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Sample records for 64cucu-bisthiosemicarbazone radiopharmaceutical binding

  1. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P; Greenberg, D; Hannon, S J

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  2. Radiobrominated triphenylethylenes as estrogen receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Seevers, R.H.; Meese, R.C.; Friedman, A.M.; DeSombre, E.R.

    1985-05-01

    Estrogen receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals have potential for use in the diagnosis and treatment of cancers of the female reproductive system. Tamoxifen is an antiestrogen derived from the triphenylethylene skeleton which is used in the treatment of mammary carcinoma. Hydroxytamoxifen is a metabolite of tamoxifen which binds tightly to the estrogen receptor. Two triphenylethylene derivatives based on the structure of hydroxytamoxifen have been prepared: 1-bromo-1-phenyl-2- (2-dimethylamino)-4-ethoxyphenyl -2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) ethene (1) where the ethyl group of hydroxytamoxifen has been replaced by a bromine, and 1-bromo-1-phenyl-2,2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) ethene (2) with a similar substitution and also lacking the aminoethoxy side chain believed to confer antiestrogenicity. Both 1 and 2 bind strongly to the estrogen receptor. 2 has been labeled with the Auger electron emitting nuclide Br-80m in moderate yields in high specific activity using either N-bromosuccinimide or N-bromophthalimide and shows promise as a potential radiotherapy agent.

  3. Radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Theobald, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a review of the latest developments in radiopharmaceuticals. It covers the development of radiopharmaceutical compounds, the theory and practice of their synthesis, and examples of their application. Also covers safe handling of radiopharmaceuticals, legislation affecting their use, radiation monitoring, radiochromatography, and computer techniques.

  4. Estrogen receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals: II. Tissue distribution of 17. cap alpha. -methylestradiol in normal and tumor-bearing rats

    SciTech Connect

    Feenstra, A.; Vaalburg, W.; Nolten, G.M.J.; Reiffers, S.; Talma, A.G.; Wiegman, T.; van der Molen, H.D.; Woldring, M.G.

    1983-06-01

    Tritiated 17..cap alpha..-methylestradiol was synthesized to investigate the potential of the carbon-11-labeled analog as an estrogen-receptor-binding radiopharmaceutical. In vitro, 17..cap alpha..-methylestradiol is bound with high affinity to the cytoplasmic estrogen receptor from rabbit uterus (K/sub d/ = 1.96 x 10/sup -10/M), and it sediments as an 8S hormone-receptor complex in sucrose gradients. The compound shows specific uptake in the uterus of the adult rat, within 1 h after injection. In female rats bearing DMBA-induced tumors, specific uterine and tumor uptakes were observed, although at 30 min the tumor uptake was only 23 to 30% of the uptake in the uterus. Tritiated 17..cap alpha..-methylestradiol with a specific activity of 6 Ci/mmole showed a similar tissue distribution. Our results indicate that a 17 ..cap alpha..-methylestradiol is promising as an estrogen-receptor-binding radiopharmaceutical.

  5. In vivo binding in rat brain and radiopharmaceutical preparation of radioiodinated HEAT, an alpha-1 adrenoceptor ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, M.W.; Greer, D.M.; Thonoor, C.M.; Williams, C.M.

    1988-03-01

    In vivo binding of (/sup 125/I)-2-(beta-(3-iodo-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylaminomethyl tetralone) ((/sup 125/I)HEAT) to alpha-1 adrenoceptors in the rat brain was determined over 4 hr. Uptake in the thalamus and frontal cortex was approximately 0.1% injected dose per gram tissue. Thalamus/cerebellum ratios of 10:1 and frontal cortex/cerebellum ratios of 5:1 were found at 4 hr. Pretreatment with prazosin, an alpha-1 antagonist, completely inhibited the accumulation of (/sup 125/I)HEAT in thalamus and frontal cortex; yet uptake of radioactivity was not significantly affected by antagonists and agonists for other receptors classes (propranolol, beta-1; apomorphine, D-1; spiperone, D-2). Binding of (/sup 125/I)HEAT is saturable. At 4 hr, (/sup 125/I)HEAT or (/sup 123/I)HEAT was shown to be the only radioactive material in rat thalamus and frontal cortex. Iodine-123 HEAT and (/sup 125/I)HEAT were synthesized as radiopharmaceuticals within 3 hr in 99% radiochemical purity.

  6. Kinetic sensitivity of a receptor-binding radiopharmaceutical: Technetium-99m galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin

    SciTech Connect

    Vera, D.R.; Woodle, E.S.; Stadalnik, R.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Kinetic sensitivity is the ability of a physiochemical parameter to alter the time-activity curve of a radiotracer. The kinetic sensitivity of liver and blood time-activity data resulting from a single bolus injection of ({sup 99m}Tc)galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (( Tc)NGA) into healthy pigs was examined. Three parameters, hepatic plasma flow scaled as flow per plasma volume, ligand-receptor affinity, and total receptor concentration, were tested using (Tc)NGA injections of various molar doses and affinities. Simultaneous measurements of plasma volume (iodine-125 human serum albumin dilution), and hepatic plasma flow (indocyanine green extraction) were performed during 12 (Tc)NGA studies. Paired data sets demonstrated differences (P(chi v2) less than 0.01) in liver and blood time-activity curves in response to changes in each of the tested parameters. We conclude that the (Tc)NGA radiopharmacokinetic system is therefore sensitive to hepatic plasma flow, ligand-receptor affinity, and receptor concentration. In vivo demonstration of kinetic sensitivity permits delineation of the physiologic parameters that determine the biodistribution of a radiopharmaceutical. This delineation is a prerequisite to a valid analytic assessment of receptor biochemistry via kinetic modeling.

  7. Cu(II) Bis(thiosemicarbazone) Radiopharmaceutical Binding to Serum Albumin: Further Definition of Species-Dependence and Associated Substituent Effects

    PubMed Central

    Basken, Nathan E.; Green, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The Cu-PTSM (pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II)) and Cu-ATSM (diacetyl bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II)) radiopharmaceuticals exhibit strong, species-dependent binding to the IIA site of human serum albumin (HSA), while the related Cu-ETS (ethylglyoxal bis(thiosemicarbazonato)copper(II)) radiopharmaceutical appears to only exhibit non-specific binding to human and animal serum albumins. Methods To further probe the structural basis for the species-dependence of this albumin binding interaction, protein binding of these three radiopharmaceuticals was examined in solutions of albumin and/or serum from a broader array of mammalian species (rat, sheep, donkey, rabbit, cow, pig, dog, baboon, mouse, cat, elephant). We also evaluated the albumin binding of several copper(II) bis(thiosemicarbazone) chelates offering more diverse substitution of the ligand backbone. Results Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM exhibit a strong interaction with HSA that is not apparent with the albumins of other species, while the binding of Cu-ETS to albumin is much less species-dependent. The strong interaction of Cu-PTSM with HSA does not appear to simply correlate with variation, relative to the animal albumins, of a single amino acid lining HSA's IIA site. Those agents that selectively interact with HSA share the common feature of only methyl or hydrogen substitution at the carbon atoms of the diimine fragment of the ligand backbone. Conclusions The interspecies variations in albumin binding of Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM are not simply explained by unique amino acid substitutions in the IIA binding pocket of the serum albumins. However, the specific affinity for this region of HSA is disrupted when substituents bulkier than a methyl group appear on the imine carbons of the copper bis(thiosemicarbazone) chelate. PMID:19520290

  8. Binding of ReO4(-) with an engineered MoO4(2-)-binding protein: towards a new approach in radiopharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Baikuntha P; Brugarolas, Pedro; He, Chuan

    2012-01-01

    Radiolabeled biomolecules are routinely used for clinical diagnostics. (99m)Tc is the most commonly used radioactive tracer in radiopharmaceuticals. (188)Re and (186)Re are also commonly used as radioactive tracers in medicine. However, currently available methods for radiolabeling are lengthy and involve several steps in bioconjugation processes. In this work we present a strategy to engineer proteins that may selectively recognize the perrhenate (ReO(4)(-)) ion as a new way to label proteins. We found that a molybdate (MoO(4)(2-))-binding protein (ModA) from Escherichia coli can bind perrhenate with high affinity. Using fluorescence and isothermal titration calorimetry measurements, we determined the dissociation constant of ModA for ReO(4)(-) to be 541 nM and we solved a crystal structure of ModA with a bound ReO(4)(-). On the basis of the structure we created a mutant protein containing a disulfide linkage, which exhibited increased affinity for perrhenate (K(d) = 104 nM). High-resolution crystal structures of ModA (1.7 Å) and A11C/R153C mutant (2.0 Å) were solved with bound perrhenate. Both structures show that a perrhenate ion occupies the molybdate binding site using the same amino acid residues that are involved in molybdate binding. The overall structure of the perrhenate-bound ModA is unchanged compared with that of the molybdate-bound form. In the mutant protein, the bound perrhenate is further stabilized by the engineered disulfide bond.

  9. 'Naked' radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, Paul E. . E-mail: pwallner@rtsx.com

    2006-10-01

    The term 'naked' radiopharmaceuticals, more appropriately, 'unbound' radiopharmaceuticals, refers to any radioisotope used for clinical research or clinical purposes that is not attached to a chemical or biological carrier, and that localizes in various tissues because of a physiologic or chemical propensity/affinity, or secondary to focal anatomic placement. Although they remain useful in selected clinical circumstances, the available agents (except for Iodine-131) have been relegated to an unfortunate and somewhat secondary role. The agents remain useful and worthy of consideration for new clinical investigation and clinical use.

  10. Organometallic Radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberto, Roger

    Although molecular imaging agents have to be synthesized ultimately from aqueous solutions, organometallic complexes are becoming more and more important as flexible yet kinetically stable building blocks for radiopharmaceutical drug discovery. The diversity of ligands, targets, and targeting molecules related to these complexes is an essential base for finding novel, noninvasive imaging agents to diagnose and eventually treat widespread diseases such as cancer. This review article covers the most important findings toward these objectives accomplished during the past 3-4 years. The two major available organometallic building blocks will be discussed in the beginning together with constraints for market introduction as imposed by science and industry. Since targeting radiopharmaceuticals are a major focus of current research in molecular imaging, attempts toward so-called technetium essential radiopharmaceuticals will be briefly touched in the beginning followed by the main discussion about the labeling of targeting molecules such as folic acid, nucleosides, vitamins, carbohydrates, and fatty acids. At the end, some new strategies for drug discovery will be introduced together with results from organometallic chemistry in water. The majority of the new results have been achieved with the [99mTc(OH2)3(CO)3]+ complex which will, though not exclusively, be a focus of this review.

  11. Agonist and antagonist bind differently to 5-HT1A receptors during Alzheimer's disease: A post-mortem study with PET radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Benjamin; Sebti, Johan; Verdurand, Mathieu; Fieux, Sylvain; Billard, Thierry; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Troakes, Claire; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Zimmer, Luc

    2016-10-01

    PET imaging studies using 5-HT1A receptor radiotracers show a decreased density of this receptor in hippocampi of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) at advanced stages. However, current 5-HT1A receptor radiopharmaceuticals used in neuroimaging are antagonists, thought to bind to 5-HT1A receptors in different functional states (i.e., both the one which displays high affinity for agonists and is thought to mediate receptor activation, as well as the state which has low affinity for agonists). Comparing the PET imaging obtained using an agonist radiotracer, which binds selectively to functional receptors, with the PET imaging obtained using an antagonist radiotracer would therefore provide original information on 5-HT1A receptor impairment during AD. Quantitative autoradiography using [(18)F]F13640 and [(18)F]MPPF, a 5-HT1A agonist and antagonist, respectively, was measured in hippocampi of patients with AD (n = 25, at different Braak stages) and control subjects (n = 9). The neuronal density was measured in the same tissues by NeuN immunohistochemistry. The specific binding of both radiotracers was determined by addition of WAY-100635, a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. The autoradiography distribution of both 5-HT1A PET radiotracers varied across hippocampus regions. The highest binding density was in the pyramidal layer of CA1. Incubation with Gpp(NH)p, a non-hydrolysable analogue of GTP, reduced significantly [(18)F]F13640 binding in hippocampal regions, confirming its preferential interaction with G-coupled receptors, and slightly increased [(18)F]MPPF binding. In the CA1 subfield, [(18)F]F13640 binding was significantly decreased at Braak stages I/II (-19%), Braak stages III/IV (-23%), and Braak stages V/VI (-36%) versus control. In contrast, [(18)F]MPPF binding was statistically reduced only at the most advanced Braak stages V/VI compared to control (-33%). Since [(18)F]F13640 and [(18)F]MPPF can be used in vivo in humans, this

  12. Rhenium and technetium tricarbonyl, {M(CO)3} (+) (M = Tc, Re), binding to mammalian metallothioneins: new insights into chemical and radiopharmaceutical implications.

    PubMed

    Lecina, Joan; Palacios, Òscar; Atrian, Sílvia; Capdevila, Mercè; Suades, Joan

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with the binding of the four mammalian metallothioneins (MTs) to the organometallic metal fragment {fac-M(CO)3}(+) (M = (99)Tc, Re), which is highly promising for the preparation of second-generation radiopharmaceuticals. The study of the transmetallation reaction between zinc and rhenium in Zn7-MT1 by means of UV-vis and CD spectroscopy demonstrated the incorporation of the {fac-Re(CO)3}(+) fragment to the MTs. This reaction should be performed at 70 °C to accelerate the reaction rate, a result that is consistent with the reported reactivity of the rhenium fragment. ESI-TOF MS demonstrated the formation of mixed-metal species as Zn6,{Re(CO)3}-MT, Zn6,{Re(CO)3}2-MT, and Zn5,{Re(CO)3}3-MT, as well as the different reactivity of the four MT isoforms. Hence, Zn-MT3 showed the highest reactivity, in agreement with its high Cu-thionein character, whereas Zn-MT2 exhibited the lowest reactivity, in line with its high Zn-thionein character. The reactivity of the Zn-loaded forms of MT1 and MT4 is intermediate between those of MT3 and MT2. The study of the binding of the {fac-(99)Tc(CO)3}(+) fragment to MTs showed a significant and very interesting different reactivity in relation to rhenium. The transmetallation reaction is much more effective with technetium than with rhenium and significant amounts of mixed Zn x ,{(99)Tc(CO)3} y -MT species were formed with the four MT isoforms whereas only MT3 rendered similar amounts of rhenium derivatives. The results obtained in this study support the possible use of technetium for labelling mammalian metallothioneins and also for possible radiopharmaceutical applications.

  13. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    We report on our efforts in PET basic radiochemistry, radiopharmaceutical synthesis, and preclinical radiopharmaceutical evaluation. These efforts are focused on three fronts. First predictive abilities in nucleophilic aromatic substitution with [[sup 18]F]fluorination of substituted aromatic rings. Although radiochemical yields can be predicted within a very similar group of compounds with similar leaving groups and substituent patterns, generalization to all nucleophilic substitutions with [[sup 18]F] fluoride is not warranted. Kinetic studies indicate significantly different rates of reactions, depending on ring substituents. Second, preclinical evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals. We have synthesized and begun the preclinical evaluation of [[sup 11]C]tetrabenazine, a new radioligand based on the vesicular monoamine transport system. Third, our work, on [[sup 18]F]fluorination/decarbonylation reactions, structure-activity relationships in dopamine uptake inhibitors and effects of chronic drugs on radioligand binding is described.

  14. γ-Tilmanocept, a New Radiopharmaceutical Tracer for Cancer Sentinel Lymph Nodes, Binds to the Mannose Receptor (CD206).

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul K; Rajaram, Murugesan V S; Metz, Wendy L; Cope, Frederick O; Blue, Michael S; Vera, David R; Schlesinger, Larry S

    2015-09-01

    γ-Tilmanocept ((99m)Tc-labeled-tilmanocept or [(99m)Tc]-tilmanocept) is the first mannose-containing, receptor-directed, radiolabeled tracer for the highly sensitive imaging of sentinel lymph nodes in solid tumor staging. To elucidate the mannose-binding receptor that retains tilmanocept in this microenvironment, human macrophages were used that have high expression of the C-type lectin mannose receptor (MR; CD206). Cy3-labeled tilmanocept exhibited high specificity binding to macrophages that was nearly abolished in competitive inhibition experiments. Furthermore, Cy3-tilmanocept binding was markedly reduced on macrophages deficient in the MR by small interfering RNA treatment and was increased on MR-transfected HEK 293 cells. Finally, confocal microscopy revealed colocalization of Cy3-tilmanocept with the macrophage membrane MR and binding of labeled tilmanocept to MR(+) cells (macrophages and/or dendritic cells) in human sentinel lymph node tissues. Together these data provide strong evidence that CD206 is a major binding receptor for γ-tilmanocept. Identification of CD206 as the γ-tilmanocept-binding receptor enables opportunities for designing receptor-targeted advanced imaging agents and therapeutics for cancer and other diseases.

  15. Medicinal Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry of Metal Radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saw, Maung Maung

    2012-06-01

    Metal complexes have been used as medicinal compounds. Metals have advantageous features over organic compounds. Significant applications of metal complexes are in the field of nuclear medicine. Radiopharmaceuticals are drugs containing radioisotopes used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The generalized targeting strategy for molecular imaging probe consists of three essential parts: (i) reporter unit or payload, (ii) carrier, and (iii) targeting system. Medicinal radiopharmaceutical chemistry pays special consideration to radioisotopes, as a reporter unit for diagnostic application or as a payload for therapeutic application. Targeting is achieved by a few approaches but the most common is the bifunctional chelator approach. While designing a radiopharmaceutical, a range of issues needs to be considered including properties of metal radioisotopes, bifunctional chelators, linkers, and targeting molecules. Designing radiopharmaceuticals requires consideration of two key words: "compounds of biological interest" and "fit for intended use." The ultimate goal is the development of new diagnostic methods and treatment. Diagnostic metal radiopharmaceuticals are used for SPECT and PET applications. Technetium chemistry constitutes a major portion of SPECT and gallium chemistry constitutes a major portion of PET. Therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals can be constructed by using alpha-, beta minus-, or Auger electron-emitting radiometals. Special uses of medicinal radiopharmaceuticals include internal radiation therapy, brachytherapy, immunoPET, radioimmunotherapy, and peptide receptor radionuclide imaging and therapy.

  16. Binding of ReO[subscript 4];#8722; with an engineered MoO[subscript 4 superscript 2];#8722;-binding protein: towards a new approach in radiopharmaceutical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Aryal, Baikuntha P.; Brugarolas, Pedro; He, Chuan

    2012-05-25

    Radiolabeled biomolecules are routinely used for clinical diagnostics. {sup 99m}Tc is the most commonly used radioactive tracer in radiopharmaceuticals. {sup 188}Re and {sup 186}Re are also commonly used as radioactive tracers in medicine. However, currently available methods for radiolabeling are lengthy and involve several steps in bioconjugation processes. In this work we present a strategy to engineer proteins that may selectively recognize the perrhenate (ReO{sub 4}{sup -}) ion as a new way to label proteins. We found that a molybdate (MoO{sub 4}{sup 2-})-binding protein (ModA) from Escherichia coli can bind perrhenate with high affinity. Using fluorescence and isothermal titration calorimetry measurements, we determined the dissociation constant of ModA for ReO{sub 4}{sup -} to be 541 nM and we solved a crystal structure of ModA with a bound ReO{sub 4}{sup -}. On the basis of the structure we created a mutant protein containing a disulfide linkage, which exhibited increased affinity for perrhenate (K{sub d} = 104 nM). High-resolution crystal structures of ModA (1.7 {angstrom}) and A11C/R153C mutant (2.0 {angstrom}) were solved with bound perrhenate. Both structures show that a perrhenate ion occupies the molybdate binding site using the same amino acid residues that are involved in molybdate binding. The overall structure of the perrhenate-bound ModA is unchanged compared with that of the molybdate-bound form. In the mutant protein, the bound perrhenate is further stabilized by the engineered disulfide bond.

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    In this grant period we have continued our efforts in the areas of PE basic radiochemistry, radiopharmaceutical synthesis, and preclinical radiopharmaceutical evaluation. A new synthetic sequence, consisting, of no-carrier-added fluorine-18 labeling of substituted benzaldehydes followed by reductive decarbonylation, has been developed. This new methodology can be applied to the fluorine-18 labeling of a wide variety of drugs not previously accessible through existing fluorine-18 labeling methods. Following up on a literature report that the ability to radiolabel aromatic rings can be predicted by {sup 13}C-NMR chemical shifts, we have examined the generality of this correlation in aromatic rings bearing a variety of substituents. Although the original correlation holds for nitro substituted anisaldehydes, it cannot be extended to other rings substitution patterns. We have examined the relationship of in vivo localization of various fluorine-18 labeled dopamine uptake inhibitors to their in vitro binding affinities and lipophilicities. We have found that remarkably small decreases in binding affinity result in dramatic losses of in vivo binding to the desired high affinity binding sites. In order to probe the effects of endogenous neurotransmitter on the in vivo binding of radiolabeled dopamine uptake inhibitors, we have examined the in vivo regional localization of (18{sub F}) GBR 13119 after acute and chronic drug treatments which alter the endogenous levels of dopamine. We have found that acute changes in dopamine levels do not affect the binding of this radioligand, but chronic depletion of neurotransmitter results in down-regulation of the in vivo binding sites. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1992-12-01

    We report on our efforts in PET basic radiochemistry, radiopharmaceutical synthesis, and preclinical radiopharmaceutical evaluation. These efforts are focused on three fronts. First predictive abilities in nucleophilic aromatic substitution with [{sup 18}F]fluorination of substituted aromatic rings. Although radiochemical yields can be predicted within a very similar group of compounds with similar leaving groups and substituent patterns, generalization to all nucleophilic substitutions with [{sup 18}F] fluoride is not warranted. Kinetic studies indicate significantly different rates of reactions, depending on ring substituents. Second, preclinical evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals. We have synthesized and begun the preclinical evaluation of [{sup 11}C]tetrabenazine, a new radioligand based on the vesicular monoamine transport system. Third, our work, on [{sup 18}F]fluorination/decarbonylation reactions, structure-activity relationships in dopamine uptake inhibitors and effects of chronic drugs on radioligand binding is described.

  19. Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry.

  20. The development of new radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Britton, K E

    1990-01-01

    The development of new radiopharmaceuticals is the basis of the continuing growth of nuclear medicine. Chemical interactions of electron clouds in their three-dimensional conformations bring together, in the process of molecular recognition, the reaction of antibody and antigen, receptor and ligand, enzyme and substrate, hormone and response site. This convergence enables the computer design of molecules such as ligands to fit computer-displayed conformational models showing active centres, positive and negative charges and other interactions. Indeed, given a particular molecule, a complementary binding structure can be devised. The hybridoma approach to monoclonal antibody production is being superceded by the bacterial bioengineer. The gene for the hypervariable region from the spleen cells of immunized mouse can be coupled with the myeloma gene. The polymerase chain reaction can duplicate the DNA a million times over in 20 min and the result transfected into a bacterial plasmid to produce the antibody. These scientific problems are soluble in principle and are being solved. However, so much damage to this developing biological field is being done by regulatory authorities that one must ask who should or can regulate the regulators. These problems have to be overcome in order to provide the new radiopharmaceuticals that are the food and wine of nuclear medicine.

  1. Method for preparing radiopharmaceutical complexes

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Abrams, Michael J.

    1989-05-02

    A method for preparing radiopharmaceutical complexes that are substantially free of the reaction materials used to produce the radiopharmaceutical complex is disclosed. The method involves admixing in a suitable first solvent in a container a target seeking ligand or salt or metal adduct thereof, a radionuclide label, and a reducing agent for said radionuclide, thereby forming said radiopharmaceutical complex; coating the interior walls of the container with said pharmaceutical complex; discarding the solvent containing by-products and unreacted starting reaction materials; and removing the radiopharmaceutical complex from said walls by dissolving it in a second solvent, thereby obtaining said radiopharmaceutical complex substantially free of by-products and unreacted starting materials.

  2. Process for preparing radiopharmaceuticals

    DOEpatents

    Barak, Morton; Winchell, Harry S.

    1977-01-04

    A process for the preparation of technetium-99m labeled pharmaceuticals is disclosed. The process comprises initially isolating technetium-99m pertechnetate by adsorption upon an adsorbent packing in a chromatographic column. The technetium-99m is then eluted from the packing with a biological compound to form a radiopharmaceutical.

  3. Audits of radiopharmaceutical formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Castronovo, F.P. Jr. )

    1992-03-01

    A procedure for auditing radiopharmaceutical formulations is described. To meet FDA guidelines regarding the quality of radiopharmaceuticals, institutional radioactive drug research committees perform audits when such drugs are formulated away from an institutional pharmacy. All principal investigators who formulate drugs outside institutional pharmacies must pass these audits before they can obtain a radiopharmaceutical investigation permit. The audit team meets with the individual who performs the formulation at the site of drug preparation to verify that drug formulations meet identity, strength, quality, and purity standards; are uniform and reproducible; and are sterile and pyrogen free. This team must contain an expert knowledgeable in the preparation of radioactive drugs; a radiopharmacist is the most qualified person for this role. Problems that have been identified by audits include lack of sterility and apyrogenicity testing, formulations that are open to the laboratory environment, failure to use pharmaceutical-grade chemicals, inadequate quality control methods or records, inadequate training of the person preparing the drug, and improper unit dose preparation. Investigational radiopharmaceutical formulations, including nonradiolabeled drugs, must be audited before they are administered to humans. A properly trained pharmacist should be a member of the audit team.

  4. Pharmacovigilance in radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rishi; Kalaiselvan, Vivekanandan; Kumar, Rakesh; Verma, Ravendra; Singh, Gyanendra Nath

    2016-01-01

    Indian Pharmacopoeia Commission is Committed for maintaining the standards of drugs including Radiopharmaceuticals (RPs) by publishing Indian Pharmacopoeia. These RPs are being used in India for diagnostic or therapeutic purpose. RPs though contain relatively small quantities of active ingredient and administered in small volumes could cause some adverse reactions to the patients. The objective of presenting this article is to introduce the system of adverse drug reaction reporting to the nuclear medicine fraternity who are dealing with RPs. PMID:27095855

  5. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1990-06-01

    During this grant period 1 January 1988--31 December 1990, we have successfully developed a number of new approaches to fluorine-18 labeled compounds, prepared several new radiotracers for both animal studies and eventual clinical trials, and explored the utility of a high-quality industrial robot in radiopharmaceutical applications. The progress during the last grant period is summarized briefly in the following sections. Publications arising from this research are listed below and can be found in Appendix I. 1 fig.

  6. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  7. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1991-12-31

    In this grant period we have continued our efforts in the areas of PE basic radiochemistry, radiopharmaceutical synthesis, and preclinical radiopharmaceutical evaluation. A new synthetic sequence, consisting, of no-carrier-added fluorine-18 labeling of substituted benzaldehydes followed by reductive decarbonylation, has been developed. This new methodology can be applied to the fluorine-18 labeling of a wide variety of drugs not previously accessible through existing fluorine-18 labeling methods. Following up on a literature report that the ability to radiolabel aromatic rings can be predicted by {sup 13}C-NMR chemical shifts, we have examined the generality of this correlation in aromatic rings bearing a variety of substituents. Although the original correlation holds for nitro substituted anisaldehydes, it cannot be extended to other rings substitution patterns. We have examined the relationship of in vivo localization of various fluorine-18 labeled dopamine uptake inhibitors to their in vitro binding affinities and lipophilicities. We have found that remarkably small decreases in binding affinity result in dramatic losses of in vivo binding to the desired high affinity binding sites. In order to probe the effects of endogenous neurotransmitter on the in vivo binding of radiolabeled dopamine uptake inhibitors, we have examined the in vivo regional localization of [18{sub F}] GBR 13119 after acute and chronic drug treatments which alter the endogenous levels of dopamine. We have found that acute changes in dopamine levels do not affect the binding of this radioligand, but chronic depletion of neurotransmitter results in down-regulation of the in vivo binding sites. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Aptamers as radiopharmaceuticals for nuclear imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Gijs, Marlies; Aerts, An; Impens, Nathalie; Baatout, Sarah; Luxen, André

    2016-04-01

    Today, radiopharmaceuticals belong to the standard instrumentation of nuclear medicine, both in the context of diagnosis and therapy. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals consist of targeting biomolecules which are designed to interact with a disease-related molecular target. A plethora of targeting biomolecules of radiopharmaceuticals exists, including antibodies, antibody fragments, proteins, peptides and nucleic acids. Nucleic acids have some significant advantages relative to proteinaceous biomolecules in terms of size, production, modifications, possible targets and immunogenicity. In particular, aptamers (non-coding, synthetic, single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides) are of interest because they can bind a molecular target with high affinity and specificity. At present, few aptamers have been investigated preclinically for imaging and therapeutic applications. In this review, we describe the use of aptamers as targeting biomolecules of radiopharmaceuticals. We also discuss the chemical modifications which are needed to turn aptamers into valuable (radio-)pharmaceuticals, as well as the different radiolabeling strategies that can be used to radiolabel oligonucleotides and, in particular, aptamers. PMID:26746572

  9. Receptor-binding radiopharmaceuticals for imaging breast tumors: estrogen-receptor interactions and selectivity of tissue uptake of halogenated estrogen analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Katzenellenbogen J.A.; Carlson, K.E.; Heiman, D.F.; Goswami, R.

    1980-06-01

    Four halogenated estrogen analogs - o-fluorohexestrol, and 1-fluoro-, 1-bromo-, and 1-iodohexestrol - have been prepared and tritium-labeled in high specific activity, to investigate their potential as estrogen-receptor-based agents for imaging breast tumors. These compounds bind with high affinity in vitro to the cytoplasmic uterine estrogen receptor from rat and lamb and sediment as 8S receptor complexes on sucrose gradients. After 1 hr in immature rats, these compounds show high uptake into the uterus, but low uptakes (10 to 25% of the uterine levels) into most nontarget tissues. The uterine uptake is estrogen specific since it is depressed by excess nonradioactive estradiol. Uptake selectivity is greatest for the fluorohexestrols and decreases for the bromo and iodo compounds. In mature rats bearing DMBA-induced mammary tumors, selective uptake by the uterus and tumors is seen with 1-fluoro(/sup 3/H/sub 4/)hexestrol and o-fluoro(/sup 3/H/sub 3/)hexestrol. The studies indicate that these four halogenated hexestrols are promising candidates as estrogen-receptor-based agents for the imaging of human breast tumors.

  10. Dosimetry for Radiopharmaceutical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Hobbs, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) involves the use of radionuclides that are either conjugated to tumor-targeting agents (eg, nanoscale constructs, antibodies, peptides, and small molecules) or concentrated in tissue through natural physiological mechanisms that occur predominantly in neoplastic or otherwise targeted cells (eg, Graves disease). The ability to collect pharmacokinetic data by imaging and use this to perform dosimetry calculations for treatment planning distinguishes RPT from other systemic treatment modalities. Treatment planning has not been widely adopted, in part, because early attempts to relate dosimetry to outcome were not successful. This was partially because a dosimetry methodology appropriate to risk evaluation rather than efficacy and toxicity was being applied to RPT. The weakest links in both diagnostic and therapeutic dosimetry are the accuracy of the input and the reliability of the radiobiological models used to convert dosimetric data to the relevant biologic end points. Dosimetry for RPT places a greater demand on both of these weak links. To date, most dosimetric studies have been retrospective, with a focus on tumor dose-response correlations rather than prospective treatment planning. In this regard, transarterial radioembolization also known as intra-arterial radiation therapy, which uses radiolabeled (90Y) microspheres of glass or resin to treat lesions in the liver holds much promise for more widespread dosimetric treatment planning. The recent interest in RPT with alpha-particle emitters has highlighted the need to adopt a dosimetry methodology that specifically accounts for the unique aspects of alpha particles. The short range of alpha-particle emitters means that in cases in which the distribution of activity is localized to specific functional components or cell types of an organ, the absorbed dose will be equally localized and dosimetric calculations on the scale of organs or even voxels (~5 mm) are no longer sufficient

  11. Recent advances in copper radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guiyang; Singh, Ajay N; Oz, Orhan K; Sun, Xiankai

    2011-04-01

    Copper has five radioisotopes ((60)Cu, (61)Cu, (62)Cu, (64)Cu, and (67)Cu) that can be used in copper radiopharmaceuticals. These radioisotopes decay by mixed emissions of β+, β-, and γ with a wide range of half-lives from 9.74 min ((62)Cu) to 2.58 d ((67)Cu), which enable the design and synthesis of a variety of radiopharmaceuticals for different biomedical applications in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. However, due to the availability and production cost, the research efforts in copper radiopharmaceuticals are mainly focused on the use of (64)Cu (t(1/2) = 12.7 h; 17.4% β+, 43% EC, 39% β-), a radioisotope with low positron energy (E β+max = 0.656 MeV) that is ideal for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging quantification and β- emissions along with Auger electron for radiotherapy. Driven by the ever-increasing availability of preclinical and clinical PET scanners, a considerable interest has been seen in the development of novel copper radiopharmaceuticals in the past decade for a variety of diseases as represented by PET imaging of cancer. To avoid unnecessary literature redundancy, this review focuses on the unrepresented research aspects of copper chemistry (e.g. electrochemistry) and their uses in the evaluation of novel nuclear imaging probe design and recent advances in the field towards the practical use of copper radiopharmaceuticals.

  12. Preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with metal radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1992-06-01

    We recently developed a useful zinc-62/copper-62 generator and are presently evaluating copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals for clinical studies. While developing these copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals, in collaboration with the University of Missouri Research Reactor, Columbia we have also explored copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals. The PET images we obtained with copper-64 tracers were of such high quality that we have developed and evaluated copper-64 labeled antibodies for PET imaging. The major research activities described herein include: the development and assessment of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals; the development and evaluation of a new zinc-62/copper-62 generator and the assessment of copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals; mechanistic studies on proteins labeled with metal radionuclides.

  13. Bioinorganic Activity of Technetium Radiopharmaceuticals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkerton, Thomas C.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Technetium radiopharmaceuticals are diagnostic imaging agents used in the field of nuclear medicine to visualize tissues, anatomical structures, and metabolic disorders. Bioavailability of technetium complexes, thyroid imaging, brain imaging, kidney imaging, imaging liver function, bone imaging, and heart imaging are the major areas discussed. (JN)

  14. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    In the period 1969-1986, this project was directed to the evolution of target-specific labeled chemicals useful for nuclear medical imaging, especially radioactive indicators suited to tracing adrenal functions and localizing tumors in the neuroendocrine system. Since 1986, this project research has focused on the chemistry of positron emission tomography (PET) ligands. This project has involved the evaluation of methods for radiochemical syntheses with fluorine-18, as well as the development and preliminary evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography. In the radiochemistry area, the ability to predict fluorine-18 labeling yields for aromatic substitution reactions through the use of carbon-13 NMR analysis was studied. Radiochemical yields can be predicted for some structurally analogous aromatic compounds, but this correlation could not be generally applied to aromatic substrates for this reaction, particularly with changes in ring substituents or leaving groups. Importantly, certain aryl ring substituents, particularly methyl groups, appeared to have a negative effect on fluorination reactions. These observations are important in the future design of syntheses of complicated organic radiopharmaceuticals. In the radiopharmaceutical area, this project has supported the development of a new class of radiopharmaceuticals based on the monoamine vesicular uptake systems. The new radioligands, based on the tetrabenazine structure, offer a new approach to the quantification of monoaminergic neurons in the brain. Preliminary primate imaging studies support further development of these radioligands for PET studies in humans. If successful, such radiopharmaceuticals will find application in studies of the causes and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson`s disease.

  15. Development of peptide and protein based radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Wynendaele, Evelien; Bracke, Nathalie; Stalmans, Sofie; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Radiolabelled peptides and proteins have recently gained great interest as theranostics, due to their numerous and considerable advantages over small (organic) molecules. Developmental procedures of these radiolabelled biomolecules start with the radiolabelling process, greatly defined by the amino acid composition of the molecule and the radionuclide used. Depending on the radionuclide selection, radiolabelling starting materials are whether or not essential for efficient radiolabelling, resulting in direct or indirect radioiodination, radiometal-chelate coupling, indirect radiofluorination or (3)H/(14)C-labelling. Before preclinical investigations are performed, quality control analyses of the synthesized radiopharmaceutical are recommended to eliminate false positive or negative functionality results, e.g. changed receptor binding properties due to (radiolabelled) impurities. Therefore, radionuclidic, radiochemical and chemical purity are investigated, next to the general peptide attributes as described in the European and the United States Pharmacopeia. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo stability characteristics of the peptides and proteins also need to be explored, seen their strong sensitivity to proteinases and peptidases, together with radiolysis and trans-chelation phenomena of the radiopharmaceuticals. In vitro biomedical characterization of the radiolabelled peptides and proteins is performed by saturation, kinetic and competition binding assays, analyzing KD, Bmax, kon, koff and internalization properties, taking into account the chemical and metabolic stability and adsorption events inherent to peptides and proteins. In vivo biodistribution can be adapted by linker, chelate or radionuclide modifications, minimizing normal tissue (e.g. kidney and liver) radiation, and resulting in favorable dosimetry analyses. Finally, clinical trials are initiated, eventually leading to the marketing of radiolabelled peptides and proteins for PET/SPECT-imaging and therapy

  16. Prospective of 68Ga-Radiopharmaceutical Development

    PubMed Central

    Velikyan, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) experienced accelerated development and has become an established method for medical research and clinical routine diagnostics on patient individualized basis. Development and availability of new radiopharmaceuticals specific for particular diseases is one of the driving forces of the expansion of clinical PET. The future development of the 68Ga-radiopharmaceuticals must be put in the context of several aspects such as role of PET in nuclear medicine, unmet medical needs, identification of new biomarkers, targets and corresponding ligands, production and availability of 68Ga, automation of the radiopharmaceutical production, progress of positron emission tomography technologies and image analysis methodologies for improved quantitation accuracy, PET radiopharmaceutical regulations as well as advances in radiopharmaceutical chemistry. The review presents the prospects of the 68Ga-based radiopharmaceutical development on the basis of the current status of these aspects as well as wide range and variety of imaging agents. PMID:24396515

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging the heart

    DOEpatents

    Green, M.A.; Tsang, B.W.

    1994-06-28

    Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging myocardial tissues are prepared by forming lipophilic, cationic complexes of radioactive metal ions with metal chelating ligands comprising the Schiff base adducts of triamines and tetraamines with optionally substituted salicylaldehydes. The lipophilic, cationic, radioactive complexes of the invention exhibit high uptake and retention in myocardial tissues. Preferred gallium-68(III) complexes in accordance with this invention can be used to image the heart using positron emission tomography. 6 figures.

  18. Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging the heart

    DOEpatents

    Green, Mark A.; Tsang, Brenda W.

    1994-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging myocardial tissues are prepared by forming lipophilic, cationic complexes of radioactive metal ions with metal chelating ligands comprising the Schiff base adducts of triamines and tetraamines with optionally substituted salicylaldehydes. The lipophilic, cationic, radioactive complexes of the invention exhibit high uptake and retention in myocardial tissues. Preferred gallium-68(III) complexes in accordance with this invention can be used to image the heart using positron emission tomography.

  19. Radiation dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Stubbs, J.B.; Toohey, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    Tables of radiation dose estimates based on the Cristy-Eckerman adult male phantom are provided for a number of radiopharmaceuticals commonly used in nuclear medicine. Radiation dose estimates are listed for all major source organs, and several other organs of interest. The dose estimates were calculated using the MIRD Technique as implemented in the MIRDOSE3 computer code, developed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Internal Dose Information Center. In this code, residence times for source organs are used with decay data from the MIRD Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes to produce estimates of radiation dose to organs of standardized phantoms representing individuals of different ages. The adult male phantom of the Cristy-Eckerman phantom series is different from the MIRD 5, or Reference Man phantom in several aspects, the most important of which is the difference in the masses and absorbed fractions for the active (red) marrow. The absorbed fractions for flow energy photons striking the marrow are also different. Other minor differences exist, but are not likely to significantly affect dose estimates calculated with the two phantoms. Assumptions which support each of the dose estimates appears at the bottom of the table of estimates for a given radiopharmaceutical. In most cases, the model kinetics or organ residence times are explicitly given. The results presented here can easily be extended to include other radiopharmaceuticals or phantoms.

  20. Renal radiopharmaceuticals--an update

    SciTech Connect

    Chervu, L.R.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1982-07-01

    Noninvasive radionuclide procedures in the evaluation of renal disease have been accepted increasingly as effective and valuable alternatives to older clinical methods. The development of suitable radiopharmaceuticals labeled with high photon intensity radionuclides and with /sup 99m/Tc in particular has stimulated this modality during the last few years. Currently several nearly ideal agents are available for anatomical and functional studies of kidney imparting very low absorbed radiation doses. These include /sup 99m/Tc-GHA and /sup 99m/Tc-DMSA for renal morphology and differential function evaluation, /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA for GFR and /sup 123/I orthoiodohippurate for ERPF measurements. A suitable agent as a replacement for the latter labeled with /sup 99m/Tc is actively being sought. Computer-assisted processing of dynamic renal function studies enables the observer to obtain a wealth of information related to the renal extraction, uptake, parenchymal transit and pelvic transit parameters of the agent administered into the bloodstream. Each of these parameters either globally or differentially contributes to a detailed evaluation of renal disease states. Several of these procedures have been validated against classical techniques clinically but more detailed information is being sought with the recently introduced radiopharmaceuticals. With the detailed validation and increasing recognition of the clinical utility of several of the radionuclidic procedures at many centers, it is hoped that radionuclide assessment of renal disorders ultimately will be made available routinely at all medical facilities.

  1. Hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Krohn, Kenneth A.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Link, Jeanne M.; Welch, Michael J.

    2012-12-19

    The chemical products made in a cyclotron target are a combined result of the chemical effects of the nuclear transformation that made the radioactive atom and the bulk radiolysis in the target. This review uses some well-known examples to understand how hot atom chemistry explains the primary products from a nuclear reaction and then how radiation chemistry is exploited to set up the optimal product for radiosynthesis. It also addresses the chemical effects of nuclear decay. There are important principles that are common to hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Both emphasize short-lived radionuclides and manipulation of high specific activity nuclides. Furthermore, they both rely on radiochromatographic separation for identification of no-carrieradded products.

  2. Positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals for imaging brain Beta-amyloid.

    PubMed

    Vallabhajosula, Shankar

    2011-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is defined histologically by the presence of extracellular β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles in the cerebral cortex. The diagnosis of dementia, along with the prediction of who will develop dementia, has been assisted by magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) by using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). These techniques, however, are not specific for AD. Based on the chemistry of histologic staining dyes, several Aβ-specific positron-emitting radiotracers have been developed to image neuropathology of AD. Among these, [(11)C]PiB is the most studied Aβ-binding PET radiopharmaceutical in the world. The histologic and biochemical specificity of PiB binding across different regions of the AD brain was demonstrated by showing a direct correlation between Aβ-containing amyloid plaques and in vivo [(11)C]PiB retention measured by PET imaging. Because (11)C is not ideal for commercialization, several (18)F-labeled tracers have been developed. At this time, [(18)F]3'-F-PiB (Flutemetamol), (18)F-AV-45 (Florbetapir), and (18)F-AV-1 (Florbetaben) are undergoing extensive phase II and III clinical trials. This article provides a brief review of the amyloid biology and chemistry of Aβ-specific (11)C and (18)F-PET radiopharmaceuticals. Clinical trials have clearly documented that PET radiopharmaceuticals capable of assessing Aβ content in vivo in the brains of AD subjects and subjects with mild cognitive impairment will be important as diagnostic agents to detect in vivo amyloid brain pathology. In addition, PET amyloid imaging will also help test the amyloid cascade hypothesis of AD and as an aid to assess the efficacy of antiamyloid therapeutics currently under development in clinical trials.

  3. Radiopharmaceuticals in PET, Progress and Promise

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wolf, A. P.; Fowler, J. S.

    1988-11-01

    It is the intention of this presentation to focus on the current state of radiopharmaceuticals for PET and where this is leading us. PET radiopharmaceuticals can be broken down into perhaps seven categories at present with each being applicable to a different aspect of human biochemistry. These are: metabolic probes, neurochemical probes, enzyme probes, ion channel blockers, blood flow agents, ethical drugs and other positron emitters.

  4. Radiopharmaceuticals in PET, progress and promise

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1988-11-01

    It is the intention of this presentation to focus on the current state of radiopharmaceuticals for PET and where this is leading us. PET radiopharmaceuticals can be broken down into perhaps seven categories at present with each being applicable to a different aspect of human biochemistry. These are: metabolic probes, neurochemical probes, enzyme probes, ion channel blockers, blood flow agents, ethical drugs and other positron emitters. 7 refs.

  5. Astatine Radiopharmaceuticals: Prospects and Problems.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2008-09-01

    For the treatment of minimum residual diseases such micrometastases and residual tumor margins that remain after debulking of the primary tumor, targeted radiotherapy using radiopharmaceuticals tagged with alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides is very attractive. In addition to the their short range in tissue, which helps minimize harmful effects on adjacent normal tissues, alpha-particles, being high LET radiation, have several radiobiological advantages. The heavy halogen, astatine-211 is one of the prominent alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides in practice. Being a halogen, it can often be incorporated into biomolecules of interest by adapting radioiodination chemistry. A wide spectrum of compounds from the simple [(211)At]astatide ion to small organic molecules, peptides, and large proteins labeled with (211)At have been investigated with at least two reaching the stage of clinical evaluation. The chemistry, cytotoxic advantages, biodistribution studies, and microdosimetry/pharmacokinetic modeling of some of these agents will be reviewed. In addition, potential problems such as the harmful effect of radiolysis on the synthesis, lack of sufficient in vivo stability of astatinated compounds, and possible adverse effects when they are systemically administered will be discussed. PMID:20150978

  6. Peptide targeted copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Ma, Michelle T; Donnelly, Paul S

    2011-01-01

    Peptide targeted ⁶⁴Cu-labelled diagnostic agents for positron emission tomography are viable candidates for molecular imaging of cancer. In a clinical setting, optimal image quality relies on selective tumor uptake of the ⁶⁴Cu-labelled radiotracer. The three components of the radiotracer construct--the chelate group, linker and targeting peptide--all influence the biodistribution of the ⁶⁴Cu-labelled radiotracer in vivo. Low or moderate Cu complex stability in vivo results in transmetallation of ⁶⁴Cu to endogenous proteins, giving rise to high background activity. The length and the nature of the linker group affect the affinity of the ⁶⁴Cu-labelled radiotracer for the target receptor. Variations in the peptide sequence can impact on the metabolic stability and therefore the bioavailability and tumor retention of the ⁶⁴Cu-labelled radiotracer in vivo. Lastly, the hydrophilicity of the construct can influence radiotracer metabolism and clearance pathways. Recent advances in the field of peptide targeted ⁶⁴Cu-labelled radiopharmaceuticals involve GRPR-targeted and αvβ3 integrin receptor-targeted constructs. These constructs are based on the bombesin peptide sequence and the RGD recognition motif respectively. These examples are reviewed as case studies in the optimisation of ⁶⁴Cu radiotracer design.

  7. Astatine Radiopharmaceuticals: Prospects and Problems.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2008-09-01

    For the treatment of minimum residual diseases such micrometastases and residual tumor margins that remain after debulking of the primary tumor, targeted radiotherapy using radiopharmaceuticals tagged with alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides is very attractive. In addition to the their short range in tissue, which helps minimize harmful effects on adjacent normal tissues, alpha-particles, being high LET radiation, have several radiobiological advantages. The heavy halogen, astatine-211 is one of the prominent alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides in practice. Being a halogen, it can often be incorporated into biomolecules of interest by adapting radioiodination chemistry. A wide spectrum of compounds from the simple [(211)At]astatide ion to small organic molecules, peptides, and large proteins labeled with (211)At have been investigated with at least two reaching the stage of clinical evaluation. The chemistry, cytotoxic advantages, biodistribution studies, and microdosimetry/pharmacokinetic modeling of some of these agents will be reviewed. In addition, potential problems such as the harmful effect of radiolysis on the synthesis, lack of sufficient in vivo stability of astatinated compounds, and possible adverse effects when they are systemically administered will be discussed.

  8. Astatine Radiopharmaceuticals: Prospects and Problems

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    For the treatment of minimum residual diseases such micrometastases and residual tumor margins that remain after debulking of the primary tumor, targeted radiotherapy using radiopharmaceuticals tagged with α-particle-emitting radionuclides is very attractive. In addition to the their short range in tissue, which helps minimize harmful effects on adjacent normal tissues, α-particles, being high LET radiation, have several radiobiological advantages. The heavy halogen, astatine-211 is one of the prominent α-particle-emitting radionuclides in practice. Being a halogen, it can often be incorporated into biomolecules of interest by adapting radioiodination chemistry. A wide spectrum of compounds from the simple [211At]astatide ion to small organic molecules, peptides, and large proteins labeled with 211At have been investigated with at least two reaching the stage of clinical evaluation. The chemistry, cytotoxic advantages, biodistribution studies, and microdosimetry/pharmacokinetic modeling of some of these agents will be reviewed. In addition, potential problems such as the harmful effect of radiolysis on the synthesis, lack of sufficient in vivo stability of astatinated compounds, and possible adverse effects when they are systemically administered will be discussed. PMID:20150978

  9. Radiopharmaceutical and Gene Therapy Program

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2006-02-09

    The objective of our research program was to determine whether novel receptors can be induced in solid cancers as a target for therapy with radiolabeled unmodified peptides that bind to the receptors. The hypothesis was that induction of a high number of receptors on the surface of these cancer cells would result in an increased uptake of the radiolabeled monomeric peptides as compared to published results with radiolabeled antibodies or peptides to naturally expressed antigens or receptors, and therefore a better therapeutic outcome. The following is a summary of published results.

  10. Simplification of Methods for PET Radiopharmaceutical Syntheses

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbourn, Michael, R.

    2011-12-27

    In an attempt to develop simplified methods for radiochemical synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals useful in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), current commercially available automated synthesis apparati were evaluated for use with solid phase synthesis, thin-film techniques, microwave-accelerated chemistry, and click chemistry approaches. Using combinations of these techniques, it was shown that these automated synthesis systems can be simply and effectively used to support the synthesis of a wide variety of carbon-11 and fluorine-18 labeled compounds, representing all of the major types of compounds synthesized and using all of the common radiochemical precursors available. These techniques are available for use to deliver clinically useful amounts of PET radiopharmaceuticals with chemical and radiochemical purities and high specific activities, suitable for human administration.

  11. Diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals for localization in target tissues exhibiting a regional PH shift relative to surrounding tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, M.; Kung, H. F.

    1984-10-02

    A radiopharmaceutical chemical compound comprising a radioactive isotope, other than an isotope of iodine, in chemical combination with at least one amine group. The compound has a lipophilicity sufficiently high at a pH of 7.6 to permit passage of the compound from the blood of a mammal into a target organ or tissue and sufficiently low at a pH of 6.6 to prevent rapid return of the compound from the target organ or tissue to the blood. The compound has a percent protein binding of less than ninety percent. A method for selectively depositing a radiopharmaceutical compound in at least one target tissue or organ of a mammal, which tissue or organ has a significantly different intracellular pH than the blood of the mammal, by introducing the compound of the invention into the bloodstream of the mammal.

  12. Radiopharmaceuticals for somatostatin receptor imaging.

    PubMed

    Mikołajczak, Renata; Maecke, Helmut R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the developments and briefly characterize the somatostatin analogs which are currently used for somatostatin receptor imaging in clinical routine or in early phase clinical trials. Somatostatin (sst) receptor targeting with radiolabeled peptides has become an integral part in nuclear oncology during the last 20 years. This integration process has been initiated in Europe with the introduction to the market of 111In-DTPA-DPhe1-octreotide [111In-pentetreotide]. Introducing 99mTc in somatostatin receptor targeting radiopeptides resulted in much better image quality, higher sensitivity of tumor detection and lower mean effective dose for the examined patient. The next generation are 68Ga labeled somatostatin analogs. Due to the spatial resolution of PET technique and increasing number of PET scanners, the PET or PET/CT technique became very important in somatostatin receptor imaging. Until up to a couple of years ago the analogs of somatostatin were constructed aiming at their agonistic behavior, expecting that their internalization with the receptor acti-vated by the radiolabeled ligand and its retention within the tumor cell are crucial for efficient imaging and therapy. Recently it has been shown that the antagonists recognize more binding sites at the tumor cell membrane and hence offer an improved diagnostic efficacy, especially when the density of sst receptors is low. This approach may in future improve diagnostic value of somatostatin receptor imaging techniques. The developments in tracer design are followed by the improvements in imaging techniques. The new SPECT scanners offer resolution close to that of PET, which might open a new era for 99mTc and other SPECT radiotracers. PMID:27479790

  13. Preparation of Radiopharmaceuticals Labeled with Metal Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    2012-02-16

    The overall goal of this project was to develop methods for the production of metal-based radionuclides, to develop metal-based radiopharmaceuticals and in a limited number of cases, to translate these agents to the clinical situation. Initial work concentrated on the application of the radionuclides of Cu, Cu-60, Cu-61 and Cu-64, as well as application of Ga-68 radiopharmaceuticals. Initially Cu-64 was produced at the Missouri University Research Reactor and experiments carried out at Washington University. A limited number of studies were carried out utilizing Cu-62, a generator produced radionuclide produced by Mallinckrodt Inc. (now Covidien). In these studies, copper-62-labeled pyruvaldehyde Bis(N{sup 4}-methylthiosemicarbazonato)-copper(II) was studied as an agent for cerebral myocardial perfusion. A remote system for the production of this radiopharmaceutical was developed and a limited number of patient studies carried out with this agent. Various other copper radiopharmaceuticals were investigated, these included copper labeled blood imaging agents as well as Cu-64 labeled antibodies. Cu-64 labeled antibodies targeting colon cancer were translated to the human situation. Cu-64 was also used to label peptides (Cu-64 octriatide) and this is one of the first applications of a peptide radiolabeled with a positron emitting metal radionuclide. Investigations were then pursued on the preparation of the copper radionuclides on a small biomedical cyclotron. A system for the production of high specific activity Cu-64 was developed and initially the Cu-64 was utilized to study the hypoxic imaging agent Cu-64 ATSM. Utilizing the same target system, other positron emitting metal radionuclides were produced, these were Y-86 and Ga-66. Radiopharmaceuticals were labeled utilizing both of these radionuclides. Many studies were carried out in animal models on the uptake of Cu-ATSM in hypoxic tissue. The hypothesis is that Cu-ATSM retention in vivo is dependent upon the

  14. Labelled compounds and radiopharmaceuticals applied in nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Balaban, A.; Galateanu, I.; Geogescu, G.; Simionescu, L.

    1986-01-01

    This book includes material on radiopharmacy and nuclear medicine with a section on in vitro assays. Contents are divided into four parts: radioisotopes, labelled compounds and radiopharmaceuticals; radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnostic purposes; in vitro methods of analysis with labelled compounds and applications of radioimmunoassay to medicine.

  15. Consequences of electroplated targets on radiopharmaceutical preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, R. D.; Tirelli, S.; Sheh, Y.; Knott, A.; Gelbard, A. S.; Larson, S. M.; Dahl, J. R.

    1991-05-01

    The staff of the cyclotron facility at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center is involved in a comprehensive radionuclide preparation program which culminates with the formulation of numerous requested short-lived, positron-emitting radiopharmaceutical agents for clinical investigation. Both the produced radionuclide as well as the final radiolabeled compound are subjected to stringent quality control standards including assays for radiochemical and chemical purity. The subtle chemical consequences resulting from the irradiation of a nickel-plated target for 13N production serve to emphasize some of these potential technical difficulties.

  16. Placental transfer of radiopharmaceuticals and dosimetry in pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.R.; Stabin, M.G.; Sparks, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    The calculation of radiation dose estimates to the fetus is often important in nuclear medicine. To obtain the best estimates of radiation dose to the fetus, the best biological and physical models should be employed. In this paper, after identification of radiopharmaceuticals often administered to women of childbearing age, the most recent data available on the placental crossover of these radiopharmaceuticals was used (with standard kinetic models describing the maternal distribution and retention and with the best available physical models) to obtain fetal dose estimates for these radiopharmaceuticals were identified as those most commonly administered to women of childbearing years. The literature yielded information on placental crossover of 15 radiopharmaceuticals, from animal or human data. Radiation dose estimates are presented in early pregnancy and at 3-, 6-, and 9-months gestation for these radiopharmaceuticals, as well as for many others used in nuclear medicine (the latter considering only maternal organ contributions to fetal dose). 46 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  17. Small Molecule Radiopharmaceuticals – A Review of Current Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Shubhra; Mishra, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are an integral component of nuclear medicine and are widely applied in diagnostics and therapy. Though widely applied, the development of an “ideal” radiopharmaceutical can be challenging. Issues such as specificity, selectivity, sensitivity, and feasible chemistry challenge the design and synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals. Over time, strategies to address the issues have evolved by making use of new technological advances in the fields of biology and chemistry. This review presents the application of few advances in design and synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals. The topics covered are bivalent ligand approach and lipidization as part of design modifications for enhanced selectivity and sensitivity and novel synthetic strategies for optimized chemistry and radiolabeling of radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:26942181

  18. Radiopharmaceutical Therapy in the Era of Precision Medicine*

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Goldenberg, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Precision medicine is the selection of a treatment modality that is specifically tailored to the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of a particular patient’s disease. In cancer, the objective is to treat with agents that inhibit cell signaling pathways that drive uncontrolled proliferation and dissemination of the disease. To overcome the eventual resistance to pathway inhibition therapy, this treatment modality has been combined with chemotherapy. We propose that pathway inhibition therapy is more rationally combined with radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT), a cytotoxic treatment that is also targeted. RPT exploits pharmaceuticals that either bind specifically to tumors or accumulate by a broad array of physiological mechanisms indigenous to the neoplastic cells to deliver radiation specifically to these cells. Consistent with pathway inhibition therapy and in contrast to chemotherapy, RPT is well tolerated. However, the potential of RPT has not been fully exploited; for the most part, treatment has been implemented without using the ability to customize RPT by imaging and deriving individual patient tumor and normal organ radiation absorbed doses. These are more closely related to biological response and their determination should enable RPT treatment administration to maximum therapeutic benefit by treating to normal organ tolerance or demonstrating futility via tumor dosimetry. This is the essence of precision medicine. PMID:24953565

  19. Clinically proven radiopharmaceuticals for infection imaging: mechanisms and applications.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Stanley J; Vallabhajosula, Shankar

    2009-01-01

    Gallium-67 ((67)Ga)-citrate was initially introduced as a tumor imaging agent in the early 1970s, but it was soon recognized that it was useful in the identification of both acute and chronic inflammation. Because of its physical characteristics (multiple gamma photons energy; long half life) and binding to the plasma protein transferrin (resulting in relatively high background and therefore reduced lesion-to-background contrast), it was less than ideal as an imaging agent. Several years later, it became possible to radiolabel leukocytes, which had the advantage of greater specificity for acute infections characterized by a granulocytic response, but had the disadvantage of requiring the removal of blood and isolation of the leukocyte component. Several radiolabeled antibody preparations and a radiolabeled antibacterial agent have been introduced and evaluated, but none of these have been used widely. Most recently, it has been recognized that the use of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose can be used to identify infection/inflammation, probably based on the focal increase in anaerobic glucose metabolism associated with the cellular response. In this work, we review the features of each of these agents and discuss the issues involved in their use as radiopharmaceuticals for the identification of inflammation and/or infection.

  20. [Current Status and Prospects on PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    18F-FDG is a most popular radiopharmaceutical for tumor diagnosis in the world. In addition, 11C-methionine, 18F-FLT and 11C-choline have been used to compensate for drawbacks of 18F-FDG. Now, novel radiopharmaceuticals are required to estimate or predict therapeutic efficacy because we have many strategies to treat tumors. Radiotherapy which damage DNA by producing free radicals is commonly used to treat various types of tumors. Hypoxia is closely associated with resistance to chemo- and/or radiotherapy and is a common feature of solid tumors. Recently, understanding of tumor hypoxia in oncology has led to development of radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging. This review provides an overview of PET radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging and 18F-FBPA which is used for boron neutron capture therapy.

  1. [Current Status and Prospects on PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    18F-FDG is a most popular radiopharmaceutical for tumor diagnosis in the world. In addition, 11C-methionine, 18F-FLT and 11C-choline have been used to compensate for drawbacks of 18F-FDG. Now, novel radiopharmaceuticals are required to estimate or predict therapeutic efficacy because we have many strategies to treat tumors. Radiotherapy which damage DNA by producing free radicals is commonly used to treat various types of tumors. Hypoxia is closely associated with resistance to chemo- and/or radiotherapy and is a common feature of solid tumors. Recently, understanding of tumor hypoxia in oncology has led to development of radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging. This review provides an overview of PET radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging and 18F-FBPA which is used for boron neutron capture therapy. PMID:26753391

  2. Stroma Targeting Nuclear Imaging and Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Dinesh; Jeong, Jae-Min; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2012-01-01

    Malignant transformation of tumor accompanies profound changes in the normal neighboring tissue, called tumor stroma. The tumor stroma provides an environment favoring local tumor growth, invasion, and metastatic spreading. Nuclear imaging (PET/SPECT) measures biochemical and physiologic functions in the human body. In oncology, PET/SPECT is particularly useful for differentiating tumors from postsurgical changes or radiation necrosis, distinguishing benign from malignant lesions, identifying the optimal site for biopsy, staging cancers, and monitoring the response to therapy. Indeed, PET/SPECT is a powerful, proven diagnostic imaging modality that displays information unobtainable through other anatomical imaging, such as CT or MRI. When combined with coregistered CT data, [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG)-PET is particularly useful. However, [18F]FDG is not a target-specific PET tracer. This paper will review the tumor microenvironment targeting oncologic imaging such as angiogenesis, invasion, hypoxia, growth, and homing, and also therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals to provide a roadmap for additional applications of tumor imaging and therapy. PMID:22685650

  3. (Coordinated research of chemotherapeutic agents and radiopharmaceuticals)

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, P.C.

    1991-01-14

    The traveler received a United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Award for Distinguished Scientists to visit Indian Research Institutions including Central Drug Research Institute (CDRI), Lucknow, the host institution, in cooperation with the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) of India. At CDRI, the traveler had meetings to discuss progress and future directions of on-going collaborative research work on nucleosides and had the opportunity to initiate new projects with the divisions of pharmacology, biopolymers, and membrane biology. As a part of this program, the traveler also visited Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute (SGPI) of Medical Sciences, Lucknow; Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT) and Bhabha Atomic Research Center (BARC), Bombay; Variable Energy Cyclotron Center (VECC) and Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Calcutta. He also attended the Indo-American Society of Nuclear Medicine Meeting held in Calcutta. The traveler delivered five seminars describing various aspects of radiopharmaceutical development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and discussed the opportunities for exchange visits to ORNL by Indian scientists.

  4. Radiopharmaceutical stem cell tracking for neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Rosado-de-Castro, Paulo Henrique; Pimentel-Coelho, Pedro Moreno; Gutfilen, Bianca; Lopes de Souza, Sergio Augusto; de Freitas, Gabriel Rodriguez; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Barbosa da Fonseca, Lea Mirian

    2014-01-01

    Although neurological ailments continue to be some of the main causes of disease burden in the world, current therapies such as pharmacological agents have limited potential in the restoration of neural functions. Cell therapies, firstly applied to treat different hematological diseases, are now being investigated in preclinical and clinical studies for neurological illnesses. However, the potential applications and mechanisms for such treatments are still poorly comprehended and are the focus of permanent research. In this setting, noninvasive in vivo imaging allows better understanding of several aspects of stem cell therapies. Amongst the various methods available, radioisotope cell labeling has become one of the most promising since it permits tracking of cells after injection by different routes to investigate their biodistribution. A significant increase in the number of studies utilizing this method has occurred in the last years. Here, we review the different radiopharmaceuticals, imaging techniques, and findings of the preclinical and clinical reports published up to now. Moreover, we discuss the limitations and future applications of radioisotope cell labeling in the field of cell transplantation for neurological diseases. PMID:24982880

  5. Receptor-specific positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals: /sup 75/Br-labeled butyrophenone neuroleptics

    SciTech Connect

    Moerlein, S.M.; Stoecklin, G.; Weinhard, K.; Pawlik, G.; Heiss, W.D.

    1985-11-01

    Cerebral dopaminergic D/sub 2/ receptors are involved in several common disease states, such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's chorea. The use of radiolabeled D/sub 2/ receptor-binding ligands with positron emission tomography (PET) to noninvasively quantitate D/sub 2/ receptor densities thus has potential application in medicine. Butyrophenone neuroleptics have a high in vitro and in vivo binding affinity for cerebral D/sub 2/ receptors, and due to the useful chemical and nuclear decay properties of /sup 74/Br (76% ..beta../sup +/, half-life = 1.6 h), the authors have evaluated radiobrominated bromospiperone (BSP), brombenperidol (BBP), and bromperidol (BP) as radiopharmaceuticals for use with PET.

  6. Auger Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals for Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falzone, Nadia; Cornelissen, Bart; Vallis, Katherine A.

