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Sample records for 64-slice multidetector computed

  1. Effect of obesity on coronary artery plaque using 64 slice multidetector cardiac computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Isma'eel, Hussain; Tellalian, David; Hamirani, Yasmin S; Kadakia, Jigar; Nasir, Khurram; Budoff, Matthew J

    2010-04-30

    Patients with a coronary artery calcification score (CACS) of zero and an intermediate risk of coronary artery disease have been shown to have a low prevalence of non-calcified coronary artery plaque (NCP). 181 consecutive patients with CAC 'zero', undergoing cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) angiography at our center were evaluated. Presence of detectable NCP on CCTA in these patients was 13.8%. Mild non-obstructive disease (<30% and limited to one segment) was present in 76% of patients while only one patient (0.6%) had significant stenosis (>50%). Traditional risk factors were not found to be associated with the presence of NCP. However higher body mass index (BMI) was strongly found to be associated with NCP (31.6 in patients with NCP vs. 27.6 kg/m(2) in patients without NCP, p<.05). Obesity was 2.76 times more likely to be associated with NCP as compared to normal BMI (p<0.05).

  2. Non-invasive detection of aortic and coronary atherosclerosis in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia by 64 slice multi-detector row computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Santos, Raul D; Miname, Marcio H; Martinez, Lilton R C; Rochitte, Carlos E; Chacra, Ana P M; Nakandakare, Edna R; Chen, David; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2008-04-01

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare disorder characterized by the early onset of atherosclerosis, often at the ostia of coronary arteries. In this study we document for the first time that aortic and coronary atherosclerosis can be detected using 64 slice multiple detector row computed tomographic coronary angiography (CTCA). We studied five HoFH patients (three females, two males, mean age 19.8+/-2.9 years, age range 15-23 years, with a mean low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol 618+/-211 mg/dL) using 64 slice CTCA. None of the patients showed evidence of ischemia with standard exercise testing. Calcified and mixed atherosclerotic plaques adjacent to or compromising the coronary artery ostia were found in all study subjects. Coronary plaques causing significant obstruction were found in one patient, who had previously undergone coronary artery bypass surgery and aortic valve replacement. Two other patients were noted to have non-obstructive calcified, mixed and non-calcified coronary artery plaques. Our data suggest that CTCA could be a useful non-invasive method for detection of early aortic and coronary atherosclerosis specifically affecting the coronary ostia in HoFH subjects. PMID:17884061

  3. Non-invasive Detection of Aortic and Coronary Atherosclerosis in Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia by 64 Slice Multi-detector Row Computed Tomography Angiography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare disorder characterized by the early onset of atherosclerosis, often at the ostia of coronary arteries. In this study we document for the first time that aortic and coronary atherosclerosis can be detected using 64 slice multiple detector-row ...

  4. Non-invasive detection of aortic and coronary atherosclerosis in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia by 64 slice multi-detector row computed tomography angiography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare disorder characterized by the early onset of atherosclerosis, often at the ostia of coronary arteries. In this study we document for the first time that aortic and coronary atherosclerosis can be detected using 64 slice multiple detector row ...

  5. Comparison of accuracy of 64-slice cardiovascular computed tomography with coronary angiography in patients with suspected coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Fine, Jeffrey J; Hopkins, Christie B; Ruff, Nicol; Newton, F Carter

    2006-01-15

    Cardiovascular computed tomography (CVCT) with the recently released 64-slice technology increases spatial resolution and decreases acquisition times and slice thickness. We investigated the accuracy of 64-slice CVCT in relation to catheter angiography. We studied 66 sequential subjects who underwent 64-slice CVCT and catheter angiography within 30 days. Accuracy results were 94% for interpretable images, 95% for sensitivity, 96% for specificity, 97% for positive predictive value, and 92% for negative predictive value for lesions with >50% stenosis. We found 100% agreement between 64-slice CVCT and catheterization among vein graft evaluations (9 of 9). These metrics are vastly improved from the 16-slice generation and support 64-slice CVCT as a reliable diagnostic tool.

  6. Coronary artery fistula: 64-slice computed tomographic delineation and correlation with multiplane transesophageal echocardiography and surgical findings.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Jonathan K; Beache, Garth M; Slaughter, Mark S; Sobieski, Michael A; Schneider, William; Stoddard, Marcus F

    2012-03-01

    A 49-year-old female who presented with 3 weeks of exertional chest pain had an abnormal mediastinal finding at chest x-ray imaging. Conventional, nongated computed tomography of the chest revealed a "mass" in proximity to the right atrium. 64-slice, cardiac gated computed tomographic coronary angiography, and transesophageal echocardiography delineated the "mass" as a coronary artery fistula structure. The fistula originated from the left main as a tubular vessel that continued into an aneurysmal sac-like cavity that emptied into the superior vena cava near the right atrium. Computed tomographic coronary angiography showed otherwise normal coronary arteries. Findings were ultimately confirmed at cardiac catheterization. Coronary steal was clinically diagnosed and she underwent surgical ligation and resection of the fistula and aneurysm. Her subsequent course was uncomplicated.

  7. 64-Slice spiral computed tomography and three-dimensional reconstruction in the diagnosis of cystic pancreatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    WEN, ZHAOXIA; YAO, FENGQING; WANG, YUXING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to describe the characteristics of cystic pancreatic tumors using computed tomography (CT) and to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy (DA) of post-imaging three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. Clinical and imaging data, including multi-slice spiral CT scans, enhanced scans and multi-faceted reconstruction, from 30 patients with pathologically confirmed cystic pancreatic tumors diagnosed at the Linyi People's Hospital between August 2008 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Following the injection of Ultravist® 300 contrast agent, arterial, portal venous and parenchymal phase scans were obtained at 28, 60 and 150 sec, respectively, and 3D reconstructions of the CT images were generated. The average age of the patients was 38.4 years (range, 16–77 years), and the cohort included 5 males and 25 females (ratio, 1:5). The patients included 8 cases of mucinous cystadenoma (DA), 80%]; 9 cases of cystadenocarcinoma (DA, 84%); 6 cases of serous cystadenoma (DA, 100%); 3 cases of solid pseudopapillary tumor (DA, 100%); and 4 cases of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (DA, 100%). 3D reconstructions of CT images were generated and, in the 4 cases of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, the tumor was connected to the main pancreatic duct and multiple mural nodules were detected in one of these cases. The DA of the 3D-reconstructed images of cystic pancreatic tumors was 89.3%. The 64-slice spiral CT and 3D-reconstructed CT images facilitated the visualization of cystic pancreatic tumor characteristics, in particular the connections between the tumor and the main pancreatic duct. In conclusion, the 3D reconstruction of multi-slice CT data may provide an important source of information for the surgical team, in combination with the available clinical data. PMID:27073473

  8. Coronary artery dissection with rupture of aortic valve commissure following type A aortic dissection: the role of 64-slice MDCT.

    PubMed

    Das, K M; Abdou, Sayed M; El-Menyar, Ayman; Ayman, El Menyar; Khulaifi, A A; Nabti, A L

    2008-01-01

    A rare case of bilateral coronary artery dissection with rupture of aortic valve commissure following type A aortic dissection is described. 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) was able to demonstrate both this findings along with involvement of other neck vessels. TEE demonstrated the severity and mechanisms of aortic valve damage and assisted the surgeon in valve repair. MDCT has played an invaluable role in the diagnosis of the abnormal details of such life-threatening vascular complications. PMID:18384568

  9. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT) Updated:Sep 3,2015 ... facts MDCT is a very fast type of computed tomography (CT) scan. MDCT creates pictures of the healthy ...

  10. Multi-Detector Computed Tomography Angiography for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Purpose Computed tomography (CT) scanning continues to be an important modality for the diagnosis of injury and disease, most notably for indications of the head and abdomen. (1) According to a recent report published by the Canadian Institutes of Health Information, (1) there were about 10.3 scanners per million people in Canada as of January 2004. Ontario had the fewest number of CT scanners per million compared to the other provinces (8 CT scanners per million). The wait time for CT in Ontario of 5 weeks approaches the Canadian median of 6 weeks. This health technology and policy appraisal systematically reviews the published literature on multidetector CT (MDCT) angiography as a diagnostic tool for the newest indication for CT, coronary artery disease (CAD), and will apply the results of the review to current health care practices in Ontario. This review does not evaluate MDCT to detect coronary calcification without contrast medium for CAD screening purposes. The Technology Compared with conventional CT scanning, MDCT can provide smaller pieces of information and can cover a larger area faster. (2) Advancing MDCT technology (8, 16, 32, 64 slice systems) is capable of producing more images in less time. For general CT scanning, this faster capability can reduce the time that patients must stay still during the procedure, thereby reducing potential movement artefact. However, the additional clinical utility of images obtained from faster scanners compared to the images obtained from conventional CT scanners for current CT indications (i.e., non-moving body parts) is not known. There are suggestions that the new fast scanners can reduce wait times for general CT. MDCT angiography that utilizes a contrast medium, has been proposed as a minimally invasive replacement to coronary angiography to detect coronary artery disease. MDCT may take between 15 to 45 minutes; coronary angiography may take up to 1 hour. Although 16-slice and 32-slice CT

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Intraventricular Dyssynchrony Using Wall Thickness by Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Quynh A.; Singh, Jagmeet P.; Cannon, Christopher P.; Sarwar, Ammar; Nasir, Khurram; Auricchio, Angelo; Faletra, Francesco F.; Sorgente, Antonio; Conca, Cristina; Moccetti, Tiziano; Handschumacher, Mark; Brady, Thomas J.; Hoffmann, Udo

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We sought to determine the feasibility of cardiac computed tomography (CT) to detect significant differences in the extent of left ventricular dyssynchrony in heart failure (HF) patients with wide QRS, HF patients with narrow QRS, and age-matched controls. BACKGROUND The degree of mechanical dyssynchrony has been suggested as a predictor of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy. There have been no published reports of dyssynchrony assessment with the use of CT. METHODS Thirty-eight subjects underwent electrocardiogram-gated contrast-enhanced 64-slice multidetector CT. The left ventricular endocardial and epicardial boundaries were delineated from short-axis images reconstructed at 10% phase increments of the cardiac cycle. Global and segmental CT dyssynchrony metrics that used changes in wall thickness, wall motion, and volume over time were assessed for reproducibility. We defined a global metric using changes in wall thickness as the dyssynchrony index (DI). RESULTS The DI was the most reproducible metric (interobserver and intraobserver intraclass correlation coefficients ≥0.94, p < 0.0001) and was used to determine differences between the 3 groups: HF-wide QRS group (ejection fraction [EF] 22 ± 8%, QRS 163 ± 28 ms), HF-narrow QRS (EF 26 ± 7%, QRS 96 ± 11 ms), and age-matched control subjects (EF 64 ± 5%, QRS 87 ± 9 ms). Mean DI was significantly different between the 3 groups (HF-wide QRS: 152 ± 44 ms, HF-narrow QRS: 121 ± 58 ms, and control subjects: 65 ± 12 ms; p < 0.0001) and greater in the HF-wide QRS (p < 0.0001) and HF-narrow QRS (p = 0.005) groups compared with control subjects. We found that DI had a good correlation with 2-dimensional (r = 0.65, p = 0.012) and 3-dimensional (r = 0.68, p = 0.008) echocardiographic dyssynchrony. CONCLUSIONS Quantitative assessment of global CT-derived DI, based on changes in wall thickness over time, is highly reproducible and renders significant differences between subjects most likely to

  12. Multidetector computer tomography: evaluation of blunt chest trauma in adults.

    PubMed

    Palas, João; Matos, António P; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco; Ramalho, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall. PMID:25295188

  13. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Matos, António P.; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall. PMID:25295188

  14. Multidetector computer tomography: evaluation of blunt chest trauma in adults.

    PubMed

    Palas, João; Matos, António P; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco; Ramalho, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  15. [The different manifestations of pulmonary aspergillosis: multidetector computed tomography findings].

    PubMed

    Koren Fernández, L; Alonso Charterina, S; Alcalá-Galiano Rubio, A; Sánchez Nistal, M A

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary aspergillosis is a fungal infection usually caused by inhaling Aspergillus fumigatus spores. However, when we talk about aspergillosis, we normally refer to the spectrum of clinical and radiological findings that depend directly on the patient's immune status, on the prior existence of lung disease, and on the virulence of the infective organism. There are four types of pulmonary aspergillosis (aspergilloma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis, and invasive aspergillosis), and each type has its own distinct radiologic findings. We review the signs of pulmonary aspergillosis on multidetector computed tomography and we correlate them with patients' symptoms and immune responses. Likewise, we discuss the differential diagnoses.

  16. Perforated Appendicitis: Assessment With Multidetector Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Iacobellis, Francesca; Iadevito, Isabella; Romano, Federica; Altiero, Michele; Bhattacharjee, Bikram; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-02-01

    Appendicitis is one of the most common abdominal surgical emergencies. In some cases, the correct diagnosis may be challenging, owing to different conditions that can mimic this pathology. In this context, abdominal computed tomography (CT) is the imaging modality of choice, leading to an accurate diagnosis and to a reduction in unnecessary laparotomies. The diagnosis of perforated appendix is crucial, but the detection of the perforation signs by CT may not be so simple in the early process. The aim of this article is to review the multiple detector CT signs of perforated appendicitis.

  17. Multidetector Computed Tomography for Congenital Anomalies of the Aortic Arch: Vascular Rings.

    PubMed

    García-Guereta, Luis; García-Cerro, Estefanía; Bret-Zurita, Montserrat

    2016-07-01

    The development of multidetector computed tomography has triggered a revolution in the study of the aorta and other large vessels and has replaced angiography in the diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the aortic arch, particularly vascular rings. The major advantage of multidetector computed tomography is that it permits clear 3-dimensional assessment of not only vascular structures, but also airway and esophageal compression. The current update aims to summarize the embryonic development of the aortic arch and the developmental anomalies leading to vascular ring formation and to discuss the current diagnostic and therapeutic role of multidetector computed tomography in this field.

  18. Multidetector computed tomography of temporomandibular joint: A road less travelled

    PubMed Central

    Pahwa, Shivani; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Roychaudhary, Ajoy; Bhutia, Ongkila

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the imaging anatomy of temporomandibular joint (TMJ), describes the technique of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) of the TMJ, and describes in detail various osseous pathologic afflictions affecting the joint. Traumatic injuries affecting the mandibular condyle are most common, followed by joint ankylosis as a sequel to arthritis. The congenital anomalies are less frequent, hemifacial microsomia being the most commonly encountered anomaly involving the TMJ. Neoplastic afflictions of TMJ are distinctly uncommon, osteochondroma being one of the most common lesions. MDCT enables comprehensive evaluation of osseous afflictions of TMJ, and is a valuable tool for surgical planning. Sagittal, coronal and 3D reformatted images well depict osseous TMJ lesions, and their relationship to adjacent structures. PMID:25984518

  19. Multidetector-row computed tomography in cerebral hydatid cyst

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Nisar A; Kosar, Tasleem L; Khan, Abdul Qayum; Ahmad, Sheikh Shahnawaz

    2010-01-01

    Intracranial localization is a rare manifestation of hydatid cyst disease (Echinococcosis). It comprises only 2% of cases of Echinococcosis infection even in endemic areas and is predominantly seen in children. Clinical manifestations resulting from raised intracranial tension are nonspecific. Imaging with computed tomography (CT) may suggest the diagnosis preoperatively with reasonable accuracy. Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) with its high resolution multiplanar reformations can demonstrate the relationship of the cyst with adjacent brain structures and thus help in planning surgery. This has a practical utility in places where magnetic resonance imaging is not available. We describe a case of cerebral hydatid cyst in a 13-year-old boy who was diagnosed with MDCT, which helped in planning its surgical removal. PMID:21808517

  20. Dosimetric and image quality assessment of different acquisition protocols of a novel 64-slice CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vite, Cristina; Mangini, Monica; Strocchi, Sabina; Novario, Raffaele; Tanzi, Fabio; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Conte, Leopoldo; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-03-01

    Dose and image quality assessment in computed tomography (CT) are almost affected by the vast variety of CT scanners (axial CT, spiral CT, low-multislice CT (2-16), high-multislice CT (32-64)) and imaging protocols in use. Very poor information is at the moment available on 64 slices CT scanners. Aim of this work is to assess image quality related to patient dose indexes and to investigate the achievable dose reduction for a commercially available 64 slices CT scanner. CT dose indexes (weighted computed tomography dose index, CTDI w and Dose Length Product, DLP) were measured with a standard CT phantom for the main protocols in use (head, chest, abdomen and pelvis) and compared with the values displayed by the scanner itself. The differences were always below 7%. All the indexes were below the Diagnostic Reference Levels defined by the European Council Directive 97/42. Effective doses were measured for each protocol with thermoluminescent dosimeters inserted in an anthropomorphic Alderson Rando phantom and compared with the same values computed by the ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator software code and corrected by a factor taking in account the number of slices (from 16 to 64). The differences were always below 25%. The effective doses range from 1.5 mSv (head) to 21.8 mSv (abdomen). The dose reduction system of the scanner was assessed comparing the effective dose measured for a standard phantom-man (a cylinder phantom, 32 cm in diameter) to the mean dose evaluated on 46 patients. The standard phantom was considered as no dose reduction reference. The dose reduction factor range from 16% to 78% (mean of 46%) for all protocols, from 29% to 78% (mean of 55%) for chest protocol, from 16% to 76% (mean of 42%) for abdomen protocol. The possibility of a further dose reduction was investigated measuring image quality (spatial resolution, contrast and noise) as a function of CTDI w. This curve shows a quite flat trend decreasing the dose approximately to 90% and a

  1. Acute Perforated Diverticulitis: Assessment With Multidetector Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Barbara; Galluzzo, Michele; Ianniello, Stefania; Pinto, Antonio; Trinci, Margherita; Miele, Vittorio

    2016-02-01

    Colonic diverticulitis is a common condition in the western population. Complicated diverticulitis is defined as the presence of extraluminal air or abscess, peritonitis, colon occlusion, or fistulas. Multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) is the modality of choice for the diagnosis and the staging of diverticulitis and its complications, which enables performing an accurate differential diagnosis and addressing the patients to a correct management. MDCT is accurate in diagnosing the site of perforation in approximately 85% of cases, by the detection of direct signs (focal bowel wall discontinuity, extraluminal gas, and extraluminal enteric contrast) and indirect signs, which are represented by segmental bowel wall thickening, abnormal bowel wall enhancement, perivisceral fat stranding of fluid, and abscess. MDCT is accurate in the differentiation from complicated colon diverticulitis and colon cancer, often with a similar imaging. The computed tomography-guided classification is recommended to discriminate patients with mild diverticulitis, generally treated with antibiotics, from those with severe diverticulitis with a large abscess, which may be drained with a percutaneous approach.

  2. Multidetector computed tomographic angiography of aberrant subclavian arteries.

    PubMed

    Türkvatan, Aysel; Büyükbayraktar, Fatma Gül; Olçer, Tülay; Cumhur, Turhan

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of 16-slice multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography for identifying anatomic features of aberrant subclavian arteries. Seventeen patients with aberrant subclavian arteries were assessed by MDCT angiography. The aortic arch position, the presence of a Kommerell's diverticulum, aneurysm, vascular compression of trachea and oesophagus and associated cardiovascular abnormalities were evaluated. MDCT findings were confirmed by surgery in eight patients but in the other nine patients no further evaluation or management was warranted as the aberrant subclavian artery had no significant clinical consequence. Eleven patients had an aberrant right subclavian artery arising from the left aortic arch and six patients had an aberrant left subclavian artery arising from the right aortic arch. Kommerell's diverticulum was identified in three patients with an aberrant right subclavian artery and in five patients with an aberrant left subclavian artery. In two patients it was aneurysmal. Oesophageal compression was detected in eight patients, and tracheal compression was identified in only one paediatric patient. An aberrant subclavian artery was associated with complex congenital heart disease in one patient, intracardiac defects in two patients, aortic coarctation in two patients, patent ductus arteriosus in two patients and an aberrant vertebral artery in one patient. In conclusion, MDCT angiography is superior to digital subtraction angiography for the assessment of aberrant subclavian arteries since digital subtraction angiography has only a poor ability to visualize adjacent structures completely and is invasive in nature. MDCT angiography or magnetic resonance angiography are the current standard in the initial evaluation of thoracic vascular anomalies.

  3. Measurement of scattered radiation in a volumetric 64-slice CT scanner using three experimental techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarzadeh, A.; Ay, M. R.; Ghadiri, H.; Sarkar, S.; Zaidi, H.

    2010-04-01

    Compton scatter poses a significant threat to volumetric x-ray computed tomography, bringing cupping and streak artefacts thus impacting qualitative and quantitative imaging procedures. To perform appropriate scatter compensation, it is necessary to estimate the magnitude and spatial distribution of x-ray scatter. The aim of this study is to compare three experimental methods for measurement of the scattered radiation profile in a 64-slice CT scanner. The explored techniques involve the use of collimator shadow, a single blocker (a lead bar that suppresses the primary radiation) and an array blocker. The latter was recently proposed and validated by our group. The collimator shadow technique was used as reference for comparison since it established itself as the most accurate experimental procedure available today. The mean relative error of measurements in all tube voltages was 3.9 ± 5.5% (with a maximum value of 20%) for the single blocker method whereas it was 1.4 ± 1.1% (with a maximum value of 5%) for the proposed blocker array method. The calculated scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) using the blocker array method for the tube voltages of 140 kVp and 80 kVp was 0.148 and 1.034, respectively. For a larger polypropylene phantom, the maximum SPR achieved was 0.803 and 6.458 at 140 kVp and 80 kVp, respectively. Although the three compared methods present a reasonable accuracy for calculation of the scattered profile in the region corresponding to the object, the collimator shadow method is by far the most accurate empirical technique. Nevertheless, the blocker array method is relatively straightforward for scatter estimation providing minor additional radiation exposure to the patient.

  4. Radiation exposure of ovarian cancer patients: contribution of CT examinations performed on different MDCT (16 and 64 slices) scanners and image quality evaluation: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Stefania; Origgi, Daniela; Brambilla, Sarah; De Maria, Federica; Foà, Riccardo; Raimondi, Sara; Colombo, Nicoletta; Bellomi, Massimo

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study is to compare radiation doses given to ovarian cancer patients by different computed tomographies (CTs) and to evaluate association between doses and subjective and objective image quality.CT examinations included were performed either on a 16-slice CT, equipped with automatic z-axis tube current modulation, or on a 64-slice CT, equipped with z-axis, xy-axis modulation, and adaptive statistical iterative algorithm (ASIR). Evaluation of dose included the following dose descriptors: volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). Objective image noise was evaluated in abdominal aorta and liver. Subjective image quality was evaluated by assessment of image noise, spatial resolution and diagnostic acceptability.Mean and median CTDIvol, DLP, and E; correlation between CTDIvol and DLP and patients' weight; comparison of objective noise for the 2 scanners; association between dose descriptors and subjective image quality.The 64-slice CT delivered to patients 24.5% lower dose (P < 0.0001) than 16-slice CT. There was a significant correlation between all dose descriptors (CTDIvol, DLP, E) and weight (P < 0.0001). Objective noise was comparable for the 2 CT scanners. There was a significant correlation between dose descriptors and image noise for the 64-slice CT, and between dose descriptors and spatial resolution for the 16-slice CT.Current dose reduction systems may reduce radiation dose without significantly affecting image quality and diagnostic acceptability of CT exams. PMID:25929914

  5. Radiation Exposure of Ovarian Cancer Patients: Contribution of CT Examinations Performed on Different MDCT (16 and 64 Slices) Scanners and Image Quality Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Stefania; Origgi, Daniela; Brambilla, Sarah; De Maria, Federica; Foà, Riccardo; Raimondi, Sara; Colombo, Nicoletta; Bellomi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study is to compare radiation doses given to ovarian cancer patients by different computed tomographies (CTs) and to evaluate association between doses and subjective and objective image quality. CT examinations included were performed either on a 16-slice CT, equipped with automatic z-axis tube current modulation, or on a 64-slice CT, equipped with z-axis, xy-axis modulation, and adaptive statistical iterative algorithm (ASIR). Evaluation of dose included the following dose descriptors: volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). Objective image noise was evaluated in abdominal aorta and liver. Subjective image quality was evaluated by assessment of image noise, spatial resolution and diagnostic acceptability. Mean and median CTDIvol, DLP, and E; correlation between CTDIvol and DLP and patients’ weight; comparison of objective noise for the 2 scanners; association between dose descriptors and subjective image quality. The 64-slice CT delivered to patients 24.5% lower dose (P < 0.0001) than 16-slice CT. There was a significant correlation between all dose descriptors (CTDIvol, DLP, E) and weight (P < 0.0001). Objective noise was comparable for the 2 CT scanners. There was a significant correlation between dose descriptors and image noise for the 64-slice CT, and between dose descriptors and spatial resolution for the 16-slice CT. Current dose reduction systems may reduce radiation dose without significantly affecting image quality and diagnostic acceptability of CT exams. PMID:25929914

  6. Multidetector-row computed tomography in the planning of abdominal perforator flaps.

    PubMed

    Masia, J; Clavero, J A; Larrañaga, J R; Alomar, X; Pons, G; Serret, P

    2006-01-01

    An accurate preoperative evaluation of the vascular anatomy of the abdominal wall is extremely valuable in improving the surgical strategy in abdominal perforator flaps. The multidetector-row computer tomography offers thin slice coverage of extended volumes with an extremely high spatial resolution. From October 2003 to December 2004, 66 female patients had breast reconstruction surgery in our department using the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap. Our multidetector-row computer tomography studies were performed using a 16-detector-row computer tomography scanner. The image assessment was carried out using the following protocol: we first identified the best three perforators from each side of the abdomen. Then we conducted a three-dimensional reconstruction of the abdomen by identifying exactly where the three best perforators emerged from the rectus abdominis fascia. We then transferred the data obtained from the image to the patient using a coordinate system. In addition, we also placed the dominant perforators in the patient by using a conventional hand-held Doppler. During the operation we compared intra-operative findings, Doppler results and computer tomography outcomes. Neither false positive nor false negative results were found in the computer tomography outcome. Multidetector-row computer tomography provides us with an easy method of interpreting the virtual anatomic dissection in three dimensions. It has high sensitivity and specificity and provides a good quality evaluation of the perforator vessels. This information allows reduction of operating time and safer performance of surgery. The multidetector-row computer tomography is a highly effective tool in the preoperative study of abdominal perforator flaps. PMID:16716952

  7. Carotid stenosis evaluation by 64-slice CTA: comparison of NASCET, ECST and CC grading methods.

    PubMed

    Kılıçkap, Gülsüm; Ergun, Elif; Başbay, Elif; Koşar, Pınar; Kosar, Uğur

    2012-06-01

    Purpose is to evaluate the intraobserver and interobserver variability of the North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial (NASCET), European Carotid Surgery Trial (ECST) and Common Carotid (CC) methods, which are used to measure the degree of ICA stenosis, using 64-slice CT angiography and to compare the measurements made by these three methods. 88 cases (111 carotid arteries) were included in the study. Carotid CTA was performed by a 64 slice scanner (Toshiba, Aqullion 64).Two radiologists measured the degree of carotid stenosis by using NASCET, ECST and CC methods. Intraobserver and interobserver variability of each method was determined by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), Bland-Altman plots and kappa and linear weighted kappa statistics. The relation between the measurements was assessed by correlation coefficient (with linear and quadratic methods). Correlation coefficients showed that there is linear correlation between the measurements made by the three methods. The degree of stenosis measured with the NASCET method had the lowest value, while the corresponding values measured with the ECST and CC methods were close to each other. ICC and Bland-Altman plots showed high intra and inter observer agreement for NASCET, ECST and CC methods whereas kappa statistics showed moderate to substantial agreement. CC method had slightly higher agreement when compared with the other two methods. Intra and interobserver agreement is high for NASCET, ECST and CC methods however CC method has a slightly higher reproducibility. There is linear correlation between the measurements made by the three methods.

  8. Multidetector computed tomography evaluation of cavernous haemangioma of the azygous vein.

    PubMed

    Das, Karuna Moy; Ahmed, Ali M; Aljubab, Abdulwahab; Alzoum, Mohammed A

    2013-08-01

    Giant cavernous haemangioma of azygous arch is extremely rare. We present the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) features of a mediastinal cavernous haemangioma in an asymptomatic child detected in a follow-up examination. MDCT features with multiple venous lakes filling from the periphery, focal specks of calcification, low-density soft tissue mass along with tortuous varicose veins and large feeding veins from the abdomen are suggestive of cavernous haemangioma.

  9. Multi-detector computed tomography of an aortic dissection in a cat.

    PubMed

    Scollan, Katherine; Sisson, David

    2014-03-01

    Contrast enhanced, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) is a useful diagnostic imaging modality that has become increasingly available in veterinary medicine. Multi-planar and three-dimensional reconstructions allow accurate and comprehensive assessment of cardiac and vascular lesions with short image acquisition times. ECG-gated, contrast enhanced MDCT was used to assess the lesion extent and therapeutic options in a case of aortic dissection diagnosed in a hypertensive cat. PMID:24485986

  10. [Update on cardiac imaging techniques. Echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance and multidetector computed tomography].

    PubMed

    de Vinuesa, Pastora Gallego García; del Castillo, Sonia Velasco; Torres, Río Aguilar; Bardera, Juan C Paré

    2008-02-01

    This review of progress in cardiac imaging techniques summarizes the most significant development reported in the last year on different echocardiographic techniques and their application in a range of settings, from the treatment of heart failure to their use in intraoperative monitoring and guiding interventional procedures. Large sections are devoted to recent developments in three-dimensional imaging and, because of its clinical importance, to magnetic resonance imaging. Finally, there is a comprehensive update on the use of multidetector computed tomography in cardiology.

  11. Multidetector computed tomography evaluation of cavernous haemangioma of the azygous vein

    PubMed Central

    Das, Karuna Moy; Ahmed, Ali M.; Aljubab, Abdulwahab; Alzoum, Mohammed A.

    2013-01-01

    Giant cavernous haemangioma of azygous arch is extremely rare. We present the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) features of a mediastinal cavernous haemangioma in an asymptomatic child detected in a follow-up examination. MDCT features with multiple venous lakes filling from the periphery, focal specks of calcification, low-density soft tissue mass along with tortuous varicose veins and large feeding veins from the abdomen are suggestive of cavernous haemangioma. PMID:23660735

  12. Prevalence of extracardiac findings in the evaluation of ischemic heart disease by multidetector computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jeong-Hwan; Park, Jong-Seon; Shin, Dong-Gu; Kim, Young-Jo; Lee, Sang-Hee; Choi, Yoon-Jung; Cho, Ihn-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Objective Multidector computed tomography (MDCT) is now commonly used for the evaluation of coronary artery disease. Because MDCT images include many non-cardiac organs and the patient population evaluated is highly susceptible to extracardiac diseases, this study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of extracardiac findings in the MDCT evaluation of ischemic heart disease. Methods From March 2007 to March 2008, a total of six-hundred twenty patients, who underwent 64-slice MDCT evaluations for chest pain, or dyspnea, were enrolled in this study. Cardiac and non-cardiac findings were comprehensively evaluated by a radiologist. Results Enrolled patients included 306 men (49.4%), with a mean age of 66 years. Significant coronary artery stenosis was found in 41.6% of the patients. A total of 158 extracardiac findings were observed in 110 (17.7%) patients. Commonly involved extracardiac organs were lung (36.7%), hepatobiliary system (21.5%), thyroid (19.6%), kidney (10.8%), spine (9.7%) and breast (0.6%). Of those 110 patients, 50 (45.5%) patients underwent further diagnostic investigations. Malignant disease was detected in three (2.7%) patients (lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, and thyroid cancer). Conclusions Extracardiac findings are frequently present and should be a concern in the MDCT evaluation of chest pain syndrome. PMID:24133511

  13. Evaluation of pulmonary sequestration with multidetector computed tomography angiography in a select cohort of patients: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Long, Qihua; Zha, Yunfei; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the role of multidetector computed tomography angiography in diagnosing patients with pulmonary sequestration. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the computed tomography studies and clinical materials of 43 patients who had undergone preoperative multidetector computed tomography angiography in our hospital and had pathologically proven pulmonary sequestration. Each examination of pulmonary sequestration was reviewed for type, location, parenchymal changes, arterial supply and venous drainage on two-dimensional and three-dimensional computed tomography images. RESULTS: Multidetector computed tomography successfully detected all pulmonary sequestrations in the 43 patients (100%). This included 40 patients (93.0%) with intralobar sequestration and 3 patients (7.0%) with extralobar sequestration. The locations of pulmonary sequestration were left lower lobe (28 cases, 70% of intralobar sequestrations), right lower lobe (12 cases, 30% of intralobar sequestrations) and costodiaphragmatic sulcus (3 cases). Cases of sequestered lung presented as mass lesions (37.2%), cystic lesions (32.6%), pneumonic lesions (16.3%), cavitary lesions (9.3%) and bronchiectasis (4.6%). The angioarchitecture of pulmonary sequestration, including feeding arteries from the thoracic aorta (86.1%), celiac truck (9.3%), abdominal aorta (2.3%) and left gastric artery (2.3%) and venous drainage into inferior pulmonary veins (86.0%) and the azygos vein system (14.0%), was visualized on multidetector computed tomography. Finally, the multidetector computed tomography angiography results of the sequestered lungs and angioarchitectures were surgically confirmed in all the patients. CONCLUSIONS: As a noninvasive modality, multidetector computed tomography angiography is helpful for making diagnostic decisions regarding pulmonary sequestration with high confidence and for visualizing the related parenchymal characteristics, arterial supply, and venous drainage

  14. Extraperitoneal Rupture of a Bladder Diverticulum and the Role of Multidetector Computed Tomography Cystography.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Koichi; Takase, Yasukazu; Saito, Katsuhiko

    2016-11-01

    Nontraumatic rupture of the bladder is less widely recognized than traumatic rupture, with a challenging early diagnosis due to high variability in clinical presentations. We report a case of extraperitoneal rupture of a bladder diverticulum in a patient with diabetes mellitus who presented with paralytic ileus. Despite conservative management, the patient developed sepsis requiring surgical treatment. Urinary tract infection and bladder outlet obstruction were considered to be potential mechanisms of the rupture. Multidetector computed tomography cystography should be used as the first-line modality when evaluating for a suspected bladder rupture, even in patients with nontraumatic bladder rupture. PMID:27656418

  15. Identification of Cardiac and Aortic Injuries in Trauma with Multi-detector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shergill, Arvind K; Maraj, Tishan; Barszczyk, Mark S; Cheung, Helen; Singh, Navneet; Zavodni, Anna E

    2015-01-01

    Blunt and penetrating cardiovascular (CV) injuries are associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Rapid detection of these injuries in trauma is critical for patient survival. The advent of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has led to increased detection of CV injuries during rapid comprehensive scanning of stabilized major trauma patients. MDCT has the ability to acquire images with a higher temporal and spatial resolution, as well as the capability to create multiplanar reformats. This pictorial review illustrates several common and life-threatening traumatic CV injuries from a regional trauma center. PMID:26430541

  16. Primary lung and large airway neoplasms in children: current imaging evaluation with multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Amini, Behrang; Huang, Steven Y; Tsai, Jason; Benveniste, Marcelo F; Robledo, Hector H; Lee, Edward Y

    2013-07-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) offers an important noninvasive imaging modality for confirmation and further characterization of primary lung and large airway neoplasms encountered in pediatric patients. Children represent a unique challenge in imaging, not only because of unique patient factors (eg, inability to follow instructions, motion, need for sedation) but because of the technical factors that must be optimized to reduce radiation dose. This article reviews an MDCT imaging algorithm, up-to-date imaging techniques, and clinical applications of MDCT for evaluating benign and malignant primary neoplasms of lung and large airway in infants and children.

  17. Role of Multidetector Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Colorectal Perforations.

    PubMed

    Saturnino, Pietro Paolo; Pinto, Antonio; Liguori, Carlo; Ponticiello, Gianluca; Romano, Luigia

    2016-02-01

    Colonic perforations can be classified into perforations that occur at the site of a localized pathologic process and cecal perforations that occur secondary to distal colonic obstructions. Rectal perforations may result from foreign bodies inserted into the rectum; moreover, deep rectal biopsies, polypectomy, improper cleansing enema, or thermometer placement may also lead to rectal perforation. Correct identification of the cause and site of the perforation is crucial for appropriate management and surgical planning. Multidetector row computed tomography has a pivot role in planning the type of operative treatment, the prognosis, and in assessing those patients who have clinical symptoms of peritonitis but no radiographic signs of perforation.

  18. Multi-detector computed tomography imaging of large airway pathology: A pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Jugpal, Tejeshwar Singh; Garg, Anju; Sethi, Gulshan Rai; Daga, Mradul Kumar; Kumar, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    The tracheobronchial tree is a musculo-cartilagenous framework which acts as a conduit to aerate the lungs and consequently the entire body. A large spectrum of pathological conditions can involve the trachea and bronchial airways. These may be congenital anomalies, infections, post-intubation airway injuries, foreign body aspiration or neoplasms involving the airway. Appropriate management of airway disease requires an early and accurate diagnosis. In this pictorial essay review, we will comprehensively describe the various airway pathologies and their imaging findings by multi-detector computed tomography. PMID:26753061

  19. Congenital Anomalies of the Aortic Arch: Evaluation with the Use of Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Büyükbayraktar, Fatma Gül; Ölçer, Tülay; Cumhur, Turhan

    2009-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the aortic arch have clinical importance, as the anomalies may be associated with vascular rings or other congenital cardiovascular diseases. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography enables one to display the detailed anatomy of vascular structures and the spatial relationships with adjacent organs; this ability is the greatest advantage of the use of MDCT angiography in comparison to other imaging modalities in the evaluation of the congenital anomalies of the aortic arch. In this review article, we illustrate 16-slice MDCT angiography appearances of congenital anomalies of the aortic arch. PMID:19270864

  20. [Capabilities of Multidetector Computed Tomography in Assessment of Atherosclerosis of Coronary Arteries].

    PubMed

    Barysheva, N A; Merkulova, I N; Sharia, M A; Veselova, T N

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of ischemic heart disease (IHD) as well as high mortality from its exacerbations led to an active search and study of diagnostic methods to predict the possible development of acute coronary events. At the moment, it is proved that the morphological properties of atherosclerotic plaque largely determine the course of IHD. Contemporary multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is the only non-invasive method which allows to study the state of coronary arteries. In this review we have analyzed capabilities of MDCT in assessing the severity of stenosis and calcification in the coronary arteries, as well as the structure of atherosclerotic plaques, including signs of "instability".

  1. [Capabilities of Multidetector Computed Tomography in Assessment of Atherosclerosis of Coronary Arteries].

    PubMed

    Barysheva, N A; Merkulova, I N; Sharia, M A; Veselova, T N

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of ischemic heart disease (IHD) as well as high mortality from its exacerbations led to an active search and study of diagnostic methods to predict the possible development of acute coronary events. At the moment, it is proved that the morphological properties of atherosclerotic plaque largely determine the course of IHD. Contemporary multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is the only non-invasive method which allows to study the state of coronary arteries. In this review we have analyzed capabilities of MDCT in assessing the severity of stenosis and calcification in the coronary arteries, as well as the structure of atherosclerotic plaques, including signs of "instability". PMID:26502511

  2. Comparison between clinical indicators of transmembrane oxygenator thrombosis and multidetector computed tomographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Panigada, Mauro; L'Acqua, Camilla; Passamonti, Serena Maria; Mietto, Cristina; Protti, Alessandro; Riva, Roberto; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to assess whether multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) could accurately confirm the clinical suspicion of transmembrane oxygenator thrombosis (MOT) during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Twenty-seven oxygenators were examined using MDCT at the end of patient treatment. Transmembrane oxygenator thrombosis was suspected in 15 of them according to the presence of at least 2 of the following clinical indicators: (1) increase in d-dimer, (2) decrease in platelet count, (3) decrease in oxygenator performance, and (4) presence of clots on the surface of the oxygenator. Transmembrane oxygenator thrombosis was confirmed by MDCT in 5 (33%) of them. Transmembrane oxygenator thrombosis was unexpectedly found in 5 (41%) of the remaining 12 oxygenators not suspected for MOT. Eight (80%) of these oxygenators had clots accounting for less than 1% of total volume. Clots were mainly detectable at the apical corner of the oxygenator, most likely due to greater blood stasis. We found a significant increase in d-dimer and in membrane oxygenator shunt and a decrease in platelet count from the start to the discontinuation of ECMO. Hemostatic abnormalities significantly reverted 48 hours after oxygenator removal, suggesting the role of ECMO in activation of the coagulation cascade. Multidetector computed tomographic scan could not accurately confirm the clinical suspicion of MOT.

  3. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the renal arteries: normal anatomy and its variations.

    PubMed

    de Mello Júnior, Carlos Fernando; Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; de Carvalho Junior, Arlindo Monteiro; Rebouças, Rafael Batista; Negromonte, Gustavo Ramalho Pessoa; de Oliveira, Carollyne Dantas

    2016-01-01

    Conventional angiography is still considered the gold standard for the study of the anatomy and of vascular diseases of the abdomen. However, the advent of multidetector computed tomography and techniques of digital image reconstruction has provided an alternative means of performing angiography, without the risks inherent to invasive angiographic examinations. Therefore, within the field of radiology, there is an ever-increasing demand for deeper knowledge of the anatomy of the regional vasculature and its variations. Variations in the renal vascular system are relatively prevalent in the venous and arterial vessels. For various conditions in which surgical planning is crucial to the success of the procedure, knowledge of this topic is important. The aim of this study was to familiarize the general radiologist with variations in the renal vascular system. To that end, we prepared a pictorial essay comprising multidetector computed tomography images obtained in a series of cases. We show patterns representative of the most common anatomical variations in the arterial blood supply to the kidneys, calling attention to the nomenclature, as well as to the clinical and surgical implications of such variations.

  4. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the renal arteries: normal anatomy and its variations*

    PubMed Central

    de Mello Júnior, Carlos Fernando; Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; de Carvalho Junior, Arlindo Monteiro; Rebouças, Rafael Batista; Negromonte, Gustavo Ramalho Pessoa; de Oliveira, Carollyne Dantas

    2016-01-01

    Conventional angiography is still considered the gold standard for the study of the anatomy and of vascular diseases of the abdomen. However, the advent of multidetector computed tomography and techniques of digital image reconstruction has provided an alternative means of performing angiography, without the risks inherent to invasive angiographic examinations. Therefore, within the field of radiology, there is an ever-increasing demand for deeper knowledge of the anatomy of the regional vasculature and its variations. Variations in the renal vascular system are relatively prevalent in the venous and arterial vessels. For various conditions in which surgical planning is crucial to the success of the procedure, knowledge of this topic is important. The aim of this study was to familiarize the general radiologist with variations in the renal vascular system. To that end, we prepared a pictorial essay comprising multidetector computed tomography images obtained in a series of cases. We show patterns representative of the most common anatomical variations in the arterial blood supply to the kidneys, calling attention to the nomenclature, as well as to the clinical and surgical implications of such variations. PMID:27403020

  5. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the renal arteries: normal anatomy and its variations.

    PubMed

    de Mello Júnior, Carlos Fernando; Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; de Carvalho Junior, Arlindo Monteiro; Rebouças, Rafael Batista; Negromonte, Gustavo Ramalho Pessoa; de Oliveira, Carollyne Dantas

    2016-01-01

    Conventional angiography is still considered the gold standard for the study of the anatomy and of vascular diseases of the abdomen. However, the advent of multidetector computed tomography and techniques of digital image reconstruction has provided an alternative means of performing angiography, without the risks inherent to invasive angiographic examinations. Therefore, within the field of radiology, there is an ever-increasing demand for deeper knowledge of the anatomy of the regional vasculature and its variations. Variations in the renal vascular system are relatively prevalent in the venous and arterial vessels. For various conditions in which surgical planning is crucial to the success of the procedure, knowledge of this topic is important. The aim of this study was to familiarize the general radiologist with variations in the renal vascular system. To that end, we prepared a pictorial essay comprising multidetector computed tomography images obtained in a series of cases. We show patterns representative of the most common anatomical variations in the arterial blood supply to the kidneys, calling attention to the nomenclature, as well as to the clinical and surgical implications of such variations. PMID:27403020

  6. An Unusual Left Ventricular Outflow Pseudoaneurysm: Usefulness of Echocardiography and Multidetector Computed Tomography for Surgical Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Da Col, Uberto; Ramoni, Enrico Di Bella, Isidoro; Ragni, Temistocle

    2009-01-15

    Left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) pseudoaneurysm is a rare but potentially lethal complication, mainly after aortic root endocarditis or surgery. Usually it originates from a dehiscence in the mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa and it arises posteriorly to the aortic root. Due to these anatomical features, its imaging assessment is challenging and surgical repair requires complex procedures. An unusual case of LVOT pseudoaneurysm is described. It was detected by transthoracic ecocardiography 7 months after aortic root replacement for acute endocarditis. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) confirmed the presence of a pouch located between the aortic root and the right atrium. Computed tomography also detected the origin of the pseudoaneurysm from the muscular interventricular septum of the LVOT, rather below the aortic valve plane. It was repaired with an extracardiac surgical approach, sparing the aortic root bioprosthesis previously implanted. The high-resolution three-dimensional details provided by the preoperative MDCT allowed us to plan a simple and effective surgical strategy.

  7. Coronary calcium mass scores measured by identical 64-slice MDCT scanners are comparable: a cardiac phantom study.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Hildebrand; Greuter, Marcel J W; Groen, Jaap M; Vliegenthart-Proença, Rozemarijn; Renema, Klaasjan W K; de Lange, Frank; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2010-01-01

    To assess whether absolute mass scores are comparable or differ between identical 64-slice MDCT scanners of the same manufacturer and to compare absolute mass scores to the physical mass and between scan modes using a calcified phantom. A non-moving anthropomorphic phantom with nine calcifications of three sizes and three densities was scanned 30 times on three 64-slice MDCT scanners of manufacturer A and on three 64-slice MDCT scanners of manufacturer B in both sequential and spiral scan mode. The mean mass scores and mass score variabilities of seven calcifications were determined for all scanners; two non-detectable calcifications were omitted. It was analyzed whether identical scanners yielded similar or significantly different mass scores. Furthermore mass scores were compared to the physical mass and mass scores were compared between scan modes. The mass score calibration factor was determined for all scanners. Mass scores obtained on identical scanners were similar for almost all calcifications. Overall, mass score differences between the scanners were small ranging from 1.5 to 3.4% for the total mass scores, and most differences between scanners were observed for high density calcifications. Mass scores were significantly different from the physical mass for almost all calcifications and all scanners. In sequential mode the total physical mass (167.8 mg) was significantly overestimated (+2.3%) for 4 out of 6 scanners. In spiral mode a significant overestimation (+2.5%) was found for system B and a significant underestimation (-1.8%) for two scanners of system A. Mass scores were dependent on the scan mode, for manufacturer A scores were higher in sequential mode and for manufacturer B in spiral mode. For system A using spiral scan mode no differences were found between identical scanners, whereas a few differences were found using sequential mode. For system B the scan mode did not affect the number of different mass scores between identical scanners. Mass

  8. [Review of pre- and post-treatment multidetector computed tomography findings in abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Casula, E; Lonjedo, E; Cerverón, M J; Ruiz, A; Gómez, J

    2014-01-01

    The increase in the frequency of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and the widely accepted use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) as a first-line treatment or as an alternative to conventional surgery make it necessary for radiologists to have thorough knowledge of the pre- and post-treatment findings. The high image quality provided by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) enables CT angiography to play a fundamental role in the study of AAA and in planning treatment. The objective of this article is to review the cases of AAA in which CT angiography was the main imaging technique, so that radiologists will be able to detect the signs related to this disease, to diagnose it, to plan treatment, and to detect complications in the postoperative period. PMID:23489768

  9. Three-dimensional reconstruction of New Zealand rabbit antebrachium by multidetector computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Özkadif, S; Eken, E; Beşoluk, K; Dayan, M. O.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal biometric peculiarities of New Zealand white rabbit antebrachium (radius and ulna) by means of three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) images. Under general anesthesia, the antebrachiums of a total of sixteen rabbits of both sexes were scanned with a general diagnostic MDCT. Biometric measurements of the reconstructed models from high resolution MDCT images were analyzed statistically. Consequently, when biometric measurement values of corresponding bones of antebrachium were compared, it was revealed that there was no statistical significance within both sexes but there were statistically important differences between both sexes in some biometric measurements. It has been suggested that the results from the study can shed light on future studies on the skeletal system and can form a modern point of view to anatomical education. PMID:27175177

  10. Demonstration of normal and dilated testicular veins by multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Karcaaltincaba, Musturay

    2011-04-01

    Recent advances in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) technology enabled better visualization of testicular (gonadal) vein using submillimeter slice thickness and three-dimensional images. Normally, the testicular vein measures 1-3 mm and drains into the inferior vena cava and left renal vein on the right and left sides, respectively. They can be seen in most patients during MDCT studies. Curved planar and volume-rendered images can be used to display testicular veins. We aim to demonstrate MDCT findings of normal testicular vein and its pathologies including varicocele, varices, the testicular vascular pedicle sign, and phlebolith. The testicular vein can be dilated owing to varicocele or portal hypertension and in patients with intraabdominal seminomas arising from undescended testis. The testicular vein can also cause ureteral compression at the crossing point. Understanding MDCT findings of the normal testicular vein and its various pathologies can allow a correct diagnosis, thereby avoiding further diagnostic tests. PMID:21519988

  11. [Review of pre- and post-treatment multidetector computed tomography findings in abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Casula, E; Lonjedo, E; Cerverón, M J; Ruiz, A; Gómez, J

    2014-01-01

    The increase in the frequency of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and the widely accepted use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) as a first-line treatment or as an alternative to conventional surgery make it necessary for radiologists to have thorough knowledge of the pre- and post-treatment findings. The high image quality provided by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) enables CT angiography to play a fundamental role in the study of AAA and in planning treatment. The objective of this article is to review the cases of AAA in which CT angiography was the main imaging technique, so that radiologists will be able to detect the signs related to this disease, to diagnose it, to plan treatment, and to detect complications in the postoperative period.

  12. Trapping volumetric measurement by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Effect of CT threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaohua; Yuan, Huishu; Duan, Jianghui; Du, Yipeng; Shen, Ning; He, Bei

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various computed tomography (CT) thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).Methods: Twenty-three COPD patients were scanned with a 64-slice CT scanner in both the inspiratory and expiratory phase. CT thresholds of −950 Hu in inspiration and −950 to −890 Hu in expiration were used, after which trapping volumetric measurements were made using computer software. Trapping volume percentage (Vtrap%) under the different CT thresholds in the expiratory phase and below −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase was compared and correlated with lung function.Results: Mean Vtrap% was similar under −930 Hu in the expiratory phase and below −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase, being 13.18 ± 9.66 and 13.95 ± 6.72 (both lungs), respectively; this difference was not significant (P= 0.240). Vtrap% under −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase and below the −950 to −890 Hu threshold in the expiratory phase was moderately negatively correlated with the ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity and the measured value of forced expiratory volume in one second as a percentage of the predicted value.Conclusions: Trapping volumetric measurement with multidetector CT is a promising method for the quantification of COPD. It is important to know the effect of various CT thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements.

  13. Comparison of the Diagnostic Image Quality of the Canine Maxillary Dentoalveolar Structures Obtained by Cone Beam Computed Tomography and 64-Multidetector Row Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Jason W; Drees, Randi; Koenig, Lisa J; Snyder, Christopher J; Hetzel, Scott; Miles, Chanda R; Schwarz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this blinded study was to validate the use of cone beam computed tomography (C) for imaging of the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures by comparing its diagnostic image quality with that of 64-multidetector row CT Sagittal slices of a tooth-bearing segment of the maxilla of a commercially purchased dog skull embedded in methylmethacrylate were obtained along a line parallel with the dental arch using a commercial histology diamond saw. The slice of tooth-bearing bone that best depicted the dentoalveolar structures was chosen and photographed. The maxillary segment was imaged with cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT. Four blinded evaluators compared the cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT images and image quality was scored as it related to the anatomy of dentoalveolar structures. Trabecular bone, enamel, dentin, pulp cavity, periodontal ligament space, and lamina dura were scored In addition, a score depicting the evaluators overall impression of the image was recorded. Images acquired with cone beam CT were found to be significantly superior in image quality to images acquired with 64-multidetector row CT overall, and in all scored categories. In our study setting cone beam CT was found to be a valid and clinically superior imaging modality for the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures when compared to 64-multidetector row CT. PMID:26415384

  14. Quadricuspid pulmonary valve in an adult patient identified by transthoracic echocardiography and multi-detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Jung, Soo-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Quadricuspid pulmonary valve is a rare congenital heart disease. It is infrequently associated with significant clinical complications and tends to be clinically silent. Because of its benign nature, it has been diagnosed mainly post mortem. Its diagnosis by transthoracic echocardiography is very difficult because of the anatomical features. We describe a case of quadricuspid pulmonary valve diagnosed by transthoracic echocardiography and electrocardiography-gated multi-detector row computed tomography.

  15. Multidetector row computed tomography evaluation of the micropig kidney as a potential renal donor.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Woong; Lee, Min Young; Ryu, Jung Min; Moon, Yong Ju; Lee, Sang Hun; Park, Jae Hong; Yun, Seung Pil; Jang, Min Woo; Park, Sung Su; Han, Ho Jae

    2010-03-01

    Multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) provides anatomical information about the kidney and other internal organs. Presently, the suitability of 64-channel MDCT to assess the kidney of healthy micropigs was evaluated. Morphological evaluations of the kidney and the major renal vessels of six healthy micropigs were carried out using MDCT, recording kidney volume and the diameter and length of renal arteries and veins. The mean diameters and lengths of the renal artery were 0.44 +/- 0.05 and 4.51 +/- 0.55 cm on the right side and 0.46 +/- 0.06 and 3.36 +/- 0.27 cm on the left side, respectively. The mean diameters and lengths of the renal vein were 1.44 +/- 0.52 and 4.22 +/- 1.29 cm on the right side and 1.38 +/- 0.17 and 5.15 +/- 0.87 cm on the left side, respectively. The mean volume of the right kidney was 79.3 +/- 14.5 mL and of the left kidney was 78.0 +/- 13.9 mL. The data presented in this study suggest that the MDCT offers a noninvasive, rapid, and accurate method for the evaluation of the renal anatomy in living kidney donors. It also provides sufficient information about extra-renal anatomy important for donor surgery and determination of organ suitability.

  16. Evaluation of cardiovascular anomalies in patients with asymptomatic turner syndrome using multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Hee; Jung, Ji Mi; Song, Min Seob; Choi, Seok jin; Chung, Woo Yeong

    2013-08-01

    Turner syndrome is well known to be associated with significant cardiovascular abnormalities. This paper studied the incidence of cardiovascular abnormalities in asymptomatic adolescent patients with Turner syndrome using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) instead of echocardiography. Twenty subjects diagnosed with Turner syndrome who had no cardiac symptoms were included. Blood pressure and electrocardiography (ECG) was checked. Cardiovascular abnormalities were checked by MDCT. According to the ECG results, 11 had a prolonged QTc interval, 5 had a posterior fascicular block, 3 had a ventricular conduction disorder. MDCT revealed vascular abnormalities in 13 patients (65%). Three patients had an aberrant right subclavian artery, 2 had dilatation of left subclavian artery, and others had an aortic root dilatation, aortic diverticulum, and abnormal left vertebral artery. As for venous abnormalities, 3 patients had partial anomalous pulmonary venous return and 2 had a persistent left superior vena cava. This study found cardiovascular abnormalities in 65% of asymptomatic Turner syndrome patients using MDCT. Even though, there are no cardiac symptoms in Turner syndrome patients, a complete evaluation of the heart with echocardiography or MDCT at transition period to adults must be performed.

