Digital Libraries and the Digitization of Cultural Heritage Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Clifford

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the development of digital collections and digital libraries. Topics include digitization of cultural heritage information; broadband issues; lack of compelling content; training issues; types of materials being digitized; sustainability; digital preservation; infrastructure; digital images; data mining; and future possibilities for…

  1. All-optical analog comparator.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-01-01

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical '1' or '0' by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function.

  2. All-optical analog comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-08-01

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical ‘1’ or ‘0’ by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function.

  3. All-optical analog comparator

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-01-01

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical ‘1’ or ‘0’ by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function. PMID:27550874

  4. All-optical analog comparator.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-01-01

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical '1' or '0' by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function. PMID:27550874

  5. Studies in optical parallel processing. [All optical and electro-optic approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    Threshold and A/D devices for converting a gray scale image into a binary one were investigated for all-optical and opto-electronic approaches to parallel processing. Integrated optical logic circuits (IOC) and optical parallel logic devices (OPA) were studied as an approach to processing optical binary signals. In the IOC logic scheme, a single row of an optical image is coupled into the IOC substrate at a time through an array of optical fibers. Parallel processing is carried out out, on each image element of these rows, in the IOC substrate and the resulting output exits via a second array of optical fibers. The OPAL system for parallel processing which uses a Fabry-Perot interferometer for image thresholding and analog-to-digital conversion, achieves a higher degree of parallel processing than is possible with IOC.

  6. Eliminating Bias In Acousto-Optical Spectrum Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Homayoon; Lesh, James R.

    1992-01-01

    Scheme for digital processing of video signals in acousto-optical spectrum analyzer provides real-time correction for signal-dependent spectral bias. Spectrum analyzer described in "Two-Dimensional Acousto-Optical Spectrum Analyzer" (NPO-18092), related apparatus described in "Three-Dimensional Acousto-Optical Spectrum Analyzer" (NPO-18122). Essence of correction is to average over digitized outputs of pixels in each CCD row and to subtract this from the digitized output of each pixel in row. Signal processed electro-optically with reference-function signals to form two-dimensional spectral image in CCD camera.

  7. High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Sandra D.

    2009-01-01

    A High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review (HSD Review) is being conducted to evaluate the state-of-the-shelf in this rapidly progressing industry. Five HSD cameras supplied by four camera manufacturers participated in a Field Test during the Space Shuttle Discovery STS-128 launch. Each camera was also subjected to Bench Tests in the ASRC Imaging Development Laboratory. Evaluation of the data from the Field and Bench Tests is underway. Representatives from the imaging communities at NASA / KSC and the Optical Systems Group are participating as reviewers. A High Speed Digital Video Camera Draft Specification was updated to address Shuttle engineering imagery requirements based on findings from this HSD Review. This draft specification will serve as the template for a High Speed Digital Video Camera Specification to be developed for the wider OSG imaging community under OSG Task OS-33.

  8. Optically measured explosive impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biss, Matthew M.; McNesby, Kevin L.

    2014-06-01

    An experimental technique is investigated to optically measure the explosive impulse produced by laboratory-scale spherical charges detonated in air. Explosive impulse has historically been calculated from temporal pressure measurements obtained via piezoelectric transducers. The presented technique instead combines schlieren flow visualization and high-speed digital imaging to optically measure explosive impulse. Prior to an explosive event, schlieren system calibration is performed using known light-ray refractions and resulting digital image intensities. Explosive charges are detonated in the test section of a schlieren system and imaged by a high-speed digital camera in pseudo-streak mode. Spatiotemporal schlieren intensity maps are converted using an Abel deconvolution, Rankine-Hugoniot jump equations, ideal gas law, triangular temperature decay profile, and Schardin's standard photometric technique to yield spatiotemporal pressure maps. Temporal integration of individual pixel pressure profiles over the positive pressure duration of the shock wave yields the explosive impulse generated for a given radial standoff. Calculated explosive impulses are shown to exhibit good agreement between optically derived values and pencil gage pressure transducers.

  9. Digital work-flow

    PubMed Central

    MARSANGO, V.; BOLLERO, R.; D’OVIDIO, N.; MIRANDA, M.; BOLLERO, P.; BARLATTANI, A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective. The project presents a clinical case in which the digital work-flow procedure was applied for a prosthetic rehabilitation in natural teeth and implants. Materials. Digital work-flow uses patient’s photo for the aesthetic’s planning, digital smile technology for the simulation of the final restoration and real time scanning to register the two arches. Than the scanning are sent to the laboratory that proceed with CAD-CAM production. Results. Digital work-flow offers the opportunities to easily speak with laboratory and patients, gives better clinical results and demonstrated to be a less invasiveness method for the patient. Conclusion. Intra-oral scanner, digital smile design, preview using digital wax-up, CAD-CAM production, are new predictable opportunities for prosthetic team. This work-flow, compared with traditional methods, is faster, more precise and predictable. PMID:25694797

  10. Digitally controlling the 'twist' of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, A.; Forbes, A.

    2014-08-01

    An overview of the work done within the Mathematical Optics group at the CSIR's National Laser Centre will be presented. We will focus on our work done in laser beam shaping with the use of digital holograms for the generation of superimposed optical fields which carry orbital angular momentum (OAM) and the development of OAM measurement techniques. Since OAM offers a potentially infinite-dimensional state space, much interest has been generated in its measurement for higher-dimensional quantum information processing to be realised. We generate superpositions of higher-order Bessel beams and show that even though we can create a field which carries no overall OAM, we can still witness an angular rotation in the intensity profile of the beam. We also develop a new OAM measurement technique by means of digital holograms.