    Radionuclides that emit Auger electrons have been of particular interest as therapeutic agents. This is primarily due to the short range in tissue, controlled linear paths and high linear energy transfer of these particles. Taking into consideration that ionizations are clustered within several cubic nanometers around the point of decay the possibility of incorporating an Auger emitter in close proximity to the cancer cell DNA has immense therapeutic potential thus making nuclear targeted Auger-electron emitters ideal for precise targeting of cancer cells. Furthermore, many Auger-electron emitters also emit γ-radiation, this property makes Auger emitting radionuclides a very attractive option as therapeutic and diagnostic agents in the molecular imaging and management of tumors. The first requirement for the delivery of Auger emitting nuclides is the definition of suitable tumor-selective delivery vehicles to avoid normal tissue toxicity. One of the main challenges of targeted radionuclide therapy remains in matching the physical and chemical characteristics of the radionuclide and targeting moiety with the clinical character of the tumor. Molecules and molecular targets that have been used in the past can be classified according to the carrier molecule used to deliver the Auger-electron-emitting radionuclide. These include (1) antibodies, (2) peptides, (3) small molecules, (4) oligonucleotides and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), (5) proteins, and (6) nanoparticles. The efficacy of targeted radionuclide therapy depends greatly on the ability to increase intranuclear incorporation of the radiopharmaceutical without compromising toxicity. Several strategies to achieve this goal have been proposed in literature. The possibility of transferring tumor therapy based on the emission of Auger electrons from experimental models to patients has vast therapeutic potential, and remains a field of intense research.

  7. Applications of quantitative whole body autoradiographic technique in radiopharmaceutical research

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Oster, Z.H.; Yonekura, Y.; Meyer, M.A.; Fand, I.; Brill, A.B.

    1982-01-01

    The routine evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals involves dissecting tissue distribution studies (DTDS) and gamma or positron imaging. DTDS have the following disadvantages: since not all tissues can always be sampled, sites of radiopharmaceutical uptake may be missed and because the procedure involves weighing of dissected tissue samples, the spatial resolution of this method is low and determined by the smallest amount that can be weighed accurately. Gamma camera imaging and positron emission tomography though more comprehensive in evaluating the global distribution of a compound, have relative low spatial resolution. Whole body autoradiography of small animals has a much higher spatial resolution as compared to the above and depicts the global distribution of radiopharmaceuticals. A computer-assisted quantification method of WBARG applied to positron, beta, and gamma emitters will complement the method by producing quantitative values comparable to those obtained by dissection and direct tissue counting, with the advantages of depicting the global distribution at high spatial resolution.

  8. Newer positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals for radiotherapy planning: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has changed cancer imaging in the last decade, for better. It can be employed for radiation treatment planning of different cancers with improved accuracy and outcomes as compared to conventional imaging methods. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose remains the most widely used though relatively non-specific cancer imaging PET tracer. A wide array of newer PET radiopharmaceuticals has been developed for targeted imaging of different cancers. PET-CT with such new PET radiopharmaceuticals has also been used for radiotherapy planning with encouraging results. In the present review we have briefly outlined the role of PET-CT with newer radiopharmaceuticals for radiotherapy planning and briefly reviewed the available literature in this regard. PMID:26904575

  9. [Current trends in using PET radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostics in oncology].

    PubMed

    Adam, J; Kadeřávek, J; Kužel, F; Vašina, J; Rehák, Z

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is an important field of modern medicine, particularly thanks to its role in in vivo imaging of important processes in human organism. This is possible thanks to the use of radiopharmaceuticals, specific substances labeled by radioactive nuclide, its distribution in the body can be visualized by specialized scanners and, based on the knowledge of physiological patterns, dia-gnosis can be determined. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a modern and in many ways indispensable method of nuclear medicine. The spectrum of radiopharmaceuticals available in recent years is broadening thanks to a coordinated effort of manufacturers of synthesis equipment, chemists and potential users -  physicians. This review focuses on the development in the PET radiopharmaceutical field in the last five years, with an emphasis on oncological applications of PET. PMID:24945550

  10. Relationship between lipophilicity and brain extraction of C-11-labeled radiopharmaceuticals. [Baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Dischino, D.D.; Welch, M.J.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Raichle, M.E.

    1983-11-01

    The brain extraction of fifteen C-11-labeled compounds during a single capillary transit was studied in adult baboons by external detection of these tracers after injection into the internal carotid artery. The log P/sub oct/ (partition coefficient for octanol/water) values of these compounds range from -0.7 to greater than 4.0. A parabolic relationship was found between the log P/sub oct/value of the C-11-labeled compounds and the fraction of the radiopharmaceutical entering the brain. Compounds with log P/sub oct/ values between 0.9 and 2.5 were found to pass freely across the blood-brain barrier at a cerebral blood flow of 100 ml-min/sup -1/-hg/sup -1/. An apparently decreased extraction of very lipophilic compounds was shown to be related to binding of the tracer to blood components and macromolecules (red blood cells, albumin, etc.). These data suggest that a radiopharmaceutical designed to measure blood flow should have a log P/sub oct/ value of between 0.9 and 2.5.

  11. Preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with metal radionuclides. Progress report, July 1, 1988--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1992-06-01

    We recently developed a useful zinc-62/copper-62 generator and are presently evaluating copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals for clinical studies. While developing these copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals, in collaboration with the University of Missouri Research Reactor, Columbia we have also explored copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals. The PET images we obtained with copper-64 tracers were of such high quality that we have developed and evaluated copper-64 labeled antibodies for PET imaging. The major research activities described herein include: the development and assessment of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals; the development and evaluation of a new zinc-62/copper-62 generator and the assessment of copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals; mechanistic studies on proteins labeled with metal radionuclides.

  12. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report presents research on radiopharmaceuticals. The following topics are discussed: antibody labeling with positron-emitting radionuclides; antibody modification for radioimmune imaging; labeling antibodies; evaluation of technetium acetlyacetonates as potential cerebral blood flow agents; and studies in technetium chemistry. (CBS)

  13. Nitroimidazole radiopharmaceuticals in bioimaging: part I: synthesis and imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakesh

    2011-10-01

    The paper is review on synthesis of nitroimidazole radiosensitizers useful in imaging of tumor cells. Nitroimidazole compounds are radiolabeled probes for specific use in imaging such as 18F for positron emission tomography; 99mTc for single photon emission computed tomography; 123I, or 131I for computer assisted tomography and 19F for magnetic resonance imaging. In synthesis of radiopharmaceutical compounds, parent nitroimidazole is modified to thiopyranosyl nucleosides, neuraminic acid derivatives followed by nitro group deprotection-substitution and radiolabeling by specific isotopes. Commercial attempts have been made to radiolabel the nitroimidazole by [18F]fluorine, [131I or 123I]iodine, [99mTc]technicium and [64Cu]copper on modified side chain of nitroimidazole compounds to design multimodal and multifunctional imaging techniques to detect and monitor the tumor hypoxia by measuring distribution of radiatiolabel or radiation. Nitroimidazole initially showed poor diffusion and poor stability in tissues with neurotoxicity concern limited its use as radiosensitizer. In last decade, several nitroimidazole derivatives were developed as potent less toxic and highly stable radiopharmaceuticals with optimized radiolabel concentration with high detectability of tumor oxygen or hypoxia. Currently, nitroimidazole based radiopharmaceuticals have emerged as multimodal and multifunctional hypoxia reporters with antitumor, anti-ischemic, anti-inflammatory and tumor targeting properties. In conclusion, nitroimidazole based radiopharmaceuticals are a new generation hypoxia biosensors for localized theradiagnostic utility in clinical medicine.

  14. Process for producing astatine-211 for radiopharmaceutical use

    DOEpatents

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Lambrecht, Richard M.

    1987-01-01

    A process for reliably and consistently producing astatine-211 in small controlled volumes of a solution, which is selected from a choice of solvents that are useful in selected radiopharmaceutical procedures in which the At-211 activities are to be applied.

  15. Process for producing astatine-211 for radiopharmaceutical use

    DOEpatents

    Mirzadeh, S.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1984-04-10

    A process is described for reliably and consistently producing astatine-211 in small controlled volumes of a solution, which is selected from a choice of solvents that are useful in selected radiopharmaceutical procedures in which the At-211 activities are to be applied. 4 figures, 1 table.

  16. Development of specific radiopharmaceuticals for infection imaging by targeting infectious micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Ocampo-Garcia, Blanca E; Melendez-Alafort, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Infectious diseases remain a major health problem and cause of death worldwide. A variety of radiopharmaceuticals are used for the imaging of infections and inflammation in the practice of nuclear medicine. Long-term clinical use has shown that the majority of radiolabeled probes cannot distinguish between inflammation and infection. Gallium-67-citrate binds to bacteria, but also to proteins accumulating at both sterile inflammation and bacterial infection sites. Other agents are used to interact with receptors or domains on circulating and infiltrating leukocytes or to label them directly. However, these probes cannot distinguish between infection and inflammation because they are not specific to infectious micro-organisms. This review examines the recent developments and applications of radiolabeled specific agents, such as antiviral drugs, antifungal, antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides, to visualize infectious foci by targeting viruses, fungi or bacteria.

  17. Cerenkov Luminescence Tomography for In Vivo Radiopharmaceutical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jianghong; Qin, Chenghu; Yang, Xin; Zhu, Shuping; Zhang, Xing; Tian, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is a cost-effective molecular imaging tool for biomedical applications of radiotracers. The introduction of Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) relative to planar CLI can be compared to the development of X-ray CT based on radiography. With CLT, quantitative and localized analysis of a radiopharmaceutical distribution becomes feasible. In this contribution, a feasibility study of in vivo radiopharmaceutical imaging in heterogeneous medium is presented. Coupled with a multimodal in vivo imaging system, this CLT reconstruction method allows precise anatomical registration of the positron probe in heterogeneous tissues and facilitates the more widespread application of radiotracers. Source distribution inside the small animal is obtained from CLT reconstruction. The experimental results demonstrated that CLT can be employed as an available in vivo tomographic imaging of charged particle emitters in a heterogeneous medium. PMID:21747821

  18. Enantiopure bifunctional chelators for copper radiopharmaceuticals--does chirality matter in radiotracer design?

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay N; Dakanali, Marianna; Hao, Guiyang; Ramezani, Saleh; Kumar, Amit; Sun, Xiankai

    2014-06-10

    It is well recognized that carbon chirality plays a critical role in the design of drug molecules. However, very little information is available regarding the effect of stereoisomerism of macrocyclic bifunctional chelators (BFC) on biological behaviors of the corresponding radiopharmaceuticals. To evaluate such effects, three enantiopure stereoisomers of a copper radiopharmaceutical BFC bearing two chiral carbon atoms were synthesized in forms of R,R-, S,S-, and R,S-. Their corresponding peptide conjugates were prepared by coupling with a model peptide sequence, c(RGDyK), which targets the αvβ3 integrin for in vitro and in vivo evaluation of their biological behaviors as compared to the racemic conjugate. Despite the chirality differences, all the conjugates showed a similar in vitro binding affinity profile to the αvβ3 integrin (106, 108, 85 and 100 nM for rac-H2-1, RR-H2-1, SS-H2-1, and RS-H2-1 respectively with all p values > 0.05) and a similar level of in vivo tumor uptake (2.72 ± 0.45, 2.60 ± 0.52, 2.45 ± 0.48 and 2.88 ± 0.59 for rac-(64)Cu-1, RR-(64)Cu-1, SS-(64)Cu-1, and RS-(64)Cu-1 at 1 h p.i. respectively). Furthermore, they demonstrated a nearly identical biodistribution pattern in major organs (e.g. 2.07 ± 0.21, 2.13 ± 0.58, 1.70 ± 0.20 and 1.90 ± 0.46 %ID/g at 24 h p.i. in liver for rac-(64)Cu-1, RR-(64)Cu-1, SS-(64)Cu-1, and RS-(64)Cu-1 respectively; 1.80 ± 0.46, 2.30 ± 1.49, 1.73 ± 0.31 and 2.23 ± 0.71 at 24 h p.i. in kidneys for rac-(64)Cu-1, RR-(64)Cu-1, SS-(64)Cu-1, and RS-(64)Cu-1 respectively). Therefore we conclude that the chirality of BFC plays a negligible role in αvβ3-targeted copper radiopharmaceuticals. However, we believe it is still worthwhile to consider the chirality effects of BFCs on other targeted imaging or therapeutic agents.

  19. [Computer simulated images of radiopharmaceutical distributions in anthropomorphic phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-17

    We have constructed an anatomically correct human geometry, which can be used to store radioisotope concentrations in 51 various internal organs. Each organ is associated with an index number which references to its attenuating characteristics (composition and density). The initial development of Computer Simulated Images of Radiopharmaceuticals in Anthropomorphic Phantoms (CSIRDAP) over the first 3 years has been very successful. All components of the simulation have been coded, made operational and debugged.

  20. Improving radiopharmaceutical supply chain safety by implementing bar code technology.

    PubMed

    Matanza, David; Hallouard, François; Rioufol, Catherine; Fessi, Hatem; Fraysse, Marc

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate an approach for improving radiopharmaceutical supply chain safety by implementing bar code technology. We first evaluated the current situation of our radiopharmaceutical supply chain and, by means of the ALARM protocol, analysed two dispensing errors that occurred in our department. Thereafter, we implemented a bar code system to secure selected key stages of the radiopharmaceutical supply chain. Finally, we evaluated the cost of this implementation, from overtime, to overheads, to additional radiation exposure to workers. An analysis of the events that occurred revealed a lack of identification of prepared or dispensed drugs. Moreover, the evaluation of the current radiopharmaceutical supply chain showed that the dispensation and injection steps needed to be further secured. The bar code system was used to reinforce product identification at three selected key stages: at usable stock entry; at preparation-dispensation; and during administration, allowing to check conformity between the labelling of the delivered product (identity and activity) and the prescription. The extra time needed for all these steps had no impact on the number and successful conduct of examinations. The investment cost was reduced (2600 euros for new material and 30 euros a year for additional supplies) because of pre-existing computing equipment. With regard to the radiation exposure to workers there was an insignificant overexposure for hands with this new organization because of the labelling and scanning processes of radiolabelled preparation vials. Implementation of bar code technology is now an essential part of a global securing approach towards optimum patient management. PMID:25144560

  1. Advancement in treatment and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer with radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu-Ping; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a major health problem. Conventional imaging modalities show limited accuracy for reliable assessment of the tumor. Recent researches suggest that molecular imaging techniques with tracers provide more biologically relevant information and are benefit for the diagnosis of the cancer. In addition, radiopharmaceuticals also play more important roles in treatment of the disease. This review summaries the advancement of the radiolabeled compounds in the theranostics of PC. PMID:26909131

  2. Improving radiopharmaceutical supply chain safety by implementing bar code technology.

    PubMed

    Matanza, David; Hallouard, François; Rioufol, Catherine; Fessi, Hatem; Fraysse, Marc

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate an approach for improving radiopharmaceutical supply chain safety by implementing bar code technology. We first evaluated the current situation of our radiopharmaceutical supply chain and, by means of the ALARM protocol, analysed two dispensing errors that occurred in our department. Thereafter, we implemented a bar code system to secure selected key stages of the radiopharmaceutical supply chain. Finally, we evaluated the cost of this implementation, from overtime, to overheads, to additional radiation exposure to workers. An analysis of the events that occurred revealed a lack of identification of prepared or dispensed drugs. Moreover, the evaluation of the current radiopharmaceutical supply chain showed that the dispensation and injection steps needed to be further secured. The bar code system was used to reinforce product identification at three selected key stages: at usable stock entry; at preparation-dispensation; and during administration, allowing to check conformity between the labelling of the delivered product (identity and activity) and the prescription. The extra time needed for all these steps had no impact on the number and successful conduct of examinations. The investment cost was reduced (2600 euros for new material and 30 euros a year for additional supplies) because of pre-existing computing equipment. With regard to the radiation exposure to workers there was an insignificant overexposure for hands with this new organization because of the labelling and scanning processes of radiolabelled preparation vials. Implementation of bar code technology is now an essential part of a global securing approach towards optimum patient management.

  3. Radionuclides, radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals for in vivo diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Leonard I.

    Radioactive tracers for in vivo clinical diagnosis fall within a narrow, strictly-defined set of specifications in respect of their physical properties, chemical and biochemical characteristics, and (approved) medical applications. The type of radioactive decay and physical half-life of the radionuclide are immutable properties which, along with the demands of production and supply, limit the choice of radionuclides used in medicine to only a small fraction of those known to exist. In use, the biochemical and physiological properties of a radiotracer are dictated by the chemical form of the radionuclide. This chemical form may range from elemental, molecular or ionic, to complex compounds formed by coordinate or covalent bonding of the radionuclide to either simple organic or inorganic molecules, or complex macromolecules. Few of the radiotracers which are tested in model systems ever become radiopharmaceuticals in the strictest sense. Radionuclides, radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals in use are reviewed. Drug legislation and regulations concerning drug manufacture, as well as hospital ethical constraints and legislation concerning unsealed sources of radiation must all be satisfied in order to translate a radiopharmaceutical from the laboratory to clinical use.

  4. ( sup 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe sup 1 )-octreotide, a potential radiopharmaceutical for imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors: Synthesis, radiolabeling and in vitro validation

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, W.H.; Albert, R.; Bruns, C.; Breeman, W.A.P.; Hofland, L.J.; Marbach, P.; Pless, J.; Pralet, D.; Stolz, B.; Koper, J.W.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Visser, T.J.; Krenning, E.P. Sandoz Pharma AG, Basel )

    1991-01-01

    As starting material for a potentially convenient radiopharmaceutical, a diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (DTPA) conjugated derivative of octreotide (SMS 201-995) was prepared. This peptide, (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide (SDZ 215-811) binds more than 95% of added {sup 111}In in an easy, single-step labeling procedure without necessity of further purification. The specific somatostatin-like biologic effect of these analogues was proven by the inhibition of growth hormone secretion by cultured rat pituitary cells in a dose-dependent fashion by octreotide, (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide and non-radioactive ({sup 115}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide. The binding of ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide to rat brain cortex membranes proved to be displaced similarly by natural somatosatin as well as by octreotide, suggesting specific binding of ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide to somatostatin receptors. The binding of the indium-labeled compound showed a somewhat lower affinity when compared with the iodinated (Tyr{sup 3})-octreotide, but indium-labeled (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide still binds with nanomolar affinity. In conjunction with in vivo studies, these results suggest that ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide is a promising radiopharmaceutical for scintigraphic imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors.

  5. Peptide Based Radiopharmaceuticals: Specific Construct Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P; Rhodes, B A; Sharma, S S

    1997-10-21

    The objective of this project was to develop receptor based peptides for diagnostic imaging and therapy. A series of peptides related to cell adhesion molecules (CAM) and immune regulation were designed for radiolabeling with 99mTc and evaluated in animal models as potential diagnostic imaging agents for various disease conditions such as thrombus (clot), acute kidney failure, and inflection/inflammation imaging. The peptides for this project were designed by the industrial partner, Palatin Technologies, (formerly Rhomed, Inc.) using various peptide design approaches including a newly developed rational computer assisted drug design (CADD) approach termed MIDAS (Metal ion Induced Distinctive Array of Structures). In this approach, the biological function domain and the 99mTc complexing domain are fused together so that structurally these domains are indistinguishable. This approach allows construction of conformationally rigid metallo-peptide molecules (similar to cyclic peptides) that are metabolically stable in-vivo. All the newly designed peptides were screened in various in vitro receptor binding and functional assays to identify a lead compound. The lead compounds were formulated in a one-step 99mTc labeling kit form which were studied by BNL for detailed in-vivo imaging using various animals models of human disease. Two main peptides usingMIDAS approach evolved and were investigated: RGD peptide for acute renal failure and an immunomodulatory peptide derived from tuftsin (RMT-1) for infection/inflammation imaging. Various RGD based metallopeptides were designed, synthesized and assayed for their efficacy in inhibiting ADP-induced human platelet aggregation. Most of these peptides displayed biological activity in the 1-100 µM range. Based on previous work by others, RGD-I and RGD-II were evaluated in animal models of acute renal failure. These earlier studies showed that after acute ischemic injury the renal cortex displays

  6. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science)

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.D.; Beck, R.N.

    1990-09-01

    This is a report of progress in Year Two (January 1, 1990--December 31, 1990) of Grant FG02-86ER60438, Quantitative Studies in Radiopharmaceutical Science,'' awarded for the three-year period January 1, 1989--December 31, 1991 as a competitive renewal following site visit in the fall of 1988. This program addresses the problems involving the basic science and technology underlying the physical and conceptual tools of radioactive tracer methodology as they relate to the measurement of structural and functional parameters of physiologic importance in health and disease. The principal tool is quantitative radionuclide imaging. The overall objective of this program is to further the development and transfer of radiotracer methodology from basic theory to routine clinical practice in order that individual patients and society as a whole will receive the maximum net benefit from the new knowledge gained. The focus of the research is on the development of new instruments and radiopharmaceuticals, and the evaluation of these through the phase of clinical feasibility. 25 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Process for producing astatine-211 for radiopharmaceutical use

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, S.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1987-07-21

    A one-step chemical manipulation is described in combination with a distillation and collection process for producing At-211 comprising; a. providing a target of irradiated Bismuth coated to a predetermined thickness of a backing member, b. providing a vapor-producing still operably connected with a condenser that has a water cooled condensate collector formed of a dry silica gel mesh maintained at a temperature above the freezing point of water, and providing an effluent gas filter that is operably connected to receive effluent gas from the condenser, c. heating the target in the still at a temperature in the range of about 630/sup 0/-680/sup 0/C for a time period in the range of 50 to 80 minutes, to evole At-211 vapor from the target, c. providing a dry carrier gas having an oxygen concentration that is sufficient to form Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/ thereby to essentially preclude vaporization of Bi metal, passing the carrier gas through the still to carry the At-211 vapor to the condenser, and to carry effluent from the condenser to the effluent gas filter, e. eluting At-211 from the condensate collector of the condenser with a controlled volume of eluent containing predetermined solvents that are compatible with a given desired radiopharmaceutical procedure, and f. collecting the At-211 in the controlled volume of eluent for use in the given radiopharmaceutical procedure.

  8. HPLC-MS technique for radiopharmaceuticals analysis and quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macášek, F.; Búriová, E.; Brúder, P.; Vera-Ruiz, H.

    2003-01-01

    Potentialities of liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric detector (MSD) were investigated with the objective of quality control of radiopharmaceuticals; 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) being an example. Screening of suitable MSD analytical lines is presented. Mass-spectrometric monitoring of acetonitrile— aqueous ammonium formate eluant by negatively charged FDG.HCO2 - ions enables isotope analysis (specific activity) of the radiopharmaceutical at m/z 227 and 226. Kryptofix® 222 provides an intense MSD signal of the positive ion associated with NH4 + at m/z 394. Expired FDG injection samples contain decomposition products from which at least one labelled by 18F and characterised by signal of negative ions at m/z 207 does not correspond to FDG fragments but to C5 decomposition products. A glucose chromatographic peak, characterised by m/z 225 negative ion is accompanied by a tail of a component giving a signal of m/z 227, which can belong to [18O]glucose; isobaric sorbitol signals were excluded but FDG-glucose association occurs in the co-elution of separation of model mixtures. The latter can actually lead to a convoluted chromatographic peak, but the absence of 18F makes this inconsistent. Quantification and validation of the FDG component analysis is under way.

  9. Cyclotron targets and production technologies used for radiopharmaceuticals in NPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fišer, M.; Kopička, K.; Hradilek, P.; Hanč, P.; Lebeda, O.; Pánek, J.; Vognar, M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with some technical aspects of the development and production of cyclotronmade radiopharmaceuticals (excluding PET). In this field, nuclear chemistry and pharmacy are in a close contact; therefore, requirements of the both should be taken into account. The principles of cyclotron targetry, separation/recovery of materials and synthesis of active substances are given, as well as issues connected with formulation of pharmaceutical forms. As the radiopharmaceuticals should fulfil the requirements on in vivo preparations, there exist a variety of demands pertaining to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) concept, which is also briefly discussed. A typical production chain is presented and practical examples of real technologies based on cyclotron-made radionuclides are given as they have been used in Nuclear Physics Institute of CAS (NPI). Special attention is devoted to the technology of enriched cyclotron targets. Frequently used medicinal products employing cyclotron-produced active substances are characterised (Rb/Kr generators, 123I-labelled MIBG, OIH and MAB's). The cyclotron produced radioactive implants for transluminal coronary angioplasty (radioactive stents) are introduced as an example of a medical device developed for therapeutic application.

  10. A method to assess safety and resilience in radiopharmaceuticals production process.

    PubMed

    Grecco, Cláudio H S; Vidal, Mario C R; Santos, Isaac J A L; Carvalho, Paulo V R

    2012-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are radiation-emitting substances used in medicine for radiotherapy and imaging diagnosis. A Research Institute, located in Rio de Janeiro, produces three radiopharmaceuticals: the sodium iodate is used in the diagnosis of thyroid dysfunctions, the meta-iodo-benzylguanidine is used in the diagnosis of cardiac diseases, and the fluordesoxyglucose is used in diagnosis in cardiology, oncology, neurology and neuropsychiatry. This paper presents a method to access safety and resilience in radiopharmaceuticals production processes. The method uses resilience indicators in order to proactively evaluate and manage the safety.

  11. New selenium-75 labeled radiopharmaceuticals: selenonium analogues of dopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Sadek, S.A.; Basmadjian, G.P.; Hsu, P.M.; Rieger, J.A.

    1983-07-01

    Selenium-75 labeled selenonium analogues of dopamine, (2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethyl)dimethylselenonium iodide and its dihydroxy analogue, were prepared by reducing (/sup 75/Se)selenious acid with sodium borohydride at pH 6.0 and reacting the NaSeH produced with 1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(p-toluenesulfonyloxy)ethane. Tissue distribution studies in rats given the /sup 75/Se-labeled selenonium agents intravenously demonstrated high initial heart uptake. Prolonged adrenal retention and high adrenal to blood ratio of compound 4 were observed. The high uptake and adrenal to blood ratio suggest the potential use of compound 4 as a radiopharmaceutical for the adrenal gland.

  12. Altered biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals: role of radiochemical/pharmaceutical purity, physiological, and pharmacologic factors.

    PubMed

    Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Killeen, Ronan P; Osborne, Joseph R

    2010-07-01

    One of the most common problems associated with radiopharmaceuticals is an unanticipated or altered biodistribution, which can have a significant clinical impact on safety, scan interpretation, and diagnostic imaging accuracy. In their most extreme manifestations, unanticipated imaging results may even compromise the utility and or accuracy of nuclear medicine studies. We present here an overall summary of altered biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals with a special emphasis on the molecular mechanisms involved. Important factors affecting the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals can be described in 5 major categories and include (1) radiopharmaceutical preparation and formulation problems; (2) problems caused by radiopharmaceutical administration techniques and procedures; (3) by changes in biochemical and pathophysiology; (4) previous medical procedures, such as surgery, radiation therapy and dialysis; and finally (5) by drug interactions. The altered biodistribution of (99m)Tc radiopharmaceuticals are generally associated with increased amounts of (99m)Tc radiochemical impurities, such as free (99m)TcO(4)(-) and particulate impurities, such as (99m)Tc colloids or (99m)Tc-reduced hydrolyzed species. Faulty injection, such as dose infiltration or contamination with antiseptics and aluminum during dose administration, may cause significant artifacts. The patient's own medical problems, such as abnormalities in the regulation of hormone levels; failure in the function of excretory organs and systems, such as hepatobiliary and genitourinary systems; and even simple conditions, such as excessive talking may contribute to altered biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals. Previous medical procedures (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, dialysis) and drug interaction are the some of the nontechnical factors responsible for unanticipated biodistribution of radiotracers. This review provides a comprehensive summary of various factors and specific examples to illustrate

  13. USE OF RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS IN DIAGNOSTIC NUCLEAR MEDICINE IN THE UNITED STATES: 1960–2010

    PubMed Central

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Brill, Aaron B.; Callahan, Ronald J.; Clanton, Jeffrey A.; DePietro, Allegra; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Greenspan, Bennett S.; Gross, Milton D.; Hays, Marguerite T.; Moore, Stephen C.; Ponto, James A.; Shreeve, Walton W.; Melo, Dunstana R.; Linet, Martha S.; Simon, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    To reconstruct reliable nuclear medicine-related occupational radiation doses or doses received as patients from radiopharmaceuticals over the last five decades, we assessed which radiopharmaceuticals were used in different time periods, their relative frequency of use, and typical values of the administered activity. This paper presents data on the changing patterns of clinical use of radiopharmaceuticals and documents the range of activity administered to adult patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures in the U.S. between 1960 and 2010. Data are presented for 15 diagnostic imaging procedures that include thyroid scan and thyroid uptake, brain scan, brain blood flow, lung perfusion and ventilation, bone, liver, hepatobiliary, bone marrow, pancreas, and kidney scans, cardiac imaging procedures, tumor localization studies, localization of gastrointestinal bleeding, and non-imaging studies of blood volume and iron metabolism. Data on the relative use of radiopharmaceuticals were collected using key informant interviews and comprehensive literature reviews of typical administered activities of these diagnostic nuclear medicine studies. Responses of key informants on relative use of radiopharmaceuticals are in agreement with published literature. Results of this study will be used for retrospective reconstruction of occupational and personal medical radiation doses from diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals to members of the U.S. radiologic technologist’s cohort and in reconstructing radiation doses from occupational or patient radiation exposures to other U.S. workers or patient populations. PMID:25811150

  14. Use of radiopharmaceuticals in diagnostic nuclear medicine in the United States: 1960-2010.

    PubMed

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Brill, Aaron B; Callahan, Ronald J; Clanton, Jeffrey A; DePietro, Allegra; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Greenspan, Bennett S; Gross, Milton D; Hays, Marguerite T; Moore, Stephen C; Ponto, James A; Shreeve, Walton W; Melo, Dunstana R; Linet, Martha S; Simon, Steven L

    2015-05-01

    To reconstruct reliable nuclear medicine-related occupational radiation doses or doses received as patients from radiopharmaceuticals over the last five decades, the authors assessed which radiopharmaceuticals were used in different time periods, their relative frequency of use, and typical values of the administered activity. This paper presents data on the changing patterns of clinical use of radiopharmaceuticals and documents the range of activity administered to adult patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures in the U.S. between 1960 and 2010. Data are presented for 15 diagnostic imaging procedures that include thyroid scan and thyroid uptake; brain scan; brain blood flow; lung perfusion and ventilation; bone, liver, hepatobiliary, bone marrow, pancreas, and kidney scans; cardiac imaging procedures; tumor localization studies; localization of gastrointestinal bleeding; and non-imaging studies of blood volume and iron metabolism. Data on the relative use of radiopharmaceuticals were collected using key informant interviews and comprehensive literature reviews of typical administered activities of these diagnostic nuclear medicine studies. Responses of key informants on relative use of radiopharmaceuticals are in agreement with published literature. Results of this study will be used for retrospective reconstruction of occupational and personal medical radiation doses from diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals to members of the U.S. radiologic technologists' cohort and in reconstructing radiation doses from occupational or patient radiation exposures to other U.S. workers or patient populations.

  15. Synthesis and biological studies of positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Dischino, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    The development and clinical evaluation of two-positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals designed to image myelin in humans is reported. Carbon-11-labeled benzyl methyl ether was synthesized by the reaction of carbon-11-labeled methanol and benzyl chloride in dimethyl sulfoxide containing powdered potassium hydroxide in a radiochemical yield of 43% and a synthesis and purification time of 40 minutes. Carbon-11-labeled diphenylmethanol was synthesized by the reaction of carbon-11-labeled carbon dioxide and phenyllithium followed by the reduction of the carbon-11-labeled intermediate to diphenylmethanol via lithium aluminum hydride in a radiochemical yield of 71% and a synthesis and purification time of 38 minutes. Carbon-11-labeled benzyl methyl ether and diphenylmethanol were each evaluated as myelin imaging agents in three patients with multiple sclerosis via positron-emission tomography. In two out of three patients studied with carbon-11-labeled benzyl methyl ether, the distribution of activity in the brain was not consistent with local lipid content. A new synthesis of carbon-11-labeled-DL-phenylalanine labeled in the benzylic position and the synthesis of fluorine-18-labeled 1-(2-nitro-1-imidazolyl)-3-fluoro-2-propanol, a potential in vivo marker of hypoxic tissue, are reported.

  16. The Next Generation of Positron Emission Tomography Radiopharmaceuticals in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Samuel L.; Roney, Celeste A.; Daumar, Pierre; Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Although 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) is still the most widely used positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer, there are a few well-known limitations to its use. The last decade has seen the development of new PET probes for in vivo visualization of specific molecular targets, along with important technical advances in the production of positron-emitting radionuclides and their related labeling methods. As such, a broad range of new PET tracers are in preclinical development or have recently entered clinical trials. The topics covered in this review include labeling methods, biological targets, and the most recent preclinical or clinical data of some of the next generation of PET radiopharmaceuticals. This review, which is by no means exhaustive, has been separated into sections related to the PET radionuclide used for radiolabeling: fluorine-18, for the labeling of agents such as FACBC, FDHT, choline, and Galacto-RGD; carbon-11, for the labeling of choline; gallium-68, for the labeling of peptides such as DOTATOC and bombesin analogs; and the long-lived radionuclides iodine-124 and zirconium-89 for the labeling of monoclonal antibodies cG250, and J591 and trastuzumab, respectively. PMID:21624561

  17. The next generation of positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals in oncology.

    PubMed

    Rice, Samuel L; Roney, Celeste A; Daumar, Pierre; Lewis, Jason S

    2011-07-01

    Although (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) is still the most widely used positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer, there are a few well-known limitations to its use. The last decade has seen the development of new PET probes for in vivo visualization of specific molecular targets, along with important technical advances in the production of positron-emitting radionuclides and their related labeling methods. As such, a broad range of new PET tracers are in preclinical development or have recently entered clinical trials. The topics covered in this review include labeling methods, biological targets, and the most recent preclinical or clinical data of some of the next generation of PET radiopharmaceuticals. This review, which is by no means exhaustive, has been separated into sections related to the PET radionuclide used for radiolabeling: fluorine-18, for the labeling of agents such as FACBC, FDHT, choline, and Galacto-RGD; carbon-11, for the labeling of choline; gallium-68, for the labeling of peptides such as DOTATOC and bombesin analogs; and the long-lived radionuclides iodine-124 and zirconium-89 for the labeling of monoclonal antibodies cG250, and J591 and trastuzumab, respectively.

  18. AUTOMATION FOR THE SYNTHESIS AND APPLICATION OF PET RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS.

    SciTech Connect

    Alexoff, D.L.

    2001-09-21

    The development of automated systems supporting the production and application of PET radiopharmaceuticals has been an important focus of researchers since the first successes of using carbon-11 (Comar et al., 1979) and fluorine-18 (Reivich et al., 1979) labeled compounds to visualize functional activity of the human brain. These initial successes of imaging the human brain soon led to applications in the human heart (Schelbert et al., 1980), and quickly radiochemists began to see the importance of automation to support PET studies in humans (Lambrecht, 1982; Langstrom et al., 1983). Driven by the necessity of controlling processes emanating high fluxes of 511 KeV photons, and by the tedium of repetitive syntheses for carrying out these human PET investigations, academic and government scientists have designed, developed and tested many useful and novel automated systems in the past twenty years. These systems, originally designed primarily by radiochemists, not only carry out effectively the tasks they were designed for, but also demonstrate significant engineering innovation in the field of laboratory automation.

  19. New SPECT and PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Imaging Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sogbein, Oyebola O.; Pelletier-Galarneau, Matthieu; Schindler, Thomas H.; Wei, Lihui; Wells, R. Glenn; Ruddy, Terrence D.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has experienced exponential growth within the past four decades with converging capacity to diagnose and influence management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with technetium-99m radiotracers or thallium-201 has dominated the field; however new hardware and software designs that optimize image quality with reduced radiation exposure are fuelling a resurgence of interest at the preclinical and clinical levels to expand beyond MPI. Other imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) continue to emerge as powerful players with an expanded capacity to diagnose a variety of cardiac conditions. At the forefront of this resurgence is the development of novel target vectors based on an enhanced understanding of the underlying pathophysiological process in the subcellular domain. Molecular imaging with novel radiopharmaceuticals engineered to target a specific subcellular process has the capacity to improve diagnostic accuracy and deliver enhanced prognostic information to alter management. This paper, while not comprehensive, will review the recent advancements in radiotracer development for SPECT and PET MPI, autonomic dysfunction, apoptosis, atherosclerotic plaques, metabolism, and viability. The relevant radiochemistry and preclinical and clinical development in addition to molecular imaging with emerging modalities such as cardiac MRI and PET-MR will be discussed. PMID:24901002

  20. In Vitro Assessment of the In Vivo Stability of Cu-64 Radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Packard, Alan B

    2011-12-15

    Research Plans: The successful development of Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals depends upon retention of the Cu-64 atom in the radiopharmaceutical. To date, the focus has been on the development of chelators that better retain Cu-64, but there has been no effort to develop an effective method by which improved retention may be measured. In the absence of a suitable analytical method, the stability of Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals is estimated indirectly, with decreased liver uptake suggesting higher in vivo complex stability. But this approach is inadequate for radiopharmaceuticals, such as radiolabeled antibodies, that are expected to accumulate in the liver even when there is no free Cu-64 present. The absence of such a method has also hampered efforts to systematically evaluate the chemical factors that may give rise to improved retention. The objective of this project is to develop and validate such a method. Accomplishments: The two primary accomplishments of this project will be 1) the development and validation of a method to measure the stability of Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals and 2) the determination of the chemical factors that define the in vivo stability of Cu 64 radiopharmaceuticals. Because Cu(II) is extremely labile, the in vivo stability of Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals is not primarily determined by the amount of free Cu that is present at any given time or by the thermodynamic stability constants, but rather by the rate at which Cu is lost from the complex, the dissociation rate constant, kd. The dissociation rate constants of the Cu-64 complexes from a series of bifunctional chelators (BFCs) will be measured using Free Ion Selective Radiotracer Extraction (FISRE), a technique originally developed to measure bioavailable Cu in environmental samples. FISRE will also be applied to the determination of the kd's of a series of reference Cu-64 complexes to determine the chemical factors that define the in vivo stability of Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals. Potential

  1. A broad overview of positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals and clinical applications: what is new?

    PubMed

    Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Solnes, Lilja; Vallabhajosula, Brigitte

    2011-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is a rapidly expanding imaging modality, thanks to the availability of compact medical cyclotrons and automated chemistry synthesis modules for the production of PET radiopharmaceuticals. Despite the availability of many radiotracers, [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is currently the most widely used radiopharmaceutical in PET, and the field of molecular imaging is anxiously awaiting the introduction of new PET radiopharmaceuticals for routine clinical use. During the last five years, several proprietary PET radiopharmaceuticals have been developed by major companies, and these new agents are in different stages of clinical evaluation. These new PET drugs are designed for imaging brain beta amyloid, myocardial perfusion, amino acid transport, angiogenesis, and tumor antigen expression. In addition, the National Cancer Institute, Society of Nuclear Medicine Clinical Trials Network, and the American College of Radiology Imaging Network have been conducting multicenter clinical trials with several nonproprietary PET drugs such as sodium [(18)F]fluoride, [(18)F]fluorothymidine, [(18)F]fluoromisonidazole, and (64)Cu-labeled diacetyl-bis (N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone. All new PET radiopharmaceuticals, like any other drugs, must be manufactured under current good manufacturing practices as required by the Food and Drug Administration before clinical evaluation (phases I, II, and III) and submission of new drug application. This review briefly describes the chemistry, mechanisms(s) of localization, and clinical application of both proprietary and nonproprietary new PET drugs under multicenter clinical evaluation.

  2. Environmental effects on the structure of metal ion-DOTA complexes: An ab initio study of radiopharmaceutical metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Lightstone, F C; Colvin, M E

    2006-02-10

    Quantum mechanical calculations were performed to study the differences between the important radiopharmaceutical metals yttrium (Y) and indium (In) bound by DOTA and modified DOTA molecules. Energies were calculated at the MP2/6-31+G(d)//HF/6-31G(d) levels, using effective core potentials on the Y and In ions. Although the minimum energy structures obtained are similar for both metal ion-DOTA complexes, changes in coordination and local environment significantly affect the geometries and energies of these complexes. Coordination by a single water molecule causes a change in the coordination number and a change in the position of the metal ion in In-DOTA; but, Y-DOTA is hardly affected by water coordination. When one of the DOTA carboxylates is replaced by an amide, the coordination energy for the amide arm shows a large variation between the Y and In ions. Optimizations including water and guandinium moieties to approximate the effects of antibody binding indicate a large energy cost for the DOTA-chelated In to adopt the ideal conformation for antibody binding.

  3. DOPASCAN Injection ([{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT): A radiopharmaceutical with potential for the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Nowotnik, D. P.

    1999-06-10

    In conjunction with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT), the radiopharmaceutical [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT (DOPASCAN Injection) has demonstrated significant potential for the early diagnosis and monitoring of Parkinson's Disease. Well over 2000 patients worldwide have been studied with this product, which has completed phase II clinical studies. This review summarizes the development and clinical application of this new radiopharmaceutical product.

  4. Incorporation of radiohalogens via versatile organometallic reactions: applications in radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, P.C.; Goodman, M.M.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Factors that must be considered for the design of radiohalogenated radio-pharmaceuticals include the stability and availability of the substrate, the physical half-life of the radiohalogen and the in vivo stability of the radiolabel. Vinyl and phenyl radiohalogen bonds show more in vivo stability than the alkyl radiohalogen bonds. Consequently, a variety of methods suitable for the synthesis of tissue specific radiopharmaceuticals bearing a vinyl or phenyl radiohalogen have been developed involving the synthesis and halogenation of metallovinyl and phenyl intermediates. The halogens and metallation reactions include iodine and bromine and alanation, boronation, mercuration, stannylation, and thallation, respectively. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis. [Final] report, 1 January 1991--31 December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1993-06-01

    Since 1987, this grant has supported the development of new radiochemical methods for use with short-lived, positron-emitting radionuclides; new laboratory techniques for radiochemical syntheses; and development of new radiopharmaceuticals which will be of use in Positron Emission Tomography. For the period 1 January 1991 to 31 December 1993, the authors have continued their efforts in all of these areas, as they feel that an integrated approach to the synthesis and characterization of new PET Radiopharmaceuticals is crucial to the continued growth and application of this imaging technique in modern medicine. Progress in a number of these areas is described in this report.

  6. Specific in vivo binding of /sup 77/Br-brombenperidol in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Moerlein, S.M.; Stoecklin, G.

    1984-09-24

    The in vivo binding of the radiobrominated neuroleptic brombenperidol in rat brain was studied. The accumulation of the radiolabeled neuroleptic was high in the striatum and relatively low in the cerebellum, cortex, and blood. Striatal binding of brombenperidol was saturable and displaced by subsequent administration of benperidol. The rationale for the development of /sup 75/Br-brombenperidol as a radiopharmaceutical for the non-invasive imaging of cerebral dopamine receptor areas is presented.

  7. Auger Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Kiess, Ana P.; Hobbs, Robert; Sgouros, George; Mease, Ronnie C.; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Shen, Colette J.; Foss, Catherine A.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2015-01-01

    Auger electron emitters such as 125I have a high linear energy transfer and short range of emission (<10 μm), making them suitable for treating micrometastases while sparing normal tissues. We used a highly specific small molecule targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) to deliver 125I to prostate cancer cells. Methods The PSMA-targeting Auger emitter 2-[3-[1-carboxy-5-(4-125I-iodo-benzoylamino)-pentyl]-ureido]-pentanedioic acid (125I-DCIBzL) was synthesized. DNA damage (via phosphorylated H2A histone family member X staining) and clonogenic survival were tested in PSMA-positive (PSMA+) PC3 PIP and PSMA-negative (PSMA−) PC3 flu human prostate cancer cells after treatment with 125I-DCIBzL. Subcellular drug distribution was assessed with confocal microscopy using a related fluorescent PSMA-targeting compound YC-36. In vivo antitumor efficacy was tested in nude mice bearing PSMA+ PC3 PIP or PSMA− PC3 flu flank xenografts. Animals were administered (intravenously) 111 MBq (3 mCi) of 125I-DCIBzL, 111 MBq (3 mCi) of 125I-NaI, an equivalent amount of nonradiolabeled DCIBzL, or saline. Results After treatment with 125I-DCIBzL, PSMA+ PC3 PIP cells exhibited increased DNA damage and decreased clonogenic survival when compared with PSMA− PC3 flu cells. Confocal microscopy of YC-36 showed drug distribution in the perinuclear area and plasma membrane. Animals bearing PSMA+ PC3 PIP tumors had significant tumor growth delay after treatment with 125I-DCIBzL, with only 1 mouse reaching 5 times the initial tumor volume by 60 d after treatment, compared with a median time to 5 times volume of less than 15 d for PSMA− PC3 flu tumors and all other treatment groups (P = 0.002 by log-rank test). Conclusion PSMA-targeted radiopharmaceutical therapy with the Auger emitter 125I-DCIBzL yielded highly specific antitumor efficacy in vivo, suggesting promise for treatment of prostate cancer micrometastases. PMID:26182968

  8. Lutetium-177 DOTATATE Production with an Automated Radiopharmaceutical Synthesis System

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Alireza; Snowdon, Graeme M; Bailey, Dale L; Schembri, Geoffrey P; Bailey, Elizabeth A; Pavlakis, Nick; Roach, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT) with yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu)-labelled SST analogues are now therapy option for patients who have failed to respond to conventional medical therapy. In-house production with automated PRRT synthesis systems have clear advantages over manual methods resulting in increasing use in hospital-based radiopharmacies. We report on our one year experience with an automated radiopharmaceutical synthesis system. Methods: All syntheses were carried out using the Eckert & Ziegler Eurotope’s Modular-Lab Pharm Tracer® automated synthesis system. All materials and methods used were followed as instructed by the manufacturer of the system (Eckert & Ziegler Eurotope, Berlin, Germany). Sterile, GMP-certified, no-carrier added (NCA) 177Lu was used with GMP-certified peptide. An audit trail was also produced and saved by the system. The quality of the final product was assessed after each synthesis by ITLC-SG and HPLC methods. Results: A total of 17 [177Lu]-DOTATATE syntheses were performed between August 2013 and December 2014. The amount of radioactive [177Lu]-DOTATATE produced by each synthesis varied between 10-40 GBq and was dependant on the number of patients being treated on a given day. Thirteen individuals received a total of 37 individual treatment administrations in this period. There were no issues and failures with the system or the synthesis cassettes. The average radiochemical purity as determined by ITLC was above 99% (99.8 ± 0.05%) and the average radiochemical purity as determined by HPLC technique was above 97% (97.3 ± 1.5%) for this period. Conclusions: The automated synthesis of [177Lu]-DOTATATE using Eckert & Ziegler Eurotope’s Modular-Lab Pharm Tracer® system is a robust, convenient and high yield approach to the radiolabelling of DOTATATE peptide benefiting from the use of NCA 177Lu and almost negligible radiation exposure of the operators. PMID:27408890

  9. Development of more efficacious Tc-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by characterization of radiopharmaceuticals. Final report, September 1, 1992--June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, W.R.; Seliskar, C.J.

    1998-08-04

    The primary goals of this project were twofold: (1) Development of a microsensor that would demonstrate the capability for in vivo monitoring of a radiopharmaceutical after its injection into a test animal; and (2) Exploration of capillary electrophoresis (CE) as a separation technique for the analysis of radiopharmaceuticals that are mixtures of different compounds. The combination of in vivo sensors for real-time monitoring of specific chemical states of a radiopharmaceutical in individual organs and CE for analysis of radiopharmaceuticals prior to injection would provide valuable information regarding the fate of an imaging agent after administration. Such information should give insight into strategies for the development of more efficacious radiopharmaceuticals.

  10. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Technical progress report, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, S.J.

    1991-12-31

    This report presents research on radiopharmaceuticals. The following topics are discussed: antibody labeling with positron-emitting radionuclides; antibody modification for radioimmune imaging; labeling antibodies; evaluation of technetium acetlyacetonates as potential cerebral blood flow agents; and studies in technetium chemistry. (CBS)

  11. Rhenium-188 and copper-67 radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Frier, Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    The favourable nuclear properties of copper-67 and rhenium-188 for therapeutic application are described, together with methods for the chemical synthesis of a number of derivatives. Survival from invasive bladder cancer has changed little over the past 20 years. The intravesicular administration of Cu-67 or Re-188 radiopharmaceuticals in the treatment of bladder cancer offers some promise for improvement in this situation.

  12. Design of CGMP Production of 18F- and 68Ga-Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Pei-Chun; Chao, Hao-Yu; Shieh, Wei-Chen; Chen, Chuck C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Radiopharmaceutical production process must adhere to current good manufacturing process (CGMP) compliance to ensure the quality of precursor, prodrug (active pharmaceutical ingredient, API), and the final drug product that meet acceptance criteria. We aimed to develop an automated system for production of CGMP grade of PET radiopharmaceuticals. Methods. The hardware and software of the automated synthesizer that fit in the hot cell under cGMP requirement were developed. Examples of production yield and purity for 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG at CGMP facility were optimized. Analytical assays and acceptance criteria for cGMP grade of 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG were established. Results. CGMP facility for the production of PET radiopharmaceuticals has been established. Radio-TLC and HPLC analyses of 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG showed that the radiochemical purity was 92% and 96%, respectively. The products were sterile and pyrogenic-free. Conclusion. CGMP compliance of radiopharmaceuticals has been reviewed. 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG were synthesized with high radiochemical yield under CGMP process. PMID:25276810

  13. Systemic metabolic radiopharmaceutical therapy in the treatment of metastatic bone pain.

    PubMed

    Paes, Fabio M; Serafini, Aldo N

    2010-03-01

    Bone pain due to skeletal metastases constitutes the most common type of chronic pain among patients with cancer. It significantly decreases the patient's quality of life and is associated with comorbidities, such as hypercalcemia, pathologic fractures and spinal cord compression. Approximately 65% of patients with prostate or breast cancer and 35% of those with advanced lung, thyroid, and kidney cancers will have symptomatic skeletal metastases. The management of bone pain is extremely difficult and involves a multidisciplinary approach, which usually includes analgesics, hormone therapies, bisphosphonates, external beam radiation, and systemic radiopharmaceuticals. In patients with extensive osseous metastases, systemic radiopharmaceuticals should be the preferred adjunctive therapy for pain palliation. In this article, we review the current approved radiopharmaceutical armamentarium for bone pain palliation, focusing on indications, patient selection, efficacy, and different biochemical characteristics and toxicity of strontium-89 chloride, samarium-153 lexidronam, and rhenium-186 etidronate. A brief discussion on the available data on rhenium-188 is presented focusing on its major advantages and disadvantages. We also perform a concise appraisal of the other available treatment options, including pharmacologic and hormonal treatment modalities, external beam radiation, and bisphosphonates. Finally, the available data on combination therapy of radiopharmaceuticals with bisphosphonates or chemotherapy are discussed. PMID:20113678

  14. Pharmaceutical and clinical development of phosphonate-based radiopharmaceuticals for the targeted treatment of bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rogier; Ter Heine, Rob; Knapp, Russ Ff; de Klerk, John M H; Bloemendal, Haiko J; Hendrikse, N Harry

    2016-10-01

    Therapeutic phosphonate-based radiopharmaceuticals radiolabeled with beta, alpha and conversion electron emitting radioisotopes have been investigated for the targeted treatment of painful bone metastases for >35years. We performed a systematic literature search and focused on the pharmaceutical development, preclinical research and early human studies of these radiopharmaceuticals. The characteristics of an ideal bone-targeting therapeutic radiopharmaceutical are presented and compliance with these criteria by the compounds discussed is verified. The importance of both composition and preparation conditions for the stability and biodistribution of several agents is discussed. Very few studies have described the characterization of these products, although knowledge on the molecular structure is important with respect to in vivo behavior. This review discusses a total of 91 phosphonate-based therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals, of which only six agents have progressed to clinical use. Extensive clinical studies have only been described for (186)Re-HEDP, (188)Re-HEDP and (153)Sm-EDTMP. Of these, (153)Sm-EDTMP represents the only compound with worldwide marketing authorization. (177)Lu-EDTMP has recently received approval for clinical use in India. This review illustrates that a thorough understanding of the radiochemistry of these agents is required to design simple and robust preparation and quality control methods, which are needed to fully exploit the potential benefits of these theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. Extensive biodistribution and dosimetry studies are indispensable to provide the portfolios that are required for assessment before human administration is possible. Use of the existing knowledge collected in this review should guide future research efforts and may lead to the approval of new promising agents. PMID:27496068

  15. Pharmaceutical and clinical development of phosphonate-based radiopharmaceuticals for the targeted treatment of bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rogier; Ter Heine, Rob; Knapp, Russ Ff; de Klerk, John M H; Bloemendal, Haiko J; Hendrikse, N Harry

    2016-10-01

    Therapeutic phosphonate-based radiopharmaceuticals radiolabeled with beta, alpha and conversion electron emitting radioisotopes have been investigated for the targeted treatment of painful bone metastases for >35years. We performed a systematic literature search and focused on the pharmaceutical development, preclinical research and early human studies of these radiopharmaceuticals. The characteristics of an ideal bone-targeting therapeutic radiopharmaceutical are presented and compliance with these criteria by the compounds discussed is verified. The importance of both composition and preparation conditions for the stability and biodistribution of several agents is discussed. Very few studies have described the characterization of these products, although knowledge on the molecular structure is important with respect to in vivo behavior. This review discusses a total of 91 phosphonate-based therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals, of which only six agents have progressed to clinical use. Extensive clinical studies have only been described for (186)Re-HEDP, (188)Re-HEDP and (153)Sm-EDTMP. Of these, (153)Sm-EDTMP represents the only compound with worldwide marketing authorization. (177)Lu-EDTMP has recently received approval for clinical use in India. This review illustrates that a thorough understanding of the radiochemistry of these agents is required to design simple and robust preparation and quality control methods, which are needed to fully exploit the potential benefits of these theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. Extensive biodistribution and dosimetry studies are indispensable to provide the portfolios that are required for assessment before human administration is possible. Use of the existing knowledge collected in this review should guide future research efforts and may lead to the approval of new promising agents.

  16. Nuclear medicine imaging in tuberculosis using commercially available radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Sathekge, Mike; Maes, Alex; D'Asseler, Yves; Vorster, Mariza; Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, data available on nuclear medicine imaging using commercially available radiopharmaceuticals for the differentiation, staging, and prediction or assessment of the response to treatment in tuberculosis (TB) are reviewed. Limited available studies suggest that single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using either 201Tl, 99mTc-sestamibi, or 99mTc-tetrofosmin is accurate (≥85%) and has a high negative predictive value (≥90%) for the differentiation of TB from carcinoma in patients presenting with a solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN). The criteria for detection of TB on 201Tl SPECT are nondepiction of the suspicious lesion in the delayed image or a negative retention index [washout on the delayed images (3–4 h postinjection) vs. the early image (5–15 min postinjection)] and a comparable-to-background uptake on 99mTc-sestamibi or 99mTc-tetrofosmin SPECT. Another SPECT tracer of potential interest for the differentiation of TB from malignant SPN that warrants further exploration, is N-isopropyl-p-[123I]iodoamphetamine (123I-IMP). In contrast, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET is unable to differentiate malignancy from TB and thus cannot be used as a tool to reduce futile biopsy/thoracotomy in these patients. A limited number of studies have reported on the potential of nuclear medicine imaging in assessment of the extent of disease in patients with extrapulmonary TB using 67Ga-citrate SPECT and 18F-FDG PET, respectively. 67Ga-citrate SPECT was shown to be as sensitive as bone scintigraphy for the detection of bone infection and was found to be complementary to computed tomography (CT) imaging. 18F-FDG PET was found to be significantly more efficient when compared with CT, respectively, in over half of patients for the identification of sites of lymph node involvement that were missed by CT and often the only sites of extrapulmonary TB identified. Unfortunately, 18F-FDG PET findings did not lead to alterations in treatment planning in any

  17. Nuclear medicine imaging in tuberculosis using commercially available radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Sathekge, Mike; Maes, Alex; D'Asseler, Yves; Vorster, Mariza; Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, data available on nuclear medicine imaging using commercially available radiopharmaceuticals for the differentiation, staging, and prediction or assessment of the response to treatment in tuberculosis (TB) are reviewed. Limited available studies suggest that single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using either 201Tl, 99mTc-sestamibi, or 99mTc-tetrofosmin is accurate (≥85%) and has a high negative predictive value (≥90%) for the differentiation of TB from carcinoma in patients presenting with a solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN). The criteria for detection of TB on 201Tl SPECT are nondepiction of the suspicious lesion in the delayed image or a negative retention index [washout on the delayed images (3–4 h postinjection) vs. the early image (5–15 min postinjection)] and a comparable-to-background uptake on 99mTc-sestamibi or 99mTc-tetrofosmin SPECT. Another SPECT tracer of potential interest for the differentiation of TB from malignant SPN that warrants further exploration, is N-isopropyl-p-[123I]iodoamphetamine (123I-IMP). In contrast, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET is unable to differentiate malignancy from TB and thus cannot be used as a tool to reduce futile biopsy/thoracotomy in these patients. A limited number of studies have reported on the potential of nuclear medicine imaging in assessment of the extent of disease in patients with extrapulmonary TB using 67Ga-citrate SPECT and 18F-FDG PET, respectively. 67Ga-citrate SPECT was shown to be as sensitive as bone scintigraphy for the detection of bone infection and was found to be complementary to computed tomography (CT) imaging. 18F-FDG PET was found to be significantly more efficient when compared with CT, respectively, in over half of patients for the identification of sites of lymph node involvement that were missed by CT and often the only sites of extrapulmonary TB identified. Unfortunately, 18F-FDG PET findings did not lead to alterations in treatment planning in any

  18. Understanding radioxenon isotopical ratios originating from radiopharmaceutical facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saey, P. R. J.; Ringbom, A.; Bowyer, T. W.; Becker, A.; de Geer, L.-E.; Nikkinen, M.; Payne, R. F.

    2009-04-01

    It was recently shown that radiopharmaceutical facilities (RPF) are major contributors to the general background of 133Xe and other xenon isotopes both in the northern and southern hemisphere. To distinguish a nuclear explosion signal from releases from civil nuclear facilities, not only the activity concentrations but also the ratios of the four different CTBT relevant radioxenon isotopes (131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 135Xe) have to be well understood. First measurements taken recently in and around two of the world's largest RPF's: NTP at Pelindaba, South Africa and IRE at Fleurus, Belgium have been presented. At both sites, also stack samples were taken in close cooperation with the facility operators. The radioxenon in Belgium could be classified in four classes: the normal European background (133Xe activity between 0 - 5 mBq/m3) on one hand and then the samples where all four isotopes were detected with 133mXe/131mXe > 1. In northern South Africa the Pelindaba RPF is in practice the sole source of radioxenon. It generated a background of 133Xe at the measurement site some 230 km to the west of the RPF of 0 - 5 mBq/m3. In the cases where the air from the Pelindaba facility reached the measurement site directly and in a short time period, the 133Xe was higher, also 135Xe was present and in some samples 133mXe as well. The ratios of the activity concentrations of 135Xe/133Xe vs. 133mXe/131mXe (Multiple Isotope Ratio Plot - MIRC) have been analysed. For both facilities, the possible theoretical ratio's for different scenarios were calculated with the information available and compared with the measurements. It was found that there is an excess of 131mXe present in the European samples compared to theoretical calculations. A similar excess has also been seen in samples measured in northern America. In South Africa, neither the environmental samples nor the stack ones contained 131mXe at measurable levels. This can probably be explained by different processes and

  19. Radiopharmaceutical stannic Sn-117m chelate compositions and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Meinken, George E.

    2001-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical compositions including .sup.117m Sn labeled stannic (Sn.sup.4+) chelates are provided. The chelates are preferably polyhydroxycarboxylate, such as oxalates, tartrates, citrates, malonates, gluconates, glucoheptonates and the like. Methods of making .sup.117m Sn-labeled (Sn.sup.4+) polyhydroxycarboxylic chelates are also provided. The foregoing pharmaceutical compositions can be used in methods of preparing bone for scintigraphical analysis, for radiopharmaceutical skeletal imaging, treatment of pain resulting from metastatic bone involvement, treatment of primary bone cancer, treatment of cancer resulting from metastatic spread to bone from other primary cancers, treatment of pain resulting from rheumatoid arthritis, treatment of bone/joint disorders and to monitor radioactively the skeletal system.

  20. [Computer simulated images of radiopharmaceutical distributions in anthropomorphic phantoms]. Performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-17

    We have constructed an anatomically correct human geometry, which can be used to store radioisotope concentrations in 51 various internal organs. Each organ is associated with an index number which references to its attenuating characteristics (composition and density). The initial development of Computer Simulated Images of Radiopharmaceuticals in Anthropomorphic Phantoms (CSIRDAP) over the first 3 years has been very successful. All components of the simulation have been coded, made operational and debugged.

  1. Quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.

    1985-09-01

    This program, during the past 30 years, has developed with the constant awareness of the close interrelationships and interdependence between clinical needs, radiopharmaceutical and instrument developments, and clinical feasibility studies. This is a year of transition for this contract with two of the responsible investigators, Katherine Lathrop and Paul Harper, reaching the age of mandatory retirement. This report focuses on the completion and write-up of current research projects by Dr. Harper and Mrs. Lathrop. 4 refs.

  2. Development new radiopharmaceutical based on 5-thio-d- glucose labeled technetium-99m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasyuk, E. S.; Skuridin, V. S.; Ilina, E. A.; Rogov, A. S.; Nesterov, E. A.; Sadkin, V. L.; Larionova, L. A.; Varlamova, N. V.; Zelchan, R.

    2016-06-01

    The article considers the obtaining and possibility of using 5-thio-D-glucose labeled technetium-99m for the diagnosis of malignant tumors by single photon emission computed tomography. The analysis of the level of international developments of radiopharmaceuticals based on derivatives of glucose has been carried out. Also the article provides information on of using experimental batches of lyophilisate on the basis of 5-thio-D-glucose for preliminary biomedical testing on the mice.

  3. Internal dose assessment for 211At α-emitter in isotonic solution as radiopharmaceutical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuminov, O. A.; Fotina, O. V.; Priselkova, A. B.; Tultaev, A. V.; Platonov, S. Yu.; Eremenko, D. O.; Drozdov, V. A.

    2003-12-01

    The functional fitness of the α-emitter 211At for radiotherapy of the thyroid gland cancer is evaluated. Radiation doses are calculated using the MIRD method and previously obtained pharmacokinetic data for 211At in isotonic solution and for 123I as sodium iodide. Analysis of the 211At radiation dose to the thyroid gland suggests that this radiopharmaceutical may be predominantly used for the treatment of the thyroid cancer.

  4. Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals as targeted agents of osteosarcoma: samarium-153-EDTMP and radium-223.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter M; Subbiah, Vivek; Rohren, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a cancer characterized by formation of bone by malignant cells. Routine bone scan imaging with Tc-99m-MDP is done at diagnosis to evaluate primary tumor uptake and check for bone metastases. At time of relapse the Tc-99m-MDP bone scan also provides a specific means to assess formation of bone by malignant osteosarcoma cells and the potential for bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals to deliver radioactivity directly into osteoblastic osteosarcoma lesions. This chapter will review and compare a bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical that emits beta-particles, samarium-153-EDTMP, with an alpha-particle emitter, radium-223. The charged alpha particles from radium-223 have far more mass and energy than beta particles (electrons) from Sm-153-EDTMP. Because radium-223 has less marrow toxicity and more radiobiological effectiveness, especially if inside the bone forming cancer cell than samarium-153-EDTMP, radium-223 may have greater potential to become widely used against osteosarcoma as a targeted therapy. Radium-223 also has more potential to be used with chemotherapy against osteosarcoma and bone metastases. Because osteosarcoma makes bone and radium-223 acts like calcium, this radiopharmaceutical could possibly become a new targeted means to achieve safe and effective reduction of tumor burden as well as facilitate better surgery and/or radiotherapy for difficult to resect large, or metastatic tumors.

  5. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, S.J.

    1995-02-01

    The Harvard-MIT Research Program in Short-lived Radiopharmaceuticals was established in 1977 to foster interaction among groups working in radiopharmaceutical chemistry at Harvard Medical School, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Massachusetts General Hospital. To this was added a group at The Childrens Hospital. From these collaborations and building upon the special strengths of the participating individuals, laboratories and institutions, it was hoped that original approaches would be found for the design of new, clinically useful, radiolabeled compounds. The original thrust of this proposal included: (a) examination of the coordination chemistry of technetium as a basis for rational radiopharmaceutical design, (b) development of an ultrashort-lived radionuclide generator for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in newborns, (c) synthesis of receptor-site-directed halopharmaceuticals, (d) improved facile labeling of complex molecules with positron-emitting radionuclides. The authors` 1986 proposal was oriented toward organs and disease, emphasizing radiolabeled agents that delineate specific functions and the distribution of receptors in brain, heart, and tumors. In 1989, they further refined their purposes and focused on two major aims: (a) synthesis and utilization of neutral technetium and rhenium complexes of high specific activity, and (b) development of new approaches to the radiolabeling of proteins, peptides, immunoglobulins, and their fragments. In 1992, the authors amended this proposal to concentrate their efforts on biologically active peptides and proteins for targeted radiodiagnosis and therapy.

  6. Preparation of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals for positron tomography. Progress report, November 1, 1977-October 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1980-06-01

    Although the germanium-68 ..-->.. gallium-68 generator is probably the only source of positron-emitting radionuclides that could enable the widespread application of positron tomography, the commercially available /sup 68/Ga//sup 68/Ge generator system suffers from several major disadvantages. The most important of these is that the generator is eluted with EDTA, which forms a very strong chelate with gallium. In order to produce radiopharmaceuticals other than /sup 68/Ga-EDTA, it is first necessary to break the stable EDTA complex and remove all traces of EDTA. This procedure adds several steps and a significant amount of time to procedures for preparing /sup 68/Ga-radiopharmaceuticals. We have developed a new generator using a solvent extraction system which will produce /sup 68/Ga-oxine (8-hydroxyquinoline), a weak chelate. Using this agent we have synthesized several /sup 68/Ga-radiopharmaceuticals and tested them in vitro and in vivo. We have also carried out some preliminary studies to compare generator systems which produce /sup 68/Ga in an ionic form. Attempts have been made using polarographic and chromatographic techniques, and in vivo distribution data to investigate the stability of radiogallium complexes with a series of potentially lipophilic complexing agents.