  17. Abdominal crush injury in the Sichuan earthquake evaluated by multidetector computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tian-Wu; Yang, Zhi-Gang; Dong, Zhi-Hui; Shao, Heng; Chu, Zhi-Gang; Tang, Si-Shi

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the features of abdominal crush injuries resulting from an earthquake using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). METHODS: Fifty-one survivors with abdominal crush injuries due to the 2008 Sichuan earthquake underwent emergency non-enhanced scans with 16-row MDCT. Data were reviewed focusing on anatomic regions including lumbar vertebrae, abdominal wall soft tissue, retroperitoneum and intraperitoneal space; and types of traumatic lesions. RESULTS: Fractures of lumbar vertebrae and abdominal wall soft tissue injuries were more common than retro- and intraperitoneal injuries (P < 0.05). With regard to the 49 lumbar vertebral fractures in 24 patients, these occurred predominantly in the transverse process (P < 0.05), and 66.67% of patients (16/24) had fractures of multiple vertebrae, predominantly two vertebrae in 62.5% of patients (10/16), mainly in L1-3 vertebrae in 81.63% of the vertebrae (40/49). Retroperitoneal injuries occurred more frequently than intraperitoneal injuries (P < 0.05), and renal and liver injuries were most often seen in the retroperitoneum and in the intraperitoneal space, respectively (all P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Transverse process fractures in two vertebrae among L1-3 vertebrae, injury of abdominal wall soft tissue, and renal injury might be features of earthquake-related crush abdominal injury. PMID:21666819

  18. A Structural and Functional Assessment of the Lung via Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Eric A.; Simon, Brett A.; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2006-01-01

    With advances in multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT), it is now possible to image the lung in 10 s or less and accurately extract the lungs, lobes, and airway tree to the fifth- through seventh-generation bronchi and to regionally characterize lung density, texture, ventilation, and perfusion. These methods are now being used to phenotype the lung in health and disease and to gain insights into the etiology of pathologic processes. This article outlines the application of these methodologies with specific emphasis on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We demonstrate the use of our methods for assessing regional ventilation and perfusion and demonstrate early data that show, in a sheep model, a regionally intact hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstrictor (HPV) response with an apparent inhibition of HPV regionally in the presence of inflammation. We present the hypothesis that, in subjects with pulmonary emphysema, one major contributing factor leading to parenchymal destruction is the lack of a regional blunting of HPV when the regional hypoxia is related to regional inflammatory events (bronchiolitis or alveolar flooding). If maintaining adequate blood flow to inflamed lung regions is critical to the nondestructive resolution of inflammatory events, the pathologic condition whereby HPV is sustained in regions of inflammation would likely have its greatest effect in the lung apices where blood flow is already reduced in the upright body posture. PMID:16921136

  19. To assess vascular calcification in the patients of hypoparathyroidism using multidetector computed tomography scan

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Pooja; Prakash, Mahesh; Singhal, Manphool; Bhadada, Sanjay Kumar; Gupta, Yashdeep; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Our pilot data showed an increased intima media thickness in the patients with sporadic idiopathic hypoparathyroidism (SIH). Alteration in homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and parathyroid hormone (PTH) may predispose to increase the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The data on objective assessment of this increased risk is however lacking. Objective: To assess the effect of altered calcium, phosphate, and PTH homeostasis in the patients with SIH on coronary calcium score (a marker of increase vascular risk) by multidetector computed tomography scan (MDCT). Methods: In this case-control study, we measured coronary CT calcium score in 30 patients of SIH and compared with 40 age and sex matched healthy subjects. Correlation of coronary calcium score with biochemical parameters was evaluated. Results: Three of the 30 cases (10%) with SIH were found to have coronary artery calcification (CAC) of varying degree, whereas none of the control showed CAC (P = 0.07). The patients with CAC had significantly lower serum calcium levels (albumin corrected), as compared to the patients without CAC. Inverse correlation of CAC was found with serum calcium levels. No correlation was found with other biochemical parameters. Conclusion: The vascular risk is increased in the patients with SIH as assessed by coronary calcium score measured by MDCT. Low serum calcium levels might be a predisposing factor for this increased risk. PMID:26693429

  20. Evaluation of Cardiovascular Anomalies in Patients with Asymptomatic Turner Syndrome Using Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Hee; Jung, Ji Mi; Song, Min Seob; Choi, Seok jin

    2013-01-01

    Turner syndrome is well known to be associated with significant cardiovascular abnormalities. This paper studied the incidence of cardiovascular abnormalities in asymptomatic adolescent patients with Turner syndrome using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) instead of echocardiography. Twenty subjects diagnosed with Turner syndrome who had no cardiac symptoms were included. Blood pressure and electrocardiography (ECG) was checked. Cardiovascular abnormalities were checked by MDCT. According to the ECG results, 11 had a prolonged QTc interval, 5 had a posterior fascicular block, 3 had a ventricular conduction disorder. MDCT revealed vascular abnormalities in 13 patients (65%). Three patients had an aberrant right subclavian artery, 2 had dilatation of left subclavian artery, and others had an aortic root dilatation, aortic diverticulum, and abnormal left vertebral artery. As for venous abnormalities, 3 patients had partial anomalous pulmonary venous return and 2 had a persistent left superior vena cava. This study found cardiovascular abnormalities in 65% of asymptomatic Turner syndrome patients using MDCT. Even though, there are no cardiac symptoms in Turner syndrome patients, a complete evaluation of the heart with echocardiography or MDCT at transition period to adults must be performed. PMID:23960443

  1. PULMONARY ANGIOGRAPHY WITH 64-MULTIDETECTOR-ROW COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN NORMAL DOGS

    PubMed Central

    Drees, Randi; Frydrychowicz, Alex; Keuler, Nicholas S.; Reeder, Scott B.; Johnson, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary angiography using 64-multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) was used to evaluate pulmonary artery anatomy, and determine the sensitivity of pulmonary artery segment visualization in four Beagle dogs using images reconstructed to 0.625 mm and retro-reconstructed to 1.25 and 2.5 mm slice thickness. Morphologically, characteristic features included a focal narrowing in the right cranial pulmonary artery in all dogs, which should not be mistaken as stenosis. While the right cranial pulmonary artery divided into two equally sized branches that were tracked into the periphery of the lung lobe in all dogs, only a single left cranial (cranial portion) lobar artery was present. Compared with 1.25 and 2.5 mm retro-reconstructions, 0.625 mm reconstructions allowed for detection of significantly (P ≤ 0.05) more pulmonary artery segments and sharper depiction of vessel margins. Clinical applications such as prevalence and significance of diameter changes, and detection of pulmonary arterial thrombembolism on lobar and sublobar level, using pulmonary angiography with 64-MDCT applying 0.625 mm reconstruction slice thickness remain to be established. PMID:21545367

  2. Multidetector Computed Tomography Features in Differentiating Exophytic Renal Angiomyolipoma from Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiushi; Juan, Yu-Hsiang; Li, Yong; Xie, Jia-Jun; Liu, Hui; Huang, Hongfei; Liu, Zaiyi; Zheng, Junhui; Saboo, Ujwala S.; Saboo, Sachin S.; Liang, Changhong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to evaluate the multidetector computed tomography (CT) imaging features in differentiating exophytic renal angiomyolipoma (AML) from retroperitoneal liposarcoma. We retrospectively enrolled 42 patients with confirmed exophytic renal AML (31 patients) or retroperitoneal liposarcoma (11 patients) during 8 years period to assess: renal parenchymal defect at site of tumor contact, supply from branches of renal artery, tumoral vessel extending through the renal parenchyma, dilated intratumoral vessels, hemorrhage, non–fat-containing intratumoral nodules with postcontrast enhancement, calcification, renal sinus enlargement, anterior displacement of kidneys, and other associated AML. Renal parenchymal defect, renal arterial blood supply, tumoral vessel through the renal parenchyma, dilated intratumoral vessels, intratumoral/perirenal hemorrhage, renal sinus enlargement, and associated AML were seen only or mainly in exophytic renal AML (all P value < 0.05); however, non–fat-attenuating enhancing intratumoral nodules, intratumoral calcification, and anterior displacement of the kidney were more common in liposarcoma (all P value < 0.05). AMLs reveal renal parenchymal defect at the site of tumor contact, supply from renal artery, tumoral vessel extending through the renal parenchyma, dilated intratumoral vessels, intratumoral and/or perirenal hemorrhage, renal sinus enlargement, and associated AML. Non–fat-attenuating enhancing intratumoral nodules, intratumoral calcifications, and anterior displacement of kidney were more commonly seen in liposarcoma. PMID:26376398

  3. Stature estimation in Japanese cadavers using the sacral and coccygeal length measured with multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Makino, Yohsuke; Saitoh, Hisako; Ishii, Namiko; Hayakawa, Mutsumi; Yajima, Daisuke; Inokuchi, Go; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between stature and the length of the sacrum and coccyx using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and derived regression equations for stature estimation in the modern Japanese population. Two hundred and sixteen Japanese subjects (110 males and 106 females) who underwent postmortem computed tomography with subsequent forensic autopsy between January 2010 and August 2013 were measured. A sagittal-plane image of the sacrum and coccyx was used. Anterior sacral length (ASL) was defined as the linear distance from the anterosuperior edge of the first sacral vertebra (S1) to the anteroinferior edge of the fifth sacral vertebra (S5), and posterior sacral length (PSL) was defined as the linear distance from the posterosuperior edge of S1 to the anteroinferior edge of S5. Anterior sacrococcygeal length (ASCL) was defined as the linear distance from the anterosuperior edge of S1 to the anteroinferior edge of the last coccygeal vertebra (LCV), and posterior sacrococcygeal length (PSCL) was defined as the linear distance from the posterosuperior edge of S1 to the anteroinferior edge of the LCV. The correlation between stature and each parameter was evaluated by simple regression analysis using Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients. Each parameter was significantly and positively correlated with stature among both males and females. Cadaver stature (CS, cm)=0.39×PSL (mm)+123.70 [Corrected] provided the most accurate stature prediction (R=0.507, SEE=5.83 cm) in males. CS (cm)=0.56×PSCL (mm)+85.29 provided the most accurate stature prediction (R=0.659, SEE=6.68 cm) in females. We conclude that sacral/sacrococcygeal length measured with MDCT is a potentially useful tool for stature estimation, particularly in cases where better predictors such as the long bones are not available.

  4. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the celiac trunk and hepatic arterial system: normal anatomy and main variants *

    PubMed Central

    Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; de Mello Júnior, Carlos Fernando; Franca, Henrique Almeida; Duarte, Cláudia Martina Araújo; Borges, Rafael Farias; de Magalhães, Ana Guardiana Ximenes

    2016-01-01

    Although digital angiography remains as the gold standard for imaging the celiac arterial trunk and hepatic arteries, multidetector computed tomography in association with digital images processing by software resources represents a useful tool particularly attractive for its non invasiveness. Knowledge of normal anatomy as well as of its variations is helpful in images interpretation and to address surgical planning on a case-by-case basis. The present essay illustrates several types of anatomical variations of celiac trunk, hepatic artery and its main branches, by means of digitally reconstructed computed tomography images, correlating their prevalence in the population with surgical implications. PMID:26929461

  5. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the celiac trunk and hepatic arterial system: normal anatomy and main variants.

    PubMed

    Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; de Mello Júnior, Carlos Fernando; Franca, Henrique Almeida; Duarte, Cláudia Martina Araújo; Borges, Rafael Farias; de Magalhães, Ana Guardiana Ximenes

    2016-01-01

    Although digital angiography remains as the gold standard for imaging the celiac arterial trunk and hepatic arteries, multidetector computed tomography in association with digital images processing by software resources represents a useful tool particularly attractive for its non invasiveness. Knowledge of normal anatomy as well as of its variations is helpful in images interpretation and to address surgical planning on a case-by-case basis. The present essay illustrates several types of anatomical variations of celiac trunk, hepatic artery and its main branches, by means of digitally reconstructed computed tomography images, correlating their prevalence in the population with surgical implications.

  6. Image Quality and Radiation Dose for Prospectively Triggered Coronary CT Angiography: 128-Slice Single-Source CT versus First-Generation 64-Slice Dual-Source CT

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jin; Shi, He-shui; Han, Ping; Yu, Jie; Ma, Gui-na; Wu, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to compare the image quality and radiation dose of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) from prospectively triggered 128-slice CT (128-MSCT) versus dual-source 64-slice CT (DSCT). The study was approved by the Medical Ethics Committee at Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Eighty consecutive patients with stable heart rates lower than 70 bpm were enrolled. Forty patients were scanned with 128-MSCT, and the other 40 patients were scanned with DSCT. Two radiologists independently assessed the image quality in segments (diameter >1 mm) according to a three-point scale (1: excellent; 2: moderate; 3: insufficient). The CCTA radiation dose was calculated. Eighty patients with 526 segments in the 128-MSCT group and 544 segments in the DSCT group were evaluated. The image quality 1, 2 and 3 scores were 91.6%, 6.9% and 1.5%, respectively, for the 128-MSCT group and 97.6%, 1.7% and 0.7%, respectively, for the DSCT group, and there was a statistically significant inter-group difference (P ≤ 0.001). The effective doses were 3.0 mSv in the 128-MSCT group and 4.5 mSv in the DSCT group (P ≤ 0.001). Compared with DSCT, CCTA with prospectively triggered 128-MSCT had adequate image quality and a 33.3% lower radiation dose. PMID:27752040

  7. Multi-Detector Computed Tomography in Evaluating Locally Aggressive and Malignant Bone Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Ramavathu, Kumar Venu Madhav; Garga, U.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the ability of Multi-Detector Computed Tomography in preoperative evaluation of locally aggressive and malignant bone tumours in correlation with histopathological findings. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients suspected of malignant bone tumours on the basis of their clinical profile were selected. Following a plain radiograph evaluation, all of them were subjected to CT scan examination. Multi Planar Reconstruction (MPR) was done in sagittal and coronal planes and also three-dimensional Volume Rendering (VR) and Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) images were obtained. Results: Of the 20 patients, 18 underwent surgery, and their histopathological findings were compared and correlated with MDCT findings. MDCT was 92.8% sensitive and 100% specific in determining the vascularity of the tumour and also can detect displacement/ encasement/ involvement of adjacent vessels. It has a sensitivity and specificity of 100% in determining cortical break, calcification and periosteal reaction. However, it is less sensitive in detecting joint involvement. Post contrast enhancement gives details of the extent of the soft tissue component. Conclusion: Although MRI is a preferred modality in preoperative evaluation of bone tumours, CT may be used an alternative in case of non-availability of MRI, which has faster acquisition time and better resolution. Using three dimensional MPR imaging, the location and extent of the tumour can be studied. It is also useful in determining cortical discontinuity, periosteal reaction, and calcification. By virtue of MIP and VR imaging, vascularity of the tumour and its relationship with the adjacent vasculature can be established. However, it is inferior to MRI in soft tissue characterization and has poor sensitivity in detecting marrow and joint involvement. PMID:26023618

  8. Airway Evaluation with Multidetector Computed Tomography Post-Processing Methods in Asthmatic Patients.

    PubMed

    Patyk, Mateusz; Obojski, Andrzej; Gojny, Łukasz; Panaszek, Bernard; Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory obstructive airways disease. The disease occurs regardless of age and manifests with cough, attacks of breathlessness, and tightness in the chest. The pathophysiology of asthma is complex and still not fully understood. It is essential to find answers concerning the role of each part of the bronchial tree in asthma, especially the role of small bronchioles. With the development of newer generations of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and advanced post-processing methods it is possible to obtain more detailed images and gain insight into further aspects of asthma. MDCT post-processing methods can be divided into two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D). In 2D projections, visualized hypodense regions correspond to the airway flow limitations. With the more advanced methods, such as multi planar reconstructions (MPR), images in different planes (axial, coronal, or sagittal) can be created. In the MPR technique only the voxels which are adjacent to each other in the predetermined plane can be extracted from the data set. Using the minimal/maximal intensity projections and shaded surface display, the volume of interest (VOI) can be extracted. High resolution CT scans can be used to create a more advanced imaging tool - the virtual bronchoscopy (VB). Using the VB makes it possible to visualize regions of obturation in the bronchi of up to the 5-8th generation. The MDCT with advanced post-processing methods is likely to assume an important role in the differential diagnosis of asthma, particularly when the diagnosis is dubious or hard to settle due to accompanying other lung diseases. PMID:27271759

  9. Anthropometric Assessment of Neck Adipose Tissue and Airway Volume Using Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Maresky, Hillel S.; Sharfman, Zachary; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Gomori, J.M.; Copel, Laurian; Tal, Sigal

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Neck adiposity tissue volume (NATV) accumulation is an indicator for metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Neck circumference is a poor measure of NATV, and a quantifier for this entity has not yet been established. To evaluate volumetric quantification by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as a reproducible anthropometric tool to measure NATV and airway volume (AWV). A total of 519 patients, including a subset of 70 random patients who underwent head and neck CT scanning in our hospital within 1 year (2013), were studied. Included patients were all those undergoing nonenhanced CT (NECT) or CT angiography (CTA). Neck cross-sectional areas (NCSA) were measured at 2 separate levels of the neck, and 3D postprocessing tissue reconstruction was performed, and NATV and AWVs were quantified volumetrically for all patients within the year. The average NCSA at the level of the soft palate and thyroid cartilage was 22,579 and 14,500 mm2, respectively. NATV when compared to the upper and lower levels of NCSA showed correlations of 0.64 and 0.79, respectively (P < 0.001). Interobserver analysis showed mean deviations of 0.46% and 0.32% for NATV and AWV, respectively. A strong correlation between NATV and body mass index (BMI) was found (r = 0.658, P < 0.001), and the top quartile of NATV:AWV patients (out of 519 patients) displayed a statistically significant mortality rate during 670 days of follow-up (d = 7.5%, P = 0.032). After adjustment for age and gender, the association between NATV:AWV and mortality was close to significant (P = 0.072). Volumetric quantification of NATV and AWV is a reproducible and prognostic anthropometric tool, as a high NATV:AWV demonstrated a significant risk factor for mortality; future research may further advance our understanding of this phenomenon. PMID:26559286

  10. Tendon entrapments and dislocations in ankle and hindfoot fractures: evaluation with multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ballard, David H; Campbell, Kevin J; Blanton, Lee E; Williams, Jason T; Sangster, Guillermo; Hollister, Anne M; Simoncini, Alberto A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of tendon entrapments and tendon dislocations associated with ankle and hindfoot fractures in patients studied by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Additionally, we describe particular tendon injuries associated with specific fractures. This was a retrospective review of all individuals with a trauma-protocol CT for suspected ankle and/or hindfoot fractures during a consecutive 41-month time period at a single Level I Trauma Center. Each patient's images were evaluated by two radiologists and an orthopedic surgeon for tendon entrapment, tendon dislocation, and bone(s) fractured or dislocated. There were 398 patients with ankle and/or hindfoot fractures that showed tendon entrapment or dislocation in 64 (16.1 %) patients. There were 30 (46.9 %) patients with 40 tendon entrapments, 31 (48.4 %) patients with 59 tendon dislocations, and three (4.7 %) patients with both tendon entrapment and dislocation. All patients with tendon entrapments were seen with either pilon fractures and/or a combination of posterior, medial, or lateral malleolar fractures. The most frequently entrapped tendon was the posterior tibialis tendon (PTT) in 27 patients (27/30, 90.0 %). The peroneal tendons were the most frequently dislocated, representing 27 (87.1 %) of patients with tendon dislocation; all resulted from a talar or calcaneal fracture or subluxation. This study demonstrates that tendon entrapments and tendon dislocations are commonly seen in complex fractures of the ankle and hindfoot. Pilon fractures were associated with the majority of tendon entrapments, whereas calcaneus fractures were associated with the majority of tendon dislocations. PMID:27234977

  11. A case of fatal sigmoid volvulus visualized on postmortem radiography: The importance of image optimization with multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Usui, Akihito; Kawasumi, Yusuke; Hosokai, Yoshiyuki; Ishizuka, Yuya; Ikeda, Tomoya; Saito, Haruo; Funayama, Masato

    2016-03-01

    This report describes the case of a man who developed fatal sigmoid volvulus that was identified on postmortem radiography before forensic autopsy. Postmortem radiography is useful for visualizing the body prior to autopsy. We discuss postmortem multidetector computed tomography that was tailored for optimum image quality to allow reconstruction of the fatal findings in multiple axes and in three dimensions, helping to pinpoint the anatomical sites of interest. This involves techniques such as manipulation of the scanning beam pitch and overlapping CT section acquisition. These techniques are best performed by personnel with CT technology training. PMID:26980251

  12. Rectal cancer staging: Multidetector-row computed tomography diagnostic accuracy in assessment of mesorectal fascia invasion

    PubMed Central

    Ippolito, Davide; Drago, Silvia Girolama; Franzesi, Cammillo Talei; Fior, Davide; Sironi, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) as compared with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in identifying mesorectal fascia (MRF) invasion in rectal cancer patients. METHODS: Ninety-one patients with biopsy proven rectal adenocarcinoma referred for thoracic and abdominal CT staging were enrolled in this study. The contrast-enhanced MDCT scans were performed on a 256 row scanner (ICT, Philips) with the following acquisition parameters: tube voltage 120 KV, tube current 150-300 mAs. Imaging data were reviewed as axial and as multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) images along the rectal tumor axis. MRI study, performed on 1.5 T with dedicated phased array multicoil, included multiplanar T2 and axial T1 sequences and diffusion weighted images (DWI). Axial and MPR CT images independently were compared to MRI and MRF involvement was determined. Diagnostic accuracy of both modalities was compared and statistically analyzed. RESULTS: According to MRI, the MRF was involved in 51 patients and not involved in 40 patients. DWI allowed to recognize the tumor as a focal mass with high signal intensity on high b-value images, compared with the signal of the normal adjacent rectal wall or with the lower tissue signal intensity background. The number of patients correctly staged by the native axial CT images was 71 out of 91 (41 with involved MRF; 30 with not involved MRF), while by using the MPR 80 patients were correctly staged (45 with involved MRF; 35 with not involved MRF). Local tumor staging suggested by MDCT agreed with those of MRI, obtaining for CT axial images sensitivity and specificity of 80.4% and 75%, positive predictive value (PPV) 80.4%, negative predictive value (NPV) 75% and accuracy 78%; while performing MPR the sensitivity and specificity increased to 88% and 87.5%, PPV was 90%, NPV 85.36% and accuracy 88%. MPR images showed higher diagnostic accuracy, in terms of MRF involvement, than native axial images

  13. The effect of z overscanning on patient effective dose from multidetector helical computed tomography examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Tzedakis, A.; Damilakis, J.; Perisinakis, K.; Stratakis, J.; Gourtsoyiannis, N.

    2005-06-15

    z overscanning in multidetector (MD) helical CT scanning is prerequisite for the interpolation of acquired data required during image reconstruction and refers to the exposure of tissues beyond the boundaries of the volume to be imaged. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of z overscanning on the patient effective dose from helical MD CT examinations. The Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport code was employed in the current study to simulate CT exposure. The validity of the Monte Carlo simulation was verified by (a) a comparison of calculated and measured standard computed tomography dose index (CTDI) dosimetric data, and (b) a comparison of calculated and measured dose profiles along the z axis. CTDI was measured using a pencil ionization chamber and head and body CT phantoms. Dose profiles along the z axis were obtained using thermoluminescence dosimeters. A commercially available mathematical anthropomorphic phantom was used for the estimation of effective doses from four standard CT examinations, i.e., head and neck, chest, abdomen and pelvis, and trunk studies. Data for both axial and helical modes of operation were obtained. In the helical mode, z overscanning was taken into account. The calculated effective dose from a CT exposure was normalized to CTDI{sub freeinair}. The percentage differences in the normalized effective dose between contiguous axial and helical scans with pitch=1, may reach 13.1%, 35.8%, 29.0%, and 21.5%, for head and neck, chest, abdomen and pelvis, and trunk studies, respectively. Given that the same kilovoltage and tube load per rotation were used in both axial and helical scans, the above differences may be attributed to z overscanning. For helical scans with pitch=1, broader beam collimation is associated with increased z overscanning and consequently higher normalized effective dose value, when other scanning parameters are held constant. For a given beam collimation, the selection of a higher value of

  14. Optimization of the imaging quality of 64-slice CT acquisition protocol using Taguchi analysis: A phantom study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lung Fa; Erdene, Erdenetsetseg; Chen, Chun Chi; Pan, Lung Kwang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the phantom imaging quality of 64-slice CT acquisition protocol was quantitatively evaluated using Taguchi. The phantom acrylic line group was designed and assembled with multiple layers of solid water plate in order to imitate the adult abdomen, and scanned with Philips brilliance CT in order to simulate a clinical examination. According to the Taguchi L8(2(7)) orthogonal array, four major factors of the acquisition protocol were optimized, including (A) CT slice thickness, (B) the image reconstruction filter type, (C) the spiral CT pitch, and (D) the matrix size. The reconstructed line group phantom image was counted by four radiologists for three discrete rounds in order to obtain the averages and standard deviations of the line counts and the corresponding signal to noise ratios (S/N). The quantified S/N values were analyzed and the optimal combination of the four factor settings was determined to be comprised of (A) a 1-mm thickness, (B) a sharp filter type, (C) a 1.172 spiral CT pitch, and (D) a 1024×1024 matrix size. The dominant factors included the (A) filter type and the cross interaction between the filter type and CT slice thickness (A×B). The minor factors were determined to be (C) the spiral CT pitch and (D) the matrix size since neither was capable of yielding a 95% confidence level in the ANOVA test. PMID:26405931

  15. [The role of multidetector computer tomography in diagnosis of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Lohanikhina, K Iu; Hordiienko, K P; Kozarenko, T M

    2014-10-01

    With the objective to improve the diagnostic semiotics of an acute pancreatitis (AP) 35 patients were examined, using 64-cut computeric tomograph Lightspeed VCT (GE, USA) with intravenous augmentation in arterial and portal phases. Basing on analysis of the investigations conducted, using multidetector computeric tomography (MDCT), the AP semiotics was systematized, which is characteristic for oedematous and destructive forms, diagnosed in 19 (44.2%) and 16 (45.8%) patients, accordingly. The procedure for estimation of preservation of the organ functional capacity in pancreonecrosis pres- ence was elaborated, promoting rising of the method diagnostic efficacy by 5.3 - 9.4%. PMID:25675779

  16. [The role of multidetector computer tomography in diagnosis of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Lohanikhina, K Iu; Hordiienko, K P; Kozarenko, T M

    2014-10-01

    With the objective to improve the diagnostic semiotics of an acute pancreatitis (AP) 35 patients were examined, using 64-cut computeric tomograph Lightspeed VCT (GE, USA) with intravenous augmentation in arterial and portal phases. Basing on analysis of the investigations conducted, using multidetector computeric tomography (MDCT), the AP semiotics was systematized, which is characteristic for oedematous and destructive forms, diagnosed in 19 (44.2%) and 16 (45.8%) patients, accordingly. The procedure for estimation of preservation of the organ functional capacity in pancreonecrosis pres- ence was elaborated, promoting rising of the method diagnostic efficacy by 5.3 - 9.4%.

  17. Pulmonary Findings on Computed Tomography in Asymptomatic Total Joint Arthroplasty Patients.

    PubMed

    Vigdorchik, Jonathan M; Riesgo, Aldo M; Lincoln, Denis; Markel, David C

    2016-08-01

    An increase in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolus (PE) in the early postoperative period has been attributed to the use of multidetector 64-slice computed tomographic (CT) scans. It was suspected that this finding was the result of marrow or fat emboli that are commonly associated with arthroplasty rather than a true venous thromboembolic phenomenon. The purpose of this study was to determine the baseline pulmonary findings in asymptomatic patients after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Over a 1-year period, an institutional review board-approved prospective study of 20 asymptomatic patients using a multidetector 64-slice CT scanner was performed. Overall, 15 TKAs and 5 total hip arthroplasties were included for analysis. All of the CT scans were negative for PE. There were no signs of microemboli or fat emboli on any scan. No patient went on to develop a PE at 2 years postoperatively. Despite the fact that emboli are created during TJA, if emboli are seen on a CT scan postoperatively, they should be assumed to be real events with clinical sequelae. If pulmonary symptoms develop postoperatively, they should not simply be assumed to be the result of fat or marrow embolism.

  18. Assessments of Coronary Artery Visibility and Radiation Dose in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease on Cardiac 128-slice CT and on Cardiac 64-slice CT.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y; Huang, M; Zheng, J; Li, J; Liu, H; Liang, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the coronary artery visibility and radiation dose in infants with CHD on cardiac 128-slice CT and on cardiac 64-slice CT. The images of 200 patients were analyzed in this study, 100 patients were selected randomly from a group of 789 infants (<1 years old) with CHD undergoing 128-slice CT prospective ECG-triggered axial scan, and 100 were selected randomly from 911 infants with CHD undergoing 64-slice CT retrospective ECG-gated spiral scan. The visibility of coronary artery segments was graded on a four-point scale. The coronary arteries were considered to be detected or visible when grade was 2 or higher. The visibility of the coronary artery segments and the radiation dose was compared between the two groups. Except for the rate of LM (96 vs. 99%), the detection rates of the total, LAD, LCX, RCA, and the proximal segment of the RCA in the 256-slice CT group were significantly higher than those in the 64-slice CT group (51.7, 53.33, 33.67, 53.33, and 99 vs. 34.8, 34.33, 18, 30.67, and 75%, respectively). The counts of visibility score (4/3/2/1) for the LM and the proximal segment of the RCA were 62/22/12/4 and 56/20/17/7, respectively, in the 128-slice CT group and 17/42/30/1 and 9/30/38/25, respectively, in the 64-slice CT group. There were significant differences, especially for score 4 and 3, between the two groups. The radiation dose in the 128-slice CT group was significantly decreased than those in the 64-slice CT group (CTDIvol 1.88 ± 0.51 vs. 5.61 ± 0.63 mGy; SSDE 4.48 ± 1.15 vs. 13.97 ± 1.52 mGy; effective radiation dose 1.36 ± 0.44 vs. 4.06 ± 0.7 mSv). With reduced radiation dose, the visibility of the coronary artery in infants with CHD via prospective ECG-triggered mode on a 128-slice CT is superior to that of the 64-slice CT using retrospective ECG-gated spiral mode.

  19. Validation of a paediatric thyroid phantom using different multidetector computed tomography models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsabbagh, M.; Ng, L. Y.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Manap, M. A.; Zainon, R.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the attenuation values of a fabricated paediatric thyroid phantom material using different MDCT models. A paediatric thyroid phantom was designed to mimic the shape and size of a paediatric patient with an age of 9 years using high- density Polyethylene as the phantom material. The fabricated phantom was scanned using two different multidetector CT scanners (16- and 128-row detectors). The CT numbers were evaluated and the mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of the phantom material were obtained at each applied energy from each scanner. The results were compared with the tables of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The CTs of 16- and 128-row detectors showed that the obtained attenuation values are very similar to the NIST's values. However, the CT of the 128-row detectors showed a slightly much closer match to the NIST's values. This refers to the type and quality of the electronic connections between the detectors. Furthermore, the type and number of detectors (16- and 128-detectors) could affect the details and quality of the output images. The results show that different multidetector CTs can be used to validate the phantom and determine the mass attenuation coefficients of its material.

  20. Observational case series: an algorithm incorporating multidetector computed tomography in the medicolegal investigation of human remains after a natural disaster.

    PubMed

    Berran, Philip J; Mazuchowski, Edward L; Marzouk, Abubakr; Harcke, H Theodore

    2014-07-01

    An algorithm incorporating multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), digital radiographs, and external examination was used to triage cases for noninvasive or complete autopsy after a natural disaster. The algorithm was applied to 27 individuals who died during or soon after the earthquake that struck the Republic of Haiti on January 12, 2010. Of the 27 cases reviewed, 7 (26%) required a complete autopsy to determine cause and manner of death. In the remaining 20 (74%), cause and manner of death were determined with a reasonable degree of medical certainty after review of circumstances, an external examination, and postmortem imaging by MDCT and digital radiography (noninvasive autopsy). MDCT was particularly useful in detecting skeletal fractures caused by blunt force injury which were not evident on digital radiographs. The algorithm incorporating postmortem MDCT can be useful in the triage of human remains for autopsy after a natural disaster.

  1. Is 3-Tesla Gd-EOB-DTPA-Enhanced MRI with Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Superior to 64-Slice Contrast-Enhanced CT for the Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Maiwald, Bettina; Lobsien, Donald; Kahn, Thomas; Stumpp, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare 64-slice contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) with 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using Gd-EOB-DTPA for the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and evaluate the utility of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in this setting. Methods 3-phase-liver-CT was performed in fifty patients (42 male, 8 female) with suspected or proven HCC. The patients were subjected to a 3-Tesla-MRI-examination with Gd-EOB-DTPA and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) at b-values of 0, 50 and 400 s/mm2. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)-value was determined for each lesion detected in DWI. The histopathological report after resection or biopsy of a lesion served as the gold standard, and a surrogate of follow-up or complementary imaging techniques in combination with clinical and paraclinical parameters was used in unresected lesions. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were evaluated for each technique. Results MRI detected slightly more lesions that were considered suspicious for HCC per patient compared to CT (2.7 versus 2.3, respectively). ADC-measurements in HCC showed notably heterogeneous values with a median of 1.2±0.5×10−3 mm2/s (range from 0.07±0.1 to 3.0±0.1×10−3 mm2/s). MRI showed similar diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and positive and negative predictive values compared to CT (AUC 0.837, sensitivity 92%, PPV 80% and NPV 90% for MRI vs. AUC 0.798, sensitivity 85%, PPV 79% and NPV 82% for CT; not significant). Specificity was 75% for both techniques. Conclusions Our study did not show a statistically significant difference in detection in detection of HCC between MRI and CT. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI tended to detect more lesions per patient compared to contrast-enhanced CT; therefore, we would recommend this modality as the first-choice imaging method for the detection of HCC and therapeutic decisions. However, contrast-enhanced CT was not inferior in our study, so

  2. Stature estimation based on measurements of the sternal medullary cavity using multidetector computed tomography images of Japanese cadavers.

    PubMed

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Makino, Yohsuke; Saitoh, Hisako; Sakuma, Ayaka; Ishii, Namiko; Hayakawa, Mutsumi; Yajima, Daisuke; Inokuchi, Go; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2014-09-01

    Stature estimation using a skeleton is important for the medicolegal investigation of unidentified human remains. The aims of this study were to identify a correlation between stature and measurements of the sternal medullary cavity using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and derive regression equations for stature estimation in the Japanese population. Measurements were conducted on 215 Japanese subjects (107 males, 108 females) who underwent postmortem computed tomography with subsequent forensic autopsy between May 2012 and January 2014. For assessment, MDCT cross-sections through the mid-point of the first costal facets were chosen. The length of a rising diagonal stroke from the bottom left to the top right of the sternal medullary cavity (RS) and the length of a falling diagonal stroke from top left to bottom right of the sternal medullary cavity (FS) were measured. Statistical analyses indicated that both RS and FS were positively correlated with stature regardless of sex. The correlations were stronger for males than for females. The correlation coefficients for RS were higher than those for FS, and standard errors of estimation calculated by regression analysis using RS were lower than those using FS regardless of sex. Measurement of the sternal medullary cavity using MDCT images may be a potentially useful tool for stature estimation, particularly in cases where better predictors such as long bones are not available. PMID:25082372

  3. Quantification of global left ventricular function: comparison of multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. a meta-analysis and review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    van der Vleuten, P A; Willems, T P; Götte, M J W; Tio, R A; Greuter, M J W; Zijlstra, F; Oudkerk, M

    2006-12-01

    Cardiac morbidity and mortality are closely related to cardiac volumes and global left ventricular (LV) function, expressed as left ventricular ejection fraction. Accurate assessment of these parameters is required for the prediction of prognosis in individual patients as well as in entire cohorts. The current standard of reference for left ventricular function is analysis by short-axis magnetic resonance imaging. In recent years, major extensive technological improvements have been achieved in computed tomography. The most marked development has been the introduction of the multidetector CT (MDCT), which has significantly improved temporal and spatial resolutions. In order to assess the current status of MDCT for analysis of LV function, the current available literature on this subject was reviewed. The data presented in this review indicate that the global left ventricular functional parameters measured by contemporary multi-detector row systems combined with adequate reconstruction algorithms and post-processing tools show a narrow diagnostic window and are interchangeable with those obtained by MRI.

  4. Thoracic Injuries in earthquake-related versus non-earthquake-related trauma patients: differentiation via Multi-detector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhi-hui; Yang, Zhi-gang; Chen, Tian-wu; Chu, Zhi-gang; Deng, Wen; Shao, Heng

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Massive earthquakes are harmful to humankind. This study of a historical cohort aimed to investigate the difference between earthquake-related crush thoracic traumas and thoracic traumas unrelated to earthquakes using a multi-detector Computed Tomography (CT). METHODS: We retrospectively compared an earthquake-exposed cohort of 215 thoracic trauma crush victims of the Sichuan earthquake to a cohort of 215 non-earthquake-related thoracic trauma patients, focusing on the lesions and coexisting injuries to the thoracic cage and the pulmonary parenchyma and pleura using a multi-detector CT. RESULTS: The incidence of rib fracture was elevated in the earthquake-exposed cohort (143 vs. 66 patients in the non-earthquake-exposed cohort, Risk Ratio (RR) = 2.2; p<0.001). Among these patients, those with more than 3 fractured ribs (106/143 vs. 41/66 patients, RR = 1.2; p<0.05) or flail chest (45/143 vs. 11/66 patients, RR = 1.9; p<0.05) were more frequently seen in the earthquake cohort. Earthquake-related crush injuries more frequently resulted in bilateral rib fractures (66/143 vs. 18/66 patients, RR = 1.7; p<0.01). Additionally, the incidence of non-rib fracture was higher in the earthquake cohort (85 vs. 60 patients, RR = 1.4; p<0.01). Pulmonary parenchymal and pleural injuries were more frequently seen in earthquake-related crush injuries (117 vs. 80 patients, RR = 1.5 for parenchymal and 146 vs. 74 patients, RR = 2.0 for pleural injuries; p<0.001). Non-rib fractures, pulmonary parenchymal and pleural injuries had significant positive correlation with rib fractures in these two cohorts. CONCLUSIONS: Thoracic crush traumas resulting from the earthquake were life threatening with a high incidence of bony thoracic fractures. The ribs were frequently involved in bilateral and severe types of fractures, which were accompanied by non-rib fractures, pulmonary parenchymal and pleural injuries. PMID:21789386

  5. Evaluation of lower-limb arteries with multidetector computed tomography angiography prior to free flap surgery: a radioanatomic study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Onder; Yuce, Ihsan; Kantarci, Mecit; Algan, Said

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the vascular structures of the lower limb with multidetector computed tomography (CT) angiography and to reveal the importance of this method in preoperative planning of microsurgical transplantation. In 24 patients, lower-limb arteries were bilaterally evaluated with 16-detector spiral CT scanner in terms of patency, stenosis, or occlusion; maximal and minimal external diameters through their traces; and variations as well as length of the peroneal artery. The peroneal artery was absent unilaterally in two patients (4.3%). The mean maximal and minimal diameters were as 2.77 and 1.63, 2.92 and 1.75, and 2.72 and 1.50 mm for anterior and posterior tibial and peroneal arteries, respectively. The ranges of lengths of peroneal arteries were 50 to 117 mm. This valuable tool can provide detailed information about vascular and the remaining anatomic structures by means of its high-resolution characteristics before planning free flap surgery. PMID:21181625

  6. Preoperative evaluation value of aortic arch lesions by multidetector computed tomography angiography in type A aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fang; Chen, Qiang; Lai, Qing-Quan; Huang, Wen-Han; Wu, Hong; Li, Wei-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to preoperatively evaluate the value of aortic arch lesions by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography in type A aortic dissection (AD).From January 2013 to December 2015, we enrolled 42 patients with type A AD who underwent MDCT angiography in our hospital. The institutional database of patients was retrospectively reviewed to identify MDCT angiography examinations for type A AD. Surgical corrections were conducted in all patients to confirm diagnostic accuracy.In this study, the diagnostic accuracy of MDCT angiography was 100% in all 42 patients. The intimal tear site locations that were identified in patients included the ascending aorta (n = 25), aortic arch (n = 12), and all other sites (n = 5). Compared with the control group, there were significant differences in the aortic arch anatomy among the cases. Regarding the distance between the left common carotid and left subclavian arteries, compared with the control group, most cases with type A AD had a significant variation.MDCT angiography plays an important role in detecting aortic arch lesions of type A AD, especially in determining the location of the intimal entry site and change of branch blood vessels. Surgeons can formulate an appropriate operating plan, according to the preoperative MDCT diagnosis information. PMID:27684852

  7. Split-Bolus Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography Technique for Characterization of Focal Liver Lesions in Oncologic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scialpi, Michele; Pierotti, Luisa; Gravante, Sabrina; Rebonato, Alberto; Piscioli, Irene; D’Andrea, Alfredo; Schiavone, Raffaele; Palumbo, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background In oncologic patients, the liver is the most common target for metastases. An accurate detection and characterization of focal liver lesions in patients with known primary extrahepatic malignancy are essential to define management and prognosis. Objectives To assess the diagnostic accuracy of the split-bolus multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) protocol in the characterization of focal liver lesions in oncologic patients. Patients and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the follow-up split-bolus 64-detector row CT protocol in 36 oncologic patients to characterize focal liver lesions. The split-bolus MDCT protocol by intravenous injection of two boluses of contrast medium combines the hepatic arterial phase (HAP) and hepatic enhancement during the portal venous phase (PVP) in a single-pass. Results The split-bolus MDCT protocol detected 208 lesions and characterized 186 (89.4%) of them: typical hemangiomas (n = 9), atypical hemangiomas (n = 3), cysts (n = 78), hypovascular (n = 93) and hypervascular (n = 3) metastases. Twenty two (10.6%) hypodense lesions were categorized as indeterminate (≤5 mm). The mean radiation dose was 24.5±6.5 millisieverts (mSv). Conclusion The designed split-bolus MDCT technique can be proposed alternatively to triphasic MDCT and in a single-pass to PVP in the initial staging and in the follow-up respectively in oncologic patients.

  8. Three-dimensional reconstruction of medieval child mummy in Yangju, Korea, using multi-detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Sun; Kim, Myeung Ju; Yoo, Dong Soo; Lee, Young Seok; Park, Sung Sil; Bok, Gi Dae; Han, Seung Ho; Chung, Yoon Hee; Chang, Byung Soo; Yi, Yang Su; Oh, Chang Seok; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2007-01-01

    Recently reported studies on the medieval mummies in Korea have been regarded as an invaluable source for studying the physical characteristics of medieval Koreans. However, since the reported medieval mummies were re-buried by their descendants without any scientific investigations, the development of a brief, non-invasive investigation technique was desperately needed among the researchers in Korea. In this regard, we tried to apply high-quality multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) with three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and multi-planar reformat (MPR) to investigate Korean mummies. In our study, after 1.25 or 2.5mm thin slice axial images were taken, 3D reconstruction and MPR were performed to get more accurate information about internal organs. In this trial, we successfully showed high-quality images for the brain, muscles, bones, heart and liver. During various trials for getting selected organs, we could make the 3D reconstructed images of them. Since we could show that the current MDCT technique could be useful for obtaining high-quality 3D reconstructed images of the internal organs of Korean mummies, this technique will be used in forthcoming similar cases, which could not be investigated using invasive techniques.

  9. Anatomical variations of the celiac trunk and hepatic arterial system: an analysis using multidetector computed tomography angiography*

    PubMed Central

    Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; Franca, Henrique Almeida; de Mello Júnior, Carlos Fernando; Silva Neto, Eulâmpio José; Negromonte, Gustavo Ramalho Pessoa; Duarte, Cláudia Martina Araújo; Cavalcanti Neto, Bartolomeu Fragoso; Farias, Rebeca Danielly da Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the prevalence of anatomical variations of celiac arterial trunk (CAT) branches and hepatic arterial system (HAS), as well as the CAT diameter, length and distance to the superior mesenteric artery. Materials and Methods Retrospective, cross-sectional and predominantly descriptive study based on the analysis of multidetector computed tomography images of 60 patients. Results The celiac trunk anatomy was normal in 90% of cases. Hepatosplenic trunk was found in 8.3% of patients, and hepatogastric trunk in 1.7%. Variation of the HAS was observed in 21.7% of cases, including anomalous location of the right hepatic artery in 8.3% of cases, and of the left hepatic artery, in 5%. Also, cases of joint relocation of right and left hepatic arteries, and trifurcation of the proper hepatic artery were observed, respectively, in 3 (5%) and 2 (3.3%) patients. Mean length and caliber of the CAT were 2.3 cm and 0.8 cm, respectively. Mean distance between CAT and superior mesenteric artery was 1.2 cm (standard deviation = 4.08). A significant correlation was observed between CAT diameter and length, and CAT diameter and distance to superior mesenteric artery. Conclusion The pattern of CAT variations and diameter corroborate the majority of the literature data. However, this does not happen in relation to the HAS. PMID:26811552

  10. MULTIDETECTOR-ROW COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY PATTERNS OF BRONCHOESPHAGEAL ARTERY HYPERTROPHY AND SYSTEMIC-TO-PULMONARY FISTULA IN DOGS.

    PubMed

    Ledda, Gianluca; Caldin, Marco; Mezzalira, Giorgia; Bertolini, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Anomalies involving arterial branches in the lungs are one of the causes of hemoptysis in humans and dogs. Congenital and acquired patterns of bronchoesophageal artery hypertrophy have been reported in humans based on CT characteristics. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe clinical, echocardiographic, and multidetector computed tomography features of bronchoesophageal artery hypertrophy and systemic-to-pulmonary arterial communications in a sample of 14 dogs. Two main vascular patterns were identified in dogs that resembled congenital and acquired conditions reported in humans. Pattern 1 appeared as an aberrant origin of the right bronchoesophageal artery, normal origin of the left one, and enlargement of both the bronchial and esophageal branches that formed a dense network terminating in a pulmonary artery through an orifice. Pattern 2 appeared as a normal origin of both right and left bronchoesophageal arteries, with an enlarged and tortuous course along the bronchi to the periphery of the lung, where they communicated with subsegmental pulmonary arteries. Dogs having Pattern 1 also had paraesophageal and esophageal varices, with the latter being confirmed by videoendoscopy examination. Authors conclude that dogs with Pattern 1 should be differentiated from dogs with other congenital vascular systemic-to-pulmonary connections. Dogs having Pattern 2 should be evaluated for underlying pleural or pulmonary diseases. Bronchoesophageal artery hypertrophy can be accompanied by esophageal venous engorgement and should be included in the differential diagnosis for esophageal and paraesophageal varices in dogs. PMID:25961802

  11. Comparison between coronary plaque 64-slice spiral CT characteristics and risk factors of coronary artery disease patients in Chinese Han population and Mongolian

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Zhigang; Yang, Xiaoguang; Han, Xiaodong; Dong, Peide; Liu, Aishi

    2013-01-01

    Objective : To compare the coronary atherosclerotic plaque 64-slice spiral CT characteristics and the risk factors of Han (in Inner Mongolia) and Mongolian coronary artery disease patients. Metho d s: The plaques of 126 Mongolian and 269 Han patients were analyzed by 64-slice spiral CT coronary angiography. Their gender, age, height, body mass, the history of hypertension, diabetes, smoking and family diseases, the levels of triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were compared. Results: The incidence of plaques (P <0.05), the proportion of plaques in the circumflex branch (P <0.05), the proportion of medium-severe lumen stenosis induced by plaques (P <0.05), and the proportion of obstructive plaque involved multi-branch (P <0.05) of the Mongolian patients were higher. The plaque compositions of the two groups did not differ significantly (P> 0.05). The body mass index of the Mongolian patients was higher (P <0.05). The hypertension, diabetes, smoking history, TG, TC, HDL-C and LDL-C of the two groups did not differ significantly (P> 0.05). Conclusion: The higher incidence of coronary atherosclerotic plaques and the more severe lesions of the Mongolian patients may be related to their higher body mass index. PMID:24353662

  12. Image reconstruction and image quality evaluation for a 64-slice CT scanner with z-flying focal spot

    SciTech Connect

    Flohr, T.G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Ulzheimer, S.; Bruder, H.; Primak, A.N.; McCollough, C.H.

    2005-08-15

    We present a theoretical overview and a performance evaluation of a novel z-sampling technique for multidetector row CT (MDCT), relying on a periodic motion of the focal spot in the longitudinal direction (z-flying focal spot) to double the number of simultaneously acquired slices. The z-flying focal spot technique has been implemented in a recently introduced MDCT scanner. Using 32x0.6 mm collimation, this scanner acquires 64 overlapping 0.6 mm slices per rotation in its spiral (helical) mode of operation, with the goal of improved longitudinal resolution and reduction of spiral artifacts. The longitudinal sampling distance at isocenter is 0.3 mm. We discuss in detail the impact of the z-flying focal spot technique on image reconstruction. We present measurements of spiral slice sensitivity profiles (SSPs) and of longitudinal resolution, both in the isocenter and off-center. We evaluate the pitch dependence of the image noise measured in a centered 20 cm water phantom. To investigate spiral image quality we present images of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom and patient scans. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the spiral SSPs shows only minor variations as a function of the pitch, measured values differ by less than 0.15 mm from the nominal values 0.6, 0.75, 1, 1.5, and 2 mm. The measured FWHM of the smallest slice ranges between 0.66 and 0.68 mm at isocenter, except for pitch 0.55 (0.72 mm). In a centered z-resolution phantom, bar patterns up to 15 lp/cm can be visualized independent of the pitch, corresponding to 0.33 mm longitudinal resolution. 100 mm off-center, bar patterns up to 14 lp/cm are visible, corresponding to an object size of 0.36 mm that can be resolved in the z direction. Image noise for constant effective mAs is almost independent of the pitch. Measured values show a variation of less than 7% as a function of the pitch, which demonstrates correct utilization of the applied radiation dose at any pitch. The product of image noise and square

  13. [Study of anatomy of the lateral attachment of the renal fascia in adult with multidetector computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Qi, Rui; Zhou, Xianping; Yu, Jianqun; Chen, Weixia; Li, Zhenlin; Zhang, Chunle

    2012-08-01

    The present paper is aimed to observe the lateral attachment of the renal fascia (RF) in vivo with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanning, and to discuss its diagnostic value. 121 healthy adults were adopted into this experiment. All images were obtained with MDCT and double phase enhancement scanning. Then we observed the lateral attachment of RF. In addition, we mad a fresh body specimen as anatomical basis. The study found that above the renal hilar plane (RHP), the anterior renal fascia laterally fused with the peritoneum of the liver on the right and the peritoneum of the spleen on the left,and the posterior renal fascia fused with the subdiaphragmatic fascia. The lateral attachment of the RF at the RHP and the lower renal pole(LRP)is divided into three types. The RF in Type I is about 47.9% (58/121) at the left RHP, while about 33.9% (41/121) at the right RHP. At the LRP of the kidney is about 55.3% (67/121) on the left, and about 42.1% (51/121) on the right. The RF in Type I is about 38.8% (47/121) on the left side at the RHP, about 26.4% (32/121) on the right side. At the LRP, left side about 27.3% (33/121), right side about 13.3%(16/121). The RF in Type III at the RHP is 13.3% (16/121) on the left side, and on the right side is about 39.7% (48/121). At the LRP, it is about 17.4% (21/121) on the left side, and about 44.6% (54/121) on the right side. MDCT can display the lateral attachment of the RF better as well as the outside connection of the retroperitoneal space.

  14. Multidetector computed tomography angiography for assessment of in-stent restenosis: meta-analysis of diagnostic performance

    PubMed Central

    Vanhoenacker, Piet K; Decramer, Isabel; Bladt, Olivier; Sarno, Giovanna; Van Hul, Erik; Wijns, William; Dwamena, Ben A

    2008-01-01

    Background Multi-detector computed tomography angiography (MDCTA)of the coronary arteries after stenting has been evaluated in multiple studies. The purpose of this study was to perform a structured review and meta-analysis of the diagnostic performance of MDCTA for the detection of in-stent restenosis in the coronary arteries. Methods A Pubmed and manual search of the literature on in-stent restenosis (ISR) detected on MDCTA compared with conventional coronary angiography (CA) was performed. Bivariate summary receiver operating curve (SROC) analysis, with calculation of summary estimates was done on a stent and patient basis. In addition, the influence of study characteristics on diagnostic performance and number of non-assessable segments (NAP) was investigated with logistic meta-regression. Results Fourteen studies were included. On a stent basis, Pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.82(0.72–0.89) and 0.91 (0.83–0.96). Pooled negative likelihood ratio and positive likelihood ratio were 0.20 (0.13–0.32) and 9.34 (4.68–18.62) respectively. The exclusion of non-assessable stents and the strut thickness of the stents had an influence on the diagnostic performance. The proportion of non-assessable stents was influenced by the number of detectors, stent diameter, strut thickness and the use of an edge-enhancing kernel. Conclusion The sensitivity of MDTCA for the detection of in-stent stenosis is insufficient to use this test to select patients for further invasive testing as with this strategy around 20% of the patients with in-stent stenosis would be missed. Further improvement of scanner technology is needed before it can be recommended as a triage instrument in practice. In addition, the number of non-assessable stents is also high. PMID:18671850

  15. Electrocardiogram-Gated 320-Slice Multidetector Computed Tomography for the Measurement of Pulmonary Arterial Distensibility in Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Hajime; Sugiura, Toshihiko; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Sakurai, Yoriko; Yahaba, Misuzu; Matsuura, Yukiko; Shigeta, Ayako; Kawata, Naoko; Sakao, Seiichiro; Kasahara, Yasunori; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to study whether pulmonary arterial distensibility (PAD) correlates with hemodynamic parameters in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) using electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated 320-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Methods and Findings ECG-gated 320-slice MDCT and right heart catheterization (RHC) was performed in 53 subjects (60.6±11.4 years old; 37 females) with CTEPH. We retrospectively measured the minimum and maximum values of the cross sectional area (CSA) of the main pulmonary artery (mainPA), right pulmonary artery (rtPA), and left pulmonary artery (ltPA) during one heartbeat. PAD was calculated using the following formula: PAD = [(CSAmaximum−CSAminimum)/CSAmaximum]×100(%). The correlation between hemodynamic parameters and PAD was assessed. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) were 40.8±8.7 mmHg and 8.3±3.0 wood units, respectively. PAD values were as follows: mainPA (14.0±5.0%), rtPA (12.8±5.6%), and ltPA (9.7±4.6%). Good correlations existed between mainPAD, with mPAP (r = −0.594, p<0.001) and PVR (r = −0.659, p<0.001). The correlation coefficients between rtPAD and ltPAD with pulmonary hemodynamics were all lower or equal than for mainPAD. Conclusions PAD measured using ECG-gated 320-slice MDCT correlates with pulmonary hemodynamics in subjects with CTEPH. The mainPA is suitable for PAD measurement. PMID:25365168

  16. Transmural myocardial perfusion gradients in relation to coronary artery stenoses severity assessed by cardiac multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Linde, Jesper James; Kühl, Jørgen Tobias; Hove, Jens Dahlgaard; Sørgaard, Mathias; Kelbæk, Henning; Nielsen, Walter Bjørn; Kofoed, Klaus Fuglsang

    2015-01-01

    To assess the relationship between epicardial coronary artery stenosis severity and the corresponding regional transmural perfusion at rest and during adenosine stress, using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). We evaluated the relationship between the severity of coronary artery diameter stenosis assessed by MDCT angiography and semi-quantitative myocardial MDCT perfusion in 200 symptomatic patients. The perfusion index (PI = mean myocardial attenuation density/mean left ventricular lumen attenuation density) at rest and during adenosine stress, the myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR = stress - PI/rest - PI), and the transmural perfusion ratio (TPR = subendocardium/subepicardium) were calculated. A coronary artery stenosis ≥50 % was present in 49 patients (25 %). Rest-PI and rest-TPR values were similar in patients with and without a coronary artery stenosis ≥50 %, whereas stress-PI, stress-TPR and MPR were significantly reduced in patients with a stenosis ≥50 % (p < 0.001, p < 0.0001 and p = 0.02, respectively). Subendocardial PI was significantly higher than subepicardial PI at rest and during stress for patients without a significant stenosis, whereas this difference was blurred during stress in patients with ≥50 % stenosis. In a broad spectrum of stenosis severity groups, TPR at rest remained unchanged until the group of patients with total occlusions, whereas TPR during stress decreased progressively when a threshold of 50 % was superseded. In this study we establish the relationship between semi-quantitative perfusion measurements by MDCT and severity of coronary artery stenoses and find the transmural myocardial perfusion ratio to be a potential strong functional index of the hemodynamic significance of coronary artery atherosclerotic lesions.

  17. Comparison of the accuracy of multidetector computed tomography versus two-dimensional echocardiography to measure left atrial volume.

    PubMed

    Avelar, Erick; Durst, Ronen; Rosito, Guido A; Thangaroopan, Molly; Kumar, Simi; Tournoux, Francois; Chan, Raymond C; Hung, Judy; Hoffmann, Udo; Abbara, Suhny; Brady, Thomas; Cury, Ricardo C

    2010-07-01

    Left atrial (LA) volume is an important prognostic factor in cardiovascular disease. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is an emerging cardiac imaging modality; however, its accuracy in measuring the LA volume has not been well studied. The aim of our study was to determine the accuracy of MDCT in quantifying the LA volume. A total of 48 patients underwent MDCT and 2-dimensional (2D) echocardiography (2DE) on the same day. The area-length and Simpson's methods were used to obtain the 2D echocardiographic LA volume. The LA volume assessment by MDCT was obtained using the modified Simpson's method. Four artificial phantoms were created, and their true volume was assessed by an independent observer using both imaging modalities. The correlation between the LA volume by MDCT and 2DE was significant (r = 0.68). The mean 2D echocardiographic LA volume was lower than the LA volume obtained with MDCT (2DE 79 +/- 37 vs MDCT 103 +/- 32, p <0.05). In the phantom experiment, the volume obtained using MDCT and 2DE correlated significantly with the true volume (r = 0.97, p <0.05 vs r = 0.96, p <0.05, respectively). However, the mean 2D echocardiographic phantom volume was 16% lower than the true volume (2DE, Simpson's method 53 +/- 24 vs the true volume 61 +/- 24, p <0.05). The mean volume calculated using MDCT did not differ from the true volume (MDCT 60 +/- 21 vs true volume 61 +/- 24, p = NS). 2DE appeared to systematically underestimate the LA volume compared to phantom and cardiac MDCT, suggesting that different normal cutoff values should be used for each modality. In conclusion, LA volume quantification using MDCT is an accurate and feasible method. PMID:20609656

  18. Prediction of Small Bowel Obstruction Caused by Bezoars Using Risk Factor Categories on Multidetector Computed Tomographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Lian-qin; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to detect factors associated with small bowel obstruction (SBO) caused by bezoars on multidetector computed tomographic findings. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 61 patients who had bezoars in the small bowels on MDCT. The patients were divided into SBO patients group and non-SBO patients group. The mean values of the diameter, volume, and CT attenuation as well as location and characteristics of the bezoars were compared between the two groups. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine factors associated with SBO. Results. There were 32 patients (52.5%) in the SBO group and 29 patients (47.5%) in the non-SBO group. The bezoars in the SBO group had greater values of each mean diameter and mean volume than those in the non-SBO group (3.2 ± 0.5 cm versus 1.6 ± 0.7 cm, P < 0.0001, 14.9 ± 6.4 cm3 versus 2.5 ± 2.7 cm3, P < 0.0001, resp.) and had a lower CT attenuation than the non-SBO group (55.5 ± 23.4 versus 173.0 ± 68.0, P < 0.0001). The SBO group had higher prevalence of phytobezoar appearance (75.0% versus 10.3%, P < 0.0001). Major diameters of bezoar and phytobezoar were significant independent risk factors associated with SBO (odds ratio = 36.09, 8.26, resp., and P = 0.0004, 0.044, resp.). Conclusions. Major diameter of bezoar or phytobezoar is a potential risk factor associated with SBO. PMID:27403434

  19. Sequential radial artery for coronary artery bypass grafting: five-year follow-up and evaluation with multi-detector row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Emir, Mustafa; Kunt, Ayşe Gül; Çiçek, Murat; Bozok, Şahin; Karakişi, Sedat Ozan; Uğuz, Emrah; Hidiroğlu, Mete; Çetin, Levent; Şener, Erol

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to compare early postoperative results, programmed multi-detector row computed tomography coronary angiographic patency and midterm results of revascularization by sequential radial artery grafting with those of single radial artery grafting during a five-year period. Patients were grouped as those with sequential radial artery grafts (Group A, n = 27) and single radial artery grafts (Group B, n = 26). Multi-detector row computed tomography coronary angiography was scheduled at 1 and 5 years postoperatively. Each distal anastomosis was accepted as nonfunctional if a radial artery graft was occluded proximally or there was a critical stenosis. One sequential radial artery graft and two single radial artery grafts failed in the 1-year period (p>0.05). In the 5-year period, three radial artery grafts failed in each group (p>0.05). In Group A, there was no mortality in the five-year period, but in Group B, one patient died four years after the operation due to cardiac problems (p>0.05). In addition to one death in Group B, there were three percutaneous interventions and two myocardial infarctions among the 26 patients during the five-year follow-up. In group A, among 27 patients, there were 4 percutaneous interventions and one myocardial infarction (p>0.05). Although the sample size is relatively small to be conclusive, these data suggest that sequential radial artery grafting may be considered as a method of choice for maximizing arterial graft survival and patency. Noninvasive control of sequential and single radial artery grafts with multi-detector row computed tomography is feasible with no discomfort for the patient and excellent visualization of grafts. PMID:22889883

  20. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Radiation Dose-Equivalent Radiography, Multidetector Computed Tomography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Fractures of Adult Cadaveric Wrists

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Reidelbach, Carolin; Krauß, Tobias; Lampert, Florian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Fiebich, Martin; Goerke, Sebastian M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic accuracy of radiography, to radiography equivalent dose multidetector computed tomography (RED-MDCT) and to radiography equivalent dose cone beam computed tomography (RED-CBCT) for wrist fractures. Methods As study subjects we obtained 10 cadaveric human hands from body donors. Distal radius, distal ulna and carpal bones (n = 100) were artificially fractured in random order in a controlled experimental setting. We performed radiation dose equivalent radiography (settings as in standard clinical care), RED-MDCT in a 320 row MDCT with single shot mode and RED-CBCT in a device dedicated to musculoskeletal imaging. Three raters independently evaluated the resulting images for fractures and the level of confidence for each finding. Gold standard was evaluated by consensus reading of a high-dose MDCT. Results Pooled sensitivity was higher in RED-MDCT with 0.89 and RED-MDCT with 0.81 compared to radiography with 0.54 (P = < .004). No significant differences were detected concerning the modalities’ specificities (with values between P = .98). Raters' confidence was higher in RED-MDCT and RED-CBCT compared to radiography (P < .001). Conclusion The diagnostic accuracy of RED-MDCT and RED-CBCT for wrist fractures proved to be similar and in some parts even higher compared to radiography. Readers are more confident in their reporting with the cross sectional modalities. Dose equivalent cross sectional computed tomography of the wrist could replace plain radiography for fracture diagnosis in the long run. PMID:27788215

  1. Clinical structural anatomy of the inferior pyramidal space reconstructed from the living heart: Three-dimensional visualization using multidetector-row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shumpei; Nishii, Tatsuya; Takaya, Tomofumi; Kashio, Kazuhiro; Kasamatsu, Akira; Takamine, Sachiko; Ito, Tatsuro; Fujiwara, Sei; Kono, Atsushi K; Hirata, Ken-Ichi

    2015-10-01

    The inferior pyramidal space (IPS) comprises the epicardial visceral adipose tissue wedged between the bottoms of the four cardiac chambers from the postero-inferior epicardial surface of the heart. Understanding the complex anatomy around the IPS is important for clinical cardiologists. Although leading anatomists and radiologists have clarified the anatomy of the IPS in detail, few studies have demonstrated this anatomy in three dimensions. The aim of this study was to visualize the three-dimensional anatomy of the IPS reconstructed from the living heart using multidetector-row computed tomography. We also developed an original paper model of the IPS to enhance understanding of its intricate structure.

  2. Clinical application of 320-row multidetector computed tomography for a dynamic three-dimensional vascular study: imaging findings and initial experience.