  11. Capability enhancement in compact digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Weijuan; Wen, Yongfu; Wang, Zhaomin; Yang, Fang; Asundi, Anand

    2015-03-01

    A compact reflection digital holographic microscopy (DHM) system integrated with the light source and optical interferometer is developed for 3D topographic characterization and real-time dynamic inspection for Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Capability enhancement methods in lateral resolution, axial resolving range and large field of view for the compact DHM system are presented. To enhance the lateral resolution, the numerical aperture of a reflection DHM system is analyzed and optimum designed. To enhance the axial resolving range, dual wavelengths are used to extend the measuring range. To enable the large field of view, stitching of the measurement results is developed in the user-friendly software. Results from surfaces structures on silicon wafer, micro-optics on fused silica and dynamic inspection of MEMS structures demonstrate applications of this compact reflection digital holographic microscope for technical inspection in material science.

  12. Digital Longitudinal Tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimkus, Daniel Steven

    1985-12-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to investigate the clinical utility of digital longitudinal tomosynthesis in radiology. By acquiring a finite group of digital images during a longitudinal tomographic exposure, and processing these images, tomographic planes, other than the fulcrum plane, can be reconstructed. This process is now termed "tomosynthesis". A prototype system utilizing this technique was developed. Both phantom and patient studies were done with this system. The phantom studies were evaluated by subjective, visual criterion and by quantitative analysis of edge sharpness and noise in the reconstructions. Two groups of patients and one volunteer were studied. The first patient group consisted of 8 patients undergoing intravenous urography (IVU). These patients had digital tomography and film tomography of the abdomen. The second patient group consisted of 4 patients with lung cancer admitted to the hospital for laser resection of endobronchial tumor. These patients had mediastinal digital tomograms to evaluate the trachea and mainstem bronchi. The knee of one volunteer was imaged by film tomography and digital tomography. The results of the phantom studies showed that the digital reconstructions accurately produced images of the desired planes. The edge sharpness of the reconstructions approached that of the acquired images. Adequate reconstructions were achieved with as few as 5 images acquired during the exposure, with the quality of the reconstructions improving as the number of images acquired increased. The IVU patients' digital studies had less contrast and spatial resolution than the film tomograms. The single renal lesion visible on the film tomograms was also visible in the digital images. The digital mediastinal studies were felt by several radiologists to be superior to a standard chest xray in evaluating the airways. The digital images of the volunteer's knee showed many of the same anatomic features as the film tomogram, but the digital

  13. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Ken D.; Quinn, Edward L.; Mauck, Jerry L.; Bockhorst, Richard M.

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy and reliability. This paper, which refers to a final report issued in 2013, demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. Improved accuracy results from the superior operating characteristics of digital sensors. These include improvements in sensor accuracy and drift and other related parameters which reduce total loop uncertainty and thereby increase safety and operating margins. An example instrument loop uncertainty calculation for a pressure sensor application is presented to illustrate these improvements. This is a side-by-side comparison of the instrument loop uncertainty for both an analog and a digital sensor in the same pressure measurement application. Similarly, improved sensor reliability is illustrated with a sample calculation for determining the probability of failure on demand, an industry standard reliability measure. This looks at equivalent analog and digital temperature sensors to draw the comparison. The results confirm substantial reliability improvement with the digital sensor, due in large part to ability to continuously monitor the health of a digital sensor such that problems can be immediately identified and corrected. This greatly reduces the likelihood of a latent failure condition of the sensor at the time of a design basis event. Notwithstanding the benefits of digital sensors, there are certain qualification issues that are inherent with digital technology and these are described in the report. One major qualification impediment for digital sensor implementation is software common cause failure (SCCF).

  14. Quantitative optical scanning tests of complex microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    An approach for the development of the optical scanner as a screening inspection instrument for microcircuits involves comparing the quantitative differences in photoresponse images and then correlating them with electrical parameter differences in test devices. The existing optical scanner was modified so that the photoresponse data could be recorded and subsequently digitized. A method was devised for applying digital image processing techniques to the digitized photoresponse data in order to quantitatively compare the data. Electrical tests were performed and photoresponse images were recorded before and following life test intervals on two groups of test devices. Correlations were made between differences or changes in the electrical parameters of the test devices.