  7. Use of pressure-hold test for sterilizing filter membrane integrity in radiopharmaceutical manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Belanger, Anthony P; Byrne, John F; Paolino, Justin M; DeGrado, Timothy R

    2009-11-01

    The bubble point test is the de facto standard for postproduction filter membrane integrity test in the radiopharmaceutical community. However, the bubble point test depends on a subjective visual assessment of bubbling rate that can be obscured by significant diffusive gas flows below the manufacturer's prescribed bubble point. To provide a more objective means to assess filter membrane integrity, this study evaluates the pressure-hold test as an alternative to the bubble point test. In our application of the pressure-hold test, the nonsterile side of the sterilizing filter is pressurized to 85% of the predetermined bubble point with nitrogen, the filter system is closed off from the pressurizing gas and the pressure is monitored over a prescribed time interval. The drop in pressure, which has a known relationship with diffusive gas flow, is used as a quantitative measure of membrane integrity. Characterization of the gas flow vs. pressure relationship of each filter/solution combination provides an objective and quantitative means for defining a critical value of pressure drop over which the membrane is indicated to be nonintegral. The method is applied to sterilizing filter integrity testing associated with the commonly produced radiopharmaceuticals, [(18)F]FDG and [(11)C]PIB. The method is shown to be robust, practical and amenable to automation in radiopharmaceutical manufacturing environments (e.g., hot cells).

  8. Traceability from governmental producers of radiopharmaceuticals in measuring (18)F in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A E; Iwahara, A; Silva, C J; Cruz, P A L; Poledna, R; Silva, R L; Laranjeira, A S; Delgado, J U; Tauhata, L; Loureiro, J S; Toledo, B C; Braghirolli, A M S; Andrade, E A L; Silva, J L; Hernandes, H O K; Valente, E S; Dalle, H M; Almeida, V M; Silva, T G; Fragoso, M C F; Oliveira, M L; Nascimento, E S S; Oliveira, E M; Herrerias, R; Souza, A A; Bambalas, E; Bruzinga, W A

    2016-03-01

    Since the inception of its proficiency test program to evaluate radionuclide measurement in hospitals and clinics, the National Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation-LNMRI, that represents Brazilian National Metrology Institute (NMI) for ionizing radiation has expanded its measurement and calibration capability. Requirements from the National Health Surveillance Agency from Ministry of Health (ANVISA), to producers of radiopharmaceuticals provided an opportunity to improve the full traceability chain to the highest level. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-(18)F) is the only radiopharmaceutical simultaneously produced by all Brazilian radiopharmaceutical production centers (RPCs). By running this proficiency test, LNMRI began to provide them with the required traceability. For evaluation, the ratio of RPC to reference value results and ISO/IEC17043:2010 criteria were used. The reference value established as calibration factor on the secondary standard ionization chamber was obtained from three absolute measurements systems, and routinely confirmed in each round of proficiency test by CIEMAT/NIST liquid scintillation counting. The γ-emitting impurities were checked using a High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. The results show that Brazilian RPCs are in accordance with (accuracy within ±10%) the Brazilian standard for evaluation of measurements with radionuclide calibrators (CNEN NN 3.05., 2013). Nevertheless, the RPCs should improve the methodology of uncertainty estimates, essential when using the statistical criteria of ISO/IEC 17043 standard, in addition to improving accuracy to levels consistent with their position in the national traceability chain. PMID:26688362

  9. SU-E-I-82: PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Prostate Cancer Imaging: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, F; Silva, D da; Rodrigues, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to review new and clinical practice PET radiopharmaceuticals for prostate cancer imaging. Methods: PET radiopharmaceuticals were reviewed on the main databases. Availability, dosimetry, accuracy and limitations were considered. Results: The following radioisotopes with respective physical half-life and mean positron energy were found: {sup 18}F (109,7 min, 249,8 keV), {sup 89}Zr (78,4 hs, 395,5 keV), {sup 11}C (20,4 min, 385,7 keV) and {sup 68}Ga (67,8 min, 836 keV). {sup 68}Ga was the only one not produced by cyclotron. Radiopharmaceuticals uptake by glucose metabolism ({sup 18}F-FDG), lipogenesis ({sup 11}C-Choline and {sup 11}C-Acetate), amino acid transport (Anti-{sup 18}F-FACBC), bone matrix ({sup 18}F-NaF), prostatespecific membrane antigen ({sup 68}Ga-PSMA and {sup 89}Zr-J591), CXCR receptors ({sup 89}Ga-Pentixafor), adrenal receptors ({sup 18}F-FDHT) and gastrin release peptide receptor (bombesin analogue). Most of radiopharmaceuticals are urinary excretion, so bladder is the critical organ. 11C-choline (pancreas), Anti-{sup 18}FFACBC (liver) and {sup 18}F-FBDC (stomach wall) are the exception. Higher effective dose was seen {sup 18}F-NaF (27 μSv/MBq) while the lowest was {sup 11}CAcetate (3,5 μSv/MBq). Conclusion: Even though {sup 18}F-FDG has a large availability its high urinary excretion and poor uptake to slow growing disease offers weak results for prostate cancer. Better accuracy is obtained when {sup 18}F-NaF is used for bone metastatic investigation although physicians tend to choose bone scintigraphy probably due to its cost and practice. Many guidelines in oncology consider {sup 11}C or {sup 18}F labeled with Choline the gold standard for biochemical relapse after radical treatment. Local, lymph node and distant metastatic relapse can be evaluated at same time with this radiopharmaceutical. There is no consensus over bigger urinary excretion for {sup 18}F labeling. Anti-{sup 18}F-FACBC, {sup 68}Ga-PSMA and {sup

  10. 99mtc-Ubiquicidin [29–41], a Promising Radiopharmaceutical to Differentiate Orthopedic Implant Infections from Sterile Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Beiki, Davood; Yousefi, Gholamali; Fallahi, Babak; Tahmasebi, Mohammad Naghi; Gholamrezanezhad, Ali; Fard-Esfahani, Armaghan; Erfani, Mostafa; Eftekhari, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquicidin (UBI) [29-41] is a synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide that preferentially binds to bacterial cell membrane at the site of infection. We aimed to assess diagnostic value of 99mTc-UBI [29-41] as a radiopharmaceutical in differentiation of bacterial infection from sterile inflammation in suspected orthopedic implants. Nine patients suspected for orthopedic implant infection, all males with the mean age of 41.6 ± 20.9 years, were studied. A dose of 10 MBq/Kg (range : 555-740 MBq) 99mTc-UBI [29-41] was injected intravenously. A dynamic study followed by static whole body imaging at 30, 60 and 120 min post-radiotracer injection was acquired. Periprosthetic tissue culture was considered the closest test to a gold standard for diagnosing infections and scintigraphic scans were categorized as true- or false-positive and true- or false-negative, considering the bacterial culture as the gold standard. No adverse reaction was observed during or after the radiotracer injection days. There were five true positive, four true negative and no false positive and false negative scans. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were all calculated as 100%. We found a high diagnostic accuracy for 99mTc-UBI [29-41] scintigraphy in differentiation of bacterial infection from sterile inflammation in suspected orthopedic implants. Therefore, 99mTc-UBI [29-41] scintigraphy might be potentially recommended as a safe and promising imaging modality in these settings. However, further studies on a larger number of patients and different pathologies are still needed. PMID:24250609

  11. Bench to bedside development of GMP grade Rhenium-188-HEDP, a radiopharmaceutical for targeted treatment of painful bone metastases.

    PubMed

    ter Heine, Rob; Lange, Rogier; Breukels, Oscar B; Bloemendal, Haiko J; Rummenie, Rob G; Wakker, Antoinette M; de Graaf, Hilly; Beekman, Freek J; van der Westerlaken, Monique M L; Malingré, Mirte M; Wielders, Jos P M; van den Berg, Leo; Hendrikse, N Harry; de Klerk, John M H

    2014-04-25

    Bone-targeting therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals are effective agents for treatment of painful bone metastases. Rhenium-188-HEDP is such a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical and has advantages over commercially available alternatives in terms of efficacy, safety and the ability to be produced on-site, allowing rapid treatment upon presentation of patients with pain. Unlike many other radiopharmaceuticals, there are no standardized preparation methods for Rhenium-188-HEDP. It is known, however, that drug composition may not only affect stability of the final drug product, but it may also influence bone affinity and, thus, efficacy. Furthermore, for support of clinical studies with Rhenium-188-HEDP as an investigational medicinal product, preparation of this radiopharmaceutical has to be performed under GMP conditions. To our knowledge, no group has reported on the preparation of Rhenium-188-HEDP under GMP conditions or on stock production of sterile non-radioactive starting materials. We present the production of GMP grade Rhenium-188-HEDP for application of this therapeutic radiopharmaceutical in routine clinical practice and for support of clinical studies. In addition, bio-distribution data of Rhenium-188-HEDP in mice and in patients with bone metastases originating from prostate cancer are presented.

  12. Harvard--MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    This report describes progress on five projects. The first project showed a 1000 fold concentration of the cationic complex {sup 99m}Tc (MIBI) in heart cell mitochondria vs heart cell cytoplasm, as determined by high resolution electron probe microanalysis. Additional technetium-99m based complexes are being developed and tested. The second project involves evaluating technetium acetylacteonates as potential indicators of cerebral blood flow. An intermediate in the synthesis of a technetium porphyrin complex has been synthesized; an oxotechnetium(V)-2,4-pentanedione complex has been prepared and is currently being characterized. The third project involves using radio labelled antibodies for diagnosis and treatment of cancer. An early discovery was that chloramine-T based iodination protocols resulted in a reversal of the charge on mouse lgGs. Immunoperoxidase-labelled monoclonal antibody MOv 18 was shown to bind specifically to the most frequent ovarian aderon carcinomas, and not to healthy tissue, making this antibody a good candidate for immunotherapy or immunodetection. Work on a specific immunotherapy protocol suffered a setback when one reagent, a {sup 125}I-biotin complex, proved to be unstable in vivo. The fourth project involves labelling antibodies with positron emitting radionuclides. Radiofluorination was accomplished through reductive alkylation of {sup 18}F-aldehyde, or pentafluorophenyl esters. Radioiodination was accomplished using alkyl-tin derivation exchange. The fifth project examined antibody modification for use in radioimmune imaging. Technetium-99m-labelled lgG was shown to be biologically equivalent to Indium-III-labelled lgG for imaging focal sites of inflamation. Also, Indium III labelling of small bioactive peptides was examined as a means of imaging important physiological processes. 44 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Chemistry and bifunctional chelating agents for binding (177)Lu.

    PubMed

    Parus, Józef L; Pawlak, Dariusz; Mikolajczak, Renata; Duatti, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    A short overview of fundamental chemistry of lutetium and of structural characteristics of lutetium coordination complexes, as relevant for understanding the properties of lutetium-177 radiopharmaceuticals, is presented. This includes basic concepts on lutetium electronic structure, lanthanide contraction, coordination geometries, behavior in aqueous solution and thermodynamic stability. An illustration of the structure and binding properties of the most important chelating agents for the Lu(3+) ion in aqueous solution is also reported with specific focus on coordination complexes formed with linear and macrocyclic polydentate amino-carboxylate donor ligands.

  14. Copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals for PET imaging of cancer: advances in preclinical and clinical research.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Carolyn J; Ferdani, Riccardo

    2009-08-01

    Copper-64 (T(1/2) = 12.7 hours; beta(+), 0.653 MeV [17.8 %]; beta(-), 0.579 MeV [38.4 %]) has decay characteristics that allow for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and targeted radiotherapy of cancer. The well-established coordination chemistry of copper allows for its reaction with a wide variety of chelator systems that can potentially be linked to peptides and other biologically relevant small molecules, antibodies, proteins, and nanoparticles. The 12.7-hours half-life of 64Cu provides the flexibility to image both smaller molecules and larger, slower clearing proteins and nanoparticles. In a practical sense, the radionuclide or the 64Cu-radiopharmaceuticals can be easily shipped for PET imaging studies at sites remote to the production facility. Due to the versatility of 64Cu, there has been an abundance of novel research in this area over the past 20 years, primarily in the area of PET imaging, but also for the targeted radiotherapy of cancer. The biologic activity of the hypoxia imaging agent, 60/64Cu-ATSM, has been described in great detail in animal models and in clinical PET studies. An investigational new drug application for 64Cu-ATSM was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States, paving the way for a multicenter trial to validate the utility of this agent, with the hopeful result being FDA approval for routine clinical use. This article discusses state-of-the-art cancer imaging with 64Cu radiopharmaceuticals, including 64Cu-ATSM for imaging hypoxia, 64Cu-labeled peptides for tumor-receptor targeting, (64)Cu-labeled monoclonal antibodies for targeting tumor antigens, and 64Cu-labeled nanoparticles for cancer targeting. The emphasis of this article will be on the new scientific discoveries involving (64)Cu radiopharmaceuticals, as well as the translation of these into human studies.

  15. Radio-UHPLC: a tool for rapidly determining the radiochemical purity of technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals?

    PubMed

    Kryza, David; Janier, Marc

    2013-08-01

    Determining the radiochemical purity (RCP) of technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) radiopharmaceuticals using the method described in the package insert is a time-consuming process, requiring particular attention in order to achieve accurate RCP results. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether radio-ultra high performance liquid chromatography (radio-UHPLC) may be an alternative method for RCP testing of (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin, (99m)Tc-MAG3 and (99m)Tc-sestamibi. Results obtained using radio-UHPLC were in excellent agreement with the standard method, with total analysis time being reduced to less than 3 min.

  16. High--valent technetium chemistry-new opportunities for radiopharmaceutical developments.

    PubMed

    Braband, Henrik

    2014-04-01

    The rich coordination chemistry of (99m) Tc distinguishes this radiometal from other radiolabels applied for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET). This potential should be used to create novel opportunities for the development of effective imaging probes. In this context, the field of high-valent technetium chemistry has received much interest. It has been shown that fac-{(99m) TcO3 }(+) complexes are potential new synthons for radiopharmaceutical developments, due to their unique physicochemical properties and unprecedented reactivity. In this article, recent developments and the 'state of the art' in this field of technetium chemistry will be reviewed comprehensively.

  17. ACR-ASTRO practice guideline for the performance of therapy with unsealed radiopharmaceutical sources.

    PubMed

    Henkin, Robert E; Del Rowe, John D; Grigsby, Perry W; Hartford, Alan C; Jadvar, Hossein; Macklis, Roger M; Parker, J Anthony; Wong, Jeffrey Y C; Rosenthal, Seth A

    2011-08-01

    This guideline is intended to guide appropriately trained and licensed physicians performing therapy with unsealed radiopharmaceutical sources. Adherence to this guideline should help to maximize the efficacious use of these procedures, maintain safe conditions, and ensure compliance with applicable regulations. The topics dealt with in this guideline include indications for the use of iodine-131, both for the treatment of hyperthyroidism and thyroid carcinoma. In addition, indications for other less common procedures include those for the use of phosphorous-32 in its liquid and colloidal forms, strontium-89, samarium-153, and the use of Y-90 antibodies.

  18. USCEA/NIST measurement assurance programs for the radiopharmaceutical and nuclear power industries

    SciTech Connect

    Golas, D.B.

    1993-12-31

    In cooperation with the U.S. Council for Energy Awareness (USCEA), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) supervises and administers two measurement assurance programs for radioactivity measurement traceability. One, in existence since the mid 1970s, provides traceability to suppliers of radiochemicals and radiopharmaceuticals, dose calibrators, and nuclear pharmacy services. The second program, begun in 1987, provides traceability to the nuclear power industry for utilities, source suppliers, and service laboratories. Each program is described, and the results of measurements of samples of known, but undisclosed activity, prepared at NIST and measured by the participants are presented.

  19. Proliferation dangers associated with nuclear medicine: getting weapons-grade uranium out of radiopharmaceutical production.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bill; Ruff, Tilman A

    2007-01-01

    Abolishing the threat of nuclear war requires the outlawing of nuclear weapons and dismantling current nuclear weapon stockpiles, but also depends on eliminating access to fissile material (nuclear weapon fuel). The near-universal use of weapons-grade, highly enriched uranium (HEU) to produce radiopharmaceuticals is a significant proliferation hazard. Health professionals have a strategic opportunity and obligation to progress the elimination of medically-related commerce in HEU, closing one of the most vulnerable pathways to the much-feared 'terrorist bomb'.

  20. A Generator-Produced Gallium-68 Radiopharmaceutical for PET Imaging of Myocardial Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vijay; Sivapackiam, Jothilingam; Harpstrite, Scott E.; Prior, Julie L.; Gu, Hannah; Rath, Nigam P.; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2014-01-01

    Lipophilic cationic technetium-99m-complexes are widely used for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). However, inherent uncertainties in the supply chain of molybdenum-99, the parent isotope required for manufacturing 99Mo/99mTc generators, intensifies the need for discovery of novel MPI agents incorporating alternative radionuclides. Recently, germanium/gallium (Ge/Ga) generators capable of producing high quality 68Ga, an isotope with excellent emission characteristics for clinical PET imaging, have emerged. Herein, we report a novel 68Ga-complex identified through mechanism-based cell screening that holds promise as a generator-produced radiopharmaceutical for PET MPI. PMID:25353349

  1. Measurement and control of the air contamination generated in a medical cyclotron facility for PET radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Calandrino, R; del Vecchio, A; Todde, S; Fazio, F

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the data concerning the contamination of the exhausted air from the hot cells dedicated to the large-scale synthesis of positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceuticals. Two cyclotrons are currently operating in Ospedale San Raffaele for the routine production of C and F. They are linked with four radiochemistry laboratories by means of shielded radioisotope delivery lines. The above labs are dedicated both to the large scale preparation and to the research and development of PET radiopharmaceuticals. The department hosts four CT-PET scanners, which operate with a mean patient workload of 40 per day. Radiosyntheses are performed using automated modules located in 10 hot cells. The air outlets are monitored online by a 2-inch NaI(Tl) counter in a Marinelli geometry counting volume. Contamination values up to 10(5) Bq L(-1) have been measured at the hot cell exit point during the synthesis. The corresponding concentrations at the point of release in atmosphere are largely above the threshold of 1.29 Bq L(-1), defined by national regulations as the limit for free environmental release. A shielded gas storage system controlled by a dedicated, customized software program has thus been installed to prevent the potentially hazardous release of gaseous radioactive contaminants. The system has allowed us to maintain the effective dose to neighboring population groups below the limit of 10 muSv y(-1).

  2. Dose rate measurements from radiopharmaceuticals: implications for nuclear medicine staff and for children with radioactive parents.

    PubMed

    Greaves, C D; Tindale, W B

    1999-02-01

    Following the introduction of a number of radiopharmaceuticals, we assessed the dose received by staff working in the nuclear medicine department and also by children who may be in close contact with a radioactive parent. We measured departure dose rates (microSv.h-1) at distances of 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 m from the skin surface at the level of the thyroid, chest and bladder of patients undergoing the following nuclear medicine procedures: MUGA scans using 99Tcm-labelled red blood cells, myocardial perfusion scans using 99Tcm-labelled radiopharmaceuticals, lymphoscintigraphy using colloidal 99Tcm (Re) sulphide, bone scans using 99Tcm-labelled oxidronate, 111In-octreotide scans, 111In-labelled leukocyte studies and cardiac reinjection studies using 201Tl. The maximum dose rates at 0.1 m were those from MUGA studies (167.3 microSv.h-1) and myocardial perfusion studies (one-day protocol = 391.7 microSv.h-1, two-day protocol = 121.8 microSv.h-1). The implications of these dose rates on both technical and nursing staff are assessed. Also, the dose received by an infant in close contact with a parent following a nuclear medicine investigation was estimated.

  3. Radiopharmaceuticals for radiation synovectomy: Evaluation of two yttrium-90 particulate agents

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.A.; Chinol, M.

    1989-06-01

    Radiation synovectomy, a noninvasive therapeutic alternative to surgical synovectomy, has not gained widespread acceptance in the United States because of the lack of a suitable radiopharmaceutical. Two new radioactive particles, (/sup 90/Y)Ca oxalate and (/sup 90/Y)ferric hydroxide macroaggregates (FHMA), were developed in our laboratory and evaluated for size, stability, and joint leakage. More than 90% of the (/sup 90/Y)Ca oxalate particles were in the optimal size range of 1-10 microns, and the unbound activity in serum and synovial fluid was 3.7% to 5.0%. Following injection in rabbit knees, leakage of (/sup 90/Y)Ca oxalate was 5 +/- 2%, with localization primarily in the bone and virtually no uptake by the lymph nodes or liver. Yttrium-90 FHMA particles were larger (95% greater than 10 microns), and at least on a microscopic level, appeared to distribute homogeneously over the articular surface. Leakage of (/sup 90/Y)FHMA was initially less but eventually slightly exceeded that of (/sup 90/Y)Ca oxalate. Nevertheless, both radiopharmaceuticals can provide a satisfactory therapeutic dose to the knee with less than half the leakage and a marked reduction in absorbed dose to nontarget tissues compared to previously tested agents. Ease of preparation, physical characteristics of the /sup 90/Y beta ray, and apparent lack of substantial leakage from the joint make these agents extremely attractive for clinical evaluation in rheumatoid arthritis patients who are unresponsive to medical therapy.

  4. Bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of prostate cancer with bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Jatinder; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) frequently have metastases to the bone, which may cause pain and lead to a deterioration in quality-of-life. Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals are agents which, when administered systemically, localize to the site of bone metastases and deliver focal radiation there. In this review, we will summarize the current literature on bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals for CRPC, focusing on strontium-89, samarium-153, rhenium-186 and radium-223. We will discuss their indications, clinical efficacy, and toxicities and highlight some of the challenges in optimizing treatment with these agents. Historically, clinical trials with these drugs have failed to demonstrate survival improvements, restricting their use for palliative purposes only. Radium-223 is the first agent in this class to show an overall survival advantage in CRPC patients with bone metastases. This landmark finding will likely have a considerable impact on the treatment paradigm of bone-metastatic CRPC, and will pave the way for further developments in the future. PMID:22521546

  5. 18F-Labeled Silicon-Based Fluoride Acceptors: Potential Opportunities for Novel Positron Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Bernard-Gauthier, Vadim; Wängler, Carmen; Wängler, Bjoern; Schirrmacher, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Background. Over the recent years, radiopharmaceutical chemistry has experienced a wide variety of innovative pushes towards finding both novel and unconventional radiochemical methods to introduce fluorine-18 into radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET). These “nonclassical” labeling methodologies based on silicon-, boron-, and aluminium-18F chemistry deviate from commonplace bonding of an [18F]fluorine atom (18F) to either an aliphatic or aromatic carbon atom. One method in particular, the silicon-fluoride-acceptor isotopic exchange (SiFA-IE) approach, invalidates a dogma in radiochemistry that has been widely accepted for many years: the inability to obtain radiopharmaceuticals of high specific activity (SA) via simple IE. Methodology. The most advantageous feature of IE labeling in general is that labeling precursor and labeled radiotracer are chemically identical, eliminating the need to separate the radiotracer from its precursor. SiFA-IE chemistry proceeds in dipolar aprotic solvents at room temperature and below, entirely avoiding the formation of radioactive side products during the IE. Scope of Review. A great plethora of different SiFA species have been reported in the literature ranging from small prosthetic groups and other compounds of low molecular weight to labeled peptides and most recently affibody molecules. Conclusions. The literature over the last years (from 2006 to 2014) shows unambiguously that SiFA-IE and other silicon-based fluoride acceptor strategies relying on 18F− leaving group substitutions have the potential to become a valuable addition to radiochemistry. PMID:25157357

  6. Binding Procurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the binding procurement process in purchasing Aerospace Flight Battery Systems. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) requested NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to develop a set of guideline requirements document for Binding Procurement Contracts.

  7. Novel Preclinical and Radiopharmaceutical Aspects of [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC: A New PET Tracer for Imaging of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Eder, Matthias; Neels, Oliver; Müller, Miriam; Bauder-Wüst, Ulrike; Remde, Yvonne; Schäfer, Martin; Hennrich, Ute; Eisenhut, Michael; Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Haberkorn, Uwe; Kopka, Klaus

    2014-06-30

    The detection of prostate cancer lesions by PET imaging of the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has gained highest clinical impact during the last years. 68Ga-labelled Glu-urea-Lys(Ahx)-HBED-CC ([68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC) represents a successful novel PSMA inhibitor radiotracer which has recently demonstrated its suitability in individual first-in-man studies. The radiometal chelator HBED-CC used in this molecule represents a rather rarely used acyclic complexing agent with chemical characteristics favourably influencing the biological functionality of the PSMA inhibitor. The simple replacement of HBED-CC by the prominent radiometal chelator DOTA was shown to dramatically reduce the in vivo imaging quality of the respective 68Ga-labelled PSMA-targeted tracer proving that HBED-CC contributes intrinsically to the PSMA binding of the Glu-urea-Lys(Ahx) pharmacophore. Owing to the obvious growing clinical impact, this work aims to reflect the properties of HBED-CC as acyclic radiometal chelator and presents novel preclinical data and relevant aspects of the radiopharmaceutical production process of [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC.

  8. Current activities in the ICRP concerning estimation of radiation doses to patients from radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.; Leide-Svegborn, S.; Liniecki, J.; Nosske, D.; Riklund, K.; Stabin, M.; Taylor, D.

    2011-09-01

    A Task Group within the ICRP Committees 2 and 3 is continuously working to improve absorbed dose estimates to patients investigated with radiopharmaceuticals. The work deals with reviews of the literature, initiation of new or complementary studies of the biokinetics of a compound and dose estimates. Absorbed dose calculations for organs and tissues have up to now been carried out using the MIRD formalism. There is still a lack of necessary biokinetic data from measurements in humans. More time series obtained by nuclear medicine imaging techniques such as whole-body planar gamma-camera imaging, SPECT or PET are highly desirable for this purpose. In 2008, a new addendum to ICRP Publication 53 was published under the name of ICRP Publication 106 containing biokinetic data and absorbed dose information to organs and tissues of patients of various ages for radiopharmaceuticals in common use. That report also covers a number of generic models and realistic maximum models covering other large groups of substances (e.g. "123I-brain receptor substances"). Together with ICRP Publication 80, most radiopharmaceuticals in clinical use at the time of publication were covered except the radioiodine labeled compounds for which the ICRP dose estimates are still found in Publication 53. There is an increasing use of new radiopharmaceuticals, especially PET-tracers and the TG has recently finished its work with biokinetic and dosimetric data for 18F-FET, 18F-FLT and 18F-choline. The work continues now with new data for 11C-raclopride, 11C-PiB and 123I-ioflupan as well as re-evaluation of published data for 82Rb-chloride, 18F-fluoride and radioiodide. This paper summarises published ICRP-information on dose to patients from radiopharmaceuticals and gives some preliminary data for substances under review.

  9. Improved dose-volume histogram estimates for radiopharmaceutical therapy by optimizing quantitative SPECT reconstruction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lishui; Hobbs, Robert F.; Segars, Paul W.; Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric C.

    2013-06-01

    In radiopharmaceutical therapy, an understanding of the dose distribution in normal and target tissues is important for optimizing treatment. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry takes into account patient anatomy and the nonuniform uptake of radiopharmaceuticals in tissues. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) provide a useful summary representation of the 3D dose distribution and have been widely used for external beam treatment planning. Reliable 3D dosimetry requires an accurate 3D radioactivity distribution as the input. However, activity distribution estimates from SPECT are corrupted by noise and partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we systematically investigated OS-EM based quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) image reconstruction in terms of its effect on DVHs estimates. A modified 3D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that incorporated a non-uniform kidney model and clinically realistic organ activities and biokinetics was used. Projections were generated using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation; noise effects were studied using 50 noise realizations with clinical count levels. Activity images were reconstructed using QSPECT with compensation for attenuation, scatter and collimator-detector response (CDR). Dose rate distributions were estimated by convolution of the activity image with a voxel S kernel. Cumulative DVHs were calculated from the phantom and QSPECT images and compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. We found that noise, PVEs, and ringing artifacts due to CDR compensation all degraded histogram estimates. Low-pass filtering and early termination of the iterative process were needed to reduce the effects of noise and ringing artifacts on DVHs, but resulted in increased degradations due to PVEs. Large objects with few features, such as the liver, had more accurate histogram estimates and required fewer iterations and more smoothing for optimal results. Smaller objects with fine details, such as the kidneys, required more iterations and less

  10. Scaling animal to human biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Pamela Ochoa; Veloza, Stella

    2016-07-01

    The radiotracer called 68Ga-labelled Glu-urea-Lys(Ahx)-HBED-CC ([68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC) is a novel radiophar-maceutical for the detection of prostate cancer lesions by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Setting up a cost-effective manual synthesis of this radiotracer and making its clinical translation in Colombia will require two important elements: the evaluation of the procedure to yield a consistent product, meeting standards of radio-chemical purity and low toxicity and then, the evaluation of the radiation dosimetry. In this paper a protocol to extrapolate the biokinetic model made in normal mice to humans by using the computer software for internal dose assessment OLINDA/EXM® is presented as an accurate and standardized method for the calculation of radiation dosimetry estimates.

  11. The growing impact of bioorthogonal click chemistry on the development of radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dexing; Zeglis, Brian M; Lewis, Jason S; Anderson, Carolyn J

    2013-06-01

    Click chemistry has become a ubiquitous chemical tool with applications in nearly all areas of modern chemistry, including drug discovery, bioconjugation, and nanoscience. Radiochemistry is no exception, as the canonical Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition, strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition, inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction, and other types of bioorthogonal click ligations have had a significant impact on the synthesis and development of radiopharmaceuticals. This review will focus on recent applications of click chemistry ligations in the preparation of imaging agents for SPECT and PET, including small molecules, peptides, and proteins labeled with radionuclides such as (18)F, (64)Cu, (111)In, and (99m)Tc.

  12. Highway accident involving radiopharmaceuticals near Brookhaven, Mississippi on December 3, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, P.B.; Mount, M.E.; Schwartz, M.W.

    1985-04-01

    A rear-end collision occurred between a passenger automobile and a luggage trailer carrying 84 packages, 76 of which contained radiopharmaceuticals, on US Highway 84 near Brookhaven, Mississippi on the afternoon of December 3, 1983. The purpose of this report is to document the mechanical circumstances of the accident, confirm the nature and quantity of radioactive materials involved, and assess the nature of the physical environment to which the packages were exposed and the response of the packages. The report consists of three major sections. The first deals wth the nature and circumstances of the accident and findings of fact. The second gives an accounting and description of the materials involved and the consequences of their exposure. The third gives an assessment and analysis of the mechanisms of damage and the conclusions which may be drawn from the investigation. 4 refs., 24 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Click-to-Chelate: development of technetium and rhenium-tricarbonyl labeled radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Kluba, Christiane A; Mindt, Thomas L

    2013-03-12

    The Click-to-Chelate approach is a highly efficient strategy for the radiolabeling of molecules of medicinal interest with technetium and rhenium-tricarbonyl cores. Reaction of azide-functionalized molecules with alkyne prochelators by the Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC; click reaction) enables the simultaneous synthesis and conjugation of tridentate chelating systems for the stable complexation of the radiometals. In many cases, the functionalization of (bio)molecules with the ligand system and radiolabeling can be achieved by convenient one-pot procedures. Since its first report in 2006, Click-to-Chelate has been applied to the development of numerous novel radiotracers with promising potential for translation into the clinic. This review summarizes the use of the Click-to-Chelate approach in radiopharmaceutical sciences and provides a perspective for future applications.

  14. Evaluation of alternative rapid thin layer chromatography systems for quality control of technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Mang'era, Kennedy; Wong, Derek; Douglas, David; Franz, Kellie; Biru, Taddese

    2014-04-01

    Whatman 3MM™ and Tec-Control™ systems were evaluated as ITLC-SG alternatives for 99mTc-radiopharmaceuticals. They compare well in accuracy and reproducibility, and are faster and more convenient than ITLC-SG. Tec-Control™ radiochemical purity values for 99mTc-sestamibi were more conservative than ITLC-SG. Full solvent migration was not reproduced for 99mTc-tetrofosmin in Tec-Control™, and for this Whatman 3MM™ is preferred. Developing times were 10-15 min, 7-9 min and ~1min for ITLC-SG, Whatman 3MM™ and Tec-Control™, respectively. Overall, Tec-Control™ strips are preferred due to speed and ease of use.

  15. Cage-like bifunctional chelators, copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals and PET imaging using the same

    DOEpatents

    Conti, Peter S.; Cai, Hancheng; Li, Zibo; Liu, Shuanglong

    2016-08-02

    Disclosed is a class of versatile Sarcophagine based bifunctional chelators (BFCs) containing a hexa-aza cage for labeling with metals having either imaging, therapeutic or contrast applications radiolabeling and one or more linkers (A) and (B). The compounds have the general formula ##STR00001## where A is a functional group selected from group consisting of an amine, a carboxylic acid, an ester, a carbonyl, a thiol, an azide and an alkene, and B is a functional group selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, an amine, a carboxylic acid, and ester, a carbonyl, a thiol, an azide and an alkene. Also disclosed are conjugate of the BFC and a targeting moiety, which may be a peptide or antibody. Also disclosed are metal complexes of the BFC/targeting moiety conjugates that are useful as radiopharmaceuticals, imaging agents or contrast agents.

  16. Copper complexes of bis(thiosemicarbazones): from chemotherapeutics to diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Brett M; Donnelly, Paul S

    2011-05-01

    The molecules known as bis(thiosemicarbazones) derived from 1,2-diones can act as tetradentate ligands for Cu(II), forming stable, neutral complexes. As a family, these complexes possess fascinating biological activity. This critical review presents an historical perspective of their progression from potential chemotherapeutics through to more recent applications in nuclear medicine. Methods of synthesis are presented followed by studies focusing on their potential application as anti-cancer agents and more recent investigations into their potential as therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease. The Cu(II) complexes are of sufficient stability to be used to coordinate copper radioisotopes for application in diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Detailed understanding of the coordination chemistry has allowed careful manipulation of the metal based properties to engineer specific biological activities. Perhaps the most promising complex radiolabelled with copper radioisotopes to date is Cu(II)(atsm), which has progressed to clinical trials in humans (162 references).

  17. Design Features Of Microfluidic Reactor For [18F]FDG Radiopharmaceutical Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, J. H.; Lee, B. N.; Nam, K. R.; Attla, G. A.; Lee, K. C.; Cjai, J. S.

    2011-06-01

    Microfluidic reactor exhibits advantages for radiopharmaceutical synthesis. Microfluidic chips can reduce the time for radiosynthesis using tiny quantities of chemical compounds. It also has a good heat transfer, performance and provides an integrated system including synthesis, separation, and purification. These advantages make FDG production. So we have designed a microreactor chip which included the whole chemical processing; water evaporation, solvent exchange, radiofluorination and so on. It was designed by using a commercial 3D CAD modeling program CATIA V5, heat transfer performance was analyzed by ANSYS, and CFX was used for analyzing fluid performance. This paper described the design of FDG synthesis system on a microchip, the relevant locations of its parts, both heat and fluid performance efficiency analysis.

  18. Copper complexes of bis(thiosemicarbazones): from chemotherapeutics to diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Brett M; Donnelly, Paul S

    2011-05-01

    The molecules known as bis(thiosemicarbazones) derived from 1,2-diones can act as tetradentate ligands for Cu(II), forming stable, neutral complexes. As a family, these complexes possess fascinating biological activity. This critical review presents an historical perspective of their progression from potential chemotherapeutics through to more recent applications in nuclear medicine. Methods of synthesis are presented followed by studies focusing on their potential application as anti-cancer agents and more recent investigations into their potential as therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease. The Cu(II) complexes are of sufficient stability to be used to coordinate copper radioisotopes for application in diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Detailed understanding of the coordination chemistry has allowed careful manipulation of the metal based properties to engineer specific biological activities. Perhaps the most promising complex radiolabelled with copper radioisotopes to date is Cu(II)(atsm), which has progressed to clinical trials in humans (162 references). PMID:21409228

  19. Differential renal function in unilateral renal injury: possible effects of radiopharmaceutical choice. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A. Jr.; Lallone, R.

    1985-01-01

    An abnormal filtration fraction or a significant divergence between a kidney's ability to extract Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and other function parameters, such as the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or the effective renal plasma flow (ERPF, could lead to different estimates of relative or absolute renal function, depending on the radiopharmaceutical administered. To evaluate this possible divergence, the authors measured the relative GFR (I-125 iothalamate), ERPF (I-131 hippurate), and Tc-99m DMSA accumulation in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with unilateral ureteral obstruction or unilateral ischemia at various times after renal injury. The relative ERPF of the obstructed kidney was significantly greater than the relative GFR at all time periods studied; significant but less dramatic differences were noted comparing DMSA with GFR in obstruction and DMSA and ERPF with GRF in ischemia.

  20. Complexation study on no-carrier-added astatine with insulin: a candidate radiopharmaceutical.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Susanta; Roy, Kamalika; Sen, Souvik

    2008-12-01

    No-carrier-added astatine radionuclides produced in the (7)Li-irradiated lead matrix were separated from bulk lead nitrate target by complexing At with insulin, followed by dialysis. The method offers simultaneous separation of At from lead as well as its complexation with insulin. The At-insulin complex might be a potential radiopharmaceutical in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. The stability of At-insulin complex was checked by dialysis against deionized water and Ringer lactate (RL) solution. It has been found that the half-life of At-insulin complex is about approximately 12h, when dialyzed against deionized water and is only 6h, when dialyzed against RL solution having the same composition as blood serum. The 6h half-life of this Insulin-At complex is perfect for killing cancer cells from external cell surfaces as the half-life of internalization of insulin molecule inside the cell is 7-12h.

  1. In vivo nanoparticle-mediated radiopharmaceutical-excited fluorescence molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhenhua; Qu, Yawei; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zha, Jiali; Song, Tianming; Bao, Chengpeng; Liu, Haixiao; Wang, Zhongliang; Wang, Jing; Liu, Zhongyu; Liu, Haifeng; Tian, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging utilizes visible photons emitted from radiopharmaceuticals to achieve in vivo optical molecular-derived signals. Since Cerenkov radiation is weak, non-optimum for tissue penetration and continuous regardless of biological interactions, it is challenging to detect this signal with a diagnostic dose. Therefore, it is challenging to achieve useful activated optical imaging for the acquisition of direct molecular information. Here we introduce a novel imaging strategy, which converts γ and Cerenkov radiation from radioisotopes into fluorescence through europium oxide nanoparticles. After a series of imaging studies, we demonstrate that this approach provides strong optical signals with high signal-to-background ratios, an ideal tissue penetration spectrum and activatable imaging ability. In comparison with present imaging techniques, it detects tumour lesions with low radioactive tracer uptake or small tumour lesions more effectively. We believe it will facilitate the development of nuclear and optical molecular imaging for new, highly sensitive imaging applications. PMID:26123615

  2. Overview and perspectives on automation strategies in (68)Ga radiopharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Boschi, Stefano; Malizia, Claudio; Lodi, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    The renaissance of (68)Ga radiopharmacy has led to great advances in automation technology. The availability of a highly efficient, reliable, long-lived (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator system along with a well-established coordination chemistry based on bifunctional chelating agents have been the bases of this development in (68)Ga radiopharmacy. Syntheses of (68)Ga peptides were originally performed by manual or semiautomated systems, but increasing clinical demand, radioprotection, and regulatory issues have driven extensive automation of their production process. Several automated systems, based on different post-processing of the (68)Ga generator eluate, on different engineering, and on fixed tubing or disposable cassette approaches, have been developed and are discussed in this chapter. Since automatic systems for preparation of radiopharmaceuticals should comply with qualification and validation protocols established by regulations such as current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) and local regulations, some regulatory issues and the more relevant qualification protocols are also discussed.

  3. Theranostic Radiopharmaceuticals Based on Gold Nanoparticles Labeled with (177)Lu and Conjugated to Peptides.

    PubMed

    Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Ocampo-García, Blanca E; Santos-Cuevas, Clara L; de María Ramírez, Flor; Azorín-Vega, Erika P; Meléndez-Alafort, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been proposed for a variety of medical applications such as localized heat sources for cancer treatment and drug delivery systems. The conjugation of peptides to AuNPs produces stable multimeric systems with target-specific molecular recognition. Lutetium- 177 ((177)Lu) has been successfully used in peptide radionuclide therapy. Recently, (177)Lu-AuNPs conjugated to different peptides have been proposed as a new class of theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. These radioconjugates may function simultaneously as molecular imaging agents, radiotherapy systems and thermal-ablation systems. This article covers advancements in the design, synthesis, physicochemical characterization, molecular recognition assessment and preclinical therapeutic efficacy of gold nanoparticles radiolabeled with (177)Lu and conjugated to RGD (-Arg-Gly-Asp-), Lys(3)-Bombesin and Tat(49-57) peptides.

  4. Effect of altered thyroid status on the transport of hepatobiliary radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Pahuja, D.N.; Noronha, O.P.

    1985-10-01

    The effect of induced hypothyroidism (by feeding an antithyroid drug-propylthiouracil) on the transport and clearance of the routinely used hepatobiliary radiopharmaceuticals--radioiodinated iodine- T (131I) rose bengal and technetium-99m-N-(4-n-butylphenylcarbamoylmethyl) iminodiacetate, was studied in the rats. Hypothyroidism was associated with depressed growth and retarded clearance of these radiotracers from the in vivo system. Treatment of the hypothyroid rats with thyroxine (2-5 micrograms/100 g b.w. day) for 6 wk, restored these parameters towards normal values. These data suggest that delayed clearance of these hepatobiliary tracers could be related to reduced metabolic rate accompanied with the hypotonia and hypomotility of intestine normally observed in the hypothyroid state.

  5. The role of coordination chemistry in the development of copper and rhenium radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Paul S

    2011-02-01

    There are several isotopes of copper and rhenium that are of interest in the development of new molecular imaging or radiotherapeutic agents. This perspective article highlights the role of coordination chemistry in the design of copper and rhenium radiopharmaceuticals engineered to selectively target tissue of interest such as cancer cells or pathological features associated with Alzheimer's disease. The coordination chemistry of copper bis(thiosemicarbazone) derivatives and copper macrocyclic complexes is discussed in terms of their potential application as targeted positron emission tomography tracers for non-invasive diagnostic imaging. A range of rhenium complexes with different ligands with rhenium in different oxidation states are introduced and their potential to be translated to new radiotherapeutic agents discussed.

  6. Theranostic Radiopharmaceuticals Based on Gold Nanoparticles Labeled with (177)Lu and Conjugated to Peptides.

    PubMed

    Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Ocampo-García, Blanca E; Santos-Cuevas, Clara L; de María Ramírez, Flor; Azorín-Vega, Erika P; Meléndez-Alafort, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been proposed for a variety of medical applications such as localized heat sources for cancer treatment and drug delivery systems. The conjugation of peptides to AuNPs produces stable multimeric systems with target-specific molecular recognition. Lutetium- 177 ((177)Lu) has been successfully used in peptide radionuclide therapy. Recently, (177)Lu-AuNPs conjugated to different peptides have been proposed as a new class of theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. These radioconjugates may function simultaneously as molecular imaging agents, radiotherapy systems and thermal-ablation systems. This article covers advancements in the design, synthesis, physicochemical characterization, molecular recognition assessment and preclinical therapeutic efficacy of gold nanoparticles radiolabeled with (177)Lu and conjugated to RGD (-Arg-Gly-Asp-), Lys(3)-Bombesin and Tat(49-57) peptides. PMID:25771363

  7. Implementation and validation of collapsed cone superposition for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Garcia, Manuel; Gardin, Isabelle; Lebtahi, Rachida; Dieudonné, Arnaud

    2015-10-01

    Two collapsed cone (CC) superposition algorithms have been implemented for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters. The straight CC (SCC) superposition method uses a water energy deposition kernel (EDKw) for each electron, positron and photon components, while the primary and scatter CC (PSCC) superposition method uses different EDKw for primary and once-scattered photons. PSCC was implemented only for photons originating from the nucleus, precluding its application to positron emitters. EDKw are linearly scaled by radiological distance, taking into account tissue density heterogeneities. The implementation was tested on 100, 300 and 600 keV mono-energetic photons and 18F, 99mTc, 131I and 177Lu. The kernels were generated using the Monte Carlo codes MCNP and EGSnrc. The validation was performed on 6 phantoms representing interfaces between soft-tissues, lung and bone. The figures of merit were γ (3%, 3 mm) and γ (5%, 5 mm) criterions corresponding to the computation comparison on 80 absorbed doses (AD) points per phantom between Monte Carlo simulations and CC algorithms. PSCC gave better results than SCC for the lowest photon energy (100 keV). For the 3 isotopes computed with PSCC, the percentage of AD points satisfying the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion was always over 99%. A still good but worse result was found with SCC, since at least 97% of AD-values verified the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion, except a value of 57% for the 99mTc with the lung/bone interface. The CC superposition method for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry is a good alternative to Monte Carlo simulations while reducing computation complexity.

  8. Implementation and validation of collapsed cone superposition for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Garcia, Manuel; Gardin, Isabelle; Lebtahi, Rachida; Dieudonné, Arnaud

    2015-10-21

    Two collapsed cone (CC) superposition algorithms have been implemented for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters. The straight CC (SCC) superposition method uses a water energy deposition kernel (EDKw) for each electron, positron and photon components, while the primary and scatter CC (PSCC) superposition method uses different EDKw for primary and once-scattered photons. PSCC was implemented only for photons originating from the nucleus, precluding its application to positron emitters. EDKw are linearly scaled by radiological distance, taking into account tissue density heterogeneities. The implementation was tested on 100, 300 and 600 keV mono-energetic photons and (18)F, (99m)Tc, (131)I and (177)Lu. The kernels were generated using the Monte Carlo codes MCNP and EGSnrc. The validation was performed on 6 phantoms representing interfaces between soft-tissues, lung and bone. The figures of merit were γ (3%, 3 mm) and γ (5%, 5 mm) criterions corresponding to the computation comparison on 80 absorbed doses (AD) points per phantom between Monte Carlo simulations and CC algorithms. PSCC gave better results than SCC for the lowest photon energy (100 keV). For the 3 isotopes computed with PSCC, the percentage of AD points satisfying the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion was always over 99%. A still good but worse result was found with SCC, since at least 97% of AD-values verified the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion, except a value of 57% for the (99m)Tc with the lung/bone interface. The CC superposition method for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry is a good alternative to Monte Carlo simulations while reducing computation complexity. PMID:26406778

  9. [A new radiopharmaceutical for bone imaging: experimental study of 99mTc-HEDTMP].

    PubMed

    Hu, Shu; Deng, Houfu; Jiang, Shubin; Luo, Shunzhong; Lei, Yong

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to prepare 99mTc-HEDTMP [N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethlenediamine-1,1,2-tri (methylene phosphonic acid), a new kind of bone seeking compound; to investigate its biological properties; and to explore the possibility of using it as a potential radiopharmaceutical for skeleton scintigraphy. HEDTMP was labeled with 99mTc by "pretinning" method, the radiochemical purity was 97.00% +/- 0.34%. 99mTc-HEDTMP was found to be stable in 5 hours in vitro with the radiochemical purity over 95% even after being diluted by physiological saline with the factor of dilution 100. The plane bone scanning of rabbits showed that 99mTc-HEDTMP was principally absorbed by skeletal system. Skull, spine and legs could be observed clearly, and were more legible than the images of 99mTc-MDP. Mice trial also indicated the high bone seeking of 99mTc-HEDTMP. The skeletal uptake was 11.92% ID/g, 13.19% ID/g, 10.14% ID/g, 10.04% ID/g, 7.71% ID/g separately at 30 minutes, 1 hour, 3 hours, 6 hours and 24 hours after the injection. Kidney seemed to be the major excretory organ. The clearance of blood was quick and the retaining amount in non-target organs was small. These results indicate that 99mTc-HEDTMP can be prepared easily, and its biological properties can be compared favorably with the commonly used bone imaging agent, and it is well worth further researching as a promising potential radiopharmaceutical in nuclide diagnosis for skeleton diseases. PMID:20842850

  10. (177) Lu-5-Fluorouracil a potential theranostic radiopharmaceutical: radiosynthesis, quality control, biodistribution, and scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Rashid; Tariq, Saleha; Naqvi, Syed Ali Raza; Gillani, Syed Jawad Hussain; Rizvi, Faheem Askari; Sajid, Muhammad; Rasheed, Shahid

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to develop (177) Lu-5-Flourouracil as a potential cancer therapeutic radiopharmaceutical. 5-Flourouracil (5-FU) is widely accepted as an anticancer drug of broad spectrum fame. The labeling of 5-FU was carried out at different set of experimental conditions using high specific activity of (177) LuCl3 . The optimum conditions for maximum radiochemical yield was set: 5-FU (5 mg), (177) LuCl3 (185 MBq), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (10 µg), reaction volume (2 mL), pH (5.5), temperature (80°C), and reaction time (20 min). The radiochemical labeling was assessed with Whatman No. 2 paper, instant thin layer chromatographic, and radio-HPLC, which revealed >94% labeling results with sufficient stability up to 6 h. Serum stability study also showed (177) Lu-5-FU promising stability. Biodistribution study in normal rats and rabbits showed liver, stomach, kidney, and heart as area of increased tracer accumulation just after injection, which decreased to 1.4%, 0.4%, 0.2%, and 0.39% ID/g, respectively, after 72 h. Glomerular filtration rate and cytotoxicity study results of (177) Lu-5-FU showed it had no adverse effect on renal function and nontoxic to blood cells. The promising characteristics of (177) Lu-5-FU, that is, clever elimination from kidney and nontoxic nature toward blood cells make it the radiopharmaceutical for further testing in patients for therapeutic purposes. PMID:27444959

  11. Implementation and validation of collapsed cone superposition for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Garcia, Manuel; Gardin, Isabelle; Lebtahi, Rachida; Dieudonné, Arnaud

    2015-10-21

    Two collapsed cone (CC) superposition algorithms have been implemented for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters. The straight CC (SCC) superposition method uses a water energy deposition kernel (EDKw) for each electron, positron and photon components, while the primary and scatter CC (PSCC) superposition method uses different EDKw for primary and once-scattered photons. PSCC was implemented only for photons originating from the nucleus, precluding its application to positron emitters. EDKw are linearly scaled by radiological distance, taking into account tissue density heterogeneities. The implementation was tested on 100, 300 and 600 keV mono-energetic photons and (18)F, (99m)Tc, (131)I and (177)Lu. The kernels were generated using the Monte Carlo codes MCNP and EGSnrc. The validation was performed on 6 phantoms representing interfaces between soft-tissues, lung and bone. The figures of merit were γ (3%, 3 mm) and γ (5%, 5 mm) criterions corresponding to the computation comparison on 80 absorbed doses (AD) points per phantom between Monte Carlo simulations and CC algorithms. PSCC gave better results than SCC for the lowest photon energy (100 keV). For the 3 isotopes computed with PSCC, the percentage of AD points satisfying the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion was always over 99%. A still good but worse result was found with SCC, since at least 97% of AD-values verified the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion, except a value of 57% for the (99m)Tc with the lung/bone interface. The CC superposition method for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry is a good alternative to Monte Carlo simulations while reducing computation complexity.

  12. A Treatment Planning Method for Sequentially Combining Radiopharmaceutical Therapy and External Radiation Therapy;External beam therapy; Radiopharmaceutical therapy; Three-dimensional dosimetry; Treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, Robert F.; McNutt, Todd; Baechler, Sebastien; He Bin; Esaias, Caroline E.; Frey, Eric C.; Loeb, David M.; Wahl, Richard L.; Shokek, Ori; Sgouros, George

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Effective cancer treatment generally requires combination therapy. The combination of external beam therapy (XRT) with radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) requires accurate three-dimensional dose calculations to avoid toxicity and evaluate efficacy. We have developed and tested a treatment planning method, using the patient-specific three-dimensional dosimetry package 3D-RD, for sequentially combined RPT/XRT therapy designed to limit toxicity to organs at risk. Methods and Materials: The biologic effective dose (BED) was used to translate voxelized RPT absorbed dose (D{sub RPT}) values into a normalized total dose (or equivalent 2-Gy-fraction XRT absorbed dose), NTD{sub RPT} map. The BED was calculated numerically using an algorithmic approach, which enabled a more accurate calculation of BED and NTD{sub RPT}. A treatment plan from the combined Samarium-153 and external beam was designed that would deliver a tumoricidal dose while delivering no more than 50 Gy of NTD{sub sum} to the spinal cord of a patient with a paraspinal tumor. Results: The average voxel NTD{sub RPT} to tumor from RPT was 22.6 Gy (range, 1-85 Gy); the maximum spinal cord voxel NTD{sub RPT} from RPT was 6.8 Gy. The combined therapy NTD{sub sum} to tumor was 71.5 Gy (range, 40-135 Gy) for a maximum voxel spinal cord NTD{sub sum} equal to the maximum tolerated dose of 50 Gy. Conclusions: A method that enables real-time treatment planning of combined RPT-XRT has been developed. By implementing a more generalized conversion between the dose values from the two modalities and an activity-based treatment of partial volume effects, the reliability of combination therapy treatment planning has been expanded.

  13. A new approach to the analysis of radiopharmaceuticals. Final technical report, January 15, 1987--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.G.; Davison, A.; Costello, C.E.

    1998-03-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate analytical techniques that could be used in the study of both the basic chemistry and the radiopharmaceutical chemistry of {sup 99m}Tc. First funded in 1981, the work focused initially upon the use of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and various forms of mass spectrometry for the identification of technetium species. This funding allowed the authors to combine HPLC and mass spectrometry to identify radiopharmaceuticals which, although in clinical use, had not previously been characterized. Other techniques that have been examined include resonance Raman spectroscopy and, more significantly, {sup 99}Tc nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), with the latter not only being used in purely chemical experiments but also in biologic studies. In 1985 a grant to the Department of Chemistry at MIT from DOE allowed the purchase of an X-ray diffractometer and access to this instrument has enabled them to broaden the analytical base with routine structural determinations.

  14. What is currently the best radiopharmaceutical for the hybrid PET/CT detection of recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Slavikova, K; Montravers, F; Treglia, G; Kunikowska, J; Kaliska, L; Vereb, M; Talbot, J N; Balogova, S

    2013-06-01

    Among thyroid malignancies, medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) has some very specific features. Production and secretion of large amounts of peptides occur in malignant transformed C cells with few exceptions, leading to high serum levels of calcitonin (Ctn) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), that act after thyroidectomy as tumour markers warning for the presence of persistent or metastatic MTC. The availability of those serum biomarkers with an excellent sensitivity challenges medical imaging to localise the recurrent cancer tissue, since surgery is a major therapeutic option. The aims of this article are (i) to review literature evidence about the efficacy and tolerance of radiopharmaceuticals for 3 targets of PET/CT imaging (glucose metabolism, bioamines metabolism and somatostatin receptors) and also bone scintigraphy which is recommended in the Guidelines of European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO; (ii) to compare the availability and the costs in relation with those radiopharmaceuticals, (iii) and to discuss a possible sequence of those examinations, in order to optimise spending and to minimise the overall radiation dose. In this context of recurrent MTC suspected on rising tumour markers levels after thyroidectomy, this survey of literature confirms that FDOPA is the best radiopharmaceutical for PET/CT with significant diagnostic performance if Ctn>150 pg/mL; an early image acquisition starting during the first 15 min is advised. In negative cases, FDG should be the next PET radiopharmaceutical, in particular if Ctn and CEA levels are rapidly rising, and PET with a somatostatin analogue labelled with gallium-68 when neither FDOPA nor FDG PET are conclusive. Bone scintigraphy could complement FDG-PET/CT if FDOPA is not available.

  15. (18)F-labeled positron emission tomographic radiopharmaceuticals in oncology: an overview of radiochemistry and mechanisms of tumor localization.

    PubMed

    Vallabhajosula, Shankar

    2007-11-01

    Molecular imaging is the visualization, characterization, and measurement of biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels in a living system. At present, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is one the most rapidly growing areas of medical imaging, with many applications in the clinical management of patients with cancer. Although [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT imaging provides high specificity and sensitivity in several kinds of cancer and has many applications, it is important to recognize that FDG is not a "specific" radiotracer for imaging malignant disease. Highly "tumor-specific" and "tumor cell signal-specific" PET radiopharmaceuticals are essential to meet the growing demand of radioisotope-based molecular imaging technology. In the last 15 years, many alternative PET tracers have been proposed and evaluated in preclinical and clinical studies to characterize the tumor biology more appropriately. The potential clinical utility of several (18)F-labeled radiotracers (eg, fluoride, FDOPA, FLT, FMISO, FES, and FCH) is being reviewed by several investigators in this issue. An overview of design and development of (18)F-labeled PET radiopharmaceuticals, radiochemistry, and mechanism(s) of tumor cell uptake and localization of radiotracers are presented here. The approval of clinical indications for FDG-PET in the year 2000 by the Food and Drug Administration, based on a review of literature, was a major breakthrough to the rapid incorporation of PET into nuclear medicine practice, particularly in oncology. Approval of a radiopharmaceutical typically involves submission of a "New Drug Application" by a manufacturer or a company clearly documenting 2 major aspects of the drug: (1) manufacturing of PET drug using current good manufacturing practices and (2) the safety and effectiveness of a drug with specific indications. The potential routine clinical utility of (18)F-labeled PET radiopharmaceuticals depends also on

  16. Production and Clinical Applications of Radiopharmaceuticals and Medical Radioisotopes in Iran.

    PubMed

    Jalilian, Amir Reza; Beiki, Davood; Hassanzadeh-Rad, Arman; Eftekhari, Arash; Geramifar, Parham; Eftekhari, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    During past 3 decades, nuclear medicine has flourished as vibrant and independent medical specialty in Iran. Since that time, more than 200 nuclear physicians have been trained and now practicing in nearly 158 centers throughout the country. In the same period, Tc-99m generators and variety of cold kits for conventional nuclear medicine were locally produced for the first time. Local production has continued to mature in robust manner while fulfilling international standards. To meet the ever-growing demand at the national level and with international achievements in mind, work for production of other Tc-99m-based peptides such as ubiquicidin, bombesin, octreotide, and more recently a kit formulation for Tc-99m TRODAT-1 for clinical use was introduced. Other than the Tehran Research Reactor, the oldest facility active in production of medical radioisotopes, there is one commercial and three hospital-based cyclotrons currently operational in the country. I-131 has been one of the oldest radioisotope produced in Iran and traditionally used for treatment of thyrotoxicosis and differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Since 2009, (131)I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine has been locally available for diagnostic applications. Gallium-67 citrate, thallium-201 thallous chloride, and Indium-111 in the form of DTPA and Oxine are among the early cyclotron-produced tracers available in Iran for about 2 decades. Rb-81/Kr-81m generator has been available for pulmonary ventilation studies since 1996. Experimental production of PET radiopharmaceuticals began in 1998. This work has culminated with development and optimization of the high-scale production line of (18)F-FDG shortly after installation of PET/CT scanner in 2012. In the field of therapy, other than the use of old timers such as I-131 and different forms of P-32, there has been quite a significant advancement in production and application of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals in recent years. Application of (131)I

  17. Molecular imaging of cancer with copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals and positron emission tomography (PET).

    PubMed

    Shokeen, Monica; Anderson, Carolyn J

    2009-07-21

    Molecular imaging has evolved over the past several years into an important tool for diagnosing, understanding, and monitoring disease. Molecular imaging has distinguished itself as an interdisciplinary field, with contributions from chemistry, biology, physics, and medicine. The cross-disciplinary impetus has led to significant achievements, such as the development of more sensitive imaging instruments and robust, safer radiopharmaceuticals, thereby providing more choices to fit personalized medical needs. Molecular imaging is making steadfast progress in the field of cancer research among others. Cancer is a challenging disease, characterized by heterogeneity, uncontrolled cell division, and the ability of cancer cells to invade other tissues. Researchers are addressing these challenges by aggressively identifying and studying key cancer-specific biomarkers such as growth factor receptors, protein kinases, cell adhesion molecules, and proteases, as well as cancer-related biological processes such as hypoxia, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. Positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used by clinicians in the United States as a diagnostic molecular imaging tool. Small-animal PET systems that can image rodents and generate reconstructed images in a noninvasive manner (with a resolution as low as 1 mm) have been developed and are used frequently, facilitating radiopharmaceutical development and drug discovery. Currently, [(18)F]-labeled 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is the only PET radiotracer used for routine clinical evaluation (primarily for oncological imaging). There is now increasing interest in nontraditional positron-emitting radionuclides, particularly those of the transition metals, for imaging with PET because of increased production and availability. Copper-based radionuclides are currently being extensively evaluated because they offer a varying range of half-lives and positron energies. For example, the half-life (12.7 h) and decay properties (beta(+), 0

  18. Cardiac blood-pool scintigraphy in rats and hamsters: comparison of five radiopharmaceuticals and three pinhole collimator apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Pieri, P.; Fischman, A.J.; Ahmad, M.; Moore, R.H.; Callahan, R.J.; Strauss, H.W. )

    1991-05-01

    Preclinical evaluation of cardiac drugs may require evaluation of cardiac function in intact animals. To optimize the quality of radionuclide measurements of ventricular function in small animals, a comparison was made of gated blood-pool scans recorded with five blood-pool radiopharmaceuticals ({sup 99}mTc-labeled human polyclonal IgG, {sup 99}mTc-human serum albumin labeled by two methods, and red blood cells radiolabeled with {sup 99}mTc via in vivo and in vitro methods) in rats and three pinhole apertures in hamsters. The quality of the radiopharmaceuticals was evaluated by comparing count density ratios (LV/BACKGROUND and LV/LIVER) and ejection fractions recorded with each agent. The edge definition of the left ventricle and count rate performance of the 1-, 2-, and 3-mm apertures was evaluated in hamsters. In general, the images obtained with the radiolabeled cells were superior to those obtained with the labeled proteins and no significant differences between the protein preparations were detected. Left ventricular ejection fractions calculated with all five radiopharmaceuticals were not significantly different. The best quality images were obtained with the 1-mm pinhole collimator. Ejection fraction and acquisition time were inversely related to aperture size. A good compromise between resolution and sensitivity was obtained with the 2-mm pinhole collimator.

  19. Development of more efficacious [Tc]-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, W.R.

    1993-05-03

    This research program is detailed at development of more efficacious technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals for use as imaging agents in diagnostic nuclear medicine. We seek to isolate and develop distinct site imaging agents to provide diagnostic information concerning a given pathological condition. Analytical techniques are being developed to enable complete analysis of radiopharmaceutical preparations so that individual complexes can be characterized with respect to imaging efficacy and to enable a radiopharmaceutical to be monitored after injection into a test animal to determine the species that actually accumulates in an organ to provide the image. Administration of the isolated, single most effective imaging complex, rather than a mixture of technetium-containing complexes, wi-11 minimize radiation exposure to the patient and maximize diagnostic information available to the clinician. This report specifically describes the development of capillary electrophoresis (CE) for characterizating diphosphonate skeletal imaging agents. Advances in the development of electrochemical and fiber optic sensors for Tc and Re imaging agents are described. These sensors will ultimately be capable of monitoring a specific chemical state of an imaging agent in vivo after injection into a test animal by implantation in the organ of interest.

  20. New rhenium complexes with ciprofloxacin as useful models for understanding the properties of [99mTc]-ciprofloxacin radiopharmaceutical.

    PubMed

    Lecina, Joan; Cortés, Pilar; Llagostera, Montserrat; Piera, Carlos; Suades, Joan

    2014-07-01

    Rhenium complexes with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin have been prepared to be studied as models of technetium radiopharmaceuticals. With this aim, the new rhenium complexes 1 {[ReO(Cpf)2]Cl}, 2 {[ReO(CpfH)2]Cl3} and 3 {fac-[Re(CO)3(H2O)(Cpf)]} with ciprofloxacin (CpfH=ciprofloxacin; Cpf=conjugated base of ciprofloxacin) have been synthesised and characterised by elemental analyses, IR, NMR ((1)H, (19)F and (13)C CP-MAS) spectroscopy, as well as MS measurements. All spectroscopic data are consistent with the coordination of ciprofloxacin in all these complexes through the carbonyl and the carboxylate oxygen atoms with the formation of a six member chelate ring. The study of a Tc-ciprofloxacin solution by ESI-MS reveals the presence of [TcO(Cpf)2](+) cations, which agrees with the hypothesis that complexes 1 and 2 can be seen as model rhenium complexes of this radiopharmaceutical. Antimicrobial and DNA gyrase inhibition studies performed with complexes 2 and 3 have shown a very similar behaviour between complex 2 and the free antibiotic, whereas complex 3 exhibit a lower antimicrobial activity. Based on a joint analysis of the data reported in the literature and the chemical and biological results obtained in this study, a tentative proposal to explain some aspects of the behaviour of Tc-ciprofloxacin radiopharmaceutical has been made.

  1. Experimental study of radiopharmaceuticals based on technetium-99m labeled derivative of glucose for tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeltchan, R.; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Bragina, O.; Chernov, V.; Stasyuk, E.; Rogov, A.; Il'ina, E.; Larionova, L.; Skuridin, V.; Dergilev, A.