    PubMed

    Nagamatsu, Shogo; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Kayano, Shuji; Koizumi, Takuya; Akazawa, Satoshi; Onitsuka, Tetsuro; Iida, Yoshiyuki; Endo, Masahiro; Nakaya, Yoshihiro; Urikura, Atsushi

    2010-10-01

    The 320-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is now used by both cardiologists and neurosurgeons. It enables dynamic 3D-CT angiography, because the wide-area detector eliminates helical scanning, thus achieving very fast scanning times for single 3D-CT volume data. Some microvascular surgeons are familiar with 64-row MDCT for perforator studies, but there are few reports of studies using 320-row MDCT. This MDCT system was used to follow the dynamic blood flow of small vessels. It is considered to have a great potential in the clinical field of microvascular surgery. PMID:20399163

  3. Variability of repeated coronary artery calcium measurements by 1.25-mm- and 2.5-mm-thickness images on prospective electrocardiograph-triggered 64-slice CT.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Jun; Matsuura, Noriaki; Yamamoto, Hideya; Hirai, Nobuhiko; Kiguchi, Masao; Fujioka, Chikako; Kitagawa, Toshiro; Kohno, Nobuoki; Ito, Katsuhide

    2008-02-01

    High reproducibility on coronary artery calcium scoring is a key requirement in monitoring the progression of coronary atherosclerosis. The purpose of this prospective study is to assess the reproducibility of 1.25-mm- and 2.5-mm-thickness images on prospective electrocardiograph-triggered 64-slice CT with respect to 2.5-mm-thickness images on spiral overlapping reconstruction. One hundred patients suspected of coronary artery disease were scanned twice repeatedly, both on prospective electrocardiograph-triggered step-and-shoot and retrospective electrocardiograph-gated spiral scans. Using 1.25-mm-thickness collimation, 1.25-mm- and 2.5-mm-thickness image sets on prospective scans and 2.5-mm-thickness image sets with 1.25-mm increment (overlapping) on retrospective scans were obtained. Coronary artery calcium scores, interscan variability and interobserver variability were evaluated. The mean interscan variability in coronary artery calcium measurement on 1.25-mm prospective/2.5-mm prospective/2.5-mm overlapping retrospective scans were Agatston: 10%/18%/12%, volume: 10%/12%/10% and mass: 8%/13%/11% for observer 1 and Agatston: 8%/14%/10%, volume: 7%/9%/10% and mass: 7%/10%/9% for observer 2, respectively. The mean interobserver variability was 5% to 14%. In conclusion, prospective electrocardiograph-triggered 64-slice CT using the 1.25-mm prospective scan shows the lowest variability. The 2.5-mm prospective scan on volume or mass scoring shows variability of around 10%, comparable to 2.5-mm-thickness spiral overlapping reconstruction images.

  4. Comparison of Multidetector Computed Tomography and Flat-Panel Computed Tomography Regarding Visualization of Cortical Fractures, Cortical Defects, and Orthopedic Screws: A Phantom Study.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Lang, Hannah; Lampert, Florian; Kemna, Lars; Konstantinidis, Lukas; Neubauer, Claudia; Reising, Kilian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Goerke, Sebastian M

    2015-08-01

    To compare the visualization of cortical fractures, cortical defects, and orthopedic screws in a dedicated extremity flat-panel computed tomography (FPCT) scanner and a multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanner.We used feet of European roe deer as phantoms for cortical fractures, cortical defects, and implanted orthopedic screws. FPCT and MDCT scans were performed with equivalent dose settings. Six observers rated the scans according to number of fragments, size of defects, size of defects opposite orthopedic screws, and the length of different screws. The image quality regarding depiction of the cortical bone was assessed. The gold standard (real number of fragments) was evaluated by autopsy.The correlation of reader assessment of fragments, cortical defects, and screws with the gold standard was similar for FPCT and MDCT. Three readers rated the subjective image quality of the MDCT to be higher, whereas the others showed no preferences.Although the image quality was rated higher in the MDCT than in the FPCT by 3 out of 6 observers, both modalities proved to be comparable regarding the visualization of cortical fractures, cortical defects, and orthopedic screws and of use to musculoskeletal radiology regarding fracture detection and postsurgical evaluation in our experimental setting. PMID:26252281

  5. Comparison of Multidetector Computed Tomography and Flat-Panel Computed Tomography Regarding Visualization of Cortical Fractures, Cortical Defects, and Orthopedic Screws

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Lang, Hannah; Lampert, Florian; Kemna, Lars; Konstantinidis, Lukas; Neubauer, Claudia; Reising, Kilian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Goerke, Sebastian M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To compare the visualization of cortical fractures, cortical defects, and orthopedic screws in a dedicated extremity flat-panel computed tomography (FPCT) scanner and a multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanner. We used feet of European roe deer as phantoms for cortical fractures, cortical defects, and implanted orthopedic screws. FPCT and MDCT scans were performed with equivalent dose settings. Six observers rated the scans according to number of fragments, size of defects, size of defects opposite orthopedic screws, and the length of different screws. The image quality regarding depiction of the cortical bone was assessed. The gold standard (real number of fragments) was evaluated by autopsy. The correlation of reader assessment of fragments, cortical defects, and screws with the gold standard was similar for FPCT and MDCT. Three readers rated the subjective image quality of the MDCT to be higher, whereas the others showed no preferences. Although the image quality was rated higher in the MDCT than in the FPCT by 3 out of 6 observers, both modalities proved to be comparable regarding the visualization of cortical fractures, cortical defects, and orthopedic screws and of use to musculoskeletal radiology regarding fracture detection and postsurgical evaluation in our experimental setting. PMID:26252281

  6. Stature estimation from skull measurements using multidetector computed tomographic images: A Japanese forensic sample.

    PubMed

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Makino, Yohsuke; Saitoh, Hisako; Sakuma, Ayaka; Ishii, Namiko; Yajima, Daisuke; Inokuchi, Go; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Yamaguchi, Rutsuko; Hashimoto, Mari; Hoshioka, Yumi; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between stature and cranial measurements in a contemporary Japanese population, using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomographic (CT) images. A total of 228 cadavers (123 males, 105 females) underwent postmortem CT scanning and subsequent forensic autopsy between May 2011 and April 2015. Five cranial measurements were taken from 3D CT reconstructed images that extracted only cranial data. The correlations between stature and each of the cranial measurements were assessed with Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients. Simple and multiple regression analyses showed significant correlations between stature and cranial measurements. In conclusion, cranial measurements obtained from 3D CT images may be useful for forensic estimation of the stature of Japanese individuals, particularly in cases where better predictors, such as long bones, are not available.

  7. A radioanatomic study of the internal mammary artery and its perforators using multidetector computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Tan, Onder; Yuce, Ihsan; Aydin, Osman Enver; Kantarci, Mecit

    2014-05-01

    The Internal Mammary Artery (IMA) and its perforators play an important role in coronary bypass grafting and reconstructive breast, head, and neck surgery. This study aimed to obtain anatomic data pertaining to these vessels using Multi Detector Computed Tomography Angiography (MDCTA) and to demonstrate that the MDCTA could be a considerable assessment tool prior to surgery. In 50 outpatients (27 males and 23 females), the above-mentioned arteries were bilaterally evaluated with a 16-detector spiral computed tomography scanner. Based on the obtained images, diameters of the bilateral IMAs were separately measured in each intercostal spaces from 1 to 5 through their traces. IMAPs greater than 0.5 mm in diameter were bilaterally evaluated in terms of distance from the sternal border to the ramification point under the muscular layer, maximal external diameter at ramification from the IMA, and the length between the ramification point from the IMA and enter point to the subcutaneous fat tissue. Mean diameters of the left and right IMAs were 2.05 ± 0.50 mm and 2.20 ± 0.57 mm, respectively. Mean diameters, distances, and lengths of the perforators were 1.30 ± 0.30 mm, 6.80 ± 3.40 mm, 17.05 ± 6.07 mm on the left side and 1.32 ± 0.25 mm, 6.71 ± 3.43 mm, 17.35 ± 3.48 mm on the right side, respectively. No statistically difference was found between the sides (P > 0.05). About 20 of 36 perforators appeared in the second intercostal space, whereas there were eight in the first and eight in the third intercostal space. MDCTA, as a non-invasive vascular imaging method, can be a valuable tool for investigating the anatomic characteristics of the IMA and its perforators before planning an operation. PMID:24105707

  8. Candida prosthetic valve endocarditis: the complementary role of multidetector computed tomography and transoesophageal echocardiography in preoperative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ghersin, E; Lessick, J; Agmon, Y; Engel, A; Kophit, A; Adler, Z

    2007-12-01

    A 72-year-old man with previous mitral valve replacement and single coronary bypass surgery was diagnosed with recurrent candida endocarditis by transoesophageal echocardiography and positive blood cultures. Preoperative electrocardiogram-gated multidetector CT (MDCT) was ordered to evaluate the patency and course of the mammary graft. In addition to verifying graft patency, MDCT demonstrated a mobile vegetation on the mitral prosthesis as well as a vegetation on the posterior left atrial wall which was not visible by transoesophageal echocardiography. Multidetector CT also revealed signs of osteomyelitis in the thoracic spine. Repeated surgery confirmed these findings and mitral valve replacement with resection of the left atrial vegetation were performed. This case illustrates the complementary role of MDCT and echocardiography in the preoperative evaluation of fungal endocarditis.

  9. Multidetector row computed tomography and ultrasound characteristics of caudal vena cava duplication in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Giovanna; Diana, Alessia; Cipone, Mario; Drigo, Michele; Caldin, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Caudal vena cava duplication has been rarely reported in small animals. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe characteristics of duplicated caudal vena cava in a large group of dogs. Computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound databases from two hospitals were searched for canine reports having the diagnosis "double caudal vena cava." One observer reviewed CT images for 71 dogs and two observers reviewed ultrasound images for 21 dogs. In all CT cases, the duplication comprised two vessels that were bilaterally symmetrical and approximately the same calibre (similar to Type I complete duplication in humans). In all ultrasound cases, the duplicated caudal vena cava appeared as a distinct vessel running on the left side of the abdominal segment of the descending aorta and extending from the left common iliac vein to the left renal vein. The prevalence of caudal vena cava duplication was 0.46% for canine ultrasound studies and 2.08% for canine CT studies performed at these hospitals. Median body weight for affected dogs was significantly lower than that of unaffected dogs (P < 0.0001). Breeds with increased risk for duplicated caudal vena cava were Yorkshire Terrier (odds ratio [OR] = 6.41), Poodle (OR = 7.46), West Highland White Terrier (OR = 6.33), and Maltese (OR = 3.87). Presence of a duplicated caudal vena cava was significantly associated with presence of extrahepatic portosystemic shunt(s) (P < 0.004). While uncommon in dogs, caudal vena cava duplication should be differentiated from other vascular anomalies when planning surgeries and for avoiding misdiagnoses.

  10. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a 60Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44-50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the

  11. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a (60)Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44-50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the

  12. Evaluation of organ doses and specific k effective dose of 64-slice CT thorax examination using an adult anthropomorphic phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, S.; Karim, M. K. A.; Bakar, K. A.; Sabarudin, A.; Chin, A. W.; Saripan, M. I.; Bradley, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    The magnitude of radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) depends on the scan acquisition parameters, investigated herein using an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO®) and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). Specific interest was in the organ doses resulting from CT thorax examination, the specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation for particular protocols also being determined. For measurement of doses representing five main organs (thyroid, lung, liver, esophagus and skin), TLD-100 (LiF:Mg, Ti) were inserted into selected holes in a phantom slab. Five CT thorax protocols were investigated, one routine (R1) and four that were modified protocols (R2 to R5). Organ doses were ranked from greatest to least, found to lie in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. The greatest dose, for thyroid at 25 mGy, was that in use of R1 while the lowest, at 8.8 mGy, was in breast tissue using R3. Effective dose (E) was estimated using three standard methods: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-103 recommendation (E103), the computational phantom CT-EXPO (E(CTEXPO)) method, and the dose-length product (DLP) based approach. E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, ~8% less than that of the universal k factor. Due to inconsistency in tube potential and pitch factor the k factors from CTEXPO were found to vary between 0.015 and 0.010 for protocols R3 and R5. With considerable variation between scan acquisition parameters and organ doses, optimization of practice is necessary in order to reduce patient organ dose.

  13. Efficacy of Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography as a Practical Tool in Comparison to Invasive Procedures for Visualization of the Biliary Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Abdolmajid; Rostamzadeh, Ayoob; Gharib, Alireza; Fatehi, Daryoush

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Recently, multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has been introduced into clinical practice. MDCT has become the noninvasive diagnostic test of choice for detailed evaluation of biliary obstruction. Aim: the main objective of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of MDCT compared to invasive procedures for detecting biliary obstruction causes. Material and Methods: Since February 2009 until May 2011 fifty biliary obstruction patients based on clinical, laboratory or ultrasonographic findings, were evaluated by Multidetector-row computed tomography. The causes of biliary obstruction, which was identified using. MDCT were classified into three categories: calculus, benign stricture, and malignancy. Final diagnosis was conducted based on percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC), endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, biopsy, or surgery. The MDCT diagnosis and were compared with the final diagnosis. Results: A correct diagnosis of causes of biliaryobstruction was made on the basis of MDCT findings for 44 of the total 50 patients. Two patients with chronic pancreatitis were incorrectly diagnosed with a pancreatic head adenocarcinoma on the basis of MDCT findings. One patient with biliary stone was incorrectly diagnosed with a periampullary adenocarcinoma on the basis of MDCT findings. The Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MDCT in the diagnosis of causes of biliary obstruction were 94.12% and87.87% and94.6% respectively. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study MDCT has an excellent image quality, providing valuable information about the biliary tree and other abdominal organs. The use of advanced image processing, including maximum intensity projection and multiplanar reconstruction (especially coronal or sagittal reformatted images), allows superior visualization of the biliary tree and vascular structures. Three-dimensional reconstruction images complement axial images by providing a more anatomically

  14. Gadolinium Ethoxybenzyl Diethylenetriamine Pentaacetic Acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography for the Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Feng; Liu, Jun; Ouyang, Han

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this meta-analysis was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until July 4, 2014, using combinations of the following terms: gadoxetic acid disodium, Gd-EOB-DTPA, multidetector CT, contrast-enhanced computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Inclusion criteria were as follows: confirmed diagnosis of primary HCC by histopathological examination of a biopsy specimen; comparative study of MRI using Gd-EOB-DTPA and MDCT for diagnosis of HCC; and studies that provided quantitative outcome data. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of the 2 methods were compared, and diagnostic accuracy was assessed with alternative-free response receiver-operating characteristic analysis. Nine studies were included in the meta-analysis, and a total of 1439 lesions were examined. The pooled sensitivity and specificity for 1.5T MRI were 0.95 and 0.96, respectively, for 3.0T MRI were 0.91 and 0.96, respectively, and for MDCT were 0.74 and 0.93, respectively. The pooled diagnostic odds ratio for 1.5T and 3.0T MRI was 242.96, respectively, and that of MDCT was 33.47. To summarize, Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI (1.5T and 3.0T) has better diagnostic accuracy for HCC than MDCT. PMID:26266348

  15. The feasibility of a 64-slice MDCT for detection of the Adamkiewicz artery: comparison of the detection rate of intravenous injection CT angiography using a 64-slice MDCT versus intra-arterial and intravenous injection CT angiography using a 16-slice MDCT.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Tatsuya; Kono, Atsushi K; Negi, Noriyuki; Hashimura, Hiromi; Uotani, Kensuke; Okita, Yutaka; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-12-01

    Identification of the Adamkiewicz artery (AKA) using CT angiography (CTA) is crucial in patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) or aortic dissection (AD). The purpose of this study was to compare the AKA detection rate of intravenous injection with a 64-slice MDCT (IV64) versus a 16-slice MDCT (IV16) as well as by CTA using intra-arterial injection with a 16-slice MDCT (IA16). A retrospective review of 160 consecutive patients who underwent CTA was performed. There were 108 TAA and 52 AD cases, 105 of whom were examined with IV64, 15 with IV16, and 40 with IA16. The AKA detectability for each imaging method was assessed, and the factors influencing the detectability were analyzed by multivariate analysis. The detection rates for IV64, IV16, and IA16 were 85.7, 60.0, and 80.0 %, respectively, with IV64 being more sensitive than IV16 (P = 0.025). The detection rate for AD patients was 66.7 % with IV64, which was similar to IV16 (57.1 %) and IA16 (66.8 %). On the other hand, the detection rate for TAA patients was 93.3 % with IV64, which was higher than IV16 (62.5 %, P = 0.021) and similar to IA16 (88.0 %). Multivariate analysis demonstrated the independent factors for AKA detectability were TAA versus AD (P = 0.005, Odds ratio = 3.98) and IV64 versus IV16 (P = 0.037, Odds ratio = 4.03). The detection rate was higher for IV64 than for IV16, especially for TAA patients, while the rate was similar between IV64 and invasive IA16. A 64-slice MDCT thus provides a less invasive visualization of the AKA.

  16. Multi-Detector Row Computed Tomographic Evaluation of a Rare Type of Complete Vascular Ring: Double Aortic Arch with Atretic Left Arch Distal to the Origin of Left Subclavian Artery

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ying-Ying; Fu, Yun-Ching; Wei, Hao-Ji; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Double aortic arch with an atretic left arch distal to the origin of left subclavian artery was diagnosed with multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) in two children with dysphagia. This rare type of complete vascular ring is clinically important because it may be confused with right aortic arch in mirror imaging. Anatomic details of this rare type of complete vascular ring demonstrated on MDCT facilitated appropriate surgical treatment. PMID:24043984

  17. Detection of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty with a Non-Flat-Panel Angio Unit Compared to Multidetector Computed Tomography - An Ex Vivo Study

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Clemens Fuchs, Heiko; Westphalen, Kerstin; Hierholzer, Johannes

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the detection of cement leakages after vertebroplasty using angiographic computed tomography (ACT) in a non-flat-panel angio unit compared to multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Vertebroplasty was performed in 19 of 33 cadaver vertebrae (23 thoracic and 10 lumbar segments). In the angio suite, ACT (190{sup o}; 1.5{sup o} per image) was performed to obtain volumetric data. Another volumetric data set of the specimen was obtained by MDCT using a standard algorithm. Nine multiplanar reconstructions in standardized axial, coronal, and sagittal planes of every vertebra were generated from both data sets. Images were evaluated on the basis of a nominal scale with 18 criteria, comprising osseous properties (e.g., integrity of the end plate) and cement distribution (e.g., presence of intraspinal cement). MDCT images were regarded as gold standard and analyzed by two readers in a consensus mode. Rotational acquisitions were analyzed by six blinded readers. Results were correlated with the gold standard using Cohen's {kappa}-coefficient analysis. Furthermore, interobserver variability was calculated. Correlation with the gold standard ranged from no correlation (osseous margins of the neuroforamen, {kappa} = 0.008) to intermediate (trace of vertebroplasty canula; {kappa} = 0.615) for criteria referring to osseous morphology. However, there was an excellent correlation for those criteria referring to cement distribution, with {kappa} values ranging from 0.948 (paravertebral cement distribution) to 0.972 (intraspinal cement distribution). With a minimum of {kappa} = 0.768 ('good correlation') and a maximum of {kappa} = 0.91 ('excellent'), interobserver variability was low. In conclusion, ACT in an angio suite without a flat-panel detector depicts a cement leakage after vertebroplasty as well as MDCT. However, the method does not provide sufficient depiction of osseous morphology.

  18. Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography in the Evaluation of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Performed with Expanded-Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Stent-Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Fabrizio Bezzi, Mario; Bruni, Antonio; Corona, Mario; Boatta, Emanuele; Lucatelli, Pierleone; Passariello, Roberto

    2011-02-15

    We assessed, in a prospective study, the efficacy of multidetector spiral computed tomography (MDCT) in the evaluation of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) patency in patients treated with the Viatorr (Gore, Flagstaff, AZ) expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE)-covered stent-graft. Eighty patients who underwent TIPS procedure using the Viatorr self-expanding e-PTFE stent-graft were evaluated at follow-up of 1, 3, 6, and 12 months with clinical and laboratory tests as well as ultrasound-color Doppler (USCD) imaging. In case of varices, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was also performed. In addition, the shunt was evaluated using MDCT at 6 and 12 months. In all cases of abnormal findings and discrepancy between MDCT and USCD, invasive control venography was performed. MDCT images were acquired before and after injection of intravenous contrast media on the axial plane and after three-dimensional reconstruction using different algorithms. MDCT was successfully performed in all patients. No artefacts correlated to the Viatorr stent-graft were observed. A missing correlation between UCSD and MDCT was noticed in 20 of 80 (25%) patients. Invasive control venography confirmed shunt patency in 16 (80%) cases and shunt malfunction in 4 (20%) cases. According to these data, MDCT sensitivity was 95.2%; specificity was 96.6%; and positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were 90.9 and 98.2%, respectively. USCD sensitivity was 90%; specificity was 75%; and PPV and NPV were 54.5 and 95.7%, respectively. A high correlation (K value = 0.85) between MDCT and invasive control venography was observed. On the basis of these results, MDCT shows superior sensitivity and specificity compared with USCD in those patients in whom TIPS was performed with the Viatorr stent-graft. MDCT can be considered a valid tool in the follow-up of these patients.

  19. Usefulness of Multidetector Row Computed Tomography for Predicting Cardiac Events in Asymptomatic Chronic Kidney Disease Patients at the Initiation of Renal Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Eun; Lee, Yong Kyu; Choi, Eun Jeong; Nam, Ji Sun; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2013-01-01

    Background. The prevalence of coronary artery stenosis (CAS) at the initiation of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients has not been fully elucidated. Although coronary angiography is the gold standard in diagnosing CAS its invasiveness and economic burden lead to searching for a noninvasive alternative method. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of CAS by multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) and related risk factor to articulate the usefulness of MDCT. Method. Seventy-four asymptomatic CKD patients who began dialysis were evaluated with echocardiography and MDCT. The patients were stratified into two groups according to CAS and coronary artery calcification score (CACS) by MDCT to detect silent CAS and evaluate its predictability for cardiac events. Results. CAS was seen in 24 (32.4%) of 74 asymptomatic CKD patients on MDCT. Both groups showed increasing frequencies of CAS with age (P < 0.01), presence of diabetes (P < 0.05), uric acid level (P < 0.01), and calcium score (P < 0.01). Multiple regression analysis revealed that age and uric acid level were independent risk factors for CAS and high CACS in asymptomatic CKD patients at the initiation of dialysis. Patients with both CAS and high CACS were presented with higher cardiac events rates compared to those without any of them. In Cox regression model, age and the presence of CAS and high CACS on MDCT were an independent risk factor for cardiac events in these patients. Conclusion. We showed that CAS was highly seen in asymptomatic CKD patients starting dialysis. Moreover, both high CACS and CAS on MDCT might predict cardiac events in these patients and MDCT can be a useful screening tool for evaluating coronary artery disease and predicting cardiovascular mortality noninvasively. PMID:24363626

  20. Perforated duodenal ulcer presenting with a subphrenic abscess revealed by plain abdominal X-ray films and confirmed by multi-detector computed tomography: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer disease is still the major cause of gastrointestinal perforation despite major improvements in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. While the diagnosis of a perforated ulcer is straightforward in typical cases, its clinical onset may be subtle because of comorbidities and/or concurrent therapies. Case presentation We report the case of a 53-year-old Caucasian man with a history of chronic myeloid leukemia on maintenance therapy (100mg/day) with imatinib who was found to have a subphrenic abscess resulting from a perforated duodenal ulcer that had been clinically overlooked. Our patient was febrile (38.5°C) with abdominal tenderness and hypoactive bowel sounds. On the abdominal plain X-ray films, a right subphrenic abscess could be seen. On contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography, a huge air-fluid collection extending from the subphrenic to the subhepatic anterior space was observed. After oral administration of 500cm3 of 3 percent diluted diatrizoate meglumine, an extraluminal leakage of the water-soluble iodinated contrast media could then be appreciated as a result of a perforated duodenal ulcer. During surgery, the abscess was drained and extensive adhesiolysis had to be performed to expose the duodenal bulb where the ulcer was first identified by methylene blue administration and then sutured. Conclusions While subphrenic abscesses are well known complications of perforated gastric or duodenal ulcers, they have nowadays become rare thanks to advances in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for peptic ulcer disease. However, when peptic ulcer disease is not clinically suspected, the contribution of imaging may be substantial. PMID:24215711

  1. Anthropometric Assessment of Neck Adipose Tissue and Airway Volume Using Multidetector Computed Tomography: An Imaging Approach and Association With Overall Mortality.

    PubMed

    Maresky, Hillel S; Sharfman, Zachary; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Gomori, J M; Copel, Laurian; Tal, Sigal

    2015-11-01

    Neck adiposity tissue volume (NATV) accumulation is an indicator for metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Neck circumference is a poor measure of NATV, and a quantifier for this entity has not yet been established. To evaluate volumetric quantification by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as a reproducible anthropometric tool to measure NATV and airway volume (AWV). A total of 519 patients, including a subset of 70 random patients who underwent head and neck CT scanning in our hospital within 1 year (2013), were studied. Included patients were all those undergoing nonenhanced CT (NECT) or CT angiography (CTA). Neck cross-sectional areas (NCSA) were measured at 2 separate levels of the neck, and 3D postprocessing tissue reconstruction was performed, and NATV and AWVs were quantified volumetrically for all patients within the year. The average NCSA at the level of the soft palate and thyroid cartilage was 22,579 and 14,500 mm, respectively. NATV when compared to the upper and lower levels of NCSA showed correlations of 0.64 and 0.79, respectively (P < 0.001). Interobserver analysis showed mean deviations of 0.46% and 0.32% for NATV and AWV, respectively. A strong correlation between NATV and body mass index (BMI) was found (r = 0.658, P < 0.001), and the top quartile of NATV:AWV patients (out of 519 patients) displayed a statistically significant mortality rate during 670 days of follow-up (d = 7.5%, P = 0.032). After adjustment for age and gender, the association between NATV:AWV and mortality was close to significant (P = 0.072). Volumetric quantification of NATV and AWV is a reproducible and prognostic anthropometric tool, as a high NATV:AWV demonstrated a significant risk factor for mortality; future research may further advance our understanding of this phenomenon. PMID:26559286

  2. The role of multidetector computed tomography versus digital subtraction angiography in triaging care and management in abdominopelvic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Hallinan, James Thomas Patrick Decourcy; Tan, Cher Heng; Pua, Uei

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to assess the ability of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) to detect active abdominopelvic haemorrhage in patients with blunt trauma, as compared to digital subtraction angiography (DSA). METHODS In this retrospective study, patients who underwent DSA within 24 hours following CECT for blunt abdominal and/or pelvic trauma were identified. The computed tomography (CT) trauma protocol consisted of a portal venous phase scan without CT angiography; delayed phase study was performed if appropriate. All selected CECT studies were independently reviewed for the presence of active extravasation of contrast by two radiologists, who were blinded to the DSA results. Fisher’s exact test was used to correlate the presence of extravasation on CT with subsequent confirmed haemorrhage on DSA. RESULTS During the eight-year study period, 51 patients underwent CECT prior to emergent DSA for abdominal or pelvic trauma. Evidence of active extravasation of contrast on CECT was observed in 35 patients and active haemorrhage was confirmed on DSA in 31 of these patients; embolisation was performed in all 31 patients. Two patients who were negative for active extravasation of contrast on CECT but positive for active haemorrhage on DSA had extensive bilateral pelvic fractures and haematomas. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of CECT in detecting active abdominopelvic haemorrhage, as compared to DSA, were 93.9%, 77.8%, 88.6% and 87.5%, respectively. CONCLUSION When compared with DSA, dual-phase CECT without CT angiography shows high sensitivity and positive predictive value for the detection of active haemorrhage in patients with blunt abdominopelvic trauma. PMID:26778466

  3. Comparison of accuracy of aortic root annulus assessment with cardiac magnetic resonance versus echocardiography and multidetector computed tomography in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Pontone, Gianluca; Andreini, Daniele; Bartorelli, Antonio L; Bertella, Erika; Mushtaq, Saima; Gripari, Paola; Loguercio, Monica; Cortinovis, Sarah; Baggiano, Andrea; Conte, Edoardo; Beltrama, Virginia; Annoni, Andrea; Formenti, Alberto; Tamborini, Gloria; Muratori, Manuela; Guaricci, Andrea; Alamanni, Francesco; Ballerini, Giovanni; Pepi, Mauro

    2013-12-01

    The evaluation of the aortic root in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation is crucial. The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) evaluation of the aortic annulus (AoA) with transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. In 50 patients, maximum diameter, minimum diameter and AoA, length of the left coronary, right coronary, and noncoronary aortic leaflets, degree (grades 1 to 4) of aortic leaflet calcification, and distance between AoA and coronary artery ostia were assessed. AoA maximum diameter, minimum diameter, and area by CMR were 26.4 ± 2.8 mm, 20.6 ± 2.3 mm, 449.8 ± 86.2 mm(2), respectively. The length of left coronary, right coronary, and noncoronary leaflets by CMR were 13.9 ± 2.2, 13.3 ± 2.1, and 13.4 ± 1.8 mm, respectively, whereas the score of aortic leaflet calcifications was 2.9 ± 0.8. Finally, the distances between AoA and left main and right coronary artery ostia were 16.1 ± 2.8 and 16.1 ± 4.4 mm, respectively. Regarding AoA area, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography showed an underestimation (p <0.01), with a moderate agreement (r: 0.5 and 0.6, respectively, p <0.01) compared with CMR. No differences and excellent correlation were observed between CMR and MDCT for all parameters (r: 0.9, p <0.01), except for aortic leaflet calcifications that were underestimated by CMR. In conclusion, aortic root assessment with CMR including AoA size, aortic leaflet length, and coronary artery ostia height is accurate compared with MDCT. CMR may be a valid imaging alternative in patients unsuitable for MDCT. PMID:24045059

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging and multi-detector computed tomography assessment of extracellular compartment in ischemic and non-ischemic myocardial pathologies.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Maythem; Hetts, Steven W; Jablonowski, Robert; Wilson, Mark W

    2014-11-26

    Myocardial pathologies are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Early detection of loss of cellular integrity and expansion in extracellular volume (ECV) in myocardium is critical to initiate effective treatment. The three compartments in healthy myocardium are: intravascular (approximately 10% of tissue volume), interstitium (approximately 15%) and intracellular (approximately 75%). Myocardial cells, fibroblasts and vascular endothelial/smooth muscle cells represent intracellular compartment and the main proteins in the interstitium are types I/III collagens. Microscopic studies have shown that expansion of ECV is an important feature of diffuse physiologic fibrosis (e.g., aging and obesity) and pathologic fibrosis [heart failure, aortic valve disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, amyloidosis, congenital heart disease, aortic stenosis, restrictive cardiomyopathy (hypereosinophilic and idiopathic types), arrythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and hypertension]. This review addresses recent advances in measuring of ECV in ischemic and non-ischemic myocardial pathologies. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the ability to characterize tissue proton relaxation times (T1, T2, and T2*). Proton relaxation times reflect the physical and chemical environments of water protons in myocardium. Delayed contrast enhanced-MRI (DE-MRI) and multi-detector computed tomography (DE-MDCT) demonstrated hyper-enhanced infarct, hypo-enhanced microvascular obstruction zone and moderately enhanced peri-infarct zone, but are limited for visualizing diffuse fibrosis and patchy microinfarct despite the increase in ECV. ECV can be measured on equilibrium contrast enhanced MRI/MDCT and MRI longitudinal relaxation time mapping. Equilibrium contrast enhanced MRI/MDCT and MRI T1 mapping is currently used, but at a lower scale, as an alternative to invasive sub-endomyocardial biopsies to eliminate the need for anesthesia, coronary

  5. Stature estimation in Japanese cadavers based on pelvic measurements in three-dimensional multidetector computed tomographic images.

    PubMed

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Makino, Yohsuke; Saitoh, Hisako; Sakuma, Ayaka; Ishii, Namiko; Hayakawa, Mutsumi; Yajima, Daisuke; Inokuchi, Go; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of stature estimation by measuring the pelvic bones of Japanese cadavers using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT). We assessed 3D reconstructed images of 210 Japanese subjects (108 males, 102 females) who had undergone postmortem CT between May 2011 and November 2013. We defined the linear distance from the anterosuperior margin of the left and right anterior superior iliac spines (ASIS) to the posterior margin of the left and right ischial spines as the LSS and RSS, respectively. We also defined the linear distance from the anterosuperior margin of the left and right ASIS to the anteroinferior margin of the left and right ischial tuberosities as the LST and RST, respectively. The correlation between the cadaver stature (CS) and each parameter (LSS, LST, RSS, and RST) was evaluated using Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients and regression analysis was performed for stature estimation. All four parameters correlated significantly with stature independent of sex, suggesting that they can be used as a tool for stature estimation. The LST had the closest correlation with stature in both sexes.

  6. Anatomy of the larynx and pharynx: effects of age, gender and height revealed by multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Inamoto, Y; Saitoh, E; Okada, S; Kagaya, H; Shibata, S; Baba, M; Onogi, K; Hashimoto, S; Katada, K; Wattanapan, P; Palmer, J B

    2015-09-01

    Although oropharyngeal and laryngeal structures are essential for swallowing, the three-dimensional (3D) anatomy is not well understood, due in part to limitations of available measuring techniques. This study uses 3D images acquired by 320-row area detector computed tomography ('320-ADCT'), to measure the pharynx and larynx and to investigate the effects of age, gender and height. Fifty-four healthy volunteers (30 male, 24 female, 23-77 years) underwent one single-phase volume scan (0.35 s) with 320-ADCT during resting tidal breathing. Six measurements of the pharynx and two of larynx were performed. Bivariate statistical methods were used to analyse the effects of gender, age and height on these measurements. Length and volume were significantly larger for men than for women for every measurement (P < 0.05) and increased with height (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis was performed to understand the interactions of gender, height and age. Gender, height and age each had significant effects on certain values. The volume of the larynx and hypopharynx was significantly affected by height and age. The length of pharynx was associated with gender and age. Length of the vocal folds and distance from the valleculae to the vocal folds were significantly affected by gender (P < 0.05). These results suggest that age, gender and height have independent and interacting effects on the morphology of the pharynx and larynx. Three-dimensional imaging and morphometrics using 320-ADCT are powerful tools for efficiently and reliably observing and measuring the pharynx and larynx.

  7. Role of multidetector computed tomography in the diagnosis and management of patients attending the rapid access chest pain clinic, The Scottish computed tomography of the heart (SCOT-HEART) trial: study protocol for randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rapid access chest pain clinics have facilitated the early diagnosis and treatment of patients with coronary heart disease and angina. Despite this important service provision, coronary heart disease continues to be under-diagnosed and many patients are left untreated and at risk. Recent advances in imaging technology have now led to the widespread use of noninvasive computed tomography, which can be used to measure coronary artery calcium scores and perform coronary angiography in one examination. However, this technology has not been robustly evaluated in its application to the clinic. Methods/design The SCOT-HEART study is an open parallel group prospective multicentre randomized controlled trial of 4,138 patients attending the rapid access chest pain clinic for evaluation of suspected cardiac chest pain. Following clinical consultation, participants will be approached and randomized 1:1 to receive standard care or standard care plus ≥64-multidetector computed tomography coronary angiography and coronary calcium score. Randomization will be conducted using a web-based system to ensure allocation concealment and will incorporate minimization. The primary endpoint of the study will be the proportion of patients diagnosed with angina pectoris secondary to coronary heart disease at 6 weeks. Secondary endpoints will include the assessment of subsequent symptoms, diagnosis, investigation and treatment. In addition, long-term health outcomes, safety endpoints, such as radiation dose, and health economic endpoints will be assessed. Assuming a clinic rate of 27.0% for the diagnosis of angina pectoris due to coronary heart disease, we will need to recruit 2,069 patients per group to detect an absolute increase of 4.0% in the rate of diagnosis at 80% power and a two-sided P value of 0.05. The SCOT-HEART study is currently recruiting participants and expects to report in 2014. Discussion This is the first study to look at the implementation of computed

  8. The Role of Virtual Cystoscopy, after Multidetector Computed Tomography Imaging Reconstruction without the Use of Contrast Medium, in the Diagnosis and Evaluations of Bladder Tumors: Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Kalokairinou, Kyriaki; Ploumidis, Achilles; Kalogeropoulos, Theodoros; Vlachos, Lampros; Stringaris, Kyriakos; Tavernaraki, Ageliki; Thanos, Anastasios; Papacharalampous, Xenofon; Koutoulidis, Vasilios; Letendre, Julien; Traxer, Olivier; Gouliamos, Athanasios

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Although conventional cystoscopy is considered to be the gold standard for diagnosis and follow-up of bladder tumors, it remains an invasive and costly procedure. With the advent of the multidetector CT (MDCT) scanners supported by specialized software virtual cystoscopy (VC) is possible. We assess the role of VC in diagnosing and evaluating bladder lesions. Materials and Methods. Between September 2010 and October 2011, 25 consecutive patients with cystoscopically confirmed bladder tumor underwent VC. The radiologists involved in this prospective study were blinded to the exact findings. After draining any residual urine with a catheter, the bladder was retrogradely insufflated with 200-600 cc of air. No intravenous or intravesical contrast was used. MDCT scan was performed in supine and prone positions and three-dimensional reconstruction of the urinary bladder was performed. Results. The examination was well tolerated by all patients with no complications. In total, 43 lesions were detected both with conventional cystoscopy and VC. Tumor size measured by CT ranged from 3 to 80 mm in diameter. The pathological report revealed noninvasive transitional cell carcinomas in all cases. Conclusion. VC has promising results in detecting exophytic bladder lesions. In the future it could be part of the diagnostic algorithm for bladder tumors. PMID:24799894

  9. Newer cardiac imaging techniques: multidetector CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Davidoff, Ravin; Ruberg, Frederick L

    2006-01-01

    An update of new developments with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) coronary angiography is presented. Similar to what has occurred with the introduction of other new technologies such as electron beam computed tomography (EBCT), life insurance medical directors are expected to evaluate a technology before there are sufficient data from large clinical trials. Well-performed studies of the performance of MDCT coronary angiography have only recently appeared. MDCT appears to perform well for excluding significant coronary disease, and will perhaps be useful in emergency room "rule-out" situations. Other applications may be for the diagnosis of significant coronary obstruction (> 75% stenosis), as well as for the evaluation of bypass grafts. Limitations include the requirement for radiologic contrast administration and significant radiation exposure. MDCT does not provide information on atheroma morphology. Given these limitations, MDCT coronary angiography utilization will grow, and it will prove to be a useful tool in specific situations. PMID:16845845

  10. Non-invasive assessment of coronary artery bypass graft with retrospectively ECG-gated four-row multi-detector spiral computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Marano, Riccardo; Storto, Maria Luigia; Maddestra, Nicola; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of four-row multi-detector CT (MDCT) in the evaluation of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) in patients with at least a left internal mammary artery (LIMA) grafted to the left anterior descending artery (LAD), because of the conduit of choice in bypass surgery and the greater difficulty of evaluation with non-invasive diagnostic tools. Included in the study were 57 patients with a total of 122 grafts (95 arterial and 27 venous) who underwent MDCT (4x2.5-mm detector-collimation, 3-mm slice width, 1.5-mm reconstruction increment) with retrospective ECG gating. Twelve patients (21%) with high heart rates were given beta-blockers in order to obtain a heart rate lateral>posterior-inferior wall; P=0.002). In the remaining 30 patent grafts (33%), the assessment of stenoses was hampered by surgical clips, calcifications and motion artifacts. Sensitivity and specificity of MDCT for detection of significant graft stenoses were 80 and 96%, respectively. Inter-observer agreement was good ( K=0.73). MDCT seems to be a valuable diagnostic tool for non-invasive assessment of patency of both venous and arterial grafts. An accurate evaluation

  11. Reproducibility of coronary atherosclerotic plaque characteristics in populations with low, intermediate, and high prevalence of coronary artery disease by multidetector computer tomography: a guide to reliable visual coronary plaque assessments.

    PubMed

    de Knegt, Martina C; Linde, Jesper J; Fuchs, Andreas; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Køber, Lars V; Hove, Jens D; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the interobserver agreement of visual coronary plaque characteristics by 320-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in three populations with low, intermediate and high CAD prevalence and to identify determinants for the reproducible assessment of these plaque characteristics. 150 patients, 50 asymptomatic subjects from the general population (low CAD prevalence), 50 symptomatic non-acute coronary syndrome (non-ACS) patients (intermediate CAD prevalence), and 50 ACS patients (high CAD prevalence), matched according to age and gender, were retrospectively enrolled. All coronary segments were evaluated for overall image quality, evaluability, presence of CAD, coronary stenosis, plaque composition, plaque focality, and spotty calcification by four readers. Interobserver agreement was assessed using Fleiss' Kappa (κ) and intra-class correlation (ICC). Widely used clinical parameters (overall scan quality, presence of CAD, and determination of coronary stenosis) showed good agreement among the four readers, (ICC = 0.66, κ = 0.73, ICC = 0.74, respectively). When accounting for heart rate, body mass index, plaque location, and coronary stenosis above/below 50 %, interobserver agreement for plaque composition, presence of CAD, and coronary stenosis improved to either good or excellent, (κ = 0.61, κ = 0.81, ICC = 0.78, respectively). Spotty calcification was the least reproducible parameter investigated (κ = 0.33). Across subpopulations, reproducibility of coronary plaque characteristics generally decreased with increasing CAD prevalence except for plaque composition, (limits of agreement: ±2.03, ±1.96, ±1.79 for low, intermediate and high CAD prevalence, respectively). 320-slice MDCT can be used to assess coronary plaque characteristics, except for spotty calcification. Reproducibility estimates are influenced by heart rate, body size, plaque location, and degree of luminal stenosis.

  12. Organ dose measurements from multiple-detector computed tomography using a commercial dosimetry system and tomographic, physical phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, Lindsey K.

    The technology of computed tomography (CT) imaging has soared over the last decade with the use of multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners that are capable of performing studies in a matter of seconds. While the diagnostic information obtained from MDCT imaging is extremely valuable, it is important to ensure that the radiation doses resulting from these studies are at acceptably safe levels. This research project focused on the measurement of organ doses resulting from modern MDCT scanners. A commercially-available dosimetry system was used to measure organ doses. Small dosimeters made of optically-stimulated luminescent (OSL) material were analyzed with a portable OSL reader. Detailed verification of this system was performed. Characteristics studied include energy, scatter, and angular responses; dose linearity, ability to erase the exposed dose and ability to reuse dosimeters multiple times. The results of this verification process were positive. While small correction factors needed to be applied to the dose reported by the OSL reader, these factors were small and expected. Physical, tomographic pediatric and adult phantoms were used to measure organ doses. These phantoms were developed from CT images and are composed of tissue-equivalent materials. Because the adult phantom is comprised of numerous segments, dosimeters were placed in the phantom at several organ locations, and doses to select organs were measured using three clinical protocols: pediatric craniosynostosis, adult brain perfusion and adult cardiac CT angiography (CTA). A wide-beam, 320-slice, volumetric CT scanner and a 64-slice, MDCT scanner were used for organ dose measurements. Doses ranged from 1 to 26 mGy for the pediatric protocol, 1 to 1241 mGy for the brain perfusion protocol, and 2-100 mGy for the cardiac protocol. In most cases, the doses measured on the 64-slice scanner were higher than those on the 320-slice scanner. A methodology to measure organ doses with OSL dosimeters received from CT

  13. Three-dimensional multi-detector row CT portal venography in the evaluation of portosystemic collateral vessels in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heoung Keun; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Choi, Jun Ho; Choi, Song; Chung, Tae Woong; Seo, Jeong Jin; Kim, Jae Kyu; Yoon, Woong; Park, Jin Gyoon

    2002-01-01

    Multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) offers distinct advantages over traditional spiral CT. Multi-detector row CT scanners are faster and allow thinner collimation than single-detector row spiral CT scanners. The use of multi-detector row CT combined with postprocessing of the imaging data with a variety of three-dimensional reformatting techniques (eg, maximum intensity projection, shaded surface display, volume rendering) allows creation of vascular maps whose quality equals or exceeds that of maps created at classic angiography for many applications. Three-dimensional multi-detector row CT portal venography can help determine the extent and location of portosystemic collateral vessels (eg, left gastric vein, short gastric vein, esophageal and paraesophageal varices, splenorenal and gastrorenal shunts, paraumbilical and abdominal wall veins) in patients with liver cirrhosis and is probably the optimal imaging technique in this setting.

  14. Earthquake-related Crush Injury versus Non-Earthquake Injury in Abdominal Trauma Patients on Emergency Multidetector Computed Tomography: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tian-wu; Dong, Zhi-hui; Chu, Zhi-gang; Tang, Si-shi; Deng, Wen

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate features of abdominal earthquake-related crush traumas in comparison with non-earthquake injury. A cross sectional survey was conducted with 51 survivors with abdominal crush injury in the 2008 Sichuan earthquake, and 41 with abdominal non-earthquake injury, undergoing non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans, serving as earthquake trauma and control group, respectively. Data were analyzed between groups focusing on CT appearance. We found that injury of abdominal-wall soft tissue and fractures of lumbar vertebrae were more common in earthquake trauma group than in control group (28 vs 13 victims, and 24 vs 9, respectively; all P < 0.05); and fractures were predominantly in transverse process of 1-2 vertebrae among L1-3 vertebrae. Retroperitoneal injury in the kidney occurred more frequently in earthquake trauma group than in control group (29 vs 14 victims, P < 0.05). Abdominal injury in combination with thoracic and pelvic injury occurred more frequently in earthquake trauma group than in control group (43 vs 29 victims, P < 0.05). In conclusion, abdominal earthquake-related crush injury might be characteristic of high incidence in injury of abdominal-wall soft tissue, fractures of lumbar vertebrae in transverse process of 1-2 vertebrae among L1-3 vertebrae, retroperitoneal injury in the kidney, and in combination with injury in the thorax and pelvis. PMID:21394315

  15. Extrahepatic, nonneoplastic, fat-containing lesions of the abdominopelvic cavity: spectrum of lesions, significance, and typical appearance on multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kani, Kimia Khalatbari; Moshiri, Mariam; Bhargava, Puneet; Kolokythas, Orpheus

    2012-01-01

    Fat may be noted in a diffuse or focal manner in a variety of nonneoplastic abdominopelvic conditions. The specific signature of macroscopic fat on computed tomography along with the usually characteristic findings of these entities makes the diagnosis of most of these conditions relatively straightforward. In the intestinal tract, the "fat halo sign" usually arises in the context of subacute to chronic bowel wall inflammation. Excess fat in the renal sinus may occur with renal sinus lipomatosis or "replacement lipomatosis of the kidney." Some cases of "pancreatic lipomatosis" may culminate in steatopancreatitis and ultimately neoplastic transformations. "Fibrofatty mesenteric proliferation" is a characteristic feature of Crohn disease. In the setting of the acute abdomen, accurate diagnosis of fat-containing lesions (epiploic appendagitis or omental infarction) from other causes of the acute abdomen is critical. Mesenteric panniculitis is 1 of the causes of the "misty mesentery." Juxtacaval fat deposition is a benign process that has the potential to be confused with more serious conditions. More diffuse fat deposition (abdominal or pelvic lipomatosis) has the potential to become symptomatic by causing mass effect upon the adjacent structures. Fat can also be seen in a variety of postoperative/iatrogenic conditions or abdominal wall/diaphragmatic hernias. PMID:22285003

  16. [Multidetector computed tomography in acute abdomen].

    PubMed

    Carreras Aja, M; Arrieta Artieda, I; Borruel Nacenta, S

    2011-10-01

    MDCT has become a fundamental tool for determining the causes of acute abdomen. CT is considered the imaging technique of choice in the diagnostic workup of both localized and diffuse acute abdomen, except in patients in whom acute cholecystitis or acute gynecological disease is suspected and in children, adolescents, and pregnant patients, in whom ultrasonography is the imaging technique of choice. Plain-film X-ray examination has been relegated to the initial management of renal colic, suspected foreign bodies, and intestinal obstruction. One of the drawbacks of MDCT is its use of ionizing radiation, which makes it necessary to filter and direct the examinations as well as to ensure that the most appropriate protocols are used. For this reason, low dose protocols have been developed so that diagnostic studies can be performed with doses of radiation between 2 and 3 mSv; these are normally used in the diagnosis of renal colic and can also be used in selected patients with suspected appendicitis and acute diverticulitis. PMID:21742357

  17. Changes in entrance surface dose in relation to the location of shielding material in chest computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Y. M.; Cho, J. H.; Kim, S. C.

    2015-07-01

    This study examined the effects of entrance surface dose (ESD) on the abdomen and pelvis of the patient when undergoing chest computed tomography (CT) procedure, and evaluated the effects of ESD reduction depending on the location of radiation shield. For CT scanner, the 64-slice multi-detector computed tomography was used. The alderson radiation therapy phantom and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD), which enabled measurement from low to high dose, were also used. For measurement of radiation dose, the slice number from 9 to 21 of the phantom was set as the test range, which included apex up to both costophrenic angles. A total of 10 OSLD nanoDots were attached for measurement of the front and rear ESD. Cyclic tests were performed using the low-dose chest CT and high-resolution CT (HRCT) protocol on the following set-ups: without shielding; shielding only on the front side; shielding only on the rear side; and shielding for both front and rear sides. According to the test results, ESD for both front and rear sides was higher in HRCT than low-dose CT when radiation shielding was not used. It was also determined that, compared to the set-up that did not use the radiation shield, locating the radiation shield on the front side was effective in reducing front ESD, while locating the radiation shield on the rear side reduced rear ESD level. Shielding both the front and rear sides resulted in ESD reduction. In conclusion, it was confirmed that shielding the front and rear sides was the most effective method to reduce the ESD effect caused by scatter ray during radiography.

  18. CHIMERA Multidetector at Laboratori Nazionali del Sud

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, S.; Anzalone, A.; Baldo, M.; Barna, R.; Campisi, M.g.; Cardella, G.; Cavallaro, Sl., Amico, V.D.; De Filippo, E.; DePasquale, D.; Femino, S.; Geraci, E.; Giustolisi, F.; Guazzoni, P.; Iacono-Manno, C.M.; Italiano, A.; Lanzalone, G.; Lanzano, G.; LoNigro, S.; Lombardo, U.; Manfredi, G.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Sambataro, S.; Sperduto, M.L.; Sutera, C.M.; Zetta, L.

    2000-12-31

    The installation of CHIMERA multidetector, designed in order to study central collisions in heavy ion reactions at intermediate energy, is going on at LNS and the first experiment with the forward part (688 telescopes) is running since May 1999. The aim of this contribution is to present the status of the project.

  19. Heterogeneous Microinfarcts Caused by Coronary Microemboli: Evaluation with Multidetector CT and MR Imaging in a Swine Model1

    PubMed Central

    Saloner, David; Martin, Alastair J.; Ursell, Philip C.; Saeed, Maythem

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To directly compare the sensitivity of 64-section multidetector computed tomography (CT) with that of 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the depiction and measurement of heterogeneous 7–8-week-old microinfarcts and the quantification of regional left ventricular (LV) function and perfusion in the territory of coronary intervention in a swine model. Materials and Methods: Approval was obtained from the institutional animal committee. An x-ray/MR system was used to catheterize the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery with x-ray guidance and to delineate the perfusion territory. The vessel was selectively microembolized in six pigs with small-diameter embolic material (40–120 µm, 250000 count). At 7–8 weeks after microembolization, multidetector CT and MR imaging were used to assess LV function, first-pass perfusion, and delayed contrast enhancement in remote myocardium and microinfarct scars. Histochemical staining with triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) was used to confirm and quantify heterogeneous microinfarct scars. The two-tailed Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to detect differences between modalities and myocardial regions. Results: The LAD territory was 32.4% ± 3.8(stadard error of the mean) of the LV mass. Multidetector CT and MR imaging have similar sensitivity in the detection of regional and global LV dysfunction and extent of microinfarct. The mean LV end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, and ejection fraction were 93 mL ± 8, 46 mL ± 4, and 50% ± 3, respectively, on multidetector CT images and 92 mL ± 8, 48 mL ± 5, and 48% ± 3, respectively, on MR images (P ≥ .05). The extent of heterogeneous microinfarct was not significantly different between multidetector CT (6.3% ± 0.8 of the LV mass), MR imaging (6.6% ± 0.5 of the LV mass), and TTC staining (7.0% ± 0.6 of the LV mass). First-pass multidetector CT and MR imaging demonstrated significant regional differences (P < .05) in time to peak between the

  20. Usefulness of Cardiac Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Prosthetic Coronary Artery Graft with Interposition Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Wake, Ryotaro; Iwata, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Masashi; Doi, Atsushi; Sugioka, Kenichi; Otsuka, Ryo; Hozumi, Takeshi; Takemoto, Yasuhiko; Ehara, Shoichi; Hanatani, Akihisa; Muro, Takashi; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    An 80-year-old Japanese man was admitted with orthopnea and pitting edema of both lower legs. We diagnosed congestive heart failure (CHF) on the basis of a chest X-ray and an echocardiogram. An electrocardiogram showed a heart rate of 120 beats/min with atrial fibrillation rhythm (Af). The patient developed aortic valve failure and destruction of the base of right coronary artery (RCA) due to infectious endocarditis at 71 years of age. The patient underwent aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting with an interposed graft with polyester vascular graft to RCA. The patient recovered from CHF after the 6 days of treatment with diuretics and verapamil. We confirmed the patency of coronary arteries and bypass grafts using a 64-slice cardiac computed tomography scan (CT) and diagnosed CHF due to Af. Here we describe the estimation of the prosthetic coronary artery graft patency with the interposition procedure using 64-slice cardiac CT. PMID:21079753

  1. A method to generate equivalent energy spectra and filtration models based on measurement for multidetector CT Monte Carlo dosimetry simulations.

    PubMed

    Turner, Adam C; Zhang, Di; Kim, Hyun J; DeMarco, John J; Cagnon, Chris H; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna D; Stevens, Donna M; Primak, Andrew N; McCollough, Cynthia H; McNitt-Gray, Michael F

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to present a method for generating x-ray source models for performing Monte Carlo (MC) radiation dosimetry simulations of multidetector row CT (MDCT) scanners. These so-called "equivalent" source models consist of an energy spectrum and filtration description that are generated based wholly on the measured values and can be used in place of proprietary manufacturer's data for scanner-specific MDCT MC simulations. Required measurements include the half value layers (HVL1 and HVL2) and the bowtie profile (exposure values across the fan beam) for the MDCT scanner of interest. Using these measured values, a method was described (a) to numerically construct a spectrum with the calculated HVLs approximately equal to those measured (equivalent spectrum) and then (b) to determine a filtration scheme (equivalent filter) that attenuates the equivalent spectrum in a similar fashion as the actual filtration attenuates the actual x-ray beam, as measured by the bowtie profile measurements. Using this method, two types of equivalent source models were generated: One using a spectrum based on both HVL1 and HVL2 measurements and its corresponding filtration scheme and the second consisting of a spectrum based only on the measured HVL1 and its corresponding filtration scheme. Finally, a third type of source model was built based on the spectrum and filtration data provided by the scanner's manufacturer. MC simulations using each of these three source model types were evaluated by comparing the accuracy of multiple CT dose index (CTDI) simulations to measured CTDI values for 64-slice scanners from the four major MDCT manufacturers. Comprehensive evaluations were carried out for each scanner using each kVp and bowtie filter combination available. CTDI experiments were performed for both head (16 cm in diameter) and body (32 cm in diameter) CTDI phantoms using both central and peripheral measurement positions. Both equivalent source model types result in

  2. Misty mesentery: a pictorial review of multidetector-row CT findings.

    PubMed

    Filippone, A; Cianci, R; Di Fabio, F; Storto, M L

    2011-04-01

    The term "misty mesentery" indicates a pathological increase in mesenteric fat attenuation at computed tomography (CT). It is frequently observed on multidetector CT (MDCT) scans performed during daily clinical practice and may be caused by various pathological conditions, including oedema, inflammation, haemorrhage, neoplastic infiltration or sclerosing mesenteritis. In patients suffering from acute abdominal disease, misty mesentery may be considered a feature of the underlying disease. Otherwise, it may represent an incidental finding on MDCT performed for other reasons. This article describes the MDCT features of misty mesentery in different diseases in order to provide a rational approach to the differential diagnosis. PMID:21311992

  3. The Diminishing Role of Pelvic Stability Evaluation in the Era of Computed Tomographic Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chih-Yuan; Teng, Lan-Hsuan; Liao, Chien-Hung; Hsu, Yu-Pao; Wang, Shang-Yu; Kuo, Ling-Wei; Yuan, Kuo-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pelvic fractures can result in life-threatening hemorrhages or other associated injuries. Therefore, computed tomography (CT) scanning plays a key role in the management of pelvic fracture patients. However, CT scanning is utilized as an adjunct in secondary survey according to traditional Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guidelines, whereas pelvic x-ray is used as a primary tool to evaluate pelvic stability and the necessity of further CT scanning. In the current study, we attempted to evaluate the role of CT scanning in the era of advanced technology. The significance of pelvic stability was also analyzed. From January 2012 to December 2014, the trauma registry and medical records of pelvic fracture patients were retrospectively reviewed. A 64-slice multidetector CT scanner was used in our emergency department as a standard diagnostic tool for evaluating trauma patients. Pelvic x-ray was used as a primary tool for screening pelvic fractures, and pelvic stability was evaluated accordingly. CT scans were performed in patients with unstable pelvic fractures, suspected associated intra-abdominal injuries (IAIs), or other conditions based on the physicians’ clinical judgment. The clinical features of patients with stable and unstable pelvic fractures were compared. The patients with stable pelvic fractures were analyzed to determine the characteristics associated with retroperitoneal hemorrhage (RH) or IAIs. Patients with stable pelvic fractures were also compared based on whether they underwent a CT scan. A total of 716 patients were enrolled in this study. There were 533 (74.4%) patients with stable pelvic fractures. Of these patients, there were 66 (12.4%) and 50 (9.4%) patients with associated RH and IAI, respectively. There were no significant differences between the patients with associated RH based on their primary evaluation (vital signs, volume of blood transfusion, and hemoglobin level). Similarly, the demographics and the primary evaluation

  4. The Diminishing Role of Pelvic Stability Evaluation in the Era of Computed Tomographic Scanning.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chih-Yuan; Teng, Lan-Hsuan; Liao, Chien-Hung; Hsu, Yu-Pao; Wang, Shang-Yu; Kuo, Ling-Wei; Yuan, Kuo-Ching

    2016-04-01

    Pelvic fractures can result in life-threatening hemorrhages or other associated injuries. Therefore, computed tomography (CT) scanning plays a key role in the management of pelvic fracture patients. However, CT scanning is utilized as an adjunct in secondary survey according to traditional Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guidelines, whereas pelvic x-ray is used as a primary tool to evaluate pelvic stability and the necessity of further CT scanning. In the current study, we attempted to evaluate the role of CT scanning in the era of advanced technology. The significance of pelvic stability was also analyzed. From January 2012 to December 2014, the trauma registry and medical records of pelvic fracture patients were retrospectively reviewed. A 64-slice multidetector CT scanner was used in our emergency department as a standard diagnostic tool for evaluating trauma patients. Pelvic x-ray was used as a primary tool for screening pelvic fractures, and pelvic stability was evaluated accordingly. CT scans were performed in patients with unstable pelvic fractures, suspected associated intra-abdominal injuries (IAIs), or other conditions based on the physicians' clinical judgment. The clinical features of patients with stable and unstable pelvic fractures were compared. The patients with stable pelvic fractures were analyzed to determine the characteristics associated with retroperitoneal hemorrhage (RH) or IAIs. Patients with stable pelvic fractures were also compared based on whether they underwent a CT scan. A total of 716 patients were enrolled in this study. There were 533 (74.4%) patients with stable pelvic fractures. Of these patients, there were 66 (12.4%) and 50 (9.4%) patients with associated RH and IAI, respectively. There were no significant differences between the patients with associated RH based on their primary evaluation (vital signs, volume of blood transfusion, and hemoglobin level). Similarly, the demographics and the primary evaluation results

  5. Important advances in technology and unique applications to cardiovascular computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Chaikriangkrai, Kongkiat; Choi, Su Yeon; Nabi, Faisal; Chang, Su Min

    2014-01-01

    For the past decade, multidetector cardiac computed tomography and its main application, coronary computed tomography angiography, have been established as a noninvasive technique for anatomical assessment of coronary arteries. This new era of coronary artery evaluation by coronary computed tomography angiography has arisen from the rapid advancement in computed tomography technology, which has led to massive diagnostic and prognostic clinical studies in various patient populations. This article gives a brief overview of current multidetector cardiac computed tomography systems, developing cardiac computed tomography technologies in both hardware and software fields, innovative radiation exposure reduction measures, multidetector cardiac computed tomography functional studies, and their newer clinical applications beyond coronary computed tomography angiography. PMID:25574342

  6. Multidetector CT of Mandibular Fractures, Reductions, and Complications: A Clinically Relevant Primer for the Radiologist.