  15. Fast serial link using optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    In virtue of offering complete immunity from EMI, fiber-optics links for digital data are useful in the isolation of sensitive detecting apparatus from noisy digital computers. Attention is presently given to one such serial data link employing commercially available transmitter, receiver, cable and connector components together with an encoder/decoder circuit employing standard TTL digital logic components. Although designed for high speed fiber-optic operation, the circuit is equally well suited to medium- or low-speed operation over wires and does not have to transmit a separate clock. A data error rate is measured through operation of the link for a lengthy period of time.

  16. Gated high speed optical detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S. I.; Carson, L. M.; Neal, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and test of two gated, high speed optical detectors for use in high speed digital laser communication links are discussed. The optical detectors used a dynamic crossed field photomultiplier and electronics including dc bias and RF drive circuits, automatic remote synchronization circuits, automatic gain control circuits, and threshold detection circuits. The equipment is used to detect binary encoded signals from a mode locked neodynium laser.

  17. Debunking the "Digital Native": Beyond Digital Apartheid, towards Digital Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, C.; Czerniewicz, L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper interrogates the currently pervasive discourse of the "net generation" finding the concept of the "digital native" especially problematic, both empirically and conceptually. We draw on a research project of South African higher education students' access to and use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) to show that age is…

  18. Digital In, Digital Out: Digital Editing with Firewire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Bob; Sauer, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    Reviews linear and nonlinear digital video (DV) editing equipment and software, using the IEEE 1394 (FireWire) connector. Includes a chart listing specifications and rating eight DV editing systems, reviews two DV still-photo cameras, and previews beta DV products. (PEN)

  19. Exploring digital professionalism.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Coral, Janet; Topps, David; Topps, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of digital media (both computing devices and the services they access) has blurred the boundaries between our personal and professional lives. Contemporary students are the last to remember a time before the widespread use of the Internet and they will be the first to practice in a largely e-health environment. This article explores concepts of digital professionalism and their place in contemporary medical education, and proposes a series of principles of digital professionalism to guide teaching, learning and practice in the healthcare professions. Despite the many risks and fears surrounding their use, digital media are not an intrinsic threat to medical professionalism. Professionals should maintain the capacity for deliberate, ethical, and accountable practice when using digital media. The authors describe a digital professionalism framework structured around concepts of proficiency, reputation, and responsibility. Digital professionalism can be integrated into medical education using strategies based on awareness, alignment, assessment, and accountability. These principles of digital professionalism provide a way for medical students and medical practitioners to embrace the positive aspects of digital media use while being mindful and deliberate in its use to avoid or minimize any negative consequences. PMID:26030375

  20. Exploring digital professionalism.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Coral, Janet; Topps, David; Topps, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of digital media (both computing devices and the services they access) has blurred the boundaries between our personal and professional lives. Contemporary students are the last to remember a time before the widespread use of the Internet and they will be the first to practice in a largely e-health environment. This article explores concepts of digital professionalism and their place in contemporary medical education, and proposes a series of principles of digital professionalism to guide teaching, learning and practice in the healthcare professions. Despite the many risks and fears surrounding their use, digital media are not an intrinsic threat to medical professionalism. Professionals should maintain the capacity for deliberate, ethical, and accountable practice when using digital media. The authors describe a digital professionalism framework structured around concepts of proficiency, reputation, and responsibility. Digital professionalism can be integrated into medical education using strategies based on awareness, alignment, assessment, and accountability. These principles of digital professionalism provide a way for medical students and medical practitioners to embrace the positive aspects of digital media use while being mindful and deliberate in its use to avoid or minimize any negative consequences.

  1. Experiments in digital literacy.

    PubMed

    Eshet-Alkali, Yoram; Amichai-Hamburger, Yair

    2004-08-01

    Having digital literacy requires more than just the ability to use software or to operate a digital device; it includes a large variety of complex skills such as cognitive, motoric, sociological, and emotional that users need to have in order to use digital environments effectively. A conceptual model that was recently described by the authors suggests that digital literacy comprises five major digital skills: photo-visual skills ("reading" instructions from graphical displays), reproduction skills (utilizing digital reproduction to create new, meaningful materials from preexisting ones), branching skills (constructing knowledge from non-linear, hypertextual navigation), information skills (evaluating the quality and validity of information), and socio-emotional skills (understanding the "rules" that prevail in cyberspace and applying this understanding in online cyberspace communication). The present paper presents results from a performance-based pioneer study that investigated the application of the above digital literacy skills conceptual model among different groups of scholars. Results clearly indicate that the younger participants performed better than the older ones, with photo-visual and branching literacy tasks, whereas the older participants were found to be more literate in reproduction and information literacy tasks. Research results shed light on the cognitive skills that users utilize in performing with digital environments, and provide educators and software developers with helpful guidelines for designing better user-centered digital environments. PMID:15331029

  2. Digital security technology simplified.

    PubMed

    Scaglione, Bernard J

    2007-01-01

    Digital security technology is making great strides in replacing analog and other traditional security systems including CCTV card access, personal identification and alarm monitoring applications. Like any new technology, the author says, it is important to understand its benefits and limitations before purchasing and installing, to ensure its proper operation and effectiveness. This article is a primer for security directors on how digital technology works. It provides an understanding of the key components which make up the foundation for digital security systems, focusing on three key aspects of the digital security world: the security network, IP cameras and IP recorders.