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: to study the potential utility of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc for cancer imaging in laboratory animals. Materials and method: the study was carried out in cell cultures of normal CHO (Chinese hamster ovary cells CHO) and malignant tissues MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7). To evaluate the uptake of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in normal and tumor tissue cells, 25 MBq of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc was added to the vials with 3 million cells and incubated for 30 minutes at room temperature. After centrifugation of the vials with cells, the supernatant was removed. Radioactivity in vials with normal and tumor cells was then measured. In addition, the study included 40 mice of C57B 1/6j lines with tumor lesion of the right femur. For neoplastic lesions, Lewis lung carcinoma model was used. Following anesthesia, mice were injected intravenously with 25MBq of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose. Planar scintigraphy was performed 15 minutes later in a matrix of 512x512 pixels for 5 minutes. Results: when measuring the radioactivity of normal and malignant cells after incubation with 99mTc-1-thio-D- glucose, it was found that the radioactivity of malignant cells was higher than that of normal cells. The mean values of radioactivity levels in normal and malignant cells were 0.3±0.15MBq and 1.07±0.6MBq, respectively. All examined animals had increased accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio- D-glucose at the tumor site. The accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the tumor was on average twice as high as compared to the symmetric region. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose is a prospective radiopharmaceutical for cancer visualization. In addition, high accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the culture of cancer cells and in tumor tissue of animals demonstrates tumor tropism of the radiopharmaceutical.

  2. Study of potential utility of new radiopharmaceuticals based on technetium-99m labeled derivative of glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeltchan, R.; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Chernov, V.; Stasyuk, E.; Rogov, A.; Il'ina, E.; Larionova, L.; Skuridin, V.

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: to study the potential utility of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc for cancer imaging in laboratory animals. Materials and method: the study was carried out in cell cultures of normal CHO (Chinese hamster ovary cells CHO) and malignant tissues MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7). To evaluate the uptake of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in normal and tumor tissue cells, 25 MBq of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc was added to the vials with 3 million cells and incubated for 30 min at room temperature. After centrifugation of the vials with cells, the supernatant was removed. The radioactivity in vials with normal and tumor cells was then measured. In addition, the study included 40 mice of C57B1/6j lines with tumor lesion of the right femur. For neoplastic lesions, Lewis lung carcinoma model was used. Following anesthesia, mice were injected intravenously with 25 MBq of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose. Planar scintigraphy was performed 15 minutes later in a matrix of 512x512 pixels for 5 min. Results: when measuring the radioactivity of normal and malignant cells after incubation with 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose, it was found that the radioactivity of malignant cells was higher than that of normal cells. The mean values of radioactivity levels in normal and malignant cells were 0.3 ± 0.15 MBq and 1.07 ± 0.6 MBq, respectively. All examined animals had increased accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose at the tumor site. The accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the tumor was on average twice as high as compared to the symmetric region. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose is a prospective radiopharmaceutical for cancer visualization. In addition, high accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the culture of cancer cells and in tumor tissue of animals demonstrates tumor tropism of the radiopharmaceutical.

  3. Convenient preparation of 68Ga-based PET-radiopharmaceuticals at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Velikyan, I; Maecke, H; Langstrom, B

    2008-02-01

    A straightforward labeling using generator produced positron emitting (68)Ga, which provides high quality images, may result in kit type production of PET radiopharmaceuticals and make PET examinations possible also at centers lacking accelerators. The introduction of macrocyclic bifunctional chelators that would provide fast (68)Ga-complexation at room temperature would simplify even further tracer preparation and open wide possibilities for (68)Ga-labeling of fragile and potent macromolecules. Gallium-68 has the potential to facilitate development of clinically practical PET and to promote PET technique for individualized medicine. The macrocyclic chelator, 1,4,7-triazacyclononanetriacetic acid (NOTA), and its derivative coupled to an eight amino acid residue peptide (NODAGA-TATE, [NODAGA (0), Tyr(3)]Octreotate) were labeled with (68)Ge/(68)Ga-generator produced positron emitting (68)Ga. Formation kinetics of (68)Ga-NOTA was studied as a function of pH and formation kinetics of (68)Ga-NODAGA-TATE was studied as a function of the bioconjugate concentration. The nearly quantitative radioactivity incorporation (RAI>95%) for (68)Ga-NOTA was achieved within less than 10 min at room temperature and pH 3.5. The concentrations of NODAGA-TATE required for RAI of >90% and >95% were, respectively, 2-5 and 10 microM. In both cases the purification of the (68)Ga-labeled products was not necessary since the radiochemical purity was >95% and the preparation buffer, 4-(2-hydroxyethyl) piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) is suitable for human use. In order to confirm the identity of the products, complexes comprising (nat)Ga were synthesized and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The complex was found to be stable in the reaction mixture, phosphate buffer, and human plasma during 4.5 h incubation. Free and peptide conjugated NOTA formed stable complexes with (68)Ga at room temperature within 10 min. This might be of special interest for the labeling of fragile and potent

  4. Direct solid-phase synthesis of octreotide conjugates: precursors for use as tumor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, H P; Wu, Y T; Chen, S T; Wang, K T

    1999-09-01

    Somatostatin analogues, such as octreotide, are useful for the visualization and treatment of tumors. Unfortunately, these compounds were produced synthetically using complex and inefficient procedures. Here, we describe a novel approach for the synthesis of octreotide and its analogues using p-carboxybenzaldehyde to anchor Fmoc-threoninol to solid phase resins. The reaction of the two hydroxyl groups of Fmoc-threoninol with p-carboxybenzaldehyde was catalyzed with p-toluenesulphonic acid in chloroform using a Dean-Stark apparatus to form Fmoc-threoninol p-carboxybenzacetal in 91% yield. The Fmoc-threoninol p-carboxybenzacetal acted as an Fmoc-amino acid derivative and the carboxyl group of Fmoc-threoninol p-carboxybenzacetal was coupled to an amine-resin via a DCC coupling reaction. The synthesis of protected octreotide and its conjugates were carried out in their entirety using a conventional Fmoc protocol and an autosynthesizer. The acetal was stable during the stepwise elongation of each Fmoc-amino acid as shown by the averaged coupling yield (> 95%). Octreotide (74 to 78% yield) and five conjugated derivatives were synthesized with high yields using this procedure, including three radiotherapy octreotides (62 to 75% yield) and two cellular markers (72 to 76% yield). This novel approach provides a strategy for the rapid and efficient large-scale synthesis of octreotide and its analogues for radiopharmaceutical and tagged conjugates.

  5. Development of dopamine receptor radiopharmaceuticals for the study of neurological and psychiatric disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Jogeshwar Mukherjee

    2009-01-02

    Our goals in this grant application are directed towards the development of radiotracers that may allow the study of the high-affinity state (functional state) of the dopamine receptors. There have been numerous reports on the presence of two inter-convertible states of these (G-protein coupled) receptors in vitro. However, there is no report that establishes the presence of these separate affinity states in vivo. We have made efforts in this direction in order to provide such direct in vivo evidence about the presence of the high affinity state. This understanding of the functional state of the receptors is of critical significance in our overall diagnosis and treatment of diseases that implicate the G-protein coupled receptors. Four specific aims have been listed in the grant application: (1). Design and syntheses of agonists (2). Radiosyntheses of agonists (3). In vitro pharmacology of agonists (4). In vivo distribution and pharmacology of labeled derivatives. We have accomplished the syntheses and radiosyntheses of three agonist radiotracers labeled with carbon-11. In vitro and in vivo pharmacological experiments have been accomplished in rats and preliminary PET studies in non-human primates have been carried out. Various accomplishments during the funded years, briefly outlined in this document, have been disseminated by several publications in various journals and presentations in national and international meetings (Society of Nuclear Medicine, Society for Neuroscience and International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry).

  6. Monte Carlo determination of emerging energy spectra for diagnostically realistic radiopharmaceutical distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubal, L. G.; Harrell, C. R.; Esser, P. D.

    1990-12-01

    In order to realistically define the internal organs of a representative human, 150 transverse CT scans of an (average) male patient were acquired from head to mid-thigh on the GE 9800 Quick scanner. The reconstructed transverse slices were read into a microVAX 3500 and members of the medical staff outlined 42 separate internal organs contained in the transverse slice. This digitized human phantom serves as an input to a Monte Carlo program which models photoelectric absorption and scatter processes of gamma-rays in matter. The organs can be "filled" with variable amounts of radiopharmaceuticals and the simulation computes the emerging energy spectra for a given source distribution and detector position. The simulation follows gamma-ray histories out to a maximum of 32 scatter events. Scatter spectra are histogrammed into energy distributions of gamma-rays which have undergone a specific number of scatter events before emerging from the phantom. A sum of all these scatter spectra yields the simulated total spectra. Simulated total spectra of diagnostically relevant human distributions are compared to spectra acquired from nuclear medicine clinical patients.

  7. Complexation study on no-carrier-added astatine with insulin: a candidate radiopharmaceutical.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Susanta; Roy, Kamalika; Sen, Souvik

    2008-12-01

    No-carrier-added astatine radionuclides produced in the (7)Li-irradiated lead matrix were separated from bulk lead nitrate target by complexing At with insulin, followed by dialysis. The method offers simultaneous separation of At from lead as well as its complexation with insulin. The At-insulin complex might be a potential radiopharmaceutical in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. The stability of At-insulin complex was checked by dialysis against deionized water and Ringer lactate (RL) solution. It has been found that the half-life of At-insulin complex is about approximately 12h, when dialyzed against deionized water and is only 6h, when dialyzed against RL solution having the same composition as blood serum. The 6h half-life of this Insulin-At complex is perfect for killing cancer cells from external cell surfaces as the half-life of internalization of insulin molecule inside the cell is 7-12h. PMID:18674921

  8. A Concise Radiosynthesis of the Tau Radiopharmaceutical, [18F]T807

    PubMed Central

    Shoup, Timothy M.; Yokell, Daniel L.; Rice, Peter A.; Jackson, Raul N.; Livni, Eli; Johnson, Keith A.; Brady, Thomas J.; Vasdev, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Fluorine-18 labelled 7-(6-fluoropyridin-3-yl)-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole ([18F]T807) is a potent and selective agent for imaging paired helical filaments of tau (PHF-tau) and is among the most promising PET radiopharmaceuticals for this target in early clinical trials. The present study reports a simplified one-step method for the synthesis of [18F]T807 that is broadly applicable for routine clinical production using a GE Tracerlab™ FXFN radiosynthesis module. Key facets of our optimized radiosynthesis include development and use of a more soluble protected precursor, tert-butyl 7-(6-nitropyridin-3-yl)-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole-5-carboxylate, as well as new HPLC separation conditions that enable a facile one-step synthesis. During the nucleophilic fluorinating reaction with potassium cryptand [18F]fluoride (K[18F]/K222) in DMSO at 130 °C over 10 min, the precursor is concurrently deprotected. Formulated [18F]T807 was prepared in an uncorrected radiochemical yield of 14 ± 3%, with a specific activity of 216 ± 60 GBq/μmol (5837 ± 1621 mCi/μmol) at the end of synthesis (60 min; n = 3) and validated for human use. This methodology offers the advantage of faster synthesis in fewer steps, with simpler automation which we anticipate will facilitate widespread clinical use of [18F]T807. PMID:24339014

  9. Diagnostic and therapeutic potential of new radiopharmaceutical agents in medullary thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Troncone, L.; Rufini, V.; De Rosa, G.; Testa, A.

    1989-01-01

    Recently developed radiopharmaceuticals have been proposed for imaging medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) with some having therapeutic potential. This study compares the imaging results obtained with radioiodinated meta-iodo-benzylguanidine (MIBG), {sup 99m}Tc (V) DMSA, and {sup 131}I F(ab')2 anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (anti-CEA) in a group of MTC patients. In 23 patients {sup 131}I MIBG imaging showed a high specificity (no false-positive results) but a less satisfactory sensitivity (50%). In 12 patients {sup 99m}Tc (V) DMSA revealed a better sensitivity (77%) but a lower specificity (three false-positive results). Positive results were obtained in two of three patients studied with {sup 131}I F(ab')2 anti-CEA. These data suggest that the highly sensitive {sup 99m}Tc (V) DMSA should be considered as a first choice procedure followed by the highly specific radioiodinated MIBG to confirm the initial results. Since radioiodinated MIBG imaging may have therapeutic usefulness, {sup 131}I MIBG was evaluated in an integrated treatment protocol in four cases of proven MTC. The preliminary results obtained were encouraging.

  10. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of biokinetic models for radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, W B; Hoeschen, C

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical models for kinetics of radiopharmaceuticals in humans were developed and are used to estimate the radiation absorbed dose for patients in nuclear medicine by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee. However, due to the fact that the residence times used were derived from different subjects, partially even with different ethnic backgrounds, a large variation in the model parameters propagates to a high uncertainty of the dose estimation. In this work, a method was developed for analysing the uncertainty and sensitivity of biokinetic models that are used to calculate the residence times. The biokinetic model of (18)F-FDG (FDG) developed by the MIRD Committee was analysed by this developed method. The sources of uncertainty of all model parameters were evaluated based on the experiments. The Latin hypercube sampling technique was used to sample the parameters for model input. Kinetic modelling of FDG in humans was performed. Sensitivity of model parameters was indicated by combining the model input and output, using regression and partial correlation analysis. The transfer rate parameter of plasma to other tissue fast is the parameter with the greatest influence on the residence time of plasma. Optimisation of biokinetic data acquisition in the clinical practice by exploitation of the sensitivity of model parameters obtained in this study is discussed. PMID:20185457

  11. Production of 64Cu and 67Cu radiopharmaceuticals using zinc target irradiated with accelerator neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Masako; Hashimoto, Kazuyuki; Saeki, Hideya; Sato, Nozomi; Motoishi, Shoji; Nagai, Yasuki

    2014-09-01

    Copper radioisotopes have gained a lot of attention in radiopharmaceuticals owing to their unique decay characteristics. The longest half-life β emitter, 67Cu, is thought to be suitable for targeted radio-immunotherapy. Adequate production of 67Cu to meet the demands of clinical studies has not been fully established. Another attractive copper isotope, 64Cu has possible applications as a diagnostic imaging tracer combined with a therapeutic effect. This work proposes a production method using accelerator neutrons in which two copper radioisotopes can be produced: 1) 68Zn(n,x)67Cu and 2) 64Zn(n,p)64Cu using ~14 MeV neutrons generated by natC(d, n) reaction, both from natural or enriched zinc oxides. The generated 64,67Cu were separated from the target zinc oxide using a chelating and an anion exchange columns and were labelled with two widely studied chelators where the labelling efficiency was found to be acceptably good. The major advantage of this method is that a significant amount of 64,67Cu with a very few impurity radionuclides are produced which also makes the separation procedure simple. Provided an accelerator supplying an Ed = ~ 40 MeV, a wide application of 64,67Cu based drugs in nuclear medicine is feasible in the near future. We will present the characteristics of this production method using accelerator neutrons including the chemical separation processes.

  12. Biokinetics and dosimetry of target-specific radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Torres-García, Eugenio; Gonz&Ález-v&Ázquez, Armando; de Murphy, Consuelo Arteaga

    Molecular imaging techniques directly or indirectly monitor and record the spatiotemporal distribution of molecular or cellular processes for biochemical, biologic, diagnostic or therapeutic applications. 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC has shown high stability both in vitro and in vivo and rapid detection of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. Therapies using radiolabeled anti-CD20 have demonstrated their efficacy in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The aim of this study was to establish biokinetic models for 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC and 188Re-anti-CD20 and to evaluate their dosimetry as target-specific radiopharmaceuticals. The OLINDA/EXM code was used to calculate patient-specific internal radiation dose estimates. 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC images showed an average tumor/blood ratio of 4.3±0.7 in receptor-positive tumors with an average effective dose of 4.4 mSv. Dosimetric studies indicated that after administration of 5.8 to 7.5 GBq of 188Re-anti-CD20 the absorbed dose to total body would be 0.75 Gy which corresponds to the recommended dose for NHL therapies.

  13. PET radiopharmaceuticals for imaging of tumor hypoxia: a review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lopci, Egesta; Grassi, Ilaria; Chiti, Arturo; Nanni, Cristina; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Toschi, Luca; Fonti, Cristina; Lodi, Filippo; Mattioli, Sandro; Fanti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a pathological condition arising in living tissues when oxygen supply does not adequately cover the cellular metabolic demand. Detection of this phenomenon in tumors is of the utmost clinical relevance because tumor aggressiveness, metastatic spread, failure to achieve tumor control, increased rate of recurrence, and ultimate poor outcome are all associated with hypoxia. Consequently, in recent decades there has been increasing interest in developing methods for measurement of oxygen levels in tumors. Among the image-based modalities for hypoxia assessment, positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most extensively investigated based on the various advantages it offers, i.e., broad range of radiopharmaceuticals, good intrinsic resolution, three-dimensional tumor representation, possibility of semiquantification/quantification of the amount of hypoxic tumor burden, overall patient friendliness, and ease of repetition. Compared with the other non-invasive techniques, the biggest advantage of PET imaging is that it offers the highest specificity for detection of hypoxic tissue. Starting with the 2-nitroimidazole family of compounds in the early 1980s, a great number of PET tracers have been developed for the identification of hypoxia in living tissue and solid tumors. This paper provides an overview of the principal PET tracers applied in cancer imaging of hypoxia and discusses in detail their advantages and pitfalls. PMID:24982822

  14. Evaluation of H2CHXdedpa, H2dedpa- and H2CHXdedpa-N,N'-propyl-2-NI ligands for (64)Cu(ii) radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Ramogida, Caterina F; Boros, Eszter; Patrick, Brian O; Zeisler, Stefan K; Kumlin, Joel; Adam, Michael J; Schaffer, Paul; Orvig, Chris

    2016-08-16

    The chiral acyclic "pa" ligand (pa = picolinic acid) H2CHXdedpa (N4O2) and two NI-containing dedpa analogues (H2CHXdedpa-N,N'-propyl-2-NI, H2dedpa-N,N'-propyl-2-NI, NI = nitroimidazole) were studied as chelators for copper radiopharmaceuticals (CHX = cyclohexyl, H2dedpa = 1,2-[[carboxypyridin-2-yl]methylamino]ethane). The hexadentate ligand H2CHXdedpa was previously established as a superb system for (67/68)Ga radiochemistry. The solid state X-ray crystal structures of [Cu(CHXdedpa-N,N'-propyl-2-NI)] and [Cu(dedpa-N,N'-propyl-2-NI)] reveal the predicted hexadentate, distorted octahedral binding of the copper(ii) ion. Cyclic voltammetry of [Cu(dedpa-N,N'-propyl-2-NI)] shows that there is one reversible couple associated with the NI redox, and one irreversible but reproducible couple attributed to the Cu(ii)/Cu(i) redox cycle. Quantitative radiolabeling (>99%) of CHXdedpa(2-) and (dedpa-N,N'-propyl-2-NI)(2-) with (64)Cu was achieved under fast and efficient labeling conditions (10 min, RT, 0.5 M sodium acetate buffer, pH 5.5) at ligand concentrations as low as 10(-6) M. In vitro kinetic inertness studies of the (64)Cu labelled complexes were studied in human serum at 37 °C over 24 hours; [(64)Cu(CHXdedpa)] was found to be 98% stable compared to previously investigated [(64)Cu(dedpa)] which was only 72% intact after 24 hours. PMID:27161975

  15. Synthesis and radioiodination of ergoline derivatives: potential in-vivo dopamine receptor site mapping radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhail, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    The need of a dopamine-receptor based radiopharmaceutical for brain imaging is apparent. If such an agent is made available to physicians, it could provide means for detecting brain tumors, and diagnose such mental disorders as parkinsonism, schizophrenia and psychosis. Currently, such agents are yet to be discovered. Procedures were developed to synthesize and label four ergoline derivatives which could potentially exhibit affinity to dopamine receptors. Labelling with /sup 125/I was accomplished in some cases by displacing a suitably positioned leaving group with /sup 125/I-anion, while in other cases iodine exchange procedures were utilized. Formulations of the labeled derivatives were achieved via the formation of their water soluble tartarate salts. Biodistribution studies in mature Sprague-Dawley rats showed that of the four radioactive compounds injected, the highest uptake in the brain and adrenals was achieved with 8 ..beta..-(I-125)-iodomethyl-6-propylergoline. In addition, high target/nontarget ratios were obtained with the above mentioned compound. On the other hand, the least brain and adrenal uptake as well as the lowest target/nontarget ratios were exhibited by 8 ..beta..-(I-125)-(p-iodobenzenesulfonyl)-lysergol presumably due to its in-vivo instability. A comparative biodistribution study for ergoline derivatives and N-isopropyl-(I-123)-p-iodoamphetamine was conducted. The biodistribution studies showed that the brain to blood ratio for the ergoline derivative 8 ..beta..-(I-125)-iodomethyl-6-propylergoline to be very close to that for /sup 125/I-IMP at 1 minute after dose administration. However after 15 minutes the brain/blood ratio of compound XLVI was half the value of /sup 123/I-IMP. Different mechanisms of brain influx and efflux are known to occur with the amphetamine and ergoline derivatives.

  16. Clinical use of bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals with focus on alpha-emitters

    PubMed Central

    Wieder, Hinrich A; Lassmann, Michael; Allen-Auerbach, Martin S; Czernin, Johannes; Herrmann, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Various single or multi-modality therapeutic options are available to treat pain of bone metastasis in patients with prostate cancer. Different radionuclides that emit β-rays such as 153Samarium and 89Strontium and achieve palliation are commercially available. In contrast to β-emitters, 223Radium as a α-emitter has a short path-length. The advantage of the α-emitter is thus a highly localized biological effect that is caused by radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks and subsequent cell killing and/or limited effectiveness of cellular repair mechanisms. Due to the limited range of the α-particles the bone surface to red bone marrow dose ratio is also lower for 223Radium which is expressed in a lower myelotoxicity. The α emitter 223Radium dichloride is the first radiopharmaceutical that significantly prolongs life in castrate resistant prostate cancer patients with wide-spread bone metastatic disease. In a phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study 921 patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and bone metastases were randomly assigned. The analysis confirmed the 223Radium survival benefit compared to the placebo (median, 14.9 mo vs 11.3 mo; P < 0.001). In addition, the treatment results in pain palliation and thus, improved quality of life and a delay of skeletal related events. At the same time the toxicity profile of 223Radium was favourable. Since May 2013, 223Radium dichloride (Xofigo®) is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. PMID:25071888

  17. Spectroelectrochemical and computational studies on the mechanism of hypoxia selectivity of copper radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Holland, Jason P; Barnard, Peter J; Collison, David; Dilworth, Jonathan R; Edge, Ruth; Green, Jennifer C; McInnes, Eric J L

    2008-01-01

    Detailed chemical, spectroelectrochemical and computational studies have been used to investigate the mechanism of hypoxia selectivity of a range of copper radiopharmaceuticals. A revised mechanism involving a delicate balance between cellular uptake, intracellular reduction, reoxidation, protonation and ligand dissociation is proposed. This mechanism accounts for observed differences in the reported cellular uptake and washout of related copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes. Three copper and zinc complexes have been characterised by X-ray crystallography and the redox chemistry of a series of copper complexes has been investigated by using electronic absorption and EPR spectroelectrochemistry. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations have also been used to probe the electronic structures of intermediate species and assign the electronic absorption spectra. DFT calculations also show that one-electron oxidation is ligand-based, leading to the formation of cationic triplet species. In the absence of protons, metal-centred one-electron reduction gives the reduced anionic copper(I) species, [CuIATSM](-), and for the first time it is shown that molecular oxygen can reoxidise this anion to give the neutral, lipophilic parent complexes, which can wash out of cells. The electrochemistry is pH dependent and in the presence of stronger acids both chemical and electrochemical reduction leads to quantitative and rapid dissociation of copper(I) ions from the mono- or diprotonated complexes, [CuIATSMH] and [Cu(I)ATSMH2]+. In addition, a range of protonated intermediate species have been identified at lower acid concentrations. The one-electron reduction potential, rate of reoxidation of the copper(I) anionic species and ease of protonation are dependent on the structure of the ligand, which also governs their observed behaviour in vivo. PMID:18494010

  18. Analysis of radionuclide concentration in air released through the stack of a radiopharmaceutical production facility based on a medical cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardina, M.; Tomarchio, E.; Greco, D.

    2015-11-01

    Positron emitting radionuclides are increasingly used in medical diagnostics and the number of radiopharmaceutical production facilities have been estimated to be growing worldwide. During the process of production and/or patient administration of radiopharmaceuticals, an amount of these radionuclides might become airborne and escape into the environment. Therefore, the analysis of radionuclide concentration in the air released to the stack is a very important issue to evaluate the dose to the population living around the plant. To this end, sampling and measurement of radionuclide concentration in air released through the stack of a Nuclear Medicine Center (NMC), provided with a cyclotron for radiopharmaceuticals production, must be routinely carried out with an automatic measurement system. In this work is presented the air monitoring system realized at "San Gaetano" NMC at Bagheria (Italy) besides the analysis of the recorded stack relesead air concentration data. Sampling of air was carried out continuously and gamma-ray spectrometric measurement are made on-line and for a short time by using a shielded Marinelli beaker filled with sampled air and a gamma detector. The use of this system allows to have 1440 values of air concentration per day from 2002, year of the start of operation with the cyclotron. Therefore, the concentration values are very many and an analysis software is needed to determine the dose to the population. A comparison with the results of a simulation code based on a Gaussian Plume air dispersion modelling allow us to confirm the no-radiological significance of the stack effluent releases in terms of dose to population and to evaluate possible improvements in the plant devices to reduce the air concentration at stack.

  19. Preclinical assessment of dopaminergic system in rats by MicroPET using three positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Camacho, V. M. Ávila-García, M. C. Ávila-Rodríguez, M. A.

    2014-11-07

    Different diseases associated with dysfunction of dopaminergic system such as Parkinson, Alzheimer, and Schizophrenia are being widely studied with positron emission tomography (PET) which is a noninvasive method useful to assess the stage of these illnesses. In our facility we have recently implemented the production of [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ, [{sup 11}C]-RAC, and [{sup 18}F]-FDOPA, which are among the most common PET radiopharmaceuticals used in neurology applications to get information about the dopamine pathways. In this study two healthy rats were imaged with each of those radiotracers in order to confirm selective striatum uptake as a proof of principle before to release them for human use.

  20. Preclinical assessment of dopaminergic system in rats by MicroPET using three positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-Camacho, V. M.; Ávila-García, M. C.; Ávila-Rodríguez, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    Different diseases associated with dysfunction of dopaminergic system such as Parkinson, Alzheimer, and Schizophrenia are being widely studied with positron emission tomography (PET) which is a noninvasive method useful to assess the stage of these illnesses. In our facility we have recently implemented the production of [11C ]-DTBZ, [11C ]-RAC, and [18F ]-FDOPA, which are among the most common PET radiopharmaceuticals used in neurology applications to get information about the dopamine pathways. In this study two healthy rats were imaged with each of those radiotracers in order to confirm selective striatum uptake as a proof of principle before to release them for human use.

  1. MIRD Pamphlet No. 26: Joint EANM/MIRD Guidelines for Quantitative 177Lu SPECT Applied for Dosimetry of Radiopharmaceutical Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ljungberg, Michael; Celler, Anna; Konijnenberg, Mark W; Eckerman, Keith F; Dewaraja, Yuni K; Sjögreen-Gleisner, Katarina; Bolch, Wesley E; Brill, A Bertrand; Fahey, Frederic; Fisher, Darrell R; Hobbs, Robert; Howell, Roger W; Meredith, Ruby F; Sgouros, George; Zanzonico, Pat; Bacher, Klaus; Chiesa, Carlo; Flux, Glenn; Lassmann, Michael; Strigari, Lidia; Walrand, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of absorbed dose calculations in personalized internal radionuclide therapy is directly related to the accuracy of the activity (or activity concentration) estimates obtained at each of the imaging time points. MIRD Pamphlet no. 23 presented a general overview of methods that are required for quantitative SPECT imaging. The present document is next in a series of isotope-specific guidelines and recommendations that follow the general information that was provided in MIRD 23. This paper focuses on (177)Lu (lutetium) and its application in radiopharmaceutical therapy. PMID:26471692

  2. MIRD Pamphlet No. 26: Joint EANM/MIRD Guidelines for Quantitative 177Lu SPECT Applied for Dosimetry of Radiopharmaceutical Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ljungberg, Michael; Celler, Anna; Konijnenberg, Mark W; Eckerman, Keith F; Dewaraja, Yuni K; Sjögreen-Gleisner, Katarina; Bolch, Wesley E; Brill, A Bertrand; Fahey, Frederic; Fisher, Darrell R; Hobbs, Robert; Howell, Roger W; Meredith, Ruby F; Sgouros, George; Zanzonico, Pat; Bacher, Klaus; Chiesa, Carlo; Flux, Glenn; Lassmann, Michael; Strigari, Lidia; Walrand, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of absorbed dose calculations in personalized internal radionuclide therapy is directly related to the accuracy of the activity (or activity concentration) estimates obtained at each of the imaging time points. MIRD Pamphlet no. 23 presented a general overview of methods that are required for quantitative SPECT imaging. The present document is next in a series of isotope-specific guidelines and recommendations that follow the general information that was provided in MIRD 23. This paper focuses on (177)Lu (lutetium) and its application in radiopharmaceutical therapy.

  3. Untangling the web of European regulations for the preparation of unlicensed radiopharmaceuticals: a concise overview and practical guidance for a risk-based approach.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rogier; ter Heine, Rob; Decristoforo, Clemens; Peñuelas, Iván; Elsinga, Philip H; van der Westerlaken, Monique M L; Hendrikse, N Harry

    2015-05-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are highly regulated, because they are controlled both as regular medicinal products and as radioactive substances. This can pose a hurdle for their development and clinical use. Radiopharmaceuticals are fundamentally different from other medicinal products and these regulations are not always adequate for their production. Strict compliance may have a huge resource impact, without further improving product quality. In this paper we give an overview of the applicable legislation and guidelines and propose a risk-based approach for their implementation. We focus on a few controversial Good Manufacturing Practice topics: cleanroom classification, air pressure regime, cleanroom qualification and microbiological monitoring. We have developed an algorithm to assess the combined risk of microbiological contamination of a radiopharmaceutical preparation process and propose corresponding Good Manufacturing Practice classification levels. In our opinion, the risk of carry-over of radiopharmaceuticals by individuals cannot be contained by pressure differences, and complicated regimes with underpressured rooms are not necessary in most situations. We propose a sterility assurance level of 10 for radiopharmaceuticals that are administered within a working day, irrespective of their use. We suggest the adoption of limits for environmental monitoring of microbial contamination, as proposed by Bruel and colleagues, on behalf of the French Society of Radiopharmacy. Recently launched regulatory documents seem to breathe a more liberal spirit than current legislation and recognize the need for the use of risk assessment. We argue that future legislation be further harmonized and state risk assessment as the gold standard for implementation of drug quality regulations for the preparation of unlicensed radiopharmaceuticals.

  4. Radiation absorbed dose estimates for oxygen-15 radiopharmaceuticals (H2( V)O, C VO, O VO) in newborn infants

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, W.J.; Stabin, M.; Howse, D.; Eichling, J.O.; Herscovitch, P.

    1988-12-01

    In preparation for measurement of regional cerebral oxygen metabolism by positron emission tomography, radiation absorbed dose estimates for 19 internal organs, blood, and total body were calculated for newborn infants following bolus intravenous administration of H2( V)O and brief inhalation of C VO and O VO. Cumulated activity for each radiopharmaceutical was calculated from a compartmental model based on the known biologic behavior of the compound. Values for mean absorbed dose/unit cumulated activity (S) for internal organs and total body were based on a newborn phantom. S was separately calculated for blood. Total radiopharmaceutical absorbed dose estimates necessary to measure cerebral oxygen metabolism in a 3.51-kg infant based on 0.7 mCi/kg H2( V)O and 1 mCi/kg C VO and O VO were determined to be 1.6 rad to the lung (maximum organ dose), 0.28 rad to the marrow, 0.46 rad to the gonads, and 0.22 rad to total body. These values are similar to those for current clinical nuclear medicine procedures employing /sup 99m/Tc in newborn infants.

  5. The effect of radiopharmaceutical choice on the determination of relative renal function in rats with unilateral renal obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.; Lallone, R.

    1984-01-01

    A significant divergence of GFR and ERPF within a single kidney could lead to different estimates of relative renal function depending on which radiopharmaceutical is administered. To address this question, the authors studied adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with unilateral ureteral obstruction by giving each animal an intravenous injection of 10 ..mu..Ci of I-125 iothalamate (GFR), I-131 hippurate (ERPF), and TC-99m DMSA and measuring the 30 minute clearance (renal uptake and urine excretion) of each agent. Normal control animals were sham operated; 25 experimental animals were subjected to permanent unilateral ureteral occlusion and studied at 6 hours, 1, 3, 7 and 14 days. Acute ureteral obstruction impaired the clearance of iothalamate to a much greater degree than OIH or DMSA at 6 hours and 1 day (rho<.005) and 3 days (rho<.05). The decline in DMSA clearance reflected ERPF more closely than GFR. In evaluating renal disease, one should consider the functional parameter reflected by the radiopharmaceutical as well as the underlying disease state.

  6. Ion-pair binding: is binding both binding better?

    PubMed

    Roelens, Stefano; Vacca, Alberto; Francesconi, Oscar; Venturi, Chiara

    2009-08-17

    It is often tempting to explain chemical phenomena on the basis of intuitive principles, but this practice can frequently lead to biased analysis of data and incorrect conclusions. One such intuitive principle is brought into play in the binding of salts by synthetic receptors. Following the heuristic concept that "binding both is binding better", it is widely believed that ditopic receptors capable of binding both ionic partners of a salt are more effective than monotopic receptors because of a cooperative effect. Using a newly designed ditopic receptor and a generalized binding descriptor, we show here that, when the problem is correctly formulated and the appropriate algorithm is derived, the cooperativity principle is neither general nor predictable, and that competition between ion binding and ion pairing may even lead to inhibition rather than enhancement of the binding of an ion to a ditopic receptor.

  7. Analyzing binding data.

    PubMed

    Motulsky, Harvey J; Neubig, Richard R

    2010-07-01

    Measuring the rate and extent of radioligand binding provides information on the number of binding sites, and their affinity and accessibility of these binding sites for various drugs. This unit explains how to design and analyze such experiments.

  8. Food and Drug Administration process for development and approval of drugs and radiopharmaceuticals: treatments in urologic oncology.

    PubMed

    Ning, Yang-Min; Maher, V Ellen

    2015-03-01

    Regulatory advice and assessment play an important role in the successful development of new drugs and radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of urologic malignancies. Cooperation between the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the pharmaceutical industry has led to the approval of more than 20 new urologic oncology products in the last 2 decades. Despite these advances, more effective treatments need to be developed and approved for the treatment of urologic malignancies. This review provides general information about the FDA's role in the development of investigational new drugs, with an emphasis on the regulatory process and the requirements for marketing approval. In addition, this review summarizes the products for the treatment of urologic malignancies that were approved by the FDA in the last 30 years and the key issues concerning urologic oncology products that were discussed publicly at Oncologic Drug Advisory Committee meetings in the past 10 years.

  9. Studying the General Toxicity and Cumulative Properties of a Radiopharmaceutical Nanocolloid, (99m)Tc-Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Varlamova, N V; Churin, A A; Fomina, T I; Ermolaeva, L A; Vetoshkina, T V; Dubskaya, T Yu; Lamzina, T Yu; Fedorova, E P; Neupokoeva, O V; Skuridin, V S; Nesterov, E A; Larionova, L A; Chernov, V I

    2016-07-01

    We studied toxicity of a new Russian radiopharmaceutical Nanocolloid, (99m)Tc-Al2O3. Tests for acute toxicity showed that this agent belongs to a class of moderate-toxicity substances and does not have cumulative properties. The evaluation of subchronic toxicity after subcutaneous injection of this product to rats (0.04, 0.2, and 0.4 ml/kg) and rabbits (0.02 and 0.2 ml/kg) for 7 days did not reveal changes in the general state, temperature, body weight, indices of the peripheral blood and bone marrow, functions of the heart, liver, kidneys, and nervous system, and morphological characteristics of the internal organs in animals. The drug does not produce a local irritant effect. PMID:27502539

  10. Performance of a Lanthanum Bromide Detector and a New Conception Collimator for Radiopharmaceuticals Molecular Imaging in Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, Roberto; Pellegrini, Rosanna; Bennati, Paolo; Cinti, Maria Nerina; Scafe, Raffaele; De Vincentis, Giuseppe; Navarria, Francesco; Moschini, Giuliano; Rossi, Paolo; Cencelli, Valentino Orsolini; De Notaristefani, Francesco

    2009-03-10

    We have realized and tested a new-design compact gamma camera for high resolution SPET (Single Photon Emission Tomography), and small animals' radio-pharmaceutical molecular imaging. The camera is based on a 'continuous' Lanthanum tri-Bromide crystal, and a new Low Energy (LE) collimator. The crystal is interfaced to a 2x2 array of Hamamatsu-H8500 position sensitive photo-multipliers. The lead collimator features parallel hexagonal 1.0 mm holes, 18 mm length, 0.2 mm septa and 10x10 cm{sup 2} detection area. It was newly designed to fully exploit the high spatial resolution a Lanthanum crystal may provide. To better evaluate its role, we have compared our camera to three other systems with similar crystals and photomultipliers, but employing traditional collimators, either pinhole or parallel. The new camera seems to be complementary to pinhole systems and shows a very attractive trade-off between spatial resolution and detection area.

  11. Performance of a Lanthanum Bromide Detector and a New Conception Collimator for Radiopharmaceuticals Molecular Imaging in Oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Roberto; Pellegrini, Rosanna; Bennati, Paolo; Cinti, Maria Nerina; Scafè, Raffaele; De Vincentis, Giuseppe; Navarria, Francesco; Moschini, Giuliano; Cencelli, Valentino Orsolini; De Notaristefani, Francesco; Rossi, Paolo

    2009-03-01

    We have realized and tested a new-design compact gamma camera for high resolution SPET (Single Photon Emission Tomography), and small animals' radio-pharmaceutical molecular imaging. The camera is based on a "continuous" Lanthanum tri-Bromide crystal, and a new Low Energy (LE) collimator. The crystal is interfaced to a 2×2 array of Hamamatsu-H8500 position sensitive photo-multipliers. The lead collimator features parallel hexagonal 1.0 mm holes, 18 mm length, 0.2 mm septa and 10×10 cm2 detection area. It was newly designed to fully exploit the high spatial resolution a Lanthanum crystal may provide. To better evaluate its role, we have compared our camera to three other systems with similar crystals and photomultipliers, but employing traditional collimators, either pinhole or parallel. The new camera seems to be complementary to pinhole systems and shows a very attractive trade-off between spatial resolution and detection area.

  12. Radiogallium localization in tumors: blood binding and transport and the role of transferrin

    SciTech Connect

    Vallabhajosula, S.R.; Harwig, J.F.; Siemsen, J.K.; Wolf, W.

    1980-07-01

    As a crucial step toward the understanding of the tumor localization of gallium, we have re-investigated its binding and transport in blood. The studies were performed in vivo by injection of gallium-67 citrate in rabbits, and in vitro by incubation of gallium-67 citrate with individual plasma proteins. By ultrafiltration and gel filtration chromatography, rabbit plasma samples showed essentially complete protein binding, whereas dialysis indicated considerable nonprotein-bound gallium, the amount depending on the dialysis medium. According to electrophoresis, total binding was inversely proportional to electrophoresis time. Affinity chromatography showed all gallium to be bound to transferrin, whereas electrophoresis caused continuous dissociation of gallium from transferrin, with the resulting unbound radioactivity appearing in various other protein bands. Similarly, the binding of gallium to transferrin in the in vitro incubation studies was inversely proportional to electrophoresis time, whereas ultrafiltration and gel filtration chromatography showed all gallium to be transferrin-bound. No binding of gallium to other proteins, such as albumin, was observed. This study demonstrates that gallium at the tracer level in blood is exclusively bound to and transported by transferrin, and indicates that electrophoresis and dialysis of easily dissociable metal complexes are subject to significant artifacts. Accurate determination of protein binding of radiopharmaceuticals requires a combination of analytical techniques and cautious interpretation of the results.

  13. Design of site specific radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging. (Parts I and II)

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dort, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Part I. Synthetic methods were developed for the preparation of several iodinated benzoic acid hydrazides as labeling moieties for indirect tagging of carbonyl-containing bio-molecules and potential tumor-imaging agents. Biodistribution studies conducted in mice on the derivatives having the I-125 label ortho to a phenolic OH demonstrated a rapid in vivo deiodination. Part II. The reported high melanin binding affinity of quinoline and other heterocyclic antimalarial drugs led to the development of many analogues of such molecules as potential melanoma-imaging agents. Once such analogue iodochloroquine does exhibit high melanin binding, but has found limited clinical use due to appreciable accumulation in non-target tissues such as the adrenal cortex and inner ear. This project developed a new series of candidate melanoma imaging agents which would be easier to radio-label, could yield higher specific activity product, and which might demonstrate more favorable pharmacokinetic and dosimetric characteristics compared to iodochloroquine.

  14. Radiolabeled tirofiban – a potential radiopharmaceutical for detection of deep venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Darkovska-Serafimovska, Marija; Janevik-Ivanovska, Emilija; Djorgoski, Icko; Arsova-Sarafinovska, Zorica; Zdravkovska, Milka; Balkanov, Trajan; Ugresic, Nenad

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of using 99mtechnetium (99mTc)-labeled tirofiban (a reversible antagonist of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa) for detection of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in rats without causing an antiplatelet effect. Methods The ability of in vitro tirofiban to inhibit adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation was evaluated using optical aggregometer. Binding of 99mTc-tirofiban to platelets was evaluated. Serum levels of unlabeled (a validated high performance liquid chromatography method) and 99mTc-tirofiban after single intravenous injection were evaluated in male Wistar rats with or without induced DVT (femoral vein ligation model), and the rats were also subjected to whole body scintigraphy. Results Tirofiban in vitro inhibits ADP-induced aggregation of human platelets in a dose- and concentration-dependent manner (10 nM to 2 μM), but only if it is added before ADP and not after ADP. 99mTc labeling did not affect the ability of tirofiban to bind to either human or rat platelets, nor did it affect tirofiban pharmacokinetics in intact rats or in animals with induced DVT. When 99mTc-tirofiban was injected to rats after induction of DVT, at a molar dose lower than the one showing only a weak antiaggregatory effect in vitro, whole body scintigraphy indicated localization of 99mTc-tirofiban around the place of the induced DVT. Conclusion 99mTc labeling of tirofiban does not affect its ability to bind to glycoprotein IIb/IIIa or its in vivo pharmacokinetics in rats, either intact or with DVT. A low, nonantiaggregatory dose of 99mTc-tirofiban may be used to visualize DVT at an early stage. PMID:27713618

  15. Coordination chemistry of the sup 212 Pb/ sup 212 Bi nuclear transformation: Alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, N.J.; Harris, W.R.; Keen, C.L.; Cooper, S.R.

    1992-07-01

    Subdivisions of this project are: (a) the synthesis of prototypical thiolate and dithiocarbamate based hexacoordinate complexes, (b) radiochemical engineering for generation of no-carrier-added lead and bismuth radioelements, (c) the first isolation of bismuth-binding proteins from in vivo studies with cyclotron produced {sup 205/206}Bi tracer, and (d) initial development of transport mechanisms for the intracellular radiobiological study of alpha emitting bismuth, and (e) the initiation of chemical equilibrium studies and biochemical pathways with cyclotron-produced, no-carrier-added, {sup 203}Pb (T{sub 1/2} = 51 hr).

  16. A simple low-cost of liquid I-131 dispenser for routine radiopharmaceutical dispensing at nuclear medicine department, Institut Kanser Negara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, M. A.; Ashhar, Z. N.; Suhaimi, N. E. F.; Zainon, R.

    2016-01-01

    In routine radiopharmaceutical Iodine-131 (131I) dispensing, the amount of radiation dose received by the personnel depends on the distance between the personnel and the source, the time spent manipulating the source and the amount of shielding used to reduce the dose rate from the source. The novel iRAD-I131 dispenser using recycle 131I liquid lead pot will lead into low cost production, less maintenance and low dose received by the personnel that prepared the 131I. The new fabricated of low cost 131I dispenser was tested and the dose received by personnel were evaluated. The body of lead material is made from 2.5 cm lead shielded coated with epoxy paint to absorb the radiation dose up to 7.4 GBq of 131 I. The lead pot was supported with two stainless steel rod. The Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) nanodot was used in this study to measure the dose rate at both extremities for every personnel who prepared the 131I. Each OSL nanodot was attached at the fingertip. Three different personnel (experienced between one to ten years above in preparing the radiopharmaceuticals) were participated in this study. The average equivalent dose at right and left hand were 122.694 ± 121.637 µSv/GBq and 77.281 ± 62.146 µSv/GBq respectively. This study found that the dose exposure received using iRAD-I131 was less up to seven times compared to the conventional method. The comparison of experimental data using iRAD-I131 and established radiopharmaceutical dispenser was also discussed. The innovation of 131I dispenser is highly recommended in a small radiopharmaceutical facility with limited budget. The novel iRAD-I131 enables implementation of higher output liquid dispensing with low radiation dose to the personnel.

  17. Comparison of effective dose and lifetime risk of cancer incidence of CT attenuation correction acquisitions and radiopharmaceutical administration for myocardial perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Szczepura, K; Hogg, P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To measure the organ dose and calculate effective dose from CT attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisitions from four commonly used gamma camera single photon emission CT/CT systems. Methods: CTAC dosimetry data was collected using thermoluminescent dosemeters on GE Healthcare's Infinia™ Hawkeye™ (GE Healthcare, Buckinghamshire, UK) four- and single-slice systems, Siemens Symbia™ T6 (Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) and the Philips Precedence (Philips Healthcare, Amsterdam, Netherlands). Organ and effective dose from the administration of 99mTc-tetrofosmin and 99mTc-sestamibi were calculated using International Commission of Radiological Protection reports 80 and 106. Using these data, the lifetime biological risk was calculated. Results: The Siemens Symbia gave the lowest CTAC dose (1.8 mSv) followed by the GE Infinia Hawkeye single-slice (1.9 mSv), GE Infinia Hawkeye four-slice (2.5 mSv) and Philips Precedence v. 3.0. Doses were significantly lower than the calculated doses from radiopharmaceutical administration (11 and 14 mSv for 99mTc-tetrofosmin and 99mTc-sestamibi, respectively). Overall lifetime biological risks were lower, which suggests that using CTAC data posed minimal risk to the patient. Comparison of data for breast tissue demonstrated a higher risk than that from the radiopharmaceutical administration. Conclusion: CTAC doses were confirmed to be much lower than those from radiopharmaceutical administration. The localized nature of the CTAC exposure compared to the radiopharmaceutical biological distribution indicated dose and risk to the breast to be higher. Advances in knowledge: This research proved that CTAC is a comparatively low-dose acquisition. However, it has been shown that there is increased risk for breast tissue especially in the younger patients. As per legislation, justification is required and CTAC should only be used in situations that demonstrate sufficient net benefit. PMID:24998249

  18. Alternative chromatographic system for the quality control of lipophilic technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals such as [(99m)Tc(MIBI)₆].

    PubMed

    Faria, D P; Buchpiguel, C A; Marques, F L N

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge of the radiochemical purity of radiopharmaceuticals is mandatory and can be evaluated by several methods and techniques. Planar chromatography is the technique normally employed in nuclear medicine since it is simple, rapid and usually of low cost. There is no standard system for the chromatographic technique, but price, separation efficiency and short time for execution must be considered. We have studied an alternative system using common chromatographic stationary phase and alcohol or alcohol:chloroform mixtures as the mobile phase, using the lipophilic radiopharmaceutical [(99m)Tc(MIBI)₆]⁺ as a model. Whatman 1 modified phase paper and absolute ethanol, Whatman 1 paper and methanol:chloroform (25:75), Whatman 3MM paper and ethanol:chloroform (25:75), and the more expensive ITLC-SG and 1-propanol:chloroform (10:90) were suitable systems for the direct determination of radiochemical purity of [(99m)Tc(MIBI)₆]⁺ since impurities such as (99m)Tc-reduced-hydrolyzed (RH), (99m)TcO(4)(-) and [(99m)Tc(cysteine)₂]⁻ complex were completely separated from the radiopharmaceutical, which moved toward the front of chromatographic systems while impurities were retained at the origin. The time required for analysis was 4 to 15 min, which is appropriate for nuclear medicine routines.

  19. Reproducibility of quantitative measures of binding potential in rat striatum: A test re-test study using DTBZ dynamic PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Avendaño-Estrada, A. Lara-Camacho, V. M. Ávila-García, M. C. Ávila- Rodríguez, M. A.

    2014-11-07

    There is great interest in the study of dopamine (DA) pathways due to the increasing number of patients with illnesses related to the dopaminergic system and molecular imaging based in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been proven helpful for this task. Among the different radiopharmaceuticals available to study DA interaction, [{sup 11}C]Dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) has a high affinity for the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2) and its binding potential (BP) is a marker of DA terminal integrity. This paper reports on the intersubject reproducibility of BP measurements in rat striatum with [11C]DTBZ using the Logańs method.

  20. Analyzing radioligand binding data.

    PubMed

    Motulsky, Harvey; Neubig, Richard

    2002-08-01

    Radioligand binding experiments are easy to perform, and provide useful data in many fields. They can be used to study receptor regulation, discover new drugs by screening for compounds that compete with high affinity for radioligand binding to a particular receptor, investigate receptor localization in different organs or regions using autoradiography, categorize receptor subtypes, and probe mechanisms of receptor signaling, via measurements of agonist binding and its regulation by ions, nucleotides, and other allosteric modulators. This unit reviews the theory of receptor binding and explains how to analyze experimental data. Since binding data are usually best analyzed using nonlinear regression, this unit also explains the principles of curve fitting with nonlinear regression.

  1. Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals for treatment of osseous metastases, Part 1: α therapy with 223Ra-dichloride.

    PubMed

    Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Larson, Steven M; Carrasquillo, Jorge A

    2014-02-01

    Metastatic disease to bone is commonly seen in the advanced stages of many cancers. The cardinal symptom, pain, is often the cause of significant morbidity and reduced quality of life. Treatment of bone pain includes nonsteroidal analgesics and opiates; however, long-term use of these drugs is commonly associated with significant side effects, and tolerance is common. External-beam radiation therapy is effective mainly in localized disease sites. Bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals are beneficial in the management of patients with multiple metastatic lesions. This article focuses on the 3 most commonly used agents: the Food and Drug Administration-approved (89)Sr-chloride, (153)Sm-ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP), and (223)Ra-dichloride. We will discuss the physical characteristics, clinical data, dosage, and administration of these agents, including optimal patient selection and toxicity associated with their use. These radioactive agents have proven efficacy in the treatment of painful osseous metastases from prostate cancer and breast cancer. Significant recent advances include use of these agents in combination with chemotherapy and the use of the α emitter (223)Ra-dichloride in prostate cancer, primarily to improve survival and skeletal related events. The review is presented in 2 parts. The first will discuss the characteristics and clinical use of (223)Ra-dichloride, and the second will discuss the β emitters (89)Sr and (153)Sm-EDTMP.

  2. Molecular modeling in the development of metal radiopharmaceuticals. Final progress report, July 15, 1989--July 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1993-10-01

    We began this project with a compilation of a structural library to serve as a data base containing descriptions of the molecular features of metal-labeled radiopharmaceuticals known to efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier. Such a data base is needed in order to identify structural features (size, shape, molecular surface areas and volumes) that are critical in allowing blood-brain barrier penetration. Nine metal complexes have been added to this structural library. We have completed a detailed comparison of four molecular mechanics computer programs QUANTA, SYBYL, BOYD, and MM2DREW to assess their applicability to modeling the structures of low molecular weight metal complexes. We tested the ability of each program to reproduce the crystallographic structures of 38 complexes between nickel(II) and saturated N-donor ligands. The programs were evaluated in terns of their ability to reproduce structural features such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles. Recently, we investigated the synthesis and characterization of lipophilic cationic gallium complexes with hexadentate bis(salicylaldimine) ligands. This work identified the first gallium-68 radiopharrnaceuticals that can be injected intravenously and that subsequently exhibit significant myocardial uptake followed by prolonged myocardial retention of {sup 68}Ga radioactivity. Tracers of this type remain under investigation as agents for evaluation of myocardial perfusion with positron emission tomography.

  3. Automated synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography: an apparatus for labelling with [11C] methyl iodide (MIASA)

    PubMed Central

    Cork, D. G.; Yamato, H.; Yajima, K.; Hayashi, N.; Sugawara, T.; Kato, S.

    1994-01-01

    A fully automated apparatus for the routine synthesis and formulation of short-lived 11C (t1/2 = 20 min) labelled radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET) has been developed. [11C]Carbon dioxide is converted to [11C]methyl iodide, which can be used to label a wide variety of substrates by methylation at C, N, O, or S electron rich centres. The apparatus, MIASA (methyl iodide automated synthesis apparatus), was designed to operate as part of an automated labelling system in a shielded ‘hot’ laboratory. The apparatus was designed without the size constraints of typical instrumentation used in hot cells, although it is compact where necessary. Ample use of indicators and sensors, together with compact design of the reaction flasks for small dead space and efficient evaporation, led to good reliability and performance. The design of the hardware and software is described in this paper, together with a preparation of 3-N-[11C]methylspiperone as a sterile injectable solution in physiological saline. PMID:18924994

  4. (11)C[double bond, length as m-dash]O bonds made easily for positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Rotstein, Benjamin H; Liang, Steven H; Placzek, Michael S; Hooker, Jacob M; Gee, Antony D; Dollé, Frédéric; Wilson, Alan A; Vasdev, Neil

    2016-08-22

    The positron-emitting radionuclide carbon-11 ((11)C, t1/2 = 20.3 min) possesses the unique potential for radiolabeling of any biological, naturally occurring, or synthetic organic molecule for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Carbon-11 is most often incorporated into small molecules by methylation of alcohol, thiol, amine or carboxylic acid precursors using [(11)C]methyl iodide or [(11)C]methyl triflate (generated from [(11)C]carbon dioxide or [(11)C]methane). Consequently, small molecules that lack an easily substituted (11)C-methyl group are often considered to have non-obvious strategies for radiolabeling and require a more customized approach. [(11)C]Carbon dioxide itself, [(11)C]carbon monoxide, [(11)C]cyanide, and [(11)C]phosgene represent alternative reactants to enable (11)C-carbonylation. Methodologies developed for preparation of (11)C-carbonyl groups have had a tremendous impact on the development of novel PET tracers and provided key tools for clinical research. (11)C-Carbonyl radiopharmaceuticals based on labeled carboxylic acids, amides, carbamates and ureas now account for a substantial number of important imaging agents that have seen translation to higher species and clinical research of previously inaccessible targets, which is a testament to the creativity, utility and practicality of the underlying radiochemistry. PMID:27276357

  5. SU-C-303-03: Dosimetric Model of the Beagle Needed for Pre-Clinical Testing of Radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, M; Sands, M; Bolch, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Large animal models, most popularly beagles, have been crucial surrogates to humans in determining radiation safety levels of radiopharmaceuticals. This study aims to develop a detailed beagle phantom to accurately approximate organ absorbed doses for therapy nuclear medicine preclinical studies. Methods: A 3D NURBS model was created subordinate to a whole body CT of an adult beagle. Bones were harvested and CT imaged to offer macroscopic skeletal detail. Samples of trabecular spongiosa were cored and imaged to offer microscopic skeletal detail for bone trabeculae and marrow volume fractions. Results: Organ masses in the model are typical of an adult beagle. Trends in volume fractions for skeletal dosimetry are fundamentally similar to those found in existing models of other canine species. Conclusion: This work warrants its use in further investigations of radiation transport calculation for electron and photon dosimetry. This model accurately represents the anatomy of a beagle, and can be directly translated into a useable geometry for a voxel-based Monte Carlo radiation transport program such as MCNP6. Work supported by a grant from the Hyundai Hope on Wheels Foundation for Pediatric Cancer Research.

  6. Design of hypoxia-targeting radiopharmaceuticals: selective uptake of copper-64 complexes in hypoxic cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dearling, J L; Lewis, J S; Mullen, G E; Rae, M T; Zweit, J; Blower, P J

    1998-07-01

    The well-known perfusion tracer CuPTSM, labelled with 62Cu or 64Cu, is believed to be trapped in cells non-selectively by a bioreductive mechanism. It is proposed that by modifying the ligand to increase its electron donor strength (for example by adding alkyl functionality or replacing sulphur ligands with oxygen ligands), the copper complexes will become less easily reduced and tracers with selectivity for hypoxic tissues could thus be developed. The aim of this work was to prepare 64Cu-labelled complexes of two series of ligands, based on the bis(thiosemicarbazone) (13 ligands) and bis(salicylaldimine) (3 ligands) skeletons, and to evaluate the hypoxia dependence of their uptake in cells. The complexes were incubated with Chinese hamster ovary cells under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, and the cells isolated by centrifugation to determine radioactivity uptake at various time points up to 90 min. Several members of both series demonstrated significant (P<0.05) or highly significant (P<0.01) hypoxia selectivity, indicating that both series of complexes offer a basis for development of hypoxia-targeting radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (60Cu, 61Cu, 62Cu, 64Cu) and targeted radiotherapy (64Cu, 67Cu).

  7. Iofetamine hydrochloride I 123: a new radiopharmaceutical for cerebral perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Druckenbrod, R.W.; Williams, C.C.; Gelfand, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Iofetamine hydrochloride I-123 permits cerebral blood perfusion imaging with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). SPECT is more widely available than positron emission tomography, and complements anatomic visualization with X-ray computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging. Iofetamine is an amphetamine analog that is rapidly taken up by the lungs, then redistributed principally to the liver and brain. The precise mechanism of localization has not been determined, but is believed to result from nonspecific receptor binding. Brain uptake peaks at 30 minutes postinjection and remains relatively constant through 60 minutes. The drug is metabolized and excreted in the urine, with negligible activity remaining at 48 hours. When compared with CT in stroke patients, visualization may be performed sooner after symptom onset and a larger zone of involvement may be evident with iofetamine. Localization of seizure foci and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease may also be possible. As CT has revolutionized noninvasive imaging of brain anatomy, SPECT with iofetamine permits routine cerebral blood flow imaging. 36 references.

  8. Synthesis of tripeptide derivatized cyclopentadienyl complexes of technetium and rhenium as radiopharmaceutical probes.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Qaisar; Can, Daniel; Shen, Yunjun; Felber, Michael; Mahmood, Zaid; Alberto, Roger

    2014-03-28

    We describe the syntheses of half-sandwich complexes of the type [(η(5)-Cp(CONH-R))M(CO)3] with M = Re or (99m)Tc. The R group represents different tri-peptides (tpe) which display high binding affinities for oligopeptide transporters PEPT2. The (99m)Tc complexes were prepared directly from [(99m)Tc(OH2)3(CO)3](+) and Diels-Alder dimerized, cyclopentadienyl derivatized peptides in water. This approach corroborates the feasibility of metal-mediated retro Diels-Alder reactions for the preparation of not only small molecules but also peptides carrying a [(η(5)-Cp)(99m)Tc(CO)3] tag. We synthesized the Diels-Alder product [(HCpCONH-tpe)2] from Thiele's acid [(η(5)-HCpCOOH)2] via double peptide coupling. The Re-complexes [(η(5)-CpCONH-tpe)Re(CO)3] were obtained by attaching [(Cp-COOH)Re(CO)3] directly to the N-terminus of peptides as received from SPPS. The authenticity of the (99m)Tc-complexes is confirmed by chromatographic comparison with the corresponding rhenium complexes, fully characterized by spectroscopic techniques.

  9. Protein Binding Pocket Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stank, Antonia; Kokh, Daria B; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-05-17

    The dynamics of protein binding pockets are crucial for their interaction specificity. Structural flexibility allows proteins to adapt to their individual molecular binding partners and facilitates the binding process. This implies the necessity to consider protein internal motion in determining and predicting binding properties and in designing new binders. Although accounting for protein dynamics presents a challenge for computational approaches, it expands the structural and physicochemical space for compound design and thus offers the prospect of improved binding specificity and selectivity. A cavity on the surface or in the interior of a protein that possesses suitable properties for binding a ligand is usually referred to as a binding pocket. The set of amino acid residues around a binding pocket determines its physicochemical characteristics and, together with its shape and location in a protein, defines its functionality. Residues outside the binding site can also have a long-range effect on the properties of the binding pocket. Cavities with similar functionalities are often conserved across protein families. For example, enzyme active sites are usually concave surfaces that present amino acid residues in a suitable configuration for binding low molecular weight compounds. Macromolecular binding pockets, on the other hand, are located on the protein surface and are often shallower. The mobility of proteins allows the opening, closing, and adaptation of binding pockets to regulate binding processes and specific protein functionalities. For example, channels and tunnels can exist permanently or transiently to transport compounds to and from a binding site. The influence of protein flexibility on binding pockets can vary from small changes to an already existent pocket to the formation of a completely new pocket. Here, we review recent developments in computational methods to detect and define binding pockets and to study pocket dynamics. We introduce five

  10. Protein Binding Pocket Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stank, Antonia; Kokh, Daria B; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-05-17

    The dynamics of protein binding pockets are crucial for their interaction specificity. Structural flexibility allows proteins to adapt to their individual molecular binding partners and facilitates the binding process. This implies the necessity to consider protein internal motion in determining and predicting binding properties and in designing new binders. Although accounting for protein dynamics presents a challenge for computational approaches, it expands the structural and physicochemical space for compound design and thus offers the prospect of improved binding specificity and selectivity. A cavity on the surface or in the interior of a protein that possesses suitable properties for binding a ligand is usually referred to as a binding pocket. The set of amino acid residues around a binding pocket determines its physicochemical characteristics and, together with its shape and location in a protein, defines its functionality. Residues outside the binding site can also have a long-range effect on the properties of the binding pocket. Cavities with similar functionalities are often conserved across protein families. For example, enzyme active sites are usually concave surfaces that present amino acid residues in a suitable configuration for binding low molecular weight compounds. Macromolecular binding pockets, on the other hand, are located on the protein surface and are often shallower. The mobility of proteins allows the opening, closing, and adaptation of binding pockets to regulate binding processes and specific protein functionalities. For example, channels and tunnels can exist permanently or transiently to transport compounds to and from a binding site. The influence of protein flexibility on binding pockets can vary from small changes to an already existent pocket to the formation of a completely new pocket. Here, we review recent developments in computational methods to detect and define binding pockets and to study pocket dynamics. We introduce five

  11. Analyzing radioligand binding data.

    PubMed

    Motulsky, H; Neubig, R

    2001-05-01

    A radioligand is a radioactively labeled drug that can associate with a receptor, transporter, enzyme, or any protein of interest. Measuring the rate and extent of binding provides information on the number of binding sites, and their affinity and accessibility for various drugs. Radioligand binding experiments are easy to perform, and provide useful data in many fields. For example, radioligand binding studies are used to study receptor regulation, investigate receptor localization in different organs or regions using autoradiography, categorize receptor subtypes, and probe mechanisms of receptor signaling. This unit reviews the theory of receptor binding and explains how to analyze experimental data. Since binding data are usually best analyzed using nonlinear regression, this unit also explains the principles of curve fitting with nonlinear regression.

  12. Evolving nucleotide binding surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber-Emmons, T.; Rein, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the stability and nature of binding of a nucleotide to several known dehydrogenases. The employed approach includes calculation of hydrophobic stabilization of the binding motif and its intermolecular interaction with the ligand. The evolutionary changes of the binding motif are studied by calculating the Euclidean deviation of the respective dehydrogenases. Attention is given to the possible structural elements involved in the origin of nucleotide recognition by non-coded primordial polypeptides.

  13. Macrocyclic complexes of scandium radionuclides as precursors for diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Majkowska-Pilip, A; Bilewicz, A

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate new ligands which can be applied for labeling biomolecules with scandium radionuclides. Two radionuclides of scandium, (47)Sc and (44)Sc, are perspective radioisotopes for radiotherapy and diagnostic imaging. (47)Sc decays with a half-life of 3.35 days and a maximum β(-) energy of 600 keV and could be an alternative to carrier added (177)Lu radionuclide for targeted radionuclide therapy. Another scandium radionuclide (44)Sc (t(1/2) = 3.92 h) is an ideal β(+) emitter for PET diagnosis. It can be obtained as a daughter of the long-lived (44)Ti (t(1/2) = 60.4 y) from (44)Ti/(44)Sc generator. For complexation of scandium radionuclides macrocyclic ligands having a cavity size similar to Sc(3+) ionic radius were selected: 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7 triacetic acid (NOTA), 1,4,7-triazacyclodecane-1,4,7 triacetic acid and 1,4,7-triazacycloundecane triacetic acid, and analogs of NOTA with 10, 11 and 12 atoms of the carbon in the ring. Our results have shown that from the studied macrocyclic ligands studied DOTA is most efficient for binding scandium radionuclides (44)Sc and (47)Sc to biomolecules. The determined stability constant of Sc-DOTA complex logK = 27.0 is comparable with stability constants for Y(3+) and heaviest lanthanides but is higher than those for In(3+) and Ga(3+). Also (46)Sc-DOTATATE conjugate exhibits high stability in-vitro studies. The (13)C NMR studies have shown that Sc-DOTA like Lu-DOTA forms in solution complexes with eight-coordination geometry. The lipophilicity of Sc-DOTATATE is nearly identical to that of Lu-DOTATATE, which suggests similar receptor affinity of both radioconjugates.