    PubMed

    Dreizin, David; Nam, Arthur J; Tirada, Nikki; Levin, Martin D; Stein, Deborah M; Bodanapally, Uttam K; Mirvis, Stuart E; Munera, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    After the nasal bones, the mandible is the second most common site of facial fractures, and mandibular fractures frequently require open reduction. In the trauma injury setting, multidetector computed tomography (CT) has become the cornerstone imaging modality for determining the most appropriate treatment management, fixation method, and surgical approach. Multidetector CT is also used to assess the adequacy of the reduction and evaluate potential complications in the postoperative period. For successful restoration of the mandible's form and function, as well as management of posttraumatic and postoperative complications, reconstructive surgeons are required to have a detailed understanding of mandibular biomechanics, occlusion, and anatomy. To provide added value in the diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up of mandibular fractures, radiologists should be aware of these concepts. Knowledge of the techniques commonly used to achieve occlusal and anatomic reduction and of the rationale behind the range of available treatment options for different injury patterns-from isolated and nondisplaced fractures to multisite and comminuted fractures-also is essential. This article focuses on the use of multidetector CT for pre- and postoperative evaluation of mandibular fractures and outlines fundamental concepts of diagnosis and management-beginning with an explanation of common fracture patterns and their biomechanical underpinnings, and followed by a review of the common postoperative appearances of these fractures after semirigid and rigid fixation procedures. Specific considerations regarding fractures in different regions of the tooth-bearing and non-tooth-bearing mandible and the unique issues pertaining to the edentulous atrophic mandible are reviewed, and key features that distinguish major from minor complications are described. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27618328

  7. Search for continuous gravitational waves: Metric of the multidetector F-statistic

    SciTech Connect

    Prix, Reinhard

    2007-01-15

    We develop a general formalism for the parameter-space metric of the multidetector F-statistic, which is a matched-filtering detection statistic for continuous gravitational waves. We find that there exists a whole family of F-statistic metrics, parametrized by the (unknown) amplitude parameters of the gravitational wave. The multidetector metric is shown to be expressible in terms of noise-weighted averages of single-detector contributions, which implies that the number of templates required to cover the parameter space does not scale with the number of detectors. Contrary to using a longer observation time, combining detectors of similar sensitivity is therefore the computationally cheapest way to improve the sensitivity of coherent wide-parameter searches for continuous gravitational waves. We explicitly compute the F-statistic metric family for signals from isolated spinning neutron stars, and we numerically evaluate the quality of different metric approximations in a Monte Carlo study. The metric predictions are tested against the measured mismatches and we identify regimes in which the local metric is no longer a good description of the parameter-space structure.

  8. Value and Accuracy of Multidetector Computed Tomography in Obstructive Jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Rishi Philip; Moorkath, Abdunnisar; Basti, Ram Shenoy; Suresh, Hadihally B.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Objective; To find out the role of MDCT in the evaluation of obstructive jaundice with respect to the cause and level of the obstruction, and its accuracy. To identify the advantages of MDCT with respect to other imaging modalities. To correlate MDCT findings with histopathology/surgical findings/Endoscopic Retrograde CholangioPancreatography (ERCP) findings as applicable. Material/Methods This was a prospective study conducted over a period of one year from August 2014 to August 2015. Data were collected from 50 patients with clinically suspected obstructive jaundice. CT findings were correlated with histopathology/surgical findings/ERCP findings as applicable. Results Among the 50 people studied, males and females were equal in number, and the majority belonged to the 41–60 year age group. The major cause for obstructive jaundice was choledocholithiasis. MDCT with reformatting techniques was very accurate in picking a mass as the cause for biliary obstruction and was able to differentiate a benign mass from a malignant one with high accuracy. There was 100% correlation between the CT diagnosis and the final diagnosis regarding the level and type of obstruction. MDCT was able to determine the cause of obstruction with an accuracy of 96%. Conclusions MDCT with good reformatting techniques has excellent accuracy in the evaluation of obstructive jaundice with regards to the level and cause of obstruction. PMID:27429673

  9. Cirsoid Aneurysm of Coronary Arteries Associated with Arterioventricular Fistula Evaluated by 64-Multidetector CT Coronary Angiography: Depiction of a Case

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, Gianluca Mamone, Giuseppe; Milazzo, Mariapina; Caruso, Settimo; Baravoglia, Cesar Hernandez; Vitulo, Patrizio; Gridelli, Bruno; Luca, Angelo

    2009-05-15

    A female patient with severe pulmonary hypertension was admitted for lung transplant evaluation. As an incidental finding, the chest CT showed diffuse and dilated coronaries, not detected at previous echocardiography. A coronary CT angiography was then performed using a 64-multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanner to better evaluate the coronary tree. The images obtained after postprocessing demonstrated tremendously aneurysmatic and tortuous coronary arteries and the presence of a septal branch deepening into the myocardium and penetrating the right ventricle cavity, forming an abnormal arterioventricular fistula. A causal relation between the aneurysms and the fistula is suspected.

  10. Anomalous Morphology of an Ectopic Tooth in the Maxillary Sinus on Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Images

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yee-Tak Alta; Luk, Yiu Shiobhon; Fung, Kai-Hung

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of an incidentally-diagnosed ectopic tooth showing anomalous morphology in the maxillary antrum, using three-dimensional reconstruction of computed tomography images of the tooth obtained by multi-detector computed tomography. PMID:23705035

  11. Scenes from the past: multidetector CT of Egyptian mummies of the Redpath Museum.

    PubMed

    Wade, Andrew D; Garvin, Gregory J; Hurnanen, Jaana H; Williams, Licd Lana; Lawson, Barbara; Nelson, Andrew J; Tampieri, Donatella

    2012-01-01

    As a nondestructive method of historical and anthropologic inquiry, imaging has played an important role in mummy studies over the past several decades. Recent technologic advances have made multidetector computed tomography (CT) an especially useful means for deepening the present understanding of ancient cultures by examining preserved human remains. In April 2011, three ancient Egyptian human mummies from the Redpath Museum of McGill University were examined with 320-section multidetector CT as part of the IMPACT Radiological Mummy Database project headquartered at the University of Western Ontario. Whole-body scanning was performed with a section thickness of 0.5 mm and a peak voltage of 120 kVp, and the raw CT datasets were postprocessed by using smooth body and high-resolution bone convolution filters. Two of the mummies were scanned at different energy levels (80 and 135 keV). The high-resolution CT scans revealed the details of mummification and allowed observations about the socioeconomic and health status of the human subjects based on both the mummification technique used and the appearance of the remains, particularly the bones and teeth. The paleopathologic information obtained from the scans confirmed some findings in studies performed in the same mummies in the late 19th and 20th centuries. The CT scans also demonstrated a high degree of variability in Egyptian mortuary practice, variability that is not generally recognized in the literature. Unusual features that were observed included a relatively uncommon retained heart in mummy RM2718, retained lungs in a mummy from which the heart had been extracted (RM2720), and a cartonnage plaque placed over the left abdomen of a mummy that had been eviscerated transperineally (RM2717). PMID:22787004

  12. Scenes from the past: multidetector CT of Egyptian mummies of the Redpath Museum.

    PubMed

    Wade, Andrew D; Garvin, Gregory J; Hurnanen, Jaana H; Williams, Licd Lana; Lawson, Barbara; Nelson, Andrew J; Tampieri, Donatella

    2012-01-01

    As a nondestructive method of historical and anthropologic inquiry, imaging has played an important role in mummy studies over the past several decades. Recent technologic advances have made multidetector computed tomography (CT) an especially useful means for deepening the present understanding of ancient cultures by examining preserved human remains. In April 2011, three ancient Egyptian human mummies from the Redpath Museum of McGill University were examined with 320-section multidetector CT as part of the IMPACT Radiological Mummy Database project headquartered at the University of Western Ontario. Whole-body scanning was performed with a section thickness of 0.5 mm and a peak voltage of 120 kVp, and the raw CT datasets were postprocessed by using smooth body and high-resolution bone convolution filters. Two of the mummies were scanned at different energy levels (80 and 135 keV). The high-resolution CT scans revealed the details of mummification and allowed observations about the socioeconomic and health status of the human subjects based on both the mummification technique used and the appearance of the remains, particularly the bones and teeth. The paleopathologic information obtained from the scans confirmed some findings in studies performed in the same mummies in the late 19th and 20th centuries. The CT scans also demonstrated a high degree of variability in Egyptian mortuary practice, variability that is not generally recognized in the literature. Unusual features that were observed included a relatively uncommon retained heart in mummy RM2718, retained lungs in a mummy from which the heart had been extracted (RM2720), and a cartonnage plaque placed over the left abdomen of a mummy that had been eviscerated transperineally (RM2717).

  13. Multislice computer tomography for detection of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Ropers, Dieter

    2006-12-01

    Multislice computer tomography has undergone substantial technological progress during the past years. Current 64-slice scanners with gantry rotation speeds of as little as 330 ms, and particularly the recently introduced dual source CT equipped with two X-ray tubes, provide a temporal and spatial resolution that is sufficient to allow reliable imaging of cardiac morphology and coronary arteries. Especially the ability to noninvasively visualize the coronary arteries, including the assessment and quantification of calcifications, as well as the detection of luminal obstruction and atherosclerotic plaque, constitutes an attractive addition to currently available diagnostic tools for the work-up of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. Besides the evaluation of coronary artery calcium and atherosclerotic plaques, this review focuses on the contrast-enhanced CT visualization of the coronary vessels, including native coronary arteries, bypass grafts, and coronary stonts. Thereby detailed information concerning the scan protocol, clinical data, possible indications, and limitations using up-to-date 64-slice technology is provided. Finally, the overview includes design and initial image examples of dual source CT technology as the newest development in the field.

  14. Cam-type deformities: Concepts, criteria, and multidetector CT features.

    PubMed

    Mellado, J M; Radi, N

    2015-01-01

    Interpreting imaging studies of a painful hip requires detailed knowledge of the regional anatomy. Some variants of the proximal femur, such as cam-type deformities, can course asymptomatically or cause femoroacetabular impingement. The principal numerical criterion for defining cam-type deformities, the alpha angle, has some limitations. In this article, we review the anatomic variants of the anterior aspect of the proximal femur, focusing on cam-type deformities. Using diagrams and multidetector CT images, we describe the parameters that are useful for characterizing these deformities in different imaging techniques. We also discuss the potential correspondence of imaging findings of cam-type deformities with the terms coined by anatomists and anthropologists to describe these phenomena. PMID:25660594

  15. Cam-type deformities: Concepts, criteria, and multidetector CT features.

    PubMed

    Mellado, J M; Radi, N

    2015-01-01

    Interpreting imaging studies of a painful hip requires detailed knowledge of the regional anatomy. Some variants of the proximal femur, such as cam-type deformities, can course asymptomatically or cause femoroacetabular impingement. The principal numerical criterion for defining cam-type deformities, the alpha angle, has some limitations. In this article, we review the anatomic variants of the anterior aspect of the proximal femur, focusing on cam-type deformities. Using diagrams and multidetector CT images, we describe the parameters that are useful for characterizing these deformities in different imaging techniques. We also discuss the potential correspondence of imaging findings of cam-type deformities with the terms coined by anatomists and anthropologists to describe these phenomena.

  16. Toroid cavity/coil NMR multi-detector

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Meadows, Alexander D.; Gregar, Joseph S.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2007-09-18

    An analytical device for rapid, non-invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of multiple samples using a single spectrometer is provided. A modified toroid cavity/coil detector (TCD), and methods for conducting the simultaneous acquisition of NMR data for multiple samples including a protocol for testing NMR multi-detectors are provided. One embodiment includes a plurality of LC resonant circuits including spatially separated toroid coil inductors, each toroid coil inductor enveloping its corresponding sample volume, and tuned to resonate at a predefined frequency using a variable capacitor. The toroid coil is formed into a loop, where both ends of the toroid coil are brought into coincidence. Another embodiment includes multiple micro Helmholtz coils arranged on a circular perimeter concentric with a central conductor of the toroid cavity.

  17. Influence of z overscanning on normalized effective doses calculated for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Karantanas, Apostolos; Karabekios, Spiros; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2007-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of z overscanning on normalized effective dose for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector-computed tomography (CT) examinations. Five commercially available mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old patients and the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP, version 4C2) radiation transport code were employed in the current study to simulate pediatric CT exposures. For all phantoms, axial and helical examinations at 120 kV tube voltage were simulated. Scans performed at 80 kV were also simulated. Sex-specific normalized effective doses were estimated for four standard CT examinations i.e., head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk, for all pediatric phantoms. Data for both axial and helical mode acquisition were obtained. In the helical mode, z overscanning was taken into account. The validity of the Monte Carlo results was verified by comparison with dose data obtained using thermoluminescence dosimetry and a physical pediatric anthropomorphic phantom simulating a 10-year-old child. In all cases normalized effective dose values were found to increase with increasing z overscanning. The percentage differences in normalized data between axial and helical scans may reach 43%, 70%, 36%, and 26% for head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk studies, respectively. Normalized data for female pediatric patients was in general higher compared to male patients for all ages, examined regions, and z overscanning values. For both male and female children, the normalized effective dose values were reduced as the age was increased. For the same typical exposure conditions, dose values decreased when lower tube voltage was used; for a 1-year-old child, for example, the effective dose was 3.8 times lower when 80 kV instead of 120 kV was used. Normalized data for the estimation of effective dose to pediatric patients undergoing standard axial and helical CT examinations on an

  18. Can 64-row computed tomography replace angiography after coronary bypass?

    PubMed

    Doi, Hirosato; Koshima, Ryuji; Suzuki, Masato; Takahashi, Ken; Yokoyama, Hiroichi; Yoshida, Naoya

    2008-12-01

    Multi-detector (64-row) computed tomography has become an alternative to coronary angiography to diagnose graft occlusion and stenosis after coronary artery bypass. We compared the power of evaluation of multi-detector computed tomography with that of conventional coronary angiography in 60 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass with 135 grafts and 210 graft anastomoses. The diagnostic power of multi-detector computed tomography for graft occlusion was: 100% (2/2) sensitivity, 98.5% (131/133) specificity, 50% (2/4) positive predictive value, and 100% (133/133) negative predictive value; there were no significant differences in rates of occlusion among the different types of graft. The diagnostic power of multi-detector computed tomography for stenosis of the graft anastomosis was: 100% (2/2) sensitivity, 95.1% (194/204) specificity, 16.6% (2/12) positive predictive value, and 100% (194/194) negative predictive value, with no significant differences among grafts. Multi-detector computed tomography permits evaluation of bypass grafts and is much less invasive for the patients. PMID:18984751

  19. Multidetector CT evaluation of airway stents: what the radiologist should know.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Myrna C B; Saldana, David A; Rao, Praveen P; Vlahos, Ioannis; Naidich, David P; Benveniste, Marcelo F; Erasmus, Jeremy J; Marom, Edith M; Ost, David

    2014-01-01

    Airway stents are increasingly used to treat symptomatic patients with obstructive tracheobronchial diseases who are not amenable to surgical resection or who have poor performance status, precluding them from resection. The most common conditions that are treated with tracheobronchial stents are primary lung cancer and metastatic disease. However, stents have also been used to treat patients with airway stenosis related to a variety of benign conditions, such as tracheobronchomalacia, relapsing polychondritis, postintubation tracheal stenosis, postoperative anastomotic stenosis, and granulomatous diseases. Additionally, airway stents can be used as a barrier method in the management of esophagorespiratory fistulas. Many types of stents are available from different manufacturers. Principally, they are classified as silicone; covered and uncovered metal; or hybrid, which are made of silicone and reinforced by metal rings. The advantages and disadvantages of each type of airway stent are carefully considered when choosing the most appropriate stent for each patient. Multidetector computed tomography plays an important role in determining the cause and assessing the location and extent of airway obstruction. Moreover, it is very accurate in its depiction of complications after airway stent placement.

  20. Multidetector CT in the evaluation of potential living donors for liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Torres, Ana; Fernández-Cuadrado, Jaime; Pinilla, Inmaculada; Parrón, Manuel; de Vicente, Emilio; López-Santamaría, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Living donor liver transplantation is increasingly being used to help compensate for the increasing shortage of cadaveric liver grafts. However, the extreme variability of the hepatic vascular systems can impede this surgical procedure. Evaluation of potential living donors was conducted in which a two-detector-row computed tomographic (CT) scanner was used to obtain arterial phase and portal dominant phase images following the intravenous injection of contrast material, after which three-dimensional maximum-intensity-projection and volume-rendered images were created. The vascular anatomy was evaluated, with special attention given to the origin and course of the artery to segment IV and the presence of variants, especially those considered relative or absolute contraindications for donation, those requiring reconstruction, or those potentially altering the surgical approach. In addition, graft and remnant liver volumes were determined and the liver parenchyma evaluated. Multidetector CT is proving to be valuable in the evaluation of potential living liver donors, contributing to donor safety and providing comprehensive information about the hepatic vascular anatomy, the liver parenchyma, and graft and remnant liver volume. This information is critical in choosing the most suitable potential donor, in surgical planning, and in obtaining an optimal graft that maintains the balance between blood supply and venous drainage. PMID:16009821

  1. Benefits of contrast-enhanced multidetector row CT colonography for preoperative staging in colorectal cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Gen; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Satake, Mitso; Miyakawa, Kunihisa; Muramatsu, Yukio; Tateishi, Ukihide; Akasu, Takayuki; Otake, Yousuke; Fujii, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Toshiaki

    2003-05-01

    Recently, CT colonography has been recognized as an effective option for evaluating colorectal polyps in the USA. We have applied this technique to preoperative staging of colorectal cancer patients with a contrast-enhanced multi-detector row CT (MDCT). The use of manipulated multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) views in contrast-enhanced MDCT colonography proved advantageous for detecting lymph node metastases. Furthermore, 3-dimensional (3D) endoluminal images with Hansfield-transparency settings allowed vascular views of the colorectal wall for identification of invasive colorectal cancers. Using endoluminal images, increase in flow and pooling of blood related to angiogenesis of invasive cancer could be demonstrated, not only in the lymph nodes but also in the colorectal wall. Both MPR views and 3D endoluminal images can be acquired from the same 3D volumetric data generated by helical scanning in MDCT colonography, and both have great potential as modalities for computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) using blood flow information. Therefore the use of CAD can be expected to improve radiologists' diagnostic performance with regard to colorectal cancer.

  2. [Motion analysis of target in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumors using 320-row multidetector CT].

    PubMed

    Imae, Toshikazu; Haga, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Ino, Kenji; Tanaka, Kenichirou; Okano, Yukari; Sasaki, Katsutake; Saegusa, Shigeki; Shiraki, Takashi; Oritate, Takashi; Yano, Keiichi; Shinohara, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has rapidly evolved and is increasingly used for treatment simulation of thoracic and abdominal radiotherapy. A 320-detector row CT scanner has recently become available that allows axial volumetric scanning of a 16-cm-long range in a patient without table movement. Current radiotherapy techniques require a generous margin around the presumed gross tumor volume (GTV) to account for uncertainties such as tumor motion and set up error. Motion analysis is useful to evaluate the internal margin of a moving target due to respiration and to improve therapeutic precision. The purpose of this study is to propose a method using phase-only correlation to automatically detect the target and to assess the motion of the target in numerical phantoms and patients. Free-breathing scans using 320-detector row CT were acquired for 4 patients with lung tumor(s). The proposed method was feasible for motion analysis of all numerical phantoms and patients. The results reproduced the facts that the motion of tumors in the patients varied in orbits during the respiratory cycle and exhibited hysteresis. The maximum distance between peak exhalation and inhalation increased as the tumors approached the diaphragm. The proposed method detected the three-dimensional position of the targets automatically and analyzed the trajectories. The tumor motion due to respiration differed by region and was greatest for the lower lobe. PMID:21471676

  3. Multidetector CT investigation of the mummy of Rosalia Lombardo (1918-1920).

    PubMed

    Panzer, Stephanie; Gill-Frerking, Heather; Rosendahl, Wilfried; Zink, Albert R; Piombino-Mascali, Dario

    2013-10-01

    Whole-body multidetector computed tomography (CT) was performed on the mummified corpse of two-year-old Rosalia Lombardo, an anthropogenic mummy displayed in the Capuchin Catacombs of Palermo, Sicily, Italy. Rosalia Lombardo reportedly died of bronchopneumonia in 1920 and was preserved by the embalmer and taxidermist Alfredo Salafia with a formaldehyde-based fluid. Rosalia Lombardo's body is still exhibited in the Capuchin Catacombs inside the original glass-topped coffin in which she was placed. Only her head is visible: the rest of her body is covered by a sheet. CT images of Rosalia's body within her coffin were of reduced quality because of distinct metal artifacts caused by the coffin itself. Nevertheless, a detailed radiological analysis was possible for most of the body. Analysis of the data from the CT examination revealed indicators for the historically-reported endovasal and intracavity treatment. Rosalia's entire body was preserved in a remarkable state. The exceptional preservation of her internal organs made it possible to consider a radiological diagnosis of pneumonia. For this study, CT was determined to be the ultimate method for investigation, since Rosalia's body had to be kept untouched in her sealed coffin for conservation purposes. The CT examination offered new insights into the current preservation status of the body, and the superior contrast of CT allowed detailed assessment of different tissues. Post-processing methods provided reconstructions on any desired plane, as well as three-dimensional reconstruction, for the best possible visualization and interpretation of the body.

  4. Relationship between indexed epicardial fat volume and coronary plaque volume assessed by cardiac multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    You, Seulgi; Sun, Joo Sung; Park, Seon Young; Baek, Yoolim; Kang, Doo Kyoung

    2016-07-01

    We explored whether baseline indexed epicardial fat volume (EFVi) and serial changes in EFVi were associated with increase in coronary plaque volume as assessed by multidetector computed tomography.We retrospectively reviewed 87 patients with coronary artery plaque, identified during either baseline or follow-up cardiac computed tomography (CT) examinations. Each plaque volume was measured in volumetric units using a semiautomatic software tool. EFVi was quantified by calculating the total volume of epicardial tissue of CT density -190 to -30 HU, indexed to the body surface area. Clinical cardiovascular risk factors were extracted by medical record review at the time of the cardiac CT examinations. The relationship between EFVi and coronary plaque volume was explored by regression analysis.Although the EFVi did not change significantly from baseline to the time of the follow-up CT (65.7 ± 21.8 vs 66.0 ± 21.8 cm/m, P = 0.620), the plaque volumes were increased significantly on the follow-up CT scans. The annual change in EFVi was not accompanied by a parallel change in coronary plaque volume (P = 0.096-0.500). On univariate analysis, smoking, hypercholesterolemia, 10-year coronary heart disease risk, obesity, and baseline EFVi predicted rapid increases in lipid-rich and fibrous plaque volumes. On multivariate analysis, baseline EFVi (odds ratio = 1.029, P = 0.016) was an independent predictor of a rapid increase in lipid-rich plaque volume.EFVi was shown to be an independent predictor of a rapid increase in lipid-rich plaque volume. However, changes in EFVi were not associated with parallel changes in coronary plaque volume.

  5. Computed tomographic angiography in tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Kasar, Pankajkumar Ashok; Ravikumar, Radhakrishnan; Varghese, Roy; Kotecha, Monika; Vimala, Jesudian; Kumar, Raghavan Nair Suresh

    2011-10-01

    Echocardiography is often inadequate for imaging tetralogy of Fallot, prompting cineangiography. This study prospectively evaluated multidetector computed tomographic angiography for preoperative evaluation of tetralogy of Fallot in 112 consecutive patients. Forty-eight had nonconfluent or hypoplastic pulmonary arteries (mean z-score, -2; range, -11.1-0.13) permitting only palliative or no surgery; 64 had adequate pulmonary artery anatomy (mean z-score, 0.59; range, -2.53-3.4) allowing total repair. The surgical data of 50 patients who underwent total correction were compared with transthoracic echocardiography and multidetector computed tomographic angiography findings. Multidetector computed tomographic angiography tended to reveal unsuspected collaterals and coronary abnormalities besides outlining the right ventricular outflow tract and pulmonary artery branches. The branch pulmonary artery diameter z-score was the most important determinant of surgical strategy, with the worst figures being associated with no surgical options or palliative surgery, and the best figures leading to corrective surgery. The mean radiation dose was 3.45 mSv. Multidetector computed tomographic angiography is a powerful supplement to echocardiography in the preoperative evaluation of tetralogy of Fallot.

  6. Stress Computed Tomography Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: A New Topic in Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Seitun, Sara; Castiglione Morelli, Margherita; Budaj, Irilda; Boccalini, Sara; Galletto Pregliasco, Athena; Valbusa, Alberto; Cademartiri, Filippo; Ferro, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Since its introduction about 15 years ago, coronary computed tomography angiography has become today the most accurate clinical instrument for noninvasive assessment of coronary atherosclerosis. Important technical developments have led to a continuous stream of new clinical applications together with a significant reduction in radiation dose exposure. Latest generation computed tomography scanners (≥ 64 slices) allow the possibility of performing static or dynamic perfusion imaging during stress by using coronary vasodilator agents (adenosine, dipyridamole, or regadenoson), combining both functional and anatomical information in the same examination. In this article, the emerging role and state-of-the-art of myocardial computed tomography perfusion imaging are reviewed and are illustrated by clinical cases from our experience with a second-generation dual-source 128-slice scanner (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens; Erlangen, Germany). Technical aspects, data analysis, diagnostic accuracy, radiation dose and future prospects are reviewed.

  7. Stress Computed Tomography Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: A New Topic in Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Seitun, Sara; Castiglione Morelli, Margherita; Budaj, Irilda; Boccalini, Sara; Galletto Pregliasco, Athena; Valbusa, Alberto; Cademartiri, Filippo; Ferro, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Since its introduction about 15 years ago, coronary computed tomography angiography has become today the most accurate clinical instrument for noninvasive assessment of coronary atherosclerosis. Important technical developments have led to a continuous stream of new clinical applications together with a significant reduction in radiation dose exposure. Latest generation computed tomography scanners (≥ 64 slices) allow the possibility of performing static or dynamic perfusion imaging during stress by using coronary vasodilator agents (adenosine, dipyridamole, or regadenoson), combining both functional and anatomical information in the same examination. In this article, the emerging role and state-of-the-art of myocardial computed tomography perfusion imaging are reviewed and are illustrated by clinical cases from our experience with a second-generation dual-source 128-slice scanner (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens; Erlangen, Germany). Technical aspects, data analysis, diagnostic accuracy, radiation dose and future prospects are reviewed. PMID:26774540

  8. Multi-detector row CT scanning in Paleoanthropology at various tube current settings and scanning mode.

    PubMed

    Badawi-Fayad, J; Yazbeck, C; Balzeau, A; Nguyen, T H; Istoc, A; Grimaud-Hervé, D; Cabanis, E- A

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal tube current setting and scanning mode for hominid fossil skull scanning, using multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Four fossil skulls (La Ferrassie 1, Abri Pataud 1, CroMagnon 2 and Cro-Magnon 3) were examined by using the CT scanner LightSpeed 16 (General Electric Medical Systems) with varying dose per section (160, 250, and 300 mAs) and scanning mode (helical and conventional). Image quality of two-dimensional (2D) multiplanar reconstructions, three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and native images was assessed by four reviewers using a four-point grading scale. An ANOVA (analysis of variance) model was used to compare the mean score for each sequence and the overall mean score according to the levels of the scanning parameters. Compared with helical CT (mean score=12.03), the conventional technique showed sustained poor image quality (mean score=4.17). With the helical mode, we observed a better image quality at 300 mAs than at 160 in the 3D sequences (P=0.03). Whereas in native images, a reduction in the effective tube current induced no degradation in image quality (P=0.05). Our study suggests a standardized protocol for fossil scanning with a 16 x 0.625 detector configuration, a 10 mm beam collimation, a 0.562:1 acquisition mode, a 0.625/0.4 mm slice thickness/reconstruction interval, a pitch of 5.62, 120 kV and 300 mAs especially when a 3D study is required.

  9. Novel ultrahigh resolution data acquisition and image reconstruction for multi-detector row CT

    SciTech Connect

    Flohr, T. G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Suess, C.; Schmidt, B.; Primak, A. N.; McCollough, C. H.

    2007-05-15

    We present and evaluate a special ultrahigh resolution mode providing considerably enhanced spatial resolution both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction for a routine medical multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) system. Data acquisition is performed by using a flying focal spot both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction in combination with tantalum grids that are inserted in front of the multi-row detector to reduce the aperture of the detector elements both in-plane and in the z-axis direction. The dose utilization of the system for standard applications is not affected, since the grids are moved into place only when needed and are removed for standard scanning. By means of this technique, image slices with a nominal section width of 0.4 mm (measured full width at half maximum=0.45 mm) can be reconstructed in spiral mode on a CT system with a detector configuration of 32x0.6 mm. The measured 2% value of the in-plane modulation transfer function (MTF) is 20.4 lp/cm, the measured 2% value of the longitudinal (z axis) MTF is 21.5 lp/cm. In a resolution phantom with metal line pair test patterns, spatial resolution of 20 lp/cm can be demonstrated both in the scan plane and along the z axis. This corresponds to an object size of 0.25 mm that can be resolved. The new mode is intended for ultrahigh resolution bone imaging, in particular for wrists, joints, and inner ear studies, where a higher level of image noise due to the reduced aperture is an acceptable trade-off for the clinical benefit brought about by the improved spatial resolution.

  10. Multi-detector row CT scanning in Paleoanthropology at various tube current settings and scanning mode.

    PubMed

    Badawi-Fayad, J; Yazbeck, C; Balzeau, A; Nguyen, T H; Istoc, A; Grimaud-Hervé, D; Cabanis, E- A

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal tube current setting and scanning mode for hominid fossil skull scanning, using multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Four fossil skulls (La Ferrassie 1, Abri Pataud 1, CroMagnon 2 and Cro-Magnon 3) were examined by using the CT scanner LightSpeed 16 (General Electric Medical Systems) with varying dose per section (160, 250, and 300 mAs) and scanning mode (helical and conventional). Image quality of two-dimensional (2D) multiplanar reconstructions, three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and native images was assessed by four reviewers using a four-point grading scale. An ANOVA (analysis of variance) model was used to compare the mean score for each sequence and the overall mean score according to the levels of the scanning parameters. Compared with helical CT (mean score=12.03), the conventional technique showed sustained poor image quality (mean score=4.17). With the helical mode, we observed a better image quality at 300 mAs than at 160 in the 3D sequences (P=0.03). Whereas in native images, a reduction in the effective tube current induced no degradation in image quality (P=0.05). Our study suggests a standardized protocol for fossil scanning with a 16 x 0.625 detector configuration, a 10 mm beam collimation, a 0.562:1 acquisition mode, a 0.625/0.4 mm slice thickness/reconstruction interval, a pitch of 5.62, 120 kV and 300 mAs especially when a 3D study is required. PMID:16211320

  11. Study of statistical properties of hybrid statistic in coherent multidetector compact binary coalescences search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, K.; Pai, Archana

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we revisit the coherent gravitational wave search problem of compact binary coalescences with multidetector network consisting of advanced interferometers like LIGO-Virgo. Based on the loss of the optimal multidetector signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), we construct a hybrid statistic as a best of maximum-likelihood-ratio (MLR) statistic tuned for face-on and face-off binaries. The statistical properties of the hybrid statistic is studied. The performance of this hybrid statistic is compared with that of the coherent MLR statistic for generic inclination angles. Owing to the single synthetic data stream, the hybrid statistic gives few false alarms compared to the multidetector MLR statistic and small fractional loss in the optimum SNR for a large range of binary inclinations. We demonstrate that, for a LIGO-Virgo network and binary inclination ɛ <7 0 ° and ɛ >11 0 ° , the hybrid statistic captures more than 98% of the network optimum matched filter SNR with a low false alarm rate. The Monte Carlo exercise with two distributions of incoming inclination angles—namely, U [cos ɛ ] and a more realistic distribution proposed by B. F. Schutz [Classical Quantum Gravity 28, 125023 (2011)]—are performed with the hybrid statistic and give approximately 5% and 7% higher detection probabilities, respectively, compared to the two stream multidetector MLR statistic for a fixed false alarm probability of 1 0-5.

  12. Lymph nodes metastasis of gastric cancer: Measurement with multidetector CT oblique multiplanar reformation-correlation with histopathologic results.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Long; Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Tang, Lei; Li, Xiao-Ting; Wu, Ying; Sun, Ying-Shi

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the ability of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) oblique multiplanar reformation (MPR) for differentiating metastatic lymph nodes (LNs) in patients with gastric cancer.Seventy-nine patients with gastric cancer underwent preoperative computed tomography (CT). One-to-one correlation of LN was made between CT oblique multiplanar reformation and histopathologic slides. Long diameters, short diameters, and short-to-long axis ratios of LNs were evaluated to differentiate metastasis.Short diameters of nodes performed better for diagnosing metastasis than long diameters and short-to-long ratios. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of short diameter were 57.8%, 74.7%, 68.2%, and 0.713, respectively. With different thresholds of short diameters of nodes (No. 8 group >6 mm and other groups >4 mm), total sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy can reach 57.2%, 79.0%, and 70.3%, respectively.MDCT oblique MPR images have certain reference value to distinguish metastasis of LNs in gastric cancer. The diagnostic power for LN metastasis of gastric cancer can be improved by using different threshold for No. 8 group LNs and other groups. PMID:27684881

  13. Computed Tomography of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic disease often is asymptomatic until tissue damage and complications occur or until malignancies have reached advanced stages and have metastasized. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing, staging, and treatment planning for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the functional anatomy of the pancreas and common bile duct and the epidemiology, pathobiology, and computed tomography imaging of pancreatitis, calculi, and pancreatic cancer.

  14. Dual-energy CT revisited with multidetector CT: review of principles and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay; Aktaş, Aykut

    2011-09-01

    Although dual-energy CT (DECT) was first conceived in the 1970s, it was not widely used for CT indications. Recently, the simultaneous acquisition of volumetric dual-energy data has been introduced using multidetector CT (MDCT) with two X-ray tubes and rapid kVp switching (gemstone spectral imaging). Two major advantages of DECT are material decomposition by acquiring two image series with different kVp and the elimination of misregistration artifacts. Hounsfield unit measurements by DECT are not absolute and can change depending on the kVp used for an acquisition. Typically, a combination of 80/140 kVp is used for DECT, but for some applications, 100/140 kVp is preferred. In this study, we summarized the clinical applications of DECT and included images that were acquired using the dual-source CT and rapid kVp switching. In general, unenhanced images can be avoided by using DECT for body and neurological applications; iodine can be removed from the image, and a virtual, non-contrast (water) image can be obtained. Neuroradiological applications allow for the removal of bone and calcium from the carotid and brain CT angiography. Thorax applications include perfusion imaging in patients with pulmonary thromboemboli and other chest diseases, xenon ventilation-perfusion imaging and solitary nodule characterization. Cardiac applications include dual-energy cardiac perfusion, viability and cardiac iron detection. The removal of calcific plaques from arteries, bone removal and aortic stent graft evaluation may be achieved in the vascular system. Abdominal applications include the detection and characterization of liver and pancreas masses, the diagnosis of steatosis and iron overload, DECT colonoscopy and CT cholangiography. Urinary system applications are urinary calculi characterization (uric acid vs. non-uric acid), renal cyst characterization and mass characterization. Musculoskeletal applications permit the differentiation of gout from pseudogout and a reduction of

  15. Blind-ending branch of a bifid ureter: multidetector CT imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Chang, E; Santillan, C; O'Boyle, M K

    2011-01-01

    A bifid ureter with a blind-ending branch is a rare congenital anomaly. Although typically found incidentally, this anomaly can be symptomatic and radiologists should be aware of this important variant. To our knowledge, there has been no previous report of this anomaly as seen on multidetector CT urography. We present a patient with haematuria and review the clinical significance, radiological findings and embryological aetiology of this anomaly. PMID:21257834

  16. Infrared multidetector spectrometer for remote sensing of temperature profiles in the presence of clouds.

    PubMed

    Aumann, H H; Chahine, M T

    1976-09-01

    An infrared multidetector spectrometer with channels in the 4.3-microm and 15-microm CO(2) bands for the remote sensing of temperature profiles in the presence of clouds is described. Results obtained from aircraft flights in July 1975 over ocean sites under various conditions of cloudiness demonstrate the capability of the dual frequency technique to recover surface temperatures to an accuracy of +/-0.5 K in the presence of up to 90% cloud cover.

  17. Acute pulmonary embolism in the era of multi-detector CT: a reality in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The advantages of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) have made it the imaging modality of choice for some patients with suspected cardiothoracic disease, of which pulmonary embolism (PE) is an exponent. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of PE in patients with clinical suspicion of acute PE using MDCT in a sub-Saharan setting, and to describe the demographic characteristics of these patients. Methods Consecutive records of patients who underwent MDCT pulmonary angiography for suspected acute PE over a two-year period at the Radiology Department of a university-affiliated hospital were systematically reviewed. All MDCT pulmonary angiograms were performed with a 16-detector computed tomography (CT) scanner using real-time bolus tracking technique. Authorization for the study was obtained from the institutional authorities. Results Forty-one MDCT pulmonary angiograms were reviewed of which 37 were retained. Of the 4 excluded studies, 3 were repeat angiograms and 1 study was not technically adequate. Twelve of 37 patients (32.4%) had CT angiograms that were positive for PE, of which 7 were males. The mean age of these patients was 47.6±10.5 years (age range from 33 to 65 years). Twenty five patients out of 37 (67.6%) had CT angiograms that were negative for PE. Eleven PE-positive patients (91.7%) had at least 1 identifiable thromboembolic risk factor whilst 5 PE-negative patients (20%) also had at least a thromboembolic risk factor. The relative risk of the occurrence of PE in patients with at least a thromboembolic risk factor was estimated at 14.4. Conclusion Acute PE is a reality in sub-Saharan Africa, with an increased likelihood of MDCT evidence in patients with clinical suspicion of PE who have at least a thromboembolic risk factor. The increasing availability of MDCT will help provide more information on the occurrence of PE in these settings. PMID:23072500

  18. Cardiac Multidetector Computed Tomography: Basic Physics of Image Acquisition and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Bardo, Dianna M.E; Brown, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac MDCT is here to stay. And, it is more than just imaging coronary arteries. Understanding the differences in and the benefits of one CT scanner from another will help you to optimize the capabilities of the scanner, but requires a basic understanding of the MDCT imaging physics. This review provides key information needed to understand the differences in the types of MDCT scanners, from 64 – 320 detectors, flat panels, single and dual source configurations, step and shoot prospective and retrospective gating, and how each factor influences radiation dose, spatial and temporal resolution, and image noise. PMID:19936200

  19. Assessment of coronary bypass graft patency by first-line multi-detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Pesenti-Rossi, D; Baron, N; Georges, J-L; Augusto, S; Gibault-Genty, G; Livarek, B

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess whether a strategy based on a MDCT performed routinely before CA can reduce the radiation dose during the CA, without increased global exposure in patients who need imaging of CABG. A total of 147 consecutive patients were included. The radiation dose during CA (KAP 12.1 vs 22.0 Gy/cm(2), P<.01) and the volume of iodinated contrast (155 vs 200 mL, P<.02) were reduced when preceded by a MDCT. Patients' cumulative exposures were not different in the 2 strategies (5.0 vs 5.1 mSv, P=.76). MDCT performed in first line is a valuable strategy for the assessment of CABG. PMID:25258019

  20. Investigating the low-dose limits of multidetector CT in lung nodule surveillance.

    PubMed

    Paul, N S; Siewerdsen, J H; Patsios, D; Chung, T B

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the factors limiting nodule detection in thoracic computed tomography (CT) and to determine whether prior knowledge of nodule size and attenuation, available from a baseline CT study, influences the minimum radiation dose at which nodule surveillance CT scans can be performed while maintaining current levels of nodule detectability. Multiple nodules varying in attenuation (-509 to + 110 HU) and diameter (1.6 to 9.5 mm) were layered in random and ordered sequences within 2 lung cylinders made of Rando lung material and suspended within a custom-built CT phantom. Multiple CT scans were performed at varying kVp (120, 100, and 80), mA (200, 150, 100, 50, 20, and 10), and beam collimation (5, 2.5, and 1.25 mm) on a four-row multidetector scanner (Lightspeed, General Electric, Milwaukee, WI) using 0.8 s gantry rotation. The corresponding range of radiation dose over which images were acquired was 0.3-26.4 mGy. Nine observers independently performed three specific tasks, namely: (1) To detect a 3.2 mm nodule of 23 HU; (2) To detect 3.2 mm nodules of varying attenuation (-509 to -154 HU); and (3) To detect nodules varying in size (1.6-9 mm) and attenuation (-509 to 110 HU). A two-alternative forced-choice test was used in order to determine the limits of nodule detection in terms of the proportion of correct responses (Pcorr, related to the area under the ROC curve) as a summary metric of observer performance. The radiation dose levels for detection of 99% of nodules in each task were as follows: Task 1 (1 mGy); Task 2 (5 mGy); and Task 3 (7 mGy). The corresponding interobserver confidence limits were 1, 5, and 10 mGy for Tasks 1, 2, and 3, respectively. There was a fivefold increase in the radiation dose required for detection of lower-density nodules (Tasks 1 to 2). Absence of prior knowledge of the nodule size and density (Task 3) corresponds to a significant increase in the minimum required radiation dose. Significant image

  1. Multi-Detector Coronary CT Imaging for the Identification of Coronary Artery Stenoses in a “Real-World” Population

    PubMed Central

    Makaryus, Amgad N; Henry, Sonia; Loewinger, Lee; Makaryus, John N; Boxt, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Multi-detector computed tomography (CT) has emerged as a modality for the non-invasive assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD). Prior studies have selected patients for evaluation and have excluded many of the “real-world” patients commonly encountered in daily practice. We compared 64-detector-CT (64-CT) to conventional coronary angiography (CA) to investigate the accuracy of 64-CT in determining significant coronary stenoses in a “real-world” clinical population. METHODS A total of 1,818 consecutive patients referred for 64-CT were evaluated. CT angiography was performed using the GE LightSpeed VCT (GE® Healthcare). Forty-one patients in whom 64-CT results prompted CA investigation were further evaluated, and results of the two diagnostic modalities were compared. RESULTS A total of 164 coronary arteries and 410 coronary segments were evaluated in 41 patients (30 men, 11 women, age 39–85 years) who were identified by 64-CT to have significant coronary stenoses and who thereafter underwent CA. The overall per-vessel sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy at the 50% stenosis level were 86%, 84%, 65%, 95%, and 85%, respectively, and 77%, 93%, 61%, 97%, and 91%, respectively, in the per-segment analysis at the 50% stenosis level. CONCLUSION 64-CT is an accurate imaging tool that allows a non-invasive assessment of significant CAD with a high diagnostic accuracy in a “real-world” population of patients. The sensitivity and specificity that we noted are not as high as those in prior reports, but we evaluated a population of patients that is typically encountered in clinical practice and therefore see more “real-world” results. PMID:25628513

  2. Nonalcoholic Hepatic Steatosis Is a Strong Predictor of High-Risk Coronary-Artery Plaques as Determined by Multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Kazuhiro; Miyoshi, Toru; Yamauchi, Kentarou; Koyama, Yasushi; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Sato, Shuhei; Kanazawa, Susumu; Ito, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with a risk of coronary artery disease (e.g., diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome). We evaluated whether nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis is associated with high-risk plaques as assessed by multidetector computed tomography (CT). Methods This retrospective study involved 414 participants suspected of having coronary artery disease. Nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis was defined as a liver-to-spleen fat ratio of <1.0 and the presence and appropriate characteristics of coronary-artery plaques as assessed by coronary CT angiography. High-risk plaques were identified, as were low-density plaques, positive remodeling, and spotty calcification. Results Compared with patients who did not have nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis, patients with nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis had more low-density plaques (21% vs. 44%, p<0.01), positive remodeling (41% vs. 58%, p = 0.01), and spotty calcification (12% vs. 36%, p<0.01). The number of high-risk plaques in patients with nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis was greater than in those without nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis (p<0.01). Patients with nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis were more likely to have high-risk plaques than were those with only an elevated level of visceral adipose tissue (≥86 cm2; 35% vs. 16%, p<0.01). Multivariate analyses that included nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis, amount of visceral adipose tissue, and the presence/absence of traditional risk factors demonstrated that nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis was an independent predictor of high-risk plaques (odds ratio: 4.60; 95% confidence interval: 1.94–9.07, p<0.01). Conclusions Diagnosis of nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis may be of value when assessing the risk of coronary artery disease. PMID:26125952

  3. Comparison of Multidetector CT and Gadobutrol-Enhanced MR Imaging for Evaluation of Small, Solid Pancreatic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Tae Won; Kim, Jung Hoon; Yu, Mi Hye; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and MRI for lesion conspicuity, as well as the detection and characterization of small solid pancreatic lesions (SPLs). Materials and Methods 193 patients with small SPLs (< 3 cm) and 52 patients with normal pancreas who underwent both multiphasic MDCT and gadobutrol-enhanced MRI were included in our study. Two radiologists blinded to the pathologic diagnoses independently reviewed those images, and determined the detection of "SPL per se" and "SPL in consideration of secondary features", the lesion conspicuity, the probability of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and the most likely specific diagnosis. Results The sensitivity of MRI for "detection of SPL per se" was significantly higher than that of CT in both reviewers: 92.7% (179/193) and 97.9% (189/193), respectively, for reviewer 1 (p = 0.031) and 90.7% (175/193) and 99.5% (192/193), respectively, for reviewer 2 (p < 0.001). In addition, MRI provided better lesion conspicuity than MDCT for both reviewers (p < 0.001). However, CT and MRI did not show significant difference in sensitivity for "detection of SPL in consideration of secondary features", specificity for SPL detection, and differentiation of PDAC vs. non-PDAC (p > 0.05). The accuracies of CT and MRI for making a specific diagnosis were as follows: 85.7% (210/245) vs. 86.9% (213/245), respectively, for reviewer 1 (p = 0.736), and 91.8% (225/245) vs. 93.5% (229/245), respectively, for reviewer 2 (p = 0.454). Conclusion MRI showed better lesion conspicuity than MDCT, but did not show significantly different diagnostic performance compared with MDCT for detecting and characterizing small SPLs. PMID:27390542

  4. Novel wearable and wireless ring-type pulse oximeter with multi-detectors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng-Yang; Chan, Ming-Che; Chen, Chien-Yue; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2014-01-01

    The pulse oximeter is a popular instrument to monitor the arterial oxygen saturation (SPO2). Although a fingertip-type pulse oximeter is the mainstream one on the market at present, it is still inconvenient for long-term monitoring, in particular, with respect to motion. Therefore, the development of a wearable pulse oximeter, such as a finger base-type pulse oximeter, can effectively solve the above issue. However, the tissue structure of the finger base is complex, and there is lack of detailed information on the effect of the light source and detector placement on measuring SPO2. In this study, the practicability of a ring-type pulse oximeter with a multi-detector was investigated by optical human tissue simulation. The optimal design of a ring-type pulse oximeter that can provide the best efficiency of measuring SPO2 was discussed. The efficiency of ring-type pulse oximeters with a single detector and a multi-detector was also discussed. Finally, a wearable and wireless ring-type pulse oximeter was also implemented to validate the simulation results and was compared with the commercial fingertip-type pulse oximeter.

  5. Novel Wearable and Wireless Ring-Type Pulse Oximeter with Multi-Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng-Yang; Chan, Ming-Che; Chen, Chien-Yue; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2014-01-01

    The pulse oximeter is a popular instrument to monitor the arterial oxygen saturation (SPO2). Although a fingertip-type pulse oximeter is the mainstream one on the market at present, it is still inconvenient for long-term monitoring, in particular, with respect to motion. Therefore, the development of a wearable pulse oximeter, such as a finger base-type pulse oximeter, can effectively solve the above issue. However, the tissue structure of the finger base is complex, and there is lack of detailed information on the effect of the light source and detector placement on measuring SPO2. In this study, the practicability of a ring-type pulse oximeter with a multi-detector was investigated by optical human tissue simulation. The optimal design of a ring-type pulse oximeter that can provide the best efficiency of measuring SPO2 was discussed. The efficiency of ring-type pulse oximeters with a single detector and a multi-detector was also discussed. Finally, a wearable and wireless ring-type pulse oximeter was also implemented to validate the simulation results and was compared with the commercial fingertip-type pulse oximeter. PMID:25244586

  6. Intercostal Artery Supplying Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Demonstration of a Tumor Feeder by C-arm CT and Multidetector Row CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo-Cheol Chung, Jin Wook; Lee, In Joon; An, Sangbu; Seong, Nak Jong; Son, Kyu Ri; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2011-02-15

    This study was designed to describe tumor feeders from the intercostal artery supplying hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on C-arm CT and multidetector row CT. From March 2008 to May 2009, C-arm CT of the intercostal artery was prospectively performed in 24 HCC patients. Two interventional radiologists, who performed C-arm CT, evaluated tumor feeders on C-arm CT and multidetector row CT scans by consensus. In total, 35 intercostal arteries were examined by C-arm CT. All tumor feeders except one showed a sharp upward turn at or near the costochondral junction. On axial C-arm CT images, all tumor feeders were observed as an enhancing dot in the upper intercostal space along the diaphragm. On multidetector CT scans, 17 tumor feeders were observed and 18 were not. Tumor feeders from the intercostal artery are observed as an enhancing dot along the diaphragm on C-arm CT and can be seen on multidetector row CT in approximately half of patients.

  7. Monte Carlo simulations in multi-detector CT (MDCT) for two PET/CT scanner models using MASH and FASH adult phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belinato, W.; Santos, W. S.; Paschoal, C. M. M.; Souza, D. N.

    2015-06-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) has been extensively used in oncology for diagnosis and staging of tumors, radiotherapy planning and follow-up of patients with cancer, as well as in cardiology and neurology. This study determines by the Monte Carlo method the internal organ dose deposition for computational phantoms created by multidetector CT (MDCT) beams of two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. The different MDCT beam parameters were largely related to the total filtration that provides a beam energetic change inside the gantry. This parameter was determined experimentally with the Accu-Gold Radcal measurement system. The experimental values of the total filtration were included in the simulations of two MCNPX code scenarios. The absorbed organ doses obtained in MASH and FASH phantoms indicate that bowtie filter geometry and the energy of the X-ray beam have significant influence on the results, although this influence can be compensated by adjusting other variables such as the tube current-time product (mAs) and pitch during PET/CT procedures.

  8. [Multidetector CT and magnetic resonance imaging features of solitary fibrous tumors in the pelvis and the relevant pathologic basis changes].

    PubMed

    Li, Xueming; Ren, Jing; Zhou, Peng; Cao, Ying; Cheng, Zhuzhong; Yu, Jianqun; Xu, Guohui

    2015-02-01

    In order to investigate the features of multidetector CT (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as the corresponding pathogic basis of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) in the pelvis, we collected the clinical data of 13 patients with pathologically confirmed SFT in pelvis, and retrospectively reviewed the MDCT and MRI appearances. Of these enrolled patients, 6 received MDCT scans, 5 underwent MRI scans, and 2 underwent both MDCT and MRI examinations. Shown on the MDCT and MRI, the maximum diameters of the masses ranged from 4.0 to 25.2 cm (averaged 11.8 cm). Six masses were lobulated, and seven were round or oval. In addition, all masses were well-defined and displaced the adjacent structures to some degrees. On the computed tomography, all masses were of isodensity on unenhanced scans in general, among which five masses were demonstrated with hypodense areas. On the MRI T1-weighted image, all lesions were isointense, of which patchy hypointense areas were detected in 3 cases and radial hypointense areas were in 3 cases, and the other one was presented with homogenous intensity. On T2-weighted images, most of the lesions were mixed hyperintense, of which 3 cases were of heterogenous hyperintesity, radial hypointense areas were detected in 3 patients, and the other one was homogenously intense. On enhanced computed tomography and MRI, large supplying vessels were found in 4 cases; 12 cases showed moderate to conspicuous enhancement, and the other one was presented with mild homogenous enhancement. Of the patients with moderate to conspicuous enhancement, patchy areas of non-enhancement were detected in 7 cases, radial areas of progressive enhancement were detected in 3 cases, and the remained 2 cases showed homogenous enhancement. On pathology, the radial area presented as progressive enhancement was fibrosis. During the follow-ups after surgery, 2 patients had local recurrence and 1 had metastasis to liver. In conclusion, the SFT in the pelvis are commonly

  9. [Multidetector CT and magnetic resonance imaging features of solitary fibrous tumors in the pelvis and the relevant pathologic basis changes].

    PubMed

    Li, Xueming; Ren, Jing; Zhou, Peng; Cao, Ying; Cheng, Zhuzhong; Yu, Jianqun; Xu, Guohui

    2015-02-01

    In order to investigate the features of multidetector CT (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as the corresponding pathogic basis of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) in the pelvis, we collected the clinical data of 13 patients with pathologically confirmed SFT in pelvis, and retrospectively reviewed the MDCT and MRI appearances. Of these enrolled patients, 6 received MDCT scans, 5 underwent MRI scans, and 2 underwent both MDCT and MRI examinations. Shown on the MDCT and MRI, the maximum diameters of the masses ranged from 4.0 to 25.2 cm (averaged 11.8 cm). Six masses were lobulated, and seven were round or oval. In addition, all masses were well-defined and displaced the adjacent structures to some degrees. On the computed tomography, all masses were of isodensity on unenhanced scans in general, among which five masses were demonstrated with hypodense areas. On the MRI T1-weighted image, all lesions were isointense, of which patchy hypointense areas were detected in 3 cases and radial hypointense areas were in 3 cases, and the other one was presented with homogenous intensity. On T2-weighted images, most of the lesions were mixed hyperintense, of which 3 cases were of heterogenous hyperintesity, radial hypointense areas were detected in 3 patients, and the other one was homogenously intense. On enhanced computed tomography and MRI, large supplying vessels were found in 4 cases; 12 cases showed moderate to conspicuous enhancement, and the other one was presented with mild homogenous enhancement. Of the patients with moderate to conspicuous enhancement, patchy areas of non-enhancement were detected in 7 cases, radial areas of progressive enhancement were detected in 3 cases, and the remained 2 cases showed homogenous enhancement. On pathology, the radial area presented as progressive enhancement was fibrosis. During the follow-ups after surgery, 2 patients had local recurrence and 1 had metastasis to liver. In conclusion, the SFT in the pelvis are commonly

  10. High resolution multidetector CT aided tissue analysis and quantification of lung fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavaletta, Vanessa A.; Karwoski, Ronald A.; Bartholmai, Brian; Robb, Richard A.

    2006-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, also known as Idiopathic Usual Interstitial Pneumontis, pathologically) is a progressive diffuse lung disease which has a median survival rate of less than four years with a prevalence of 15-20/100,000 in the United States. Global function changes are measured by pulmonary function tests and the diagnosis and extent of pulmonary structural changes are typically assessed by acquiring two-dimensional high resolution CT (HRCT) images. The acquisition and analysis of volumetric high resolution Multi-Detector CT (MDCT) images with nearly isotropic pixels offers the potential to measure both lung function and structure. This paper presents a new approach to three dimensional lung image analysis and classification of normal and abnormal structures in lungs with IPF.

  11. Multidetector CT in emergency radiology: acute and generalized non-traumatic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Paolantonio, Pasquale; Rengo, Marco; Ferrari, Riccardo; Laghi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) is an imaging technique that provides otherwise unobtainable information in the diagnostic work-up of patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A correct working diagnosis depends essentially on understanding the individual patient's clinical data and laboratory findings. In haemodynamically stable patients with acute severe and generalized abdominal pain, MDCT is now the preferred imaging test and gives invaluable diagnostic information, also in unstable patients after stabilization. In this descriptive review, we focus our attention on acute, severe and generalized or undifferentiated non-traumatic abdominal pain. The main differential diagnoses are acute pancreatitis, gastrointestinal perforation, ruptured abdominal aneurysm and acute mesenteric ischaemia. We will provide radiologist readers with a technical guide to optimize MDCT imaging protocols and list the major CT signs essential to reach a correct diagnosis and guide the best treatment. PMID:26689097

  12. Multidetector CT of expected findings and complications after contemporary inguinal hernia repair surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tonolini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Inguinal hernia repair (IHR) with prosthetic mesh implantation is the most common procedure in general surgery, and may be performed using either an open or laparoscopic approach. This paper provides an overview of contemporary tension-free IHR techniques and materials, and illustrates the expected postoperative imaging findings and iatrogenic injuries. Emphasis is placed on multidetector CT, which represents the ideal modality to comprehensively visualize the operated groin region and deeper intra-abdominal structures. CT consistently depicts seroma, mesh infections, hemorrhages, bowel complications and urinary bladder injuries, and thus generally provides a consistent basis for therapeutic choice. Since radiologists are increasingly requested to investigate suspected iatrogenic complications, this paper aims to provide an increased familiarity with early CT studies after IHR, including complications and normal postoperative appearances such as focal pseudolesions, in order to avoid misinterpretation and inappropriate management. PMID:27460285

  13. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: an imaging review comparing MR pulmonary angiography and perfusion with multidetector CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira, F P; Lima, C M A O; Coutinho, A C; Parente, D B; Bittencourt, L K; Bessa, L G P; Domingues, R C; Marchiori, E

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disease that leads to substantial morbidity and eventual death. Pulmonary multidetector CT angiography (MDCTA), pulmonary MR angiography (MRA) and MR-derived pulmonary perfusion (MRPP) imaging are non-invasive imaging techniques for the differential diagnosis of PH. MDCTA is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, one of the most common causes of PH. MRA and MRPP are promising techniques that do not require the use of ionising radiation or iodinated contrast material, and can be useful for patients for whom such material cannot be used. This review compares the imaging aspects of pulmonary MRA and 64-row MDCTA in patients with chronic thromboembolic or idiopathic PH. PMID:22932061

  14. Collimated prompt gamma TOF measurements with multi-slit multi-detector configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimmer, J.; Chevallier, M.; Constanzo, J.; Dauvergne, D.; De Rydt, M.; Dedes, G.; Freud, N.; Henriquet, P.; La Tessa, C.; Létang, J. M.; Pleskač, R.; Pinto, M.; Ray, C.; Reithinger, V.; Richard, M. H.; Rinaldi, I.; Roellinghoff, F.; Schuy, C.; Testa, E.; Testa, M.

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal prompt-gamma ray profiles have been measured with a multi-slit multi-detector configuration at a 75 MeV/u 13C beam and with a PMMA target. Selections in time-of-flight and energy have been applied in order to discriminate prompt-gamma rays produced in the target from background events. The ion ranges which have been extracted from each individual detector module agree amongst each other and are consistent with theoretical expectations. In a separate dedicated experiment with 200 MeV/u 12C ions the fraction of inter-detector scattering has been determined to be on the 10%-level via a combination of experimental results and simulations. At the same experiment different collimator configurations have been tested and the shielding properties of tungsten and lead for prompt-gamma rays have been measured.

  15. [Multidetector row CT in assessment of coronary artery calcification on hemodialisis].