  3. Digital solar system geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, R. M.; Kozak, R. C.; Isbell, Nancy K.

    1991-01-01

    All available synoptic maps of the solid-surface bodies of the Solar System were digitized for presentation in the planned Atlas of the Solar System by Greeley and Batson. Since the last report (Batson et al., 1990), preliminary Uranian satellite maps were replaced with improved versions, Galilean satellite geology was simplified and digitized, structure was added to many maps, and the maps were converted to a standard format, with corresponding standing colors for the mapped units. Following these changes, the maps were re-reviewed by their authors and are now undergoing final editing before preparation for publication. In some cases (for Mercury, Venus, and Mars), more detailed maps were digitized and then simplified for the Atlas. Other detailed maps are planned to be digitized in the coming year for the Moon and the Galilean satellites. For most of the remaining bodies such as the Uranian satellites, the current digitized versions contain virtually all the detail that can be mapped given the available data; those versions will be unchanged for the Atlas. These digital geologic maps are archived at the digital scale of 1/16 degree/ pixel, in sinusoidal format. The availability of geology of the Solar System in a digital database will facilitate comparisons and integration with other data: digitized lunar geologic maps have already been used in a comparison with Galileo SSI observations of the Moon.

  4. Digitization Best Practices

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Fei; Holtkamp, Irma S.; Knudson, Frances L.

    2012-07-31

    This project involved performing tests and documenting results to determine best practices for digitizing older print documents. The digitization process is complicated, especially when original documents exhibit non-standard fonts and are faded. Tests focused on solutions to improve high quality scanning, increase OCR accuracy, and efficiently use embedded metadata. Results are summarized. From the test results on the right sides, we know that when we plan to digitize documents, we should balance Quantity and Quality based on our expectation, and then make final decision for the digitization process.

  5. Recent trends in digital halftoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delabastita, Paul A.

    1997-02-01

    Screening is perhaps the oldest form of image processing. The word refers to the mechanical cross line screens that were used at the beginning of this century for the purpose of photomechanical reproduction. Later on, these mechanical screens were replaced by photographic contact screens that enabled significantly improved process control. In the early eighties, the optical screening on graphic arts scanners was replaced by a combination of laser optics and electronic screening. The algorithms, however, were still digital implementations of the original optical methods. The printing needs in the fast growing computer and software industry gave birth to a number of alternative printing technologies such as electrophotographic and inkjet printing. Originally these deices were only designed for printing text, but soon people started experimenting and using them for printing images. The relatively low spatial resolutions of these new devices however made complete review of 'the screening issue' necessary to achieve an acceptable image quality. In this paper a number of recent developments in screening technology are summarized. Special attention is given to the interaction that exists between a halftone screen and the printing devices on which they are rendered including the color mixing behavior. Improved screening techniques are presented that take advantage of modeling the physical behavior of the rendering device.

  6. Optical data transmission at the superconducting super collider

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovar, B.

    1989-04-01

    Digital and analog data transmissions via fiber optics for the Superconducting Super Collider have been investigated. The state of the art of optical transmitters, low loss fiber waveguides, receivers and associated electronics components are reviewed and summarized. Emphasis is placed on the effects of the radiation environment on the performance of an optical data transmission system components. Also, the performance of candidate components of the wide band digital and analog transmission systems intended for deployment in the Superconducting Super Collider Detector is discussed.

  7. Electro-optical techniques for signal conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfrich, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Electro-optical (EO) processing is discussed as a potential alternative to the all-digital approach to signal processing. Nonuniformity compensation can be done by normalizing all the single element detectors outputs in a staring array for both gain and level. Distortion correction can be accomplished with blackbodies, scene statistics or defocused optics. An algorithm used in digital signal conditioning that can be closely approximated by EO techniques is Local Area Brightness Control (LABC). In a digital processor, LABC is performed on a pixel-by-pixel basis, resulting in an enormous amount of calculation. A partially defocused optical system can be used in an EO analog to the digital system. For both nonuniformity compensation and LABC, the EO technique can result in great simplification.

  8. Optical Monitors and OT/GRB analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, R.; Krizek, M.

    2005-07-01

    The Optical Monitors, despite of lower detection limits, are still valuable for detection of prompt real-time and (hypothetical) pre-burst optical emission of gamma-ray bursts. We refer on the ongoing project at the Astronomical Institute in Ondřejov based on digitized data from the photographic EN network.