  14. Radioprotective effect of the Barbados Cherry (Malpighia glabra L.) against radiopharmaceutical Iodine-131 in Wistar rats in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables has contributed to the improvement of populational health, due in part, to the abundance of antioxidants in these foods. Antioxidants reduce the level of oxidative damage to DNA caused by free radicals and ionizing radiation, including the radioisotope iodine-131 (131I). This isotope is used for the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid injuries, such as hyperthyroidism and cancer. Methods This study aimed to evaluate the radioprotective and cytotoxic activity of acute and subchronic treatments with Barbados Cherry (BC) (Malpighia glabra L.) fruit juice (5 mg), which is rich in potent antioxidants such as vitamin C, phenols, carotenoids, anthocyanins and yellow flavonoids and its activity against the mutagenic activity of the therapeutic dose of 25 μCi of radioiodine for hyperthyroidism. The test system used was the bone marrow cells of Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) that were treated in vivo by gavage. Results BC showed radioprotective activity in acute treatments, which is most likely due to the joint action of its antioxidant components. In subchronic treatments, the continuous treatment presented an effective radioprotective activity, which was significantly different from treatment with the radiopharmaceutical only. Treatment with BC prior to (PRE) and simultaneous with (SIM) ionizing radiation decreased the number of induced chromosomal alterations, while post-treatment produced no protective effect. In addition, BC exhibited no cytotoxic activity. Conclusions These data serve as evidence that BC can be used as a preventive health measure to improve public health quality by countering the action of inevitable exposure to mutagens, such as 131I. PMID:24479389

  15. Effect of cyclodextrin complexation on the in vivo disposition of the brain imaging radiopharmaceutical 99mTechnetium ethyl cysteinate dimer (99mTc-ECD).

    PubMed

    Oliver, D W; Dormehl, I C; Louw, W; Kilian, E; de Beco, V; Morretti, J L

    2000-08-01

    The brain imaging radiopharmaceutical, 99mTechnetium ethyl cysteinate dimer (99mTc-ECD, 99mTc-bicisate) is the most recent addition to the available set of radiopharmaceuticals for measuring cerebral blood flow. Ideally radiotracers should be trapped in the brain long enough so that their distribution can be quantitated and should demonstrate good spatial resolution. Furthermore, the stability (chemical and metabolic) and bioavailability of radiopharmaceuticals have in general proved to be a challenge during development and clinical administration. In view of these challenges and background, this study with 99mTc-ECD is presented. The aims of this research program were to develop novel approaches to improve the chemical and metabolic stability and the bioavailability of 99mTc-ECD across the blood brain barrier for cerebral blood flow determinations, using the well known non-human primate in vivo baboon model. These aims were addressed by investigating the influence of cyclodextrin--99mTc-ECD complexation on normal cerebral blood flow patterns, using two different cyclodextrins, i.e., gamma-cyclodextrin (CAS 17465-86-0) and beta-trimethylcyclodextrin (CAS 55216-11-0). The effect of incubation of 99mTc-ECD (with or without cyclodextrin complexation) in plasma, on metabolic esterase action, was also investigated. Possible protection against plasma esterase by acetylcholine (CAS 51-84-3) of 99mTc-ECD was further determined. The current study has shown that cyclodextrin complexation of 99mTc-ECD indeed offers a useful approach to improve the stability of the radiopharmaceutical against peripheral metabolism. The acetylcholine shows also potential to protect 99mTc-ECD. However, it is clear from the current data that the choice of cyclodextrin is of utmost importance, as has been observed from significantly reduced the bioavailability of 99mTc-ECD when complexed with beta-trimethylcyclodextrin. The plasma incubation procedures showed that gamma-cyclodextrin offers

  16. ⁶⁸Ge content quality control of ⁶⁸Ge/⁶⁸Ga-generator eluates and ⁶⁸Ga radiopharmaceuticals--a protocol for determining the ⁶⁸Ge content using thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Eppard, Elisabeth; Loktionova, Natalia S; Rösch, Frank

    2014-09-01

    (68)Ge breakthrough from a (68)Ge/(68)Ga-generator appears to be one of the most critical parameters for the routine clinical application of this generator and (68)Ga-radiopharmaceuticals. We report a TLC-based (thin-layer chromatography) protocol which allows the (68)Ge breakthrough of a generator to be determined within 1 h post-initial elution. The protocol can also be adapted to allow the (68)Ge content of a (68)Ga-radiopharmaceutical preparation to be determined prior to in vivo application.

  17. Metallochaperones: bind and deliver

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    Metallochaperones deliver metal ions directly to target proteins via specific protein-protein interactions. Recent research has led to a molecular picture of how some metallochaperones bind metal ions, recognize their partner proteins, and accomplish metal ion transfer.

  18. An experimental model to study the effects of a senna extract on the blood constituent labeling and biodistribution of a radiopharmaceutical in rats.

    PubMed

    Souza, Deise Elizabeth; Pereira, Marcia Oliveira; Bernardo, Luciana Camargo; Carmo, Fernanda Santos; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Cassia angustifolia Vahl (senna) is a natural product that contains sennosides, which are active components that affect the intestinal tract and induce diarrhea. Authors have shown that senna produces DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) lesions in Escherichia coli cultures and can act as an antifungal agent. Natural drugs can alter the labeling of blood constituents with technetium-⁹⁹m (⁹⁹mTc) and can affect the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals. In this work, we have evaluated the influence of a senna extract on the radiolabeling of blood constituents and on the biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical sodium pertechnetate (Na⁹⁹mTcO₄)in Wistar rats. Twelve animals were treated with senna extract for 7 days. Blood samples were withdrawn from the animals and the radiolabeling procedure was carried out. The senna extract did not modify the radiolabeling of the blood constituents. A biodistributional assay was performed by administering Na⁹⁹mTcO₄ and determining its activity in different organs and in blood. The senna extract altered the biodistribution of Na⁹⁹mTcO₄ in the thyroid, liver, pancreas, lungs and blood. These results are associated with properties of the chemical substances present in the aqueous senna extract. Although these assays were performed in animals, our findings suggest that caution should be exercised when nuclear medicine examinations using Na⁹⁹mTcO₄ are conducted in patients who are using senna extract. PMID:21552677

  19. An experimental model to study the effects of a senna extract on the blood constituent labeling and biodistribution of a radiopharmaceutical in rats

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Deise Elizabeth; Pereira, Marcia Oliveira; Bernardo, Luciana Camargo; Carmo, Fernanda Santos; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cassia angustifolia Vahl (senna) is a natural product that contains sennosides, which are active components that affect the intestinal tract and induce diarrhea. Authors have shown that senna produces DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) lesions in Escherichia coli cultures and can act as an antifungal agent. Natural drugs can alter the labeling of blood constituents with technetium-99m (99mTc) and can affect the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals. In this work, we have evaluated the influence of a senna extract on the radiolabeling of blood constituents and on the biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical sodium pertechnetate (Na99mTcO4) in Wistar rats. Twelve animals were treated with senna extract for 7 days. Blood samples were withdrawn from the animals and the radiolabeling procedure was carried out. The senna extract did not modify the radiolabeling of the blood constituents. A biodistributional assay was performed by administering Na99mTcO4 and determining its activity in different organs and in blood. The senna extract altered the biodistribution of Na99mTcO4 in the thyroid, liver, pancreas, lungs and blood. These results are associated with properties of the chemical substances present in the aqueous senna extract. Although these assays were performed in animals, our findings suggest that caution should be exercised when nuclear medicine examinations using Na99mTcO4 are conducted in patients who are using senna extract. PMID:21552677

  20. An overview of translational (radio)pharmaceutical research related to certain oncological and non-oncological applications

    PubMed Central

    Cona, Marlein Miranda; de Witte, Peter; Verbruggen, Alfons; Ni, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    Translational medicine pursues the conversion of scientific discovery into human health improvement. It aims to establish strategies for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Cancer treatment is difficult. Radio-pharmaceutical research has played an important role in multiple disciplines, particularly in translational oncology. Based on the natural phenomenon of necrosis avidity, OncoCiDia has emerged as a novel generic approach for treating solid malignancies. Under this systemic dual targeting strategy, a vascular disrupting agent first selectively causes massive tumor necrosis that is followed by iodine-131 labeled-hypericin (123I-Hyp), a necrosis-avid compound that kills the residual cancer cells by crossfire effect of beta radiation. In this review, by emphasizing the potential clinical applicability of OncoCiDia, we summarize our research activities including optimization of radioiodinated hypericin Hyp preparations and recent studies on the biodistribution, dosimetry, pharmacokinetic and, chemical and radiochemical toxicities of the preparations. Myocardial infarction is a global health problem. Although cardiac scintigraphy using radioactive perfusion tracers is used in the assessment of myocardial viability, searching for diagnostic imaging agents with authentic necrosis avidity is pursued. Therefore, a comparative study on the biological profiles of the necrosis avid 123I-Hyp and the commercially available 99mTc-Sestamibi was conducted and the results are demonstrated. Cholelithiasis or gallstone disease may cause gallbladder inflammation, infection and other severe complications. While studying the mechanisms underlying the necrosis avidity of Hyp and derivatives, their naturally occurring fluorophore property was exploited for targeting cholesterol as a main component of gallstones. The usefulness of Hyp as an optical imaging agent for cholelithiasis was studied and the results are presented. Multiple uses of automatic contrast injectors may reduce costs

  1. DOE SBIR Phase I Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER83067, ''A Flexible and Economical Automated Nucleophilic [{sup 18}F]Fluorination synthesis System for PET Radiopharmaceuticals.'' Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Padgett, Henry C.

    2001-08-04

    Phase I Final Report. A prototype manual remote synthesis system based on the unit operations approach was designed, constructed, and functionally tested. This general-purpose system was validated by its configuration and initial use for the preparation of the PET radiopharmaceutical [F-18]FLT using [F-18]fluoride ion.

  2. Squaring cooperative binding circles

    PubMed Central

    Deutman, Alexander B. C.; Monnereau, Cyrille; Moalin, Mohamed; Coumans, Ruud G. E.; Veling, Nico; Coenen, Michiel; Smits, Jan M. M.; de Gelder, René; Elemans, Johannes A. A. W.; Ercolani, Gianfranco; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; Rowan, Alan E.

    2009-01-01

    The cooperative binding effects of viologens and pyridines to a synthetic bivalent porphyrin receptor are used as a model system to study how the magnitudes of these effects relate to the experimentally obtained values. The full thermodynamic and kinetic circles concerning both activation and inhibition of the cage of the receptor for the binding of viologens were measured and evaluated. The results strongly emphasize the apparent character of measured binding and rate constants, in which the fractional saturation of receptors with other guests is linearly expressed in these constants. The presented method can be used as a simple tool to better analyze and comprehend the experimentally observed kinetics and thermodynamics of natural and artificial cooperative systems. PMID:19470643

  3. Mechanisms for optical binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, David L.; Davila Romero, Luciana C.

    2009-08-01

    The phenomenon of optical binding is now experimentally very well established. With a recognition of the facility to collect and organize particles held in an optical trap, the related term 'optical matter' has also been gaining currency, highlighting possibilities for a significant interplay between optically induced inter-particle forces and other interactions such as chemical bonding and dispersion forces. Optical binding itself has a variety of interpretations. With some of these explanations being more prominent than others, and their applicability to some extent depending on the nature of the particles involved, a listing of these has to include the following: collective scattering, laser-dressed Casimir forces, virtual photon coupling, optically induced dipole resonance, and plasmon resonance coupling. It is the purpose of this paper to review and to establish the extent of fundamental linkages between these theoretical descriptions, recognizing the value that each has in relating the phenomenon of optical binding to the broader context of other, closely related physical measurements.

  4. Stabalized radiopharmaceutical compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Charleson, F.P.

    1989-11-14

    This patent describes a stabilized radiopharmaceutial composition. It comprises: a molecule containing a radioactive iodine atom and a stabilize, selected from the group consisting of ascorbic acid, nicotinamide and its corresponding amides, or a mixture of ascorbic acid and nicotinamide and its amides, in a sufficient amount to stabilize against radiolytic decomposition.

  5. Rapid brain scanning radiopharmaceutical

    DOEpatents

    Sargent, T.W. III; Shulgin, A.T.; Mathis, C.A.

    1987-03-03

    A method for detecting the blood flow in animals, particularly in the brain, is provided wherein a detectable amount of a novel radioactive compound of the formula 1 is administered to one animal: as given in figure in patent wherein R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] are independently alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms or benzyl; R[sub 3] is alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms, benzyl, cyclopropylalkyl of 4 to 6 carbon atoms, or cyanoalkyl of 2 to 6 carbon atoms; R[sub 4] is hydrogen, benzyl or alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms; with the provisos that R[sub 4] is not isopropyl and when R[sub 4] is methyl, R[sub 3] is not benzyl; and X is a radioactive halogen. 2 figs.

  6. Rapid brain scanning radiopharmaceutical

    DOEpatents

    Sargent, III, Thornton W.; Shulgin, Alexander T.; Mathis, Chester A.

    1987-01-01

    A method for detecting the blood flow in animals, particularly in the brain, is provided wherein a detectable amount of a novel radioactive compound of the formula I is administered to one animal: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are independently alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms or benzyl; R.sub.3 is alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms, benzyl, cyclopropylalkyl of 4 to 6 carbon atoms, or cyanoalkyl of 2 to 6 carbon atoms; R.sub.4 is hydrogen, benzyl or alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms; with the provisos that R.sub.4 is not isopropyl and when R.sub.4 is methyl, R.sub.3 is not benzyl; and X is a radioactive halogen.

  7. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Caroline

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  8. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Caroline

    2001-10-09

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  9. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Carolyn

    1999-10-05

    This invention provides a system for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, this system can be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  10. The folate binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Corrocher, R; Olivieri, O; Pacor, M L

    1991-01-01

    Folates are essential molecules for cell life and, not surprisingly, their transport in biological fluids and their transfer to cells are finely regulated. Folate binding proteins play a major role in this regulation. This paper will review our knowledge on these proteins and examine the most recent advances in this field. PMID:1820987

  11. MD-2 binds cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Kim, Jungsu; Gonen, Ayelet; Viriyakosol, Suganya; Miller, Yury I

    2016-02-19

    Cholesterol is a structural component of cellular membranes, which is transported from liver to peripheral cells in the form of cholesterol esters (CE), residing in the hydrophobic core of low-density lipoprotein. Oxidized CE (OxCE) is often found in plasma and in atherosclerotic lesions of subjects with cardiovascular disease. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that OxCE activates inflammatory responses in macrophages via toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). Here we demonstrate that cholesterol binds to myeloid differentiation-2 (MD-2), a TLR4 ancillary molecule, which is a binding receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and is indispensable for LPS-induced TLR4 dimerization and signaling. Cholesterol binding to MD-2 was competed by LPS and by OxCE-modified BSA. Furthermore, soluble MD-2 in human plasma and MD-2 in mouse atherosclerotic lesions carried cholesterol, the finding supporting the biological significance of MD-2 cholesterol binding. These results help understand the molecular basis of TLR4 activation by OxCE and mechanisms of chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis.

  12. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories—episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  13. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  14. Lectin binding in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Kleinert, R; Radner, H

    1987-01-01

    Forty-two meningiomas of different morphological sub-type were examined to determine their pattern of binding to 11 different lectins which characterize cell surface components such as carbohydrate residues. Histiocytic and xanthoma cells within meningiomas could be demonstrated with six different lectins: wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), peanut agglutinin (PNA) Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin (BPA), Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), Vicia fava agglutinin (VFA) and Soyabean agglutinin (SBA). Vascular elements including endothelial cells and intimal cells, bound Ulex europaeus agglutinin type 1 (UEA 1), WGA and HPA. The fibrous stroma in fibrous and fibroblastic meningiomas bound PNA, Laburnum alpinum agglutinin (LAA) and SBA. Tumour cells in meningotheliomatous meningiomas and some areas of anaplastic meningiomas bound Concanavalin A, PNA, LAA and VFA whereas tumour cells in fibrous and fibroblastic meningiomas bound BPA, LAA and VFA. Lectin binding has proved to be of value in detecting histiocytic and xanthoma cells together with vascular elements within meningiomas. In addition, the different lectin binding patterns allow different histological sub-types of meningioma to be distinguished although the biological significance of the binding patterns is unclear. PMID:3658105

  15. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  16. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics.

    PubMed

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories-episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities. PMID:26520084

  17. A strategy for the study of cerebral amino acid transport using iodine-123-labeled amino acid radiopharmaceutical: 3-iodo-alpha-methyl-L-tyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, K.; Fujibayashi, Y.; Saji, H.; Yonekura, Y.; Konishi, J.; Kubodera, A.; Yokoyama, A. )

    1991-05-01

    We examined the brain accumulation of iodine-123-iodo-alpha-methyl-L-tyrosine ({sup 123}I-L-AMT) in mice and rats. I-L-AMT showed high brain accumulation in mice, and in rats; rat brain uptake index exceeded that of {sup 14}C-L-tyrosine. The brain uptake index and the brain slice studies indicated the affinity of I-L-AMT for carrier-mediated and stereoselective active transport systems, respectively; both operating across the blood-brain barrier and cell membranes of the brain. The tissue homogenate analysis revealed that most of the accumulated radioactivity belonged to intact I-L-AMT, an indication of its stability. Thus, {sup 123}I-L-AMT appears to be a useful radiopharmaceutical for the selective measurement of cerebral amino acid transport.

  18. Synthesis of the first radiolabeled 188Re N-heterocyclic carbene complex and initial studies on its potential use in radiopharmaceutical applications

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Thomas; Zeglis, Brian M.; Groveman, Sam; Hille, Claudia; Pöthig, Alexander; Francesconi, Lynn C.; Herrmann, Wolfgang A.; Kühn, Fritz E.; Reiner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach towards the synthesis of radiolabeled organometallic rhenium complexes is presented. We successfully synthesized and analyzed the first 188Re-labeled N-heterocyclic biscarbene complex, trans-dioxobis(1,1′-methylene-bis(3,3′-diisopropylimidazolium-2-ylidene))188rhenium(V) hexafluorophosphate (188Re-4) via transmetalation using an air-stable and moisture-stable silver(I) biscarbene complex. In order to assess the viability of this complex as a potential lead structure for in vivo applications, the stability of the 188Re-NHC complex was tested in physiologically relevant media. Ultimately, our studies illustrate that the complex we synthesized dissociates rapidly and is therefore unsuitable for use in radiopharmaceuticals. However, it is clear that the transmetalation approach we have developed is a rapid, robust, and mild method for the synthesis of new 188Re-labeled carbene complexes. PMID:24889257

  19. Modular syntheses of H₄octapa and H₂dedpa, and yttrium coordination chemistry relevant to ⁸⁶Y/⁹⁰Y radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Price, Eric W; Cawthray, Jacqueline F; Adam, Michael J; Orvig, Chris

    2014-05-21

    The ligands H2dedpa, H4octapa, p-SCN-Bn-H2dedpa, and p-SCN-Bn-H4octapa were synthesized using a new protection chemistry approach, with labile tert-butyl esters replacing the previously used methyl esters as protecting groups for picolinic acid moieties. Additionally, the ligands H2dedpa and p-SCN-Bn-H2dedpa were synthesized using nosyl protection chemistry for the first time. The use of tert-butyl esters allows for deprotection at room temperature in trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), which compares favorably to the harsh conditions of refluxing HCl (6 M) or LiOH that were previously required for methyl ester cleavage. H4octapa has recently been shown to be a very promising (111)In and (177)Lu ligand for radiopharmaceutical applications; therefore, coordination chemistry studies with Y(3+) are described to assess its potential for use with (86)Y/(90)Y. The solution chemistry of H4octapa with Y(3+) is shown to be suitable via solution NMR studies of the [Y(octapa)](-) complex and density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the predicted structure, suggesting properties similar to those of the analogous In(3+) and Lu(3+) complexes. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was mapped onto the molecular surface of the DFT-calculated coordination structures, suggesting very similar and even charge distributions between both the Lu(3+) and Y(3+) complexes of octapa(4-), and coordinate structures between 8 (ligand only) and 9 (ligand and one H2O). Potentiometric titrations determined H4octapa to have a formation constant (log K(ML)) with Y(3+) of 18.3 ± 0.1, revealing high thermodynamic stability. This preliminary work suggests that H4octapa may be a competent ligand for future (86)Y/(90)Y radiopharmaceutical applications.

  20. Comparative evaluation of glutamate-sensitive radiopharmaceuticals: Technetium-99m-glutamic acid and technetium-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-bis(glutamate) conjugate for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Dipti; Tiwari, Anjani K; Chuttani, Krishna; Kaul, Ankur; Singh, Harpal; Mishra, Anil K

    2010-12-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography has become a significant imaging modality with huge potential to visualize and provide information of anatomic dysfunctions that are predictive of future diseases. This imaging tool is complimented by radiopharmaceuticals/radiosubstrates that help in imaging specific physiological aspects of the human body. The present study was undertaken to explore the utility of technetium-99m (⁹⁹(m)Tc)-labeled glutamate conjugates for tumor scintigraphy. As part of our efforts to further utilize the application of chelating agents, glutamic acid was conjugated with a multidentate ligand, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). The DTPA-glutamate conjugate [DTPA-bis(Glu)] was well characterized by IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy. The biological activity of glutamic acid was compared with its DTPA conjugate by radiocomplexation with ⁹⁹(m)Tc (labeling efficiency ≥98%). In vivo studies of both the radiolabeled complexes ⁹⁹(m)Tc-Glu and ⁹⁹(m)Tc-DTPA-bis(Glu) were then carried out, followed by gamma scintigraphy in New Zealand albino rabbits. Improved serum stability of ⁹⁹(m)Tc-labeled DTPA conjugate indicated that ⁹⁹(m)Tc remained bound to the conjugate up to 24 hours. Blood clearance showed a relatively slow washout of the DTPA conjugate when compared with the labeled glutamate. Biodistribution characteristics of the conjugate in Balb/c mice revealed that DTPA conjugation of glutamic acid favors less accumulation in the liver and bone and rapid renal clearance. Tumor scintigraphy in mice showed increasing tumor accumulation, stable up to 4 hours. These preliminary studies show that ⁹⁹(m)Tc-DTPA-bis(Glu) can be a useful radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic applications in single-photon emission computed tomography imaging.

  1. A Method to Predict Response of Cell Populations to Cocktails of Chemotherapeutics and Radiopharmaceuticals: Validation with Daunomycin, Doxorubicin, and the Alpha Particle Emitter 210Po

    PubMed Central

    Akudugu, John M.; Howell, Roger W.

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the use of α-emitting radionuclides in radioimmunotherapy. However, the high toxicity of α-emitting radionuclides often does not permit administration of high activities for fear of normal tissue toxicity. Accordingly, targeting procedures need to be optimized for improved tumor control and minimized normal tissue toxicity. To guide design of effective cocktails of α-emitting radiopharmaceuticals and chemotherapy drugs, approaches that can predict biological response of a cell population on a cell-by-cell basis are needed. Methods Cells were concomitantly treated with the α-particle emitting radiochemical 210Po-citrate and daunomycin, or with 210Po-citrate and doxorubicin. The responses of the treated cell populations were measured with a colony forming assay. The nonuniform cellular incorporation of the radiochemical and drugs was determined simultaneously on a cell-by-cell basis using flow cytometry. Monte Carlo methods were used to simulate cell survival on the of basis individual cell incorporation of each cytotoxic agent and validated by direct comparison with the experimental clonogenic cell survival. Results Both daunomycin and doxorubicin enhanced the toxicity of the α-particles with a magnitude greater than expected based on single-agent toxicities. Cell survival obtained by Monte Carlo simulation was in good agreement with clonogenic cell survival for the combination treatments. Conclusion Flow cytometry assisted Monte Carlo simulations can be used to predict toxicity of cocktails of α-emitting radiopharmaceuticals and chemotherapy drugs in a manner that takes into account the effects of nonuniform distributions of agents within cell populations. PMID:22503536

  2. Design of Ga-DOTA-based bifunctional radiopharmaceuticals: two functional moieties can be conjugated to radiogallium-DOTA without reducing the complex stability.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Takahiro; Suwada, Jun; Sano, Kohei; Okada, Mayumi; Yamamoto, Fumihiko; Maeda, Minoru

    2009-07-01

    From the X-ray crystal structures of Ga-DOTA chelates, we were able to deduce that two free carboxylate groups of the radiogallium-DOTA complex may be utilized for coupling to functional moieties that recognize molecular targets for in vivo imaging without reducing the radiogallium-complex stability. Thus, we designed 2,2'-[4,10-bis(2-{[2-(2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethyl]amino}-2-oxoethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-diyl]diacetic acid (DOTA-MN2) (7), employing a metronidazole moiety as the recognition site of hypoxic lesions, based on the drug design concept of bifunctional radiopharmaceuticals. Coupling of DOTA-bis(tert-butyl)ester 5 with 1-(2-aminoethyl)-2-methyl-5-nitroimidazole dihydrochloride, followed by deprotection, afforded the required 7 (DOTA-MN2). (67)Ga-labeling was carried out by reaction of DOTA-MN2 with (67)Ga-citrate. When (67)Ga-DOTA-MN2 was incubated in phosphate-buffered saline or mouse plasma, no measurable decomposition occurred over a 24-h period. In biodistribution experiments in NFSa tumor-bearing mice, (67)Ga-DOTA-MN2 displayed not only a significant tumor uptake, but also rapid blood clearance and low accumulations in nontarget tissues, resulting in high target-to-nontarget ratios of radioactivity. These results indicate the potential benefits of the drug design of (67)Ga-DOTA-MN2. The present findings provide helpful information for the development of radiogallium-labeled radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT and PET studies. PMID:19481944

  3. Recombinant complement receptor 2 radiolabeled with [99mTc(CO)3]+: a potential new radiopharmaceutical for imaging activated complement.

    PubMed

    Badar, Adam; DeFreitas, Sarah; McDonnell, James M; Yahya, Norhakim; Thakor, David; Razavi, Reza; Smith, Richard; Sacks, Steven; Mullen, Gregory E D

    2011-04-06

    We describe the design and synthesis of a new Tc-99m labeled bioconjugate for imaging activated complement, based on Short Consensus Repeats 1 and 2 of Complement Receptor 2 (CR2), the binding domain for C3d. To avoid non specific modification of CR2 and the potential for modifying lysine residues critical to the CR2/C3d contact surface, we engineered a new protein, recombinant CR2 (rCR2), to include the C-terminal sequence VFPLECHHHHHH, a hexahistidine tag (for site-specific radiolabeling with [(99m)Tc(CO)(3)(OH(2))(3)](+)). The protein was characterized by N-terminal sequencing, SDS-PAGE and size exclusion chromatography. To test the function of the recombinant CR2, binding to C3d was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The function was further confirmed by binding of rCR2 to C3d(+) red blood cells (RBC) which were generated by deposition of human or rat C3d and analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The affinity of rCR2 for C3d(+), in presence of 150 mM NaCl, was measured using surface plasma resonance giving rise to a K(D)≈500 nM. Radiolabeling of rCR2 or an inactive mutant of rCR2 (K41E CR2) or an unrelated protein of a similar size (C2A) with [(99m)Tc(CO)(3)(OH(2))(3)](+) at gave radiochemical yields >95%. Site-specifically radiolabeled rCR2 bound to C3d to C3d(+) RBC. Binding of radiolabeled rCR2 to C3d was inhibited by anti-C3d and the radiolabeled inactive mutant K41E CR2 and C2A did not bind to C3d(+) RBCs. We conclude that rCR2-Tc(99m) has excellent radiolabeling, stability and C3d binding characteristics and warrants in vivo evaluation as an activated complement imaging agent.

  4. Library Binding Manual. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakhanpal, S. K.

    This procedural manual is designed to be used in bindery sections in public, university and special libraries. It briefly discusses these general matters: administrative control; selection of a binder; when and what to bind; conventional binding; routines; missing issues; schedule for shipments; temporary binding; rare books, maps and newspapers;…

  5. Coordination chemistry of the {sup 212}Pb/{sup 212}Bi nuclear transformation: Alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, N.J.; Harris, W.R.; Keen, C.L.; Cooper, S.R.

    1992-07-01

    Subdivisions of this project are: (a) the synthesis of prototypical thiolate and dithiocarbamate based hexacoordinate complexes, (b) radiochemical engineering for generation of no-carrier-added lead and bismuth radioelements, (c) the first isolation of bismuth-binding proteins from in vivo studies with cyclotron produced {sup 205/206}Bi tracer, and (d) initial development of transport mechanisms for the intracellular radiobiological study of alpha emitting bismuth, and (e) the initiation of chemical equilibrium studies and biochemical pathways with cyclotron-produced, no-carrier-added, {sup 203}Pb (T{sub 1/2} = 51 hr).

  6. SPECT Imaging of Mice with 99mTc-Radiopharmaceuticals Obtained from 99Mo Produced by 100Mo(n,2n)99Mo and Fission of 235U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Kazuyuki; Nagai, Yasuki; Kawabata, Masako; Sato, Nozomi; Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Saeki, Hideya; Motoishi, Shoji; Ohta, Masayuki; Konno, Chikara; Ochiai, Kentaro; Kawauchi, Yukimasa; Ohta, Akio; Shiina, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Nobuhiro; Ashino, Hiroki; Nakahara, Yuto

    2015-04-01

    The distribution of 99mTc-radiopharmaceutical in mouse was determined by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for the first time using 99mTc, which was separated by thermochromatography from 99Mo produced via the 100Mo(n,2n)99Mo reaction with accelerator neutrons. The SPECT image was comparable to that obtained using the fission product 99Mo. Radionuclidic and radiochemical purities of the separated 99mTc and its aluminum concentration met the United States Pharmacopeia regulatory requirements for 99mTc from the fission product 99Mo. These results provide important evidence that the 99mTc-radiopharmaceutical formulated using the (n,2n) 99Mo can be a promising substitute for the fission product 99Mo. The current and forthcoming problem of ensuring a reliable and constant supply of 99Mo in Japan can be partially mitigated.

  7. Carboplatin binding to histidine

    SciTech Connect

    Tanley, Simon W. M.; Diederichs, Kay; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J.; Levy, Colin; Schreurs, Antoine M. M.; Helliwell, John R.

    2014-08-29

    An X-ray crystal structure showing the binding of purely carboplatin to histidine in a model protein has finally been obtained. This required extensive crystallization trials and various novel crystal structure analyses. Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the bromine form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are described.

  8. BINDING OF ANTIGEN BY IMMUNOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Bystryn, Jean-Claude; Siskind, Gregory W.; Uhr, Jonathan W.

    1973-01-01

    The binding of antigen to cells with antibody on their surface has been studied in a model system consisting of murine myeloma cells (MOPC 315) and DNP conjugates. Specific binding occurred between the DNP groups of DNP conjugates and cell surface immunoglobulin. Using this model, the binding affinities of multivalent and univalent DNP conjugates were measured directly by equilibrium-binding techniques and indirectly by displacement of bound conjugate with univalent hapten. With both approaches the multivalent conjugate was shown to bind to cells with an avidity 100–300 fold greater than the univalent hapten. Nonspecific binding of unrelated protein and repeated washing of cells was found to markedly dedecrease the specific binding of univalent conjugates, presumably because the relatively weak bonds dissociate readily. PMID:4734402

  9. A Monte Carlo approach to small-scale dosimetry of solid tumour microvasculature for nuclear medicine therapies with (223)Ra-, (131)I-, (177)Lu- and (111)In-labelled radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Amato, Ernesto; Leotta, Salvatore; Italiano, Antonio; Baldari, Sergio

    2015-07-01

    The small-scale dosimetry of radionuclides in solid-tumours is directly related to the intra-tumoral distribution of the administered radiopharmaceutical, which is affected by its egress from the vasculature and dispersion within the tumour. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the combined dosimetric effects of radiopharmaceutical distribution and range of the emitted radiation in a model of tumour microvasculature. We developed a computational model of solid-tumour microenvironment around a blood capillary vessel, and we simulated the transport of radiation emitted by (223)Ra, (111)In, (131)I and (177)Lu using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo. For each nuclide, several models of radiopharmaceutical dispersion throughout the capillary vessel were considered. Radial dose profiles around the capillary vessel, the Initial Radioactivity (IR) necessary to deposit 100 Gy of dose at the edge of the viable tumour-cell region, the Endothelial Cell Mean Dose (ECMD) and the Tumour Edge Mean Dose (TEMD), i.e. the mean dose imparted at the 250-μm layer of tissue, were computed. The results for beta and Auger emitters demonstrate that the photon dose is about three to four orders of magnitude lower than that deposited by electrons. For (223)Ra, the beta emissions of its progeny deliver a dose about three orders of magnitude lower than that delivered by the alpha emissions. Such results may help to characterize the dose inhomogeneities in solid tumour therapies with radiopharmaceuticals, taking into account the interplay between drug distribution from vasculature and range of ionizing radiations. PMID:25979209

  10. A Monte Carlo approach to small-scale dosimetry of solid tumour microvasculature for nuclear medicine therapies with (223)Ra-, (131)I-, (177)Lu- and (111)In-labelled radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Amato, Ernesto; Leotta, Salvatore; Italiano, Antonio; Baldari, Sergio

    2015-07-01

    The small-scale dosimetry of radionuclides in solid-tumours is directly related to the intra-tumoral distribution of the administered radiopharmaceutical, which is affected by its egress from the vasculature and dispersion within the tumour. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the combined dosimetric effects of radiopharmaceutical distribution and range of the emitted radiation in a model of tumour microvasculature. We developed a computational model of solid-tumour microenvironment around a blood capillary vessel, and we simulated the transport of radiation emitted by (223)Ra, (111)In, (131)I and (177)Lu using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo. For each nuclide, several models of radiopharmaceutical dispersion throughout the capillary vessel were considered. Radial dose profiles around the capillary vessel, the Initial Radioactivity (IR) necessary to deposit 100 Gy of dose at the edge of the viable tumour-cell region, the Endothelial Cell Mean Dose (ECMD) and the Tumour Edge Mean Dose (TEMD), i.e. the mean dose imparted at the 250-μm layer of tissue, were computed. The results for beta and Auger emitters demonstrate that the photon dose is about three to four orders of magnitude lower than that deposited by electrons. For (223)Ra, the beta emissions of its progeny deliver a dose about three orders of magnitude lower than that delivered by the alpha emissions. Such results may help to characterize the dose inhomogeneities in solid tumour therapies with radiopharmaceuticals, taking into account the interplay between drug distribution from vasculature and range of ionizing radiations.

  11. Development of more efficacious {Tc}-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceuticals. Annual technical progress report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, W.R.

    1993-05-03

    This research program is detailed at development of more efficacious technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals for use as imaging agents in diagnostic nuclear medicine. We seek to isolate and develop distinct site imaging agents to provide diagnostic information concerning a given pathological condition. Analytical techniques are being developed to enable complete analysis of radiopharmaceutical preparations so that individual complexes can be characterized with respect to imaging efficacy and to enable a radiopharmaceutical to be monitored after injection into a test animal to determine the species that actually accumulates in an organ to provide the image. Administration of the isolated, single most effective imaging complex, rather than a mixture of technetium-containing complexes, wi-11 minimize radiation exposure to the patient and maximize diagnostic information available to the clinician. This report specifically describes the development of capillary electrophoresis (CE) for characterizating diphosphonate skeletal imaging agents. Advances in the development of electrochemical and fiber optic sensors for Tc and Re imaging agents are described. These sensors will ultimately be capable of monitoring a specific chemical state of an imaging agent in vivo after injection into a test animal by implantation in the organ of interest.

  12. Development of additive [11C]CO2 target system in the KOTRON-13 cyclotron and its application for [11C]radiopharmaceutical production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Byung Seok; Lee, Hong Jin; Lee, Won Kyung; Hur, Min Goo; Yang, Seung Dae; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Sang Eun

    2015-08-01

    The KOTRON-13 cyclotron, which was developed in South Korea for the production of medical radioisotopes, has the structural limitation of only one beam-output port, restricting the production of the carbon-11 isotope. In the present study, we investigate the design of a switchable target system and develop an effective carbon-11 target in the KOTRON-13 cyclotron, for combination with the fluorine-18 target. The target system was designed by introducing a sliding-type element between the fluorine-18 and carbon-11 targets, a tailor-made C-11 target and its cooling system. For the efficient production of [11C]CO2, the desirable target shape and internal volume were determined by a Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) simulation program, and the target grid was modified to resist the cavity pressure during beam irradiation. We evaluated the [11C]CO2 production while varying the material and thickness of the target foil, oxygen content of the nitrogen gas, and target loading pressure. Using sliding-type equipment including an additional gate valve and a high vacuum in a beam line, the bi-directional conversion between the fluorine-18 and carbon-11 targets was efficient regarding the accurate beam irradiation on both targets. The optimal [11C]CO2 production for 30 min irradiation at 60 μA (86.6 ± 1.7 GBq in the target at EOB) was observed at a thickness of 19 μm with HAVAR® material as a target foil and a target loading pressure of 24 bar with nitrogen plus 300 ppb of oxygen gas. Additionally, the coolant cavity system in the target grid and target chamber is useful to remove the heat transferred to the target body by the internal convection of water and thereby ensure the stability of the [11C]CO2 production under a high beam current. In the application of C-11 labeled radiopharmaceuticals such as [11C]PIB, [11C]DASB, [11C]PBR28, [11C]Methionine and [11C]Clozapine, the radiochemical yields were shown to be 25-38% (decay corrected) with over 166 GBq/μmol of

  13. Multipose binding in molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Atkovska, Kalina; Samsonov, Sergey A; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Pisabarro, M Teresa

    2014-02-14

    Molecular docking has been extensively applied in virtual screening of small molecule libraries for lead identification and optimization. A necessary prerequisite for successful differentiation between active and non-active ligands is the accurate prediction of their binding affinities in the complex by use of docking scoring functions. However, many studies have shown rather poor correlations between docking scores and experimental binding affinities. Our work aimed to improve this correlation by implementing a multipose binding concept in the docking scoring scheme. Multipose binding, i.e., the property of certain protein-ligand complexes to exhibit different ligand binding modes, has been shown to occur in nature for a variety of molecules. We conducted a high-throughput docking study and implemented multipose binding in the scoring procedure by considering multiple docking solutions in binding affinity prediction. In general, improvement of the agreement between docking scores and experimental data was observed, and this was most pronounced in complexes with large and flexible ligands and high binding affinities. Further developments of the selection criteria for docking solutions for each individual complex are still necessary for a general utilization of the multipose binding concept for accurate binding affinity prediction by molecular docking.

  14. Carboplatin binding to histidine.

    PubMed

    Tanley, Simon W M; Diederichs, Kay; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M J; Levy, Colin; Schreurs, Antoine M M; Helliwell, John R

    2014-09-01

    Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the bromine form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are described.

  15. Trifluoperazine binding to mutant calmodulins.

    PubMed

    Massom, L R; Lukas, T J; Persechini, A; Kretsinger, R H; Watterson, D M; Jarrett, H W

    1991-01-22

    Trifluoperazine (TFP) binding by 14 calmodulins, including 12 produced by site-directed mutagenesis, was determined. While vertebrate calmodulin binds 4.2 +/- 0.2 equiv of TFP, Escherichia coli expressed but unmutated calmodulins bind about 5.0 +/- 0.5 equiv of TFP. The cause for this difference is not known. The E. coli expressed proteins consist of two different series expressed from different calmodulin genes, CaMI and SYNCAM. The wild-type genes code for proteins that differ by nine conservative amino acid substitutions. Both these calmodulins bind 5 equiv of TFP with similar affinities, thus none of these conservative substitutions has any additional effect on TFP binding. Some altered calmodulins (deletion of EE83-84 or SEEE81-84, changing DEE118-120----KKK, M124----I,E120----K, or E82----K) have no appreciable effect on TFP binding. Other mutations affect either the binding of one TFP (deletion of E84) or about two TFP (changing E84----K, EEE82-84----KKK, E67----A, DEQ6-8----KKK, or E11----K). The mutations that affect TFP binding are localized to three regions of calmodulin: The amino-terminal alpha-helix, the central helix between the two globular ends of calmodulin, and a calcium-binding site in the second calcium-binding domain. The results are consistent with each of these regions either directly participating in drug binding or involved structurally in maintaining or inducing the correct conformation for TFP binding in the amino-terminal half of calmodulin.

  16. Alpha particles as radiopharmaceuticals in the treatment of bone metastases: mechanism of action of radium-223 chloride (Alpharadin) and radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Cheetham, Philippa J; Petrylak, Daniel P

    2012-04-01

    Approximately 85% to 90% of men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) have radiological evidence of bone metastases. To date, however, therapies to manage bone metastases have been primarily palliative. Among CRPC patients with bone metastases, there is a significant unmet need for active antitumor treatment options that are highly efficacious and have a favorable safety profile. This article will present current information about alpha-pharmaceuticals, a new class of targeted cancer therapy for the treatment of patients with CRPC and bone metastases. It will review preclinical and clinical studies of the experimental radiopharmaceutical radium-223 chloride (Alpharadin), a first-in-class, highly targeted and well-tolerated alpha-pharmaceutical under development to improve survival in patients with bone metastases from advanced prostate cancer. Alpharadin kills cancer cells via alpha radiation from the decay of radium-223, a calcium mimetic that naturally self-targets to bone metastases. The mechanism of action of Alpharadin and specifics of administration, radiation protection, and patient management will be discussed.

  17. A novel device for automatic withdrawal and accurate calibration of 99m-technetium radiopharmaceuticals to minimise radiation exposure to nuclear medicine staff and patient.

    PubMed

    Nazififard, Mohammad; Mahdizadeh, Simin; Meigooni, A S; Alavi, M; Suh, Kune Y

    2012-09-01

    A Joint Automatic Dispenser Equipment (JADE) has been designed and fabricated for automatic withdrawal and calibration of radiopharmaceutical materials. The thermoluminescent dosemeter procedures have shown a reduction in dose to the technician's hand with this novel dose dispenser system JADE when compared with the manual withdrawal of (99m)Tc. This system helps to increase the precision of calibration and to minimise the radiation dose to the hands and body of the workers. This paper describes the structure of this device, its function and user-friendliness, and its efficacy. The efficacy of this device was determined by measuring the radiation dose delivered to the hands of the nuclear medicine laboratory technician. The user-friendliness of JADE has been examined. The automatic withdrawal and calibration offered by this system reduces the dose to the technician's hand to a level below the maximum permissible dose stipulated by the international protocols. This research will serve as a backbone for future study about the safe use of ionising radiation in medicine.

  18. The first experience of using 99mTc-Al2O3-based radiopharmaceutical for the detection of sentinel lymph nodes in cervical cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinilkin, I. G.; Chernov, V. I.; Lyapunov, A. Yu.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Chernyshova, A. L.; Kolomiets, L. A.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of using 99mTc-Al2O3-based radiopharmaceutical, a novel molecular imaging agent for sentinel lymph node detection in patients with invasive cervical cancer. The study included 23 cervical cancer patients (T1aNxMx-T2bNxMx) treated at the Tomsk Cancer Research Institute. In the 18 hours before surgery, 80 MBq of the 99mTc-Al2O3 in peritumoral injected, followed by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the pelvis and intraoperative SLN identification. Twenty-seven SLNs were detected by SPECT, and 34 SLNs were identified by intraoperative gamma probe. The total number of identified SLNs per patient ranged from 1 to 3 (the mean number of SLNs was 1.4 per patient). The most common site for SLN detection was the external iliac region (57.2%), followed by the internal iliac (14%), obturator (14%), presacral and retrosacral regions (14%), and the parametrial region (1%). Sensitivity in detecting SLNs was 100% for intraoperative SLN identification and 79% for SPECT image.

  19. Binding Energy and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, David E.; Raines, Ronald T.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the fundamental role that the favorable free energy of binding of the rate-determining transition state plays in catalysis. The principle that all of the catalytic factors discussed are realized by the use of this binding energy is reviewed. (CW)

  20. Cooperative binding: a multiple personality.

    PubMed

    Martini, Johannes W R; Diambra, Luis; Habeck, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Cooperative binding has been described in many publications and has been related to or defined by several different properties of the binding behavior of the ligand to the target molecule. In addition to the commonly used Hill coefficient, other characteristics such as a sigmoidal shape of the overall titration curve in a linear plot, a change of ligand affinity of the other binding sites when a site of the target molecule becomes occupied, or complex roots of the binding polynomial have been used to define or to quantify cooperative binding. In this work, we analyze how the different properties are related in the most general model for binding curves based on the grand canonical partition function and present several examples which highlight differences between the cooperativity characterizing properties which are discussed. Our results mainly show that among the presented definitions there are not two which fully coincide. Moreover, this work poses the question whether it can make sense to distinguish between positive and negative cooperativity based on the macroscopic binding isotherm only. This article shall emphasize that scientists who investigate cooperative effects in biological systems could help avoiding misunderstandings by stating clearly which kind of cooperativity they discuss.

  1. (/sup 3/)tetrahydrotrazodone binding. Association with serotonin binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, D.A.; Taylor, D.P.; Enna, S.J.

    1983-05-01

    High (17 nM) and low (603 nM) affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/)tetrahydrotrazodone ((/sup 3/) THT), a biologically active analogue of trazodone, have been identified in rat brain membranes. The substrate specificity, concentration, and subcellular and regional distributions of these sites suggest that they may represent a component of the serotonin transmitter system. Pharmacological analysis of (/sup 3/)THT binding, coupled with brain lesion and drug treatment experiments, revealed that, unlike other antidepressants, (/sup 3/) THT does not attach to either a biogenic amine transporter or serotonin binding sites. Rather, it would appear that (/sup 3/)THT may be an antagonist ligand for the serotonin binding site. This probe may prove of value in defining the mechanism of action of trazodone and in further characterizing serotonin receptors.

  2. Production, biodistribution, and dosimetry of (47)Sc-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetramethylene phosphonic acid as a bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Fatemeh; Moghaddam-Banaem, Leila; Shamsaei, Mojtaba; Samani, Ali; Maragheh, Mohammad G

    2015-01-01

    In this study 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetramethylene phosphonic acid (DOTMP) was used as the polyaminophosphonic acid carrier ligand and the therapeutic potential of the bone seeking radiopharmaceutical (47)Sc-DOTMP was assessed by measuring its dosage-dependent skeletal uptake and then the absorbed radiation dose of human organs was estimated. Because of limited availability of (47)Sc we performed some preliminary studies using (46)Sc. (46)Sc was produced with a specific activity of 116.58 MBq/mg (3.15 mCi/mg) and radionuclide purity of 98%. (46)Sc-DOTMP was prepared and an activity of 1.258 MBq (34 μCi) at a chelant-to-metal ratio of 60:1 was administered to five groups of mice with each group containing 3 mice that were euthanized at 4, 24, 48, 96 and 192 h post administration. The heart, lungs, liver, spleen, kidneys, intestine, skin, muscle, and a femur were excised, weighed, and counted. The data were analyzed to determine skeletal uptake and source organ residence times and cumulated activities for (47)Sc-DOTMP. (46)Sc-DOTMP complex was prepared in radiochemical purity about 93%. In vitro stability of complex was evaluated at room temperature for 48 h. Biodistribution studies of complex in mice were studied for 7 days. The data were analyzed to estimate skeletal uptake and absorbed radiation dose of human organs using biodistribution data from mice. By considering the results, (47)Sc-DOTMP is a possible therapeutic agent for using in palliation of bone pain due to metastatic skeletal lesions from several types of primary cancers in prostate, breast, etc.

  3. High performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for ex vivo metabolic studies of a rhenium-labeled radiopharmaceutical for liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hsi; Liao, Chen-Wei; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Chang, Yu; Men, Lee-Chung; Hsieh, Yi-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The radio-isotope rhenium-labeled N-[2-(triphenylmethyl)thioethyl]-3-aza-19-ethyloxycarbonyl-3-[2-(triphenylmethyl)thioethyl] octadecanoate) ligand (188Re-MN-16ET) is a novel therapeutic agent under preclinical evaluation for hepatoma. A reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled with a tandem mass spectrometric analysis method and diode array detector (DAD) involving a T type splitter was developed to characterize this pharmaceutical in rat liver tissue solution and determine its biotransformation rate. The separation was accomplished on a C18 column (chromolith silica, 4.6 mm x 100 mm) using an acetonitrile-ammonium acetate buffer gradient as the mobile phase. The detection was achieved by DAD set at 250nm and tandem mass spectrometry using electrospray ionization in the positive ion mode. Re-MN-16ET displayed a retention time of 23.2 min and a transition ion pair corresponding to m/z677 --> 631 for multiple reaction monitoring. Its biotransformation reaction in rat liver homogenate proceeded for 90 min in a 37°C water bath. The characterization was conducted using aliquots that were extracted and concentrated from the reaction mixture for various incubation times. Re-MN-16ET exhibited a biotransformation half-life (t1/2) of 8-9 min in liver tissue solution and was almost completely exhausted after 90 min. Two of its metabolites, consisting of the Re-labeled carboxylic acid derivative, predominately, and its corresponding demetallized disulfide ligand were found in the liver homogenate, providing a metabolism pathway for the radio-pharmaceutical.

  4. Superresolution microscopy with transient binding.

    PubMed

    Molle, Julia; Raab, Mario; Holzmeister, Susanne; Schmitt-Monreal, Daniel; Grohmann, Dina; He, Zhike; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2016-06-01

    For single-molecule localization based superresolution, the concentration of fluorescent labels has to be thinned out. This is commonly achieved by photophysically or photochemically deactivating subsets of molecules. Alternatively, apparent switching of molecules can be achieved by transient binding of fluorescent labels. Here, a diffusing dye yields bright fluorescent spots when binding to the structure of interest. As the binding interaction is weak, the labeling is reversible and the dye ligand construct diffuses back into solution. This approach of achieving superresolution by transient binding (STB) is reviewed in this manuscript. Different realizations of STB are discussed and compared to other localization-based superresolution modalities. We propose the development of labeling strategies that will make STB a highly versatile tool for superresolution microscopy at highest resolution. PMID:26773299

  5. When is protein binding important?

    PubMed

    Heuberger, Jules; Schmidt, Stephan; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2013-09-01

    The present paper is an ode to a classic citation by Benet and Hoener (2002. Clin Pharm Ther 71(3):115-121). The now classic paper had a huge impact on drug development and the way the issue of protein binding is perceived and interpreted. Although the authors very clearly pointed out the limitations and underlying assumptions for their delineations, these are too often overlooked and the classic paper's message is misinterpreted by broadening to cases that were not intended. Some members of the scientific community concluded from the paper that protein binding is not important. This was clearly not intended by the authors, as they finished their paper with a paragraph entitled: "When is protein binding important?" Misinterpretation of the underlying assumptions in the classic work can result in major pitfalls in drug development. Therefore, we revisit the topic of protein binding with the intention of clarifying when clinically relevant changes should be considered during drug development.

  6. Superresolution microscopy with transient binding.

    PubMed

    Molle, Julia; Raab, Mario; Holzmeister, Susanne; Schmitt-Monreal, Daniel; Grohmann, Dina; He, Zhike; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2016-06-01

    For single-molecule localization based superresolution, the concentration of fluorescent labels has to be thinned out. This is commonly achieved by photophysically or photochemically deactivating subsets of molecules. Alternatively, apparent switching of molecules can be achieved by transient binding of fluorescent labels. Here, a diffusing dye yields bright fluorescent spots when binding to the structure of interest. As the binding interaction is weak, the labeling is reversible and the dye ligand construct diffuses back into solution. This approach of achieving superresolution by transient binding (STB) is reviewed in this manuscript. Different realizations of STB are discussed and compared to other localization-based superresolution modalities. We propose the development of labeling strategies that will make STB a highly versatile tool for superresolution microscopy at highest resolution.

  7. Metal binding to the HIV nucleocapsid peptide.

    PubMed

    McLendon, G; Hull, H; Larkin, K; Chang, W

    1999-04-01

    Co(II) and Zn(II) binding constants have been measured for binding to the HIV-1 nucleocapsid N-terminal metal binding domain (residues 1-18), using competition titration methods and monitoring Co(II) binding by visible absorbance spectroscopy. Enthalpies for binding were directly measured by isothermal titration colorimetry. The results are compared with recent studies of related systems, including a study of Zn(II) binding by the full length protein.

  8. Binding of cellulose binding modules reveal differences between cellulose substrates

    PubMed Central

    Arola, Suvi; Linder, Markus B.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between cellulase enzymes and their substrates is of central importance to several technological and scientific challenges. Here we report that the binding of cellulose binding modules (CBM) from Trichoderma reesei cellulases Cel6A and Cel7A show a major difference in how they interact with substrates originating from wood compared to bacterial cellulose. We found that the CBM from TrCel7A recognizes the two substrates differently and as a consequence shows an unexpected way of binding. We show that the substrate has a large impact on the exchange rate of the studied CBM, and moreover, CBM-TrCel7A seems to have an additional mode of binding on wood derived cellulose but not on cellulose originating from bacterial source. This mode is not seen in double CBM (DCBM) constructs comprising both CBM-TrCel7A and CBM-TrCel6A. The linker length of DCBMs affects the binding properties, and slows down the exchange rates of the proteins and thus, can be used to analyze the differences between the single CBM. These results have impact on the cellulase research and offer new understanding on how these industrially relevant enzymes act. PMID:27748440

  9. The binding domain structure of retinoblastoma-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Figge, J.; Breese, K.; Vajda, S.; Zhu, Q. L.; Eisele, L.; Andersen, T. T.; MacColl, R.; Friedrich, T.; Smith, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene product (Rb), a cellular growth suppressor, complexes with viral and cellular proteins that contain a specific binding domain incorporating three invariant residues: Leu-X-Cys-X-Glu, where X denotes a nonconserved residue. Hydrophobic and electrostatic properties are strongly conserved in this segment even though the nonconserved amino acids vary considerably from one Rb-binding protein to another. In this report, we present a diagnostic computer pattern for a high-affinity Rb-binding domain featuring the three conserved residues as well as the conserved physico-chemical properties. Although the pattern encompasses only 10 residues (with only 4 of these explicitly defined), it exhibits 100% sensitivity and 99.95% specificity in database searches. This implies that a certain pattern of structural and physico-chemical properties encoded by this short sequence is sufficient to govern specific Rb binding. We also present evidence that the secondary structural conformation through this region is important for effective Rb binding. PMID:8382993

  10. Ion binding to biological macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Petukh, Marharyta; Alexov, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Biological macromolecules carry out their functions in water and in the presence of ions. The ions can bind to the macromolecules either specifically or non-specifically, or can simply to be a part of the water phase providing physiological gradient across various membranes. This review outlines the differences between specific and non-specific ion binding in terms of the function and stability of the corresponding macromolecules. Furthermore, the experimental techniques to identify ion positions and computational methods to predict ion binding are reviewed and their advantages compared. It is indicated that specifically bound ions are relatively easier to be revealed while non-specifically associated ions are difficult to predict. In addition, the binding and the residential time of non-specifically bound ions are very much sensitive to the environmental factors in the cells, specifically to the local pH and ion concentration. Since these characteristics differ among the cellular compartments, the non-specific ion binding must be investigated with respect to the sub-cellular localization of the corresponding macromolecule. PMID:25774076

  11. Cholesterol binding to ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Irena; Singh, Dev K.; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies demonstrated that membrane cholesterol is a major regulator of ion channel function. The goal of this review is to discuss significant advances that have been recently achieved in elucidating the mechanisms responsible for cholesterol regulation of ion channels. The first major insight that comes from growing number of studies that based on the sterol specificity of cholesterol effects, show that several types of ion channels (nAChR, Kir, BK, TRPV) are regulated by specific sterol-protein interactions. This conclusion is supported by demonstrating direct saturable binding of cholesterol to a bacterial Kir channel. The second major advance in the field is the identification of putative cholesterol binding sites in several types of ion channels. These include sites at locations associated with the well-known cholesterol binding motif CRAC and its reversed form CARC in nAChR, BK, and TRPV, as well as novel cholesterol binding regions in Kir channels. Notably, in the majority of these channels, cholesterol is suggested to interact mainly with hydrophobic residues in non-annular regions of the channels being embedded in between transmembrane protein helices. We also discuss how identification of putative cholesterol binding sites is an essential step to understand the mechanistic basis of cholesterol-induced channel regulation. Clearly, however, these are only the first few steps in obtaining a general understanding of cholesterol-ion channels interactions and their roles in cellular and organ functions. PMID:24616704

  12. 177Lu-DO3A-HSA-Z EGFR:1907: characterization as a potential radiopharmaceutical for radionuclide therapy of EGFR-expressing head and neck carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hoppmann, Susan; Qi, Shibo; Miao, Zheng; Liu, Hongguang; Jiang, Han; Cutler, Cathy S; Bao, Ande; Cheng, Zhen

    2012-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (EGFR) is an attractive target for radionuclide therapy of head and neck carcinomas. Affibody molecules against EGFR (Z(EGFR)) show excellent tumor localizations in imaging studies. However, one major drawback is that radiometal-labeled Affibody molecules display extremely high uptakes in the radiosensitive kidneys which may impact their use as radiotherapeutic agents. The purpose of this study is to further explore whether radiometal-labeled human serum albumin (HSA)-Z(EFGR) bioconjugates display desirable profiles for the use in radionuclide therapy of EGFR-positive head and neck carcinomas. The Z(EFGR) analog, Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907), was site-specifically conjugated with HSA. The resulting bioconjugate 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (DO3A)-HSA-Z(EGFR:1907) was then radiolabeled with either (64)Cu or (177)Lu and subjected to in vitro cell uptake and internalization studies using the human oral squamous carcinoma cell line SAS. Positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and biodistribution studies were conducted using SAS-tumor-bearing mice. Cell studies revealed a high (8.43 ± 0.55 % at 4 h) and specific (0.95 ± 0.09 % at 4 h) uptake of (177)Lu-DO3A-HSA-Z(EGFR:1907) as determined by blocking with nonradioactive Z(EGFR:1907). The internalization of (177)Lu-DO3A-HSA-Z(EGFR:1907) was verified in vitro and found to be significantly higher than that of (177)Lu-labeled Z(EFGR) at 2-24 h of incubation. PET and SPECT studies showed good tumor imaging contrasts. The biodistribution of (177)Lu-DO3A-HSA-Z(EGFR:1907) in SAS-tumor-bearing mice displayed high tumor uptake (5.1 ± 0.44 % ID/g) and liver uptake (31.5 ± 7.66 % ID/g) and moderate kidney uptake (8.5 ± 1.08 % ID/g) at 72 h after injection. (177)Lu-DO3A-HSA-Z(EGFR:1907) shows promising in vivo profiles and may be a potential radiopharmaceutical for radionuclide therapy of EGFR-expressing head and neck carcinomas

  13. Comparative efficacy, tolerability, and survival outcomes of various radiopharmaceuticals in castration-resistant prostate cancer with bone metastasis: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Tunio, Mutahir; Al Asiri, Mushabbab; Al Hadab, Abdulrehman; Bayoumi, Yasser

    2015-01-01

    Background A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the impact of radiopharmaceuticals (RPs) in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) on pain control, symptomatic skeletal events (SSEs), toxicity profile, quality of life (QoL), and overall survival (OS). Materials and methods The PubMed/MEDLINE, CANCERLIT, EMBASE, Cochrane Library database, and other search engines were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing RPs with control (placebo or radiation therapy) in metastatic CRPC. Data were extracted and assessed for the risk of bias (Cochrane’s risk of bias tool). Pooled data were expressed as odds ratio (OR), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs; Mantel–Haenszel fixed-effects model). Results Eight RCTs with a total patient population of 1,877 patients were identified. The use of RP was associated with significant reduction in pain intensity and SSE (OR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.51–0.78, I2=27%, P,0.0001), improved QoL (OR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.55–0.91, I2=65%, three trials, 1,178 patients, P=0.006), and a minimal improved OS (OR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.64–1.04, I2=47%, seven trials, 1,845 patients, P=0.11). A subgroup analysis suggested an improved OS with radium-223 (OR: 0.68, 95% CI: 0.51–0.90, one trial, 921 patients) and strontium-89 (OR: 0.21, 95% CI: 0.05–0.91, one trial, 49 patients). Strontium-89 (five trials) was associated with increased rates of grade 3 and 4 thrombocytopenia (OR: 4.26, 95% CI: 2.22–8.18, P=0.01), leucopenia (OR: 7.98, 95% CI: 1.82–34.95, P=0.02), pain flare (OR: 6.82, 95% CI: 3.42–13.55, P=0.04), and emesis (OR: 3.61, 95% CI: 1.76–7.40, P=0.02). Conclusion The use of RPs was associated with significant reduction in SSEs and improved QoL, while the radium-223-related OS benefit warrants further large, RCTs in docetaxel naive metastatic CRPC patients. PMID:26451085

  14. Water binding in legume seeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vertucci, C. W.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    The physical status of water in seeds has a pivotal role in determining the physiological reactions that can take place in the dry state. Using water sorption isotherms from cotyledon and axis tissue of five leguminous seeds, the strength of water binding and the numbers of binding sites have been estimated using van't Hoff analyses and the D'Arcy/Watt equation. These parameters of water sorption are calculated for each of the three regions of water binding and for a range of temperatures. Water sorption characteristics are reflective of the chemical composition of the biological materials as well as the temperature at which hydration takes place. Changes in the sorption characteristics with temperature and hydration level may suggest hydration-induced structural changes in cellular components.

  15. HIV: Cell Binding and Entry

    PubMed Central

    Wilen, Craig B.; Tilton, John C.; Doms, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    The first step of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication cycle—binding and entry into the host cell—plays a major role in determining viral tropism and the ability of HIV to degrade the human immune system. HIV uses a complex series of steps to deliver its genome into the host cell cytoplasm while simultaneously evading the host immune response. To infect cells, the HIV protein envelope (Env) binds to the primary cellular receptor CD4 and then to a cellular coreceptor. This sequential binding triggers fusion of the viral and host cell membranes, initiating infection. Revealing the mechanism of HIV entry has profound implications for viral tropism, transmission, pathogenesis, and therapeutic intervention. Here, we provide an overview into the mechanism of HIV entry, provide historical context to key discoveries, discuss recent advances, and speculate on future directions in the field. PMID:22908191

  16. Binding Kinetics in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Ferruz, Noelia; De Fabritiis, Gianni

    2016-07-01

    Over the last years, researchers have increasingly become interested in measuring and understanding drugs' binding kinetics, namely the time in which drug and its target associate and dissociate. Historically, drug discovery programs focused on the optimization of target affinity as a proxy of in-vivo efficacy. However, often the efficacy of a ligand is not appropriately described by the in-vitro measured drug-receptor affinity, but rather depends on the lifetime of the in-vivo drug-receptor interaction. In this review we review recent works that highlight the importance of binding kinetics, molecular determinants for rational optimization and the recent emergence of computational methods as powerful tools in measuring and understanding binding kinetics. PMID:27492236

  17. Diarylferrocene tweezers for cation binding.

    PubMed

    Lima, Carlos F R A C; Fernandes, Ana M; Melo, André; Gonçalves, Luís M; Silva, Artur M S; Santos, Luís M N B F

    2015-10-01

    The host-guest chemistry of ferrocene derivatives was explored by a combined experimental and theoretical study. Several 1-arylferrocenes and 1,1'-diarylferrocenes were synthesized by the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction. The ability of these compounds to bind small cations in the gas phase was investigated experimentally by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The results evidenced a noticeable ability of all 1,1'-diarylferrocenes studied to bind cations, while the same was not observed for the corresponding 1-arylferrocenes nor ferrocene. The 1,1'-diarylferrocenecation relative interaction energies were evaluated by ESI-MS and quantum chemical calculations and showed that cation binding in these systems follows electrostatic trends. It was found that, due to their unique molecular shape and smooth torsional potentials, 1,1'-diarylferrocenes can act as molecular tweezers of small-sized cations in the gas phase. PMID:26309143

  18. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Si, Jingna; Cui, Jing; Cheng, Jin; Wu, Rongling

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%-8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein-RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein-RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  19. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  20. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  1. Positive Emotion Facilitates Audiovisual Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Miho S.; Watanabe, Katsumi; Kitagawa, Norimichi

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that positive emotions can facilitate integrative and associative information processing in cognitive functions. The present study examined whether emotions in observers can also enhance perceptual integrative processes. We tested 125 participants in total for revealing the effects of emotional states and traits in observers on the multisensory binding between auditory and visual signals. Participants in Experiment 1 observed two identical visual disks moving toward each other, coinciding, and moving away, presented with a brief sound. We found that for participants with lower depressive tendency, induced happy moods increased the width of the temporal binding window of the sound-induced bounce percept in the stream/bounce display, while no effect was found for the participants with higher depressive tendency. In contrast, no effect of mood was observed for a simple audiovisual simultaneity discrimination task in Experiment 2. These results provide the first empirical evidence of a dependency of multisensory binding upon emotional states and traits, revealing that positive emotions can facilitate the multisensory binding processes at a perceptual level. PMID:26834585

  2. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  3. Obligate Ordered Binding of Human Lactogenic Cytokines*

    PubMed Central

    Voorhees, Jeffery L.; Brooks, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Class 1 cytokines bind two receptors to create an active heterotrimeric complex. It has been argued that ligand binding to their receptors is an ordered process, but a structural mechanism describing this process has not been determined. We have previously described an obligate ordered binding mechanism for the human prolactin/prolactin receptor heterotrimeric complex. In this work we expand this conceptual understanding of ordered binding to include three human lactogenic hormones: prolactin, growth hormone, and placental lactogen. We independently blocked either of the two receptor binding sites of each hormone and used surface plasmon resonance to measure human prolactin receptor binding kinetics and stoichiometries to the remaining binding surface. When site 1 of any of the three hormones was blocked, site 2 could not bind the receptor. But blocking site 2 did not affect receptor binding at site 1, indicating a requirement for receptor binding to site 1 before site 2 binding. In addition we noted variable responses to the presence of zinc in hormone-receptor interaction. Finally, we performed Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) analyses where receptor binding at subsaturating stoichiometries induced changes in FRET signaling, indicative of binding-induced changes in hormone conformation, whereas at receptor:hormone ratios in excess of 2:1 no additional changes in FRET signaling were observed. These results strongly support a conformationally mediated obligate-ordered receptor binding for each of the three lactogenic hormones. PMID:20427283

  4. Fifth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, E.E.; Schlafke-Stelson, A.T.

    1992-05-01

    This meeting was held to exchange information on how to get better estimates of the radiation absorbed dose. There seems to be a high interest of late in patient dosimetry; discussions were held in the light of revised risk estimates for radiation. Topics included: Strategies of Dose Assessment; Dose Estimation for Radioimmunotherapy; Dose Calculation Techniques and Models; Dose Estimation for Positron Emission Tomography (PET); Kinetics for Dose Estimation; and Small Scale Dosimetry and Microdosimetry. (VC)

  5. The clinical application of radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Leeds, N.E. )

    1990-11-01

    This article highlights the choices and the arguments in the selection of appropriate contrast materials in radiological examinations--nonionic versus ionic contrast material--and aims to assist the physician in decision-making. Various authors have raised questions concerning the proposed advantages of nonionic contrast material. However, studies in low risk patients have shown more complications with the use of ionic contrast than nonionic contrast materials; this is the important group of patients since in high risk patients nonionics are used almost exclusively. The important factor that increases the controversy is cost, which is significant since nonionic agents cost 10 to 15 times more than ionic agents in the USA. Thus, cost-benefit considerations are important because price sensitivity and cost may determine fund availability for equipment or materials that also may be necessary or important in improving patient care. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as in computed tomography (CT), the use of contrast material has improved diagnostic accuracy and the ability to reveal lesions not otherwise easily detected in brain and spinal cord imaging. These include separating scan from disc, meningitis, meningeal spread of tumour, tumour seeding, small metastases, intracanalicular tumours, separating major mass from oedema, determining bulk tumour size and ability to demonstrate blood vessels so dynamic circulatory changes may be revealed. 33 refs.