    PubMed

    Caro, P; Delgado, R; Dapena, F; Núñez, A

    2007-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a strong predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Coronary artery calcification is more frequent, more extensive and progresses more rapidly in CKD than in general population. They are also considered a marker of coronary heart disease, with high prevalence and functional significance. It suggests that detection and surveillance may be worthwhile in general clinical practice. New non-invasive image techniques, like Multi-detector row CT, a type of spiral scanner, assess density and volume of calcification at multiple sites and allow quantitative scoring of vascular calcification using calcium scores analogous to those from electron-beam CT. We have assessed and quantified coronary artery calcification with 16 multidetector row CT in 44 patients on hemodialysis and their relationship with several cardiovascular risk factors. Coronary artery calcification prevalence was of 84 % with mean calcium score of 1580 +/- 2010 ( r 0-9844) with calcium score > 400 in 66% of patients. It was usually multiple, affecting more than two vessels in more than 50%. In all but one patient, left anterior descending artery was involved with higher calcium score level at right coronary artery. Advanced age, male, diabetes, smoking, more morbidity, cerebrovascular disease previous, and calcium-binders phosphate and analogous vitamin D treatment would seem to be associated with coronary artery calcification. Coronary artery calcification is very frequent and extensive, usually multiple and associated to modifiable risk factors in hemodialysis patients. Multi-detector-row CT seems an effective, suitable, readily applicable method to assess and quantify coronary artery calcification. PMID:18336102

  16. Estimating radiation dose to organs of patients undergoing conventional and novel multidetector CT exams using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, Erin

    Advances in Computed Tomography (CT) technology have led to an increase in the modality's diagnostic capabilities and therefore its utilization, which has in turn led to an increase in radiation exposure to the patient population. As a result, CT imaging currently constitutes approximately half of the collective exposure to ionizing radiation from medical procedures. In order to understand the radiation risk, it is necessary to estimate the radiation doses absorbed by patients undergoing CT imaging. The most widely accepted risk models are based on radiosensitive organ dose as opposed to whole body dose. In this research, radiosensitive organ dose was estimated using Monte Carlo based simulations incorporating detailed multidetector CT (MDCT) scanner models, specific scan protocols, and using patient models based on accurate patient anatomy and representing a range of patient sizes. Organ dose estimates were estimated for clinical MDCT exam protocols which pose a specific concern for radiosensitive organs or regions. These dose estimates include estimation of fetal dose for pregnant patients undergoing abdomen pelvis CT exams or undergoing exams to diagnose pulmonary embolism and venous thromboembolism. Breast and lung dose were estimated for patients undergoing coronary CTA imaging, conventional fixed tube current chest CT, and conventional tube current modulated (TCM) chest CT exams. The correlation of organ dose with patient size was quantified for pregnant patients undergoing abdomen/pelvis exams and for all breast and lung dose estimates presented. Novel dose reduction techniques were developed that incorporate organ location and are specifically designed to reduce close to radiosensitive organs during CT acquisition. A generalizable model was created for simulating conventional and novel attenuation-based TCM algorithms which can be used in simulations estimating organ dose for any patient model. The generalizable model is a significant contribution of this

  17. Considerations on an automatic computed tomography tube current modulation system.

    PubMed

    Moro, Luca; Panizza, Denis; D'Ambrosio, Daniela; Carne, Irene

    2013-10-01

    The scope of this study was to evaluate the effects on radiation output and image noise varying the acquisition parameters with an automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) system in computed tomography (CT). Chest CT examinations of an anthropomorphic phantom were acquired using a GE LightSpeed VCT 64-slice tomograph. Acquisitions were performed using different pitch, slice thickness and noise index (NI) values and varying the orientation of the scanned projection radiograph (SPR). The radiation output was determined by the CT dose index (CTDIvol). Image noise was evaluated measuring the standard deviation of CT numbers in several regions of interest. The radiation output was lower if the SPR was acquired in the anterior-posterior projection. The radiation dose with the posterior-anterior SPR was higher, because the divergence of the X-ray beam magnifies the anatomical structures closest to the tube, especially the spinal column, and this leads the ATCM system to estimate higher patient attenuation values and, therefore, to select higher tube current values. The NI was inversely proportional to the square root of the CTDIvol and, with fixed NI, the CTDIvol increased as the slice thickness decreased. This study suggests some important issues to use the GE ATCM system efficiently.

  18. Characterizing string-of-pearls colloidal silica by multidetector hydrodynamic chromatography and comparison to multidetector size-exclusion chromatography, off-line multiangle static light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Amandaa K; Striegel, André M

    2011-04-15

    The string-of-pearls-type morphology is ubiquitous, manifesting itself variously in proteins, vesicles, bacteria, synthetic polymers, and biopolymers. Characterizing the size and shape of analytes with such morphology, however, presents a challenge, due chiefly to the ease with which the "strings" can be broken during chromatographic analysis or to the paucity of information obtained from the benchmark microscopy and off-line light scattering methods. Here, we address this challenge with multidetector hydrodynamic chromatography (HDC), which has the ability to determine, simultaneously, the size, shape, and compactness and their distributions of string-of-pearls samples. We present the quadruple-detector HDC analysis of colloidal string-of-pearls silica, employing static multiangle and quasielastic light scattering, differential viscometry, and differential refractometry as detection methods. The multidetector approach shows a sample that is broadly polydisperse in both molar mass and size, with strings ranging from two to five particles, but which also contains a high concentration of single, unattached "pearls". Synergistic combination of the various size parameters obtained from the multiplicity of detectors employed shows that the strings with higher degrees of polymerization have a shape similar to the theory-predicted shape of a Gaussian random coil chain of nonoverlapping beads, while the strings with lower degrees of polymerization have a prolate ellipsoidal shape. The HDC technique is contrasted experimentally with multidetector size-exclusion chromatography, where, even under extremely gentle conditions, the strings still degraded during analysis. Such degradation is shown to be absent in HDC, as evidenced by the fact that the molar mass and radius of gyration obtained by HDC with multiangle static light scattering detection (HDC/MALS) compare quite favorably to those determined by off-line MALS analysis under otherwise identical conditions. The

  19. Characterizing string-of-pearls colloidal silica by multidetector hydrodynamic chromatography and comparison to multidetector size-exclusion chromatography, off-line multiangle static light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Amandaa K; Striegel, André M

    2011-04-15

    The string-of-pearls-type morphology is ubiquitous, manifesting itself variously in proteins, vesicles, bacteria, synthetic polymers, and biopolymers. Characterizing the size and shape of analytes with such morphology, however, presents a challenge, due chiefly to the ease with which the "strings" can be broken during chromatographic analysis or to the paucity of information obtained from the benchmark microscopy and off-line light scattering methods. Here, we address this challenge with multidetector hydrodynamic chromatography (HDC), which has the ability to determine, simultaneously, the size, shape, and compactness and their distributions of string-of-pearls samples. We present the quadruple-detector HDC analysis of colloidal string-of-pearls silica, employing static multiangle and quasielastic light scattering, differential viscometry, and differential refractometry as detection methods. The multidetector approach shows a sample that is broadly polydisperse in both molar mass and size, with strings ranging from two to five particles, but which also contains a high concentration of single, unattached "pearls". Synergistic combination of the various size parameters obtained from the multiplicity of detectors employed shows that the strings with higher degrees of polymerization have a shape similar to the theory-predicted shape of a Gaussian random coil chain of nonoverlapping beads, while the strings with lower degrees of polymerization have a prolate ellipsoidal shape. The HDC technique is contrasted experimentally with multidetector size-exclusion chromatography, where, even under extremely gentle conditions, the strings still degraded during analysis. Such degradation is shown to be absent in HDC, as evidenced by the fact that the molar mass and radius of gyration obtained by HDC with multiangle static light scattering detection (HDC/MALS) compare quite favorably to those determined by off-line MALS analysis under otherwise identical conditions. The

  20. Myocardial ischemia due to a type IV dual LAD with the long LAD arising from the right sinus of valsalva: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiangyu; Li, Hongwei; Chen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 60-year-old man who presented with chest discomfort. Coronary angiography demonstrated that the short left anterior descending artery (LAD) arose from the left main coronary artery and the long LAD from the right coronary sinus of Valsalva, which was confirmed by 64-slice multidetector computed tomography coronary angiography. Single-photon emission computed tomography revealed a significant, almost irreversible degree of hypoperfusion in the anterior wall of the left ventricle, thus indicating that the short LAD was associated with myocardial ischemia and severe atherosclerotic lesions. Therefore, SPECT showed that the myocardium was largely necrotic, and we did not perform angioplasty for the short LAD. PMID:26466699

  1. Advances in computed tomography imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Ginat, Daniel Thomas; Gupta, Rajiv

    2014-07-11

    Computed tomography (CT) is an essential tool in diagnostic imaging for evaluating many clinical conditions. In recent years, there have been several notable advances in CT technology that already have had or are expected to have a significant clinical impact, including extreme multidetector CT, iterative reconstruction algorithms, dual-energy CT, cone-beam CT, portable CT, and phase-contrast CT. These techniques and their clinical applications are reviewed and illustrated in this article. In addition, emerging technologies that address deficiencies in these modalities are discussed.

  2. F IASCO: a multidetector optimized for semiperipheral heavy ion collisions at Fermi energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, M.; Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A. A.; Bardelli, L.; Bartoli, A.; Bidini, L.; Coppi, C.; Del Carmine, P.; Mangiarotti, A.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Pasquali, G.; Piantelli, S.; Poggi, S.; Taccetti, N.; Vanzi, E.

    2003-12-01

    The F IASCO multidetector is a low-threshold apparatus, optimized for the investigation of peripheral to semi-central collisions in heavy ion reactions at Fermi energies. It consists of three types of detectors. The first detector layer is a shell of 24 position-sensitive Parallel Plate Avalanche Detectors (PPADs), covering about 70% of the forward hemisphere, which measure the velocity vectors of the heavy ( Z≳10) reaction products. Below and around the grazing angle, behind the most forward PPADs, there are 96 Δ E-E silicon telescopes (with thickness of 200 and 500 μm, respectively); they are mainly used to measure the energy of the projectile-like fragment and to identify its charge and, via the time-of-flight of the PPADs, also its mass. Finally, behind most of the PPADs there are 158 (or 182, depending on the configuration) scintillation detectors, mostly of the phoswich type, which cover 25-30% of the forward hemisphere; they identify both light charged particles ( Z=1,2) and intermediate mass fragments (3⩽ Z≲20), measuring also their time-of-flight.

  3. Synthetic streams in a gravitational wave inspiral search with a multidetector network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, K.; Pai, Archana

    2014-07-01

    A gravitational wave inspiral search with a global network of interferometers when carried in a phase coherent fashion mimics a search with two effective synthetic data streams. The streams are constructed by the linear combination of the overwhitened data from individual detectors. We demonstrate here that the two synthetic data streams pertaining to the two polarizations of the gravitational wave can be derived prior to the maximum-likelihood analysis in a most natural way using the technique of singular-value decomposition applied to the network signal-to-noise ratio vector. The singular-value technique combined with the matched filtering in network plus spectral space enables the construction of the synthetic streams. We further show that the network log likelihood ratio is then the sum of the log-likelihood ratios of these synthetic streams. In this formalism, the four extrinsic parameters of the nonspinning inspiral signal, namely, amplitude, initial phase, binary inclination, and the polarization {A0,ϕa,ɛ ,Ψ}, are mapped to the two amplitudes and two phases, namely, {ρL,ρR,ΦL,ΦR}. We show that the maximization over the new extrinsic parameters is a straightforward exercise closely linked to the single detector approach in the literature. Toward the end, we connect all the previous works related to the multidetector gravitational wave inspiral search and present in the same notation.

  4. [Characteristics of pneumoconiosis on multi-detector row CT and its' anatomic-pathologic basis].

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuanchun; Yang, Zhigang; Li, Yuan; Chen, Tianwu; Wang, Qiling; Deng, Wen

    2011-04-01

    In order to investigate the fine distinction of the tomographic images and the dominant anatomic distributions, we carefully reviewed and analyzed the features and predominant anatomic distribution of forty-nine pneumoconiosis patients with confirmed diagnosis on multi-detector row CT (MDCT). It was found that the round and small opacity p and irregular small opacity were mostly shown in the MDCT features of pneumoconiosis, while the large opacity and progressive massive fibrosis (PMF) were less frequently depicted in the MDCT. Distributions of round and small opacity and irregular small opacity in the six lung lobes were significantly different (P < 0.01). The most common p opacity was significantly seen in the upper and lower left lungs as well as in the upper right lung's opacity was in the upper left lung as well as lower left and right lungs. The large opacity commonly distributed in upper left and right lungs, while the PMF was often shown in both of two lungs. The results demonstrated that the MDCT could be an effective modality for detecting tiny lesions and anatomic distribution of pneumoconiosis, and it would be helpful for early diagnosis and accurate staging of the pneumoconiosis disease.

  5. National Survey of Radiation Dose and Image Quality in Adult CT Head Scans in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Jung; Mok, Greta S. P.; Tsai, Mang-Fen; Tsai, Wei-Ta; Yang, Bang-Hung; Tu, Chun-Yuan; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the influence of different variables on radiation dose and image quality based on a national database. Materials and Methods Taiwan’s Ministry of Health and Welfare requested all radiology departments to complete a questionnaire for each of their CT scanners. Information gathered included all scanning parameters for CT head scans. For the present analysis, CT machines were divided into three subgroups: single slice CT (Group A); multi-detector CT (MDCT) with 2-64 slices (Group B); and MDCT with more than 64 slices (Group C). Correlations between computed tomography dose index (CTDI) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) with cumulated tube rotation number (CTW(n)) and cumulated tube rotation time (CTW(s)), and sub group analyses of CTDI and SNR across the three groups were performed. Results CTDI values demonstrated a weak correlation (r = 0.33) with CTW(n) in Group A. SNR values demonstrated a weak negative correlation (r = -0.46) with CTW(n) in Group C. MDCT with higher slice numbers used more tube potential resulting in higher effective doses. There were both significantly lower CTDI and SNR values in helical mode than in axial mode in Group B, but not Group C. Conclusion CTW(n) and CTW(s) did not influence radiation output. Helical mode is more often used in MDCT and results in both lower CTDI and SNR compared to axial mode in MDCT with less than 64 slices. PMID:26125549

  6. Computer simulations to estimate organ doses from clinically validated cardiac, neuro, and pediatric protocols for multiple detector computed tomography scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghita, Monica

    . Results were compared against organ dose measurements previously obtained at Shands UF. Important dose reductions were assessed for the broad beam volumetric acquisition of this new scanner when compared to the standard 64-slice helical protocols.

  7. Comparison of methods for assessing geometric efficiency on multi-detector CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Berris, Theocharis; Perisinakis, Kostas; Papadakis, Antonios E; Damilakis, John

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare the film method against the method based on a new CT slice detector in assessing geometric efficiency (GE) of x-ray beams utilized by a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Measurements of GE were performed using radiographic films and a solid state CT slice detector for all beam qualities, collimations and focal spot sizes available on an MDCT scanner. Repeatability of GE measurements was assessed. The radiographic film and the solid state detector methods were compared to each other in regard to efficacy in measuring free-in-air GE. The values of GE determined using the radiographic film method were found to range between 48.5% and 90.6%. Differences between values obtained with the radiographic film method and corresponding values obtained with the solid state detector were less than 10% exceeding 5% for only one case. Both methods show that wide beams have higher GE values compared to thin ones. The use of large instead of small focal spot was found to deteriorate GE values by up to 23.1%. Beam quality did not seem to influence GE of the various collimations. When thin beam collimations are employed, a considerable amount of the radiation is wasted for non-imaging purposes. Both film and solid state probe methods are capable of measuring GE of thin as well as wide collimations. The solid state detector is the easiest to use, however its usefulness is reduced by the fact that it cannot measure dose profiles of beam collimations available for step-and-shoot mode of operation.

  8. A method of estimating conceptus doses resulting from multidetector CT examinations during all stages of gestation

    SciTech Connect

    Damilakis, John; Tzedakis, Antonis; Perisinakis, Kostas; Papadakis, Antonios E.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Current methods for the estimation of conceptus dose from multidetector CT (MDCT) examinations performed on the mother provide dose data for typical protocols with a fixed scan length. However, modified low-dose imaging protocols are frequently used during pregnancy. The purpose of the current study was to develop a method for the estimation of conceptus dose from any MDCT examination of the trunk performed during all stages of gestation. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was employed in this study to model the Siemens Sensation 16 and Sensation 64 MDCT scanners. Four mathematical phantoms were used, simulating women at 0, 3, 6, and 9 months of gestation. The contribution to the conceptus dose from single simulated scans was obtained at various positions across the phantoms. To investigate the effect of maternal body size and conceptus depth on conceptus dose, phantoms of different sizes were produced by adding layers of adipose tissue around the trunk of the mathematical phantoms. To verify MCNP results, conceptus dose measurements were carried out by means of three physical anthropomorphic phantoms, simulating pregnancy at 0, 3, and 6 months of gestation and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) crystals. Results: The results consist of Monte Carlo-generated normalized conceptus dose coefficients for single scans across the four mathematical phantoms. These coefficients were defined as the conceptus dose contribution from a single scan divided by the CTDI free-in-air measured with identical scanning parameters. Data have been produced to take into account the effect of maternal body size and conceptus position variations on conceptus dose. Conceptus doses measured with TLD crystals showed a difference of up to 19% compared to those estimated by mathematical simulations. Conclusions: Estimation of conceptus doses from MDCT examinations of the trunk performed on pregnant patients during all stages of gestation can be made

  9. Anomalous origin of the left circumflex coronary artery from the first diagonal branch presented as acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Hyun; Ha, Geun Jin; Seong, Myung Jun; Jung, Jin Wook; Kim, So Yeon; Moon, Sung Hee; Lee, Young Soo

    2011-10-01

    Coronary artery anomalies are diagnosed in 0.6 to 1.5% of patients who undergo coronary angiography (CAG). They may present with life threatening conditions but are generally asymptomatic. Recognition and adequate visualization of the anomaly is essential for correct management of the condition. However, in some cases the exact orifice and course of an anomalous coronary vessel cannot be selectively identified by CAG. In this report, a 54-year-old man was admitted to the hospital with acute inferior myocardial infarction and had an anomalous origin of the left circumflex coronary artery (LCX) from the first diagonal branch (D1). In CAG, the right CAG showed no significant stenosis and fortunately we found an anomalous origin of the LCX from the D1. The course of LCX was precisely established by 64-slice multi-detector computed tomography.

  10. Forensic considerations for preprocessing effects on clinical MDCT scans.

    PubMed

    Wade, Andrew D; Conlogue, Gerald J

    2013-05-01

    Manipulation of digital photographs destined for medico-legal inquiry must be thoroughly documented and presented with explanation of any manipulations. Unlike digital photography, computed tomography (CT) data must pass through an additional step before viewing. Reconstruction of raw data involves reconstruction algorithms to preprocess the raw information into display data. Preprocessing of raw data, although it occurs at the source, alters the images and must be accounted for in the same way as postprocessing. Repeated CT scans of a gunshot wound phantom were made using the Toshiba Aquilion 64-slice multidetector CT scanner. The appearance of fragments, high-density inclusion artifacts, and soft tissue were assessed. Preprocessing with different algorithms results in substantial differences in image output. It is important to appreciate that preprocessing affects the image, that it does so differently in the presence of high-density inclusions, and that preprocessing algorithms and scanning parameters may be used to overcome the resulting artifacts.

  11. Bezoar-induced small bowel obstruction: Clinical characteristics and diagnostic value of multi-slice spiral computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pei-Yuan; Wang, Xia; Zhang, Lin; Li, Hai-Fei; Chen, Liang; Wang, Xu; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the possible predisposing factors of bezoar-induced small bowel obstruction (BI-SBO) and to discuss the diagnostic value of multi-slice spiral computed tomography, particularly contrast-enhanced scanning, in this condition. METHODS: A total of 35 BI-SBO cases treated at our hospital from January 2007 to December 2013 were retrospectively analysed. Complete clinical and computed tomography (CT) data of the patients were available and confirmed by surgery. SBO was clinically diagnosed on the basis of clinical manifestations. Of the 35 patients, 18 underwent abdominal and pelvic CT planar scanning with GE 64-slice spiral CT and 17 underwent abdominal and pelvic CT planar scanning with GE 64-slice spiral CT combined with contrast-enhanced examination. Original images were processed using a GE ADW4.3 workstation to obtain MPR, CPR, MIP and CTA images. The images of all patients were evaluated by two abdominal imaging experts. The main analytical contents of planar scanning included intestinal bezoar conditions, changes in the intestinal wall and changes in peri-intestinal conditions. Vascular hyperaemia and arterial blood supply conditions at a specific obstruction site and the distal end of the obstruction site were evaluated through contrast-enhanced examination. RESULTS: The proportion of males to females among the 35 cases was 1:1.69 (13:22); median age was 63.3 years. The following cases were observed: 29 (82.8%) cases occurred in autumn and winter and showed a history of consuming high amounts of persimmon and hawthorn; 19 (54.3%) cases revealed a history of gastrointestinal surgery; 19 exhibited incomplete dentition, with missing partial or whole posterior teeth; 26 suffered from obstruction at the ileum. A total of 51 bezoars were found in these patients, of whom 16 (45.7%) had multiple bezoars. CT planar scanning of bezoars showed lumps with mottled gas inside the intestinal cavity. Furthermore, 9 cases of bezoars had envelopes and 11 cases

  12. An ancient Roman bowl embedded in a soil sample: surface shaded three dimensional display using data from a multi-detector CT.

    PubMed

    De Maeseneer, M; Buls, N; Cleeren, N; Lenchik, L; De Mey, J

    2006-01-01

    We present an unusual application of multidetector CT and shaded surface rendering in the investigation of a soil sample, containing an ancient Roman bronze bowl. The CT findings were of fundamental importance in helping the archaeologists study the bronze bowl from the soil sample.

  13. Multidetector CT Findings and Differential Diagnoses of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma and Metastatic Pleural Diseases in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon Kyung; Lee, Kyung Won; Yi, Chin A; Koo, Jin Mo; Jung, Soon-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the multidetector CT (MDCT) features of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) and metastatic pleural disease (MPD). Materials and Methods The authors reviewed the MDCT images of 167 patients, 103 patients with MPM and 64 patients with MPD. All 167 cases were pathologically confirmed by sonography-guided needle biopsy of pleura, thoracoscopic pleural biopsy, or open thoracotomy. CT features were evaluated with respect to pleural effusion, pleural thickening, invasion of other organs, lung abnormality, lymphadenopathy, mediastinal shifting, thoracic volume decrease, asbestosis, and the presence of pleural plaque. Results Pleural thickening was the most common CT finding in MPM (96.1%) and MPD (93.8%). Circumferential pleural thickening (31.1% vs. 10.9%, odds ratio [OR] 3.670), thickening of fissural pleura (83.5% vs. 67.2%, OR 2.471), thickening of diaphragmatic pleura (90.3% vs. 73.4%, OR 3.364), pleural mass (38.8% vs. 23.4%, OR 2.074), pericardial involvement (56.3% vs. 20.3%, OR 5.056), and pleural plaque (66.0% vs. 21.9%, OR 6.939) were more frequently seen in MPM than in MPD. On the other hand, nodular pleural thickening (59.2% vs. 76.6%, OR 0.445), hilar lymph node metastasis (5.8% vs. 20.3%, OR 0.243), mediastinal lymph node metastasis (10.7% vs. 37.5%, OR 0.199), and hematogenous lung metastasis (9.7% vs. 29.2%, OR 0.261) were less frequent in MPM than in MPD. When we analyzed MPD from extrathoracic malignancy (EMPD) separately and compared them to MPM, circumferential pleural thickening, thickening of interlobar fissure, pericardial involvement and presence of pleural plaque were significant findings indicating MPM than EMPD. MPM had significantly lower occurrence of hematogenous lung metastasis, as compared with EMPD. Conclusion Awareness of frequent and infrequent CT findings could aid in distinguishing MPM from MPD. PMID:27390546

  14. Absorbed Radiation Dose in Radiosensitive Organs Using 64- and 320-Row Multidetector Computed Tomography: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Atif N.; Nikolic, Boris; Khan, Mohammad K.; Kang, Jian; Khosa, Faisal

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To determine absorbed radiation dose (ARD) in radiosensitive organs during prospective and full phase dose modulation using ECG-gated MDCTA scanner under 64- and 320-row detector modes. Methods. Female phantom was used to measure organ radiation dose. Five DP-3 radiation detectors were used to measure ARD to lungs, breast, and thyroid using the Aquilion ONE scanner in 64- and 320-row modes using both prospective and dose modulation in full phase acquisition. Five measurements were made using three tube voltages: 100, 120, and 135 kVp at 400 mA at heart rate (HR) of 60 and 75 bpm for each protocol. Mean acquisition was recorded in milligrays (mGy). Results. Mean ARD was less for 320-row versus 64-row mode for each imaging protocol. Prospective EKG-gated imaging protocol resulted in a statistically lower ARD using 320-row versus 64-row modes for midbreast (6.728 versus 19.687 mGy, P < 0.001), lung (6.102 versus 21.841 mGy, P < 0.001), and thyroid gland (0.208 versus 0.913 mGy; P < 0.001). Retrospective imaging using 320- versus 64-row modes showed lower ARD for midbreast (10.839 versus 43.169 mGy, P < 0.001), lung (8.848 versus 47.877 mGy, P < 0.001), and thyroid gland (0.057 versus 2.091 mGy; P < 0.001). ARD reduction was observed at lower kVp and heart rate. Conclusions. Dose reduction to radiosensitive organs is achieved using 320-row compared to 64-row modes for both prospective and retrospective gating, whereas 64-row mode is equivalent to the same model 64-row MDCT scanner. PMID:25170427

  15. Association between Red Blood Cell Distribution Width and Coronary Artery Calcification in Patients Undergoing 64-Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Gürel, Ozgul Malcok; Bilgic, Mukadder Ayse; Yilmaz, Hakki; Yilmaz, Omer Caglar; Cakmak, Muzaffer; Eryonucu, Beyhan

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives The red blood cell distribution width (RDW) has been found to be associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to determine whether the RDW measures are associated with the coronary artery calcification score (CACS) in patients who did not present with obvious coronary heart disease (CHD). Subjects and Methods A total of 527 consecutive patients with a low to intermediate risk for CHD but without obvious disease were enrolled in this study. The study subjects underwent coronary computerized tomography angiography and CACS was calculated. The patients were divided into two groups based on CACS: Group I (CACS≤100) and Group II (CACS>100). The two groups were compared in terms of classic CHD risk factors and haematological parameters, particularly the RDW. Results Group I patients were younger than Group II patients. The Framingham risk score (FRS) in patients of Group II was significantly higher than that in patients of Group I. Group II patients had significantly elevated levels of haemoglobin, RDW, neutrophil count, and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio compared with Group I patients. CACS was correlated with age, RDW, and ejection fraction. In the multivariate analysis, age, RDW, and FRS were independent predictors of CACS. Using the receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis, a RDW value of 13.05% was identified as the best cut-off for predicting the severity of CACS (>100) (area under the curve=0.706). Conclusion We found that the RDW is an independent predictor of the CACS, suggesting that it might be a useful marker for predicting CAD. PMID:26413104

  16. Achieving consistent image quality with dose optimization in 64-row multidetector computed tomography prospective ECG gated coronary calcium scoring.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zilai; Pang, Lifang; Li, Jianying; Zhang, Huan; Yang, Wenjie; Ding, Bei; Chai, Weimin; Chen, Kemin; Yao, Weiwu

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical value of a body mass index (BMI) based tube current (mA) selection method for obtaining consistent image quality with dose optimization in MDCT prospective ECG gated coronary calcium scoring. A formula for selecting mA to achieve desired image quality based on patient BMI was established using a control group (A) of 200 MDCT cardiac patients with a standard scan protocol. One hundred patients in Group B were scanned with this BMI-dependent mA for achieving a desired noise level of 18 HU at 2.5 mm slice thickness. The CTDIvol and image noise on the ascending aorta for the two groups were recorded. Two experienced radiologists quantitatively evaluated the image quality using scores of 1-4 with 4 being the highest. The image quality scores had no statistical difference (P = 0.71) at 3.89 ± 0.32, 3.87 ± 0.34, respectively, for groups A and B of similar BMI. The image noise in Group A had linear relationship with BMI. The image noise in Group B using BMI-dependent mA was independent of BMI with average value of 17.9 HU and smaller deviations for the noise values than in Group A (2.0 vs. 2.9 HU). There was a 35% dose reduction with BMI-dependent mA selection method on average with the lowest effective dose being only 0.35 mSv for patient with BMI of 18.3. A quantitative BMI-based mA selection method in MDCT prospective ECG gated coronary calcium scoring has been proposed to obtain a desired and consistent image quality and provide dose optimization across patient population.

  17. Effect of reducing field of view on multi-detector quantitative computed tomography parameters of airway wall thickness in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sheshadri, Ajay; Rodriguez, Alfonso; Chen, Ryan; Kozlowski, James; Burgdorf, Dana; Koch, Tammy; Tarsi, Jaime; Schutz, Rebecca; Wilson, Brad; Schechtman, Kenneth; Leader, Joseph K.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Castro, Mario; Fain, Sean B.; Gierada, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We reduced the CT-reconstructed field of view (FOV), increasing pixel density across airway structures and reducing partial volume effects, to determine whether this would improve accuracy of airway wall thickness quantification. Methods We performed CT imaging on a lung phantom and 29 subjects. Images were reconstructed at 30, 15, and 10 cm FOV using a medium-smooth kernel. Cross-sectional airway dimensions were compared at each FOV with repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results Phantom measurements were more accurate when FOV decreased from 30 to 15 cm (p<0.05). Decreasing FOV further to 10 cm did not significantly improve accuracy. Human airway measurements similarly decreased by decreasing FOV (p<0.001). Percent changes in all measurements when reducing FOV from 30 to 15 cm were less than 3%. Conclusions Airway measurements at 30 cm FOV are near the limits of CT resolution using a medium-smooth kernel. Reducing reconstructed FOV would minimally increase sensitivity to detect differences in airway dimensions. PMID:25938213

  18. Computed tomographic angiography in evaluation of superficial temporal to middle cerebral artery bypass.

    PubMed

    Besachio, David A; Ziegler, Jordan I; Duncan, Timothy D; Wanebo, John S

    2010-01-01

    Catheter-directed digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is considered the standard for evaluation of superficial temporal to middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) bypass patency. Few clinical investigations have been performed that evaluate the efficacy of computed tomographic angiography (CTA) in the assessment of extracranial-intracranial bypass. Using multi-detector row CTA, STA-MCA bypass patency was assessed in the initial postoperative period and several months afterward and compared with DSA. No significant difference was identified in the evaluation of graft patency between DSA and CTA. Although multiple modalities exist to evaluate STA-MCA bypass graft patency, the multidetector CTA is widely available and allows for rapid, accurate patency assessment. PMID:20498550

  19. The role of multidetector-row CT in the diagnosis, classification and management of acute aortic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, I W; Peebles, C R; Harden, S P; Shambrook, J S

    2014-01-01

    The term “acute aortic syndrome” (AAS) encompasses several non-traumatic life-threatening pathologies of the thoracic aorta presenting in patients with a similar clinical profile. These include aortic dissection, intramural haematoma and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcers. These different pathological entities can be indistinguishable on clinical grounds alone and may be confused with other causes of chest pain, including myocardial infarction. Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) is the current modality of choice for imaging AAS with a sensitivity and specificity approaching 100%. Early diagnosis and accurate radiological classification is associated with improved clinical outcomes in AAS. We review the characteristic radiological features of the different pathologies that encompass AAS and highlight the vital role of MDCT in determining the management of these life-threatening conditions. PMID:25083552

  20. Unsuspected colorectal carcinoma on routine abdominopelvic computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Ann; Poh, Angeline

    2015-05-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is a common lethal disease with signs and symptoms that may be nonspecific. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis with or without contrast is frequently performed for various general abdominal complaints, but unlike CT colonography, the large bowel may not be optimally prepared for evaluation. As such, careful and diligent assessment of the non-prepared colon in all CT images of the abdomen and pelvis is important, as it ensures that incidental colorectal malignancy is not missed, especially in older patients. This article gives an overview of multidetector CT imaging signs and subtle clues to aid in the diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma, as well as their pitfalls.

  1. Angular on-line tube current modulation in multidetector CT examinations of children and adults: The influence of different scanning parameters on dose reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Papadakis, Antonios E.; Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John

    2007-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of angular on-line tube current modulation on dose reduction in pediatric and adult patients undergoing multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) examinations. Five physical anthropomorphic phantoms that simulate the average individual as neonate, 1-year-old, 5-year-old, 10-year-old, and adult were employed in the current study. Phantoms were scanned with the use of on-line tube current modulation (TCM). Percent dose reduction (%DR) factors achieved by applying TCM, were determined for standard protocols used for head and neck, shoulder, thorax, thorax and abdomen, abdomen, abdomen and pelvis, pelvis, and whole body examinations. A preliminary study on the application of TCM in MDCT examinations of adult patients was performed to validate the results obtained in anthropomorphic phantoms. Dose reduction was estimated as the percentage difference of the modulated milliamperes for each scan and the preset milliamperes prescribed by the scan protocol. The dose reduction in children was found to be much lower than the corresponding reduction achieved for adults. For helical scans the %DR factors, ranged between 1.6% and 7.4% for the neonate, 2.9% and 8.7% for the 1-year old, 2% and 6% for the 5-year-old, 5% and 10.9% for the 10-year-old, and 10.4% and 20.7% for the adult individual. For sequential scans the corresponding %DR factors ranged between 1.3% and 6.7%, 4.5% and 11%, 4.2% and 6.6%, 6.4% and 12.3%, and 8.9% and 23.3%, respectively. Broader beam collimations are associated with decreased %DR factors, when other scanning parameters are held constant. TCM did not impair image noise. In adult patients, the %DR values were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding results obtained in the anthropomorphic adult phantom. In conclusion, on-line TCM may be considered as a valuable tool for reducing dose in routine CT examinations of pediatric and adult patients. However, the dose reduction achieved with TCM

  2. Improving Image Quality of On-Board Cone-Beam CT in Radiation Therapy Using Image Information Provided by Planning Multi-Detector CT: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Chen, Fong-Lin; Lo, Yeh-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to improve the image quality of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) mounted on the gantry of a linear accelerator used in radiation therapy based on the image information provided by planning multi-detector CT (MDCT). Methods MDCT-based shading correction for CBCT and virtual monochromatic CT (VMCT) synthesized using the dual-energy method were performed. In VMCT, the high-energy data were obtained from CBCT, while the low-energy data were obtained from MDCT. An electron density phantom was used to investigate the efficacy of shading correction and VMCT on improving the target detectability, Hounsfield unit (HU) accuracy and variation, which were quantified by calculating the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the percent difference (%Diff) and the standard deviation of the CT numbers for tissue equivalent background material, respectively. Treatment plan studies for a chest phantom were conducted to investigate the effects of image quality improvement on dose planning. Results For the electron density phantom, the mean value of CNR was 17.84, 26.78 and 34.31 in CBCT, shading-corrected CBCT and VMCT, respectively. The mean value of %Diff was 152.67%, 11.93% and 7.66% in CBCT, shading-corrected CBCT and VMCT, respectively. The standard deviation within a uniform background of CBCT, shading-corrected CBCT and VMCT was 85, 23 and 15 HU, respectively. With regards to the chest phantom, the monitor unit (MU) difference between the treatment plan calculated using MDCT and those based on CBCT, shading corrected CBCT and VMCT was 6.32%, 1.05% and 0.94%, respectively. Conclusions Enhancement of image quality in on-board CBCT can contribute to daily patient setup and adaptive dose delivery, thus enabling higher confidence in patient treatment accuracy in radiation therapy. Based on our results, VMCT has the highest image quality, followed by the shading corrected CBCT and the original CBCT. The research results presented in this study should be

  3. Imaging of the heart with computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Flohr, Thomas G; Ohnesorge, Bernd M

    2008-03-01

    Imaging of the heart with computed tomography (CT) was already introduced in the 1980Is and has meanwhile entered clinical routine as a consequence of the rapid evolution of CT technology during the last decade. In this review article, we give an overview on the technology and clinical performance of different CT-scanner generations used for cardiac imaging, such as Electron Beam CT (EBCT), single-slice CT und multi-detector row CT (MDCT) with 4, 16 and 64 simultaneously acquired slices. We identify the limitations of current CT-scanners, indicate potential of improvement and discuss alternative system concepts such as CT with area detectors and dual source CT (DSCT). PMID:18324372

  4. Design and characterization of a compact multi-detector gamma spectrometer for studies of triggered energy release from nuclear isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugorowski, Philip; Propri, Ronald J.; Caldwell, Nathan; Lazich, Joseph; Carroll, James J.

    2004-10-01

    Nuclear Isomers are long-lived nuclear excited states, with lifetimes ranging up to decades or longer. Recently, attention has focused on the second isomeric state of 178-Hf (31-year natural half-life). The spontaneous decay takes the form of a cascade of gamma photons, totaling 2.45 MeV of energy per nucleus and corresponding to an energy density of 1.3 GigaJoules/gram. Since the ground state is stable, there is no radioactive residue and the 2.4 MeV therefore represents a ``clean'' release of energy. It has been suggested that isomers like this could be used for applications and that would require some means of causing an energy release upon demand. Thus, experiments have been performed to determine the cross-sections for x-ray induced decay, if it occurs. Positive indications by one group have been plagued by poor statistical accuracy in looking for triggered increases in the numbers of photons that correspond to the natural decay cascades. A refined technique based on calorimetry of gamma cascades has been devised to avoid these problems and a portable multi-detector array has been constructed for this purpose. This talk will discuss the design and characterization of this system.

  5. Computerized left ventricular regional ejection fraction analysis for detection of ischemic coronary artery disease with multidetector CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Irfan; Li, Dong; Nasir, Khurram; Gupta, Mohit; Kadakia, Jigar; Gao, Yanlin; Ma, Eva; Mao, Song Shou; Budoff, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    Regional ejection fraction (REF) provides important functional information of the left ventricular regional myocardium. We aimed to test the diagnostic accuracy of computerized REF analysis for detecting the ischemia and significant stenosis with multidetector CT angiography (MDCT). This is a retrospective study including 155 patients who underwent MDCT scans for evaluation of coronary artery disease. Among them, 83 patients also underwent SPECT imaging and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Two groups of patients were defined: Control group with 0 coronary artery calcium and normal global and regional ventricular function, and comparison group. REF measurement was performed on all patients using computerized software. Control group REF measurements will be used as reference standard (mean-2SD REF/mean global ejection fraction) to define abnormal REF. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of REF in detecting perfusion defects (fixed and reversible) was 73, 80, 75 and 79 % respectively, in a patient based analysis of comparison group. The diagnostic accuracy of REF in predicting significant stenosis (>50 %) on ICA compared with SPECT was 72 versus 61 % and 85 versus 79 % in patient and vessel based analysis of comparison group, respectively. ROC curve analysis showed REF to be a better predictor of perfusion defects on SPECT compared with significant stenosis (>50 %) alone or stenosis combined with REF (P < 0.05). The computerized assessment of REF analysis is comparable to SPECT in predicting ischemia and a better predictor of significant stenosis than SPECT. This study also provides reference standard to define abnormal values.

  6. Evaluation of bone substitute materials: comparison of flat-panel based volume CT to conventional multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Sauerbier, Sebastian; Duttenhoefer, Fabian; Sachlos, Elefterios; Haberstroh, Jörg; Scheifele, Christian; Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Voss, Pit Jacob; Veigel, Egle; Smedek, Jörg; Ganter, Philip; Tuna, Taskin; Gutwald, Ralf; Palmowski, Moritz

    2013-10-01

    Over the last decade tissue engineering has emerged as a key factor in bone regeneration within the field of cranio-maxillofacial surgery. Despite this in vivo analysis of tissue-engineered-constructs to monitor bone rehabilitation are difficult to conduct. Novel high-resolving flat-panel based volume CTs (fp-VCT) are increasingly used for imaging bone structures. This study compares the potential value of novel fp-VCT with conventional multidetector CT (MDCT) based on a sheep sinus floor elevation model. Calcium-hydroxyapatite reinforced collagen scaffolds were populated with autologous osteoblasts and implanted into sheep maxillary sinus. After 8, 16 and 24 weeks MDCT and fp-VCT scans were performed to investigate the volume of the augmented area; densities of cancellous and compact bone were assessed as comparative values. fp-VCT imaging resulted in higher spatial resolution, which was advantageous when separating closely related anatomical structures (i.e. trabecular and compact bone, biomaterials). Fp-VCT facilitated imaging of alterations occurring in test specimens over time. fp-VCTs therefore displayed high volume coverage, dynamic imaging potential and superior performance when investigating superfine bone structures and bone remodelling of biomaterials. Thus, fp-VCTs may be a suitable instrument for intraoperative imaging and future in vivo tissue-engineering studies.

  7. Volume Changes of Experimental Carotid Sidewall Aneurysms Due to Embolization with Liquid Embolic Agents: A Multidetector CT Angiography Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dudeck, O. Okuducu, A. F.; Jordan, O.; Tesmer, K.; Pech, M.; Weigang, E.; Ruefenacht, D. A.; Doelker, E.; Felix, R.

    2006-12-15

    Iodine-containing polyvinyl alcohol polymer (I-PVAL) is a novel precipitating liquid embolic that allows for artifact-free evaluation of CT angiography (CTA). As accurate aneurysm volumetry can be performed with multidetector CTA, we determined volumes of experimental aneurysms before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after embolization of 14 porcine experimental carotid sidewall aneurysms with this liquid embolic. An automated three-dimensional software measurement tool was used for volumetric analysis of volume-rendering CTA data. Furthermore, intra-aneurysmal pressure changes during liquid embolization were measured in four silicone aneurysms and potential polymer volume changes within 4 weeks were assessed in vitro. Liquid embolic injection was performed during temporary balloon occlusion of the aneurysm neck, resulting in a mean occlusion rate of 98.3%. Aneurysms enlarged significantly during embolization by 61.1 {+-} 28.9%, whereas a significant shrinkage of 5.6 {+-} 2.7% was observed within the follow-up period. Histologic analysis revealed an inflammatory foreign body reaction with partial polymer degradation. In silicone aneurysm models, intra-aneurysmal pressure remained unchanged during liquid embolic injection, whereas balloon inflation resulted in a mean pressure increase of 31.2 {+-} 0.7%. No polymer shrinkage was observed in vitro. The aneurysm enlargement noted was presumably due to pressure elevation after balloon inflation, which resulted in dilatation of the weak venous wall of the newly constructed aneurysm-another shortcoming of this experimental aneurysm model. The volume decrease after 4 weeks expressed partial polymer degradation.

  8. Diagnostic capability of gadoxetate disodium-enhanced liver MRI for diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison with multi-detector CT.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Naoyuki; Nakamura, Yuko; Hieda, Masashi; Akiyama, Naoko; Terada, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Noriaki; Nishiki, Masayo; Kono, Hirotaka; Kohno, Hiroshi; Irei, Toshimitsu; Yoshikawa, Yukinobu; Kuraoka, Kazuya; Taniyama, Kiyomi; Awai, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic capability of gadoxetate disodium (Gd-EOB)-MRI for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared with multidetector CT (MDCT). Fifty patients with 57 surgically proven HCCs who underwent Gd-EOB-MRI and MDCT from March 2008 to June 2011 were evaluated. Two observers evaluated MR and CT on a lesion-by-lesion basis. We analyzed sensitivity by grading on a 5-point scale, the degree of arterial enhancement and the differences in histological grades in the diffusion-weighted images (DWI). The results showed that the sensitivity of Gd-EOB-MRI was higher than that of MDCT especially for HCCs that were 1 cm in diameter or smaller. The hepatobiliary phase was useful for the detecting of small HCC. We had few cases in which it was difficult to judge HCC in the arterial enhancement between MRI and MDCT. In the diffusion-weighted image, well differentiated HCC tended to show a low signal intensity, and poorly differentiated HCC tended to show a high signal intensity. In moderately differentiated HCC's, the mean diameter of the high signal intensity group was larger than that of the low signal intensity group (24.5 mm vs. 15.8 mm). In conclusion, Gd-EOB-MRI tended to show higher sensitivity compared to MDCT in the detection of HCC.

  9. [Computed tomography and cranial paleoanthropology].

    PubMed

    Cabanis, Emmanuel Alain; Badawi-Fayad, Jackie; Iba-Zizen, Marie-Thérèse; Istoc, Adrian; de Lumley, Henry; de Lumley, Marie-Antoinette; Coppens, Yves

    2007-06-01

    Since its invention in 1972, computed tomography (C.T.) has significantly evolved. With the advent of multi-slice detectors (500 times more sensitive than conventional radiography) and high-powered computer programs, medical applications have also improved. CT is now contributing to paleoanthropological research. Its non-destructive nature is the biggest advantage for studying fossil skulls. The second advantage is the possibility of image analysis, storage, and transmission. Potential disadvantages include the possible loss of files and the need to keep up with rapid technological advances. Our experience since the late 1970s, and a recent PhD thesis, led us to describe routine applications of this method. The main contributions of CT to cranial paleoanthropology are five-fold: --Numerical anatomy with rapid acquisition and high spatial resolution (helicoidal and multidetector CT) offering digital storage and stereolithography (3D printing). --Numerical biometry (2D and 3D) can be used to create "normograms" such as the 3D craniofacial reference model used in maxillofacial surgery. --Numerical analysis offers thorough characterization of the specimen and its state of conservation and/or restoration. --From "surrealism" to virtual imaging, anatomical structures can be reconstructed, providing access to hidden or dangerous zones. --The time dimension (4D imaging) confers movement and the possibility for endoscopic simulation and internal navigation (see Iconography). New technical developments will focus on data processing and networking. It remains our duty to deal respectfully with human fossils. PMID:18402165

  10. Crossed Fused Renal Ectopia: Presentations on 99mTc-MAG3 Scan, 99mTc-DMSA SPECT, and Multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun Ha; Kim, Min-Woo; Kim, Young Jun; Sun, In O

    2015-10-01

    Crossed renal ectopia is an uncommon developmental anomaly in which both kidneys are located on the same side of the body. The present case describes a 20-year-old man who underwent the military entrance physical examination. The ultrasound showed the right kidney in normal site with slightly increased size, but the left kidney was not identified. Tc-MAG3 scan showed a single kidney with 2 ureters, and the orifices of the ureters were connected at both sides of bladder. Tc-DMSA SPECT and contrast-enhanced multidetector CT were performed and revealed crossed fused renal ectopia.

  11. Improving Outcomes in the Patient with Polytrauma: A Review of the Role of Whole-Body Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Martin L; Kool, Digna R; Lehnert, Bruce E

    2015-07-01

    Whole-body computed tomography (WBCT) is used for the workup of the patient with blunt polytrauma. WBCT is associated with improved patient survival and reduces the emergency department length of stay. However, randomized studies are needed to determine whether early WBCT improves survival, to clarify which patients benefit the most, and to model the costs of this technique compared with traditional workup. Advancements in modern multidetector computed tomography technology and an improved understanding of optimal protocols have enabled one to scan the entire body and achieve adequate image quality for a comprehensive trauma assessment in a short period. PMID:26046503

  12. Assessment methodologies and statistical issues for computer-aided diagnosis of lung nodules in computed tomography: contemporary research topics relevant to the lung image database consortium.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Lori E; Wagner, Robert F; Armato, Samuel G; McNitt-Gray, Michael F; Beiden, Sergey; Chan, Heang-Ping; Gur, David; McLennan, Geoffrey; Metz, Charles E; Petrick, Nicholas; Sahiner, Berkman; Sayre, Jim

    2004-04-01

    Cancer of the lung and bronchus is the leading fatal malignancy in the United States. Five-year survival is low, but treatment of early stage disease considerably improves chances of survival. Advances in multidetector-row computed tomography technology provide detection of smaller lung nodules and offer a potentially effective screening tool. The large number of images per exam, however, requires considerable radiologist time for interpretation and is an impediment to clinical throughput. Thus, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) methods are needed to assist radiologists with their decision making. To promote the development of CAD methods, the National Cancer Institute formed the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC). The LIDC is charged with developing the consensus and standards necessary to create an image database of multidetector-row computed tomography lung images as a resource for CAD researchers. To develop such a prospective database, its potential uses must be anticipated. The ultimate applications will influence the information that must be included along with the images, the relevant measures of algorithm performance, and the number of required images. In this article we outline assessment methodologies and statistical issues as they relate to several potential uses of the LIDC database. We review methods for performance assessment and discuss issues of defining "truth" as well as the complications that arise when truth information is not available. We also discuss issues about sizing and populating a database.

  13. Radiological protection in computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Rehani, M M

    2015-06-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has sustained interest in radiological protection in computed tomography (CT), and ICRP Publications 87 and 102 focused on the management of patient doses in CT and multi-detector CT (MDCT) respectively. ICRP forecasted and 'sounded the alarm' on increasing patient doses in CT, and recommended actions for manufacturers and users. One of the approaches was that safety is best achieved when it is built into the machine, rather than left as a matter of choice for users. In view of upcoming challenges posed by newer systems that use cone beam geometry for CT (CBCT), and their widened usage, often by untrained users, a new ICRP task group has been working on radiological protection issues in CBCT. Some of the issues identified by the task group are: lack of standardisation of dosimetry in CBCT; the false belief within the medical and dental community that CBCT is a 'light', low-dose CT whereas mobile CBCT units and newer applications, particularly C-arm CT in interventional procedures, involve higher doses; lack of training in radiological protection among clinical users; and lack of dose information and tracking in many applications. This paper provides a summary of approaches used in CT and MDCT, and preliminary information regarding work just published for radiological protection in CBCT.

  14. A retrospective comparison of smart prep and test bolus multi-detector CT pulmonary angiography protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Suckling, Tara; Smith, Tony; Reed, Warren

    2013-06-15

    Optimal arterial opacification is crucial in imaging the pulmonary arteries using computed tomography (CT). This poses the challenge of precisely timing data acquisition to coincide with the transit of the contrast bolus through the pulmonary vasculature. The aim of this quality assurance exercise was to investigate if a change in CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) scanning protocol resulted in improved opacification of the pulmonary arteries. Comparison was made between the smart prep protocol (SPP) and the test bolus protocol (TBP) for opacification in the pulmonary trunk. A total of 160 CTPA examinations (80 using each protocol) performed between January 2010 and February 2011 were assessed retrospectively. CT attenuation coefficients were measured in Hounsfield Units (HU) using regions of interest at the level of the pulmonary trunk. The average pixel value, standard deviation (SD), maximum, and minimum were recorded. For each of these variables a mean value was then calculated and compared for these two CTPA protocols. Minimum opacification of 200 HU was achieved in 98% of the TBP sample but only 90% of the SPP sample. The average CT attenuation over the pulmonary trunk for the SPP was 329 (SD = ±21) HU, whereas for the TBP it was 396 (SD = ±22) HU (P = 0.0017). The TBP also recorded higher maximum (P = 0.0024) and minimum (P = 0.0039) levels of opacification. This study has found that a TBP resulted in significantly better opacification of the pulmonary trunk than the SPP.

  15. Prospective versus retrospective ECG-gated 64-detector coronary CT angiography for evaluation of coronary artery bypass graft patency: comparison of image quality, radiation dose and diagnostic accuracy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hwan; Chun, Eun Ju; Choi, Sang Il; Vembar, Mani; Lim, Cheong; Park, Kay-Hyun; Choi, Dong-Ju

    2011-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate image quality, radiation dose and diagnostic accuracy of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) with a prospectively gated transverse-axial scan (PGT) compared with a retrospectively gated helical scan (RGH), using a 64-slice scanner in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Of the 131 consecutive patients that underwent CABG using 64-slice multidetector row computed tomography during 2008, patients with heart rate (HR) of <75 beats/minute (bpm), and HR variation <10 bpm were included in the study. PGT was performed on 39 patients with 93 grafts, with RGH performed on 43 patients with 102 grafts. Image quality (1: excellent-4: poor) and estimated radiation dose were compared between the two groups. Of these, a total of 64 segments in 26 patients were subjected to invasive coronary angiography (ICA) for clinical reasons. Diagnostic accuracy of CCTA for evaluation of graft was performed between the two groups with ICA as a reference standard in terms of significant stenosis (≥ 50% of luminal stenosis). The image quality was not statistically different in the two groups. Mean effective radiation dose was 6.5 mSv in PGT-group, which was significantly lower than that in the RGH-group (21.2 mSv; P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in diagnostic accuracy between the two groups (PGT-group versus RGH-group; 93.1% versus 91.4%). PGT can achieve dose reductions of up to 70% compared to RGH while maintaining image quality and high diagnostic accuracy in patients undergoing CABG. PMID:21678128

  16. Feature-based characterization of motion-contaminated calcified plaques in cardiac multidetector CT

    SciTech Connect

    King, Martin; Giger, Maryellen L.; Suzuki, Kenji; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2007-12-15

    features mostly involved intensity-based features. Edge-based volume/irregularity and average margin gradient/variance of margin gradient were the only two feature pairs out of 12 with stronger correlations that did not involve intensity-based features. Automatically extracted features of the motion artifacts affecting calcified plaques in cardiac computed tomography images potentially can be used to develop models for predicting image assessability with respect to motion artifacts.

  17. Computerized assessment of motion-contaminated calcified plaques in cardiac multidetector CT

    SciTech Connect

    King, Martin; Giger, Maryellen L.; Suzuki, Kenji; Bardo, Dianna M. E.; Greenberg, Brent; Lan Li; Pan Xiaochuan

    2007-12-15

    An automated method for evaluating the image quality of calcified plaques with respect to motion artifacts in noncontrast-enhanced cardiac computed tomography (CT) images is introduced. This method involves using linear regression (LR) and artificial neural network (ANN) regression models for predicting two patient-specific, region-of-interest-specific, reconstruction-specific and temporal phase-specific image quality indices. The first is a plaque motion index, which is derived from the actual trajectory of the calcified plaque and is represented on a continuous scale. The second is an assessability index, which reflects the degree to which a calcified plaque is affected by motion artifacts, and is represented on an ordinal five-point scale. Two sets of assessability indices were provided independently by two radiologists experienced in evaluating cardiac CT images. Inputs for the regression models were selected from 12 features characterizing the dynamic, morphological, and intensity-based properties of the calcified plaques. Whereas LR-velocity (LR-V) used only a single feature (three-dimensional velocity), the LR-multiple (LR-M) and ANN regression models used the same subset of these 12 features selected through stepwise regression. The regression models were parameterized and evaluated using a database of simulated calcified plaque images from the dynamic NCAT phantom involving nine heart rate/multi-sector gating combinations and 40 cardiac phases covering two cardiac cycles. Six calcified plaques were used for the plaque motion indices and three calcified plaques were used for both sets of assessability indices. In one configuration, images from the second cardiac cycle were used for feature selection and regression model parameterization, whereas images from the first cardiac cycle were used for testing. With this configuration, repeated measures concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs) and associated 95% confidence intervals for the LR-V, LR-M, and ANN

  18. Prior image constrained image reconstruction in emerging computed tomography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Stephen T.

    Advances have been made in computed tomography (CT), especially in the past five years, by incorporating prior images into the image reconstruction process. In this dissertation, we investigate prior image constrained image reconstruction in three emerging CT applications: dual-energy CT, multi-energy photon-counting CT, and cone-beam CT in image-guided radiation therapy. First, we investigate the application of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) in dual-energy CT, which has been called "one of the hottest research areas in CT." Phantom and animal studies are conducted using a state-of-the-art 64-slice GE Discovery 750 HD CT scanner to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose reduction in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging. Second, we extend the application of PICCS from dual-energy CT to multi-energy photon-counting CT, which has been called "one of the 12 topics in CT to be critical in the next decade." Numerical simulations are conducted to generate multiple energy bin images for a photon-counting CT acquisition and to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose efficiency improvement. Third, we investigate the performance of a newly proposed prior image constrained scatter correction technique to correct scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT, which, when used in image-guided radiation therapy procedures, can assist in patient localization, and potentially, dose verification and adaptive radiation therapy. Phantom studies are conducted using a Varian 2100 EX system with an on-board imager to investigate the extent to which the prior image constrained scatter correction technique can mitigate scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT. Results show that these prior image constrained image reconstruction techniques can reduce radiation dose in dual-energy CT by 50% in phantom and animal studies in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging, can lead to radiation

  19. Comparative analysis of clinical and computed tomography features of basal skull fractures in head injury in southwestern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Olabinri, Eunice O.; Ogbole, Godwin I.; Adeleye, Amos O.; Dairo, David M.; Malomo, Adefolarin O.; Ogunseyinde, Ayotunde O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Basal skull fractures (BSF) in head injury may be missed clinically. Early detection ensures prompt treatment and prevention of complications We compared the clinical and Computed Tomography (CT) features of basal skull fractures in head injured patients in a southwestern Nigerian hospital. Materials and Methods: Head injury patients who had cranial CT at a Southwestern Nigerian hospital were selected. CT images were acquired with a 64-slice Toshiba Aquillion CT scanner using a standard head protocol. The images were evaluated for evidence of skull fractures, and associated complications. The clinical data and CT findings were analyzed. Results: One hundred and thirty patients were evaluated, including 103 (79.2%) males. Their ages ranged between 7 months and 81 years, mean 35 years (SD, 20.3). In 59 patients (45.4%, 59/130) BSF was detected on CT, while 71 (54.6%) had no evidence BSF. Forty-two (71.2%) of the 59 patients detected on CT had clinical suspicion of BSF (P < 0.001) while the remaining 17 (28.8%) were not clinically diagnosed. This equaled a sensitivity of 71.2% and, specificity of 90.1% for clinical determination of BSF in this study. There was no statistically significant difference between clinical and CT diagnosis (P > 0.05). The commonest observed clinical feature in patients with confirmed BSF was otorrhagia (45.8%) and the petrous temporal bone (45.8%) was the most commonly fractured bone. The BSF was caused most commonly by motor bike accidents in 53 (40.8%). The most common associated intracranial injuries were intracerebral haemorrhage (34.6%) and subdural (17.3%) Conclusion: It appears that neurosurgical evaluation is comparatively reliable in evaluating basal skull fractures in this study area even as they are consistently demonstrated by high resolution CT scanners. A clinical suspicion of BSF should warrant a closer detailed CT evaluation and reporting by radiologists. PMID:25883468

  20. Three‐dimensional scanning with dual‐source computed tomography in patients with acute skeletal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Duzgun; Tamam, Cuneyt; Gumus, Terman

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of multiplanar reformatted images and three‐dimensional images created after multidetector computed tomography examination in detecting acute post‐traumatic osseous pathology of the skeletal system. METHOD: Between October 2006 and December 2008, 105 patients with a history of acute trauma were referred to our service. Patients were evaluated with multidetector computed tomography using multiplanary reconstructed images initially (R‐I), and six months after this initial evaluation, three‐dimensional images were assessed of each patient (R‐II). Axial images were used for guiding as a reference Data obtained was recorded and graded according to importance levels of the pathologies. RESULTS: The R‐II score was higher in the non‐articular and highest in periartricular fractures of the extremities, and thoracic and pelvic cage injuries. For the spinal column, while R‐I data was more significant In patients referred with polytrauma, R‐II data, was more statistically significant, for short processing and adaptation time to acquiring immediate critical information. For all cases it was seen that three dimensional scans were more efficient in providing the orientation, within a short time. CONCLUSION: By dual source multidedector tomography systems trauma patients may be evaluated by multiplanary and three dimensionally reconstructed images. When used correctly, three dimensional imaging is advantageous and can help determine the exact nature and extension and also importance of osseous injuries. PMID:21120300

  1. Computed tomographic colonography (CTC): Possibilities and limitations of clinical application in colorectal polyps and cancer.

    PubMed

    Heuschmid, Martin; Luz, Oliver; Schaefer, Juergen F; Kopp, Andreas F; Claussen, Claus D; Seemann, Marcus D

    2004-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Europe and the United States. Most colorectal cancers develop from adenomatous polyps over a number of years. Early detection of polyps eliminates the risk of subsequent carcinomas. Computed tomographic (CT) colonography is a diagnostic technique detecting colorectal neoplasms. With the introduction of multidetector-row computed tomography (MD-CT), CT colonography (CTC) has gained influence as a new diagnostic tool in early detection of colonic pathologies by acquiring volumetric CT data sets of the abdomen. This volumetric data is analyzed using CTC workstations, which provide an interactive display of 2D and 3D images of the colon. In several studies, CTC revealed a high accuracy (sensitivity/patient: 83-100% and specificity/patient: 93-100%) in detecting pathological colonic changes. Furthermore, CTC is an excellent diagnostic technique for the evaluation of patients with incomplete conventional colonoscopy and allows the assessment of extracolonic abdominal and pelvic organs. In this article, the status of CT colonography as a method of detecting colonic polyps and colorectal carcinomas using single- and multidetector-row CT will be reviewed.

  2. Novel clinical applications of dual energy computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kraśnicki, Tomasz; Podgórski, Przemysław; Guziński, Maciej; Czarnecka, Anna; Tupikowski, Krzysztof; Garcarek, Jerzy; Marek Sąsiadek, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Dual energy CT (DECT) was conceived at the very beginning of the computed tomography era. However the first DECT scanner was developed in 2006. Nowadays there are three different types of DECT available: dual-source CT with 80(100) kVp and 140 kVp tubes (Siemens Medical Solution); dual-layer multi-detector scanner with acquisition 120 or 140kVp (Philips Healthcare); CT unit with one rapid kVp switching source and new detector based on gemstone scintillator materials (GE Healthcare). This article describes the physical background and principles of DECT imaging as well as applications of this innovative method in routine clinical practice (renal stone differentiation, pulmonary perfusion, neuroradiology and metallic implant imaging). The particular applications are illustrated by cases from author's material.