  9. State-of-the-art digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Lee, K R; Siegel, E L; Templeton, A W; Dwyer, S J; Murphey, M D; Wetzel, L H

    1991-11-01

    Technologic advances in digital radiography have improved the ways in which radiographic images are acquired, displayed, transmitted, recorded, and archived. With computed radiography, performed with storage phosphor plates and interactive high-resolution workstations, radiation dose is reduced and repeat exposures necessitated due to technical errors are eliminated. Digital fluorography allows reductions in dose, procedure time, and film costs. These digital imaging modalities have been well accepted clinically and are equal in diagnostic accuracy to conventional methods. Teleradiology has advanced with the development of laser film digitization, fiberoptic networks, and dial-up circuit switching technology. Laser film printers yield improved hard copies of transmitted images, but further work is needed to faithfully reproduce the images displayed on high-resolution work-stations. Although the capacity for archiving digital image data has increased (260,000 examinations or 23,500 Gbytes can be stored in a six-unit optical disc library), higher capacity storage media are needed. Further technologic advances in the speed of image transmission and storage capacity are anticipated. PMID:1749846

  10. Distributed digital music archives and libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujinaga, Ichiro

    2005-09-01

    The main goal of this research program is to develop and evaluate practices, frameworks, and tools for the design and construction of worldwide distributed digital music archives and libraries. Over the last few millennia, humans have amassed an enormous amount of musical information that is scattered around the world. It is becoming abundantly clear that the optimal path for acquisition is to distribute the task of digitizing the wealth of historical and cultural heritage material that exists in analogue formats, which may include books and manuscripts related to music, music scores, photographs, videos, audio tapes, and phonograph records. In order to achieve this goal, libraries, museums, and archives throughout the world, large or small, need well-researched policies, proper guidance, and efficient tools to digitize their collections and to make them available economically. The research conducted within the program addresses unique and imminent challenges posed by the digitization and dissemination of music media. The are four major research projects in progress: development and evaluation of digitization methods for preservation of analogue recordings; optical music recognition using microfilms; design of workflow management system with automatic metadata extraction; and formulation of interlibrary communication strategies.

  11. A digital-receiver for the MurchisonWidefield Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabu, Thiagaraj; Srivani, K. S.; Roshi, D. Anish; Kamini, P. A.; Madhavi, S.; Emrich, David; Crosse, Brian; Williams, Andrew J.; Waterson, Mark; Deshpande, Avinash A.; Shankar, N. Udaya; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Briggs, Frank H.; Goeke, Robert F.; Tingay, Steven J.; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; R, Gopalakrishna M.; Morgan, Edward H.; Pathikulangara, Joseph; Bunton, John D.; Hampson, Grant; Williams, Christopher; Ord, Stephen M.; Wayth, Randall B.; Kumar, Deepak; Morales, Miguel F.; deSouza, Ludi; Kratzenberg, Eric; Pallot, D.; McWhirter, Russell; Hazelton, Bryna J.; Arcus, Wayne; Barnes, David G.; Bernardi, Gianni; Booler, T.; Bowman, Judd D.; Cappallo, Roger J.; Corey, Brian E.; Greenhill, Lincoln J.; Herne, David; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Kaplan, David L.; Kasper, Justin C.; Kincaid, Barton B.; Koenig, Ronald; Lonsdale, Colin J.; Lynch, Mervyn J.; Mitchell, Daniel A.; Oberoi, Divya; Remillard, Ronald A.; Rogers, Alan E.; Salah, Joseph E.; Sault, Robert J.; Stevens, Jamie B.; Tremblay, S.; Webster, Rachel L.; Whitney, Alan R.; Wyithe, Stuart B.

    2015-03-01

    An FPGA-based digital-receiver has been developed for a low-frequency imaging radio interferometer, the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). The MWA, located at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia, consists of 128 dual-polarized aperture-array elements (tiles) operating between 80 and 300 MHz, with a total processed bandwidth of 30.72 MHz for each polarization. Radio-frequency signals from the tiles are amplified and band limited using analog signal conditioning units; sampled and channelized by digital-receivers. The signals from eight tiles are processed by a single digital-receiver, thus requiring 16 digital-receivers for the MWA. The main function of the digital-receivers is to digitize the broad-band signals from each tile, channelize them to form the sky-band, and transport it through optical fibers to a centrally located correlator for further processing. The digital-receiver firmware also implements functions to measure the signal power, perform power equalization across the band, detect interference-like events, and invoke diagnostic modes. The digital-receiver is controlled by high-level programs running on a single-board-computer. This paper presents the digital-receiver design, implementation, current status, and plans for future enhancements.