  6. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. I.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. Materials and Methods: a total of 220 patients were included into the study. Of them, there were 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and '00 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). Results: no abnormal 199Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of 199Tl SPECT. In breast cancer patients, increased 199Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, 99mTc-MIBI in 93.4% patients. Increased 199Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients and 99mTc-MIBI in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, sensitivity of SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI were 95%. The 199Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the 99mTc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. Conclusion: the data obtained show that SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  7. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. I.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. A total of 220 patients were included into the study: 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and 100 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). No abnormal 199Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of 199Tl SPECT. In the breast cancer patients, the increased 199Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, 99mTc-MIBI—in 93.4% patients. The increased 199Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients, and 99mTc-MIBI—in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, the sensitivity of SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI was 95%. The 199Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in the patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the 99mTc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. The data obtained showed that SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  8. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-05: Internal Dosimetric Calculations for Several Imaging Radiopharmaceuticals in Preclinical Studies and Quantitative Assessment of the Mouse Size Impact On Them. Realistic Monte Carlo Simulations Based On the 4D-MOBY Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kostou, T; Papadimitroulas, P; Kagadis, GC; Loudos, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Commonly used radiopharmaceuticals were tested to define the most important dosimetric factors in preclinical studies. Dosimetric calculations were applied in two different whole-body mouse models, with varying organ size, so as to determine their impact on absorbed doses and S-values. Organ mass influence was evaluated with computational models and Monte Carlo(MC) simulations. Methods: MC simulations were executed on GATE to determine dose distribution in the 4D digital MOBY mouse phantom. Two mouse models, 28 and 34 g respectively, were constructed based on realistic preclinical exams to calculate the absorbed doses and S-values of five commonly used radionuclides in SPECT/PET studies (18F, 68Ga, 177Lu, 111In and 99mTc).Radionuclide biodistributions were obtained from literature. Realistic statistics (uncertainty lower than 4.5%) were acquired using the standard physical model in Geant4. Comparisons of the dosimetric calculations on the two different phantoms for each radiopharmaceutical are presented. Results: Dose per organ in mGy was calculated for all radiopharmaceuticals. The two models introduced a difference of 0.69% in their brain masses, while the largest differences were observed in the marrow 18.98% and in the thyroid 18.65% masses.Furthermore, S-values of the most important target-organs were calculated for each isotope. Source-organ was selected to be the whole mouse body.Differences on the S-factors were observed in the 6.0–30.0% range. Tables with all the calculations as reference dosimetric data were developed. Conclusion: Accurate dose per organ and the most appropriate S-values are derived for specific preclinical studies. The impact of the mouse model size is rather high (up to 30% for a 17.65% difference in the total mass), and thus accurate definition of the organ mass is a crucial parameter for self-absorbed S values calculation.Our goal is to extent the study for accurate estimations in small animal imaging, whereas it is known

  9. Anion binding in biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  10. Potential pitfalls in the nuclear medicine imaging: Experimental models to evaluate the effect of natural products on the radiolabeling of blood constituents, bioavailability of radiopharmaceutical and on the survival of Escherichia coli strains submitted to the treatment with stannous ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Scheila F.; Brito, Lavínia C.; Souza, Deise E.; Bernardo, Luciana C.; Oliveira, Joelma F.; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2006-12-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) allows studies of physiological or pathological processes. Red blood cells labeled with technetium-99m ( 99mTc-RBC) are used as a radiopharmaceutical in several evaluations. The radiolabeling efficiency and bioavailability of radiopharmaceuticals can be altered by natural/synthetic drugs and may induce pitfalls in the analysis of the nuclear medicine imaging. The labeling with 99mTc requires a reducing agent and stannous chloride (SnCl 2) is widely utilized. However, SnCl 2 presents a citotoxic and/or genotoxic potential in Escherichia coli ( E. coli) strains. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of aqueous extracts of Baccharis genistelloides (BG), Terminalia chebula (TC), Maytenus ilicifolia (MI), Cassia angustifolia (CA) and Equisetum arvense (EA) on (i) radiolabeling of blood constituents, (ii) bioavailability of sodium pertechnetate(Na 99mTcO 4) radiopharmaceutical, (iii) survival of E. coli. In vitro labeling of RBC was performed with blood ( Wistar rats) incubated with each extract, SnCl 2 and Na 99mTcO 4. Plasma (P) and blood cells (BC) were isolated, another aliquots precipitated and soluble (SF) and insoluble (IF) fractions isolated and counted. In the bioavailability of Na 99mTcO 4, Wistar rats were treated (7 days) with aqueous extract or with 0.9%NaCl, the radiopharmaceutical was administered, the animals sacrificed, the organs isolated, weighted and radioactivity counted. To evaluate the effect on the bacterial survival, E. coli was treated with: (a) SnCl 2; (b) 0.9% NaCl; (c) vegetal extract; or (d) SnCl 2 and vegetal extract. Radiolabeling efficiency showed a significantly decrease (ANOVA/Tukey post-test, p<0.05) after treatment with BG, TC, MI and CA extracts. The bioavailability results showed that the uptake of Na 99mTcO 4 was altered significantly (unpaired t-student test, p<0.05) in blood, lungs (CA/TC extracts), bone, heart, ovary (EA /TC), spleen, kidney (TC) , pancreas, thyroid

  11. Study of the production yields of 18F, 11C, 13N and 15O positron emitters from plasma-laser proton sources at ELI-Beamlines for labeling of PET radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Ernesto; Italiano, Antonio; Margarone, Daniele; Pagano, Benedetta; Baldari, Sergio; Korn, Georg

    2016-03-01

    The development of novel compact PET radionuclide production systems is of great interest to promote the diffusion of PET diagnostics, especially in view of the continuous development of microfluidics labeling approaches. We studied the feasibility to produce clinically-relevant amounts of PET isotopes by means of laser-accelerated proton sources such that expected at the ELI-Beamlines facility. 18F, 11C, 13N and 15O production yields were calculated through the TALYS software, by taking into account the broad proton spectra expected. With the hypothesized proton fluencies, clinically-relevant amounts of radionuclides can be obtained, suitable to prepare single doses of 18F-, 11C- and 13N-labeled radiopharmaceuticals exploiting fast and efficient microfluidic labeling systems.

  12. Synthesis and evaluation of Lys¹(α,γ-Folate)Lys³(¹⁷⁷Lu-DOTA)-Bombesin(1-14) as a potential theranostic radiopharmaceutical for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Aranda-Lara, Liliana; Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Azorín-Vega, Erika; Ramírez, Flor de María; Jiménez-Mancilla, Nallely; Ocampo-García, Blanca; Santos-Cuevas, Clara; Isaac-Olivé, Keila

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to synthesize Lys(1)(α,γ-Folate)-Lys(3)((177)Lu-DOTA)-Bombesin (1-14) ((177)Lu-Folate-BN), as well as to assess its potential for molecular imaging and targeted radiotherapy of breast tumors expressing folate receptors (FR) and gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPR). Radiation absorbed doses of (177)Lu-Folate-BN (74 MBq, i.v.) estimated in athymic mice with T47D-induced breast tumors (positive to FR and GRPR), showed tumor doses of 23.9±2.1 Gy. T47D-tumors were clearly visible (Micro-SPECT/CT images). (177)Lu-Folate-BN demonstrated properties suitable as a theranostic radiopharmaceutical. PMID:26545016

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of Lys¹(α,γ-Folate)Lys³(¹⁷⁷Lu-DOTA)-Bombesin(1-14) as a potential theranostic radiopharmaceutical for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Aranda-Lara, Liliana; Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Azorín-Vega, Erika; Ramírez, Flor de María; Jiménez-Mancilla, Nallely; Ocampo-García, Blanca; Santos-Cuevas, Clara; Isaac-Olivé, Keila

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to synthesize Lys(1)(α,γ-Folate)-Lys(3)((177)Lu-DOTA)-Bombesin (1-14) ((177)Lu-Folate-BN), as well as to assess its potential for molecular imaging and targeted radiotherapy of breast tumors expressing folate receptors (FR) and gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPR). Radiation absorbed doses of (177)Lu-Folate-BN (74 MBq, i.v.) estimated in athymic mice with T47D-induced breast tumors (positive to FR and GRPR), showed tumor doses of 23.9±2.1 Gy. T47D-tumors were clearly visible (Micro-SPECT/CT images). (177)Lu-Folate-BN demonstrated properties suitable as a theranostic radiopharmaceutical.

  14. Mammalian Argonaute-DNA binding?

    PubMed

    Smalheiser, Neil R; Gomes, Octavio L A

    2015-01-01

    When a field shares the consensus that a particular phenomenon does NOT occur, this may reflect extensive experimental investigations with negative outcomes, or may represent the "common sense" position based on current knowledge and established ways of thinking. The current consensus of the RNA field is that eukaryotic Argonaute (Ago) proteins employ RNA guides and target other RNAs. The alternative -- that eukaryotic Ago has biologically important interactions with DNA in vivo - has not been seriously considered, in part because the only role contemplated for DNA was as a guide strand, and in part because it did not seem plausible that any natural source of suitable DNAs exists in eukaryotic cells. However, eukaryotic Argonaute domains bind DNA in the test tube, and several articles report that small inhibitory double-stranded DNAs do have the ability to silence target RNAs in a sequence-dependent (though poorly characterized) manner. A search of the literature identified potential DNA binding partners for Ago, including (among others) single-stranded DNAs residing in extracellular vesicles, and cytoplasmic satellite-repeat DNA fragments that are associated with the plasma membrane and transcribed by Pol II. It is interesting to note that both cytoplasmic and extracellular vesicle DNA are expressed at greatly elevated levels in cancer cells relative to normal cells. In such a pathological scenario, if not under normal conditions, there may be appreciable binding of Ago to DNA despite its lower affinity compared to RNA. If so, DNA might displace Ago from binding to its normal partners (miRNAs, siRNAs and other short ncRNAs), disrupting tightly controlled post-transcriptional gene silencing processes that are vital to correct functioning of a normal cell. The possible contribution to cancer pathogenesis is a strong motivator for further investigation of Ago-DNA binding. More generally, this case underscores the need for better informatics tools to allow

  15. In vitro and in vivo studies of an aqueous extract of Matricaria recutita (German chamomile) on the radiolabeling of blood constituents, on the morphology of red blood cells and on the biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical sodium pertechnetate

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Pinto, Angélica B.; Santos-Filho, Sebastião D.; Carvalho, Jorge J.; Pereira, Mário J. S.; Fonseca, Adenilson S.; Bernardo-Filho, Mário

    2013-01-01

    Background: Natural products might alter the labeling of blood constituents with technetium-99m (99mTc) and these results may be correlated with modifications of the shape of the red blood cells (RBC). The biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals can be also altered. Objective: This investigation aimed to determine biological effects of an aqueous extract of chamomile (CE). Materials and Methods: To study the effect of the CE on the labeling of blood constituents with 99mTc, in vitro and in vivo assays were performed. The effect of the CE on the morphology of RBC was observed under light microscope. The images were acquired, processed, and the perimeter/area ratio of the RBC determined. To analyze the effect of the CE on biodistribution of the sodium pertechnetate (Na99mTcO4) in Wistar rats, these animals were treated or not with a CE. Na99mTcO4 was injected, the rats were sacrificed, the organs were removed, weighted and percentage of radioactivity/gram calculated. Result: In the in vitro experiment, the radioactivity on blood cells compartment and on insoluble fractions of plasma was diminished. The shape and the perimeter/area ratio of the RBC were altered in in vitro assays. An increase of the percentage of radioactivity of Na99mTcO4 was observed in stomach after in vivo treatment. Conclusion: These results could be due to substances of the CE or by the products of the metabolism of this extract in the animal organism. These findings are examples of drug interaction with a radiopharmaceutical, which could lead to misdiagnosis in clinical practice with unexpected consequences. PMID:24143045

  16. Feature-Based Binding and Phase Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonenko, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Current theories of binding cannot provide a uniform account for many facts associated with the distribution of anaphors, such as long-distance binding effects and the subject-orientation of monomorphemic anaphors. Further, traditional binding theory is incompatible with minimalist assumptions. In this dissertation I propose an analysis of…

  17. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, G.K.

    1997-04-29

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described. 11 figs.

  18. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, Gisela K.

    1997-01-01

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described.

  19. Evolution of Protein-binding DNA Sequences through Competitive Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Weiqun; Gerland, Ulrich; Hwa, Terence; Levine, Herbert

    2002-03-01

    The dynamics of in vitro DNA evolution controlled via competitive binding of DNA sequences to proteins has been explored in a recent serial transfer experiment footnote B. Dubertret, S.Liu, Q. Ouyang, A. Libchaber, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 6022 (2001).. Motivated by the experiment, we investigate a continuum model for this evolution process in various parameter regimes. We establish a self-consistent mean-field evolution equation, determine its dynamical properties and finite population size corrections. In addition, we discuss the experimental implications of our results.

  20. Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul O.; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2010-04-20

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  1. High Affinity Radiopharmaceuticals Based Upon Lansoprazole for PET Imaging of Aggregated Tau in Alzheimer’s Disease and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: Synthesis, Preclinical Evaluation, and Lead Selection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abnormally aggregated tau is the hallmark pathology of tauopathy neurodegenerative disorders and is a target for development of both diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies across the tauopathy disease spectrum. Development of carbon-11- or fluorine-18-labeled radiotracers with appropriate affinity and specificity for tau would allow noninvasive quantification of tau burden using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. We have synthesized [18F]lansoprazole, [11C]N-methyl lansoprazole, and [18F]N-methyl lansoprazole and identified them as high affinity radiotracers for tau with low to subnanomolar binding affinities. Herein, we report radiosyntheses and extensive preclinical evaluation with the aim of selecting a lead radiotracer for translation into human PET imaging trials. We demonstrate that [18F]N-methyl lansoprazole, on account of the favorable half-life of fluorine-18 and its rapid brain entry in nonhuman primates, favorable kinetics, low white matter binding, and selectivity for binding to tau over amyloid, is the lead compound for progression into clinical trials. PMID:24896980

  2. Glucocorticoid receptor transformation and DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Tienrungroj, W.

    1986-01-01

    The overall goal is to probe the mechanism whereby glucocorticoid receptors are transformed from a non-DNA-binding form to their active DNA-binding form. The author has examined the effect of an endogenous inhibitor purified from rat liver cytosol on receptor binding to DNA. The inhibitor binds to transformed receptors in whole cytosol and prevent their binding to DNA. He also examined the role of sulfhydryl groups in determining the DNA binding activity of the transformed receptor and in determining the transformation process. Treatment of rat liver cytosol containing temperature-transformed, (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone-bound receptors at 0/sup 0/C with the sulfhydryl modifying reagent methyl methanethiosulfonate inhibits the DNA-binding activity of the receptor, and DNA-binding activity is restored after addition of dithiothreitol. In addition, he has examined the relationship between receptor phosphorylation and DNA binding. Untransformed receptor complexes purified from cytosol prepared from mouse L cells grown in medium containing (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate contain two components, a 100 k-Da and a 90-kDa subunit, both of which are phosphoproteins. On transformation, the receptor dissociates from the 90-kDa protein. Transformation of the complex under cell free conditions does not result in a dephosphorylation of the 100-kDa steroid-binding protein. Transformed receptor that has been bound to DNA and purified by monoclonal antibody is still in a phosphorylated form. These results suggest that dephosphorylation is not required for receptor binding to DNA.

  3. Infinite sets and double binds.

    PubMed

    Arden, M

    1984-01-01

    There have been many attempts to bring psychoanalytical theory up to date. This paper approaches the problem by discussing the work of Gregory Bateson and Ignacio Matte-Blanco, with particular reference to the use made by these authors of Russell's theory of logical types. Bateson's theory of the double bind and Matte-Blanco's bilogic are both based on concepts of logical typing. It is argued that the two theories can be linked by the idea that neurotic symptoms are based on category errors in thinking. Clinical material is presented from the analysis of a middle-aged woman. The intention is to demonstrate that the process of making interpretations can be thought of as revealing errors in thinking. Changes in the patient's inner world are then seen to be the result of clarifying childhood experiences based on category errors. Matte-Blanco's theory of bilogic and infinite experiences is a re-evaluation of the place of the primary process in mental life. It is suggested that a combination of bilogic and double bind theory provides a possibility of reformulating psychoanalytical theory. PMID:6544755

  4. Infinite sets and double binds.

    PubMed

    Arden, M

    1984-01-01

    There have been many attempts to bring psychoanalytical theory up to date. This paper approaches the problem by discussing the work of Gregory Bateson and Ignacio Matte-Blanco, with particular reference to the use made by these authors of Russell's theory of logical types. Bateson's theory of the double bind and Matte-Blanco's bilogic are both based on concepts of logical typing. It is argued that the two theories can be linked by the idea that neurotic symptoms are based on category errors in thinking. Clinical material is presented from the analysis of a middle-aged woman. The intention is to demonstrate that the process of making interpretations can be thought of as revealing errors in thinking. Changes in the patient's inner world are then seen to be the result of clarifying childhood experiences based on category errors. Matte-Blanco's theory of bilogic and infinite experiences is a re-evaluation of the place of the primary process in mental life. It is suggested that a combination of bilogic and double bind theory provides a possibility of reformulating psychoanalytical theory.

  5. Unraveling determinants of transcription factor binding outside the core binding site.

    PubMed

    Levo, Michal; Zalckvar, Einat; Sharon, Eilon; Dantas Machado, Ana Carolina; Kalma, Yael; Lotam-Pompan, Maya; Weinberger, Adina; Yakhini, Zohar; Rohs, Remo; Segal, Eran

    2015-07-01

    Binding of transcription factors (TFs) to regulatory sequences is a pivotal step in the control of gene expression. Despite many advances in the characterization of sequence motifs recognized by TFs, our ability to quantitatively predict TF binding to different regulatory sequences is still limited. Here, we present a novel experimental assay termed BunDLE-seq that provides quantitative measurements of TF binding to thousands of fully designed sequences of 200 bp in length within a single experiment. Applying this binding assay to two yeast TFs, we demonstrate that sequences outside the core TF binding site profoundly affect TF binding. We show that TF-specific models based on the sequence or DNA shape of the regions flanking the core binding site are highly predictive of the measured differential TF binding. We further characterize the dependence of TF binding, accounting for measurements of single and co-occurring binding events, on the number and location of binding sites and on the TF concentration. Finally, by coupling our in vitro TF binding measurements, and another application of our method probing nucleosome formation, to in vivo expression measurements carried out with the same template sequences serving as promoters, we offer insights into mechanisms that may determine the different expression outcomes observed. Our assay thus paves the way to a more comprehensive understanding of TF binding to regulatory sequences and allows the characterization of TF binding determinants within and outside of core binding sites. PMID:25762553

  6. Binding characteristics of swine erythrocyte insulin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Dieberg, G.; Bryan, G.S.; Sartin, J.L.; Williams, J.C.; Prince, T.J.; Kemppainen, R.J.

    1985-09-01

    Crossbred gilts had 8.8 +/- 1.1% maximum binding of ( SVI)insulin to insulin receptors on erythrocytes. The number of insulin-binding sites per cell was 137 +/- 19, with a binding affinity ranging from 7.4 X 10(7)M-1 to 11.2 X 10(7)M-1 and mean of 8.8 X 10(7)M-1. Pregnant sows had a significant increase in maximum binding due to an increase in number of receptor sites per cell. Lactating sows fed a high-fiber diet and a low-fiber diet did not develop a significant difference in maximum binding of insulin. Sows fed the low-fiber diet had a significantly higher number of binding sites and a significantly lower binding affinity than did sows fed a high-fiber diet. Receptor-binding affinity was lower in the low-fiber diet group than in cycling gilts, whereas data from sows fed the high-fiber diet did not differ from data for cycling gilts. Data from this study indicated that insulin receptors of swine erythrocytes have binding characteristics similar to those in other species. Pregnancy and diet will alter insulin receptor binding in swine.

  7. On the Theory of Noncovalent Binding

    PubMed Central

    Mihailescu, Mihail; Gilson, Michael K.

    2004-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the binding constant of a receptor and ligand can be written as a two-body integral involving the interaction energy of the receptor and the ligand. Interestingly, however, three different theories of binding in the literature dictate three distinct integrals. The present study uses theory, as well as simulations of binding experiments, to test the validity of the three integrals. When binding is measured by a signal that detects the ligand in the binding site, the most accurate results are obtained by an integral of the Boltzmann factor, where the bound complex is defined in terms of an exclusive binding region. A novel prediction of this approach, that expanding a ligand can increase its binding constant, is borne out by the simulations. The simulations also show that abnormal binding isotherms can be obtained when the region over which the signal is detected deviates markedly from the exclusion zone. Interestingly, the binding constant measured by equilibrium dialysis, rather than by monitoring a localized signal, can yield a binding constant that differs from that obtained from a signal measurement, and that is matched best by the integral of the Mayer factor. PMID:15240441

  8. Receptor-binding sites: bioinformatic approaches.

    PubMed

    Flower, Darren R

    2006-01-01

    It is increasingly clear that both transient and long-lasting interactions between biomacromolecules and their molecular partners are the most fundamental of all biological mechanisms and lie at the conceptual heart of protein function. In particular, the protein-binding site is the most fascinating and important mechanistic arbiter of protein function. In this review, I examine the nature of protein-binding sites found in both ligand-binding receptors and substrate-binding enzymes. I highlight two important concepts underlying the identification and analysis of binding sites. The first is based on knowledge: when one knows the location of a binding site in one protein, one can "inherit" the site from one protein to another. The second approach involves the a priori prediction of a binding site from a sequence or a structure. The full and complete analysis of binding sites will necessarily involve the full range of informatic techniques ranging from sequence-based bioinformatic analysis through structural bioinformatics to computational chemistry and molecular physics. Integration of both diverse experimental and diverse theoretical approaches is thus a mandatory requirement in the evaluation of binding sites and the binding events that occur within them. PMID:16671408

  9. Synthetic LPS-Binding Polymer Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tian

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), one of the principal components of most gram-negative bacteria's outer membrane, is a type of contaminant that can be frequently found in recombinant DNA products. Because of its strong and even lethal biological effects, selective LPS removal from bioproducts solution is of particular importance in the pharmaceutical and health care industries. In this thesis, for the first time, a proof-of-concept study on preparing LPS-binding hydrogel-like NPs through facile one-step free-radical polymerization was presented. With the incorporation of various hydrophobic (TBAm), cationic (APM, GUA) monomers and cross-linkers (BIS, PEG), a small library of NPs was constructed. Their FITC-LPS binding behaviors were investigated and compared with those of commercially available LPS-binding products. Moreover, the LPS binding selectivity of the NPs was also explored by studying the NPs-BSA interactions. The results showed that all NPs obtained generally presented higher FITC-LPS binding capacity in lower ionic strength buffer than higher ionic strength. However, unlike commercial poly-lysine cellulose and polymyxin B agarose beads' nearly linear increase of FITC-LPS binding with particle concentration, NPs exhibited serious aggregation and the binding quickly saturated or even decreased at high particle concentration. Among various types of NPs, higher FITC-LPS binding capacity was observed for those containing more hydrophobic monomers (TBAm). However, surprisingly, more cationic NPs with higher content of APM exhibited decreased FITC-LPS binding in high ionic strength conditions. Additionally, when new cationic monomer and cross-linker, GUA and PEG, were applied to replace APM and BIS, the obtained NPs showed improved FITC-LPS binding capacity at low NP concentration. But compared with APM- and BIS-containing NPs, the FITC-LPS binding capacity of GUA- and PEG-containing NPs saturated earlier. To investigate the NPs' binding to proteins, we tested the NPs

  10. Why tight-binding theory?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Walter A.

    2002-12-01

    In the context of computational physics other methods are more accurate, but tight-binding theory allows very direct physical interpretation and is simple enough to allow much more realistic treatments beyond the local density approximation. We address several important questions of this last category: How does the gap enhancement from Coulomb correlations vary from material to material? Should the enhanced gap be used for calculating the dielectric constant? For calculating the effective mass in k-dot-p theory? How valid is the scissors approximation? How does one line up bands at an interface? How should we match the envelope function at interfaces in effective-mass theory? Why can the resulting quantum-well states seem to violate the uncertainty principle? How should f-shell electrons be treated when they are intermediate between band-like and core-like? The answers to all of these questions are given and discussed.

  11. Gamma Oscillations and Visual Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Peter A.; Kim, Jong Won

    2006-03-01

    At the root of visual perception is the mechanism the brain uses to analyze features in a scene and bind related ones together. Experiments show this process is linked to oscillations of brain activity in the 30-100 Hz gamma band. Oscillations at different sites have correlation functions (CFs) that often peak at zero lag, implying simultaneous firing, even when conduction delays are large. CFs are strongest between cells stimulated by related features. Gamma oscillations are studied here by modeling mm-scale patchy interconnections in the visual cortex. Resulting predictions for gamma responses to stimuli account for numerous experimental findings, including why oscillations and zero-lag synchrony are associated, observed connections with feature preferences, the shape of the zero-lag peak, and variations of CFs with attention. Gamma waves are found to obey the Schroedinger equation, opening the possibility of cortical analogs of quantum phenomena. Gamma instabilities are tied to observations of gamma activity linked to seizures and hallucinations.

  12. Receptor binding properties of amperozide.

    PubMed

    Svartengren, J; Simonsson, P

    1990-01-01

    The receptor pharmacology of amperozide was investigated with in vitro radioligand binding technique. Amperozide possessed a high affinity to the 5-HT2 receptors (Ki = 16.5 +/- 2.1 nM) and a moderate affinity to alpha 1-adrenergic receptors of rat cerebral cortical membranes (Ki = 172 +/- 14 nM). The affinity of amperozide for striatal and limbic dopamine D2 receptors was low and not significantly different (Ki +/- S.E.M. = 540 +/- 59 nM vs 403 +/- 42 nM; p less than 0.11, n = 4). The affinity for striatal and limbic 5-HT2 receptors was measured as well and found to be very close to the affinity to the cerebral cortical 5-HT2 receptor. The drug affinity for D2 and 5-HT2 receptors seems thus not to be influenced by the location of the receptor moiety. The affinity for several other rat brain receptors such as 5-HT1A, alpha 2-adrenergic, dopamine D1, muscarinic M1 and M2, opiate sigma and beta 2-adrenergic was low. The pseudo-Hill coefficient of the amperozide competition binding curve was consistently higher than one indicating antagonistic and complex interactions with the 5-HT2 receptor or with alpha 1-adrenergic and dopamine D2 receptors. The antagonistic properties of amperozide were investigated by its ability to antagonize the serotonin-induced formation of inositol-1-phosphate in human blood platelets. Amperozide inhibited this 5-HT2 receptor-mediated intracellular response with similar potency as ketanserin. These results suggest that amperozide is a selective 5-HT2 receptor antagonist.

  13. The helical structure of DNA facilitates binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Otto G.; Mahmutovic, Anel; Marklund, Emil; Elf, Johan

    2016-09-01

    The helical structure of DNA imposes constraints on the rate of diffusion-limited protein binding. Here we solve the reaction-diffusion equations for DNA-like geometries and extend with simulations when necessary. We find that the helical structure can make binding to the DNA more than twice as fast compared to a case where DNA would be reactive only along one side. We also find that this rate advantage remains when the contributions from steric constraints and rotational diffusion of the DNA-binding protein are included. Furthermore, we find that the association rate is insensitive to changes in the steric constraints on the DNA in the helix geometry, while it is much more dependent on the steric constraints on the DNA-binding protein. We conclude that the helical structure of DNA facilitates the nonspecific binding of transcription factors and structural DNA-binding proteins in general.

  14. Secretin: specific binding to rat brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Fremeau, R.T. Jr.; Jensen, R.T.; Charlton, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; O'Donohue, T.L.; Moody, T.W.

    1983-08-01

    The binding of (/sup 125/I)secretin to rat brain membranes was investigated. Radiolabeled secretin bound with high affinity (KD . 0.2 nM) to a single class of noninteracting sites. Binding was specific, saturable, and reversible. Regional distribution studies indicated that the specific binding was greatest in the cerebellum, intermediate in the cortex, thalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus, and lowest in the midbrain and medulla/pons. Pharmacological studies indicated that only secretin, but not other peptides, inhibits binding of (/sup 125/I)secretin with high affinity. Also, certain guanine nucleotides inhibited high affinity binding. These data indicate that rat brain membranes possess high affinity binding sites specific for secretin and that with the use of (/sup 125/I) secretin the kinetics, stoichiometry, specificity, and distribution of secretin receptors can be directly investigated.

  15. The helical structure of DNA facilitates binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Otto G.; Mahmutovic, Anel; Marklund, Emil; Elf, Johan

    2016-09-01

    The helical structure of DNA imposes constraints on the rate of diffusion-limited protein binding. Here we solve the reaction–diffusion equations for DNA-like geometries and extend with simulations when necessary. We find that the helical structure can make binding to the DNA more than twice as fast compared to a case where DNA would be reactive only along one side. We also find that this rate advantage remains when the contributions from steric constraints and rotational diffusion of the DNA-binding protein are included. Furthermore, we find that the association rate is insensitive to changes in the steric constraints on the DNA in the helix geometry, while it is much more dependent on the steric constraints on the DNA-binding protein. We conclude that the helical structure of DNA facilitates the nonspecific binding of transcription factors and structural DNA-binding proteins in general.

  16. Binding of cholera toxin by various tissues.

    PubMed

    Gascoyne, N; Van Heyningen, W E

    1975-09-01

    Under certain conditions, it is possible to confirm the observation by Peterson (1974) that the cholera toxin-binding capacities of tissues from brain and colon mucosa, and from liver and small intestine mucosa, are comparable. Binding of toxin by all tissues except brain is very variable, but is roughtly proportional to their content of the toxin-binding ganglioside galactosyl-N-acetylgalactosaminyl (sialosyl) lactosyl ceramide. It appears that some toxin-binding sites of the mucosa of the small intestin and colon may be masked. It has also been confirmed that there may be some solubilization of toxin-binding material from brain on standing a few days at 4 C, but this is comparatively slight. Some disadvantages of measuring toxin binding by adding small amounts of radioactive toxin to compartively large amounts of tissue are discussed.

  17. An RNA motif that binds ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassanfar, M.; Szostak, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    RNAs that contain specific high-affinity binding sites for small molecule ligands immobilized on a solid support are present at a frequency of roughly one in 10(10)-10(11) in pools of random sequence RNA molecules. Here we describe a new in vitro selection procedure designed to ensure the isolation of RNAs that bind the ligand of interest in solution as well as on a solid support. We have used this method to isolate a remarkably small RNA motif that binds ATP, a substrate in numerous biological reactions and the universal biological high-energy intermediate. The selected ATP-binding RNAs contain a consensus sequence, embedded in a common secondary structure. The binding properties of ATP analogues and modified RNAs show that the binding interaction is characterized by a large number of close contacts between the ATP and RNA, and by a change in the conformation of the RNA.

  18. Calcium-binding proteins and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckingham, K.; Lu, A. Q.; Andruss, B. F.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The known roles for calcium-binding proteins in developmental signaling pathways are reviewed. Current information on the calcium-binding characteristics of three classes of cell-surface developmental signaling proteins (EGF-domain proteins, cadherins and integrins) is presented together with an overview of the intracellular pathways downstream of these surface receptors. The developmental roles delineated to date for the universal intracellular calcium sensor, calmodulin, and its targets, and for calcium-binding regulators of the cytoskeleton are also reviewed.

  19. Mutated Leguminous Lectin Containing a Heparin-Binding like Motif in a Carbohydrate-Binding Loop Specifically Binds to Heparin

    PubMed Central

    Abo, Hirohito; Soga, Keisuke; Tanaka, Atsuhiro; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    We previously introduced random mutations in the sugar-binding loops of a leguminous lectin and screened the resulting mutated lectins for novel specificities using cell surface display. Screening of a mutated peanut agglutinin (PNA), revealed a mutated PNA with a distinct preference for heparin. Glycan microarray analyses using the mutated lectin fused to the Fc region of human immunoglobulin, revealed that a particular sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), heparin, had the highest binding affinity for mutated PNA among 97 glycans tested, although wild-type PNA showed affinity towards Galβ1-3GalNAc and similar galactosylated glycans. Further analyses of binding specificity using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay demonstrated that the mutated PNA specifically binds to heparin, and weakly to de-2-O-sulfated heparin, but not to other GAG chains including de-6-O-sulfated and de-N-sulfated heparins. The mutated PNA had six amino acid substitutions within the eight amino acid-long sugar-binding loop. In this loop, the heparin-binding like motif comprised three arginine residues at positions 124, 128, and 129, and a histidine at position 125 was present. Substitution of each arginine or histidine residue to alanine reduced heparin-binding ability, indicating that all of these basic amino acid residues contributed to heparin binding. Inhibition assay demonstrated that heparin and dextran sulfate strongly inhibited mutated PNA binding to heparin in dose-dependent manner. The mutated PNA could distinguish between CHO cells and proteoglycan-deficient mutant cells. This is the first report establishing a novel leguminous lectin that preferentially binds to highly sulfated heparin and may provide novel GAG-binding probes to distinguish between heterogeneous GAG repeating units. PMID:26714191

  20. Mutated Leguminous Lectin Containing a Heparin-Binding like Motif in a Carbohydrate-Binding Loop Specifically Binds to Heparin.

    PubMed

    Abo, Hirohito; Soga, Keisuke; Tanaka, Atsuhiro; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    We previously introduced random mutations in the sugar-binding loops of a leguminous lectin and screened the resulting mutated lectins for novel specificities using cell surface display. Screening of a mutated peanut agglutinin (PNA), revealed a mutated PNA with a distinct preference for heparin. Glycan microarray analyses using the mutated lectin fused to the Fc region of human immunoglobulin, revealed that a particular sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), heparin, had the highest binding affinity for mutated PNA among 97 glycans tested, although wild-type PNA showed affinity towards Galβ1-3GalNAc and similar galactosylated glycans. Further analyses of binding specificity using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay demonstrated that the mutated PNA specifically binds to heparin, and weakly to de-2-O-sulfated heparin, but not to other GAG chains including de-6-O-sulfated and de-N-sulfated heparins. The mutated PNA had six amino acid substitutions within the eight amino acid-long sugar-binding loop. In this loop, the heparin-binding like motif comprised three arginine residues at positions 124, 128, and 129, and a histidine at position 125 was present. Substitution of each arginine or histidine residue to alanine reduced heparin-binding ability, indicating that all of these basic amino acid residues contributed to heparin binding. Inhibition assay demonstrated that heparin and dextran sulfate strongly inhibited mutated PNA binding to heparin in dose-dependent manner. The mutated PNA could distinguish between CHO cells and proteoglycan-deficient mutant cells. This is the first report establishing a novel leguminous lectin that preferentially binds to highly sulfated heparin and may provide novel GAG-binding probes to distinguish between heterogeneous GAG repeating units.

  1. Radiation abolishes inducer binding to lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Nathalie; Spotheim-Maurizot, Mélanie; Charlier, Michel

    2005-04-01

    The lactose operon functions under the control of the repressor-operator system. Binding of the repressor to the operator prevents the expression of the structural genes. This interaction can be destroyed by the binding of an inducer to the repressor. If ionizing radiations damage the partners, a dramatic dysfunction of the regulation system may be expected. We showed previously that gamma irradiation hinders repressor-operator binding through protein damage. Here we show that irradiation of the repressor abolishes the binding of the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-1-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) to the repressor. The observed lack of release of the repressor from the complex results from the loss of the ability of the inducer to bind to the repressor due to the destruction of the IPTG binding site. Fluorescence measurements show that both tryptophan residues located in or near the IPTG binding site are damaged. Since tryptophan damage is strongly correlated with the loss of IPTG binding ability, we conclude that it plays a critical role in the effect. A model was built that takes into account the kinetic analysis of damage production and the observed protection of its binding site by IPTG. This model satisfactorily accounts for the experimental results and allows us to understand the radiation-induced effects. PMID:15799700

  2. Chemokine binding proteins encoded by pathogens.

    PubMed

    Alcami, Antonio; Saraiva, Margarida

    2009-01-01

    Chemokines are chemoattractant cytokines that play an important role in immunity. The role of chemokines against invading pathogens is emphasized by the expression of chemokine inhibitors by many pathogens. A mechanims employed by poxviruses and herpesviruses is the secretion of chemokine bindingproteins unrelated to host receptors that bind chemokines with high affinity and block their activity. Soluble chemokine binding proteins have also been identified in the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni and in ticks. The binding specificity of these inhibitors of cell migration point at chemokines that contribute to host defense mechanisms against various pathogens. Chemokine binding proteins modulate the immune response and may lead to new therapeutic approaches to treat inflamatory diseases.

  3. Lack of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzylate binding to biologically relevant binding sites on mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Adams, E M; Lubrano, T M; Gordon, J; Fields, J Z

    1992-09-01

    We analyzed the binding characteristics of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzylate ([3H]QNB), a muscarinic cholinergic ligand, to rat and human mononuclear cells (MNC). Under various assay conditions, atropine-sensitive, saturable binding occurred with an apparent Kd of 10 nM. Conditions which disrupted the MNC membrane reduced total binding and eliminated specific binding. Muscarinic agonists were unable to inhibit [3H]QNB binding to MNC at concentrations up to 10(-2) M. Stereoisomers dexetimide and levetimide were equipotent inhibitors of binding (IC50 2 x 10(-5) M). We conclude that, although atropine-sensitive binding of [3H]QNB to MNC occurs, the binding is not consistent with the presence of a biologically relevant muscarinic cholinergic receptor. PMID:1392105

  4. Tissue specificity of endothelin binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bolger, G.T.; Liard, F.; Krogsrud, R.; Thibeault, D.; Jaramillo, J. )

    1990-09-01

    A measurement was made of the binding of 125I-labeled endothelin (125I-ET) to crude membrane fractions prepared from rat aorta, atrium, ventricle, portal vein, trachea, lung parenchyma, vas deferens, ileum, bladder, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma. Scatchard analysis of 125I-ET binding in all tissues indicated binding to a single class of saturable sites. The affinity and density of 125I-ET binding sites varied between tissues. The Kd of 125I-ET binding was approximately 0.5 nM for rat aorta, trachea, lung parenchyma, ventricle, bladder, and vas deferens, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma, 1.8 nM for rat portal vein and atrium, and 3.3 nM for ileum. The Bmax of 125I-ET binding had the following rank order of density in rat tissues: trachea greater than lung parenchyma = vas deferens much greater than aorta = portal vein = atrium greater than bladder greater than ventricle = ileum. The properties of 125I-ET endothelin binding were characterized in rat ventricular membranes. 125I-ET binding was time dependent, reaching a maximum within 45-60 min at 25 degrees C. The calculated microassociation constant was 9.67 x 10(5) s-1 M-1. Only 15-20% of 125I-ET dissociated from its binding site even when dissociation was studied as long as 3 h. Preincubation of ventricular membranes with ET prevented binding of 125I-ET. 125I-ET binding was destroyed by boiling of ventricular membranes and was temperature, pH, and cation (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+) dependent.

  5. New DNA-binding radioprotectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roger

    The normal tissue damage associated with cancer radiotherapy has motivated the development at Peter Mac of a new class of DNA-binding radioprotecting drugs that could be applied top-ically to normal tissues at risk. Methylproamine (MP), the lead compound, reduces radiation induced cell kill at low concentrations. For example, experiments comparing the clonogenic survival of transformed human keratinocytes treated with 30 micromolar MP before and dur-ing various doses of ionising radiation, with the radiation dose response for untreated cells, indicate a dose reduction factor (DRF) of 2. Similar survival curve experiments using various concentrations of MP, with parallel measurements of uptake of MP into cell nuclei, have en-abled the relationship between drug uptake and extent of radioprotection to be established. Radioprotection has also been demonstrated after systemic administration to mice, for three different endpoints, namely lung, jejunum and bone marrow (survival at 30 days post-TBI). The results of pulse radiolysis studies indicated that the drugs act by reduction of transient radiation-induced oxidative species on DNA. This hypothesis was substantiated by the results of experiments in which MP radioprotection of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, assessed as -H2AX foci, in the human keratinocyte cell line. For both endpoints, the extent of radioprotection increased with MP concentration up to a maximal value. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that radioprotection by MP is mediated by attenuation of the extent of initial DNA damage. However, although MP is a potent radioprotector, it becomes cytotoxic at higher concentrations. This limitation has been addressed in an extensive program of lead optimisation and some promising analogues have emerged from which the next lead will be selected. Given the clinical potential of topical radioprotection, the new analogues are being assessed in terms of delivery to mouse oral mucosa. This is

  6. Designing ligands to bind proteins.

    PubMed

    Whitesides, George M; Krishnamurthy, Vijay M

    2005-11-01

    The ability to design drugs (so-called 'rational drug design') has been one of the long-term objectives of chemistry for 50 years. It is an exceptionally difficult problem, and many of its parts lie outside the expertise of chemistry. The much more limited problem - how to design tight-binding ligands (rational ligand design) - would seem to be one that chemistry could solve, but has also proved remarkably recalcitrant. The question is 'Why is it so difficult?' and the answer is 'We still don't entirely know'. This perspective discusses some of the technical issues - potential functions, protein plasticity, enthalpy/entropy compensation, and others - that contribute, and suggests areas where fundamental understanding of protein-ligand interactions falls short of what is needed. It surveys recent technological developments (in particular, isothermal titration calorimetry) that will, hopefully, make now the time for serious progress in this area. It concludes with the calorimetric examination of the association of a series of systematically varied ligands with a model protein. The counterintuitive thermodynamic results observed serve to illustrate that, even in relatively simple systems, understanding protein-ligand association is challenging.

  7. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  8. Vinculin Tail Dimerization and Paxillin Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Sharon

    2006-03-01

    Vinculin is a highly conserved cytoskeletal protein that is essential for regulation of cell morphology and migration, and is a critical component of both cell-cell and cell-matrix complexes. The tail domain of vinculin (Vt) was crystallized as a homodimer and is believed to bind F-actin as a dimer. We have characterized Vt dimerization by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy and identified the dimer interface in solution by chemical shift perturbation. The Vt dimer interface in solution is similar to the crystallographic dimer interface. Interestingly, the Vt dimer interface determined by NMR partially overlaps the paxillin binding region previously defined coarsely by deletion mutagenesis and gel-blot assays. To further characterize the paxillin binding site in Vt and probe relationship between paxillin binding and dimerization, we conducted chemical shift perturbations experiments using a paxillin derived peptide, LD2. Our NMR experiments have confirmed that the paxillin binding site and the Vt dimerization site partially overlap, and we have further characterized both of these two binding interfaces. Information derived from these studies was used to identify mutations in Vt that selectively perturb paxillin binding and Vt self-association. These mutants are currently being characterized for their utility in structural and biological analyses to elucidate the role of paxillin binding and Vt dimerization in vinculin function.

  9. Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding in Bovine Cerebral Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Reinhard, John F.; Synder, Solomon H.

    1980-05-01

    Purified preparations of microvessels from bovine cerebral cortex contain substantial levels of alpha-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, and histamine 1 receptor binding sites but only negligible serotonin, muscarinic cholinergic, opiate, and benzodiazepine receptor binding. Norepinephrine and histamine may be endogenous regulators of the cerebral microcirculation at the observed receptors.

  10. Multiple instance learning of Calmodulin binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Minhas, Fayyaz ul Amir Afsar; Ben-Hur, Asa

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitously conserved protein that acts as a calcium sensor, and interacts with a large number of proteins. Detection of CaM binding proteins and their interaction sites experimentally requires a significant effort, so accurate methods for their prediction are important. Results: We present a novel algorithm (MI-1 SVM) for binding site prediction and evaluate its performance on a set of CaM-binding proteins extracted from the Calmodulin Target Database. Our approach directly models the problem of binding site prediction as a large-margin classification problem, and is able to take into account uncertainty in binding site location. We show that the proposed algorithm performs better than the standard SVM formulation, and illustrate its ability to recover known CaM binding motifs. A highly accurate cascaded classification approach using the proposed binding site prediction method to predict CaM binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana is also presented. Availability: Matlab code for training MI-1 SVM and the cascaded classification approach is available on request. Contact: fayyazafsar@gmail.com or asa@cs.colostate.edu PMID:22962461

  11. Methods for Improving Aptamer Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hijiri; Savory, Nasa; Abe, Koichi; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single stranded oligonucleotides that bind a wide range of biological targets. Although aptamers can be isolated from pools of random sequence oligonucleotides using affinity-based selection, aptamers with high affinities are not always obtained. Therefore, further refinement of aptamers is required to achieve desired binding affinities. The optimization of primary sequences and stabilization of aptamer conformations are the main approaches to refining the binding properties of aptamers. In particular, sequence optimization using combined in silico sequence recombinations and in vitro functional evaluations is effective for the improvement of binding affinities, however, the binding affinities of aptamers are limited by the low hydrophobicity of nucleic acids. Accordingly, introduction of hydrophobic moieties into aptamers expands the diversity of interactions between aptamers and targets. Moreover, construction of multivalent aptamers by connecting aptamers that recognize distinct epitopes is an attractive approach to substantial increases in binding affinity. In addition, binding affinities can be tuned by optimizing the scaffolds of multivalent constructs. In this review, we summarize the various techniques for improving the binding affinities of aptamers. PMID:27043498

  12. Plasma protein binding of zomepirac sodium.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, P J

    1981-07-01

    The plasma protein binding of zomepirac, a new nonnarcotic analgesic, was studied using equilibrium dialysis. Experiments were performed using human plasma and plasma from mice, rats, and rhesus monkeys, all species of pharmacological or toxicological interest. At concentrations approximating those achieved in vivo, the binding was fairly constant at 98-99% in all species except the rhesus monkey, where binding was decreased from 98 to approximately 96% at higher concentrations (greater then 50 microgram/ml). Zomepirac (10 microgram/ml) did not appear to displace or to be displaced by warfarin (10 microgram/ml) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in zomepirac (10 microgram/ml) binding. Zomepirac did not affect salicylate binding.

  13. Ethylene binding site affinity in ripening apples

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, S.M. . Dept. of Horticultural Science); Sisler, E.C. )

    1993-09-01

    Scatchard plots for ethylene binding in apples (Malus domestica Borkh.), which were harvested weekly for 5 weeks to include the ethylene climacteric rise, showed C[sub 50] values (concentration of ethylene needed to occupy 50% of the ethylene binding sites) of 0.10, 0.11, 0.34, 0.40, and 0.57 [mu]l ethylene/liter[sup [minus]1], respectively, for each of the 5 weeks. Higher ethylene concentrations were required to saturate the binding sites during the climacteric rise than at other times. Diffusion of [sup 14]C-ethylene from the binding sites was curvilinear and did not show any indication of multiple binding sites. Ethylene was not metabolized by apple tissue.

  14. (TH) diazepam binding to human granulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, P.A.; Cundall, R.L.; Rolfe, B.

    1985-07-08

    (TH)-diazepam binds to sites on human granulocyte membranes, with little or no binding to platelets or lymphocytes. These (TH)-diazepam binding sites are of the peripheral type, being strongly inhibited by R05-4864 (Ki=6.23nM) but only weakly by clonazepam (Ki=14 M). Binding of (TH) diazepam at 0 is saturable, specific and stereoselective. Scatchard analysis indicates a single class of sites with Bmax of 109 +/- 17f moles per mg of protein and K/sub D/ of 3.07 +/- 0.53nM. Hill plots of saturation experiments gave straight lines with a mean Hill coefficient of 1.03 +/- 0.014. Binding is time dependent and reversible and it varies linearly with granulocyte protein concentration over the range 0.025-0.300 mg of protein. 11 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  15. Development of more efficacious Tc-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceutical mixtures. Progress report, September 1, 1989--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, W.R.

    1992-01-24

    The long-range objective of this research program is the development of more efficacious technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals for use as imaging agents in diagnostic nuclear medicine. We seek to isolate and develop distinct site imaging agents, each of which has properties optimized to provide diagnostic information concerning a given pathological condition. The specific objectives during the period (9/1/89 to 8/31/92) include: (1) Development of strategies for improving yields of specific Tc-diphosphonate complexes with optimum imaging properties; (2) Development of electrodes for rapid in situ electrochemical generation of skeletal imaging agents; (3) Development of electrochemical sensors for {Tc} and Re imaging agents; (4) Characterization of stable {Tc}- and Re-diphosphonate complexes obtainable in high yield by structural studies with techniques such as NMR, EXAFS, and Raman spectroscopy; (5) Development of improved separation techniques for the characterization of diphosphonate skeletal imaging agents; (6) Evaluation of the effect of the biological milieu on {Tc}-diphosphonate complexes; and (7) Electrochemical studies of technetium and rhenium complexes synthesized by Professor Deutsch`s research group for heart and brain imaging.

  16. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  17. Improving Binding Affinity and Selectivity of Computationally Designed Ligand-Binding Proteins Using Experiments.

    PubMed

    Tinberg, Christine E; Khare, Sagar D

    2016-01-01

    The ability to de novo design proteins that can bind small molecules has wide implications for synthetic biology and medicine. Combining computational protein design with the high-throughput screening of mutagenic libraries of computationally designed proteins is emerging as a general approach for creating binding proteins with programmable binding modes, affinities, and selectivities. The computational step enables the creation of a binding site in a protein that otherwise does not (measurably) bind the intended ligand, and targeted mutagenic screening allows for validation and refinement of the computational model as well as provides orders-of-magnitude increases in the binding affinity. Deep sequencing of mutagenic libraries can provide insights into the mutagenic binding landscape and enable further affinity improvements. Moreover, in such a combined computational-experimental approach where the binding mode is preprogrammed and iteratively refined, selectivity can be achieved (and modulated) by the placement of specified amino acid side chain groups around the ligand in defined orientations. Here, we describe the experimental aspects of a combined computational-experimental approach for designing-using the software suite Rosetta-proteins that bind a small molecule of choice and engineering, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and high-throughput yeast surface display, high affinity and ligand selectivity. We illustrated the utility of this approach by performing the design of a selective digoxigenin (DIG)-binding protein that, after affinity maturation, binds DIG with picomolar affinity and high selectivity over structurally related steroids. PMID:27094290

  18. Measuring Equilibrium Binding Constants for the WT1-DNA Interaction Using a Filter Binding Assay.

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Equilibrium binding of WT1 to specific sites in DNA and potentially RNA molecules is central in mediating the regulatory roles of this protein. In order to understand the functional effects of mutations in the nucleic acid-binding domain of WT1 proteins and/or mutations in the DNA- or RNA-binding sites, it is necessary to measure the equilibrium constant for formation of the protein-nucleic acid complex. This chapter describes the use of a filter binding assay to make accurate measurements of the binding of the WT1 zinc finger domain to the consensus WT1-binding site in DNA. The method described is readily adapted to the measurement of the effects of mutations in either the WT1 zinc finger domain or the putative binding sites within a promoter element or cellular RNA.

  19. The TRPV5/6 calcium channels contain multiple calmodulin binding sites with differential binding properties.

    PubMed

    Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V; Bokhovchuk, Fedir M; Vuister, Geerten W

    2012-06-01

    The epithelial Ca(2+) channels TRPV5/6 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 5/6) are thoroughly regulated in order to fine-tune the amount of Ca(2+) reabsorption. Calmodulin has been shown to be involved into calcium-dependent inactivation of TRPV5/6 channels by binding directly to the distal C-terminal fragment of the channels (de Groot et al. in Mol Cell Biol 31:2845-2853, 12). Here, we investigate this binding in detail and find significant differences between TRPV5 and TRPV6. We also identify and characterize in vitro four other CaM binding fragments of TRPV5/6, which likely are also involved in TRPV5/6 channel regulation. The five CaM binding sites display diversity in binding modes, binding stoichiometries and binding affinities, which may fine-tune the response of the channels to varying Ca(2+)-concentrations. PMID:22354706

  20. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer's disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer's disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer's disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  1. WISP-1 binds to decorin and biglycan.

    PubMed

    Desnoyers, L; Arnott, D; Pennica, D

    2001-12-14

    Wnt-1-induced secreted protein 1 (WISP-1) is a member of the CCN (connective tissue growth factor, Cyr61, NOV) family of growth factors. Structural and experimental evidence suggests that CCN family member activities are modulated by their interaction with sulfated glycoconjugates. To elucidate the mechanism of action for WISP-1, we characterized the specificity of its tissue and cellular interaction and identified binding factors. WISP-1 binding was restricted to the stroma of colon tumors and to cells with a fibroblastic phenotype. By using a solid phase assay, we showed that human skin fibroblast conditioned media contained WISP-1 binding factors. Competitive inhibition with different glycosaminoglycans and treatment with glycosaminoglycan lyases and proteases demonstrated that binding to the conditioned media was mediated by dermatan sulfate proteoglycans. Mass spectrometric analysis identified the isolated binding factors as decorin and biglycan. Decorin and biglycan interacted directly with WISP-1 and inhibited its binding to components in the conditioned media. Similarly, WISP-1 interaction with human skin fibroblasts was inhibited by dermatan sulfate, decorin, and biglycan or by treatment of the cell surface with dermatan sulfate-specific lyases. Together these results demonstrate that decorin and biglycan are WISP-1 binding factors that can mediate and modulate its interaction with the surface of fibroblasts. We propose that this specific interaction plays a role in the regulation of WISP-1 function.

  2. [Binding to chicken liver lactatedehydrogenase (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lluís, C; Bozal, J

    1976-06-01

    Some information about the lactate dehydrogenase NAD binding site has been obtained by working with coenzymes analogs of incomplete molecules. 5'AMP, 5'-ADP, ATP, 5'-c-AMP and 3'(2)-AMP inhibit chicken liver LDH activity competitively with NADH. 5"-AMP and 5'-ADP show a stronger inhibition power than ATP, suggesting that the presence of one or two phosphate groups at the 5' position of adenosine, is essential for the binding of the coenzyme analogs at the enzyme binding site. Ribose and ribose-5'-P do not appear to inhibit the LDH activity, proving that purine base lacking mononucleotides do not bind to the enzyme. 5"-ADPG inhibits LDH activity in the exactly as 5'-ADP, showing that ribose moiety may be replaced by glucose, without considerable effects on the coenzyme analog binding. 2'-desoxidenosin-5'-phosphate proves to be a poorer inhibitor of the LDH activity than 5'-AMP, indicating that an interaction between the--OH groups and the amino-acids of the LDH active center takes place. Nicotinamide does not produce any inhibition effect, while NMN and CMP induce a much weaker inhibition than the adenine analogues, thus indicating a lesser binding capacity to the enzyme. Therefore, the LDH binding site seems to show some definite specificity towards the adenina groups of the coenzyme.

  3. Improved flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, G.C.

    1984-05-30

    The invention relates to a method of measuring binding assays carried out with different size particles wherein the binding assay sample is run through a flow cytometer without separating the sample from the marking agent. The amount of a binding reactant present in a sample is determined by providing particles with a coating of binder and also a known quantity of smaller particles with a coating of binder reactant. The binding reactant is the same as the binding reactant present in the sample. The smaller particles also contain a fluorescent chemical. The particles are combined with the sample and the binding reaction is allowed to occur for a set length of time followed by combining the smaller particles with the mixture of the particles and the sample produced and allowing the binding reactions to proceed to equilibrium. The fluorescence and light scatter of the combined mixture is then measured as the combined mixture passes through a flow cytometer equipped with a laser to bring about fluorescence, and the number and strength of fluorescent events are compared. A similar method is also provided for determining the amount of antigen present in the sample by providing spheres with an antibody coating and some smaller spheres with an antigen coating. (LEW)

  4. Role of carbohydrates in thyrotropin binding sites.

    PubMed

    Pekonen, F

    1980-07-01

    The role of carbohydrates in thyrotropin binding was studied by glycosidase treatment of human thyroid membranes. Removal of over 75% of membrane sialic acid resulted in a 50% increase of TSH binding, measured in 10 mM Tris-HCl, 50 mM NaCl, 0.1% bSA, pH 7.4, 37 degrees C (buffer A). This augmentation was due to an increase in binding to high affinity sites (Ka 1 X 10(10)M-1). The binding was highly specific and was not significantly inhibited by gangliosides. In contrast, low affinity binding of TSH was unchanged either in buffer A or in 10 mM Tris-acetate, 0.1% bSA pH 6.0, 4 degrees C (buffer B) and was inhibited by gangliosides. Treatment of membranes with beta-galactosidase, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase and alpha-L-fucosidase had little effect on TSH binding. The data suggests that membrane-associated sialic acid inhibits TSH binding to high affinity receptors and that gangliosides are not involved in tthis TSH-receptor interaction.

  5. Muscarine binding sites in bovine adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Barron, B A; Murrin, L C; Hexum, T D

    1986-03-18

    The presence of muscarinic binding sites in the bovine adrenal medulla was investigated using [3H]QNB and the bovine adrenal medulla. Scatchard analysis combined with computer analysis yielded data consistent with a two binding site configuration. KDs of 0.15 and 14 nM and Bmax s of 29 and 210 fmol/mg protein, respectively, were observed. Displacement of [3H]QNB by various cholinergic agents is, in order of decreasing potency: QNB, dexetimide, atropine, scopolamine, imipramine, desipramine, oxotremorine, pilocarpine, acetylcholine, methacholine and carbachol. These results demonstrate the presence of more than one muscarine binding site in the bovine adrenal gland. PMID:3709656

  6. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  7. Carbohydrate-binding modules from a thermostable Rhodothermus marinus xylanase: cloning, expression and binding studies.

    PubMed Central

    Abou Hachem, M; Nordberg Karlsson, E; Bartonek-Roxâ, E; Raghothama, S; Simpson, P J; Gilbert, H J; Williamson, M P; Holst, O

    2000-01-01

    The two N-terminally repeated carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM4-1 and CBM4-2) encoded by xyn10A from Rhodothermus marinus were produced in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. Binding assays to insoluble polysaccharides showed binding to insoluble xylan and to phosphoric-acid-swollen cellulose but not to Avicel or crystalline cellulose. Binding to insoluble substrates was significantly enhanced by the presence of Na(+) and Ca(2+) ions. The binding affinities for soluble polysaccharides were tested by affinity electrophoresis; strong binding occurred with different xylans and beta-glucan. CBM4-2 displayed a somewhat higher binding affinity than CBM4-1 for both soluble and insoluble substrates but both had similar specificities. Binding to short oligosaccharides was measured by NMR; both modules bound with similar affinities. The binding of the modules was shown to be dominated by enthalpic forces. The binding modules did not contribute with any significant synergistic effects on xylan hydrolysis when incubated with a Xyn10A catalytic module. This is the first report of family 4 CBMs with affinity for both insoluble xylan and amorphous cellulose. PMID:10600638

  8. Leukocyte protease binding to nucleic acids promotes nuclear localization and cleavage of nucleic acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Marshall P; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron J; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-06-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. In this study, we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein targets, whereas adding RNA to recombinant RNA binding protein substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Preincubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G. During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps, which bind NE and cathepsin G. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and neutrophil extracellular traps in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high-affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation.

  9. Two nucleotide binding sites modulate ( sup 3 H) glyburide binding to rat cortex membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.E.; Gopalakrishnan, M.; Triggle, D.J.; Janis, R.A. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1991-03-11

    The effects of nucleotides on the binding of the ATP-dependent K{sup +}-channel antagonist ({sup 3}H)glyburide (GLB) to rat cortex membranes were examined. Nucleotide triphosphates (NTPs) and nucleotide diphosphate (NDPs) inhibited the binding of GLB. This effect was dependent on the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT). Inhibition of binding by NTPs, with the exception of ATP{gamma}S, was dependent on the presence of Mg{sup 2+}. GLB binding showed a biphasic response to ADP: up to 3 mM, ADP inhibited binding, and above this concentration GLB binding increased rapidly, and was restored to normal levels by 10 mM ADP. In the presence of Mg{sup 2+}, ADP did not stimulate binding. Saturation analysis in the presence of Mg{sup 2+} and increasing concentrations of ADP showed that ADP results primarily in a change of the B{sub max} for GLB binding. The differential effects of NTPS and NDPs indicate that two nucleotide binding sites regulate GLB binding.

  10. Tau Induces Cooperative Taxol Binding to Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer; Santangelo, Christian; Victoria, Makrides; Fygenson, Deborah

    2004-03-01

    Taxol and tau are two ligands which stabilize the microtubule (MT) lattice. Taxol is an anti-mitotic drug that binds β tubulin in the MT interior. Tau is a MT-associated protein that binds both α and β tubulin on the MT exterior. Both taxol and tau reduce MT dynamics and promote tubulin polymerization. Tau alone also acts as a buttress to bundle, stiffen, and space MTs. A structural study recently suggested that taxol and tau may interact by binding to the same site. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we find that tau induces taxol to bind MTs cooperatively depending on the tau concentration. We develop a model that correctly fits the data in the absence of tau and yields a measure of taxol cooperativity when tau is present.

  11. Binding of ATP to the progesterone receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Moudgil, V K; Toft, D O

    1975-01-01

    The possible interaction of progesterone--receptor complexes with nucleotides was tested by affinity chromatography. The cytosol progesterone receptor from hen oviduct was partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation before use. When progesterone was bound to the receptor, the resulting complex could be selectively adsorbed onto columns of ATP-Sepharose. This interaction was reversible and of an ionic nature since it could be disrupted by high-salt conditions. A competitive binding assay was used to test the specificity of receptor binding to several other nucleotides, including ADP, AMP, and cAMP. A clear specificity for binding ATP was evident from these studies. When ATP was added to receptor preparations, the nucleotide did not affect the sedimentation properties or hormone binding characteristics of the receptor. Although the function of ATP remains unknown, these studies indicate a role of this nucleotide in some aspect of hormone receptor activity. PMID:165493

  12. Hardware device binding and mutual authentication

    DOEpatents

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-03-04

    Detection and deterrence of device tampering and subversion by substitution may be achieved by including a cryptographic unit within a computing device for binding multiple hardware devices and mutually authenticating the devices. The cryptographic unit includes a physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a binding PUF value. The cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF value during an enrollment phase and subsequent authentication phases. During a subsequent authentication phase, the cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF values of the multiple hardware devices to generate a challenge to send to the other device, and to verify a challenge received from the other device to mutually authenticate the hardware devices.

  13. Ligand Binding to Macromolecules: Allosteric and Sequential Models of Cooperativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, V. L.; Szabo, Attila

    1979-01-01

    A simple model is described for the binding of ligands to macromolecules. The model is applied to the cooperative binding by hemoglobin and aspartate transcarbamylase. The sequential and allosteric models of cooperative binding are considered. (BB)

  14. Weak binding gases as modulators of hemoglobin function

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenborn, B P; Saxena, A; North, B E

    1980-01-01

    Studies are reported in which the mechanisms of binding of inert gaseous agents to hemoglobin and myoglobin are investigated. Specific binding sites are mapped. Possible effects on sickle cell formation and oxygen binding are discussed. (ACR)

  15. Mixed tridentate π -donor and monodentate π -acceptor ligands as chelating systems for rhenium-188 and technetium-99m nitrido radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Boschi, Alessandra; Uccelli, Licia; Pasquali, Micol; Pasqualini, Roberto; Guerrini, Remo; Duatti, Adriano

    2013-09-01

    A new molecular metallic fragment for labeling biologically active molecules with 99mTc and 188Re is described. This system is composed of a combination of tridentate π-donor and monodentate π-acceptor ligands bound to a [M Ξ N]2+ group (M = (99m)Tc, 188Re) in a pseudo square-pyramidal geometry. A simple structural model of the new metallic fragment was obtained by reacting the ligand 2, 2'-iminodiethanethiol [H2NS2 = NH(CH2CH2SH)2] and monodentate tertiary phosphines with the [M Ξ N]2+ group (M = (99m)Tc, (188)Re). In the resulting complexes (dubbed3+1complexes), the tridentate ligand binds the [M Ξ N]2+ core through the two deprotonated, negatively charged, thiol sulfur atoms and the neutral, protonated, amine nitrogen atom. The residual fourth position of the five-coordinated arrangement is occupied by a phosphine ligand. The chemical identity of these model (99m)Tc and (188)Re compounds was established by comparison with the chromatographic properties of the corresponding complexes obtained at the macroscopic level with the long-lived (99)Tc and natural Re isotopes. The investigation was further extended to comprise a series of ligands formed by simple combinations of two basic amino acids or pseudo-amino acids to yield potential tridentate chelating systems having [S, N, S] and [N, N, S] as sets of π-donor atoms. Labeling yields and in vitro stability were investigated using different ancillary ligands. Results showed that SNS-type ligands afforded the highest labeling yields and the most robust 3+1 nitrido complexes with both (99m)Tc and (188)Re. Thus, the new chelating system can be conveniently employed for labeling peptides and other biomolecules with the [M Ξ N]2+ group.