  3. Computers and Computer Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitter, Gary

    1980-01-01

    This resource directory provides brief evaluative descriptions of six popular home computers and lists selected sources of educational software, computer books, and magazines. For a related article on microcomputers in the schools, see p53-58 of this journal issue. (SJL)

  4. The development, validation and application of a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner model for assessing organ doses to the pregnant patient and the fetus using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, J.; Bednarz, B.; Caracappa, P. F.; Xu, X. G.

    2009-05-01

    The latest multiple-detector technologies have further increased the popularity of x-ray CT as a diagnostic imaging modality. There is a continuing need to assess the potential radiation risk associated with such rapidly evolving multi-detector CT (MDCT) modalities and scanning protocols. This need can be met by the use of CT source models that are integrated with patient computational phantoms for organ dose calculations. Based on this purpose, this work developed and validated an MDCT scanner using the Monte Carlo method, and meanwhile the pregnant patient phantoms were integrated into the MDCT scanner model for assessment of the dose to the fetus as well as doses to the organs or tissues of the pregnant patient phantom. A Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, was used to simulate the x-ray source including the energy spectrum, filter and scan trajectory. Detailed CT scanner components were specified using an iterative trial-and-error procedure for a GE LightSpeed CT scanner. The scanner model was validated by comparing simulated results against measured CTDI values and dose profiles reported in the literature. The source movement along the helical trajectory was simulated using the pitch of 0.9375 and 1.375, respectively. The validated scanner model was then integrated with phantoms of a pregnant patient in three different gestational periods to calculate organ doses. It was found that the dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. The paper also discusses how these fetal dose values can be used to evaluate imaging procedures and to assess risk using recommendations of the report from AAPM Task Group 36. This work demonstrates the ability of modeling and validating an MDCT scanner by the Monte Carlo method, as well as

  5. A case of a giant mucocoele of the appendiceal stump presented with a palpable mass in the right thigh: pre-operative diagnosis based on characteristic multidetector CT findings.

    PubMed

    Kim, M K; Lee, H Y; Song, I S; Lee, J B; Kim, G H; Yoo, S M; Rho, J Y; White, C S

    2010-10-01

    The pre-operative diagnosis of a mucocoele of the appendiceal stump (MAS) may be difficult owing to rarity and non-specific clinical presentation. However, a pre-operative diagnosis of a MAS is important to prevent widespread dissemination by inadvertent spillage of mucous contents. We describe a case of a MAS presenting with a palpable mass in the right thigh in which a pre-operative diagnosis was made by characteristic multidetector CT (MDCT) findings.

  6. Differentiation of Malignant and Benign Incidental Breast Lesions Detected by Chest Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography: Added Value of Quantitative Enhancement Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Pang; Hsu, Hsian-He; Ko, Kai-Hsiung; Chu, Chi-Ming; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chang, Wei-Chou; Chang, Tsun-Hou

    2016-01-01

    To retrospectively determine the association between breast lesion morphology and malignancy and to determine the optimal value of lesion enhancement (HU, Hounsfield units) to improve the diagnostic accuracy of breast cancer in patients with incidental breast lesions (IBLs). A total of 97 patients with 102 IBLs detected from July 2009 to December 2012 were enrolled in this study. Two radiologists analyzed CT images for the presence of malignancy based on the morphology of the lesions alone and in combination with an enhancement value (HU) analysis. There were 36 malignant and 66 benign IBLs. When the morphology and enhancement values were combined, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 92%, 97%, and 95%, respectively, for reader 1 and 89%, 94%, and 92%, respectively, for reader 2. The addition of HU values led to correct changes in the diagnosis; specifically, the accuracy of the diagnosis of reader 1 and reader 2 improved by 6.9% and 11.8%, respectively. The addition of the enhancement value (HU) to the CT morphology improved the diagnostic accuracy in the differentiation of malignant from benign IBLs by using the region of interest (ROI) to measure the HU within the most suspicious part of the lesion. PMID:27128524

  7. The role of computed tomography in terminal ballistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rutty, G N; Boyce, P; Robinson, C E; Jeffery, A J; Morgan, B

    2008-01-01

    Terminal ballistics concerns the science of projectile behaviour within a target and includes wound ballistics that considers what happens when a projectile strikes a living being. A number of soft tissue ballistic simulants have been used to assess the damage to tissue caused by projectiles. Standard assessment of these materials, such as ballistic soap or ordnance gelatine, requires the block to be opened or that a mould to be made to visualize the wound track. This is time consuming and may affect the accuracy of the findings especially if the block dries and alters shape during the process. Therefore, accurate numerical analysis of the permanent or temporary cavity is limited. Computed tomography (CT) potentially offers a quicker non-invasive analysis tool for this task. Four commercially purchased ballistic glycerine soap blocks were used. Each had a single firearm discharged into it from a distance of approximately 15 cm using both gunshot and shotgun projectiles. After discharge, each block was imaged by a modern 16 slice multi-detector CT scanner and analysed using 3-D reconstruction software. Using the anterior-posterior and lateral scout views and the multi-plane reconstructed images, it was possible to visualize the temporary cavity, as well as the fragmentation and dispersal pattern of the projectiles, the distance travelled and angle of dispersal within the block of each projectile or fragment. A virtual cast of the temporary cavity can be also be made. Multi-detector CT with 3-D analysis software is shown to create a reliable permanent record of the projectile path allowing rapid analysis of different firearms and projectiles. PMID:17205351

  8. The role of computed tomography in terminal ballistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rutty, G N; Boyce, P; Robinson, C E; Jeffery, A J; Morgan, B

    2008-01-01

    Terminal ballistics concerns the science of projectile behaviour within a target and includes wound ballistics that considers what happens when a projectile strikes a living being. A number of soft tissue ballistic simulants have been used to assess the damage to tissue caused by projectiles. Standard assessment of these materials, such as ballistic soap or ordnance gelatine, requires the block to be opened or that a mould to be made to visualize the wound track. This is time consuming and may affect the accuracy of the findings especially if the block dries and alters shape during the process. Therefore, accurate numerical analysis of the permanent or temporary cavity is limited. Computed tomography (CT) potentially offers a quicker non-invasive analysis tool for this task. Four commercially purchased ballistic glycerine soap blocks were used. Each had a single firearm discharged into it from a distance of approximately 15 cm using both gunshot and shotgun projectiles. After discharge, each block was imaged by a modern 16 slice multi-detector CT scanner and analysed using 3-D reconstruction software. Using the anterior-posterior and lateral scout views and the multi-plane reconstructed images, it was possible to visualize the temporary cavity, as well as the fragmentation and dispersal pattern of the projectiles, the distance travelled and angle of dispersal within the block of each projectile or fragment. A virtual cast of the temporary cavity can be also be made. Multi-detector CT with 3-D analysis software is shown to create a reliable permanent record of the projectile path allowing rapid analysis of different firearms and projectiles.

  9. Application of an asymmetric flow field flow fractionation multi-detector approach for metallic engineered nanoparticle characterization--prospects and limitations demonstrated on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hagendorfer, Harald; Kaegi, Ralf; Traber, Jacqueline; Mertens, Stijn F L; Scherrers, Roger; Ludwig, Christian; Ulrich, Andrea

    2011-11-14

    In this work we discuss about the method development, applicability and limitations of an asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (A4F) system in combination with a multi-detector setup consisting of UV/vis, light scattering, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The overall aim was to obtain a size dependent-, element specific-, and quantitative method appropriate for the characterization of metallic engineered nanoparticle (ENP) dispersions. Thus, systematic investigations of crucial method parameters were performed by employing well characterized Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) as a defined model system. For good separation performance, the A4F flow-, membrane-, and carrier conditions were optimized. To obtain reliable size information, the use of laser light scattering based detectors was evaluated, where an online dynamic light scattering (DLS) detector showed good results for the investigated Au-NP up to a size of 80 nm in hydrodynamic diameter. To adapt large sensitivity differences of the various detectors, as well as to guarantee long term stability and minimum contamination of the mass spectrometer a split-flow concept for coupling ICPMS was evaluated. To test for reliable quantification, the ICPMS signal response of ionic Au standards was compared to that of Au-NP. Using proper stabilization with surfactants, no difference for concentrations of 1-50 μg Au L(-1) in the size range from 5 to 80 nm for citrate stabilized dispersions was observed. However, studies using different A4F channel membranes showed unspecific particle-membrane interaction resulting in retention time shifts and unspecific loss of nanoparticles, depending on the Au-NP system as well as membrane batch and type. Thus, reliable quantification and discrimination of ionic and particular species was performed using ICPMS in combination with ultracentrifugation instead of direct quantification with the A4F multi-detector setup. Figures of merit were obtained, by comparing the

  10. Application of an asymmetric flow field flow fractionation multi-detector approach for metallic engineered nanoparticle characterization--prospects and limitations demonstrated on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hagendorfer, Harald; Kaegi, Ralf; Traber, Jacqueline; Mertens, Stijn F L; Scherrers, Roger; Ludwig, Christian; Ulrich, Andrea

    2011-11-14

    In this work we discuss about the method development, applicability and limitations of an asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (A4F) system in combination with a multi-detector setup consisting of UV/vis, light scattering, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The overall aim was to obtain a size dependent-, element specific-, and quantitative method appropriate for the characterization of metallic engineered nanoparticle (ENP) dispersions. Thus, systematic investigations of crucial method parameters were performed by employing well characterized Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) as a defined model system. For good separation performance, the A4F flow-, membrane-, and carrier conditions were optimized. To obtain reliable size information, the use of laser light scattering based detectors was evaluated, where an online dynamic light scattering (DLS) detector showed good results for the investigated Au-NP up to a size of 80 nm in hydrodynamic diameter. To adapt large sensitivity differences of the various detectors, as well as to guarantee long term stability and minimum contamination of the mass spectrometer a split-flow concept for coupling ICPMS was evaluated. To test for reliable quantification, the ICPMS signal response of ionic Au standards was compared to that of Au-NP. Using proper stabilization with surfactants, no difference for concentrations of 1-50 μg Au L(-1) in the size range from 5 to 80 nm for citrate stabilized dispersions was observed. However, studies using different A4F channel membranes showed unspecific particle-membrane interaction resulting in retention time shifts and unspecific loss of nanoparticles, depending on the Au-NP system as well as membrane batch and type. Thus, reliable quantification and discrimination of ionic and particular species was performed using ICPMS in combination with ultracentrifugation instead of direct quantification with the A4F multi-detector setup. Figures of merit were obtained, by comparing the

  11. Computers and Computer Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papert, Seymour

    1981-01-01

    Instruction using computers is viewed as different from most other approaches to education, by allowing more than right or wrong answers, by providing models for systematic procedures, by shifting the boundary between formal and concrete processes, and by influencing the development of thinking in many new ways. (MP)

  12. Computed tomography imaging and angiography - principles.

    PubMed

    Kamalian, Shervin; Lev, Michael H; Gupta, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of patients with diverse neurologic disorders was forever changed in the summer of 1973, when the first commercial computed tomography (CT) scanners were introduced. Until then, the detection and characterization of intracranial or spinal lesions could only be inferred by limited spatial resolution radioisotope scans, or by the patterns of tissue and vascular displacement on invasive pneumoencaphalography and direct carotid puncture catheter arteriography. Even the earliest-generation CT scanners - which required tens of minutes for the acquisition and reconstruction of low-resolution images (128×128 matrix) - could, based on density, noninvasively distinguish infarct, hemorrhage, and other mass lesions with unprecedented accuracy. Iodinated, intravenous contrast added further sensitivity and specificity in regions of blood-brain barrier breakdown. The advent of rapid multidetector row CT scanning in the early 1990s created renewed enthusiasm for CT, with CT angiography largely replacing direct catheter angiography. More recently, iterative reconstruction postprocessing techniques have made possible high spatial resolution, reduced noise, very low radiation dose CT scanning. The speed, spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and low radiation dose capability of present-day scanners have also facilitated dual-energy imaging which, like magnetic resonance imaging, for the first time, has allowed tissue-specific CT imaging characterization of intracranial pathology. PMID:27432657

  13. Should computed tomography angiography supersede invasive coronary angiography for the evaluation of graft patency following coronary artery bypass graft surgery?

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Joseph; Klimach, Stefan; Lang, Peter; Hildick-Smith, David

    2015-08-01

    Invasive coronary angiography (ICA) has long been the established gold standard in assessing graft patency following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Over the past decade or so however, improvements in computed tomography angiography (CTA) technology have allowed its emergence as a useful clinical tool in graft assessment. The recent introduction of 64-slice and now 128-slice scanners into widespread distribution, and the development of 320-detector row technology allowing volumetric imaging of the entire heart at single points in time within one cardiac cycle, has increased the potential of CTA to supersede ICA in this capacity. This study sought to examine the evidence surrounding this potential. A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The enquiry: In [patients who have undergone coronary artery bypass graft surgery] is [computed tomography angiography or invasive coronary angiography] superior in terms of [graft patency assessment, stenosis detection, radiation exposure and complication rate]? Four hundred and twenty-four articles were identified from the search strategy. Four additional articles were identified from references of key articles. Seventeen articles selected as best evidence were tabulated. The reliability of CTA as a tool in the detection of graft patency and stenosis has continued to improve with each successive generation of multislice technology. The latest 64- and 128-slice CTA techniques are able to detect graft patency and stenosis with very high sensitivities and specificities comparable with ICA, while remaining non-invasive procedures associated with fewer complications (ICA carries a 0.08% risk of myocardial infarction and 0.7% risk of minor complications in clinically stable patients). Present limitations of the technology include the accurate visualization of distal anastomoses and clip artefacts. In addition, the capacity of diagnostic ICA to be combined simultaneously with percutaneous coronary

  14. Computer Music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Perry R.

    This chapter covers algorithms, technologies, computer languages, and systems for computer music. Computer music involves the application of computers and other digital/electronic technologies to music composition, performance, theory, history, and the study of perception. The field combines digital signal processing, computational algorithms, computer languages, hardware and software systems, acoustics, psychoacoustics (low-level perception of sounds from the raw acoustic signal), and music cognition (higher-level perception of musical style, form, emotion, etc.).

  15. Computer Music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Perry

    This chapter covers algorithms, technologies, computer languages, and systems for computer music. Computer music involves the application of computers and other digital/electronic technologies to music composition, performance, theory, history, and perception. The field combines digital signal processing, computational algorithms, computer languages, hardware and software systems, acoustics, psychoacoustics (low-level perception of sounds from the raw acoustic signal), and music cognition (higher-level perception of musical style, form, emotion, etc.). Although most people would think that analog synthesizers and electronic music substantially predate the use of computers in music, many experiments and complete computer music systems were being constructed and used as early as the 1950s.

  16. Coronary artery calcium score on low-dose computed tomography for lung cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Arcadi, Teresa; Maffei, Erica; Sverzellati, Nicola; Mantini, Cesare; Guaricci, Andrea I; Tedeschi, Carlo; Martini, Chiara; La Grutta, Ludovico; Cademartiri, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of coronary artery calcium score (CACS) on low-dose non-gated chest CT (ngCCT). METHODS: Sixty consecutive individuals (30 males; 73 ± 7 years) scheduled for risk stratification by means of unenhanced ECG-triggered cardiac computed tomography (gCCT) underwent additional unenhanced ngCCT. All CT scans were performed on a 64-slice CT scanner (Somatom Sensation 64 Cardiac, Siemens, Germany). CACS was calculated using conventional methods/scores (Volume, Mass, Agatston) as previously described in literature. The CACS value obtained were compared. The Mayo Clinic classification was used to stratify cardiovascular risk based on Agatston CACS. Differences and correlations between the two methods were compared. A P-value < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: Mean CACS values were significantly higher for gCCT as compared to ngCCT (Volume: 418 ± 747 vs 332 ± 597; Mass: 89 ± 151 vs 78 ± 141; Agatston: 481 ± 854 vs 428 ± 776; P < 0.05). The correlation between the two values was always very high (Volume: r = 0.95; Mass: r = 0.97; Agatston: r = 0.98). Of the 6 patients with 0 Agatston score on gCCT, 2 (33%) showed an Agatston score > 0 in the ngCCT. Of the 3 patients with 1-10 Agatston score on gCCT, 1 (33%) showed an Agatston score of 0 in the ngCCT. Overall, 23 (38%) patients were reclassified in a different cardiovascular risk category, mostly (18/23; 78%) shifting to a lower risk in the ngCCT. The estimated radiation dose was significantly higher for gCCT (DLP 115.8 ± 50.7 vs 83.8 ± 16.3; Effective dose 1.6 ± 0.7 mSv vs 1.2 ± 0.2 mSv; P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: CACS assessment is feasible on ngCCT; the variability of CACS values and the associated re-stratification of patients in cardiovascular risk groups should be taken into account. PMID:24976939

  17. SU-E-I-28: Evaluating the Organ Dose From Computed Tomography Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, T; Araki, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate organ doses from computed tomography (CT) using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations. Methods: A Philips Brilliance CT scanner (64 slice) was simulated using the GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) based on the EGSnrc user code. The X-ray spectra and a bowtie filter for MC simulations were determined to coincide with measurements of half-value layer (HVL) and off-center ratio (OCR) profile in air. The MC dose was calibrated from absorbed dose measurements using a Farmer chamber and a cylindrical water phantom. The dose distribution from CT was calculated using patient CT images and organ doses were evaluated from dose volume histograms. Results: The HVLs of Al at 80, 100, and 120 kV were 6.3, 7.7, and 8.7 mm, respectively. The calculated HVLs agreed with measurements within 0.3%. The calculated and measured OCR profiles agreed within 3%. For adult head scans (CTDIvol) =51.4 mGy), mean doses for brain stem, eye, and eye lens were 23.2, 34.2, and 37.6 mGy, respectively. For pediatric head scans (CTDIvol =35.6 mGy), mean doses for brain stem, eye, and eye lens were 19.3, 24.5, and 26.8 mGy, respectively. For adult chest scans (CTDIvol=19.0 mGy), mean doses for lung, heart, and spinal cord were 21.1, 22.0, and 15.5 mGy, respectively. For adult abdominal scans (CTDIvol=14.4 mGy), the mean doses for kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and spinal cord were 17.4, 16.5, 16.8, 16.8, and 13.1 mGy, respectively. For pediatric abdominal scans (CTDIvol=6.76 mGy), mean doses for kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and spinal cord were 8.24, 8.90, 8.17, 8.31, and 6.73 mGy, respectively. In head scan, organ doses were considerably different from CTDIvol values. Conclusion: MC dose distributions calculated by using patient CT images are useful to evaluate organ doses absorbed to individual patients.

  18. Pulmonary 64-MDCT angiography with 50 mL of iodinated contrast material in an unselected patient population: a feasible protocol*

    PubMed Central

    Trad, Henrique Simão; Boasquevisque, Gustavo Santos; Giacometti, Tiago Rangon; Trad, Catherine Yang; Zoghbi Neto, Orlando Salomão; Trad, Clovis Simão

    2016-01-01

    Objective To propose a protocol for pulmonary angiography using 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (64-MDCT) with 50 mL of iodinated contrast material, in an unselected patient population, as well as to evaluate vascular enhancement and image quality. Materials and Methods We evaluated 29 patients (22-86 years of age). The body mass index ranged from 19.0 kg/m2 to 41.8 kg/m2. Patients underwent pulmonary CT angiography in a 64-MDCT scanner, receiving 50 mL of iodinated contrast material via venous access at a rate of 4.5 mL/s. Bolus tracking was applied in the superior vena cava. Two experienced radiologists assessed image quality and vascular enhancement. Results The mean density was 382 Hounsfield units (HU) for the pulmonary trunk; 379 and 377 HU for the right and left main pulmonary arteries, respectively; and 346 and 364 HU for the right and left inferior pulmonary arteries, respectively. In all patients, subsegmental arteries were analyzed. There were streak artifacts from contrast material in the superior vena cava in all patients. However, those artifacts did not impair the image analysis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that pulmonary angiography using 64-MDCT with 50 mL of iodinated contrast can produce high quality images in unselected patient populations. PMID:27141128

  19. Relation of Serum Fetuin-A Levels to Coronary Artery Calcium in African-American Patients on Chronic Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Sijie; de las Fuentes, Lisa; Bierhals, Andrew; Ash-Bernal, Rachel; Spence, Karen; Slatopolsky, Eduardo; Davila-Roman, Victor G.; Delmez, James

    2008-01-01

    Vascular calcium deposition in end-stage renal disease occurs commonly, however its relationship to cardiovascular risk factors and fetuin-A levels in African-Americans is not known. Compliant African-American HD patients (n=17) agreed to undergo a 64-slice multidetector computed tomography for the assessment of coronary artery calcium score (CACS). The relationship between traditional cardiovascular risk factors (i.e., age, gender, dialysis vintage, history of diabetes, means of the previous 3 years of the weekly pre-dialysis blood pressure and hemoglobin, means of monthly values of calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, uric acid and albumin, and means of quarterly measures of parathyroid hormone and lipids), and fetuin-A levels and CACS was explored by univariate analyses. Serum phosphorus levels over the previous 3 years were well controlled. The CACS range was 0-3,877 Agatston units (mean: 996; median :196). Among the tested variables, only fetuin-A was significantly and inversely associated with CACS (standardized β = -0.64 [95% confidence limits [CL]: -18.09, -3.62], p=0.006). There was no association between age and fetuin-A level (standardized β = -0.02 [95%CL: -0.10, 0.23]). In conclusion, African-American patients on long-term HD and with good phosphorus control exhibit a strong inverse correlation between fetuin-A levels and CACS which is independent of age. PMID:19101228

  20. Cooling Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birken, Marvin N.

    1967-01-01

    Numerous decisions must be made in the design of computer air conditioning, each determined by a combination of economics, physical, and esthetic characteristics, and computer requirements. Several computer air conditioning systems are analyzed--(1) underfloor supply and overhead return, (2) underfloor plenum and overhead supply with computer unit…

  1. Pygmalion's Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peelle, Howard A.

    Computers have undoubtedly entered the educational arena, mainly in the areas of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) and artificial intelligence, but whether educators should embrace computers and exactly how they should use them are matters of great debate. The use of computers in support of educational administration is widely accepted.…

  2. A method to analyse observer disagreement in visual grading studies: example of assessed image quality in paediatric cerebral multidetector CT images.

    PubMed

    Ledenius, K; Svensson, E; Stålhammar, F; Wiklund, L-M; Thilander-Klang, A

    2010-07-01

    The purpose was to demonstrate a non-parametric statistical method that can identify and explain the components of observer disagreement in terms of systematic disagreement as well as additional individual variability, in visual grading studies. As an example, the method was applied to a study where the effect of reduced tube current on diagnostic image quality in paediatric cerebral multidetector CT (MDCT) images was investigated. Quantum noise, representing dose reductions equivalent to steps of 20 mA, was artificially added to the raw data of 25 retrospectively selected paediatric cerebral MDCT examinations. Three radiologists, blindly and randomly, assessed the resulting images from two different levels of the brain with regard to the reproduction of high- and low-contrast structures and overall image quality. Images from three patients were assessed twice for the analysis of intra-observer disagreement. The intra-observer disagreement in test-retest assessments could mainly be explained by a systematic change towards lower image quality the second time the image was reviewed. The inter-observer comparisons showed that the paediatric radiologist was more critical of the overall image quality, while the neuroradiologists were more critical of the reproduction of the basal ganglia. Differences between the radiologists regarding the extent to which they used the whole classification scale were also found. The statistical method used was able to identify and separately measure a presence of bias apart from additional individual variability within and between the radiologists which is, at the time of writing, not attainable by any other statistical approach suitable for paired, ordinal data.

  3. Liver injury diagnosed on computed tomography after use of an automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation device.

    PubMed

    Camden, Jeremy R; Carucci, Laura R

    2011-10-01

    We report a case of an 89-year-old female with active extravasation and hemoperitoneum from a liver laceration demonstrated on multidetector computed tomography (CT), attributed to the use of an automated mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) device. Although iatrogenic internal injuries related to manual CPR and CPR devices have previously been reported [1, 2], there has been no reported CT evidence of liver injury related to automated CPR devices to the authors' knowledge. Imaging findings of complications related to the use of automated CPR devices are important to recognize and also help explain the possible mechanisms of injury. Liver injuries with active bleeding following CPR may have devastating consequences related to hemodynamic instability and may have an increased incidence when CPR is performed using an automated chest compression device.

  4. Usefulness and limitations of postmortem computed tomography in forensic analysis of gunshot injuries: Three case reports.

    PubMed

    Usui, Akihito; Kawasumi, Yusuke; Hosokai, Yoshiyuki; Kozakai, Masataka; Saito, Haruo; Funayama, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Gunshot injury has always been an important field of investigation in postmortem forensic radiology. The localization and retrieval of the bullet and of potentially important fragments are vital to these cases. Using postmortem multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) prior to forensic autopsy, we sought to illustrate the importance of this modality in the noninvasive characterization of gunshot wounds. We obtained and analyzed MDCT images in three cases of gunshot wounds (accidental close-range shotgun shooting, suicidal contact gunshot to the head and accidental long-range buckshot shooting). We discuss the value of postmortem MDCT findings in gunshot wound cases by comparing with forensic autopsy findings in Japan, a developing country with miserably low autopsy rate. PMID:26832386

  5. Computational dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, B.R.L.; Thomas, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a definition of the term ``Computational Dosimetry`` that is interpreted as the sub-discipline of computational physics which is devoted to radiation metrology. It is shown that computational dosimetry is more than a mere collection of computational methods. Computational simulations directed at basic understanding and modelling are important tools provided by computational dosimetry, while another very important application is the support that it can give to the design, optimization and analysis of experiments. However, the primary task of computational dosimetry is to reduce the variance in the determination of absorbed dose (and its related quantities), for example in the disciplines of radiological protection and radiation therapy. In this paper emphasis is given to the discussion of potential pitfalls in the applications of computational dosimetry and recommendations are given for their avoidance. The need for comparison of calculated and experimental data whenever possible is strongly stressed.

  6. Computer Recreations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewdney, A. K.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the performance of computer programs for writing poetry and prose, including MARK V. SHANEY, MELL, POETRY GENERATOR, THUNDER THOUGHT, and ORPHEUS. Discusses the writing principles of the programs. Provides additional information on computer magnification techniques. (YP)

  7. Computational Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational toxicology’ is a broad term that encompasses all manner of computer-facilitated informatics, data-mining, and modeling endeavors in relation to toxicology, including exposure modeling, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling, dose-response modeling, ...

  8. Female Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Melba Roy heads the group of NASA mathematicians, known as 'computers,' who track the Echo satellites. Roy's computations help produce the orbital element timetables by which millions can view the satellite from Earth as it passes overhead.

  9. Cloud Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Pete Beckman and Ian Foster

    2009-12-04

    Chicago Matters: Beyond Burnham (WTTW). Chicago has become a world center of "cloud computing." Argonne experts Pete Beckman and Ian Foster explain what "cloud computing" is and how you probably already use it on a daily basis.

  10. Quantum computing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Shen; Long, Gui-Lu; Bai, Feng-Shan; Feng, Song-Lin; Zheng, Hou-Zhi

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computing is a quickly growing research field. This article introduces the basic concepts of quantum computing, recent developments in quantum searching, and decoherence in a possible quantum dot realization. PMID:11562459

  11. Computer Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavelle, Richard; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes the nature and use of computer algebra and its applications to various physical sciences. Includes diagrams illustrating, among others, a computer algebra system and flow chart of operation of the Euclidean algorithm. (SK)

  12. Computer Ease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drenning, Susan; Getz, Lou

    1992-01-01

    Computer Ease is an intergenerational program designed to put an Ohio elementary school's computer lab, software library, staff, and students at the disposal of older adults desiring to become computer literate. Three 90-minute instructional sessions allow seniors to experience 1-to-1 high-tech instruction by enthusiastic, nonthreatening…

  13. Parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Treveaven, P.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to object-oriented, functional, and logic parallel computing on which the fifth generation of computer systems will be based. Coverage includes concepts for parallel computing languages, a parallel object-oriented system (DOOM) and its language (POOL), an object-oriented multilevel VLSI simulator using POOL, and implementation of lazy functional languages on parallel architectures.

  14. Computer Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    This manual designed to provide the teacher with methods of understanding the computer and its potential in the classroom includes four units with exercises and an answer sheet. Unit 1 covers computer fundamentals, the mini computer, programming languages, an introduction to BASIC, and control instructions. Variable names and constants described…

  15. Computer Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Marcos Unified School District, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: After viewing many computer-literacy programs, we believe San Marcos Junior High School has developed a unique program which will truly develop computer literacy. Our hope is to give all students a comprehensive look at computers as they go through their two years here. They will not only learn the…

  16. Development of adaptive noise reduction filter algorithm for pediatric body images in a multi-detector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimaru, Eiji; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Okita, Izumi; Ninomiya, Yuuji; Tomoshige, Yukihiro; Kurokawa, Takehiro; Ono, Yutaka; Nakamura, Yuko; Suzuki, Masayuki

    2008-03-01

    Recently, several kinds of post-processing image filters which reduce the noise of computed tomography (CT) images have been proposed. However, these image filters are mostly for adults. Because these are not very effective in small (< 20 cm) display fields of view (FOV), we cannot use them for pediatric body images (e.g., premature babies and infant children). We have developed a new noise reduction filter algorithm for pediatric body CT images. This algorithm is based on a 3D post-processing in which the output pixel values are calculated by nonlinear interpolation in z-directions on original volumetric-data-sets. This algorithm does not need the in-plane (axial plane) processing, so the spatial resolution does not change. From the phantom studies, our algorithm could reduce SD up to 40% without affecting the spatial resolution of x-y plane and z-axis, and improved the CNR up to 30%. This newly developed filter algorithm will be useful for the diagnosis and radiation dose reduction of the pediatric body CT images.

  17. Computer software.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, L E

    1986-10-01

    Software is the component in a computer system that permits the hardware to perform the various functions that a computer system is capable of doing. The history of software and its development can be traced to the early nineteenth century. All computer systems are designed to utilize the "stored program concept" as first developed by Charles Babbage in the 1850s. The concept was lost until the mid-1940s, when modern computers made their appearance. Today, because of the complex and myriad tasks that a computer system can perform, there has been a differentiation of types of software. There is software designed to perform specific business applications. There is software that controls the overall operation of a computer system. And there is software that is designed to carry out specialized tasks. Regardless of types, software is the most critical component of any computer system. Without it, all one has is a collection of circuits, transistors, and silicone chips.

  18. Computer sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Paul H.

    1988-01-01

    The Computer Science Program provides advanced concepts, techniques, system architectures, algorithms, and software for both space and aeronautics information sciences and computer systems. The overall goal is to provide the technical foundation within NASA for the advancement of computing technology in aerospace applications. The research program is improving the state of knowledge of fundamental aerospace computing principles and advancing computing technology in space applications such as software engineering and information extraction from data collected by scientific instruments in space. The program includes the development of special algorithms and techniques to exploit the computing power provided by high performance parallel processors and special purpose architectures. Research is being conducted in the fundamentals of data base logic and improvement techniques for producing reliable computing systems.

  19. Pulmonary Perfused Blood Volume with Dual-Energy CT as Surrogate for Pulmonary Perfusion Assessed with Dynamic Multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Fuld, Matthew K.; Halaweish, Ahmed F.; Haynes, Susan E.; Divekar, Abhay A.; Guo, Junfeng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare measurements of regional pulmonary perfused blood volume (PBV) and pulmonary blood flow (PBF) obtained with computed tomography (CT) in two pig models. Materials and Methods: The institutional animal care and use committee approved all animal studies. CT-derived PBF and PBV were determined in four anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, supine swine by using two methods for creating pulmonary parenchymal perfusion heterogeneity. Two animals were examined after sequentially moving a pulmonary arterial balloon catheter from a distal to a central location, and two others were examined over a range of static airway pressures, which varied the extents of regional PBF. Lung sections were divided into blocks and Pearson correlation coefficients calculated to compare matching regions between the two methods. Results: CT-derived PBF, CT-derived PBV, and their associated coefficients of variation (CV) were closely correlated on a region-by-region basis in both the balloon occlusion (Pearson R = 0.91 and 0.73 for animals 1 and 2, respectively; Pearson R = 0.98 and 0.87 for comparison of normalized mean and CV for animals 1 and 2, respectively) and lung inflation studies (Pearson R = 0.94 and 0.74 for animals 3 and 4, respectively; Pearson R = 0.94 and 0.69 for normalized mean and CV for animals 3 and 4, respectively). When accounting for region-based effects, correlations remained highly significant at the P < .001 level. Conclusion: CT-derived PBV heterogeneity is a suitable surrogate for CT-derived PBF heterogeneity. ©RSNA, 2012 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.12112789/-/DC1 PMID:23192773

  20. Computer Literacy: Teaching Computer Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troutner, Joanne

    1986-01-01

    Suggests learning activities for teaching computer ethics in three areas: (1) equal access; (2) computer crime; and (3) privacy. Topics include computer time, advertising, class enrollments, copyright law, sabotage ("worms"), the Privacy Act of 1974 and the Freedom of Information Act of 1966. (JM)

  1. Computational psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Montague, P Read; Dolan, Raymond J; Friston, Karl J; Dayan, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Computational ideas pervade many areas of science and have an integrative explanatory role in neuroscience and cognitive science. However, computational depictions of cognitive function have had surprisingly little impact on the way we assess mental illness because diseases of the mind have not been systematically conceptualized in computational terms. Here, we outline goals and nascent efforts in the new field of computational psychiatry, which seeks to characterize mental dysfunction in terms of aberrant computations over multiple scales. We highlight early efforts in this area that employ reinforcement learning and game theoretic frameworks to elucidate decision-making in health and disease. Looking forwards, we emphasize a need for theory development and large-scale computational phenotyping in human subjects.

  2. Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Isabel; Geleijns, Jacob

    After its clinical introduction in 1973, computed tomography developed from an x-ray modality for axial imaging in neuroradiology into a versatile three dimensional imaging modality for a wide range of applications in for example oncology, vascular radiology, cardiology, traumatology and even in interventional radiology. Computed tomography is applied for diagnosis, follow-up studies and screening of healthy subpopulations with specific risk factors. This chapter provides a general introduction in computed tomography, covering a short history of computed tomography, technology, image quality, dosimetry, room shielding, quality control and quality criteria.

  3. Computer Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Alan

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature and development of computer software. Programing, programing languages, types of software (including dynamic spreadsheets), and software of the future are among the topics considered. (JN)

  4. Computer News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities: Classroom Projects and Curriculum Ideas, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents several news stories about computers and technology. (1) Applied Science Associates of Narragansett, Rhode Island is providing computer modeling technology to help locate the remains to the USS Bonhomme Richard, which sank in 1779 after claiming a Revolutionary War victory. (2) Whyville, the leading edu-tainment virtual world…

  5. Cafeteria Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dervarics, Charles

    1992-01-01

    By relying on new computer hardware and software, school food service departments can keep better records of daily food consumption, free and reduced-price meals, inventory, production, and other essentials. The most commonly used systems fall into two basic categories: point-of-sale computers and behind-the-counter systems. State funding efforts…

  6. Computer Recreations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewdney, A. K.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are three examples of computer graphics including biomorphs, Truchet tilings, and fractal popcorn. The graphics are shown and the basic algorithm using multiple iteration of a particular function or mathematical operation is described. An illustration of a snail shell created by computer graphics is presented. (YP)

  7. Computer Insecurity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David L.

    1994-01-01

    College administrators recently appealed to students and faculty to change their computer passwords after security experts announced that tens of thousands had been stolen by computer hackers. Federal officials are investigating. Such attacks are not uncommon, but the most effective solutions are either inconvenient or cumbersome. (MSE)

  8. Computer Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Jeanne W.

    1970-01-01

    Computer graphics have been called the most exciting development in computer technology. At the University of Michigan, three kinds of graphics output equipment are now being used: symbolic printers, line plotters or drafting devices, and cathode-ray tubes (CRT). Six examples are given that demonstrate the range of graphics use at the University.…

  9. Computing Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Computer advances now let researchers quickly search through DNA sequences to find gene variations that could lead to disease, simulate how flu might spread through one's school, and design three-dimensional animations of molecules that rival any video game. By teaming computers and biology, scientists can answer new and old questions that could…

  10. Grid Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Ian

    2001-08-01

    The term "Grid Computing" refers to the use, for computational purposes, of emerging distributed Grid infrastructures: that is, network and middleware services designed to provide on-demand and high-performance access to all important computational resources within an organization or community. Grid computing promises to enable both evolutionary and revolutionary changes in the practice of computational science and engineering based on new application modalities such as high-speed distributed analysis of large datasets, collaborative engineering and visualization, desktop access to computation via "science portals," rapid parameter studies and Monte Carlo simulations that use all available resources within an organization, and online analysis of data from scientific instruments. In this article, I examine the status of Grid computing circa 2000, briefly reviewing some relevant history, outlining major current Grid research and development activities, and pointing out likely directions for future work. I also present a number of case studies, selected to illustrate the potential of Grid computing in various areas of science.

  11. Computational astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Richard H.

    1987-01-01

    Astronomy is an area of applied physics in which unusually beautiful objects challenge the imagination to explain observed phenomena in terms of known laws of physics. It is a field that has stimulated the development of physical laws and of mathematical and computational methods. Current computational applications are discussed in terms of stellar and galactic evolution, galactic dynamics, and particle motions.

  12. Computational Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Louis, David N.; Feldman, Michael; Carter, Alexis B.; Dighe, Anand S.; Pfeifer, John D.; Bry, Lynn; Almeida, Jonas S.; Saltz, Joel; Braun, Jonathan; Tomaszewski, John E.; Gilbertson, John R.; Sinard, John H.; Gerber, Georg K.; Galli, Stephen J.; Golden, Jeffrey A.; Becich, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Context We define the scope and needs within the new discipline of computational pathology, a discipline critical to the future of both the practice of pathology and, more broadly, medical practice in general. Objective To define the scope and needs of computational pathology. Data Sources A meeting was convened in Boston, Massachusetts, in July 2014 prior to the annual Association of Pathology Chairs meeting, and it was attended by a variety of pathologists, including individuals highly invested in pathology informatics as well as chairs of pathology departments. Conclusions The meeting made recommendations to promote computational pathology, including clearly defining the field and articulating its value propositions; asserting that the value propositions for health care systems must include means to incorporate robust computational approaches to implement data-driven methods that aid in guiding individual and population health care; leveraging computational pathology as a center for data interpretation in modern health care systems; stating that realizing the value proposition will require working with institutional administrations, other departments, and pathology colleagues; declaring that a robust pipeline should be fostered that trains and develops future computational pathologists, for those with both pathology and non-pathology backgrounds; and deciding that computational pathology should serve as a hub for data-related research in health care systems. The dissemination of these recommendations to pathology and bioinformatics departments should help facilitate the development of computational pathology. PMID:26098131

  13. I, Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barack, Lauren

    2005-01-01

    What child hasn't chatted with friends through a computer? But chatting with a computer? Some Danish scientists have literally put a face on their latest software program, bringing to virtual life storyteller Hans Christian Andersen, who engages users in actual conversations. The digitized Andersen resides at the Hans Christian Andersen Museum in…

  14. Diagnosis of High Bifurcation of the Abdominal Aorta with Associated Vascular Variations: Case Report with Multidedector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Atalar, Mehmet Haydar; Salk, Ismail; Bozbiyik, Nisa; Cetin, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Variations of the branches and bifurcation of the abdominal aorta and their relations with other abdominal structures and organs are important concerning abdominal and spinal surgery. Case Report In this report, authors present a high -positioned bifurcation of the abdominal aorta at the level of the L3 vertebral body and its associations with multiple variations of other abdominal arteries during contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) examination of the abdomen. Conclusions We reported on a unique clinically and surgically significant case of variations of the abdominal aorta as related to the location and type of bifurcation. The awareness of the variations of the abdominal aorta is of great importance for surgeons in order to reduce complications during abdominal and spinal interventions, as well as for radiologists for precise interpretation of angiograms. PMID:26688701

  15. [Simulation of thoracoscopic esophagectomy by three-dimensional computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Hirofumi

    2007-07-01

    The virtual operative field of thoracoscopic surgery for esophageal cancer was created by three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) imaging. Major vessels, bone, trachea, bronchi, lung, esophagus, lymph nodes and broncial arteries were constructed by a Zio M900 workstation from multidetector-row CT scanning data. The mediastinal lymph nodes and bilateral bronchial arteries were drawn by a free-hand tool. The static images and fry-through movies by a virtual endoscopy mode were useful for simulation of the endoscopic surgery, which is usually performed in very limited viewing. The location of lymph nodes and bronchial arteries in relation to the adjacent anatomical structures was realized by this virtual vision. The bronchial arteries should be preserved to avoid tracheobronchial ischemia, especially in case of salvage surgery after definitive chemoradiotherapy. The left bronchial arteries had many anatomical variations, so that 3D CT images were helpful to identify and to preserve the left bronchial arteries. In conclusion, the simulation of thoracoscopic esophagectomy by 3D CT is thought to contribute to safty and precise navigation for this kind of surgery. PMID:17763681

  16. [Contribution of X-ray computed tomography in the evaluation of kidney performance].

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Sandrine; Rognant, Nicolas; Collet-Benzaquen, Diane; Juillard, Laurent

    2012-07-01

    X-ray computer assisted tomography scanner is an imaging method based on the use of X-ray attenuation in tissue. This attenuation is proportional to the density of the tissue (without or after contrast media injection) in each pixel image of the image. Spiral scanner, the electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) scanner and multidetector computed tomography scanner allow renal anatomical measurements, such as cortical and medullary volume, but also the measurement of renal functional parameters, such as regional renal perfusion, renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. These functional parameters are extracted from the modeling of the kinetics of the contrast media concentration in the vascular space and the renal tissue, using two main mathematical models (the gamma variate model and the Patlak model). Renal functional imaging allows measuring quantitative parameters on each kidney separately, in a non-invasive manner, providing significant opportunities in nephrology, both for experimental and clinical studies. However, this method uses contrast media that may alter renal function, thus limiting its use in patients with chronic renal failure. Moreover, the increase irradiation delivered to the patient with multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) should be considered. PMID:22019734

  17. Personal Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toong, Hoo-min D.; Gupta, Amar

    1982-01-01

    Describes the hardware, software, applications, and current proliferation of personal computers (microcomputers). Includes discussions of microprocessors, memory, output (including printers), application programs, the microcomputer industry, and major microcomputer manufacturers (Apple, Radio Shack, Commodore, and IBM). (JN)

  18. Sort computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorband, John E.

    1988-01-01

    Sorting has long been used to organize data in preparation for further computation, but sort computation allows some types of computation to be performed during the sort. Sort aggregation and sort distribution are the two basic forms of sort computation. Sort aggregation generates an accumulative or aggregate result for each group of records and places this result in one of the records. An aggregate operation can be any operation that is both associative and commutative, i.e., any operation whose result does not depend on the order of the operands or the order in which the operations are performed. Sort distribution copies the value from a field of a specific record in a group into that field in every record of that group.

  19. LHC Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-07-28

    The LHC is the world’s highest energy particle accelerator and scientists use it to record an unprecedented amount of data. This data is recorded in electronic format and it requires an enormous computational infrastructure to convert the raw data into conclusions about the fundamental rules that govern matter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln gives us a sense of just how much data is involved and the incredible computer resources that makes it all possible.

  20. Advanced computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Advanced concepts in hardware, software and algorithms are being pursued for application in next generation space computers and for ground based analysis of space data. The research program focuses on massively parallel computation and neural networks, as well as optical processing and optical networking which are discussed under photonics. Also included are theoretical programs in neural and nonlinear science, and device development for magnetic and ferroelectric memories.

  1. Computational chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  2. Chromatin Computation

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In living cells, DNA is packaged along with protein and RNA into chromatin. Chemical modifications to nucleotides and histone proteins are added, removed and recognized by multi-functional molecular complexes. Here I define a new computational model, in which chromatin modifications are information units that can be written onto a one-dimensional string of nucleosomes, analogous to the symbols written onto cells of a Turing machine tape, and chromatin-modifying complexes are modeled as read-write rules that operate on a finite set of adjacent nucleosomes. I illustrate the use of this “chromatin computer” to solve an instance of the Hamiltonian path problem. I prove that chromatin computers are computationally universal – and therefore more powerful than the logic circuits often used to model transcription factor control of gene expression. Features of biological chromatin provide a rich instruction set for efficient computation of nontrivial algorithms in biological time scales. Modeling chromatin as a computer shifts how we think about chromatin function, suggests new approaches to medical intervention, and lays the groundwork for the engineering of a new class of biological computing machines. PMID:22567109

  3. Computational structures for robotic computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. S. G.; Chang, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    The computational problem of inverse kinematics and inverse dynamics of robot manipulators by taking advantage of parallelism and pipelining architectures is discussed. For the computation of inverse kinematic position solution, a maximum pipelined CORDIC architecture has been designed based on a functional decomposition of the closed-form joint equations. For the inverse dynamics computation, an efficient p-fold parallel algorithm to overcome the recurrence problem of the Newton-Euler equations of motion to achieve the time lower bound of O(log sub 2 n) has also been developed.

  4. [DNA computing].

    PubMed

    Błasiak, Janusz; Krasiński, Tadeusz; Popławski, Tomasz; Sakowski, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Biocomputers can be an alternative for traditional "silicon-based" computers, which continuous development may be limited due to further miniaturization (imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle) and increasing the amount of information between the central processing unit and the main memory (von Neuman bottleneck). The idea of DNA computing came true for the first time in 1994, when Adleman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using short DNA oligomers and DNA ligase. In the early 2000s a series of biocomputer models was presented with a seminal work of Shapiro and his colleguas who presented molecular 2 state finite automaton, in which the restriction enzyme, FokI, constituted hardware and short DNA oligomers were software as well as input/output signals. DNA molecules provided also energy for this machine. DNA computing can be exploited in many applications, from study on the gene expression pattern to diagnosis and therapy of cancer. The idea of DNA computing is still in progress in research both in vitro and in vivo and at least promising results of these research allow to have a hope for a breakthrough in the computer science. PMID:21735816

  5. Computational mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Goudreau, G.L.

    1993-03-01

    The Computational Mechanics thrust area sponsors research into the underlying solid, structural and fluid mechanics and heat transfer necessary for the development of state-of-the-art general purpose computational software. The scale of computational capability spans office workstations, departmental computer servers, and Cray-class supercomputers. The DYNA, NIKE, and TOPAZ codes have achieved world fame through our broad collaborators program, in addition to their strong support of on-going Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) programs. Several technology transfer initiatives have been based on these established codes, teaming LLNL analysts and researchers with counterparts in industry, extending code capability to specific industrial interests of casting, metalforming, and automobile crash dynamics. The next-generation solid/structural mechanics code, ParaDyn, is targeted toward massively parallel computers, which will extend performance from gigaflop to teraflop power. Our work for FY-92 is described in the following eight articles: (1) Solution Strategies: New Approaches for Strongly Nonlinear Quasistatic Problems Using DYNA3D; (2) Enhanced Enforcement of Mechanical Contact: The Method of Augmented Lagrangians; (3) ParaDyn: New Generation Solid/Structural Mechanics Codes for Massively Parallel Processors; (4) Composite Damage Modeling; (5) HYDRA: A Parallel/Vector Flow Solver for Three-Dimensional, Transient, Incompressible Viscous How; (6) Development and Testing of the TRIM3D Radiation Heat Transfer Code; (7) A Methodology for Calculating the Seismic Response of Critical Structures; and (8) Reinforced Concrete Damage Modeling.

  6. RELATION OF LEFT VENTRICULAR MASS AND CONCENTRIC REMODELING TO EXTENT OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE BY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN PATIENTS WITHOUT LEFT VENTRICULAR HYPERTROPHY: ROMICAT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Quynh A.; Toepker, Michael; Mahabadi, Amir A.; Bamberg, Fabian; Rogers, Ian S.; Blankstein, Ron; Brady, Thomas J.; Nagurney, John T.; Hoffmann, Udo

    2010-01-01

    Objective Cardiac computed tomography (CT) allows for simultaneous assessment of left ventricular mass (LVM) and coronary artery disease (CAD). We aimed to determine whether LVM, LVM index (LVMi), and the left ventricular (LV) geometric pattern of concentric remodeling are associated with the extent of CAD in patients without left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Methods In 348 patients from the ROMICAT trial, 64-slice CT was performed and LVM measured at end-diastole. We used 3 LVM indexation criteria to obtain 3 cohorts: LVM indexed to body surface area by echocardiography (n=337) and CT criteria (n=325), and by height2.7 (n=326). The cohorts were subdivided into concentric remodeling and normal geometry. Extent of coronary plaque was classified based on a 17-segment model, treated as a continuous variable, and stratified into 3 groups: 0 segments, 1–4 segments, >4 segments. Results Patients with >4 segments of coronary plaque had higher LVM (Δ12.8–15.1g) and LVMi (Δ4.0–5.5g/m2 and Δ2.2g/m2.7) than those without CAD (all p≤0.03). After multivariable adjustment, LVM and LVMi remained independent predictors of extent of coronary plaque, with 0.27–0.29 segments more plaque per 20 g increase of LVM (all p=0.02), 0.32–0.34 segments more plaque per 10 g/m2 increase of LVMi (both p=0.02), and 0.80 segments more plaque per 10 g/m2.7 increase of LVMi (p=0.008). Concentric remodeling patients had 1.1–1.3 segments more plaque than those with normal geometry (all p≤0.05). Patients with >4 segments of plaque had 2-fold increase odds (all p≤0.05) of having concentric remodeling as compared to those without CAD. Conclusion Increased LVM, LVMi, and concentric remodeling are associated with a greater degree of coronary plaque burden in patients without LVH. These findings could provide an indication to intensify medical therapy in patients with subclinical CAD and hypertension. PMID:19696685

  7. Computational Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Jing; Krystal, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia arise from abnormalities in brain systems that underlie cognitive, emotional and social functions. The brain is enormously complex and its abundant feedback loops on multiple scales preclude intuitive explication of circuit functions. In close interplay with experiments, theory and computational modeling are essential for understanding how, precisely, neural circuits generate flexible behaviors and their impairments give rise to psychiatric symptoms. This Perspective highlights recent progress in applying computational neuroscience to the study of mental disorders. We outline basic approaches, including identification of core deficits that cut across disease categories, biologically-realistic modeling bridging cellular and synaptic mechanisms with behavior, model-aided diagnosis. The need for new research strategies in psychiatry is urgent. Computational psychiatry potentially provides powerful tools for elucidating pathophysiology that may inform both diagnosis and treatment. To achieve this promise will require investment in cross-disciplinary training and research in this nascent field. PMID:25442941

  8. Computational mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Raboin, P J

    1998-01-01

    The Computational Mechanics thrust area is a vital and growing facet of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This work supports the development of computational analysis tools in the areas of structural mechanics and heat transfer. Over 75 analysts depend on thrust area-supported software running on a variety of computing platforms to meet the demands of LLNL programs. Interactions with the Department of Defense (DOD) High Performance Computing and Modernization Program and the Defense Special Weapons Agency are of special importance as they support our ParaDyn project in its development of new parallel capabilities for DYNA3D. Working with DOD customers has been invaluable to driving this technology in directions mutually beneficial to the Department of Energy. Other projects associated with the Computational Mechanics thrust area include work with the Partnership for a New Generation Vehicle (PNGV) for ''Springback Predictability'' and with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for the ''Development of Methodologies for Evaluating Containment and Mitigation of Uncontained Engine Debris.'' In this report for FY-97, there are five articles detailing three code development activities and two projects that synthesized new code capabilities with new analytic research in damage/failure and biomechanics. The article this year are: (1) Energy- and Momentum-Conserving Rigid-Body Contact for NIKE3D and DYNA3D; (2) Computational Modeling of Prosthetics: A New Approach to Implant Design; (3) Characterization of Laser-Induced Mechanical Failure Damage of Optical Components; (4) Parallel Algorithm Research for Solid Mechanics Applications Using Finite Element Analysis; and (5) An Accurate One-Step Elasto-Plasticity Algorithm for Shell Elements in DYNA3D.

  9. Computer viruses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    The worm, Trojan horse, bacterium, and virus are destructive programs that attack information stored in a computer's memory. Virus programs, which propagate by incorporating copies of themselves into other programs, are a growing menace in the late-1980s world of unprotected, networked workstations and personal computers. Limited immunity is offered by memory protection hardware, digitally authenticated object programs,and antibody programs that kill specific viruses. Additional immunity can be gained from the practice of digital hygiene, primarily the refusal to use software from untrusted sources. Full immunity requires attention in a social dimension, the accountability of programmers.

  10. LHC Computing

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The LHC is the world’s highest energy particle accelerator and scientists use it to record an unprecedented amount of data. This data is recorded in electronic format and it requires an enormous computational infrastructure to convert the raw data into conclusions about the fundamental rules that govern matter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln gives us a sense of just how much data is involved and the incredible computer resources that makes it all possible.

  11. Computational vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrow, H. G.; Tenenbaum, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The range of fundamental computational principles underlying human vision that equally apply to artificial and natural systems is surveyed. There emerges from research a view of the structuring of vision systems as a sequence of levels of representation, with the initial levels being primarily iconic (edges, regions, gradients) and the highest symbolic (surfaces, objects, scenes). Intermediate levels are constrained by information made available by preceding levels and information required by subsequent levels. In particular, it appears that physical and three-dimensional surface characteristics provide a critical transition from iconic to symbolic representations. A plausible vision system design incorporating these principles is outlined, and its key computational processes are elaborated.

  12. Computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Lola

    1992-01-01

    In addition to the discussions, Ocean Climate Data Workshop hosts gave participants an opportunity to hear about, see, and test for themselves some of the latest computer tools now available for those studying climate change and the oceans. Six speakers described computer systems and their functions. The introductory talks were followed by demonstrations to small groups of participants and some opportunities for participants to get hands-on experience. After this familiarization period, attendees were invited to return during the course of the Workshop and have one-on-one discussions and further hands-on experience with these systems. Brief summaries or abstracts of introductory presentations are addressed.

  13. Threshold adjusted calcium scoring using CT is less susceptible to cardiac motion and more accurate.

    PubMed

    Groen, J M; Dijkstra, H; Greuter, M J W; Oudkerk, M

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate calcium scoring on computed tomography (CT) using an adjusted threshold depending on the maximum Hounsfield value within the calcification (HU(peak)). The volume of 19 calcifications was retrospectively determined on 64-slice multidetector CT and dual source CT (DSCT) at different thresholds and the threshold associated with the physical volume was determined. In addition, approximately 10 000 computer simulations were done simulating the same process for calcifications with mixed density. Using these data a relation between the HU(peak) and the threshold could be established. Hereafter, this relation was assessed by scanning six calcifications in a phantom at 40-110 beats per minute using DSCT. The influence of motion was determined and the measured calcium scores were compared to the physical volumes and mass. A positive linear correlation was found between the scoring threshold and the HU(peak) of the calcifications both for the phantom measurements as for the computer simulations. Using this relation the individual threshold for each calcification could be calculated. Calcium scores of the moving calcifications determined with an adjusted threshold were approximately 30% less susceptible to cardiac motion compared to standard calcium scoring. Furthermore, these scores approximated the physical volume and mass at least 10% better than the standard calcium scores. The threshold in calcium scoring should be adjusted for each individual calcification based on the HU(peak) of the calcification. Calcium scoring using an adjusted threshold is less susceptible to cardiac motion and more accurate compared to the physical values. PMID:19291982

  14. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary In July 2009, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on Non-Invasive Cardiac Imaging Technologies for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding different cardiac imaging modalities to ensure that appropriate technologies are accessed by patients suspected of having CAD. This project came about when the Health Services Branch at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care asked MAS to provide an evidentiary platform on effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of non-invasive cardiac imaging modalities. After an initial review of the strategy and consultation with experts, MAS identified five key non-invasive cardiac imaging technologies for the diagnosis of CAD. Evidence-based analyses have been prepared for each of these five imaging modalities: cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, single photon emission computed tomography, 64-slice computed tomographic angiography, stress echocardiography, and stress echocardiography with contrast. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed (where appropriate). A summary decision analytic model was then developed to encapsulate the data from each of these reports (available on the OHTAC and MAS website). The Non-Invasive Cardiac Imaging Technologies for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: www.health.gov.on.ca/mas or at www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/mas_about.html Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease: An Evidence-Based Analysis Stress Echocardiography for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease: An Evidence-Based Analysis Stress Echocardiography with Contrast for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease: An Evidence-Based Analysis 64-Slice Computed Tomographic Angiography for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease: An Evidence-Based Analysis Cardiac

  15. Computer Routing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Roger

    1991-01-01

    Computerized bus-routing systems plot the most efficient routes, cut the time it takes to draw routes, and generate reports quickly and accurately. However, school districts often underestimate the amount of work necessary to get information into the computer database. (MLF)

  16. Computer Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Margie

    1985-01-01

    This article: describes how to prevent pins on game paddles from breaking; suggests using needlepoint books for ideas to design computer graphics; lists a BASIC program to create a Christmas tree, with extension activities; suggests a LOGO Christmas activity; and describes a book on the development of microcomputers. (JN)

  17. Business Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canipe, Stephen L.

    A brief definition of some fundamentals of microcomputers and of the ways they may be used in small businesses can help potential buyers make informed purchases. Hardware (the mechanical devices from which computers are made) described here are the video display, keyboard, central processing unit, "random access" and "read only" memories, cassette…

  18. Computational trigonometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, K.

    1994-12-31

    By means of the author`s earlier theory of antieigenvalues and antieigenvectors, a new computational approach to iterative methods is presented. This enables an explicit trigonometric understanding of iterative convergence and provides new insights into the sharpness of error bounds. Direct applications to Gradient descent, Conjugate gradient, GCR(k), Orthomin, CGN, GMRES, CGS, and other matrix iterative schemes will be given.

  19. Computational Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borcherds, P. H.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an optional course in "computational physics" offered at the University of Birmingham. Includes an introduction to numerical methods and presents exercises involving fast-Fourier transforms, non-linear least-squares, Monte Carlo methods, and the three-body problem. Recommends adding laboratory work into the course in the future. (TW)

  20. Computer Recreations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewdney, A. K.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the creation of the computer program "BOUNCE," designed to simulate a weighted piston coming into equilibrium with a cloud of bouncing balls. The model follows the ideal gas law. Utilizes the critical event technique to create the model. Discusses another program, "BOOM," which simulates a chain reaction. (CW)

  1. Networking computers.

    PubMed

    McBride, D C

    1997-03-01

    This decade the role of the personal computer has shifted dramatically from a desktop device designed to increase individual productivity and efficiency to an instrument of communication linking people and machines in different places with one another. A computer in one city can communicate with another that may be thousands of miles away. Networking is how this is accomplished. Just like the voice network used by the telephone, computer networks transmit data and other information via modems over these same telephone lines. A network can be created over both short and long distances. Networks can be established within a hospital or medical building or over many hospitals or buildings covering many geographic areas. Those confined to one location are called LANs, local area networks. Those that link computers in one building to those at other locations are known as WANs, or wide area networks. The ultimate wide area network is the one we've all been hearing so much about these days--the Internet, and its World Wide Web. Setting up a network is a process that requires careful planning and commitment. To avoid potential pitfalls and to make certain the network you establish meets your needs today and several years down the road, several steps need to be followed. This article reviews the initial steps involved in getting ready to network.