  12. Roadmap on optical security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javidi, Bahram; Carnicer, Artur; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Nomura, Takanori; Pérez-Cabré, Elisabet; Millán, María S.; Nishchal, Naveen K.; Torroba, Roberto; Fredy Barrera, John; He, Wenqi; Peng, Xiang; Stern, Adrian; Rivenson, Yair; Alfalou, A.; Brosseau, C.; Guo, Changliang; Sheridan, John T.; Situ, Guohai; Naruse, Makoto; Matsumoto, Tsutomu; Juvells, Ignasi; Tajahuerce, Enrique; Lancis, Jesús; Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong; Pinkse, Pepijn W. H.; Mosk, Allard P.; Markman, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Information security and authentication are important challenges facing society. Recent attacks by hackers on the databases of large commercial and financial companies have demonstrated that more research and development of advanced approaches are necessary to deny unauthorized access to critical data. Free space optical technology has been investigated by many researchers in information security, encryption, and authentication. The main motivation for using optics and photonics for information security is that optical waveforms possess many complex degrees of freedom such as amplitude, phase, polarization, large bandwidth, nonlinear transformations, quantum properties of photons, and multiplexing that can be combined in many ways to make information encryption more secure and more difficult to attack. This roadmap article presents an overview of the potential, recent advances, and challenges of optical security and encryption using free space optics. The roadmap on optical security is comprised of six categories that together include 16 short sections written by authors who have made relevant contributions in this field. The first category of this roadmap describes novel encryption approaches, including secure optical sensing which summarizes double random phase encryption applications and flaws [Yamaguchi], the digital holographic encryption in free space optical technique which describes encryption using multidimensional digital holography [Nomura], simultaneous encryption of multiple signals [Pérez-Cabré], asymmetric methods based on information truncation [Nishchal], and dynamic encryption of video sequences [Torroba]. Asymmetric and one-way cryptosystems are analyzed by Peng. The second category is on compression for encryption. In their respective contributions, Alfalou and Stern propose similar goals involving compressed data and compressive sensing encryption. The very important area of cryptanalysis is the topic of the third category with two sections

  13. Towards a Digital Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    A month ago, a French court ruled that internet access is a basic human right. Gordon Brown has said it is as crucial for people as electricity and water. Yet, 17 million Britons are still excluded from digital technology and an estimated 13 per cent of the population--some six million people--are both socially and digitally excluded. There are…

  14. Digital Image Access & Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidorn, P. Bryan, Ed.; Sandore, Beth, Ed.

    Recent technological advances in computing and digital imaging technology have had immediate and permanent consequences for visual resource collections. Libraries are involved in organizing and managing large visual resource collections. The central challenges in working with digital image collections mirror those that libraries have sought to…

  15. Fundamentals of Digital Logic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noell, Monica L.

    This course is designed to prepare electronics personnel for further training in digital techniques, presenting need to know information that is basic to any maintenance course on digital equipment. It consists of seven study units: (1) binary arithmetic; (2) boolean algebra; (3) logic gates; (4) logic flip-flops; (5) nonlogic circuits; (6)…

  16. Digitized synchronous demodulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodhouse, Christopher E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A digitized synchronous demodulator is constructed entirely of digital components including timing logic, an accumulator, and means to digitally filter the digital output signal. Indirectly, it accepts, at its input, periodic analog signals which are converted to digital signals by traditional analog-to-digital conversion techniques. Broadly, the input digital signals are summed to one of two registers within an accumulator, based on the phase of the input signal and medicated by timing logic. At the end of a predetermined number of cycles of the inputted periodic signals, the contents of the register that accumulated samples from the negative half cycle is subtracted from the accumulated samples from the positive half cycle. The resulting difference is an accurate measurement of the narrow band amplitude of the periodic input signal during the measurement period. This measurement will not include error sources encountered in prior art synchronous demodulators using analog techniques such as offsets, charge injection errors, temperature drift, switching transients, settling time, analog to digital converter missing code, and linearity errors.

  17. Digital Media and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    MacArthur launched the digital media and learning initiative in 2006 to explore how digital media are changing the way young people learn, socialize, communicate, and play. Since 2006, the Foundation has awarded grants totaling more than $100 million for research, development of innovative new technologies, new learning environments for youth,…

  18. Optimization of digital designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling R. (Inventor); Miles, Lowell H. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An application specific integrated circuit is optimized by translating a first representation of its digital design to a second representation. The second representation includes multiple syntactic expressions that admit a representation of a higher-order function of base Boolean values. The syntactic expressions are manipulated to form a third representation of the digital design.