  16. Mixed tridentate π -donor and monodentate π -acceptor ligands as chelating systems for rhenium-188 and technetium-99m nitrido radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Boschi, Alessandra; Uccelli, Licia; Pasquali, Micol; Pasqualini, Roberto; Guerrini, Remo; Duatti, Adriano

    2013-09-01

    A new molecular metallic fragment for labeling biologically active molecules with 99mTc and 188Re is described. This system is composed of a combination of tridentate π-donor and monodentate π-acceptor ligands bound to a [M Ξ N]2+ group (M = (99m)Tc, 188Re) in a pseudo square-pyramidal geometry. A simple structural model of the new metallic fragment was obtained by reacting the ligand 2, 2'-iminodiethanethiol [H2NS2 = NH(CH2CH2SH)2] and monodentate tertiary phosphines with the [M Ξ N]2+ group (M = (99m)Tc, (188)Re). In the resulting complexes (dubbed3+1complexes), the tridentate ligand binds the [M Ξ N]2+ core through the two deprotonated, negatively charged, thiol sulfur atoms and the neutral, protonated, amine nitrogen atom. The residual fourth position of the five-coordinated arrangement is occupied by a phosphine ligand. The chemical identity of these model (99m)Tc and (188)Re compounds was established by comparison with the chromatographic properties of the corresponding complexes obtained at the macroscopic level with the long-lived (99)Tc and natural Re isotopes. The investigation was further extended to comprise a series of ligands formed by simple combinations of two basic amino acids or pseudo-amino acids to yield potential tridentate chelating systems having [S, N, S] and [N, N, S] as sets of π-donor atoms. Labeling yields and in vitro stability were investigated using different ancillary ligands. Results showed that SNS-type ligands afforded the highest labeling yields and the most robust 3+1 nitrido complexes with both (99m)Tc and (188)Re. Thus, the new chelating system can be conveniently employed for labeling peptides and other biomolecules with the [M Ξ N]2+ group. PMID:24106999

  17. Atomic electron binding energies in fermium

    SciTech Connect

    Das, M.P.

    1981-02-01

    Calculations of the binding energies of electrons in fermium by using a relativistic local-density functional theory are reported. It is found that relaxation effects are nonnegligible for inner core orbitals. Calculated orbital binding energies are compared with those due to nonlocal Dirac-Fock calculations and also with those determined experimentally from conversion electron spectroscopy. Finally the usefulness of the local-density approximation for the study of heavy atomic and condensed systems is discussed.

  18. Binding capacity: cooperativity and buffering in biopolymers.

    PubMed Central

    Di Cera, E; Gill, S J; Wyman, J

    1988-01-01

    The group of linkage potentials resulting from the energy of a physicochemical system expressed per mol of a reference component, say a polyfunctional macromolecule, leads to the concept of binding capacity. This concept applies equally to both chemical and physical ligands and opens the way to consideration of higher-order linkage relationships. It provides a means of exploring the consequences of thermodynamic stability on generalized binding phenomena in biopolymers. PMID:3422436

  19. Electrostatically biased binding of kinesin to microtubules.

    PubMed

    Grant, Barry J; Gheorghe, Dana M; Zheng, Wenjun; Alonso, Maria; Huber, Gary; Dlugosz, Maciej; McCammon, J Andrew; Cross, Robert A

    2011-11-01

    The minimum motor domain of kinesin-1 is a single head. Recent evidence suggests that such minimal motor domains generate force by a biased binding mechanism, in which they preferentially select binding sites on the microtubule that lie ahead in the progress direction of the motor. A specific molecular mechanism for biased binding has, however, so far been lacking. Here we use atomistic Brownian dynamics simulations combined with experimental mutagenesis to show that incoming kinesin heads undergo electrostatically guided diffusion-to-capture by microtubules, and that this produces directionally biased binding. Kinesin-1 heads are initially rotated by the electrostatic field so that their tubulin-binding sites face inwards, and then steered towards a plus-endwards binding site. In tethered kinesin dimers, this bias is amplified. A 3-residue sequence (RAK) in kinesin helix alpha-6 is predicted to be important for electrostatic guidance. Real-world mutagenesis of this sequence powerfully influences kinesin-driven microtubule sliding, with one mutant producing a 5-fold acceleration over wild type. We conclude that electrostatic interactions play an important role in the kinesin stepping mechanism, by biasing the diffusional association of kinesin with microtubules. PMID:22140358

  20. Electrostatically Biased Binding of Kinesin to Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wenjun; Alonso, Maria; Huber, Gary; Dlugosz, Maciej; McCammon, J. Andrew; Cross, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    The minimum motor domain of kinesin-1 is a single head. Recent evidence suggests that such minimal motor domains generate force by a biased binding mechanism, in which they preferentially select binding sites on the microtubule that lie ahead in the progress direction of the motor. A specific molecular mechanism for biased binding has, however, so far been lacking. Here we use atomistic Brownian dynamics simulations combined with experimental mutagenesis to show that incoming kinesin heads undergo electrostatically guided diffusion-to-capture by microtubules, and that this produces directionally biased binding. Kinesin-1 heads are initially rotated by the electrostatic field so that their tubulin-binding sites face inwards, and then steered towards a plus-endwards binding site. In tethered kinesin dimers, this bias is amplified. A 3-residue sequence (RAK) in kinesin helix alpha-6 is predicted to be important for electrostatic guidance. Real-world mutagenesis of this sequence powerfully influences kinesin-driven microtubule sliding, with one mutant producing a 5-fold acceleration over wild type. We conclude that electrostatic interactions play an important role in the kinesin stepping mechanism, by biasing the diffusional association of kinesin with microtubules. PMID:22140358

  1. The readiness potential reflects intentional binding.

    PubMed

    Jo, Han-Gue; Wittmann, Marc; Hinterberger, Thilo; Schmidt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    When a voluntary action is causally linked with a sensory outcome, the action and its consequent effect are perceived as being closer together in time. This effect is called intentional binding. Although many experiments were conducted on this phenomenon, the underlying neural mechanisms are not well understood. While intentional binding is specific to voluntary action, we presumed that preconscious brain activity (the readiness potential, RP), which occurs before an action is made, might play an important role in this binding effect. In this study, the brain dynamics were recorded with electroencephalography (EEG) and analyzed in single-trials in order to estimate whether intentional binding is correlated with the early neural processes. Moreover, we were interested in different behavioral performance between meditators and non-meditators since meditators are expected to be able to keep attention more consistently on a task. Thus, we performed the intentional binding paradigm with 20 mindfulness meditators and compared them to matched controls. Although, we did not observe a group effect on either behavioral data or EEG recordings, we found that self-initiated movements following ongoing negative deflections of slow cortical potentials (SCPs) result in a stronger binding effect compared to positive potentials, especially regarding the perceived time of the consequent effect. Our results provide the first direct evidence that the early neural activity within the range of SCPs affects perceived time of a sensory outcome that is caused by intentional action.

  2. Molecular design of substrate binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, J.A.; Hobbs, J.D.

    1991-12-31

    Computer-aided molecular design methods were used to tailor binding sites for small substrate molecules, including CO{sub 2} and methane. The goal is to design a cavity, adjacent to a catalytic metal center, into which the substrate will selectively bind through only non-bonding interactions with the groups lining the binding pocket. Porphyrins are used as a basic molecular structure, with various substituents added to construct the binding pocket. The conformations of these highly-substituted porphyrins are predicted using molecular mechanics calculations with a force field that gives accurate predictions for metalloporhyrins. Dynamics and energy-minimization calculations of substrate molecules bound to the cavity indicate high substrate binding affinity. The size, shape and charge-distribution of groups surrounding the cavity provide molecular selectivity. Specifically, calculated binding energies of methane, benzene, dichloromethane, CO{sub 2} and chloroform vary by about 10 kcal/mol for metal octaethyl-tetraphenylporphyrins (OETPPs) with chloroform, dichloromethane, and CO{sub 2} having the lowest. Significantly, a solvent molecule is found in the cavity in the X-ray structures of Co- and CuOETPP crystals obtained from dichloromethane. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Molecular design of substrate binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, J.A.; Hobbs, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Computer-aided molecular design methods were used to tailor binding sites for small substrate molecules, including CO{sub 2} and methane. The goal is to design a cavity, adjacent to a catalytic metal center, into which the substrate will selectively bind through only non-bonding interactions with the groups lining the binding pocket. Porphyrins are used as a basic molecular structure, with various substituents added to construct the binding pocket. The conformations of these highly-substituted porphyrins are predicted using molecular mechanics calculations with a force field that gives accurate predictions for metalloporhyrins. Dynamics and energy-minimization calculations of substrate molecules bound to the cavity indicate high substrate binding affinity. The size, shape and charge-distribution of groups surrounding the cavity provide molecular selectivity. Specifically, calculated binding energies of methane, benzene, dichloromethane, CO{sub 2} and chloroform vary by about 10 kcal/mol for metal octaethyl-tetraphenylporphyrins (OETPPs) with chloroform, dichloromethane, and CO{sub 2} having the lowest. Significantly, a solvent molecule is found in the cavity in the X-ray structures of Co- and CuOETPP crystals obtained from dichloromethane. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Two bradykinin binding sites with picomolar affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, D.C.; Vavrek, R.; Stewart, J.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1986-05-01

    Bradykinin (BK) and related peptides exert a wide range of effects on several organ systems. We have attempted to sort out these effects by studying the binding interaction of (/sup 3/H)BK at the membrane level with in vitro receptor binding techniques. High specific activity (/sup 3/H)BK and an enzyme inhibitor cocktail has enabled us to label two BK binding sites with different affinity and peptide specificity in several guinea-pig tissues. In the guinea-pig ileum the high-affinity site has an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for (/sup 3/H)BK of 13 pM and a maximal number of binding sites of 8.3 pmol/g of tissue wet weight. The low-affinity guinea-pig ileum site displays a Kd of 910 pM, a maximum number of binding sites of 14 pmol/g of tissue wet weight and shows a greater selectivity for BK analogs over Lysyl-BK analogs. Two similar sites can also be discriminated in kidney and heart. The potencies of a series of BK analogs at the high-affinity guinea-pig ileum site correlate well with their potencies in contracting ileal smooth muscle. The binding of (/sup 3/H)BK in the guinea-pig ileum is inhibited by physiological concentrations of monovalent and divalent cations.

  5. Immobilized purified folate-binding protein: binding characteristics and use for quantifying folate in erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S.I.; Holm, J.; Nexo, E.

    1987-08-01

    Purified folate-binding protein from cow's milk was immobilized on monodisperse polymer particles (Dynospheres) activated by rho-toluenesulfonyl chloride. Leakage from the spheres was less than 0.1%, and the binding properties were similar to those of the soluble protein with regard to dissociation, pH optimum for binding pteroylglutamic acid, and specificity for binding various folate derivatives. We used the immobilized folate-binding protein as binding protein in an isotope-dilution assay for quantifying folate in erythrocytes. The detection limit was 50 nmol/L and the CV over a six-month period was 2.3% (means = 1.25 mumol/L, n = 15). The reference interval, for folate measured in erythrocytes of 43 blood donors, was 0.4-1.5 mumol/L.

  6. Theoretical studies of binding of mannose-binding protein to monosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aida-Hyugaji, Sachiko; Takano, Keiko; Takada, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Haruo; Kojima, Naoya; Mizuochi, Tsuguo; Inoue, Yasushi

    2004-11-01

    Binding properties of mannose-binding protein (MBP) to monosaccharides are discussed based on ab initio molecular orbital calculations for cluster models constructed. The calculated binding energies indicate that MBP has an affinity for N-acetyl- D-glucosamine, D-mannose, L-fucose, and D-glucose rather than D-galactose and N-acetyl- D-galactosamine, which is consistent with the biochemical experimental results. Electrostatic potential surfaces at the binding site of four monosaccharides having binding properties matched well with that of MBP. A vacant frontier orbital was found to be localized around the binding site of MBP, suggesting that MBP-monosaccharide interaction may occur through electrostatic and orbital interactions.

  7. Fucose-binding Lotus tetragonolobus lectin binds to human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and induces a chemotactic response.

    PubMed

    VanEpps, D E; Tung, K S

    1977-09-01

    Fucose-binding L. tetragonolobus lectin to the surface of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and induces a chemotactic response. Both surface binding and chemotaxis are inhibited by free fucose but not by fructose, mannose, or galactose. The lectin-binding sites on PMN are unrelated to the A, B, or O blood group antigen. Utilization of this lectin should be a useful tool in isolating PMN membrane components and in analyzing the mechanism of neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:330752

  8. Folding funnels, binding funnels, and protein function.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C. J.; Kumar, S.; Ma, B.; Nussinov, R.

    1999-01-01

    Folding funnels have been the focus of considerable attention during the last few years. These have mostly been discussed in the general context of the theory of protein folding. Here we extend the utility of the concept of folding funnels, relating them to biological mechanisms and function. In particular, here we describe the shape of the funnels in light of protein synthesis and folding; flexibility, conformational diversity, and binding mechanisms; and the associated binding funnels, illustrating the multiple routes and the range of complexed conformers. Specifically, the walls of the folding funnels, their crevices, and bumps are related to the complexity of protein folding, and hence to sequential vs. nonsequential folding. Whereas the former is more frequently observed in eukaryotic proteins, where the rate of protein synthesis is slower, the latter is more frequent in prokaryotes, with faster translation rates. The bottoms of the funnels reflect the extent of the flexibility of the proteins. Rugged floors imply a range of conformational isomers, which may be close on the energy landscape. Rather than undergoing an induced fit binding mechanism, the conformational ensembles around the rugged bottoms argue that the conformers, which are most complementary to the ligand, will bind to it with the equilibrium shifting in their favor. Furthermore, depending on the extent of the ruggedness, or of the smoothness with only a few minima, we may infer nonspecific, broad range vs. specific binding. In particular, folding and binding are similar processes, with similar underlying principles. Hence, the shape of the folding funnel of the monomer enables making reasonable guesses regarding the shape of the corresponding binding funnel. Proteins having a broad range of binding, such as proteolytic enzymes or relatively nonspecific endonucleases, may be expected to have not only rugged floors in their folding funnels, but their binding funnels will also behave similarly

  9. Kinetic mechanisms of inhibitor binding: relevance to the fast-acting slow-binding paradigm.

    PubMed Central

    Falk, S; Oulianova, N; Berteloot, A

    1999-01-01

    Although phlorizin inhibition of Na+-glucose cotransport occurs within a few seconds, 3H-phlorizin binding to the sodium-coupled glucose transport protein(s) requires several minutes to reach equilibrium (the fast-acting slow-binding paradigm). Using kinetic models of arbitrary dimension that can be reduced to a two-state diagram according to Cha's formalism, we show that three basic mechanisms of inhibitor binding can be identified whereby the inhibitor binding step either (A) represents, (B) precedes, or (C) follows the rate-limiting step in a binding reaction. We demonstrate that each of mechanisms A-C is associated with a set of unique kinetic properties, and that the time scale over which one may expect to observe mechanism C is conditioned by the turnover number of the catalytic cycle. In contrast, mechanisms A and B may be relevant to either fast-acting or slow-binding inhibitors. However, slow-binding inhibition according to mechanism A may not be compatible with a fast-acting behavior on the steady-state time scale of a few seconds. We conclude that the recruitment hypothesis (mechanism C) cannot account for slow phlorizin binding to the sodium-coupled glucose transport protein(s), and that mechanism B is the only alternative that may explain the fast-acting slow-binding paradigm. PMID:10388748

  10. Recent improvements to Binding MOAD: a resource for protein–ligand binding affinities and structures

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aqeel; Smith, Richard D.; Clark, Jordan J.; Dunbar, James B.; Carlson, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    For over 10 years, Binding MOAD (Mother of All Databases; http://www.BindingMOAD.org) has been one of the largest resources for high-quality protein–ligand complexes and associated binding affinity data. Binding MOAD has grown at the rate of 1994 complexes per year, on average. Currently, it contains 23 269 complexes and 8156 binding affinities. Our annual updates curate the data using a semi-automated literature search of the references cited within the PDB file, and we have recently upgraded our website and added new features and functionalities to better serve Binding MOAD users. In order to eliminate the legacy application server of the old platform and to accommodate new changes, the website has been completely rewritten in the LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) environment. The improved user interface incorporates current third-party plugins for better visualization of protein and ligand molecules, and it provides features like sorting, filtering and filtered downloads. In addition to the field-based searching, Binding MOAD now can be searched by structural queries based on the ligand. In order to remove redundancy, Binding MOAD records are clustered in different families based on 90% sequence identity. The new Binding MOAD, with the upgraded platform, features and functionalities, is now equipped to better serve its users. PMID:25378330

  11. Crystal Structure of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Binding Domain: Insight into Cell Surface Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, Pål; Dong, Min; Dupuy, Jérôme; Chapman, Edwin R.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2011-11-02

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) typically bind the neuronal cell surface via dual interactions with both protein receptors and gangliosides. We present here the 1.9-{angstrom} X-ray structure of the BoNT serotype G (BoNT/G) receptor binding domain (residues 868-1297) and a detailed view of protein receptor and ganglioside binding regions. The ganglioside binding motif (SxWY) has a conserved structure compared to the corresponding regions in BoNT serotype A and BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B), but several features of interactions with the hydrophilic face of the ganglioside are absent at the opposite side of the motif in the BoNT/G ganglioside binding cleft. This may significantly reduce the affinity between BoNT/G and gangliosides. BoNT/G and BoNT/B share the protein receptor synaptotagmin (Syt) I/II. The Syt binding site has a conserved hydrophobic plateau located centrally in the proposed protein receptor binding interface (Tyr1189, Phe1202, Ala1204, Pro1205, and Phe1212). Interestingly, only 5 of 14 residues that are important for binding between Syt-II and BoNT/B are conserved in BoNT/G, suggesting that the means by which BoNT/G and BoNT/B bind Syt diverges more than previously appreciated. Indeed, substitution of Syt-II Phe47 and Phe55 with alanine residues had little effect on the binding of BoNT/G, but strongly reduced the binding of BoNT/B. Furthermore, an extended solvent-exposed hydrophobic loop, located between the Syt binding site and the ganglioside binding cleft, may serve as a third membrane association and binding element to contribute to high-affinity binding to the neuronal membrane. While BoNT/G and BoNT/B are homologous to each other and both utilize Syt-I/Syt-II as their protein receptor, the precise means by which these two toxin serotypes bind to Syt appears surprisingly divergent.

  12. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2006-10-17

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  13. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  14. Binding studies of SV40 T-antigen to SV40 binding site II.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, P; Nasoff, M S; Fisher, E F; Walsh, A M; Caruthers, M H

    1985-09-25

    SV40 T-Antigen binding site II was synthesized, cloned and analyzed for its ability to bind purified SV40 T-antigen. We report the binding constant of T-antigen for isolated site II. Using a filter binding assay the calculated binding constant was 6-8 fold less efficient than site I previously reported. Binding constants were calculated using two methods. The first was a direct calculation using a protein titration curve (KD). The second was by the ratio of measured association and dissociation rates. Both methods gave similar constants. Protection studies with SV40 T-antigen on the T-antigen binding sites in the wild-type array demonstrated that the binding constants of site I and site II are similar to those calculated for the individual sites. These results demonstrate that SV40 T-antigen does not bind cooperatively to sites one and two as earlier believed and are in agreement with recent observations emanating from several laboratories.

  15. Wild-Type p53 Binds to the TATA-Binding Protein and Represses Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Edward; Usheva, Anny; Zambetti, Gerard P.; Momand, Jamil; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Weinmann, Roberto; Levine, Arnold J.; Shenk, Thomas

    1992-12-01

    p53 activates transcription of genes with a p53 response element, and it can repress genes lacking the element. Here we demonstrate that wild-type but not mutant p53 inhibits transcription in a HeLa nuclear extract from minimal promoters. Wild-type but not mutant p53 binds to human TATA-binding protein (TBP). p53 does not bind to yeast TBP, and it cannot inhibit transcription in a HeLa extract where yeast TBP substitutes for human TBP. These results suggest a model in which p53 binds to TBP and interferes with transcriptional initiation.

  16. Radiation inactivation reveals discrete cation binding sites that modulate dihydropyridine binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bolger, G.T.; Skolnick, P.; Kempner, E.S. )

    1989-08-01

    In low ionic strength buffer (5 mM Tris.HCl), the binding of (3H) nitrendipine to dihydropyridine calcium antagonist binding sites of mouse forebrain membranes is increased by both Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. Radiation inactivation was used to determine the target size of ({sup 3}H)nitrendipine binding sites in 5 mM Tris.HCl buffer, in the presence and absence of these cations. After irradiation, ({sup 3}H) nitrendipine binding in buffer with or without Na+ was diminished, due to a loss of binding sites and also to an increase in Kd. After accounting for radiation effects on the dissociation constant, the target size for the nitrendipine binding site in buffer was 160-170 kDa and was 170-180 kDa in the presence of sodium. In the presence of calcium ions, ({sup 3}H)nitrendipine binding showed no radiation effects on Kd and yielded a target size of 150-170 kDa. These findings suggest, as in the case of opioid receptors, the presence of high molecular weight membrane components that modulate cation-induced alterations in radioligand binding to dihydropyridine binding sites.

  17. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    PubMed Central

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-01-01

    Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states. PMID:25004958

  18. Tight-Binding Configuration Interaction (TBCI): A Noniterative Approach to Incorporating Electrostatics into Tight Binding.

    PubMed

    Iron, Mark A; Heyden, Andreas; Staszewska, Grażyna; Truhlar, Donald G

    2008-05-01

    We present a new electronic structure approximation called Tight Binding Configuration Interaction. It uses a tight-binding Hamiltonian to obtain orbitals that are used in a configuration interaction calculation that includes explicit charge interactions. This new method is better capable of predicting energies, ionization potentials, and fragmentation charges than the Wolfsberg-Helmholz Tight-Binding and Many-Body Tight-Binding models reported earlier (Staszewska, G.; Staszewski, P.; Schultz, N. E.; Truhlar, D. Phys. Rev. B 2005, 71, 045423). The method is illustrated for clusters and nanoparticles containing aluminum.

  19. Formation of a Metal-to-Nitrogen Bond of Normal Length by a Neutral Sufonamide Group within a Tridentate Ligand. A New Approach to Radiopharmaceutical Bioconjugation

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Theshini; Abhayawardhana, Pramuditha; Marzilli, Patricia A.; Fronczek, Frank R.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that a tertiary sulfonamide group, N(SO2R)R′2, can re-hybridize to form a M–N bond of normal length even when the group is in a linear tridentate ligand, such as in the new tridentate N(SO2R)dpa ligands derived from di-(2-picolyl)amine (N(H)dpa). N(SO2R)dpa ligands were used to prepare fac-[Re(CO)3(N(SO2R)dpa)](PF6 or BF4) complexes. Structural characterization of the new complexes established that the tertiary sulfonamide nitrogen atom binds to Re with concomitant sp2-to-sp3 re-hybridization, facilitating facial coordination. The new fac-[Re(CO)3(N(SO2R)dpa)]X structures provide the only examples for any metal with the sulfonamide as part of a noncyclic linear tridentate ligand and with a normal metal-to-nitrogen(tertiary sulfonamide) bond length. Rare previous examples of such normal M–N bonds have been found only in more constrained situations, such as with tripodal tetradentate ligands. Our long-term objectives for the new tridentate N(SO2R)dpa ligands are to develop the fundamental chemistry relevant to the eventual use of the fac-[MI(CO)3]+ core (M = 99mTc, 186/188Re) in imaging and therapy. The sulfonamide group uniquely contributes to two of our goals: expanding ways to conjugate the fac-[MI(CO)3]+ core to biological molecules and also developing new symmetrical tridentate ligands that can coordinate facially to this core. Tests of our conjugation method, conducted by linking the fac-[ReI(CO)3]+ core to a new tetraarylporphyrin (T(N(SO2C6H4)dpa)P) as well as to a dansyl (5-(dimethylamino)naphthalene-1-sulfonyl) group, demonstrate that large molecular fragments can be tethered via a coordinated tertiary sulfonamide linkage to this core. PMID:23421481

  20. Evidence for chemoreceptors with bimodular ligand-binding regions harboring two signal-binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Pineda-Molina, Estela; Reyes-Darias, José-Antonio; Lacal, Jesús; Ramos, Juan L.; García-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Gavira, Jose A.; Krell, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Chemoreceptor-based signaling is a central mechanism in bacterial signal transduction. Receptors are classified according to the size of their ligand-binding region. The well-studied cluster I proteins have a 100- to 150-residue ligand-binding region that contains a single site for chemoattractant recognition. Cluster II receptors, which contain a 220- to 300-residue ligand-binding region and which are almost as abundant as cluster I receptors, remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we report high-resolution structures of the ligand-binding region of the cluster II McpS chemotaxis receptor (McpS-LBR) of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 in complex with different chemoattractants. The structure of McpS-LBR represents a small-molecule binding domain composed of two modules, each able to bind different signal molecules. Malate and succinate were found to bind to the membrane-proximal module, whereas acetate binds to the membrane-distal module. A structural alignment of the two modules revealed that the ligand-binding sites could be superimposed and that amino acids involved in ligand recognition are conserved in both binding sites. Ligand binding to both modules was shown to trigger chemotactic responses. Further analysis showed that McpS-like receptors were found in different classes of proteobacteria, indicating that this mode of response to different carbon sources may be universally distributed. The physiological relevance of the McpS architecture may lie in its capacity to respond with high sensitivity to the preferred carbon sources malate and succinate and, at the same time, mediate lower sensitivity responses to the less preferred but very abundant carbon source acetate. PMID:23112148

  1. Prebending the estrogen response element destabilizes binding of the estrogen receptor DNA binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J; de Haan, G; Nardulli, A M; Shapiro, D J

    1997-01-01

    Binding of many eukaryotic transcription regulatory proteins to their DNA recognition sequences results in conformational changes in DNA. To test the effect of altering DNA topology by prebending a transcription factor binding site, we examined the interaction of the estrogen receptor (ER) DNA binding domain (DBD) with prebent estrogen response elements (EREs). When the ERE in minicircle DNA was prebent toward the major groove, which is in the same direction as the ER-induced DNA bend, there was no significant effect on ER DBD binding relative to the linear counterparts. However, when the ERE was bent toward the minor groove, in a direction that opposes the ER-induced DNA bend, there was a four- to eightfold reduction in ER DBD binding. Since reduced binding was also observed with the ERE in nicked circles, the reduction in binding was not due to torsional force induced by binding of ER DBD to the prebent ERE in covalently closed minicircles. To determine the mechanism responsible for reduced binding to the prebent ERE, we examined the effect of prebending the ERE on the association and dissociation of the ER DBD. Binding of the ER DBD to ERE-containing minicircles was rapid when the EREs were prebent toward either the major or minor groove of the DNA (k(on) of 9.9 x 10(6) to 1.7 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)). Prebending the ERE toward the minor groove resulted in an increase in k(off) of four- to fivefold. Increased dissociation of the ER DBD from the ERE is, therefore, the major factor responsible for reduced binding of the ER DBD to an ERE prebent toward the minor groove. These data provide the first direct demonstration that the interaction of a eukaryotic transcription factor with its recognition sequence can be strongly influenced by altering DNA topology through prebending the DNA. PMID:9154816

  2. Human sex hormone-binding globulin binding affinities of 125 structurally diverse chemicals and comparison with their binding to androgen receptor, estrogen receptor, and α-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Hong, Huixiao; Branham, William S; Ng, Hui Wen; Moland, Carrie L; Dial, Stacey L; Fang, Hong; Perkins, Roger; Sheehan, Daniel; Tong, Weida

    2015-02-01

    One endocrine disruption mechanism is through binding to nuclear receptors such as the androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor (ER) in target cells. The concentration of a chemical in serum is important for its entry into the target cells to bind the receptors, which is regulated by the serum proteins. Human sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is the major transport protein in serum that can bind androgens and estrogens and thus change a chemical's availability to enter the target cells. Sequestration of an androgen or estrogen in the serum can alter the chemical elicited AR- and ER-mediated responses. To better understand the chemical-induced endocrine activity, we developed a competitive binding assay using human pregnancy plasma and measured the binding to the human SHBG for 125 structurally diverse chemicals, most of which were known to bind AR and ER. Eighty seven chemicals were able to bind the human SHBG in the assay, whereas 38 chemicals were nonbinders. Binding data for human SHBG are compared with that for rat α-fetoprotein, ER and AR. Knowing the binding profiles between serum and nuclear receptors will improve assessment of a chemical's potential for endocrine disruption. The SHBG binding data reported here represent the largest data set of structurally diverse chemicals tested for human SHBG binding. Utilization of the SHBG binding data with AR and ER binding data could enable better evaluation of endocrine disrupting potential of chemicals through AR- and ER-mediated responses since sequestration in serum could be considered.

  3. Ag(I)-binding to phytochelatins.

    PubMed

    Mehra, R K; Tran, K; Scott, G W; Mulchandani, P; Saini, S S

    1996-02-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are glutathione-derived peptides with the general structure (gamma-Glu-Cys)nGly, where n varies from 2 to 11. A variety of metal ions such as Cu(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), and Ag(I) induce PC synthesis in plants and some yeasts. It has generally been assumed that the inducer metals also bind PCs. However, very little information is available on the binding of metals other than Cu(I) and Cd(II) to PCs. In this paper, we describe the Ag(I)-binding characteristics of PCs with the structure (gamma-Glu-Cys)2Gly, (gamma-Glu-Cys)3Gly, and (gamma-Glu-Cys)4Gly. The Ag(I)-binding stoichiometries of these three peptides were determined by (i) UV/VIS spectrophotometry, (ii) luminescence spectroscopy at 77 K, and (iii) reverse-phase HPLC. The three techniques yielded similar results. ApoPCs exhibit featureless absorption in the 220-340 nm range. The binding of Ag(I) to PCs induced the appearance of specific absorption shoulders. The titration end point was indicated by the flattening of the characteristic absorption shoulders. Similarly, luminescence at 77 K due to Ag(I)-thiolate clusters increased with the addition of graded Ag(I) equivalents. The luminescence declined when Ag(I) equivalents in excess of the saturating amounts were added to the peptides. At neutral pH, (gamma-Glu-Cys)2Gly, (gamma-Glu-Cys)3Gly, and (gamma-Glu-Cys)4Gly bind 1.0, 1.5, and 4.0 equivalents of Ag(I), respectively. The Ag(I)-binding capacity of (gamma-Glu-Cys)2Gly and (gamma-Glu-Cys)3Gly was increased at pH 5.0 and below so that Ag(I)/-SH ratio approached 1.0. A similar pH-dependent binding of Ag(I) to glutathione was also observed. The increased Ag(I)-binding to PCs at lower pH is of physiological significance as these peptides accumulate in acidic vacuoles. We also report lifetime data on Ag(I)-PCs. The relatively long decay-times (approximately 0.1-0.3 msec) accompanied with a large Stokes shift in the emission band are indicative of spin-forbidden phosphorescence. PMID

  4. Conformational heterogeneity of the calmodulin binding interface

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Diwakar; Peck, Ariana; Pande, Vijay S.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor and a crucial signalling hub in many pathways aberrantly activated in disease. However, the mechanistic basis of its ability to bind diverse signalling molecules including G-protein-coupled receptors, ion channels and kinases remains poorly understood. Here we harness the high resolution of molecular dynamics simulations and the analytical power of Markov state models to dissect the molecular underpinnings of CaM binding diversity. Our computational model indicates that in the absence of Ca2+, sub-states in the folded ensemble of CaM's C-terminal domain present chemically and sterically distinct topologies that may facilitate conformational selection. Furthermore, we find that local unfolding is off-pathway for the exchange process relevant for peptide binding, in contrast to prior hypotheses that unfolding might account for binding diversity. Finally, our model predicts a novel binding interface that is well-populated in the Ca2+-bound regime and, thus, a candidate for pharmacological intervention. PMID:27040077

  5. Endocytosis of Integrin-Binding Human Picornaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Merilahti, Pirjo; Koskinen, Satu; Heikkilä, Outi; Karelehto, Eveliina; Susi, Petri

    2012-01-01

    Picornaviruses that infect humans form one of the largest virus groups with almost three hundred virus types. They include significant enteroviral pathogens such as rhino-, polio-, echo-, and coxsackieviruses and human parechoviruses that cause wide range of disease symptoms. Despite the economic importance of picornaviruses, there are no antivirals. More than ten cellular receptors are known to participate in picornavirus infection, but experimental evidence of their role in cellular infection has been shown for only about twenty picornavirus types. Three enterovirus types and one parechovirus have experimentally been shown to bind and use integrin receptors in cellular infection. These include coxsackievirus A9 (CV-A9), echovirus 9, and human parechovirus 1 that are among the most common and epidemic human picornaviruses and bind to αV-integrins via RGD motif that resides on virus capsid. In contrast, echovirus 1 (E-1) has no RGD and uses integrin α2β1 as cellular receptor. Endocytosis of CV-A9 has recently been shown to occur via a novel Arf6- and dynamin-dependent pathways, while, contrary to collagen binding, E-1 binds inactive β1 integrin and enters via macropinocytosis. In this paper, we review what is known about receptors and endocytosis of integrin-binding human picornaviruses. PMID:23227048

  6. C60 fullerene binding to DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshehri, Mansoor H.; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2014-09-01

    Fullerenes have attracted considerable attention in various areas of science and technology. Owing to their exceptional physical, chemical, and biological properties, they have many applications, particularly in cosmetic and medical products. Using the Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential function and the continuum approximation, which assumes that intermolecular interactions can be approximated by average atomic surface densities, we determine the binding energies of a C60 fullerene with respect to both single-strand and double-strand DNA molecules. We assume that all configurations are in a vacuum and that the C60 fullerene is initially at rest. Double integrals are performed to determine the interaction energy of the system. We find that the C60 fullerene binds to the double-strand DNA molecule, at either the major or minor grooves, with binding energies of -4.7 eV or -2.3 eV, respectively, and that the C60 molecule binds to the single-strand DNA molecule with a binding energy of -1.6 eV. Our results suggest that the C60 molecule is most likely to be linked to the major groove of the dsDNA molecule.

  7. Binding in agrammatic aphasia: Processing to comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Janet Choy, Jungwon; Thompson, Cynthia K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Theories of comprehension deficits in Broca’s aphasia have largely been based on the pattern of deficit found with movement constructions. However, some studies have found comprehension deficits with binding constructions, which do not involve movement. Aims This study investigates online processing and offline comprehension of binding constructions, such as reflexive (e.g., himself) and pronoun (e.g., him) constructions in unimpaired and aphasic individuals in an attempt to evaluate theories of agrammatic comprehension. Methods & Procedures Participants were eight individuals with agrammatic Broca’s aphasia and eight age-matched unimpaired individuals. We used eyetracking to examine online processing of binding constructions while participants listened to stories. Offline comprehension was also tested. Outcomes & Results The eye movement data showed that individuals with Broca’s aphasia were able to automatically process the correct antecedent of reflexives and pronouns. In addition, their syntactic processing of binding was not delayed compared to normal controls. Nevertheless, offline comprehension of both pronouns and reflexives was significantly impaired compared to the control participants. This comprehension failure was reflected in the aphasic participants’ eye movements at sentence end, where fixations to the competitor increased. Conclusions These data suggest that comprehension difficulties with binding constructions seen in agrammatic aphasic patients are not due to a deficit in automatic syntactic processing or delayed processing. Rather, they point to a possible deficit in lexical integration. PMID:20535243

  8. Endocytosis of integrin-binding human picornaviruses.

    PubMed

    Merilahti, Pirjo; Koskinen, Satu; Heikkilä, Outi; Karelehto, Eveliina; Susi, Petri

    2012-01-01

    Picornaviruses that infect humans form one of the largest virus groups with almost three hundred virus types. They include significant enteroviral pathogens such as rhino-, polio-, echo-, and coxsackieviruses and human parechoviruses that cause wide range of disease symptoms. Despite the economic importance of picornaviruses, there are no antivirals. More than ten cellular receptors are known to participate in picornavirus infection, but experimental evidence of their role in cellular infection has been shown for only about twenty picornavirus types. Three enterovirus types and one parechovirus have experimentally been shown to bind and use integrin receptors in cellular infection. These include coxsackievirus A9 (CV-A9), echovirus 9, and human parechovirus 1 that are among the most common and epidemic human picornaviruses and bind to αV-integrins via RGD motif that resides on virus capsid. In contrast, echovirus 1 (E-1) has no RGD and uses integrin α2β1 as cellular receptor. Endocytosis of CV-A9 has recently been shown to occur via a novel Arf6- and dynamin-dependent pathways, while, contrary to collagen binding, E-1 binds inactive β1 integrin and enters via macropinocytosis. In this paper, we review what is known about receptors and endocytosis of integrin-binding human picornaviruses.

  9. Lactoferrin binding properties of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Ascencio, F; Ljungh, A; Wadström, T

    1992-01-01

    The lactoferrin binding properties of Vibrio cholerae, a non-invasive pathogen were investigated. Screening of fifty V. cholerae strains of different serogroups and serotypes, showed that 10% of the V. cholerae strains bound to 125I-labelled lactoferrin, and 40% of the 125I-labelled lactoferrin bound to V. cholerae strain 623 could be displaced by unlabelled lactoferrin. Other iron-binding glycoproteins and ferroproteins like ferritin, transferrin, haemoglobin, and myoglobin inhibited the binding of 125I-lactoferrin to a lesser degree. Monosaccharides (GalNac, Man, Gal, and Fuc), and other glycoproteins such as fetuin and orosomucoid also inhibited the binding to a lesser extent. V. cholerae 623 showed a cell surface associated-proteolytic activity which cleaved off the cell-bound 125I-labelled lactoferrin. The generation of cryptotopes on the V. cholerae cell surface by proteolytic digestion favoured the binding of ferritin, transferrin, haemoglobin, and haemin, as well as Congo red, to cells of V. cholerae 623.

  10. Improved flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, G. C.

    1984-05-01

    A method of measuring binding assays is carried out with different size particles wherein the binding assay sample is run through a flow cytometer without separating the sample from the marking agent. The amount of a binding reactant present in a sample is determined by providing particles with a coating of binder and also known quantity of smaller particles with a coating of binder reactant. The smaller particles also contain a fluorescent chemical. The particles are combined with the sample and the binding reaction is allowed to occur for a set length of time followed by combining the smaller particles with the mixture of the particles and the sample produced and allowing the binding reactions to proceed to equilibrium. The fluorescence and light scatter of the combined mixture is then measured as the combined mixture passes through a flow cytometer equipped with a laser to bring about fluorescence, and the number of fluorescent events are compared. A similar method is also provided for determining the amount of antigen present in the sample by providing spheres with an antibody coating and some smaller spheres with an antigen coating.

  11. Conformational heterogeneity of the calmodulin binding interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Diwakar; Peck, Ariana; Pande, Vijay S.

    2016-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor and a crucial signalling hub in many pathways aberrantly activated in disease. However, the mechanistic basis of its ability to bind diverse signalling molecules including G-protein-coupled receptors, ion channels and kinases remains poorly understood. Here we harness the high resolution of molecular dynamics simulations and the analytical power of Markov state models to dissect the molecular underpinnings of CaM binding diversity. Our computational model indicates that in the absence of Ca2+, sub-states in the folded ensemble of CaM's C-terminal domain present chemically and sterically distinct topologies that may facilitate conformational selection. Furthermore, we find that local unfolding is off-pathway for the exchange process relevant for peptide binding, in contrast to prior hypotheses that unfolding might account for binding diversity. Finally, our model predicts a novel binding interface that is well-populated in the Ca2+-bound regime and, thus, a candidate for pharmacological intervention.

  12. Phage display of engineered binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Levisson, Mark; Spruijt, Ruud B; Winkel, Ingrid Nolla; Kengen, Servé W M; van der Oost, John

    2014-01-01

    In current purification processes optimization of the capture step generally has a large impact on cost reduction. At present, valuable biomolecules are often produced in relatively low concentrations and, consequently, the eventual selective separation from complex mixtures can be rather inefficient. A separation technology based on a very selective high-affinity binding may overcome these problems. Proteins in their natural environment manifest functionality by interacting specifically and often with relatively high affinity with other molecules, such as substrates, inhibitors, activators, or other proteins. At present, antibodies are the most commonly used binding proteins in numerous applications. However, antibodies do have limitations, such as high production costs, low stability, and a complex patent landscape. A novel approach is therefore to use non-immunoglobulin engineered binding proteins in affinity purification. In order to obtain engineered binders with a desired specificity, a large mutant library of the new to-be-developed binding protein has to be created and screened for potential binders. A powerful technique to screen and select for proteins with desired properties from a large pool of variants is phage display. Here, we indicate several criteria for potential binding protein scaffolds and explain the principle of M13 phage display. In addition, we describe experimental protocols for the initial steps in setting up a M13 phage display system based on the pComb3X vector, including construction of the phagemid vector, production of phages displaying the protein of interest, and confirmation of display on the M13 phage.

  13. Specific Ion Binding at Phospholipid Membrane Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Calero, Carles; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Martí, Jordi

    2015-09-01

    Metal cations are ubiquitous components in biological environments and play an important role in regulating cellular functions and membrane properties. By applying metadynamics simulations, we have performed systematic free energy calculations of Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) bound to phospholipid membrane surfaces for the first time. The free energy landscapes unveil specific binding behaviors of metal cations on phospholipid membranes. Na(+) and K(+) are more likely to stay in the aqueous solution and can bind easily to a few lipid oxygens by overcoming low free energy barriers. Ca(2+) is most stable when it is bound to four lipid oxygens of the membrane rather than being hydrated in the aqueous solution. Mg(2+) is tightly hydrated, and it shows hardly any loss of a hydration water or binding directly to the membrane. When bound to the membrane, the cations' most favorable total coordination numbers with water and lipid oxygens are the same as their corresponding hydration numbers in aqueous solution, indicating a competition between ion binding to water and lipids. The binding specificity of metal cations on membranes is highly correlated with the hydration free energy and the size of the hydration shell.

  14. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models*

    PubMed Central

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. PMID:26912662

  15. Allosteric opening of the polypeptide-binding site when an Hsp70 binds ATP

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ruifeng; Sarbeng, Evans Boateng; Liu, Qun; Le, Katherine Quynh; Xu, Xinping; Xu, Hongya; Yang, Jiao; Wong, Jennifer Li; Vorvis, Christina; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Qinglian

    2013-01-01

    The 70kD heat shock proteins (Hsp70s) are ubiquitous molecular chaperones essential for cellular protein folding and proteostasis. Each Hsp70 has two functional domains: a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) that binds and hydrolyzes ATP, and a substrate-binding domain (SBD) that binds extended polypeptides. NBD and SBD interact little when in ADP; however, ATP binding allosterically couples the polypeptide- and ATP-binding sites. ATP binding promotes polypeptide release; polypeptide rebinding stimulates ATP hydrolysis. This allosteric coupling is poorly understood. Here we present the crystal structure of an intact Hsp70 from Escherichia coli in an ATP-bound state at 1.96 Å resolution. NBD-ATP adopts a unique conformation, forming extensive interfaces with a radically changed SBD that has its α-helical lid displaced and the polypeptide-binding channel of its β-subdomain restructured. These conformational changes together with our biochemical tests provide a long-sought structural explanation for allosteric coupling in Hsp70 activity. PMID:23708608

  16. Binding of ethidium to the nucleosome core particle. 2. Internal and external binding modes

    SciTech Connect

    McMurray, C.T.; Small, E.W.; van Holde, K.E. )

    1991-06-11

    The authors have previously reported that the binding of ethidium bromide to the nucleosome core particle results in a stepwise dissociation of the structure which involves the initial release of one copy each of H2A and H2B. In this report, they have examined the absorbance and fluorescence properties of intercalated and outside bound forms of ethidium bromide. From these properties, they have measured the extent of external, electrostatic binding of the dye versus internal, intercalation binding to the core particle, free from contribution by linker DNA. They have established that dissociation is induced by the intercalation mode of binding to DNA within the core particle DNA, and not by binding to the histones or by nonintercalative binding to DNA. The covalent binding of ({sup 3}H)-8-azidoethidium to the core particle clearly shows that < 1.0 adduct is formed per histone octamer over a wide range of input ratios. Simultaneously, analyses of steady-state fluorescence enhancement and fluorescence lifetime data from bound ethidium complexes demonstrate extensive intercalation binding. Combined analyses from steady-state fluorescence intensity with equilibrium dialysis or fluorescence lifetime data revealed that dissociation began when {approximately}14 ethidium molecules are bound by intercalation to each core particle and < 1.0 nonintercalated ion pair was formed per core particle.

  17. Characterization of DNA Binding and Retinoic Acid Binding Properties of Retinoic Acid Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Na; Schule, Roland; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Evans, Ronald M.

    1991-05-01

    High-level expression of the full-length human retinoic acid receptor (RAR) α and the DNA binding domain of the RAR in Escherichia coli was achieved by using a T7 RNA polymerase-directed expression system. After induction, full-length RAR protein was produced at an estimated level of 20% of the total bacterial proteins. Both intact RAR molecules and the DNA binding domain bind to the cognate DNA response element with high specificity in the absence of retinoic acid. However, this binding is enhanced to a great extent upon the addition of eukaryotic cell extracts. The factor responsible for this enhancement is heat-sensitive and forms a complex with RAR that binds to DNA and exhibits a distinct migration pattern in the gel-mobility-shift assay. The interaction site of the factor with RAR is localized in the 70-amino acid DNA binding region of RAR. The hormone binding ability of the RARα protein was assayed by a charcoal absorption assay and the RAR protein was found to bind to retinoic acid with a K_d of 2.1 x 10-10 M.

  18. The RNA-binding protein Gemin5 binds directly to the ribosome and regulates global translation

    PubMed Central

    Francisco-Velilla, Rosario; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Ramajo, Jorge; Martinez-Salas, Encarnación

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play crucial roles in all organisms. The protein Gemin5 harbors two functional domains. The N-terminal domain binds to snRNAs targeting them for snRNPs assembly, while the C-terminal domain binds to IRES elements through a non-canonical RNA-binding site. Here we report a comprehensive view of the Gemin5 interactome; most partners copurified with the N-terminal domain via RNA bridges. Notably, Gemin5 sediments with the subcellular ribosome fraction, and His-Gemin5 binds to ribosome particles via its N-terminal domain. The interaction with the ribosome was lost in F381A and Y474A Gemin5 mutants, but not in W14A and Y15A. Moreover, the ribosomal proteins L3 and L4 bind directly with Gemin5, and conversely, Gemin5 mutants impairing the binding to the ribosome are defective in the interaction with L3 and L4. The overall polysome profile was affected by Gemin5 depletion or overexpression, concomitant to an increase or a decrease, respectively, of global protein synthesis. Gemin5, and G5-Nter as well, were detected on the polysome fractions. These results reveal the ribosome-binding capacity of the N-ter moiety, enabling Gemin5 to control global protein synthesis. Our study uncovers a crosstalk between this protein and the ribosome, and provides support for the view that Gemin5 may control translation elongation. PMID:27507887

  19. The cell-binding domain of intimin from enteropathogenic Escherichia coli binds to beta1 integrins.

    PubMed

    Frankel, G; Lider, O; Hershkoviz, R; Mould, A P; Kachalsky, S G; Candy, D C; Cahalon, L; Humphries, M J; Dougan, G

    1996-08-23

    Bacteria interact with mammalian cells surface molecules, such as integrins, to colonize tissues and evade immunological detection. Herein, the ability of intimin, an outer membrane protein from enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, to bind beta1 integrins was investigated. Solid-phase binding assays revealed binding of the carboxyl-terminal 280 amino acids of intimin (Int280) to alpha4beta1 and alpha5beta1 integrins. The binding required divalent ions (in particular, it was enhanced by Mn2+) and was inhibited by an RGD-containing peptide. Nonderivatized Int280, but not Int280CS (like Int280 but with Cys-937 replaced by Ser) blocked the binding of biotinylated Int280 to integrins. Int280 did not efficiently inhibit beta1 integrin binding of invasin from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Both intimin and invasin, immobilized on plastic surfaces, mediated adherence of resting or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-activated human CD4(+) T cells, whereas fibronectin mediated the adherence of only activated T cells. T cell binding to intimin and invasin was integrin mediated because it was specifically blocked by an RGD-containing peptide and by antibodies directed against the integrin subunits beta1, alpha4, and alpha5. These results demonstrate a specific integrin binding activity for intimin that is related to, but distinct from, that of invasin. PMID:8702771

  20. Binding of C-reactive protein to human lymphocytes. I. Requirement for a binding specificity.

    PubMed

    James, K; Hansen, B; Gewurz, H

    1981-12-01

    Our laboratory previously reported that C-reactive protein (CRP) binds selectively to T lymphocytes and inhibits certain of their reactivities in vitro. However, these findings could not be repeated using more highly purified CRP preparations even under a variety of experimental conditions. Purified CRP alone did not bind to peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL); however, in the presence of a ligand such as pneumococcal C-polysaccharide (CPS), CRP binding was readily detectable both by immunofluorescence and by a radioassay established for this purpose. The optimal concentration of CRP, ratio of CRP:CPS, and time and temperature for reactivity were determined using both assays. A markedly enhanced rate of binding was observed after pre-equilibration of CRP with calcium. A small percentage (mean 3.0%; range 0.5 to 8.0%) of PBL bound complexed CRP, and saturation was reached with 200 microgram CRP/ml. Reactivity of CRP with a multimeric form of phosphocholine (PC) (KLH-PC44) led to binding comparable to that observed with CPS, whereas monomeric PC inhibited the binding. Thus, in the presence of a multimeric binding specificity, CRP binds to a small fraction of peripheral blood lymphocytes, which are characterized in the accompanying paper.

  1. Ancestral Protein Reconstruction Yields Insights into Adaptive Evolution of Binding Specificity in Solute-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Ben E; Jackson, Colin J

    2016-02-18

    The promiscuous functions of proteins are an important reservoir of functional novelty in protein evolution, but the molecular basis for binding promiscuity remains elusive. We used ancestral protein reconstruction to experimentally characterize evolutionary intermediates in the functional expansion of the polar amino acid-binding protein family, which has evolved to bind a variety of amino acids with high affinity and specificity. High-resolution crystal structures of an ancestral arginine-binding protein in complex with l-arginine and l-glutamine show that the promiscuous binding of l-glutamine is enabled by multi-scale conformational plasticity, water-mediated interactions, and selection of an alternative conformational substate productive for l-glutamine binding. Evolution of specialized glutamine-binding proteins from this ancestral protein was achieved by displacement of water molecules from the protein-ligand interface, reducing the entropic penalty associated with the promiscuous interaction. These results provide a structural and thermodynamic basis for the co-option of a promiscuous interaction in the evolution of binding specificity.

  2. Binding of ionic species: a general approach to measuring binding constants and assessing affinities.

    PubMed

    Roelens, Stefano; Vacca, Alberto; Venturi, Chiara

    2009-03-01

    Bound together: The association of receptors with ionic species cannot be assimilated to the binding of neutral guests. When dealing with salts, both ion pairing and binding to the free and the ion-paired ionic guest determine the actual association pattern (see figure). The general issue of measuring association constants and assessing affinities for ions is addressed and validated in two cases of anion binding.A general approach to the largely underestimated issue of measuring binding constants and assessing affinities in the binding of ionic species is described. The approach is based on a rigorous, nongraphical determination of binding constants in multiequilibrium systems by nonlinear regression of chemical shift data from NMR titrations and on the use of the BC(50) descriptor for assessing affinities and ranking the binding ability of receptors on a common scale. The approach has been validated with two tripodal anion-binding receptors, namely, a ureidic (1) and a pyrrolic (2) receptor, binding to tetramethylammonium chloride in CDCl(3)/CD(3)CN (80:20). A set of five and six formation constants could be measured for 1 and 2, respectively, including, in addition to the ion pair, complexes of the free and the ion-paired anion. The BC(50) values calculated from the measured constants allowed a quantitative assessment of each receptor's binding affinity towards the chloride anion, the pyrrolic receptor showing a 15-fold larger affinity over the ureidic receptor, a figure that quantifies the improvement obtained by replacing the amido-pyrrolic for ureidic binding groups on the tripodal scaffold of the receptor. The results have shown that, in contrast to common practice, neither of the two systems could be appropriately described by a 1:1 association with the anion only, but required the ion-pairing and ion-pair binding equilibria to be taken into account because these contribute substantially to the complexation process. The BC(50) descriptor has also been shown

  3. Opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney: Radioligand homogenate binding and autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Dissanayake, V.U.; Hughes, J.; Hunter, J.C. )

    1991-07-01

    The specific binding of the selective {mu}-, {delta}-, and {kappa}-opioid ligands (3H)(D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5)enkephalin ((3H) DAGOL), (3H)(D-Pen2,D-Pen5)enkephalin ((3H)DPDPE), and (3H)U69593, respectively, to crude membranes of the guinea pig and rat whole kidney, kidney cortex, and kidney medulla was investigated. In addition, the distribution of specific 3H-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney was visualized by autoradiography. Homogenate binding and autoradiography demonstrated the absence of {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig kidney. No opioid binding sites were demonstrable in the rat kidney. In the guinea pig whole kidney, cortex, and medulla, saturation studies demonstrated that (3H)DPDPE bound with high affinity (KD = 2.6-3.5 nM) to an apparently homogeneous population of binding sites (Bmax = 8.4-30 fmol/mg of protein). Competition studies using several opioid compounds confirmed the nature of the {delta}-opioid binding site. Autoradiography experiments demonstrated that specific (3H)DPDPE binding sites were distributed radially in regions of the inner and outer medulla and at the corticomedullary junction of the guinea pig kidney. Computer-assisted image analysis of saturation data yielded KD values (4.5-5.0 nM) that were in good agreement with those obtained from the homogenate binding studies. Further investigation of the {delta}-opioid binding site in medulla homogenates, using agonist ((3H)DPDPE) and antagonist ((3H)diprenorphine) binding in the presence of Na+, Mg2+, and nucleotides, suggested that the {delta}-opioid site is linked to a second messenger system via a GTP-binding protein. Further studies are required to establish the precise localization of the {delta} binding site in the guinea pig kidney and to determine the nature of the second messenger linked to the GTP-binding protein in the medulla.

  4. Presence of a highly efficient binding to bacterial contamination can distort data from binding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Balcar, V.J. )

    1990-12-01

    {sup 3}HGABA at low concentrations (5-10 nM) was bound by what appeared to be a GABA receptor binding site in bacterial contamination originating from a batch of distilled water. Under experimental conditions similar to those usually employed in {sup 3}HGABA binding studies, the apparent binding displayed a very high specific component and a high efficiency in terms of {sup 3}HGABA bound per mg of protein. The binding was blocked by muscimol but not by isoguvacine, SR95531 and nipecotic acid. These characteristics suggest that the presence of such spurious binding in the experiments using 3H-labeled ligands in brain homogenates may not always be very obvious and, moreover, it can result in subtle, but serious, distortions of data from such studies, which may not be immediately recognized.

  5. Relation between the change in DNA elasticity on ligand binding and the binding energetics.

    PubMed

    Kostjukov, Viktor V; Evstigneev, Maxim P

    2012-09-01

    The widespread use of tweezers for measurement of ligand-DNA binding parameters is based on the McGhee-von Hippel treatment of the DNA contour and persistence length as a function of concentration. The McGhee-von Hippel approach contains the basic assumption that the binding constant K is independent of the number of already bound ligands. However, the change in elasticity of DNA on binding affects the entropic part of the Gibbs free energy and, hence, the K value in a concentration-dependent manner, making the whole approach inconsistent. In the present work we show that the energetic effect of DNA stiffening on noncovalent binding of small ligands is negligible with respect to the net energy of reaction, whereas the DNA stiffening on binding of large ligands must always be considered in each particular case.

  6. Relation between the change in DNA elasticity on ligand binding and the binding energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostjukov, Viktor V.; Evstigneev, Maxim P.

    2012-09-01

    The widespread use of tweezers for measurement of ligand-DNA binding parameters is based on the McGhee-von Hippel treatment of the DNA contour and persistence length as a function of concentration. The McGhee-von Hippel approach contains the basic assumption that the binding constant K is independent of the number of already bound ligands. However, the change in elasticity of DNA on binding affects the entropic part of the Gibbs free energy and, hence, the K value in a concentration-dependent manner, making the whole approach inconsistent. In the present work we show that the energetic effect of DNA stiffening on noncovalent binding of small ligands is negligible with respect to the net energy of reaction, whereas the DNA stiffening on binding of large ligands must always be considered in each particular case.

  7. Binding kinetics of lock and key colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colón-Meléndez, Laura; Beltran-Villegas, Daniel J.; van Anders, Greg; Liu, Jun; Spellings, Matthew; Sacanna, Stefano; Pine, David J.; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Larson, Ronald G.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2015-05-01

    Using confocal microscopy and first passage time analysis, we measure and predict the rates of formation and breakage of polymer-depletion-induced bonds between lock-and-key colloidal particles and find that an indirect route to bond formation is accessed at a rate comparable to that of the direct formation of these bonds. In the indirect route, the pocket of the lock particle is accessed by nonspecific bonding of the key particle with the lock surface, followed by surface diffusion leading to specific binding in the pocket of the lock. The surprisingly high rate of indirect binding is facilitated by its high entropy relative to that of the pocket. Rate constants for forward and reverse transitions among free, nonspecific, and specific bonds are reported, compared to theoretical values, and used to determine the free energy difference between the nonspecific and specific binding states.

  8. AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN1: The Outsider

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Michael; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN1 (ABP1) is one of the first characterized proteins that bind auxin and has been implied as a receptor for a number of auxin responses. Early studies characterized its auxin binding properties and focused on rapid electrophysiological and cell expansion responses, while subsequent work indicated a role in cell cycle and cell division control. Very recently, ABP1 has been ascribed a role in modulating endocytic events at the plasma membrane and RHO OF PLANTS-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangements during asymmetric cell expansion. The exact molecular function of ABP1 is still unresolved, but its main activity apparently lies in influencing events at the plasma membrane. This review aims to connect the novel findings with the more classical literature on ABP1 and to point out the many open questions that still separate us from a comprehensive model of ABP1 action, almost 40 years after the first reports of its existence. PMID:21719690

  9. Mercury-binding proteins of Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Roesijadi, G.; Morris, J. E.; Calabrese, A.

    1981-11-01

    Mytilus edulis possesses low molecular weight, mercury-binding proteins. The predominant protein isolated from gill tissue is enriched in cysteinyl residues (8%) and possesses an amino acid composition similar to cadmium-binding proteins of mussels and oysters. Continuous exposure of mussels to 5 ..mu..g/l mercury results in spillover of mercury from these proteins to high molecular weight proteins. Antibodies to these proteins have been isolated, and development of immunoassays is presently underway. Preliminary studies to determine whether exposure of adult mussels to mercury will result in induction of mercury-binding proteins in offspring suggest that such proteins occur in larvae although additional studies are indicated for a conclusive demonstration.

  10. Energetics of echinomycin binding to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Fenfei; Chaires, Jonathan B.; Waring, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry and UV thermal denaturation have been used to determine a complete thermodynamic profile for the bis-intercalative interaction of the peptide antibiotic echinomycin with DNA. The new calorimetric data are consistent with all previously published binding data, and afford the most rigorous and direct determination of the binding enthalpy possible. For the association of echinomycin with DNA, we found ΔG° = –7.6 kcal mol–1, ΔH = +3.8 kcal mol–1 and ΔS = +38.9 cal mol–1 K–1 at 20°C. The binding reaction is clearly entropically driven, a hallmark of a process that is predominantly stabilized by hydrophobic interactions, though a deeper analysis of the free energy contributions suggests that direct molecular recognition between echinomycin and DNA, mediated by hydrogen bonding and van der Waals contacts, also plays an important role in stabilizing the complex. PMID:14576305

  11. Conformation-controlled binding kinetics of antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanti, Marta; Fanelli, Duccio; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are large, extremely flexible molecules, whose internal dynamics is certainly key to their astounding ability to bind antigens of all sizes, from small hormones to giant viruses. In this paper, we build a shape-based coarse-grained model of IgG molecules and show that it can be used to generate 3D conformations in agreement with single-molecule Cryo-Electron Tomography data. Furthermore, we elaborate a theoretical model that can be solved exactly to compute the binding rate constant of a small antigen to an IgG in a prescribed 3D conformation. Our model shows that the antigen binding process is tightly related to the internal dynamics of the IgG. Our findings pave the way for further investigation of the subtle connection between the dynamics and the function of large, flexible multi-valent molecular machines.

  12. Conformation-controlled binding kinetics of antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Galanti, Marta; Fanelli, Duccio; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are large, extremely flexible molecules, whose internal dynamics is certainly key to their astounding ability to bind antigens of all sizes, from small hormones to giant viruses. In this paper, we build a shape-based coarse-grained model of IgG molecules and show that it can be used to generate 3D conformations in agreement with single-molecule Cryo-Electron Tomography data. Furthermore, we elaborate a theoretical model that can be solved exactly to compute the binding rate constant of a small antigen to an IgG in a prescribed 3D conformation. Our model shows that the antigen binding process is tightly related to the internal dynamics of the IgG. Our findings pave the way for further investigation of the subtle connection between the dynamics and the function of large, flexible multi-valent molecular machines. PMID:26755272

  13. Flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, George C.

    1987-01-01

    A method of measuring the result of a binding assay that does not require separation of fluorescent smaller particles is disclosed. In a competitive binding assay the smaller fluorescent particles coated with antigen compete with antigen in the sample being analyzed for available binding sites on larger particles. In a sandwich assay, the smaller, fluorescent spheres coated with antibody attach themselves to molecules containing antigen that are attached to larger spheres coated with the same antibody. The separation of unattached, fluorescent smaller particles is made unnecessary by only counting the fluorescent events triggered by the laser of a flow cytometer when the event is caused by a particle with a light scatter measurement within a certain range corresponding to the presence of larger particles.

  14. Voluntary action and causality in temporal binding.

    PubMed

    Cravo, Andre M; Claessens, Peter M E; Baldo, Marcus V C

    2009-10-01

    Previous studies have documented temporal attraction in perceived times of actions and their effects. While some authors argue that voluntary action is a necessary condition for this phenomenon, others claim that the causal relationship between action and effect is the crucial ingredient. In the present study, we investigate voluntary action and causality as the necessary and sufficient conditions for temporal binding. We used a variation of the launching effect proposed by Michotte, in which participants controlled the launch stimulus in some blocks. Volunteers reported causality ratings and estimated the interval between the two events. Our results show dissociations between causality ratings and temporal estimation. While causality ratings are not affected by voluntary action, temporal bindings were only found in the presence of both voluntary action and high causality. Our results indicate that voluntary action and causality are both necessary for the emergence of temporal binding.

  15. Molecular beacons for detecting DNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Heyduk, Tomasz; Heyduk, Ewa

    2002-02-01

    We report here a simple, rapid, homogeneous fluorescence assay, the molecular beacon assay, for the detection and quantification of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins. The central feature of the assay is the protein-dependent association of two DNA fragments each containing about half of a DNA sequence defining a protein-binding site. Protein-dependent association of DNA fragments can be detected by any proximity-based spectroscopic signal, such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorochromes introduced into these DNA molecules. The assay is fully homogeneous and requires no manipulations aside from mixing of the sample and the test solution. It offers flexibility with respect to the mode of signal detection and the fluorescence probe, and is compatible with multicolor simultaneous detection of several proteins. The assay can be used in research and medical diagnosis and for high-throughput screening of drugs targeted to DNA-binding proteins.

  16. Protein Binding Studies with Zero Mode Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samiee, K.; Foquet, M.; Cox, E. C.; Craighead, H. G.

    2004-03-01

    Single protein molecules binding to their DNA operator site are observed using zero mode waveguides, novel quasi one-dimensional optical nanostructures. The subwavelength features of the waveguides allow the formation of a focal volume smaller than those allowed by classical diffraction limited optics. The small observation volume allows the use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to measure diffusion constants at fluorophore concentrations as high as10uM. Binding is observed between a DNA oligomer containing OR1, an operator site on the Lambda genome, and CI, the repressor protein that inhibits the bacteriophage's lytic growth cycle. The dimensions of the waveguide should allow a single DNA fragment to be fixed at the bottom where its binding dynamics can be characterized on a single molecule basis.