  2. Computational Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fung, Maria G.; Latulippe, Christine L.

    2010-01-01

    Elementary school teachers are responsible for constructing the foundation of number sense in youngsters, and so it is recommended that teacher-training programs include an emphasis on number sense to ensure the development of dynamic, productive computation and estimation skills in students. To better prepare preservice elementary school teachers…

  3. Computational Musicology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bel, Bernard; Vecchione, Bernard

    1993-01-01

    Asserts that a revolution has been occurring in musicology since the 1970s. Contends that music has change from being only a source of emotion to appearing more open to science and techniques based on computer technology. Describes recent research and other writings about the topic and provides an extensive bibliography. (CFR)

  4. Amorphous Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, Gerald

    2002-03-01

    Digital computers have always been constructed to behave as precise arrangements of reliable parts, and our techniques for organizing computations depend upon this precision and reliability. Two emerging technologies, however, are begnning to undercut these assumptions about constructing and programming computers. These technologies -- microfabrication and bioengineering -- will make it possible to assemble systems composed of myriad information- processing units at almost no cost, provided: 1) that not all the units need to work correctly; and 2) that there is no need to manufacture precise geometrical arrangements or interconnection patterns among them. Microelectronic mechanical components are becoming so inexpensive to manufacture that we can anticipate combining logic circuits, microsensors, actuators, and communications devices integrated on the same chip to produce particles that could be mixed with bulk materials, such as paints, gels, and concrete. Imagine coating bridges or buildings with smart paint that can sense and report on traffic and wind loads and monitor structural integrity of the bridge. A smart paint coating on a wall could sense vibrations, monitor the premises for intruders, or cancel noise. Even more striking, there has been such astounding progress in understanding the biochemical mechanisms in individual cells, that it appears we'll be able to harness these mechanisms to construct digital- logic circuits. Imagine a discipline of cellular engineering that could tailor-make biological cells that function as sensors and actuators, as programmable delivery vehicles for pharmaceuticals, as chemical factories for the assembly of nanoscale structures. Fabricating such systems seem to be within our reach, even if it is not yet within our grasp Fabrication, however, is only part of the story. We can envision producing vast quantities of individual computing elements, whether microfabricated particles, engineered cells, or macromolecular computing

  5. Fetal radiation dose in computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kelaranta, Anna; Kaasalainen, Touko; Seuri, Raija; Toroi, Paula; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2015-07-01

    The connection between recorded volumetric CT dose index (CTDI vol) and determined mean fetal dose (Df) was examined from metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor dose measurements on an anthropomorphic female phantom in four stages of pregnancy in a 64-slice CT scanner. Automated tube current modulation kept the mean Df fairly constant through all pregnancy stages in trauma (4.4-4.9 mGy) and abdomino-pelvic (2.1-2.4 mGy) protocols. In pulmonary angiography protocol, the mean Df increased exponentially as the distance from the end of the scan range decreased (0.01-0.09 mGy). For trauma protocol, the relative mean Df as a function of gestational age were in the range 0.80-0.97 compared with the mean CTDI vol. For abdomino-pelvic protocol, the relative mean Df was 0.57-0.79 and for pulmonary angiography protocol, 0.01-0.05 compared with the mean CTDI vol, respectively. In conclusion, if the fetus is in the primary beam, the CTDI vol can be used as an upper estimate of the fetal dose. If the fetus is not in the primary beam, the fetal dose can be estimated by considering also the distance of the fetus from the scan range. PMID:25836690

  6. Bacteria as computers making computers

    PubMed Central

    Danchin, Antoine

    2009-01-01

    Various efforts to integrate biological knowledge into networks of interactions have produced a lively microbial systems biology. Putting molecular biology and computer sciences in perspective, we review another trend in systems biology, in which recursivity and information replace the usual concepts of differential equations, feedback and feedforward loops and the like. Noting that the processes of gene expression separate the genome from the cell machinery, we analyse the role of the separation between machine and program in computers. However, computers do not make computers. For cells to make cells requires a specific organization of the genetic program, which we investigate using available knowledge. Microbial genomes are organized into a paleome (the name emphasizes the role of the corresponding functions from the time of the origin of life), comprising a constructor and a replicator, and a cenome (emphasizing community-relevant genes), made up of genes that permit life in a particular context. The cell duplication process supposes rejuvenation of the machine and replication of the program. The paleome also possesses genes that enable information to accumulate in a ratchet-like process down the generations. The systems biology must include the dynamics of information creation in its future developments. PMID:19016882

  7. RATIO COMPUTER

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1958-11-11

    An electronic computer circuit is described for producing an output voltage proportional to the product or quotient of tbe voltages of a pair of input signals. ln essence, the disclosed invention provides a computer having two channels adapted to receive separate input signals and each having amplifiers with like fixed amplification factors and like negatlve feedback amplifiers. One of the channels receives a constant signal for comparison purposes, whereby a difference signal is produced to control the amplification factors of the variable feedback amplifiers. The output of the other channel is thereby proportional to the product or quotient of input signals depending upon the relation of input to fixed signals in the first mentioned channel.

  8. Computational Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Mizobuchi, Y; Poinsot, T J; Smith, P J; Warnatz, J

    2004-08-26

    Progress in the field of computational combustion over the past 50 years is reviewed. Particular attention is given to those classes of models that are common to most system modeling efforts, including fluid dynamics, chemical kinetics, liquid sprays, and turbulent flame models. The developments in combustion modeling are placed into the time-dependent context of the accompanying exponential growth in computer capabilities and Moore's Law. Superimposed on this steady growth, the occasional sudden advances in modeling capabilities are identified and their impacts are discussed. Integration of submodels into system models for spark ignition, diesel and homogeneous charge, compression ignition engines, surface and catalytic combustion, pulse combustion, and detonations are described. Finally, the current state of combustion modeling is illustrated by descriptions of a very large jet lifted 3D turbulent hydrogen flame with direct numerical simulation and 3D large eddy simulations of practical gas burner combustion devices.

  9. Assessment of liver ablation using cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed; Ronot, Maxime; Sibert, Annie; Vilgrain, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility and accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in assessing the ablation zone after liver tumor ablation. METHODS: Twenty-three patients (17 men and 6 women, range: 45-85 years old, mean age 65 years) with malignant liver tumors underwent ultrasound-guided percutaneous tumor ablation [radiofrequency (n = 14), microwave (n = 9)] followed by intravenous contrast-enhanced CBCT. Baseline multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and peri-procedural CBCT images were compared. CBCT image quality was assessed as poor, good, or excellent. Image fusion was performed to assess tumor coverage, and quality of fusion was rated as bad, good, or excellent. Ablation zone volumes on peri-procedural CBCT and post-procedural MDCT were compared using the non-parametric paired Wilcoxon t-test. RESULTS: Rate of primary ablation effectiveness was 100%. There were no complications related to ablation. Local tumor recurrence and new liver tumors were found 3 mo after initial treatment in one patient (4%). The ablation zone was identified in 21/23 (91.3%) patients on CBCT. The fusion of baseline MDCT and peri-procedural CBCT images was feasible in all patients and showed satisfactory tumor coverage (at least 5-mm margin). CBCT image quality was poor, good, and excellent in 2 (9%), 8 (35%), and 13 (56%), patients respectively. Registration quality between peri-procedural CBCT and post-procedural MDCT images was good to excellent in 17/23 (74%) patients. The median ablation volume on peri-procedural CBCT and post-procedural MDCT was 30 cm3 (range: 4-95 cm3) and 30 cm3 (range: 4-124 cm3), respectively (P-value > 0.2). There was a good correlation (r = 0.79) between the volumes of the two techniques. CONCLUSION: Contrast-enhanced CBCT after tumor ablation of the liver allows early assessment of the ablation zone. PMID:25593467

  10. Computer Game

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Using NASA studies of advanced lunar exploration and colonization, KDT Industries, Inc. and Wesson International have developed MOONBASE, a computer game. The player, or team commander, must build and operate a lunar base using NASA technology. He has 10 years to explore the surface, select a site and assemble structures brought from Earth into an efficient base. The game was introduced in 1991 by Texas Space Grant Consortium.

  11. Computer centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The National Science Foundation has renewed grants to four of its five supercomputer centers. Average annual funding will rise from $10 million to $14 million so facilities can be upgraded and training and education expanded. As cooperative projects, the centers also receive money from states, universities, computer vendors and industry. The centers support research in fluid dynamics, atmospheric modeling, engineering geophysics and many other scientific disciplines.

  12. Singularity computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swedlow, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    An approach is described for singularity computations based on a numerical method for elastoplastic flow to delineate radial and angular distribution of field quantities and measure the intensity of the singularity. The method is applicable to problems in solid mechanics and lends itself to certain types of heat flow and fluid motion studies. Its use is not limited to linear, elastic, small strain, or two-dimensional situations.

  13. New computer architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberghien, J.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on supercomputers. Topics considered include decentralized computer architecture, new programming languages, data flow computers, reduction computers, parallel prefix calculations, structural and behavioral descriptions of digital systems, instruction sets, software generation, personal computing, and computer architecture education.

  14. Computer vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gennery, D.; Cunningham, R.; Saund, E.; High, J.; Ruoff, C.

    1981-01-01

    The field of computer vision is surveyed and assessed, key research issues are identified, and possibilities for a future vision system are discussed. The problems of descriptions of two and three dimensional worlds are discussed. The representation of such features as texture, edges, curves, and corners are detailed. Recognition methods are described in which cross correlation coefficients are maximized or numerical values for a set of features are measured. Object tracking is discussed in terms of the robust matching algorithms that must be devised. Stereo vision, camera control and calibration, and the hardware and systems architecture are discussed.

  15. Application of three-dimensional computed tomography in craniofacial clinical practice and research.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P J; Yong, R; Surman, T L; Rajion, Z A; Ranjitkar, S

    2014-06-01

    Following the invention of the first computed tomography (CT) scanner in the early 1970s, many innovations in three-dimensional (3D) diagnostic imaging technology have occurred, leading to a wide range of applications in craniofacial clinical practice and research. Three-dimensional image analysis provides superior and more detailed information compared with conventional plain two-dimensional (2D) radiography, with the added benefit of 3D printing for preoperative treatment planning and regenerative therapy. Current state-of-the-art multidetector CT (MDCT), also known as medical CT, has an important role in the diagnosis and management of craniofacial injuries and pathology. Three-dimensional cone beam CT (CBCT), pioneered in the 1990s, is gaining increasing popularity in dental and craniofacial clinical practice because of its faster image acquisition at a lower radiation dose, but sound guidelines are needed to ensure its optimal clinical use. Recent innovations in micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) have revolutionized craniofacial biology research by enabling higher resolution scanning of teeth beyond the capabilities of MDCT and CBCT, presenting new prospects for translational clinical research. Even after four decades of refinement, CT technology continues to advance and broaden the horizons of craniofacial clinical practice and phenomics research. PMID:24611727

  16. Computational crystallization.

    PubMed

    Altan, Irem; Charbonneau, Patrick; Snell, Edward H

    2016-07-15

    Crystallization is a key step in macromolecular structure determination by crystallography. While a robust theoretical treatment of the process is available, due to the complexity of the system, the experimental process is still largely one of trial and error. In this article, efforts in the field are discussed together with a theoretical underpinning using a solubility phase diagram. Prior knowledge has been used to develop tools that computationally predict the crystallization outcome and define mutational approaches that enhance the likelihood of crystallization. For the most part these tools are based on binary outcomes (crystal or no crystal), and the full information contained in an assembly of crystallization screening experiments is lost. The potential of this additional information is illustrated by examples where new biological knowledge can be obtained and where a target can be sub-categorized to predict which class of reagents provides the crystallization driving force. Computational analysis of crystallization requires complete and correctly formatted data. While massive crystallization screening efforts are under way, the data available from many of these studies are sparse. The potential for this data and the steps needed to realize this potential are discussed.

  17. Computational Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Astsatryan, H. V.

    2015-07-01

    Present astronomical archives that contain billions of objects, both Galactic and extragalactic, and the vast amount of data on them allow new studies and discoveries. Astrophysical Virtual Observatories (VO) use available databases and current observing material as a collection of interoperating data archives and software tools to form a research environment in which complex research programs can be conducted. Most of the modern databases give at present VO access to the stored information, which makes possible also a fast analysis and managing of these data. Cross-correlations result in revealing new objects and new samples. Very often dozens of thousands of sources hide a few very interesting ones that are needed to be discovered by comparison of various physical characteristics. VO is a prototype of Grid technologies that allows distributed data computation, analysis and imaging. Particularly important are data reduction and analysis systems: spectral analysis, SED building and fitting, modelling, variability studies, cross correlations, etc. Computational astrophysics has become an indissoluble part of astronomy and most of modern research is being done by means of it.

  18. Microcalcifications in the breast detected by a color Doppler method using twinkling artifacts: some important discussions based on clinical cases and experiments with a new ultrasound modality called multidetector-ultrasonography (MD-US).

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    The twinkling artifact is well known as a color Doppler artifact but it is still an unresolved phenomenon [Rahmouni et al., Radiology 1996;199:269-271 ; Atan et al., Astas Urol Esp 2001;35:396-402; Kamaya et al., AJR 2003;80:215-222]. Many factors affect the appearance of the twinkling artifact, such as the surface roughness of stones creating multiple reflections and a form of intrinsic noise known as clock jitter within the Doppler circuitry of the ultrasound equipment. However, no studies have reported on the twinkling artifact of breast microcalcifications. While considering these premises, I detected microcalcifications in the breast using twinkling artifacts that could not be detected on B-mode imaging. The twinkling artifact is a well-defined but not well-understood phenomenon that may assist in the detection of calcified foci. The phenomenon of the twinkling artifact is discussed here with regard to prospectively and retrospectively studied cases including experiments with a new ultrasound modality called multidetector-ultrasonography (MD-US). MD-US using detectability of the twinkling artifact in microcalcifications of the breast may play an important role in breast screening.

  19. Microcalcifications in the breast detected by a color Doppler method using twinkling artifacts: some important discussions based on clinical cases and experiments with a new ultrasound modality called multidetector-ultrasonography (MD-US).

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    The twinkling artifact is well known as a color Doppler artifact but it is still an unresolved phenomenon [Rahmouni et al., Radiology 1996;199:269-271 ; Atan et al., Astas Urol Esp 2001;35:396-402; Kamaya et al., AJR 2003;80:215-222]. Many factors affect the appearance of the twinkling artifact, such as the surface roughness of stones creating multiple reflections and a form of intrinsic noise known as clock jitter within the Doppler circuitry of the ultrasound equipment. However, no studies have reported on the twinkling artifact of breast microcalcifications. While considering these premises, I detected microcalcifications in the breast using twinkling artifacts that could not be detected on B-mode imaging. The twinkling artifact is a well-defined but not well-understood phenomenon that may assist in the detection of calcified foci. The phenomenon of the twinkling artifact is discussed here with regard to prospectively and retrospectively studied cases including experiments with a new ultrasound modality called multidetector-ultrasonography (MD-US). MD-US using detectability of the twinkling artifact in microcalcifications of the breast may play an important role in breast screening. PMID:27277641

  20. Computational introspection

    SciTech Connect

    Batali, J.

    1983-02-01

    Introspection is the process of thinking about one's own thoughts and feelings. In this paper, the author discusses recent attempts to make computational systems that exhibit introspective behavior. Each presents a system capable of manipulating representations of its own program and current context. He argues that introspective ability is crucial for intelligent systems--without it an agent cannot represent certain problems that it must be able to solve. A theory of intelligent action would describe how and why certain actions intelligently achieve an agent's goals. The agent would both embody and represent this theory: it would be implemented as the program for the agent; and the importance of introspection suggests that the agent represent its theory of action to itself.

  1. Computer vision

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    This paper discusses material from areas such as artificial intelligence, psychology, computer graphics, and image processing. The intent is to assemble a selection of this material in a form that will serve both as a senior/graduate-level academic text and as a useful reference to those building vision systems. This book has a strong artificial intelligence flavour, emphasising the belief that both the intrinsic image information and the internal model of the world are important in successful vision systems. The book is organised into four parts, based on descriptions of objects at four different levels of abstraction. These are: generalised images-images and image-like entities; segmented images-images organised into subimages that are likely to correspond to interesting objects; geometric structures-quantitative models of image and world structures; relational structures-complex symbolic descriptions of image and world structures. The book contains author and subject indexes.

  2. Combining Automatic Tube Current Modulation with Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction for Low-Dose Chest CT Screening

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiang-Hong; Jin, Er-Hu; He, Wen; Zhao, Li-Qin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To reduce radiation dose while maintaining image quality in low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) by combining adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and automatic tube current modulation (ATCM). Methods Patients undergoing cancer screening (n = 200) were subjected to 64-slice multidetector chest CT scanning with ASIR and ATCM. Patients were divided into groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 (n = 50 each), with a noise index (NI) of 15, 20, 30, and 40, respectively. Each image set was reconstructed with 4 ASIR levels (0% ASIR, 30% ASIR, 50% ASIR, and 80% ASIR) in each group. Two radiologists assessed subjective image noise, image artifacts, and visibility of the anatomical structures. Objective image noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured, and effective dose (ED) was recorded. Results Increased NI was associated with increased subjective and objective image noise results (P<0.001), and SNR decreased with increasing NI (P<0.001). These values improved with increased ASIR levels (P<0.001). Images from all 4 groups were clinically diagnosable. Images with NI = 30 and 50% ASIR had average subjective image noise scores and nearly average anatomical structure visibility scores, with a mean objective image noise of 23.42 HU. The EDs for groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 were 2.79±1.17, 1.69±0.59, 0.74±0.29, and 0.37±0.22 mSv, respectively. Compared to group 1 (NI = 15), the ED reductions were 39.43%, 73.48%, and 86.74% for groups 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Conclusions Using NI = 30 with 50% ASIR in the chest CT protocol, we obtained average or above-average image quality but a reduced ED. PMID:24691208

  3. PROspective Multicenter Imaging Study for Evaluation of Chest Pain: Rationale and Design of the PROMISE Trial

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Pamela S.; Hoffmann, Udo; Lee, Kerry L.; Mark, Daniel B.; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R.; Anstrom, Kevin; Dolor, Rowena J.; Kosinski, Andrzej; Krucoff, Mitchell W.; Mudrick, Daniel W.; Patel, Manesh R.; Picard, Michael H.; Udelson, James E.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Cooper, Lawton

    2014-01-01

    Background Suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the most common, potentially life threatening diagnostic problems clinicians encounter. However, no large outcome-based randomized trials have been performed to guide the selection of diagnostic strategies for these patients. Methods The PROMISE study is a prospective, randomized trial comparing the effectiveness of two initial diagnostic strategies in patients with symptoms suspicious for CAD. Patients are randomized to either: 1) functional testing (exercise electrocardiogram, stress nuclear imaging, or stress echocardiogram); or 2) anatomic testing with >=64 slice multidetector coronary computed tomographic angiography. Tests are interpreted locally in real time by subspecialty certified physicians and all subsequent care decisions are made by the clinical care team. Sites are provided results of central core lab quality and completeness assessment. All subjects are followed for ≥1 year. The primary end-point is the time to occurrence of the composite of death, myocardial infarction, major procedural complications (stroke, major bleeding, anaphylaxis and renal failure) or hospitalization for unstable angina. Results Over 10,000 symptomatic subjects were randomized in 3.2 years at 193 US and Canadian cardiology, radiology, primary care, urgent care and anesthesiology sites. Conclusion Multi-specialty community practice enrollment into a large pragmatic trial of diagnostic testing strategies is both feasible and efficient. PROMISE will compare the clinical effectiveness of an initial strategy of functional testing against an initial strategy of anatomic testing in symptomatic patients with suspected CAD. Quality of life, resource use, cost effectiveness and radiation exposure will be assessed. Clinical trials.gov identifier NCT01174550 PMID:24890527

  4. Impact of Body Mass Index on Vascular Calcification and Pericardial Fat Volume Among Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nafakhi, Hussein; Al-Mosawi, Abdulameer; Elwali, Hayder; Al-Nafakh, Hasan; Tawfeq, Raad; Nafakhi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of body mass index (BMI) on the relationship between pericardial fat volume (PFV), aortic root calcification (ARC) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) among patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: This cross-sectional study took place between January and December 2014 at the Kufa University Teaching Hospital, Najaf, Iraq. A total of 130 consecutive patients with an intermediate pretest probability of ischaemic heart disease who underwent 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (CT) angiography during the study period were recruited. Of these, 111 were included in the study and divided into groups according to BMI. Imaging markers were measured on CT angiography. Results: A total of 28 patients were obese, while 42 and 41 were overweight and normal weight, respectively. The median PFV, CAC and ARC was 109 cm3 (interquartile range [IQR]: 52–176 cm3), 0 Agatston score (IQR: 0–52 Agatston score) and 0 Agatston score (IQR: 0–15 Agatston score), respectively, in the normal weight group in comparison to 79 cm3 (IQR: 43–138 cm3), 0 Agatston score (IQR: 0–54 Agatston score) and 0 Agatston score (IQR: 0–0 Agatston score), respectively, in the obese group. Significant correlations were observed between PFV and CAC (r2 = 0.22; P = 0.002) and ARC and CAC (r2 = 0.37; P <0.001) in the normal weight group. However, no significant correlations were observed for obese and overweight patients. Conclusion: These findings indicate that BMI may not be an accurate tool for measuring adiposity or assessing subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in patients with suspected CAD.

  5. The Abundance of Epicardial Adipose Tissue Surrounding Left Atrium Is Associated With the Occurrence of Stroke in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Hsuan-Ming; Hu, Wei-Chih; Tsai, Ping-Huang; Lee, Chao-Lin; Liu, Fang-Chun; Wang, Hsueh-Han; Lo, Li-Wei; Chang, Shih-Lin; Chao, Tze-Fan; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is positively associated with risk factors for cardiovascular disease, but the role of EAT in the development of atrial fibrillation (AF)-related stroke and its association with the anatomical and functional remodeling of the left atrium (LA) have not been elucidated. This was a comparative cross-sectional study. Twenty-seven patients with paroxysmal or persistent AF and cardioembolic stroke were selected and compared with 68 age- and sex-matched AF patients without stroke. In addition, 20 controls without a history of AF or stroke were included. The periatrial EAT and the structural and functional properties of the LA and left ventricle were evaluated using contrast-enhanced 64-slice multidetector computed tomography during sinus rhythm. Total EAT around the LA was significantly increased across the groups (control vs AF vs AF-related stroke, P < 0.001). The volumes of the LA and the LA appendage (LAA) were also significantly increased across the 3 groups (P < 0.001 for each). The emptying fraction of the LA and LAA and the booster-pump function of the LA and LAA were all reduced across the 3 groups (P < 0.001 for all). In addition, the Hounsfield unit (HU) ratio of the LAA to the ascending aorta (LAA/AA) was also decreased in patients with stroke (P < 0.001). Furthermore, EAT had a negative correlation with the dynamic function of the LA, LAA, and the HU ratio. After a multivariate analysis, increased EAT (P < 0.001) was shown to be independently associated with the occurrence of AF-related stroke. Periatrial EAT was increased and was correlated with atrial dysfunction in patients with AF-related stroke. Hence, EAT assessment may potentially offer an incremental value for grading the risk of cardioembolic stroke in patients with AF. PMID:27057876

  6. The Abundance of Epicardial Adipose Tissue Surrounding Left Atrium Is Associated With the Occurrence of Stroke in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Hsuan-Ming; Hu, Wei-Chih; Tsai, Ping-Huang; Lee, Chao-Lin; Liu, Fang-Chun; Wang, Hsueh-Han; Lo, Li-Wei; Chang, Shih-Lin; Chao, Tze-Fan; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-04-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is positively associated with risk factors for cardiovascular disease, but the role of EAT in the development of atrial fibrillation (AF)-related stroke and its association with the anatomical and functional remodeling of the left atrium (LA) have not been elucidated.This was a comparative cross-sectional study. Twenty-seven patients with paroxysmal or persistent AF and cardioembolic stroke were selected and compared with 68 age- and sex-matched AF patients without stroke. In addition, 20 controls without a history of AF or stroke were included. The periatrial EAT and the structural and functional properties of the LA and left ventricle were evaluated using contrast-enhanced 64-slice multidetector computed tomography during sinus rhythm. Total EAT around the LA was significantly increased across the groups (control vs AF vs AF-related stroke, P < 0.001). The volumes of the LA and the LA appendage (LAA) were also significantly increased across the 3 groups (P < 0.001 for each). The emptying fraction of the LA and LAA and the booster-pump function of the LA and LAA were all reduced across the 3 groups (P < 0.001 for all). In addition, the Hounsfield unit (HU) ratio of the LAA to the ascending aorta (LAA/AA) was also decreased in patients with stroke (P < 0.001). Furthermore, EAT had a negative correlation with the dynamic function of the LA, LAA, and the HU ratio. After a multivariate analysis, increased EAT (P < 0.001) was shown to be independently associated with the occurrence of AF-related stroke.Periatrial EAT was increased and was correlated with atrial dysfunction in patients with AF-related stroke. Hence, EAT assessment may potentially offer an incremental value for grading the risk of cardioembolic stroke in patients with AF. PMID:27057876

  7. Impact of Body Mass Index on Vascular Calcification and Pericardial Fat Volume Among Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nafakhi, Hussein; Al-Mosawi, Abdulameer; Elwali, Hayder; Al-Nafakh, Hasan; Tawfeq, Raad; Nafakhi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of body mass index (BMI) on the relationship between pericardial fat volume (PFV), aortic root calcification (ARC) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) among patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: This cross-sectional study took place between January and December 2014 at the Kufa University Teaching Hospital, Najaf, Iraq. A total of 130 consecutive patients with an intermediate pretest probability of ischaemic heart disease who underwent 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (CT) angiography during the study period were recruited. Of these, 111 were included in the study and divided into groups according to BMI. Imaging markers were measured on CT angiography. Results: A total of 28 patients were obese, while 42 and 41 were overweight and normal weight, respectively. The median PFV, CAC and ARC was 109 cm3 (interquartile range [IQR]: 52–176 cm3), 0 Agatston score (IQR: 0–52 Agatston score) and 0 Agatston score (IQR: 0–15 Agatston score), respectively, in the normal weight group in comparison to 79 cm3 (IQR: 43–138 cm3), 0 Agatston score (IQR: 0–54 Agatston score) and 0 Agatston score (IQR: 0–0 Agatston score), respectively, in the obese group. Significant correlations were observed between PFV and CAC (r2 = 0.22; P = 0.002) and ARC and CAC (r2 = 0.37; P <0.001) in the normal weight group. However, no significant correlations were observed for obese and overweight patients. Conclusion: These findings indicate that BMI may not be an accurate tool for measuring adiposity or assessing subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in patients with suspected CAD. PMID:27606110

  8. Using clinical cardiovascular risk scores to predict coronary artery plaque severity and stenosis detected by CT coronary angiography in asymptomatic Chinese subjects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bai-Chin; Lee, Wen-Jeng; Hsu, Hsiu-Ching; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang; Chen, Ming-Fong

    2011-06-01

    We aimed to determine whether the Framingham risk score (FRS), systematic coronary risk evaluation (SCORE), and Chinese multi-provincial cohort study (CMCS) could predict anatomic severity of coronary plaques. From January 2007 to October 2010, we performed a contrast-enhanced 64-slice or 256-slice multidetector computed tomography coronary angiography as part of a health check-up protocol in 806 asymptomatic subjects (70.5% male, 56 ± 9 year-old). Risk scores significantly correlated with calcium volume score, plaque stenosis score and plaque distribution score (P < 0.001). Of the 3 risk scores, the SCORE system showed the best correlation. Overall, 180 (22%) and 37 (5%) subjects were found to have stenosis of 50-69% and more than 70% in at-least one coronary artery segment, respectively. In the prediction of the presence of obstructive CAD (≥ 50% diameter stenosis), all risk scores had similar discrimination. In the prediction of severe CAD (≥ 70% diameter stenosis), FRS and CMCS had similar area under curves but SCORE discriminated better than FRS (P < 0.05). The optimal cutoff point to predict obstructive CAD was 9.54% for FRS, 1.05% for CMCS, and 0.95% for SCORE, whereas to predict severe CAD was 9.63, 1.05, 1.15% for FRS, CMCS, SCORE, respectively, with a sensitivity of 0.61-0.70 and a specificity of 0.55-0.66. Cardiovascular risk scores are associated with the severity and extent of coronary artery plaque. The stronger association might translate into a better discrimination using SCORE. These findings will aid in the appropriate selection or recalibration of the risk assessment system for cardiovascular disease screening.

  9. Left Main Ostial Compression in a Patient with Pulmonary Hypertension: Dynamic Findings by IVUS

    PubMed Central

    Seabra, Luciana F.; Ribeiro, Henrique B.; de Barros e Silva, Pedro Gabriel Melo; Rodrigues, Marcelo J.; Spadaro, André G.; Conejo, Fábio; Godinho, Roger R.; Faig, Sandro M. M.; de Macedo, Thiago Andrade; de P. S. Baptista, Luciana; de Resende, Marcos Valerio C.; Furlan, Valter; Ribeiro, Expedito E.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 39 Final Diagnosis: Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension Symptoms: Chest pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Percutaneous coronary intervention Specialty: Cardiology and Pulmonology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Pulmonary artery dilatation is a common feature among patients with severe pulmonary hypertension. Left main coronary artery extrinsic compression by an enlarged pulmonary artery is a rare complication and a potential cause for chest pain and sudden cardiac death in patients with pulmonary hypertension. This situation is very rare and few reports have described it. Currently, the appropriate management of these patients remains unknown. Case Report: In the present report we describe the case of a 39-year-old woman who presented with a 2-year history of cardiac symptoms related to exercise. The patient underwent a 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) coronary angiography, which showed left main coronary artery (LMCA) compression by a markedly enlarged pulmonary artery trunk (44 mm), without intraluminal stenosis or coronary artery calcium, as determined by the Agatston score. This compression was considered to be the cause of the cardiac symptoms. To confirm and plan the treatment, the patient underwent cardiac catheterization that confirmed the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension and LMCA critical obstruction. Taking into account the paucity of information regarding the best management in these cases, the treatment decision was shared among a “heart team” that chose percutaneous coronary intervention with stent placement. An intra-vascular ultrasound was performed during the procedure, which showed a dynamic compression of the left main coronary artery. The intervention was successfully executed without any adverse events. Conclusions: This case illustrates dynamic compression of the LMCA by IVUS, visually demonstrating the mechanism of the intermittent symptoms of myocardial

  10. Monte Carlo calculation of patient organ doses from computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Oono, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Tsuduki, Shoya; Kawasaki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate quantitatively the patient organ dose from computed tomography (CT) using Monte Carlo calculations. A multidetector CT unit (Aquilion 16, TOSHIBA Medical Systems) was modeled with the GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. The X-ray spectrum and the configuration of the bowtie filter for the Monte Carlo modeling were determined from the chamber measurements for the half-value layer (HVL) of aluminum and the dose profile (off-center ratio, OCR) in air. The calculated HVL and OCR were compared with measured values for body irradiation with 120 kVp. The Monte Carlo-calculated patient dose distribution was converted to the absorbed dose measured by a Farmer chamber with a (60)Co calibration factor at the center of a CT water phantom. The patient dose was evaluated from dose-volume histograms for the internal organs in the pelvis. The calculated Al HVL was in agreement within 0.3% with the measured value of 5.2 mm. The calculated dose profile in air matched the measured value within 5% in a range of 15 cm from the central axis. The mean doses for soft tissues were 23.5, 23.8, and 27.9 mGy for the prostate, rectum, and bladder, respectively, under exposure conditions of 120 kVp, 200 mA, a beam pitch of 0.938, and beam collimation of 32 mm. For bones of the femur and pelvis, the mean doses were 56.1 and 63.6 mGy, respectively. The doses for bone increased by up to 2-3 times that of soft tissue, corresponding to the ratio of their mass-energy absorption coefficients.

  11. Advanced Computing for Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rennels, Glenn D.; Shortliffe, Edward H.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses contributions that computers and computer networks are making to the field of medicine. Emphasizes the computer's speed in storing and retrieving data. Suggests that doctors may soon be able to use computers to advise on diagnosis and treatment. (TW)

  12. Computer security in DOE distributed computing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hunteman, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    The modernization of DOE facilities amid limited funding is creating pressure on DOE facilities to find innovative approaches to their daily activities. Distributed computing systems are becoming cost-effective solutions to improved productivity. This paper defines and describes typical distributed computing systems in the DOE. The special computer security problems present in distributed computing systems are identified and compared with traditional computer systems. The existing DOE computer security policy supports only basic networks and traditional computer systems and does not address distributed computing systems. A review of the existing policy requirements is followed by an analysis of the policy as it applies to distributed computing systems. Suggested changes in the DOE computer security policy are identified and discussed. The long lead time in updating DOE policy will require guidelines for applying the existing policy to distributed systems. Some possible interim approaches are identified and discussed. 2 refs.

  13. Computers and occupational therapy.

    PubMed

    English, C B

    1975-01-01

    The benefits and applications of computer science for occupational therapy are explored and a basic, functional description of the computer and computer programming is presented. Potential problems and advantages of computer utilization are compared and examples of existing computer systems in health fields are cited. Methods for successfully introducing computers are discussed.

  14. Significant reduction of left atrial volume concomitant with clinical improvement after percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation for drug-refractory hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, and its precise detection with multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Yuichiro; Akita, Keitaro; Tsuruta, Hikaru; Yamada, Yoshitake; Hayashida, Kentaro; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Murata, Mitsushige; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Objective In patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM), left atrial (LA) volume measurement is very important to provide prognostic information. Recent studies demonstrated that multidetector CT (MDCT) is useful to assess the changes in LA volume. Our aim was to examine the utility of a follow-up cardiac MDCT for long-term evaluation of the effect of percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA) on LA volume. Methods We studied a consecutive cohort of 20 patients with drug-refractory symptomatic HOCM after PTSMA. We evaluated LA volume analyses with cardiac MDCT on patients who underwent PTSMA as compared to echocardiography. Results Before PTSMA, 75% of all patients had heart failure-associated symptoms in the New York Heart Association functional class III/IV. All patients experienced relief from heart failure-associated symptoms after PTSMA. Cardiac MDCT showed significant reduction in the index of maximum LA volume during follow-up compared to before PTSMA in the same way as in echocardiography (93.6±34.1 mL/m2 vs 82.6±35.3 mL/m2, p=0.035). A Bland-Altman plot showed small mean differences and limits of agreement in the measurements of the index of maximum LA volume before and after PTSMA between echocardiography and MDCT. Conclusions The follow-up cardiac MDCT was a useful tool to evaluate the effectiveness of PTSMA on reduction of LA volume. Cardiac MDCT might provide comparable measurements of the LA volume in patients with drug-refractory symptomatic HOCM before and after PTSMA compared to echocardiography. PMID:27307994

  15. Scanning protocol optimization and dose evaluation in coronary stenosis using multi-slices computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yung-hui; Chen, Chia-lin; Sheu, Chin-yin; Lee, Jason J. S.

    2007-02-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common incidence for premature death in developed countries. A major fraction is attributable to atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, which may result in sudden cardiac failure. A reduction of mortality caused by myocardial infarction may be achieved if coronary atherosclerosis can be detected and treated at an early stage before symptoms occur. Therefore, there is need for an effective tool that allows identification of patients at increased risk for future cardiac events. The current multi-detector CT has been widely used for detection and quantification of coronary calcifications as a sign of coronary atherosclerosis. The aim of this study is to optimize the diagnostic values and radiation exposure in coronary artery calcium-screening examination using multi-slice CT (MSCT) with different image scan protocols. The radiation exposure for all protocols is evaluated by using computed tomography dose index (CTDI) phantom measurements. We chose an optimal scanning protocol and evaluated patient radiation dose in the MSCT coronary artery screenings and preserved its expecting diagnostic accuracy. These changes make the MSCT have more operation flexibility and provide more diagnostic values in current practice.

  16. Assessing vertebral fracture risk on volumetric quantitative computed tomography by geometric characterization of trabecular bone structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checefsky, Walter A.; Abidin, Anas Z.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Bauer, Jan S.; Baum, Thomas; Wismüller, Axel

    2016-03-01

    The current clinical standard for measuring Bone Mineral Density (BMD) is dual X-ray absorptiometry, however more recently BMD derived from volumetric quantitative computed tomography has been shown to demonstrate a high association with spinal fracture susceptibility. In this study, we propose a method of fracture risk assessment using structural properties of trabecular bone in spinal vertebrae. Experimental data was acquired via axial multi-detector CT (MDCT) from 12 spinal vertebrae specimens using a whole-body 256-row CT scanner with a dedicated calibration phantom. Common image processing methods were used to annotate the trabecular compartment in the vertebral slices creating a circular region of interest (ROI) that excluded cortical bone for each slice. The pixels inside the ROI were converted to values indicative of BMD. High dimensional geometrical features were derived using the scaling index method (SIM) at different radii and scaling factors (SF). The mean BMD values within the ROI were then extracted and used in conjunction with a support vector machine to predict the failure load of the specimens. Prediction performance was measured using the root-mean-square error (RMSE) metric and determined that SIM combined with mean BMD features (RMSE = 0.82 +/- 0.37) outperformed MDCT-measured mean BMD (RMSE = 1.11 +/- 0.33) (p < 10-4). These results demonstrate that biomechanical strength prediction in vertebrae can be significantly improved through the use of SIM-derived texture features from trabecular bone.

  17. Does preoperative computed tomography reduce the risks associated with re-do cardiac surgery?

    PubMed

    Khan, Nouman U; Yonan, Nizar

    2009-07-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to the structured protocol. The question addressed was whether preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan reduces the risk associated with re-do cardiac surgery. A Medline search revealed 412 papers, of which seven were deemed relevant to the topic. We conclude that preoperative CT angiography using ECG-gated multi-detector scan enables excellent anatomical details of heart, aorta and previous grafts, and highlights high-risk cases due to adherent grafts or ventricle or aortic atherosclerosis. This allows for better risk stratification and change of surgical strategy to reduce the potential risk in patients coming for re-do cardiac surgery. According to published reports, high-risk CT-scan findings in these patients caused clinicians to cancel surgery in up to 13% of cases, while preventive surgical strategies including non-midline approach, peripheral vascular exposure or establishing cardiopulmonary bypass prior to re-sternotomy have been reported in over two-thirds of patients with significant reduction in the operative risk. The risk of damage to vital structures, including previous grafts, heart or larger vessels is generally reported fewer than 10%, with evidence of significantly lower incidence of intra-operative injuries in patients who had prior CT-scans compared to those who did not. Hence, adequate preoperative imaging using ECG-gated multi-slice CT is essential for optimum planning of re-do cardiac surgery. PMID:19339275

  18. Patient radiation dose from computed tomography angiography and digital subtraction angiography of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netwong, Y.; Krisanachinda, A.

    2016-03-01

    The 64-row multidetector computed tomography angiography (64-MDCTA) provides vascular image quality of the brain similar to digital subtraction angiography (DSA), but the effective dose of CTA is lower than DSA studied in phantom. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effective dose from 64-MDCTA and DSA. Effective dose (according to ICRP 103) from 64-MDCTA and DSA flat panel detector for cerebral vessels examination of the brain using standard protocols as recommended by the manufacturer was calculated for 30 cases of MDCTA (15 male and 15 female).The mean patient age was 49.5 (23-89) yrs. 30 cases of DSA (14 male and 16 female), the mean patient age was 46.8 (21-81) yrs. For CTA, the mean effective dose was 3.7 (2.82- 5.19) mSv. For DSA, the mean effective dose was 5.78 (3.3-10.06) mSv. The effective dose of CTA depends on the scanning protocol and scan length. Low tube current can reduce patient dose whereas the number of exposures and number of series in 3D rotational angiography (3D RA) resulted in increasing effective dose in DSA patients.

  19. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC AND ULTRASONOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF CAVERNOUS TRANSFORMATION OF THE OBSTRUCTED PORTAL VEIN IN SMALL ANIMALS.

    PubMed

    Specchi, Swan; Pey, Pascaline; Ledda, Gianluca; Lustgarten, Meghann; Thrall, Donald; Bertolini, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    In humans, the process of development of collateral vessels with hepatopetal flow around the portal vein in order to bypass an obstruction is called "cavernous transformation of the portal vein." The purpose of this retrospective, cross-sectional, multicentric study was to describe presumed cavernous transformation of the portal vein in small animals with portal vein obstruction using ultrasound and multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). Databases from three different institutions were searched for patients with an imaging diagnosis of cavernous transformation of the portal vein secondary to portal vein obstruction of any cause. Images were retrieved and reanalyzed. With MDCT-angiography, two main portoportal collateral pathways were identified: short tortuous portoportal veins around/inside the thrombus and long portoportal collaterals bypassing the site of portal obstruction. Three subtypes of the long collaterals, often coexisting, were identified. Branches of the hepatic artery where involved in collateral circulation in nine cases. Concomitant acquired portosystemic shunts were identified in six patients. With ultrasound, cavernous transformation of the portal vein was suspected in three dogs and one cat based on visualization of multiple and tortuous vascular structures corresponding to periportal collaterals. In conclusion, the current study provided descriptive MDCT and ultrasonographic characteristics of presumed cavernous transformation of the portal vein in a sample of small animals. Cavernous transformation of the portal vein could occur as a single condition or could be concurrent with acquired portosystemic shunts.

  20. Effective Doses in Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography for Lung Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Shinichiro Ko, Susumu; Ishii, Takayoshi; Nishizawa, Kanae

    2009-04-01

    The recent broad adoption of 4-D computed tomography (4DCT) scanning in radiotherapy has allowed the accurate determination of the target volume of tumors by minimizing image degradation caused by respiratory motion. Although the radiation exposure of the treatment beam is significantly greater than that of CT scans used for treatment planning, it is important to recognize and optimize the radiation exposure in 4DCT from the radiological protection point of view. Here, radiation exposure in 4DCT was measured with a 16 multidetector CT. Organ doses were measured using thermoluminescence radiation dosimeter chips inserted at respective anatomical sites of an anthropomorphic phantom. Results were compared with those with the helical CT scan mode. The effective dose measured for 4DCT was 24.7 mSv, approximately four times higher than that for helical CT. However, the increase in treatment accuracy afforded by 4DCT means its use in radiotherapy is inevitable. The patient exposure in the 4DCT could be of value by clarifying the advantage of the treatment planning using 4DCT.

  1. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC AND ULTRASONOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF CAVERNOUS TRANSFORMATION OF THE OBSTRUCTED PORTAL VEIN IN SMALL ANIMALS.

    PubMed

    Specchi, Swan; Pey, Pascaline; Ledda, Gianluca; Lustgarten, Meghann; Thrall, Donald; Bertolini, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    In humans, the process of development of collateral vessels with hepatopetal flow around the portal vein in order to bypass an obstruction is called "cavernous transformation of the portal vein." The purpose of this retrospective, cross-sectional, multicentric study was to describe presumed cavernous transformation of the portal vein in small animals with portal vein obstruction using ultrasound and multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). Databases from three different institutions were searched for patients with an imaging diagnosis of cavernous transformation of the portal vein secondary to portal vein obstruction of any cause. Images were retrieved and reanalyzed. With MDCT-angiography, two main portoportal collateral pathways were identified: short tortuous portoportal veins around/inside the thrombus and long portoportal collaterals bypassing the site of portal obstruction. Three subtypes of the long collaterals, often coexisting, were identified. Branches of the hepatic artery where involved in collateral circulation in nine cases. Concomitant acquired portosystemic shunts were identified in six patients. With ultrasound, cavernous transformation of the portal vein was suspected in three dogs and one cat based on visualization of multiple and tortuous vascular structures corresponding to periportal collaterals. In conclusion, the current study provided descriptive MDCT and ultrasonographic characteristics of presumed cavernous transformation of the portal vein in a sample of small animals. Cavernous transformation of the portal vein could occur as a single condition or could be concurrent with acquired portosystemic shunts. PMID:25877678

  2. From macro-scale to micro-scale computational anatomy: a perspective on the next 20 years.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kensaku

    2016-10-01

    This paper gives our perspective on the next two decades of computational anatomy, which has made great strides in the recognition and understanding of human anatomy from conventional clinical images. The results from this field are now used in a variety of medical applications, including quantitative analysis of organ shapes, interventional assistance, surgical navigation, and population analysis. Several anatomical models have also been used in computational anatomy, and these mainly target millimeter-scale shapes. For example, liver-shape models are almost completely modeled at the millimeter scale, and shape variations are described at such scales. Most clinical 3D scanning devices have had just under 1 or 0.5 mm per voxel resolution for over 25 years, and this resolution has not changed drastically in that time. Although Z-axis (head-to-tail direction) resolution has been drastically improved by the introduction of multi-detector CT scanning devices, in-plane resolutions have not changed very much either. When we look at human anatomy, we can see different anatomical structures at different scales. For example, pulmonary blood vessels and lung lobes can be observed in millimeter-scale images. If we take 10-µm-scale images of a lung specimen, the alveoli and bronchiole regions can be located in them. Most work in millimeter-scale computational anatomy has been done by the medical-image analysis community. In the next two decades, we encourage our community to focus on micro-scale computational anatomy. In this perspective paper, we briefly review the achievements of computational anatomy and its impacts on clinical applications; furthermore, we show several possibilities from the viewpoint of microscopic computational anatomy by discussing experimental results from our recent research activities.

  3. The assumptions of computing

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, J.K.

    1994-12-31

    The use of computers, like any technological activity, is not content-neutral. Users of computers constantly interact with assumptions regarding worthwhile activity which are embedded in any computing system. Directly questioning these assumptions in the context of computing allows us to develop an understanding of responsible computing.

  4. Computers in Teaching English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, James E., Ed.; Davis, Hazel K., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The 26 articles in this journal issue discuss the use of the computer in the English classroom. Among the topics and applications discussed are (1) computer assisted invention, (2) word processing, (3) overcoming computer anxiety, (4) using computers in technical writing classes, (5) grading student essays by computer, (6) the experiences of an…

  5. The Old Computers' Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angier, Natalie

    1983-01-01

    The Computer Museum in Marlborough, Massachusetts houses old and not-so-old calculators, famous old computers and parts of computers, photographs and assorted memorabilia, computer-generated murals, and even a computer made of Tinkertoys that plays tick-tack-toe. The development of the museum and selected exhibits is described. (Author/JN)

  6. Democratizing Computer Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Jane; Goode, Joanna; Ryoo, Jean J.

    2015-01-01

    Computer science programs are too often identified with a narrow stratum of the student population, often white or Asian boys who have access to computers at home. But because computers play such a huge role in our world today, all students can benefit from the study of computer science and the opportunity to build skills related to computing. The…

  7. Computers for Everybody.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Jerry; Miller, Merl

    This book explains how computers can be used in the home, office or school, and provides a consumer's guide to computer equipment for the novice user. The first sections of the book offer a brief sketch of computer history, a listing of entertaining and easily available computer programs, a step-by-step guide to buying a computer, and advice on…

  8. GeoComputation 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Yong; Hoffman, Forrest M; Liu, Dingsheng

    2009-01-01

    The tremendous computing requirements of today's algorithms and the high costs of high-performance supercomputers drive us to share computing resources. The emerging computational Grid technologies are expected to make feasible the creation of a computational environment handling many PetaBytes of distributed data, tens of thousands of heterogeneous computing resources, and thousands of simultaneous users from multiple research institutions.

  9. Tying into Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canipe, Stephen L.

    Topics in this paper include: sources of computer programs, public domain software, copyright violations, purposes of computers in classrooms (drill/practice and interactive learning), computer assisted instruction, flow charts, and computer clubs (such as App-le-kations in Charlotte, North Carolina). A complete listing of two computer programs…

  10. Computational thinking and thinking about computing.

    PubMed

    Wing, Jeannette M

    2008-10-28

    Computational thinking will influence everyone in every field of endeavour. This vision poses a new educational challenge for our society, especially for our children. In thinking about computing, we need to be attuned to the three drivers of our field: science, technology and society. Accelerating technological advances and monumental societal demands force us to revisit the most basic scientific questions of computing.

  11. Computational thinking and thinking about computing

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Jeannette M.

    2008-01-01

    Computational thinking will influence everyone in every field of endeavour. This vision poses a new educational challenge for our society, especially for our children. In thinking about computing, we need to be attuned to the three drivers of our field: science, technology and society. Accelerating technological advances and monumental societal demands force us to revisit the most basic scientific questions of computing. PMID:18672462

  12. Computational Method for Identifying and Quantifying Shape Features of Human Left Ventricular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ardekani, Siamak; Weiss, Robert G.; Lardo, Albert C.; George, Richard T.; Lima, Joao A. C.; Wu, Katherine C.; Miller, Michael I.; Winslow, Raimond L.; Younes, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Left ventricular remodeling during the development of heart failure is a strong predictor of cardiovascular mortality. However, methods to objectively quantify remodeling-associated shape changes are not routinely available but may be possible with new computational anatomy tools. In this study, we analyzed and compared multi-detector computed tomographic (MDCT) images of ventricular shape at endsystole (ES) and end-diastole (ED) to determine whether regional structural characteristics could be identified and, as a proof of principle, whether differences in hearts of patients with anterior myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) could be distinguished from those with global nonischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM). MDCT images of hearts from 11 patients (5 with ICM) with ejection fractions (EF) > 35% were analyzed. An average ventricular shape model (template) was constructed for each cardiac phase by bringing heart shapes into correspondence using linear and nonlinear image matching algorithms. Next, transformation fields were computed between the template image and individual heart images in the population. Principal component analysis (PCA) method was used to quantify ventricular shape differences described by the transformation vector fields. Statistical analysis of PCA coefficients revealed significant ventricular shape differences at ED (p = 0.03) and ES (p = 0.03). For validation, a second set of 14 EF-matched patients (8 with ICM) were evaluated. The discrimination rule learned from the training data set was able to differentiate ICM from NICM patients (p = 0.008). Application of a novel shape analysis method to in vivo human cardiac images acquired on a clinical scanner is feasible and can quantify regional shape differences at end-systole in remodeled myopathic human myocardium. This approach may be useful in identifying differences in the remodeling process between ICM and NICM populations and possibly in differentiating the populations

  13. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN DOSE MODELING: APPLICATION OF COMPUTATIONAL BIOPHYSICAL TRANSPORT, COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational toxicology (CompTox) leverages the significant gains in computing power and computational techniques (e.g., numerical approaches, structure-activity relationships, bioinformatics) realized over the last few years, thereby reducing costs and increasing efficiency i...

  14. PR Educators Stress Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    Surveys the varied roles computers play in public relations education. Asserts that, because computers are used extensively in the public relations field, students should become acquainted with the varied capabilities of computers and their role in public relations practice. (MM)

  15. On Teaching Computer Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Er, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Points out difficulties associated with teaching introductory computer programing courses, discussing the importance of computer programing and explains activities associated with its use. Possible solutions to help teachers resolve problem areas in computer instruction are also offered. (ML)

  16. Computers: Instruments of Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkume, Megan

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the impact of computers in the home, the school, and the workplace. Looks at changes in computer use by occupations and by industry. Provides information on new job titles in computer occupations. (JOW)

  17. Selecting Appropriate Computing Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetlow, William L.

    1990-01-01

    Selecting computer tools requires analyzing information requirements and audiences, assessing existing institutional research and computing capacities, creating or improving a planning database, using computer experts, determining software needs, obtaining sufficient resources for independent operations, acquiring quality, and insisting on…

  18. Avoiding Computer Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Joyce; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The threat of computer sabotage is a real concern to business teachers and others responsible for academic computer facilities. Teachers can minimize the possibility. Eight suggestions for avoiding computer viruses are given. (JOW)

  19. Computer Viruses: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmion, Dan

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the early history and current proliferation of computer viruses that occur on Macintosh and DOS personal computers, mentions virus detection programs, and offers suggestions for how libraries can protect themselves and their users from damage by computer viruses. (LRW)

  20. Computing technology in the 1980's. [computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. S.

    1978-01-01

    Advances in computing technology have been led by consistently improving semiconductor technology. The semiconductor industry has turned out ever faster, smaller, and less expensive devices since transistorized computers were first introduced 20 years ago. For the next decade, there appear to be new advances possible, with the rate of introduction of improved devices at least equal to the historic trends. The implication of these projections is that computers will enter new markets and will truly be pervasive in business, home, and factory as their cost diminishes and their computational power expands to new levels. The computer industry as we know it today will be greatly altered in the next decade, primarily because the raw computer system will give way to computer-based turn-key information and control systems.

  1. Symbolic and algebraic computation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book contains subjects under the following headings: Foundations of symbolic computation; Computational logics; systems Algorithms on polynormal; Integrative and differential equations; and Differential equations.

  2. Computer Lab Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodarz, Nan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the layout and elements of an effective school computer lab. Includes configuration, storage spaces, cabling and electrical requirements, lighting, furniture, and computer hardware and peripherals. (PKP)

  3. Computer hardware fault administration

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-09-14

    Computer hardware fault administration carried out in a parallel computer, where the parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes. The compute nodes are coupled for data communications by at least two independent data communications networks, where each data communications network includes data communications links connected to the compute nodes. Typical embodiments carry out hardware fault administration by identifying a location of a defective link in the first data communications network of the parallel computer and routing communications data around the defective link through the second data communications network of the parallel computer.

  4. Computational aerodynamics and supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the progress in computational aerodynamics over the last decade is reviewed. The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program objectives, computational goals, and implementation plans are described.

  5. Computational physics with PetaFlops computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attig, Norbert

    2009-04-01

    Driven by technology, Scientific Computing is rapidly entering the PetaFlops era. The Jülich Supercomputing Centre (JSC), one of three German national supercomputing centres, is focusing on the IBM Blue Gene architecture to provide computer resources of this class to its users, the majority of whom are computational physicists. Details of the system will be discussed and applications will be described which significantly benefit from this new architecture.

  6. Computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) activities at the Langley Research Center is given. The role of supercomputers in CFD research, algorithm development, multigrid approaches to computational fluid flows, aerodynamics computer programs, computational grid generation, turbulence research, and studies of rarefied gas flows are among the topics that are briefly surveyed.

  7. Computer-Based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Peggy, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Three essays on the ways in which colleges and universities use the computer as a teaching tool are presented, along with descriptions of 10 school programs that reflect the diversity of computer applications across the United States. In "A Place for Computing in Liberal Education," Karl L. Zinn likens the computer to personal resource tools, such…

  8. Computers and Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Sheila; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Includes "Role of Computers in Reshaping the Work Force" (McConnell); "Semiconductors" (Moris); "Computer Manufacturing" (Warnke); "Commercial Banking Transformed by Computer Technology" (Morisi); "Software, Engineering Industries: Threatened by Technological Change?" (Goodman); "Job Creation and the Emerging Home Computer Market" (Freeman); and…

  9. Computer Viruses. Technology Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponder, Tim, Comp.; Ropog, Marty, Comp.; Keating, Joseph, Comp.

    This document provides general information on computer viruses, how to help protect a computer network from them, measures to take if a computer becomes infected. Highlights include the origins of computer viruses; virus contraction; a description of some common virus types (File Virus, Boot Sector/Partition Table Viruses, Trojan Horses, and…

  10. My Computer Romance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Gardner

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author relates the big role of computers in his life as a writer. The author narrates that he has been using a computer for nearly twenty years now. He relates that computers has set his writing free. When he started writing, he was just using an electric typewriter. He also relates that his romance with computers is also a…

  11. Overview 1993: Computational applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benek, John A.

    1993-01-01

    Computational applications include projects that apply or develop computationally intensive computer programs. Such programs typically require supercomputers to obtain solutions in a timely fashion. This report describes two CSTAR projects involving Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technology. The first, the Parallel Processing Initiative, is a joint development effort and the second, the Chimera Technology Development, is a transfer of government developed technology to American industry.

  12. Computer Innovations in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Andrew R.

    Computers in education are put in context by a brief review of current social and technological trends, a short history of the development of computers and the vast expansion of their use, and a brief description of computers and their use. Further chapters describe instructional applications, administrative uses, uses of computers for libraries…

  13. Elementary School Computer Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY.

    This curriculum guide presents lessons for computer literacy instruction in the elementary grades. The first section of the guide includes 22 lessons on hardware, covering such topics as how computers work, keyboarding, word processing, and computer peripherals. The 13 lessons in the second section cover social topics related to the computer,…

  14. The Computer Manpower Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooney, Joseph J.

    1975-01-01

    Advances and employment outlook in the field of computer science are discussed as well as the problems related to improving the quality of computer education. Specific computer jobs discussed include: data processing machine repairers, systems analysts, programmers, computer and peripheral equipment operators, and keypunch operators. (EA)

  15. The Glass Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paesler, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Digital computers use different kinds of memory, each of which is either volatile or nonvolatile. On most computers only the hard drive memory is nonvolatile, i.e., it retains all information stored on it when the power is off. When a computer is turned on, an operating system stored on the hard drive is loaded into the computer's memory cache and…

  16. How Computer Graphics Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prosise, Jeff

    This document presents the principles behind modern computer graphics without straying into the arcane languages of mathematics and computer science. Illustrations accompany the clear, step-by-step explanations that describe how computers draw pictures. The 22 chapters of the book are organized into 5 sections. "Part 1: Computer Graphics in…

  17. Computers and Conceptual Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, John

    A systematic study was conducted with a group of 10- to 12-year-olds using computer assisted instruction in a unit on fire which included a computer simulation of combustion. Three research questions were addressed to learn more about how the computer experience challenged the students' preconceptions: what the students thought the computer knew,…

  18. French Computer Terminology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Eugene F.

    1985-01-01

    Characteristics, idiosyncrasies, borrowings, and other aspects of the French terminology for computers and computer-related matters are discussed and placed in the context of French computer use. A glossary provides French equivalent terms or translations of English computer terminology. (MSE)

  19. The Story of Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meadow, Charles T.

    The aim of this book is to interest young people from the ages of ten to fourteen in computers, particularly to show them that computers are exciting machines, controlled by people, and to dispel myths that computers can do magic. This is not a detailed exposition of computers, nor is it a textbook. It is an attempt to impart flavor and general…

  20. The effect of z overscanning on radiation burden of pediatric patients undergoing head CT with multidetector scanners: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Tzedakis, Antonis; Perisinakis, Kostas; Raissaki, Maria; Damilakis, John

    2006-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of z overscanning on eye lens dose and effective dose received by pediatric patients undergoing head CT examinations. A pediatric patient study was carried out to obtain the exposure parameters and data regarding the eye lens position with respect to imaged volume boundaries. This information was used to simulate CT exposures by Monte Carlo code. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP, version 4C2) radiation transport code and five mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old patient, were employed in the current study. To estimate effective dose, the weighted computed tomography dose index was calculated by cylindrical polymethyl-methacrylate phantoms of 9.7, 13.1, 15.4, 16.1, and 16.9 cm in diameter representing the pediatric head of newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old individuals, respectively. The validity of the Monte Carlo calculated approach was verified by comparison with dose data obtained using physical pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms and thermoluminescence dosimetry. For all patients studied, the eye lenses were located in the region -1 to 3 cm from the first slice of the imaged volume. Doses from axial scans were always lower than those from corresponding helical examinations. The percentage differences in normalized eye lens absorbed dose between contiguous axial and helical examinations with pitch=1 were found to be up to 10.9%, when the eye lenses were located inside the region to be imaged. When the eye lenses were positioned 0-3 cm far from the first slice of region to be imaged, the normalized dose to the lens from contiguous axial examinations was up to 11 times lower than the corresponding values from helical mode with pitch=1. The effective dose from axial examinations was up to 24% lower than corresponding values from helical examinations with pitch=1. In conclusion, it is more dose efficient to use axial mode acquisition rather than helical scan

  1. Parallel computing works

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-23

    An account of the Caltech Concurrent Computation Program (C{sup 3}P), a five year project that focused on answering the question: Can parallel computers be used to do large-scale scientific computations '' As the title indicates, the question is answered in the affirmative, by implementing numerous scientific applications on real parallel computers and doing computations that produced new scientific results. In the process of doing so, C{sup 3}P helped design and build several new computers, designed and implemented basic system software, developed algorithms for frequently used mathematical computations on massively parallel machines, devised performance models and measured the performance of many computers, and created a high performance computing facility based exclusively on parallel computers. While the initial focus of C{sup 3}P was the hypercube architecture developed by C. Seitz, many of the methods developed and lessons learned have been applied successfully on other massively parallel architectures.

  2. (Computer vision and robotics)

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.P.

    1989-02-13

    The traveler attended the Fourth Aalborg International Symposium on Computer Vision at Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. The traveler presented three invited lectures entitled, Concurrent Computer Vision on a Hypercube Multicomputer'', The Butterfly Accumulator and its Application in Concurrent Computer Vision on Hypercube Multicomputers'', and Concurrency in Mobile Robotics at ORNL'', and a ten-minute editorial entitled, It Concurrency an Issue in Computer Vision.'' The traveler obtained information on current R D efforts elsewhere in concurrent computer vision.