  19. Digital Signature Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassler, Vesna; Biely, Helmut

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Digital Signature Project that was developed in Austria to establish an infrastructure for applying smart card-based digital signatures in banking and electronic-commerce applications. Discusses the need to conform to international standards, an international certification infrastructure, and security features for a public directory…

  20. Will Digital Texts Succeed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acker, Stephen R.

    2008-01-01

    With faculty changing instructional practices to take advantage of customizable, focused content (and digital delivery of that content), many people assume that digital distribution is the answer to bringing the costs of course content delivery in line. But the picture just isn't that simple. A wide continuum of options is available to faculty and…

  1. Occupying the Digital Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    This essay questions the digital humanities' dependence on interpretation and critique as strategies for reading and responding to texts. Instead, the essay proposes suggestion as a digital rhetorical practice, one that does not replace hermeneutics, but instead offers alternative ways to respond to texts. The essay uses the Occupy movement as an…

  2. Educating Digital Citizens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Digital citizenship is how educators, citizens, and parents can teach where the lines of cyber safety and ethics are in the interconnected online world their students will inhabit. Aside from keeping technology users safe, digital citizenship also prepares students to survive and thrive in an environment embedded with information, communication,…

  3. Digital Pinhole Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancor, Rachael; Lancor, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In this article we describe how the classic pinhole camera demonstration can be adapted for use with digital cameras. Students can easily explore the effects of the size of the pinhole and its distance from the sensor on exposure time, magnification, and image quality. Instructions for constructing a digital pinhole camera and our method for…

  4. Determining Our Digital Destiny.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    2000-01-01

    Discusses future possibilities that libraries must consider in a digital information age. Topics include how the Internet has transformed the way people look for information; the need for better Web search engines; electronic publishing; and an information infrastructure that supports the delivery of digital objects and 24-hour reference service.…

  5. Digital Knowledge Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandian, M. Paul

    2008-01-01

    Technology has revolutionized the concept of libraries. Networking and computing technologies have now become sufficiently advanced to support the design and deployment of large digital libraries which are capable of supporting the conventional end-user functions. Digital libraries are a natural extension of the evolution in which libraries have…

  6. Changing State Digital Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    2006-01-01

    Research has shown that state virtual or digital libraries are evolving into websites that are loaded with free resources, subscription databases, and instructional tools. In this article, the author explores these evolving libraries based on the following questions: (1) How user-friendly are the state digital libraries?; (2) How do state digital…

  7. Music Instruction Goes Digital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demski, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Faced with meager enrollment in band, orchestra, and choir programs, schools are using digital technology to excite students about creating music on today's terms. This article discusses how music educators reinvent their profession by acknowledging and incorporating the way students interact with music today--digitally. Bill Evans, a music…

  8. Digital Video Editing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Terry

    2004-01-01

    Monica Adams, head librarian at Robinson Secondary in Fairfax country, Virginia, states that librarians should have the technical knowledge to support projects related to digital video editing. The process of digital video editing and the cables, storage issues and the computer system with software is described.

  9. Improved digital thermometer design.

    PubMed

    Swift, C S

    1981-01-01

    A simple digital thermometer design using a self-contained 3 1/2 digit LCD meter module is presented. The Celsius-reading (Centigrade) thermometer is powered by a single 9-V battery, has very low power drain, and uses an inexpensive NPN silicon transistor for the temperature sensor. A short bibliography on temperature measurement instrumentation is included. PMID:10253871

  10. Writing and Digital Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Waes, Luuk, Ed.; Leijten, Marielle, Ed.; Neuwirth, Chris, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Digital media has become an increasingly powerful force in modern society. This volume brings together outstanding European, American and Australian research in "writing and digital media" and explores its cognitive, social and cultural implications. In addition to presenting programs of original research by internationally known scholars from a…

  11. Creating Digital Authors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoch, Melody; Langston-DeMott, Brooke; Adams-Budde, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Elementary students find themselves engaged and learning at a digital writing camp. The authors find that such elementary students usually have limited access to technology at home and school, and posit that teachers should do all they can to give them more access to and experience in digital composing. Students were motivated and learned to use…

  12. Digital communications study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boorstyn, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    Research is reported dealing with problems of digital data transmission and computer communications networks. The results of four individual studies are presented which include: (1) signal processing with finite state machines, (2) signal parameter estimation from discrete-time observations, (3) digital filtering for radar signal processing applications, and (4) multiple server queues where all servers are not identical.

  13. Digital rotation measurement unit

    DOEpatents

    Sanderson, S.N.

    1983-09-30

    A digital rotation indicator is disclosed for monitoring the position of a valve member having a movable actuator. The indicator utilizes mercury switches adapted to move in cooperation with the actuator. Each of the switches produces an output as it changes state when the actuator moves. A direction detection circuit is connected to the switches to produce a first digital signal indicative of the direction of rotation of the actuator. A count pulse generating circuit is also connected to the switches to produce a second digital pulse signal having count pulses corresponding to a change of state of any of the mercury switches. A reset pulse generating circuit is provided to generate a reset pulse each time a count pulse is generated. An up/down counter is connected to receive the first digital pulse signal and the second digital pulse signal and to count the pulses of the second digital pulse signal either up or down depending upon the instantaneous digital value of the first digital signal whereby a running count indicative of the movement of the actuator is maintained.