  17. Mucin Binding Reduces Colistin Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Johnny X; Blaskovich, Mark A T; Pelingon, Ruby; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Elliott, Alysha G; Butler, Mark S; Montgomery, A Bruce; Cooper, Matthew A

    2015-10-01

    Colistin has found increasing use in treating drug-resistant bacterial lung infections, but potential interactions with pulmonary biomolecules have not been investigated. We postulated that colistin, like aminoglycoside antibiotics, may bind to secretory mucin in sputum or epithelial mucin that lines airways, reducing free drug levels. To test this hypothesis, we measured binding of colistin and other antibiotics to porcine mucin, a family of densely glycosylated proteins used as a surrogate for human sputum and airway mucin. Antibiotics were incubated in dialysis tubing with or without mucin, and concentrations of unbound antibiotics able to penetrate the dialysis tubing were measured over time using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The percentage of antibiotic measured in the dialysate after 4 h in the presence of mucin, relative to the amount without mucin, was 15% for colistin, 16% for polymyxin B, 19% for tobramycin, 52% for ciprofloxacin, and 78% for daptomycin. Antibiotics with the strongest mucin binding had an overall polybasic positive charge, whereas those with comparatively little binding were less basic. When comparing MICs measured with or without added mucin, colistin and polymyxin B showed >100-fold increases in MICs for multiple Gram-negative bacteria. Preclinical evaluation of mucin binding should become a standard procedure when considering the potential pulmonary use of new or existing antibiotics, particularly those with a polybasic overall charge. In the airways, mucin binding may reduce the antibacterial efficacy of inhaled or intravenously administered colistin, and the presence of sub-MIC effective antibiotic concentrations could result in the development of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26169405

  18. Mucin Binding Reduces Colistin Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Johnny X; Blaskovich, Mark A T; Pelingon, Ruby; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Elliott, Alysha G; Butler, Mark S; Montgomery, A Bruce; Cooper, Matthew A

    2015-10-01

    Colistin has found increasing use in treating drug-resistant bacterial lung infections, but potential interactions with pulmonary biomolecules have not been investigated. We postulated that colistin, like aminoglycoside antibiotics, may bind to secretory mucin in sputum or epithelial mucin that lines airways, reducing free drug levels. To test this hypothesis, we measured binding of colistin and other antibiotics to porcine mucin, a family of densely glycosylated proteins used as a surrogate for human sputum and airway mucin. Antibiotics were incubated in dialysis tubing with or without mucin, and concentrations of unbound antibiotics able to penetrate the dialysis tubing were measured over time using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The percentage of antibiotic measured in the dialysate after 4 h in the presence of mucin, relative to the amount without mucin, was 15% for colistin, 16% for polymyxin B, 19% for tobramycin, 52% for ciprofloxacin, and 78% for daptomycin. Antibiotics with the strongest mucin binding had an overall polybasic positive charge, whereas those with comparatively little binding were less basic. When comparing MICs measured with or without added mucin, colistin and polymyxin B showed >100-fold increases in MICs for multiple Gram-negative bacteria. Preclinical evaluation of mucin binding should become a standard procedure when considering the potential pulmonary use of new or existing antibiotics, particularly those with a polybasic overall charge. In the airways, mucin binding may reduce the antibacterial efficacy of inhaled or intravenously administered colistin, and the presence of sub-MIC effective antibiotic concentrations could result in the development of antibiotic resistance.

  19. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  20. Binding of actin to lens alpha crystallins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Actin has been coupled to a cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose 4B column, then tested for binding to alpha, beta, and gamma crystallin preparations from the bovine lens. Alpha, but not beta or gamma, crystallins bound to the actin affinity column in a time dependent and saturable manner. Subfractionation of the alpha crystallin preparation into the alpha-A and alpha-B species, followed by incubation with the affinity column, demonstrated that both species bound approximately the same. Together, these studies demonstrate a specific and saturable binding of lens alpha-A and alpha-B with actin.

  1. Binding energies of hypernuclei and hypernuclear interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, A.R. |; Murali, S.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1996-05-01

    In part 1 the effect of nuclear core dynamics on the binding energies of {Lambda} hypernuclei is discussed in the framework of variational correlated wave functions. In particular, the authors discuss a new rearrangement energy contribution and its effect on the core polarization. In part 2 they consider the interpretation of the {Lambda} single-particle energy in terms of basic {Lambda}-nuclear interactions using a local density approximation based on a Fermi hypernetted chain calculation of the A binding to nuclear matter. To account for the data strongly repulsive 3-body {Lambda}NN forces are required. Also in this framework they discuss core polarization for medium and heavier hypernuclei.

  2. Ice-Binding Proteins and Their Function.

    PubMed

    Bar Dolev, Maya; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter L

    2016-06-01

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) are a diverse class of proteins that assist organism survival in the presence of ice in cold climates. They have different origins in many organisms, including bacteria, fungi, algae, diatoms, plants, insects, and fish. This review covers the gamut of IBP structures and functions and the common features they use to bind ice. We discuss mechanisms by which IBPs adsorb to ice and interfere with its growth, evidence for their irreversible association with ice, and methods for enhancing the activity of IBPs. The applications of IBPs in the food industry, in cryopreservation, and in other technologies are vast, and we chart out some possibilities. PMID:27145844

  3. Binding properties of Paracentrotus lividus (Echinoidea) hemolysin.

    PubMed

    Canicatti, C

    1991-01-01

    1. Paracentrotus lividus hemolysin binds erythrocytes, zymosan particles, lipopolysaccharide and laminarin surfaces but not auto and allogeneic cell membranes. 2. The binding could, at least for erythrocytes, involve phospholipids and cholesterol. 3. The protease activity of the coelomic fluid is not related to hemolysis. 4. The finding that very low concentrations of Zn2+ inactivate the hemolysin suggests a possible regulative function of the ion in the hemolytic reaction. 5. Ultrastructural observations on rabbit erythrocyte membranes indicate that most likely the transmembrane pores are induced by the lytic molecules. PMID:1674457

  4. Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method: Hamiltonian Replica Exchange with Torsional Flattening for Binding Mode Prediction and Binding Free Energy Estimation.

    PubMed

    Mentes, Ahmet; Deng, Nan-Jie; Vijayan, R S K; Xia, Junchao; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-05-10

    Molecular dynamics modeling of complex biological systems is limited by finite simulation time. The simulations are often trapped close to local energy minima separated by high energy barriers. Here, we introduce Hamiltonian replica exchange (H-REMD) with torsional flattening in the Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method (BEDAM), to reduce energy barriers along torsional degrees of freedom and accelerate sampling of intramolecular degrees of freedom relevant to protein-ligand binding. The method is tested on a standard benchmark (T4 Lysozyme/L99A/p-xylene complex) and on a library of HIV-1 integrase complexes derived from the SAMPL4 blind challenge. We applied the torsional flattening strategy to 26 of the 53 known binders to the HIV Integrase LEDGF site found to have a binding energy landscape funneled toward the crystal structure. We show that our approach samples the conformational space more efficiently than the original method without flattening when starting from a poorly docked pose with incorrect ligand dihedral angle conformations. In these unfavorable cases convergence to a binding pose within 2-3 Å from the crystallographic pose is obtained within a few nanoseconds of the Hamiltonian replica exchange simulation. We found that torsional flattening is insufficient in cases where trapping is due to factors other than torsional energy, such as the formation of incorrect intramolecular hydrogen bonds and stacking. Work is in progress to generalize the approach to handle these cases and thereby make it more widely applicable.

  5. Characterizing low affinity epibatidine binding to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Along with high affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd1≈10 pM) to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), low affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd2≈1-10 nM) to an independent binding site has been reported. Studying this low affinity binding is important because it might contribute understanding about the structure and synthesis of α4β2 nAChR. The binding behavior of epibatidine and α4β2 AChR raises a question about interpreting binding data from two independent sites with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding, both of which can affect equilibrium binding of [3H]epibatidine and α4β2 nAChR. If modeled incorrectly, ligand depletion and nonspecific binding lead to inaccurate estimates of binding constants. Fitting total equilibrium binding as a function of total ligand accurately characterizes a single site with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding. The goal of this study was to determine whether this approach is sufficient with two independent high and low affinity sites. Results Computer simulations of binding revealed complexities beyond fitting total binding for characterizing the second, low affinity site of α4β2 nAChR. First, distinguishing low-affinity specific binding from nonspecific binding was a potential problem with saturation data. Varying the maximum concentration of [3H]epibatidine, simultaneously fitting independently measured nonspecific binding, and varying α4β2 nAChR concentration were effective remedies. Second, ligand depletion helped identify the low affinity site when nonspecific binding was significant in saturation or competition data, contrary to a common belief that ligand depletion always is detrimental. Third, measuring nonspecific binding without α4β2 nAChR distinguished better between nonspecific binding and low-affinity specific binding under some circumstances of competitive binding than did presuming nonspecific binding to be residual [3H]epibatidine binding after adding a large concentration of

  6. Mechanism for ordered receptor binding by human prolactin.

    PubMed

    Sivaprasad, Umasundari; Canfield, Jeffrey M; Brooks, Charles L

    2004-11-01

    Prolactin, a lactogenic hormone, binds to two prolactin receptors sequentially, the first receptor binding at site 1 of the hormone followed by the second receptor binding at site 2. We have investigated the mechanism by which human prolactin (hPRL) binds the extracellular domain of the human prolactin receptor (hPRLbp) using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology. We have covalently coupled hPRL to the SPR chip surface via coupling chemistries that reside in and block either site 1 or site 2. Equilibrium binding experiments using saturating hPRLbp concentrations show that site 2 receptor binding is dependent on site 1 receptor occupancy. In contrast, site 1 binding is independent of site 2 occupancy. Thus, sites 1 and 2 are functionally coupled, site 1 binding inducing the functional organization of site 2. Site 2 of hPRL does not have a measurable binding affinity prior to hPRLbp binding at site 1. After site 1 receptor binding, site 2 affinity is increased to values approaching that of site 1. Corruption of either site 1 or site 2 by mutagenesis is consistent with a functional coupling of sites 1 and 2. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments indicate that receptor binding at site 1 induces a conformation change in the hormone. These data support an "induced-fit" model for prolactin receptor binding where binding of the first receptor to hPRL induces a conformation change in the hormone creating the second receptor-binding site.

  7. Non-DNA-binding cofactors enhance DNA-binding specificity of a transcriptional regulatory complex.

    PubMed

    Siggers, Trevor; Duyzend, Michael H; Reddy, Jessica; Khan, Sidra; Bulyk, Martha L

    2011-12-06

    Recruitment of cofactors to specific DNA sites is integral for specificity in gene regulation. As a model system, we examined how targeting and transcriptional control of the sulfur metabolism genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is governed by recruitment of the transcriptional co-activator Met4. We developed genome-scale approaches to measure transcription factor (TF) DNA-binding affinities and cofactor recruitment to >1300 genomic binding site sequences. We report that genes responding to the TF Cbf1 and cofactor Met28 contain a novel 'recruitment motif' (RYAAT), adjacent to Cbf1 binding sites, which enhances the binding of a Met4-Met28-Cbf1 regulatory complex, and that abrogation of this motif significantly reduces gene induction under low-sulfur conditions. Furthermore, we show that correct recognition of this composite motif requires both non-DNA-binding cofactors Met4 and Met28. Finally, we demonstrate that the presence of an RYAAT motif next to a Cbf1 site, rather than Cbf1 binding affinity, specifies Cbf1-dependent sulfur metabolism genes. Our results highlight the need to examine TF/cofactor complexes, as novel specificity can result from cofactors that lack intrinsic DNA-binding specificity.

  8. Can cofactor-binding sites in proteins be flexible? Desulfovibrio desulfuricans flavodoxin binds FMN dimer.

    PubMed

    Muralidhara, B K; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2003-11-11

    Flavodoxins catalyze redox reactions using the isoalloxazine moiety of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor stacked between two aromatic residues located in two peptide loops. At high FMN concentrations that favor stacked FMN dimers in solution, isothermal titration calorimetric studies show that these dimers bind strongly to apo-flavodoxin from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (30 degrees C, 20 mM Hepes, pH 7, K(D) = 5.8 microM). Upon increasing the temperature so the FMN dimers dissociate (as shown by (1)H NMR), only one-to-one (FMN-to-protein) binding is observed. Calorimetric titrations result in one-to-one binding also in the presence of phosphate or sulfate (30 degrees C, 13 mM anion, pH 7, K(D) = 0.4 microM). FMN remains dimeric in the presence of phosphate and sulfate, suggesting that specific binding of a divalent anion to the phosphate-binding site triggers ordering of the peptide loops so only one isoalloxazine can fit. Although the physiological relevance of FMN and other nucleotides as dimers has not been explored, our study shows that high-affinity binding to proteins of such dimers can occur in vitro. This emphasizes that the cofactor-binding site in flavodoxin is more flexible than previously expected. PMID:14596623

  9. Binding balls: fast detection of binding sites using a property of spherical Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Comin, Matteo; Guerra, Concettina; Dellaert, Frank

    2009-11-01

    The functional prediction of proteins is one of the most challenging problems in modern biology. An established computational technique involves the identification of three-dimensional local similarities in proteins. In this article, we present a novel method to quickly identify promising binding sites. Our aim is to efficiently detect putative binding sites without explicitly aligning them. Using the theory of Spherical Harmonics, a candidate binding site is modeled as a Binding Ball. The Binding Ball signature, offered by the Spherical Fourier coefficients, can be efficiently used for a fast detection of putative regions. Our contribution includes the Binding Ball modeling and the definition of a scoring function that does not require aligning candidate regions. Our scoring function can be computed efficiently using a property of Spherical Fourier transform (SFT) that avoids the evaluation of all alignments. Experiments on different ligands show good discrimination power when searching for known binding sites. Moreover, we prove that this method can save up to 40% in time compared with traditional approaches.

  10. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner. PMID:27225672

  11. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain.

    PubMed

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner. PMID:27225672

  12. Coenzyme Q10-Binding/Transfer Protein Saposin B also Binds gamma-Tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guangzhi; Horinouchi, Ryo; Sagawa, Tomofumi; Orimo, Nobutsune; Kubo, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Fujisawa, Akio; Kashiba, Misato; Yamamoto, Yorihiro

    2008-09-01

    gamma-Tocopherol, the major form of dietary vitamin E, is absorbed in the intestine and is secreted in chylomicrons, which are then transferred to liver lysosomes. Most gamma-tocopherol is transferred to liver microsomes and is catabolized by cytochrome p450. Due to the hydrophobicity of gamma-tocopherol, a binding and transfer protein is plausible, but none have yet been isolated and characterized. We recently found that a ubiquitous cytosolic protein, saposin B, binds and transfers coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), which is an essential factor for ATP production and an important antioxidant. Here, we report that saposin B also binds gamma-tocopherol, but not alpha-tocopherol, as efficiently as CoQ10 at pH 7.4. At acidic pH, saposin B binds gamma-tocopherol preferentially to CoQ10 and alpha-tocopherol. Furthermore, we confirmed that saposin B selectively binds gamma-tocopherol instead of CoQ10 and alpha-tocopherol at every pH between 5.4 and 8.0 when all three lipids are competing for binding. We detected gamma-tocopherol in human saposin B monoclonal antibody-induced immunoprecipitates from human urine, although the amount of gamma-tocopherol was much smaller than that of CoQ10. These results suggest that saposin B binds and transports gamma-tocopherol in human cells.

  13. Binding Sites Analyser (BiSA): Software for Genomic Binding Sites Archiving and Overlap Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khushi, Matloob; Liddle, Christopher; Clarke, Christine L.; Graham, J. Dinny

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide mapping of transcription factor binding and histone modification reveals complex patterns of interactions. Identifying overlaps in binding patterns by different factors is a major objective of genomic studies, but existing methods to archive large numbers of datasets in a personalised database lack sophistication and utility. Therefore we have developed transcription factor DNA binding site analyser software (BiSA), for archiving of binding regions and easy identification of overlap with or proximity to other regions of interest. Analysis results can be restricted by chromosome or base pair overlap between regions or maximum distance between binding peaks. BiSA is capable of reporting overlapping regions that share common base pairs; regions that are nearby; regions that are not overlapping; and average region sizes. BiSA can identify genes located near binding regions of interest, genomic features near a gene or locus of interest and statistical significance of overlapping regions can also be reported. Overlapping results can be visualized as Venn diagrams. A major strength of BiSA is that it is supported by a comprehensive database of publicly available transcription factor binding sites and histone modifications, which can be directly compared to user data. The documentation and source code are available on http://bisa.sourceforge.net PMID:24533055

  14. Information flow through calcium binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Ji Hyun; Bialek, William

    2013-03-01

    Calcium signaling is a ubiquitous mode of biological communication, which regulates a great variety of vital processes in living systems. Such a signal typically begins with an elementary event, in which calcium ions bind to a protein, inducing a change in the protein's structure. Information can only be lost, from what was conveyed through this initial event, as the signal is further transduced through the downstream networks. In the present work we analyze and optimize the information flow in the calcium binding process. We explicitly calculate the mutual information between the calcium concentration and the states of the protein, using a simple model for allosteric regulation in a dimeric protein. The optimal solution depends on the dynamic range of the input as well as on the timescale of signal integration. According to our result, the optimizing strategy involves allowing the calcium-binding protein to be ``activated'' by a partial occupation of its sites, and tuning independently the strengths of cooperative interactions in the binding and unbinding processes.

  15. Non-binding relationship between visual features.

    PubMed

    Rangelov, Dragan; Zeki, Semir

    2014-01-01

    The answer as to how visual attributes processed in different brain loci at different speeds are bound together to give us our unitary experience of the visual world remains unknown. In this study we investigated whether bound representations arise, as commonly assumed, through physiological interactions between cells in the visual areas. In a focal attentional task in which correct responses from either bound or unbound representations were possible, participants discriminated the color or orientation of briefly presented single bars. On the assumption that representations of the two attributes are bound, the accuracy of reporting the color and orientation should co-vary. By contrast, if the attributes are not mandatorily bound, the accuracy of reporting the two attributes should be independent. The results of our psychophysical studies reported here supported the latter, non-binding, relationship between visual features, suggesting that binding does not necessarily occur even under focal attention. We propose a task-contingent binding mechanism, postulating that binding occurs at late, post-perceptual (PP), stages through the intervention of memory. PMID:25339879

  16. Stabilized sulfur binding using activated fillers

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, Paul D.; Vagin, Vyacheslav P.; Vagin, Sergey P.

    2015-07-21

    A method of making a stable, sulfur binding composite comprising impregnating a solid aggregate with an organic modifier comprising unsaturated hydrocarbons with at least one double or triple covalent bond between adjacent carbon atoms to create a modifier-impregnated aggregate; heating and drying the modifier-impregnated aggregate to activate the surface of the modifier-impregnated aggregate for reaction with sulfur.

  17. DBSI: DNA-binding site identifier

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaolei; Ericksen, Spencer S.; Mitchell, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we present the DNA-Binding Site Identifier (DBSI), a new structure-based method for predicting protein interaction sites for DNA binding. DBSI was trained and validated on a data set of 263 proteins (TRAIN-263), tested on an independent set of protein-DNA complexes (TEST-206) and data sets of 29 unbound (APO-29) and 30 bound (HOLO-30) protein structures distinct from the training data. We computed 480 candidate features for identifying protein residues that bind DNA, including new features that capture the electrostatic microenvironment within shells near the protein surface. Our iterative feature selection process identified features important in other models, as well as features unique to the DBSI model, such as a banded electrostatic feature with spatial separation comparable with the canonical width of the DNA minor groove. Validations and comparisons with established methods using a range of performance metrics clearly demonstrate the predictive advantage of DBSI, and its comparable performance on unbound (APO-29) and bound (HOLO-30) conformations demonstrates robustness to binding-induced protein conformational changes. Finally, we offer our feature data table to others for integration into their own models or for testing improved feature selection and model training strategies based on DBSI. PMID:23873960

  18. Dynamics of Transcription Factor Binding Site Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Tuğrul, Murat; Paixão, Tiago; Barton, Nicholas H.; Tkačik, Gašper

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of gene regulation is crucial for our understanding of the phenotypic differences between species, populations and individuals. Sequence-specific binding of transcription factors to the regulatory regions on the DNA is a key regulatory mechanism that determines gene expression and hence heritable phenotypic variation. We use a biophysical model for directional selection on gene expression to estimate the rates of gain and loss of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in finite populations under both point and insertion/deletion mutations. Our results show that these rates are typically slow for a single TFBS in an isolated DNA region, unless the selection is extremely strong. These rates decrease drastically with increasing TFBS length or increasingly specific protein-DNA interactions, making the evolution of sites longer than ∼ 10 bp unlikely on typical eukaryotic speciation timescales. Similarly, evolution converges to the stationary distribution of binding sequences very slowly, making the equilibrium assumption questionable. The availability of longer regulatory sequences in which multiple binding sites can evolve simultaneously, the presence of “pre-sites” or partially decayed old sites in the initial sequence, and biophysical cooperativity between transcription factors, can all facilitate gain of TFBS and reconcile theoretical calculations with timescales inferred from comparative genomics. PMID:26545200

  19. Cadmium-binding protein (metallothionein) in carp

    SciTech Connect

    Kito, H.; Ose, Y.; Sato, T.

    1986-03-01

    When carp (Cyprinus carpio) were exposed to 5 and 30 ppm Cd in the water, the contents of Cd-binding protein, which has low molecular weight, increased in the hepatopancreas, kidney, gills and gastrointestinal tract with duration of exposure. This Cd-binding protein was purified from hepatopancreas, kidney, gills, and spleen of carp administered 2 mg/kg Cd (as CdCl/sub 2/), intraperitoneally for 6 days. Two Cd-binding proteins were separated by DEAE-Sephadex A-25 column chromatography. These proteins had Cd-mercaptide bond, high cysteine contents (ca. 29-34%), but no aromatic amino acids or histidine. From these characteristics the Cd-binding proteins were identified as metallothionein. By using antiserum obtained from a rabbit to which carp hepatopancreas MT-II had been administered, immunological characteristics between hepatopancreas MT-I, II and kidney MT-II were studied, and a slight difference in antigenic determinant was observed among them. By immunological staining techniques with horseradish peroxidase, the localization of metallothionein was investigated. Carp were bred in 1 ppm Cd, 5 ppm Zn solution, and tap water for 14 days, following transfer to 15 ppm Cd solution, respectively. The survival ratio was the highest in the Zn group followed by Cd-treated and control groups.

  20. Collagen binding to OSCAR: the odd couple.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    In this issue of Blood, Zhou et al reported the high-resolution structure of the collagen-activated osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) bound to a collagen model peptide. Together with binding studies, the results confirm a novel recognition mechanism for collagen by immunoglobulin-like motifs. PMID:26847065

  1. Metal binding components in human amniotic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, P.G.; Zlotkin, S.H.; Sarkar, B. )

    1990-02-26

    Amniotic fluid is a potential source of both nutritionally essential and toxic metals for the fetus. As the binding pattern of these metals in amniotic fluid may be one of the determining factors in their availability to the fetus, the objective of this study was to investigate metal binding in vitro. The binding of six trace metals, Mn(II), Ni(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), and Fe(III), to components of human amniotic fluid was studied by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration at physiological pH, using radioisotopes as tracers and 50 mM TRIS/HCl as the elution buffer. The amniotic fluid was collected at 16-16.5 weeks gestation by amniocentesis and pooled for analysis. Extensive amounts of Fe, Cu, Zn, and Cd and small amounts of Mn and Ni were bound to high molecular weight proteins with elution patterns similar to those seen for the binding of these metals in serum. In addition, large amounts of Fe, Mn, Ni and Cd and small amounts of Zn and Cu were associated with low molecular weight component(s). The identity of these latter components is unknown, but they play an important biological role in amniotic fluid.

  2. The Cultural Bind on the American Male

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenoweth, Gene

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the cultural bind on the American male. The process starts with conception. If the spermatozoid that fertilizes the egg contains only X chromosomes a girl will be produced. If a single Y chromosome out of the 24 produced by the father is included, the baby will be a boy. From this point on the girls have a…

  3. Lipid binding proteins from parasitic platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    Alvite, Gabriela; Esteves, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    TWO MAIN FAMILIES OF LIPID BINDING PROTEINS HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED IN PARASITIC PLATYHELMINTHES: hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs) and fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs). Members of the former family of proteins are specific to the Cestoda class, while FABPs are conserved across a wide range of animal species. Because Platyhelminthes are unable to synthesize their own lipids, these lipid-binding proteins are important molecules in these organisms. HLBPs are a high molecular mass complex of proteins and lipids. They are composed of subunits of low molecular mass proteins and a wide array of lipid molecules ranging from CoA esters to cholesterol. These proteins are excretory-secretory molecules and are key serological tools for diagnosis of diseases caused by cestodes. FABPs are mainly intracellular proteins of low molecular weight. They are also vaccine candidates. Despite that the knowledge of their function is scarce, the differences in their molecular organization, ligand preferences, intra/extracellular localization, evolution, and phylogenetic distribution, suggest that platyhelminths HLBPs and FABPs should play different functions. FABPs might be involved in the removal of fatty acids from the inner surface of the cell membrane and in their subsequent targeting to specific cellular destinations. In contrast, HLBPs might be involved in fatty acid uptake from the host environment.

  4. Oxytocin binding sites in bovine mammary tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin.

    1989-01-01

    Oxytocin binding sites were identified and characterized in bovine mammary tissue. ({sup 3}H)-oxytocin binding reached equilibrium by 50 min at 20{degree}C and by 8 hr at 4{degree}C. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. Thyrotropin releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, pentagastrin, bradykinin, xenopsin and L-valyl-histidyl-L-leucyl-L-threonyl-L-prolyl-L-valyl-L-glutamyl-L-lysine were not competitive. In the presence of 10 nM LiCl, addition of oxytocin to dispersed bovine mammary cells, in which phosphatidylinositol was pre-labelled, caused a time and dose-dependent increase in radioactive inositiol monophosphate incorporation. The possibility that there are distinct vasopressin receptors in bovine mammary tissue was investigated. ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding reached equilibrium by 40 min at 20{degree}. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. The ability of the peptides to inhibit ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding was: (Thr{sup 4},Gly{sup 7})-oxytocin > Arg{sup 8}-vasopressin > (lys{sup 8})-vasopressin > (Deamino{sup 1},D-arg{sup 8})-vasopressin > oxytocin > d (CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP.

  5. Binding of NAD+ to pertussis toxin.

    PubMed

    Lobban, M D; Irons, L I; van Heyningen, S

    1991-06-24

    The equilibrium dissociation constant of NAD+ and pertussis toxin was determined by equilibrium dialysis and by the quenching of the protein's intrinsic fluorescence on titration with NAD+. A binding constant, Kd, of 24 +/- 2 microM at 30 degrees C was obtained from equilibrium dialysis, consistent with the previously determined value for the Michaelis constant, Km, of 30 +/- 5 microM for NAD+ (when the toxin is catalysing the ADP-ribosylation of water and of dithiothreitol). The intrinsic fluorescence of pertussis toxin was quenched by up to 60% on titration with NAD+, and after correction for dilution and inner filter effects, a Kd value of 27 microM at 30 degrees C was obtained, agreeing well with that found by equilibrium dialysis. The binding constants were measured at a number of temperatures using both techniques, and from this the enthalpy of binding of NAD+ to toxin was determined to be 30 kJ.mol-1, a typical value for a protein-ligand interaction. There is one binding site for NAD+ per toxin molecule. PMID:1648404

  6. The Double Bind: The next Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malcom, Lindsey E.; Malcom, Shirley M.

    2011-01-01

    In this foreword, Shirley Malcom and Lindsey Malcom speak to the history and current status of women of color in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. As the author of the seminal report "The Double Bind: The Price of Being a Minority Woman in Science", Shirley Malcom is uniquely poised to give us an insightful…

  7. The Binding Properties of Quechua Suffixes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, David

    This paper sketches an explicitly non-lexicalist application of grammatical theory to Huallaga (Huanuco) Quechua (HgQ). The advantages of applying binding theory to many suffixes that have previously been treated only as objects of the morphology are demonstrated. After an introduction, section 2 outlines basic assumptions about the nature of HgQ…

  8. Cross-Modal Binding in Developmental Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Manon W.; Branigan, Holly P.; Parra, Mario A.; Logie, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to learn visual-phonological associations is a unique predictor of word reading, and individuals with developmental dyslexia show impaired ability in learning these associations. In this study, we compared developmentally dyslexic and nondyslexic adults on their ability to form cross-modal associations (or "bindings") based…

  9. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1996-03-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

  10. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1996-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  11. Prolactin binding in minor salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Abbey, L M; Witorsch, R J

    1985-07-01

    An immunohistochemical study of 15 minor salivary gland tumors was initiated to determine if prolactin binding occurred in these tissues. Eight benign mixed tumors (BMT) and 7 adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC) were selected at random from the surgical biopsy service of the MCV/VCU School of Dentistry, Department of Oral Pathology. The specimens were cut and mounted on slides along with sections of rat pituitary and rat ventral prostate which served as methodologic controls. Experimental specimens were incubated for 24 hours with varying concentrations of highly purified (iodination grade) rat prolactin; controls were incubated with vehicle. Following incubation the specimens were stained according to the Sternberger peroxidase-antiperoxidase method. Results showed dose-dependent staining for prolactin binding sites in 7 of 8 BMTs and 5 of 7 ACCs. The staining was wider in distribution than we observed in normal human minor salivary gland tissue. Binding was confined primarily to cells of duct origin in both types of tumor. In individual cells, staining was observed in diffuse cytoplasmic and perinuclear locations as well as in nuclei and apical regions. We conclude that two minor salivary gland neoplasms (BMT and ACC) exhibit prolactin binding at different cellular locations and in a more widespread pattern than was observed in normal minor salivary gland.

  12. Perturbation Approaches for Exploring Protein Binding Site Flexibility to Predict Transient Binding Pockets.

    PubMed

    Kokh, Daria B; Czodrowski, Paul; Rippmann, Friedrich; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-08-01

    Simulations of the long-time scale motions of a ligand binding pocket in a protein may open up new perspectives for the design of compounds with steric or chemical properties differing from those of known binders. However, slow motions of proteins are difficult to access using standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and are thus usually neglected in computational drug design. Here, we introduce two nonequilibrium MD approaches to identify conformational changes of a binding site and detect transient pockets associated with these motions. The methods proposed are based on the rotamerically induced perturbation (RIP) MD approach, which employs perturbation of side-chain torsional motion for initiating large-scale protein movement. The first approach, Langevin-RIP (L-RIP), entails a series of short Langevin MD simulations, each starting with perturbation of one of the side-chains lining the binding site of interest. L-RIP provides extensive sampling of conformational changes of the binding site. In less than 1 ns of MD simulation with L-RIP, we observed distortions of the α-helix in the ATP binding site of HSP90 and flipping of the DFG loop in Src kinase. In the second approach, RIPlig, a perturbation is applied to a pseudoligand placed in different parts of a binding pocket, which enables flexible regions of the binding site to be identified in a small number of 10 ps MD simulations. The methods were evaluated for four test proteins displaying different types and degrees of binding site flexibility. Both methods reveal all transient pocket regions in less than a total of 10 ns of simulations, even though many of these regions remained closed in 100 ns conventional MD. The proposed methods provide computationally efficient tools to explore binding site flexibility and can aid in the functional characterization of protein pockets, and the identification of transient pockets for ligand design. PMID:27399277

  13. Exploration of dimensions of estrogen potency: parsing ligand binding and coactivator binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Jeyakumar, M; Carlson, Kathryn E; Gunther, Jillian R; Katzenellenbogen, John A

    2011-04-15

    The estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, are ligand-regulated transcription factors that control gene expression programs in target tissues. The molecular events underlying estrogen action involve minimally two steps, hormone binding to the ER ligand-binding domain followed by coactivator recruitment to the ER·ligand complex; this ligand·receptor·coactivator triple complex then alters gene expression. Conceptually, the potency of an estrogen in activating a cellular response should reflect the affinities that characterize both steps involved in the assembly of the active ligand·receptor·coactivator complex. Thus, to better understand the molecular basis of estrogen potency, we developed a completely in vitro system (using radiometric and time-resolved FRET assays) to quantify independently three parameters: (a) the affinity of ligand binding to ER, (b) the affinity of coactivator binding to the ER·ligand complex, and (c) the potency of ligand recruitment of coactivator. We used this system to characterize the binding and potency of 12 estrogens with both ERα and ERβ. Some ligands showed good correlations between ligand binding affinity, coactivator binding affinity, and coactivator recruitment potency with both ERs, whereas others showed correlations with only one ER subtype or displayed discordant coactivator recruitment potencies. When ligands with low receptor binding affinity but high coactivator recruitment potencies to ERβ were evaluated in cell-based assays, elevation of cellular coactivator levels significantly and selectively improved their potency. Collectively, our results indicate that some low affinity estrogens may elicit greater cellular responses in those target cells that express higher levels of specific coactivators capable of binding to their ER complexes with high affinity. PMID:21321128

  14. Five of Five VHHs Neutralizing Poliovirus Bind the Receptor-Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Mike; Schotte, Lise; Thys, Bert; Filman, David J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nanobodies, or VHHs, that recognize poliovirus type 1 have previously been selected and characterized as candidates for antiviral agents or reagents for standardization of vaccine quality control. In this study, we present high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of poliovirus with five neutralizing VHHs. All VHHs bind the capsid in the canyon at sites that extensively overlap the poliovirus receptor-binding site. In contrast, the interaction involves a unique (and surprisingly extensive) surface for each of the five VHHs. Five regions of the capsid were found to participate in binding with all five VHHs. Four of these five regions are known to alter during the expansion of the capsid associated with viral entry. Interestingly, binding of one of the VHHs, PVSS21E, resulted in significant changes of the capsid structure and thus seems to trap the virus in an early stage of expansion. IMPORTANCE We describe the cryo-electron microscopy structures of complexes of five neutralizing VHHs with the Mahoney strain of type 1 poliovirus at resolutions ranging from 3.8 to 6.3Å. All five VHHs bind deep in the virus canyon at similar sites that overlap extensively with the binding site for the receptor (CD155). The binding surfaces on the VHHs are surprisingly extensive, but despite the use of similar binding surfaces on the virus, the binding surface on the VHHs is unique for each VHH. In four of the five complexes, the virus remains essentially unchanged, but for the fifth there are significant changes reminiscent of but smaller in magnitude than the changes associated with cell entry, suggesting that this VHH traps the virus in a previously undescribed early intermediate state. The neutralizing mechanisms of the VHHs and their potential use as quality control agents for the end game of poliovirus eradication are discussed. PMID:26764003

  15. CD36 binds oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) in a mechanism dependent upon fatty acid binding.

    PubMed

    Jay, Anthony G; Chen, Alexander N; Paz, Miguel A; Hung, Justin P; Hamilton, James A

    2015-02-20

    The association of unesterified fatty acid (FA) with the scavenger receptor CD36 has been actively researched, with focuses on FA and oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake. CD36 has been shown to bind FA, but this interaction has been poorly characterized to date. To gain new insights into the physiological relevance of binding of FA to CD36, we characterized FA binding to the ectodomain of CD36 by the biophysical method surface plasmon resonance. Five structurally distinct FAs (saturated, monounsaturated (cis and trans), polyunsaturated, and oxidized) were pulsed across surface plasmon resonance channels, generating association and dissociation binding curves. Except for the oxidized FA HODE, all FAs bound to CD36, with rapid association and dissociation kinetics similar to HSA. Next, to elucidate the role that each FA might play in CD36-mediated oxLDL uptake, we used a fluorescent oxLDL (Dii-oxLDL) live cell assay with confocal microscopy imaging. CD36-mediated uptake in serum-free medium was very low but greatly increased when serum was present. The addition of exogenous FA in serum-free medium increased oxLDL binding and uptake to levels found with serum and affected CD36 plasma membrane distribution. Binding/uptake of oxLDL was dependent upon the FA dose, except for docosahexaenoic acid, which exhibited binding to CD36 but did not activate the uptake of oxLDL. HODE also did not affect oxLDL uptake. High affinity FA binding to CD36 and the effects of each FA on oxLDL uptake have important implications for protein conformation, binding of other ligands, functional properties of CD36, and high plasma FA levels in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  16. Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 has an interdigitated double Tudor domain with DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Weibin; Wang, Jinfeng; Perrett, Sarah; Feng, Yingang

    2014-02-21

    Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (RBBP1) is a tumor and leukemia suppressor that binds both methylated histone tails and DNA. Our previous studies indicated that RBBP1 possesses a Tudor domain, which cannot bind histone marks. In order to clarify the function of the Tudor domain, the solution structure of the RBBP1 Tudor domain was determined by NMR and is presented here. Although the proteins are unrelated, the RBBP1 Tudor domain forms an interdigitated double Tudor structure similar to the Tudor domain of JMJD2A, which is an epigenetic mark reader. This indicates the functional diversity of Tudor domains. The RBBP1 Tudor domain structure has a significant area of positively charged surface, which reveals a capability of the RBBP1 Tudor domain to bind nucleic acids. NMR titration and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments indicate that the RBBP1 Tudor domain binds both double- and single-stranded DNA with an affinity of 10-100 μM; no apparent DNA sequence specificity was detected. The DNA binding mode and key interaction residues were analyzed in detail based on a model structure of the Tudor domain-dsDNA complex, built by HADDOCK docking using the NMR data. Electrostatic interactions mediate the binding of the Tudor domain with DNA, which is consistent with NMR experiments performed at high salt concentration. The DNA-binding residues are conserved in Tudor domains of the RBBP1 protein family, resulting in conservation of the DNA-binding function in the RBBP1 Tudor domains. Our results provide further insights into the structure and function of RBBP1.

  17. Manganese Binds to Clostridium difficile Fbp68 and Is Essential for Fibronectin Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Kuo, Chih-Jung; Koleci, Xhelil; McDonough, Sean P.; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an etiological agent of pseudomembranous colitis and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Adhesion is the crucial first step in bacterial infection. Thus, in addition to toxins, the importance of colonization factors in C. difficile-associated disease is recognized. In this study, we identified Fbp68, one of the colonization factors that bind to fibronectin (Fn), as a manganese-binding protein (KD = 52.70 ± 1.97 nm). Furthermore, the conformation of Fbp68 changed dramatically upon manganese binding. Manganese binding can also stabilize the structure of Fbp68 as evidenced by the increased Tm measured by thermodenatured circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry (CD, Tm = 58–65 °C; differential scanning calorimetry, Tm = 59–66 °C). In addition, enhanced tolerance to protease K also suggests greatly improved stability of Fbp68 through manganese binding. Fn binding activity was found to be dependent on manganese due to the lack of binding by manganese-free Fbp68 to Fn. The C-terminal 194 amino acid residues of Fbp68 (Fbp68C) were discovered to bind to the N-terminal domain of Fn (Fbp68C-NTD, KD = 233 ± 10 nm, obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry). Moreover, adhesion of C. difficile to Caco-2 cells can be partially blocked if cells are pretreated with Fbp68C, and the binding of Fbp68C on Fn siRNA-transfected cells was significantly reduced. These results raise the possibility that Fbp68 plays a key role in C. difficile adherence on host cells to initiate infection. PMID:21062746

  18. Perturbation Approaches for Exploring Protein Binding Site Flexibility to Predict Transient Binding Pockets.

    PubMed

    Kokh, Daria B; Czodrowski, Paul; Rippmann, Friedrich; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-08-01

    Simulations of the long-time scale motions of a ligand binding pocket in a protein may open up new perspectives for the design of compounds with steric or chemical properties differing from those of known binders. However, slow motions of proteins are difficult to access using standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and are thus usually neglected in computational drug design. Here, we introduce two nonequilibrium MD approaches to identify conformational changes of a binding site and detect transient pockets associated with these motions. The methods proposed are based on the rotamerically induced perturbation (RIP) MD approach, which employs perturbation of side-chain torsional motion for initiating large-scale protein movement. The first approach, Langevin-RIP (L-RIP), entails a series of short Langevin MD simulations, each starting with perturbation of one of the side-chains lining the binding site of interest. L-RIP provides extensive sampling of conformational changes of the binding site. In less than 1 ns of MD simulation with L-RIP, we observed distortions of the α-helix in the ATP binding site of HSP90 and flipping of the DFG loop in Src kinase. In the second approach, RIPlig, a perturbation is applied to a pseudoligand placed in different parts of a binding pocket, which enables flexible regions of the binding site to be identified in a small number of 10 ps MD simulations. The methods were evaluated for four test proteins displaying different types and degrees of binding site flexibility. Both methods reveal all transient pocket regions in less than a total of 10 ns of simulations, even though many of these regions remained closed in 100 ns conventional MD. The proposed methods provide computationally efficient tools to explore binding site flexibility and can aid in the functional characterization of protein pockets, and the identification of transient pockets for ligand design.

  19. STARD4 Membrane Interactions and Sterol Binding.

    PubMed

    Iaea, David B; Dikiy, Igor; Kiburu, Irene; Eliezer, David; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2015-08-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer (START) domain family is defined by a conserved 210-amino acid sequence that folds into an α/β helix-grip structure. Members of this protein family bind a variety of ligands, including cholesterol, phospholipids, sphingolipids, and bile acids, with putative roles in nonvesicular lipid transport, metabolism, and cell signaling. Among the soluble START proteins, STARD4 is expressed in most tissues and has previously been shown to transfer sterol, but the molecular mechanisms of membrane interaction and sterol binding remain unclear. In this work, we use biochemical techniques to characterize regions of STARD4 and determine their role in membrane interaction and sterol binding. Our results show that STARD4 interacts with anionic membranes through a surface-exposed basic patch and that introducing a mutation (L124D) into the Omega-1 (Ω1) loop, which covers the sterol binding pocket, attenuates sterol transfer activity. To gain insight into the attenuating mechanism of the L124D mutation, we conducted structural and biophysical studies of wild-type and L124D STARD4. These studies show that the L124D mutation reduces the conformational flexibility of the protein, resulting in a diminished level of membrane interaction and sterol transfer. These studies also reveal that the C-terminal α-helix, and not the Ω1 loop, partitions into the membrane bilayer. On the basis of these observations, we propose a model of STARD4 membrane interaction and sterol binding and release that requires dynamic movement of both the Ω1 loop and membrane insertion of the C-terminal α-helix.

  20. Linoleic acid binding properties of ovalbumin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sponton, Osvaldo E; Perez, Adrián A; Carrara, Carlos R; Santiago, Liliana G

    2015-04-01

    In the present work, ovalbumin (OVA) solutions (10 g/L, 50 mM NaCl, pH 7.5) were heat-treated at 75, 80 and 85°C (namely, OVA-75, OVA-80 and OVA-85, respectively), from 0 to 25 min. OVA nanoparticles (OVAn) around 100 nm were obtained. For 3 min of heat treatment, OVAn sizes increased with temperature, but for a heating time longer than 10 min, OVA-75 showed the highest size values. OVAn surface hydrophobicity increased 6-8 folds in comparison with native OVA and wavelength blue shifts of 25-30 nm in maximum fluorescence intensity were registered. These results suggest that buried hydrophobic residues were exposed to the aqueous medium. Binding experiments with linoleic acid (LA) as polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) model were carried out. Firstly, binding ability of OVAn was determined from LA titration curves of intrinsic fluorescence measurements. OVA-85 at 5 min presented the highest binding ability and it was used for further binding properties studies (turbidity, particle size distribution--PSD--analysis and ζ-potential measurements). Turbidity measurement and PSD analysis showed that OVAn-LA nanocomplexes were formed, avoiding LA supramolecular self-assembly formation. The union of LA to OVAn surface confers them significant lower ζ-potential and larger size. Hence, fluorescence and ζ-potential results showed that LA would bind to OVAn by mean of hydrophobic interactions. Information derived from this work could be important to potentially use OVAn as PUFA vehiculization with applications in several industrial sectors (food, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, etc.).

  1. Switch-like surface binding of competing multivalent particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tito, N. B.; Frenkel, D.

    2016-07-01

    Multivalent particles competing for binding on the same surface can exhibit switch-like behaviour, depending on the concentration of receptors on the surface. When the receptor concentration is low, energy dominates the free energy of binding, and particles having a small number of strongly-binding ligands preferentially bind to the surface. At higher receptor concentrations, multivalent effects become significant, and entropy dominates the binding free energy; particles having many weakly-binding ligands preferentially bind to the surface. Between these two regimes there is a "switch-point", at which the surface binds the two species of particles equally strongly. We demonstrate that a simple theory can account for this switch-like behaviour and present numerical calculations that support the theoretical predictions. We argue that binding selectivity based on receptor density, rather than identity, may have practical applications.

  2. Several novel N-donor tridentate ligands formed in chemical studies of new fac-Re(CO)3 complexes relevant to fac-99mTc(CO)3 radiopharmaceuticals: attack of a terminal amine on coordinated acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Perera, Theshini; Marzilli, Patricia A; Fronczek, Frank R; Marzilli, Luigi G

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate syntheses of fac-[Re(CO)(3)L](+) complexes in organic solvents, we treated fac-[Re(CO)(3)(CH(3)CN)(3)]PF(6)/BF(4) in acetonitrile with triamine ligands (L). When L had two primary or two tertiary terminal amine groups, the expected fac-[Re(CO)(3)L](+) complexes formed. In contrast, N,N-dimethyldiethylenetriamine (N,N-Me(2)dien) formed an unusual compound, fac-[Re(CO)(3)(DAE)]BF(4) {DAE = (Z)-N'-(2-(2-(dimethylamino)ethylamino)ethyl)acetimidamide = (Me(2)NCH(2)CH(2))NH(CH(2)CH(2)N=C(NH(2))Me)}. DAE is formed by addition of acetonitrile to the N,N-Me(2)dien terminal primary amine, converting this sp(3) nitrogen to an sp(2) nitrogen with a double bond to the original acetonitrile sp carbon. The three Ns bound to Re derive from N,N-Me(2)dien. The pathway to fac-[Re(CO)(3)(DAE)]BF(4) is suggested by a second unusual compound, fac-[Re(CO)(3)(MAE)]PF(6) {MAE = N-methyl-N-(2-(methyl-(2-(methylamino)ethyl)amino)ethyl)acetimidamide = MeN(H)-CH(2)CH(2)-N(Me)-CH(2)CH(2)-N(Me)-C(Me)=NH}, isolated after treating fac-[Re(CO)(3)(CH(3)CN)(3)]PF(6) with N,N',N''-trimethyldiethylenetriamine (N,N',N''-Me(3)dien). MAE chelates via a terminal and a central sp(3) N from N,N',N''-Me(3)dien and via one sp(2) NH in a C(Me)=NH group. This group is derived from acetonitrile by addition of the other N,N',N''-Me(3)dien terminal amine to the nitrile carbon. This addition creates an endocyclic NMe group within a seven-membered chelate ring. The structure and other properties of fac-[Re(CO)(3)(MAE)]PF(6) allow us to propose a reaction scheme for the formation of the unprecedented DAE ligand. The new compounds advance our understanding of the spectral and structural properties of Re analogues of (99m)Tc radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:20104873

  3. Metal binding stoichiometry and isotherm choice in biosorption

    SciTech Connect

    Schiewer, S.; Wong, M.H.

    1999-11-01

    Seaweeds that possess a high metal binding capacity may be used as biosorbents for the removal of toxic heavy metals from wastewater. The binding of Cu and Ni by three brown algae (Sargassum, Colpomenia, Petalonia) and one green alga (Ulva) was investigated at pH 4.0 and pH 3.0. The greater binding strength of Cu is reflected in a binding constant that is about 10 times as high as that of Ni. The extent of metal binding followed the order Petalonia {approximately} Sargassum > Colpomenia > Ulva. This was caused by a decreasing number of binding sites and by much lower metal binding constants for Ulva as compared to the brown algae. Three different stoichiometric assumptions are compared for describing the metal binding, which assume either that each metal ion M binds to one binding site B forming a BM complex or that a divalent metal ion M binds to two monovalent sites B forming BM{sub 0.5} or B{sub 2}M complexes, respectively. Stoichiometry plots are proposed as tools to discern the relevant binding stoichiometry. The pH effect in metal binding and the change in proton binding were well predicted for the B{sub 2}M or BM{sub 0.5} stoichiometries with the former being better for Cu and the latter preferable for Ni. Overall, the BM{sub 0.5} model is recommended because it avoids iterations.

  4. Structural analysis of ibuprofen binding to human adipocyte fatty-acid binding protein (FABP4)

    PubMed Central

    González, Javier M.; Fisher, S. Zoë

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of human adipocyte fatty-acid binding protein (FABP4) has been proposed as a treatment for type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease and atherosclerosis. However, FABP4 displays a naturally low selectivity towards hydrophobic ligands, leading to the possibility of side effects arising from cross-inhibition of other FABP isoforms. In a search for structural determinants of ligand-binding selectivity, the binding of FABP4 towards a group of small molecules structurally related to the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen was analyzed through X-ray crystallography. Several specific hydrophobic interactions are shown to enhance the binding affinities of these compounds, whereas an aromatic edge-to-face interaction is proposed to determine the conformation of bound ligands, highlighting the importance of aromatic interactions in hydrophobic environments. PMID:25664790

  5. Structure of the RNA-Binding Domain of Telomerase: Implications For RNA Recognition and Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Rouda,S.; Skordalakes, E.

    2007-01-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein complex, replicates the linear ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, thus taking care of the 'end of replication problem.' TERT contains an essential and universally conserved domain (TRBD) that makes extensive contacts with the RNA (TER) component of the holoenzyme, and this interaction is thought to facilitate TERT/TER assembly and repeat-addition processivity. Here, we present a high-resolution structure of TRBD from Tetrahymena thermophila. The nearly all-helical structure comprises a nucleic acid-binding fold suitable for TER binding. An extended pocket on the surface of the protein, formed by two conserved motifs (CP and T motifs) comprises TRBD's RNA-binding pocket. The width and the chemical nature of this pocket suggest that it binds both single- and double-stranded RNA, possibly stem I, and the template boundary element (TBE). Moreover, the structure provides clues into the role of this domain in TERT/TER stabilization and telomerase repeat-addition processivity.

  6. Characterization of the DNA-binding activity of HIV-1 integrase using a filter binding assay.

    PubMed

    Haugan, I R; Nilsen, B M; Worland, S; Olsen, L; Helland, D E

    1995-12-26

    Based on the selective binding of proteins and DNA to distinct filter materials a double-layered dot blot radio assay was developed to evaluate the binding of DNA to HIV-1 integrase. In this assay the DNA-binding was found to be independent of Mn2+ concentration, inhibited by concentrations of Mg2+ above 5 mM, abolished by zinc chelation and inhibited by monoclonal antibodies reacting with either the N-terminal or C-terminal regions of integrase. Atomic absorption spectroscopy revealed the molar ratio between integrase and zinc to be close to 1. It is concluded that both the N-terminal and the C-terminal regions of integrase are involved in DNA-binding and that the reported double-layered dot blot radio assay is well suited for further characterization of the integrase.

  7. Structural analysis of ibuprofen binding to human adipocyte fatty-acid binding protein (FABP4).

    PubMed

    González, Javier M; Fisher, S Zoë

    2015-02-01

    Inhibition of human adipocyte fatty-acid binding protein (FABP4) has been proposed as a treatment for type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease and atherosclerosis. However, FABP4 displays a naturally low selectivity towards hydrophobic ligands, leading to the possibility of side effects arising from cross-inhibition of other FABP isoforms. In a search for structural determinants of ligand-binding selectivity, the binding of FABP4 towards a group of small molecules structurally related to the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen was analyzed through X-ray crystallography. Several specific hydrophobic interactions are shown to enhance the binding affinities of these compounds, whereas an aromatic edge-to-face interaction is proposed to determine the conformation of bound ligands, highlighting the importance of aromatic interactions in hydrophobic environments.

  8. A new zinc binding fold underlines the versatility of zinc binding modules in protein evolution.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Belinda K; Matthews, Jacqueline M; Kwan, Ann H Y; Newton, Anthea; Gell, David A; Crossley, Merlin; Mackay, Joel P

    2002-05-01

    Many different zinc binding modules have been identified. Their abundance and variety suggests that the formation of zinc binding folds might be relatively common. We have determined the structure of CH1(1), a 27-residue peptide derived from the first cysteine/histidine-rich region (CH1) of CREB binding protein (CBP). This peptide forms a highly ordered zinc-dependent fold that is distinct from known folds. The structure differs from a subsequently determined structure of a larger region from the CH3 region of CBP, and the CH1(1) fold probably represents a nonphysiologically active form. Despite this, the fold is thermostable and tolerant to both multiple alanine mutations and changes in the zinc-ligand spacing. Our data support the idea that zinc binding domains may arise frequently. Additionally, such structures may prove useful as scaffolds for protein design, given their stability and robustness.

  9. Cello-oligomer-binding dynamics and directionality in family 4 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Kognole, Abhishek A; Payne, Christina M

    2015-10-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) play significant roles in modulating the function of cellulases, and understanding the protein-carbohydrate recognition mechanisms by which CBMs selectively bind substrate is critical to development of enhanced biomass conversion technology. CBMs exhibit a limited range of specificity and appear to bind polysaccharides in a directional fashion dictated by the position of the ring oxygen relative to the protein fold. The two family 4 CBMs of Cellulomonas fimi Cel9B (CfCBM4) are reported to preferentially bind cellulosic substrates. However, experimental evidence suggests that these CBMs may not exhibit a thermodynamic preference for a particular orientation. We use molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy calculations to investigate protein-carbohydrate recognition mechanisms in CfCBM4-1 and CfCBM4-2 and to elucidate preferential ligand-binding orientation. We evaluate four cellopentaose orientations including that of the crystal structure and three others suggested by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). These four orientations differ based on position of the ligand reducing end (RE) and pyranose ring orientations relative to the protein core. MD simulations indicate that the plausible orientations reduce to two conformations. Calculated ligand-binding free energy discerns each of the orientations is equally favorable. The calculated free energies are in excellent agreement with isothermal titration calorimetry measurements from the literature. MD simulations further reveal the approximate structural symmetry of the oligosaccharides relative to the amino acids along the binding cleft plays a role in the promiscuity of ligand binding. A survey of ligand-bound structures suggests this phenomenon may be characteristic of the broader class of proteins belonging to the β-sandwich fold.

  10. Cello-oligomer-binding dynamics and directionality in family 4 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Kognole, Abhishek A; Payne, Christina M

    2015-10-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) play significant roles in modulating the function of cellulases, and understanding the protein-carbohydrate recognition mechanisms by which CBMs selectively bind substrate is critical to development of enhanced biomass conversion technology. CBMs exhibit a limited range of specificity and appear to bind polysaccharides in a directional fashion dictated by the position of the ring oxygen relative to the protein fold. The two family 4 CBMs of Cellulomonas fimi Cel9B (CfCBM4) are reported to preferentially bind cellulosic substrates. However, experimental evidence suggests that these CBMs may not exhibit a thermodynamic preference for a particular orientation. We use molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy calculations to investigate protein-carbohydrate recognition mechanisms in CfCBM4-1 and CfCBM4-2 and to elucidate preferential ligand-binding orientation. We evaluate four cellopentaose orientations including that of the crystal structure and three others suggested by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). These four orientations differ based on position of the ligand reducing end (RE) and pyranose ring orientations relative to the protein core. MD simulations indicate that the plausible orientations reduce to two conformations. Calculated ligand-binding free energy discerns each of the orientations is equally favorable. The calculated free energies are in excellent agreement with isothermal titration calorimetry measurements from the literature. MD simulations further reveal the approximate structural symmetry of the oligosaccharides relative to the amino acids along the binding cleft plays a role in the promiscuity of ligand binding. A survey of ligand-bound structures suggests this phenomenon may be characteristic of the broader class of proteins belonging to the β-sandwich fold. PMID:26153106

  11. Chloramphenicol binding to human serum albumin: Determination of binding constants and binding sites by steady-state fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Fei; Zhao, Guangyu; Chen, Shoucong; Liu, Feng; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Li

    2009-07-01

    The interaction between chloramphenicol and human serum albumin (HSA) was studied by fluorescence, UV/vis, circular dichroism (CD) and three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence data revealed that the fluorescence quenching of HSA by chloramphenicol was the result of the formation of drug-HSA complex, and the effective quenching constants ( Ka) were 2.852 × 10 4, 2.765 × 10 4, 2.638 × 10 4 and 2.542 × 10 4 M -1 at 287, 295, 303 and 311 K, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (Δ H) and entropy change (Δ S) for the reaction were calculated to be -3.634 kJ mol -1 and 72.66 J mol -1 K -1 according to van't Hoff equation. The results indicated that the hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions played a major role in the binding of drug to HSA. The distance r between donor and acceptor was obtained to be 3.63 nm according to Förster's theory. Site marker competitive experiments indicated that the binding of drug to HSA primarily took place in subdomain IIA. The alterations of HSA secondary structure in the presence of chloramphenicol were confirmed by the evidences from synchronous fluorescence, CD and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra. In addition, the effect of common ions on the binding constants of drug-HSA complex was also discussed.

  12. Is there a link between selectivity and binding thermodynamics profiles?

    PubMed

    Tarcsay, Ákos; Keserű, György M

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamics of ligand binding is influenced by the interplay between enthalpy and entropy contributions of the binding event. The impact of these binding free energy components, however, is not limited to the primary target only. Here, we investigate the relationship between binding thermodynamics and selectivity profiles by combining publicly available data from broad off-target assay profiling and the corresponding thermodynamics measurements. Our analysis indicates that compounds binding their primary targets with higher entropy contributions tend to hit more off-targets compared with those ligands that demonstrated enthalpy-driven binding.

  13. CLIPZ: a database and analysis environment for experimentally determined binding sites of RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Khorshid, Mohsen; Rodak, Christoph; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    The stability, localization and translation rate of mRNAs are regulated by a multitude of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that find their targets directly or with the help of guide RNAs. Among the experimental methods for mapping RBP binding sites, cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) coupled with deep sequencing provides transcriptome-wide coverage as well as high resolution. However, partly due to their vast volume, the data that were so far generated in CLIP experiments have not been put in a form that enables fast and interactive exploration of binding sites. To address this need, we have developed the CLIPZ database and analysis environment. Binding site data for RBPs such as Argonaute 1-4, Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-3, TNRC6 proteins A-C, Pumilio 2, Quaking and Polypyrimidine tract binding protein can be visualized at the level of the genome and of individual transcripts. Individual users can upload their own sequence data sets while being able to limit the access to these data to specific users, and analyses of the public and private data sets can be performed interactively. CLIPZ, available at http://www.clipz.unibas.ch, aims to provide an open access repository of information for post-transcriptional regulatory elements.

  14. CLIPZ: a database and analysis environment for experimentally determined binding sites of RNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Khorshid, Mohsen; Rodak, Christoph; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    The stability, localization and translation rate of mRNAs are regulated by a multitude of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that find their targets directly or with the help of guide RNAs. Among the experimental methods for mapping RBP binding sites, cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) coupled with deep sequencing provides transcriptome-wide coverage as well as high resolution. However, partly due to their vast volume, the data that were so far generated in CLIP experiments have not been put in a form that enables fast and interactive exploration of binding sites. To address this need, we have developed the CLIPZ database and analysis environment. Binding site data for RBPs such as Argonaute 1-4, Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-3, TNRC6 proteins A-C, Pumilio 2, Quaking and Polypyrimidine tract binding protein can be visualized at the level of the genome and of individual transcripts. Individual users can upload their own sequence data sets while being able to limit the access to these data to specific users, and analyses of the public and private data sets can be performed interactively. CLIPZ, available at http://www.clipz.unibas.ch, aims to provide an open access repository of information for post-transcriptional regulatory elements. PMID:21087992

  15. Amphetamine binding to synthetic melanin and scatchard analysis of binding data.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Lata; Scott, Karen S; Cole, Michael D

    2005-01-01

    Previous research into drug-hair binding shows that hair color affects drug-hair binding. There are no structural disparities in hair of different colors other than the type and content of melanin present. For this reason, this investigation focuses on synthetic eumelanin as a site for drug interaction using amphetamine as the candidate drug. The binding study was carried out at room temperature. The interaction between synthetic eumelanin and amphetamine was monitored using UV-Vis spectrophotometry at 257.2 nm. As the molecular weight of melanin is unknown, the number of binding sites could not be calculated directly. Hence the ratio of the number of mumoles of drug bound and the dry weight of melanin in mug was considered. Equilibrium was reached when approximately 32% of the drug was bound to melanin. Hence this study proves that amphetamine binds to synthetic eumelanin in vitro. Data interpretation using Scatchard analysis yielded a curvilinear plot with upward concavity indicating multiple binding sites on melanin and negative cooperativity. PMID:16105258

  16. Fucosyl neoglycoprotein binds to mouse epididymal spermatozoa and inhibits sperm binding to the egg zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Oh, Y S; Ahn, H S; Gye, M C

    2013-12-01

    Glycan epitopes of cellular glycoconjugates act as versatile biochemical signals, and this sugar coding plays an important role in cell-to-cell recognition processes. In this study, our aims were to determine the distribution of sperm receptors with activity for fucosyl- and galactosyl glycans and to address whether monosugar neoglycoproteins functionally mimic the binding between zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins and spermatozoa. In mouse epididymal spermatozoa with intact acrosomes, fucopyranosyl bovine serum albumin (BSA-Fuc) bound to the segment of the acrosome, the equatorial segment, and the postacrosome region of the sperm head. Galactosyl BSA (BSA-Gal) binding activity was similar to that of BSA-Fuc, but was weaker. In acrosome-reacted spermatozoa treated with the Ca(2+) ionophore A23187, BSA-zuc binding was lost in the apical segment of the acrosome but remained in the equatorial segment and postacrosome regions. BSA-Gal binding to the equatorial region was increased. In the presence of 2.5 μg ml(-1) BSA-Fuc, in vitro sperm-ZP binding was significantly decreased, indicating that fucosyl BSA functionally mimics ZP glycoproteins during sperm-egg ZP interactions. At the same concentration, BSA-Gal was not effective. Fucosyl BSA that efficiently inhibited the sperm-ZP binding can mimic the ZP glycoconjugate and has potential for use as a sperm fertility control agent in mouse.

  17. Blind prediction of charged ligand binding affinities in a model binding site

    PubMed Central

    Rocklin, Gabriel J.; Boyce, Sarah E.; Fischer, Marcus; Fish, Inbar; Mobley, David L.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Dill, Ken A.

    2013-01-01

    Predicting absolute protein-ligand binding affinities remains a frontier challenge in ligand discovery and design. This becomes more difficult when ionic interactions are involved, because of the large opposing solvation and electrostatic attraction energies. In a blind test, we examined whether alchemical free energy calculations could predict binding affinities of 14 charged and 5 neutral compounds previously untested as ligands for a cavity binding site in Cytochrome C Peroxidase. In this simplified site, polar and cationic ligands compete with solvent to interact with a buried aspartate. Predictions were tested by calorimetry, spectroscopy, and crystallography. Of the 15 compounds predicted to bind, 13 were experimentally confirmed, while four compounds were false negative predictions. Predictions had an RMSE of 1.95 kcal/mol to the experimental affinities, and predicted poses had an average RMSD of 1.7 Å to the crystallographic poses. This test serves as a benchmark for these thermodynamically rigorous calculations at predicting binding affinities for charged compounds, and gives insights into the existing sources of error, which are primarily electrostatic interactions inside proteins. Our experiments also provide a useful set of ionic binding affinities in a simplified system for testing new affinity prediction methods. PMID:23896298

  18. Amphetamine binding to synthetic melanin and scatchard analysis of binding data.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Lata; Scott, Karen S; Cole, Michael D

    2005-01-01

    Previous research into drug-hair binding shows that hair color affects drug-hair binding. There are no structural disparities in hair of different colors other than the type and content of melanin present. For this reason, this investigation focuses on synthetic eumelanin as a site for drug interaction using amphetamine as the candidate drug. The binding study was carried out at room temperature. The interaction between synthetic eumelanin and amphetamine was monitored using UV-Vis spectrophotometry at 257.2 nm. As the molecular weight of melanin is unknown, the number of binding sites could not be calculated directly. Hence the ratio of the number of mumoles of drug bound and the dry weight of melanin in mug was considered. Equilibrium was reached when approximately 32% of the drug was bound to melanin. Hence this study proves that amphetamine binds to synthetic eumelanin in vitro. Data interpretation using Scatchard analysis yielded a curvilinear plot with upward concavity indicating multiple binding sites on melanin and negative cooperativity.

  19. Simultaneous optimal experimental design for in vitro binding parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Ernest, C Steven; Karlsson, Mats O; Hooker, Andrew C

    2013-10-01

    Simultaneous optimization of in vitro ligand binding studies using an optimal design software package that can incorporate multiple design variables through non-linear mixed effect models and provide a general optimized design regardless of the binding site capacity and relative binding rates for a two binding system. Experimental design optimization was employed with D- and ED-optimality using PopED 2.8 including commonly encountered factors during experimentation (residual error, between experiment variability and non-specific binding) for in vitro ligand binding experiments: association, dissociation, equilibrium and non-specific binding experiments. Moreover, a method for optimizing several design parameters (ligand concentrations, measurement times and total number of samples) was examined. With changes in relative binding site density and relative binding rates, different measurement times and ligand concentrations were needed to provide precise estimation of binding parameters. However, using optimized design variables, significant reductions in number of samples provided as good or better precision of the parameter estimates compared to the original extensive sampling design. Employing ED-optimality led to a general experimental design regardless of the relative binding site density and relative binding rates. Precision of the parameter estimates were as good as the extensive sampling design for most parameters and better for the poorly estimated parameters. Optimized designs for in vitro ligand binding studies provided robust parameter estimation while allowing more efficient and cost effective experimentation by reducing the measurement times and separate ligand concentrations required and in some cases, the total number of samples. PMID:23943088

  20. Competitive protein binding assay for piritrexim

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, J.L. Jr.; Ringstad, J.L.; Sigel, C.W. )

    1989-09-01

    A competitive protein binding assay for piritrexim (PTX, 1) that makes use of a commercially available radioassay kit for methotrexate has been developed. After it is selectively extracted from plasma, PTX competes with ({sup 125}I)methotrexate for binding to dihydrofolate reductase isolated from Lactobacillus casei. Free drug is separated from bound drug by adsorption to dextran-coated charcoal. Piritrexim is measurable over a range of 0.01 to 10.0 micrograms/mL in plasma with a coefficient of variation less than 15%. The limit of sensitivity of the assay is approximately 2 ng/mL. An excellent correlation between this assay and a previously published HPLC method was found.