  3. X-ray computed tomography for virtually unrolling damaged papyri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegra, Dario; Ciliberto, Enrico; Ciliberto, Paolo; Petrillo, Giuseppe; Stanco, Filippo; Trombatore, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    The regular format for ancient works of literature was the papyrus roll. Recently many efforts to perform virtual restoration of this archeological artifact have been done. In fact the case of ancient rolled papyrus is very intriguing. Old papyruses are the substrates of very important historical information, probably being the use of papyrus dated to the Pre-Dynastic Period. Papyrus degradation is often very hard so that physical unrolling is sometime absolutely impossible. In this paper, authors describe their effort in setting a new virtual restoration methodology based on software manipulation of X-ray tomographic images. A realistic model, obtained by painting a hieroglyph inscription of Thutmosis III on a papyrus substrate made by the original method described by Plinius the Elder and by pigments and binders compatible with the Egyptian use (ochers with natural glue), was made for the X-ray investigation. A GE Optima 660 64 slice was used to obtain a stack of tomographic slices of the rolled model. Each slice appears as spiral. The intensity variations along the cross-sectional result from ink on the papyrus. The files were elaborated with original software, written by the use of MATLAB high-level language, and the final result was quite similar to the radiography of the physically unrolled sheet.

  4. Computational Biology, Advanced Scientific Computing, and Emerging Computational Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-27

    This CRADA was established at the start of FY02 with $200 K from IBM and matching funds from DOE to support post-doctoral fellows in collaborative research between International Business Machines and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to explore effective use of emerging petascale computational architectures for the solution of computational biology problems. 'No cost' extensions of the CRADA were negotiated with IBM for FY03 and FY04.

  5. Future Computer Requirements for Computational Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Recent advances in computational aerodynamics are discussed as well as motivations for and potential benefits of a National Aerodynamic Simulation Facility having the capability to solve fluid dynamic equations at speeds two to three orders of magnitude faster than presently possible with general computers. Two contracted efforts to define processor architectures for such a facility are summarized.

  6. Computers and Computation. Readings from Scientific American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Robert R.; Weizenbaum, Joseph

    A collection of articles from "Scientific American" magazine has been put together at this time because the current period in computer science is one of consolidation rather than innovation. A few years ago, computer science was moving so swiftly that even the professional journals were more archival than informative; but today it is much easier…

  7. Monte Carlo simulations of adult and pediatric computed tomography exams: Validation studies of organ doses with physical phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Daniel J.; Lee, Choonsik; Tien, Christopher; Fisher, Ryan; Hoerner, Matthew R.; Hintenlang, David; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To validate the accuracy of a Monte Carlo source model of the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 CT scanner using organ doses measured in physical anthropomorphic phantoms. Methods: The x-ray output of the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 multidetector CT scanner was simulated within the Monte Carlo radiation transport code, MCNPX version 2.6. The resulting source model was able to perform various simulated axial and helical computed tomographic (CT) scans of varying scan parameters, including beam energy, filtration, pitch, and beam collimation. Two custom-built anthropomorphic phantoms were used to take dose measurements on the CT scanner: an adult male and a 9-month-old. The adult male is a physical replica of University of Florida reference adult male hybrid computational phantom, while the 9-month-old is a replica of University of Florida Series B 9-month-old voxel computational phantom. Each phantom underwent a series of axial and helical CT scans, during which organ doses were measured using fiber-optic coupled plastic scintillator dosimeters developed at University of Florida. The physical setup was reproduced and simulated in MCNPX using the CT source model and the computational phantoms upon which the anthropomorphic phantoms were constructed. Average organ doses were then calculated based upon these MCNPX results. Results: For all CT scans, good agreement was seen between measured and simulated organ doses. For the adult male, the percent differences were within 16% for axial scans, and within 18% for helical scans. For the 9-month-old, the percent differences were all within 15% for both the axial and helical scans. These results are comparable to previously published validation studies using GE scanners and commercially available anthropomorphic phantoms. Conclusions: Overall results of this study show that the Monte Carlo source model can be used to accurately and reliably calculate organ doses for patients undergoing a variety of axial or helical CT

  8. Evaluation of renal vascular anatomy in live renal donors: Role of multi detector computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Vaidehi Kumudchandra; Patel, Alpeshkumar Shakerlal; Sutariya, Harsh Chandrakant; Gandhi, Shruti Pradipkumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evaluation of renal vascular variations is important in renal donors to avoid vascular complications during surgery. Venous variations, mainly resulting from the errors of the embryological development, are frequently observed. Aim: This retrospective cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the renal vascular variants with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography to provide valuable information for surgery and its correlations with surgical findings. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 patients underwent MDCT angiography as a routine work up for live renal donors. The number, course, and drainage patterns of the renal veins were retrospectively observed from the scans. Anomalies of renal veins and inferior vena cava (IVC) were recorded and classified. Multiplanar reformations (MPRs), maximum intensity projections, and volume rendering were used for analysis. The results obtained were correlated surgically. Results: In the present study, out of 200 healthy donors, the standard pattern of drainage of renal veins was observed in only 67% of donors on the right side and 92% of donors on the left side. Supernumerary renal veins in the form of dual and triple renal veins were seen on the right side in about 32.5% of donors (dual right renal veins in 30.5% cases and triple right renal veins in 2.5% cases). Variations on the left side were classified into four groups: supernumerary, retro-aortic, circumaortic, and plexiform left renal veins in 1%, 2.5%, 4%, 0.5%, cases respectively. Conclusions: Developmental variations in renal veins can be easily detected on computed tomography scan, which can go unnoticed and can pose a fatal threat during major surgeries such as donor nephrectomies in otherwise healthy donors if undiagnosed. PMID:27453646

  9. Cone-beam Computed Tomography-guided Stereotactic Liver Punctures: A Phantom Study

    SciTech Connect

    Toporek, Grzegorz Wallach, Daphne Weber, Stefan; Bale, Reto; Widmann, Gerlig

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Images from computed tomography (CT), combined with navigation systems, improve the outcomes of local thermal therapies that are dependent on accurate probe placement. Although the usage of CT is desired, its availability for time-consuming radiological interventions is limited. Alternatively, three-dimensional images from C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) can be used. The goal of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of navigated CBCT-guided needle punctures, controlled with CT scans. Methods: Five series of five navigated punctures were performed on a nonrigid phantom using a liver specific navigation system and CBCT volumetric dataset for planning and navigation. To mimic targets, five titanium screws were fixed to the phantom. Target positioning accuracy (TPE{sub CBCT}) was computed from control CT scans and divided into lateral and longitudinal components. Additionally, CBCT-CT guidance accuracy was deducted by performing CBCT-to-CT image coregistration and measuring TPE{sub CBCT-CT} from fused datasets. Image coregistration was evaluated using fiducial registration error (FRE{sub CBCT-CT}) and target registration error (TRE{sub CBCT-CT}). Results: Positioning accuracies in lateral directions pertaining to CBCT (TPE{sub CBCT} = 2.1 {+-} 1.0 mm) were found to be better to those achieved from previous study using CT (TPE{sub CT} = 2.3 {+-} 1.3 mm). Image coregistration error was 0.3 {+-} 0.1 mm, resulting in an average TRE of 2.1 {+-} 0.7 mm (N = 5 targets) and average Euclidean TPE{sub CBCT-CT} of 3.1 {+-} 1.3 mm. Conclusions: Stereotactic needle punctures might be planned and performed on volumetric CBCT images and controlled with multidetector CT with positioning accuracy higher or similar to those performed using CT scanners.

  10. Understanding student computational thinking with computational modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiken, John M.; Caballero, Marcos D.; Douglas, Scott S.; Burk, John B.; Scanlon, Erin M.; Thoms, Brian D.; Schatz, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the National Research Council's framework for next generation science standards highlighted "computational thinking" as one of its "fundamental practices". 9th Grade students taking a physics course that employed the Arizona State University's Modeling Instruction curriculum were taught to construct computational models of physical systems. Student computational thinking was assessed using a proctored programming assignment, written essay, and a series of think-aloud interviews, where the students produced and discussed a computational model of a baseball in motion via a high-level programming environment (VPython). Roughly a third of the students in the study were successful in completing the programming assignment. Student success on this assessment was tied to how students synthesized their knowledge of physics and computation. On the essay and interview assessments, students displayed unique views of the relationship between force and motion; those who spoke of this relationship in causal (rather than observational) terms tended to have more success in the programming exercise.

  11. Heterotic computing: exploiting hybrid computational devices.

    PubMed

    Kendon, Viv; Sebald, Angelika; Stepney, Susan

    2015-07-28

    Current computational theory deals almost exclusively with single models: classical, neural, analogue, quantum, etc. In practice, researchers use ad hoc combinations, realizing only recently that they can be fundamentally more powerful than the individual parts. A Theo Murphy meeting brought together theorists and practitioners of various types of computing, to engage in combining the individual strengths to produce powerful new heterotic devices. 'Heterotic computing' is defined as a combination of two or more computational systems such that they provide an advantage over either substrate used separately. This post-meeting collection of articles provides a wide-ranging survey of the state of the art in diverse computational paradigms, together with reflections on their future combination into powerful and practical applications.

  12. Cloud Computing for radiologists.

    PubMed

    Kharat, Amit T; Safvi, Amjad; Thind, Ss; Singh, Amarjit

    2012-07-01

    Cloud computing is a concept wherein a computer grid is created using the Internet with the sole purpose of utilizing shared resources such as computer software, hardware, on a pay-per-use model. Using Cloud computing, radiology users can efficiently manage multimodality imaging units by using the latest software and hardware without paying huge upfront costs. Cloud computing systems usually work on public, private, hybrid, or community models. Using the various components of a Cloud, such as applications, client, infrastructure, storage, services, and processing power, Cloud computing can help imaging units rapidly scale and descale operations and avoid huge spending on maintenance of costly applications and storage. Cloud computing allows flexibility in imaging. It sets free radiology from the confines of a hospital and creates a virtual mobile office. The downsides to Cloud computing involve security and privacy issues which need to be addressed to ensure the success of Cloud computing in the future.

  13. Polymorphous computing fabric

    DOEpatents

    Wolinski, Christophe Czeslaw; Gokhale, Maya B.; McCabe, Kevin Peter

    2011-01-18

    Fabric-based computing systems and methods are disclosed. A fabric-based computing system can include a polymorphous computing fabric that can be customized on a per application basis and a host processor in communication with said polymorphous computing fabric. The polymorphous computing fabric includes a cellular architecture that can be highly parameterized to enable a customized synthesis of fabric instances for a variety of enhanced application performances thereof. A global memory concept can also be included that provides the host processor random access to all variables and instructions associated with the polymorphous computing fabric.

  14. Computational aerodynamics and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The role of computational aerodynamics in design is reviewed with attention given to the design process; the proper role of computations; the importance of calibration, interpretation, and verification; the usefulness of a given computational capability; and the marketing of new codes. Examples of computational aerodynamics in design are given with particular emphasis on the Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology. Finally, future prospects are noted, with consideration given to the role of advanced computers, advances in numerical solution techniques, turbulence models, complex geometries, and computational design procedures. Previously announced in STAR as N82-33348

  15. Scientific Grid computing.

    PubMed

    Coveney, Peter V

    2005-08-15

    We introduce a definition of Grid computing which is adhered to throughout this Theme Issue. We compare the evolution of the World Wide Web with current aspirations for Grid computing and indicate areas that need further research and development before a generally usable Grid infrastructure becomes available. We discuss work that has been done in order to make scientific Grid computing a viable proposition, including the building of Grids, middleware developments, computational steering and visualization. We review science that has been enabled by contemporary computational Grids, and associated progress made through the widening availability of high performance computing.

  16. Cardiac computed tomography radiation dose reduction using interior reconstruction algorithm with the aorta and vertebra as known information.

    PubMed

    Bharkhada, Deepak; Yu, Hengyong; Ge, Shuping; Carr, J Jeffrey; Wang, Ge

    2009-01-01

    High x-ray radiation dose is a major public concern with the increasing use of multidetector computed tomography (CT) for diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. This issue must be effectively addressed by dose-reduction techniques. Recently, our group proved that an internal region of interest (ROI) can be exactly reconstructed solely from localized projections if a small subregion within the ROI is known. In this article, we propose to use attenuation values of the blood in aorta and vertebral bone to serve as the known information for localized cardiac CT. First, we describe a novel interior tomography approach that backprojects differential fan-beam or parallel-beam projections to obtain the Hilbert transform and then reconstructs the original image in an ROI using the iterative projection onto convex sets algorithm. Then, we develop a numerical phantom based on clinical cardiac CT images for simulations. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to use practical prior information and exactly reconstruct cardiovascular structures only from projection data along x-ray paths through the ROI.

  17. Structural mechanics computations on parallel computing platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.; Plaskacz, E.J.; Pfeiffer, P.A.

    1995-06-01

    With recent advances in parallel supercomputers and network-connected workstations, the solution to large scale structural engineering problems has now become tractable. High-performance computer architectures, which are usually available at large universities and national laboratories, now can solve large nonlinear problems. At the other end of the spectrum, network connected workstations can be configured to become a distributed-parallel computer. This approach is attractive to small, medium and large engineering firms. This paper describes the development of a parallelized finite element computer program for the solution of static, nonlinear structural mechanics problems.

  18. Cognitive Computing for Security.

    SciTech Connect

    Debenedictis, Erik; Rothganger, Fredrick; Aimone, James Bradley; Marinella, Matthew; Evans, Brian Robert; Warrender, Christina E.; Mickel, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Final report for Cognitive Computing for Security LDRD 165613. It reports on the development of hybrid of general purpose/ne uromorphic computer architecture, with an emphasis on potential implementation with memristors.

  19. Computer Intrusions and Attacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Howard

    1999-01-01

    Examines some frequently encountered unsolicited computer intrusions, including computer viruses, worms, Java applications, trojan horses or vandals, e-mail spamming, hoaxes, and cookies. Also discusses virus-protection software, both for networks and for individual users. (LRW)

  20. Computers in Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Advances in factory computerization (computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing) are reviewed, including discussions of robotics, human factors engineering, and the sociological impact of automation. (JN)

  1. ICASE Computer Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering computer science program is discussed in outline form. Information is given on such topics as problem decomposition, algorithm development, programming languages, and parallel architectures.

  2. Computational Toxicology (S)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emerging field of computational toxicology applies mathematical and computer models and molecular biological and chemical approaches to explore both qualitative and quantitative relationships between sources of environmental pollutant exposure and adverse health outcomes. Th...

  3. Computers in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, John W.; Moore, Elizabeth A.

    1988-01-01

    Surveys the types of computers being used in high school and university chemistry courses. Identifies types of hardware found on Apple and MS-DOS computers. Makes recommendations for the upgrading of current equipment. (ML)

  4. The Interpersonal Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, John S.

    1994-01-01

    Provides helpful tips regarding classroom use of computers in a cooperative-learning environment. Comments on student computer ratio, interdependence, individual accountability, heterogeneous grouping, shared responsibility, and good working relationships. (ZWH)

  5. Space Spurred Computer Graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Dicomed Corporation was asked by NASA in the early 1970s to develop processing capabilities for recording images sent from Mars by Viking spacecraft. The company produced a film recorder which increased the intensity levels and the capability for color recording. This development led to a strong technology base resulting in sophisticated computer graphics equipment. Dicomed systems are used to record CAD (computer aided design) and CAM (computer aided manufacturing) equipment, to update maps and produce computer generated animation.

  6. Introduction to Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekert, A.

    A computation is a physical process. It may be performed by a piece of electronics or on an abacus, or in your brain, but it is a process that takes place in nature and as such it is subject to the laws of physics. Quantum computers are machines that rely on characteristically quantum phenomena, such as quantum interference and quantum entanglement in order to perform computation. In this series of lectures I want to elaborate on the computational power of such machines.

  7. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT,J.

    2004-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security.

  8. Quantum computing and probability.

    PubMed

    Ferry, David K

    2009-11-25

    Over the past two decades, quantum computing has become a popular and promising approach to trying to solve computationally difficult problems. Missing in many descriptions of quantum computing is just how probability enters into the process. Here, we discuss some simple examples of how uncertainty and probability enter, and how this and the ideas of quantum computing challenge our interpretations of quantum mechanics. It is found that this uncertainty can lead to intrinsic decoherence, and this raises challenges for error correction.

  9. Nanoelectronics: Metrology and Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, Mark; Clark, Jason V.; Klimeck, Gerhard; Raman, Arvind

    2007-09-26

    Research in nanoelectronics poses new challenges for metrology, but advances in theory, simulation and computing and networking technology provide new opportunities to couple simulation and metrology. This paper begins with a brief overview of current work in computational nanoelectronics. Three examples of how computation can assist metrology will then be discussed. The paper concludes with a discussion of how cyberinfrastructure can help connect computing and metrology using the nanoHUB (www.nanoHUB.org) as a specific example.

  10. Expanding Computer Service with Personal Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bomzer, Herbert

    1983-01-01

    A planning technique, the mission justification document, and the evaluation procedures developed at Central Michigan University to ensure the orderly growth of computer-dependent resources within the constraints of tight budgets are described. (Author/MLW)

  11. Computer Literacy. Focus 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benderson, Albert

    One of a series on the responses by the Educational Testing Service (ETS) and others to critical problems in education, this overview addresses a variety of issues related to computer literacy. Topics discussed include the pace of the transition to the computer age, the development of microprocessors, and the computer as fad or revolution.…

  12. BNL ATLAS Grid Computing

    ScienceCinema

    Michael Ernst

    2016-07-12

    As the sole Tier-1 computing facility for ATLAS in the United States and the largest ATLAS computing center worldwide Brookhaven provides a large portion of the overall computing resources for U.S. collaborators and serves as the central hub for storing,

  13. Computers in Scientific Instrumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enke, C. G.

    1982-01-01

    Computer applications in scientific instrumentation are traced from early data processing to modern computer-based instruments. Probable pathways toward instruments with increased "intelligence" include, among others, implementation of hierarchical computer networks and microprocessor controllers and the simplification of programing. The…

  14. Dietary Interviewing by Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slack, Warner V.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    A computer based dietary interviewing program enhanced self awareness for overweight participants. In a three part interview designed for direct interaction between patient and computer, questions dealt with general dietary behavior and details of food intake. The computer assisted the patient in planning a weight reducing diet of approximately…

  15. Coping with Computing Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslin, Richard D.

    Elements of computing success of Iona College, the challenges it currently faces, and the strategies conceived to cope with future computing needs are discussed. The college has mandated computer literacy for students and offers nine degrees in the computerized information system/management information system areas. Since planning is needed in…

  16. The fifth generation computer

    SciTech Connect

    Moto-Oka, T.; Kitsuregawa, M.

    1985-01-01

    The leader of Japan's Fifth Generation computer project, known as the 'Apollo' project, and a young computer scientist elucidate in this book the process of how the idea came about, international reactions, the basic technology, prospects for realization, and the abilities of the Fifth Generation computer. Topics considered included forecasting, research programs, planning, and technology impacts.

  17. The Computer Goes Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirone, Bill

    2001-01-01

    A partnership between local community, business, and education leaders and the Santa Barbara County Education Office spawned Computers for Families--a program putting computers in needy families' homes. Adjudicated youth at a residential boys' camp gain vocational skills when refurbishing donated computers for families' use. (MLH)

  18. Writing, Thinking and Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, James

    1993-01-01

    Reviews the potential of word processors for changing the ways in which students process written text and think about writing. Three levels of computer-aided writing are considered: simple word processors; computer-aided writing programs; and higher-level computer-aided processing; and improvements in writing quality. (41 references) (LRW)

  19. Mathematics Unipac. Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parma City School District, OH.

    Five activities are presented in this student workbook designed for exploration of a career in computers, and the mathematics related to that career. Included are activities on basic computer language, flow charts, and basic computer programming. Each activity includes the objective, materials needed, and information for completing the activity.…

  20. Personal Computers on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldrop, M. Mitchell

    1985-01-01

    Examines issues involving the use of on-line databases, magnetic and optical data storage, digital telecommunications, and microcomputers on college campuses. These issues include access to computers and computer networking, and educational uses of the computers. Examples of efforts at four universities are included. (JN)

  1. Understanding Computer Terms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilly, Edward R.

    Designed to assist teachers and administrators approaching the subject of computers for the first time to acquire a feel for computer terminology, this document presents a computer term glossary on three levels. (1) The terms most frequently used, called a "basic vocabulary," are presented first in three paragraphs which explain their meanings:…

  2. Computer Applications for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dulsky, Dwight; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Four articles discuss computer-assisted instruction, including (1) a middle school art and computer departments project that used LOGO to create rose window designs; (2) student journals; (3) the application of Piaget constructivism and Vygotskin social interaction to LOGO learning; and (4) computer lab writing workshops for elementary school…

  3. BBC Computer Literacy Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salkeld, Bob

    1982-01-01

    Describes the development and purpose of The Computer Programme, a 10-part television series produced by the BBC's Continuing Education Television Department and designed to provide a beginner's guide to the world of computers and computing. The history of the project is reviewed and the creation of the BBC microcomputer is recounted. (Author/JL)

  4. Education for Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heslep, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    The computer engineers who refer to the education of computers do not have a definite idea of education and do not bother to justify the fuzzy ones to which they allude. Hence, they logically cannot specify the features a computer must have in order to be educable. This paper puts forth a non-standard, but not arbitrary, concept of education that…

  5. BNL ATLAS Grid Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Ernst

    2008-10-02

    As the sole Tier-1 computing facility for ATLAS in the United States and the largest ATLAS computing center worldwide Brookhaven provides a large portion of the overall computing resources for U.S. collaborators and serves as the central hub for storing,

  6. The Computer Delusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppenheimer, Todd

    1997-01-01

    Challenges research and prevailing attitudes that maintain that computers improve teaching and academic achievement. Criticizes and questions research methodology, computer literacy education, the need for computer skills to make a competitive workforce, support from the business community resulting from technology programs, and Internet use. (LRW)

  7. Computational Thinking Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ioannidou, Andri; Bennett, Vicki; Repenning, Alexander; Koh, Kyu Han; Basawapatna, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    The iDREAMS project aims to reinvent Computer Science education in K-12 schools, by using game design and computational science for motivating and educating students through an approach we call Scalable Game Design, starting at the middle school level. In this paper we discuss the use of Computational Thinking Patterns as the basis for our…

  8. Teaching with Personal Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stonebraker, Peter W.; Coye, Ray W.

    1988-01-01

    A discussion of computer integration in the college curriculum describes its impact on courses and classroom interaction, looks at levels of computer integration, and examines strategies for developing such a course. It is proposed that, although computer integration is inevitable, it will cause a turbulent transition period for classroom…

  9. Getting To Know Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundgren, Mary Beth

    Originally written for adult new readers involved in literacy programs, this book is also helpful to those individuals who want a basic book about computers. It uses the carefully controlled vocabulary with which adult new readers are familiar. Chapter 1 addresses the widespread use of computers. Chapter 2 discusses what a computer is and…

  10. The Computer Bulletin Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batt, Russell H., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Four applications of microcomputers in the chemical laboratory are presented. Included are "Mass Spectrometer Interface with an Apple II Computer,""Interfacing the Spectronic 20 to a Computer,""A pH-Monitoring and Control System for Teaching Laboratories," and "A Computer-Aided Optical Melting Point Device." Software, instrumentation, and uses are…

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a diagnostic imaging ... Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  12. Computing environment logbook

    DOEpatents

    Osbourn, Gordon C; Bouchard, Ann M

    2012-09-18

    A computing environment logbook logs events occurring within a computing environment. The events are displayed as a history of past events within the logbook of the computing environment. The logbook provides search functionality to search through the history of past events to find one or more selected past events, and further, enables an undo of the one or more selected past events.

  13. Quantum walk computation

    SciTech Connect

    Kendon, Viv

    2014-12-04

    Quantum versions of random walks have diverse applications that are motivating experimental implementations as well as theoretical studies. Recent results showing quantum walks are “universal for quantum computation” relate to algorithms, to be run on quantum computers. We consider whether an experimental implementation of a quantum walk could provide useful computation before we have a universal quantum computer.

  14. On Understanding Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olds, Henry F., Jr.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Three articles discuss the use of computers in education: (1) "References for a Broader Vision" (Henry F. Olds, Jr.); (2) "What Every Teacher Should Know About Computer Simulations" (David Grady); and (3) "The Computer as Palette and Model Builder" (Interview of Alan Kay). (CJ)

  15. The Challenge of Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leger, Guy

    Computers may change teachers' lifestyles, teaching styles, and perhaps even their personal values. A brief survey of the history of computers demonstrates the incredible pace at which computer technology is moving ahead. The cost and size of microchips will continue to decline dramatically over the next 20 years, while the capability and variety…

  16. Computer Center: CIBE Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crovello, Theodore J.

    1982-01-01

    Differentiates between computer systems and Computers in Biological Education (CIBE) systems (computer system intended for use in biological education). Describes several CIBE stand alone systems: single-user microcomputer; single-user microcomputer/video-disc; multiuser microcomputers; multiuser maxicomputer; and local and long distance computer…

  17. Advanced Computing for Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hut, Piet; Sussman, Gerald Jay

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the contributions that high-speed computing is making to the study of science. Emphasizes the use of computers in exploring complicated systems without the simplification required in traditional methods of observation and experimentation. Provides examples of computer assisted investigations in astronomy and physics. (TW)

  18. Computers in Engineering Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushby, N. J.

    This bibliography cites 26 books, papers, and reports dealing with various uses of computers in engineering education; and describes several computer programs available for use in teaching aeronautical, chemical, civil, electrical and electronic, mechanical, and nuclear engineering. Each computer program entry is presented by name, author,…

  19. Computer animation challenges for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vines, Mauricio; Lee, Won-Sook; Mavriplis, Catherine

    2012-07-01

    Computer animation requirements differ from those of traditional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) investigations in that visual plausibility and rapid frame update rates trump physical accuracy. We present an overview of the main techniques for fluid simulation in computer animation, starting with Eulerian grid approaches, the Lattice Boltzmann method, Fourier transform techniques and Lagrangian particle introduction. Adaptive grid methods, precomputation of results for model reduction, parallelisation and computation on graphical processing units (GPUs) are reviewed in the context of accelerating simulation computations for animation. A survey of current specific approaches for the application of these techniques to the simulation of smoke, fire, water, bubbles, mixing, phase change and solid-fluid coupling is also included. Adding plausibility to results through particle introduction, turbulence detail and concentration on regions of interest by level set techniques has elevated the degree of accuracy and realism of recent animations. Basic approaches are described here. Techniques to control the simulation to produce a desired visual effect are also discussed. Finally, some references to rendering techniques and haptic applications are mentioned to provide the reader with a complete picture of the challenges of simulating fluids in computer animation.

  20. The science of computing - Parallel computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    Although parallel computation architectures have been known for computers since the 1920s, it was only in the 1970s that microelectronic components technologies advanced to the point where it became feasible to incorporate multiple processors in one machine. Concommitantly, the development of algorithms for parallel processing also lagged due to hardware limitations. The speed of computing with solid-state chips is limited by gate switching delays. The physical limit implies that a 1 Gflop operational speed is the maximum for sequential processors. A computer recently introduced features a 'hypercube' architecture with 128 processors connected in networks at 5, 6 or 7 points per grid, depending on the design choice. Its computing speed rivals that of supercomputers, but at a fraction of the cost. The added speed with less hardware is due to parallel processing, which utilizes algorithms representing different parts of an equation that can be broken into simpler statements and processed simultaneously. Present, highly developed computer languages like FORTRAN, PASCAL, COBOL, etc., rely on sequential instructions. Thus, increased emphasis will now be directed at parallel processing algorithms to exploit the new architectures.

  1. Role of Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) in the detection of pulmonary nodules on 64 row multi detector computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Prakashini, K; Babu, Satish; Rajgopal, KV; Kokila, K Raja

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To determine the overall performance of an existing CAD algorithm with thin-section computed tomography (CT) in the detection of pulmonary nodules and to evaluate detection sensitivity at a varying range of nodule density, size, and location. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional prospective study was conducted on 20 patients with 322 suspected nodules who underwent diagnostic chest imaging using 64-row multi-detector CT. The examinations were evaluated on reconstructed images of 1.4 mm thickness and 0.7 mm interval. Detection of pulmonary nodules, initially by a radiologist of 2 years experience (RAD) and later by CAD lung nodule software was assessed. Then, CAD nodule candidates were accepted or rejected accordingly. Detected nodules were classified based on their size, density, and location. The performance of the RAD and CAD system was compared with the gold standard that is true nodules confirmed by consensus of senior RAD and CAD together. The overall sensitivity and false-positive (FP) rate of CAD software was calculated. Observations and Results: Of the 322 suspected nodules, 221 were classified as true nodules on the consensus of senior RAD and CAD together. Of the true nodules, the RAD detected 206 (93.2%) and 202 (91.4%) by the CAD. CAD and RAD together picked up more number of nodules than either CAD or RAD alone. Overall sensitivity for nodule detection with the CAD program was 91.4%, and FP detection per patient was 5.5%. The CAD showed comparatively higher sensitivity for nodules of size 4–10 mm (93.4%) and nodules in hilar (100%) and central (96.5%) location when compared to RAD's performance. Conclusion: CAD performance was high in detecting pulmonary nodules including the small size and low-density nodules. CAD even with relatively high FP rate, assists and improves RAD's performance as a second reader, especially for nodules located in the central and hilar region and for small nodules by saving RADs time. PMID:27578931

  2. Neural Computation and the Computational Theory of Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piccinini, Gualtiero; Bahar, Sonya

    2013-01-01

    We begin by distinguishing computationalism from a number of other theses that are sometimes conflated with it. We also distinguish between several important kinds of computation: computation in a generic sense, digital computation, and analog computation. Then, we defend a weak version of computationalism--neural processes are computations in the…

  3. An artificial muscle computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marc O'Brien, Benjamin; Alexander Anderson, Iain

    2013-03-01

    We have built an artificial muscle computer based on Wolfram's "2, 3" Turing machine architecture, the simplest known universal Turing machine. Our computer uses artificial muscles for its instruction set, output buffers, and memory write and addressing mechanisms. The computer is very slow and large (0.15 Hz, ˜1 m3); however by using only 13 artificial muscle relays, it is capable of solving any computable problem given sufficient memory, time, and reliability. The development of this computer shows that artificial muscles can think—paving the way for soft robots with reflexes like those seen in nature.

  4. Scalable optical quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Manykin, E A; Mel'nichenko, E V

    2014-12-31

    A way of designing a scalable optical quantum computer based on the photon echo effect is proposed. Individual rare earth ions Pr{sup 3+}, regularly located in the lattice of the orthosilicate (Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}) crystal, are suggested to be used as optical qubits. Operations with qubits are performed using coherent and incoherent laser pulses. The operation protocol includes both the method of measurement-based quantum computations and the technique of optical computations. Modern hybrid photon echo protocols, which provide a sufficient quantum efficiency when reading recorded states, are considered as most promising for quantum computations and communications. (quantum computer)

  5. Computer algebra and operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fateman, Richard; Grossman, Robert

    1989-01-01

    The symbolic computation of operator expansions is discussed. Some of the capabilities that prove useful when performing computer algebra computations involving operators are considered. These capabilities may be broadly divided into three areas: the algebraic manipulation of expressions from the algebra generated by operators; the algebraic manipulation of the actions of the operators upon other mathematical objects; and the development of appropriate normal forms and simplification algorithms for operators and their actions. Brief descriptions are given of the computer algebra computations that arise when working with various operators and their actions.

  6. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2005-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include, for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security. To achieve our goals we have established a close alliance with applied mathematicians and computer scientists at Stony Brook and Columbia Universities.

  7. Richard Feynman and computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, Tony

    1999-04-01

    The enormous contribution of Richard Feynman to modern physics is well known, both to teaching through his famous Feynman Lectures on Physics, and to research with his Feynman diagram approach to quantum field theory and his path integral formulation of quantum mechanics. Less well known perhaps is his long-standing interest in the physics of computation and this is the subject of this paper. Feynman lectured on computation at Caltech for most of the last decade of his life, first with John Hopfield and Carver Mead, and then with Gerry Sussman. The story of how these lectures came to be written up as the Feynman Lectures on Computation is briefly recounted. Feynman also discussed the fundamentals of computation with other legendary figures of the computer science and physics community such as Ed Fredkin, Rolf Landauer, Carver Mead, Marvin Minsky and John Wheeler. He was also instrumental in stimulating developments in both nanotechnology and quantum computing. During the 1980s Feynman re-visited long-standing interests both in parallel computing with Geoffrey Fox and Danny Hillis, and in reversible computation and quantum computing with Charles Bennett, Norman Margolus, Tom Toffoli and Wojciech Zurek. This paper records Feynman's links with the computational community and includes some reminiscences about his involvement with the fundamentals of computing.

  8. ALMA correlator computer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisano, Jim; Amestica, Rodrigo; Perez, Jesus

    2004-09-01

    We present a design for the computer systems which control, configure, and monitor the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) correlator and process its output. Two distinct computer systems implement this functionality: a rack- mounted PC controls and monitors the correlator, and a cluster of 17 PCs process the correlator output into raw spectral results. The correlator computer systems interface to other ALMA computers via gigabit Ethernet networks utilizing CORBA and raw socket connections. ALMA Common Software provides the software infrastructure for this distributed computer environment. The control computer interfaces to the correlator via multiple CAN busses and the data processing computer cluster interfaces to the correlator via sixteen dedicated high speed data ports. An independent array-wide hardware timing bus connects to the computer systems and the correlator hardware ensuring synchronous behavior and imposing hard deadlines on the control and data processor computers. An aggregate correlator output of 1 gigabyte per second with 16 millisecond periods and computational data rates of approximately 1 billion floating point operations per second define other hard deadlines for the data processing computer cluster.

  9. Multidisciplinary computational aerosciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, Paul

    1992-01-01

    As the challenges of single disciplinary computational physics are met, such as computational fluid dynamics, computational structural mechanics, computational propulsion, computational aeroacoustics, computational electromagnetics, etc., scientists have begun investigating the combination of these single disciplines into what is being called multidisciplinary computational aerosciences (MCAS). The combination of several disciplines not only offers simulation realism but also formidable computational challenges. The solution of such problems will require computers orders of magnitude larger than those currently available. Such computer power can only be supplied by massively parallel machines because of the current speed-of-light limitation of conventional serial systems. Even with such machines, MCAS problems will require hundreds of hours for their solution. To efficiently utilize such a machine, research is required in three areas that include parallel architectures, systems software, and applications software. The main emphasis of this paper is the applications software element. Examples that demonstrate application software for multidisciplinary problems currently being solved at NASA Ames Research Center are presented. Pacing items for MCAS are discussed such as solution methodology, physical modeling, computer power, and multidisciplinary validation experiments.

  10. Computer-assisted psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jesse H.; Wright, Andrew S.

    1997-01-01

    The rationale for using computers in psychotherapy includes the possibility that therapeutic software could improve the efficiency of treatment and provide access for greater numbers of patients. Computers have not been able to reliably duplicate the type of dialogue typically used in clinician-administered therapy. However, computers have significant strengths that can be used to advantage in designing treatment programs. Software developed for computer-assisted therapy generally has been well accepted by patients. Outcome studies have usually demonstrated treatment effectiveness for this form of therapy. Future development of computer tools may be influenced by changes in health care financing and rapid growth of new technologies. An integrated care delivery model incorporating the unique attributes of both clinicians and computers should be adopted for computer-assisted therapy. PMID:9292446

  11. Hyperswitch Communication Network Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John C.; Chow, Edward T.; Priel, Moshe; Upchurch, Edwin T.

    1993-01-01

    Hyperswitch Communications Network (HCN) computer is prototype multiple-processor computer being developed. Incorporates improved version of hyperswitch communication network described in "Hyperswitch Network For Hypercube Computer" (NPO-16905). Designed to support high-level software and expansion of itself. HCN computer is message-passing, multiple-instruction/multiple-data computer offering significant advantages over older single-processor and bus-based multiple-processor computers, with respect to price/performance ratio, reliability, availability, and manufacturing. Design of HCN operating-system software provides flexible computing environment accommodating both parallel and distributed processing. Also achieves balance among following competing factors; performance in processing and communications, ease of use, and tolerance of (and recovery from) faults.

  12. Navier-Stokes Computations on Commodity Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Faulkner, Thomas R.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we discuss and demonstrate the feasibility of solving high-fidelity, nonlinear computational fluid dynamics (CFD) problems of practical interest on commodity machines, namely Pentium Pro PC's. Such calculations have now become possible due to the progress in computational power and memory of the off-the-shelf commodity computers, along with the growth in bandwidth and communication speeds of networks. A widely used CFD code known as TLNS3D, which was developed originally on large shared memory computers was selected for this effort. This code has recently been ported to massively parallel processor (MPP) type machines, where natural partitioning along grid blocks is adopted in which one or more blocks are distributed to each of the available processors. In this paper, a similar approach is adapted to port this code to a cluster of Pentium Pro computers. The message passing among the processors is accomplished through the use of standard message passing interface (MPI) libraries. Scaling studies indicate fairly high level of parallelism on such clusters of commodity machines, thus making solutions to Navier-Stokes equations for practical problems more affordable.

  13. Computational Biology and High Performance Computing 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Horst D.; Zorn, Manfred D.; Spengler, Sylvia J.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Stewart, Craig; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2000-10-19

    The pace of extraordinary advances in molecular biology has accelerated in the past decade due in large part to discoveries coming from genome projects on human and model organisms. The advances in the genome project so far, happening well ahead of schedule and under budget, have exceeded any dreams by its protagonists, let alone formal expectations. Biologists expect the next phase of the genome project to be even more startling in terms of dramatic breakthroughs in our understanding of human biology, the biology of health and of disease. Only today can biologists begin to envision the necessary experimental, computational and theoretical steps necessary to exploit genome sequence information for its medical impact, its contribution to biotechnology and economic competitiveness, and its ultimate contribution to environmental quality. High performance computing has become one of the critical enabling technologies, which will help to translate this vision of future advances in biology into reality. Biologists are increasingly becoming aware of the potential of high performance computing. The goal of this tutorial is to introduce the exciting new developments in computational biology and genomics to the high performance computing community.

  14. Multidetector CT of hepatic artery pathologies.

    PubMed

    Karaosmanoglu, D; Erol, B; Karcaaltincaba, M

    2012-01-01

    The hepatic artery can be involved by a variety of pathology and diseases.Today MDCT enables high quality imaging of the hepatic artery using axial, MIP and volume rendered images. We illustrate MDCT findings of anatomical variations, aneurysm, dilatation, dissection, arteriovenous fistula, thrombosis and stenosis. Aneurysms can be saccular, fusiform and multiple and may develop due to atherosclerosis, vasculitis, trauma and biopsy. Dilatation of hepatic artery can be seen in portal hypertension, Osler-Weber-Rendu disease and hemangiomatosis. Hepatic artery can be occluded after trauma and transplantation. Dissection develops due to atherosclerosis, Marfan and Ehler Danlos syndromes and during pregnancy. Arteriovenous fistula can be congenital and acquired. We conclude that various hepatic artery pathologies can be confidently diagnosed by MDCT.

  15. Computers and neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Shaikhouni, Ammar; Elder, J Bradley

    2012-11-01

    At the turn of the twentieth century, the only computational device used in neurosurgical procedures was the brain of the surgeon. Today, most neurosurgical procedures rely at least in part on the use of a computer to help perform surgeries accurately and safely. The techniques that revolutionized neurosurgery were mostly developed after the 1950s. Just before that era, the transistor was invented in the late 1940s, and the integrated circuit was invented in the late 1950s. During this time, the first automated, programmable computational machines were introduced. The rapid progress in the field of neurosurgery not only occurred hand in hand with the development of modern computers, but one also can state that modern neurosurgery would not exist without computers. The focus of this article is the impact modern computers have had on the practice of neurosurgery. Neuroimaging, neuronavigation, and neuromodulation are examples of tools in the armamentarium of the modern neurosurgeon that owe each step in their evolution to progress made in computer technology. Advances in computer technology central to innovations in these fields are highlighted, with particular attention to neuroimaging. Developments over the last 10 years in areas of sensors and robotics that promise to transform the practice of neurosurgery further are discussed. Potential impacts of advances in computers related to neurosurgery in developing countries and underserved regions are also discussed. As this article illustrates, the computer, with its underlying and related technologies, is central to advances in neurosurgery over the last half century.

  16. Quantum analogue computing.

    PubMed

    Kendon, Vivien M; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J

    2010-08-13

    We briefly review what a quantum computer is, what it promises to do for us and why it is so hard to build one. Among the first applications anticipated to bear fruit is the quantum simulation of quantum systems. While most quantum computation is an extension of classical digital computation, quantum simulation differs fundamentally in how the data are encoded in the quantum computer. To perform a quantum simulation, the Hilbert space of the system to be simulated is mapped directly onto the Hilbert space of the (logical) qubits in the quantum computer. This type of direct correspondence is how data are encoded in a classical analogue computer. There is no binary encoding, and increasing precision becomes exponentially costly: an extra bit of precision doubles the size of the computer. This has important consequences for both the precision and error-correction requirements of quantum simulation, and significant open questions remain about its practicality. It also means that the quantum version of analogue computers, continuous-variable quantum computers, becomes an equally efficient architecture for quantum simulation. Lessons from past use of classical analogue computers can help us to build better quantum simulators in future.

  17. Computers and neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Shaikhouni, Ammar; Elder, J Bradley

    2012-11-01

    At the turn of the twentieth century, the only computational device used in neurosurgical procedures was the brain of the surgeon. Today, most neurosurgical procedures rely at least in part on the use of a computer to help perform surgeries accurately and safely. The techniques that revolutionized neurosurgery were mostly developed after the 1950s. Just before that era, the transistor was invented in the late 1940s, and the integrated circuit was invented in the late 1950s. During this time, the first automated, programmable computational machines were introduced. The rapid progress in the field of neurosurgery not only occurred hand in hand with the development of modern computers, but one also can state that modern neurosurgery would not exist without computers. The focus of this article is the impact modern computers have had on the practice of neurosurgery. Neuroimaging, neuronavigation, and neuromodulation are examples of tools in the armamentarium of the modern neurosurgeon that owe each step in their evolution to progress made in computer technology. Advances in computer technology central to innovations in these fields are highlighted, with particular attention to neuroimaging. Developments over the last 10 years in areas of sensors and robotics that promise to transform the practice of neurosurgery further are discussed. Potential impacts of advances in computers related to neurosurgery in developing countries and underserved regions are also discussed. As this article illustrates, the computer, with its underlying and related technologies, is central to advances in neurosurgery over the last half century. PMID:22985531

  18. Architecture Adaptive Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorband, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Architecture Adaptive Computing Environment (aCe) is a software system that includes a language, compiler, and run-time library for parallel computing. aCe was developed to enable programmers to write programs, more easily than was previously possible, for a variety of parallel computing architectures. Heretofore, it has been perceived to be difficult to write parallel programs for parallel computers and more difficult to port the programs to different parallel computing architectures. In contrast, aCe is supportable on all high-performance computing architectures. Currently, it is supported on LINUX clusters. aCe uses parallel programming constructs that facilitate writing of parallel programs. Such constructs were used in single-instruction/multiple-data (SIMD) programming languages of the 1980s, including Parallel Pascal, Parallel Forth, C*, *LISP, and MasPar MPL. In aCe, these constructs are extended and implemented for both SIMD and multiple- instruction/multiple-data (MIMD) architectures. Two new constructs incorporated in aCe are those of (1) scalar and virtual variables and (2) pre-computed paths. The scalar-and-virtual-variables construct increases flexibility in optimizing memory utilization in various architectures. The pre-computed-paths construct enables the compiler to pre-compute part of a communication operation once, rather than computing it every time the communication operation is performed.

  19. Parallel computation and computers for artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalik, J.S. )

    1988-01-01

    This book discusses Parallel Processing in Artificial Intelligence; Parallel Computing using Multilisp; Execution of Common Lisp in a Parallel Environment; Qlisp; Restricted AND-Parallel Execution of Logic Programs; PARLOG: Parallel Programming in Logic; and Data-driven Processing of Semantic Nets. Attention is also given to: Application of the Butterfly Parallel Processor in Artificial Intelligence; On the Range of Applicability of an Artificial Intelligence Machine; Low-level Vision on Warp and the Apply Programming Mode; AHR: A Parallel Computer for Pure Lisp; FAIM-1: An Architecture for Symbolic Multi-processing; and Overview of Al Application Oriented Parallel Processing Research in Japan.

  20. Computational approaches to computational aero-acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C.

    1996-01-01

    The various techniques by which the goal of computational aeroacoustics (the calculation and noise prediction of a fluctuating fluid flow) may be achieved are reviewed. The governing equations for compressible fluid flow are presented. The direct numerical simulation approach is shown to be computationally intensive for high Reynolds number viscous flows. Therefore, other approaches, such as the acoustic analogy, vortex models and various perturbation techniques that aim to break the analysis into a viscous part and an acoustic part are presented. The choice of the approach is shown to be problem dependent.

  1. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to bring together

  2. Value of liver computed tomography with iodixanol 270, 80 kVp and iterative reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Botsikas, Diomidis; Barnaure, Isabelle; Terraz, Sylvain; Becker, Christoph D; Kalovidouri, Anastasia; Montet, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the image quality of hepatic multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) with dynamic contrast enhancement. METHODS It uses iodixanol 270 mg/mL (Visipaque 270) and 80 kVp acquisitions reconstructed with sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE®) in comparison with a standard MDCT protocol. Fifty-three consecutive patients with known or suspected hepatocellular carcinoma underwent 55 CT examinations, with two different four-phase CT protocols. The first group of 30 patients underwent a standard 120 kVp acquisition after injection of Iohexol 350 mg/mL (Accupaque 350®) and reconstructed with filtered back projection. The second group of 25 patients underwent a dual-energy CT at 80-140 kVp with iodixanol 270. The 80 kVp component of the second group was reconstructed iteratively (SAFIRE®-Siemens). All hyperdense and hypodense hepatic lesions ≥ 5 mm were identified with both protocols. Aorta and portal vessels/liver parenchyma contrast to noise ratio (CNR) in arterial phase, hypervascular lesion/liver parenchyma CNR in arterial phase, hypodense lesion/liver parenchyma CNR in portal and late phase were calculated in both groups. RESULTS Aorta/liver and focal lesions altogether/liver CNR were higher for the second protocol (P = 0.0078 and 0.0346). Hypervascular lesions/liver CNR was not statistically different (P = 0.86). Hypodense lesion/liver CNR in the portal phase was significantly higher for the second group (P = 0.0107). Hypodense lesion/liver CNR in the late phase was the same for both groups (P = 0.9926). CONCLUSION MDCT imaging with 80 kVp with iterative reconstruction and iodixanol 270 yields equal or even better image quality. PMID:27551339

  3. Characterizing trabecular bone structure for assessing vertebral fracture risk on volumetric quantitative computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Checefsky, Walter A.; Abidin, Anas Z.; Tsai, Halley; Wang, Xixi; Hobbs, Susan K.; Bauer, Jan S.; Baum, Thomas; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-03-01

    While the proximal femur is preferred for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) in fracture risk estimation, the introduction of volumetric quantitative computed tomography has revealed stronger associations between BMD and spinal fracture status. In this study, we propose to capture properties of trabecular bone structure in spinal vertebrae with advanced second-order statistical features for purposes of fracture risk assessment. For this purpose, axial multi-detector CT (MDCT) images were acquired from 28 spinal vertebrae specimens using a whole-body 256-row CT scanner with a dedicated calibration phantom. A semi-automated method was used to annotate the trabecular compartment in the central vertebral slice with a circular region of interest (ROI) to exclude cortical bone; pixels within were converted to values indicative of BMD. Six second-order statistical features derived from gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) and the mean BMD within the ROI were then extracted and used in conjunction with a generalized radial basis functions (GRBF) neural network to predict the failure load of the specimens; true failure load was measured through biomechanical testing. Prediction performance was evaluated with a root-mean-square error (RMSE) metric. The best prediction performance was observed with GLCM feature `correlation' (RMSE = 1.02 ± 0.18), which significantly outperformed all other GLCM features (p < 0.01). GLCM feature correlation also significantly outperformed MDCTmeasured mean BMD (RMSE = 1.11 ± 0.17) (p< 10-4). These results suggest that biomechanical strength prediction in spinal vertebrae can be significantly improved through characterization of trabecular bone structure with GLCM-derived texture features.

  4. Prediction of Intimal Tear Site by Computed Tomography in Acute Aortic Dissection Type A

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Sung; Lim, Cheong; Kim, Dong Jin; Jung, Yochun; Shin, Yoon Cheol; Choi, Sang Il; Chun, Eun Ju; Yoo, Jin Young

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Preoperative identification of intimal tear site in acute type A dissection will help procedural planning. The objective of this study was to determine the key findings of computed tomography (CT)-based prediction for tear site and compare the accuracy between radiologists and surgeons. Subjects and Methods Multi-detector CT (MDCT) images from 50 patients who underwent surgical repair of type A aortic dissection were retrospectively reviewed by 4 cardiac surgeons with limited experience or by 3 radiologists specialized in cardiovascular imaging. Surgical findings of intimal tear site were used as references. Results In surgical findings, the locations of intimal tear that were identified in 43 patients included aorta (n=25), ascending with arch (n=7), and arch only (n=11). The rest were retrograde dissections from the tear of descending aorta. Key CT findings that were most frequently found were defect in the intimal flap shadow (30.0±4.0 patients/reviewer, accuracy 87.0±11.7%) and differential filling of false lumen by phase and location (9.4±2.9 patients/reviewer, 84.8±10.4%). Surgeons predicted tear site (75.0±7.7% vs. 86.7±1.2%, p=0.055) and specified flap defect (80.5±10.3% vs. 95.7±7.4%, p=0.073) with lower accuracy than radiologists. Conclusions With MDCT imaging, well-educated surgeons could be accurate in three fourths of cases. There was room for improvement through experience. Considering the substantial possibility of inaccuracy, critical decisions on CT images should be made through thorough reviewing by as many experienced radiologists and surgeons as possible. PMID:26798385

  5. Ultrasonography in the diagnosis of nasal bone fractures: a comparison with conventional radiography and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Sook; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Woo, Chang-Ki; Kim, Hak Jin; Sol, Yu Li; Song, Jong Woon; Cho, Kyu-Sup

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the diagnostic efficacy of ultrasonography (US) with radiography and multi-detector computed tomography (CT) for the detection of nasal bone fractures. Forty-one patients with a nasal bone fracture who underwent prospective US examinations were included. Plain radiographs and CT images were obtained on the day of trauma. For US examinations, radiologist used a linear array transducer (L17-5 MHz) in 24 patients and hockey-stick probe (L15-7 MHz) in 17. The bony component of the nose was divided into three parts (right and left lateral nasal walls, and midline of nasal bone). Fracture detection by three modalities was subjected to analysis. Furthermore, findings made by each modality were compared with intraoperative findings. Nasal bone fractures were located in the right lateral wall (n = 28), midline of nasal bone (n = 31), or left lateral wall (n = 31). For right and left lateral nasal walls, CT had greater sensitivity and specificity than US or radiography, and better agreed with intraoperative findings. However, for midline fractures of nasal bone, US had higher specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value than CT. Although two US evaluations showed good agreements at all three sites, US findings obtained by the hockey-stick probe showed closer agreement with intraoperative findings for both lateral nasal wall and midline of nasal bone. Although CT showed higher sensitivity and specificity than US or radiography, US found to be helpful for evaluating the midline of nasal bone. Furthermore, for US examinations of the nasal bone, a smaller probe and higher frequency may be required.

  6. Computed tomography, endoscopic, laparoscopic, and intra-operative sonography for assessing resectability of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Long, Eliza E; Van Dam, Jacques; Weinstein, Stefanie; Jeffrey, Brooke; Desser, Terry; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2005-08-01

    Pancreas cancer is the fourth leading cancer killer in adults. Cure of pancreas cancer is dependent on the complete surgical removal of localized tumor. A complete surgical resection is dependent on accurate preoperative and intra-operative imaging of tumor and its relationship to vital structures. Imaging of pancreatic tumors preoperatively and intra-operatively is achieved by pancreatic protocol computed tomography (CT), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), laparoscopic ultrasound (LUS), and intra-operative ultrasound (IOUS). Multi-detector CT with three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of images is the most useful preoperative modality to assess resectability. It has a sensitivity and specificity of 90 and 99%, respectively. It is not observer dependent. The images predict operative findings. EUS and LUS have sensitivities of 77 and 78%, respectively. They both have a very high specificity. Further, EUS has the ability to biopsy tumor and obtain a definitive tissue diagnosis. IOUS is a very sensitive (93%) method to assess tumor resectability during surgery. It adds little time and no morbidity to the operation. It greatly facilitates the intra-operative decision-making. In reality, each of these methods adds some information to help in determining the extent of tumor and the surgeon's ability to remove it. We rely on pancreatic protocol CT with 3-D reconstruction and either EUS or IOUS depending on the tumor location and operability of the tumor and patient. With these modern imaging modalities, it is now possible to avoid major operations that only determine an inoperable tumor. With proper preoperative selection, surgery is able to remove tumor in the majority of patients.

  7. Computational engine structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Johns, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    A significant research activity at the NASA Lewis Research Center is the computational simulation of complex multidisciplinary engine structural problems. This simulation is performed using computational engine structural analysis (CESA) which consists of integrated multidisciplinary computer codes in conjunction with computer post-processing for problem-specific application. A variety of the computational simulations of specific cases are described in some detail in this paper. These case studies include: (1) aeroelastic behavior of bladed rotors, (2) high velocity impact of fan blades, (3) blade-loss transient response, (4) rotor/stator/squeeze-film/bearing interaction, (5) blade-fragment/rotor-burst containment, and (6) structural behavior of advanced swept turboprops. These representative case studies are selected to demonstrate the breath of the problems analyzed and the role of the computer including post-processing and graphical display of voluminous output data.

  8. Personal computers on campus.

    PubMed

    Waldrop, M M

    1985-04-26

    Colleges and universities are becoming test beds for the much-heralded "information society" as they incorporate a new series of information technologies. These include on-line databases, magnetic and optical data storage, digital telecommunications, computer networks, and, most visibly and dramatically, personal computers. The transition is presenting administrators and faculty with major challenges, however. This article discusses some of the issues involved, including access to computers and to computer networking, managing the transition, and the educational uses of personal computers. A final section discusses efforts at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Brown University, and Camegie-Mellon University to shape a new-generation personal computer, the so-called "scholar's workstation." PMID:17746874

  9. Adiabatic topological quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesare, Chris; Landahl, Andrew J.; Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T.; Neels, Alice

    2015-07-01

    Topological quantum computing promises error-resistant quantum computation without active error correction. However, there is a worry that during the process of executing quantum gates by braiding anyons around each other, extra anyonic excitations will be created that will disorder the encoded quantum information. Here, we explore this question in detail by studying adiabatic code deformations on Hamiltonians based on topological codes, notably Kitaev's surface codes and the more recently discovered color codes. We develop protocols that enable universal quantum computing by adiabatic evolution in a way that keeps the energy gap of the system constant with respect to the computation size and introduces only simple local Hamiltonian interactions. This allows one to perform holonomic quantum computing with these topological quantum computing systems. The tools we develop allow one to go beyond numerical simulations and understand these processes analytically.

  10. Trends; Integrating computer systems

    SciTech Connect

    de Buyl, M. )

    1991-11-04

    This paper reports that computers are invaluable tools in assisting E and P managers with their information management and analysis tasks. Oil companies and software houses are striving to adapt their products and work practices to capitalize on the rapid evolution in computer hardware performance and affordability. Ironically, an investment in computers aimed at reducing risk and cost also contains an element of added risk and cost. Hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent by the oil industry in purchasing hardware and software and in developing software. Unfortunately, these investments may not have completely fulfilled the industry's expectations. The lower return on computer science investments is due to: Unmet expectations in productivity gains. Premature computer hardware and software obsolescence. Inefficient data transfer between software applications. Hidden costs of computer support personnel and vendors.

  11. New computing systems and their impact on computational mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in computer technology that are likely to impact computational mechanics are reviewed. The technical needs for computational mechanics technology are outlined. The major features of new and projected computing systems, including supersystems, parallel processing machines, special-purpose computing hardware, and small systems are described. Advances in programming environments, numerical algorithms, and computational strategies for new computing systems are reviewed, and a novel partitioning strategy is outlined for maximizing the degree of parallelism on multiprocessor computers with a shared memory.

  12. Computer aided production engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the following contents: CIM in avionics; computer analysis of product designs for robot assembly; a simulation decision mould for manpower forecast and its application; development of flexible manufacturing system; advances in microcomputer applications in CAD/CAM; an automated interface between CAD and process planning; CAM and computer vision; low friction pneumatic actuators for accurate robot control; robot assembly of printed circuit boards; information systems design for computer integrated manufacture; and a CAD engineering language to aid manufacture.

  13. Sensor sentinel computing device

    DOEpatents

    Damico, Joseph P.

    2016-08-02

    Technologies pertaining to authenticating data output by sensors in an industrial environment are described herein. A sensor sentinel computing device receives time-series data from a sensor by way of a wireline connection. The sensor sentinel computing device generates a validation signal that is a function of the time-series signal. The sensor sentinel computing device then transmits the validation signal to a programmable logic controller in the industrial environment.

  14. Research in computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Various graduate research activities in the field of computer science are reported. Among the topics discussed are: (1) failure probabilities in multi-version software; (2) Gaussian Elimination on parallel computers; (3) three dimensional Poisson solvers on parallel/vector computers; (4) automated task decomposition for multiple robot arms; (5) multi-color incomplete cholesky conjugate gradient methods on the Cyber 205; and (6) parallel implementation of iterative methods for solving linear equations.

  15. Computation of Standard Errors

    PubMed Central

    Dowd, Bryan E; Greene, William H; Norton, Edward C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We discuss the problem of computing the standard errors of functions involving estimated parameters and provide the relevant computer code for three different computational approaches using two popular computer packages. Study Design We show how to compute the standard errors of several functions of interest: the predicted value of the dependent variable for a particular subject, and the effect of a change in an explanatory variable on the predicted value of the dependent variable for an individual subject and average effect for a sample of subjects. Empirical Application Using a publicly available dataset, we explain three different methods of computing standard errors: the delta method, Krinsky–Robb, and bootstrapping. We provide computer code for Stata 12 and LIMDEP 10/NLOGIT 5. Conclusions In most applications, choice of the computational method for standard errors of functions of estimated parameters is a matter of convenience. However, when computing standard errors of the sample average of functions that involve both estimated parameters and nonstochastic explanatory variables, it is important to consider the sources of variation in the function's values. PMID:24800304

  16. The Social Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serugendo, Giovanna Di Marzo; Risoldi, Matteo; Solemayni, Mohammad

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Problem and Research Questions * State of the Art * TSC Structure and Computational Awareness * Methodology and Research Directions * Case Study: Democracy * Conclusions

  17. Computing by Observing Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaliere, Matteo; Leupold, Peter

    Computing by Observing is a paradigm for the implementation of models of Natural Computing. It was inspired by the setup of experiments in biochemistry. One central feature is an observer that translates the evolution of an underlying observed system into sequences over a finite alphabet. We take a step toward more realistic observers by allowing them to notice only an occurring change in the observed system rather than to read the system's entire configuration. Compared to previous implementations of the Computing by Observing paradigm, this decreases the computational power; but with relatively simple systems we still obtain the language class generated by matrix grammars.

  18. Optimization of computations

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhalevich, V.S.; Sergienko, I.V.; Zadiraka, V.K.; Babich, M.D.

    1994-11-01

    This article examines some topics of optimization of computations, which have been discussed at 25 seminar-schools and symposia organized by the V.M. Glushkov Institute of Cybernetics of the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences since 1969. We describe the main directions in the development of computational mathematics and present some of our own results that reflect a certain design conception of speed-optimal and accuracy-optimal (or nearly optimal) algorithms for various classes of problems, as well as a certain approach to optimization of computer computations.

  19. Cloud Computing: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Ling; Luo, Zhiguo; Du, Yujian; Guo, Leitao

    In order to support the maximum number of user and elastic service with the minimum resource, the Internet service provider invented the cloud computing. within a few years, emerging cloud computing has became the hottest technology. From the publication of core papers by Google since 2003 to the commercialization of Amazon EC2 in 2006, and to the service offering of AT&T Synaptic Hosting, the cloud computing has been evolved from internal IT system to public service, from cost-saving tools to revenue generator, and from ISP to telecom. This paper introduces the concept, history, pros and cons of cloud computing as well as the value chain and standardization effort.

  20. Forensic webwatch: Forensic computing.

    PubMed

    Bouhaidar, R

    2005-02-01

    With the rapid and continuous development of information technology, policing faces new challenges. As computer equipments are becoming cheaper and the internet more readily available, computer crime and criminal exploitation is on the increase. Investigating such crimes requires identification, preservation, analysis and presentation of digital evidence, the key elements of forensic computing. This is helped by the fact that Locard's principle is applicable to this branch of science as much as in other areas of forensic science. This webwatch considers the ever evolving area of Forensic Computing.