  14. Transformation optics with windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxburgh, Stephen; White, Chris D.; Antoniou, Georgios; Orife, Ejovbokoghene; Courtial, Johannes

    2014-09-01

    Identity certification in the cyberworld has always been troublesome if critical information and financial transaction must be processed. Biometric identification is the most effective measure to circumvent the identity issues in mobile devices. Due to bulky and pricy optical design, conventional optical fingerprint readers have been discarded for mobile applications. In this paper, a digital variable-focus liquid lens was adopted for capture of a floating finger via fast focusplane scanning. Only putting a finger in front of a camera could fulfill the fingerprint ID process. This prototyped fingerprint reader scans multiple focal planes from 30 mm to 15 mm in 0.2 second. Through multiple images at various focuses, one of the images is chosen for extraction of fingerprint minutiae used for identity certification. In the optical design, a digital liquid lens atop a webcam with a fixed-focus lens module is to fast-scan a floating finger at preset focus planes. The distance, rolling angle and pitching angle of the finger are stored for crucial parameters during the match process of fingerprint minutiae. This innovative compact touchless fingerprint reader could be packed into a minute size of 9.8*9.8*5 (mm) after the optical design and multiple focus-plane scan function are optimized.

  15. Fast all-optical switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, Thomas M. (Inventor); Poliakov, Evgeni Y. (Inventor); Hazzard, David A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method wherein polarization rotation in alkali vapors or other mediums is used for all-optical switching and digital logic and where the rate of operation is proportional to the amplitude of the pump field. High rates of speed are accomplished by Rabi flopping of the atomic states using a continuously operating monochromatic atomic beam as the pump.

  16. Hadamard multimode optical imaging transceiver

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Bradly J; Guenther, David C; Tiee, Joe J; Kellum, Mervyn J; Olivas, Nicholas L; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R; Judd, Stephen L; Braun, Thomas R

    2012-10-30

    Disclosed is a method and system for simultaneously acquiring and producing results for multiple image modes using a common sensor without optical filtering, scanning, or other moving parts. The system and method utilize the Walsh-Hadamard correlation detection process (e.g., functions/matrix) to provide an all-binary structure that permits seamless bridging between analog and digital domains. An embodiment may capture an incoming optical signal at an optical aperture, convert the optical signal to an electrical signal, pass the electrical signal through a Low-Noise Amplifier (LNA) to create an LNA signal, pass the LNA signal through one or more correlators where each correlator has a corresponding Walsh-Hadamard (WH) binary basis function, calculate a correlation output coefficient for each correlator as a function of the corresponding WH binary basis function in accordance with Walsh-Hadamard mathematical principles, digitize each of the correlation output coefficient by passing each correlation output coefficient through an Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC), and performing image mode processing on the digitized correlation output coefficients as desired to produce one or more image modes. Some, but not all, potential image modes include: multi-channel access, temporal, range, three-dimensional, and synthetic aperture.

  17. The Chemistry of Optical Discs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkett, David

    2002-01-01

    Explains the chemistry used in compact discs (CD), digital versatile discs (DVD), and magneto-optical (MO) discs focusing on the steps of initial creation of the mold, the molding of the polycarbonate, the deposition of the reflective layers, the lacquering of the CDs, and the bonding of DVDs. (Contains 15 references.) (YDS)

  18. Optical Disc Applications in Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andre, Pamela Q. J.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a variety of library applications of optical disc storage technology, including CD-ROM, digital videodisc, and WORM. Research and development projects at the Library of Congress, National Library of Medicine, and National Agricultural Library are described, products offered by library networks are reviewed, and activities in academic and…

  19. Parallel digital forensics infrastructure.

    SciTech Connect

    Liebrock, Lorie M.; Duggan, David Patrick

    2009-10-01

    This report documents the architecture and implementation of a Parallel Digital Forensics infrastructure. This infrastructure is necessary for supporting the design, implementation, and testing of new classes of parallel digital forensics tools. Digital Forensics has become extremely difficult with data sets of one terabyte and larger. The only way to overcome the processing time of these large sets is to identify and develop new parallel algorithms for performing the analysis. To support algorithm research, a flexible base infrastructure is required. A candidate architecture for this base infrastructure was designed, instantiated, and tested by this project, in collaboration with New Mexico Tech. Previous infrastructures were not designed and built specifically for the development and testing of parallel algorithms. With the size of forensics data sets only expected to increase significantly, this type of infrastructure support is necessary for continued research in parallel digital forensics. This report documents the implementation of the parallel digital forensics (PDF) infrastructure architecture and implementation.

  20. Image processing in digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Freedman, M T; Artz, D S

    1997-01-01

    Image processing is a critical part of obtaining high-quality digital radiographs. Fortunately, the user of these systems does not need to understand image processing in detail, because the manufacturers provide good starting values. Because radiologists may have different preferences in image appearance, it is helpful to know that many aspects of image appearance can be changed by image processing, and a new preferred setting can be loaded into the computer and saved so that it can become the new standard processing method. Image processing allows one to change the overall optical density of an image and to change its contrast. Spatial frequency processing allows an image to be sharpened, improving its appearance. It also allows noise to be blurred so that it is less visible. Care is necessary to avoid the introduction of artifacts or the hiding of mediastinal tubes.